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Sample records for pressure sores formation

  1. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... may form. Pressure sores are also called bedsores, pressure ulcers and decubitus ulcers. Symptoms What are the symptoms ... do to help pressure sores heal: Relieving the pressure that caused the sore Treating the sore itself Improving nutrition and other conditions to help the sore heal ...

  2. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    Pressure sores are areas of damaged skin caused by staying in one position for too long. They ... wheelchair, or are unable to change your position. Pressure sores can cause serious infections, some of which ...

  3. Preventing Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Experts \\ Preventing Pressure Sores Topics Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 Spinal Cord Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury ... The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Preventing Pressure Sores Preventing Pressure Sores Transition from Hospital to ...

  4. Skin (Pressure) Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Skin dryness Next Topic Sleep problems Skin (pressure) sores A skin or pressure sore develops when the blood supply to an ... is bedridden or always in a wheelchair puts pressure on the same places much of the time. ...

  5. Osteomyelitis beneath pressure sores

    SciTech Connect

    Sugarman, B.; Hawes, S.; Musher, D.M.; Klima, M.; Young, E.J.; Pircher, F.

    1983-04-01

    Twenty-eight pressure sores were evaluated prospectively. Osteomyelitis was reported histologically in nine of 28 bones and pressure-related changes were reported in 14 bones. Roentgenograms suggested the presence of osteomyelitis in four instances of histologically proved osteomyelitis. Technetium Tc 99m medronate bone scans were highly sensitive, showing increased uptake in all cases of osteomyelitis; however, increased uptake also occurred commonly in uninfected bones due to pressure-related changes or other noninfectious causes. Cultures of bone biopsy samples usually disclosed anaerobic bacteria, gram-negative bacilli, or both. The diagnosis of osteomyelitis must be considered if a pressure sore does not respond to local therapy. If the technetium Tc 99m medronate uptake is increased in the involved area, or roentgenographic findings are abnormal, the diagnosis can only be made with certainty by histologic examination of bone. Antibacterial treatment should be selected based on the results of bone culture.

  6. Pressure sores in nursing home patients.

    PubMed

    Weiler, P G; Franzi, C; Kecskes, D

    1990-09-01

    One hundred and sixty-seven patients were part of a cross-sectional study examining pressure sores in patients in skilled nursing facilities. Every patient admitted to this study was physically examined for the presence or absence of pressure sores and evaluated according to a standardized procedure. Using logistic regression analysis, the variables most significantly associated with pressure sores included a history of hypertension, infection, unwelcome response to visitors, history of poor dietary intake and a pattern of slow or poor response to commands. Knowledge of these factors may lead to more intensive efforts to develop better methods of prevention and treatment of pressure sores. PMID:2094365

  7. Taking Care of Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... between dressing changes. 6. Check for signs of wound healing with each dressing change. 7. If there are ... Surgery is frequently required for this type of wound. How to know if the sore is healing The sore will get smaller. Pinkish tissue usually ...

  8. How to care for pressure sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... to protect the area from bodily fluids. Ask your doctor what type of moisturizer to use. Stage II pressure sores ... sore moist so it can heal. Talk with your doctor about what type of dressing to use. Depending on the size ...

  9. Silicone moulding for pressure sore debridement.

    PubMed

    Erba, P; Wettstein, R; Schumacher, R; Schwenzer-Zimmerer, K; Pierer, G; Kalbermatten, D F

    2010-03-01

    The radicality of wound debridement is an important feature of the surgical treatment of pressure sores. Several methods such as injection of methylene blue or hydrogen peroxide have been proposed to facilitate and optimise the surgical debridement technique, but none of them proved to be sufficient. We present an innovative modification of the pseudo-tumour technique consisting in the injection of fluid silicone. Vulcanization of the silicone leads to pressure-sore moulding, permitting a more radical and sterile excision. In a series of 10 paraplegic patients presenting with ischial pressure sores, silicone moulding was used to facilitate debridement. Radical en bloc debridement was achieved in all patients. After a minimal follow-up of 2 years, no complications and recurrences occurred. A three-dimensional (3D) analysis of the silicone prints objectified the pyramidal shape of ischial pressure sores. Our study showed that complete resection without capsular lesion can be easily achieved. Further, it allows the surgeon to analyse the shape and size of the resected defect, which might be helpful to select the appropriate defect coverage technique. PMID:19167279

  10. Pressure sores and underlying bone infection

    SciTech Connect

    Sugarman, B.

    1987-03-01

    Pressure sores are a serious complication of hospitalized and chronically ill patients. Evaluation for underlying bone infection can be made difficult by radiographic, nuclear imaging, and soft-tissue culture studies that are abnormal and suggest the presence of bone infection, when no infection is present. Evaluation by bone biopsy with histologic and microbiological studies can accurately and promptly diagnose whether bone infection is present. This allows appropriate treatment when infection is present, and prevents unneeded and potentially toxic antibiotic therapy when preliminary studies incorrectly suggest that infection is present.

  11. Pressure sore survey. Part 3: Locus of control.

    PubMed

    Maylor, M; Torrance, C

    1999-03-01

    This is the third in a three-part article which investigates the prevalence, knowledge and attitudes to pressure sores in one NHS trust. This study describes the methodology used in choosing and developing attitude scales to explore whether there are any relationships between the locus of control and pressure sore prevention. Factors to do with attitude and the value associated with pressure sore prevention have a central role. Attitudes and beliefs affect what we do and may contribute to pressure sore development. PMID:10362985

  12. New concepts in the prevention of pressure sores.

    PubMed

    Bogie, Kath; Powell, Heather L; Ho, Chester H

    2012-01-01

    Pressure sores are a serious, and costly, complication for many patients with reduced mobility and sensation. Some populations, such as those with spinal cord injury (SCI), remain at high risk throughout their lifetime. Prevention is highly preferable and while the concept is readily definable, it is much more challenging to develop valid preventative measures. Subjective and objective approaches to risk factor assessment before pressure sores develop are reviewed, including risk status scales and emerging techniques to assess deep tissue injury. Devices to prevent pressure sores have traditionally focused on pressure-relieving cushions and mattresses. Technological advances being applied in the development of new pressure sore prevention devices are presented. Clinical evidence-based practice is integral to pressure sore prevention. Comprehensive assessment must include evaluation of systemic diseases, anatomical and physiological factors, together with environmental and psychosocial factors, which can all contribute to pressure sore development. Extrinsic factors need to be considered in conjunction with intrinsic tissue health factors and are reviewed together with an evaluation of currently available clinical practice guidelines. This chapter presents the broad diversity of factors associated with pressure sore development and highlights the need for an interdisciplinary team approach in order to maximize successful prevention of pressure sores. PMID:23098716

  13. Pressure sensor-based tongue-placed electrotactile biofeedback for balance improvement--biomedical application to prevent pressure sores formation and falls.

    PubMed

    Vuillerme, N; Chenu, O; Pinsault, N; Moreau-Gaudry, A; Fleury, A; Demongeot, J; Payan, Y

    2007-01-01

    We introduce the innovative technologies, based on the concept of "sensory substitution", we are developing in the fields of biomedical engineering and human disability. Precisely, our goal is to design, develop and validate practical assistive biomedical and/or technical devices and/or rehabilitating procedures for persons with disabilities, using artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback systems. Proposed applications are dealing with: (1) pressure sores prevention in case of spinal cord injuries (persons with paraplegia, or tetraplegia); and (2) balance control improvement to prevent fall in older and/or disabled adults. This paper describes the architecture and the functioning principle of these biofeedback systems and presents preliminary results of two feasibility studies performed on young healthy adults. PMID:18003410

  14. Can electric beds aid pressure sore prevention in hospitals?

    PubMed

    Hampton, S

    The purchase, cleaning and maintenance of air mattresses can be an expensive part of pressure sore prevention and repositioning of patients can be time consuming and costly in terms of possible nursing injuries. The King's Fund bed has been a friend to the health service for many years but the time has come to look for an alternative system that will support patient comfort and independence, will assist nurses in implementation of a no-lifting policy and aid pressure sore prevention policies. This article describes a study that was undertaken in two medical wards to assess the value of electrically controlled beds in relation to the prevention of pressure sores, implementation of a no-lifting policy and quality of patient care. A total of 782 patients took part in the study over a 6-month period and 726 replies were obtained from nurses. The ward had similar profiles of patients' medical conditions and age; they were being medically managed by the same consultants. Results showed that patients experienced greater comfort on beds with the electric facility, produced less pressure sores, mobilized easily and pressure sore prevention costs could be reduced. There is a need to be proactive in prevention of pressure sores and not reactive to a pressure sore that is already developing. PMID:9830895

  15. How to care for pressure sores

    MedlinePlus

    Pressure ulcer; Bedsore; Decubitus ulcer ... when pressed. This is a sign that a pressure ulcer is forming. The skin may be warm or ... body fat in the crater. Stage IV: The pressure ulcer has become so deep that there is damage ...

  16. Electrical stimulation for pressure sore prevention and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Bogie, K M; Reger, S I; Levine, S P; Sahgal, V

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews applications of therapeutic electrical stimulation (ES) specific to wound healing and pressure sore prevention. The application of ES for wound healing has been found to increase the rate of healing by more than 50%. Furthermore, the total number of wounds healed is also increased. However, optimal delivery techniques for ES therapy have not been established to date. A study of stimulation current effects on wound healing in a pig model has shown that direct current (DC) stimulation is most effective in wound area reduction and alternating current (AC) stimulation for wound volume reduction at current densities of 127 microA/cm2 and 1,125 microA/cm2, respectively. Preliminary studies have been carried out at two research centers to assess the role of ES in pressure sore prevention. Surface stimulation studies have shown that ES can produce positive short-term changes in tissue health variables such as regional blood flow and pressure distribution. The use of an implanted stimulation system consisting of intramuscular electrodes with percutaneous leads has been found to produce additional long-term changes. Specifically, gluteal muscle thickness increased by 50% with regular long-term ES application concurrent with a 20% decrease in regional interface pressures and increased tissue oxygen levels. These findings indicate that an implantable ES system may have great potential for pressure sore prevention, particularly for individuals who lack sensation or who are physically unable to perform regular independent pressure relief. PMID:11067577

  17. Pressure-induced referred pain is expanded by persistent soreness.

    PubMed

    Doménech-García, V; Palsson, T S; Herrero, P; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2016-05-01

    Several chronic pain conditions are accompanied with enlarged referred pain areas. This study investigated a novel method for assessing referred pain. In 20 healthy subjects, pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were recorded and pressure stimuli (120% PPT) were applied bilaterally for 5 and 60 seconds at the infraspinatus muscle to induce local and referred pain. Moreover, PPTs were measured bilaterally at the shoulder, neck, and leg before, during, and after hypertonic saline-induced referred pain in the dominant infraspinatus muscle. The pressure and saline-induced pain areas were assessed on drawings. Subsequently, delayed onset muscle soreness was induced using eccentric exercise of the dominant infraspinatus muscle. The day-1 assessments were repeated the following day (day 2). Suprathreshold pressure stimulations and saline injections into the infraspinatus muscle caused referred pain to the frontal aspect of the shoulder/arm in all subjects. The 60-second pressure stimulation caused larger referred pain areas compared with the 5-second stimulation (P < 0.01). Compared with pressure stimulation, the saline-induced referred pain area was larger (P < 0.02). After saline-induced pain, the PPTs at the infraspinatus and supraspinatus muscles were reduced (P < 0.05), and the 5-second pressure-induced referred pain area was larger than baseline. Pressure pain thresholds at the infraspinatus and supraspinatus muscles were reduced at day 2 in the delayed onset muscle soreness side (P < 0.05). Compared with day 1, larger pressure and saline-induced referred pain areas were observed on day 2 (P < 0.05). Referred pain to the shoulder/arm was consistently induced and enlarged after 1 day of muscle soreness, indicating that the referred pain area may be a sensitive biomarker for sensitization of the pain system. PMID:26808146

  18. Development of a cushion to prevent ischial pressure sores.

    PubMed Central

    Bowker, P; Davidson, L M

    1979-01-01

    A study was carried out jointly by nursing staff and technologists in an attempt to develop a cushion based on scientific principles and measurement that might prevent pressure sores. At each stage in the development clinical trials were carried out, and using the results of these together with the opinions of medical staff and patients who used the cushion the design was suitably modified. Over four years a seat was evolved that was simple to construct and fulfilled the clinical requirements for a wide range of patients while providing maximum relief of high-pressure points. The design was subsequently taken up commercially. Images Fig 3 PMID:509176

  19. Therapeutic Effect of External Application of Ligustrazine Combined with Holistic Nursing on Pressure Sores

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Junzhi; Han, Lin; Gong, Fen

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to explore the therapeutic effect of external application of ligustrazine combined with holistic nursing on pressure sores, as well as the underlying mechanism. Material/Methods From February 2014 to March 2015, a total of 32 patients with Phase II and Phase III pressure sores were enrolled and randomly assigned to an experimental group or a control group. The clinical data were comparable between the 2 groups. In addition to holistic nursing, the patients in the experimental group received 4 weeks of continuous external application of ligustrazine, whereas patients in the control group received compound clotrimazole cream. Therapeutic effect and healing time were recorded. HaCaT cells were used as an in vitro model for mechanism analysis of the effect of ligustrazine in treating pressure sores. After culturing with different concentrations of ligustrazine or the inhibitor of AKT (LY294002) for 72 h, cell viability, clone formation numbers, and levels of phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K), p-AKT, and p-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) were determined. Results Compared to the control group, the total effective rate in the experimental group was significantly higher, and the healing time was significantly reduced. Cell viability and clone formation numbers were significantly upregulated by ligustrazine in a dose-dependent manner. Both the cell viability and clone formation numbers were significantly inhibited by application of LY294002. Conclusions Our results suggest that ligustrazine combined with holistic nursing is an effective treatment of pressure sores. The protective effect may be associated with the promotion of cell growth by activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway. PMID:27523814

  20. [The Development of a Care Protocol for Postoperative Pressure Sore Prevention].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Ling; Lin, Hui-Ling; Wang, Fang; Wu, Shu-Fang Vivienne

    2015-12-01

    Pressure sores are a common complication caused by long periods of bed rest following major surgery. These sores may increase patient postoperative pain, increase the risk of infections, lengthen the pe-riod of hospitalization, and increase the duration and costs of nursing care. Therefore, maintaining the skin integrity of surgical patients is an important responsibility for operating room nurses and an indicator of nursing care quality. While pressure-sore risk assessment tools and interoperative strategies are available and used in foreign countries, there has been little related research conducted in Taiwan. After examining the relevant literature and considering the current postoperative pressure sore situation in Taiwan, the author developed a postoperative pressure sore care protocol as a reference for clinical staff. Protocol procedures include major breakthrough developments in areas such as post-survey risk assessment for pressure ulcers, pressure ulcer prevention strategies that take surgery-related risk factors into consideration, extra care and protection measures for surgical supine patients, and post-pressure sores. The developed postoperative pressure sore protocol may be incorporated into surgical care procedures during the post-surgical care period in order to effectively prevent the occurrence of post-surgery pressure ulcers. Furthermore, the developed protocol offers the potential to improve and strengthen the quality of surgical care in terms of both healthcare and post-surgical care. PMID:26645449

  1. Using a modified nasotracheal tube to prevent nasal ala pressure sore during prolonged nasotracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Cherng, Chen-Hwan; Chen, Yuan-Wu

    2010-12-01

    Nasotracheal tube induced nasal ala pressure sores or necrosis during prolonged nasotracheal intubation have been reported, and it is a serious but preventable complication. Here we introduce a modified nasotracheal tube to prevent this complication. This modified nasotracheal tube is composed of two parts, an oral endotracheal tube and a proximal part of a preformed nasotracheal tube, which are linked by a connector. The use of this modified nasotracheal tube can prevent nasal ala pressure sores during prolonged nasotracheal intubation. PMID:20809246

  2. [Prevalence and prevention and treatment modalities for pressure sores. Study of the Emilia-Romagna region].

    PubMed

    Melotti, Rita Maria; Fortuna, Daniela; Chiari, Paolo; Cavicchioli, Andrea; Mongardi, Maria; Santullo, Antonella; Grilli, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    This audit initiative aimed at assessing the prevalence of pressure sores in the public hospitals of Emilia-Romagna, and at monitoring the rate of use of specific modalities of prevention and cure. The design was cross-sectional, with information collected on three index days during 2000 by trained personnel. Overall, the prevalence of pressure sores at the regional level was 7.1%, with remarkable variation across hospitals (from 2.9% to 9.7%), also after adjustment for case mix. As for patterns of prevention and cure, 74% of patients at risk (according to the Braden scale) of developing a pressure sores received only standard low technology devices, and 50% of those in need were included in a systematic programme of postural change. Adequate (according to the available evidence) medications were used in 45% of patients with a pressure sore. The overall prevalence of pressure sore is close (or even inferior) to that observed in similar studies. However, variation between hospitals indicates that the current health services ability to deal with pressure sore is variable and often suboptimal. This evaluation is also supported by the limited adoption of adequate preventive and curative modalities. PMID:12958732

  3. Detection and Isolation of Digital Dermatitis Treponemes from Bovine Pressure Sores.

    PubMed

    Clegg, S R; Crosby-Durrani, H E; Bell, J; Blundell, R; Blowey, R W; Carter, S D; Evans, N J

    2016-05-01

    Pressure sores cause severe pain and discomfort in hospitalized people and in farmed cattle and are often infected with unknown bacteria. Pressure sores occur on the upper legs of 6-10% of recumbent cattle and are generally considered to be caused by constant pressure, commonly on bony areas of the limbs. This study analyzed pressure sores taken from the upper limbs of 14 cattle using isolation in culture and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect treponemes associated with digital dermatitis (DD). A 100% association of DD treponemes with the pressure sores was demonstrated, but treponemes were shown not to be part of the normal skin microbiota. Immunohistochemistry showed an association of DD treponemes with lesions and particularly with the hair follicles in lesions, identifying the bacteria deep within wounds, thereby suggesting that they could contribute to lesion pathogenesis. The bacteria isolated from the pressure sore lesions were similar or identical on analysis of the 16S rRNA gene to those found in DD foot lesions in cattle, suggesting the same bacteria can infect multiple lesions. Indeed, the results of this study suggest that these spirochaetal bacteria may be expanding in host range and in their ability to colonize different tissues and contribute to a range of disease manifestations in farm animals. PMID:27040650

  4. Evaluating the effects of pentoxifylline administration on experimental pressure sores in rats by biomechanical examinations

    PubMed Central

    Velaei, Kobra; Torkman, Giti; Rezaie, Fatemealsadat; Amini, Abdollah; Noruzian, Mohsen; Tavassol, Azaedh; Bayat, Mehernoush

    2012-01-01

    This study used a biomechanical test to evaluate the effects of pentoxifylline administration on the wound healing process of an experimental pressure sore induced in rats. Under general anesthesia and sterile conditions, experimental pressure sores generated by no. 25 Halsted mosquito forceps were inflicted on 12 adult male rats. Pentoxifylline was injected intraperitoneally at a dose of 50 mg/kg daily from the day the pressure sore was generated, for a period of 20 days. At the end of 20 days, rats were sacrificed and skin samples extracted. Samples were biomechanically examined by a material testing instrument for maximum stress (N mm2), work up to maximum force (N), and elastic stiffness (N/mm). In the experimental group, maximum stress (2.05±0.15) and work up to maximum force (N/mm) (63.75±4.97) were significantly higher than the control group (1.3±0.27 and 43.3±14.96, P=0.002 and P=0.035, respectively). Pentoxifylline administration significantly accelerated the wound healing process in experimental rats with pressure sores, compared to that of the control group. PMID:23091522

  5. Physical characteristics of a new synthetic fiber mattress in relation to pressure sores.

    PubMed

    Mita, K; Akataki, K; Itoh, K; Yoshida, M; Shinoda, T; Ishida, Y

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to develop a mattress which was made of the new synthetic fibers called 'Shin-Gosen', and to determine its physical characteristics associated with pressure sores such as pressure distribution, temperature and humidity. The Shin-Gosen mattress consisted of three layers of elastic fibers made of polyester multifilaments, which were mediated by four layers of wave-like fabrics made of nylon monofilaments. The physical characteristics of the mattress were compared with (a) the conventional cotton hospital mattress and (b) the SORELESS MAT made of vacuole gel which effectively eliminated compression forces. The Shin-Gosen mattress was found to provide pressure relief effects similar to that of the SORELESS MAT the desired thermal insulation as well as that of the cotton mattress and a higher level of moisture vapor permeability. These excellent features will not only contribute to preventing pressure sores, but will also enable comfortable resting and sleeping. PMID:9444514

  6. Profunda Femoris Artery Perforator Propeller Flap: A Valid Method to Cover Complicated Ischiatic Pressure Sores.

    PubMed

    Scalise, Alessandro; Tartaglione, Caterina; Bolletta, Elisa; Pierangeli, Marina; Di Benedetto, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    We report the case of a 50-year-old paraplegic man with a complicated grade III/IV ischiatic pressure sore treated with a propeller flap based on the first perforator of the profunda femoris artery. Our aim was to surgically reconstruct an ischiatic pressure sore in a patient with ankylosis using a fasciocutaneous perforator propeller flap obtained from the posterior region of the thigh. Our decision to perform a profunda femoris artery perforator propeller flap reconstruction was mainly due to the anatomical contiguity of the flap with the site of the lesion and the good quality of the skin harvested from the posterior region of the thigh. The use of the perforator fasciocutaneous flap represents a muscle-sparing technique, providing a better long-term result in surgical reconstruction. The choice of the 180-degree propeller flap was due to its ability to provide a good repair of the pressure ulcer and to pass over the ischiatic prominence in the patient in the forced decubitus position. The operatory course did not present any kind of complication. Using this reconstructive treatment, we have obtained complete coverage of the ischiatic pressure sore. PMID:26495200

  7. Profunda Femoris Artery Perforator Propeller Flap: A Valid Method to Cover Complicated Ischiatic Pressure Sores

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglione, Caterina; Bolletta, Elisa; Pierangeli, Marina; Di Benedetto, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Summary: We report the case of a 50-year-old paraplegic man with a complicated grade III/IV ischiatic pressure sore treated with a propeller flap based on the first perforator of the profunda femoris artery. Our aim was to surgically reconstruct an ischiatic pressure sore in a patient with ankylosis using a fasciocutaneous perforator propeller flap obtained from the posterior region of the thigh. Our decision to perform a profunda femoris artery perforator propeller flap reconstruction was mainly due to the anatomical contiguity of the flap with the site of the lesion and the good quality of the skin harvested from the posterior region of the thigh. The use of the perforator fasciocutaneous flap represents a muscle-sparing technique, providing a better long-term result in surgical reconstruction. The choice of the 180-degree propeller flap was due to its ability to provide a good repair of the pressure ulcer and to pass over the ischiatic prominence in the patient in the forced decubitus position. The operatory course did not present any kind of complication. Using this reconstructive treatment, we have obtained complete coverage of the ischiatic pressure sore. PMID:26495200

  8. The user--friendliness of protective support surfaces in prevention of pressure sores.

    PubMed

    Conine, T A; Choi, A K; Lim, R

    1989-01-01

    Special mattress overlays and seat cushions for the prevention of pressure sores constitute a large portion of the rehabilitation products market. Consumers frequently face economic concerns in choosing among these products. This article summarizes the favorable and unfavorable features of major support surface types: foam, air-filled, flotation, and alternating air. A careful consideration of characteristics, such as fire safety, patient comfort, and ease of transfer and handling, may facilitate selection and result in more satisfied users and caregivers. PMID:2781130

  9. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Are Cold Sores? Article Chapters What Are Cold Sores? Cold ... January 2012 Previous Next Related Articles: Canker and Cold Sores Aloe Vera May Help Relieve Mouth Sores ...

  10. An evidence-based approach to pressure sores.

    PubMed

    Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N; Kuzon, William M

    2011-02-01

    The Maintenance of Certification module series is designed to help the clinician structure his or her study in specific areas appropriate to his or her clinical practice. This article is prepared to accompany practice-based assessment of preoperative assessment, anesthesia, surgical treatment plan, perioperative management, and outcomes. In this format, the clinician is invited to compare his or her methods of patient assessment and treatment, outcomes, and complications, with authoritative, information-based references. This information base is then used for self-assessment and benchmarking in parts II and IV of the Maintenance of Certification process of the American Board of Plastic Surgery. This article is not intended to be an exhaustive treatise on the subject. Rather, it is designed to serve as a reference point for further in-depth study by review of the reference articles presented. PMID:21285799

  11. Design and research on reliability-validity for 3S intraoperative risk assessment scale of pressure sore.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xing-lian; Hu, Juan-juan; Ma, Qiong; Wu, He-yu; Wang, Zeng-yan; Li, Ting-ting; Shen, Jian-hui; Yang, Ying

    2015-04-01

    The reliability and validity of risk assessment scale (RAS) of pressure sore during 3S surgery were investigated. RAS of pressure sore was designed independently during 3S surgery. Five operating room nursing experts were selected to consult and detect face validity. Convenient and purposive sampling of 707 samples was conducted. Cronbach's alpha was used to measure content reliability and evaluate the internal consistence of RAS. The structural reliability was investigated by exploratory factor analysis method. The results showed that the content validity index was 0.92, and Cronbach's alpha of content reliability was 0.71. Structural validity, detected by Bartlett sphericity test, was 135.3 for 707 samples with the difference being statistically significant (P<0.01). KMO value was 0.729. The accumulative variance contribution ratio of common factor was 64.63%. The exploratory factor analysis showed the factor load of every clause was larger than 0.596. It was concluded that RAS of pressure sore for 3S surgery has better validity and reliability, and it could be used for evaluating and screening the high risk patients with pressure sores during surgery in order to efficiently reduce the occurrence of pressure sore during surgery. RAS of pressure sore for 3S surgery is worth to be popularized. PMID:25877367

  12. Computed tomography of pressure sores, pelvic abscess, and osteomyelitis in patients with spinal cord injury

    SciTech Connect

    Firooznia, H.; Rafii, M.; Golimbu, C.; Lam, S.; Sokolow, J.; Kung, J.S.

    1982-11-01

    Nine patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and large pressure ulcers and other possible complications, were evaluated by computed tomography (CT), conventional radiography, tomography, bone scanning, gallium scanning, and sonography. CT revealed the depth, extent, and relationship of the ulcer-bed to the underlying structures in all 9 patients. CT also positively identified unsuspected intra- and extra-pelvic abscess and pelvic osteomyelitis in 4 patients each. Other modalities identified only 2 of these complications. We believe CT is the modality of choice for evaluation of these complications in SCI patients, because of its superior ability in evaluation of pressure sores and detection of pathologic changes in soft tissue and bone in the pelvic region.

  13. Canker Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes canker sores. Mouth injuries, stress, poor nutrition, food allergies and menstrual periods are some of the things that may increase your chances of getting a canker sore. Treatment How are canker sores treated? There is no cure for canker sores, but they usually go away ...

  14. Sore Throat

    MedlinePlus

    ... sore throat will return and also helps prevent antibiotic resistance. What is the treatment for a sore throat ... given to children younger than 18 years of age. Gargle with warm salt water (1 teaspoon of ...

  15. Mouth sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... minerals in the diet, including vitamin B12 or folate Less commonly, mouth sores can be a sign ... sores often, talk to your provider about taking folate and vitamin B12 to prevent outbreaks. To prevent ...

  16. Canker Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... cycle . Some research suggests that using products containing sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) can be associated with canker sores. SLS ... with toothpastes and mouthwashes that don't contain sodium lauryl sulfate. And avoid brushing the sore itself with a ...

  17. Marjolin’s Ulcer Complicating a Pressure Sore: The Clock is Ticking

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Kamran; Giannone, Anna Lucia; Mehrabi, Erfan; Khan, Ayda; Giannone, Roberto E.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 85 Final Diagnosis: Marjolin’s ulcer (squamous cell carcinoma) Symptoms: None Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Ulcer excision and split thickness skin graft placement Specialty: Dermatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Malignant degeneration in any chronic wound is termed a Marjolin’s ulcer (MU). The overall metastatic rate of MU is approximately 27.5%. However, the prognosis of MU specific to pressure sores is poor, with a reported metastatic rate of 61%. This is due to insidious, asymptomatic malignant degeneration, a lack of healthcare provider awareness, and, ultimately, delayed management. Case Report: An 85-year-old white male was noted by his wound-care nurse to have a rapidly developing growth on his lower back over a period of 4 months. There was history of a non-healing, progressive pressure ulcer of the lower back for the past 10 years. On examination, there was a 4×4 cm pressure ulcer of the lower back, with a superimposed 1.5×2 cm growth in the superior region. There was an absence of palpable regional lymphadenopathy. Punch biopsy revealed squamous cell carcinoma consistent with Marjolin’s ulcer. The ulcer underwent excision with wide margins, and a skin graft was placed. Due to the prompt recognition of an abnormality by the patient’s wound-care nurse, metastasis was not evident on imaging. There are no signs of recurrence at 1-year follow-up. Conclusions: Marjolin’s ulcer has a rapid progression from local disease to widespread metastasis. Therefore, it is essential that wound-care providers are aware of the clinical signs and symptoms of malignant degeneration in chronic wounds. PMID:26898816

  18. Coping with Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Coping With Cold Sores KidsHealth > For Kids > Coping With Cold Sores ... sore." What's that? Adam wondered. What Is a Cold Sore? Cold sores are small blisters that is ...

  19. Mouth sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... begin as blisters and then crust over. The herpes virus can live in your body for years. It only appears as a mouth sore when something triggers it, such as: Another ... medicines, penicillamine, sulfa drugs, and phenytoin.

  20. Using a case-mix-adjusted pressure sore incidence study in a surgical directorate to improve patient outcomes in pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Watret, L

    1999-10-01

    The Glasgow Acute Clinical Audit Sub-Committee on Pressure Sores has previously carried out studies of incidence of pressure ulcers in the medical directorates and case-mix-adjusted the figures for length of hospital stay and risk assessment score. Case-mix classification is 'classification of people or treatment placed into groups using characteristics associated with condition, treatment or outcome that can be used to predict need, resource, use of outcomes'. In this instance, crude pressure ulcer incidence figures may be adjusted for length of hospital stay and pressure sore risk assessment score, and stratified into groups, which allows like to be compared with like. The value in case-mix-adjusted figures lies in repeating the exercise, thus determining the trend for individual areas and assessing whether improvement in the quality of care is being achieved. This is more positive than creation of 'league tables' comparing simultaneous studies in a number of areas. The figures showed that there was no statistically significant difference between surgical directorates in trusts with regard to risk assessment scores and length of hospital stay. Gathering data on the incidence of pressure ulcer development allows us to identify where new sores are occurring, but does not critically analyse the nursing intervention taken in individual cases, which identifies preventive strategies. The Glasgow group's primary aim was to gather data on case-mix-adjusted incidence of pressure damage; the secondary objectives were to scrutinize the data to gather more general information on intrinsic and extrinsic factors which may predispose to pressure ulcer development. The study was carried out in the surgical directorate. Findings showed that incidence was low (1.1%), with the majority of sores being superficial. There was a correlation between pressure ulcer development and incontinence, evidence of under-utilization of moving and handling aids for prevention of pressure ulcers

  1. Predictive power of the Braden scale for pressure sore risk in adult critical care patients: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Critical care is designed for managing the sickest patients within our healthcare system. Multiple factors associated with an increased likelihood of pressure ulcer development have been investigated in the critical care population. Nevertheless, there is a lack of consensus regarding which of these factors poses the greatest risk for pressure ulceration. While the Braden scale for pressure sore risk is the most commonly used tool for measuring pressure ulcer risk in the United States, research focusing on the cumulative Braden Scale score and subscale scores is lacking in the critical care population. This author conducted a literature review on pressure ulcer risk assessment in the critical care population, to include the predictive value of both the total score and the subscale scores. In this review, the subscales sensory perception, mobility, moisture, and friction/shear were found to be associated with an increased likelihood of pressure ulcer development; in contrast, the Activity and Nutrition subscales were not found to predict pressure ulcer development in this population. In order to more precisely quantify risk in the critically ill population, modification of the Braden scale or development of a critical care specific risk assessment tool may be indicated. PMID:22948495

  2. Canker sore

    MedlinePlus

    ... most cases, the canker sores go away without treatment. Try not to eat hot or spicy foods, which can cause pain. Use over-the-counter medicines that ease pain in the area. Rinse your mouth with salt water or mild, over-the-counter mouthwashes. (DO NOT ...

  3. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes oral herpes, or cold sores. Type 1 herpes virus infects more than half of the U.S. population by the time they reach their 20s. Type 2 usually affects the genital area Some people have no symptoms from the ...

  4. Canker Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... be triggered by stress, food allergies, lack of vitamins and minerals, hormonal changes or menstrual periods. In some cases the cause is unknown. In most cases, the sores go away by themselves. Some ointments, creams or rinses may help with the pain. Avoiding ...

  5. Increased technetium uptake is not equivalent to muscle necrosis: scintigraphic, morphological and intramuscular pressure analyses of sore muscles after exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crenshaw, A. G.; Friden, J.; Hargens, A. R.; Lang, G. H.; Thornell, L. E.

    1993-01-01

    A scintigraphic technique employing technetium pyrophosphate uptake was used to identify the area of skeletal muscle damage in the lower leg of four runners 24 h after an ultramarathon footrace (160 km). Most of the race had been run downhill which incorporated an extensive amount of eccentric work. Soreness was diffuse throughout the posterior region of the lower leg. In order to interpret what increased technetium uptake reflects and to express extreme endurance related damages, a biopsy was taken from the 3-D position of abnormal uptake. In addition, intramuscular pressures were determined in the deep posterior compartment. Scintigraphs revealed increased technetium pyrophosphate uptake in the medial portion of the gastrocnemius muscle. For 3698 fibres analysed, 33 fibres (1%) were necrotic, while a few other fibres were either atrophic or irregular shaped. A cluster of necrotic fibres occurred at the fascicular periphery for one subject and fibre type grouping occurred for another. Ultrastructural analysis revealed Z-line streaming near many capillaries and variously altered subsarcolemmal mitochondria including some with paracrystalline inclusions. The majority of the capillaries included thickened and irregular shaped endothelial cells. Intramuscular pressures of the deep posterior compartment were slightly elevated (12-15 mmHg) for three of the four subjects. Increased technetium uptake following extreme endurance running does not just reflect muscle necrosis but also subtle fibre abnormalities. Collectively, these pathological findings are attributed to relative ischaemia occurring during the race and during pre-race training, whereas, intramuscular pressure elevations associated with muscle soreness are attributed to mechanical stress caused by extensive eccentric work during the race.

  6. Doreen Norton OBE, MSc, SRN, FRCN (1922-2007): Pioneer who revolutionised pressure sore management and geriatric nursing to international acclaim.

    PubMed

    Denham, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Doreen Norton was a delightful, widely respected nurse who devoted her life to improving the care of elderly people. She researched the neglected problem of pressure sores, revolutionised their nursing care, and thus achieved international fame. Her Pressure Sore Scale was established as a management tool and is still used today. She was a key member of the design team that produced the 'King's Fund Bed', researched equipment required on geriatric wards, assessed all geriatric long stay units in Scotland and established research as a valuable nursing tool within her profession and health authorities. She lectured extensively and her publications attracted worldwide acclamation. After her retirement, she was subsequently appointed to the world's first Chair of Gerontological Nursing in Cleveland, Ohio. PMID:26968512

  7. Pharyngitis - sore throat

    MedlinePlus

    Pharyngitis - bacterial; Sore throat ... caused by swelling in the back of the throat (pharynx) between the tonsils and the voice box (larynx). Most sore throats are caused by colds, the flu, coxsackie virus ...

  8. Cold Sores (Orofacial Herpes)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Cold Sores (Orofacial Herpes) Information for adults A A ... face, known as orofacial herpes simplex, herpes labialis, cold sores, or fever blisters, is a common, recurrent ...

  9. Cold Sores (HSV-1)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cold Sores (HSV-1) KidsHealth > For Teens > Cold Sores (HSV-1) Print A A A Text Size What's in ... person's lips, are caused by herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) . But they don't just show ...

  10. Canker Sores (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... if the sores appear more than two or three times a year. Diagnosis Tests are usually not done to diagnose canker sores, as a doctor can identify them based on medical history and physical exam alone. If your child has very frequent or severe bouts of recurrent ...

  11. Sore Throat (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which Ones & When? Smart School Lunches Emmy-Nominated Video "Cerebral Palsy: Shannon's Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Sore ...

  12. Postoperative sore throat: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    El-Boghdadly, K; Bailey, C R; Wiles, M D

    2016-06-01

    Postoperative sore throat has a reported incidence of up to 62% following general anaesthesia. In adults undergoing tracheal intubation, female sex, younger age, pre-existing lung disease, prolonged duration of anaesthesia and the presence of a blood-stained tracheal tube on extubation are associated with the greatest risk. Tracheal intubation without neuromuscular blockade, use of double-lumen tubes, as well as high tracheal tube cuff pressures may also increase the risk of postoperative sore throat. The expertise of the anaesthetist performing tracheal intubation appears to have no influence on the incidence in adults, although it may in children. In adults, the i-gel(™) supraglottic airway device results in a lower incidence of postoperative sore throat. Cuffed supraglottic airway devices should be inflated sufficiently to obtain an adequate seal and intracuff pressure should be monitored. Children with respiratory tract disease are at increased risk. The use of supraglottic airway devices, oral, rather than nasal, tracheal intubation and cuffed, rather than uncuffed, tracheal tubes have benefit in reducing the incidence of postoperative sore throat in children. Limiting both tracheal tube and supraglottic airway device cuff pressure may also reduce the incidence. PMID:27158989

  13. Heating tar sands formations while controlling pressure

    DOEpatents

    Stegemeier, George Leo [Houston, TX; Beer, Gary Lee [Houston, TX; Zhang, Etuan [Houston, TX

    2010-01-12

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. A pressure in the majority of the section may be maintained below a fracture pressure of the formation. The pressure in the majority of the section may be reduced to a selected pressure after the average temperature reaches a temperature that is above 240.degree. C. and is at or below pyrolysis temperatures of hydrocarbons in the section. At least some hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  14. Herpes Simplex (Cold Sores and Genital Herpes)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Select a Language: Fact Sheet 508 Herpes Simplex (Cold Sores and Genital Herpes) WHAT IS HERPES? HSV ... virus 1 (HSV1) is the common cause of cold sores (oral herpes) around the mouth. HSV2 normally ...

  15. Abnormally high formation pressures, Potwar Plateau, Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Shah, S.H.A.; Malik, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormally high formation pressures in the Potwar Plateau of north-central Pakistan are major obstacles to oil and gas exploration. Severe drilling problems associated with high pressures have, in some cases, prevented adequate evaluation of reservoirs and significantly increased drilling costs. Previous investigations of abnormal pressure in the Potwar Plateau have only identified abnormal pressures in Neogene rocks. We have identified two distinct pressure regimes in this Himalayan foreland fold and thrust belt basin: one in Neogene rocks and another in pre-Neogene rocks. Pore pressures in Neogene rocks are as high as lithostatic and are interpreted to be due to tectonic compression and compaction disequilibrium associated with high rates of sedimentation. Pore pressure gradients in pre-Neogene rocks are generally less than those in Neogene rocks, commonly ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 psi/ft (11.3 to 15.8 kPa/m) and are most likely due to a combination of tectonic compression and hydrocarbon generation. The top of abnormally high pressure is highly variable and doesn't appear to be related to any specific lithologic seal. Consequently, attempts to predict the depth to the top of overpressure prior to drilling are precluded.

  16. Why Are My Breasts Sore?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and it is often present in guys and girls. The breast bud may be a little tender and may cause you to worry but it's a normal part of puberty. It is also common to have sore breasts around the beginning of a girl's period, or menstruation. During her menstrual cycle, a ...

  17. Resolving the Sore Throat Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Brian; Yassi, Anna Lee

    1981-01-01

    Many physicians ignore the traditional dictum that throat culture is the only tool of value in assessing sore throat. A review of the literature supports this skepticism. Evidence indicates that clinical assessment has been underestimated and the significance of positive culture exaggerated. An approach to managing pharyngitis utilizing the combined strengths of throat culture and clinical assessment is proposed. This approach avoids needless cultures, minimizes unnecessary antibiotic use, achieves prompt clinical improvement in patients whose symptoms are most severe and reduces the risk of long term morbidity from rheumatic heart disease to negligible levels. PMID:21289692

  18. Doctor, I have a sore throat

    PubMed Central

    Dholakia, Shamik; Hashimi, Yasmin

    2013-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a rare yet potentially fatal cause of sore throat. Recently published literature suggests an increase in the incidence of this ‘forgotten disease’, highlighting Lemierre's syndrome as a clinically important differential diagnosis of sore throat. We present a case report of an 85-year-old man who developed a sore throat, which illustrates the re-emergence of Lemierre's syndrome. Reducing the morbidity and mortality from this disease requires a high index of clinical suspicion to ensure prompt diagnosis and initiation of appropriate multidisciplinary management. PMID:23376662

  19. Doctor, I have a sore throat.

    PubMed

    Dholakia, Shamik; Hashimi, Yasmin

    2013-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a rare yet potentially fatal cause of sore throat. Recently published literature suggests an increase in the incidence of this 'forgotten disease', highlighting Lemierre's syndrome as a clinically important differential diagnosis of sore throat. We present a case report of an 85-year-old man who developed a sore throat, which illustrates the re-emergence of Lemierre's syndrome. Reducing the morbidity and mortality from this disease requires a high index of clinical suspicion to ensure prompt diagnosis and initiation of appropriate multidisciplinary management. PMID:23376662

  20. SPECIFIC AND CROSS OVER EFFECTS OF MASSAGE FOR MUSCLE SORENESS: RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Sundstrup, Emil; Søndergaard, Stine D.; Behm, David; Brandt, Mikkel; Særvoll, Charlotte A.; Jakobsen, Markus D.; Andersen, Lars L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Muscle soreness can negatively interfere with the activities of daily living as well as sports performance. In the working environment, a common problem is muscle tenderness, soreness and pain, especially for workers frequently exposed to unilateral high repetitive movements tasks. The aim of the study is therefore to investigate the acute effect of massage applied using a simple device Thera‐band roller Massager on laboratory induced hamstring muscle soreness, and the potential cross over effect to the non‐massaged limb. Methods: 22 healthy untrained men (Mean age 34 +/− 7 years; mean height 181.7 +/− 6.9 cm; mean weight 80.6 +/− 6.4 kg; BMI: 24.5 +/− 1.3) with no prior history of knee, low back or neck injury or other adverse health issues were recruited. Participants visited the researchers on two separate occasions, separated by 48 hours, each time providing a soreness rating (modified visual analog scale 0‐10), and being tested for pressure pain threshold (PPT) and active range of motion (ROM) of the hamstring muscles. During the first visit, delayed onset muscular soreness of the hamstring muscles was induced by 10 x 10 repetitions of the stiff‐legged dead‐lift. On the second visit participants received either 1) 10 minutes of roller massage on one leg, while the contralateral leg served as a cross over control, or 2) Resting for 10 minutes with no massage at all. Measurement of soreness, PPT and ROM were taken immediately before and at 0, 10, 30 and 60 min. after treatment. Results: There was a significant group by time interaction for soreness (p < 0.0001) and PPT (p = 0.0007), with the massage group experiencing reduced soreness and increasing PPT compared with the control group. There was no group by time interaction for ROM (p = 0.18). At 10 min. post massage there was a significant reduction in soreness of the non‐massaged limb in the cross over control group compared to controls but this effect was lost 30

  1. Structure formation of atmospheric pressure discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Alexey E.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper it is shown, by analyzing the results of experimental studies, that the outer boundary of the atmospheric pressure discharge pinch is determined by the condition of equality of plasma flows based on the thermal and electric field energy. In most cases, the number of charged particles coming from near-electrode zones is sufficient to compensate for losses in the discharge bulk. At large currents and enhanced heating, plasma is in the diffusion mode of losses, with recombination of charged particles at the pinch boundary. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Recent Breakthroughs in Microplasma Science and Technology", edited by Kurt Becker, Jose Lopez, David Staack, Klaus-Dieter Weltmann and Wei Dong Zhu.

  2. Ozone formation in pulsed SDBD in a wide pressure range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Nudnova, Maryia; mipt Team

    2011-10-01

    Ozone concentration in surface anode-directed DBD for wide pressure range (150 - 1300 torr) was experimentally measured. Voltage and pressure effect were investigated. Reduced electric field was measured for anode-directed and cathode-directed SDBD. E/n values in cathode-directed SDBD is higher than in cathode-directed on 50 percent at atmospheric pressure. E/n value increase leads to decrease the rate of oxygen dissociation and Ozone formation at lower pressures. Radiating region thickness of sliding discharge was measured. Typical thickness of radiating zone is 0.4-1.0 mm within pressure range 220-740 torr. It was shown that high-voltage pulsed nanosecond discharge due to high E/n value produces less Ozone with compare to other discharges. Kinetic model was proposed to describe Ozone formation in the pulsed nanosecond SDBD.

  3. Can You Get Genital Herpes from a Cold Sore?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cuts? Can You Get Genital Herpes From a Cold Sore? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can You Get Genital Herpes From a Cold Sore? Print A A A Text Size Can you get genital herpes from a cold sore? – Lucy* Yes — it is possible to get ...

  4. Vibration Therapy in Management of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS).

    PubMed

    Veqar, Zubia; Imtiyaz, Shagufta

    2014-06-01

    Both athletic and nonathletic population when subjected to any unaccustomed or unfamiliar exercise will experience pain 24-72 hours postexercise. This exercise especially eccentric in nature caused primarily by muscle damage is known as delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). This damage is characterized by muscular pain, decreased muscle force production, reduce range of motion and discomfort experienced. DOMS is due to microscopic muscle fiber tears. The presence of DOMS increases risk of injury. A reduced range of motion may lead to the incapability to efficiently absorb the shock that affect physical activity. Alterations to mechanical motion may increase strain placed on soft tissue structures. Reduced force output may signal compensatory recruitment of muscles, thus leading to unaccustomed stress on musculature. Differences in strength ratios may also cause excessive strain on unaccustomed musculature. A range of interventions aimed at decreasing symptoms of DOMS have been proposed. Although voluminous research has been done in this regard, there is little consensus among the practitioners regarding the most effective way of treating DOMS. Mechanical oscillatory motion provided by vibration therapy. Vibration could represent an effective exercise intervention for enhancing neuromuscular performance in athletes. Vibration has shown effectiveness in flexibility and explosive power. Vibration can apply either local area or whole body vibration. Vibration therapy improves muscular strength, power development, kinesthetic awareness, decreased muscle sore, increased range of motion, and increased blood flow under the skin. VT was effective for reduction of DOMS and regaining full ROM. Application of whole body vibration therapy in postexercise demonstrates less pressure pain threshold, muscle soreness along with less reduction maximal isometric and isokinetic voluntary strength and lower creatine kinase levels in the blood. PMID:25121012

  5. Magnetically Orchestrated Formation of Diamond at Lower Temperatures and Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Reginald B.; Lochner, Eric; Goddard, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Man's curiosity and fascination with diamonds date back to ancient times. The knowledge of the many properties of diamond is recorded during Biblical times. Antoine Lavoisier determined the composition of diamond by burning in O2 to form CO2. With the then existing awareness of graphite as carbon, the race began to convert graphite to diamond. The selective chemical synthesis of diamond has been pursued by Cagniard, Hannay, Moisson and Parson. On the basis of the thermodynamically predicted equilibrium line of diamond and graphite, P W Bridgman attempted extraordinary conditions of high temperature (>2200°C) and pressure (>100,000 atm) for the allotropic conversion of graphite to diamond. H T Hall was the first to successfully form bulk diamond by realizing the kinetic restrictions to Bridgman's (thermodynamic) high pressure high temperature direct allotropic conversion. Moreover, Hall identified catalysts for the faster kinetics of diamond formation. H M Strong determined the import of the liquid catalyst during Hall's catalytic synthesis. W G Eversole discovered the slow metastable low pressure diamond formation by pyrolytic chemical vapor deposition with the molecular hydrogen etching of the rapidly forming stable graphitic carbon. J C Angus determined the import of atomic hydrogen for faster etching for faster diamond growth at low pressure. S Matsumoto has developed plasma and hot filament technology for faster hydrogen and carbon radical generations at low pressure for faster diamond formation. However the metastable low pressure chemical vapor depositions by plasma and hot filament are prone to polycrystalline films. From Bridgman to Hall to Eversole, Angus and Matsumoto, much knowledge has developed of the importance of pressure, temperature, transition metal catalyst, liquid state of metal (metal radicals atoms) and the carbon radical intermediates for diamond synthesis. Here we advance this understanding of diamond formation by demonstrating the external

  6. Instability of black hole formation under small pressure perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Pankaj S.; Malafarina, Daniele

    2013-02-01

    We investigate here the spectrum of gravitational collapse endstates when arbitrarily small perfect fluid pressures are introduced in the classic black hole formation scenario as described by Oppenheimer, Snyder and Datt (OSD) (Oppenheimer and Snyder in Phys Rev 56:455, 1939; Datt in Zs f Phys 108:314, 1938). This extends a previous result on tangential pressures (Joshi and Malafarina Phys Rev D 83:024009, 2011) to the physically more realistic scenario of perfect fluid collapse. The existence of classes of pressure perturbations is shown explicitly, which has the property that injecting any smallest pressure changes the final fate of the dynamical collapse from a black hole to a naked singularity. It is therefore seen that any smallest neighborhood of the OSD model, in the space of initial data, contains collapse evolutions that go to a naked singularity outcome. This gives an intriguing insight on the nature of naked singularity formation in gravitational collapse.

  7. Delayed onset muscle soreness: is massage effective?

    PubMed

    Nelson, Nicole

    2013-10-01

    Despite the widespread occurrence of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), there is little consensus as to the exact cause or which treatments may be most effective at alleviating symptoms. Greater understanding of DOMS can give sports medicine and fitness professionals an opportunity to help prevent or speed recovery of this performance limiting condition. This article will review the DOMS literature, including the potential role of psychosocial factors and explore studies which involve massage therapy as a treatment modality. Articles from PubMed, MEDLINE, Google Scholar, and references from articles are included in this review. Search words and phrases included delayed onset muscle soreness, repeated bout effect, massage effectiveness, exercise induced muscle damage, and eccentric exercise. PMID:24139006

  8. Fluid Pressure Anomalies in Shallow Intraplate Argillaceous Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuzil, C.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid transport in shales and other argillaceous formations is difficult to study because these materials often have extremely low permeability. However, recent investigations have revealed a number of instances of apparently isolated highs or lows in pore fluid potential in shallow (< ~ 1 km depth) argillaceous formations in intraplate settings. The presence (or absence) of such pressure anomalies may provide clues to fluid flow. Formations with the pressure anomalies are distinguished by (1) smaller ratios of hydraulic conductivity to formation thickness and (2) smaller hydraulic (or pressure) diffusivities than those without anomalies. This is consistent with water-saturated transient Darcian flow caused by strain at rates of ~ 10-17 to 10-16 s-1, by significant perturbing events in the past 104 to 106 years or by some combination of the two. Plausible causes include erosional downwasting, tectonic strain, and glaciation. In this conceptualization the anomalies constrain formation-scale flow properties, flow history, and local geological forcing in the last 106 years and in particular indicate zones of low permeability (10-19 - 10-22 m2) that could be useful for isolation of nuclear waste.

  9. Pressure regimes and core formation in the accreting earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, H. E.

    1992-01-01

    Recent work suggests that a large degree of melting is required to segregate metal from silicates, suggesting a connection with the formation of magma oceans. At low pressures metallic liquids do not wet silicate minerals, preventing the metal from aggregating into large masses that can sink. At high pressures, above 25 GPa, the dihedral angles of grains in contact with oxygen-rich metallic liquids may be reduced enough to allow percolation of metal, but this has not been confirmed. Physical models of core formation and accretion may therefore involve the formation of magma oceans and the segregation of metal at both high and low pressures. Models of core formation involving different pressure regimes are discussed as well as chemical evidence bearing on the models. Available geophysical data is ambiguous. The nature of the 670 km boundary (chemical difference or strictly phase change) between the upper and lower mantle is in doubt. There is some evidence that plumes are derived from the lower mantle, and seismic tomography strongly indicates that penetration of subducting oceanic crust into the lower mantle, but the tomography data also indicates that the 670 km discontinuity is a significant barrier to general mantle convection. The presence of the D' layer at the base of the lower mantle could be a reaction zone between the mantle and core indicating core-mantle disequilibrium, or D' layer could be subducted material. The abundance of the siderophile elements in the mantle could provide clues to the importance of high pressure processes in Earth, but partition coefficients at high pressures are only beginning to be measured.

  10. RELIABILITY AND APPLICABILITY OF DSTS AND BOTTOMHOLE PRESSURE MEASUREMENTS IN TEXAS GULF TERTIARY FORMATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pressure data gathered from drillstem tests (DSTs) and bottomhole pressure measurements provide critical information toward formation and can be used for an assessment of prevailing pressure regimes and their influence on the migration potential of formation fluids. Reliability o...

  11. Sore throat in a young man: guess what…

    PubMed Central

    Lazarescu, Roxana Elena; Prabhu, Vinay; Wallace, Camari; Htet, Hein

    2014-01-01

    Sore throat is a common complaint in the outpatient and emergency room settings. Typically, little workup is necessary and includes visual inspection with or without swabs for bacterial infection. We present a case that demonstrates an important entity to be excluded by simple history and physical examination in patients presenting with pain in the throat or neck. The most important cause of pneumomediastinum is previous instrumentation. Spontaneous pneumomediastinum is uncommonly seen in young adults. Most cases of spontaneous pneumomediastinum are uncomplicated, as mediastinal pressures rarely mount to dangerous levels. However, when the patient presents with distended neck veins, cyanosis or marked dyspnoea, further action is necessary. Lastly, since pneumomediastinum can be caused by oesophageal rupture and occasionally present with concurrent pneumothorax, these dangerous entities must be excluded. PMID:24951599

  12. Conductivity affects nanosecond electrical pulse induced pressure transient formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Caleb C.; Barnes, Ronald A.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope T.; Glickman, Randolph D.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoporation occurs in cells exposed to high amplitude short duration (< 1μs) electrical pulses. The biophysical mechanism(s) responsible for nanoporation is unknown although several theories exist. Current theories focus exclusively on the electrical field, citing electrostriction, water dipole alignment and/or electrodeformation as the primary mechanisms for pore formation. Our group has shown that mechanical forces of substantial magnitude are also generated during nsEP exposures. We hypothesize that these mechanical forces may contribute to pore formation. In this paper, we report that alteration of the conductivity of the exposure solution also altered the level of mechanical forces generated during a nsEP exposure. By reducing the conductivity of the exposure solutions, we found that we could completely eliminate any pressure transients normally created by nsEP exposure. The data collected for this proceeding does not definitively show that the pressure transients previously identified contribute to nanoporation; however; it indicates that conductivity influences both survival and pressure transient formation.

  13. Treating Sore Throats: Practice vs. Theory

    PubMed Central

    Hutten-Czapski, P.

    1987-01-01

    The management of a seemingly simple and common ailment, the sore throat, is shrouded in considerable controversy. At present, authoritarian opinion, stressing prevention of acute rheumatic fever (ARF), is in conflict with the practices of a large segment of the profession, whose members seem to treat primarily for symptom relief. Recent developments, in fields as diverse as epidemiology of ARF, clinical decision making, laboratory tests for streptococcus, and clinical trials of penicillin, are in support of management that is directed primarily towards symptom relief and secondarily towards prevention of ARF. PMID:21263777

  14. Laser homeostatics on delayed onset muscle soreness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T. C. Y.; Fu, D. R.; Liu, X. G.; Tian, Z. X.

    2011-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and its photobiomodulation were reviewed from the viewpoint of function-specific homeostasis (FSH) in this paper. FSH is a negative-feedback response of a biosystem to maintain the function-specific fluctuations inside the biosystem so that the function is perfectly performed. A stressor may destroy a FSH. A stress is a response of a biosystem to a stressor and may also be in stress-specific homeostasis (StSH). A low level light (LLL) is so defined that it has no effects on a function in its FSH or a stress in its StSH, but it modulate a function far from its FSH or a stress far from its StSH. For DOMS recovery, protein metabolism in the Z-line streaming muscular cell is the essential process, but the inflammation, pain and soreness are non-essential processes. For many DOMS phenomena, protein metabolism in the Z-line streaming muscular cell is in protein metabolism-specific homeostasis (PmSH) so that there are no effects of LLL although the inflammation can be inhibited and the pain can be relieved. An athlete or animal in the dysfunctional conditions such as blood flow restriction and exercise exhaustion is far from PmSH and the protein metabolism can be improved with LLL.

  15. Does Postexercise Static Stretching Alleviate Delayed Muscle Soreness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buroker, Katherine C.; Schwane, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Because many experts recommend stretching after exercise to relieve muscle soreness, 23 subjects performed a 30-minute step test to induce delayed muscle soreness. There was neither temporary relief of pain immediately after stretching nor a reduction in pain during the 3-day postexercise period. (Author/SM)

  16. FILAMENT FORMATION BY ESCHERICHIA COLI AT INCREASED HYDROSTATIC PRESSURES1

    PubMed Central

    Zobell, Claude E.; Cobet, Andre B.

    1964-01-01

    ZoBell, Claude E. (University of California, La Jolla), and Andre B. Cobet. Filament formation by Escherichia coli at increased hydrostatic pressures. J. Bacteriol. 87:710–719. 1964.—The reproduction as well as the growth of Escherichia coli is retarded by hydrostatic pressures ranging from 200 to 500 atm. Reproduction was indicated by an increase in the number of cells determined by plating on EMB Agar as well as by direct microscopic counts. Growth, which is not necessarily synonymous with reproduction, was indicated by increase in dry weight and protein content of the bacterial biomass. At increased pressures, cells of three different strains of E. coli tended to form long filaments. Whereas most normal cells of E. coli that developed at 1 atm were only about 2 μ long, the mean length of those that developed at 475 atm was 2.93 μ for strain R4, 3.99 μ for strain S, and 5.82 μ for strain B cells. Nearly 90% of the bacterial biomass produced at 475 atm by strain B was found in filaments exceeding 5 μ in length; 74.7 and 16.4% of the biomass produced at 475 atm by strains S and R4, respectively, occurred in such filaments. Strain R4 formed fewer and shorter (5 to 35 μ) filaments than did the other two strains, whose filaments ranged in length from 5 to >100 μ. The bacterial biomass produced at all pressures had approximately the same content of protein and nucleic acids. But at increased pressures appreciably more ribonucleic acid (RNA) and proportionately less deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was found per unit of biomass. Whereas the RNA content per cell increased with cell length, the amount of DNA was nearly the same in long filaments formed at increased pressure as in cells of normal length formed at 1 atm. The inverse relationship between the concentration of DNA and cell length in all three strains of E. coli suggests that the failure of DNA to replicate at increased pressure may be responsible for a repression of cell division and consequent filament

  17. Modeling of formation of extended NH solids under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batyrev, Iskander G.

    Structure of N-H extended network under high pressure was modelled using the evolutionary algorithm program USPEX based on plane wave DFT calculations (VASP). Concentration ratio of N2 to H2 gases was 3:1, 4:1, and 9:1. Range of the studied pressures was 10 - 50 GPa on compression, and from 50 to 1 GPa on isotropic decompression of the extended network. Formation of an extended network with covalent bonds occurs between 30-50 GPa. Higher concentration of N requires higher pressure to form a covalent bond network. New structure of NH extended solids with covalent bonds are predicted: with P-1(CI-1) symmetry group for 9:1 ratio, with PBAM (D2H +9) symmetry group for 4:1 ratio, and with P-1(CI-1) for 3:1 ratio of N2 to H2 gas. Calculations of the mixtures of N2 and H2 gases at pressures in the range of 10-20 GPa resulted in a variety of structures without a covalent network, but consisting of nitrogen-containing molecules. For example, the lowest energy structure for a 3:1 ratio of N to H atoms consists of tetrazene and N2 molecules. At 10 GPa the lowest energy structure appears to be a combination of protonated ammonia and N2 molecules.

  18. Fluid pressure and reaction zone formation at a lithological interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Podladchikov, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    Chemical composition variations in reaction zones between two distinct lithologies are generally interpreted in terms of chemical potential gradients and diffusion process. Concentration profiles can then be used to quantify the species diffusion coefficients or the time scale of geological events. However, chemical potential gradients are also functions of temperature and pressure and local variations of these parameters can thus potentially modify the diffusion process. In northern Corsica, a centimeter scale reaction zone formed under blueschist conditions at a serpentinite - marble contact of sedimentary origin. Three sub-zones having chemical compositions evolving from one rock end-member to another divide the reaction zone along sharp interfaces. At the reaction zone - marble interface, marble decarbonation occurs to form wollastonite and carbonaceous matter. Thermodynamic calculations for this reaction and the respective increase in density of 25 % and 7 % in the bulk rock and in the garnet minerals are interpreted as records of a pressure gradient during reaction zone formation. Moreover, the formation of a volatile-free sub-zone in the reaction zone from reaction between the H2O-bearing serpentinite and the CO2-bearing marble released fluids at the contact. The impact of such a release on the fluid pressure was modelled by considering the effects of both the rock compaction and the transport of fluid by hydraulic diffusion. Modelling results indicates that > 0.5 GPa fluid overpressure can be generated at the contact if devolatilization rates are of the order of the one experimentally measured (> 10-5 kg of fluid/m3 of rock/s). The resulting pressure gradient is of the order of magnitude of the one necessary to counter-balance the effect on chemical potential of the chemical composition variations across the contact. Finally, after the reaction has run to completion, the model predicts that fluid rapidly diffuses away from the interface which thus stops

  19. Electrical characteristics and formation mechanism of atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lijuan; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Weijing; Meng, Ying; Ouyang, Jiting

    2014-06-16

    The behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma jet produced by a coplanar dielectric barrier discharge in helium in external electrostatic and magnetic field is investigated. Net negative charges in the plasma jet outside the tube were detected. The deflection of the plume in the external field was observed. The plasma jet is suggested to be formed by the electron beam from the temporal cathode which is accelerated by a longitudinal field induced by the surface charges on the dielectric tube or interface between the helium and ambient air. The helium flow is necessary for the jet formation in the surrounding air.

  20. Pressure broadening of the ((dt. mu. )dee)* formation resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.S.; Leon, M.; Padial, N.T.

    1988-12-27

    The treatment of ((dt..mu..)dee)* formation at high densities as a pressure broadening process is discussed. Cross sections for collisions of the complex (dt..mu..)dee, and of the D/sub 2/ molecule from which it is formed, with the bath molecules have been accurately calculated. These cross sections are used to calculate the collisional width in three variations of the impact approximation that have been proposed for this problem. In general, the quasistatic approximation is shown to satisfy the usual conditions of muon-catalyzed fusion better than does the impact approximation. A preliminary rough treatment is presented to illustrate the quasistatic approximation.

  1. Magma chambers: Formation, local stresses, excess pressures, and compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, Agust

    2012-09-01

    An existing magma chamber is normally a necessary condition for the generation of a large volcanic edifice. Most magma chambers form through repeated magma injections, commonly sills, and gradually expand and change their shapes. Highly irregular magma-chamber shapes are thermo-mechanically unstable; common long-term equilibrium shapes are comparatively smooth and approximate those of ellipsoids of revolution. Some chambers, particularly small and sill-like, may be totally molten. Most chambers, however, are only partially molten, the main part of the chamber being crystal mush, a porous material. During an eruption, magma is drawn from the crystal mush towards a molten zone beneath the lower end of the feeder dyke. Magma transport to the feeder dyke, however, depends on the chamber's internal structure; in particular on whether the chamber contains pressure compartments that are, to a degree, isolated from other compartments. It is only during large drops in the hydraulic potential beneath the feeder dyke that other compartments become likely to supply magma to the erupting compartment, thereby contributing to its excess pressure (the pressure needed to rupture a magma chamber) and the duration of the eruption. Simple analytical models suggest that during a typical eruption, the excess-pressure in the chamber decreases exponentially. This result applies to a magma chamber that (a) is homogeneous and totally fluid (contains no compartments), (b) is not subject to significant replenishment (inflow of new magma into the chamber) during the eruption, and (c) contains magma where exsolution of gas has no significant effect on the excess pressure. For a chamber consisting of pressure compartments, the exponential excess-pressure decline applies primarily to a single erupting compartment. When more than one compartment contributes magma to the eruption, the excess pressure may decline much more slowly and irregularly. Excess pressure is normally similar to the in

  2. Pregame Sore Throat, Postgame Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Stork, Natalie C; Smoot, M Kyle

    2016-05-01

    A collegiate football athlete presented, on game day, with an acute onset of sore throat. He was afebrile, speaking in full sentences, without signs of respiratory distress. His examination was negative for lymphadenopathy or tonsillar enlargement or exudate. Twelve hours after initial presentation, he developed acute epiglottitis. He underwent urgent fiberoptic intubation and was empirically treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics and corticosteroids. Currently, there are no published reports of acute epiglottitis in athletes. Consequently, there is no evidence to guide return to play decisions. Return to play, following acute epiglottitis, should include resolution of symptoms and a graded return to play, taking into consideration the level of deconditioning the athlete experienced from hospitalization. PMID:26247550

  3. Sore throat may be a clue to the early diagnosis of spontaneous pneumomediastinum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke-Wei; Chiu, Wen-Yi; Lo, Yi-Hao

    2015-02-01

    Spontaneous pneumomediastinum is defined as presence of air in the mediastinum without obvious cause such as esophageal perforation or abscess formation. It is a benign condition and usually resolved by itself in 1 to 2 weeks. The main symptom of spontaneous pneumomediastinum is retrosternal chest pain. Here, we present a young adult who complained about sore throat initially. Marked retropharyngeal emphysema was noted by neck x-ray. Pneumomediastinum was confirmed with chest x-ray and computed tomographic scan later on.We want to emphasize the importance of thorough history taking and lateral soft tissue neck radiograph on retropharyngeal emphysema in real time, which is key to the diagnostic workup for patients who present with persistent sore throat and dysphagia in young adult. PMID:25070194

  4. Carbonate formation in Wyoming montmorillonite under high pressure carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Tae-Bong; Baltrus, John P.; Howard, Bret H.; Harbert, William P.; Romanov, Vyacheslav N.

    2013-03-01

    Carbonation reaction with silicate minerals that are common components of the host rock and cap rock within geological storage reservoirs and the associated structural deformation were investigated for better understanding of the geochemical reactions associated with geologic CO2 storage. Exposure of a model expanding clay, Wyoming montmorillonite, SWy-2, to high-pressure CO2 resulted in the formation of a mineral carbonate phase via dry CO2–clay mineral interactions at two different temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that the properties of CO2 fluid at 70 °C provide more favorable conditions for carbonate formation at the clay surface less accessible to CO2 at 22 °C. The carbonation reaction occurred predominantly within the first couple of days of exposure to the fluid and then proceeded slower with continuing exposure. As compared to the as-received clay under the same ambient conditions, the (0 0 1) basal spacing of the clay bearing carbonates (after the CO2 exposure) was slightly expanded at a relative humidity (RH) level of 12% but it was slightly collapsed at the RH level of 40%. Finally, experimental observations suggest that the carbonation reaction occurs at the external surface as well as internal surface (interlayer) of the clay particles.

  5. Controlling and assessing pressure conditions during treatment of tar sands formations

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Etuan; Beer, Gary Lee

    2015-11-10

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the tar sands formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. Heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. A pressure in the portion of the formation is controlled such that the pressure remains below a fracture pressure of the formation overburden while allowing the portion of the formation to heat to a selected average temperature of at least about 280.degree. C. and at most about 300.degree. C. The pressure in the portion of the formation is reduced to a selected pressure after the portion of the formation reaches the selected average temperature.

  6. A ram-pressure threshold for star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitworth, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    In turbulent fragmentation, star formation occurs in condensations created by converging flows. The condensations must be sufficiently massive, dense and cool to be gravitationally unstable, so that they start to contract; and they must then radiate away thermal energy fast enough for self-gravity to remain dominant, so that they continue to contract. For the metallicities and temperatures in local star-forming clouds, this second requirement is only met robustly when the gas couples thermally to the dust, because this delivers the capacity to radiate across the full bandwidth of the continuum, rather than just in a few discrete spectral lines. This translates into a threshold for vigorous star formation, which can be written as a minimum ram pressure PCRIT ˜ 4 × 10-11 dyne. PCRIT is independent of temperature, and corresponds to flows with molecular hydrogen number density n_{{H_2.FLOW}} and velocity vFLOW satisfying n_{{H_2.FLOW}} v_{FLOW}^2≳ 800 cm^{-3} (km s^{-1})^2. This in turn corresponds to a minimum molecular hydrogen column density for vigorous star formation, N_{{H_2.CRIT}} ˜ 4 × 10^{21} cm^{-2} (ΣCRIT ˜ 100 M⊙ pc-2), and a minimum visual extinction AV, CRIT ˜ 9 mag. The characteristic diameter and line density for a star-forming filament when this threshold is just exceeded - a sweet spot for local star formation regions - are 2RFIL ˜ 0.1 pc and μFIL ˜ 13 M⊙ pc-2. The characteristic diameter and mass for a prestellar core condensing out of such a filament are 2RCORE ˜ 0.1 pc and MCORE ˜ 1 M⊙. We also show that fragmentation of a shock-compressed layer is likely to commence while the convergent flows creating the layer are still ongoing, and we stress that, under this circumstance, the phenomenology and characteristic scales for fragmentation of the layer are fundamentally different from those derived traditionally for pre-existing layers.

  7. Just a sore throat? Uncommon causes of significant respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Wahab, Dalia; Bichard, Julia; Shah, Anand; Mann, Bhupinder

    2013-01-01

    We present two uncommon underlying causes of a sore throat which, if missed or delayed in diagnosis, can lead to disastrous consequences. Our first case is of Lemierre's syndrome diagnosed in a 21-year-old man presenting with a 5-day history of sore throat, fever, right-sided pleuritic chest pain and bilateral pulmonary nodules on CT imaging. Fusobacterium necrophorum cultured from peripheral blood and an occluded left internal jugular vein on ultrasound lead to an eventual diagnosis. Our second case presents a 29-year-old woman with a 5-day history of sore throat, fever and right-sided pleuritic chest pain. A left-sided quinsy was diagnosed and aspirated and the patient was discharged home. She represented shortly with worsening pleuritic pain and was found to have a right-sided pleural effusion with descending mediastinitis originating from the tonsillar abscess. Delayed diagnosis resulted in open thoracotomy, decortication and prolonged intravenous antibiotics. PMID:23632177

  8. Just a sore throat? Uncommon causes of significant respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Wahab, Dalia; Bichard, Julia; Shah, Anand; Mann, Bhupinder

    2013-01-01

    We present two uncommon underlying causes of a sore throat which, if missed or delayed in diagnosis, can lead to disastrous consequences. Our first case is of Lemierre's syndrome diagnosed in a 21-year-old man presenting with a 5-day history of sore throat, fever, right-sided pleuritic chest pain and bilateral pulmonary nodules on CT imaging. Fusobacterium necrophorum cultured from peripheral blood and an occluded left internal jugular vein on ultrasound lead to an eventual diagnosis. Our second case presents a 29-year-old woman with a 5-day history of sore throat, fever and right-sided pleuritic chest pain. A left-sided quinsy was diagnosed and aspirated and the patient was discharged home. She represented shortly with worsening pleuritic pain and was found to have a right-sided pleural effusion with descending mediastinitis originating from the tonsillar abscess. Delayed diagnosis resulted in open thoracotomy, decortication and prolonged intravenous antibiotics. PMID:23632177

  9. A pressure-induced, magnetic transition in pyrrhotite: Implications for the formation pressure of meteorites and diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilder, S. A.; Egli, R.; Hochleitner, R.; Roud, S. C.; Volk, M. W. R.; Le Goff, M.; de Wit, M.

    2012-04-01

    Meteorites and diamonds encounter high pressures during their formation or subsequent evolution. These materials sometimes contain magnetic inclusions of pyrrhotite. Because magnetic properties are sensitive to strain, pyrrhotite can potentially record the shock or formation pressures of its host. Moreover, pyrrhotite undergoes a pressure-induced phase transition between 1.6 and 6.2 GPa, but the magnetic signature of this transition is poorly known. Here we report room temperature magnetic measurements on multi- and single domain pyrrhotite under non-hydrostatic pressure up to 4.5 GPa. We find that the ratio of magnetic coercivity and remanence follows a logarithmic law with respect to pressure, which can potentially be used as a geobarometer. Due to the greater thermal expansion of pyrrhotite with respect to diamond, pyrrhotite inclusions in diamond experience a confining pressure at the Earth's surface. Applying our experimentally derived magnetic geobarometer to pyrrhotite-bearing diamonds from Botswana and the Central African Republic suggests the pressures of the pyrrhotite inclusions in the diamonds range from 1.3 to 2.1 GPa. These overpressures constrain the mantle source pressures from 5.4 to 9.5 GPa, depending on which bulk modulus and thermal expansion coefficients of the two phases are used. We are now trying to develop magnetic barometers on other magnetic phases to apply to meteorites, ultimately to constrain the minimum pressure in which the meteorite formed and, hence, information regarding the planetesmal's size, and/or depth, in which the meteorite was derived.

  10. Theoretical assessment of bonaccordite formation in pressurized water reactors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rak, Zsolt; O'Brien, Chris; Shin, Dongwon; Andersson, Anders David; Stanek, Christopher; Brenner, Donald

    2016-03-04

    The free energy of formation of bonaccordite (Ni2FeBO5) as a function of temperature has been calculated using a technique that combines first principles calculations with experimental free energies of formation of aqueous species. The results suggest that bonaccordite formation from aqueous metal ions (Ni2+ andFe3+) and boric acid is thermodynamically favorable at elevated temperature and pH that have been predicted to exist at the CRUD-clad interface in deposits thicker than 60 μm.

  11. Theoretical assessment of bonaccordite formation in pressurized water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rak, Zs; O'Brien, C. J.; Shin, D.; Andersson, A. D.; Stanek, C. R.; Brenner, D. W.

    2016-06-01

    The free energy of formation of bonaccordite (Ni2FeBO5) as a function of temperature has been calculated using a technique that combines first principles calculations with experimental free energies of formation of aqueous species. The results suggest that bonaccordite formation from aqueous metal ions (Ni2+ andFe3+) and boric acid is thermodynamically favorable at elevated temperature and pH that have been predicted to exist at the CRUD-clad interface in deposits thicker than 60 μm.

  12. Theoretical assessment of bonaccordite formation in pressurized water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rak, Zs; O'Brien, C. J.; Shin, D.; Andersson, A. D.; Stanek, C. R.; Brenner, D. W.

    2016-06-01

    The free energy of formation of bonaccordite (Ni2FeBO5) as a function of temperature has been calculated using a technique that combines first principles calculations with experimental free energies of formation of aqueous species. The results suggest that bonaccordite formation from aqueous metal ions (Ni2+ andFe3+) and boric acid is thermodynamically favorable at elevated temperature and pH that have been predicted to exist at the CRUD-clad interface in deposits thicker than 60 μm.

  13. Recommendations for the Avoidance of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymanski, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the possible causes of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), which include buildup of lactic acid in muscle, increased intracellular calcium concentration, increased intramuscular inflammation, and muscle fiber and connective tissue damage. Proposed methods to reduce DOMS include warming up before exercise and performing repeated bouts…

  14. Hemispheric Asymmetry and Pun Comprehension: When Cowboys Have Sore Calves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulson, Seana; Severens, Els

    2007-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded as healthy participants listened to puns such as ''During branding, cowboys have sore calves.'' To assess hemispheric differences in pun comprehension, visually presented probes that were either highly related (COW), moderately related (LEG), or unrelated, were presented in either the left or right…

  15. School Nurses on the Front Lines of Medicine: A Student With Fever and Sore Throat.

    PubMed

    Olympia, Robert P

    2016-05-01

    Fever and sore throat are common chief complaints encountered by school nurses. This article explains the etiology of both fever and sore throat in children, describes the office assessment, and delineates life-threatening complications associated with fever and sore throat that may prompt the school nurse to transfer the child to a local emergency department. PMID:27091630

  16. Density fluctuations as an intrinsic mechanism of pressure profile formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vershkov, V. A.; Shelukhin, D. A.; Subbotin, G. F.; Dnestrovskij, Yu. N.; Danilov, A. V.; Melnikov, A. V.; Eliseev, L. G.; Maltsev, S. G.; Gorbunov, E. P.; Sergeev, D. S.; Krylov, S. V.; Myalton, T. B.; Ryzhakov, D. V.; Trukhin, V. M.; Chistiakov, V. V.; Cherkasov, S. V.

    2015-06-01

    This article provides new insight into previous and new experimental data regarding behaviour of small-scale density fluctuations in T-10 ohmic and electron cyclotron resonance heated (ECRH) discharges. The experiments demonstrate the existence of certain peaked-‘marginal’ normalized plasma pressure profiles in both ohmic and discharges with on-axis ECRH. Strong particle confinement degradation occurred when the normalized plasma pressure gradient exceeded this marginal profile gradient (fast density decay in ohmic, ‘density pump out’ in ECRH). The marginal profile could be achieved either with a flat density and peaked temperature profile or vice versa. Minimal turbulence level did not depend on heating power and was observed with the ‘optimal’ pressure profile, which was slightly broader than the marginal profile. The density fluctuations did not significantly contribute to the heat transport but determined particle fluxes to maintain the pressure profile. The experimental density behaviour could be reasonably described with the modified model of canonical profiles, which includes particle confinement deterioration under marginal pressure profile conditions.

  17. Pressure-driven formation and stabilization of superconductive chromium hydrides.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuyin; Jia, Xiaojing; Frapper, Gilles; Li, Duan; Oganov, Artem R; Zeng, Qingfeng; Zhang, Litong

    2015-01-01

    Chromium hydride is a prototype stoichiometric transition metal hydride. The phase diagram of Cr-H system at high pressures remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in dealing with the high activation barriers and complications in handing hydrogen under pressure. We have performed an extensive structural study on Cr-H system at pressure range 0 ∼ 300 GPa using an unbiased structure prediction method based on evolutionary algorithm. Upon compression, a number of hydrides are predicted to become stable in the excess hydrogen environment and these have compositions of Cr2Hn (n = 2-4, 6, 8, 16). Cr2H3, CrH2 and Cr2H5 structures are versions of the perfect anti-NiAs-type CrH with ordered tetrahedral interstitial sites filled by H atoms. CrH3 and CrH4 exhibit host-guest structural characteristics. In CrH8, H2 units are also identified. Our study unravels that CrH is a superconductor at atmospheric pressure with an estimated transition temperature (T c) of 10.6 K, and superconductivity in CrH3 is enhanced by the metallic hydrogen sublattice with T c of 37.1 K at 81 GPa, very similar to the extensively studied MgB2. PMID:26626579

  18. Pressure-driven formation and stabilization of superconductive chromium hydrides

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuyin; Jia, Xiaojing; Frapper, Gilles; Li, Duan; Oganov, Artem R.; Zeng, Qingfeng; Zhang, Litong

    2015-01-01

    Chromium hydride is a prototype stoichiometric transition metal hydride. The phase diagram of Cr-H system at high pressures remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in dealing with the high activation barriers and complications in handing hydrogen under pressure. We have performed an extensive structural study on Cr-H system at pressure range 0 ∼ 300 GPa using an unbiased structure prediction method based on evolutionary algorithm. Upon compression, a number of hydrides are predicted to become stable in the excess hydrogen environment and these have compositions of Cr2Hn (n = 2–4, 6, 8, 16). Cr2H3, CrH2 and Cr2H5 structures are versions of the perfect anti-NiAs-type CrH with ordered tetrahedral interstitial sites filled by H atoms. CrH3 and CrH4 exhibit host-guest structural characteristics. In CrH8, H2 units are also identified. Our study unravels that CrH is a superconductor at atmospheric pressure with an estimated transition temperature (T c) of 10.6 K, and superconductivity in CrH3 is enhanced by the metallic hydrogen sublattice with T c of 37.1 K at 81 GPa, very similar to the extensively studied MgB2. PMID:26626579

  19. Swimming movements initiate bubble formation in fish decompressed from elevated gas pressures.

    PubMed

    McDonough, P M; Hemmingsen, E A

    1985-01-01

    Young specimens of trout, catfish, sculpin and salamanders were equilibrated with elevated gas pressures, then rapidly decompressed to ambient pressure. The newly hatched forms tolerated extremely high gas supersaturations; equilibration pressures of 80-120 atm argon or 150-250 atm helium were required for in vivo bubble formation. During subsequent larval development, the equilibration pressures required decreased to just 5-10 atm and bubbles originated in the fins. Anesthetising older fish before decompression prevented bubble formation in the fins; this suggests that swimming movements mechanically initiate bubbles, possibly by a tribonucleation mechanism. PMID:2859954

  20. Anatomy of a pressure-induced, ferromagnetic-to-paramagnetic transition in pyrrhotite: Implications for the formation pressure of diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilder, Stuart A.; Egli, Ramon; Hochleitner, Rupert; Roud, Sophie C.; Volk, Michael W. R.; Le Goff, Maxime; de Wit, Maarten

    2011-10-01

    Meteorites and diamonds encounter high pressures during their formation or subsequent evolution. These materials commonly contain magnetic inclusions of pyrrhotite. Because magnetic properties are sensitive to strain, pyrrhotite can potentially record the shock or formation pressures of its host. Moreover, pyrrhotite undergoes a pressure-induced phase transition between 1.6 and 6.2 GPa, but the magnetic signature of this transition is poorly known. Here we report room temperature magnetic measurements on multidomain and single-domain pyrrhotite under nonhydrostatic pressure. Magnetic remanence in single-domain pyrrhotite is largely insensitive to pressure until 2 GPa, whereas the remanence of multidomain pyrrhotite increases 50% over that of initial conditions by 2 GPa, and then decreases until only 33% of the original remanence remains by 4.5 GPa. In contrast, magnetic coercivity increases with increasing pressure to 4.5 GPa. Below ˜1.5 GPa, multidomain pyrrhotite obeys Néel theory with a positive correlation between coercivity and remanence; above ˜1.5 GPa, it behaves single domain-like yet distinctly different from uncompressed single-domain pyrrhotite. The ratio of magnetic coercivity and remanence follows a logarithmic law with respect to pressure, which can potentially be used as a geobarometer. Owing to the greater thermal expansion of pyrrhotite with respect to diamond, pyrrhotite inclusions in diamonds experience a confining pressure at Earth's surface. Applying our experimentally derived magnetic geobarometer to pyrrhotite-bearing diamonds from Botswana and the Central African Republic suggests the pressures of the pyrrhotite inclusions in the diamonds range from 1.3 to 2.1 GPa. These overpressures constrain the mantle source pressures from 5.4 to 9.5 GPa, depending on which bulk modulus and thermal expansion coefficients of the two phases are used.

  1. Dynamics of plasma flow formation in a pulsed accelerator operating at a constant pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baimbetov, F. B.; Zhukeshov, A. M.; Amrenova, A. U.

    2007-01-01

    Features in the dynamics of plasma flow formation at a constant pressure in a pulsed coaxial accelerator have been studied. The temperature and density of electrons in a plasma bunch have been determined using a probe technique.

  2. Combined V-Y Fasciocutaneous Advancement and Gluteus Maximus Muscle Rotational Flaps for Treating Sacral Sores

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun Jeong; Moon, Suk Ho; Lee, Yoon Jae

    2016-01-01

    The sacral area is the most common site of pressure sore in bed-ridden patients. Though many treatment methods have been proposed, a musculocutaneous flap using the gluteus muscles or a fasciocutaneous flap is the most popular surgical option. Here, we propose a new method that combines the benefits of these 2 methods: combined V-Y fasciocutaneous advancement and gluteus maximus muscle rotational flaps. A retrospective review was performed for 13 patients who underwent this new procedure from March 2011 to December 2013. Patients' age, sex, accompanying diseases, follow-up duration, surgical details, complications, and recurrence were documented. Computed tomography was performed postoperatively at 2 to 4 weeks and again at 4 to 6 months to identify the thickness and volume of the rotational muscle portion. After surgery, all patients healed within 1 month; 3 patients experienced minor complications. The average follow-up period was 13.6 months, during which time 1 patient had a recurrence (recurrence rate, 7.7%). Average thickness of the rotated muscle was 9.43 mm at 2 to 4 weeks postoperatively and 9.22 mm at 4 to 6 months postoperatively (p = 0.087). Muscle thickness had not decreased, and muscle volume was relatively maintained. This modified method is relatively simple and easy for reconstructing sacral sores, provides sufficient padding, and has little muscle donor-site morbidity. PMID:27366755

  3. A pressure-induced, magnetic transition in pyrrhotite: Implications for the formation pressure of meteorites and diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilder, S. A.; Egli, R.; Hochleitner, R.; Roud, S. C.; Volk, M.; Le Goff, M.; de Wit, M.

    2010-12-01

    Meteorites and diamonds encounter high-pressures during their geologic histories. These materials commonly contain magnetic inclusions of pyrrhotite, and because magnetic properties are sensitive to strain, pyrrhotite can potentially record the shock or formation pressures of its host. Moreover, pyrrhotite undergoes a pressure-induced phase transition between 1.6 and 6.2 GPa, but the magnetic signature of this transition is poorly known. Here we report magnetic measurements performed at high-pressures on single and multi-domain pyrrhotite. A magnetic hysteresis model based on our observations suggests that multidomain pyrrhotite transforms into single domain-like material, and once in the single domain state, hysteresis loops become progressively squarer and then squatter with increasing pressure, until they ultimately collapse approaching the paramagnetic state at the transition. The ratio of the bulk magnetic coercive force to magnetic remanence for pure pyrrhotite is reversible with pressure and follows a logarithmic law as a function of pressure, which can be used as a magnetic barometer for natural systems.

  4. Polar format statistical image processing based fiber optic pressure sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alver, Muhammed B.; Toker, Onur; Fidanboylu, Kemal

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents detailed study on the development of a fiber optic sensor system to design a pressure sensor with different sensor configurations. The sensor used in the experiments is based on modal power distribution (MPD) technique. MPD technique is spatial modulation of the modal power in multimode fibers. Stress measurements and CCD camera based techniques were investigated in this research. Differently from earlier MPD works, all of the data gathered from CCD camera are used instead of using some part of the data, the ring shaped pictures taken from the CCD camera converted to polar coordinates, and so stripe shaped pictures are obtained. Four different features are calculated from these converted pictures. R component of the center of mass in the polar form is the first feature. It is calculated because it was expected to decrease monotonically with respect to increasing applied pressure. Second and third features are ring thickness in polar form with taking brightness of each pixel into account and ring thickness in polar form without taking brightness of each pixel into account. These features are calculated to analyze the effect of each pixel's brightness. It was expected for these two features that there will not be a big margin between them. Fourth feature is the ratio between third feature and first feature. A MATLAB code is written to correlate these features and applied force to the sensor. Various experiments conducted to analyze this correlation. Pictures are taken from CCD camera with 1 kg steps and from the written MATLAB code, graphics of each feature versus the applied force are generated. Experimental results showed that, the sensitivity of the proposed sensor is much higher than sensors that uses only some part of the collected data in earlier MPD studies. Furthermore, results are almost exactly the same that what was expected for the four proposed features. Results also showed that converting pictures to the polar form increases the

  5. Effect of plasticity and atmospheric pressure on the formation of donut- and croissantlike buckles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamade, S.; Durinck, J.; Parry, G.; Coupeau, C.; Cimetière, A.; Grilhé, J.; Colin, J.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of donut- and croissantlike buckles has been observed onto the free surface of gold thin films deposited on silicon substrates. Numerical simulations clearly evidence that the coupling effect between the atmospheric pressure acting on the free surface and the plastic folding of the ductile film is responsible for the circular blister destabilization and the formation of the donut- and croissantlike buckling patterns.

  6. Adhesive tablet effective for treating canker sores in humans.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, Boaz; Golenser, Jacob; Wolnerman, Joseph S; Domb, Abraham J

    2004-12-01

    A new mucoadhesive tablet, which releases natural active agents for pain reduction and rapid healing of canker sores, has been prepared and characterized. Adhesive tablets were prepared by compression molding of mixed powders of crosslinked polyacrylic acid and hydroxypropyl cellulose, absorbed with citrus oil and magnesium salt. The rate of tablet erosion and the rates of citrus oil and magnesium release were determined as well as the adhesiveness of the tablet using bovine gingival tissue and an Instron tensiometer. A clinical trial was conducted on 248 volunteers who had canker sores. Tablets adhere well to the mucosal tissue and gradually erode for 8 h releasing the citrus oil in a zero-order pattern whereas the magnesium is released during a period of 2 h. Both experimental and plain tablets were effective in reducing pain and decreasing healing time (p < 0.05) without adverse side effects. However, the tablets loaded with active agents were more effective. PMID:15459950

  7. Soot formation and temperature field structure in laminar propane-air diffusion flames at elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Bento, Decio S.; Guelder, OEmer L.; Thomson, Kevin A.

    2006-06-15

    The effect of pressure on soot formation and the structure of the temperature field was studied in coflow propane-air laminar diffusion flames over the pressure range of 0.1 to 0.73 MPa in a high-pressure combustion chamber. The fuel flow rate was selected so that the soot was completely oxidized within the visible flame and the flame was stable at all pressures. Spectral soot emission was used to measure radially resolved soot volume fraction and soot temperature as a function of pressure. Additional soot volume fraction measurements were made at selected heights using line-of-sight light attenuation. Soot concentration values from these two techniques agreed to within 30% and both methods exhibited similar trends in the spatial distribution of soot concentration. Maximum line-of-sight soot concentration along the flame centerline scaled with pressure; the pressure exponent was about 1.4 for pressures between 0.2 and 0.73 MPa. Peak carbon conversion to soot, defined as the percentage of fuel carbon content converted to soot, also followed a power-law dependence on pressure, where the pressure exponent was near to unity for pressures between 0.2 and 0.73 MPa. Soot temperature measurements indicated that the overall temperatures decreased with increasing pressure; however, the temperature gradients increased with increasing pressure. (author)

  8. Laminar plume formation by high pressure CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadal, Francois; Meunier, Patrice; Pouligny, Bernard; Laurichesse, Eric

    2012-11-01

    Convection flows have often revealed the presence of plumes, especially in the earth's mantle where the Schmidt number is large. There has thus been a large number of studies on plumes created by a point source. However, there are very few results on plumes generated by an extended source. Here, we present experimental, numerical and theoretical results on the flow created by high pressure CO2 dissolved into distilled water. The thin layer of dense fluid created at the surface destabilizes through the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and leads to a laminar and parallel stationary plume. The plume width and amplitude are measured by Particle Image Velocimetry for various aspect ratios, Bond and Rayleigh numbers. They are in good agreement with the numerical result if a no-slip boundary condition is assumed at the free surface. Finally, the theory for a plume generated by a point source is adapted for an extended source, which leads to different scaling exponents (with a logarithmic dependence), in excellent agreement with the experimental and numerical results. This study thus provides a simple and accurate description of axisymmetric plumes generated by an extended source.

  9. JET FORMATION FROM MASSIVE YOUNG STARS: MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS VERSUS RADIATION PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Bhargav; Porth, Oliver; Fendt, Christian; Beuther, Henrik E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2011-11-20

    Observations indicate that outflows from massive young stars are more collimated during their early evolution compared to later stages. Our paper investigates various physical processes that impact the outflow dynamics, i.e., its acceleration and collimation. We perform axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations particularly considering the radiation pressure exerted by the star and the disk. We have modified the PLUTO code to include radiative forces in the line-driving approximation. We launch the outflow from the innermost disk region (r < 50 AU) by magnetocentrifugal acceleration. In order to disentangle MHD effects from radiative forces, we start the simulation in pure MHD and later switch on the radiation force. We perform a parameter study considering different stellar masses (thus luminosity), magnetic flux, and line-force strength. For our reference simulation-assuming a 30 M{sub Sun} star-we find substantial de-collimation of 35% due to radiation forces. The opening angle increases from 20 Degree-Sign to 32 Degree-Sign for stellar masses from 20 M{sub Sun} to 60 M{sub Sun }. A small change in the line-force parameter {alpha} from 0.60 to 0.55 changes the opening angle by {approx}8 Degree-Sign . We find that it is mainly the stellar radiation that affects the jet dynamics. Unless the disk extends very close to the star, its force is too small to have much impact. Essentially, our parameter runs with different stellar masses can be understood as a proxy for the time evolution of the star-outflow system. Thus, we have shown that when the stellar mass (thus luminosity) increases with age, the outflows become less collimated.

  10. Self-regulating galaxy formation. I - H II disk and Lyman-alpha pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. P.

    1985-01-01

    The nascent interstellar medium and star formation model are incorporated into a scenario for the formation epoch of spiral galaxies. The structure, star formation time scale, and luminosity of a self-gravitating isothermal disk are evaluated as functions of the disk surface density. The importance of radiation pressure, particularly that of Lyman-alpha, in maintaining an inflated disk and halting infall is discussed. The Lyman-alpha pressure also supports a considerable halo of material in the vicinity of the disk. A first-order infall scenario and the time-dependent properties of the system it constructs are presented. Disk properties are evaluated at the epoch at which further material is supportable against infall by Lyman-alpha pressure. The two-dimensional family of disk galaxies whose scales and surface density are expressible in terms of fundamental constants and which arise from the three parameter sets of perturbations in the Hubble flow are determined.

  11. A NEW MECHANISM FOR MASS ACCRETION UNDER RADIATION PRESSURE IN MASSIVE STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2010-05-01

    During the formation of a massive star, strong radiation pressure from the central star acts on the dust sublimation front and tends to halt the accretion flow. To overcome this strong radiation pressure, it has been considered that a strong ram pressure produced by a high-mass accretion rate of 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} or more is needed. We reinvestigated the necessary condition to overcome the radiation pressure and found a new mechanism for overcoming it. Accumulated mass in a stagnant flow near the dust sublimation front helps the mass accretion by its weight. This mechanism relaxes the condition for the massive star formation. We call this mechanism the 'OMOSHI effect', where OMOSHI is an acronym for 'One Mechanism for Overcoming Stellar High radiation pressure by weIght'. Additionally, in Japanese, OMOSHI is a noun meaning a weight that is put on something to prevent it from moving. We investigate the generation of the OMOSHI effect using local one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations. The radiation pressure and the gravitational force are connected through the gas pressure, and to sum up, the radiation pressure is balanced or overcome by the gravitational force. We also discuss the global structure and temporal variation of the accretion flow.

  12. A New Mechanism for Mass Accretion Under Radiation Pressure in Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2010-05-01

    During the formation of a massive star, strong radiation pressure from the central star acts on the dust sublimation front and tends to halt the accretion flow. To overcome this strong radiation pressure, it has been considered that a strong ram pressure produced by a high-mass accretion rate of 10-3 M sun yr-1 or more is needed. We reinvestigated the necessary condition to overcome the radiation pressure and found a new mechanism for overcoming it. Accumulated mass in a stagnant flow near the dust sublimation front helps the mass accretion by its weight. This mechanism relaxes the condition for the massive star formation. We call this mechanism the "OMOSHI effect," where OMOSHI is an acronym for "One Mechanism for Overcoming Stellar High radiation pressure by weIght." Additionally, in Japanese, OMOSHI is a noun meaning a weight that is put on something to prevent it from moving. We investigate the generation of the OMOSHI effect using local one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations. The radiation pressure and the gravitational force are connected through the gas pressure, and to sum up, the radiation pressure is balanced or overcome by the gravitational force. We also discuss the global structure and temporal variation of the accretion flow.

  13. The effect of ram pressure on the star formation, mass distribution and morphology of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapferer, Wolfgang; Schindler, Sabine; Ziegler, Bodo; Ferrari, Chiara

    We investigate the dependence of star formation and the distribution of the components of galaxies on the strength of ram pressure. Several mock observations in X-ray, H and HI wavelength for different ram-pressure scenarios are presented. By applying a combined N-body/hydrodynamic description (GADGET-2) with radiative cooling and a recipe for star formation and stellar feedback 12 different ram-pressure stripping scenarios for disc galaxies were calculated. Special emphasis was put on the gas within the disc and in the surroundings. The star formation of a galaxy is enhanced by more than a magnitude in the simulation with a high ram-pressure (5 x 10-11 dyn/cm2 ) in comparison to the same system evolving in isolation. The enhancement of the star formation depends more on the surrounding gas density than on the relative velocity. Up to 95% of all newly formed stars can be found in the wake of the galaxy out to distances of more than 350 kpc behind the stellar disc. Continuously stars fall back to the old stellar disc, building up a bulge-like structure. Young stars can be found throughout the stripped wake with surface densities locally comparable to values in the inner stellar disc. Ram-pressure stripping can shift the location of star formation from the disc into the wake on very short timescales. As the gas in a galaxy has a complex velocity pattern due to the rotation and spiral arms, the superposition of the internal velocity field and the ram pressure causes complex structures in the gaseous wake which survive dynamically up to several 100 Myr. Fi-nally we provide simulated X-ray, Hα and HI observations to be able to compare our results with observations in these wavebands. These simulated observations show many features which depend strongly both on the strength and the duration of the external ram pressure.

  14. Control of tetrahedron satellite formation flying in the geosynchronous orbit using solar radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yong-Gang; Zhang, Ming-Jiang; Zhao, Chang-Yin; Sun, Rong-Yu

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the control of tetrahedron satellite formation flying in the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) using solar radiation pressure is investigated. The long term disturbing effect of the main zonal and tesseral harmonics J2 and J_{22} of the geopotential are eliminated by adjusting the initial orbital elements, and a tetrahedron satellite formation flying in the GEO is designed. Then a control system using solar radiation pressure is further proposed to maintain the tetrahedron satellite formation, in which a sliding mode control (SMC) is developed to determine the control force. The control force is acquired from the solar sails equipped on the satellites, and the final control law and strategy using solar radiation pressure are presented. Moreover, three kinds of numerical simulations are especially given to verify the validity of the control system using solar radiation. It shows that Laplace precession of the GEO satellite can be avoided effectively, and the in-plane and out-of-plane errors of the formation can be eliminated easily. And hence the control of tetrahedron satellite formation flying in the GEO using solar radiation pressure is proved to be feasible.

  15. Effect of plasticity and atmospheric pressure on the formation of donut- and croissantlike buckles.

    PubMed

    Hamade, S; Durinck, J; Parry, G; Coupeau, C; Cimetière, A; Grilhé, J; Colin, J

    2015-01-01

    The formation of donut- and croissantlike buckles has been observed onto the free surface of gold thin films deposited on silicon substrates. Numerical simulations clearly evidence that the coupling effect between the atmospheric pressure acting on the free surface and the plastic folding of the ductile film is responsible for the circular blister destabilization and the formation of the donut- and croissantlike buckling patterns. PMID:25679631

  16. Injection well with high-pressure, high-temperature in situ down-hole steam formation

    SciTech Connect

    Marr, A.W.

    1981-12-01

    A portion of an injection well adjacent an oil-bearing earth formation is sealed off by spaced-apart high-pressure-resistant plugs, and water is charged into the bore-hole space between the plugs at a sufficient rate to effect sustained water pressure in the range of from 400 to 25,000 psi. Under such pressure sufficient current is passed between two electrodes in the water to convert from 10 to 33 barrels of water per hour into steam.

  17. Life threatening complication of sore throat: Lemierre's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khan, Arif; Ganesan, Subramanian; Arora, Manish; Hussain, Nahin

    2013-12-01

    The authors report a case of previously healthy toddler who presented with acute sore throat that led to bacteremia, septic shock, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, encephalopathy and pleural effusion. Magnetic resonance imaging and venogram showed thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. He was successfully treated with antibiotics and low molecular weight heparin. The authors review the literature and explore the presentation, management and the role of anticoagulation in this condition. To the authors' knowledge, this is one of the youngest patient reports with this condition in the literature. PMID:23275185

  18. Pressure-controlled formation of crystalline, Janus, and core-shell supraparticles.

    PubMed

    Kister, Thomas; Mravlak, Marko; Schilling, Tanja; Kraus, Tobias

    2016-07-21

    Binary mixtures of nanoparticles self-assemble in the confinement of evaporating oil droplets and form regular supraparticles. We demonstrate that moderate pressure differences on the order of 100 kPa change the particles' self-assembly behavior. Crystalline superlattices, Janus particles, and core-shell particle arrangements form in the same dispersions when changing the working pressure or the surfactant that sets the Laplace pressure inside the droplets. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that pressure-dependent interparticle potentials affect the self-assembly route of the confined particles. Optical spectrometry, small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy are used to compare experiments and simulations and confirm that the onset of self-assembly depends on particle size and pressure. The overall formation mechanism reminds of the demixing of binary alloys with different phase diagrams. PMID:27340805

  19. Pressure Dependence and Metastable State Formation in the Photolysis of Dichlorine Monoxide (Cl2O)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickolaisen, Scott; Miller, Charles; Sander, Stanley; Hand, Michael; Williams, Ian; Francisco, Joseph

    1995-01-01

    Physics%K photolysis, dichlorine monoxide, pressure%U http://techreports.jpl.nasa.gov/1995/95-0924.pdfThe photodissociation of dichlorine monoxide (Cl2O) was studied using broadband flash photolysis to investigate the influence of variations in the photolysis wavelength domain, bath gas pressure, and bath gas identity on the yield and temporal dependence of the ClO product. ClO yields were independent of bath gas pressure when the photolysis spectral band extended to 200 nm (quartz cutoff) but for photolysis restricted to wavelengths longer than about 250 nm, ClO yields decreased with increasing bath gas pressure and there was a pressure-dependent delay in the formation of ClO.!.

  20. Pressure-controlled formation of crystalline, Janus, and core-shell supraparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kister, Thomas; Mravlak, Marko; Schilling, Tanja; Kraus, Tobias

    2016-07-01

    Binary mixtures of nanoparticles self-assemble in the confinement of evaporating oil droplets and form regular supraparticles. We demonstrate that moderate pressure differences on the order of 100 kPa change the particles' self-assembly behavior. Crystalline superlattices, Janus particles, and core-shell particle arrangements form in the same dispersions when changing the working pressure or the surfactant that sets the Laplace pressure inside the droplets. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that pressure-dependent interparticle potentials affect the self-assembly route of the confined particles. Optical spectrometry, small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy are used to compare experiments and simulations and confirm that the onset of self-assembly depends on particle size and pressure. The overall formation mechanism reminds of the demixing of binary alloys with different phase diagrams.Binary mixtures of nanoparticles self-assemble in the confinement of evaporating oil droplets and form regular supraparticles. We demonstrate that moderate pressure differences on the order of 100 kPa change the particles' self-assembly behavior. Crystalline superlattices, Janus particles, and core-shell particle arrangements form in the same dispersions when changing the working pressure or the surfactant that sets the Laplace pressure inside the droplets. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that pressure-dependent interparticle potentials affect the self-assembly route of the confined particles. Optical spectrometry, small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy are used to compare experiments and simulations and confirm that the onset of self-assembly depends on particle size and pressure. The overall formation mechanism reminds of the demixing of binary alloys with different phase diagrams. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C6NR01940D

  1. Plasma formation in atmospheric pressure helium discharges under different background air pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yaoge; Hao Yanpeng; Zheng Bin

    2012-09-15

    Atmospheric pressure glow discharges generated between parallel-plate electrodes in helium have been characterized using temporally resolved emission spectra. The variation of typical spectral lines over time has been analyzed. In helium with a low concentration of N{sub 2}, the emission of He at 706.5 nm is dominant and appears 500 ns earlier than N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative bands, indicating low reaction rates of Penning ionization and charge transfer in the initial stage. During the decay, it is the Penning ionization caused by He metastables with a long lifetime rather than the charge transfer reaction that leads to the long decay of N{sub 2}{sup +} emissions. When helium contains a higher concentration of N{sub 2} molecules, the N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative bands become the most intense, and emissions from He, N{sub 2}{sup +}, and O exhibit similar behavior as they increase. The emissions last for a shorter time under such conditions because of rapid consumption of He metastables and He{sub 2}{sup +}.

  2. Glass formation and cluster evolution in the rapidly solidified monatomic metallic liquid Ta under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dejun; Wen, Dadong; Tian, Zean; Liu, Rangsu

    2016-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to examine the glass formation and cluster evolution during the rapid solidification of monatomic metallic liquid Ta under high pressure. The atomic structures in the systems are characterized by the radical distribution function (RDF), Honeycutt-Anderson (H-A) bond-type index method and cluster-type index method (CTIM). It is observed that the defective icosahedra play the critical role in the formation of Ta monatomic metallic glasses (MGs) rather than (12 0 12 0) perfect icosahedra, which have been identified as the basic local atomic units in many multi-component MGs. With the increase of pressure P, the fraction of icosahedral type clusters decreases remarkably in Ta MGs, while the fraction of bcc type clusters rises evidently. The evolution of vitrification degree (DSRO or DMRO) of the rapidly cooled metal Ta system further reveals that a higher pressure P is disadvantageous to the formation of Ta monatomic MGs. The weaker glass forming ability (GFA) of liquid metal Ta obtained under higher pressure P can be contributed to the decrease of DSRO or DMRO which is induced by increasing high pressure P to some extent.

  3. Rogue wave formation under the action of quasi-stationary pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrashkin, A. A.; Oshmarina, O. E.

    2016-05-01

    The process of rogue wave formation on deep water is considered. A wave of extreme amplitude is born against the background of uniform waves (Gerstner waves) under the action of external pressure on free surface. The pressure distribution has a form of a quasi-stationary "pit". The fluid motion is supposed to be a vortex one and is described by an exact solution of equations of 2D hydrodynamics for an ideal fluid in Lagrangian coordinates. Liquid particles are moving around circumferences of different radii in the absence of drift flow. Values of amplitude and wave steepness optimal for rogue wave formation are found numerically. The influence of vorticity distribution and pressure drop on parameters of the fluid is investigated.

  4. OMOSHI Effect: A New Mechanism for Mass Accretion under the Radiation Pressure in Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kei; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2009-08-01

    In a massive-star formation process, a high-mass accretion rate is considered to be needed to overcome the strong radiation pressure at the dust sublimation front. We examined the accretion structure near the dust sublimation front and found a new mechanism to overcome this radiation pressure. The weight of the accumulated mass in a stagnant flow near the dust sublimation front helps with the mass accretion. We call this mechanism the ``OMOSHI effect,'' where OMOSHI is an acronym for ``One Mechanism for Overcoming Stellar High radiation pressure by weight.'' OMOSHI is also a Japanese noun meaning a weight that is put on something to prevent it from moving. This mechanism relaxes the condition for the massive star formation.

  5. Pressure-dependent formation of i-motif and G-quadruplex DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Sugimoto, N

    2015-12-14

    Pressure is an important physical stimulus that can influence the fate of cells by causing structural changes in biomolecules such as DNA. We investigated the effect of high pressure on the folding of duplex, DNA i-motif, and G-quadruplex (G4) structures; the non-canonical structures may be modulators of expression of genes involved in cancer progression. The i-motif structure was stabilized by high pressure, whereas the G4 structure was destabilized. The melting temperature of an intramolecular i-motif formed by 5'-dCGG(CCT)10CGG-3' increased from 38.8 °C at atmospheric pressure to 61.5 °C at 400 MPa. This effect was also observed in the presence of 40 wt% ethylene glycol, a crowding agent. In the presence of 40 wt% ethylene glycol, the G4 structure was less destabilized than in the absence of the crowding agent. P-T stability diagrams of duplex DNA with a telomeric sequence indicated that the duplex is more stable than G4 and i-motif structures under low pressure, but the i-motif dominates the structural composition under high pressure. Under crowding conditions, the P-T diagrams indicated that the duplex does not form under high pressure, and i-motif and G4 structures dominate. Our findings imply that temperature regulates the formation of the duplex structure, whereas pressure triggers the formation of non-canonical DNA structures like i-motif and G4. These results suggest that pressure impacts the function of nucleic acids by stabilizing non-canonical structures; this may be relevant to deep sea organisms and during evolution under prebiotic conditions. PMID:26387909

  6. The nursing rounds system: effect of patient's call light use, bed sores, fall and satisfaction level.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Bassem S; Nusair, Hussam; Al Zubadi, Nariman; Al Shloul, Shams; Saleh, Usama

    2011-06-01

    The nursing round system (NRS) means checking patients on an hourly basis during the A (0700-2200 h) shift and once every 2 h during the B (2200-0700 h) by the assigned nursing staff. The overall goal of this prospective study is to implement an NRS in a major rehabilitation centre-Sultan Bin Abdulaziz Humanitarian City-in the Riyadh area of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The purposes of this study are to measure the effect of the NRS on: (i) the use of patient call light; (ii) the number of incidences of patients' fall; (iii) the number of incidences of hospital-acquired bed sores; and (iv) the level of patients' satisfaction. All patients hospitalized in the male stroke unit will be involved in this study. For the period of 8 weeks (17 December 2009-17 February 2010) All Nursing staff on the unit will record each call light and the patient's need. Implementation of the NRS would start on 18 February 2010 and last for 8 weeks, until 18 April 2010. Data collected throughout this period will be compared with data collected during the 8 weeks period immediately preceding the implementation of the NRS (17 December 2009-17 February 2010) in order to measure the impact of the call light use. The following information were collected on all subjects involved in the study: (i) the Demographic Information Form; (ii) authors' developed NRS Audit Form; (iii) Patient Call Light Audit Form; (iv) Patient Fall Audit Record; (v) Hospital-Acquired Bed Sores Audit Form; and (vi) hospital developed Patient Satisfaction Records. The findings suggested that a significant reduction on the use of call bell (P < 0.001), a significant reduction of fall incidence (P < 0.01) while pressure ulcer reduced by 50% before and after the implementation of NRS. Also, the implementation of NRS increased patient satisfaction by 7/5 (P < 0.05). PMID:21605271

  7. Effects of hydrogen partial pressure on autotrophic growth and product formation of Acetobacterium woodii.

    PubMed

    Kantzow, Christina; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2016-08-01

    Low aqueous solubility of the gases for autotrophic fermentations (e.g., hydrogen gas) results in low productivities in bioreactors. A frequently suggested approach to overcome mass transfer limitation is to increase the solubility of the limiting gas in the reaction medium by increasing the partial pressure in the gas phase. An increased inlet hydrogen partial pressure of up to 2.1 bar (total pressure of 3.5 bar) was applied for the autotrophic conversion of hydrogen and carbon dioxide with Acetobacterium woodii in a batch-operated stirred-tank bioreactor with continuous gas supply. Compared to the autotrophic batch process with an inlet hydrogen partial pressure of 0.4 bar (total pressure of 1.0 bar) the final acetate concentration after 3.1 days was reduced to 50 % (29.2 g L(-1) compared to 59.3 g L(-1)), but the final formate concentration was increased by a factor of 18 (7.3 g L(-1) compared to 0.4 g L(-1)). Applying recombinant A. woodii strains overexpressing either genes for enzymes in the methyl branch of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway or the genes phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase at an inlet hydrogen partial pressure of 1.4 bar reduced the final formate concentration by up to 40 % and increased the final dry cell mass and acetate concentrations compared to the wild type strain. Solely the overexpression of the two genes for ATP regeneration at the end of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway resulted in an initial switch off of formate production at increased hydrogen partial pressure until the maximum of the hydrogen uptake rate was reached. PMID:27059835

  8. 21 CFR 201.315 - Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Specific Labeling Requirements for Specific Drug Products § 201.315 Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning. The Food...

  9. 21 CFR 201.315 - Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Specific Labeling Requirements for Specific Drug Products § 201.315 Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning. The Food...

  10. 21 CFR 201.315 - Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats... Drug Products § 201.315 Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning. The Food and... anesthetic, chewing gum containing aspirin, various mouth washes and gargles and other articles sold over...

  11. 21 CFR 201.315 - Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats... Drug Products § 201.315 Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning. The Food and... anesthetic, chewing gum containing aspirin, various mouth washes and gargles and other articles sold over...

  12. 21 CFR 201.315 - Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats... Drug Products § 201.315 Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning. The Food and... anesthetic, chewing gum containing aspirin, various mouth washes and gargles and other articles sold over...

  13. An unusual case of a sore throat and otalgia in a 4-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Siupšinskienė, Nora; Padervinskis, Evaldas; Poškienė, Lina; Endeley, Nganjo; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2012-01-01

    A sore throat, otalgia, and snoring are the common symptoms seen in children presenting to an otorhinolaryngological clinic. Sometimes, however, these symptoms may be suggestive of an aggressive malignancy. We present a rare case of Burkitt's lymphoma of the tonsil in a young child, which initially manifested as a sore throat and otalgia. PMID:22864276

  14. Silicon nitride-aluminum oxide solid solution (SiAION) formation and densification by pressure sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. C.; Sanders, W. A.; Fiyalko, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Stirred-ball-mill-blended Si3N4 and Al2O3 powders were pressure sintered in order to investigate the mechanism of solid solution formation and densification in the Si3N4-Al2O3 system. Powder blends with Si3N4:Al2O3 mole ratios of 4:1, 3:2, and 2:3 were pressure sintered at 27.6-MN/sq m pressure at temperatures to 17000 C (3090 F). The compaction behavior of the powder blends during pressure sintering was determined by observing the density of the powder compact as a function of temperature and time starting from room temperature. This information, combined with the results of X-ray diffraction and metallographic analyses regarding solutioning and phase transformation phenomena in the Si3N4-Al2O3 system, was used to describe the densification behavior.

  15. Does Pressure Accentuate General Relativistic Gravitational Collapse and Formation of Trapped Surfaces?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Abhas

    2013-04-01

    It is widely believed that though pressure resists gravitational collapse in Newtonian gravity, it aids the same in general relativity (GR) so that GR collapse should eventually be similar to the monotonous free fall case. But we show that, even in the context of radiationless adiabatic collapse of a perfect fluid, pressure tends to resist GR collapse in a manner which is more pronounced than the corresponding Newtonian case and formation of trapped surfaces is inhibited. In fact there are many works which show such collapse to rebound or become oscillatory implying a tug of war between attractive gravity and repulsive pressure gradient. Furthermore, for an imperfect fluid, the resistive effect of pressure could be significant due to likely dramatic increase of tangential pressure beyond the "photon sphere." Indeed, with inclusion of tangential pressure, in principle, there can be static objects with surface gravitational redshift z → ∞. Therefore, pressure can certainly oppose gravitational contraction in GR in a significant manner in contradiction to the idea of Roger Penrose that GR continued collapse must be unstoppable.

  16. Effect of negative pressure on growth, secretion and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Li, Tongtong; Wang, Guoqi; Yin, Peng; Li, Zhirui; Zhang, Licheng; Liu, Jianheng; Li, Ming; Zhang, Lihai; Han, Li; Tang, Peifu

    2015-10-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has gained popularity in the management of contaminated wounds as an effective physical therapy, although its influence on the bacteria in the wounds remains unclear. In this study, we attempted to explore the effect of negative pressure conditions on Staphylococcus aureus, the most frequently isolated pathogen during wound infection. S. aureus was cultured in Luria-Bertani medium at subatmospheric pressure of -125 mmHg for 24 h, with the bacteria grown at ambient pressure as the control. The application of negative pressure was found to slow down the growth rate and inhibit biofilm development of S. aureus, which was confirmed by static biofilm assays. Furthermore, decreases in the total amount of virulence factors and biofilm components were observed, including α-hemolysin, extracellular adherence protein, polysaccharide intercellular adhesin and extracellular DNA. With quantitative RT-PCR analysis, we also revealed a significant inhibition in the transcription of virulence and regulatory genes related to wound infections and bacterial biofilms. Together, these findings indicated that negative pressure could inhibit the growth, virulence and biofilm formation of S. aureus. A topical subatmospheric pressure condition, such as NPWT, may be a potential antivirulence and antibiofilm strategy in the field of wound care. PMID:26272011

  17. TURBULENCE SETS THE INITIAL CONDITIONS FOR STAR FORMATION IN HIGH-PRESSURE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Rathborne, J. M.; Contreras, Y.; Longmore, S. N.; Bastian, N.; Jackson, J. M.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Alves, J. F.; Bally, J.; Foster, J. B.; Garay, G.; Testi, L.; Walsh, A. J.

    2014-11-10

    Despite the simplicity of theoretical models of supersonically turbulent, isothermal media, their predictions successfully match the observed gas structure and star formation activity within low-pressure (P/k < 10{sup 5} K cm{sup –3}) molecular clouds in the solar neighborhood. However, it is unknown whether or not these theories extend to clouds in high-pressure (P/k > 10{sup 7} K cm{sup –3}) environments, like those in the Galaxy's inner 200 pc central molecular zone (CMZ) and in the early universe. Here, we present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array 3 mm dust continuum emission within a cloud, G0.253+0.016, which is immersed in the high-pressure environment of the CMZ. While the log-normal shape and dispersion of its column density probability distribution function (PDF) are strikingly similar to those of solar neighborhood clouds, there is one important quantitative difference: its mean column density is one to two orders of magnitude higher. Both the similarity and difference in the PDF compared to those derived from solar neighborhood clouds match predictions of turbulent cloud models given the high-pressure environment of the CMZ. The PDF shows a small deviation from log-normal at high column densities confirming the youth of G0.253+0.016. Its lack of star formation is consistent with the theoretically predicted, environmentally dependent volume density threshold for star formation which is orders of magnitude higher than that derived for solar neighborhood clouds. Our results provide the first empirical evidence that the current theoretical understanding of molecular cloud structure derived from the solar neighborhood also holds in high-pressure environments. We therefore suggest that these theories may be applicable to understand star formation in the early universe.

  18. The effect of ram pressure on the star formation, mass distribution and morphology of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapferer, W.; Sluka, C.; Schindler, S.; Ferrari, C.; Ziegler, B.

    2009-05-01

    Aims: We investigate the dependence of star formation and the distribution of the components of galaxies on the strength of ram pressure. Several mock observations in X-ray, Hα and HI wavelength for different ram-pressure scenarios are presented. Methods: By applying a combined N-body/hydrodynamic description (GADGET-2) with radiative cooling and a recipe for star formation and stellar feedback 12 different ram-pressure stripping scenarios for disc galaxies were calculated. Special emphasis was put on the gas within the disc and in the surroundings. All gas particles within the computational domain having the same mass resolution. The relative velocity was varied from 100 km s-1 to 1000 km s-1 in different surrounding gas densities in the range from 1 × 10-28 to 5 × 10-27 g/cm^3. The temperature of the surrounding gas was initially 1 × 107 K. Results: The star formation of a galaxy is enhanced by more than a magnitude in the simulation with a high ram-pressure (5 × 10-11 dyn/cm^2) in comparison to the same system evolving in isolation. The enhancement of the star formation depends more on the surrounding gas density than on the relative velocity. Up to 95% of all newly formed stars can be found in the wake of the galaxy out to distances of more than 350 kpc behind the stellar disc. Continuously stars fall back to the old stellar disc, building up a bulge-like structure. Young stars can be found throughout the stripped wake with surface densities locally comparable to values in the inner stellar disc. Ram-pressure stripping can shift the location of star formation from the disc into the wake on very short timescales. As the gas in a galaxy has a complex velocity pattern due to the rotation and spiral arms, the superposition of the internal velocity field and the ram pressure causes complex structures in the gaseous wake which survive dynamically up to several 100 Myr. Finally we provide simulated X-ray, Hα and HI observations to be able to compare our results

  19. Pressure-temperature evolution of Neoproterozoic metamorphism in the Welayati Formation (Kabul Block), Afghanistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, Stephen; Faryad, Shah Wali

    2015-11-01

    The Welayati Formation, consisting of alternating layers of mica-schist and quartzite with lenses of amphibolite, unconformably overlies the Neoarchean Sherdarwaza Formation of the Kabul Block that underwent Paleoproterozoic granulite-facies and Neoproterozoic amphibolite-facies metamorphic events. To analyze metamorphic history of the Welayati Formation and its relations to the underlying Sherdarwaza Formation, petrographic study and pressure-temperature (P-T) pseudosection modeling were applied to staurolite- and kyanite-bearing mica-schists, which crop out to the south of Kabul City. Prograde metamorphism, identified by inclusion trails and chemical zonation in garnet from the micaschists indicates that the rocks underwent burial from around 6.2 kbar at 525 °C to maximum pressure conditions of around 9.5 kbar at temperatures of around 650 °C. Decompression from peak pressures under isothermal or moderate heating conditions are indicated by formation of biotite and plagioclase porphyroblasts which cross-cut and overgrow the dominant foliation. The lack of sillimanite and/or andalusite suggests that cooling and further decompression occurred in the kyanite stability field. The results of this study indicate a single amphibolite-facies metamorphism that based on P-T conditions and age dating correlates well with the Neoproterozoic metamorphism in the underlying Sherdarwaza Formation. The rocks lack any paragenetic evidence for a preceding granulite-facies overprint or subsequent Paleozoic metamorphism. Owing to the position of the Kabul Block, within the India-Eurasia collision zone, partial replacement of the amphibolite-facies minerals in the micaschist could, in addition to retrogression of the Neoproterozoic metamorphism, relate to deformation associated with the Alpine orogeny.

  20. The formation of chondrules at high gas pressures in the solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Galy, A; Young, E D; Ash, R D; O'Nions, R K

    2000-12-01

    High-precision magnesium isotope measurements of whole chondrules from the Allende carbonaceous chondrite meteorite show that some aluminum-rich Allende chondrules formed at or near the time of formation of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions and that some others formed later and incorporated precursors previously enriched in magnesium-26. Chondrule magnesium-25/magnesium-24 correlates with [magnesium]/[aluminum] and size, the aluminum-rich, smaller chondrules being the most enriched in the heavy isotopes of magnesium. These relations imply that high gas pressures prevailed during chondrule formation in the solar nebula. PMID:11099410

  1. Reconsidering sore throats. Part I: Problems with current clinical practice.

    PubMed Central

    McIsaac, W. J.; Goel, V.; Slaughter, P. M.; Parsons, G. W.; Woolnough, K. V.; Weir, P. T.; Ennet, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide evidence-based answers to clinical questions posed by family physicians about Group A streptococcus pharyngitis and to further understanding of why management is controversial. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Evidence from randomized trials was not found for most questions. The most critical information came from high-quality community prevalence studies and criterion standard studies of physician clinical judgement. MAIN FINDINGS: Expert recommendations for physician management are not likely to help prevent rheumatic fever, as most people with sore throats do not seek medical care. Current clinical practices result in overuse of antibiotics because accuracy of clinical judgment is limited. CONCLUSIONS: Costs associated with visits for upper respiratory infections as well as increasing antibiotic resistance necessitate reconsidering the current clinical approach. An alternative management strategy is presented in part 2. PMID:9116520

  2. Formation processes of nanometer sized particles in low pressure Ar/CH{sub 4} rf plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Beckers, J.; Vacaresse, G. D. G. J.; Stoffels, W. W.

    2008-09-07

    In this paper, formation and growth processes of nanometer and micrometer sized dust particles in low pressure Ar/CH{sub 4} rf (13.56 MHz) plasmas are investigated as function of temperature in the range 25-100 deg. C. During experiments the pressure was typically 0.8 mbar and the forward power to the plasma was {approx}70 Watt. Measuring the fundamental voltage, current and phase angle together with their harmonics (up to the fourth) gives a good method to monitor the creation and growth of these dust particles in time. Furthermore, laser light scattering measurements are performed to give information about the dust particle density. It has been shown that dust particle formation in these conditions depends greatly on temperature.

  3. Moist Heat or Dry Heat for Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Petrofsky, Jerrold; Berk, Lee; Bains, Gurinder; Khowailed, Iman Akef; Hui, Timothy; Granado, Michael; Laymon, Mike; Lee, Haneul

    2013-01-01

    Background Heat is commonly used in physical therapy following exercise induced delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Most heat modalities used in a clinical setting for DOMS are only applied for 5 to 20 minutes. This minimal heat exposure causes little, if any, change in deep tissue temperature. For this reason, long duration dry chemical heat packs are used at home to slowly and safely warm tissue and reduce potential heat damage while reducing pain associated from DOMS. Clinically, it has been shown that moist heat penetrates deep tissue faster than dry heat. Therefore, in home use chemical moist heat may be more efficacious than dry heat to provide pain relief and reduce tissue damage following exercise DOMS. However, chemical moist heat only lasts for 2 hours compared to the 8 hours duration of chemical dry heat packs. The purpose of this study was to compare the beneficial effect of dry heat versus moist heat on 100 young subjects after exercise induce DOMS. Methods One hundred subjects exercised for 15 minutes accomplishing squats. Before and for 3 days after, strength, muscle soreness, tissue resistance, and the force to passively move the knee were recorded. Heat and moist heat were applied in different groups either immediately after exercise or 24 hours later. Results The research results of this study showed that immediate application of heat, either dry (8 hours application) or moist (2 hours application), had a similar preservation of quadriceps muscle strength and muscle activity. Results also revealed that the greatest pain reduction was shown after immediate application of moist heat. Never the less, immediate application of dry heat had a similar effect but to a lesser extent. Conclusion It should be noted that moist heat had not only similar benefits of dry heat but in some cases enhanced benefits, and with only 25% of the time of application of the dry heat. PMID:24171053

  4. Pressure broadening of the ((dt. mu. )dee)/sup */ formation resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.S.; Leon, M.; Padial, N.T.

    1988-01-01

    The treatment of ((dt..mu..)dee)/sup */ formation at high densities as a pressure broadening process is discussed. The quasistatic approximation is shown to satisfy the usual conditions of muon-catalyzed fusion better than does the impact approximation. Complete accurate results are shown for the impact approximation, and a preliminary rough treatment is presented to illustrate the quasistatic approximation. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Polymorphism and Formation Mechanism of Nanobipods in Manganese Sulfide Nanocrystals Induced by Temperature or Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xinyi; Wang, Yingnan; Wang, Kai; Sui, Yongming; Zhang, Meiguang; Li, Bing; Ma, Yanming; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Guangtian; Zou, Bo

    2012-03-15

    Manganese sulfide (MnS) nanocrystals (NCs) with three different phases were synthesized by one-pot solvent thermal approach. The crystal structures and morphologies were investigated using powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. We found that the crystal structure and morphology of MnS NCs could be controlled by simply varying the reaction temperature. The detailed growth process of MnS nanobipods, including the zinc blende (ZB)-core formation and wurtzite (WZ)-arms growth, provides direct experimental evidence for the polymorphism model. Furthermore, we have studied the stability of metastable ZB- and WZ-MnS NCs under high pressure and found that ZB-nanoparticles and ZB/WZ-nanobipods are stable below their critical pressure, 5.3 and 2.9 GPa, respectively. When pressures exceed the critical point, all these metastable MnS NCs directly convert to the stable rock salt MnS.

  6. Dipyrenylphosphatidylcholines as membrane fluidity probes. Pressure and temperature dependence of the intramolecular excimer formation rate.

    PubMed Central

    Sassaroli, M; Vauhkonen, M; Somerharju, P; Scarlata, S

    1993-01-01

    We have measured the pressure dependence of the intramolecular excimer formation rate, K(p), for di-(1'-pyrenedecanoyl)-phosphatidylcholine (dipy10PC) probes in single-component lipid multilamellar vesicles (MLV) as a function of temperature. Apparent volumes of activation (V(a)) for intramolecular excimer formation are obtained from the slopes of plots of log K(p) versus P. For liquid-crystalline saturated lipid MLV (DMPC and DPPC), these plots are linear and yield a unique V(a) at each temperature, whereas for unsaturated lipids (POPC and DOPC) they are curvilinear and V(a) appears to decrease with pressure. The isothermal pressure induced phase transition is marked by an abrupt drop in the values of K(p). The pressure to temperature equivalence values, dPm/dT, estimated from the midpoint of the transitions, are 47.0, 43.5, and 52.5 bar degree C-1 for DMPC, DPPC, and POPC, respectively. In liquid-crystalline DMPC, V(a) decreases linearly as a function of temperature, with a coefficient -dVa/dT = 0.65 +/- 0.11 ml degree C-1 mol-1. Using a modified free volume model of diffusion, we show that this value corresponds to the thermal expansivity of DMPC. Both the apparent energy and entropy of activation, Ea and delta Sa, increase with pressure in DMPC, whereas both decrease in POPC and DOPC. This difference is attributed to the sensitivity of the dynamics and/or packing of the dipy10PC probes to the location of the cis-double bonds in the chains of the unsaturated host phospholipids. Finally, the atmospheric pressure values of Ea and delta Sa for the four host MLV examined are shown to be linearly related. The relevance of this finding with respect to the structure of the excimers formed by the dipy10PC probes is briefly discussed. PMID:8431538

  7. Simulation of non-ionic surfactant micelle formation across a range of temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custer, Gregory; Das, Payel; Matysiak, Silvina

    Non-ionic surfactants can, at certain concentrations and thermodynamic conditions, aggregate into micelles due to their amphiphilic nature. Our work looks at the formation and behavior of micelles at extremes of temperature and pressure. Due to the large system size and simulation time required to study micelle formation, we have developed a coarse-grained (CG) model of our system. This CG model represents each heavy atom with a single CG bead. We use the multibody Stillinger-Weber potential, which adds a three-body angular penalty to a two-body potential, to emulate hydrogen bonds in the system. We simulate the linear surfactant C12E5 , which has a nonpolar domain of 12 carbons and a polar domain of 5 ethers. Our CG model has been parameterized to match structural properties from all-atom simulations of single and dimer surfactant systems. Simulations were performed using a concentration above the experimental critical micelle concentration at 300K and 1atm. We observe an expected region of stable micelle formation at intermediate temperature, with a breakdown at high and low temperature, as well as at high pressure. The driving forces behind the destabilization of micelles and the mechanism of micelle formation at different thermodynamic conditions will be discussed.

  8. Ionized gas pressure correlates with star formation intensity in nearby starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tianxing; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Yang, Huan

    2016-06-01

    We estimate the electron density of the ionized gas and thus the thermal pressure in HII regions; and compare that to the SFR (star formation rate) surface density for a combined sample of about 40 green peas and Lyman Break Analogs at z < 0.30. The electron density of the ionized gas is measured from sulfur line ratio ([SII] 6716 / 6731). We find that the SFR surface density is correlated with the electron density and the thermal pressure in HII regions for the star-forming galaxies with SFR surface density above a certain threshold. This work shows quantitatively the correlation between SFR surface density and electron density and that between SFR surface density and the thermal pressure in HII regions for the nearby starburst galaxies. This is consistent with theoretical models of disks (e.g. Kim et al. (2011) if we assume that the thermal pressure in HII regions is comparable to the total diffuse gas pressure at the midplane of the diffuse neutral gas. It is also in agreement with the results from star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2.5. We might infer that the starburst galaxies at low-redshift (z < 0.3) share similar physical properties to the galaxies at high redshift (z ~ 2.5).

  9. Study the formation mechanism of silicon carbide polytype by silicon carbide nanobelts sintered under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guodong; Zhang, Guangqian; Gao, Fenmei; Zheng, Jinju; Qin, Yanfen; Han, Wei; Qin, Weiping; Yang, Weiyou

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, in order to reveal the formation mechanism of SiC polytype, four SiC specimens sintered under high pressure has been investigated, after being prepared from SiC nanobelts as initial powders. The structure and morphology variation dependence of SiC specimens with temperature and pressure was studied based on experimental data obtained by XRD, SEM, and Raman. The results show that SiC lattice structure and the crystallite size are greatly affected by pressure between 2 and 4 GPa under different sintering temperatures of 800 and 1200 degrees C. At the largest applied pressure and temperature, 4 GPa and 1200 degrees C, 3C-SiC crystal structure can be changed into to R-SiC due to the stress resulted in dislocations instead of planar defects. Based on our results, the multiquantum-well structure based a single one-dimensional nanostructure can be achieved by applying high pressure at certain sintered temperature. PMID:22413287

  10. Analysis of Pore Pressure and Stress Distribution around a Wellbore Drilled in Chemically Active Elastoplastic Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshan, Hamid; Rahman, S. S.

    2011-09-01

    Drilling in low-permeable reactive shale formations with water-based drilling mud presents significant challenges, particularly in high-pressure and high-temperature environments. In previous studies, several models were proposed to describe the thermodynamic behaviour of shale. Most shale formations under high pressure are expected to undergo plastic deformation. An innovative algorithm including work hardening is proposed in the framework of thermo-chemo-poroelasticity to investigate the effect of plasticity on stresses around the wellbore. For this purpose a finite-element model of coupled thermo-chemo-poro-elastoplasticity is developed. The governing equations are based on the concept of thermodynamics of irreversible processes in discontinuous systems. In order to solve the plastic problem, a single-step backward Euler algorithm containing a yield surface-correction scheme is used to integrate the plastic stress-strain relation. An initial stress method is employed to solve the non-linearity of the plastic equation. In addition, super convergent patch recovery is used to accurately evaluate the time-dependent stress tensor from nodal displacement. The results of this study reveal that thermal and chemical osmosis can significantly affect the fluid flow in low-permeable shale formations. When the salinity of drilling mud is higher than that of pore fluid, fluid is pulled out of the formation by chemical osmotic back flow. Similar results are observed when the temperature of drilling mud is lower than that of the formation fluid. It is found that linear elastic approaches to wellbore stability analysis appear to overestimate the tangential stress around the wellbore and produce more conservative stresses compared to the results of field observation. Therefore, the drilling mud properties obtained from the elastoplastic wellbore stability in shales provide a safer mud weight window and reduce drilling cost.

  11. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  12. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation--O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  13. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  14. High-pressure soot formation and diffusion flame extinction characteristics of gaseous and liquid fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatas, Ahmet Emre

    High-pressure soot formation and flame stability characteristics were studied experimentally in laminar diffusion flames. For the former, radially resolved soot volume fraction and temperature profiles were measured in axisymmetric co-flow laminar diffusion flames of pre-vaporized n-heptane-air, undiluted ethylene-air, and nitrogen and carbon dioxide diluted ethylene-air at elevated pressures. Abel inversion was used to re-construct radially resolved data from the line-of-sight spectral soot emission measurements. For the latter, flame extinction strain rate was measured in counterflow laminar diffusion flames of C1-4 alcohols and hydrocarbon fuels of n-heptane, n-octane, iso-octane, toluene, Jet-A, and biodiesel. The luminous flame height, as marked by visible soot radiation, of the nitrogen- and helium-diluted n-heptane and nitrogen- and carbon dioxide-diluted ethylene flames stayed constant at all pressures. In pure ethylene flames, flame heights initially increased with pressure, but changed little above 5 atm. The maximum soot yield as a function of pressure in nitrogen-diluted n-heptane diffusion flames indicate that n-heptane flames are slightly more sensitive to pressure than gaseous alkane hydrocarbon flames at least up to 7 atm. Ethylene's maximum soot volume fractions were much higher than those of ethane and n-heptane diluted with nitrogen (fuel to nitrogen mass flow ratio is about 0.5). Pressure dependence of the peak carbon conversion to soot, defined as the percentage of fuel's carbon content converted to soot, was assessed and compared to previous measurements with other gaseous fuels. Maximum soot volume fractions were consistently lower in carbon dioxide-diluted flames between 5 and 15 atm but approached similar values to those in nitrogen-diluted flames at 20 atm. This observation implies that the chemical soot suppression effect of carbon dioxide, previously demonstrated at atmospheric pressure, is also present at elevated pressures up to 15 atm

  15. Mixing unmixables: Unexpected formation of Li-Cs alloys at low pressure

    PubMed Central

    Desgreniers, Serge; Tse, John S.; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Ohishi, Yasuo; Tse, Justin J.

    2015-01-01

    Contrary to the empirical Miedema and Hume-Rothery rules and a recent theoretical prediction, we report experimental evidence on the formation of Li-Cs alloys at very low pressure (>0.1 GPa). We also succeeded in synthesizing a pure nonstoichiometric and ordered crystalline phase from an approximately equimolar mixture and resolved its structure using the maximum entropy method. The new alloy has a primitive cubic cell with the Li atom situated in the center and the Cs at the corners. This structure is stable to at least 10 GPa and has an anomalously high coefficient of thermal expansion at low pressure. Analysis of the valence charge density shows that electrons are donated from Cs to the Li “p”-orbitals, resulting in a rare formal oxidation state of −1 for Li. The observation indicates the diversity in the bonding of the seeming simple group I Li element. PMID:26601304

  16. Mixing unmixables: Unexpected formation of Li-Cs alloys at low pressure.

    PubMed

    Desgreniers, Serge; Tse, John S; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Ohishi, Yasuo; Tse, Justin J

    2015-10-01

    Contrary to the empirical Miedema and Hume-Rothery rules and a recent theoretical prediction, we report experimental evidence on the formation of Li-Cs alloys at very low pressure (>0.1 GPa). We also succeeded in synthesizing a pure nonstoichiometric and ordered crystalline phase from an approximately equimolar mixture and resolved its structure using the maximum entropy method. The new alloy has a primitive cubic cell with the Li atom situated in the center and the Cs at the corners. This structure is stable to at least 10 GPa and has an anomalously high coefficient of thermal expansion at low pressure. Analysis of the valence charge density shows that electrons are donated from Cs to the Li "p"-orbitals, resulting in a rare formal oxidation state of -1 for Li. The observation indicates the diversity in the bonding of the seeming simple group I Li element. PMID:26601304

  17. Effects of stretching before and after exercising on muscle soreness and risk of injury: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Rob D; Gabriel, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of stretching before and after exercising on muscle soreness after exercise, risk of injury, and athletic performance. Method Systematic review. Data sources Randomised or quasi-randomised studies identified by searching Medline, Embase, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, and PEDro, and by recursive checking of bibliographies. Main outcome measures Muscle soreness, incidence of injury, athletic performance. Results Five studies, all of moderate quality, reported sufficient data on the effects of stretching on muscle soreness to be included in the analysis. Outcomes seemed homogeneous. Stretching produced small and statistically non-significant reductions in muscle soreness. The pooled estimate of reduction in muscle soreness 24 hours after exercising was only 0.9 mm on a 100 mm scale (95% confidence interval −2.6 mm to 4.4 mm). Data from two studies on army recruits in military training show that muscle stretching before exercising does not produce useful reductions in injury risk (pooled hazard ratio 0.95, 0.78 to 1.16). Conclusions Stretching before or after exercising does not confer protection from muscle soreness. Stretching before exercising does not seem to confer a practically useful reduction in the risk of injury, but the generality of this finding needs testing. Insufficient research has been done with which to determine the effects of stretching on sporting performance. What is already known on this topicReviews of the effects of stretching before exercising have drawn conflicting conclusionsThe literature on effects of stretching before and after exercising on muscle soreness and risk of injury has not been systematically reviewedWhat this study addsStretching before and after exercising does not confer protection from muscle soreness and stretching before exercise does not seem to confer a practically useful reduction in the risk of injury PMID:12202327

  18. Self-regulating galaxy formation. Part 1: HII disk and Lyman alpha pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    Assuming a simple but physically based prototype for behavior of interstellar material during formation of a disk galaxy, coupled with the lowest order description of infall, a scenario is developed for self-regulated disk galaxy formation. Radiation pressure, particularly that of Lyman depha (from fluorescence conversion Lyman continuum), is an essential component, maintaining an inflated disk and stopping infall when only a small fraction of the overall perturbation has joined the disk. The resulting galaxies consist of a two dimensional family whose typical scales and surface density are expressable in terms of fundamental constants. The model leads naturally to galaxies with a rich circumgalactic environment and flat rotation curves (but is weak in its analysis of the subsequent evolution of halo material).

  19. Subnanosecond processes in the stage of breakdown formation in gas at a high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Yu. D.; Bykov, N. M.; Ivanov, S. N.

    2008-12-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the prebreakdown stage of a discharge in nitrogen at pressures of a few tens of atmospheres, gap voltages higher than 140 kV, and a voltage rise time of about 1 ns. Breakdown occurs at the front of the voltage pulse; i.e., the time of breakdown formation is shorter than the front duration. It is shown that, in gaps with a nonuniform electric field, the breakdown formation time is mainly determined by the time of avalanche development to the critical number of charge carriers. The subsequent stages of breakdown (the development of the ionization wave and the buildup of the conductivity in the weakly conducting channel bridging the gap) turn out to be shorter than this time or comparable to it.

  20. The integrated method to select drilling muds for abnormally high pressure formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorev, V. S.; Dmitriev, A. Yu; Boyko, I. A.; Kayumova, N. S.; Rakhimov, T. R.

    2016-03-01

    The article describes the method for choosing a drilling mud for drilling abnormally high pressure formations. A carefully selected drilling mud formulation would not only enhance an array of interrelated fluid properties, but also minimize the impact on the pay zones when the drill bit first penetrates the pay. To ensure a better assessment of drilling mud impact on the pay zone, it is reasonable to carry out the study focused on the analysis of technological parameters, involving filtration, acid and drilling mud tests, as well as formation damage analysis. This would enable evaluating the degree of mudding off, reservoirs acid fracturing effect and the risks of pipe sticking at significant depth. The article presents the results of the above-described study with regard to the currently used drilling mud and new experimental formulations developed at National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University (Drilling Mud and Cement Slurry Laboratory).

  1. Periodic seepage face formation and water pressure distribution along a vertical boundary of an aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jazayeri Shoushtari, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Nielsen, Peter; Cartwright, Nick; Perrochet, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Detailed measurements of the piezometric head from sand flume experiments of an idealised coastal aquifer forced by a simple harmonic boundary condition across a vertical boundary are presented. The measurements focus on the pore pressures very close to the interface (x = 0.01m) and throw light on the details of the boundary condition, particularly with respect to meniscus suction and seepage face formation during the falling tide. Between the low and the mean water level, the response is consistent with meniscus suction free models in terms of both the vertical mean head and oscillation amplitude profiles and is consistent with the observation that this area of the interface was generally within the seepage face. Above the mean water level, the influence of meniscus formation is significant with the mean pressure head being less than that predicted by capillary free theory and oscillation amplitudes decaying faster than predicted by suction free models. The reduced hydraulic conductivity in this area due to partial drainage of pores on the falling tide also causes a delay in the response to the rising tide. The combined influence of seepage face formation, meniscus suction and reduced hydraulic conductivity generate higher harmonics with amplitudes of up to 26% of the local main harmonic. To model the influence of seepage face formation and meniscus suction a numerical solution of the Richards' equation was developed and evaluated against the data. The model-data comparison shows a good agreement with the behaviour high above the water table sensitive to the choice of moisture retention parameters.

  2. Formation of nanoclusters under radiation pressure in solution: A Brownian dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Prasanth P.; Bagchi, Biman

    2002-02-01

    When radiation is scattered by a medium, a part of its momentum is transferred to the target particles. This is purely a mechanical force which comes into effect when radiation is not coherently interacting. This force is known in literature as radiation pressure. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated the feasibility of using radiation pressure of a laser beam as a tool for cluster formation in solution. In this paper we describe the Brownian dynamics simulation of solute molecules under the perturbation induced by laser radiation. Here the force field generated by a laser beam in the fundamental mode is modeled as that of a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator. The radial distribution function of the perturbed system gives indication of high inhomogeneities in the solute distribution. An explicit analysis of the nature of these clusters is carried out by calculating the density-density correlation functions in the plane perpendicular to beam direction g(rxy); and along the direction of beam g(z), they give an average picture of shell structure formation in the different directions. The relaxation time of the first shell structure calculated from the van Hove correlation function is found to be relatively large in the perturbed solution. This is the signature of formation of stable nanoclusters in the presence of the radiation field. Our study on the dynamics of solute molecules during the cluster formation and dissolution gives the duration of collective relaxation, far away from the equilibrium to an equilibrium distribution. This relaxation time is found to be large for a perturbed solution.

  3. Significant Enhancement of H2 Formation in Disk Galaxies under Strong Ram Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Benjamin; Bekki, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    We show for the first time that H2 formation on dust grains can be enhanced in disk galaxies under strong ram pressure (RP). We numerically investigate how the time evolution of H i and H2 components in disk galaxies orbiting a group/cluster of galaxies can be influenced by the hydrodynamical interaction between the gaseous components of the galaxies and the hot intracluster medium. We find that compression of H i caused by RP increases H2 formation in disk galaxies before RP rapidly strips H i, cutting off the fuel supply and causing a drop in H2 density. We also find that the level of this H2 formation enhancement in a disk galaxy under RP depends on the mass of its host cluster dark matter halo, the initial positions and velocities of the disk galaxy, and the disk inclination angle with respect to the orbital plane. We demonstrate that dust growth is a key factor in the evolution of the H i and H2 mass in disk galaxies under strong RP. We discuss how the correlation between H2 fractions and surface gas densities of disk galaxies evolves with time in the galaxies under RP. We also discuss whether galaxy-wide star formation rates (SFRs) in cluster disk galaxies can be enhanced by RP if the SFRs depend on H2 densities.

  4. Nanoparticle formation by laser ablation in air and by spark discharges at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itina, T. E.; Voloshko, A.

    2013-12-01

    Recent promising methods of nanoparticle fabrication include laser ablation and spark discharge. Despite different experimental conditions, a striking similarity is often observed in the sizes of the obtained particles. To explain this result, we elucidate physical mechanisms involved in the formation of metallic nanoparticles. In particular, we compare supersaturation degree and sizes of critical nucleus obtained under laser ablation conditions with that obtained for spark discharge in air. For this, the dynamics of the expansion of either ablated or eroded products is described by using a three-dimensional blast wave model. Firstly, we consider nanosecond laser ablation in air. In the presence of a background gas, the plume expansion is limited by the gas pressure. Nanoparticles are mostly formed by nucleation and condensation taking place in the supersaturated vapor. Secondly, we investigate nanoparticles formation by spark discharge at atmospheric pressure. After efficient photoionization and streamer expansion, the cathode material suffers erosion and NPs appear. The calculation results allow us to examine the sizes of critical nuclei as function of the experimental parameters and to reveal the conditions favorable for the size reduction and for the increase in the nanoparticle yield.

  5. High Pressure and Temperature Core Formation as an Alternative to the "Late Veneer" Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin; Pando, K.; Humayun, M.; Danielson, L.

    2011-01-01

    The highly siderophile elements (HSE; Re, Au and the Platinum Group Elements - Pd Pt, Rh, Ru, Ir, Os) are commonly utilized to constrain accretion processes in terrestrial differentiated bodies due to their affinity for FeNi metal [1]. These eight elements exhibit highly siderophile behavior, but nonetheless have highly diverse metal-silicate partition coefficients [2]. Therefore the near chondritic relative concentrations of HSEs in the terrestrial and lunar mantles, as well as some other bodies, are attributed to late accretion rather than core formation [1]. Evaluation of competing theories, such as high pressure metal-silicate partitioning or magma ocean hypotheses has been hindered by a lack of relevant partitioning data for this group of eight elements. In particular, systematic studies isolating the effect of one variable (e.g. temperature or melt compositions) are lacking. Here we undertake new experiments on all eight elements, using Fe metal and FeO-bearing silicate melts at fixed pressure, but variable temperatures. These experiments, as well as some additional planned experiments should allow partition coefficients to be more accurately calculated or estimated at the PT conditions and compositions at which core formation is thought to have occurred.

  6. Ligand-free Ni nanocluster formation at atmospheric pressure via rapid quenching in a microplasma process.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Kang, Seungkoo; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; Ouyang, Hui; Hogan, Christopher J; Sankaran, R Mohan

    2014-09-26

    The production of metal nanoclusters composed of less than 10(3) atoms is important for applications in energy conversion and medicine, and for fundamental studies of nanomaterial nucleation and growth. Unfortunately, existing synthesis methods do not enable adequate control of cluster formation, particularly at atmospheric pressure wherein formation typically occurs on sub-millisecond timescales. Here, we demonstrate that ligand-free, unagglomerated nickel nanoclusters can be continuously synthesized at atmospheric pressure via the decomposition of bis(cyclopentadienyl)nickel(II) (nickelocene) in a spatially-confined microplasma process that rapidly quenches particle growth and agglomeration. The clusters were measured on line by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and further analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results reveal that stable clusters with spherical equivalent mean diameters below 10 Åare produced, and by controlling the nickelocene concentration, the mean diameter can be tuned up to ∼50 Å. Although diameter is often the sole metric used in nanocluster and nanoparticle characterization, to infer the number of atoms in AFM and IMS detected clusters, we compare measured AFM heights and IMS inferred collision cross sections to theoretical predictions based on both bulk matter approximations and density functional theory and Hartree-Fock calculated Ni nanocluster structures (composed of 2-15 atoms for the latter). The calculations suggest that Ni nanoclusters composed of less than 10(2) atoms can be produced repeatably with simple microplasma reactors. PMID:25180756

  7. Ligand-free Ni nanocluster formation at atmospheric pressure via rapid quenching in a microplasma process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Kang, Seungkoo; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; Ouyang, Hui; Hogan, Christopher J.; Mohan Sankaran, R.

    2014-09-01

    The production of metal nanoclusters composed of less than 103 atoms is important for applications in energy conversion and medicine, and for fundamental studies of nanomaterial nucleation and growth. Unfortunately, existing synthesis methods do not enable adequate control of cluster formation, particularly at atmospheric pressure wherein formation typically occurs on sub-millisecond timescales. Here, we demonstrate that ligand-free, unagglomerated nickel nanoclusters can be continuously synthesized at atmospheric pressure via the decomposition of bis(cyclopentadienyl)nickel(II) (nickelocene) in a spatially-confined microplasma process that rapidly quenches particle growth and agglomeration. The clusters were measured on line by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and further analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results reveal that stable clusters with spherical equivalent mean diameters below 10 \\dot{A} are produced, and by controlling the nickelocene concentration, the mean diameter can be tuned up to ˜50 \\dot{A}. Although diameter is often the sole metric used in nanocluster and nanoparticle characterization, to infer the number of atoms in AFM and IMS detected clusters, we compare measured AFM heights and IMS inferred collision cross sections to theoretical predictions based on both bulk matter approximations and density functional theory and Hartree-Fock calculated Ni nanocluster structures (composed of 2-15 atoms for the latter). The calculations suggest that Ni nanoclusters composed of less than 102 atoms can be produced repeatably with simple microplasma reactors.

  8. A Computational, Tissue-Realistic Model of Pressure Ulcer Formation in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Solovyev, Alexey; Allegretti, Ana; Krishnan, Shilpa; Henzel, M Kristi; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Brienza, David; An, Gary; Mi, Qi; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2015-06-01

    People with spinal cord injury (SCI) are predisposed to pressure ulcers (PU). PU remain a significant burden in cost of care and quality of life despite improved mechanistic understanding and advanced interventions. An agent-based model (ABM) of ischemia/reperfusion-induced inflammation and PU (the PUABM) was created, calibrated to serial images of post-SCI PU, and used to investigate potential treatments in silico. Tissue-level features of the PUABM recapitulated visual patterns of ulcer formation in individuals with SCI. These morphological features, along with simulated cell counts and mediator concentrations, suggested that the influence of inflammatory dynamics caused simulations to be committed to "better" vs. "worse" outcomes by 4 days of simulated time and prior to ulcer formation. Sensitivity analysis of model parameters suggested that increasing oxygen availability would reduce PU incidence. Using the PUABM, in silico trials of anti-inflammatory treatments such as corticosteroids and a neutralizing antibody targeted at Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern molecules (DAMPs) suggested that, at best, early application at a sufficiently high dose could attenuate local inflammation and reduce pressure-associated tissue damage, but could not reduce PU incidence. The PUABM thus shows promise as an adjunct for mechanistic understanding, diagnosis, and design of therapies in the setting of PU. PMID:26111346

  9. Low-pressure clathrate-hydrate formation in amorphous astrophysical ice analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, D. F.; Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S.; Hudgins, D.; Freund, F.

    1991-01-01

    In modeling cometary ice, the properties of clathrate hydrates were used to explain anomalous gas release at large radial distances from the Sun, and the retention of particular gas inventories at elevated temperatures. Clathrates may also have been important early in solar system history. However, there has never been a reasonable mechanism proposed for clathrate formation under the low pressures typical of these environments. For the first time, it was shown that clathrate hydrates can be formed by warming and annealing amorphous mixed molecular ices at low pressures. The complex microstructures which occur as a result of clathrate formation from the solid state may provide an explanation for a variety of unexplained phenomena. The vacuum and imaging systems of an Hitachi H-500H Analytical Electron Microscope was modified to study mixed molecular ices at temperatures between 12 and 373 K. The resulting ices are characterized by low-electron dose Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED). The implications of these results for the mechanical and gas release properties of comets are discussed. Laboratory IR data from similar ices are presented which suggest the possibility of remotely observing and identifying clathrates in astrophysical objects.

  10. A Computational, Tissue-Realistic Model of Pressure Ulcer Formation in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Solovyev, Alexey; Allegretti, Ana; Krishnan, Shilpa; Henzel, M. Kristi; Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Brienza, David; An, Gary; Mi, Qi; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    People with spinal cord injury (SCI) are predisposed to pressure ulcers (PU). PU remain a significant burden in cost of care and quality of life despite improved mechanistic understanding and advanced interventions. An agent-based model (ABM) of ischemia/reperfusion-induced inflammation and PU (the PUABM) was created, calibrated to serial images of post-SCI PU, and used to investigate potential treatments in silico. Tissue-level features of the PUABM recapitulated visual patterns of ulcer formation in individuals with SCI. These morphological features, along with simulated cell counts and mediator concentrations, suggested that the influence of inflammatory dynamics caused simulations to be committed to “better” vs. “worse” outcomes by 4 days of simulated time and prior to ulcer formation. Sensitivity analysis of model parameters suggested that increasing oxygen availability would reduce PU incidence. Using the PUABM, in silico trials of anti-inflammatory treatments such as corticosteroids and a neutralizing antibody targeted at Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern molecules (DAMPs) suggested that, at best, early application at a sufficiently high dose could attenuate local inflammation and reduce pressure-associated tissue damage, but could not reduce PU incidence. The PUABM thus shows promise as an adjunct for mechanistic understanding, diagnosis, and design of therapies in the setting of PU. PMID:26111346

  11. The formation of optical membrane reflector surfaces using uniform pressure loading

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, L.M.; Tuan, C.

    1987-08-01

    Potentially high quality optical reflector surfaces are attainable with the use of pressure formed membranes. Such reflector surfaces offer the prospect of very low weight and low cost. The formation of such surfaces, using initially flat circular membranes with uniform pressure loading, is studied in this paper. Finite axisymmetric deformations, along with both linear and nonlinear material response is considered. A wide range of focal-length-to-diameter ratios (above 0.6) are addressed and the structural/optical response mechanisms that lead to optical distortions relative to ideal parabolic reflector shapes are also considered. Results show that elastic material response can often lead to a significantly larger deviation from the ideal shape than will inelastic material response. This results primarily from the ability to limit stress nonuniformities when inelastic material response is operative. Furthermore, when under pressure loading the membrane focal length decreases monotonically with increasing radius for both linear and nonlinear material response. Further, the predicted focal length variation is increasingly nonlinear near the membrane support.

  12. Pressure-induced bonding and compound formation in xenon-hydrogen solids

    SciTech Connect

    Somayazulu, Maddury; Dera, Przemyslaw; Goncharov, Alexander F; Gramsch, Stephen A; Liermann, Peter; Yang, Wenge; Liu, Zhenxian; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, Russell J

    2010-11-03

    Closed electron shell systems, such as hydrogen, nitrogen or group 18 elements, can form weakly bound stoichiometric compounds at high pressures. An understanding of the stability of these van der Waals compounds is lacking, as is information on the nature of their interatomic interactions. We describe the formation of a stable compound in the Xe-H{sub 2} binary system, revealed by a suite of X-ray diffraction and optical spectroscopy measurements. At 4.8 GPa, a unique hydrogen-rich structure forms that can be viewed as a tripled solid hydrogen lattice modulated by layers of xenon, consisting of xenon dimers. Varying the applied pressure tunes the Xe-Xe distances in the solid over a broad range from that of an expanded xenon lattice to the distances observed in metallic xenon at megabar pressures. Infrared and Raman spectra indicate a weakening of the intramolecular covalent bond as well as persistence of semiconducting behaviour in the compound to at least 255 GPa.

  13. Structural analysis of high-pressure shear zones (Bacariza Formation, Cabo Ortegal, NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puelles, P.; Mulchrone, K. F.; Ábalos, B.; Ibarguchi, J. I. Gil

    2005-06-01

    High-pressure granulites of the Bacariza Formation (Cabo Ortegal Complex, NW Spain) exhibit spectacular examples of ductile shear zones developed at different scales in rocks containing pre-existing foliations. A detailed structural analysis was carried out on these shear zones in order to unravel and compare the role of various parameters controlling the deformation process (i.e. heterogeneous simple shear, components of homogeneous deformation, heterogeneous volume change and degree of non-coaxiality). Although heterogeneous simple shear largely dominated, negligible deviations from the ideal simple shear model were detected involving shortening along the structural directions perpendicular to the stretching axis (within the foliation plane) of the finite strain ellipsoid. The relationship between displacement parallel to a half-shear zone and the normal distance from its boundary provided the basis for the estimation of the stress exponent in the power-law constitutive flow equation associated with each shear zone, which is interpreted as a rheological indicator. These geometric and rheological results, and the thermobaric conditions of high-pressure shear zone deformation, indicate that these shear zones accommodated dominant plastic rock flow coeval with high-pressure and high-temperature deformations under moderate stress levels concomitant with elevated strain rates.

  14. Shock Formation by Plasma Filaments of Microwave Discharge under Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2016-03-01

    A one-dimensional compressible fluid calculation was coupled with a finite- difference time-domain code and a particle-in-cell code with collision to reproduce propagation of electromagnetic wave, ionization process of plasma, and shock wave formation in atmospheric microwave discharge. Plasma filaments are driven toward the microwave source at 1 atm, and the distance between each filament is one-fifth of the wavelength of the incident microwave. The strong shock wave is generated due to the high plasma density at the atmospheric pressure. A simple analysis of the microwave propagation into the plasma shows that cut-off density of the microwave becomes smaller with the pressure decrease in a collisional plasma. At the lower pressure, the smaller density plasma is obtained with a diffusive pattern because of the smaller cut-off density and the larger diffusion effect. In contrast with the 1-atm case, the weak shock wave is generated at a rarefied condition, which lowers performance of microwave thruster.

  15. The collaborative effect of ram pressure and merging on star formation and stripping fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischko, J. C.; Steinhauser, D.; Schindler, S.

    2015-04-01

    Aims: We investigate the effect of ram pressure stripping (RPS) on several simulations of merging pairs of gas-rich spiral galaxies. We are concerned with the changes in stripping efficiency and the time evolution of the star formation rate. Our goal is to provide an estimate of the combined effect of merging and RPS compared to the influence of the individual processes. Methods: We make use of the combined N-body/hydrodynamic code GADGET-2. The code features a threshold-based statistical recipe for star formation, as well as radiative cooling and modeling of galactic winds. In our simulations, we vary mass ratios between 1:4 and 1:8 in a binary merger. We sample different geometric configurations of the merging systems (edge-on and face-on mergers, different impact parameters). Furthermore, we vary the properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) in rough steps: the speed of the merging system relative to the ICM between 500 and 1000 km s-1, the ICM density between 10-29 and 10-27 g cm-3, and the ICM direction relative to the mergers' orbital plane. Ram pressure is kept constant within a simulation time period, as is the ICM temperature of 107 K. Each simulation in the ICM is compared to simulations of the merger in vacuum and the non-merging galaxies with acting ram pressure. Results: Averaged over the simulation time (1 Gyr) the merging pairs show a negligible 5% enhancement in SFR, when compared to single galaxies under the same environmental conditions. The SFRs peak at the time of the galaxies first fly-through. There, our simulations show SFRs of up to 20 M⊙ yr-1 (compared to 3 M⊙ yr-1 of the non-merging galaxies in vacuum). In the most extreme case, this constitutes a short-term (<50 Myr) SFR increase of 50 % over the non-merging galaxies experiencing ram pressure. The wake of merging galaxies in the ICM typically has a third to half the star mass seen in the non-merging galaxies and 5% to 10% less gas mass. The joint effect of RPS and merging, according

  16. Experimental constraints on formation of hematite in olivine at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanfei; Wang, Chao; Wu, Yao; Liu, Wenlong; Jin, Zhenmin

    2015-10-01

    Iron-rich oxides, such as magnetite or hematite, have been reported in olivine grains in many orogenic garnet peridotites from continental collision zones. Whether these iron-rich minerals originate from dry oxidation, dehydrogenation-oxidation or exsolution from a precursor wadsleyite phase is debatable. This paper explores high-pressure and high-temperature experiments in a hydrous harzburgite system, by taking advantage of electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analyses, to examine the formation of hematite in olivine. Experimental results show that hematite can be formed within olivine grains at pressures >6 GPa and temperatures in the 1073-1473 K range. EBSD analysis suggests that hematite rods (not associated with clinopyroxene) and host olivine have the following crystallographic relations: < 0001 rangle _{{Hem}} // [100]_{{Ol}} , < 10{-}10rangle _{{Hem}} //[001]_{{Ol}} , < 11{-}20rangle _{{Hem}} //[010]_{{Ol}} , which are consistent with those observed in natural garnet peridotite from the Dabie-Sulu ultra-high-pressure (UHP) metamorphic terrane. It is postulated that both hydroxide (OH-) and hydrogen (H+) ions have the potential to oxidize Fe2+ to Fe3+, followed by rapid dehydrogenation and slow Fe diffusion, thus forming hematite within the olivine grains. It is proposed that dehydrogenation-oxidation is the most likely formation mechanism of hematite inclusions within olivine, with the following two requirements: an ample amount of H2O and specific P- T conditions (>6 GPa, at 1073 K). Such conditions are consistent with those calculated in natural garnet peridotites from the Dabie-Sulu UHP metamorphic terranes. The present study also indicates that hematite (or magnetite?) inclusions in olivine contain important clues about the tectonic evolution of UHP rocks in continental crust collision zones.

  17. Effects of the taxanes paclitaxel and docetaxel on edema formation and interstitial fluid pressure.

    PubMed

    Brønstad, Aurora; Berg, Ansgar; Reed, Rolf K

    2004-08-01

    Interstitial fluid pressure (P(if)) is important for maintaining constant interstitial fluid volume. In several acute inflammatory reactions, a dramatic lowering of P(if) has been observed, increasing transcapillary filtration pressure and favoring initial and rapid edema formation. This lowering of P(if) seems to involve dynamic beta(1)-integrin-mediated interactions between connective tissue cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) fibers. beta(1)-Integrins are adhesion receptors responsible for the attachment of connective tissue cells to the ECM providing a force-transmitting physical link between the ECM and cytoskeleton. Disruption of actin filaments leads to lowering of P(if) and edema formation, suggesting a role for actin filaments. The aim of this study was to further investigate the role of the cytoskeleton in the control of P(if) by studying the effect of microtubuli fixation using paclitaxel and docetaxel. P(if) was measured with the micropuncture technique. Albumin extravasation (E(alb)) was measured using (125)I-labeled albumin. Paclitaxel and docetaxel were tested locally on foot skin in female Wistar rats. Paclitaxel (6 mg/ml) reduced P(if) from -1.5 +/- 1.0 mmHg in controls to -4.9 +/- 2.6 mmHg after 30 min (P < 0.05) in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05). Docetaxel caused a similar lowering of P(if). Both paclitaxel and docetaxel increased E(alb) compared with Cremophor EL and saline control (P < 0.05). Pretreatment with phalloidin before paclitaxel, causing fixation of actin filaments, abolished the lowering of P(if) caused by paclitaxel. This study confirms several previous studies demonstrating that connective tissue cells influence P(if) and edema formation. PMID:15059777

  18. Superior vena caval pressure elevation causes pleural effusion formation in sheep.

    PubMed

    Allen, S J; Laine, G A; Drake, R E; Gabel, J C

    1988-09-01

    The effect of superior vena caval pressure (SVCP) elevation on the formation of pleural effusions (PE) was studied in sheep. Through a right thoracotomy, a Silastic cuff was placed around the superior vena cava. Catheters for monitoring SVCP and pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) were also placed. After a 1- to 3-wk recovery period, we measured the SVCP, PAP, cardiac output, and plasma protein concentration (Cp). We then elevated the SVCP to various levels from base line [5.3 +/- 2.6 (SD) mmHg] to 33 mmHg. The cardiac output, PAP, and Cp were remeasured 1-2 h and 24 h after SVCP elevation. At the end of the 24-h period, the animals were killed. The PE volume and pleural fluid protein concentration (Cpl) were measured, and the Cpl/Cp was calculated. PE generally did not occur until the SVCP was elevated above 15 mmHg. To study the effect of the thoracotomy on the subsequent pleural effusion, we studied six additional sheep in which we did not perform a thoracotomy. In these animals, the SVCP was elevated to between 5 and 28 mmHg for 24 h by use of a 16-Fr balloon catheter placed via a left external jugular vein and a right carotid-external jugular shunt. We found that the PE volume, for a given SVCP elevation, was similar to that present in sheep that received a thoracotomy. For all sheep the volume of PE was related to SVCP by the equation PE (ml) = 0.24e0.26SVCP, r = 0.85. In the sheep without a thoracotomy, Cpl/Cp rose with increasing volume of PE. Our data demonstrate that elevation of SVCP greater than 15 mmHg for 24 h results in the formation of PE. The rise in Cpl/Cp with PE volume suggests that filtration through the pleural vessels is not the major contributor to PE formation. PMID:3414816

  19. Ozone kinetics in low-pressure discharges: vibrationally excited ozone and molecule formation on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, Daniil; Guerra, Vasco; Guaitella, Olivier; Booth, Jean-Paul; Rousseau, Antoine

    2013-10-01

    A combined experimental and modeling investigation of the ozone kinetics in the afterglow of pulsed direct current discharges in oxygen is carried out. The discharge is generated in a cylindrical silica tube of radius 1 cm, with short pulse durations between 0.5 and 2 ms, pressures in the range 1-5 Torr and discharge currents ˜40-120 mA. Time-resolved absolute concentrations of ground-state atoms and ozone molecules were measured simultaneously in situ, by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence and ultraviolet absorption, respectively. The experiments were complemented by a self-consistent model developed to interpret the results and, in particular, to evaluate the roles of vibrationally excited ozone and of ozone formation on surfaces. It is found that vibrationally excited ozone, O_3^{*} , plays an important role in the ozone kinetics, leading to a decrease in the ozone concentration and an increase in its formation time. In turn, the kinetics of O_3^{*} is strongly coupled with those of atomic oxygen and O2(a 1Δg) metastables. Ozone formation at the wall does not contribute significantly to the total ozone production under the present conditions. Upper limits for the effective heterogeneous recombination probability of O atoms into ozone are established.

  20. Pressure morphology of the relaxed lower esophageal sphincter: the formation and collapse of the phrenic ampulla.

    PubMed

    Kwiatek, Monika A; Nicodème, Frédéric; Pandolfino, John E; Kahrilas, Peter J

    2012-02-01

    This study aimed to apply novel high-resolution manometry with eight-sector radial pressure resolution (3D-HRM technology) to resolve the deglutitive pressure morphology at the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) before, during, and after bolus transit. A hybrid HRM assembly, including a 9-cm-long 3D-HRM array, was used to record EGJ pressure morphology in 15 normal subjects. Concurrent videofluoroscopy was used to relate bolus movement to pressure morphology and EGJ anatomy, aided by an endoclip marking the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ). The contractile deceleration point (CDP) marked the time at which luminal clearance slowed to 1.1 cm/s and the location (4 cm proximal to the elevated SCJ) at which peristalsis terminated. The phrenic ampulla spanned from the CDP to the SCJ. The subsequent radial and axial collapse of the ampulla coincided with the reconstitution of the effaced and elongated lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Following ampullary emptying, the stretched LES (maximum length 4.0 cm) progressively collapsed to its baseline length of 1.9 cm (P < 0.001). The phrenic ampulla is a transient structure comprised of the stretched, effaced, and axially displaced LES that serves as a "yield zone" to facilitate bolus transfer to the stomach. During ampullary emptying, the LES circular muscle contracts, and longitudinal muscle shortens while that of the adjacent esophagus reelongates. The likely LES elongation with the formation of the ampulla and shortening to its native length after ampullary emptying suggest that reduction in the resting tone of the longitudinal muscle within the LES segment is a previously unrecognized component of LES relaxation. PMID:22114118

  1. Pressure morphology of the relaxed lower esophageal sphincter: the formation and collapse of the phrenic ampulla

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatek, Monika A.; Nicodème, Frédéric; Pandolfino, John E.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to apply novel high-resolution manometry with eight-sector radial pressure resolution (3D-HRM technology) to resolve the deglutitive pressure morphology at the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) before, during, and after bolus transit. A hybrid HRM assembly, including a 9-cm-long 3D-HRM array, was used to record EGJ pressure morphology in 15 normal subjects. Concurrent videofluoroscopy was used to relate bolus movement to pressure morphology and EGJ anatomy, aided by an endoclip marking the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ). The contractile deceleration point (CDP) marked the time at which luminal clearance slowed to 1.1 cm/s and the location (4 cm proximal to the elevated SCJ) at which peristalsis terminated. The phrenic ampulla spanned from the CDP to the SCJ. The subsequent radial and axial collapse of the ampulla coincided with the reconstitution of the effaced and elongated lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Following ampullary emptying, the stretched LES (maximum length 4.0 cm) progressively collapsed to its baseline length of 1.9 cm (P < 0.001). The phrenic ampulla is a transient structure comprised of the stretched, effaced, and axially displaced LES that serves as a “yield zone” to facilitate bolus transfer to the stomach. During ampullary emptying, the LES circular muscle contracts, and longitudinal muscle shortens while that of the adjacent esophagus reelongates. The likely LES elongation with the formation of the ampulla and shortening to its native length after ampullary emptying suggest that reduction in the resting tone of the longitudinal muscle within the LES segment is a previously unrecognized component of LES relaxation. PMID:22114118

  2. The usefulness of a clinical 'scorecard' in managing patients with sore throat in general practice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Objective: To evaluate the usefulness of a clinical scorecard in managing sore throat in general practice. Design: Validation study of scorecard for sore throat with a throat swab culture used as the 'gold standard'. Setting: A solo family practice in rural New South Wales, Australia Participants: Patients attending with sore throat. Methods Patients from the age of 5 years and above presenting with the main symptom of a sore throat, and who have not had any antibiotic treatment in the previous two weeks, were invited to participate in the study. The doctor completed a scorecard for each patient participating and took a throat swab for culture. Adult patients (> 16 yrs) were asked to complete a patient satisfaction questionnaire, while guardians accompanying children (5 yr to < 16 yrs old) were asked to complete a similar, guardian questionnaire. Main outcome measures: 1. Ability of a new scorecard to differentiate between bacterial and non-bacterial sore throat. 2. Patients' trust in the scorecard. Results The scorecard has a sensitivity of 93.33%, a specificity of 63.16%, a positive predictive value of 50% and a negative predictive value of 96%. The sensitivity is better than other sore throat scorecards that have been published but with a slightly lower specificity. There was a high level of patient trust in the scorecard was (85.8% agreement). Patients also trusted their doctor's judgement based on the scorecard (90.6% agreement). Conclusions As the scorecard has a high sensitivity but only a moderate specificity, this means that it is more reliable for negative results, i.e. when the result suggests a viral infection. When the result favours a bacterial sore throat, then a high sensitivity can mean that there are a number of false positives. GPs can be confident in withholding antibiotics when the scorecard indicates a viral infection. PMID:20670439

  3. Effect of pressure on structure and NO sub X formation in CO-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, H. G.; Miller, I. M.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made of nitric oxide formation in a laminar CO-air diffusion flame over a pressure range from 1 to 50 atm. The carbon monoxide (CO) issued from a 3.06 mm diameter port coaxially into a coflowing stream of air confined within a 20.5 mm diameter chimney. Nitric oxide concentrations from the flame were measured at two carbon monoxide (fuel) flow rates: 73 standard cubic/min and 146 sccm. Comparison of the present data with data in the literature for a methane-air diffusion flame shows that for flames of comparable flame height (8 to 10 mm) and pseudoequivalence ratio (0.162), the molar emission index of a CO-air flame is significantly greater than that of a methane-air flame.

  4. Gas bubble formation and its pressure signature in T-junction of a microreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouya, Shahram; Koochesfahani, Manoochehr

    2013-11-01

    The segmented gas-liquid flow is of particular interest in microreactors used for high throughput material synthesis with enhanced mixing and more efficient reaction. A typical geometry to introduce gas plugs into the reactor is a T-junction where the dispersed liquid is squeezed and pinched by the continuous fluid in the main branch of the junction. We present experimental data of time resolved pressure along with synchronous imaging of the drop formation at the junction to show the transient behavior of the process. The stability of the slug regime and the regularity of the slug/plug pattern are investigated in this study. This work was supported by the CRC Program of the National Science Foundation, Grant Number CHE-0714028.

  5. Formations of negative ions in Sf6/N2 mixtures and their transport at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Yui; Sabo, Martin; Itoh, Haruo; Matejčík, Štefan

    2013-02-01

    Formation of negative ions initiated by interaction of thermal electrons and in the corona discharge (CD) in N2 with small admixture of SF6; was studied using the ion mobility spectrometry- orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry (IMS-oaTOF) at atmospheric pressure. The negative ions have been analyzed by the ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) and two-dimensional spectra (2D IMS-MS) have been recorded. We discuss the mechanisms of the negative ion formation in the N2/SF6 mixtures (0.003-0.018%) as well as the transport parameters of the ions in these mixtures. The values of the reduced ion mobilities of negative ions formed in these mixtures were determined (2.43 cm2/V s for HF2- (HF)n, 2.32 cm2/V s for NO3- (HF)n, 2.08 cm2/V s for SF5-, 2.01 cm2/V s for SOF5-, 2.00 for SOF4- 1.99 cm2/V s for SF6-, 1.83 cm2/V s for SOF5-(H2O)n and 1.73 for SOF5-(H2O)n(HF)m). The assignment of the ion mobility peaks was performed on the basis of the 2D IMS-MS spectra. Contribution to the Topical Issue "13th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (Hakone XIII)", Edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Henryca Danuta Stryczewska and Yvan Ségui.

  6. Pressure-temperature dependence of nanowire formation in the arsenic-sulfur system

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Sundaram, S. K.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Williford, Rick E.; Olmstead, Juliana D.

    2006-12-01

    Nanowire Formation in Arsenic Trisulfide Brian J. Riley, S.K. Sundaram*, Bradley R. Johnson, Mark Engelhard Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 * Corresponding author: Phone: 509-373-6665; Fax: 509-376-3108, E-mail: sk.Sundaram@pnl.gov Abstract: Arsenic trisulfide (As2S3) nanowires, nano-droplets, and micro-islands were synthesized on fused silica substrates, using a sublimation-condensation process at reduced pressures (70 mtorr – 70 torr) in a sealed ampoule. Microstructural control of the deposited thin film was achieved by controlling initial pressure, substrate temperature and substrate surface treatment. Microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). Surface topography and chemistry of the substrates were characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Semi-quantitative image analysis and basic curve-fitting were used to develop empirical models to mathematically describe the variation of microstructure as a function of initial pressure and substrate temperature and map out the regions of different microstructures in P-T space. Thermodyamic properties (available from literature) of this system are also incorporated in this map. Nanowires of an amorphous, transparent in visible-LWIR region, semi-conducting material, like As2S3, provide new opportunities for the development of novel nano-photonic and electronic devices. Additionally, this system provides an excellent opportunity to model (and control) microstructure development from nanometer to micron scales in a physical vapor deposition process, which is of great value to nanoscience and nanotechnology in general.

  7. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.

    1998-01-01

    Flame structure and soot formation were studied within soot-containing laminar premixed mc1hane/oxygen flames at atmospheric pressure. The following measurements were made: soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscope (TEM), major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and gas velocities by laser velocimetry. Present measurements of gas species concentrations were in reasonably good agreement with earlier measurements due to Ramer et al. as well as predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt: the predictions also suggest that H atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot formation region. Using this information, it was found that measured soot surface growth rates could be correlated successfully by predictions based on the hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of both Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall, extending an earlier assessment of these mechanisms for premixed ethylene/air flames to conditions having larger H/C ratios and acetylene concentrations. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates were somewhat lower than the earlier observations for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames and were significantly lower than corresponding rates in laminar diffusion flames. for reasons that still must be explained.

  8. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Flame structure and soot formation were studied within soot-containing laminar premixed methanefoxygen flames at atmospheric pressure. The following measurements were made: soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscope (TEM), major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and gas velocities by laser velocimetry. Present measurements of gas species concentrations were in reasonably good agreement with earlier measurements due to Ramer et al. as well as predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt; the predictions also suggest that H atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot formation region. Using this information, it was found that measured soot surface growth rates could be correlated successfully by predictions based on the hydrogenabstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of both Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall, extending an earlier assessment of these mechanisms for premixed ethylene/air flames to conditions having larger H/C ratios and acetylene concentrations. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates were somewhat lower than the earlier observations for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames and were significantly lower than corresponding rates in laminar diffusion flames, for reasons that still must be explained.

  9. Experimental investigation of the garnet formation in the CMNAS system at high pressure under deviatoric stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidelbach, F.

    2015-12-01

    The formation of eclogite in basaltic rocks during subduction of crustal material is a crucial process in the geodynamic cycle. This transition and also the formation of garnetite at greater depth (>10 GPa) have been investigated closely in experiments under hydrostatic conditions. However studies of naturally occurring eclogites indicate concurrent plastic deformation and deviatoric stresses during the phase transition may influence the microstructures as well as the rheology of the forming eclogite. In the present project we aim to investigate the influence of plastic deformation on the gabbro to eclogite transition in a simplified basaltic material as well as the transition of eclogite to garnetite at higher pressures. Starting materials with a simplified CMNAS composition were synthesized from glass in piston cylinder experiments at 0.5/3 GPa and 950-1000°/1200°C respectively, yielding fine grained (~10-20μm) mixtures of orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and plagioclase ('gabbro') and omphacite, garnet and quartz ('eclogite'). Transformation experiments were then performed in a pressure range from 3 to 12 GPa at 1200°C in a Dia-type mulitanvil press with six independently movable rams. Pure shear deformation of up to 30% was imposed in the deformation runs with strain rates ranging from 5x10-5 to 5x10-6 sec-1. For comparison static transformation experiments were performed with the same duration (100 to 1000 min). The reaction of the crystalline starting materials was generally sluggish and relatively large overstepping of phase boundaries was needed to induce notable reaction progress as determined by SEM-EDS, -EBSD and EPMA. Preliminary results suggest that concurrent deformation enhanced reaction progress in comparison to static experiments for both investigated transitions, however more experiments are needed to quantify this effect. Deformation was accommodated by intracrystalline plasticity of omphacite as well as diffusion assisted grain (phase) boundary

  10. DIRECT STELLAR RADIATION PRESSURE AT THE DUST SUBLIMATION FRONT IN MASSIVE STAR FORMATION: EFFECTS OF A DUST-FREE DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2011-10-01

    In massive star formation ({approx}> 40 M{sub sun}) by core accretion, the direct stellar radiation pressure acting on the dust particles exceeds the gravitational force and interferes with mass accretion at the dust sublimation front, the first absorption site. Ram pressure generated by high accretion rates of 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} is thought to be required to overcome the direct stellar radiation pressure. We investigate the direct stellar irradiation on the dust sublimation front, including the inner accretion disk structure. We show that the ram pressure of the accretion disk is lower than the stellar radiation pressure at the dust sublimation front. Thus, another mechanism must overcome the direct stellar radiation pressure. We suggest that the inner hot dust-free region is optically thick, shielding the dust sublimation front from direct stellar irradiation. Thus, accretion would not halt at the dust sublimation front, even at lower accretion rates.

  11. Soot formation and temperature structure in small methane-oxygen diffusion flames at subcritical and supercritical pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Hyun I.; Guelder, Oemer L.

    2010-06-15

    An experimental study was conducted to examine the characteristics of laminar methane-oxygen diffusion flames up to 100 atmospheres. The influence of pressure on soot formation and on the structure of the temperature field was investigated over the pressure range of 10-90 atmospheres in a high-pressure combustion chamber using a non-intrusive, line-of-sight spectral soot emission diagnostic technique. Two distinct zones characterized the appearance of a methane and pure oxygen diffusion flame: an inner luminous zone similar to the methane-air diffusion flames, and an outer diffusion flame zone which is mostly blue. The flame height, marked by the visible soot radiation emission, was reduced by over 50% over the pressure range of 10-100 atmospheres. Between 10 and 40 atmospheres, the soot levels increased with increasing pressure; however, above 40 atmospheres the soot concentrations decreased with increasing pressure. (author)

  12. Thickness of mouthguard sheets after vacuum-pressure formation: influence of mouthguard sheet material.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mutsumi; Koide, Kaoru; Iwasaki, Shin-Ichi

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the thickness of mouthguard sheet after vacuum-pressure formation based on the mouthguard sheet material. Three mouthguard sheet materials (4.0 mm thick) were compared: ethylene-vinyl acetate co-polymer (EVA), olefin co-polymer (OL), and polyolefin-polystyrene co-polymer (OS). The working model was made by hard gypsum that was trimmed to the height of 20 mm at the cutting edge of the maxillary central incisor and 15 mm at the mesiobuccal cusp of the maxillary first molar. Where the center of the softened sheet sagged 15 mm lower than the clamp, the sheet was pressed against the working model, followed by vacuum forming for 10 s and compression molding for 2 min. The thickness of mouthguard sheets after fabrication was determined for the incisal portion (incisal edge and labial surface) and molar portion (cusp and buccal surface), and dimensional measurements were obtained using a measuring device. Differences in the change in thickness due to sheet materials were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (anova) followed by Bonferroni's multiple comparison tests. The OL sheet was thickest at all measurement points. At the incisal edge and cusp, thickness after formation was highest for OL, then EVA and finally OS. At the labial surface and buccal surface, the thickness after formation was highest for OL, then OS and finally EVA. This study suggested that post-fabrication mouthguard thickness differed according to sheet material, with the olefin co-polymer sheet having the smallest thickness reduction. PMID:26446242

  13. Prophylactic Effects of Sauna on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness of the Wrist Extensors

    PubMed Central

    Khamwong, Peanchai; Paungmali, Aatit; Pirunsan, Ubon; Joseph, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Background: High-intensity of exercise or unaccustomed eccentric exercise can cause the phenomenon of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage (EIMD) which usually results in cramps, muscle strain, impaired muscle function and delayed-onset muscle soreness. Objectives: This study investigated the prophylactic effects of sauna towards the symptoms associated with muscle damage from eccentric exercises of wrist extensor muscle group. Patients and Methods: A total of twenty-eight subjects (mean age 20.9 years old, SD = 1.6) were randomly divided into the sauna group (n = 14) and the control group (n = 14). In the sauna group, subjects received sauna before eccentric exercise of the wrist extensor. The eccentric exercises were conducted on the non-dominant arm by using an isokinetic dynamometer. Pain Intensity (PI), Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) and passive range of motion of wrist flexion (PF-ROM) and extension (PE-ROM) were measured as pain variables. Grip Strength (GS) and Wrist Extension Strength (WES) were measured as variables of wrist extensor muscle function. All the measurements were performed at baseline, immediately after and from 1st to 8th days after the exercise-induced muscle damage. Results: The sauna group significantly demonstrated a lower deficit in ROM (passive flexion and passive extension), GS and WES following exercise than that of the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Sauna application prior to the exercise-induced muscle damage demonstrated effectiveness in reduction of sensory impairment (PF-ROM and PE-ROM) and improvement of muscle functions (GS, and WES) in wrist extensor muscle group. PMID:26446307

  14. Awareness about sore-throat, rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in a rural community.

    PubMed

    Arya, R K

    1992-01-01

    This I.C.M.R. study was conducted in 74 villages of Chiraigaon block, Varanasi, U.P., during the period March 1983 and December 1986. Before and after health education awareness survey about sore throat, rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease was carried out by interviewing 315 persons by stratified random sampling. The study shows that there is significant increase in the knowledge about most of the symptoms, causes, consequences and preventive measures of sore throat, rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease. This paper highlights the importance of health education as a vital component of rheumatic heart disease control programme. PMID:1303991

  15. [The plasty for the hip region sores, using the flap, consisting of M. tensor fasciae latae].

    PubMed

    Pasichniy, D A

    2015-02-01

    The method of plasty for the hip region sores, based on transposition of proximal part of m. tensor fascia latae in content of the flap, using her transsection between place of attachment to spina iliaca anterior superior and place of the main vascular pedicle entry into the muscle, was proposed, what permits to prevent vast mobilization of the muscle and to secure existing in normal conditions and formed in pathological conditions anas- tomoses between vascular net of the flap and surrounding tissues. The method proposed was successfully applied for plasty of the hip region sores of degrees III-IV in 2 patients. PMID:25985701

  16. Implications for Core Formation of the Earth from High Pressure-Temperature Au Partitioning Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Sharp, T. G.; Hervig, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    Siderophile elements in the Earth.s mantle are depleted relative to chondrites. This is most pronounced for the highly siderophile elements (HSEs), which are approximately 400x lower than chondrites. Also remarkable is the relative chondritic abundances of the HSEs. This signature has been interpreted as representing their sequestration into an iron-rich core during the separation of metal from silicate liquids early in the Earth's history, followed by a late addition of chondritic material. Alternative efforts to explain this trace element signature have centered on element partitioning experiments at varying pressures, temperatures, and compositions (P-T-X). However, first results from experiments conducted at 1 bar did not match the observed mantle abundances, which motivated the model described above, a "late veneer" of chondritic material deposited on the earth and mixed into the upper mantle. Alternatively, the mantle trace element signature could be the result of equilibrium partitioning between metal and silicate in the deep mantle, under P-T-X conditions which are not yet completely identified. An earlier model determined that equilibrium between metal and silicate liquids could occur at a depth of approximately 700 km, 27(plus or minus 6) GPa and approximately 2000 (plus or minus 200) C, based on an extrapolation of partitioning data for a variety of moderately siderophile elements obtained at lower pressures and temperatures. Based on Ni-Co partitioning, the magma ocean may have been as deep as 1450 km. At present, only a small range of possible P-T-X trace element partitioning conditions has been explored, necessitating large extrapolations from experimental to mantle conditions for tests of equilibrium models. Our primary objective was to reduce or remove the additional uncertainty introduced by extrapolation by testing the equilibrium core formation hypothesis at P-T-X conditions appropriate to the mantle.

  17. Estimating Hydraulic Conductivities in a Fractured Shale Formation from Pressure Pulse Testing and 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courbet, C.; DICK, P.; Lefevre, M.; Wittebroodt, C.; Matray, J.; Barnichon, J.

    2013-12-01

    In the framework of its research on the deep disposal of radioactive waste in shale formations, the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has developed a large array of in situ programs concerning the confining properties of shales in their underground research laboratory at Tournemire (SW France). One of its aims is to evaluate the occurrence and processes controlling radionuclide migration through the host rock, from the disposal system to the biosphere. Past research programs carried out at Tournemire covered mechanical, hydro-mechanical and physico-chemical properties of the Tournemire shale as well as water chemistry and long-term behaviour of the host rock. Studies show that fluid circulations in the undisturbed matrix are very slow (hydraulic conductivity of 10-14 to 10-15 m.s-1). However, recent work related to the occurrence of small scale fractures and clay-rich fault gouges indicate that fluid circulations may have been significantly modified in the vicinity of such features. To assess the transport properties associated with such faults, IRSN designed a series of in situ and laboratory experiments to evaluate the contribution of both diffusive and advective process on water and solute flux through a clay-rich fault zone (fault core and damaged zone) and in an undisturbed shale formation. As part of these studies, Modular Mini-Packer System (MMPS) hydraulic testing was conducted in multiple boreholes to characterize hydraulic conductivities within the formation. Pressure data collected during the hydraulic tests were analyzed using the nSIGHTS (n-dimensional Statistical Inverse Graphical Hydraulic Test Simulator) code to estimate hydraulic conductivity and formation pressures of the tested intervals. Preliminary results indicate hydraulic conductivities of 5.10-12 m.s-1 in the fault core and damaged zone and 10-14 m.s-1 in the adjacent undisturbed shale. Furthermore, when compared with neutron porosity data from borehole

  18. High Pressure Dehydration of Antigorite in Nature: Embrittlement and melt formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, B. W.; Cowan, D. S.

    2011-12-01

    Almirez spinifex olivines, and the presence in them of crystal-rich "fluid" inclusions. Thus, this complex provides not only a unique field example of the high-pressure breakdown reaction of antigorite, but possibly also of dehydration embrittlement and local melt formation.

  19. Aerobic endurance training reduces bubble formation and increases survival in rats exposed to hyperbaric pressure

    PubMed Central

    Wisløff, Ulrik; Brubakk, Alf O

    2001-01-01

    The formation of bubbles is the basis for injury to divers after decompression, a condition known as decompression illness. In the present study we investigated the effect of endurance training in the rat on decompression-induced bubble formation. A total of 52 adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (300-370 g) were randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups: training or sedentary control. Trained rats exercised on a treadmill for 1.5 h per day for 1 day, or for 2 or 6 weeks (5 days per week) at exercise intervals that alternated between 8 min at 85-90 % of maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2,max) and 2 min at 50-60 % of V̇O2,max. Rats were compressed (simulated dive) in a decompression chamber in pairs, one sedentary and one trained, at a rate of 200 kPa min−1 to a pressure of 700 kPa, and maintained for 45 min breathing air. At the end of the exposure period, rats were decompressed linearly to the ‘surface’ (100 kPa) at a rate of 50 kPa min−1. Immediately after reaching the ‘surface’ (100 kPa) the animals were anaesthetized and the right ventricle was insonated using Doppler ultrasound. Intensity-controlled interval training significantly increased V̇O2,max by 12 and 60 % after 2 and 6 weeks, respectively. At 6 weeks, left and right ventricular weights were 14 and 17 % higher, respectively, in trained compared to control rats. No effect of training was observed on skeletal muscle weight. Bubble formation was significantly reduced in trained rats after both 2 and 6 weeks. However, the same effect was seen after a single bout of aerobic exercise lasting 1.5 h on the day prior to decompression. All of the rats that exercised for 1.5 h and 2 weeks, and most of those that trained for 6 weeks, survived the protocol, whereas most sedentary rats died within 60 min post-decompression. This study shows that aerobic exercise protects rats from severe decompression and death. This may be a result of less bubbling in the trained animals. The data showed that the

  20. Electrohydrodynamic pressure enhanced by free space charge for electrically induced structure formation with high aspect ratio.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hongmiao; Wang, Chunhui; Shao, Jinyou; Ding, Yucheng; Li, Xiangming

    2014-10-28

    Electrically induced structure formation (EISF) is an interesting and unique approach for generating a microstructured duplicate from a rheological polymer by a spatially modulated electric field induced by a patterned template. Most of the research on EISF have so far used various dielectric polymers (with an electrical conductivity smaller than 10(-10) S/m that can be considered a perfect dielectric), on which the electric field induces a Maxwell stress only due to the dipoles (or bounded charges) in the polymer molecules, leading to a structure with a small aspect ratio. This paper presents a different approach for improving the aspect ratio allowed in EISF by doping organic salt into the perfect dielectric polymer, i.e., turning the perfect dielectric into a leaky dielectric, considering the fact that the free space charges enriched in the leaky dielectric polymer can make an additional contribution to the Maxwell stress, i.e., electrohydrodynamic pressure, which is desirable for high aspect ratio structuring. Our numerical simulations and experimental tests have shown that a leaky dielectric polymer, with a small conductivity comparable to that of deionized water, can be much more effective at being electrohydrodynamically deformed into a high aspect ratio in comparison with a perfect dielectric polymer when both of them have roughly the same dielectric constant. PMID:25268463

  1. Groundwater compatibility with formation water and pay zone rocks in Pervomaysk oil-gas-condensate field to maintain formation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, N.; Nazarov, A.; Alekseev, S.

    2016-03-01

    The paper describes the research results in determining the compatibility of groundwater from Aptain-Albian-Cenomanian aquifer with formation water and pay zone rocks in U1 layer sediments, Pervomaysk oil field.

  2. Isomekes: A fundamental tool to determine the formation pressure for diamond-inclusion pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvaro, Matteo; Angel, Ross; Mazzucchelli, Mattia; Nestola, Fabrizio; Domeneghetti, Chiara

    2014-05-01

    Because diamond is almost chemically pure carbon and extremely chemically inert, the structure and chemistry of diamond reveals very little about its conditions of formation. Much of what is believed about the genesis and distribution of diamond in the Earth's mantle has therefore been deduced indirectly from the characterisation of its mineral inclusions. The possible depths of entrapment of an inclusion within a host phase (and hence the depth of growth of the host diamond) can be determined if (1) the final pressure of the inclusion can be measured, (2) the Equations of State (EoS) of the host and inclusion phases are known, and (3) the elastic interaction between the host and inclusion can be calculated without gross assumptions. Given knowledge of all three, an isomeke line in P-T space (from the Greek "equal" and "length", Adams et al. 1975) can be calculated. The isomeke defines the conditions at which the host and inclusion would have had the same P, T and volume, and thus represents possible entrapment conditions. The recent application (Nestola et al. 2011; Howell et al. 2012) of in-situ diffraction techniques to the measurement of entrapped inclusions provides accurate final inclusion pressures. We have reformulated the elasticity problem so that, unlike previous work, these calculations can be performed with any form of equation of state and thermal expansion, and are not restricted to linear elasticity or just invertible EoS. This alone has significant advantages in the precision of the calculated depths of formation. Numerical calculations have been performed with a new module of EoS routines (Angel et al. 2014) that has been added to the publicly-available CrysFML library. The question remains as to what uncertainties in calculated depths of formation arise from uncertainties in experimentally-determined EoS. We will present two geologically-relevant examples, for olivine and garnet in diamond. Our calculations show that there is still a clear need

  3. Diagenesis, compaction, and fluid chemistry modeling of a sandstone near a pressure seal: Lower Tuscaloosa Formation, Gulf Coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weedman, S.D.; Brantley, S.L.; Shiraki, R.; Poulson, S.R.

    1996-01-01

    Petrographic, isotopic, and fluid-inclusion evidence from normally and overpressured sandstones of the lower Tuscaloosa Formation (Upper Cretaceous) in the Gulf Coast documents quartz-overgrowth precipitation at 90??C or less, calcite cement precipitation at approximately 100?? and 135??C, and prismatic quartz cement precipitation at about 125??C. Textural evidence suggests that carbonate cement dissolution occurred before the second phases of calcite and quartz precipitation, and was followed by precipitation of grain-rimming chlorite and pore-filling kaolinite. Geochemical calculations demonstrate that present-day lower Tuscaloosa Formation water from 5500 m depth could either dissolve or precipitate calcite cements in model simulations of upward water flow. Calcite dissolution or precipitation depends on PCO2 variability with depth (i.e., whether there is one or two-phase flow) or on the rate of generation of CO2 with depth. Calculations suggest that 105-106 rock volumes of water are required to flow through the section to precipitate 1-10% calcite cement. Compaction analysis suggests that late-stage compaction occurred in normally pressured sandstones after dissolution of carbonate cements, but was hindered in overpressured sandstones despite the presence of high porosity. These results document the inhibition of compaction by overpressured fluids and constrain the timing of pressure seal formation. Modeling results demonstrate that the proposed paragenesis used to constrain timing of pressure seal formation is feasible, and that most of the cement diagenesis occurred before the pressure seal became effective as a permeability barrier.

  4. Underground structure of terrestrial mud volcanoes and abnormal water pressure formation in Niigata, Central JAPAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K.; Shinya, T.; Miyata, Y.; Tokuyasu, S.

    2005-12-01

    Activity of mud volcano is thought to be caused by an abnormal water pressure generated in deep underground and make a serious problem for underground constructions such as railway tunnel, underground facility for radwaste and so on. It is important to investigate the underground structure of a mud volcano and the mechanism of abnormal water formation for site selection and safety assessment of such facilities. Serious trouble such as tunnel wall collapse due to the rock swelling has happened 180m deep under mud volcanoes. It took more than 10 years to excavate the section of 150 m long. 4 terrestrial mud volcanoes were found in the Tertiary sedimentary basin in Niigata, central Japan All the mud volcanoes are distributed along the rim of the topographic basin that is located at the NE-SW trending crest of mountainous area and distributed along the wing of anticline. Geological structure inside basin is heavily disturbed. The extinct mud volcano is exposed in the side-slope of newly constructed road and the internal vent structure of mud volcano can be observed. The vent is 30 m in diameter and is consisted of mud breccia and scaly network clay that is thought to be generated by hydro-fracturing and the following water-rock interaction between mudstone and groundwater. Groundwater erupted from mud volcano is highly saline with electric conductivity of 15 mS/cm and high 18 O/16 O isotope ratio of 1.2 parmillage. Also, the vitrinite reflectance is 1.5 to 1.9 % that is not expected in the sedimentary rocks exposed near ground surface. As a result, it is assumed that these erupted materials were introduced from the deep underground about 4000 m deep. CSA-MT geophysical exploration was carried out to survey the underground structure and obtained the profile of electrical resistivity from the surface to 800 m in depth. It is found that the disk-shaped low resistivity zone less than 1 m due to the high salinity content is identified in underground 600 m deep, 200 m thick

  5. Effects of whole-body vibration after eccentric exercise on muscle soreness and muscle strength recovery

    PubMed Central

    Timon, Rafael; Tejero, Javier; Brazo-Sayavera, Javier; Crespo, Carmen; Olcina, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not a single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise can reduce muscle soreness and enhance muscle recovery. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty untrained participants were randomly assigned to two groups: a vibration group (n=10) and control group (n=10). Participants performed eccentric quadriceps training of 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 120% 1RM, with 4 min rest between sets. After that, the vibration group received 3 sets of 1 min whole body vibration (12 Hz, 4 mm) with 30 s of passive recovery between sets. Serum creatine kinase, blood urea nitrogen, muscle soreness (visual analog scale) and muscle strength (peak isometric torque) were assessed. [Results] Creatine kinase was lower in the vibration group than in the control group at 24 h (200.2 ± 8.2 vs. 300.5 ± 26.1 U/L) and at 48 h (175.2 ± 12.5 vs. 285.2 ± 19.7 U/L) post-exercise. Muscle soreness decreased in vibration group compared to control group at 48 h post-exercise (34.1 ± 11.4 vs. 65.2 ± 13.2 mm). [Conclusion] Single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise reduced delayed onset muscle soreness but it did not affect muscle strength recovery. PMID:27390415

  6. Interleukin-6 and Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness Do Not Vary during the Menstrual Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaffin, Morgan E.; Berg, Kris E.; Meendering, Jessica R.; Llewellyn, Tamra L.; French, Jeffrey A.; Davis, Jeremy E.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a difference in interleukin-6 (IL-6) and delayed onset muscles soreness (DOMS) exists in two different phases of the menstrual cycle. Nine runners performed one 75-min high-intensity interval running session during the early follicular (EF) phase and once during the midluteal (ML) phase of the…

  7. Neutrophilia and an Anti-Inflammatory Drug as Markers of Inflammation in Delayed Muscle Soreness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lucille L.; And Others

    This study reexamined the concept that delayed muscle soreness (DMS) is a form of inflammatory pain. This was accomplished by having 32 male volunteers perform exercise known to induce DMS and then assess the total and differential white blood cell changes. In addition, an anti-inflammatory drug, idomethacin, was administered to determine whether…

  8. Effects of whole-body vibration after eccentric exercise on muscle soreness and muscle strength recovery.

    PubMed

    Timon, Rafael; Tejero, Javier; Brazo-Sayavera, Javier; Crespo, Carmen; Olcina, Guillermo

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not a single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise can reduce muscle soreness and enhance muscle recovery. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty untrained participants were randomly assigned to two groups: a vibration group (n=10) and control group (n=10). Participants performed eccentric quadriceps training of 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 120% 1RM, with 4 min rest between sets. After that, the vibration group received 3 sets of 1 min whole body vibration (12 Hz, 4 mm) with 30 s of passive recovery between sets. Serum creatine kinase, blood urea nitrogen, muscle soreness (visual analog scale) and muscle strength (peak isometric torque) were assessed. [Results] Creatine kinase was lower in the vibration group than in the control group at 24 h (200.2 ± 8.2 vs. 300.5 ± 26.1 U/L) and at 48 h (175.2 ± 12.5 vs. 285.2 ± 19.7 U/L) post-exercise. Muscle soreness decreased in vibration group compared to control group at 48 h post-exercise (34.1 ± 11.4 vs. 65.2 ± 13.2 mm). [Conclusion] Single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise reduced delayed onset muscle soreness but it did not affect muscle strength recovery. PMID:27390415

  9. Soot volume fraction measurement in low-pressure methane flames by combining laser-induced incandescence and cavity ring-down spectroscopy: Effect of pressure on soot formation

    SciTech Connect

    Desgroux, P.; Mercier, X.; Lefort, B.; Lemaire, R.; Therssen, E.; Pauwels, J.F.

    2008-10-15

    Soot volume fraction (f{sub v}) profiles are recorded in low-pressure methane/oxygen/nitrogen flat flames using laser-induced incandescence (LII). Experiments are performed from 20 to 28 kPa in flames having the same equivalence ratio (2.32). Calibration is performed by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and indicates a very weak soot volume fraction (0.066 ppb at 21.33 kPa and 0.8 ppb at 26.66 kPa in the burnt gases). Soot volume fraction is found to increase continuously after a given distance above the burner (HAB) and tends to level off in the burnt gases. The reaction time resolution available in low-pressure flames makes it possible to examine the early steps of soot formation. The variation of the LII signal with laser energy before the LII ''plateau'' region is much weaker at the beginning of soot formation than after a given reaction time. The LII time decays are nearly constant within the first millimetres, whereas an increase in the decay, correlated with the growth of the primary soot particle, is observed later. The growth of soot volume fraction is then analysed by considering the variation of the derivative function df{sub v}/dt with f{sub v}. Three regimes having respectively a positive slope, a constant slope, and a negative slope are observed and are interpreted with respect to the soot inception process. Finally, a very important sensitivity of f{sub v} with pressure P (at 30 mm HAB) is observed, leading to a power law, f{sub v}=KP{sup 11}, confirmed by extinction measurements (by CRDS). The observed dependence of f{sub v} with pressure could be a result of the prominence of the early soot inception process in the investigated low-pressure flames. (author)

  10. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Ethylene/Air Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Sunderland, P. B.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Soot formation was studied within laminar premixed ethylene/air flames (C/O ratios of 0.78-0.98) stabilized on a flat-flame burner operating at atmospheric pressure. Measurements included soot volume fractions by both laser extinction and gravimetric methods, temperatures by multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscopy, major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of condensable hydrocarbons by gravimetric sampling. and velocities by laser velocimetry. These data were used to find soot surface growth rates and primary soot particle nucleation rates along the axes of the flames. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates were correlated successfully by predictions based on typical hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall. These results suavest that reduced soot surface growth rates with increasing residence time seen in the present and other similar flames were mainly caused by reduced rates of surface activation due to reduced H atom concentrations as temperatures decrease as a result of radiative heat losses. Primary soot particle nucleation rates exhibited variations with temperature and acetylene concentrations that were similar to recent observations for diffusion flames; however, nucleation rates in the premixed flames were significantly lower than in, the diffusion flames for reasons that still must be explained. Finally, predictions of yields of major gas species based on mechanisms from both Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt were in good agreement with present measurements and suggest that H atom concentrations (relevant to HACA mechanisms) approximate estimates based on local thermodynamic equilibrium in the present flames.

  11. In situ characterization of formation and growth of high-pressure phases in single-crystal silicon during nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hu; Yan, Jiwang

    2016-04-01

    Pressure-induced intermediate phases of silicon exhibit unique characteristics in mechanics, chemistry, optics, and electrics. Clarifying the formation and growth processes of these new phases is essential for the preparation and application of them. For in situ characterization of the formation and growth of high-pressure phases in single-crystal silicon, a quantitative parameter, namely displacement change of indenter (Δ h) during the unloading holding process in nanoindentation, was proposed. Nanoindentation experiments under various unloading holding loads and loading/unloading rates were performed to investigate their effects on Δ h. Results indicate that Δ h varies significantly before and after the occurrence of pop-out; for the same maximum indentation load, it tends to increase with the decrease in the holding load and to increase with the increase in the loading/unloading rate. Thus, the value of Δ h can be regarded as an indicator that reflects the formation and growth processes of the high-pressure phases. Using Δ h, the initial position for the nucleation of the high-pressure phases, their growth, and their correlation to the loading/unloading rate were predictable.

  12. Methane hydrate synthesis from ice: Influence of pressurization and ethanol on optimizing formation rates and hydrate yield

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Po-Chun.; Huang, Wuu-Liang; Stern, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    Polycrystalline methane gas hydrate (MGH) was synthesized using an ice-seeding method to investigate the influence of pressurization and ethanol on the hydrate formation rate and gas yield of the resulting samples. When the reactor is pressurized with CH4 gas without external heating, methane hydrate can be formed from ice grains with yields up to 25% under otherwise static conditions. The rapid temperature rise caused by pressurization partially melts the granular ice, which reacts with methane to form hydrate rinds around the ice grains. The heat generated by the exothermic reaction of methane hydrate formation buffers the sample temperature near the melting point of ice for enough time to allow for continuous hydrate growth at high rates. Surprisingly, faster rates and higher yields of methane hydrate were found in runs with lower initial temperatures, slower rates of pressurization, higher porosity of the granular ice samples, or mixtures with sediments. The addition of ethanol also dramatically enhanced the formation of polycrystalline MGH. This study demonstrates that polycrystalline MGH with varied physical properties suitable for different laboratory tests can be manufactured by controlling synthesis procedures or parameters. Subsequent dissociation experiments using a gas collection apparatus and flowmeter confirmed high methane saturation (CH 4·2O, with n = 5.82 ± 0.03) in the MGH. Dissociation rates of the various samples synthesized at diverse conditions may be fitted to different rate laws, including zero and first order.

  13. Valley formation by groundwater seepage, pressurized groundwater outbursts and crater-lake overflow in flume experiments with implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Wouter A.; Braat, Lisanne; Baar, Anne W.; Kleinhans, Maarten G.

    2014-04-01

    Remains of fluvial valleys on Mars reveal the former presence of water on the surface. However, the source of water and the hydrological setting is not always clear, especially in types of valleys that are rare on Earth and where we have limited knowledge of the processes involved. We investigated three hydrological scenarios for valley formation on Mars: hydrostatic groundwater seepage, release of pressurized groundwater and crater-lake overflow. Using physical modeling in laboratory experiments and numerical hydrological modeling we quantitatively studied the morphological development and processes involved in channel formation that result from these different sources of water in unconsolidated sediment. Our results show that valleys emerging from seeping groundwater by headward erosion form relatively slowly as fluvial transport takes place in a channel much smaller than the valley. Pressurized groundwater release forms a characteristic source area at the channel head by fluidization processes. This head consist of a pit in case of superlithostatic pressure and may feature small radial channels and collapse features. Valleys emerging from a crater-lake overflow event develop quickly in a run-away process of rim erosion and discharge increase. The valley head at the crater outflow point has a converging fan shape, and the rapid incision of the rim leaves terraces and collapse features. Morphological elements observed in the experiments can help in identifying the formative processes on Mars, when considerations of experimental scaling and lithological characteristics of the martian surface are taken into account. These morphological features might reveal the associated hydrological settings and formative timescales of a valley. An estimate of formative timescale from sediment transport is best based on the final channel dimensions for groundwater seepage valleys and on the valley dimensions for pressurized groundwater release and crater-lake overflow valleys. Our

  14. Influence of the Gas Pressure on Single-wall Carbon Nanotubes Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkov, I.; Farhat, S.; Scott, C. D.

    2005-01-01

    Experiments and modeling have been performed to predict the effect of gas pressure on species distribution and nanotube growth rate under specific conditions of synthesis of singlewall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by arc discharge. Numerical results were compared with experiments in order to find a consistent correlation between the nanotube growth and the pressure. We used argon and helium as buffer gases with a total pressure varied between 0.1 and 1 bar. We experimentally observed that both the anode erosion rate and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of the as produced nanotube soot material are very sensitive to the total gas pressure in the reactor

  15. Cenosphere formation from heavy fuel oil: a numerical analysis accounting for the balance between porous shells and internal pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Vanteru M.; Rahman, Mustafa M.; Gandi, Appala N.; Elbaz, Ayman M.; Schrecengost, Robert A.; Roberts, William L.

    2016-01-01

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) as a fuel in industrial and power generation plants ensures the availability of energy at economy. Coke and cenosphere emissions from HFO combustion need to be controlled by particulate control equipment such as electrostatic precipitators, and collection effectiveness is impacted by the properties of these particulates. The cenosphere formation is a function of HFO composition, which varies depending on the source of the HFO. Numerical modelling of the cenosphere formation mechanism presented in this paper is an economical method of characterising cenosphere formation potential for HFO in comparison to experimental analysis of individual HFO samples, leading to better control and collection. In the present work, a novel numerical model is developed for understanding the global cenosphere formation mechanism. The critical diameter of the cenosphere is modelled based on the balance between two pressures developed in an HFO droplet. First is the pressure (Prpf) developed at the interface of the liquid surface and the inner surface of the accumulated coke due to the flow restriction of volatile components from the interior of the droplet. Second is the pressure due to the outer shell strength (PrC) gained from van der Walls energy of the coke layers and surface energy. In this present study it is considered that when PrC ≥ Prpf the outer shell starts to harden. The internal motion in the shell layer ceases and the outer diameter (DSOut) of the shell is then fixed. The entire process of cenosphere formation in this study is analysed in three phases: regression, shell formation and hardening, and post shell hardening. Variations in pressures during shell formation are analysed. Shell (cenosphere) dimensions are evaluated at the completion of droplet evaporation. The rate of fuel evaporation, rate of coke formation and coke accumulation are analysed. The model predicts shell outer diameters of 650, 860 and 1040 µm, and inner diameters are 360, 410

  16. Evaluation of Displacement and Pore Pressure change Due to the Injections of Fluid in Geological Formations and Mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Hsu, K.

    2011-12-01

    Cap rock plays an important role in the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide capture and storage. It indicates the effectiveness of the storage formation and controls the leakance of carbon dioxide and serves the need for geological repair and restoration. In this study, analytical solutions were devived based on the poroelastic theory. The effects of properties geological formation and mineralization were investigated on the change of pore pressure and the displacement of caprock. The results can be used for monitoring the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide.

  17. "Real-time" core formation experiments using X-ray tomography at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, H. C.; Anzures, B.; Yu, T.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The process of differentiation is a defining moment in a planet's history. Direct observation of this process at work is impossible in our solar system because it was complete within the first few tens of millions of years. Geochemical and geophysical evidence points to magma ocean scenarios to explain differentiation of large planets such as Earth. Smaller planets and planetesimals likely never achieved the high temperatures necessary for wide scale melting. In these smaller bodies, silicates may have only partially melted, or not melted at all. Furthermore, isotopic signatures in meteorites suggest that some planetesimals differentiated within just a few million years. Achieving efficient core segregation on this rapid timescale is difficult, particularly in a solid or semi-solid silicate matrix. Direct measurements of metallic melt migration velocities have been difficult due to experimental limitations and most previous work has relied on geometric models based on 2-D observations in quenched samples. We have employed a relatively new technique of in-situ, high pressure, high temperature, X-ray micro-tomography coupled with 3-D numerical simulations to evaluate the efficiency of melt percolation in metal/silicate systems. From this, we can place constraints on the timing of core formation in early solar system bodies. Mixtures of olivine and KLB-1 peridotite and up to 12 vol% FeS were pre-synthesized to achieve an initial equilibrium microstructure of silicate and sulfide. The samples were then were then pressed again to ~2GPa, and heated to ~1300°C to collect X-ray tomography images as the partially molten samples were undergoing shear deformation. The reconstructed 3-D images of melt distribution were used as the input for lattice Boltzmann simulations of fluid flow through the melt network and calculations of permeability and melt migration velocity. Our in-situ x-ray tomography results are complemented by traditional 2-D image analysis and high

  18. Kinetic studies of NO formation in pulsed air-like low-pressure dc plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, M.; Gortschakow, S.; Guaitella, O.; Marinov, D.; Rousseau, A.; Röpcke, J.; Loffhagen, D.

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics of the formation of NO in pulsed air-like dc plasmas at a pressure of 1.33 mbar and mean currents between 50 and 150 mA of discharge pulses with 5 ms duration has been investigated both experimentally and by self-consistent numerical modelling. Using time-resolved quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy, the densities of NO, NO2 and N2O have been measured in synthetic air as well as in air with 0.8% of NO2 and N2O, respectively. The temporal evolution of the NO density shows four distinct phases during the plasma pulse and the early afterglow in the three gas mixtures that were used. In particular, a steep density increase during the ignition phase and after termination of the discharge current pulse has been detected. The NO concentration has been found to reach a constant value of 0.57× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , 1.05× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , and 1.3× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} for mean plasma currents of 50 mA, 100 mA and 150 mA, respectively, in the afterglow. The measured densities of NO2 and N2O in the respective mixture decrease exponentially during the plasma pulse and remain almost constant in the afterglow, especially where the admixture of NO2 has a remarkable impact on the NO production during the ignition. The numerical results of the coupled solution of a set of rate equations for the various heavy particles and the time-dependent Boltzmann equation of the electrons agree quite well with the experimental findings for the different air-like plasmas. The main reaction processes have been analysed on the basis of the model calculations and the remaining differences between the experiment and modelling especially during the afterglow are discussed.

  19. Interpretation of in-situ pressure and flow measurements of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, S.M.; Peterson, E.W.; Lagus, P.L.; Lie, K.; Finley, S.J.; Nowak, E.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary interpretation of in-situ pressure and flow measurements of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The WIPP facility is located 660 m underground in the Salado, a bedded salt deposit. Shut-in pressure tests were conducted prior to, and subsequent to, the mining of a circular drift in order to evaluate excavation effects on pore pressure, permeability, and host rock heterogeneity. Borehole deformation was measured during these tests and used to correct for changes in the test region volume due to salt creep effects. Preliminary pre-excavation results indicate that the flow properties of this layered host rock are heterogeneous. Resulting pore pressures range from 1 to 14 MPa and permeabilities range from below measurable to about 1 nanodarcy. Normalized borehole diameter change rates were between {minus}4 and 63 microstrains/day. Shut-in pressures and borehole diameters in all test boreholes were affected by the excavation of Room Q coincident with the advances of the boring machine. Preliminary results from post-excavation test results show decreased pore pressures compared to pre-excavation values.

  20. Diagenesis, compaction, and fluid chemistry modeling of a sandstone near a pressure seal: Lower Tuscaloosa Formation, Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Weedman, S.D.; Brantley, S.L.; Shiraki, R.; Poulson, S.R.

    1996-07-01

    Petrographic, isotopic, and fluid-inclusion evidence from normally and overpressured sandstones of the lower Tuscaloosa Formation (Upper Cretaceous) in the Gulf Coast documents quartz-overgrowth precipitation at 90{degrees}C or less, calcite cement precipitation at approximately 100{degrees} and 135{degrees}C, and prismatic quartz cement precipitation at about 125{degrees}C. Textural evidence suggests that carbonate cement dissolution occurred before the second phases of calcite and quartz precipitation, and was followed by precipitation of grain-rimming chlorite and pore-filling kaolinite. Geochemical calculations demonstrate that present-day lower Tuscaloosa Formation water from 5500 m depth could either dissolve or precipitate calcite cements in model simulations of upward water flow. Calcite dissolution or precipitation depends on P{sub CO{sub 2}} variability with depth (i.e., whether there is one or two-phase flow) or on the rate of generation of CO{sub 2} with depth. Calculations suggest that 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} rock volumes of water are required to flow through the section to precipitate 1-10% calcite cement. Compaction analysis suggests that late-stage compaction occurred in normally pressured sandstones after dissolution of carbonate cements, but was hindered in overpressured sandstones despite the presence of high porosity. These results document the inhibition of compaction by overpressured fluids and constrain the timing of pressure seal formation. Modeling results demonstrate that the proposed paragenesis used to constrain timing of pressure seal formation is feasible, and that most of the cement diagenesis occurred before the pressure seal became effective as a permeability barrier.

  1. On Porosity Formation in Metal Matrix Composites Made with Dual-Scale Fiber Reinforcements Using Pressure Infiltration Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etemadi, Reihaneh; Pillai, Krishna M.; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.; Hamidi, Sajad Ahmad

    2015-05-01

    This is the first such study on porosity formation phenomena observed in dual-scale fiber preforms during the synthesis of metal matrix composites (MMCs) using the gas pressure infiltration process. In this paper, different mechanisms of porosity formation during pressure infiltration of Al-Si alloys into Nextel™ 3D-woven ceramic fabric reinforcements (a dual-porosity or dual-scale porous medium) are studied. The effect of processing conditions on porosity content of the ceramic fabric infiltrated by the alloys through the gas PIP (PIP stands for "Pressure Infiltration Process" in which liquid metal is injected under pressure into a mold packed with reinforcing fibers.) is investigated. Relative density (RD), defined as the ratio of the actual MMC density and the density obtained at ideal 100 pct saturation of the preform, was used to quantify the overall porosity. Increasing the infiltration temperature led to an increase in RD due to reduced viscosity of liquid metal and enhanced wettability leading to improved feedability of the liquid metal. Similarly, increasing the infiltration pressure led to enhanced penetration of fiber tows and resulted in higher RD and reduced porosity. For the first time, the modified Capillary number ( Ca*), which is found to predict formation of porosity in polymer matrix composites quite well, is employed to study porosity in MMCs made using PIP. It is observed that in the high Ca* regime which is common in PIP, the overall porosity shows a strong downward trend with increasing Ca*. In addition, the effect of matrix shrinkage on porosity content of the samples is studied through using a zero-shrinkage Al-Si alloy as the matrix; usage of this alloy as the matrix led to a reduction in porosity content.

  2. Method and tool for controlling fluid flow from a tubing string into a low pressure earth formation

    SciTech Connect

    Gurley, D.G.; Nelson, W.F.

    1981-04-07

    A tool is disclosed for controlling flow of treating fluid from a tubing string into an earth formation, in which the bottom hole pressure is less than the hydrostatic pressure of the fluid in the string. In another application, the tool is used in conjunction with a wash tool to wash sediment out of casing perforations and slotted liners. Before the downhole operation is commenced, a slidable piston in this tool closes off fluid outlet ports, to prevent the fluid from ''gravity flowing'' out of the tubing string. The piston is held in the closed position by the co-action of an adjusting bolt and a compression spring. The fluid is released from the tubing string by applying sufficient fluid pressure against the piston to overcome the spring load and thus move the piston downwardly past the fluid outlet port.

  3. New insights in the formation of silanol defects in silicalite-1 by water intrusion under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Karbowiak, Thomas; Saada, Mohamed-Ali; Rigolet, Séverinne; Ballandras, Anthony; Weber, Guy; Bezverkhyy, Igor; Soulard, Michel; Patarin, Joël; Bellat, Jean-Pierre

    2010-10-01

    The "water-silicalite-1" system is known to act as a molecular spring. The successive intrusion-extrusion cycles of liquid water in small crystallites (6 × 3 × 0.5 μm(3)) of hydrophobic silicalite-1 were studied by volumetric and calorimetric techniques. The experiments displayed a decrease of the intrusion pressure between the first intrusion-extrusion cycle and the consecutive ones, whereas the extrusion pressures remained unchanged. However, neither XRD studies nor SEM observations revealed any structural and morphological modifications of silicalite-1 at the long-range order. Such a shift in the value of the intrusion pressure after the first water intrusion-extrusion cycle is attributed to the creation of silanol groups during the first water intrusion. Detailed FTIR and solid-state NMR spectroscopic characterizations provided a molecular evidence of chemical modification of zeolite framework with the formation of local silanol defects created by the breaking of siloxane bonds. PMID:20676454

  4. The effect of ram-pressure stripping and starvation on the star formation properties of cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, A.; Boissier, S.; Cortese, L.; Gavazzi, G.

    2009-12-01

    We have combined UV to radio centimetric observations of resolved galaxies in the Virgo cluster with multizone, chemo-spectrophotometric models of galaxy evolution especially tailored to take into account the effects of the cluster environment (ram pressure stripping and starvation). This exercise has shown that anemic spirals with truncated radial profiles of the gas component and of the young stellar populations, typical in rich clusters of galaxies, have been perturbed by a recent (˜100 Myr) ram pressure stripping event induced by their interaction with the cluster intergalactic medium. Starvation is not able to reproduce the observed truncated radial profiles. Both ram pressure and starvation induce a decrease of the stellar surface brightness of the perturbed disc, and thus can hardly be invoked to explain the formation of lenticular galaxies inhabiting rich clusters, which are characterised by higher surface brightnesses than early type spirals of similar luminosity. In dwarfs the ram pressure stripping event is so efficient to totally remove their gas thus stopping on short time scales (<2 Gyr) their star formation activity. Low luminosity star forming discs can be transformed in dE galaxies.

  5. Durability of SRP Waste Glass - Effects of Pressure and Formation of Surface Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Wicks, G.G.

    2001-10-17

    This report discusses results of an assessment of pressure at anticipated storage temperature on the chemical durability of Savannah River Plant waste glass. Surface interactions were also examined and corrosion mechanisms discussed.

  6. Active CO2 Reservoir Management: A Strategy for Controlling Pressure, CO2 and Brine Migration in Saline-Formation CCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscheck, T. A.; Sun, Y.; Hao, Y.; Court, B.; Celia, M. A.; Wolery, T.; Tompson, A. F.; Aines, R. D.; Friedmann, J.

    2010-12-01

    CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) in deep geological formations is regarded as a promising means of lowering the amount of CO2 emitted to the atmosphere and thereby mitigate global warming. The most promising systems for CCS are depleted oil reservoirs, particularly those suited to CO2-based Enhanced Oil Recovery (CCS-EOR), and deep saline formations, both of which are well separated from the atmosphere. For conventional, industrial-scale, saline-formation CCS, pressure buildup can have a limiting effect on CO2 storage capacity. To address this concern, we analyze Active CO2 Reservoir Management (ACRM), which combines brine extraction and residual-brine reinjection with CO2 injection, comparing it with conventional saline-formation CCS. We investigate the influence of brine extraction on pressure response and CO2 and brine migration using the NUFT code. By extracting brine from the lower portion of the storage formation, from locations progressively further from the center of injection, we can counteract buoyancy that drives CO2 to the top of the formation, which is useful in dipping formations. Using “push-pull” manipulation of the CO2 plume, we expose less of the caprock seal to CO2 and more of the storage formation to CO2, with more of the formation utilized for trapping mechanisms. Plume manipulation can also counteract the influence of heterogeneity. We consider the impact of extraction ratio, defined as net extracted brine volume (extraction minus reinjection) divided by injected CO2 volume. Pressure buildup is reduced with increasing extraction ratio, which reduces CO2 and brine migration, increases CO2 storage capacity, and reduces other risks, such as leakage up abandoned wells, caprock fracturing, fault activation, and induced seismicity. For a 100-yr injection period, a 10-yr delay in brine extraction does not diminish the magnitude of pressure reduction. Moreover, it is possible to achieve pressure management with just a few brine-extraction wells

  7. Barometric pressure transient testing applications at the Nevada Test Site: formation permeability analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, J.M.

    1984-12-01

    The report evaluates previous investigations of the gas permeability of the rock surrounding emplacement holes at the Nevada Test Site. The discussion sets the framework from which the present uncertainty in gas permeability can be overcome. The usefulness of the barometric pressure testing method has been established. Flow models were used to evaluate barometric pressure transients taken at NTS holes U2fe, U19ac and U20ai. 31 refs., 103 figs., 18 tabs. (ACR)

  8. The prophylactic effect of dexamethasone on postoperative sore throat in prone position surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Ho; Lee, Yoon Chan; Choi, So Ron; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Jong Hwan; Chung, Chan Jong

    2016-01-01

    Background Sore throat and hoarseness are common complications after general anesthesia with tracheal intubation. The position for patients can affect the incidence of postoperative sore throat (POST) by causing displacement of the endotracheal tube. This study investigated the prophylactic effect of dexamethasone in prone position surgeries. Methods One hundred-fifty patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery (18-75 yr) were randomly allocated into the normal saline group (group P, n = 50), dexamethasone 0.1 mg/kg group (group D1, n = 50) or dexamethasone 0.2 mg/kg group (group D2, n = 50). The incidence and severity of POST, hoarseness, and cough were measured using direct interview at 1, 6, and 24 h after tracheal extubation. The severity of POST, hoarseness, and cough were graded using a 4-point scale. Results At 1, 6, and 24 h after extubation, the incidence of sore throat was significantly lower in group D1 (1 h; P = 0.015, 6 h; P < 0.001, 24 h; P = 0.038) and group D2 (1 h; P < 0.001, 6 h; P < 0.001, 24 h; P = 0.017) compared to group P. There were less number of patients in the groups D1 and D2 than group P suffering from moderate grade of POST at 1, 24 h after extubation. The incidence of hoarseness at 1, 6, and 24 h after extubation was significantly lower in groups D2 than group P (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in the incidence of cough among the three groups. Conclusions The prophylactic use of dexamethasone 0.1 mg/kg and 0.2 mg/kg in prone surgery reduces the incidence of postoperative sore throat and dexamethasone 0.2 mg/kg decreases the incidence of hoarseness. PMID:27274371

  9. Abiotic Formation of Valine Peptides Under Conditions of High Temperature and High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Otake, Tsubasa; Ishiguro, Takato; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the oligomerization of solid valine and the stabilities of valine and valine peptides under conditions of high temperature (150-200 °C) and high pressure (50-150 MPa). Experiments were performed under non-aqueous condition in order to promote dehydration reaction. After prolonged exposure of monomeric valine to elevated temperatures and pressures, the products were analyzed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry comparing their retention times and masses. We identified linear peptides that ranged in size from dimer to hexamer, as well as a cyclic dimer. Previous studies that attempted abiotic oligomerization of valine in the absence of a catalyst have never reported valine peptides larger than a dimer. Increased reaction temperature increased the dissociative decomposition of valine and valine peptides to products such as glycine, β-alanine, ammonia, and amines by processes such as deamination, decarboxylation, and cracking. The amount of residual valine and peptide yields was greater at higher pressures at a given temperature, pressure, and reaction time. This suggests that dissociative decomposition of valine and valine peptides is reduced by pressure. Our findings are relevant to the investigation of diagenetic processes in prebiotic marine sediments where similar pressures occur under water-poor conditions. These findings also suggest that amino acids, such as valine, could have been polymerized to peptides in deep prebiotic marine sediments within a few hundred million years.

  10. High-pressure synthesis of new materials via formation of new bonding patterns and unusual stoichiometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, Alexander

    2013-06-01

    The search for new materials synthesized under extreme conditions of high pressure and high pressure is currently actively pursued. There are multiple theoretical predictions for superior material properties, such as ultra-hardness, superior transport properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity, high energy-density, high-temperature superconductivity, ability to storage hydrogen, etc. Synthesis of new materials at high pressures is based on changes in the equilibrium chemical bonding. Moreover, materials with ``unusual'' stoichiometries have been predicted to become thermodynamically stable at high pressures. Implications of this novel extreme chemistry for synthesis of new materials for practical applications remain challenging because high-pressure bonding patterns are often thermodynamically unstable at ambient pressure. Search for a recovery mechanisms or attempts of synthesis in nominally metastable conditions require detailed knowledge of the energy landscape; extensive collaborative efforts of experiment and theory are needed for its determination. Here, I emphasize the importance for this task of in situ fast diagnostic methods. I will present new results on synthesis of materials with new bonding patterns and unusual stoichiometries containing hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon, and halogens. This work has been performed in collaboration with M. Somayazulu, V. V. Struzhkin, V. Prakapenka, E. Stavrou, T. Muramatsu,A. Oganov, W. Zhang, Q. Zhu, S. E. Boulfelfel, A. O. Lyakhov, Z. Konopkova, H.-P. Liermann, D.-Y. Kim. I acknowledge the support of NSF, EFRee (DOE), DARPA, Army Research Office, Deep Carbon Observatory.

  11. The Evolution of Web-based Medical Information on Sore Throat: a Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Buonuomo, Paola Sabrina; De Rose, Paola; Onesimo, Roberta; Vituzzi, Andrea; D'Atri, Alessandro

    2003-01-01

    Background The content of a page can change and is likely to change over time; this is one of the useful qualities of the Web, but also a dangerous one. Objective To monitor the evolution of Web page contents on sore throat over a 3 year period. Methods Two medical doctors independently evaluated 34 Web pages on sore throat. Pages were found using a metasearch engine. The evaluation factors were: the adherence of medical contents to a gold standard (American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations) composed of 5 subfactors (epidemiological, clinical, complications, diagnosis, and therapy); the completeness of the contents in terms of considered/missed factors of the gold standard; references to medical literature; and a specified last update of the page. During the observation period these sites were revisited twice, after 28 and 39 months, to examine any changes therein since the first visit. Results The degree of adherence to the gold standard did not significantly change. Variations (both positive and negative) were recorded solely with regard to the update and references factors as well as with regard to the availability of the pages over time (18% disappeared during the observation period). Conclusions In 3 years medical contents have not changed significantly and despite the contemporary epochal Internet revolution (in terms of, eg, technology, graphics, and access) and the increase in the number of sites dealing with the issue of sore throat, there has been no corresponding qualitative increase in the contents of the pages monitored. PMID:12857666

  12. Predictive Factors for Medical Consultation for Sore Throat in Adults with Recurrent Pharyngotonsillitis

    PubMed Central

    Koskenkorva, T.; Koivunen, P.; Alho, O.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Objects. To seek patient- and episode-related factors that associate with medical consultation for acute sore throat because these factors may affect the patient being referred to specialist care and tonsillectomy for recurrent pharyngotonsillitis. Methods. In a secondary analysis of two prior randomised controlled trials, sore throat episodes and medical visits were explored among 156 adult patients referred for tonsillectomy because of recurrent pharyngotonsillitis. Results. The 156 patients (104 females, mean age of 26 years) suffered from 208 acute pharyngotonsillitis episodes during 5-6 months of follow-up. Forty (25%) patients visited a physician, and female gender (adjusted hazard ratio, HR, 3.3; 95% confidence interval 1.4–8.0) and finding of chronically infected tonsils (HR 2.7; 1.2–6.1) were associated with medical consultation. Thirty-six (17%) episodes led to medical consultation during the first 7 days of symptoms. Presence of severe throat pain was related to medical visit (HR 4.3; 1.0–18.5). Conclusions. Even among patients with recurrent pharyngotonsillitis, the acute sore throat episodes were usually mild and only few resulted in medical consultation, with female gender, chronically infected tonsils, and having severe throat pain increasing the consultation rate.

  13. Group A streptococcal sore throat in a periurban population of northern India: a one-year prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, S.; Kumar, R.; Ray, P.; Vohra, H.; Ganguly, N. K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the incidence and risk factors of group A streptococcus (GAS) sore throat among school-aged children living in a periurban slum area of Chandigarh, North India. METHODS: A total of 536 children aged 5-15 years from 261 families identified by a systematic random selection method were enrolled in the study. Episodes of sore throat were recorded through fortnightly home visits over a one-year period. The local vernacular (Hindi) terms gala kharab (bad throat) and khansi jukam (cough and cold) were used to identify symptoms of sore throat, and throat swab specimens were collected from children who had these symptoms on the day of the home visit. Bacterial culture was carried out and the isolation of GAS was confirmed using group-A-specific antiserum. FINDINGS: The incidences of sore throat and GAS sore throat were, respectively, 7.05 and 0.95 episodes per child-year. The incidence was higher in the following situations: among 11-year-olds, during the winter (November to January) and rainy (August) months (a bimodal peak), among children living in houses where there was no separate room for the kitchen, and in homes that included a tobacco smoker. CONCLUSION: The results show that the incidence of GAS sore throat was related to age, season, and indoor air pollution. PMID:11436474

  14. Prophylactic Effects of Lidocaine or Beclomethasone Spray on Post-Operative Sore Throat and Cough after Orotracheal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Banihashem, Nadia; Alijanpour, Ebrahim; Hasannasab, Bahman; Zarei, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Post-operative sore throat and cough are common complications of endotracheal intubation. These conditions may be very distressing for the patient and may lead to unpleasant memories. This study was performed in order to determine whether beclomethasone and lidocaine spray could reduce the frequency of post-operative sore throat and hoarseness after tracheal extubation. Materials and Methods: Ninety women (18–60 years of age) with an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I or II and undergoing elective mastoidectomy were randomized into three groups of 30 patients. The endotracheal tubes in each group were sprayed with 50% beclomethasone, 10% lidocaine hydrochloride, or normal saline (control group) before endotracheal intubation. Patients were examined for sore throat (none, mild, moderate, or severe), cough, and hoarseness at 1 and 24 h after extubation. Results: There was a significantly lower incidence and severity of post-operative sore throat in the beclomethasone group than the lidocaine and control groups (P<0.05) at each observation time point. At 24 h after extubation, the incidence and severity of sore throat and cough was significantly lower in the lidocaine compared with the control group. The incidence of hoarseness was not significantly different among the three groups. Conclusion: Spraying beclomethasone and lidocaine on the endotracheal tube is a simple and effective method to reduce the incidence and severity of post-operative sore throat. PMID:26082898

  15. Postoperative Sore Throat After Laryngoscopy With Macintosh or Glide Scope Video Laryngoscope Blade in Normal Airway Patients

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Atabak; Imani, Farsad; Makarem, Jalil; Khajavi, Mohammad Reza; Etezadi, Farhad; Habibi, Shirin; Shariat Moharari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Glide Scope videolaryngoscope provides a suitable view for intubation, with less force required. Objectives: The present study was conducted, to compare postoperative sore throat and hoarseness after laryngoscopy and intubation, by Macintosh blade or Glide Scope video laryngoscope in normal airway patients. Patients and Methods: Three hundred patients were randomly allocated into two groups of 150: Macintosh blade laryngoscope or Glide Scope video laryngoscope. The patients were evaluated for 48 hours for sore throat and hoarseness by an interview. Results: The incidence and severity of sore throat in the Glide Scope group, at 6, 24 and 48 hours after the operation, were significantly lower than in the Macintosh laryngoscope group. In addition, the incidence of hoarseness in the Glide Scope group, at 6 and 24 hours after the operation, were significantly lower than in the Macintosh laryngoscope group. The incidence and severity of sore throat in men, at 6 and 24 hours after the operation, were significantly lower than in the women. Conclusions: The incidence and severity of sore throat and hoarseness after tracheal intubation by Glide Scope were lower than in the Macintosh laryngoscope. The incidence and severity of sore throat were increased by intubation and longer operation times. PMID:24660157

  16. Development and distribution of bed-parallel compaction bands and pressure solution seams in carbonates (Bolognano Formation, Majella Mountain, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustichelli, A.; Tondi, E.; Agosta, F.; Cilona, A.; Giorgioni, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Oligo-Miocene ramp carbonates pertaining to the Bolognano Formation, cropping out at the Majella Mountain, Central Italy, are diffusely crosscut by bed-parallel structural elements such as compaction bands and pressure solution seams. These bed-parallel structural elements formed under a vertical loading, during the progressive burial of the carbonates. The present field and laboratory study focuses on the control exerted, on development and distribution of bed-parallel compaction bands and pressure solution seams, by compositional, sedimentological and pore network characteristics of a variety of carbonate rocks (skeletal grainstones and packstones, marly wackestones to mudstones). The main results are consistent with the following statements: (i) bed-parallel compaction bands formed only within poorly cemented, porous grainstones (2D porosity > 10%; 3D porosity > 15%). Their dimensional parameters (i.e., length, spacing, thickness) were strongly controlled by both sorting and sphericity of the carbonate grains, as well as by the amount of intergranular macroporosity. All these rock characteristics enhanced all physical processes (i.e. grain rotation, translation and fracturing) associated to compaction banding; (ii) bed-parallel pressure solution seams predominantly formed within fine-grained packstones made up of well-sorted and spherical carbonate grains with absence of internal pores, and small amounts of clayish matrix (2-4% of total rock volume). High contents of pre-existing cement also enhanced pressure solution; (iii) well-sorted carbonates with spherical grains may be suitable to both compaction banding and pressure solution; (iv) skeletal grain types which compose grain-supported carbonate rocks (grainstones and packstones), in many cases, indirectly influence the distribution of both bed-parallel compaction bands and pressure solution seams. Considering that the containment and migration capacity of geofluids in the subsurface within carbonate

  17. Effect of high pressure on the formation of ordered phases in Ta-C systems

    SciTech Connect

    Markhasev, B.I.; Dzhamarov, S.S.; Geshko, E.I.; Klyugvant, V.V.; Pilipovskii, Y.L.; Shamatov, Y.M.

    1985-03-01

    This paper considers the effect of pressure on the completion of the transformations TaC /SUB x/ Ta/sub 4/C/sub 3/ and TaC /SUB x/ Ta/sub 2/C. The data show that in the samples with C/Ta = 0.68 and 0.71, the applied pressure substantially increases the diffraction peak heights of the ordered phases, Ta/sub 4/C/sub 3/ and Ta/sub 2/C. In samples with C/Ta = 0.76, high pressure does not generally increase the intensities of the diffracted peaks of Ta/sub 4/C/sub 3/ and Ta/sub 2/C, however the equilibrium between them is displaced to the side of increased Ta/sub 2/C content. In one of the samples a complete disappearance of the disordered TaC /SUB x/ is not observed. It is concluded that high pressure ( about7GPa) promotes the transition of nonstoichiometric TaC /SUB x/ into ordered Ta/sub 4/C/sub 3/ and Ta/sub 2/C as well as broadens the existence region of the latter. A complete transformation of TaC /SUB x/ into the ordered phase does not occur even at pressures up to about 9 GPa.

  18. The Effect of Warm-Up and Cool-Down Exercise on Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness in the Quadriceps Muscle: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Olav; Sjøhaug, Mona; van Beekvelt, Mireille; Mork, Paul Jarle

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of warm-up and cool-down exercise on delayed onset of muscle soreness at the distal and central parts of rectus femoris following leg resistance exercise. Thirty-six volunteers (21 women, 15 men) were randomly assigned to the warm-up (20 min ergometer cycling prior to the resistance exercise), cool-down (20 min cycling after the resistance exercise), or control group performing resistance exercise only. The resistance exercise consisted of front lunges (10×5 repetitions/sets) with external loading of 40% (women) and 50% (men) of body mass. Primary outcomes were pressure pain threshold along rectus femoris and maximal isometric knee extension force. Data were recorded before the resistance exercise and on the two consecutive days. Pressure pain threshold at the central muscle belly was significantly reduced for the control group on both day 2 and 3 (p≤0.003) but not for the warm-up group (p≥0.21). For the cool-down group, pressure pain threshold at the central muscle belly was significantly reduced on day 2 (p≤0.005) and was also lower compared to the warm-up group (p=0.025). Force was significantly reduced on day 2 and 3 for all groups (p<0.001). This study indicates that aerobic warm-up exercise performed prior to resistance exercise may prevent muscle soreness at the central but not distal muscle regions, but it does not prevent loss of muscle force. PMID:23486850

  19. Investigation Of Adhesion Formation In New Stainless Steel Trim Spring Operated Pressure Relief Valves

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Robert E.; Bukowski, Julia V.; Goble, William M.

    2013-04-16

    Examination of proof test data for new (not previously installed) stainless steel (SS) trim spring operated pressure relief valves (SOPRV) reveals that adhesions form between the seat and disc in about 46% of all such SOPRV. The forces needed to overcome these adhesions can be sufficiently large to cause the SOPRV to fail its proof test (FPT) prior to installation. Furthermore, a significant percentage of SOPRV which are found to FPT are also found to ''fail to open'' (FTO) meaning they would not relief excess pressure in the event of an overpressure event. The cases where adhesions result in FTO or FPT appear to be confined to SOPRV with diameters < 1 in and set pressures < 150 psig and the FTO are estimated to occur in 0.31% to 2.00% of this subpopulation of SS trim SOPRV. The reliability and safety implications of these finding for end-users who do not perform pre-installation testing of SOPRV are discussed.

  20. Dissociation of CH4 at high pressures and temperatures: diamond formation in giant planet interiors?

    PubMed

    Benedetti, L R; Nguyen, J H; Caldwell, W A; Liu, H; Kruger, M; Jeanloz, R

    1999-10-01

    Experiments using laser-heated diamond anvil cells show that methane (CH4) breaks down to form diamond at pressures between 10 and 50 gigapascals and temperatures of about 2000 to 3000 kelvin. Infrared absorption and Raman spectroscopy, along with x-ray diffraction, indicate the presence of polymeric hydrocarbons in addition to the diamond, which is in agreement with theoretical predictions. Dissociation of CH4 at high pressures and temperatures can influence the energy budgets of planets containing substantial amounts of CH4, water, and ammonia, such as Uranus and Neptune. PMID:10506552

  1. Enhancing Magnesite Formation at Low Temperature and High CO2 Pressure: The Impact of Seed Crystals and Minor Components

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Qafoku, Odeta; Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor; Liu, Jia; Perea, Daniel E.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2015-02-24

    The formation of magnesite was followed in aqueous solution containing initially added Mg(OH)2 equilibrated with supercritical carbon dioxide (90 atm pressure, 50°C) in the presence of introduced magnesite particles and minor components, Co(II). As expected, the introduction of magnesite particles accelerated the formation of magnesite from solution. However, the formation rate of magnesite was even greater when small concentrations of Co(II) were introduced, indicating that the increased rate of magnesite formation in the presence of Co(II) was not solely due to the addition of a growth promoting surface. Detailed analysis of the magnesite particles by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and atom probe tomography (APT) revealed that the originally added Co(II) was concentrated in the center but also present throughout the growing magnesite particles. Addition of the Co(II) in different chemical forms (i.e. as solid phase CoCO3 or Co(OH)2) could alter the growth rate of magnesite depending upon the addition of bicarbonate to the starting solution. Geochemical modeling calculations indicate that this difference is related to the thermodynamic stability of these different phases in the initial solutions. More broadly, these results indicate that the presence of even small concentrations of foreign ions that form carbonate compounds with a similar structure as magnesite can be incorporated into the magnesite lattice, accelerating the formation of anhydrous carbonates in natural environments.

  2. Transdermal deferoxamine prevents pressure-induced diabetic ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Duscher, Dominik; Neofytou, Evgenios; Wong, Victor W.; Maan, Zeshaan N.; Rennert, Robert C.; Januszyk, Michael; Rodrigues, Melanie; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Whitmore, Arnetha J.; Galvez, Michael G.; Whittam, Alexander J.; Brownlee, Michael; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    There is a high mortality in patients with diabetes and severe pressure ulcers. For example, chronic pressure sores of the heels often lead to limb loss in diabetic patients. A major factor underlying this is reduced neovascularization caused by impaired activity of the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). In diabetes, HIF-1α function is compromised by a high glucose-induced and reactive oxygen species-mediated modification of its coactivator p300, leading to impaired HIF-1α transactivation. We examined whether local enhancement of HIF-1α activity would improve diabetic wound healing and minimize the severity of diabetic ulcers. To improve HIF-1α activity we designed a transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) containing the FDA-approved small molecule deferoxamine (DFO), an iron chelator that increases HIF-1α transactivation in diabetes by preventing iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen stress. Applying this TDDS to a pressure-induced ulcer model in diabetic mice, we found that transdermal delivery of DFO significantly improved wound healing. Unexpectedly, prophylactic application of this transdermal delivery system also prevented diabetic ulcer formation. DFO-treated wounds demonstrated increased collagen density, improved neovascularization, and reduction of free radical formation, leading to decreased cell death. These findings suggest that transdermal delivery of DFO provides a targeted means to both prevent ulcer formation and accelerate diabetic wound healing with the potential for rapid clinical translation. PMID:25535360

  3. High-temperature- and high-pressure-induced formation of the Laves-phase compound XeS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiaozhen; Chen, Yangmei; Xiang, Shikai; Kuang, Xiaoyu; Bi, Yan; Chen, Haiyan

    2016-06-01

    We explore the reactivity of xenon with sulfur under high pressure, using unbiased structure searching techniques combined with first-principles calculations, which identify a stable XeS2 compound crystallized in a Laves phase with hypercoordinated (16-fold) Xe at 191 GPa and 0 K. Taking the thermal effects into account, we find that increasing the temperature could further stabilize it. The formation of XeS2 is a consequence of pressure-induced charge transfer from Xe to S atoms and the delocalization of Xe 5 p and S 3 p electrons. Meanwhile, the stabilization into a Laves phase of XeS2 is the result of delocalized chemical bonding and the need for optimum structure packing. The present discussion of the formation mechanism in XeS2 is general, and conclusions can be used to understand the formation of other Laves-phase compounds and the Xe chemistry that allows closed-shell Xe to participate in chemical reactions.

  4. First Evidence of Rh Nano-Hydride Formation at Low Pressure.

    PubMed

    Zlotea, Claudia; Oumellal, Yassine; Msakni, Mariem; Bourgon, Julie; Bastide, Stéphane; Cachet-Vivier, Christine; Latroche, Michel

    2015-07-01

    Rh-based nanoparticles supported on a porous carbon host were prepared with tunable average sizes ranging from 1.3 to 3.0 nm. Depending on the vacuum or hydrogen environment during thermal treatment, either Rh metal or hydride is formed at nanoscale, respectively. In contrast to bulk Rh that can form a hydride phase under 4 GPa pressure, the metallic Rh nanoparticles (∼2.3 nm) absorb hydrogen and form a hydride phase at pressure below 0.1 MPa, as evidenced by the presence of a plateau pressure in the pressure-composition isotherm curves at room temperature. Larger metal nanoparticles (∼3.0 nm) form only a solid solution with hydrogen under similar conditions. This suggests a nanoscale effect that drastically changes the Rh-H thermodynamics. The nanosized Rh hydride phase is stable at room temperature and only desorbs hydrogen above 175 °C. Within the present hydride particle size range (1.3-2.3 nm), the hydrogen desorption is size-dependent, as proven by different thermal analysis techniques. PMID:26098365

  5. Magnesite formation from MgO and CO2 at the pressures and temperatures of Earth's mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Henry P.; Doczy, Vincent M.; Frank, Mark R.; Hasan, Maggie; Lin, Jung-Fu; Yang, Jing

    2013-08-02

    Magnesite (MgCO3) is an important phase for the carbon cycle in and out of the Earth’s mantle. Its comparably large P-T stability has been inferred for several years based on the absence of its decomposition in experiments. Here we report the first experimental evidence for synthesis of magnesite out of its oxide components (MgO and CO2) at P-T conditions relevant to the Earth’s mantle. Magnesite formation was observed in situ using synchrotron X-ray diffraction, coupled with laser-heated diamond-anvil cells (DACs), at pressures and temperatures of Earth’s mantle. Despite the existence of multiple high-pressure CO2 polymorphs, the magnesite-forming reaction was observed to proceed at pressures ranging from 5 to 40 GPa and temperatures between 1400 and 1800 K. No other pressure-quenchable materials were observed to form via the MgO + CO2 = MgCO3 reaction. This work further strengthens the notion that magnesite may indeed be the primary host phase for oxidized carbon in the deep Earth.

  6. Influence of flowing helium gas on plasma plume formation in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Konda, Kohmei; Ogura, Kazuo

    2015-05-15

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and a foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. The helium gas flowing out of quartz tube mixes with air, and the flow channel is composed of the regions of flowing helium gas and air. The plasma plume length is equivalent to the reachable distance of flowing helium gas. Although the amount of helium gas on the flow channel increases by increasing the inner diameter of quartz tube at the same gas flow velocity, the plasma plume length peaks at around 8 m/s of gas flow velocity, which is the result that a flow of helium gas is balanced with the amount of gas. The plasma plume is formed at the boundary region where the flow of helium gas is kept to the wall of the air.

  7. Theory of Filamentary Plasma Array Formation in Microwave Breakdown at Near-Atmospheric Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Sang Ki; Verboncoeur, John P.

    2009-07-31

    Recently reported observations of filamentation during high power microwaves breakdown of near-atmospheric pressure gas are explained using a one-dimensional fluid model coupled to a theoretical wave-plasma model. This self-consistent treatment allows for time-dependent effects, plasma growth and diffusion, and partial absorption and reflection of waves. Simulation results, consistent with experiments, show the evolution of the plasma filaments spaced less than one-quarter wavelength, the sequential discrete light emission propagating back toward the source, and the diffusion and decay of the plasma. The model allows examination of many features not easily obtained experimentally, including dependence on field strength and frequency, pressure, and gas composition, which influence the breakdown and emission properties, including the spacing and speed of propagation of the filaments.

  8. Kinetics of microstructure formation of high-pressure induced gel from a whey protein isolate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jin-Song; Yang, Hongwei; Zhu, Wanpeng; Mu, Tai-Hua

    2010-03-01

    The kinetic process of pressure-induced gelation of whey protein isolate (WPI) solutions was studied using in situ light scattering. The relationship of the logarithm of scattered light intensity (I) versus time (t) was linear after the induced time and could be described by the Cahn-Hilliard linear theory. With increasing time, the scattered intensity deviated from the exponential relationship, and the time evolution of the scattered light intensity maximum Im and the corresponding wavenumber qm could be described in terms of the power-law relationship as Im~fβ and qm~f-α, respectively. These results indicated that phase separation occurred during the gelation of WPI solutions under high pressure.

  9. Anomalous structure-property relationships in metallic glasses through pressure-mediated glass formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jun; Asta, Mark; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2016-04-01

    Metallic glasses are commonly found to favor denser packing structures and icosahedral order in experiments, simulations, and theoretical models. Here we present a molecular dynamics simulation study of Cu-Zr metallic glasses, prepared through a pressure-mediated pathway. The resulting glasses exhibit anomalous structure-property relationships; these glasses are less energetically stable, concomitant with a denser atomic packing and a significant increase in icosahedral short-range order. The enhanced icosahedral order is shown to be accompanied by a pressure-mediated change in chemical short-range order. The results demonstrate that in amorphous alloys (nonmonatomic), theoretical frameworks of the two-order-parameter model must be generalized to account for chemical degrees of freedom.

  10. Theory of filamentary plasma array formation in microwave breakdown at near-atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sang Ki; Verboncoeur, John P

    2009-07-31

    Recently reported observations of filamentation during high power microwaves breakdown of near-atmospheric pressure gas are explained using a one-dimensional fluid model coupled to a theoretical wave-plasma model. This self-consistent treatment allows for time-dependent effects, plasma growth and diffusion, and partial absorption and reflection of waves. Simulation results, consistent with experiments, show the evolution of the plasma filaments spaced less than one-quarter wavelength, the sequential discrete light emission propagating back toward the source, and the diffusion and decay of the plasma. The model allows examination of many features not easily obtained experimentally, including dependence on field strength and frequency, pressure, and gas composition, which influence the breakdown and emission properties, including the spacing and speed of propagation of the filaments. PMID:19792510

  11. Pb nanowire formation on Al/lead zirconate titanate surfaces in high-pressure hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Shutthanandan, V.; Arey, Bruce W.; Wang, Chong M.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2012-07-12

    Thin films of Al on lead zirconate titanate (PZT) annealed in high-pressure hydrogen at 100C exhibit surface Pb nanowire growth. Wire diameter is approximately 80 nm and length can exceed 100 microns. Based on microstructural analysis using electron microscopy and ion scattering, a vapor-solid scheme with hydrogen as a carrier gas was proposed as a growth mechanism. We expect that these observations may lead to controlled Pb nanowires growth through pattering of the Al film.

  12. Selective Formation of Trimethylene Carbonate (TMC): Atmospheric Pressure Carbon Dioxide Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Benjamin R; Patel, Anish P; Wijayantha, K G Upul

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide utilisation (CDU) is currently gaining increased interest due to the abundance of CO2 and its possible application as a C1 building block. We herein report the first example of atmospheric pressure carbon dioxide incorporation into oxetane to selectively form trimethylene carbonate (TMC), which is a significant challenge as TMC is thermodynamically less favoured than its corresponding co-polymer. PMID:26213485

  13. Formation of a Cubic Iron-Sulfur Alloy at Megabar Pressures and its Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seagle, C. T.; Heinz, D. L.; Campbell, A. J.; Miller, N. A.; Prakapenka, V. B.

    2008-12-01

    The details of binary iron-light element systems at pressures and temperatures relevant to the core can be used to constrain core composition and temperature. The addition of light elements to iron is known to affect the stability field of iron polymorphs. In this study, an iron plus 10 wt. percent sulfur sample was compressed and laser heated at 145 GPa in a diamond anvil cell at the GSECARS beamline of the APS. Phases present in the sample were monitored with x-ray diffraction. At this pressure, hcp-Fe was found to coexist with Fe3S. However, at 158 GPa, upon laser heating a new cubic phase formed at the expense of hcp-Fe until all hcp-Fe was consumed and a single cubic phase was left, apparently indicating solid solution behavior. The strongest x-ray diffraction lines closely resemble the x-ray diffraction pattern of bcc-Fe, however several additional weak lines rule out a structure as simple as bcc. The sample was slowly decompressed in order to measure the pressure-volume relationship. The unit cell volume of the metastable cubic phase began to expand rapidly below 100 GPa during decompression, and was completely amorphous below 80 GPa. Solid solution behavior would suggest that sulfur could be an important component of Earth's inner core; the implications of this, and the possible structure of the cubic phase in relation to the known iron polymorphs, will be discussed.

  14. RAPID ASSOCIATION REACTIONS AT LOW PRESSURE: IMPACT ON THE FORMATION OF HYDROCARBONS ON TITAN

    SciTech Connect

    Vuitton, V.; Klippenstein, S. J. E-mail: yelle@lpl.arizona.edu E-mail: sjk@anl.gov

    2012-01-01

    Photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere predict that three-body association reactions are the main production route for several major hydrocarbons. The kinetic rate constants of these reactions strongly depend on density and are therefore only important in Titan's lower atmosphere. However, radiative association reactions do not depend on pressure. The possible existence of large rates at low density suggests that association reactions could significantly affect the chemistry of Titan's upper atmosphere and better constraints for them are required. The kinetic parameters of these reactions are extremely difficult to constrain by experimental measurements as the low pressure of Titan's upper atmosphere cannot be reproduced in the laboratory. However, in the recent years, theoretical calculations of kinetics parameters have become more and more reliable. We therefore calculated several radical-radical and radical-molecule association reaction rates using transition state theory. The calculations indicate that association reactions are fast even at low pressure for adducts having as few as four C atoms. These drastic changes have however only moderate consequences for Titan's composition. Locally, mole fractions can vary by as much as one order of magnitude but the column-integrated production and condensation rates of hydrocarbons change only by a factor of a few. We discuss the impact of these results for the organic chemistry. It would be very interesting to check the impact of these new rate constants on other environments, such as giant and extrasolar planets as well as the interstellar medium.

  15. High-pressure processing decelerates lipolysis and formation of volatile compounds in ovine milk blue-veined cheese.

    PubMed

    Calzada, J; Del Olmo, A; Picon, A; Gaya, P; Nuñez, M

    2013-01-01

    Enzyme-rich cheeses are prone to over-ripening during refrigerated storage. Blue-veined cheeses fall within this category because of the profuse growth of Penicillium roqueforti in their interior, which results in the production of highly active proteinases, lipases, and other enzymes responsible for the formation of a great number of flavor compounds. To control the excessive formation of free fatty acids (FFA) and volatile compounds, blue-veined cheeses were submitted to high-pressure processing (HPP) at 400 or 600 MPa on d 21, 42, or 63 after manufacture. Cheeses were ripened for 30d at 10°C and 93% relative humidity, followed by 60 d at 5°C, and then held at 3°C until d 360. High-pressure processing influenced the concentrations of acetic acid and short-chain, medium-chain, and long-chain FFA. The effect was dependent on treatment conditions (pressure level and cheese age at the time of treatment). The lowest concentrations of acetic acid and FFA were recorded for cheeses treated at 600 MPa on d 21; these cheeses showed the lowest esterase activity values. Acetic acid and all FFA groups increased during ripening and refrigerated storage. The 102 volatile compounds detected in cheese belonged to 10 chemical groups (5 aldehydes, 12 ketones, 17 alcohols, 12 acids, 35 esters, 9 hydrocarbons, 5 aromatic compounds, 3 nitrogen compounds, 3 terpenes, and 1 sulfur compound). High-pressure processing influenced the levels of 97 individual compounds, whereas 68 individual compounds varied during refrigerated storage. Total concentrations of all groups of volatile compounds were influenced by HPP, but only ketones, acids, esters, and sulfur compounds varied during refrigerated storage. The lowest total concentrations for most groups of volatile compounds were recorded for the cheese pressurized at 600 MPa on d 21. A principal component analysis combining total concentrations of groups of FFA and volatile compounds discriminated cheeses by age and by the pressure level

  16. Galaxies undergoing ram-pressure stripping: the influence of the bulge on morphology and star formation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauser, D.; Haider, M.; Kapferer, W.; Schindler, S.

    2012-08-01

    Aims: We investigate the influence of stellar bulges on the star formation and morphology of disc galaxies that suffer from ram pressure. Several tree-SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics) simulations have been carried out to study the dependence of the star formation rate on the mass and size of a stellar bulge. In addition, different strengths of ram pressure and different alignments of the disc with respect to the intra-cluster medium (ICM) are applied. Methods: The simulations were carried out with the combined N-body/hydrodynamic code GADGET-2 with radiative cooling and a recipe for star formation. The same galaxy with different bulge sizes was used to accomplish 31 simulations with varying inclination angles and surrounding gas densities of 10-27g cm-3 and 10-28g cm-3. For all the simulations a relative velocity of 1000 km s-1 for the galaxies and an initial gas temperature for the ICM of 107K were applied. Besides galaxies flying edge-on and face-on through the surrounding gas, various disc tilt angles in between were used. To allow a comparison, the galaxies with the different bulges were also evolved in isolation to contrast the star formation rates. Furthermore, the influence of different disc gas mass fractions has been investigated. Results: As claimed in previous works, when ram pressure is acting on a galaxy, the star formation rate (SFR) is enhanced and rises up to four times with increasing ICM density compared to galaxies that evolve in isolation. However, a bulge suppresses the SFR when the same ram pressure is applied. Consequently, fewer new stars are formed because the SFR can be lowered by up to 2M⊙ yr-1. Furthermore, the denser the surrounding gas, the more interstellar medium (ISM) is stripped. While at an ICM density of 10-28g cm-3 about 30% of the ISM is stripped, the galaxy is almost completely (more than 90%) stripped when an ICM density of 10-27g cm-3 is applied. But again, a bulge prevents the stripping of the ISM and reduces the

  17. Season-long increases in perceived muscle soreness in professional rugby league players: role of player position, match characteristics and playing surface.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Ben D; Twist, Craig; Haigh, Julian D; Brewer, Clive; Morton, James P; Close, Graeme L

    2016-06-01

    Rugby League (RL) is a high-impact collision sport characterised by repeated sprints and numerous high-speed impacts and consequently players often report immediate and prolonged muscle soreness in the days after a match. We examined muscle soreness after matches during a full season to understand the extent to which match characteristics influence soreness. Thirty-one elite Super League players provided daily measures of muscle soreness after each of the 26 competitive fixtures of the 2012 season. Playing position, phase of the season, playing surface and match characteristics were recorded from each match. Muscle soreness peaked at day 1 and was still apparent at day 4 post-game with no attenuation in the magnitude of muscle soreness over the course of the season. Neither playing position, phase of season or playing surface had any effects on the extent of muscle soreness. Playing time and total number of collisions were significantly correlated with higher ratings of muscle soreness, especially in the forwards. These data indicate the absence "contact adaptations" in elite rugby players with soreness present throughout the entire season. Strategies must now be implemented to deal with the physical and psychological consequences of prolonged feeling of pain. PMID:26368285

  18. Formation and stability of D-limonene organogel-based nanoemulsion prepared by a high-pressure homogenizer.

    PubMed

    Zahi, Mohamed Reda; Wan, Pingyu; Liang, Hao; Yuan, Qipeng

    2014-12-31

    D-limonene organogel-based nanoemulsion was prepared by high-pressure homogenization technology. The organogelator type had a major role on the formation of the formulations, in which stearic acid has given nanoemulsions with the smallest droplet size. The surfactant type and concentration also had an appreciable effect on droplet formation, with Tween 80 giving a mean droplet diameter (d ≈ 112 nm) among a range of non-ionic surfactants (Tween 20, 40, 60, 80, and 85). In addition, high-pressure homogenization conditions played a key role in the nanoemulsion preparation. The stability of d-limonene organogel-based nanoemulsion was also investigated under two different temperatures (4 and 28 °C) through 2 weeks of storage. Results showed a good stability of the formulations, which is maybe due to the incorporation of D-limonene into the organogel prior to homogenization. This study may have a valuable contribution for the design and use of organogel-based nanoemulsion as a delivery system in food. PMID:25514199

  19. The role of non-ionizing radiation pressure in star formation: the stability of cores and filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Young Min; Youdin, Andrew N.

    2016-09-01

    Stars form when filaments and dense cores in molecular clouds fragment and collapse due to self-gravity. In the most basic analyses of gravitational stability, the competition between self-gravity and thermal pressure sets the critical (i.e. maximum stable) mass of spheres and the critical line density of cylinders. Previous work has considered additional support from magnetic fields and turbulence. Here, we consider the effects of non-ionizing radiation, specifically the inward radiation pressure force that acts on dense structures embedded in an isotropic radiation field. Using hydrostatic, isothermal models, we find that irradiation lowers the critical mass and line density for gravitational collapse, and can thus act as a trigger for star formation. For structures with moderate central densities, ˜103 cm-3, the interstellar radiation field in the Solar vicinity has an order unity effect on stability thresholds. For more evolved objects with higher central densities, a significant lowering of stability thresholds requires stronger irradiation, as can be found closer to the Galactic centre or near stellar associations. Even when strong sources of ionizing radiation are absent or extincted, our study shows that interstellar irradiation can significantly influence the star formation process.

  20. The Role of Non-ionizing Radiation Pressure in Star Formation: The Stability of Cores and Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Young Min; Youdin, Andrew N.

    2016-06-01

    Stars form when filaments and dense cores in molecular clouds fragment and collapse due to self-gravity. In the most basic analyses of gravitational stability, the competition between self-gravity and thermal pressure sets the critical (i.e. maximum stable) mass of spheres and the critical line density of cylinders. Previous work has considered additional support from magnetic fields and turbulence. Here, we consider the effects of non-ionizing radiation, specifically the inward radiation pressure force that acts on dense structures embedded in an isotropic radiation field. Using hydrostatic, isothermal models, we find that irradiation lowers the critical mass and line density for gravitational collapse, and can thus act as a trigger for star formation. For structures with moderate central densities, ˜103 cm-3, the interstellar radiation field in the Solar vicinity has an order unity effect on stability thresholds. For more evolved objects with higher central densities, a significant lowering of stability thresholds requires stronger irradiation, as can be found closer to the Galactic center or near stellar associations. Even when strong sources of ionizing radiation are absent or extincted, our study shows that interstellar irradiation can significantly influence the star formation process.

  1. vapor pressure of uranyl beta-diketonates. IV. effect of adduct formation on volatility of uranyl pivaloyltrifluoroacetonate

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorenko, G.V.; Suglobov, D.N.

    1986-07-01

    Gas-phase adduct formation of uranyl pivaloyltrifluoroacetonate (I) with donor active materials such as trimethyl phosphate (TMP), pyridine (Py), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and ethanol (EtOH) was demonstrated by IR spectroscopy. Vapor pressure of the I-TMF adduct was measured by the flow method. The volatility of I was studied in a stream of helium saturated with vapors of donor-active materials: Py, THF, diethyl ether (Et/sub 2/O), EtOH, and acetonitrile. The temperature dependence of the pressure of saturated I.TMP and I vapor in a stream of neutral ligand vapor is described by log p (Pa) = -A/T + B. Following are, respectively, neutral ligand, T range (degreeK), and coefficiencts A, B: TMP 383453, 4648 +/- 48, 12.06 +/- 0.18; Py, 383-463, 5277 +/- 87, 13.36 +/- 0.21; THF, 363453, 4662 +/- 69, 12.66 +/- 0.17; Et/sub 2/O, 353-423, 4864 +/- 110, 13.29 +/- 0.28; EtOH, 363-443, 4509 +/- 89, 12.18 +/- 0.22. Adduct formation with these neutral ligands decreases the volatility of I significantly. A tendency to increase of adduct volatility was observed when the donor properties of the neutral ligand decrease.

  2. Supplementation with a polyphenolic blend improves post-exercise strength recovery and muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Herrlinger, Kelli A.; Chirouzes, Diana M.; Ceddia, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exercise can initiate a cascade of inflammatory and oxidative stress–related events leading to delayed onset muscle soreness. Polyphenols possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Objective The current study examined the effects of a proprietary polyphenolic blend (PB), containing catechins and theaflavins, on exercise performance and recovery following an eccentric exercise challenge. Design Male participants (18–35 years of age) received placebo or PB at a low dose (PB-L, 1,000 mg/d) or high dose (PB-H, 2,000 mg/d) for 13 weeks. During the 13th week of supplementation, participants completed an eccentric exercise (40 min downhill treadmill run) followed by a strength assessment (peak torque on isokinetic leg extensions) pre-exercise, and 24, 48, and 96 h post-exercise. Muscle soreness (subjective questionnaire), markers of muscle stress (cortisol and creatine phosphokinase [CK]), and antioxidant capacity (ferric reducing ability of plasma [FRAP]) were also assessed. Results PB-H attenuated the decrease in peak torque observed in the placebo group from pre-exercise to 48 h (p=0.012) and 96 h (p=0.003) post-exercise. At 48 h post-exercise, PB-H reduced whole body and hamstring soreness (p=0.029) versus placebo. Chronic consumption of PB improved serum FRAP (p=0.039). As expected, serum cortisol and CK increased from pre- to post-exercise in all groups; however, by 96 h, cortisol and CK levels returned to pre-exercise levels following PB supplementation. At 96 h, the change in cortisol from pre- to post-exercise was significantly greater in placebo versus PB-H (p=0.039). Conclusion These findings show that chronic consumption of PB improved antioxidant status, reduced markers of muscle stress, and promoted strength recovery post-exercise. PMID:26689317

  3. Predictors of suppurative complications for acute sore throat in primary care: prospective clinical cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Beth; Hobbs, F D Richard; Butler, Chris C; Hay, Alastair D; Campbell, John; Delaney, Brendan; Broomfield, Sue; Barratt, Paula; Hood, Kerenza; Everitt, Hazel; Mullee, Mark; Williamson, Ian; Mant, David; Moore, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objective To document whether elements of a structured history and examination predict adverse outcome of acute sore throat. Design Prospective clinical cohort. Setting Primary care. Participants 14 610 adults with acute sore throat (≤2 weeks’ duration). Main outcome measures Common suppurative complications (quinsy or peritonsillar abscess, otitis media, sinusitis, impetigo or cellulitis) and reconsultation with new or unresolving symptoms within one month. Results Complications were assessed reliably (inter-rater κ=0.95). 1.3% (177/13 445) of participants developed complications overall and 14.2% (1889/13 288) reconsulted with new or unresolving symptoms. Independent predictors of complications were severe tonsillar inflammation (documented among 13.0% (1652/12 717); odds ratio 1.92, 95% confidence interval 1.28 to 2.89) and severe earache (5% (667/13 323); 3.02, 1.91 to 4.76), but the model including both variables had modest prognostic utility (bootstrapped area under the receiver operator curve 0.61, 0.57 to 0.65), and 70% of complications (124/177) occurred when neither was present. Clinical prediction rules for bacterial infection (Centor criteria and FeverPAIN) also predicted complications, but predictive values were also poor and most complications occurred with low scores (67% (118/175) scoring ≤2 for Centor; 126/173 (73%) scoring ≤2 for FeverPAIN). Previous medical problems, sex, temperature, and muscle aches were independently but weakly associated with reconsultation with new or unresolving symptoms. Conclusion Important suppurative complications after an episode of acute sore throat in primary care are uncommon. History and examination and scores to predict bacterial infection cannot usefully identify those who will develop complications. Clinicians will need to rely on strategies such as safety netting or delayed prescription in managing the uncertainty and low risk of complications. PMID:24277339

  4. Understanding variation for clinical governance: an illustration using the diagnosis and treatment of sore throat.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Tom; Mohammed, Mohammed A; Lim, Hei Toon

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of clinical governance is to improve clinical care. An understanding of the information contained in variation is central to any improvement effort. We must distinguish between variation intrinsic to a process (common cause variation) and variation caused by extrinsic factors (special cause variation). The control chart is a method of distinguishing between these two kinds of variation: it is used in industry to effect improvement and may be useful in primary care. AIM: To illustrate the use of control charts to distinguish between common cause and special cause variation and to guide appropriate action. DESIGN OF STUDY: Analysis of diagnostic and treatment decisions for sore throat. SETTING: Single practice in the West Midlands. METHODS: We identified each general practitioner's (GP's) consultations for sore throat over a two-year period. We grouped these into two diagnostic categories (tonsillitis and non-tonsillar throat infection) and two treatment categories (antibiotics and no antibiotics). These data were illustrated graphically as XY control charts. RESULTS: In this practice, a special cause affects one GP's diagnosis--he is less likely to use the term 'tonsillitis'. A special cause also affects his treatment decisions--he is more likely to prescribe antibiotics. Diagnostic and treatment differences between the remaining GPs are consistent with common cause variation. CONCLUSION: In this practice, action to improve the quality of diagnosis and treatment of sore throat shouldfocus on investigating why one practitioner's diagnosis and treatment differs from that of his colleagues. Control chart analysis is valuable because it enables users to obtain practical guidance for action. PMID:11942443

  5. Intraglomerular pressure and mesangial stretching stimulate extracellular matrix formation in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Riser, B L; Cortes, P; Zhao, X; Bernstein, J; Dumler, F; Narins, R G

    1992-01-01

    To define the interplay of glomerular hypertension and hypertrophy with mesangial extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, we examined the effects of glomerular capillary distention and mesangial cell stretching on ECM synthesis. The volume of microdissected rat glomeruli (Vg), perfused ex vivo at increasing flows, was quantified and related to the proximal intraglomerular pressure (PIP). Glomerular compliance, expressed as the slope of the positive linear relationship between PIP and Vg was 7.68 x 10(3) microns 3/mmHg. Total Vg increment (PIP 0-150 mmHg) was 1.162 x 10(6) microns 3 or 61% (n = 13). A 16% increase in Vg was obtained over the PIP range equivalent to the pathophysiological limits of mean transcapillary pressure difference. A similar effect of renal perfusion on Vg was also noted histologically in tissue from kidneys perfused/fixed in vivo. Cultured mesangial cells undergoing cyclic stretching increased their synthesis of protein, total collagen, and key components of ECM (collagen IV, collagen I, laminin, fibronectin). Synthetic rates were stimulated by cell growth and the degree of stretching. These results suggest that capillary expansion and stretching of mesangial cells by glomerular hypertension provokes increased ECM production which is accentuated by cell growth and glomerular hypertrophy. Mesangial expansion and glomerulosclerosis might result from this interplay of mechanical and metabolic forces. Images PMID:1430216

  6. Microfluidic EDGE emulsification: the importance of interface interactions on droplet formation and pressure stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Sami; Bliznyuk, Olesya; Rovalino Cordova, Ana; Schroën, Karin

    2016-05-01

    The fact that interactions of components with interfaces can influence processes is well-known; e.g. deposit accumulation on heat exchangers and membrane fouling lead to additional resistances against heat and mass transfer, respectively. In microfluidic emulsification, the situation is even more complex. Component accumulation at the liquid/liquid interface is necessary for emulsion stability, while undesired at the solid/liquid interface where it may change wettability. For successful emulsification both aspects need to be controlled, and that is investigated in this paper for o/w emulsification with microfluidic EDGE devices. These devices were characterised previously, and can be used to detect small wettability changes through e.g. the pressure stability of the device. We used various oil/emulsifier combinations (alkanes, vegetable oil, surfactants and proteins) and related droplet size and operational pressure stability to component interactions with the solid surface and liquid interface. Surfactants with a strong interaction with glass always favour emulsification, while surfactants that have week interactions with the surface can be replaced by vegetable oil that interacts strongly with glass, resulting in loss of emulsification. Our findings clearly show that an appropriate combination of construction material and emulsion components is needed to achieve successful emulsification in microfluidic EDGE devices.

  7. Transient Formation of Super-Explosives under High Pressure for Fast Ignition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2007-11-01

    Dense matter, if put under high pressure, can undergo a transformation from an atomic to a molecular configuration, where the electron orbits go into lower energy levels. If the rise in pressure is very sudden, for example by a strong shock wave, the electrons change their orbits rapidly under the emission of photons, which for more than 100 megabar can reach keV energies. With the opacity of dense matter going in proportion to the square of the density, the photons can be efficiently released from the surface of the compressed matter by a rarefaction wave. The thusly produced X-ray photons can be used for the fast ignition of a thermonuclear target. Since as for thermite, the conjectured super-explosives are likely to come from the reaction between two different atoms, they should be made from a mixture of nanoparticles. The proposed mechanism may be also responsible for the large keV X-ray bursts in exploding wire arrays, which can not be explained by a simple kinetic into thermal energy conversion model.

  8. Microfluidic EDGE emulsification: the importance of interface interactions on droplet formation and pressure stability.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Sami; Bliznyuk, Olesya; Rovalino Cordova, Ana; Schroën, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The fact that interactions of components with interfaces can influence processes is well-known; e.g. deposit accumulation on heat exchangers and membrane fouling lead to additional resistances against heat and mass transfer, respectively. In microfluidic emulsification, the situation is even more complex. Component accumulation at the liquid/liquid interface is necessary for emulsion stability, while undesired at the solid/liquid interface where it may change wettability. For successful emulsification both aspects need to be controlled, and that is investigated in this paper for o/w emulsification with microfluidic EDGE devices. These devices were characterised previously, and can be used to detect small wettability changes through e.g. the pressure stability of the device. We used various oil/emulsifier combinations (alkanes, vegetable oil, surfactants and proteins) and related droplet size and operational pressure stability to component interactions with the solid surface and liquid interface. Surfactants with a strong interaction with glass always favour emulsification, while surfactants that have week interactions with the surface can be replaced by vegetable oil that interacts strongly with glass, resulting in loss of emulsification. Our findings clearly show that an appropriate combination of construction material and emulsion components is needed to achieve successful emulsification in microfluidic EDGE devices. PMID:27230981

  9. Microfluidic EDGE emulsification: the importance of interface interactions on droplet formation and pressure stability

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Sami; Bliznyuk, Olesya; Rovalino Cordova, Ana; Schroën, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The fact that interactions of components with interfaces can influence processes is well-known; e.g. deposit accumulation on heat exchangers and membrane fouling lead to additional resistances against heat and mass transfer, respectively. In microfluidic emulsification, the situation is even more complex. Component accumulation at the liquid/liquid interface is necessary for emulsion stability, while undesired at the solid/liquid interface where it may change wettability. For successful emulsification both aspects need to be controlled, and that is investigated in this paper for o/w emulsification with microfluidic EDGE devices. These devices were characterised previously, and can be used to detect small wettability changes through e.g. the pressure stability of the device. We used various oil/emulsifier combinations (alkanes, vegetable oil, surfactants and proteins) and related droplet size and operational pressure stability to component interactions with the solid surface and liquid interface. Surfactants with a strong interaction with glass always favour emulsification, while surfactants that have week interactions with the surface can be replaced by vegetable oil that interacts strongly with glass, resulting in loss of emulsification. Our findings clearly show that an appropriate combination of construction material and emulsion components is needed to achieve successful emulsification in microfluidic EDGE devices. PMID:27230981

  10. Biological CO2 conversion to acetate in subsurface coal-sand formation using a high-pressure reactor system.

    PubMed

    Ohtomo, Yoko; Ijiri, Akira; Ikegawa, Yojiro; Tsutsumi, Masazumi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Uramoto, Go-Ichiro; Hoshino, Tatsuhiko; Morono, Yuki; Sakai, Sanae; Saito, Yumi; Tanikawa, Wataru; Hirose, Takehiro; Inagaki, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    Geological CO2 sequestration in unmineable subsurface oil/gas fields and coal formations has been proposed as a means of reducing anthropogenic greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere. However, the feasibility of injecting CO2 into subsurface depends upon a variety of geological and economic conditions, and the ecological consequences are largely unpredictable. In this study, we developed a new flow-through-type reactor system to examine potential geophysical, geochemical and microbiological impacts associated with CO2 injection by simulating in-situ pressure (0-100 MPa) and temperature (0-70°C) conditions. Using the reactor system, anaerobic artificial fluid and CO2 (flow rate: 0.002 and 0.00001 ml/min, respectively) were continuously supplemented into a column comprised of bituminous coal and sand under a pore pressure of 40 MPa (confined pressure: 41 MPa) at 40°C for 56 days. 16S rRNA gene analysis of the bacterial components showed distinct spatial separation of the predominant taxa in the coal and sand over the course of the experiment. Cultivation experiments using sub-sampled fluids revealed that some microbes survived, or were metabolically active, under CO2-rich conditions. However, no methanogens were activated during the experiment, even though hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic methanogens were obtained from conventional batch-type cultivation at 20°C. During the reactor experiment, the acetate and methanol concentration in the fluids increased while the δ(13)Cacetate, H2 and CO2 concentrations decreased, indicating the occurrence of homo-acetogenesis. 16S rRNA genes of homo-acetogenic spore-forming bacteria related to the genus Sporomusa were consistently detected from the sandstone after the reactor experiment. Our results suggest that the injection of CO2 into a natural coal-sand formation preferentially stimulates homo-acetogenesis rather than methanogenesis, and that this process is accompanied by biogenic CO2 conversion to acetate. PMID:24348470

  11. Biological CO2 conversion to acetate in subsurface coal-sand formation using a high-pressure reactor system

    PubMed Central

    Ohtomo, Yoko; Ijiri, Akira; Ikegawa, Yojiro; Tsutsumi, Masazumi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Uramoto, Go-Ichiro; Hoshino, Tatsuhiko; Morono, Yuki; Sakai, Sanae; Saito, Yumi; Tanikawa, Wataru; Hirose, Takehiro; Inagaki, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    Geological CO2 sequestration in unmineable subsurface oil/gas fields and coal formations has been proposed as a means of reducing anthropogenic greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere. However, the feasibility of injecting CO2 into subsurface depends upon a variety of geological and economic conditions, and the ecological consequences are largely unpredictable. In this study, we developed a new flow-through-type reactor system to examine potential geophysical, geochemical and microbiological impacts associated with CO2 injection by simulating in-situ pressure (0–100 MPa) and temperature (0–70°C) conditions. Using the reactor system, anaerobic artificial fluid and CO2 (flow rate: 0.002 and 0.00001 ml/min, respectively) were continuously supplemented into a column comprised of bituminous coal and sand under a pore pressure of 40 MPa (confined pressure: 41 MPa) at 40°C for 56 days. 16S rRNA gene analysis of the bacterial components showed distinct spatial separation of the predominant taxa in the coal and sand over the course of the experiment. Cultivation experiments using sub-sampled fluids revealed that some microbes survived, or were metabolically active, under CO2-rich conditions. However, no methanogens were activated during the experiment, even though hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic methanogens were obtained from conventional batch-type cultivation at 20°C. During the reactor experiment, the acetate and methanol concentration in the fluids increased while the δ13Cacetate, H2 and CO2 concentrations decreased, indicating the occurrence of homo-acetogenesis. 16S rRNA genes of homo-acetogenic spore-forming bacteria related to the genus Sporomusa were consistently detected from the sandstone after the reactor experiment. Our results suggest that the injection of CO2 into a natural coal-sand formation preferentially stimulates homo-acetogenesis rather than methanogenesis, and that this process is accompanied by biogenic CO2 conversion to acetate. PMID

  12. Highly siderophile element (HSE) abundances in the mantle of Mars are due to core formation at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righter, K.; Danielson, L. R.; Pando, K. M.; Williams, J.; Humayun, M.; Hervig, R. L.; Sharp, T. G.

    2015-04-01

    Highly siderophile elements (HSEs) can be used to understand accretion and core formation in differentiated bodies, due to their strong affinity for FeNi metal and sulfides. Coupling experimental studies of metal-silicate partitioning with analyses of HSE contents of Martian meteorites can thus offer important constraints on the early history of Mars. Here, we report new metal-silicate partitioning data for the PGEs and Au and Re across a wide range of pressure and temperature space, with three series designed to complement existing experimental data sets for HSE. The first series examines temperature effects for D(HSE) in two metallic liquid compositions—C-bearing and C-free. The second series examines temperature effects for D(Re) in FeO-bearing silicate melts and FeNi-rich alloys. The third series presents the first systematic study of high pressure and temperature effects for D(Au). We then combine our data with previously published partitioning data to derive predictive expressions for metal-silicate partitioning of the HSE, which are subsequently used to calculate HSE concentrations of the Martian mantle during continuous accretion of Mars. Our results show that at midmantle depths in an early magma ocean (equivalent to approximately 14 GPa, 2100 °C), the HSE contents of the silicate fraction are similar to those observed in the Martian meteorite suite. This is in concert with previous studies on moderately siderophile elements. We then consider model calculations that examine the role of melting, fractional crystallization, and sulfide saturation/undersaturation in establishing the range of HSE contents in Martian meteorites derived from melting of the postcore formation mantle. The core formation modeling indicates that the HSE contents can be established by metal-silicate equilibrium early in the history of Mars, thus obviating the need for a late veneer for HSE, and by extension volatile siderophile elements, or volatiles in general.

  13. Star Formation in High Pressure, High Energy Density Environments: Laboratory Experiments of ISM Dust Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W; Bajt, S; Bradley, J; Bringa, E; Dai, Z; Felter, T; Graham, G; Kucheyev, S; Torres, D; Tielens, A; Baragiola, R; Dukes, C; Loeffler, M

    2005-01-05

    Dust grains control the chemistry and cooling, and thus the gravitational collapse of interstellar clouds. Energetic particles, shocks and ionizing radiation can have a profound influence on the structure, lifetime and chemical reactivity of the dust, and therefore on the star formation efficiency. This would be especially important in forming galaxies, which exhibit powerful starburst (supernovae) and AGN (active galactic nucleus) activity. How dust properties are affected in such environments may be crucial for a proper understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. The authors present the results of experiments at LLNL which show that irradiation of the interstellar medium (ISM) dust analog forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) with swift heavy ions (10 MeV Xe) and a large electronic energy deposition amorphizes its crystalline structure, without changing its chemical composition. From the data they predict that silicate grains in the ISM, even in dense and cold giant molecular clouds, can be amorphized by heavy cosmic rays (CR's). This might provide an explanation for the observed absence of crystalline dust in the ISM clouds of the Milky Way galaxy. This processing of dust by CR's would be even more important in forming galaxies and galaxies with active black holes.

  14. Electron dynamics and plasma jet formation in a helium atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge jet

    SciTech Connect

    Algwari, Q. Th.; O'Connell, D.

    2011-09-19

    The excitation dynamics within the main plasma production region and the plasma jets of a kHz atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet operated in helium was investigated. Within the dielectric tube, the plasma ignites as a streamer-type discharge. Plasma jets are emitted from both the powered and grounded electrode end; their dynamics are compared and contrasted. Ignition of these jets are quite different; the jet emitted from the powered electrode is ignited with a slight time delay to plasma ignition inside the dielectric tube, while breakdown of the jet at the grounded electrode end is from charging of the dielectric and is therefore dependent on plasma production and transport within the dielectric tube. Present streamer theories can explain these dynamics.

  15. Mouth Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... it. Or get soft foam mouth swabs to clean your teeth. (You can buy these at a drugstore.) Rinse toothbrush well in hot water after use and store in a cool, dry place. Use a non-abrasive toothpaste that contains fluoride. Note that whitening toothpastes may contain hydrogen peroxide, ...

  16. Canker sore

    MedlinePlus

    ... with salt water or mild, over-the-counter mouthwashes. (DO NOT use mouthwashes that contain alcohol which can irritate the area ... needed for severe cases. These may include: Chlorhexidine mouthwash Stronger medicines called corticosteroids that are placed on ...

  17. Mouth Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... buds. It can be caused by poor oral hygiene, chronic oral irritation, or smoking. Torus palatinus — A ... braces, or dentures. •Chew slowly. Practice good dental hygiene, including regular visits to the dentist. •Eat a ...

  18. Vaginal Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... decisions about when and where they should receive healthcare. Unfortunately, most people lack the medical knowledge needed to make these decisions safely. FreeMD.com is powered by a computer program that performs symptom triage. The goal of ...

  19. Canker Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Executive Committee Board of Trustees Governance Past Presidents Staff/Contact History Awards Our Partners Membership Membership Categories Renew Your Membership Login Fellowship Academic Fellowship Affiliate Fellowship (AFAOM) Application Process Fellowship Study ...

  20. Hydrostatic pressure and fluid-density distribution of the Culebra Dolomite member of the Rustler Formation near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, southeastern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Crawley, M.E.

    1988-05-01

    The primary objectives of the Pressure - Density Survey were to obtain the middle-of-formation pressures, determine well-bore fluid densities, define well-bore fluid density stratification, and to provide, where possible, formation water density values for wells where little or no information on densities exists. The survey collected ground-water pressure and density data during three field testing periods during the years 1986 and 1987. Data were collected from 33 individual wells located in the vicinity of the WIPP Site. 18 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Three dimensional simulations of pattern formation during high-pressure, freely localized microwave breakdown in air

    SciTech Connect

    Kourtzanidis, K. Boeuf, J. P.; Rogier, F.

    2014-12-15

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that a freely localized 100 GHz microwave discharge can propagate towards the microwave source with high speed, forming a complex pattern of self-organized filaments. We present three-dimensional simulations of the formation and propagation of such patterns that reveal more information on their nature and interaction with the electromagnetic waves. The developed three-dimensional Maxwell-plasma solver permits the study of different forms of incident field polarization. Results for linear and circular polarization of the wave are presented and comparisons with recent experiments show a good overall agreement. The three dimensional simulations provide a quantitative analysis of the parameters controlling the time and length scales of the strongly non-linear plasma dynamics and could be useful for potential microwave plasma applications such as aerodynamic flow and combustion control.

  2. Stochastic simulation of the spray formation assisted by a high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorokhovski, M.; Chtab-Desportes, A.; Voloshina, I.; Askarova, A.

    2010-03-01

    The stochastic model of spray formation in the vicinity of the injector and in the far-field has been described and assessed by comparison with measurements in Diesel-like conditions. In the proposed mesh-free approach, the 3D configuration of continuous liquid core is simulated stochastically by ensemble of spatial trajectories of the specifically introduced stochastic particles. The parameters of the stochastic process are presumed from the physics of primary atomization. The spray formation model consists in computation of spatial distribution of the probability of finding the non-fragmented liquid jet in the near-to-injector region. This model is combined with KIVA II computation of atomizing Diesel spray in two-ways. First, simultaneously with the gas phase RANS computation, the ensemble of stochastic particles is tracking and the probability field of their positions is calculated, which is used for sampling of initial locations of primary blobs. Second, the velocity increment of the gas due to the liquid injection is computed from the mean volume fraction of the simulated liquid core. Two novelties are proposed in the secondary atomization modeling. The first one is due to unsteadiness of the injection velocity. When the injection velocity increment in time is decreasing, the supplementary breakup may be induced. Therefore the critical Weber number is based on such increment. Second, a new stochastic model of the secondary atomization is proposed, in which the intermittent turbulent stretching is taken into account as the main mechanism. The measurements reported by Arcoumanis et al. (time-history of the mean axial centre-line velocity of droplet, and of the centre-line Sauter Mean Diameter), are compared with computations.

  3. Application of Formation Testing While Drilling (GeoTap) for acquiring formation pressure data from the Azeri, Chirag and Guneshli wells which were drilled in the Khazarian-Caspian Sea of the Azerbaijan Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirov, Elnur

    2016-04-01

    A new technology to acquire wireline quality pressure tests using a Logging While Drilling approach has been successfully implemented few years ago in Azeri, Chirag and Guneshli wells which were drilled in the Khazarian-Caspian Sea of the Azerbaijan Republic. The Formation Tester While Drilling tool (GeoTap) uses a testing sequence similar to wireline tools. A single probe is extended to the borehole wall and a small pretest volume withdrawn from the formation. The resulting pressure transient is then analyzed for formation pressure, formation permeability and mobility information. Up-link and down-link capabilities have been added to achieve test control and quality feedback. An efficient downlink algorithm is used downhole to analyze the data. The parameters and pressure data are transmitted to the surface in real-time for continuous monitoring of the test. More detailed pressure data is recorded and retrieved after returning to surface. Use of a quartz gauge allows excellent accuracy. Azeri, Chirag and Guneshli fields consist of layered sand reservoirs alternation with shale sequences and detailed pressure data is acquired on a high percentage of wells in order to understand lateral and vertical continuity of different flow units. The formation tester can be utilized with the 'triple combo' Logging While Drilling string which eliminates the need to rig up wireline on many wells. Wireline formation tester runs are time consuming - particularly if high deviation or high overbalance conditions are encountered requiring pipe conveyed techniques. Non-Productive Time is high when the wireline tools are stuck and fishing operations are required. The Sperry Drilling GeoTap formation pressure tester service provides real-time formation pressure measurements. It bridges the critical gap between drilling safety and optimization, by providing early and reliable measurements of key reservoir properties, while improving reservoir understanding and completion design in real

  4. Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Miloshevsky, Gennady Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-04-15

    Plasma expansion with shockwave formation during laser ablation of materials in a background gasses is a complex process. The spatial and temporal evolution of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity fields is needed for its complete understanding. We have studied the expansion of femtosecond (fs) laser-ablated aluminum (Al) plumes in Argon (Ar) gas at 0.5 and 1 atmosphere (atm). The expansion of the plume is investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is also carried out. The position of the shock front measured by shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging is then compared to that obtained from the CFD modeling. The results from the three methods are found to be in good agreement, especially during the initial stage of plasma expansion. The computed time- and space-resolved fields of gas-dynamic parameters have provided valuable insights into the dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse ablated Al plumes in Ar gas at 0.5 and 1 atm. These results are compared to our previous data on nanosecond (ns) laser ablation of Al [S. S. Harilal et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 083504 (2012)]. It is observed that both fs and ns plumes acquire a nearly spherical shape at the end of expansion in Ar gas at 1 atm. However, due to significantly lower pulse energy of the fs laser (5 mJ) compared to pulse energy of the ns laser (100 mJ) used in our studies, the values of pressure, temperature, mass density, and velocity are found to be smaller in the fs laser plume, and their time evolution occurs much faster on the same time scale. The oscillatory shock waves clearly visible in the ns plume are not observed in the internal region of the fs plume. These experimental and computational results provide a quantitative understanding of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse and ns-pulse laser ablated Al plumes in an ambient gas at atmospheric pressures.

  5. Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Miloshevsky, Gennady; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-04-01

    Plasma expansion with shockwave formation during laser ablation of materials in a background gasses is a complex process. The spatial and temporal evolution of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity fields is needed for its complete understanding. We have studied the expansion of femtosecond (fs) laser-ablated aluminum (Al) plumes in Argon (Ar) gas at 0.5 and 1 atmosphere (atm). The expansion of the plume is investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is also carried out. The position of the shock front measured by shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging is then compared to that obtained from the CFD modeling. The results from the three methods are found to be in good agreement, especially during the initial stage of plasma expansion. The computed time- and space-resolved fields of gas-dynamic parameters have provided valuable insights into the dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse ablated Al plumes in Ar gas at 0.5 and 1 atm. These results are compared to our previous data on nanosecond (ns) laser ablation of Al [S. S. Harilal et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 083504 (2012)]. It is observed that both fs and ns plumes acquire a nearly spherical shape at the end of expansion in Ar gas at 1 atm. However, due to significantly lower pulse energy of the fs laser (5 mJ) compared to pulse energy of the ns laser (100 mJ) used in our studies, the values of pressure, temperature, mass density, and velocity are found to be smaller in the fs laser plume, and their time evolution occurs much faster on the same time scale. The oscillatory shock waves clearly visible in the ns plume are not observed in the internal region of the fs plume. These experimental and computational results provide a quantitative understanding of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse and ns-pulse laser ablated Al plumes in an ambient gas at atmospheric pressures.

  6. Focused excimer laser initiated and radio frequency sustained plasma formation in high pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giar, Ryan

    A doctoral thesis project was performed to experimentally investigate the feasibility of focused excimer laser initiation of air plasmas for radio frequency sustainment. A 193 nm, 15 MW, 300 mJ laser was focused with a 18 cm focal length lens to form a small, high density (ne ~ 10 14 cm--3) seed plasma. These laser plasmas were produced inside a borosilicate glass tube around which was wrapped a 5 turn helical antenna. This antenna was powered with 5 kW of 13.56 MHz of radiation for 1.5 s. This was accomplished at a pressure of 22 Torr, resulting in a large volume (300 cm3) air plasma. Diagnostic measurements of this air plasma determined an electron density of 5E10 cm-3 and an electron temperature 1.3 eV with a neutral temperature of 3500 K. The collision frequency was measured to be 9E10 Hz which resulted in a plasma-loaded antenna resistance of 6 O with a voltage reflection coefficient of 0.7.

  7. Formation of Hydroxyl and Water Layers on MgO Films Studied with Ambient Pressure XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, J.T.; Starr, D.; Yamamoto, S.; Kaya, S.; Kendelewicz, T.; Mysak, E.R.; Porsgaard, S.; Salmeron, M.B.; Brown Jr., G.E.; Nilsson, A.; Bluhm, H.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the interaction of water with MgO(100), a detailed quantitative assessment of the interfacial chemistry is necessary. We have used ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to measure molecular (H{sub 2}O) and dissociative (OH) water adsorption on a 4 monolayer (ML) thick MgO(100)/Ag(100) film under ambient conditions. Since the entire 4 ML metal oxide (Ox) film is probed by XPS, the reaction of the MgO film with water can be quantitatively studied. Using a multilayer model (Model 1) that measures changes in Ox thickness from O 1s (film) and Ag 3d (substrate) spectra, it is shown that the oxide portion of the MgO film becomes thinner upon hydroxylation. A reaction mechanism is postulated in which the top-most layer of MgO converts to Mg(OH)2 upon dissociation of water. Based on this mechanism a second model (Model 2) is developed to calculate Ox and OH thickness changes based on OH/Ox intensity ratios from O 1s spectra measured in situ, with the known initial Ox thickness prior to hydroxylation. Models 1 and 2 are applied to a 0.15 Torr isobar experiment, yielding similar results for H{sub 2}O, OH and Ox thickness changes as a function of relative humidity.

  8. Under Pressure: Quenching Star Formation in Low-Mass Satellite Galaxies via Stripping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillingham, Sean P.; Cooper, Michael C.; Pace, Andrew B.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Bullock, James S.; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea; Wheeler, Coral

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies of galaxies in the local Universe, including those in the Local Group, find that the efficiency of environmental (or satellite) quenching increases dramatically at satellite stellar masses below ˜108~M⊙. This suggest a physical scale where quenching transitions from a slow "starvation" mode to a rapid "stripping" mode at low masses. We investigate the plausibility of this scenario using observed HI surface density profiles for a sample of 66 nearby galaxies as inputs to analytic calculations of ram-pressure and turbulent viscous stripping. Across a broad range of host properties, we find that stripping becomes increasingly effective at M★ ≲ 108 - 9~M⊙, reproducing the critical mass scale observed. However, for canonical values of the circumgalactic medium density (nhalo < 10-3.5 cm-3), we find that stripping is not fully effective; infalling satellites are, on average, stripped of only ≲ 40 - 60% of their cold gas reservoir, which is insufficient to match observations. By including a host halo gas distribution that is clumpy and therefore contains regions of higher density, we are able to reproduce the observed HI gas fractions (and thus the high quenched fraction and short quenching timescale) of Local Group satellites, suggesting that a host halo with clumpy gas may be crucial for quenching low-mass systems in Local Group-like (and more massive) host halos.

  9. Biological CO2 conversion to acetate in subsurface coal-sand formation using a high-pressure reactor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtomo, Y.; Ijiri, A.; Ikegawa, Y.; Tsutsumi, M.; Imachi, H.; Uramoto, G.; Hoshino, T.; Morono, Y.; Tanikawa, W.; Hirose, T.; Inagaki, F.

    2013-12-01

    The geological CO2 sequestration into subsurface unmineable oil/gas fields and coal formations has been considered as one of the possible ways to reduce dispersal of anthropogenic greenhouse gasses into the atmosphere. However, feasibility of CO2 injection largely depends on a variety of geological and economical settings, and its ecological consequences have remained largely unpredictable. To address these issues, we developed a new flow-through-type CO2 injection system designated as the 'geobio-reactor system' to examine possible geophysical, geochemical and microbiological impact caused by CO2 injection under in-situ pressure (0-100 MPa) and temperature (0-70°C) conditions. In this study, we investigated Eocene bituminous coal-sandstones in the northwestern Pacific coast, Hokkaido, Japan, using the geobio-reactor system. Anaerobic artificial fluid and CO2 (flow rate: 0.002 and 0.00001 mL/min, respectively) were continuously supplemented into the coal-sand column under the pore pressure of 40 MPa (confined pressure: 41 MPa) at 40°C for 56 days. Molecular analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes showed that predominant bacterial components were physically dispersed from coal to sand as the intact form during experiment. Cultivation experiments from sub-sampling fluids indicated that some terrestrial microbes could preserve their survival in subsurface condition. Molecular analysis of archaeal 16S rRNA genes also showed that no methanogens were activated during experiment. We also anaerobically incubated the coal sample using conventional batch-type cultivation technique with a medium for methanogens. After one year of the batch incubation at 20°C, methane could be detected from the cultures except for the acetate-fed culture. The sequence of archaeal 16S rRNA genes via PCR amplification obtained from the H2 plus formate-fed culture was affiliated with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen within the genus Methanobacterium, whereas the methanol plus trimethylamine culture

  10. Efficacy of massage on muscle soreness, perceived recovery, physiological restoration and physical performance in male bodybuilders.

    PubMed

    Kargarfard, Mehdi; Lam, Eddie T C; Shariat, Ardalan; Shaw, Ina; Shaw, Brandon S; Tamrin, Shamsul B M

    2016-01-01

    It is believed that sport massage after intensive exercise might improve power and perceptual recovery in athletes. However, few studies have been done in this area. This study aimed to examine the effect of massage on the performance of bodybuilders. Thirty experienced male bodybuilders were randomly assigned to either a massage group (n = 15) or a control group (n = 15). Both groups performed five repetition sets at 75-77% of 1RM of knee extensor and flexor muscle groups. The massage group then received a 30-min massage after the exercise protocol while the control group maintained their normal passive recovery. Criteria under investigation included: plasma creatine kinase (CK) level, agility test, vertical jump test, isometric torque test, and perception of soreness. All variables were measured over 6 time periods: baseline, immediately after the DOMS inducing protocol, right after the massage, and 24, 48, and 72 h after the massage. Both groups showed significant (P < .001) decreases in jumping, agility performance, and isometric torque, but significant (P < .001) increases in CK and muscle soreness levels. The massage group in general demonstrated a better recovery rate. As such, a post-exercise massage session can improve the exercise performance and recovery rate in male bodybuilders after intensive exercise. PMID:26334128

  11. Effects of therapeutic massage on gait and pain after delayed onset muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun-Ho; Kim, Min-Jeong; Yang, Hyuk-Jin; Lee, Yu-Jin; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Unfamiliar or sudden exercise can induce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) within 12–24 h. So, several researchers have reported various interventions to treat DOMS. Massage is generally known to eliminate muscle fatigue. However, effect of massage after DOMS is still not clear. We investigated whether the massage is effective on pain and gait after DOMS. The participants were divided into a control group (n= 10) with DOMS and an experimental group (n= 11) with the massage treated after DOMS. We induced DOMS by taking isotonic exercise with going up and down 20 times in 5-story building. We applied the massage and assessment on gastrocnemius of dominant foot. The change of gait and pain was assessed using gaitrite and algometer. In the present results, the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS showed significant difference in pain (P< 0.05). Also, there was a significant difference in gait (P< 0.05), especially, spatial parameters (distance, step length, stride length) and temporal parameters (ambulation, heel on off time, stride velocity). Moreover, the pain relief after massage-treated in DOMS correlated with gait. These results suggest that the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS has influence on pain and gait performance. Therefore, massage can be applied as intervention for delayed onset muscle soreness. PMID:24877051

  12. Salient beliefs and intentions to prescribe antibiotics for patients with a sore throat.

    PubMed

    Walker, A. E.; Grimshaw, J. M.; Armstrong, E. M.

    2001-11-01

    OBJECTIVES: General practitioners (GPs) in the UK continue to prescribe antibiotics for patients with sore throats despite evidence that they are ineffective and can contribute to the growth of antibiotic resistance in the population. This study uses the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) to investigate the strength of intention to prescribe antibiotics, and to identify the salient beliefs associated with this intention. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study testing hypotheses derived from the TPB. METHOD: A 66-item postal questionnaire was distributed to a random sample of GPs in one NHS region (N = 185). The questionnaire included measures of intention to prescribe antibiotics, attitude, behavioural beliefs and evaluations, normative beliefs and evaluations, perceived behavioural control, control beliefs, and past prescribing. RESULTS: Two-thirds of the GPs returned complete questionnaires (N = 126, 68%). The majority intended to prescribe antibiotics for less than half of their patients with sore throats (N = 69, 55%). The variables specified in TPB predicted 48% of the variance in intention, with past behaviour adding a further 15%. Seven salient beliefs distinguished between doctors who intend to prescribe antibiotics and those who do not. CONCLUSIONS: Attitudes towards antibiotics and control beliefs are important predictors of intention to prescribe, as predicted by TPB. Interventions could target salient beliefs associated with motivation to prescribe. PMID:12614509

  13. Effects of therapeutic massage on gait and pain after delayed onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Han, Jun-Ho; Kim, Min-Jeong; Yang, Hyuk-Jin; Lee, Yu-Jin; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2014-04-01

    Unfamiliar or sudden exercise can induce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) within 12-24 h. So, several researchers have reported various interventions to treat DOMS. Massage is generally known to eliminate muscle fatigue. However, effect of massage after DOMS is still not clear. We investigated whether the massage is effective on pain and gait after DOMS. The participants were divided into a control group (n= 10) with DOMS and an experimental group (n= 11) with the massage treated after DOMS. We induced DOMS by taking isotonic exercise with going up and down 20 times in 5-story building. We applied the massage and assessment on gastrocnemius of dominant foot. The change of gait and pain was assessed using gaitrite and algometer. In the present results, the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS showed significant difference in pain (P< 0.05). Also, there was a significant difference in gait (P< 0.05), especially, spatial parameters (distance, step length, stride length) and temporal parameters (ambulation, heel on off time, stride velocity). Moreover, the pain relief after massage-treated in DOMS correlated with gait. These results suggest that the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS has influence on pain and gait performance. Therefore, massage can be applied as intervention for delayed onset muscle soreness. PMID:24877051

  14. Phase Stability and Pressure Dependence of Defect Formation in Gd2Ti2O7 and Gd2Zr2O7 Pyrochlore

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,F.; Wang, J.; Lian, J.; Lang, M.; Becker, U.; Ewing, R.

    2008-01-01

    We report dramatically different behaviors between isostructural Gd2Ti2O7 and Gd2Zr2O7 pyrochlore at pressures up to 44 GPa, in which the substitution of Ti for Zr significantly increases structural stability. Upon release of pressure, the Gd2Ti2O7 becomes amorphous. In contrast, the high-pressure phase of Gd2Zr2O7 transforms to a disordered defect-fluorite structure. First-principle calculations for both compositions revealed that the response of pyrochlore to high pressure is controlled by the intrinsic energetics of defect formation.

  15. Analysis of formation pressure test results in the Mount Elbert methane hydrate reservoir through numerical simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurihara, M.; Sato, A.; Funatsu, K.; Ouchi, H.; Masuda, Y.; Narita, H.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    Targeting the methane hydrate (MH) bearing units C and D at the Mount Elbert prospect on the Alaska North Slope, four MDT (Modular Dynamic Formation Tester) tests were conducted in February 2007. The C2 MDT test was selected for history matching simulation in the MH Simulator Code Comparison Study. Through history matching simulation, the physical and chemical properties of the unit C were adjusted, which suggested the most likely reservoir properties of this unit. Based on these properties thus tuned, the numerical models replicating "Mount Elbert C2 zone like reservoir" "PBU L-Pad like reservoir" and "PBU L-Pad down dip like reservoir" were constructed. The long term production performances of wells in these reservoirs were then forecasted assuming the MH dissociation and production by the methods of depressurization, combination of depressurization and wellbore heating, and hot water huff and puff. The predicted cumulative gas production ranges from 2.16??106m3/well to 8.22??108m3/well depending mainly on the initial temperature of the reservoir and on the production method.This paper describes the details of modeling and history matching simulation. This paper also presents the results of the examinations on the effects of reservoir properties on MH dissociation and production performances under the application of the depressurization and thermal methods. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. CH2Cl2 thin film formation on low-pressure DC plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, H.; Flores, O.; Campillo, B.; Gomez, A.; Salazar-Flores, L.; Poveda, J. C.

    2012-08-01

    Low-pressure DC plasma discharges sustained in a glow discharge of CH2Cl2 are studied. The plasma conditions were: 1.0 Torr, 20 W and 12 l/min. The electron temperature and ion density were estimated to be 5.47±0.27 eV and (1.57±0.06)×1016 m-3, using a double Langmuir probe. The diagnostic of the species was made by optical emission spectroscopy using a spectrometer. The main species identified were at 339.61, 358.60 and 377.96 nm for C2(c'1Πg-b1Πu); at 392.50 nm for C3('Πu-' ? ); at 431.42 nm for CH(A2Δ-X2Π); at 778.28 nm for Cl; at 657.80 nm for C+; at 471.90 and 487.30 nm for H2; at 380.61 nm for CH+(A'Π-X'Σ) and at 317.73 nm for HCl+(A2Σ-X2Π). Special attention was given to the behavior of material deposited on the electrode and the time discharge dependence was also investigated. The material deposited was analyzed with the aid of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The SEM observation shows an increment in the particle size which is in agreement with the observation of less bands in the infrared spectra.

  17. Initial stages of oxide formation on the Zr surface at low oxygen pressure: An in situ FIM and XPS study.

    PubMed

    Bespalov, I; Datler, M; Buhr, S; Drachsel, W; Rupprechter, G; Suchorski, Y

    2015-12-01

    An improved methodology of the Zr specimen preparation was developed which allows fabrication of stable Zr nanotips suitable for FIM and AP applications. Initial oxidation of the Zr surface was studied on a Zr nanotip by FIM and on a polycrystalline Zr foil by XPS, both at low oxygen pressure (10(-8)-10(-7)mbar). The XPS data reveal that in a first, fast stage of oxidation, a Zr suboxide interlayer is formed which contains three suboxide components (Zr(+1), Zr(+2) and Zr(+3)) and is located between the Zr surface and a stoichiometric ZrO2 overlayer that grows in a second, slow oxidation stage. The sole suboxide layer has been observed for the first time at very early states of the oxidation (oxygen exposure ≤ 4L). The Ne(+) FIM observations are in accord with a two stage process of Zr oxide formation. PMID:25766998

  18. Initial stages of oxide formation on the Zr surface at low oxygen pressure: An in situ FIM and XPS study

    PubMed Central

    Bespalov, I.; Datler, M.; Buhr, S.; Drachsel, W.; Rupprechter, G.; Suchorski, Y.

    2015-01-01

    An improved methodology of the Zr specimen preparation was developed which allows fabrication of stable Zr nanotips suitable for FIM and AP applications. Initial oxidation of the Zr surface was studied on a Zr nanotip by FIM and on a polycrystalline Zr foil by XPS, both at low oxygen pressure (10−8–10−7 mbar). The XPS data reveal that in a first, fast stage of oxidation, a Zr suboxide interlayer is formed which contains three suboxide components (Zr+1, Zr+2 and Zr+3) and is located between the Zr surface and a stoichiometric ZrO2 overlayer that grows in a second, slow oxidation stage. The sole suboxide layer has been observed for the first time at very early states of the oxidation (oxygen exposure ≤4 L). The Ne+ FIM observations are in accord with a two stage process of Zr oxide formation. PMID:25766998

  19. Fast formation of aerobic granules by combining strong hydraulic selection pressure with overstressed organic loading rate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Tay, Joo-Hwa

    2015-09-01

    The combined strong hydraulic selection pressure (HSP) with overstressed organic loading rate (OLR) as a fast granulation strategy was used to enhance aerobic granulation. To investigate the wide applicability of this strategy to different scenarios and its relevant mechanism, different settling times, different inoculums, different exchange ratios, different reactor configurations, and different shear force were used in this study. It was found that clear granules were formed within 24 h and steady state reached within three days when the fast granulation strategy was used in a lab-scale reactor seeded with well settled activated sludge (Reactor 2). However, granules appeared after 2-week operation and reached steady state after one month at the traditional step-wise decreased settling time from 20 to 2 min with OLR of 6 g COD/L·d (Reactor 1). With the fast granulation strategy, granules appeared within 24 h even with bulking sludge as seed to start up Reactor 3, but 6-day lag phase was observed compared with Reactor 2. Both Reactor 2 and Reactor 3 experienced sigmoidal growth curve in terms of biomass accumulation and granule size increase after granulation. In addition, the reproducible results in pilot-scale reactors (Reactor 5 and Reactor 6) with diameter of 20 cm and height/diameter ratio (H/D) of 4 further proved that reactor configuration and fluid flow pattern had no effect on the aerobic granulation when the fast granulation strategy was employed, but biomass accumulation experienced a short lag phase too in Reactor 5 and Reactor 6. Although overstressed OLR was favorable for fast granulation, it also led to the fluffy granules after around two-week operation. However, the stable 6-month operation of Reactor 3 demonstrated that the rapidly formed granules were able to maintain long-term stability by reducing OLR from 12 g COD/L·d to 6 g COD/L·d. A mechanism of fast granulation with the strategy of combined strong HSP and OLR was proposed to explain

  20. Development and distribution of bed-parallel compaction bands and pressure solution seams in carbonates (Bolognano Formation, Majella Mountain, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustichelli, Andrea; Tondi, Emanuele; Agosta, Fabrizio; Cilona, Antonino; Giorgioni, Maurizio

    2012-04-01

    The Oligo-Miocene carbonates pertaining to the Bolognano Formation, cropping out at the Majella Mountain, Italy, are diffusely crosscut by bed-parallel structural elements such as compaction bands and pressure solution seams. These bed-parallel structural elements formed under a vertical loading, during the progressive burial of the carbonates. The present work focuses on the control exerted on their development and distribution by compositional, sedimentological and pore network characteristics of the studied carbonates. The main results are consistent with the following statements: (i) bed-parallel compaction bands developed only within the poorly cemented, porous grainstones (2D porosity > 10%; 3D porosity > 15%); (ii) distribution of these bands was strongly controlled by both sorting and sphericity of the carbonate grains, as well as by the amount of intergranular macroporosity; (iii) bed-parallel pressure solution seams formed, mainly, within the fine-grained packstones, which are characterized by small amounts of clayish matrix (2-4% of total rock volume), and well-sorted, spherical carbonate grains. Considering the impact that burial-related, bed-parallel structures may have on fluid flow, the results provided in this contribution can help the management of subsurface geofluids, and overall prediction of carbonate reservoir quality, by mapping/simulating/assessing carbonate facies.

  1. Membrane permeability during pressure ulcer formation: A computational model of dynamic competition between cytoskeletal damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, N Suhas; Tucker-Kellogg, Lisa

    2016-05-24

    Pressure ulcers are debilitating wounds that arise frequently in people who have lost mobility. Mechanical stress, oxidative stress and ischemia-reperfusion injury are potential sources of damage during pressure ulcer formation, but cross-talk between these sources has rarely been investigated. In vitro experiments with mechanically-induced cell damage previously demonstrated that non-lethal amounts of static cell deformation could induce myoblast membrane permeabilization. Permeabilization, in turn, has the potential to induce oxidative stress via leakage of calcium, myoglobin or alarmins. In this work, we constructed a hypothetical causal network of cellular-scale effects resulting from deformation and permeabilization, and we investigated the theoretical sensitivity of cell death toward various parameters and pathways of the model. Simulations showed that the survival/death outcome was particularly sensitive to the speed of membrane repair. The outcome was also sensitive to whether oxidative stress could decrease the speed of membrane repair. Finally, using the assumption that apoptosis and necrosis would have opposite effects on membrane leakage in dying cells, we showed that promoting apoptosis might under certain conditions have the paradoxical effect of decreasing, rather than increasing, total cell death. Our work illustrates that apoptosis may have hidden benefits at preventing spatial spread of death. More broadly, our work shows the importance of membrane repair dynamics and highlights the need for experiments to measure the effects of ischemia, apoptosis induction, and other co-occurring sources of cell stress toward the speed of membrane repair. PMID:26772800

  2. Studies on the tempo of bubble formation in recently cavitated vessels: a model to predict the pressure of air bubbles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujie; Pan, Ruihua; Tyree, Melvin T

    2015-06-01

    A cavitation event in a vessel replaces water with a mixture of water vapor and air. A quantitative theory is presented to argue that the tempo of filling of vessels with air has two phases: a fast process that extracts air from stem tissue adjacent to the cavitated vessels (less than 10 s) and a slow phase that extracts air from the atmosphere outside the stem (more than 10 h). A model was designed to estimate how water tension (T) near recently cavitated vessels causes bubbles in embolized vessels to expand or contract as T increases or decreases, respectively. The model also predicts that the hydraulic conductivity of a stem will increase as bubbles collapse. The pressure of air bubbles trapped in vessels of a stem can be predicted from the model based on fitting curves of hydraulic conductivity versus T. The model was validated using data from six stem segments each of Acer mono and the clonal hybrid Populus 84 K (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). The model was fitted to results with root mean square error less than 3%. The model provided new insight into the study of embolism formation in stem tissue and helped quantify the bubble pressure immediately after the fast process referred to above. PMID:25907963

  3. A corona discharge atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source with selective NO(+) formation and its application for monoaromatic VOC detection.

    PubMed

    Sabo, Martin; Matejčík, Štefan

    2013-11-21

    We have developed a new type of corona discharge (CD) for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) for application in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) as well as in mass spectrometry (MS). While the other CD-APCI sources are able to generate H3O(+)·(H2O)n as the major reactant ions in N2 or in zero air, the present CD-APCI source has the ability to generate up to 84% NO(+)·(H2O)n reactant ions in zero air. The change of the working gas from zero air to N2 allows us to change the major reactant ions from NO(+)·(H2O)n to H3O(+)·(H2O)n. In this paper we present the description of the new CD-APCI and discuss the processes associated with the NO(+) formation. The selective formation of NO(+)·(H2O)n reactant ions offers chemical ionization based on these ions which can be of great advantage for some classes of chemicals. We demonstrate here a significant increase in the sensitivity of the IMS-MS instrument for monoaromatic volatile organic compound (VOC) detection upon NO(+)·(H2O)n chemical ionization. PMID:24081306

  4. The Effect of Flurbiprofen on Postoperative Sore Throat and Hoarseness After LMA-ProSeal Insertion: A Randomised, Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Uztüre, Neslihan; Menda, Ferdi; Bilgen, Sevgi; Keskin, Özgül; Temur, Sibel; Köner, Özge

    2014-01-01

    Objective We hypothesized that flurbiprofen lozenges reduce the ProSeal laryngeal mask airway (LMA) related symptoms of Post Operative Sore Throat (POST), hoarseness and dysphagia compared to placebo lozenges. Methods Eighty American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I–II patients undergoing general anaesthesia with LMA were included in this prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical and single centre (university hospital) study. Group F received an 8.75 mg flurbiprofen lozenge (Strefen®) and Group P received a placebo lozenge 45 minutes before the induction of anaesthesia. Postoperative sore throat, hoarseness and dysphagia were evaluated 30 minutes after removal of the LMA in the recovery room and then at 4, 12 and 24 h after surgery using a 4-point scale. Data were analysed using Student’s t test, and Fisher’s exact and Mann-Whitney U tests. A p value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The 8.75 mg flurbiprofen lozenges reduced the severity of early (30 mins) POST and dysphagia. The severity of dysphagia at 4 h and hoarseness at 12 h were also significantly reduced in Group F. There were no significant differences betweeen the groups regarding incidence of sore throat, dysphagia and hoarseness throughout the study period. Conclusion Preoperative flurbiprofen lozenges reduce the severity of early postoperative sore throat and dysphagia. PMID:27366405

  5. A comparative study of the diagnostic methods for Group A streptococcal sore throat in two reference hospitals in Yaounde, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Gonsu, Hortense Kamga; Bomki, Cynthia Mbimenyuy; Djomou, François; Toukam, Michel; Ndze, Valantine Ngum; Lyonga, Emilia Enjema; Mbakop, Calixte Didier; Koulla-Shiro, Sinata

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sore throat is a common complaint in general practice which is more frequent in children. The most frequent pathogenic bacteria associated with this infection is Streptococcus pyogenes. Rapid Antigen Diagnostic Test (RADT) facilitates the rapid identification and consequently prompt treatment of patients, prevents complications, and also reduces the risk of spread of Group A Streptococcus (GAS). The main objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of a rapid streptococcal antigen detection test in patients with sore throat. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out from January to April 2011 on patients aged 3 to 72 years consulting for pharyngitis or sore throat at the paediatric and Ear, Nose and Throat units of the University Teaching Hospital Yaounde and the Central Hospital Yaounde. Two throat swabs were collected per patient. One was used for the rapid test and the other for standard bacteriological analysis. Results The prevalence of GAS in the study population was 22.5%. Out of the 71 samples collected, the RADT detected group A streptococcal antigens in 12 of 16 positive cultures giving a sensitivity of 75%. The specificity of the rapid test was 96%, with positive predictive value of 85.7%, and negative predictive value of 93% respectively. Conclusion Rapid test may have an additional value in the management of patients with high risk of having GAS infection. However, tests with a higher sensitivity are needed for accurate and reliable results for early diagnosis of patients with sore throat caused by GAS.

  6. The practical evaluation and management of patients with symptoms of a sore burning mouth.

    PubMed

    Steele, John C

    2016-01-01

    There are many etiologic factors to consider in a patient who presents with symptoms or sensations of a sore burning mouth. These range from local causes within the oral cavity to underlying systemic disease, including psychologic factors. This paper aims to describe the different clinical presentations and to outline a systematic approach to the evaluation and management of such patients. The clinician will be directed to the relevant diagnosis by following the traditional medical model of taking a focused history, performing a thorough clinical examination, considering the potential differential diagnoses, and requesting pertinent and appropriate investigations. The various differential diagnoses and broad treatment options will also be discussed and outlined. This paper will not, however, discuss burning mouth syndrome (oral dysesthesia), which is a diagnosis of exclusion, whereby the oral mucosa is clinically normal and there are no identifiable medical or dental causes to account for the patient's symptoms. PMID:27343959

  7. Submaximal delayed-onset muscle soreness: correlations between MR imaging findings and clinical measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, G. F.; Haller, R. G.; Wyrick, P. S.; Parkey, R. W.; Fleckenstein, J. L.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess correlations between muscle edema on magnetic resonance (MR) images and clinical indexes of muscle injury in delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) produced by submaximal exercise protocols. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixteen subjects performed 36 elbow flexions ("biceps curls") at one of two submaximal workloads that emphasized eccentric contractions. Changes in MR imaging findings, plasma levels of creatine kinase, and pain scores were correlated. RESULTS: Both exercise protocols produced DOMS in all subjects. The best correlation was between change in creatine kinase level and volume of muscle edema on MR images, regardless of the workload. Correlations tended to be better with the easier exercise protocol. CONCLUSION: Whereas many previous studies of DOMS focused on intense exercise protocols to ensure positive results, the present investigation showed that submaximal workloads are adequate to produce DOMS and that correlations between conventionally measured indexes of injury may be enhanced at lighter exercise intensities.

  8. Acute effects of ginger extract on biochemical and functional symptoms of delayed onset muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Hoseinzadeh, Khadijeh; Daryanoosh, Farhad; Baghdasar, Parvin Javad; Alizadeh, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inflammation and pain induced by delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) as a result of eccentric exercise (EE) or unaccustomed activity cause some difficulties in exercise for athletes. The purpose of this study was to survey the effect of ginger extract on biochemical and functional symptom of delayed onset muscle soreness. Methods: In a quasi-experimental study, 36 healthy female subjects, who were recruited by intra dormitory calls, randomly divided into 3 groups, including: ginger intake 1 hour before exercise (GIBE), ginger intake immediately after exercise (GIAE) and placebo group (PL). Subjects consumed capsules contain 60 mg of ginger extract (equivalent of 2 g dried ginger powder) or placebo before and after exercise. The exercise protocol consisted of a 20 minute step test using a 46cm step at a rate of 15 steps per minute. The blood samples were taken before, 1, 24 and 48 hour after exercise to assay creatine kinase (CK) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Muscle pain scores, isometric strength and circumference of thigh muscle, and hip range of motion were recorded at mentioned times. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measure was used to determine the differences between groups. Results: The results showed a significant reduction of pain in GIBE compared to GIAE after 24 and 48h of EE and GIAE compared to PL (p<0.05). IL-6 changed significantly in GIBE compared to PL (p<0.05) after 1, 24, and 48h after EE. The other factors didn’t change meaningfully. Conclusion: The finding of this study suggests that 2 grams of ginger may have anti-inflammation and analgesic effect on DOMS. PMID:26793652

  9. The impact of a pre-loaded multi-ingredient performance supplement on muscle soreness and performance following downhill running.

    PubMed

    Ormsbee, Michael J; Ward, Emery G; Bach, Christopher W; Arciero, Paul J; McKune, Andrew J; Panton, Lynn B

    2015-01-01

    The effects of multi-ingredient performance supplements (MIPS) on perceived soreness, strength, flexibility and vertical jump performance following eccentric exercise are unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of MIPS (NO-Shotgun®) pre-loaded 4 weeks prior to a single bout of downhill running (DHR) on muscle soreness and performance. Trained male runners (n = 20) were stratified by VO2max, strength, and lean mass into two groups; MIPS (n = 10) ingested one serving daily of NO-Shotgun® for 28 days and 30 min prior to all post-testing visits, Control (CON; n = 10) consumed an isocaloric maltodextrin placebo in an identical manner as MIPS. Perceived soreness and performance measurements (strength, flexibility, and jump height) were tested on 6 occasions; 28 days prior to DHR, immediately before DHR (PRE), immediately post (POST) DHR, 24, 48, and 72 hr post-DHR. Perceived soreness significantly increased (p < 0.05) post DHR compared to PRE at all time-points, with no difference between groups. Creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) increased over time (p < 0.001) with no group x time interactions (p = 0.236 and p = 0.535, respectively). Significant time effects were measured for strength (p = 0.001), flexibility (p = 0.025) and vertical jump (p < 0.001). There were no group x time interactions for any performance measurements. Consumption of MIPS for 4 weeks prior to a single bout of DHR did not affect perceived soreness, muscle damage, strength, flexibility, or jump performance compared to an isocaloric placebo in trained male runners following a single bout of DHR. PMID:25628519

  10. Estimation of maximum burial depth of Neogene-Quaternary fore-arc basin formation based on laboratory porosity measurements under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Shin-ichi; Tamura, Yukie; Marumo, Haruna; Mitsuhashi, Shunsuke

    2016-05-01

    Estimating the maximum effective stress that rocks have experienced, Pe,max, or the maximum burial depth for sedimentary rocks, Dmax, is important for many types of research, ranging from engineering applications to estimation of tectonic evolution. We estimated Pe,max and Dmax for the Kazusa fore-arc basin formations (the Kazusa Group) in the Boso Peninsula of Japan using a laboratory-based method. We carried out measurements of porosity n with siltstone specimens from the Kazusa Group formations (the Umegase, Otadai, Kiwada, Ohara, and Katsuura formations) under various effective pressure Pe conditions and estimated Pe,max from the inflection points of the log Pe-log n curve on the Pe increasing path. Except for the specimens from the Ohara Formation, estimated values of Pe,max ranged from approximately 13-24 MPa. This range corresponded to approximately 1.3-3.2 km of Dmax. Differences in Dmax among the specimens were at least four times smaller than distances normal to bedding planes among the sampling locations. This suggests that the formations were not deposited horizontally, but that deposition proceeded as the subsidence center of the fore-arc basin moved in a northwestward (NW) direction, and that formations were then uplifted almost horizontally. The Pe,max of the specimens from the Ohara Formation were 6-10 MPa smaller than the others. Thus, it is possible that pore pressure at the sampling location was more than 6 MPa larger than the hydrostatic condition when the sediments were deposited and lithified. Previous studies reported the center of a high-porosity zone at the Ohara Formation, and this high-porosity zone probably developed due to Pp over-pressurization. These results support the applicability of this method to estimation of tectonic evolution of sedimentary basins and magnitude of over-pressurization.

  11. Multi-wavelength studies of spectacular ram-pressure stripping of a galaxy. II. Star formation in the tail

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Masafumi; Gu, Liyi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Makishima, Kazuo; Fujita, Yutaka; Akahori, Takuya; Hattori, Takashi; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2013-12-01

    With multiband photometric data in public archives, we detected four intracluster star-forming regions in the Virgo Cluster. Two of them were at a projected distance of 35 kpc from NGC 4388 and the other two were 66 kpc away. Our new spectroscopic observations revealed that their recessional velocities were comparable to the ram-pressure-stripped tail of NGC 4388 and confirmed the association. The stellar mass of the star-forming regions ranged from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 4.5} M {sub ☉} except for that of the faintest one, which was <10{sup 3} M {sub ☉}. The metallicity was comparable to a solar abundance and the age of the stars was ∼10{sup 6.8} yr. Their young stellar age meant that the star formation should have started after the gas was stripped from NGC 4388. This implied in situ condensation of the stripped gas. We also found that two star-forming regions were located near the leading edge of a filamentary dark cloud. The extinction of the filament was smaller than that derived from the Balmer decrement of the star-forming regions, implying that the dust in the filament would be locally dense around the star-forming regions.

  12. Partitioning of Pd Between Fe-S-C and Mantle Liquids at High Pressure and Temperature: Implications for Core Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Humayun, M.; Danielson, L.

    2007-01-01

    One of the most elusive geochemical aspects of the early Earth has been explaining the near chondritic relative abundances of the highly siderophile elements (HSE; Au, Re and the platinum group elements) in Earth's primitive upper mantle (PUM). Perhaps they were delivered to the Earth after core formation, by late addition of carbonaceous chondrite material. However, the recognition that many moderately siderophile elements can be explained by high pressure and temperature (PT) metal-silicate equilibrium, leads to the question whether high PT equilibrium can also explain the HSE concentrations. Answers to this question have been slowed by experimental difficulties (nugget effect and very low solubilities). But two different perspectives have emerged from recent studies. One perspective is that D(M/S) for HSE at high PT are not low enough to explain terrestrial mantle depletions of these elements (for Pd and Pt). A second perspective is D(M/S) are reduced substantially at high PT and even low enough to explain terrestrial mantle depletions (for Au and Pt). Issues complicating interpretation of all experiments include use of MgO- and FeO-free silicate melts, and S-free and FeNi metal-free systems. In addition, conclusions for Pt rest on an interpretation that the tiny metallic nuggets plaguing many such experiments, were formed upon quench. There is not agreement on this issue, and the general question of HSE solubility at high PT remains unresolved

  13. On the mechanism of ion formation from the aqueous solutions irradiated with 3 microm IR laser pulses under atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Laiko, Victor V; Taranenko, Nelli I; Doroshenko, Vladimir M

    2006-10-01

    The mechanism of atmospheric pressure (AP) laser ionization of water and water/glycerol liquid samples at a 3-microm wavelength is studied experimentally. For the ion desorption, an in-house built Yb : YAG-pumped optical parametric oscillator (OPO) infrared (IR) laser has been coupled with AP MALDI ion source interfaced to an ion trap mass spectrometer (MS). It has been shown that water is primarily responsible for ion generation in water/glycerol samples, while glycerol increases the solution viscosity and decreases the water evaporation rate and sample losses. In contrast to AP UV-MALDI, the electric field in the case of AP IR-MALDI does not assist in ion production. It was found that the absence of the electrical field provides the optimum ionization condition both for water and water/glycerol liquid samples at the 3-microm laser irradiation. A two-stage ion formation mechanism, which includes the initial emission of microdroplets and release of molecular ions at the second stage, can explain the experimentally observed ion signal dependencies upon the voltage applied between MS inlet and the MALDI sample plate. Postionization using additional corona discharge APCI increases the observed signal by approximately 50%, which indicates that some portion of the analyte is desorbed in the form of neutral molecules. PMID:16981211

  14. A study on density functional theory of the effect of pressure on the formation and migration enthalpies of intrinsic point defects in growing single crystal Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueoka, Koji; Kamiyama, Eiji; Kariyazaki, Hiroaki

    2012-05-01

    In 1982, Voronkov presented a model describing point defect behavior during the growth of single crystal Si from a melt and derived an expression to predict if the crystal was vacancy- or self-interstitial-rich. Recently, Vanhellemont claimed that one should take into account the impact of compressive stress introduced by the thermal gradient at the melt/solid interface by considering the hydrostatic pressure dependence of the formation enthalpy of the intrinsic point defects. To evaluate the impact of thermal stress more correctly, the pressure dependence of both the formation enthalpy (Hf) and the migration enthalpy (Hm) of the intrinsic point defects should be taken into account. Furthermore, growing single crystal Si is not under hydrostatic pressure but almost free of external pressure (generally in Ar gas under reduced pressure). In the present paper, the dependence of Hf and Hm on the pressure P, or in other words, the pressure dependence of the formation energy (Ef) and the relaxation volume (vf), is quantified by density functional theory calculations. Although a large number of ab initio calculations of the properties of intrinsic point defects have been published during the last years, calculations for Si crystals under pressure are rather scarce. For vacancies V, the reported pressure dependences of HfV are inconsistent. In the present study, by using 216-atom supercells with a sufficient cut-off energy and mesh of k-points, the neutral I and V are found to have nearly constant formation energies EfI and EfV for pressures up to 1 GPa. For the relaxation volume, vfI is almost constant while vfV decreases linearly with increasing pressure P. In case of the hydrostatic pressure Ph, the calculated formation enthalpy HfI and migration enthalpy HmI at the [110] dumbbell site are given by HfI = 3.425 - 0.057 × Ph (eV) and HmI = 0.981 - 0.039 × Ph (eV), respectively, with Ph given in GPa. The calculated HfV and HmV dependencies on Ph given by HfV = 3.543 - 0

  15. Mechanisms of radical formation in beef and chicken meat during high pressure processing evaluated by electron spin resonance detection and the addition of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Bolumar, Tomas; Andersen, Mogens L; Orlien, Vibeke

    2014-05-01

    The generation of radicals during high pressure (HP) processing of beef loin and chicken breast was studied by spin trapping and electron spin resonance detection. The pressurization resulted in a higher level of spin adducts in the beef loin than in the chicken breast. It was shown that radicals were formed in the sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar fractions as well as in the non-soluble protein fraction due to the HP treatment, indicating that other radicals than iron-derived radicals were formed, and most likely protein-derived radicals. The addition of iron as well as the natural antioxidants caffeic acid, rosemary extract, and ascorbic acid resulted in an increased formation of radicals during the HP treatment, whereas addition of ethylendiamintetraacetic acid (EDTA) reduced the radical formation. This suggests that iron-species (protein-bound or free) catalyses the formation of radicals when meat systems are submitted to HP. PMID:24360471

  16. Thermal Decomposition of Gaseous Ammonium Nitrate at Low Pressure: Kinetic Modeling of Product Formation and Heterogeneous Decomposition of Nitric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Lin, M. C.

    2009-10-01

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, NH4NO3 (AN), in the gas phase has been studied at 423-56 K by pyrolysis/mass spectrometry under low-pressure conditions using a Saalfeld reactor coated with boric acid. The sublimation of NH4NO3 at 423 K was proposed to produce equal amounts of NH3 and HNO3, followed by the decomposition reaction of HNO3, HNO3 + M → OH + NO2 + M (where M = third-body and reactor surface). The absolute yields of N2, N2O, H2O, and NH3, which can be unambiguously measured and quantitatively calibrated under a constant pressure at 5-6.2 torr He are kinetically modeled using the detailed [H,N,O]-mechanism established earlier for the simulation of NH3-NO2 (Park, J.; Lin, M. C. Technologies and Combustion for a Clean Environment. Proc. 4th Int. Conf. 1997, 34-1, 1-5) and ADN decomposition reactions (Park, J.; Chakraborty, D.; Lin, M. C. Proc. Combust. Inst. 1998, 27, 2351-2357). Since the homogeneous decomposition reaction of HNO3 itself was found to be too slow to account for the consumption of reactants and the formation of products, we also introduced the heterogeneous decomposition of HNO3 in our kinetic modeling. The heterogeneous decomposition rate of HNO3, HNO3 + (B2O3/SiO2) → OH + NO2 + (B2O3/SiO2), was determined by varying its rate to match the modeled result to the measured concentrations of NH3 and H2O; the rate could be represented by k2b = 7.91 × 107 exp(-12 600/T) s-1, which appears to be consistent with those reported by Johnston and co-workers (Johnston, H. S.; Foering, L.; Tao, Y.-S.; Messerly, G. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1951, 73, 2319-2321) for HNO3 decomposition on glass reactors at higher temperatures. Notably, the concentration profiles of all species measured could be satisfactorily predicted by the existing [H,N,O]-mechanism with the heterogeneous initiation process.

  17. New Perspectives on Ophiolite Formation: Evidence from Ultrahigh Pressure (UHP), Highly Reduced and Crustal-type Minerals in Podiform Chromitites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P. T.; Yang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Separated and in situ ultrahigh pressure (UHP), highly reduced and crustal-type minerals are common in podiform chromitites of the Luobusa and Dongqiao ophiolites, Tibet and the Ray-Iz ophiolite of the Polar Urals, Russia. Highly reduced and crustal-type minerals have also been recovered from the Oman ophiolite. UHP minerals include diamond, coesite-stishovite and kyanite, whereas highly reduced minerals are mainly moissanite (SiC), native elements (e.g., Si, Fe, Cr, Al, Ti, Mn, W, Ta) and a wide variety of metallic alloys. Crustal-type minerals are represented by various combinations of zircon, corundum, almandine garnet, kyanite, andalusite, quartz, K-feldspar, plagioclase, apatite, amphibole, rutile, and titanite. Most in-situ grains are hosted in small, circular to irregular patches of amorphous carbon within grains of magnesiochromite, indicating the former presence of a C-rich fluid, either during or after crystallization of the chromite. The recovered zircons are typically rounded to sub-rounded grains with complex internal structures indicating polyphase growth. Their trace element contents and low-pressure inclusion assemblages (quartz, muscovite, K-feldspar, apatite, ilmenite, rutile) indicate a continental crustal origin. The zircons have SIMS U-Pb ages that are generally much older than the host ophiolite (total range: 90 to 2500 Ma). The presence of numerous crustal minerals, particularly zircon, suggests derivation from metasedimentary rocks subducted into the mantle. The preservation of UHP, highly reduced and crustal-type minerals in chromitites implies effective isolation from the mafic melts that formed the ophiolites and chromitites. Clearly, the formation of ophiolites and podiform chromitites must be a complex, multistage process involving crystallization of magnesiochromite grains at depth in the upper mantle, upwelling of the host peridotites and chromitites, capture of mantle wedges above suprasubduction zones, further crystallization and

  18. Optimal heating condition of mouthguard sheet in vacuum-pressure formation: part 2 Olefin-based thermoplastic elastomer.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mutsumi; Koide, Kaoru

    2016-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to clarify the suitable heating conditions during vacuum-pressure formation of olefin copolymer sheets and to examine the sheet temperature at molding and the thickness of the molded mouthguard. Mouthguards were fabricated using 4.0-mm-thick olefin copolymer sheets utilizing a vacuum-pressure forming device, and then, 10 s of vacuum forming and 2 min of compression molding were applied. Three heating conditions were investigated. They were, defined by the degree of sagging observed at the center of the softened sheet (10, 15, or 20 mm lower than the clamp (H-10, H-15, or H-20, respectively)). The working model was trimmed to the height of 20 mm at the maxillary central incisor and 15 mm at the mesiobuccal cusp of the maxillary first molar. The temperature on both the directly heated and the non-heated surfaces of the mouthguard sheet was measured by the radiation thermometer for each condition. The thickness of mouthguard sheets after fabrication was determined for the incisal portion (incisal edge and labial surface) and molar portion (cusp and buccal surface), and dimensional measurements were obtained using a measuring device. Differences in the thickness due to the heating condition of the sheets were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni's multiple comparison tests. The temperature difference between the heated and non-heated surfaces was highest under H-10. Sheet temperature under H-15 and H-20 was almost the same. The thickness differences were noted at incisal edge, cusp, and buccal surface, and H-15 was the greatest. This study demonstrated that heating of the sheet resulting in sag of 15 mm or more was necessary for sufficient softening of the sheet and that the mouthguard thickness decreased with increased sag. In conclusion, sag of 15 mm can be recommended as a good indicator of appropriate molding timing for this material. PMID:26341504

  19. Application of Formation Testing While Drilling (GeoTap) for acquiring formation pressure data from the Azeri, Chirag and Guneshli wells which were drilled in the Khazarian-Caspian Sea of the Azerbaijan Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirov, Elnur

    2016-04-01

    A new technology to acquire wireline quality pressure tests using a Logging While Drilling approach has been successfully implemented few years ago in Azeri, Chirag and Guneshli wells which were drilled in the Khazarian-Caspian Sea of the Azerbaijan Republic. The Formation Tester While Drilling tool (GeoTap) uses a testing sequence similar to wireline tools. A single probe is extended to the borehole wall and a small pretest volume withdrawn from the formation. The resulting pressure transient is then analyzed for formation pressure, formation permeability and mobility information. Up-link and down-link capabilities have been added to achieve test control and quality feedback. An efficient downlink algorithm is used downhole to analyze the data. The parameters and pressure data are transmitted to the surface in real-time for continuous monitoring of the test. More detailed pressure data is recorded and retrieved after returning to surface. Use of a quartz gauge allows excellent accuracy. Azeri, Chirag and Guneshli fields consist of layered sand reservoirs alternation with shale sequences and detailed pressure data is acquired on a high percentage of wells in order to understand lateral and vertical continuity of different flow units. The formation tester can be utilized with the 'triple combo' Logging While Drilling string which eliminates the need to rig up wireline on many wells. Wireline formation tester runs are time consuming - particularly if high deviation or high overbalance conditions are encountered requiring pipe conveyed techniques. Non-Productive Time is high when the wireline tools are stuck and fishing operations are required. The Sperry Drilling GeoTap formation pressure tester service provides real-time formation pressure measurements. It bridges the critical gap between drilling safety and optimization, by providing early and reliable measurements of key reservoir properties, while improving reservoir understanding and completion design in real

  20. A clinical score to reduce unnecessary antibiotic use in patients with sore throat

    PubMed Central

    McIsaac, W J; White, D; Tannenbaum, D; Low, D E

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To validate a score based on clinical symptoms and signs for the identification of group A Streptococcus (GAS) infection in general practice patients with score throat. DESIGN: A single throat swab was used as the gold standard for diagnosing GAS infection. Clinical information was recorded by experienced family physicians on standardized encounter forms. Score criteria were identified by means of logistic regression modelling of data from patients enrolled in the first half of the study. The score was then validated among the remaining patients. SETTING: University-affiliated family medicine centre in Toronto. PATIENTS: A total of 521 patients aged 3 to 76 years presenting with a new upper respiratory tract infection from December 1995 to February 1997. OUTCOME MEASURES: Sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios for identification of GAS infection with the score approach compared with throat culture. Proportion of patients prescribed antibiotics, throat culture use, and sensitivity and specificity with usual physician care and with score-based recommendations were compared. RESULTS: A score was developed ranging in value from 0 to 4. The sensitivity of the score for identifying GAS infection was 83.1%, compared with 69.4% for usual physician care (p = 0.06); the specificity values of the 2 approaches were similar. Among patients aged 3 to 14 years, the sensitivity of the score approach was higher than that of usual physician care (96.9% v. 70.6%) (p < 0.05). The proportion of patients receiving initial antibiotic prescriptions would have been reduced 48% by following score-based recommendations compared with observed physician prescribing (p < 0.001), without any increase in throat culture use. CONCLUSIONS: An age-appropriate sore throat score identified GAS infection in children and adults with sore throat better than usual care by family physicians, with significant reductions in unnecessary prescribing of antibiotics. A randomized trial

  1. Echinacea/sage or chlorhexidine/lidocaine for treating acute sore throats: a randomized double-blind trial

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this trial was to assess the relative efficacy of a sage/echinacea spray and a chlorhexidine/lidocaine spray in the treatment of acute sore throats. Methods This was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy controlled trial carried out in eleven general practices in Switzerland. A total of 154 patients (133 analyzed in per protocol collective) at least 12 years old with acute sore throat present for not more than 72 hours prior to inclusion and with a throat score ≥6 participated in the study. They used either an echinacea/sage spray or a chlorhexidine/lidocaine spray with two puffs every 2 hours, in a double-dummy blinded manner, up to 10 times daily until they were symptom-free, for a maximum of 5 days. The main outcome measures was the comparison of response rates during the first three days. A response was defined as a decrease of at least 50% of the total symptoms compared to baseline. Results The echinacea/sage treatment exhibited similar efficacy to the chlorhexidine/lidocaine treatment in reducing sore throat symptoms during the first 3 days (P(x < Y) = .5083). Response rates after 3 days were 63.8% in the echinacea/sage group and 57.8% in the chlorhexidine/lidocaine group. For all secondary parameters, such as time to becoming symptom free, throat pain, and global assessments of efficacy by the physician and patient, no difference between the two treatments was seen. They were both very well tolerated. Conclusion An echinacea/sage preparation is as efficacious and well tolerated as a chlorhexidine/lidocaine spray in the treatment of acute sore throats. PMID:19748859

  2. Evaluation of preoperative Strepsils lozenges on incidence of postextubation cough and sore throat in smokers undergoing anesthesia with endotracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Divya; Agrawal, Sanjay; Sharma, Jagdish P.

    2014-01-01

    Post-operative sore throat (POST) is an undesirable side effect of endotracheal intubation. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological measures have been utilized for minimizing the morbidity caused by POST. We have tested use of Strepsils lozenges in providing efficacy for decreasing POST in smokers presenting for surgery under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Materials and Methods: 100 patients, 20-65 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I and II, either sex, history of smoking, posted for elective surgical procedure of more than 1 hour, requiring general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation were included and randomly divided into groups (n = 50) to receive Strepsils (Group A) and sugar candy (Group B). The patients were assessed for cough, sore throat, and hoarseness of voice after extubation, 30 min, 12 hrs, and 24 hrs after extubation. Results: At extubation no cough was seen in 39 (78%) patients (group A) compared to 23 (46%) patients (Group B), and mild cough in 22% (Group A) and 52% (Group B). Incidence of sore throat at extubation was lower in group A compared to Group B (P = 0.04). At other times of observations (30 min,12 hrs and 24 hrs) there was a significant decrease in incidence of sore throat in Group A compared to Group B (P = 0.000). Hoarseness of voice was not observed in any patient in either group. Conclusions: Use of preoperative Strepsils lozenges decreases incidence of POST and maybe utilized as a simple and cost-effective measure for decreasing the symptoms of POST and increasing the satisfaction of patients. PMID:24843341

  3. On the phase formation of titanium oxide thin films deposited by reactive DC magnetron sputtering: influence of oxygen partial pressure and nitrogen doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandian, Ramanathaswamy; Natarajan, Gomathi; Rajagopalan, S.; Kamruddin, M.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2014-09-01

    This work describes about the control on phase formation in titanium oxide thin films deposited by reactive dc magnetron sputtering. Various phases of titanium oxide thin films were deposited by controlling the oxygen partial pressure during the sputtering process. By adding nitrogen gas to sputter gas mixture of oxygen and argon, the oxygen partial pressure was decreased further below the usual critical value, below and above which the sputtering yields metallic and oxide films, respectively. Furthermore, nitrogen addition eliminated the typical hysteretic behaviour between the flow rate and oxygen partial pressure, and significantly influenced the sputter rate. On increasing the oxygen partial pressure, the ratio between anatase and rutile fraction and grain size increases. The fracture cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy together with the complementary information from X-ray diffraction and micro-Raman investigations revealed the evolution and spatial distribution of the anatase and rutile phases. Both the energy delivered to the growing film and oxygen vacancy concentrations are correlated with the formation of various phases upon varying the oxygen partial pressure.

  4. The effect of intravenous low dose ketamine for reducing postoperative sore throat

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Hyun; Noh, Jung Il; Lee, Su Myoung; Kim, Mun Gyu; Kim, Sang Ho; Ok, Si Young; Kim, Soon Im

    2010-01-01

    Background This study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of intravenous low dose ketamine for reducing the incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat (POST). Methods This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trial. The study population consisted of 70 patients between 20 and 70 years old who were classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II and were scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The patients were divided randomly into two groups. Patients in the ketamine group received an intravenous injection of 0.5 mg/kg of ketamine just before induction, followed by 10 µg/kg/min throughout the operation. Patients in the control group received intravenous saline instead of ketamine. The patients were interviewed 1, 6, and 24 h after the operation. The incidence and severity of POST were recorded. Results No significant differences in the incidence and severity of POST during the 24 h after the operation were found between the two groups (21/31 in the ketamine group vs. 26/34 in the control group, P = 0.398). Conclusions Intravenous injection of low dose ketamine was not effective for reducing POST. PMID:20651994

  5. Reconsidering sore throats. Part 2: Alternative approach and practical office tool.

    PubMed Central

    McIsaac, W. J.; Goel, V.; Slaughter, P. M.; Parsons, G. W.; Woolnough, K. V.; Weir, P. T.; Ennet, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify a management approach for Group A streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis that would address overuse of antibiotics and could be implemented immediately. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: No randomized, controlled trials were found; four observational studies met our criteria: simplicity, discrimination ability for GAS pharyngitis compared with throat culture, and validation in a different patient population. Only one scoring system fulfilled all three criteria. MAIN FINDINGS: Formal clinical scoring systems have the potential to improve family physicians' ability to identify and manage GAS pharyngitis. One system had been sufficiently validated to support its use in clinical practice. Four clinical characteristics (no cough, fever higher than 38 degrees C, exudate, and tender cervical nodes) linked to explicit management decisions form the basis for a sore throat score. CONCLUSIONS: Use of a clinical score for management of GAS pharyngitis can be recommended on the basis of the rarity of rheumatic fever in modern society, the resources devoted to management of upper respiratory tract illnesses, the volume of antibiotics prescribed, and the emergence of antibiotic resistance as a growing health issue. PMID:9116521

  6. Pain-related fear and avoidance of physical exertion following delayed-onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Trost, Zina; France, Christopher R; Thomas, James S

    2011-07-01

    The current study examined the relationship between pain-related fear, physical performance, and pain-related interference in the context of experimentally induced pain to the lower back. Thirty healthy participants completed a test of maximal trunk strength before and after induction of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) to the trunk extensors. Pain-related fear (Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia and Pain Anxiety Symptom Scale) was assessed prior to DOMS induction, and measures of current pain and pain-related interference with life activities were obtained 1 day after DOMS induction. As predicted, pain-related fear was not related to strength production prior to DOMS induction. However, following DOMS induction, pain-related fear predicted reduced maximal strength production, individual decrement in maximal strength performance, and increased pain-related interference in life activities. Current pain intensity and anthropometric factors did not contribute significantly to these outcome measures. To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify the impact of pain-related fear on physical performance among a healthy group of individuals following experimental acute low back injury. The findings extend previous research on psychological variables and simulated injury, and suggest that pain-related fear may be an important vulnerability factor in development of disability following acute pain experience. PMID:21419575

  7. Stress and body condition in a population of largemouth bass: implications for red-sore disease

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, G.W.; Hazen, T.C.

    1980-09-01

    The body conditions, K = 10/sup 5/(weight, g)/(standard length)/sup 3/, and various hematological characters were examined for largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) taken from Par Pond, a reservoir heated by effluent from a nuclear production reactor at the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina. Largemouth bass with K less than 2.0 had significantly lower (P < 0.05) hematocrits, hemoglobin concentrations, total red blood cell counts, total white blood cell counts, and lymphocyte fractions, and significantly higher granulocyte fractions and cortisol concentrations, than those with K greater than 2.0; monocyte, thrombocyte, and reticulocyte fractions were not different between the two K-factor groupings. When data were pooled, all blood variables except the reticulocyte fraction were significantly correlated with K. Hematocrit, the lymphocyte fraction, and cortisol concentration account for 20.5% of the variation in K. These data support a previous hypothesis that elevated water temperature promotes stress. Stress within the Par Pond largemouth bass population may play an important role in the epizootiology of red-sore disease caused by the gram-negative bacterium, Aeromonas hydrophila.

  8. Control of scabies, skin sores and haematuria in children in the Solomon Islands: another role for ivermectin.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Gregor; Leafasia, Judson; Sheridan, John; Hills, Susan; Wate, Janet; Wate, Christine; Montgomery, Janet; Pandeya, Nirmala; Purdie, David

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of a 3-year programme aimed at controlling scabies on five small lagoon islands in the Solomon Islands by monitoring scabies, skin sores, streptococcal skin contamination, serology and haematuria in the island children. METHODS: Control was achieved by treating almost all residents of each island once or twice within 2 weeks with ivermectin (160-250 microg/kg), except for children who weighed less than 15 kg and pregnant women, for whom 5% permethrin cream was used. Reintroduction of scabies was controlled by treating returning residents and visitors, whether or not they had evident scabies. FINDINGS: Prevalence of scabies dropped from 25% to less than 1% (P < 0.001); prevalence of sores from 40% to 21% (P < 0.001); streptococcal contamination of the fingers in those with and without sores decreased significantly (P = 0.02 and 0.047, respectively) and anti-DNase B levels decreased (P = 0.002). Both the proportion of children with haematuria and its mean level fell (P = 0.002 and P < 0.001, respectively). No adverse effects of the treatments were seen. CONCLUSION: The results show that ivermectin is an effective and practical agent in the control of scabies and that control reduces the occurrence of streptococcal skin disease and possible signs of renal damage in children. Integrating community-based control of scabies and streptococcal skin disease with planned programmes for controlling filariasis and intestinal nematodes could be both practical and produce great health benefits. PMID:15682247

  9. The influence of an artificial playing surface on injury risk and perceptions of muscle soreness in elite Rugby Union.

    PubMed

    Williams, S; Trewartha, G; Kemp, S P T; Michell, R; Stokes, K A

    2016-01-01

    This prospective cohort study investigated the influence of an artificial playing surface on injury risk and perceptions of muscle soreness in elite English Premiership Rugby Union players. Time loss (from 39.5 matches) and abrasion (from 27 matches) injury risk was compared between matches played on artificial turf and natural grass. Muscle soreness was reported over the 4 days following one match played on each surface by 95 visiting players (i.e., normally play on natural grass surfaces). There was a likely trivial difference in the overall injury burden relating to time-loss injuries between playing surfaces [rate ratio = 1.01, 90% confidence interval (CI): 0.73-1.38]. Abrasions were substantially more common on artificial turf (rate ratio = 7.92, 90% CI: 4.39-14.28), although the majority of these were minor and only two resulted in any reported time loss. Muscle soreness was consistently higher over the 4 days following a match on artificial turf in comparison with natural grass, although the magnitude of this effect was small (effect sizes ranging from 0.26 to 0.40). These results suggest that overall injury risk is similar for the two playing surfaces, but further surveillance is required before inferences regarding specific injury diagnoses and smaller differences in overall injury risk can be made. PMID:25644277

  10. Linear and nonlinear analyses of multi-channel mechanomyographic recordings reveal heterogeneous activation of wrist extensors in presence of delayed onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Madeleine, Pascal; Hansen, Ernst A; Samani, Afshin

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we applied multi-channel mechanomyographic (MMG) recordings in combination with linear and nonlinear analyses to investigate muscular and musculotendinous effects of high intensity eccentric exercise. Twelve accelerometers arranged in a 3 × 4 matrix over the dominant elbow muscles were used to detect MMG activity in 12 healthy participants. Delayed onset muscle soreness was induced by repetitive high intensity eccentric contractions of the wrist extensor muscles. Average rectified values (ARV) as well as percentage of recurrence (%REC) and percentage of determinism (%DET) extracted from recurrence quantification analysis were computed from data obtained during static-dynamic contractions performed before exercise, immediately after exercise, and in presence of muscle soreness. A linear mixed model was used for the statistical analysis. The ARV, %REC, and %DET maps revealed heterogeneous MMG activity over the wrist extensor muscles before, immediately after, and in presence of muscle soreness (P<0.01). The ARVs were higher while the %REC and %DET were lower in presence of muscle soreness compared with before exercise (P<0.05). The study provides new key information on linear and nonlinear analyses of multi-channel MMG recordings of the wrist extensor muscles following eccentric exercise that results in muscle soreness. Recurrence quantification analysis can be suggested as a tool for detection of MMG changes in presence of muscle soreness. PMID:25277830

  11. The mechanism of solute-enriched clusters formation in neutron-irradiated pressure vessel steels: The case of Fe-Cu model alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbotin, A. V.; Panyukov, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    Mechanism of solute-enriched clusters formation in neutron-irradiated pressure vessel steels is proposed and developed in case of Fe-Cu model alloys. The suggested solute-drag mechanism is analogous to the well-known zone-refining process. We show that the obtained results are in good agreement with available experimental data on the parameters of clusters enriched with the alloying elements. Our model explains why the formation of solute-enriched clusters does not happen in austenitic stainless steels with fcc lattice structure. It also allows to quantify the method of evaluation of neutron irradiation dose for the process of RPV steels hardening.

  12. The Influence of Oral L-Glutamine Supplementation on Muscle Strength Recovery and Soreness Following Unilateral Knee Extension Eccentric Exercise.

    PubMed

    Legault, Zachary; Bagnall, Nicholas; Kimmerly, Derek S

    2015-10-01

    The study aimed to examine the effects that L-glutamine supplementation has on quadriceps muscle strength and soreness ratings following eccentric exercise. It was hypothesized that glutamine ingestion would quicken the recovery rate of peak force production and decrease muscle soreness ratings over a 72-hr recovery period. Sixteen healthy participants (8♀/8♂; 22 ± 4 years) volunteered in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study. Supplement conditions consisted of isoenergetic placebo (maltodextrin, 0.6 g·kg-1·day-1) and L-glutamine (0.3 g·kg-1·day-1 + 0.3 g·kg-1·day-1 maltodextrin) ingestion once per day over 72 hr. Knee extensor peak torque at 0°, 30°, and 180° per second and muscle soreness were measured before, immediately following, 24, 48, and 72 hr posteccentric exercise. Eccentric exercise consisted of 8 sets (10 repetitions/set) of unilateral knee extension at 125% maximum concentric force with 2-min rest intervals. L-glutamine resulted in greater relative peak torque at 180°/sec both immediately after (71 ± 8% vs. 66 ± 9%), and 72 hr (91 ± 8% vs. 86 ± 7%) postexercise (all, p < .01). In men, L-glutamine produced greater (p < .01) peak torques at 30°/ sec postexercise. Men also produced greater normalized peak torques at 30°/sec (Nm/kg) in the L-glutamine condition than women (all, p < .05). In the entire sample, L-glutamine resulted in lower soreness ratings at 24 (2.8 ± 1.2 vs. 3.4 ± 1.2), 48 (2.6 ± 1.4 vs. 3.9 ± 1.2), and 72 (1.7 ± 1.2 vs. 2.9 ± 1.3) hr postexercise (p < .01). The L-glutamine supplementation resulted in faster recovery of peak torque and diminished muscle soreness following eccentric exercise. The effect of L-glutamine on muscle force recovery may be greater in men than women. PMID:25811544

  13. Temperature-Induced Irreversible Phase Transition From Perovskite to Diamond But Pressure-Driven Back-Transition in an Ammonium Copper Formate.

    PubMed

    Shang, Ran; Chen, Sa; Wang, Bing-Wu; Wang, Zhe-Ming; Gao, Song

    2016-02-01

    The compound [CH3 CH2 NH3][Cu(HCOO)3] undergoes a phase transition at 357 K, from a perovskite to a diamond structure, by heating. The backward transition can be driven by pressure at room temperature but not cooling under ambient or lower pressure. The rearrangement of one long copper-formate bond, the switch of bridging-chelating mode of the formate, the alternation of N-H⋅⋅⋅O H-bonds, and the flipping of ethylammonium are involved in the transition. The strong N-H⋅⋅⋅O H-bonding probably locks the metastable diamond phase. The two phases display magnetic and electric orderings of different characters. PMID:26709724

  14. Formation pressure testing at the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Operational summary, history matching, and interpretations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, B.; Hancock, S.; Wilson, S.; Enger, C.; Collett, T.; Boswell, R.; Hunter, R.

    2011-01-01

    In February 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy, BP Exploration (Alaska), and the U.S. Geological Survey, collected open-hole pressure-response data, as well as gas and water sample collection, in a gas hydrate reservoir (the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well) using Schlumberger's Modular Dynamics Formation Tester (MDT) wireline tool. Four such MDT tests, ranging from six to twelve hours duration, and including a series of flow, sampling, and shut-in periods of various durations, were conducted. Locations for the testing were selected based on NMR and other log data to assure sufficient isolation from reservoir boundaries and zones of excess free water. Test stages in which pressure was reduced sufficiently to mobilize free water in the formation (yet not cause gas hydrate dissociation) produced readily interpretable pressure build-up profiles. Build-ups following larger drawdowns consistently showed gas-hydrate dissociation and gas release (as confirmed by optical fluid analyzer data), as well as progressive dampening of reservoir pressure build-up during sequential tests at a given MDT test station.History matches of one multi-stage, 12-h test (the C2 test) were accomplished using five different reservoir simulators: CMG-STARS, HydrateResSim, MH21-HYDRES, STOMP-HYD, and TOUGH. +. HYDRATE. Simulations utilized detailed information collected across the reservoir either obtained or determined from geophysical well logs, including thickness (11.3. m, 37 ft.), porosity (35%), hydrate saturation (65%), both mobile and immobile water saturations, intrinsic permeability (1000 mD), pore water salinity (5 ppt), and formation temperature (3.3-3.9 ??C). This paper will present the approach and preliminary results of the history-matching efforts, including estimates of initial formation permeability and analyses of the various unique features exhibited by the MDT results. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Reproducing early Martian atmospheric carbon dioxide partial pressure by modeling the formation of Mg-Fe-Ca carbonate identified in the Comanche rock outcrops on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Wolfgang; Fu, Yunjiao; Ilger, Jan-Michael

    2012-10-01

    The well defined composition of the Comanche rock's carbonate (Magnesite0.62Siderite0.25Calcite0.11Rhodochrosite0.02) and its host rock's composition, dominated by Mg-rich olivine, enable us to reproduce the atmospheric CO2partial pressure that may have triggered the formation of these carbonates. Hydrogeochemical one-dimensional transport modeling reveals that similar aqueous rock alteration conditions (including CO2partial pressure) may have led to the formation of Mg-Fe-Ca carbonate identified in the Comanche rock outcrops (Gusev Crater) and also in the ultramafic rocks exposed in the Nili Fossae region. Hydrogeochemical conditions enabling the formation of Mg-rich solid solution carbonate result from equilibrium species distributions involving (1) ultramafic rocks (ca. 32 wt% olivine; Fo0.72Fa0.28), (2) pure water, and (3) CO2partial pressures of ca. 0.5 to 2.0 bar at water-to-rock ratios of ca. 500 molH2O mol-1rock and ca. 5°C (278 K). Our modeled carbonate composition (Magnesite0.64Siderite0.28Calcite0.08) matches the measured composition of carbonates preserved in the Comanche rocks. Considerably different carbonate compositions are achieved at (1) higher temperature (85°C), (2) water-to-rock ratios considerably higher and lower than 500 mol mol-1 and (3) CO2partial pressures differing from 1.0 bar in the model set up. The Comanche rocks, hosting the carbonate, may have been subjected to long-lasting (>104 to 105 years) aqueous alteration processes triggered by atmospheric CO2partial pressures of ca. 1.0 bar at low temperature. Their outcrop may represent a fragment of the upper layers of an altered olivine-rich rock column, which is characterized by newly formed Mg-Fe-Ca solid solution carbonate, and phyllosilicate-rich alteration assemblages within deeper (unexposed) units.

  16. Effect of inlet-air humidity, temperature, pressure, and reference Mach number on the formation of oxides of nitrogen in a gas turbine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchionna, N. R.; Diehl, L. A.; Trout, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the effect of inlet air humidity on the formation of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from a gas turbine combustor. Combustor inlet air temperature ranged from 506 K (450 F) to 838 K (1050 F). The tests were primarily run at a constant pressure of 6 atmospheres and reference Mach number of 0.065. The NOx emission index was found to decrease with increasing inlet air humidity at a constant exponential rate: NOx = NOx0e-19H (where H is the humidity and the subscript 0 denotes the value at zero humidity). the emission index increased exponentially with increasing normalized inlet air temperature to the 1.14 power. Additional tests made to determine the effect of pressure and reference Mach number on NOx showed that the NOx emission index varies directly with pressure to the 0.5 power and inversely with reference Mach number.

  17. A Differential Pressure Laminar Flow Reactor Supports Osteogenic Differentiation and Extracellular Matrix Formation from Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Macroporous Ceramic Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Cornelia; Israelowitz, Meir; Gille, Christoph; von Schroeder, Herbert P.; Reimers, Kerstin; Vogt, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We present a laminar flow reactor for bone tissue engineering that was developed based on a computational fluid dynamics model. The bioreactor design permits a laminar flow field through its specific internal shape. An integrated bypass system that prevents pressure build-up through bypass openings for pressure release allows for a constant pressure environment during the changing of permeability values that are caused by cellular growth within a porous scaffold. A macroporous ceramic scaffold, composed of zirconium dioxide, was used as a test biomaterial that studies adipose stem cell behavior within a controlled three-dimensional (3D) flow and pressure environment. The topographic structure of the material provided a basis for stem cell proliferation and differentiation toward the osteogenic lineage. Dynamic culture conditions in the bioreactor supported cell viability during long-term culture and induced cell cluster formation and extra-cellular matrix deposition within the porous scaffold, though no complete closure of the pores with new-formed tissue was observed. We postulate that our system is suitable for studying fluid shear stress effects on stem cell proliferation and differentiation toward bone formation in tissue-engineered 3D constructs. PMID:23515420

  18. A high-pressure premixed flat-flame burner for chemical process studies. [of pollutant formation in hydrocarbon flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, I. M.

    1978-01-01

    A premixed flat-flame burner was designed and tested with methane-air mixtures at pressures from 1.1 to 20 atm and equivalence ratios from 0.7 to 1.1. Reactant velocity in the burner mixing chamber was used to characterize the range of stable flames at each pressure-equivalence-ratio condition. Color photographs of the flames were used to determine flame zone thickness and flame height. The results show that this burner can be used for chemical process studies in premixed high pressure methane-air flames up to 20 atm.

  19. GEODE 2: Manufacturing large area format cadmium-mercury-telluride crystals in a microgravity environment. Pressure sensor proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gale, M. R.; Beattie, D. A.

    In the GEODE 1 experiment, a semiconductor Cd-Hg telluride crystal was grown in the MASER1 sounding rocket. It was shown that bulk-quench Cd-Hg telluride crystallization in a microgravity environment results in a more homogeneous crystal structure than can be achieved terrestrially. In the GEODE 2 program, the wall thickness of the quartz ampoule containing the crystal will be reduced to improve the heat transfer characteristics during crystallization. Ampoule explosion must be prevented by active control of the pressure surrounding the weaker, thin-walled ampoule to match that inside the furnace. A prototype pressure sensor that uses the absorption of ultraviolet light by Hg vapor has been built and tested. Pressures from 4 to 40 atmospheres have been measured with a resolution better than 0.35 atmospheres over the entire range. The feasibility of the pressure measurement technique has been demonstrated, although some design improvements are required in order to make measurements more repeatable.

  20. Pressure oscillations caused by momentum on shut in of a high rate well in a fractured formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, S.

    1989-06-01

    Pressure transient testing techniques are an important part of reservoir and production testing procedures. These techniques are frequently used to determine practical information about underground reservoirs such as the permeability, porosity, liquid content, reservoir and liquid discontinuities and other related data. This information is valuable in helping to analyze, improve and forecast reservoir performance. This report is concerned with developing models for pressure transient well testing in high permeability, high flow rate, naturally fractured reservoirs. In the present work, a study was made of the effects of liquid inertia in the fractures and the wellbore on the pressure response obtained during a well test. The effects of turbulent flow and multi-phase flow effects such as gravitational segregation or anisotropic porous media effects were not considered. The scope of the study was limited to studying inertial effects on the pressure response of a fractured reservoir.

  1. Effect of magnesium sulfate nebulization on the incidence of postoperative sore throat

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Monu; Chalumuru, Nitish; Gopinath, Ramachandran

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Postoperative sore throat (POST) is a well-recognized complication after general anesthesia (GA). Numerous nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures have been used for attenuating POST with variable success. The present study was conducted to compare the efficiency of preoperative nebulization of normal saline and magnesium sulfate in reducing the incidence of POST following GA. Materials and Methods: Following institutional ethical committee approval and written informed consent, a prospective randomized double-blinded study was conducted in 100 cases divided into two equal groups. Patients included in the study were of either gender belonging to American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA) status 1 or 2 undergoing elective surgery of approximately 2 h or more duration requiring tracheal intubation. Patients in Group A are nebulized with 3 ml of normal saline and the patients in Group B are nebulized with 3 ml of 225 mg isotonic nebulized magnesium sulfate for 15 min, 5 min before induction of anesthesia. The incidence of POST at rest and on swallowing and any undue complaints at 0, 2, 4, and 24 h in the postoperative period are evaluated. Results: There is no significant difference in POST at rest during 0th, 2nd and 4th h between normal saline and MgSO4. Significant difference is seen at 24th h, where MgSO4 lessens POST. There is no significant difference in POST on swallowing during 0th and 2nd h between normal saline and MgSO4. Significant difference is seen at 4th h, where MgSO4 has been shown to lessen POST. Conclusions: MgSO4 significantly reduces the incidence of POST compared to normal saline. PMID:27275043

  2. Cold Vs. Heat After Exercise-Is There a Clear Winner for Muscle Soreness.

    PubMed

    Petrofsky, Jerrold S; Khowailed, Iman Akef; Lee, Haneul; Berk, Lee; Bains, Gurinder S; Akerkar, Siddhesh; Shah, Jinal; Al-Dabbak, Fuad; Laymon, Mike S

    2015-11-01

    Because of the differences in the exercise type, temperature, and timing of the use of cold and heat after exercise in different studies, there is no clear conclusion as to the efficacy of either modality on reducing delayed onset muscle soreness. One hundred subjects at similar fitness levels were examined. They accomplished leg squats for 15 minutes and heat and cold were applied after or 24 hours after exercise using ThermaCare heat or cold wraps. Measurements obtained were strength, the force to passively move the knee, analog visual pain scales, and blood myoglobin. Control subjects lost 24% strength after exercise. Subjects with heat or cold just after exercise only lost 4% strength (p < 0.01). For strength recovery, cold applied after 24 hours was better than heat at 24 hours. Heat or cold applied after exercise was significantly better to prevent elastic tissue damage (p < 0.01), whereas heat and cold immediately after exercise caused no loss in muscle myoglobin and heat or cold after 24 hours showed no less muscle damage from myoglobin than in control subjects. Myoglobin in the control and heat and cold 24-hour groups averaged 135.1% of the baseline data but averaged 106.1% of baseline in the immediate heat and cold groups. For reducing pain, control subjects showed a significant amount of pain the days after exercise. But cold immediately after exercise or 24 hours later was superior to heat in reducing pain. In conclusion, both cold and heat appear to be efficacious in reducing muscle damage after exercise. PMID:26502272

  3. The effect of creatine supplementation upon inflammatory and muscle soreness markers after a 30km race.

    PubMed

    Santos, R V T; Bassit, R A; Caperuto, E C; Costa Rosa, L F B P

    2004-09-01

    We have evaluated the effect of a creatine supplementation protocol upon inflammatory and muscle soreness markers: creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), prostaglandin E2) (PGE2) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) after running 30km. Runners with previously experience in running marathons, with their personal best between 2.5-3h were supplemented for 5 days prior to the 30km race with 4 doses of 5g of creatine and 15g of maltodextrine per day while the control group received the same amount of maltodextrine. Pre-race blood samples were collected immediately before running the 30km, and 24h after the end of the test (the post-race samples). After the test, athletes from the control group presented an increase in plasma CK (4.4-fold), LDH (43%), PGE2 6.6-fold) and TNF-alpha (2.34-fold) concentrations, indicating a high level of cell injury and inflammation. Creatine supplementation attenuated the changes observed for CK (by 19%), PGE2 and TNF-alpha (by 60.9% and 33.7%, respectively, p<0.05) and abolished the increase in LDH plasma concentration observed after running 30km, The athletes did not present any side effects such as cramping, dehydration or diarrhea, neither during the period of supplementation, nor during the 30km race. All the athletes finished the race in a time equivalent to their personal best +/- 5.8%. These results indicate that creatine supplementation reduced cell damage and inflammation after an exhaustive intense race. PMID:15306159

  4. Elimination of delayed-onset muscle soreness by pre-resistance cardioacceleration before each set.

    PubMed

    Davis, W Jackson; Wood, Daniel T; Andrews, Ryan G; Elkind, Les M; Davis, W Bart

    2008-01-01

    We compared delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) induced by anaerobic resistance exercises with and without aerobic cardioacceleration before each set, under the rationale that elevated heart rate (HR) may increase blood perfusion in muscles to limit eccentric contraction damage and/or speed muscle recovery. In two identical experiments (20 men, 28 women), well-conditioned athletes paired by similar physical condition were assigned randomly to experimental or control groups. HR (independent variable) was recorded with HR monitors. DOMS (dependent variable) was self-reported using Borg's Rating of Perceived Pain scale. After identical pre-training strength testing, mean DOMS in the experimental and control groups was indistinguishable (P > or = 0.19) for musculature employed in eight resistance exercises in both genders, validating the dependent variable. Subjects then trained three times per week for 9 (men) to 11 (women) weeks in a progressive, whole-body, concurrent training protocol. Before each set of resistance exercises, experimental subjects cardioaccelerated briefly (mean HR during resistance training, 63.7% HR reserve), whereas control subjects rested briefly (mean HR, 33.5% HR reserve). Mean DOMS among all muscle groups and workouts was discernibly less in experimental than control groups in men (P = 0.0000019) and women (P = 0.0007); less for each muscle group used in nine resistance exercises in both genders, discernible (P < 0.025) in 15 of 18 comparisons; and less in every workout, discernible (P < 0.05) in 32% (men) and 55% (women) of workouts. Most effect sizes were moderate. In both genders, mean DOMS per workout disappeared by the fourth week of training in experimental but not control groups. Aerobic cardioacceleration immediately before each set of resistance exercises therefore rapidly eliminates DOMS during vigorous progressive resistance training in athletes. PMID:18296978

  5. Manual therapy ameliorates delayed-onset muscle soreness and alters muscle metabolites in rats

    PubMed Central

    Urakawa, Susumu; Takamoto, Kouichi; Nakamura, Tomoya; Sakai, Shigekazu; Matsuda, Teru; Taguchi, Toru; Mizumura, Kazue; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) can be induced by lengthening contraction (LC); it can be characterized by tenderness and movement-related pain in the exercised muscle. Manual therapy (MT), including compression of exercised muscles, is widely used as physical rehabilitation to reduce pain and promote functional recovery. Although MT is beneficial for reducing musculoskeletal pain (i.e. DOMS), the physiological mechanisms of MT remain unclear. In the present study, we first developed an animal model of MT in DOMS; LC was applied to the rat gastrocnemius muscle under anesthesia, which induced mechanical hyperalgesia 2–4 days after LC. MT (manual compression) ameliorated mechanical hyperalgesia. Then, we used capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (CE-TOFMS) to investigate early effects of MT on the metabolite profiles of the muscle experiencing DOMS. The rats were divided into the following three groups; (1) normal controls, (2) rats with LC application (LC group), and (3) rats undergoing MT after LC (LC + MT group). According to the CE-TOFMS analysis, a total of 171 metabolites were detected among the three groups, and 19 of these metabolites were significant among the groups. Furthermore, the concentrations of eight metabolites, including branched-chain amino acids, carnitine, and malic acid, were significantly different between the LC + MT and LC groups. The results suggest that MT significantly altered metabolite profiles in DOMS. According to our findings and previous data regarding metabolites in mitochondrial metabolism, the ameliorative effects of MT might be mediated partly through alterations in metabolites associated with mitochondrial respiration. PMID:25713324

  6. Phytochemical, Antimicrobial, and Toxicological Evaluation of Traditional Herbs Used to Treat Sore Throat.

    PubMed

    Mehreen, Arifa; Waheed, Muzzamil; Liaqat, Iram; Arshad, Najma

    2016-01-01

    The in vitro antibacterial activities of 29 traditional medicinal plants used in respiratory ailments were assessed on multidrug resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria isolated from the sore throat patients and two reference strains. The methanolic, n-hexane, and aqueous extracts were screened by the agar well diffusion assay. Bioactive fractions of effective extracts were identified on TLC coupled with bioautography, while their toxicity was determined using haemolytic assay against human erythrocytes. Qualitative and quantitative phytochemical analysis of effective extracts was also performed. Methanolic extract of 18 plants showed antimicrobial activity against test strains. Adhatoda vasica (ZI = 17-21 mm, MIC: 7.12-62.5 μg/mL), Althaea officinalis (ZI = 16-20 mm, MIC: 15.62-31.25 μg/mL), Cordia latifolia (ZI = 16-20 mm, MIC: 12.62-62.5 μg/mL), Origanum vulgare (ZI = 20-22 mm, MIC: 3-15.62 μg/mL), Thymus vulgaris (ZI = 21-25 mm, MIC: 7.81-31.25 μg/mL), and Ziziphus jujuba (ZI = 14-20 mm, MIC: 7.81-31.25 μg/mL) showed significant antibacterial activity. Alkaloid fractions of Adhatoda vasica, Cordia latifolia, and Origanum vulgare and flavonoid fraction of the Althaea officinalis, Origanum vulgare, Thymus Vulgaris, and Ziziphus jujuba exhibited antimicrobial activity. Effective plant extracts show 0.93-0.7% erythrocyte haemolysis. The results obtained from this study provide a scientific rationale for the traditional use of these herbs and laid the basis for future studies to explore novel antimicrobial compounds. PMID:27429983

  7. Phytochemical, Antimicrobial, and Toxicological Evaluation of Traditional Herbs Used to Treat Sore Throat

    PubMed Central

    Mehreen, Arifa; Waheed, Muzzamil; Liaqat, Iram; Arshad, Najma

    2016-01-01

    The in vitro antibacterial activities of 29 traditional medicinal plants used in respiratory ailments were assessed on multidrug resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria isolated from the sore throat patients and two reference strains. The methanolic, n-hexane, and aqueous extracts were screened by the agar well diffusion assay. Bioactive fractions of effective extracts were identified on TLC coupled with bioautography, while their toxicity was determined using haemolytic assay against human erythrocytes. Qualitative and quantitative phytochemical analysis of effective extracts was also performed. Methanolic extract of 18 plants showed antimicrobial activity against test strains. Adhatoda vasica (ZI = 17–21 mm, MIC: 7.12–62.5 μg/mL), Althaea officinalis (ZI = 16–20 mm, MIC: 15.62–31.25 μg/mL), Cordia latifolia (ZI = 16–20 mm, MIC: 12.62–62.5 μg/mL), Origanum vulgare (ZI = 20–22 mm, MIC: 3–15.62 μg/mL), Thymus vulgaris (ZI = 21–25 mm, MIC: 7.81–31.25 μg/mL), and Ziziphus jujuba (ZI = 14–20 mm, MIC: 7.81–31.25 μg/mL) showed significant antibacterial activity. Alkaloid fractions of Adhatoda vasica, Cordia latifolia, and Origanum vulgare and flavonoid fraction of the Althaea officinalis, Origanum vulgare, Thymus Vulgaris, and Ziziphus jujuba exhibited antimicrobial activity. Effective plant extracts show 0.93–0.7% erythrocyte haemolysis. The results obtained from this study provide a scientific rationale for the traditional use of these herbs and laid the basis for future studies to explore novel antimicrobial compounds. PMID:27429983

  8. Effects of winter military training on energy balance, whole-body protein balance, muscle damage, soreness, and physical performance.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Lee M; Murphy, Nancy E; Martini, Svein; Spitz, Marissa G; Thrane, Ingjerd; McGraw, Susan M; Blatny, Janet-Martha; Castellani, John W; Rood, Jennifer C; Young, Andrew J; Montain, Scott J; Gundersen, Yngvar; Pasiakos, Stefan M

    2014-12-01

    Physiological consequences of winter military operations are not well described. This study examined Norwegian soldiers (n = 21 males) participating in a physically demanding winter training program to evaluate whether short-term military training alters energy and whole-body protein balance, muscle damage, soreness, and performance. Energy expenditure (D2(18)O) and intake were measured daily, and postabsorptive whole-body protein turnover ([(15)N]-glycine), muscle damage, soreness, and performance (vertical jump) were assessed at baseline, following a 4-day, military task training phase (MTT) and after a 3-day, 54-km ski march (SKI). Energy intake (kcal·day(-1)) increased (P < 0.01) from (mean ± SD (95% confidence interval)) 3098 ± 236 (2985, 3212) during MTT to 3461 ± 586 (3178, 3743) during SKI, while protein (g·kg(-1)·day(-1)) intake remained constant (MTT, 1.59 ± 0.33 (1.51, 1.66); and SKI, 1.71 ± 0.55 (1.58, 1.85)). Energy expenditure increased (P < 0.05) during SKI (6851 ± 562 (6580, 7122)) compared with MTT (5480 ± 389 (5293, 5668)) and exceeded energy intake. Protein flux, synthesis, and breakdown were all increased (P < 0.05) 24%, 18%, and 27%, respectively, during SKI compared with baseline and MTT. Whole-body protein balance was lower (P < 0.05) during SKI (-1.41 ± 1.11 (-1.98, -0.84) g·kg(-1)·10 h) than MTT and baseline. Muscle damage and soreness increased and performance decreased progressively (P < 0.05). The physiological consequences observed during short-term winter military training provide the basis for future studies to evaluate nutritional strategies that attenuate protein loss and sustain performance during severe energy deficits. PMID:25386980

  9. The Effects of Ice Massage, Ice Massage with Exercise, and Exercise on the Prevention and Treatment of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Isabell, William Kirk; Durrant, Earlene; Myrer, William; Anderson, Shauna

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effects of ice massage, ice massage with exercise, and exercise on the prevention and treatment of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Twenty-two subjects were randomly assigned to one of four groups. Preexercise measures were recorded for range of motion (ROM), strength, perceived soreness, and serum creatine kinase (CK) levels. Subjects performed up to 300 concentric/eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors with 90% of their 10 repetition maximum to induce muscle soreness. Dependent variables were assessed at 2, 4, 6, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours postexercise. Significant differences occurred in all variables with respect to time (ANOVA(p<.05)). However, no significant mode of treatment, or mode of treatment/assessment time interaction was present. Decreases in range of motion and flexion strength correspond with increases in perceived soreness. The nonsignificant mode of treatment/assessment time interaction suggests that the use of ice massage, ice massage with exercise, or exercise alone is not effective in significantly reducing the symptoms of delayed onset muscle soreness. In fact, though not statistically significant, the pattern of the data suggested the use of ice in the treatment of DOMS may be contraindicated. Further investigation is recommended. PMID:16558163

  10. The effects of yoga training and a single bout of yoga on delayed onset muscle soreness in the lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Colleen A; Sayers, Stephen P; Jensen, Barbara E; Headley, Samuel A; Manos, Tina M

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of yoga training and a single bout of yoga on the intensity of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). 24 yoga-trained (YT; n = 12) and non-yoga-trained (CON; n = 12), matched women volunteers were administered a DOMS-inducing bench-stepping exercise. Muscle soreness was assessed at baseline, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours after bench-stepping using a Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Groups were also compared on body awareness (BA), flexibility using the sit-and-reach test (SR), and perceived exertion (RPE). Statistical significance was accepted at p soreness in women following a bout of eccentric exercise. These findings have significant implications for coaches, athletes, and the exercising public who may want to implement yoga training as a preseason regimen or supplemental activity to lessen the symptoms associated with muscle soreness. PMID:15574074

  11. Formation and evolution of high-plasma-pressure region in the near-Earth plasma sheet: Precursor and postcursor of substorm expansion onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.

    2015-08-01

    Cause of substorm expansion onset is one of the major problems in the magnetospheric study. On the basis of a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation, Tanaka et al. (2010) suggested that formation and evolution of a high-pressure region (HPR) in the near-Earth plasma sheet could result in sudden intensification of the Region 1 field-aligned current and the westward auroral electrojet. In this sense, the formation and evolution of the HPR are a key in understanding the cause of the onset. On 5 April 2009, three probes of the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) were located at XGSM~-11 Re around the equator, which provide unique opportunity to investigate the spatial-temporal evolution of the HPR near the substorm expansion onset. Just before the onset, a positive excursion of the plasma pressure appeared at the outermost probe first, followed by the inner ones. Just after the onset, the opposite sequence took place. A positive excursion of the Y component of the current density was observed near the onset by the THEMIS probes and followed by a decrease trend. A similar variation was also found in the MHD simulation. All these features are consistent with the simulation result that a squeeze of the plasma from the plasma sheet results in the formation of the HPR before the onset and that the accumulated plasma spreads outward after the onset. The HPR is shown to be important for the dynamics of the magnetosphere during a substorm.

  12. Effects of high-temperature pressure cooking and traditional cooking on soymilk: Protein particles formation and sensory quality.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Feng; Peng, Xingyun; Shi, Xiaodi; Guo, Shuntang

    2016-10-15

    This study focused on the effect of high-temperature pressure cooking on the sensory quality of soymilk. Soymilk was prepared by high-temperature pressure cooking (105-125°C and 0.12-0.235MPa) and traditional cooking (97°C and 0.1MPa). The size distribution and composition of protein particles and the rheological properties of soymilk were compared. Results showed that the content of protein particles and the average size of soymilk particles were higher in high-temperature pressure cooking than in traditional cooking (p<0.05). High-temperature pressure cooking affected soymilk protein denaturation and favored protein aggregation. Similar to traditional soymilk, soymilk cooked at 115°C was categorized as a Newtonian fluid but was found with increased viscosity in the rheological test. Soymilk cooked at 115°C for 10min exhibited a homogeneous, smooth, and creamy texture with a high acceptability in the sensory test. PMID:27173533

  13. Effects of the nozzle design on the properties of plasma jet and formation of YSZ coatings under low pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chengqi; Gao, Yang; Yang, Deming; Fu, Yingqing

    2016-06-01

    How to control the quality of the coatings has become a major problem during the plasma spraying. Because nozzle contour has a great influence on the characteristic of the plasma jet, two kinds of plasma torches equipped with a standard cylindrical nozzle and a converging-diverging nozzle are designed for low pressure plasma spraying(LPPS) and very low pressure plasma spraying(VLPPS). Yttria stabilized zirconia(YSZ) coatings are obtained in the reducing pressure environment. The properties of the plasma jet without or with powder injection are analyzed by optical emission spectroscopy, and the electron temperature is calculated based on the ratio of the relative intensity of two Ar I spectral lines. The results show that some of the YSZ powder can be vaporized in the low pressure enlarged plasma jet, and the long anode nozzle may improve the characteristics of the plasma jet. The coatings deposited by LPPS are mainly composed of the equiaxed grains and while the unmelted powder particles and large scalar pores appear in the coatings made by VLPPS. The long anode nozzle could improve the melting of the powders and deposition efficiency, and enhance the coatings' hardness. At the same time, the long anode nozzle could lead to a decrease in the overspray phenomenon. Through the comparison of the two different size's nozzle, the long anode is much more suitable for making the YSZ coatings.

  14. Metamorphic evolution and thermobaric structure of the subduction-related Bacariza high-pressure granulite formation (Cabo Ortegal Complex, NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puelles, P.; Ábalos, B.; Gil Ibarguchi, J. I.

    2005-09-01

    The high-pressure Bacariza granulite formation comprises various lithostratigraphic units of granulite orthogneisses, ultramafic, Mg-rich mafic, intermediate and common mafic granulites, as well as of more exotic intercalations. Mineral assemblages in equilibrium in ultramafic- to intermediate rocks contain garnet, clinopyroxene and plagioclase, with different amounts of zoisite/clinozoisite, kyanite, quartz, scapolite, rutile and ilmenite depending on the granulite lithotype, whereas granulite orthogneisses contain garnet, phengite, biotite, K-feldspar, antiperthitic plagioclase, quartz and rutile as primary phases. Thermobarometry of these rocks supports the existence of a high-pressure metamorphism for which near-peak P- T conditions have been estimated at ca. 790 °C and 1.6 GPa. The preserved fabrics and structures enable us to relate the metamorphism to coeval polyphasic deformational processes. Dynamic retrogression began under still high-pressure granulite facies conditions (1.4 GPa and ca. 740 °C) and is postdated by symplectitization (1.3 GPa and ca. 715 °C). Subsequent retrogression under medium pressure amphibolite facies conditions at similar temperature was either widespread and static or localized and dynamic as a result of intense deformation partitioning during uplift. Loading/heating and subsequent decompression/cooling are related to a single cycle in a subduction conduit setting. This study suggests that high-pressure granulite metamorphism might not be as uncommon in the high-pressure metamorphic series as previously thought. Moreover, it might constitute a diagnostic feature of convergent lithospheric settings, whether or not associated with eclogite facies metamorphism in adjacent units.

  15. The inviscid pressure field on the tip of a semi-infinite wing and its application to the formation of a tip vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, G. F.; Shamroth, S. J.; Mcdonald, H.; Briley, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    A method was developed for determining the aerodynamic loads on the tip of an infinitely thin, swept, cambered semi-infinite wing at an angle of attack which is operating subsonically in an inviscid medium and is subjected to a sinusoidal gust. Under the assumption of linearized aerodynamics, the loads on the tip are obtained by superposition of the steady aerodynamic results for angle of attack and camber, and the unsteady results for the response to the sinusoidal gust. The near field disturbance pressures in the fluid surrounding the tip are obtained by assuming a dipole representation for the loading on the tip and calculating the pressures accordingly. The near field pressures are used to drive a reduced form of the Navier-Stokes equations which yield the tip vortex formation. The combined viscid-inviscid analysis is applied to determining the pressures and examining the vortex rollup in the vicinity of an unswept, uncambered wing moving steadily at a Mach number of 0.2 at an angle of attack of 0.1 rad. The viscous tip flow calculation shows features expected in the tip flow such as the qualitatively proper development of boundary layers on both the upper and lower airfoil surfaces. In addition, application of the viscous solution leads to the generation of a circular type flow pattern above the airfoil suction surface.

  16. 08FFL-0020Influence of High Fuel Rail Pressure and Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction on PM Formation in an Off-Highway Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, Michael D; Domingo, Norberto; Storey, John Morse; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur

    2008-01-01

    The influence of fuel rail pressure (FRP) and urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on particulate matter (PM) formation is investigated in this paper along with notes regarding the NOx and other emissions. Increasing FRP was shown to reduce the overall soot and total PM mass for four operating conditions. These conditions included two high speed conditions (2400 rpm at 540 and 270 Nm of torque) and two moderated speed conditions (1400 rpm at 488 and 325 Nm). The concentrations of CO2 and NOx increased with fuel rail pressure and this is attributed to improved fuel-air mixing. Interestingly, the level of unburned hydrocarbons remained constant (or increased slightly) with increased FRP. PM concentration was measured using an AVL smoke meter and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS); and total PM was collected using standard gravimetric techniques. These results showed that the smoke number and particulate concentrations decrease with increasing FRP. However the decrease becomes more gradual as very high rail pressures. Additionally, the total PM decreased with increasing FRP; however, the soluble organic fraction (SOF) reaches a maximum after which it declines with higher rail pressure. The total PM was collected for the two 1400 rpm conditions downstream of the engine, diesel oxidation catalyst, and a urea-SCR catalyst. The results show that significant PM reduction occurs in the SCR catalyst even during high rates of urea dosage. Analysis of the PM indicates that residual SOF is burned up in the SCR catalyst.

  17. In Situ Visualization of the Dynamics in Xylem Embolism Formation and Removal in the Absence of Root Pressure: A Study on Excised Grapevine Stems.

    PubMed

    Knipfer, Thorsten; Cuneo, Italo F; Brodersen, Craig R; McElrone, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    Gas embolisms formed during drought can disrupt long-distance water transport through plant xylem vessels, but some species have the ability to remove these blockages. Despite evidence suggesting that embolism removal is linked to the presence of vessel-associated parenchyma, the underlying mechanism remains controversial and is thought to involve positive pressure generated by roots. Here, we used in situ x-ray microtomography on excised grapevine stems to determine if embolism removal is possible without root pressure, and if the embolism formation/removal affects vessel functional status after sample excision. Our data show that embolism removal in excised stems was driven by water droplet growth and was qualitatively identical to refilling in intact plants. When stem segments were rehydrated with H2O after excision, vessel refilling occurred rapidly (<1 h). The refilling process was substantially slower when polyethylene glycol was added to the H2O source, thereby providing new support for an osmotically driven refilling mechanism. In contrast, segments not supplied with H2O showed no refilling and increased embolism formation. Dynamic changes in liquid/wall contact angles indicated that the processes of embolism removal (i.e. vessel refilling) by water influx and embolism formation by water efflux were directly linked to the activity of vessel-associated living tissue. Overall, our results emphasize that root pressure is not required as a driving force for vessel refilling, and care should be taken when performing hydraulics measurements on excised plant organs containing living vessel-associated tissue, because the vessel behavior may not be static. PMID:27208267

  18. In Situ Visualization of the Dynamics in Xylem Embolism Formation and Removal in the Absence of Root Pressure: A Study on Excised Grapevine Stems1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Knipfer, Thorsten; Cuneo, Italo F.; Brodersen, Craig R.; McElrone, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Gas embolisms formed during drought can disrupt long-distance water transport through plant xylem vessels, but some species have the ability to remove these blockages. Despite evidence suggesting that embolism removal is linked to the presence of vessel-associated parenchyma, the underlying mechanism remains controversial and is thought to involve positive pressure generated by roots. Here, we used in situ x-ray microtomography on excised grapevine stems to determine if embolism removal is possible without root pressure, and if the embolism formation/removal affects vessel functional status after sample excision. Our data show that embolism removal in excised stems was driven by water droplet growth and was qualitatively identical to refilling in intact plants. When stem segments were rehydrated with H2O after excision, vessel refilling occurred rapidly (<1 h). The refilling process was substantially slower when polyethylene glycol was added to the H2O source, thereby providing new support for an osmotically driven refilling mechanism. In contrast, segments not supplied with H2O showed no refilling and increased embolism formation. Dynamic changes in liquid/wall contact angles indicated that the processes of embolism removal (i.e. vessel refilling) by water influx and embolism formation by water efflux were directly linked to the activity of vessel-associated living tissue. Overall, our results emphasize that root pressure is not required as a driving force for vessel refilling, and care should be taken when performing hydraulics measurements on excised plant organs containing living vessel-associated tissue, because the vessel behavior may not be static. PMID:27208267

  19. Karomed armchairs and cushions in the prevention of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Collins, F

    The clinician providing seating for patients who are unwell, who have poor functional ability or who are at risk of pressure sores, is faced with an increasing choice of products. Making the decision as to which product and associated features to choose can be a difficult task. This article describes the importance of suitable seating provision in patients who are at risk and outlines the Karomed range of armchairs. PMID:11051887

  20. Studies of the mechanism of the cluster formation in a thermally sampling atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Sascha Stroh, Fred; Klopotowski, Sebastian Derpmann, Valerie Klee, Sonja Brockmann, Klaus J. Benter, Thorsten

    2014-01-15

    In this study a thermally sampling atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer is described and characterized. The ion transfer stage offers the capability to sample cluster ions at thermal equilibrium and during this transfer fundamental processes possibly affecting the cluster distribution are also readily identified. Additionally, the transfer stage combines optional collision-induced dissociation (CID) analysis of the cluster composition with thermal equilibrium sampling of clusters. The performance of the setup is demonstrated with regard to the proton-bound water cluster system. The benefit of the studied processes is that they can help to improve future transfer stages and to understand cluster ion reactions in ion mobility tubes and high-pressure ion sources. In addition, the instrument allows for the identification of fragmentation and protonation reactions caused by CID.

  1. The formation, structure, and properties of the Au-Co alloys produced by severe plastic deformation under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolmachev, T. P.; Pilyugin, V. P.; Ancharov, A. I.; Chernyshov, E. G.; Patselov, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    The mechanical alloying of Au-Co mixtures, which are systems with high positive mixing enthalpy, is studied following high-pressure torsion deformation at room and cryogenic temperatures. X-ray diffractometry in synchrotron radiation and scanning microscopy are used to investigate the sequence of structural changes in the course of deforming the mixtures up to the end state of the fcc substitutional solid solution based on gold. The mechanical properties of the alloys are measured both during mixture processing and after mechanical alloying. Microfractographic studies are performed. Factors that facilitate the solubility of Co in Au, namely, increased processing pressure, cobalt concentration in a charge mixture, true strain, and temperature decreased to cryogenic level have been identified.

  2. Studies of the mechanism of the cluster formation in a thermally sampling atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Sascha; Klopotowski, Sebastian; Derpmann, Valerie; Klee, Sonja; Brockmann, Klaus J; Stroh, Fred; Benter, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    In this study a thermally sampling atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer is described and characterized. The ion transfer stage offers the capability to sample cluster ions at thermal equilibrium and during this transfer fundamental processes possibly affecting the cluster distribution are also readily identified. Additionally, the transfer stage combines optional collision-induced dissociation (CID) analysis of the cluster composition with thermal equilibrium sampling of clusters. The performance of the setup is demonstrated with regard to the proton-bound water cluster system. The benefit of the studied processes is that they can help to improve future transfer stages and to understand cluster ion reactions in ion mobility tubes and high-pressure ion sources. In addition, the instrument allows for the identification of fragmentation and protonation reactions caused by CID. PMID:24517784

  3. A particle assembly/constrained expansion (PACE) model for the formation and structure of porous metal oxide deposits on nuclear fuel rods in pressurized light water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Donald W.; Lu, Shijing; O'Brien, Christopher J.; Bucholz, Eric W.; Rak, Zsolt

    2015-02-01

    A new model is proposed for the structure and properties of porous metal oxide scales (aka Chalk River Unidentified Deposits (CRUD)) observed on the nuclear fuel rod cladding in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). The model is based on the thermodynamically-driven expansion of agglomerated octahedral nickel ferrite particles in response to pH and temperature changes in the CRUD. The model predicts that porous nickel ferrite with internal {1 1 1} surfaces is a thermodynamically stable structure under PWR conditions even when the free energy of formation of bulk nickel ferrite is positive. This explains the pervasive presence of nickel ferrite in CRUD, observed CRUD microstructures, why CRUD maintains its porosity, and variations in porosity within the CRUD observed experimentally. This model is a stark departure from decades of conventional wisdom and detailed theoretical analysis of CRUD chemistry, and defines new research directions for model validation, and for understanding and ultimately controlling CRUD formation.

  4. Pressure dependent low temperature kinetics for CN + CH3CN: competition between chemical reaction and van der Waals complex formation.

    PubMed

    Sleiman, Chantal; González, Sergio; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Talbi, Dahbia; El Dib, Gisèle; Canosa, André

    2016-06-01

    The gas phase reaction between the CN radical and acetonitrile CH3CN was investigated experimentally, at low temperatures, with the CRESU apparatus and a slow flow reactor to explore the temperature dependence of its rate coefficient from 354 K down to 23 K. Whereas a standard Arrhenius behavior was found at T > 200 K, indicating the presence of an activation barrier, a dramatic increase in the rate coefficient by a factor of 130 was observed when the temperature was decreased from 168 to 123 K. The reaction was found to be pressure independent at 297 K unlike the experiments carried out at 52 and 132 K. The work was complemented by ab initio transition state theory based master equation calculations using reaction pathways investigated with highly accurate thermochemical protocols. The role of collisional stabilization of a CNCH3CN van der Waals complex and of tunneling induced H atom abstractions were also considered. The experimental pressure dependence at 52 and 132 K is well reproduced by the theoretical calculations provided that an anharmonic state density is considered for the van der Waals complex CH3CNCN and its Lennard-Jones radius is adjusted. Furthermore, these calculations indicate that the experimental observations correspond to the fall-off regime and that tunneling remains small in the low-pressure regime. Hence, the studied reaction is essentially an association process at very low temperature. Implications for the chemistry of interstellar clouds and Titan are discussed. PMID:27199083

  5. Formation of the -N(NO)N(NO)- polymer at high pressure and stabilization at ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hai; An, Qi; Goddard, William A; Liu, Wei-Guang; Zybin, Sergey V

    2013-04-01

    A number of exotic structures have been formed through high-pressure chemistry, but applications have been hindered by difficulties in recovering the high-pressure phase to ambient conditions (i.e., one atmosphere and 300 K). Here we use dispersion-corrected density functional theory [PBE-ulg (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof flavor of DFT with the universal low gradient correction for long range London dispersion)] to predict that above 60 gigapascal (GPa) the most stable form of N2O (the laughing gas in its molecular form) is a one-dimensional polymer with an all-nitrogen backbone analogous to cis-polyacetylene in which alternate N are bonded (ionic covalent) to O. The analogous trans-polymer is only 0.03∼0.10 eV/molecular unit less stable. Upon relaxation to ambient conditions, both polymers relax below 14 GPa to the same stable nonplanar trans-polymer. The predicted phonon spectrum and dissociation kinetics validates the stability of this trans-poly-NNO at ambient conditions, which has potential applications as a type of conducting nonlinear optical polymer with all-nitrogen chains and as a high-energy oxidizer for rocket propulsion. This work illustrates in silico materials discovery particularly in the realm of extreme conditions (very high pressure or temperature). PMID:23503849

  6. A first-principles study of pressure-induced phase transformation in a rare-earth formate framework.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Soumya S; Li, Wei; Cheetham, Anthony K; Waghmare, Umesh V; Ramamurty, Upadrasta

    2016-07-28

    Among the panoply of exciting properties that metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) exhibit, fully reversible pressure-induced phase transformations (PIPTs) are particularly interesting as they intrinsically relate to the flexibility of MOFs. Recently, a number of MOFs have been reported to exhibit this feature, which is attributed to bond rearrangement with applied pressure. However, the experimental assessment of whether a given MOF exhibits PIPT or not requires sophisticated instruments as well as detailed structural investigations. Can we capture such low pressure transformations through simulations is the question we seek to answer in this paper. For this, we have performed first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory, on a MOF, [tmenH2][Y(HCOO)4]2 (tmenH2(2+) = N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediammonium). The estimated lattice constants for both the parent and product phases of the PIPT agree well with the earlier experimental results available for the same MOF with erbium. Importantly, the results confirm the observed PIPT, and thus provide theoretical corroborative evidence for the experimental findings. Our calculations offer insights into the energetics involved and reveal that the less dense phase is energetically more stable than the denser phase. From detailed analyses of the two phases, we correlate the changes in bonding and electronic structure across the PIPT with elastic and electronic conduction behavior that can be verified experimentally, to develop a deeper understanding of the PIPT in MOFs. PMID:27355370

  7. Volatilization of low vapor pressure--volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOCs) during three cleaning products-associated activities: Potential contributions to ozone formation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; McKone, Thomas E; Bennett, Deborah H

    2016-06-01

    There have been many studies to reduce ozone formation mostly from volatile organic compound (VOC) sources. However, the role of low vapor pressure (LVP)-VOCs from consumer products remains mostly unexplored and unaddressed. This study explores the impact of high production volume LVP-VOCs on ozone formation from three cleaning products-associated activities (dishwashing, clothes washing, and surface cleaning). We develop a model framework to account for the portion available for ozone formation during the use phase and from the down-the-drain disposal. We apply experimental studies that measured emission rates or models that were developed for estimating emission rates of organic compounds during the use phase. Then, the fraction volatilized (fvolatilized) and the fraction disposed down the drain (fdown-the-drain) are multiplied by the portion available for ozone formation for releases to the outdoor air (fO3|volatilized) and down-the-drain (fO3|down-the-drain), respectively. Overall, for chemicals used in three specific cleaning-product uses, fvolatilized is less than 0.6% for all studied LVP-VOCs. Because greater than 99.4% of compounds are disposed of down the drain during the use phase, when combined with fO3|volatilized and fO3|down-the-drain, the portion available for ozone formation from the direct releases to outdoor air and the down-the-drain disposal is less than 0.4% and 0.2%, respectively. The results from this study indicate that the impact of the studied LVP-VOCs on ozone formation is very sensitive to what occurs during the use phase and suggest the need for future research on experimental work at the point of use. PMID:27016807

  8. Drop Coalescence during Emulsion Formation in a High-Pressure Homogenizer for Tetradecane-in-Water Emulsion Stabilized by Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate.

    PubMed

    Narsimhan, Ganesan; Goel, Parul

    2001-06-15

    The present study investigates the effects of homogenizer pressure, surfactant concentration, ionic strength, and dispersed phase fraction on the coalescence rate of tetradecane-in-water emulsions during their formation in a high-pressure homogenizer. Experiments were conducted in a recirculating system consisting of a Rannie laboratory-scale single-stage homogenizer and a stirred vessel for tetradecane-in-water emulsions stabilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The initial evolution of the number concentration of droplets in the stirred tank was measured when subjected to a negative stepchange in the homogenizer pressure. The average drop coalescence rate constant in the homogenizer was inferred by fitting the experimental evolution of the number concentration of drops to a simple model accounting for the coalescence in the homogenizer under the assumption of a quasi steady state in the homogenizer. The residence time of the emulsion in the homogenizer was evaluated from the analysis of radial turbulent flow between disks. The step down homogenizer pressure was varied in the range 20.7-48.3 MPa, the drop size in the range 174-209 nm, the dispersed phase fraction in the range 5%-15%, SDS concentration in the range 0.0033-0.25 wt%, and ionic strength in the range 0.01-0.1 M. The coalescence rate constants were found to be in the range from 3.34x10(-17) to 2.43x10(-16) m(3) s(-1). The coalescence rate constant was found to be higher for higher homogenizer pressures, smaller drop sizes, lower dispersed phase fractions, and lower SDS concentrations and was insensitive to variations in ionic strength. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11374938

  9. Morphology transition of raft-model membrane induced by osmotic pressure: Formation of double-layered vesicle similar to an endo- and/or exocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onai, Teruaki; Hirai, Mitsuhiro

    2010-10-01

    The effect of osmotic pressure on the structure of large uni-lamellar vesicle (LUV) of the lipid mixtures of monosialoganglioside (GM1)-cholesterol-dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) was studies by using wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) method. The molar ratios of the mixtures were 0.1/0.1/1, 0/0.1/1, and 0/0/1. The ternary lipid mixture is a model of lipid rafts. The value of osmotic pressure was varied from 0 to 4.16×105 N/m2 by adding the polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in the range from 0 to 25 % w/v. In the case of the mixtures without GM1, the rise of the osmotic pressure just enhances the multi-lamellar stacking with deceasing the inter-lamellar spacing. On the other hand, the mixture containing GM1 shows the structural transition from a uni-lamellar vesicle to a double-layered vesicle (a liposome including a smaller one inside) by the rise of osmotic pressure. In this morphology transition the total surface area of the double-layered vesicle is mostly as same as that of the LUV at the initial state. The polar head region of GM1 is bulky and highly hydrophilic due to the oligosaccharide chain containing a sialic acid residue. Then, the present results suggest that the existence of GM1 in the outer-leaflet of the LUV is essentially important for such a double-layered vesicle formation. Alternatively, a phenomenon similar to an endo- and/or exocytosis in cells can be caused simply by a variation of osmotic pressure.

  10. Ab initio chemical kinetics for the ClOO + NO reaction: Effects of temperature and pressure on product branching formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunath, P.; Lin, M. C.

    2012-07-01

    The kinetics and mechanism for the reaction of ClOO with NO have been investigated by ab initio molecular orbital theory calculations based on the CCSD(T)/6-311+G(3df)//PW91PW91/6-311+G(3df) method, employed to evaluate the energetics for the construction of potential energy surfaces and prediction of reaction rate constants. The results show that the reaction can produce two key low energy products ClNO + 3O2 via the direct triplet abstraction path and ClO + NO2 via the association and decomposition mechanism through long-lived singlet pc-ClOONO and ClONO2 intermediates. The yield of ClNO + O2 (1△) from any of the singlet intermediates was found to be negligible because of their high barriers and tight transition states. As both key reactions initially occur barrierlessly, their rate constants were evaluated with a canonical variational approach in our transition state theory and Rice-Ramspergen-Kassel-Marcus/master equation calculations. The rate constants for ClNO + 3O2 and ClO + NO2 production from ClOO + NO can be given by 2.66 × 10-16 T1.91 exp(341/T) (200-700 K) and 1.48 × 10-24 T3.99 exp(1711/T) (200-600 K), respectively, independent of pressure below atmospheric pressure. The predicted total rate constant and the yields of ClNO and NO2 in the temperature range of 200-700 K at 10-760 Torr pressure are in close agreement with available experimental results.

  11. Effect of total pressure on the formation and size evolution of silicon quantum dots in silicon nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Rezgui, B.; Sibai, A.; Nychyporuk, T.; Lemiti, M.; Bremond, G.; Maestre, D.; Palais, O.

    2010-05-03

    The size of silicon quantum dots (Si QDs) embedded in silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) has been controlled by varying the total pressure in the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) reactor. This is evidenced by transmission electron microscopy and results in a shift in the light emission peak of the quantum dots. We show that the luminescence in our structures is attributed to the quantum confinement effect. These findings give a strong indication that the quality (density and size distribution) of Si QDs can be improved by optimizing the deposition parameters which opens a route to the fabrication of an all-Si tandem solar cell.

  12. Features of the ω-phase formation in zirconium and its alloys under quasi-hydrostatic pressure and dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taluts, Nina; Dobromyslov, Arkadiy; Kozlov, Evgeniy

    2010-03-01

    X-ray diffraction, optical and transmission electron microscopy and measurement of microhardness were used to study zirconium, Zr-Ti and Zr-Nb alloys loaded by quasi-hydrostatic pressure and spherical converging shock waves of different intensity. It was revealed that the phase and structural states of the specimens depend on the loading type, the loading intensity, the niobium content, and the depth of the layer in the sphere. It has been established that there are two types of defects in the ω-phase structure: linear defects of displacements of [0001] atomic rows and stacking faults in the planes {2¯ 1¯ 10} irregularly distributed on a crystal.

  13. Formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species by repetitive negatively pulsed helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets propagating into humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets have many beneficial effects in their use in surface treatment and, in particular, plasma medicine. One of these benefits is the controlled production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in the active discharge through the molecular gases added to the primary noble gas in the input mixture, and through the interaction of reactive species in the plasma effluent with the ambient air. In this computational investigation, a parametric study was performed on the production of RONS in a multiply pulsed atmospheric pressure plasma jet sustained in a He/O2 mixture and flowing into ambient humid air. The consequences of flow rate, O2 fraction, voltage, and repetition rate on reactant densities after a single discharge pulse, after 30 pulses, and after the same total elapsed time were investigated. At the end of the first discharge pulse, voltage has the greatest influence on RONS production. However, the systematic trends for production of RONS depend on repetition rate and flow rate in large part due to the residence time of RONS in the plasma zone. Short residence times result in reactive species produced by the previous pulse still being in the discharge tube or in the path of the ionization wave at the next pulse. The RONS therefore accumulate in the tube and in the near effluent on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This accumulation enables species requiring multiple reactions among the primary RONS species to be produced in greater numbers.

  14. First-principles high-pressure unreacted equation of state and heat of formation of crystal 2,6-diamino-3, 5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (LLM-105)

    SciTech Connect

    Manaa, M. Riad Kuo, I-Feng W.; Fried, Laurence E.

    2014-08-14

    We report dispersion-corrected density functional theoretical calculations of the unreacted equation of state (EOS) of crystal 2,6-diamino-3, 5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (LLM-105) under hydrostatic compression of up to 45 GPa. Convergence tests for k-points sampling in the Brillouin zone show that a 3 × 1 × 2 mesh is required to reproduce the X-ray crystal structure at ambient conditions, and we confirm our finding with a separate supercell calculation. Our high-pressure EOS yields a bulk modulus of 19.2 GPa, and indicates a tendency towards anisotropic compression along the b lattice vector due to molecular orientations within the lattice. We find that the electronic energy band gap decreases from a semiconductor type of 1.3 eV at 0 GPa to quasi-metallic type of 0.6 eV at 45 GPa. The extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonds involving the oxide (–NO) and dioxide (–NO{sub 2}) interactions with the amine (–NH{sub 2}) group showed enhanced interactions with increasing pressure that should be discernible in the mid IR spectral region. We do not find evidence for structural phase transitions or chemically induced transformations within the pressure range of our study. The gas phase heat of formation is calculated at the G4 level of theory to be 22.48 kcal/mol, while we obtain 25.92 kcal/mol using the ccCA-PS3 method. Density functional theory calculations of the crystal and the gas phases provided an estimate for the heat of sublimation of 32.4 kcal/mol. We thus determine the room-temperature solid heat of formation of LLM-105 to be −9.9 or −6.5 kcal/mol based on the G4 or ccCA-PS3 methods, respectively.

  15. First-principles high-pressure unreacted equation of state and heat of formation of crystal 2,6-diamino-3, 5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (LLM-105)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manaa, M. Riad; Kuo, I.-Feng W.; Fried, Laurence E.

    2014-08-01

    We report dispersion-corrected density functional theoretical calculations of the unreacted equation of state (EOS) of crystal 2,6-diamino-3, 5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (LLM-105) under hydrostatic compression of up to 45 GPa. Convergence tests for k-points sampling in the Brillouin zone show that a 3 × 1 × 2 mesh is required to reproduce the X-ray crystal structure at ambient conditions, and we confirm our finding with a separate supercell calculation. Our high-pressure EOS yields a bulk modulus of 19.2 GPa, and indicates a tendency towards anisotropic compression along the b lattice vector due to molecular orientations within the lattice. We find that the electronic energy band gap decreases from a semiconductor type of 1.3 eV at 0 GPa to quasi-metallic type of 0.6 eV at 45 GPa. The extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonds involving the oxide (-NO) and dioxide (-NO2) interactions with the amine (-NH2) group showed enhanced interactions with increasing pressure that should be discernible in the mid IR spectral region. We do not find evidence for structural phase transitions or chemically induced transformations within the pressure range of our study. The gas phase heat of formation is calculated at the G4 level of theory to be 22.48 kcal/mol, while we obtain 25.92 kcal/mol using the ccCA-PS3 method. Density functional theory calculations of the crystal and the gas phases provided an estimate for the heat of sublimation of 32.4 kcal/mol. We thus determine the room-temperature solid heat of formation of LLM-105 to be -9.9 or -6.5 kcal/mol based on the G4 or ccCA-PS3 methods, respectively.

  16. New Insights into the Formation of Viable but Nonculturable Escherichia coli O157:H7 Induced by High-Pressure CO2

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Feng; Wang, Yongtao; An, Haoran; Hu, Xiaosong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The formation of viable but nonculturable (VBNC) Escherichia coli O157:H7 induced by high-pressure CO2 (HPCD) was investigated using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) transcriptomics and isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) proteomic methods. The analyses revealed that 97 genes and 56 proteins were significantly changed upon VBNC state entry. Genes and proteins related to membrane transport, central metabolisms, DNA replication, and cell division were mainly downregulated in the VBNC cells. This caused low metabolic activity concurrently with a division arrest in cells, which may be related to VBNC state formation. Cell division repression and outer membrane overexpression were confirmed to be involved in VBNC state formation by homologous expression of z2046 coding for transcriptional repressor and ompF encoding outer membrane protein F. Upon VBNC state entry, pyruvate catabolism in the cells shifted from the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle toward the fermentative route; this led to a low level of ATP. Combating the low energy supply, ATP production in the VBNC cells was compensated by the degradation of l-serine and l-threonine, the increased AMP generation, and the enhanced electron transfer. Furthermore, tolerance of the cells with respect to HPCD-induced acid, oxidation, and high CO2 stresses was enhanced by promoting the production of ammonia and NADPH and by reducing CO2 production during VBNC state formation. Most genes and proteins related to pathogenicity were downregulated in the VBNC cells. This would decrease the cell pathogenicity, which was confirmed by adhesion assays. In conclusion, the decreased metabolic activity, repressed cell division, and enhanced survival ability in E. coli O157:H7 might cause HPCD-induced VBNC state formation. PMID:27578754

  17. Fine Structural Analysis of Brefeldin A-Induced Compartment Formation After High-Pressure Freeze Fixation of Maize Root Epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Hause, G; Samaj, J; Menzel, D

    2006-01-01

    Formation of large perinuclear brefeldin A (BFA)-induced compartments is a characteristic feature of root apex cells, but it does not occur in shoot apex cells. BFA-induced compartments have been studied mostly using low resolution fluorescence microscopy techniques. Here, we have employed a high-resolution ultrastructural method based on ultra rapid freeze fixation of samples in order to study the formation of BFA-induced compartments in intact maize root epidermis cells in detail. This approach reveals five novel findings. Firstly, plant TGN/PGN elements are not tubular networks, as generally assumed, but rather vesicular compartments. Secondly, TGN/PGN vesicles interact with one another extensively via stalk-like connections and even fuse together via bridge-like structures. Thirdly, BFA-induced compartments are formed via extensive homotypic fusions of the TGN/PGN vesicles. Fourthly, multivesicular bodies (MVBs) are present within the BFA-induced compartments. Fifthly, mitochondria and small vacuoles accummulate abundantly around the large perinuclear BFA-induced compartments. PMID:19521493

  18. Instabilities and soot formation in high-pressure, rich, iso-octane-air explosion flames. 1. Dynamical structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lockett, R.D.; Woolley, R.

    2007-12-15

    Simultaneous OH planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and Rayleigh scattering measurements have been performed on 2-bar rich iso-octane-air explosion flames obtained in the optically accessible Leeds combustion bomb. Separate shadowgraph high-speed video images have been obtained from explosion flames under similar mixture conditions. Shadowgraph images, quantitative Rayleigh images, and normalized OH concentration images have been presented for a selection of these explosion flames. Normalized experimental equilibrium OH concentrations behind the flame fronts have been compared with normalized computed equilibrium OH concentrations as a function of equivalence ratio. The ratio of superequilibrium OH concentration in the flame front to equilibrium OH concentration behind the flame front reveals the response of the flame to the thermal-diffusive instability and the resistance of the flame front to rich quenching. Burned gas temperatures have been determined from the Rayleigh scattering images in the range 1.4{<=}{phi}{<=}1.9 and are found to be in good agreement with the corresponding predicted adiabatic flame temperatures. Soot formation was observed to occur behind deep cusps associated with large-wavelength cracks occurring in the flame front for equivalence ratio {phi}{>=}1.8 (C/O{>=}0.576). The reaction time-scale for iso-octane pyrolysis to soot formation has been estimated to be approximately 7.5-10 ms. (author)

  19. Reactive magnetron sputtering of Cu{sub 2}O: Dependence on oxygen pressure and interface formation with indium tin oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Deuermeier, Jonas; Gassmann, Juergen; Broetz, Joachim; Klein, Andreas

    2011-06-01

    Thin films of copper oxides were prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering and structural, morphological, chemical, and electronic properties were analyzed using x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, in situ photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrical resistance measurements. The deposition conditions for preparation of Cu(I)-oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) are identified. In addition, the interface formation between Cu{sub 2}O and Sn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} (ITO) was studied by stepwise deposition of Cu{sub 2}O onto ITO and vice versa. A type II (staggered) band alignment with a valence band offset {Delta}E{sub VB} 2.1-2.6 eV depending on interface preparation is observed. The band alignment explains the nonrectifying behavior of p-Cu{sub 2}O/n-ITO junctions, which have been investigated for thin film solar cells.

  20. Reactive magnetron sputtering of Cu2O: Dependence on oxygen pressure and interface formation with indium tin oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deuermeier, Jonas; Gassmann, Jürgen; Brötz, Joachim; Klein, Andreas

    2011-06-01

    Thin films of copper oxides were prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering and structural, morphological, chemical, and electronic properties were analyzed using x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, in situ photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrical resistance measurements. The deposition conditions for preparation of Cu(I)-oxide (Cu2O) are identified. In addition, the interface formation between Cu2O and Sn-doped In2O3 (ITO) was studied by stepwise deposition of Cu2O onto ITO and vice versa. A type II (staggered) band alignment with a valence band offset ΔEVB = 2.1-2.6 eV depending on interface preparation is observed. The band alignment explains the nonrectifying behavior of p-Cu2O/n-ITO junctions, which have been investigated for thin film solar cells.

  1. Aerosol Formation from High-Pressure Sprays for Supporting the Safety Analysis for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Kurath, Dean E.; Daniel, Richard C.; Song, Chen

    2013-03-05

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford is being designed and built to pretreat and vitrify waste currently stored in underground tanks at Hanford. One of the postulated events in the hazard analysis for the WTP is a breach in process piping that produces a pressurized spray with small droplets that can be transported into ventilation systems. Literature correlations are currently used for estimating the generation rate and size distribution of aerosol droplets in postulated spray releases. These correlations, however, are based on results obtained from small engineered nozzles using Newtonian liquids that do not contain slurry particles and thus do not accurately represent the fluids and breaches in the WTP. A test program was developed to measure the generation rate of droplets suspended in a test chamber and droplet size distribution from a range of prototypic sprays. A novel test method was developed to allow measurement of sprays from small to very large breaches and also includes the effect of aerosol generation from splatter when the spray impacts on walls. Results show that the aerosol generation rate increases with increasing the orifice area, though with a weaker dependence on orifice area than the currently-used correlation. A comparison of water sprays to slurry sprays with 8 to 20 wt% gibbsite or boehmite particles shows that the presence of slurry particles depresses the release fraction compared to water for droplets above 10 μm and increases the release fraction below this droplet size.

  2. Formation of carbonaceous nano-layers under high interfacial pressures during lubrication with mineral and bio-based oils

    SciTech Connect

    Baltrus, John P.

    2014-01-01

    In order to better protect steel surfaces against wear under high loads, understanding of chemical reactions between lubricants and metal at high interfacial pressures and elevated temperatures needs to be improved. Solutions at 5 to 20 wt. % of zinc di-2-ethylhexyl dithio phosphate (ZDDP) and chlorinated paraffins (CP) in inhibited paraffinic mineral oil (IPMO) and inhibited soy bean oil (ISBO) were compared on a Twist Compression Tribotester (TCT) at 200 MPa. Microscopy of wear tracks after 10 seconds tribotesting showed much smoother surface profiles than those of unworn areas. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) coupled with Ar-ion sputtering demonstrated that additive solutions in ISBO formed 2–3 times thicker carbon-containing nano-layers compared to IPMO. The amounts of Cl, S or P were unexpectedly low and detectable only on the top surface with less than 5 nm penetration. CP blends in IPMO formed more inorganic chlorides than those in ISBO. It can be concluded that base oils are primarily responsible for the thickness of carbonaceous nano-layers during early stages of severe boundary lubrication, while CP or ZDDP additive contributions are important, but less significant.

  3. The formation of supersaturated solid solutions in Fe–Cu alloys deformed by high-pressure torsion

    PubMed Central

    Bachmaier, A.; Kerber, M.; Setman, D.; Pippan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Fully dense bulk nanocomposites have been obtained by a novel two-step severe plastic deformation process in the immiscible Fe–Cu system. Elemental micrometer-sized Cu and Fe powders were first mixed in different compositions and subsequently high-pressure-torsion-consolidated and deformed in a two-step deformation process. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and atom probe investigations were performed to study the evolving far-from-equilibrium nanostructures which were observed at all compositions. For lower and higher Cu contents complete solid solutions of Cu in Fe and Fe in Cu, respectively, are obtained. In the near 50% regime a solid solution face-centred cubic and solid solution body-centred cubic nanograined composite has been formed. After an annealing treatment, these solid solutions decompose and form two-phase nanostructured Fe–Cu composites with a high hardness and an enhanced thermal stability. The grain size of the composites retained nanocrystalline up to high annealing temperatures. PMID:22368454

  4. Formation of Metal-Adducted Analyte Ions by Flame-Induced Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Wang, Chin-Hsiung; Shiea, Jentaie

    2016-05-17

    A flame-induced atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (FAPCI) source, consisting of a miniflame, nebulizer, and heated tube, was developed to ionize analytes. The ionization was performed by reacting analytes with a charged species generated in a flame. A stainless steel needle deposited with saturated alkali chloride solution was introduced into the mini oxyacetylene flame to generate alkali ions, which were reacted with analytes (M) generated in a heated nebulizer. The alkali-adducted 18-crown-6 ether ions, including (M + Li)(+), (M + Na)(+), (M + K)(+), (M + Rb)(+), and (M + Cs)(+), were successfully detected on the FAPCI mass spectra when the corresponding alkali chloride solutions were separately introduced to the flame. When an alkali chloride mixture was introduced, all alkali-adducted analyte ions were simultaneously detected. Their intensity order was as follows: (M + Cs)(+) > (M + Rb)(+) > (M + K)(+) > (M + Na)(+) > (M + Li)(+), and this trend agreed with the lattice energies of alkali chlorides. Besides alkali ions, other transition metal ions such as Ni(+), Cu(+), and Ag(+) were generated in a flame for analyte ionization. Other than metal ions, the reactive species generated in the fossil fuel flame could also be used to ionize analytes, which formed protonated analyte ions (M + H)(+) in positive ion mode and deprotonated analyte ions (M - H)(-) in negative ion mode. PMID:27093572

  5. Formation testers

    SciTech Connect

    Brieger, E.

    1980-07-01

    A description is given of a method for use in obtaining multiple pressure tests of an earth formation traversed by a well bore by use of a sidewall fluid sampler well tool which has a fluid pressure sampling chamber in the well tool in open fluid communication with a pad sealing means, comprising the steps of: for one selected level in a well bore, moving a pad sealing means on the well tool into engagement with the wall of a well bore and isolating a wall segment of the earth formation; after the pad sealing means engges the wall segment of the earth formation, generating a hydraulic pressure in the well tool and applying said hydraulic pressure to said fluid pressure sampling chamber for increasing the volume of said fluid pressure sampling chamber thereby to dray a fluid sample from the earth formation engaged by the pad sealing means into the fluid pressure sampling chamber, sensing the pressure of said fluid sample as it is drawn into the fluid pressure sampling chamber while the volume of the sampling chamber is being increased, relieving the hydraulic pressure in the well tool with respect to said fluid pressur sampling chamber for decreasing the volume of said fluid pressure sampling chamber thereby to contact the sampling chamber to dischrge the fluid sample through the pad sealing means; retracting the sealing pad means and, after retrction of sealing pad means from engagement from the wall of the well bore, moving the well tool to a second location at another level in the well bore and, at the second location, repeating the steps of the method performed at the one selected level for obtaining another fluid sample and pressure sensing at said second location.

  6. Geochemistry of two pressurized brines from the Castile Formation in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site

    SciTech Connect

    Faith, S.; Spiegler, P.; Rehfeldt, K.R.

    1983-04-01

    The major and minor element data and isotopic data from the ERDA-6 and WIPP-12 testing indicate that the brine reservoirs encountered in the Upper Castile Formation are largely in equilibrium with their surrounding host rock environment. This contention is supported by thermodynamic and stable isotope data. It is not possible to assign an absolute age to the brine based on uranium disequilibrium considerations, but the data do indicate that the brine reequilibrated with a new rock environment at least two million years ago. Information and data evaluated herein indicate the likelihood that the brines encountered are predominantly, if not entirely, derived from a trapped seawater source subsequently modified by diagenesis. Major ion/bromide ratios indicate that halite dissolution has occurred to some extent subsequent to deposition of the Castile anhydrites and entrapment of the seawater brine. Mechanisms for additional halite dissolution are discussed. Based on the degree of present halite saturation, it is concluded that the potential for future dissolution of halite is minimal.

  7. Interaction between phosphorus removal and hybrid granular sludge formation under low hydraulic selection pressure at alternating anaerobic/aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Lang, Longqi; Wan, Junfeng; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Jie; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The hybrid granular sludge (HGS) formation and its performances on phosphorus removal were investigated in a sequencing batch airlift reactor. Under conditions of low superficial air velocity (SAV = 0.68 cm s(-1)) and relatively long settling time (15-30 min), aerobic granules appeared and coexisted with bio-flocs after 120 days operation. At the stable phase, 54% of total suspended solid (m/m) was granular sludge with the two typical sizes (D(mean) = 1.77 ± 0.33 and 0.89 ± 0.11 mm) in the reactor, where the settling velocity was 98.7 ± 12.4 and 37.8 ± 0.9 m h(-1) for the big and small granules. With progressive extension of anaerobic time from 15 to 60 min before aerobic condition per cycle during the whole experiment, the HGS system can be maintained at a high total phosphorus removal efficiency (ca. 99%) since Day-270. The phosphorus content (wt %) in biomass was respectively 9.54 ± 0.29, 7.60 ± 0.48 and 6.15 ± 0.59 for the big granules, small granules and flocs. PMID:25921951

  8. Formation of low pressure chemically vapour deposited W thin film on silicon dioxide for gate electrode application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, Jae Hyun; Kim, Sun-Oo; Kim, Ki-Joon; Kim, Hyoung Sub; Kim, Hyeong Joon

    1994-12-01

    We have investigated the feasibility that low pressure chemically vapor deposited W can be used as a gate electrode material of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) field effect transistors. We improved adhesion of the W film to SiO2 by using a pulsing injection of source gas. The pulsing injection of the reactant gas enhances the desorption of byproduct gases from the surface of the growing film and thus more W nuclei formed on SiO2. Tungsten thin films were deposited on the SiO2/Si with a deposition rate of 1000-2000 A/min. The deposition was carried out at various temperatures of 300-750 C and various SiH4:WF6 ratios of 0.6-1.5. The higher adhesion strength and resistivity of W thin films were achieved at the higher SiH4:WF6 ratio and higher deposition temperature. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the crystal structure of all W films, deposited at various temperatures, was alpha-W in spite of either high reactant gas ratio or high temperature. Since W thin films had good adhesion to SiO2, MOS structure capacitors were fabricated with a W electrode via wet chemical processes and their electrical properties were also characterized. The extreme value distribution function of dielectric breakdown strength indicates that the thin SiO2 layer was significantly degraded by the diffused F ions. However, the stacked gate dielectric of SiO2 and Si3N4 layers instead of the single SiO2 layer was not degraded by the W gate electrode, since the Si3N4 layer protected SiO2 from chemical attack or restricted the F diffusion during deposition of the W gate electrode.

  9. Formation of diamond-like carbon thin films using barrier-type surface discharge plasma under atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Shinji; Tada, Kazuya; Takuwa, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    We studied the deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films using barrier-type surface discharge plasma under atmospheric pressure. The main radicals generated by the barrier-type surface discharge using H2, CH4, and He as the plasma gases were Hα, Hβ, and CH. The emission intensities increased as the ratio of CH4 in the mixed gas decreased, and the mixed gas ratios of 2% CH4, 18% H2, 80% He were appropriate for the generation of the barrier-type surface discharge. The gas flow rate and applied voltage required to achieve a suitable plasma state for deposition of the DLC films varied depending on the polarity of the applied pulse. When a negative pulse is used, homogenous films can be obtained on the silicon wafer under the entire hole of the electrode; however, the deposition rate becomes very low in the range of 1.8-5.8 nm/min because the surface streamer plasma is very weak. On the other hand, using a bipolar and a positive pulse, a relatively high deposition rate in the range of 10-30 nm/min can be achieved on the silicon wafer under the central part of the electrode, although the thickness of the DLC films becomes nonuniform at the edge part of the electrode. The appropriate conditions of the DLC film deposition in this study were the pulse voltages of 6-8 kV and a gas flow rate of 1500 mL/min when using bipolar- and positive-pulse voltages. The relatively hard DLC films (6-8 GPa) were obtained under these conditions.

  10. Efficacy and Safety of Ambroxol Lozenges in the Treatment of Acute Uncomplicated Sore Throat - a Pooled Analysis.

    PubMed

    de Mey, C; Koelsch, S; Richter, E; Pohlmann, T; Sousa, R

    2016-07-01

    A pooled analysis is presented of 7 placebo-controlled RCT that investigated lozenges containing ambroxol for pain relief in acute sore throat.2 242 patients were treated with different ambroxol doses or control treatments, 2 183 were evaluable for efficacy. The present analysis is focused on the recommended dose of 20 mg (AXL20): 856 patients were treated with AXL20, 847 with matched placebo lozenges (PL).The average reduction in pain intensity over the first 3 h after the first AXL20 ranged from 38% to 52% of the maximum achievable effect (MAE). The overall treatment difference between AXL20 and PL was 11% (95% CI: 8-13%) of the MAE (post-hoc meta-analysis). The corresponding NNT was 6.0 (CI: 4.7-8.4) for an average pain reduction from baseline of 33% of the MAE over the first 3 h.71.9, 79.0, and 85.3% of the AXL20-patients scored the efficacy as "very good or good" at the end of the 1(st), 2(nd) and 3(rd) day, respectively, vs. 57.5, 64.4, and 70.4% of the PL-patients resulting in odds ratios of 1.9 (CI: 1.5-2.3) for the 1(st), 2.1 (CI: 1.7-2.6) for the 2(nd) and 2.43 (CI: 1.8-3.3) for the 3(rd) day.At the end of treatment 'no redness' or 'slightly red' was scored on pharyngeal inspection in 84.4% and 77.3% of AXL20- and PL-patients (OR: 1.6, CI: 1.3-1.9).AXL20-treatment was well tolerated and is safe and efficacious for acute uncomplicated sore throat of recent onset in adolescent and adult patients. PMID:27281448

  11. Effects of alloying elements on radiation hardening based on loop formation of electron-irradiated light water reactor pressure vessel model steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Takakuni; Hashimoto, N.; Ohnuki, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Odette, G. R.

    2011-10-01

    Electron irradiations using a high voltage electron microscope were conducted on several reactor pressure vessel model alloys in order to investigate the effects of alloying elements on the formation and development of defect clusters. In addition, the effects of alloying elements on yield stress change after irradiation were considered, comparing the mean size and number density of dislocation loops with the irradiation-induced hardening. High Cu alloys formed Cu and Mn-Ni-Si rich clusters, and these are important in determining the yield stress increase. High Ni alloys formed a high density of small dislocation loops and probably Mn-Ni-Si rich cluster, which have the effect of increasing the yield stress. High P enhanced radiation-induced segregation on grain boundary, helping prevent dislocation movement.

  12. Do patients with sore throat benefit from penicillin? A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial with penicillin V in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Dagnelie, C F; van der Graaf, Y; De Melker, R A

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effect of antibiotic therapy in sore throat is questionable and this dilemma has been complicated by the emergence of multiple resistant strains of micro-organisms. AIM: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial was undertaken in patients aged 4-60 years to assess the efficacy of penicillin V on the clinical course and bacteriological response in patients with sore throat in general practice. METHOD: Two hundred and thirty-nine patients presenting with an acute sore throat to 37 general practices in the Netherlands who were clinically suspected of group A beta-haemolytic streptococci (GABHS) were randomized for treatment with penicillin V (n = 121) or placebo (n = 118). Resolution of sore throat, fever and return to daily activities were evaluated by the general practitioner 2 days after the start of treatment and by the patients keeping a diary for 7 days. The result of throat culture after 2 days was evaluated. RESULTS: A difference in resolution of sore throat was present after 2 days in all patients, but was a result of GABHS-positive patients (n = 111; 46%) in favour of those randomized for penicillin V (adjusted odds ratio 5.3; 95% CI 1.9-15.1). An effect in the course of fever was also seen in GABHS-positive patients (adjusted odds ratio 5.3; 95% CI 1.02-27.7). A difference of 1-2 days was seen in clinical recovery. No difference was found in daily activities between the treatment groups. After 2 days, 4% of the penicillin-treated patients harboured GABHS compared with 75% of the placebo group. CONCLUSION: Only GABHS-positive patients benefit from penicillin V in their clinical cure in the first few days. Therefore, rapid testing is necessary. Treatment may be beneficial with regard to the clinical course, but it is not necessary. PMID:8945796

  13. Defect formation in aqueous environment: Theoretical assessment of boron incorporation in nickel ferrite under conditions of an operating pressurized-water nuclear reactor (PWR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rák, Zs.; Bucholz, E. W.; Brenner, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    A serious concern in the safety and economy of a pressurized water nuclear reactor is related to the accumulation of boron inside the metal oxide (mostly NiFe2O4 spinel) deposits on the upper regions of the fuel rods. Boron, being a potent neutron absorber, can alter the neutron flux causing anomalous shifts and fluctuations in the power output of the reactor core. This phenomenon reduces the operational flexibility of the plant and may force the down-rating of the reactor. In this work an innovative approach is used to combine first-principles calculations with thermodynamic data to evaluate the possibility of B incorporation into the crystal structure of NiFe2O4 , under conditions typical to operating nuclear pressurized water nuclear reactors. Analyses of temperature and pH dependence of the defect formation energies indicate that B can accumulate in NiFe2O4 as an interstitial impurity and may therefore be a major contributor to the anomalous axial power shift observed in nuclear reactors. This computational approach is quite general and applicable to a large variety of solids in equilibrium with aqueous solutions.

  14. Features of formation of nanocrystalline state in internal- oxidized V-Cr-Zr-W and V-Mo-Zr system alloys during deformation by torsion under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, I. V.; Ditenberg, I. A.; Grinayev, K. V.; Radishevsky, V. L.

    2016-02-01

    The results of investigation of features of nanostructural state formed during deformation by torsion under pressure in high-strength vanadium V-Cr-Zr-W and V-Mo-Zr systems alloys are presented. It was found that after deformation at number of revolutions N = 1, samples are characterized by high anisotropy of defect and grain structure. Inside grains, limited by high-angle boundaries, the formation of two-level structure states was revealed: fragmentation of the above grains on nanofragments from 5 to 20 nm in size with a dipole nature of low-angle misorientations and high (hundreds of degrees per micron) elastic curvature of crystal lattice. Formation of the above structural states leads to a 3-fold increase in microhardness values. Further increase in deformation degree leads to fracture of samples of vanadium alloy V-Mo-Zr with a high volumetric content of fine-disperse oxide phase. At the same time V-Cr-Zr-W-system alloy with a lower concentration of Zr and, as a result, a lower volume fraction of fine particles remains ductile.

  15. [Special surfaces for managing pressure in pediatrics (II). Choice, assigned algorithm (Tarise) and management models].

    PubMed

    García Molina, Pablo; Balaguer López, Evelin

    2009-04-01

    Bed sores among children are an adverse effect provoked by the application of new technology adapted to pediatrics. Special surfaces for managing pressure in pediatrics are a preventive measure effective to avoid the development of these lesions. So that children benefit from this preventive measure, it must be adapted to their specific circumstances. In order for this to occur, it is fundamental to know: the specific characteristics which differentiate children from adults, and the type of special surfaces for managing pressure in pediatrics which are available on the market and to evaluate their appropriateness and effectiveness. The Group of Nurses to Improve Quality in Pediatrics at the University Clinical Hospital in Valencia has developed some tools which make it possible to manage and assign different sizes and types of special surfaces for managing pressure in pediatrics by means of a scientific method (Tarise). These are based on anthropometric measurements (Pediatric Space table) for each age range, the risk to develop a bed sore or skin ulcer due to pressure, the presence of a bed sore, the pathological seriousness and the type of special surfaces for managing pressure in pediatrics. PMID:19554896

  16. Contribution of low vapor pressure-volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOCs) from consumer products to ozone formation in urban atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; McKone, Thomas E.; Bennett, Deborah H.

    2015-05-01

    Because recent laboratory testing indicates that some low vapor pressure-volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOC) solvents readily evaporate at ambient conditions, LVP-VOCs used in some consumer product formulations may contribute to ozone formation. The goal of this study is to determine the fraction of LVP-VOCs available for ozone formation from the use of consumer products for two hypothetical emissions. This study calculates and compares the fraction of consumed product available for ozone formation as a result of (a) volatilization to air during use and (b) down-the-drain disposal. The study also investigates the impact of different modes of releases on the overall fraction available in ambient air for ozone formation. For the portion of the LVP-VOCs volatilized to air during use, we applied a multi-compartment mass-balance model to track the fate of emitted LVP-VOCs in a multimedia urban environment. For the portion of the LVP-VOCs disposed down the drain, we used a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) fate model to predict the emission rates of LVP-VOCs to ambient air at WWTPs or at the discharge zone of the facilities and then used these results as emissions in the multimedia urban environment model. In a WWTP, the LVP-VOCs selected in this study are primarily either biodegraded or removed via sorption to sludge depending on the magnitude of the biodegradation half-life and the octanol-water partition coefficient. Less than 0.2% of the LVP-VOCs disposed down the drain are available for ozone formation. In contrast, when the LVP-VOC in a consumer product is volatilized from the surface to which it has been applied, greater than 90% is available for photochemical reactions either at the source location or in the downwind areas. Comparing results from these two modes of releases allows us to understand the importance of determining the fraction of LVP-VOCs volatilized versus disposed down the drain when the product is used by consumers. The results from this study

  17. Pressure dependent aerosol formation from the cyclohexene gas-phase ozonolysis in the presence and absence of sulfur dioxide: a new perspective on the stabilisation of the initial clusters.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Philip Thomas Michael; Dege, Janina Elisabeth; Keunecke, Claudia; Krüger, Bastian Christopher; Wolf, Jan Lennard; Zeuch, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    The ozonolysis of cyclohexene is studied with respect to the pressure dependent formation of stable gas-phase products and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) as well as the influence of the presence of SO(2). In addition the rate coefficient for the initial reaction cyclohexene + O(3) was determined at 295 K. The observed increase in CO and ethene yields at low pressures and the absence of ketene in the product spectrum confirm previously proposed reaction pathways forming these decomposition products. An enhanced ethene formation at pressures below 300 mbar coincides with drastically decreased aerosol yields pointing to a high influence on SOA formation of chemical activation driven dynamics in the vinylhydroperoxide channel. The static reactor experiments at 450 mbar in the presence of SO(2) in the present study showed a similar sensitivity of additional particle formation to H(2)SO(4) number densities as found in near-atmospheric flow reactor experiments [Sipiläet al., Science, 2010, 327, 1243], a surprising result with regard to the very different experimental approaches. At low pressures (around 40 mbar) no significant new particle formation is observed even at high H(2)SO(4) concentrations. These findings indicate that the collisional stabilisation of initial clusters is an important aspect for SOA formation processes involving sulfuric acid and organic compounds. The results may have implications for geo-engineering strategies based on stratospheric sulfur injection, but caution is mandatory when room temperature laboratory results are extrapolated to stratospheric conditions. PMID:22825796

  18. Deformation microstructures and mechanisms in the high-pressure granulites of the Bacariza Formation (Cabo Ortegal, NW Spain): going up to the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puelles, P.; Abalos, B.

    2009-04-01

    The Cabo Ortegal complex is a nappe stack formed by fragments of subducted continental and oceanic lithosphere emplaced onto the Gondwana edge during the Variscan orogeny. The nappe units of Cabo Ortegal were metamorphosed under different high-pressure (HP) conditions and currently are separated by ductile tectonic contacts. They include mappable ultramafic massifs, N-MORB eclogites, metagabbros, metaserpentinites, metaperidotites, ortho- and paragneisses, and the Bacariza Formation granulites. The primary structure consists of the ultramafic massifs tectonically resting on top of the granulites of the Bacariza Formation, which overlie eclogites and HP gneisses with eclogite boudins. Granulites of the Bacariza Formation are mainly basic to intermediate in composition, although granulitic, carbonate-rich or mineralogically more exotic varieties also exist. On the basis of modal variations in the abundance of mafic and felsic mineral several lithotypes have been differentiated in order of decreasing outcrop area: (G1) plagio-pyrigarnites or common mafic granulites, (G2) intermediate to felsic, plagioclase-rich granulites, (G3) Mg-rich mafic granulites, (G4) pyrigarnite, or plagioclase-poor ultramafic granulites, and (G5) granulitic orthogneisses. The Bacariza Formation recorded a high-pressure metamorphic event. This event was polyphasic and two deformational phases are differentiated, D1 and D2, namely. D2 is associated to amalgamation of eclogite, high-pressure granulitic rocks and ultramafic sheets in deep portions of a subduction channel during the initial exhumation of the complex. As a result, transposition of the previous D1 fabrics took place due to the development of spectacular shear zones at the contacts with the bounding units. Pressure and temperature conditions estimated from the D2 mineral assemblage in equilibrium yield values of ca. 1.4 GPa and 740 °C, respectively. In this work we present a detailed study of a D2 shear zone located at the contact

  19. Evolution of crustal stress, pressure and temperature around shear zones during orogenic wedge formation: a 2D thermo-mechanical numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markus Schmalholz, Stefan; Jaquet, Yoann

    2016-04-01

    We study the formation of an orogenic wedge during lithospheric shortening with 2D numerical simulations. We consider a viscoelastoplastic rheology, thermo-mechanical coupling by shear heating and temperature-dependent viscosities, gravity and erosion. In the initial model configuration there is either a lateral temperature variation at the model base or a lateral variation in crustal thickness to generate slight stress variations during lithospheric shortening. These stress variations can trigger the formation of shear zones which are caused by thermal softening associated with shear heating. We do not apply any kind of strain softening, such as reduction of friction angle with progressive plastic strain. The first major shear zone that appears during shortening crosscuts the entire crust and initiates the asymmetric subduction/underthrusting of mainly the mechanically strong lower crust. After some deformation, the first shear zone in the upper crust is abandoned, the deformation propagates towards the foreland and a new shear zone forms only in the upper crust. The shear zone propagation occurs several times where new shear zones form in the upper crust and the mechanically strong top of the lower crust acts as detachment horizon. We calculate the magnitudes of the maximal and minimal principal stresses and of the mean stress (or dynamic pressure), and we record also the temperature for several marker points in the upper and lower crust. We analyse the evolution of stresses and temperature with burial depth and time. Deviatoric stresses (half the differential stress) in the upper crust are up to 200 MPa and associated shear heating in shear zones ranges between 40 - 80 °C. Lower crustal rocks remain either at the base of the orogenic wedge at depths of around 50 km or are subducted to depths of up to 120 km, depending on their position when the first shear zone formed. Largest deviatotric stresses in the strong part of the lower crust are about 1000 MPa and

  20. Piroxicam fails to reduce myocellular enzyme leakage and delayed onset muscle soreness induced by isokinetic eccentric exercise

    PubMed Central

    Croisier, J-L.; Monfils, T.; Deby-Dupon, G.; Fafchamps, M.; Venneman, I.; Crielaard, J-M.; Juchmès-Ferir, A.; Lhermerout, C.; Lamy, M.; Deby, C.

    1996-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that delayed onset muscular soreness (DOMS) following intense eccentric muscle contraction could be due to increased production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), ten healthy male subjects were studied. Using a double-blind randomized crossover design, each subject performed two isokinetic tests separated by a period of at least 6 weeks: once with placebo, and once with piroxicam (Feldene®). They were given one capsule containing either placebo or piroxicam (20 mg) per day for 6 days with initial doses given starting 3 days prior to isokinetic testing. Exercise consisted of eight stages of five maximal contractions of the knee extensor and flexor muscle groups of both legs separated by 1 min rest phases, on a Kin Trex device at 60°/s angular velocity. The subjective presence and intensity of DOMS were evaluated using a visual analogue scale immediately after, and 24 and 48 h after each test. The mean plasma concentration of PGE2 measured at rest and after exercise was significantly lower in the group treated with piroxicam (p < 0.05). However, statistical analysis (two-way ANOVA test) revealed that exercise did not cause any significant change of mean plasma PGE2 over time in either of the two groups. Eccentric work was followed by severe muscle pain in extensor and flexor muscle groups. Maximal soreness was noted 48 h postexercise. Serum creatine kinase activity and the serum concentration of myoglobin increased significantly, and reached peak values 48 h after exercise in both experimental conditions (p < 0.001). By paired t-test, it appeared that there were no significant differences in the serum levels of these two markers of muscle damage between the two groups at any time point. We conclude that: (1) oral administration of piroxicam fails to reduce muscle damage and DOMS caused by strenuous eccentric exercise; and (2) the hypothetical role of increased PGE2 production in eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage, DOMS, and reduced isokinetic

  1. Melting in the FeOsbnd SiO2 system to deep lower-mantle pressures: Implications for subducted Banded Iron Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Chie; Hirose, Kei; Nomura, Ryuichi; Ballmer, Maxim D.; Miyake, Akira; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-04-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs), consisting of layers of iron oxide and silica, are far denser than normal mantle material and should have been subducted and sunk into the deep lower mantle. We performed melting experiments on Fe2SiO4 from 26 to 131 GPa in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell (DAC). The textural and chemical characterization of a sample recovered from the DAC revealed that SiO2 is the liquidus phase for the whole pressure range examined in this study. The chemical compositions of partial melts are very rich in FeO, indicating that the eutectic melt compositions in the FeOsbnd SiO2 binary system are very close to the FeO end-member. The eutectic temperature is estimated to be 3540 ± 150 K at the core-mantle boundary (CMB), which is likely to be lower than the temperature at the top of the core at least in the Archean and Paleoproterozoic eons, suggesting that subducted BIFs underwent partial melting in a thermal boundary layer above the CMB. The FeO-rich melts formed by partial melting of the BIFs were exceedingly dense and therefore migrated downward. We infer that such partial melts have caused iron enrichment in the bottom part of the mantle, which may have contributed to the formation of ultralow velocity zones (ULVZs) observed today. On the other hand, solid residues left after the segregation of the FeO-rich partial melts have been almost pure SiO2, and therefore buoyant in the deep lower mantle to be entrained in mantle upwellings. They have likely been stretched and folded repeatedly by mantle flow, forming SiO2 streaks within the mantle "marble cake". Mantle packages enhanced by SiO2 streaks may be the origin of seismic scatterers in the mid-lower mantle.

  2. Resolution-independent modelling of environmental effects in semi-analytic models of galaxy formation that include ram-pressure stripping of both hot and cold gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yu; Kang, Xi; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Fu, Jian

    2016-05-01

    The quenching of star formation in satellite galaxies is observed over a wide range of dark matter halo masses and galaxy environments. In the recent Guo et al. and Fu et al. semi-analytic + N-body models, the gaseous environment of the satellite galaxy is governed by the properties of the dark matter subhalo in which it resides. This quantity depends of the resolution of the N-body simulation, leading to a divergent fraction of quenched satellites in high- and low-resolution simulations. Here, we incorporate an analytic model to trace the subhaloes below the resolution limit. We demonstrate that we then obtain better converged results between the Millennium I and II simulations, especially for the satellites in the massive haloes (log Mhalo = [14, 15]). We also include a new physical model for the ram-pressure stripping of cold gas in satellite galaxies. However, we find very clear discrepancies with observed trends in quenched satellite galaxy fractions as a function of stellar mass at fixed halo mass. At fixed halo mass, the quenched fraction of satellites does not depend on stellar mass in the models, but increases strongly with mass in the data. In addition to the overprediction of low-mass passive satellites, the models also predict too few quenched central galaxies with low stellar masses, so the problems in reproducing quenched fractions are not purely of environmental origin. Further improvements to the treatment of the gas-physical processes regulating the star formation histories of galaxies are clearly necessary to resolve these problems.

  3. Efficacy of disintegrating aspirin in two different models for acute mild-to-moderate pain: sore throat pain and dental pain.

    PubMed

    Voelker, M; Schachtel, B P; Cooper, S A; Gatoulis, S C

    2016-02-01

    A recently developed fast-release aspirin tablet formulation has been evaluated in two different pain models. The dental impaction pain model and the sore throat pain model are widely used for assessing analgesia, including acute mild-to-moderate pain. Both studies were double-blind, randomized, parallel group and compared a single dose of 1000 mg aspirin with 1000 mg paracetamol and with placebo and investigated the onset and overall time course of pain relief. Speed of onset was measured by the double-stopwatch method for time to meaningful pain relief and time to first perceptible pain relief. Pain intensity and pain relief were rated subjectively over a 6-h (dental pain) and 2-h (sore throat pain) time period. In both models fast-release aspirin and commercial paracetamol were statistically significantly different from placebo for onset of action, summed pain intensity differences and total pain relief. Meaningful pain relief was achieved within a median of 42.3 and 42.9 min for aspirin and paracetamol, respectively, in the dental pain model. The corresponding numbers in sore throat pain were 48.0 and 40.4 min. All treatments in both studies were safe and well tolerated. No serious adverse events were reported and no subject was discontinued due to an adverse event. Overall the two studies clearly demonstrated efficacy over placebo in the two pain models and a comparable efficacy and safety profile between aspirin and an equivalent dose of paracetamol under the conditions of acute dental pain and acute sore throat pain. Trial registration These trials were registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, registration number: NCT01420094, registration date: July 27, 2011 and registration number: NCT01453400, registration date: October 13, 2011. PMID:26603742

  4. The effect of pulsating electrostatic field application on the development of delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS) symptoms after eccentric exercise

    PubMed Central

    Gatterer, Hannes; Peters, Philippe; Philippe, Marc; Burtscher, Martin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to establish whether pulsating electrostatic field application, shown to increase blood flow and metabolic activity and to function as an ion pump, is able to reduce muscle pain after exercise-induced muscle damage. [Subjects and Methods] Seven participants (4 males, 3 females) performed two sessions of downhill running separated by at least 4 weeks. After the running sessions, participants were either treated for 45 min with a pulsating electrostatic field (field intensity, 9000 V; current, <9 mA; frequency, 50 Hz) or a sham treatment. The order of the intervention was random, and the condition was blinded for the participants. Muscle soreness score, creatine kinase, and jump ability were assessed before and up to 48 hours after running. [Results] Twenty-four and 48 hours after the downhill running, the muscle soreness score tended to be less increased after pulsating electrostatic field administration when compared with the sham setting (changes in muscle soreness score: 3.7±1.6 vs. 5.7±2.2 after 24 h and 3.1±2.0 vs. 5.4±3.2 after 48 h, respectively). No further differences were detected. [Conclusion] The outcomes show that a pulsating electrostatic field might be a promising treatment to reduce muscle soreness after exercise-induced muscle damage. However, further studies are needed to confirm the present outcomes and to establish the mechanism by which a pulsating electrostatic field may reduce muscle pain. PMID:26644654

  5. A 44-Year-Old Man With Sore Throat and Fatigue After Using an Old Camper Van.

    PubMed

    Yap, Vanessa; Abrantes, Jessica; Cruz, Lucas; Wu, Ulysses; Lahiri, Bimalin

    2016-08-01

    A 44-year-old man from Connecticut with no significant past medical history presented to the ED with a 2-week history of sore throat and fatigue, subsequently developing cough, dyspnea, fevers, and chills. The patient reported buying an old camper van and noticed a large infestation of rodent droppings, which he had cleaned thoroughly from the cabin. He used the camper van on several camping trips in Vermont, and symptoms started on his return. PMID:27502993

  6. Influences of growth parameters on the film formation of hexagonal boron nitride thin films grown on sapphire substrates by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umehara, Naoki; Masuda, Atsushi; Shimizu, Takaki; Kuwahara, Iori; Kouno, Tetsuya; Kominami, Hiroko; Hara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) films were grown on c-plane sapphire substrates by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition with BCl3 and NH3 as the boron and nitrogen sources, respectively, and the influences of growth parameters on the film quality were investigated for samples with a thickness of about 1 µm. The dependence of X-ray diffraction on the growth temperature (T g) indicated that the crystalline quality is most improved in the sample grown at 1200 °C, in which the epitaxial relationship of {100}h-BN ∥ {110}sapphire and {001}h-BN ∥ {001}sapphire was confirmed. This condition enhanced lateral growth, resulting in the formation of grains with flat top surfaces. The T g dependence was discussed in relation to the amorphous AlN formed on the substrate surface and the reaction between BCl3 and NH3 in the vapor phase. The correlation between the structural and luminescent properties, which was found from the T g dependence of CL, was also discussed.

  7. Early application of negative pressure wound therapy to acute wounds contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus: An effective approach to preventing biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    LI, TONGTONG; ZHANG, LIHAI; HAN, LI; WANG, GUOQI; YIN, PENG; LI, ZHIRUI; ZHANG, LICHENG; GUO, QI; LIU, DAOHONG; TANG, PEIFU

    2016-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been demonstrated to be effective at preventing biofilm-associated infections; however, its role in biofilm prevention is unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of NPWT on biofilm prevention when rapidly initiated following wound contamination. Full-thickness dermal wounds (8 mm) were created in rabbit ears and inoculated with green fluorescent protein-labeled Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). At 6 h following inoculation, continuous NPWT at −125 mmHg was initiated, with the wounds on the contralateral ear left untreated in order to serve as self-controls. S. aureus rapidly formed mature biofilms in the wound beds post-inoculation, with a persistent bacterial burden of ~105−107 colony-forming units (CFUs)/wound and impaired wound healing. Compared with the untreated group, NPWT resulted in a significant reduction in biofilm matrix, which was verified by scanning electron microscopy and epifluorescence. A reduction in bacterial counts followed (P<0.05) with ~103 CFUs/wound on postoperative day 13 and improvement in all healing parameters (P<0.05) relative to control wounds. The results of the present investigation suggest that NPWT is an effective strategy to impeding the formation of S. aureus wound biofilms when initiated rapidly following bacterial contamination. The early application of NPWT, aimed at biofilm prevention, may improve wound care. PMID:26997991

  8. Flexion Relaxation Ratio Not Responsive to Acutely Induced Low Back Pain from a Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Maggie E.; Bishop, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The flexion relaxation ratio (FRR) has been suggested as a measure of muscular performance in patients with low back pain (LBP). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the FRR was responsive to acute LBP produced from a delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) protocol. Methods. Fifty-one pain-free volunteers performed DOMS to induce LBP. Current pain intensity, trunk flexion range of motion (ROM), and passive straight leg raise (SLR) were measured at baseline, 24 and 48 hours after DOMS. Participants were categorized into pain groups based on reported current pain intensity. Changes in FRR, trunk flexion ROM, and SLR ROM were examined using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance. Results. Pain group was not found to have a significant effect on FRR (F1,29 = 0.054, P = 0.818), nor were there any two-way interactions for changes in FRR. The pain group had decreased trunk flexion ROM compared to the minimal pain group (F1,38 = 7.21, P = 0.011), but no decreases in SLR ROM (F1,38 = 3.51, P = 0.057) over time. Interpretation. There were no differences in FRR based on reported pain intensity of LBP from a DOMS protocol. The responsiveness of FRR might be limited in patients with acute onset LBP of muscular origin. PMID:27335879

  9. The effects of kinesio taping on architecture, strength and pain of muscles in delayed onset muscle soreness of biceps brachii

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Sin; Bae, Sea Hyun; Hwang, Jin Ah; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to confirm the effects of kinesio taping (KT) on muscle function and pain due to delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) of the biceps brachii. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven subjects with induced DOMS were randomized into either Group I (control, n=19) or Group II (KT, n=18). Outcome measures were recorded before the intervention (application of KT) and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after the intervention. DOMS was induced, and muscle thickness was measured using ultrasonic radiography. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC) was measured via electromyography (EMG). Subjective pain was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). [Results] Group I exhibited a positive correlation between muscle thickness and elapsed time from intervention (24, 48, and 72 hours post induction of DOMS); they also showed a significant decrease in MVIC(%). Group II showed significant increases in muscle thickness up to the 48-hour interval post induction of DOMS, along with a significant decrease in MVIC (%). However, in contrast to Group I, Group II did not show a significant difference in muscle thickness or MVIC (%) at the 72-hour interval in comparison with the values prior to DOMS induction. [Conclusion] In adults with DOMS, activation of muscles by applying KT was found to be an effective and faster method of recovering muscle strength than rest alone. PMID:25729190

  10. The effects of kinesio taping on architecture, strength and pain of muscles in delayed onset muscle soreness of biceps brachii.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Sin; Bae, Sea Hyun; Hwang, Jin Ah; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to confirm the effects of kinesio taping (KT) on muscle function and pain due to delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) of the biceps brachii. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven subjects with induced DOMS were randomized into either Group I (control, n=19) or Group II (KT, n=18). Outcome measures were recorded before the intervention (application of KT) and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after the intervention. DOMS was induced, and muscle thickness was measured using ultrasonic radiography. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC) was measured via electromyography (EMG). Subjective pain was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). [Results] Group I exhibited a positive correlation between muscle thickness and elapsed time from intervention (24, 48, and 72 hours post induction of DOMS); they also showed a significant decrease in MVIC(%). Group II showed significant increases in muscle thickness up to the 48-hour interval post induction of DOMS, along with a significant decrease in MVIC (%). However, in contrast to Group I, Group II did not show a significant difference in muscle thickness or MVIC (%) at the 72-hour interval in comparison with the values prior to DOMS induction. [Conclusion] In adults with DOMS, activation of muscles by applying KT was found to be an effective and faster method of recovering muscle strength than rest alone. PMID:25729190

  11. Advanced Technologies for Monitoring CO2 Saturation and Pore Pressure in Geologic Formations: Linking the Chemical and Physical Effects to Elastic and Transport Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Mavko, G.; Vanorio, T.; Vialle, S.; Saxena, N.

    2014-03-31

    advection: because of an efficient mass transfer of reactants and products, the fluid remains acidic, far from thermodynamical equilibrium and the dissolution of calcite is important. These conclusions are consistent with the lab observations. Sandstones from the Tuscaloosa formation in Mississippi were also subjected to injection under representative in situ stress and pore pressure conditions. Again, both P- and S-wave velocities decreased with injection. Time-lapse SEM images indicated permanent changes induced in the sandstone microstructure by chamosite dissolution upon injection of CO2-rich brine. After injection, the sandstone showed an overall cleaner microstructure. Two main changes are involved: (a) clay dissolution between grains and at the grain contact and (b) rearrangement of grains due to compaction under pressure Theoretical and empirical models were developed to quantify the elastic changes associated with injection. Permanent changes to the rock frame resulted in seismic velocity-porosity trends that mimic natural diagenetic changes. Hence, when laboratory measurments are not available for a candidate site, these trends can be estimated from depth trends in well logs. New theoretical equations were developed to predict the changes in elastic moduli upon substitution of pore-filling material. These equations reduce to Gassmann’s equations for the case of constant frame properties, low seismic frequencies, and fluid changes in the pore space. The new models also predict the change dissolution or precipitation of mineral, which cannot be described with the conventional Gassmann theory.

  12. Size exclusion chromatography to gain insight into the complex formation of carrot pectin methylesterase and its inhibitor from kiwi fruit as influenced by thermal and high-pressure processing.

    PubMed

    Jolie, Ruben P; Duvetter, Thomas; Verlinde, Philippe H C J; Van Buggenhout, Sandy; Van Loey, Ann M; Hendrickx, Marc E

    2009-12-01

    A size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) method was implemented to study complex formation between carrot pectin methylesterase (PME) and its inhibitor (PMEI) from kiwi fruit in the context of traditional thermal and novel high-pressure processing. Evidence was gained that both thermal and high-pressure treatments of PME give rise to two distinct enzyme subpopulations: a catalytically active population, eluting from the size exclusion column, and an inactive population, aggregated and excluded from the column. When mixing a partly denatured PME sample with a fixed amount of PMEI, a PME-PMEI complex peak was observed on HPSEC, of which the peak area was highly correlated with the residual enzyme activity of the corresponding PME sample. This observation indicates complex formation to be restricted to the active PME fraction. When an equimolar mixture of PME and PMEI was subjected to either a thermal or a high-pressure treatment, marked differences were observed. At elevated temperature, enzyme and inhibitor remained united and aggregated as a whole, thus gradually disappearing from the elution profile. Conversely, elevated pressure caused the dissociation of the PME-PMEI complexes, followed by a separate action of pressure on enzyme and inhibitor. Remarkably, PMEI appeared to be pressure-resistant when compressed at acidic pH (ca. 4). PMID:19908835

  13. Gibbs free energy of formation and heat capacity of PdO: A new calibration of the PdPdO buffer to high temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nell, J.; O'Neill, H. St. C.

    1996-07-01

    The oxygen potential defined by the reaction 2Pd + O 2 = 2PdO has been measured from 730 K to 1200 K using the electrochemical cell: Pt, Pd + PdO|CSZ|YDT (air), Pt. Measurements were taken while going up and down in temperature. Two rigorous tests of the reversibility of the data were also conducted by perturbing the composition of the gas phase in the cell. The Gibbs free energy of formation (in terms of 1 mol of O 2) relative to a reference pressure of 1 bar is given by Δ fGPdOo = -238842 + 316.129 T - 15.192 T ln T (J·mol -1 , temperature in K). The uncertainty is estimated to be ±40 J·mol -1 above 800 K and ±200 J·mol -1 at lower temperatures. This is in good agreement with several other studies conducted with a variety of different techniques. Cp of PdO was measured between 370 K and 1065 K using a differential scanning calorimeter operated in step heating mode. The data were fitted to a two-term expression, Cp = 71.08 - 531.6 T-0.5 (J·mol -1·K -1) . The uncertainty in the data is estimated to be ±1 J·mol -1·K -1. The heat capacity results are significantly different from the measurements of the only previous study, but a third-law analysis proved the Gibbs free energy of formation and heat capacity data to be internally consistent. From the third-law analysis we obtained values of 33.74J·mol -1·K -1 for S298.15o (PdO) and -117.42 KJ·mol -1 for Δ fH298.15o (PdO). The new thermodynamic data for PdO was used to revise the temperature and pressure dependence of the oxygen fugacity of the PdPdO buffer. Including corrections for the thermal expansivity and compressibility of Pd and PdO we obtain log 10fO 2 = 16.510 - 12473.4 T-1 - 1.826 log 10T + P{0.0627 T-1 - 5.22 × 10 -7 (1 - 298 T -1) + 10 -8 PT-1} ( T in Kelvin and P in bar) referenced to a standard state of 1 bar. It is also now possible to quantify the unexpected decrease in the activity coefficient of PdO in silicate melt with increasing temperature (in a diopside-anorthite eutectic melt

  14. Grapevine species from varied native habitats exhibit differences in embolism formation/repair associated with leaf gas exchange and root pressure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drought induces xylem embolism formation, but grapevines can refill blocked conduits to restore transport capacity. It is unknown whether vulnerability to embolism formation and ability to repair differ among grapevine species. We analyzed in vivo embolism formation and repair using x-ray microtomog...

  15. Evaluation of siderite and magnetite formation in BIFs by pressure-temperature experiments of Fe(III) minerals and microbial biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halama, Maximilian; Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria potentially contributed to the deposition of Archean banded iron formations (BIFs), before the evolution of cyanobacterially-generated molecular oxygen (O2), by using sunlight to oxidize aqueous Fe(II) and precipitate Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides. Once deposited at the seafloor, diagenetic reduction of the Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides by heterotrophic bacteria produced secondary Fe(II)-bearing minerals, such as siderite (FeCO3) and magnetite (Fe3O4), via the oxidation of microbial organic carbon (i.e., cellular biomass). During deeper burial at temperatures above the threshold for life, thermochemical Fe(III) reduction has the potential to form BIF-like minerals. However, the role of thermochemical Fe(III) reduction of primary BIF minerals during metamorphism, and its impact on mineralogy and geochemical signatures in BIFs, is poorly understood. Consequently, we simulated the metamorphism of the precursor and diagenetic iron-rich minerals (ferrihydrite, goethite, hematite) at low-grade metamorphic conditions (170 °C, 1.2 kbar) for 14 days by using (1) mixtures of abiotically synthesized Fe(III) minerals and either microbial biomass or glucose as a proxy for biomass, and (2) using biogenic minerals formed by phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Mössbauer spectroscopy and μXRD showed that thermochemical magnetite formation was limited to samples containing ferrihydrite and glucose, or goethite and glucose. No magnetite was formed from Fe(III) minerals when microbial biomass was present as the carbon and electron sources for thermochemical Fe(III) reduction. This could be due to biomass-derived organic molecules binding to the mineral surfaces and preventing solid-state conversion to magnetite. Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed siderite contents of up to 17% after only 14 days of incubation at elevated temperature and pressure for all samples with synthetic Fe(III) minerals and biomass, whereas 6% of the initial Fe(III) was

  16. Frustrated exchange interactions formation at low temperatures and high hydrostatic pressures in La{sub 0.70}Sr{sub 0.30}Mn{sub O2.85}

    SciTech Connect

    Trukhanov, S. V. Trukhanov, A. V.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Szymczak, H.

    2010-08-15

    The magnetic and thermal properties of the anion-deficient La{sub 0.70}Sr{sub 0.30}MnO{sub 2.85} manganite are investigated in wide temperature (4-350 K) range, including under hydrostatic pressure (0-1.1 GPa). Throughout the pressure range investigated, the sample is spin glass with diffused phase transition into paramagnetic state. It is established, that spin glass state is a consequence of exchange interaction frustration of the ferromagnetic clusters embeded into antiferromagnetic clusters. The magnetic moment freezing temperature T{sub f} of ferromagnetic clusters increases under pressure, freezing temperature dependence on pressure is characterized by derivative value {approx}4.5 K/GPa, while the magnetic ordering T{sub MO} temperature dependence is characterized by derivative value {approx}13 K/GPa. The volume fraction of sample having ferromagnetic state is V{sub fer} {approx} 13% and it increases under a pressure of 1.1 GPa by {Delta}V{sub fer} {approx} 6%. Intensification of ferromagnetic properties of the anion-deficient La{sub 0.70}Sr{sub 0.30}MnO{sub 2.85} manganite under hydrostatic pressure is a consequence of oxygen vacancies redistribution and unit cell parameters decrease. The most likely mechanism of frustrated exchange interactions formation is discussed.

  17. Clinical symptoms and signs in sore throat patients with large colony variant β-haemolytic streptococci groups C or G versus group A

    PubMed Central

    Lindbæk, Morten; Høiby, Ernst Arne; Lermark, Gro; Steinsholt, Inger Marie; Hjortdahl, Per

    2005-01-01

    Background The role of large colony streptococci groups C or G as pathogen agents in sore throat has been questioned. Aim To analyse clinical features of patients with large colony streptococci groups C or G compared with patients with group A streptococci (GAS) and with negative cultures. Design of study Prospective study of patients with sore throat. Setting Two Norwegian general practices in Stokke and Kongsberg communities with 6500 patients. Method Frequency of clinical features in the three patient categories including the four Centor criteria (fever, anterior cervical lymphadenopathy, tonsillar exudates, and lack of cough), degree of pain on swallowing, pharyngeal rubor, C-reactive protein (CRP) values, patient age between 3 and 14 years, and duration of symptoms before seeing the doctor. A logistic regression analysis to find independent predictors was performed. Results Out of 306 patients with a sore throat, 244 were adults and 62 were children under 10 years old; 40% were men. One hundred and twenty-seven had GAS, 33 had streptococci groups C or G, and 146 had negative throat cultures. Forty-eight per cent of the GAS patients and 45% of the C or G patients met three or four of the Centor criteria. The logistic regression revealed that in patients with GAS considerable pain on swallowing, an age of 3–14 years and a duration of symptoms of ≤3 days or less were significantly associated with GAS infection in addition to the Centor criteria. The same results were found when all streptococci were analysed together, in addition elevated CRP was significant. In patients with streptococci group C or G an elevated CRP-value was significantly associated. Conclusion Patients with tonsillitis caused by streptococcus groups C or G have, to a large extent, the same clinical picture as patients with GAS. Large colony streptococci groups C and G should be considered as throat pathogens in line with GAS. PMID:16105370

  18. Effect of an herbal/botanical supplement on recovery from delayed onset muscle soreness: a randomized placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We examined the effects of a proprietary herbal/botanical supplement (StemSport, Stemtech, San Clemente, CA.) suggested to increase circulating stem cells, decrease inflammation, and attenuate exercise induced muscle damage on recovery from delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Methods Sixteen subjects (male = 7, female = 9; age 23.8 ± 10 years; height 171.9 ± 10 cm, mass 72.2 ± 15 kg) were randomized in a crossover, double-blind, placebo controlled trial to receive a placebo or StemSport supplement (6150 mg/day) for 14 days. DOMS was induced on day 7 for both placebo and active conditions in the non-dominant elbow flexor group with repeated eccentric repetitions. Muscle swelling (biceps girth), elbow flexor isometric strength (hand held dynamometer), muscle pain/tenderness (visual analog scale), range of motion (active elbow flexion and extension), and inflammation (hsCRP, IL6, and TNF-α) were measured at baseline and at 24 h, 48 h, 72 h, and 168 h (1 week) post eccentric exercise. The crossover washout period was ≥14 days. Results No significant condition-by-time interactions between placebo and StemSport supplementation were observed with regard to measures of pain (p = 0.59), tenderness (p = 0.71), isometric strength (p = 0.32), elbow flexion (p = 0.45), muscle swelling (p = 0.90), or inflammation (p > 0.90). Decrements in elbow extension range of motion 48 h post-exercise were less after StemSport supplementation (Δ elbow extension 48 h post; StemSport, −2.0 deg; placebo, −10 deg; p = 0.003). Conclusions These data suggest that compared to placebo, StemSport supplementation does not improve outcome measures related to muscle recovery after acute upper-arm induced DOMS. PMID:24966805

  19. Can a standard dose of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) supplementation reduce the symptoms of delayed onset of muscle soreness?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Unaccustomed exercise can result in delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS) which can affect athletic performance. Although DOMS is a useful tool to identify muscle damage and remodelling, prolonged symptoms of DOMS may be associated with the over-training syndrome. In order to reduce the symptoms of DOMS numerous management strategies have been attempted with no significant effect on DOMS-associated cytokines surge. The present study aimed to investigate the acute and chronic effects of a 2 × 180 mg per day dose of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on interleukin-6 (IL-6) mediated inflammatory response and symptoms associated with DOMS. Methods Seventeen healthy non-smoking females (age 20.4 ± 2.1 years, height 161.2 ± 8.3 cm and mass 61.48 ± 7.4 kg) were randomly assigned to either placebo (N = 10) or EPA (N = 7). Serum IL-6, isometric and isokinetic (concentric and eccentric) strength, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded on four occasions: i-prior to supplementation, ii-immediately after three weeks of supplementation (basal effects), iii-48 hours following a single bout of resistance exercise (acute training response effects), and iv-48 hours following the last of a series of three bouts of resistance exercise (chronic training response effects). Results There was only a group difference in the degree of change in circulating IL-6 levels. In fact, relative to the first baseline, by the third bout of eccentric workout, the EPA group had 103 ± 60% increment in IL-6 levels whereas the placebo group only had 80 ± 26% incremented IL-6 levels (P = 0.020). We also describe a stable multiple linear regression model which included measures of strength and not IL-6 as predictors of RPE scale. Conclusion The present study suggests that in doubling the standard recommended dose of EPA, whilst this may still not be beneficial at ameliorating the symptoms of DOMS, it counter intuitively appears to enhance the cytokine response to exercise. In a

  20. Sore eyes and psychosis.

    PubMed

    Colley, Samantha; Smith, John

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 30-year-old woman who presented with sexual disinhibition and altered behaviour following an episode of optic neuritis. Her only history was of anxiety disorder. Her differential diagnosis was neurological versus psychiatric. Routine blood tests were unremarkable at this stage. MRI revealed non-specific change and lumbar puncture revealed a slight lymphocytosis and elevated protein and glucose in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). PCR on the CSF was negative for viruses: Adenovirus, varicella zoster virus, herpes simplex virus, enterovirus and parechovirus. She was initially treated with intravenous acyclovir to little effect. Antipsychotics olanzapine and haloperidol were also trialled and continued for 3 weeks in total. Once again these medications failed to affect the patient's behaviour but she did begin to show the side effects associated with these medications. Further test results became available at this point-she was anti-N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antibody positive. A diagnosis of anti-NMDA receptor antibody encephalitis was made. The patient was started on cyclophosphamide and methylprednisolone to good effect. PMID:25193812

  1. Sore eyes and psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Colley, Samantha; Smith, John

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 30-year-old woman who presented with sexual disinhibition and altered behaviour following an episode of optic neuritis. Her only history was of anxiety disorder. Her differential diagnosis was neurological versus psychiatric. Routine blood tests were unremarkable at this stage. MRI revealed non-specific change and lumbar puncture revealed a slight lymphocytosis and elevated protein and glucose in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). PCR on the CSF was negative for viruses: Adenovirus, varicella zoster virus, herpes simplex virus, enterovirus and parechovirus. She was initially treated with intravenous acyclovir to little effect. Antipsychotics olanzapine and haloperidol were also trialled and continued for 3 weeks in total. Once again these medications failed to affect the patient's behaviour but she did begin to show the side effects associated with these medications. Further test results became available at this point—she was anti-N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antibody positive. A diagnosis of anti-NMDA receptor antibody encephalitis was made. The patient was started on cyclophosphamide and methylprednisolone to good effect. PMID:25193812

  2. Genital sores - female

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bodurka DC. Neoplastic diseases of the vulva. In: Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Katz VL, eds . ... Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2012:chap 30. Eckert L, Lentz GM. Infections of the lower genital tract. In: ...

  3. Pharyngitis - sore throat

    MedlinePlus

    Flores AR, Caserta MT. Pharyngitis. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  4. Genital sores - female

    MedlinePlus

    ... inguinale) Genital herpes Genital warts Melanoma Molluscum contagiosum Vulvovaginitis - overview Update Date 11/5/2015 Updated by: ... any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should ...

  5. Soothing a Sore Throat

    MedlinePlus

    ... infectious disease expert at NIH. “Having lozenges or hard candies—or anything that stimulates saliva production—will keep ... fluids.” For young children who might choke on hard candies or lozenges, try cold liquids and popsicles. Throat ...

  6. Canker Sores: Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Executive Committee Board of Trustees Governance Past Presidents Staff/Contact History Awards Our Partners Membership Membership Categories Renew Your Membership Login Fellowship Academic Fellowship Affiliate Fellowship (AFAOM) Application Process Fellowship Study ...

  7. Canker Sore (Aphthous Ulcer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Notice This Site and third parties who place advertisements on this Site may collect and use information ... Site and other websites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services of interest to you. ...

  8. Influence of the reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metallic targets at atmospheric pressure and high repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girault, M.; Le Garrec, J.-L.; Mitchell, J. B. A.; Jouvard, J.-M.; Carvou, E.; Menneveux, J.; Yu, J.; Ouf, F.-X.; Carles, S.; Potin, V.; Pillon, G.; Bourgeois, S.; Perez, J.; Marco de Lucas, M. C.; Lavisse, L.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of a reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles (NPs) in the plasma plume generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metal targets (Ti, Al, Ag) was probed in situ using Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Air and different O2-N2 gas mixtures were used as reactive gas within atmospheric pressure. SAXS results showed the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume with a mean radius varying in the 2-5 nm range. A decrease of the NPs size with increasing the O2 percentage in the O2-N2 gas mixture was also showed. Ex situ observations by transmission electron microscopy and structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were also performed for powders collected in experiments done using air as ambient gas. The stability of the different metal oxides is discussed as being a key parameter influencing the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume.

  9. Wellbore pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, Lowell Z.

    1979-01-01

    Subterranean earth formations containing energy values are subjected to hydraulic fracturing procedures to enhance the recovery of the energy values. These fractures are induced in the earth formation by pumping liquid into the wellbore penetrating the earth formation until the pressure of the liquid is sufficient to fracture the earth formation adjacent to the wellbore. The present invention is directed to a transducer which is positionable within the wellbore to generate a signal indicative of the fracture initiation useful for providing a timing signal to equipment for seismic mapping of the fracture as it occurs and for providing a measurement of the pressure at which the fracture is initiated.

  10. Method of fracturing a geological formation

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, James O.

    1990-01-01

    An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

  11. Pressure-Induced Amorphization of Small Pore Zeolites—the Role of Cation-H2O Topology and Anti-glass Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan Hwang, Gil; Joo Shin, Tae; Blom, Douglas A.; Vogt, Thomas; Lee, Yongjae

    2015-10-01

    Systematic studies of pressure-induced amorphization of natrolites (PIA) containing monovalent extra-framework cations (EFC) Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+ allow us to assess the role of two different EFC-H2O configurations within the pores of a zeolite: one arrangement has H2O molecules (NATI) and the other the EFC (NATII) in closer proximity to the aluminosilicate framework. We show that NATI materials have a lower onset pressure of PIA than the NATII materials containing Rb and Cs as EFC. The onset pressure of amorphization (PA) of NATII materials increases linearly with the size of the EFC, whereas their initial bulk moduli (P1 phase) decrease linearly. Only Cs- and Rb-NAT reveal a phase separation into a dense form (P2 phase) under pressure. High-Angle Annular Dark Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HAADF-STEM) imaging shows that after recovery from pressures near 25 and 20 GPa long-range ordered Rb-Rb and Cs-Cs correlations continue to be present over length scales up to 100 nm while short-range ordering of the aluminosilicate framework is significantly reduced—this opens a new way to form anti-glass structures.

  12. Pressure-Induced Amorphization of Small Pore Zeolites-the Role of Cation-H2O Topology and Anti-glass Formation.

    PubMed

    Chan Hwang, Gil; Joo Shin, Tae; Blom, Douglas A; Vogt, Thomas; Lee, Yongjae

    2015-01-01

    Systematic studies of pressure-induced amorphization of natrolites (PIA) containing monovalent extra-framework cations (EFC) Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), Cs(+) allow us to assess the role of two different EFC-H2O configurations within the pores of a zeolite: one arrangement has H2O molecules (NATI) and the other the EFC (NATII) in closer proximity to the aluminosilicate framework. We show that NATI materials have a lower onset pressure of PIA than the NATII materials containing Rb and Cs as EFC. The onset pressure of amorphization (PA) of NATII materials increases linearly with the size of the EFC, whereas their initial bulk moduli (P1 phase) decrease linearly. Only Cs- and Rb-NAT reveal a phase separation into a dense form (P2 phase) under pressure. High-Angle Annular Dark Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HAADF-STEM) imaging shows that after recovery from pressures near 25 and 20 GPa long-range ordered Rb-Rb and Cs-Cs correlations continue to be present over length scales up to 100 nm while short-range ordering of the aluminosilicate framework is significantly reduced-this opens a new way to form anti-glass structures. PMID:26455345

  13. Pressure-Induced Amorphization of Small Pore Zeolites—the Role of Cation-H2O Topology and Anti-glass Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chan Hwang, Gil; Joo Shin, Tae; Blom, Douglas A.; Vogt, Thomas; Lee, Yongjae

    2015-01-01

    Systematic studies of pressure-induced amorphization of natrolites (PIA) containing monovalent extra-framework cations (EFC) Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+ allow us to assess the role of two different EFC-H2O configurations within the pores of a zeolite: one arrangement has H2O molecules (NATI) and the other the EFC (NATII) in closer proximity to the aluminosilicate framework. We show that NATI materials have a lower onset pressure of PIA than the NATII materials containing Rb and Cs as EFC. The onset pressure of amorphization (PA) of NATII materials increases linearly with the size of the EFC, whereas their initial bulk moduli (P1 phase) decrease linearly. Only Cs- and Rb-NAT reveal a phase separation into a dense form (P2 phase) under pressure. High-Angle Annular Dark Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HAADF-STEM) imaging shows that after recovery from pressures near 25 and 20 GPa long-range ordered Rb-Rb and Cs-Cs correlations continue to be present over length scales up to 100 nm while short-range ordering of the aluminosilicate framework is significantly reduced—this opens a new way to form anti-glass structures. PMID:26455345

  14. Submarine rescue decompression procedure from hyperbaric exposures up to 6 bar of absolute pressure in man: effects on bubble formation and pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Blatteau, Jean-Eric; Hugon, Julien; Castagna, Olivier; Meckler, Cédric; Vallée, Nicolas; Jammes, Yves; Hugon, Michel; Risberg, Jan; Pény, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in submarine rescue systems have allowed a transfer under pressure of crew members being rescued from a disabled submarine. The choice of a safe decompression procedure for pressurised rescuees has been previously discussed, but no schedule has been validated when the internal submarine pressure is significantly increased i.e. exceeding 2.8 bar absolute pressure. This study tested a saturation decompression procedure from hyperbaric exposures up to 6 bar, the maximum operating pressure of the NATO submarine rescue system. The objective was to investigate the incidence of decompression sickness (DCS) and clinical and spirometric indices of pulmonary oxygen toxicity. Two groups were exposed to a Nitrogen-Oxygen atmosphere (pO2 = 0.5 bar) at either 5 bar (N = 14) or 6 bar (N = 12) for 12 h followed by 56 h 40 min resp. 60 h of decompression. When chamber pressure reached 2.5 bar, the subjects breathed oxygen intermittently, otherwise compressed air. Repeated clinical examinations, ultrasound monitoring of venous gas embolism and spirometry were performed during decompression. During exposures to 5 bar, 3 subjects had minor subjective symptoms i.e. sensation of joint discomfort, regressing spontaneously, and after surfacing 2 subjects also experienced joint discomfort disappearing without treatment. Only 3 subjects had detectable intravascular bubbles during decompression (low grades). No bubbles were detected after surfacing. About 40% of subjects felt chest tightness when inspiring deeply during the initial phase of decompression. Precordial burning sensations were reported during oxygen periods. During decompression, vital capacity decreased by about 8% and forced expiratory flow rates decreased significantly. After surfacing, changes in the peripheral airways were still noticed; Lung Diffusion for carbon monoxide was slightly reduced by 1% while vital capacity was normalized. The procedure did not result in serious symptoms of DCS or

  15. Submarine Rescue Decompression Procedure from Hyperbaric Exposures up to 6 Bar of Absolute Pressure in Man: Effects on Bubble Formation and Pulmonary Function

    PubMed Central

    Blatteau, Jean-Eric; Hugon, Julien; Castagna, Olivier; Meckler, Cédric; Vallée, Nicolas; Jammes, Yves; Hugon, Michel; Risberg, Jan; Pény, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in submarine rescue systems have allowed a transfer under pressure of crew members being rescued from a disabled submarine. The choice of a safe decompression procedure for pressurised rescuees has been previously discussed, but no schedule has been validated when the internal submarine pressure is significantly increased i.e. exceeding 2.8 bar absolute pressure. This study tested a saturation decompression procedure from hyperbaric exposures up to 6 bar, the maximum operating pressure of the NATO submarine rescue system. The objective was to investigate the incidence of decompression sickness (DCS) and clinical and spirometric indices of pulmonary oxygen toxicity. Two groups were exposed to a Nitrogen-Oxygen atmosphere (pO2 = 0.5 bar) at either 5 bar (N = 14) or 6 bar (N = 12) for 12 h followed by 56 h 40 min resp. 60 h of decompression. When chamber pressure reached 2.5 bar, the subjects breathed oxygen intermittently, otherwise compressed air. Repeated clinical examinations, ultrasound monitoring of venous gas embolism and spirometry were performed during decompression. During exposures to 5 bar, 3 subjects had minor subjective symptoms i.e. sensation of joint discomfort, regressing spontaneously, and after surfacing 2 subjects also experienced joint discomfort disappearing without treatment. Only 3 subjects had detectable intravascular bubbles during decompression (low grades). No bubbles were detected after surfacing. About 40% of subjects felt chest tightness when inspiring deeply during the initial phase of decompression. Precordial burning sensations were reported during oxygen periods. During decompression, vital capacity decreased by about 8% and forced expiratory flow rates decreased significantly. After surfacing, changes in the peripheral airways were still noticed; Lung Diffusion for carbon monoxide was slightly reduced by 1% while vital capacity was normalized. The procedure did not result in serious symptoms of DCS or

  16. Tensor fascia lata flap versus tensor fascia lata perforator-based island flap for the coverage of extensive trochanteric pressure sores.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youn Hwan; Kim, Sang Wha; Kim, Jeong Tae; Kim, Chang Yeon

    2013-06-01

    Tensor fascia lata (TFL) musculocutaneous flaps often require a donor site graft when harvesting a large flap. However, a major drawback is that it also sacrifices the muscle. To overcome this disadvantage, we designed a TFL perforator-based island flap that was harvested from a site near the defect and involved transposition within 90 degrees without full isolation of the pedicles. We performed procedures on 17 musculocutaneous flaps and 23 perforator-based island flaps, and compared the outcomes of these surgeries. The overall complication rate was 27.5% (11 regions). There were 7 complications related to the musculocutaneous flaps and 4 complications related to the perforator flaps. Although there were no statistical differences between those groups, lower complication rates were associated with procedures involving perforator flaps. The TFL perforator procedure is a simple and fast operation that avoids sacrificing muscle. This decreases complication rates compared to true perforator flap techniques that require dissection around the perforator or pedicle. PMID:23392259

  17. Pressure ulcers: Back to the basics

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Karoon; Chauhan, Neha

    2012-01-01

    Pressure ulcer in an otherwise sick patient is a matter of concern for the care givers as well as the medical personnel. A lot has been done to understand the disease process. So much so that USA and European countries have established advisory panels in their respective continents. Since the establishment of these organizations, the understanding of the pressure ulcer has improved significantly. The authors feel that the well documented and well publicized definition of pressure ulcer is somewhat lacking in the correct description of the disease process. Hence, a modified definition has been presented. This disease is here to stay. In the process of managing these ulcers the basic pathology needs to be understood well. Pressure ischemia is the main reason behind the occurrence of ulceration. Different extrinsic and intrinsic factors have been described in detail with review of literature. There are a large number of risk factors causing ulceration. The risk assessment scales have eluded the surgical literature and mostly remained in nursing books and websites. These scales have been reproduced for completion of the basics on decubitus ulcer. The classification of the pressure sores has been given in a comparative form to elucidate that most of the classifications are the same except for minor variations. The management of these ulcers is ever evolving but the age old saying of “prevention is better than cure” suits this condition the most. PMID:23162223

  18. Ultrafine aerosol size distributions and sulfuric acid vapor pressures: Implications for new particle formation in the atmosphere. Year 2 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, P.H.

    1993-07-01

    This project has two components: (1) measurement of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} vapor pressures in air under temperature/relative humidity conditions similar to atmospheric, and (2) measurement of ultrafine aerosol size distributions. During Year 2, more effort was put on size distribution measurements. 4 figs.

  19. Stability and breakdown of Ca13CO3 melt associated with formation of 13C-diamond in static high pressure experiments up to 43 GPa and 3900 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivak, A. V.; Litvin, Yu. A.; Ovsyannikov, S. V.; Dubrovinskaia, N. A.; Dubrovinsky, L. S.

    2012-07-01

    Melting of calcium carbonate Ca13CO3, stability of the melt and its decomposition were studied in static high pressure experiments at pressures of 11-43 GPa and temperatures of 1600-3900 K using diamond anvil cell technique with laser heating. We observed formation of 13C-graphite (below 16 GPa) and 13C-diamond (between 16 and 43 GPa) on decomposition of the Ca13CO3 melt at temperatures above 3400 K. At temperatures below 3400 K congruent melting of calcium carbonate was confirmed. The experimental results were applied to construction of the phase diagram of CaCO3 up to 43 GPa and 3900 K focusing at the melting curve of calcium carbonate and the decomposition phase boundary of CaCO3 melt.

  20. Boundary pressure of inter-connection of Fe-Ni-S melt in olivine based on in-situ X-ray tomography: Implication to core formation in asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasaki, H.; Urakawa, S.; Uesugi, K.; Nakatsuka, A.; Funakoshi, K.; Ohtani, E.

    2011-12-01

    Interconnectivity of Fe-alloy melt in crystalline silicates is important property for the core formation mechanism in planetary interior. In previous studies, the interconnectivity of Fe-alloy melt has been studied based on textural observation of recovered samples from high pressure and temperature. However, there is no observation under high pressure and temperature. We have developed 80-ton uni-axial press for X-ray computed micro-tomography (X-CT) and performed X-CT measurement under high pressure (Urakawa et al. 2010). Here we report X-CT measurement of Fe-Ni-S melt in crystalline olivine and interconnectivity of the melt up to 3.5 GPa and 1273 K. X-CT measurements were carried out at BL20B2 beamline, SPring-8 synchrotron facility. The sample was powder mixture of Fe-Ni-S and olivine, which was enclosed in graphite capsule. Heating was performed using a cylindrical graphite furnace. Pressure was generated using opposed toroidal-shape WC anvil. The uni-axial press was set on the rotational stage and X-ray radiography image of the sample was collected using CCD camera from 0°to 180°with 0.3° step. 3-D image of the sample was obtained by reconstructing the 2-D radiography image. The 3-D CT image shows that the size of the Fe-Ni-S melt increased significantly compared to that before melting below 2.5 GPa, suggesting that the melt was interconnected in olivine crystals. On the other hand, 3-D texture of the sample at 3.5 GPa did not show difference from that before melting. Therefore, the boundary of inter-connection of Fe-Ni-S melt is likely to locate between 2.5 and 3.5 GPa. This result is important application for the core formation mechanism especially in small bodies, such as differentiated asteroids.

  1. Influence of the oxygen concentration on the formation of crystalline phases of TiO2 during the low-pressure arc-discharge plasma synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakov, A. V.; Karpov, I. V.; Lepeshev, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    The synthesis of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles with different percentage of anatase and rutile phases is investigated. The synthesis is performed by controlling the oxygen percentage in the gas mixture in the plasmachemical evaporation-condensation process employing a low-pressure arc discharge. In all our experiments, the pressure in the plasmachemical reactor and the average size of particles remain constant and are 60 Pa and 6 nm, respectively. The crystal structure of synthesized TiO2 is studied using X-ray diffraction; the morphology of the particles is analyzed employing transmission electron microscopy. Using X-ray phase analysis, it is established that the concentration of the TiO2 anatase phase decreases upon a decrease in the oxygen concentration in the gas mixture. It is shown that the TiO2 anatase phase is more efficient for photocatalytic decomposition of methylene blue than the rutile phase.

  2. Chip-based nanoelectrospray ionization with Fourier transform mass spectrometric detection to screen for local anesthetics intended to mask limb sore in walking horses.

    PubMed

    Szarka, Szabolcs; Prokai, Laszlo

    2015-03-01

    We report a high-throughput chip-based nanoelectrospray ionization method coupled with Fourier transform mass spectrometry to screen for local anesthetics in samples collected by swabbing. These drugs have been used to mask pain on the limbs of walking horses after forbidden practices of soring or physical abuse. Optimized for lidocaine, the method afforded sub-ppm mass accuracy for nine local anesthetics included in the study. From doped cotton swabs, two third and all of the analytes were detected after adding 10 ng and 100 ng of each drug, respectively. Benzocaine and/or lidocaine were found on positive swab samples collected during walking horse competitions. PMID:25800188

  3. Fuel structure and pressure effects on the formation of soot particles in diffusion flames. Annual technical report, 15 January 1988-15 January 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.J.

    1989-02-15

    Studies emphasizing the effects of fuel molecular structure on soot formation processes in laminar-diffusion flames were investigated. Particular attention was given to the particle inception and surface growth processes for a series of fuels. Studies of butane, 1-butene, and 1,3 butadiene have revealed that fuel structure strongly affects the soot-particle-inception process. However, subsequent surface-growth processes are largely determined by the available surface area. Thus, the surface growth process is independent of the fuel molecular structure following the initial particle-inception stage. Studies of the particle-inception region indicate that increased soot formation is strongly correlated with visible-fluorescence measurements attributed to large polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon species in the flame.

  4. High pressure nitriding

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, M.; Hoffmann, F.T.; Mayr, P.; Minarski, P.

    1995-12-31

    The aim of the presented research project is the development of a new high pressure nitriding process, which avoids disadvantages of conventional nitriding processes and allows for new applications. Up to now, a nitriding furnace has been constructed and several investigations have been made in order to characterize the influence of pressure on the nitriding process. In this paper, connections between pressure in the range of 2 to 12 atm and the corresponding nitride layer formation for the steel grades AISI 1045, H11 and a nitriding steel are discussed. Results of the nitride layer formation are presented. For all steel grades, a growth of nitride layers with increasing pressure was obtained. Steels with passive layers, as the warm working steel H11, showed a better nitriding behavior at elevated pressure.

  5. Effect of Intracuff Lidocaine on Postoperative Sore Throat and the Emergence Phenomenon: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Fai; Lin, Yu-Cih; Tsai, Hsiao-Chien; Chen, Ta-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background Postoperative sore throat and other airway morbidities are common and troublesome after endotracheal tube intubation general anesthesia (ETGA). We propose lidocaine as endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff inflation media to reduce the postintubation-related emergence phenomenon. Methods We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases systematically for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that have investigated the outcome of intracuff lidocaine versus air or saline in patients receiving ETGA. Using a random-effects model, we conducted a meta-analysis to assess the relative risks (RRs) and mean difference (MD) of the incidence and intensity of relevant adverse outcomes. Results We reviewed nineteen trials, which comprised 1566 patients. The incidence of early- and late-phase postoperative sore throat (POST), coughing, agitation, hoarseness, and dysphonia decreased significantly in lidocaine groups, with RRs of 0.46 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.31 to 0.68), 0.41 (95% CI: 0.25 to 0.66), 0.43 (95% CI: 0.31 to 0.62), 0.37 (95% CI: 0.25 to 0.55), 0.43 (95% CI: 0.29 to 0.63), and 0.19 (95% CI: 0.08 to 0.5), respectively, when compared with the control groups. The severity of POST also reduced significantly (mean difference [MD] -16.43 mm, 95% CI: -21.48 to -11.38) at 1 h and (MD -10.22 mm, 95% CI: -13.5 to -6.94) at 24 h. Both alkalinized and non-alkalinized lidocaine in the subgroup analyses showed significant benefits in emergence phenomena prevention compared with the control. Conclusion Our results indicate that both alkalinized and non-alkalinized intracuff lidocaine may prevent and alleviate POST and postintubation-related emergence phenomena. PMID:26288276

  6. The effects of a single bout of downhill running and ensuing delayed onset of muscle soreness on running economy performed 48 h later.

    PubMed

    Braun, William A; Dutto, Darren J

    2003-09-01

    Delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS) is a common response to exercise involving significant eccentric loading. Symptoms of DOMS vary widely and may include reduced force generating capacity, significant alterations in biochemical indices of muscle and connective tissue health, alteration of neuromuscular function, and changes in mechanical performance. The purpose of the investigation was to examine the effects of downhill running and ensuing DOMS on running economy and stride mechanics. Nine, well-trained distance runners and triathletes participated in the study. Running economy was measured at three relative intensities [65, 75, and 85% of maximal aerobic capacity ( VO(2peak))] before (RE1) and 48 h after (RE2) a 30-min downhill run (-10%) at 70% VO(2peak). Dependent variables included leg muscle soreness, rate of oxygen consumption ( VO(2)), minute ventilation, respiratory exchange ratio, lactate, heart rate, and stride length. These measurements were entered into a two-factor multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). The analysis revealed a significant time effect for all variables and a significant interaction (time x intensity) for lactate. The energy cost of locomotion was elevated at RE2 by an average of 3.2%. This was coupled with a significant reduction in stride length. The change in VO(2) was inversely correlated with the change in stride length ( r= -0.535). Lactate was significantly elevated at RE2 for each run intensity, with a mean increase of 0.61 mmol l(-1). Based on these findings, it is suggested that muscle damage led to changes in stride mechanics and a greater reliance on anaerobic methods of energy production, contributing to the change in running economy during DOMS. PMID:12783232

  7. A Hyperhemolytic/Hyperpigmented Group B Streptococcus Strain with a CovR Mutation Isolated from an Adolescent Patient with Sore Throat

    PubMed Central

    Gendrin, Claire; Vornhagen, Jay; Frando, Andrew; Harrell, Maria Isabel; McAdams, Ryan; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Group B Streptococci (GBS) are ß-hemolytic, gram-positive bacteria that are typically associated with infections in human newborns or immunocompromised adults. However, mutation in the two-component regulator CovR/S relieves repression of hemolysin, potentially increasing virulence of GBS. We report the isolation of hyperhemolytic/hyperpigmented GBS strain from an adolescent patient who presented to the University of Washington clinic with symptoms of sore throat. While the patient also tested positive for mononucleosis, a GBS strain with increased hemolysis was isolated from the throat swab obtained from the patient. As hyperhemolytic/hyperpigmented GBS strains are typically associated with mutations in the regulator CovR/CovS, we sequenced the covR/S loci in the clinical isolate. An adenine to cytosine mutation resulting in a change in amino acid coding sequence from glutamine at position 120 to proline in CovR (Q120P) was identified. Introduction of the Q120P amino acid substitution in a CovR complementation plasmid abolished complementation of a ΔcovR mutant derived from the wild type GBS serotype Ia strain A909; these results confirm that the hyperhemolysis observed in the clinical isolate is due to the Q120P substitution in CovR. Antibiotic was prescribed and the patient's symptoms resolved without reported complications. This study represents the first report of the isolation of a hyperhemolytic/hyperpigmented GBS strain due to a covR/S mutation from an adolescent patient with persistent sore throat who was also diagnosed with mononucleosis. The isolation of GBS CovR/S mutants indicates their presence in settings of co-infections and includes adolescents. PMID:26913295

  8. Feasibility of observing small differences in friction mean effective pressure between different lubricating oil formations using small, single-cylinder motored engine rig

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rohr, William F.; Nguyen, Ke; Bunting, Bruce G.; Qu, Jun

    2015-09-01

    Here, the feasibility of using a motored single-cylinder 517 cc diesel engine to observe small frictional differences between oil formulations is investigated. Friction mean effective pressure (FMEP) is measured and compared for an SAE 10W-30 and an SAE 5W-20 oil in three stages of production: base oil, commercial oil without a friction and wear reducing additive, and fully formulated commercial oil. In addition, a commercial SAE 5W-30 engine oil is investigated. Friction mean effective pressure is plotted versus oil dynamic viscosity to compare the lubricant FMEP at a given viscosity. Linear regressions and average friction mean effective pressure are usedmore » as a secondary means of comparing FMEP for the various oil formulations. Differences between the oils are observed with the base oil having higher friction at a given viscosity but a lower average FMEP due to the temperature distribution of the test and lower viscosities reached by the base oil. The commercial oil is shown to have both a higher FMEP at a given viscosity and a higher average FMEP than the commercial oil without a friction and wear reducing additive. The increase in friction for the oil without a friction and wear reduction additive indicates that the operational regime of the engine may be out of the bounds of the optimal regime for the additive or that the additive is more optimized for wear reduction. Results show that it is feasible to observe small differences in FMEP between lubricating oil formulations using a small, single-cylinder motored engine.« less

  9. Abundant Molecular Gas and Inefficient Star Formation in Intracluster Regions: Ram Pressure Stripped Tail of the Norma Galaxy ESO137-001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jáchym, Pavel; Combes, Françoise; Cortese, Luca; Sun, Ming; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.

    2014-09-01

    For the first time, we reveal large amounts of cold molecular gas in a ram-pressure-stripped tail, out to a large "intracluster" distance from the galaxy. With the Actama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope, we have detected 12CO(2-1) emission corresponding to more than 109 M ⊙ of H2 in three Hα bright regions along the tail of the Norma cluster galaxy ESO 137-001, out to a projected distance of 40 kpc from the disk. ESO 137-001 has an 80 kpc long and bright X-ray tail associated with a shorter (40 kpc) and broader tail of numerous star forming H II regions. The amount of ~1.5 × 108 M ⊙ of H2 found in the most distant region is similar to molecular masses of tidal dwarf galaxies, though the standard Galactic CO-to-H2 factor could overestimate the H2 content. Along the tail, we find the amount of molecular gas to drop, while masses of the X-ray-emitting and diffuse ionized components stay roughly constant. Moreover, the amounts of hot and cold gas are large and similar, and together nearly account for the missing gas from the disk. We find a very low SFE (τdep > 1010 yr) in the stripped gas in ESO 137-001 and suggest that this is due to a low average gas density in the tail, or turbulent heating of the interstellar medium that is induced by a ram pressure shock. The unprecedented bulk of observed H2 in the ESO 137-001 tail suggests that some stripped gas may survive ram pressure stripping in the molecular phase. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at La Silla Paranal Observatory under program ID 088.B-0934.

  10. Feasibility of observing small differences in friction mean effective pressure between different lubricating oil formations using small, single-cylinder motored engine rig

    SciTech Connect

    Rohr, William F.; Nguyen, Ke; Bunting, Bruce G.; Qu, Jun

    2015-09-01

    Here, the feasibility of using a motored single-cylinder 517 cc diesel engine to observe small frictional differences between oil formulations is investigated. Friction mean effective pressure (FMEP) is measured and compared for an SAE 10W-30 and an SAE 5W-20 oil in three stages of production: base oil, commercial oil without a friction and wear reducing additive, and fully formulated commercial oil. In addition, a commercial SAE 5W-30 engine oil is investigated. Friction mean effective pressure is plotted versus oil dynamic viscosity to compare the lubricant FMEP at a given viscosity. Linear regressions and average friction mean effective pressure are used as a secondary means of comparing FMEP for the various oil formulations. Differences between the oils are observed with the base oil having higher friction at a given viscosity but a lower average FMEP due to the temperature distribution of the test and lower viscosities reached by the base oil. The commercial oil is shown to have both a higher FMEP at a given viscosity and a higher average FMEP than the commercial oil without a friction and wear reducing additive. The increase in friction for the oil without a friction and wear reduction additive indicates that the operational regime of the engine may be out of the bounds of the optimal regime for the additive or that the additive is more optimized for wear reduction. Results show that it is feasible to observe small differences in FMEP between lubricating oil formulations using a small, single-cylinder motored engine.

  11. X-ray-induced dissociation of H.sub.2O and formation of an O.sub.2-H.sub.2 alloy at high pressure

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Ho-kwang; Mao, Wendy L.

    2011-11-29

    A novel molecular alloy of O.sub.2 and H.sub.2 and a method of producing such a molecular alloy are provided. When subjected to high pressure and extensive x-radiation, H.sub.2O molecules cleaved, forming O--O and H--H bonds. In the method of the present invention, the O and H framework in ice VII was converted into a molecular alloy of O.sub.2 and H.sub.2. X-ray diffraction, x-ray Raman scattering, and optical Raman spectroscopy demonstrate that this crystalline solid differs from previously known phases.

  12. Effect of continuous cuff pressure regulator in general anaesthesia with laryngeal mask airway.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Y-S; Choi, J-W; Jung, H-S; Kim, Y-S; Kim, D-W; Kim, J-H; Lee, J-A

    2011-01-01

    Postoperative pharyngolaryngeal complications (PPLC) occur during anaesthesia due to increased cuff pressure following the insertion of laryngeal mask airways. The use of a pressure regulator to prevent PPLC was evaluated in a prospective, randomized study. Sixty patients scheduled to receive general anaesthesia were randomly assigned to two equal groups of 30, either with or without the regulator. The 'just seal' cuff pressure (JSCP), cuff pressure at 5-min intervals during anaesthesia, incidence of pharyngeal sore throat (PST), dysphagia, dysphonia and other complications were evaluated at 1 and 24 h postoperatively. The combined mean ± SD JSCP of both groups was 20.3 ± 3.2 mmHg. In the group with the regulator, cuff pressure was maintained at a constant level during anaesthesia. This study demonstrated that the regulator is a simple, functional device that can reduce the incidence of PST significantly at 1 h postoperatively, following general anaesthesia. PMID:22117992

  13. Raman scattering studies of pressure-induced phase transitions in perovskite formates [(CH3)2NH2][Mg(HCOO)3] and [(CH3)2NH2][Cd(HCOO)3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mączka, M.; Almeida da Silva, T.; Paraguassu, W.; Pereira da Silva, K.

    2016-03-01

    Pressure-dependent Raman studies were preformed on two dimethylammonium metal formates, [(CH3)2NH2][Mg(HCOO)3] (DMMg) and [(CH3)2NH2][Cd(HCOO)3] (DMCd). They revealed three pressure-induced transitions in the DMMg near 2.2, 4.0 and 5.6 GPa. These transitions are associated with significant distortion of the anionic framework and the phase transition at 5.6 GPa has also great impact on the DMA+ cation. The DMCd undergoes two pressure-induced phase transitions. The first transition occurred between 1.2 and 2.0 GPa and the second one near 3.6 GPa. The first transition leads to subtle structural changes associated with distortion of anionic framework and the later leads to significant distortion of the framework. In contrast to the DMMg, the third transition associated with distortion of DMA+ cation is not observed for the DMCd up to 7.8 GPa. This difference can be most likely associated with larger volume of the cavity occupied by DMA+ cation in the DMCd and thus weaker interactions between anionic framework and DMA+ cations.

  14. In situ study of mass transfer in aqueous solutions under high pressures via Raman spectroscopy: A new method for the determination of diffusion coefficients of methane in water near hydrate formation conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, W.J.; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.; Yang, M.Z.

    2006-01-01

    A new method was developed for in situ study of the diffusive transfer of methane in aqueous solution under high pressures near hydrate formation conditions within an optical capillary cell. Time-dependent Raman spectra of the solution at several different spots along the one-dimensional diffusion path were collected and thus the varying composition profile of the solution was monitored. Diffusion coefficients were estimated by the least squares method based on the variations in methane concentration data in space and time in the cell. The measured diffusion coefficients of methane in water at the liquid (L)-vapor (V) stable region and L-V metastable region are close to previously reported values determined at lower pressure and similar temperature. This in situ monitoring method was demonstrated to be suitable for the study of mass transfer in aqueous solution under high pressure and at various temperature conditions and will be applied to the study of nucleation and dissolution kinetics of methane hydrate in a hydrate-water system where the interaction of methane and water would be more complicated than that presented here for the L-V metastable condition. ?? 2006 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.

  15. Stability and breakdown of Ca{sup 13}CO{sub 3} melt associated with formation of {sup 13}C-diamond in static high pressure experiments up to 43 GPa and 3900 K

    SciTech Connect

    Spivak, A.V.; Litvin, Yu.A.; Ovsyannikov, S.V.; Dubrovinskaia, N.A.; Dubrovinsky, L.S.

    2012-07-15

    Melting of calcium carbonate Ca{sup 13}CO{sub 3}, stability of the melt and its decomposition were studied in static high pressure experiments at pressures of 11-43 GPa and temperatures of 1600-3900 K using diamond anvil cell technique with laser heating. We observed formation of {sup 13}C-graphite (below 16 GPa) and {sup 13}C-diamond (between 16 and 43 GPa) on decomposition of the Ca{sup 13}CO{sub 3} melt at temperatures above 3400 K. At temperatures below 3400 K congruent melting of calcium carbonate was confirmed. The experimental results were applied to construction of the phase diagram of CaCO{sub 3} up to 43 GPa and 3900 K focusing at the melting curve of calcium carbonate and the decomposition phase boundary of CaCO{sub 3} melt. - Graphical abstract: Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase states of CaCO{sub 3} were studied at P=11-43 GPa and T=1600-3900 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {sup 13}C-diamond easily crystallizes in carbonate-carbon (Ca{sup 13}CO{sub 3-}{sup 13}C-graphite) melt-solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ca-carbonate melts congruently that was observed in experiments in DAC with laser heating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decomposition of CaCO{sub 3} melt, indicated by formation of graphite and/or diamond. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decomposition of CaCO{sub 3} was observed at temperatures above 3400 K in the pressure interval studied.

  16. Partial molar volume, surface area, and hydration changes for equilibrium unfolding and formation of aggregation transition state: High-pressure and cosolute studies on recombinant human IFN-γ

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Jonathan N.; Webb, Serena D.; Cleland, Jeffrey L.; Carpenter, John F.; Randolph, Theodore W.

    2001-01-01

    The equilibrium dissociation of recombinant human IFN-γ was monitored as a function of pressure and sucrose concentration. The partial molar volume change for dissociation was −209 ± 13 ml/mol of dimer. The specific molar surface area change for dissociation was 12.7 ± 1.6 nm2/molecule of dimer. The first-order aggregation rate of recombinant human IFN-γ in 0.45 M guanidine hydrochloride was studied as a function of sucrose concentration and pressure. Aggregation proceeded through a transition-state species, N*. Sucrose reduced aggregation rate by shifting the equilibrium between native state (N) and N* toward the more compact N. Pressure increased aggregation rate through increased solvation of the protein, which exposes more surface area, thus shifting the equilibrium away from N toward N*. The changes in partial molar volume and specific molar surface area between the N* and N were −41 ± 9 ml/mol of dimer and 3.5 ± 0.2 nm2/molecule, respectively. Thus, the structural change required for the formation of the transition state for aggregation is small relative to the difference between N and the dissociated state. Changes in waters of hydration were estimated from both specific molar surface area and partial molar volume data. From partial molar volume data, estimates were 25 and 128 mol H2O/mol dimer for formation of the aggregation transition state and for dissociation, respectively. From surface area data, estimates were 27 and 98 mol H2O/mol dimer. Osmotic stress theory yielded values ≈4-fold larger for both transitions. PMID:11381145

  17. The Effect of Air Preheat at Atmospheric Pressure on the Formation of NO(x) in the Quick-Mix Sections of an Axially Staged Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vardakas, M. A.; Leong, M. Y.; Brouwer, J.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    The Rich-burn/Quick-mix/Lean-burn (RQL) combustor concept has been proposed to minimize the formation of nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) in gas turbine systems. The success of this combustor strategy is dependent upon the efficiency of the mixing section bridging the fuel-rich and fuel-lean stages. Note that although these results were obtained from an experiment designed to study an RQL mixer, the link between mixing and NOx signatures is considerably broader than this application, in that the need to understand this link exists in most advanced combustors. The experiment reported herein was designed to study the effects of inlet air temperature on NO(x) formation in a mixing section. The results indicate that NO(x) emission is increased for all preheated cases compared to non-preheated cases. When comparing the various mixing modules, the affect of jet penetration is important, as this determines where NO(x) concentrations peak, and affects overall NO(x) production. Although jet air comprises 70 percent of the total airflow, the impact that jet air preheat has on overall NO(x) emissions is small compared to preheating both main and jet air flow.

  18. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lee Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-14

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  19. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lee; Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  20. Micro-pattern formation of extracellular matrix (ECM) layers by atmospheric-pressure plasmas and cell culture on the patterned ECMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Ayumi; Asano, Toshifumi; Urisu, Tsuneo; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2011-12-01

    A new patterning technique for the extracellular matrix (ECM) deposited on a Si substrate was developed with the use of a low-frequency atmospheric-pressure plasma and a metal stencil mask. The development of such a patterning technique for cell arrangement is a crucial step for the development of future cell chips. In this study, optimal process conditions for ECM patterning over the size of a typical single chip (about 1 cm2) were achieved and the obtained ECM patterns were directly observed by fluorescence labelling. It was also demonstrated that HEK293 cells (human embryo kidney cells) attach to and proliferate on the ECM layer patterned by this technique, arranging themselves on the Si substrate in the mask pattern.

  1. Porewater pressure control on subglacial soft sediment remobilization and tunnel valley formation: A case study from the Alnif tunnel valley (Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravier, Edouard; Buoncristiani, Jean-François; Guiraud, Michel; Menzies, John; Clerc, Sylvain; Goupy, Bastien; Portier, Eric

    2014-05-01

    In the eastern part of the Moroccan Anti-Atlas Mountains, the Alnif area exposes a buried Ordovician glacial tunnel valley (5 km wide, 180 m deep) cut into preglacial marine sediments. The preglacial sedimentary sequence, deposited in a marine environment, is characterized by a typical "layer-cake" configuration of permeable (sand) and impermeable (clays and early-cemented sandstones) layers. At the base of the tunnel valley, a discontinuous and fan-shaped glacial conglomeratic unit 10 to 15 m thick occurs, erosively deposited over preglacial marine sediments. The conglomeratic unit is composed of preglacial intraclasts embedded within a sandy matrix. Both preglacial and glacial sediments display soft-sediment deformation structures related to fluctuating porewater pressure and strain rates, including ball structures, clastic dykes, fluted surfaces, turbate structures, folds and radial extensional normal faults. Kinematics and relative chronology of these deformation structures allow the role of porewater pressure in the process of tunnel valley genesis on soft beds to be understood. The tunnel valley formed through multi-phased episodes of intense hydrofracturing of the preglacial bed due to overpressure development promoted by ice sheet growth over the study area, and configuration of the substratum. Transport of the resulting conglomerate composed of preglacial intraclasts and fluidized sand occurred through subglacial pipes. The brecciated material is deposited in subglacial cavities, forming fans of massive sandy conglomerate infilling the base of the tunnel valley. The conglomeratic unit is partially reworked by meltwater and exhibits intense soft-sediment deformations, due to episodes of ice-bed coupling and decoupling.

  2. Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) Purpose A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers* Setting Canadian Prevalence,% (95% CI) Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n) Acute care 25 (23.8–26.3) 23.9–29.7 (3418) Nonacute care† 30 (29.3–31.4) 30.0–53.3 (1165) Community care 15 (13.4–16.8) 13.2 (91) Mixed health care‡ 22 (20.9

  3. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body’s organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart ...

  4. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body’s organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both ...

  5. Reactions of NO2 with BaO/Pt(111) Model Catalysts: The Effects of BaO Film Thickness and NO2 Pressure on the Formation of Ba(NOx)2 Species

    SciTech Connect

    Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Yi, Cheol-Woo; Szanyi, Janos

    2011-05-31

    The adsorption and reaction of NO2 on BaO (<1, ~3, and >20 monolayer equivalent (MLE))/Pt(111) model systems were studied with temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) as well as elevated pressure conditions. NO2 reacts with sub-monolayer BaO (<1 MLE) to form nitrites only, whereas the reaction of NO2 with BaO (~3 MLE)/Pt(111) produces mainly nitrites and a small amount of nitrates under UHV conditions (PNO2 ~ 1.0 × 10-9 Torr) at 300 K. In contrast, a thick BaO(>20 MLE) layer on Pt(111) reacts with NO2 to form nitrite-nitrate ion pairs under the same conditions. At elevated NO2 pressures (≥ 1.0 × 10-5 Torr), however, BaO layers at all these three coverages convert to amorphous barium nitrates at 300 K. Upon annealing to 500 K, these amorphous barium nitrate layers transform into crystalline phases. The thermal decomposition of the thus-formed Ba(NOx)2 species is also influenced by the coverage of BaO on the Pt(111) substrate: at low BaO coverages, these species decompose at significantly lower temperatures in comparison with those formed on thick BaO films due to the presence of Ba(NOx)2/Pt interface where the decomposition can proceed at lower temperatures. However, the thermal decomposition of the thick Ba(NO3)2 films follows that of bulk nitrates. Results obtained from these BaO/Pt(111) model systems under UHV and elevated pressure conditions clearly demonstrate that both the BaO film thickness and the applied NO2 pressure are critical in the Ba(NOx)2 formation and subsequent thermal decomposition processes.

  6. Aerosol Formation from High-Pressure Sprays for Supporting the Safety Analysis for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - 13183

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Mahoney, L.A.; Schonewill, P.P.; Bontha, J.R.; Blanchard, J.; Kurath, D.E.; Daniel, R.C.; Song, C.

    2013-07-01

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford is being designed and built to pretreat and vitrify waste currently stored in underground tanks at Hanford. One of the postulated events in the hazard analysis for the WTP is a breach in process piping that produces a pressurized spray with small droplets that can be transported into ventilation systems. Literature correlations are currently used for estimating the generation rate and size distribution of aerosol droplets in postulated releases. These correlations, however, are based on results obtained from small engineered nozzles using Newtonian liquids that do not contain slurry particles and thus do not represent the fluids and breaches in the WTP. A test program was developed to measure the generation rate, and the release fraction which is the ratio of generation rate to spray flow rate, of droplets suspended in a test chamber and droplet size distribution from prototypic sprays. A novel test method was developed to allow measurement of sprays from small to large breaches and also includes the effect of aerosol generation from splatter when the spray impacts on walls. Results show that the release fraction decreases with increasing orifice area, though with a weaker dependence on orifice area than the currently-used correlation. A comparison of water sprays to slurry sprays with 8 to 20 wt% gibbsite or boehmite particles shows that the presence of slurry particles depresses the release fraction compared to water for droplets above 10 μm and increases the release fraction below this droplet size. (authors)

  7. Formation and emission characteristics of CN molecules in laser induced low pressure He plasma and its applications to N analysis in coal and fossilization study.

    PubMed

    Lahna, Kurnia; Idroes, Rinaldi; Idris, Nasrullah; Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Tjia, May On; Pardede, Marincan; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2016-03-01

    Presented in this paper are the results of an experimental study on the laser induced plasma emission of a number of CN free samples (urea, sucrose) with 40 mJ pulse energy using He and N₂ ambient gases. It is shown that the CN emission has its exclusive sources in the molecules produced as the result of chemical bonding either between the ablated C and N ions in the He plasma or between the ablated C and dissociated N from the N₂ ambient gas. The emission intensities in both cases are found to have the highest values at the low gas pressure of 2 kPa. The emission in He gas is shown to exhibit the typical characteristics related to a shockwave generated excitation mechanism. The experiments using He ambient gas further demonstrate the feasible laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy application to quantitative and sensitive N analysis of coal and promising application for practical in situ carbon dating of fossils. PMID:26974637

  8. Mechanisms of scale formation and carbon dioxide partial pressure influence. Part I. Elaboration of an experimental method and a scaling model.

    PubMed

    Gal, Jean-Yves; Fovet, Yannick; Gache, Nathalie

    2002-02-01

    Scale formation in industrial or domestic installations is still an important economic problem. The existence of a metastable domain for calcium carbonate supersaturated solutions and its breakdown are observed under conditions rarely well defined. In most cases it is the pH rise caused by the carbon dioxide loss that involves calcium carbonate precipitation. Before studying this problem, we suggest in this first part, a new model for the evolution of the calcocarbonic system that takes into account the hydrated forms of CaCO3: CaCO3 amorphous, CaCO3 x 6H2O (ikaite) and CaCO3 x H2O (monohydrate). According to this model, the precipitation of any one of these hydrated forms could be responsible for the breakdown of the metastable state. After this first step, the solids evolve into dehydrated forms. At first, the metastable domain spread of the calcium carbonate supersaturated solutions was studied by the elaboration of computer programs in which the formation of CaCO3(0)(aq) ion pairs was taken into account. These ion pairs are supposed to evolve through dehydration to form the various calcium carbonate solid form precursors. This thermodynamic study was then compared to the experimental methods of the critical pH. Here the pH rise was caused by adding sodium hydroxide under different conditions for sodium hydroxide addition speed, agitation mode and ageing of solutions. For the highest speed of sodium hydroxide addition, the CaCO3 ionic product reached the value of the amorphous calcium carbonate solubility product, and the reaction of the amorphous calcium carbonate precipitation was of the homogenous type. Decreasing the reagent's addition speed caused an extension of the titration time. Then, the breakdown of the metastable state was obtained with the CaCO3 x H2O heterogeneous precipitation. This clearly illustrates the probable ageing of the precursors of the solid states that are considered in this model. PMID:11827336

  9. Comet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, J.

    2014-07-01

    There has been vast progress in our understanding of planetesimal formation over the past decades, owing to a number of laboratory experiments as well as to refined models of dust and ice agglomeration in protoplanetary disks. Coagulation rapidly forms cm-sized ''pebbles'' by direct sticking in collisions at low velocities (Güttler et al. 2010; Zsom et al. 2010). For the further growth, two model approaches are currently being discussed: (1) Local concentration of pebbles in nebular instabilities until gravitational instability occurs (Johansen et al. 2007). (2) A competition between fragmentation and mass transfer in collisions among the dusty bodies, in which a few ''lucky winners'' make it to planetesimal sizes (Windmark et al. 2012a,b; Garaud et al. 2013). Predictions of the physical properties of the resulting bodies in both models allow a distinction of the two formation scenarios of planetesimals. In particular, the tensile strength (i.e, the inner cohesion) of the planetesimals differ widely between the two models (Skorov & Blum 2012; Blum et al. 2014). While model (1) predicts tensile strengths on the order of ˜ 1 Pa, model (2) results in rather compactified dusty bodies with tensile strengths in the kPa regime. If comets are km-sized survivors of the planetesimal-formation era, they should in principle hold the secret of their formation process. Water ice is the prime volatile responsible for the activity of comets. Thermophysical models of the heat and mass transport close to the comet-nucleus surface predict water-ice sublimation temperatures that relate to maximum sublimation pressures well below the kPa regime predicted for formation scenario (2). Model (1), however, is in agreement with the observed dust and gas activity of comets. Thus, a formation scenario for cometesimals involving gravitational instability is favored (Blum et al. 2014).

  10. Experimental device for chemical osmosis measurement on natural clay-rock samples maintained at in situ conditions: implications for formation pressure interpretations.

    PubMed

    Rousseau-Gueutin, Pauline; de Greef, Vincent; Gonçalvès, Julio; Violette, Sophie; Chanchole, Serge

    2009-09-01

    In order to characterize the so-called coupled processes occurring in compacted clay rocks, the coupling coefficients must be identified. For this purpose, an original device which allows such measurement for undisturbed (natural) samples in their in situ conditions was developed. The present experimental device minimizes the fluid leaks improving the accuracy of the coupling parameter determination. Three chemical osmotic tests were performed on a cylindrical sample of Callovo-Oxfordian argilite. Room temperature variations during the chemical osmosis experiments required the implementation of temperature effects in the numerical model used for the interpretations. These variations offered the opportunity of an alternative method to estimate the compressibility of the fluid in the circuit connected to a measurement chamber located in the center of the sample. An osmotic efficiency of almost 0.2 for a concentration of 0.094 mol L(-1) is obtained for the Callovo-Oxfordian argilite. This value would explain only some part (approximately 0.10-0.15 MPa) of the overpressures (0.5-0.6 MPa) relative to the surrounding reservoirs measured in this formation. Others processes, such as thermo-osmosis, hydrodynamic boundary condition changes due to climate variations or creep behavior of the shale, could explain the remainder of the overpressures. PMID:19527907

  11. Time-dependent effects of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure argon plasma on epithelial cell attachment, viability and tight junction formation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoentsch, Maxi; von Woedtke, Thomas; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Nebe, J. Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The application of physical plasma to living tissues is expected to promote wound healing by plasma disinfection and stimulation of tissue regeneration. However, the effects of plasma on healthy cells must be studied and understood. In our experiments we used an argon plasma jet (kINPen®09) to gain insights into time-dependent plasma effects on cell attachment, viability and tight junction formation in vitro. Murine epithelial cells mHepR1 were suspended in complete cell culture medium and were irradiated with argon plasma (direct approach) for 30, 60 and 120 s. Suspecting that physical plasma may exert its effect via the medium, cell culture medium alone was first treated with argon plasma (indirect approach) and immediately afterwards, cells were added and also cultured for 24 h. Cell morphology and vitality were verified using light microscopy and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Already after 30 s of treatment the mHepR1 cells lost their capability to adhere and the cell vitality decreased with increasing treatment time. Interestingly, the same inhibitory effect was observed in the indirect approach. Furthermore, the argon plasma-treated culture medium-induced large openings of the cell's tight junctions, were verified by the zonula occludens protein ZO-1, which we observed for the first time in confluently grown epithelial cells.

  12. Low pressure UV/H2O2 treatment for the degradation of the pesticides metaldehyde, clopyralid and mecoprop - Kinetics and reaction product formation.

    PubMed

    Semitsoglou-Tsiapou, Sofia; Templeton, Michael R; Graham, Nigel J D; Hernández Leal, Lucía; Martijn, Bram J; Royce, Alan; Kruithof, Joop C

    2016-03-15

    The degradation kinetics of three pesticides - metaldehyde, clopyralid and mecoprop - by ultraviolet photolysis and hydroxyl radical oxidation by low pressure ultraviolet hydrogen peroxide (LP-UV/H2O2) advanced oxidation was determined. Mecoprop was susceptible to both LP-UV photolysis and hydroxyl radical oxidation, and exhibited the fastest degradation kinetics, achieving 99.6% (2.4-log) degradation with a UV fluence of 800 mJ/cm(2) and 5 mg/L hydrogen peroxide. Metaldehyde was poorly degraded by LP-UV photolysis while 97.7% (1.6-log) degradation was achieved with LP-UV/H2O2 treatment at the maximum tested UV fluence of 1000 mJ/cm(2) and 15 mg/L hydrogen peroxide. Clopyralid was hardly susceptible to LP-UV photolysis and exhibited the lowest degradation by LP-UV/H2O2 among the three pesticides. The second-order reaction rate constants for the reactions between the pesticides and OH-radicals were calculated applying a kinetic model for LP-UV/H2O2 treatment to be 3.6 × 10(8), 2.0 × 10(8) and 1.1 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for metaldehyde, clopyralid and mecoprop, respectively. The main LP-UV photolysis reaction product from mecoprop was 2-(4-hydroxy-2-methylphenoxy) propanoic acid, while photo-oxidation by LP-UV/H2O2 treatment formed several oxidation products. The photo-oxidation of clopyralid involved either hydroxylation or dechlorination of the ring, while metaldehyde underwent hydroxylation and produced acetic acid as a major end product. Based on the findings, degradation pathways for the three pesticides by LP-UV/H2O2 treatment were proposed. PMID:26803264

  13. Numerical analysis of the effect of acetylene and benzene addition to low-pressure benzene-rich flat flames on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kunioshi, Nilson; Komori, Seisaku; Fukutani, Seishiro

    2006-10-15

    A modification of the CHEMKIN II package has been proposed for modeling addition of an arbitrary species at an arbitrary temperature to an arbitrary distance from the burner along a flat flame. The modified program was applied to the problem of addition of acetylene or benzene to different positions of a 40-Torr, {phi}=2.4 benzene/O{sub 2}/40%-N{sub 2} premixed flame to reach final equivalence ratios of {phi}=2.5 and 2.681. The results obtained showed that acetylene addition to early positions of the flame led to significant increase in pyrene production rates, but pyrene concentrations were lower in the flames with acetylene addition in both the {phi}=2.5 and 2.681 cases. Addition of benzene to the flame did not alter pyrene production rates in either the {phi}=2.5 or 2.681 cases; however, for {phi}=2.5, pyrene concentrations increased with benzene addition, while for {phi}=2.681, pyrene contents decreased in comparison to the correspondent flames with no addition. Acetylene addition led to a significant increase in pyrene production rates, but the pyrene levels dropped due to increase in the flow velocity. Pyrene production rates were not sensitive to benzene addition, but pyrene contents increased with benzene addition when the flow velocity decreased. These results show that PAH concentration changes accompanying species addition to flames should be interpreted carefully, because an increase or decrease in the content of a PAH species does not necessarily reflect an effect on its formation rate or mechanism. (author)

  14. The effect of pressure on sulphur speciation in mid- to deep-crustal arc magmas and implications for the formation of porphyry copper deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matjuschkin, Vladimir; Blundy, Jon D.; Brooker, Richard A.

    2016-07-01

    Piston cylinder experiments are used to investigate the effect of oxygen fugacity (ƒO2) on sulphur speciation and phase relations in arc magmas at 0.5-1.5 GPa and 840-950 °C. The experimental starting composition is a synthetic trachyandesite containing 6.0 wt% H2O, 2880 ppm S, 1500 ppm Cl and 3800 ppm C. Redox conditions ranging from 1.7 log units below the Ni-NiO buffer (NNO - 1.7) to NNO + 4.7 were imposed by solid-state buffers: Co-CoO, Ni-NiO, Re-ReO2 and haematite-magnetite. All experiments are saturated with a COH fluid. Experiments produced crystal-bearing trachydacitic melts (SiO2 from 60 to 69 wt%) for which major and volatile element concentrations were measured. Experimental results demonstrate a powerful effect of oxidation state on phase relations. For example, plagioclase was stable above NNO, but absent at more reduced conditions. Suppression of plagioclase stability produces higher Al2O3 and CaO melts. The solid sulphur-bearing phases and sulphur speciation in the melt are strong functions of ƒO2, as expected, but also of pressure. At 0.5 GPa, the anhydrite stability field is intersected at NNO ≥ +2, but at 1.0 and 1.5 GPa, experiments at the same ƒO2 produce sulphides and the stability field of sulphate moves towards higher ƒO2 by ~1 log unit at 1.0 GPa and ~1.5 log units at 1.5 GPa. As a result, models that appeal to high oxidation state as an important control on the mobility of Cu (and other chalcophiles) during crustal differentiation must also consider the enhanced stability of sulphide in deep- to mid-crustal cumulates even for relatively oxidized (NNO + 2) magmas. Experimental glasses reproduce the commonly observed minimum in sulphur solubility between the S2- and S6+ stability fields. The solubility minimum is not related to the Fe content (Fe2+/Fe3+ or total) of the melt. Instead, we propose this minimum results from an unidentified, but relatively insoluble, S-species of intermediate oxidation state.

  15. Powder formation in SiH{sub 4}-H{sub 2} discharge in large area capacitively coupled reactors: A study of the combined effect of interelectrode distance and pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Strahm, B.; Hollenstein, Ch.

    2010-01-15

    One of the main challenges for silicon thin film deposition for solar cell applications is to achieve high rate deposition in order to reduce the manufacturing costs. However, when silane and hydrogen are used as precursor gas in parallel plate plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, high rate deposition is generally synonymous of powdery discharge. In this work, time- and space-resolved light scattering experiments are presented. These were performed in an industrial-type large area reactor with a variable interelectrode distance. Results show that with a standard 25 mm interelectrode distance, the fraction of silane transformed into powder can be as high as 50% and that reducing the interelectrode distance shifts to higher pressure the appearance of powder in the discharge. From a standard 25 mm interelectrode distance to a 10 mm narrow gap reactor, the threshold pressure was increased from 2 to 7 mbars. More generally, it is proposed that the onset of powder formation depends mainly on the product of the interelectrode distance and the gas residence time in the discharge.

  16. GLOBAL STAR FORMATION REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, Joseph; Norman, Colin E-mail: norman@stsci.edu

    2009-07-20

    A general treatment of disk star formation is developed from a dissipative multiphase model, with the dominant dissipation due to cloud collisions. The Schmidt-Kennicutt (SK) law emerges naturally for star-forming disks and starbursts. We predict that there should be an inverse correlation between Tully-Fisher law and SK law residuals. The model is extended to include a multiphase treatment of supernova feedback that leads to a turbulent pressure-regulated generalization of the star formation law and is applicable to gas-rich starbursts. Enhanced pressure, as expected in merger-induced star formation, enhances star formation efficiency. An upper limit is derived for the disk star formation rate in starbursts that depends on the ratio of global ISM to cloud pressures. We extend these considerations to the case where the interstellar gas pressure in the inner galaxy is dominated by outflows from a central active galactic nucleus (AGN). During massive spheroid formation, AGN-driven winds trigger star formation, resulting in enhanced supernova feedback and outflows. The outflows are comparable to the AGN-boosted star formation rate and saturate in the super-Eddington limit. Downsizing of both SMBH and spheroids is a consequence of AGN-driven positive feedback. Bondi accretion feeds the central black hole with a specific accretion rate that is proportional to the black hole mass. AGN-enhanced star formation is mediated by turbulent pressure and relates spheroid star formation rate to black hole accretion rate. The relation between black hole mass and spheroid velocity dispersion has a coefficient (Salpeter time to gas consumption time ratio) that provides an arrow of time. Highly efficient, AGN-boosted star formation can occur at high redshift.

  17. The p in p-T is for pressure: Movement of the gas hydrate stability field during glacial sealevel lowering and its possible link to pockmark formation on the Chatham Rise, New Zealand (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecher, I. A.; Davy, B. W.; Wood, R.; Carter, L.; Gohl, K.

    2010-12-01

    The discussion on a possible destabilization of gas hydrates caused by climate fluctuations has in recent years focused on the role of a sub-seafloor temperature increase following bottom-water warming. We here revisit the scenario that a pressure drop during glacial sealevel lowering could lead to gas hydrate dissociation. A >20,000 km2 field of seafloor depressions that we interpret as pockmarks has been identified on the southern flanks of the Chatham Rise. Three classes of pockmarks are present in two distinct water-depth ranges. The shallowest class of pockmarks with a diameter of ~150 m are present in a water-depth range of 500-700 m, close to the current top of the gas hydrate stability field. Sub-bottom profiler data show evidence for a bottom simulating reflection making it likely that gas hydrates are present beneath the seafloor. Furthermore, buried pockmarks are identified on horizons that we correlate with sealevel lowstands suggesting that pockmark formation is linked to sealevel lowering. Assuming constant bottom-water temperatures, a glacial sealevel drop by 120 m would move much of the seafloor that is covered with these pockmarks out of the gas hydrate stability field. We therefore suggest these pockmarks were formed by gas from dissociating gas hydrate due to depressurization following sealevel lowering. Two larger classes of pockmarks with diameters of 1-5 and ~10 km, respectively, are present in water depths of 800-1100 m. Here, the seafloor has probably remained within the gas hydrate stability field during sealevel lowstands. However, the associated pressure drop has moved the base of gas hydrate stability upwards by ~30 m. It is unclear whether bottom-water temperatures have changed significantly in our study area during glacial cycles - changes of 1-3° C would be required to have a similar effect on gas hydrate stability as sealevel fluctuations. The boundary between warmer subtropical and cold subantarctic waters, the subtropical front

  18. Use of ammonium formate in QuEChERS for high-throughput analysis of pesticides in food by fast, low-pressure gas chromatography and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    González-Curbelo, Miguel Ángel; Lehotay, Steven J; Hernández-Borges, Javier; Rodríguez-Delgado, Miguel Ángel

    2014-09-01

    The "quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe" (QuEChERS) approach to sample preparation is widely applied in pesticide residue analysis, but the use of magnesium sulfate and other nonvolatile compounds for salting out in the method is not ideal for mass spectrometry. In this study, we developed and evaluated three new different versions of the QuEChERS method using more volatile salts (ammonium chloride and ammonium formate and acetate buffers) to induce phase separation and extraction of 43 representative pesticide analytes of different classes. Fast low-pressure gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LPGC-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography (LC)-MS/MS were used for analysis. The QuEChERS AOAC Official Method 2007.01 was also tested for comparison purposes. Of the studied methods, formate buffering using 7.5g of ammonium formate and 15mL of 5% (v/v) formic acid in acetonitrile for the extraction of 15g of sample (5g for wheat grain) provided the best performance and practical considerations. Method validation was carried out with and without the use of dispersive solid-phase extraction for cleanup, and no significant differences were observed for the majority of pesticides. The method was demonstrated in quantitative analysis for GC- and LC-amenable pesticides in 4 representative food matrices (apple, lemon, lettuce, and wheat grain). With the typical exceptions of certain pH-dependent and labile pesticides, 90-110% recoveries and <10% RSD were obtained. Detection limits were mostly <5ng/g, which met the general need to determine pesticide concentrations as low as 10ng/g for monitoring purposes in food applications. PMID:25047819

  19. A randomised trial comparing the efficacy and safety of topical ketoprofen in Transfersome(®) gel (IDEA-033) with oral ketoprofen and drug-free ultra-deformable Sequessome™ vesicles (TDT 064) for the treatment of muscle soreness following exercise.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Egbert J; Rother, Matthias; Regenspurger, Katja; Rother, Ilka

    2016-01-01

    We compared the effectiveness of topical ketoprofen in Transfersome(®) gel (IDEA-033) with oral ketoprofen and drug-free Sequessome™ vesicles (FLEXISEQ(®) Sport; TDT 064) in reducing calf muscle soreness. One hundred and sixty eight healthy individuals with a pain score ≥ 3 (10-point scale) 12-16 h post-exercise (walking down stairs with an altitude of 300-400 m) were randomised to receive IDEA-033 plus oral placebo (two dose groups), oral ketoprofen plus TDT 064, or TDT 064 plus oral placebo. The primary endpoint was muscle soreness reduction from pre-dosing to Day 7. Higher pain scores were recorded with oral ketoprofen plus TDT 064 (mean ± s 462.4 ± 160.4) versus IDEA-033 plus oral placebo (434.7 ± 190.8; P = 0.2931) or TDT 064 plus oral placebo (376.2 ± 159.1; P = 0.0240) in the 7 days post-exercise. Recovery from muscle soreness was longer with oral ketoprofen plus TDT 064 (mean 91.0 ± 19.5 h) versus IDEA-033 plus placebo (mean 81.4 ± 22.9 h; P = 0.5964) or TDT 064 plus placebo (mean 78.9 ± 22.8 h; P = 0.0262). In conclusion, ultradeformable phospholipid vesicles ± ketoprofen did not retard recovery from muscle soreness. TDT 064 improves osteoarthritis-related pain and could be of interest as a treatment for joint pain during and post-exercise. PMID:25893979

  20. Comparison of illumigene Group A Streptococcus Assay with Culture of Throat Swabs from Children with Sore Throats in the New Zealand School-Based Rheumatic Fever Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Upton, Arlo; Bissessor, Liselle; Farrell, Elizabeth; Shulman, Stanford T; Zheng, Xiaotian; Lennon, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Group A streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis is a particularly important condition in areas of New Zealand where the incidence of acute rheumatic fever remains unacceptably high. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of GAS pharyngitis are cornerstones of the Rheumatic Fever Prevention Programme, but these are hindered by the turnaround time of culture. Tests with excellent performance and rapid turnaround times are needed. For this study, throat swabs (Copan ESwabs) were collected from schoolchildren self-identifying with a sore throat. Samples were tested by routine culture and the illumigene GAS assay using loop-mediated isothermal amplification. Discrepant results were resolved by retesting of the same specimen by an alternative molecular assay. Seven hundred fifty-seven throat swab specimens were tested by both methods. The performance characteristics of the illumigene assay using culture on blood agar as the "gold standard" and following discrepancy analysis were as follows: sensitivity, 82% and 87%, respectively; specificity, 93% and 98%, respectively; positive predictive value, 61% and 88%, respectively; and negative predictive value, 97% and 97%, respectively. In our unique setting of a school-based throat swabbing program, the illumigene assay did not perform quite as well as described in previous reports. Despite this, its improved sensitivity and rapid turnaround time compared with those of culture are appealing. PMID:26560542

  1. Comparison of illumigene Group A Streptococcus Assay with Culture of Throat Swabs from Children with Sore Throats in the New Zealand School-Based Rheumatic Fever Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Bissessor, Liselle; Farrell, Elizabeth; Shulman, Stanford T.; Zheng, Xiaotian; Lennon, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Group A streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis is a particularly important condition in areas of New Zealand where the incidence of acute rheumatic fever remains unacceptably high. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of GAS pharyngitis are cornerstones of the Rheumatic Fever Prevention Programme, but these are hindered by the turnaround time of culture. Tests with excellent performance and rapid turnaround times are needed. For this study, throat swabs (Copan ESwabs) were collected from schoolchildren self-identifying with a sore throat. Samples were tested by routine culture and the illumigene GAS assay using loop-mediated isothermal amplification. Discrepant results were resolved by retesting of the same specimen by an alternative molecular assay. Seven hundred fifty-seven throat swab specimens were tested by both methods. The performance characteristics of the illumigene assay using culture on blood agar as the “gold standard” and following discrepancy analysis were as follows: sensitivity, 82% and 87%, respectively; specificity, 93% and 98%, respectively; positive predictive value, 61% and 88%, respectively; and negative predictive value, 97% and 97%, respectively. In our unique setting of a school-based throat swabbing program, the illumigene assay did not perform quite as well as described in previous reports. Despite this, its improved sensitivity and rapid turnaround time compared with those of culture are appealing. PMID:26560542

  2. Pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    O'Byrne, Deborah

    2016-04-13

    My nursing experience is in acute care. Acute medical nurses are well placed to assess skin integrity, identify patients at risk of pressure ulcer development, and commence appropriate interventions to prevent or treat pressure ulcers. PMID:27073966

  3. Pressure Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-01-01

    EPIC is Electronic Pressure Indicating Controller produced by North American Manufacturing Company. It is a high-sensitivity device for improving combustion efficiency in industrial furnaces that interprets a signal from a pressure transducer on a furnace and regulates furnace pressure accordingly. A controller can provide savings of from five to 25 percent of an industrial user's annual furnace fuel bill.

  4. Barometric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of alterations in barometric pressure on human beings are described. Human tolerances for gaseous environments and low and high barometric pressure are discussed, including effects on specific areas, such as the ear, lungs, teeth, and sinuses. Problems due to trapped gas within the body, high dynamic pressures on the body, and blasts are also considered.

  5. Areas where bedsores occur (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Bedsores, also known as pressure sores or decubitus ulcers, are a breakdown and ulceration of tissue due ... heels of the feet, are most susceptible to bedsores. Non-mobile patients are vulnerable to the formation ...

  6. Microbial activity at gigapascal pressures.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anurag; Scott, James H; Cody, George D; Fogel, Marilyn L; Hazen, Robert M; Hemley, Russell J; Huntress, Wesley T

    2002-02-22

    We observed physiological and metabolic activity of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1 and Escherichia coli strain MG1655 at pressures of 68 to 1680 megapascals (MPa) in diamond anvil cells. We measured biological formate oxidation at high pressures (68 to 1060 MPa). At pressures of 1200 to 1600 MPa, living bacteria resided in fluid inclusions in ice-VI crystals and continued to be viable upon subsequent release to ambient pressures (0.1 MPa). Evidence of microbial viability and activity at these extreme pressures expands by an order of magnitude the range of conditions representing the habitable zone in the solar system. PMID:11859192

  7. Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation, Cold, and a Combination Treatment on Pain, Decreased Range of Motion, and Strength Loss Associated with Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Denegar, Craig R.; Perrin, David H.

    1992-01-01

    Athletic trainers have a variety of therapeutic agents at their disposal to treat musculoskeletal pain, but little objective evidence exists of the efficacy of the modalities they use. In this study, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) served as a model for musculoskeletal injury in order to: (1) compare the changes in perceived pain, elbow extension range of motion, and strength loss in subjects experiencing DOMS in the elbow flexor muscle group following a single treatment with either transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), cold, a combination of TENS and cold, sham TENS, or 20 minutes of rest; (2) compare the effects of combining static stretching with these treatments; and (3) determine if decreased pain is accompanied by a restoration of strength. DOMS was induced in the non-dominant elbow flexor muscle group in 40 females (age = 22.0 ± 4.3 yr) with repeated eccentric contractions. Forty-eight hours following exercise, all subjects presented with pain, decreased elbow extension range of motion, and decreased strength consistent with DOMS. Subjects were randomly assigned to 20-minute treatments followed by static stretching. Cold, TENS, and the combined treatment resulted in significant decreases in perceived pain. Treatments with cold resulted in a significant increase in elbow extension range of motion. Static stretching also significantly reduced perceived pain. Only small, nonsignificant changes in muscle strength were observed following treatment or stretching, regardless of the treatment group. These results suggest that the muscle weakness associated with DOMS is not the result of inhibition caused by pain. The results suggest that these modalities are effective in treating the pain and muscle spasm associated with DOMS, and that decreased pain may not be an accurate indicator of the recovery of muscle strength. PMID:16558162

  8. 4-Diamond Formation from Amorphouse Carbon and Graphite in the Presence of COH Fluids : An InSitu High-Pressure and -Temperature Laser-Heated Diamond Anvil Cell Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Prakapenka, V.; Kubo, A.; Kavner, A.; Green, H.W.; Dobrzhinetskaya, L.

    2011-10-14

    Microdiamonds from orogenic belts contain nanometer-size fluid inclusions suggesting diamond formation from supercritical carbon - oxygen - hydrogen (COH) fluids. Here we report experimental results of diamond nucleation from amorphous carbon and polycrystalline graphite in the presence of COH fluids in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Our results show that: (i) diamonds can nucleate from graphite or amorphous carbon at pressures of 9-11 GPa and temperatures of 1200-1400 K in the presence of COH fluids; (ii) it is easier to nucleate diamond from amorphous carbon than from graphite with or without the COH fluids; and (iii) the fluid from decomposition of glucose is more efficient in promoting the graphite-to-diamond transformation than the fluid from decomposition of oxalic acid dihydrate. Carbon crystallinity has strong effects on the kinetics of diamond nucleation and growth. The experimental results demonstrated the critical role of presence and composition of supercritical COH fluids for promoting the graphite-to-diamond transformation.

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements of NCN in low-pressure CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} flames and its role in prompt NO formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Jeffrey A.; Williams, Bradley A.; Fleming, James W.

    2008-05-15

    NCN profiles were measured for five rich and lean premixed, low-pressure methane flames using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). A semiquantitative determination of the NCN mole fractions as a function of spatial height above the burner is made by calibrating the NCN LIF signals using highly accurate OH LIF measurements in an adjacent spectral region. The resulting calibration yields an uncertainty estimate of a factor of 3 for the absolute values, but only {+-}25% for the relative NCN profiles. For all flame conditions, the NCN profiles occur immediately downstream of previously measured CH profiles. In addition, high correlations are found between the peak CH and peak NCN concentrations and the peak NCN and postflame NO concentrations over all equivalence ratios. These observations are consistent with NCN being the primary product channel from the CH + N{sub 2} reaction and the initial intermediate in the prompt NO formation. This is the first mechanistic study in hydrocarbon flames that provides such experimental evidence. The experimental profiles are compared to numerical calculations using modified versions of two well-established hydrocarbon kinetic mechanisms. Reasonable agreement between the calculations and experiment is found for NCN profile shape, location of peak NCN concentrations, and absolute mole fractions. However, the dependence on stoichiometry of the peak NCN concentration is overestimated. Further work is required on NCN kinetics for modeling prompt NO in laminar premixed flames. (author)

  10. Magnetic fluctuations and possible formation of a spin-singlet cluster under pressure in the heavy-fermion spinel LiV2O4 probed by 7Li and 51V NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Hikaru; Kato, Yusuke; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Itoh, Masayuki; Niitaka, Seiji; Takagi, Hidenori

    2015-07-01

    7Li and 51V NMR measurements up to 9.8 GPa have been made to elucidate local magnetic properties of a heavy-fermion spinel oxide LiV2O4 which undergoes a metal-insulator transition above ˜7 GPa. The temperature T and pressure P dependences of the 7Li and 51V Knight shifts and the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rates 1 /T1 show that in the metallic phase, there is a crossover from a high-T region with weak ferromagnetic fluctuations to a low-T one with antiferromagnetic (AFM) fluctuations. The AFM fluctuations are enhanced below 20 K and 1.5 GPa, where a heavy Fermi-liquid state with the modified Korringa relation is formed. The evolution of the magnetic fluctuations is discussed from the aspect of the competition among several magnetic interactions. Above PMI˜6.7 GPa, we find the coexistence of metallic and insulating phases due to the first-order metal-insulator transition. The 7Li and 51V NMR spectra coming from the insulating phase have T -independent small Knight shifts and 7(1 /T1 ) with the thermally activated T dependence, indicating the formation of a spin-singlet cluster. We propose a model of a spin-singlet tetramer as discussed in geometrically frustrated materials.

  11. Negative pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, James T; Marks, Malcolm W

    2007-10-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy has become an increasingly important part of wound management. Over the last decade, numerous uses for this method of wound management have been reported, ranging from acute and chronic wounds, to closure of open sternal and abdominal wounds, to assistance with skin grafts. The biophysics behind the success of this treatment largely have focused on increased wound blood flow, increased granulation tissue formation, decreased bacterial counts, and stimulation of wound healing pathways through shear stress mechanisms. The overall success of negative pressure wound therapy has led to a multitude of clinical applications, which are discussed in this article. PMID:17967622

  12. Pressure Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Pressure Systems, Inc.'s DPT 6400 is a system designed to increase productivity in industrial processes where there is a need for making multiple pressure measurements quickly and with high accuracy. It is applicable in controlling industrial processes in plants that are being upgraded to automated status. In order to automate such plants the pressures at the many loops must be measured, converted to digital information and transmitted to the plant's process control computer. The DPT 6400 serves that function. By employing solid-state pressure sensing transducers whose errors are automatically corrected by a microprocessor, it is capable of highly accurate pressure measurements. Basic DPT 6400 has 64 channels, but the system can be expanded to 256 channels by the addition of "slave" units.

  13. 18 CFR 270.305 - Determination of tight formation areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... for tight formation designation, the stabilized production rate of natural gas, against atmospheric pressure, of wells completed for production in such portion of such formation, without stimulation, is...

  14. 18 CFR 270.305 - Determination of tight formation areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... for tight formation designation, the stabilized production rate of natural gas, against atmospheric pressure, of wells completed for production in such portion of such formation, without stimulation, is...

  15. Pressure Core Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates form under high fluid pressure and low temperature, and are found in permafrost, deep lakes or ocean sediments. Hydrate dissociation by depressurization and/or heating is accompanied by a multifold hydrate volume expansion and host sediments with low permeability experience massive destructuration. Proper characterization requires coring, recovery, manipulation and testing under P-T conditions within the stability field. Pressure core technology allows for the reliable characterization of hydrate bearing sediments within the stability field in order to address scientific and engineering needs, including the measurement of parameters used in hydro-thermo-mechanical analyses, and the monitoring of hydrate dissociation under controlled pressure, temperature, effective stress and chemical conditions. Inherent sampling effects remain and need to be addressed in test protocols and data interpretation. Pressure core technology has been deployed to study hydrate bearing sediments at several locations around the world. In addition to pressure core testing, a comprehensive characterization program should include sediment analysis, testing of reconstituted specimens (with and without synthetic hydrate), and in situ testing. Pressure core characterization technology can be used to study other gas-charged formations such as deep sea sediments, coal bed methane and gas shales.

  16. [Textual research on decipher of"prescriptions for treating children's head sore"from Zhi re bing yao lun (Essentials on Treatment of Febrile Diseases) in the Western Xia regime].

    PubMed

    Tang, X L; Liu, J Y

    2016-03-01

    There were 3 prescriptions for treating children's head sore, инв6476-28, 29, 30 preserved in Russia, included in the Zhi re bing yao lun (Essentials on Treatment of Febrile Diseases), a medical literature of the Western Xia regime. Based on the correlated relationship between the Tangut language and the Chinese characters, the 3 prescriptions were translated into Chinese, and then compared with Chinese medical documents. It could be seen that medical system in the Western Xia regime had an inseparable relationship with that of the Han nationality, while keeping the features of the northwestern nomadic nationalities at the same time. PMID:27255199

  17. [Individual pressure tolerance--a "target" pressure?].

    PubMed

    Bogdănici, C; Vancea, P P

    1999-01-01

    In literature there are many meanings for the limit between normal and pathological intraocular pressure: "normative pressure", "critic pressure", "individual tolerance pressure" and "target pressure". The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that these terms are synonymous. PMID:10756882

  18. Reduction of delayed onset muscle soreness by a novel curcumin delivery system (Meriva®): a randomised, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) due to eccentric muscle activity is associated with inflammatory responses and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that sustain both inflammation and oxidative stress. Curcumin, a powerful promoter of anti-oxidant response, is one of the best-investigated natural products, and is now commercially available as a lecithin delivery system (Meriva®, Indena SpA, Milan) with improved bio-availability. The aim of this study was to test whether curcumin could attenuate damage from oxidative stress and inflammation related to acute muscle injury induced by eccentric continuous exercise Methods This was a randomised, placebo-controlled, single-blind pilot trial. Twenty male healthy, moderately active volunteers were randomised to curcumin given as the Phytosome® delivery system 1 g twice daily (200 mg curcumin b.i.d.) or matching placebo. Supplementation was initiated 48 hours prior to a downhill running test and was continued for 24 hours after the test (4 days in total). Muscle damage was quantified by magnetic resonance imaging, laboratory tests and histological analyses on muscle samples obtained 48 hours after the test. Patient-reported pain intensity was also recorded. Results Subjects in the curcumin group reported less pain in the lower limb as compared with subjects in the placebo group, although significant differences were observed only for the right and left anterior thighs. Significantly fewer subjects in the curcumin group had MRI evidence of muscle injury in the posterior or medial compartment of both thighs. Increases in markers of muscle damage and inflammation tended to be lower in the curcumin group, but significant differences were only observed for interleukin-8 at 2 h after exercise. No differences in markers of oxidative stress and muscle histology were observed Conclusions Curcumin has the potential for preventing DOMS, as suggested by its effects on pain intensity and muscle injury

  19. Pressure Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Mike Lawson briefly discussed pressure drop for aerospace applications and presented short stories about adventures experienced while working at NASA and General Dynamics, including exposure to technologies like the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart and the SWME.

  20. Peer Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... and behaviors. This is often positive — it's human nature to listen to and learn from other people ... Responding to peer pressure is part of human nature — but some people are more likely to give ...