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Sample records for pressure sores formation

  1. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... may form. Pressure sores are also called bedsores, pressure ulcers and decubitus ulcers. Symptoms What are the symptoms ... do to help pressure sores heal: Relieving the pressure that caused the sore Treating the sore itself Improving nutrition and other conditions to help the sore heal ...

  2. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    Pressure sores are areas of damaged skin caused by staying in one position for too long. They ... wheelchair, or are unable to change your position. Pressure sores can cause serious infections, some of which ...

  3. Preventing Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Experts \\ Preventing Pressure Sores Topics Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 Spinal Cord Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury ... The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Preventing Pressure Sores Preventing Pressure Sores Transition from Hospital to ...

  4. Skin (Pressure) Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Skin dryness Next Topic Sleep problems Skin (pressure) sores A skin or pressure sore develops when the blood supply to an ... is bedridden or always in a wheelchair puts pressure on the same places much of the time. ...

  5. Osteomyelitis beneath pressure sores

    SciTech Connect

    Sugarman, B.; Hawes, S.; Musher, D.M.; Klima, M.; Young, E.J.; Pircher, F.

    1983-04-01

    Twenty-eight pressure sores were evaluated prospectively. Osteomyelitis was reported histologically in nine of 28 bones and pressure-related changes were reported in 14 bones. Roentgenograms suggested the presence of osteomyelitis in four instances of histologically proved osteomyelitis. Technetium Tc 99m medronate bone scans were highly sensitive, showing increased uptake in all cases of osteomyelitis; however, increased uptake also occurred commonly in uninfected bones due to pressure-related changes or other noninfectious causes. Cultures of bone biopsy samples usually disclosed anaerobic bacteria, gram-negative bacilli, or both. The diagnosis of osteomyelitis must be considered if a pressure sore does not respond to local therapy. If the technetium Tc 99m medronate uptake is increased in the involved area, or roentgenographic findings are abnormal, the diagnosis can only be made with certainty by histologic examination of bone. Antibacterial treatment should be selected based on the results of bone culture.

  6. Pressure sores in nursing home patients.

    PubMed

    Weiler, P G; Franzi, C; Kecskes, D

    1990-09-01

    One hundred and sixty-seven patients were part of a cross-sectional study examining pressure sores in patients in skilled nursing facilities. Every patient admitted to this study was physically examined for the presence or absence of pressure sores and evaluated according to a standardized procedure. Using logistic regression analysis, the variables most significantly associated with pressure sores included a history of hypertension, infection, unwelcome response to visitors, history of poor dietary intake and a pattern of slow or poor response to commands. Knowledge of these factors may lead to more intensive efforts to develop better methods of prevention and treatment of pressure sores. PMID:2094365

  7. Taking Care of Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... between dressing changes. 6. Check for signs of wound healing with each dressing change. 7. If there are ... Surgery is frequently required for this type of wound. How to know if the sore is healing The sore will get smaller. Pinkish tissue usually ...

  8. How to care for pressure sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... to protect the area from bodily fluids. Ask your doctor what type of moisturizer to use. Stage II pressure sores ... sore moist so it can heal. Talk with your doctor about what type of dressing to use. Depending on the size ...

  9. Silicone moulding for pressure sore debridement.

    PubMed

    Erba, P; Wettstein, R; Schumacher, R; Schwenzer-Zimmerer, K; Pierer, G; Kalbermatten, D F

    2010-03-01

    The radicality of wound debridement is an important feature of the surgical treatment of pressure sores. Several methods such as injection of methylene blue or hydrogen peroxide have been proposed to facilitate and optimise the surgical debridement technique, but none of them proved to be sufficient. We present an innovative modification of the pseudo-tumour technique consisting in the injection of fluid silicone. Vulcanization of the silicone leads to pressure-sore moulding, permitting a more radical and sterile excision. In a series of 10 paraplegic patients presenting with ischial pressure sores, silicone moulding was used to facilitate debridement. Radical en bloc debridement was achieved in all patients. After a minimal follow-up of 2 years, no complications and recurrences occurred. A three-dimensional (3D) analysis of the silicone prints objectified the pyramidal shape of ischial pressure sores. Our study showed that complete resection without capsular lesion can be easily achieved. Further, it allows the surgeon to analyse the shape and size of the resected defect, which might be helpful to select the appropriate defect coverage technique. PMID:19167279

  10. Pressure sores and underlying bone infection

    SciTech Connect

    Sugarman, B.

    1987-03-01

    Pressure sores are a serious complication of hospitalized and chronically ill patients. Evaluation for underlying bone infection can be made difficult by radiographic, nuclear imaging, and soft-tissue culture studies that are abnormal and suggest the presence of bone infection, when no infection is present. Evaluation by bone biopsy with histologic and microbiological studies can accurately and promptly diagnose whether bone infection is present. This allows appropriate treatment when infection is present, and prevents unneeded and potentially toxic antibiotic therapy when preliminary studies incorrectly suggest that infection is present.

  11. Pressure sore survey. Part 3: Locus of control.

    PubMed

    Maylor, M; Torrance, C

    1999-03-01

    This is the third in a three-part article which investigates the prevalence, knowledge and attitudes to pressure sores in one NHS trust. This study describes the methodology used in choosing and developing attitude scales to explore whether there are any relationships between the locus of control and pressure sore prevention. Factors to do with attitude and the value associated with pressure sore prevention have a central role. Attitudes and beliefs affect what we do and may contribute to pressure sore development. PMID:10362985

  12. New concepts in the prevention of pressure sores.

    PubMed

    Bogie, Kath; Powell, Heather L; Ho, Chester H

    2012-01-01

    Pressure sores are a serious, and costly, complication for many patients with reduced mobility and sensation. Some populations, such as those with spinal cord injury (SCI), remain at high risk throughout their lifetime. Prevention is highly preferable and while the concept is readily definable, it is much more challenging to develop valid preventative measures. Subjective and objective approaches to risk factor assessment before pressure sores develop are reviewed, including risk status scales and emerging techniques to assess deep tissue injury. Devices to prevent pressure sores have traditionally focused on pressure-relieving cushions and mattresses. Technological advances being applied in the development of new pressure sore prevention devices are presented. Clinical evidence-based practice is integral to pressure sore prevention. Comprehensive assessment must include evaluation of systemic diseases, anatomical and physiological factors, together with environmental and psychosocial factors, which can all contribute to pressure sore development. Extrinsic factors need to be considered in conjunction with intrinsic tissue health factors and are reviewed together with an evaluation of currently available clinical practice guidelines. This chapter presents the broad diversity of factors associated with pressure sore development and highlights the need for an interdisciplinary team approach in order to maximize successful prevention of pressure sores. PMID:23098716

  13. Pressure sensor-based tongue-placed electrotactile biofeedback for balance improvement--biomedical application to prevent pressure sores formation and falls.

    PubMed

    Vuillerme, N; Chenu, O; Pinsault, N; Moreau-Gaudry, A; Fleury, A; Demongeot, J; Payan, Y

    2007-01-01

    We introduce the innovative technologies, based on the concept of "sensory substitution", we are developing in the fields of biomedical engineering and human disability. Precisely, our goal is to design, develop and validate practical assistive biomedical and/or technical devices and/or rehabilitating procedures for persons with disabilities, using artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback systems. Proposed applications are dealing with: (1) pressure sores prevention in case of spinal cord injuries (persons with paraplegia, or tetraplegia); and (2) balance control improvement to prevent fall in older and/or disabled adults. This paper describes the architecture and the functioning principle of these biofeedback systems and presents preliminary results of two feasibility studies performed on young healthy adults. PMID:18003410

  14. Can electric beds aid pressure sore prevention in hospitals?

    PubMed

    Hampton, S

    The purchase, cleaning and maintenance of air mattresses can be an expensive part of pressure sore prevention and repositioning of patients can be time consuming and costly in terms of possible nursing injuries. The King's Fund bed has been a friend to the health service for many years but the time has come to look for an alternative system that will support patient comfort and independence, will assist nurses in implementation of a no-lifting policy and aid pressure sore prevention policies. This article describes a study that was undertaken in two medical wards to assess the value of electrically controlled beds in relation to the prevention of pressure sores, implementation of a no-lifting policy and quality of patient care. A total of 782 patients took part in the study over a 6-month period and 726 replies were obtained from nurses. The ward had similar profiles of patients' medical conditions and age; they were being medically managed by the same consultants. Results showed that patients experienced greater comfort on beds with the electric facility, produced less pressure sores, mobilized easily and pressure sore prevention costs could be reduced. There is a need to be proactive in prevention of pressure sores and not reactive to a pressure sore that is already developing. PMID:9830895

  15. How to care for pressure sores

    MedlinePlus

    Pressure ulcer; Bedsore; Decubitus ulcer ... when pressed. This is a sign that a pressure ulcer is forming. The skin may be warm or ... body fat in the crater. Stage IV: The pressure ulcer has become so deep that there is damage ...

  16. Electrical stimulation for pressure sore prevention and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Bogie, K M; Reger, S I; Levine, S P; Sahgal, V

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews applications of therapeutic electrical stimulation (ES) specific to wound healing and pressure sore prevention. The application of ES for wound healing has been found to increase the rate of healing by more than 50%. Furthermore, the total number of wounds healed is also increased. However, optimal delivery techniques for ES therapy have not been established to date. A study of stimulation current effects on wound healing in a pig model has shown that direct current (DC) stimulation is most effective in wound area reduction and alternating current (AC) stimulation for wound volume reduction at current densities of 127 microA/cm2 and 1,125 microA/cm2, respectively. Preliminary studies have been carried out at two research centers to assess the role of ES in pressure sore prevention. Surface stimulation studies have shown that ES can produce positive short-term changes in tissue health variables such as regional blood flow and pressure distribution. The use of an implanted stimulation system consisting of intramuscular electrodes with percutaneous leads has been found to produce additional long-term changes. Specifically, gluteal muscle thickness increased by 50% with regular long-term ES application concurrent with a 20% decrease in regional interface pressures and increased tissue oxygen levels. These findings indicate that an implantable ES system may have great potential for pressure sore prevention, particularly for individuals who lack sensation or who are physically unable to perform regular independent pressure relief. PMID:11067577

  17. Pressure-induced referred pain is expanded by persistent soreness.

    PubMed

    Doménech-García, V; Palsson, T S; Herrero, P; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2016-05-01

    Several chronic pain conditions are accompanied with enlarged referred pain areas. This study investigated a novel method for assessing referred pain. In 20 healthy subjects, pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were recorded and pressure stimuli (120% PPT) were applied bilaterally for 5 and 60 seconds at the infraspinatus muscle to induce local and referred pain. Moreover, PPTs were measured bilaterally at the shoulder, neck, and leg before, during, and after hypertonic saline-induced referred pain in the dominant infraspinatus muscle. The pressure and saline-induced pain areas were assessed on drawings. Subsequently, delayed onset muscle soreness was induced using eccentric exercise of the dominant infraspinatus muscle. The day-1 assessments were repeated the following day (day 2). Suprathreshold pressure stimulations and saline injections into the infraspinatus muscle caused referred pain to the frontal aspect of the shoulder/arm in all subjects. The 60-second pressure stimulation caused larger referred pain areas compared with the 5-second stimulation (P < 0.01). Compared with pressure stimulation, the saline-induced referred pain area was larger (P < 0.02). After saline-induced pain, the PPTs at the infraspinatus and supraspinatus muscles were reduced (P < 0.05), and the 5-second pressure-induced referred pain area was larger than baseline. Pressure pain thresholds at the infraspinatus and supraspinatus muscles were reduced at day 2 in the delayed onset muscle soreness side (P < 0.05). Compared with day 1, larger pressure and saline-induced referred pain areas were observed on day 2 (P < 0.05). Referred pain to the shoulder/arm was consistently induced and enlarged after 1 day of muscle soreness, indicating that the referred pain area may be a sensitive biomarker for sensitization of the pain system. PMID:26808146

  18. Development of a cushion to prevent ischial pressure sores.

    PubMed Central

    Bowker, P; Davidson, L M

    1979-01-01

    A study was carried out jointly by nursing staff and technologists in an attempt to develop a cushion based on scientific principles and measurement that might prevent pressure sores. At each stage in the development clinical trials were carried out, and using the results of these together with the opinions of medical staff and patients who used the cushion the design was suitably modified. Over four years a seat was evolved that was simple to construct and fulfilled the clinical requirements for a wide range of patients while providing maximum relief of high-pressure points. The design was subsequently taken up commercially. Images Fig 3 PMID:509176

  19. Therapeutic Effect of External Application of Ligustrazine Combined with Holistic Nursing on Pressure Sores

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Junzhi; Han, Lin; Gong, Fen

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to explore the therapeutic effect of external application of ligustrazine combined with holistic nursing on pressure sores, as well as the underlying mechanism. Material/Methods From February 2014 to March 2015, a total of 32 patients with Phase II and Phase III pressure sores were enrolled and randomly assigned to an experimental group or a control group. The clinical data were comparable between the 2 groups. In addition to holistic nursing, the patients in the experimental group received 4 weeks of continuous external application of ligustrazine, whereas patients in the control group received compound clotrimazole cream. Therapeutic effect and healing time were recorded. HaCaT cells were used as an in vitro model for mechanism analysis of the effect of ligustrazine in treating pressure sores. After culturing with different concentrations of ligustrazine or the inhibitor of AKT (LY294002) for 72 h, cell viability, clone formation numbers, and levels of phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K), p-AKT, and p-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) were determined. Results Compared to the control group, the total effective rate in the experimental group was significantly higher, and the healing time was significantly reduced. Cell viability and clone formation numbers were significantly upregulated by ligustrazine in a dose-dependent manner. Both the cell viability and clone formation numbers were significantly inhibited by application of LY294002. Conclusions Our results suggest that ligustrazine combined with holistic nursing is an effective treatment of pressure sores. The protective effect may be associated with the promotion of cell growth by activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway. PMID:27523814

  20. [The Development of a Care Protocol for Postoperative Pressure Sore Prevention].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Ling; Lin, Hui-Ling; Wang, Fang; Wu, Shu-Fang Vivienne

    2015-12-01

    Pressure sores are a common complication caused by long periods of bed rest following major surgery. These sores may increase patient postoperative pain, increase the risk of infections, lengthen the pe-riod of hospitalization, and increase the duration and costs of nursing care. Therefore, maintaining the skin integrity of surgical patients is an important responsibility for operating room nurses and an indicator of nursing care quality. While pressure-sore risk assessment tools and interoperative strategies are available and used in foreign countries, there has been little related research conducted in Taiwan. After examining the relevant literature and considering the current postoperative pressure sore situation in Taiwan, the author developed a postoperative pressure sore care protocol as a reference for clinical staff. Protocol procedures include major breakthrough developments in areas such as post-survey risk assessment for pressure ulcers, pressure ulcer prevention strategies that take surgery-related risk factors into consideration, extra care and protection measures for surgical supine patients, and post-pressure sores. The developed postoperative pressure sore protocol may be incorporated into surgical care procedures during the post-surgical care period in order to effectively prevent the occurrence of post-surgery pressure ulcers. Furthermore, the developed protocol offers the potential to improve and strengthen the quality of surgical care in terms of both healthcare and post-surgical care. PMID:26645449

  1. Using a modified nasotracheal tube to prevent nasal ala pressure sore during prolonged nasotracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Cherng, Chen-Hwan; Chen, Yuan-Wu

    2010-12-01

    Nasotracheal tube induced nasal ala pressure sores or necrosis during prolonged nasotracheal intubation have been reported, and it is a serious but preventable complication. Here we introduce a modified nasotracheal tube to prevent this complication. This modified nasotracheal tube is composed of two parts, an oral endotracheal tube and a proximal part of a preformed nasotracheal tube, which are linked by a connector. The use of this modified nasotracheal tube can prevent nasal ala pressure sores during prolonged nasotracheal intubation. PMID:20809246

  2. [Prevalence and prevention and treatment modalities for pressure sores. Study of the Emilia-Romagna region].

    PubMed

    Melotti, Rita Maria; Fortuna, Daniela; Chiari, Paolo; Cavicchioli, Andrea; Mongardi, Maria; Santullo, Antonella; Grilli, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    This audit initiative aimed at assessing the prevalence of pressure sores in the public hospitals of Emilia-Romagna, and at monitoring the rate of use of specific modalities of prevention and cure. The design was cross-sectional, with information collected on three index days during 2000 by trained personnel. Overall, the prevalence of pressure sores at the regional level was 7.1%, with remarkable variation across hospitals (from 2.9% to 9.7%), also after adjustment for case mix. As for patterns of prevention and cure, 74% of patients at risk (according to the Braden scale) of developing a pressure sores received only standard low technology devices, and 50% of those in need were included in a systematic programme of postural change. Adequate (according to the available evidence) medications were used in 45% of patients with a pressure sore. The overall prevalence of pressure sore is close (or even inferior) to that observed in similar studies. However, variation between hospitals indicates that the current health services ability to deal with pressure sore is variable and often suboptimal. This evaluation is also supported by the limited adoption of adequate preventive and curative modalities. PMID:12958732

  3. Detection and Isolation of Digital Dermatitis Treponemes from Bovine Pressure Sores.

    PubMed

    Clegg, S R; Crosby-Durrani, H E; Bell, J; Blundell, R; Blowey, R W; Carter, S D; Evans, N J

    2016-05-01

    Pressure sores cause severe pain and discomfort in hospitalized people and in farmed cattle and are often infected with unknown bacteria. Pressure sores occur on the upper legs of 6-10% of recumbent cattle and are generally considered to be caused by constant pressure, commonly on bony areas of the limbs. This study analyzed pressure sores taken from the upper limbs of 14 cattle using isolation in culture and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect treponemes associated with digital dermatitis (DD). A 100% association of DD treponemes with the pressure sores was demonstrated, but treponemes were shown not to be part of the normal skin microbiota. Immunohistochemistry showed an association of DD treponemes with lesions and particularly with the hair follicles in lesions, identifying the bacteria deep within wounds, thereby suggesting that they could contribute to lesion pathogenesis. The bacteria isolated from the pressure sore lesions were similar or identical on analysis of the 16S rRNA gene to those found in DD foot lesions in cattle, suggesting the same bacteria can infect multiple lesions. Indeed, the results of this study suggest that these spirochaetal bacteria may be expanding in host range and in their ability to colonize different tissues and contribute to a range of disease manifestations in farm animals. PMID:27040650

  4. Evaluating the effects of pentoxifylline administration on experimental pressure sores in rats by biomechanical examinations

    PubMed Central

    Velaei, Kobra; Torkman, Giti; Rezaie, Fatemealsadat; Amini, Abdollah; Noruzian, Mohsen; Tavassol, Azaedh; Bayat, Mehernoush

    2012-01-01

    This study used a biomechanical test to evaluate the effects of pentoxifylline administration on the wound healing process of an experimental pressure sore induced in rats. Under general anesthesia and sterile conditions, experimental pressure sores generated by no. 25 Halsted mosquito forceps were inflicted on 12 adult male rats. Pentoxifylline was injected intraperitoneally at a dose of 50 mg/kg daily from the day the pressure sore was generated, for a period of 20 days. At the end of 20 days, rats were sacrificed and skin samples extracted. Samples were biomechanically examined by a material testing instrument for maximum stress (N mm2), work up to maximum force (N), and elastic stiffness (N/mm). In the experimental group, maximum stress (2.05±0.15) and work up to maximum force (N/mm) (63.75±4.97) were significantly higher than the control group (1.3±0.27 and 43.3±14.96, P=0.002 and P=0.035, respectively). Pentoxifylline administration significantly accelerated the wound healing process in experimental rats with pressure sores, compared to that of the control group. PMID:23091522

  5. Physical characteristics of a new synthetic fiber mattress in relation to pressure sores.

    PubMed

    Mita, K; Akataki, K; Itoh, K; Yoshida, M; Shinoda, T; Ishida, Y

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to develop a mattress which was made of the new synthetic fibers called 'Shin-Gosen', and to determine its physical characteristics associated with pressure sores such as pressure distribution, temperature and humidity. The Shin-Gosen mattress consisted of three layers of elastic fibers made of polyester multifilaments, which were mediated by four layers of wave-like fabrics made of nylon monofilaments. The physical characteristics of the mattress were compared with (a) the conventional cotton hospital mattress and (b) the SORELESS MAT made of vacuole gel which effectively eliminated compression forces. The Shin-Gosen mattress was found to provide pressure relief effects similar to that of the SORELESS MAT the desired thermal insulation as well as that of the cotton mattress and a higher level of moisture vapor permeability. These excellent features will not only contribute to preventing pressure sores, but will also enable comfortable resting and sleeping. PMID:9444514

  6. Profunda Femoris Artery Perforator Propeller Flap: A Valid Method to Cover Complicated Ischiatic Pressure Sores.

    PubMed

    Scalise, Alessandro; Tartaglione, Caterina; Bolletta, Elisa; Pierangeli, Marina; Di Benedetto, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    We report the case of a 50-year-old paraplegic man with a complicated grade III/IV ischiatic pressure sore treated with a propeller flap based on the first perforator of the profunda femoris artery. Our aim was to surgically reconstruct an ischiatic pressure sore in a patient with ankylosis using a fasciocutaneous perforator propeller flap obtained from the posterior region of the thigh. Our decision to perform a profunda femoris artery perforator propeller flap reconstruction was mainly due to the anatomical contiguity of the flap with the site of the lesion and the good quality of the skin harvested from the posterior region of the thigh. The use of the perforator fasciocutaneous flap represents a muscle-sparing technique, providing a better long-term result in surgical reconstruction. The choice of the 180-degree propeller flap was due to its ability to provide a good repair of the pressure ulcer and to pass over the ischiatic prominence in the patient in the forced decubitus position. The operatory course did not present any kind of complication. Using this reconstructive treatment, we have obtained complete coverage of the ischiatic pressure sore. PMID:26495200

  7. Profunda Femoris Artery Perforator Propeller Flap: A Valid Method to Cover Complicated Ischiatic Pressure Sores

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglione, Caterina; Bolletta, Elisa; Pierangeli, Marina; Di Benedetto, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Summary: We report the case of a 50-year-old paraplegic man with a complicated grade III/IV ischiatic pressure sore treated with a propeller flap based on the first perforator of the profunda femoris artery. Our aim was to surgically reconstruct an ischiatic pressure sore in a patient with ankylosis using a fasciocutaneous perforator propeller flap obtained from the posterior region of the thigh. Our decision to perform a profunda femoris artery perforator propeller flap reconstruction was mainly due to the anatomical contiguity of the flap with the site of the lesion and the good quality of the skin harvested from the posterior region of the thigh. The use of the perforator fasciocutaneous flap represents a muscle-sparing technique, providing a better long-term result in surgical reconstruction. The choice of the 180-degree propeller flap was due to its ability to provide a good repair of the pressure ulcer and to pass over the ischiatic prominence in the patient in the forced decubitus position. The operatory course did not present any kind of complication. Using this reconstructive treatment, we have obtained complete coverage of the ischiatic pressure sore. PMID:26495200

  8. The user--friendliness of protective support surfaces in prevention of pressure sores.

    PubMed

    Conine, T A; Choi, A K; Lim, R

    1989-01-01

    Special mattress overlays and seat cushions for the prevention of pressure sores constitute a large portion of the rehabilitation products market. Consumers frequently face economic concerns in choosing among these products. This article summarizes the favorable and unfavorable features of major support surface types: foam, air-filled, flotation, and alternating air. A careful consideration of characteristics, such as fire safety, patient comfort, and ease of transfer and handling, may facilitate selection and result in more satisfied users and caregivers. PMID:2781130

  9. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Are Cold Sores? Article Chapters What Are Cold Sores? Cold ... January 2012 Previous Next Related Articles: Canker and Cold Sores Aloe Vera May Help Relieve Mouth Sores ...

  10. An evidence-based approach to pressure sores.

    PubMed

    Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N; Kuzon, William M

    2011-02-01

    The Maintenance of Certification module series is designed to help the clinician structure his or her study in specific areas appropriate to his or her clinical practice. This article is prepared to accompany practice-based assessment of preoperative assessment, anesthesia, surgical treatment plan, perioperative management, and outcomes. In this format, the clinician is invited to compare his or her methods of patient assessment and treatment, outcomes, and complications, with authoritative, information-based references. This information base is then used for self-assessment and benchmarking in parts II and IV of the Maintenance of Certification process of the American Board of Plastic Surgery. This article is not intended to be an exhaustive treatise on the subject. Rather, it is designed to serve as a reference point for further in-depth study by review of the reference articles presented. PMID:21285799

  11. Design and research on reliability-validity for 3S intraoperative risk assessment scale of pressure sore.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xing-lian; Hu, Juan-juan; Ma, Qiong; Wu, He-yu; Wang, Zeng-yan; Li, Ting-ting; Shen, Jian-hui; Yang, Ying

    2015-04-01

    The reliability and validity of risk assessment scale (RAS) of pressure sore during 3S surgery were investigated. RAS of pressure sore was designed independently during 3S surgery. Five operating room nursing experts were selected to consult and detect face validity. Convenient and purposive sampling of 707 samples was conducted. Cronbach's alpha was used to measure content reliability and evaluate the internal consistence of RAS. The structural reliability was investigated by exploratory factor analysis method. The results showed that the content validity index was 0.92, and Cronbach's alpha of content reliability was 0.71. Structural validity, detected by Bartlett sphericity test, was 135.3 for 707 samples with the difference being statistically significant (P<0.01). KMO value was 0.729. The accumulative variance contribution ratio of common factor was 64.63%. The exploratory factor analysis showed the factor load of every clause was larger than 0.596. It was concluded that RAS of pressure sore for 3S surgery has better validity and reliability, and it could be used for evaluating and screening the high risk patients with pressure sores during surgery in order to efficiently reduce the occurrence of pressure sore during surgery. RAS of pressure sore for 3S surgery is worth to be popularized. PMID:25877367

  12. Computed tomography of pressure sores, pelvic abscess, and osteomyelitis in patients with spinal cord injury

    SciTech Connect

    Firooznia, H.; Rafii, M.; Golimbu, C.; Lam, S.; Sokolow, J.; Kung, J.S.

    1982-11-01

    Nine patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and large pressure ulcers and other possible complications, were evaluated by computed tomography (CT), conventional radiography, tomography, bone scanning, gallium scanning, and sonography. CT revealed the depth, extent, and relationship of the ulcer-bed to the underlying structures in all 9 patients. CT also positively identified unsuspected intra- and extra-pelvic abscess and pelvic osteomyelitis in 4 patients each. Other modalities identified only 2 of these complications. We believe CT is the modality of choice for evaluation of these complications in SCI patients, because of its superior ability in evaluation of pressure sores and detection of pathologic changes in soft tissue and bone in the pelvic region.

  13. Canker Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes canker sores. Mouth injuries, stress, poor nutrition, food allergies and menstrual periods are some of the things that may increase your chances of getting a canker sore. Treatment How are canker sores treated? There is no cure for canker sores, but they usually go away ...

  14. Canker Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... cycle . Some research suggests that using products containing sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) can be associated with canker sores. SLS ... with toothpastes and mouthwashes that don't contain sodium lauryl sulfate. And avoid brushing the sore itself with a ...

  15. Sore Throat

    MedlinePlus

    ... sore throat will return and also helps prevent antibiotic resistance. What is the treatment for a sore throat ... given to children younger than 18 years of age. Gargle with warm salt water (1 teaspoon of ...

  16. Mouth sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... minerals in the diet, including vitamin B12 or folate Less commonly, mouth sores can be a sign ... sores often, talk to your provider about taking folate and vitamin B12 to prevent outbreaks. To prevent ...

  17. Marjolin’s Ulcer Complicating a Pressure Sore: The Clock is Ticking

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Kamran; Giannone, Anna Lucia; Mehrabi, Erfan; Khan, Ayda; Giannone, Roberto E.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 85 Final Diagnosis: Marjolin’s ulcer (squamous cell carcinoma) Symptoms: None Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Ulcer excision and split thickness skin graft placement Specialty: Dermatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Malignant degeneration in any chronic wound is termed a Marjolin’s ulcer (MU). The overall metastatic rate of MU is approximately 27.5%. However, the prognosis of MU specific to pressure sores is poor, with a reported metastatic rate of 61%. This is due to insidious, asymptomatic malignant degeneration, a lack of healthcare provider awareness, and, ultimately, delayed management. Case Report: An 85-year-old white male was noted by his wound-care nurse to have a rapidly developing growth on his lower back over a period of 4 months. There was history of a non-healing, progressive pressure ulcer of the lower back for the past 10 years. On examination, there was a 4×4 cm pressure ulcer of the lower back, with a superimposed 1.5×2 cm growth in the superior region. There was an absence of palpable regional lymphadenopathy. Punch biopsy revealed squamous cell carcinoma consistent with Marjolin’s ulcer. The ulcer underwent excision with wide margins, and a skin graft was placed. Due to the prompt recognition of an abnormality by the patient’s wound-care nurse, metastasis was not evident on imaging. There are no signs of recurrence at 1-year follow-up. Conclusions: Marjolin’s ulcer has a rapid progression from local disease to widespread metastasis. Therefore, it is essential that wound-care providers are aware of the clinical signs and symptoms of malignant degeneration in chronic wounds. PMID:26898816

  18. Coping with Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Coping With Cold Sores KidsHealth > For Kids > Coping With Cold Sores ... sore." What's that? Adam wondered. What Is a Cold Sore? Cold sores are small blisters that is ...

  19. Mouth sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... begin as blisters and then crust over. The herpes virus can live in your body for years. It only appears as a mouth sore when something triggers it, such as: Another ... medicines, penicillamine, sulfa drugs, and phenytoin.

  20. Using a case-mix-adjusted pressure sore incidence study in a surgical directorate to improve patient outcomes in pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Watret, L

    1999-10-01

    The Glasgow Acute Clinical Audit Sub-Committee on Pressure Sores has previously carried out studies of incidence of pressure ulcers in the medical directorates and case-mix-adjusted the figures for length of hospital stay and risk assessment score. Case-mix classification is 'classification of people or treatment placed into groups using characteristics associated with condition, treatment or outcome that can be used to predict need, resource, use of outcomes'. In this instance, crude pressure ulcer incidence figures may be adjusted for length of hospital stay and pressure sore risk assessment score, and stratified into groups, which allows like to be compared with like. The value in case-mix-adjusted figures lies in repeating the exercise, thus determining the trend for individual areas and assessing whether improvement in the quality of care is being achieved. This is more positive than creation of 'league tables' comparing simultaneous studies in a number of areas. The figures showed that there was no statistically significant difference between surgical directorates in trusts with regard to risk assessment scores and length of hospital stay. Gathering data on the incidence of pressure ulcer development allows us to identify where new sores are occurring, but does not critically analyse the nursing intervention taken in individual cases, which identifies preventive strategies. The Glasgow group's primary aim was to gather data on case-mix-adjusted incidence of pressure damage; the secondary objectives were to scrutinize the data to gather more general information on intrinsic and extrinsic factors which may predispose to pressure ulcer development. The study was carried out in the surgical directorate. Findings showed that incidence was low (1.1%), with the majority of sores being superficial. There was a correlation between pressure ulcer development and incontinence, evidence of under-utilization of moving and handling aids for prevention of pressure ulcers

  1. Predictive power of the Braden scale for pressure sore risk in adult critical care patients: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Critical care is designed for managing the sickest patients within our healthcare system. Multiple factors associated with an increased likelihood of pressure ulcer development have been investigated in the critical care population. Nevertheless, there is a lack of consensus regarding which of these factors poses the greatest risk for pressure ulceration. While the Braden scale for pressure sore risk is the most commonly used tool for measuring pressure ulcer risk in the United States, research focusing on the cumulative Braden Scale score and subscale scores is lacking in the critical care population. This author conducted a literature review on pressure ulcer risk assessment in the critical care population, to include the predictive value of both the total score and the subscale scores. In this review, the subscales sensory perception, mobility, moisture, and friction/shear were found to be associated with an increased likelihood of pressure ulcer development; in contrast, the Activity and Nutrition subscales were not found to predict pressure ulcer development in this population. In order to more precisely quantify risk in the critically ill population, modification of the Braden scale or development of a critical care specific risk assessment tool may be indicated. PMID:22948495

  2. Canker sore

    MedlinePlus

    ... most cases, the canker sores go away without treatment. Try not to eat hot or spicy foods, which can cause pain. Use over-the-counter medicines that ease pain in the area. Rinse your mouth with salt water or mild, over-the-counter mouthwashes. (DO NOT ...

  3. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes oral herpes, or cold sores. Type 1 herpes virus infects more than half of the U.S. population by the time they reach their 20s. Type 2 usually affects the genital area Some people have no symptoms from the ...

  4. Canker Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... be triggered by stress, food allergies, lack of vitamins and minerals, hormonal changes or menstrual periods. In some cases the cause is unknown. In most cases, the sores go away by themselves. Some ointments, creams or rinses may help with the pain. Avoiding ...

  5. Increased technetium uptake is not equivalent to muscle necrosis: scintigraphic, morphological and intramuscular pressure analyses of sore muscles after exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crenshaw, A. G.; Friden, J.; Hargens, A. R.; Lang, G. H.; Thornell, L. E.

    1993-01-01

    A scintigraphic technique employing technetium pyrophosphate uptake was used to identify the area of skeletal muscle damage in the lower leg of four runners 24 h after an ultramarathon footrace (160 km). Most of the race had been run downhill which incorporated an extensive amount of eccentric work. Soreness was diffuse throughout the posterior region of the lower leg. In order to interpret what increased technetium uptake reflects and to express extreme endurance related damages, a biopsy was taken from the 3-D position of abnormal uptake. In addition, intramuscular pressures were determined in the deep posterior compartment. Scintigraphs revealed increased technetium pyrophosphate uptake in the medial portion of the gastrocnemius muscle. For 3698 fibres analysed, 33 fibres (1%) were necrotic, while a few other fibres were either atrophic or irregular shaped. A cluster of necrotic fibres occurred at the fascicular periphery for one subject and fibre type grouping occurred for another. Ultrastructural analysis revealed Z-line streaming near many capillaries and variously altered subsarcolemmal mitochondria including some with paracrystalline inclusions. The majority of the capillaries included thickened and irregular shaped endothelial cells. Intramuscular pressures of the deep posterior compartment were slightly elevated (12-15 mmHg) for three of the four subjects. Increased technetium uptake following extreme endurance running does not just reflect muscle necrosis but also subtle fibre abnormalities. Collectively, these pathological findings are attributed to relative ischaemia occurring during the race and during pre-race training, whereas, intramuscular pressure elevations associated with muscle soreness are attributed to mechanical stress caused by extensive eccentric work during the race.

  6. Doreen Norton OBE, MSc, SRN, FRCN (1922-2007): Pioneer who revolutionised pressure sore management and geriatric nursing to international acclaim.

    PubMed

    Denham, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Doreen Norton was a delightful, widely respected nurse who devoted her life to improving the care of elderly people. She researched the neglected problem of pressure sores, revolutionised their nursing care, and thus achieved international fame. Her Pressure Sore Scale was established as a management tool and is still used today. She was a key member of the design team that produced the 'King's Fund Bed', researched equipment required on geriatric wards, assessed all geriatric long stay units in Scotland and established research as a valuable nursing tool within her profession and health authorities. She lectured extensively and her publications attracted worldwide acclamation. After her retirement, she was subsequently appointed to the world's first Chair of Gerontological Nursing in Cleveland, Ohio. PMID:26968512

  7. Cold Sores (Orofacial Herpes)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Cold Sores (Orofacial Herpes) Information for adults A A ... face, known as orofacial herpes simplex, herpes labialis, cold sores, or fever blisters, is a common, recurrent ...

  8. Pharyngitis - sore throat

    MedlinePlus

    Pharyngitis - bacterial; Sore throat ... caused by swelling in the back of the throat (pharynx) between the tonsils and the voice box (larynx). Most sore throats are caused by colds, the flu, coxsackie virus ...

  9. Cold Sores (HSV-1)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cold Sores (HSV-1) KidsHealth > For Teens > Cold Sores (HSV-1) Print A A A Text Size What's in ... person's lips, are caused by herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) . But they don't just show ...

  10. Canker Sores (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... if the sores appear more than two or three times a year. Diagnosis Tests are usually not done to diagnose canker sores, as a doctor can identify them based on medical history and physical exam alone. If your child has very frequent or severe bouts of recurrent ...

  11. Sore Throat (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which Ones & When? Smart School Lunches Emmy-Nominated Video "Cerebral Palsy: Shannon's Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Sore ...

  12. Postoperative sore throat: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    El-Boghdadly, K; Bailey, C R; Wiles, M D

    2016-06-01

    Postoperative sore throat has a reported incidence of up to 62% following general anaesthesia. In adults undergoing tracheal intubation, female sex, younger age, pre-existing lung disease, prolonged duration of anaesthesia and the presence of a blood-stained tracheal tube on extubation are associated with the greatest risk. Tracheal intubation without neuromuscular blockade, use of double-lumen tubes, as well as high tracheal tube cuff pressures may also increase the risk of postoperative sore throat. The expertise of the anaesthetist performing tracheal intubation appears to have no influence on the incidence in adults, although it may in children. In adults, the i-gel(™) supraglottic airway device results in a lower incidence of postoperative sore throat. Cuffed supraglottic airway devices should be inflated sufficiently to obtain an adequate seal and intracuff pressure should be monitored. Children with respiratory tract disease are at increased risk. The use of supraglottic airway devices, oral, rather than nasal, tracheal intubation and cuffed, rather than uncuffed, tracheal tubes have benefit in reducing the incidence of postoperative sore throat in children. Limiting both tracheal tube and supraglottic airway device cuff pressure may also reduce the incidence. PMID:27158989

  13. Heating tar sands formations while controlling pressure

    DOEpatents

    Stegemeier, George Leo [Houston, TX; Beer, Gary Lee [Houston, TX; Zhang, Etuan [Houston, TX

    2010-01-12

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. A pressure in the majority of the section may be maintained below a fracture pressure of the formation. The pressure in the majority of the section may be reduced to a selected pressure after the average temperature reaches a temperature that is above 240.degree. C. and is at or below pyrolysis temperatures of hydrocarbons in the section. At least some hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  14. Herpes Simplex (Cold Sores and Genital Herpes)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Select a Language: Fact Sheet 508 Herpes Simplex (Cold Sores and Genital Herpes) WHAT IS HERPES? HSV ... virus 1 (HSV1) is the common cause of cold sores (oral herpes) around the mouth. HSV2 normally ...

  15. Abnormally high formation pressures, Potwar Plateau, Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Shah, S.H.A.; Malik, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormally high formation pressures in the Potwar Plateau of north-central Pakistan are major obstacles to oil and gas exploration. Severe drilling problems associated with high pressures have, in some cases, prevented adequate evaluation of reservoirs and significantly increased drilling costs. Previous investigations of abnormal pressure in the Potwar Plateau have only identified abnormal pressures in Neogene rocks. We have identified two distinct pressure regimes in this Himalayan foreland fold and thrust belt basin: one in Neogene rocks and another in pre-Neogene rocks. Pore pressures in Neogene rocks are as high as lithostatic and are interpreted to be due to tectonic compression and compaction disequilibrium associated with high rates of sedimentation. Pore pressure gradients in pre-Neogene rocks are generally less than those in Neogene rocks, commonly ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 psi/ft (11.3 to 15.8 kPa/m) and are most likely due to a combination of tectonic compression and hydrocarbon generation. The top of abnormally high pressure is highly variable and doesn't appear to be related to any specific lithologic seal. Consequently, attempts to predict the depth to the top of overpressure prior to drilling are precluded.

  16. Why Are My Breasts Sore?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and it is often present in guys and girls. The breast bud may be a little tender and may cause you to worry but it's a normal part of puberty. It is also common to have sore breasts around the beginning of a girl's period, or menstruation. During her menstrual cycle, a ...

  17. Resolving the Sore Throat Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Brian; Yassi, Anna Lee

    1981-01-01

    Many physicians ignore the traditional dictum that throat culture is the only tool of value in assessing sore throat. A review of the literature supports this skepticism. Evidence indicates that clinical assessment has been underestimated and the significance of positive culture exaggerated. An approach to managing pharyngitis utilizing the combined strengths of throat culture and clinical assessment is proposed. This approach avoids needless cultures, minimizes unnecessary antibiotic use, achieves prompt clinical improvement in patients whose symptoms are most severe and reduces the risk of long term morbidity from rheumatic heart disease to negligible levels. PMID:21289692

  18. Doctor, I have a sore throat

    PubMed Central

    Dholakia, Shamik; Hashimi, Yasmin

    2013-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a rare yet potentially fatal cause of sore throat. Recently published literature suggests an increase in the incidence of this ‘forgotten disease’, highlighting Lemierre's syndrome as a clinically important differential diagnosis of sore throat. We present a case report of an 85-year-old man who developed a sore throat, which illustrates the re-emergence of Lemierre's syndrome. Reducing the morbidity and mortality from this disease requires a high index of clinical suspicion to ensure prompt diagnosis and initiation of appropriate multidisciplinary management. PMID:23376662

  19. Doctor, I have a sore throat.

    PubMed

    Dholakia, Shamik; Hashimi, Yasmin

    2013-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a rare yet potentially fatal cause of sore throat. Recently published literature suggests an increase in the incidence of this 'forgotten disease', highlighting Lemierre's syndrome as a clinically important differential diagnosis of sore throat. We present a case report of an 85-year-old man who developed a sore throat, which illustrates the re-emergence of Lemierre's syndrome. Reducing the morbidity and mortality from this disease requires a high index of clinical suspicion to ensure prompt diagnosis and initiation of appropriate multidisciplinary management. PMID:23376662

  20. SPECIFIC AND CROSS OVER EFFECTS OF MASSAGE FOR MUSCLE SORENESS: RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Sundstrup, Emil; Søndergaard, Stine D.; Behm, David; Brandt, Mikkel; Særvoll, Charlotte A.; Jakobsen, Markus D.; Andersen, Lars L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Muscle soreness can negatively interfere with the activities of daily living as well as sports performance. In the working environment, a common problem is muscle tenderness, soreness and pain, especially for workers frequently exposed to unilateral high repetitive movements tasks. The aim of the study is therefore to investigate the acute effect of massage applied using a simple device Thera‐band roller Massager on laboratory induced hamstring muscle soreness, and the potential cross over effect to the non‐massaged limb. Methods: 22 healthy untrained men (Mean age 34 +/− 7 years; mean height 181.7 +/− 6.9 cm; mean weight 80.6 +/− 6.4 kg; BMI: 24.5 +/− 1.3) with no prior history of knee, low back or neck injury or other adverse health issues were recruited. Participants visited the researchers on two separate occasions, separated by 48 hours, each time providing a soreness rating (modified visual analog scale 0‐10), and being tested for pressure pain threshold (PPT) and active range of motion (ROM) of the hamstring muscles. During the first visit, delayed onset muscular soreness of the hamstring muscles was induced by 10 x 10 repetitions of the stiff‐legged dead‐lift. On the second visit participants received either 1) 10 minutes of roller massage on one leg, while the contralateral leg served as a cross over control, or 2) Resting for 10 minutes with no massage at all. Measurement of soreness, PPT and ROM were taken immediately before and at 0, 10, 30 and 60 min. after treatment. Results: There was a significant group by time interaction for soreness (p < 0.0001) and PPT (p = 0.0007), with the massage group experiencing reduced soreness and increasing PPT compared with the control group. There was no group by time interaction for ROM (p = 0.18). At 10 min. post massage there was a significant reduction in soreness of the non‐massaged limb in the cross over control group compared to controls but this effect was lost 30

  1. Structure formation of atmospheric pressure discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Alexey E.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper it is shown, by analyzing the results of experimental studies, that the outer boundary of the atmospheric pressure discharge pinch is determined by the condition of equality of plasma flows based on the thermal and electric field energy. In most cases, the number of charged particles coming from near-electrode zones is sufficient to compensate for losses in the discharge bulk. At large currents and enhanced heating, plasma is in the diffusion mode of losses, with recombination of charged particles at the pinch boundary. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Recent Breakthroughs in Microplasma Science and Technology", edited by Kurt Becker, Jose Lopez, David Staack, Klaus-Dieter Weltmann and Wei Dong Zhu.

  2. Ozone formation in pulsed SDBD in a wide pressure range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Nudnova, Maryia; mipt Team

    2011-10-01

    Ozone concentration in surface anode-directed DBD for wide pressure range (150 - 1300 torr) was experimentally measured. Voltage and pressure effect were investigated. Reduced electric field was measured for anode-directed and cathode-directed SDBD. E/n values in cathode-directed SDBD is higher than in cathode-directed on 50 percent at atmospheric pressure. E/n value increase leads to decrease the rate of oxygen dissociation and Ozone formation at lower pressures. Radiating region thickness of sliding discharge was measured. Typical thickness of radiating zone is 0.4-1.0 mm within pressure range 220-740 torr. It was shown that high-voltage pulsed nanosecond discharge due to high E/n value produces less Ozone with compare to other discharges. Kinetic model was proposed to describe Ozone formation in the pulsed nanosecond SDBD.

  3. Can You Get Genital Herpes from a Cold Sore?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cuts? Can You Get Genital Herpes From a Cold Sore? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can You Get Genital Herpes From a Cold Sore? Print A A A Text Size Can you get genital herpes from a cold sore? – Lucy* Yes — it is possible to get ...

  4. Vibration Therapy in Management of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS).

    PubMed

    Veqar, Zubia; Imtiyaz, Shagufta

    2014-06-01

    Both athletic and nonathletic population when subjected to any unaccustomed or unfamiliar exercise will experience pain 24-72 hours postexercise. This exercise especially eccentric in nature caused primarily by muscle damage is known as delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). This damage is characterized by muscular pain, decreased muscle force production, reduce range of motion and discomfort experienced. DOMS is due to microscopic muscle fiber tears. The presence of DOMS increases risk of injury. A reduced range of motion may lead to the incapability to efficiently absorb the shock that affect physical activity. Alterations to mechanical motion may increase strain placed on soft tissue structures. Reduced force output may signal compensatory recruitment of muscles, thus leading to unaccustomed stress on musculature. Differences in strength ratios may also cause excessive strain on unaccustomed musculature. A range of interventions aimed at decreasing symptoms of DOMS have been proposed. Although voluminous research has been done in this regard, there is little consensus among the practitioners regarding the most effective way of treating DOMS. Mechanical oscillatory motion provided by vibration therapy. Vibration could represent an effective exercise intervention for enhancing neuromuscular performance in athletes. Vibration has shown effectiveness in flexibility and explosive power. Vibration can apply either local area or whole body vibration. Vibration therapy improves muscular strength, power development, kinesthetic awareness, decreased muscle sore, increased range of motion, and increased blood flow under the skin. VT was effective for reduction of DOMS and regaining full ROM. Application of whole body vibration therapy in postexercise demonstrates less pressure pain threshold, muscle soreness along with less reduction maximal isometric and isokinetic voluntary strength and lower creatine kinase levels in the blood. PMID:25121012

  5. Magnetically Orchestrated Formation of Diamond at Lower Temperatures and Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Reginald B.; Lochner, Eric; Goddard, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Man's curiosity and fascination with diamonds date back to ancient times. The knowledge of the many properties of diamond is recorded during Biblical times. Antoine Lavoisier determined the composition of diamond by burning in O2 to form CO2. With the then existing awareness of graphite as carbon, the race began to convert graphite to diamond. The selective chemical synthesis of diamond has been pursued by Cagniard, Hannay, Moisson and Parson. On the basis of the thermodynamically predicted equilibrium line of diamond and graphite, P W Bridgman attempted extraordinary conditions of high temperature (>2200°C) and pressure (>100,000 atm) for the allotropic conversion of graphite to diamond. H T Hall was the first to successfully form bulk diamond by realizing the kinetic restrictions to Bridgman's (thermodynamic) high pressure high temperature direct allotropic conversion. Moreover, Hall identified catalysts for the faster kinetics of diamond formation. H M Strong determined the import of the liquid catalyst during Hall's catalytic synthesis. W G Eversole discovered the slow metastable low pressure diamond formation by pyrolytic chemical vapor deposition with the molecular hydrogen etching of the rapidly forming stable graphitic carbon. J C Angus determined the import of atomic hydrogen for faster etching for faster diamond growth at low pressure. S Matsumoto has developed plasma and hot filament technology for faster hydrogen and carbon radical generations at low pressure for faster diamond formation. However the metastable low pressure chemical vapor depositions by plasma and hot filament are prone to polycrystalline films. From Bridgman to Hall to Eversole, Angus and Matsumoto, much knowledge has developed of the importance of pressure, temperature, transition metal catalyst, liquid state of metal (metal radicals atoms) and the carbon radical intermediates for diamond synthesis. Here we advance this understanding of diamond formation by demonstrating the external

  6. Instability of black hole formation under small pressure perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Pankaj S.; Malafarina, Daniele

    2013-02-01

    We investigate here the spectrum of gravitational collapse endstates when arbitrarily small perfect fluid pressures are introduced in the classic black hole formation scenario as described by Oppenheimer, Snyder and Datt (OSD) (Oppenheimer and Snyder in Phys Rev 56:455, 1939; Datt in Zs f Phys 108:314, 1938). This extends a previous result on tangential pressures (Joshi and Malafarina Phys Rev D 83:024009, 2011) to the physically more realistic scenario of perfect fluid collapse. The existence of classes of pressure perturbations is shown explicitly, which has the property that injecting any smallest pressure changes the final fate of the dynamical collapse from a black hole to a naked singularity. It is therefore seen that any smallest neighborhood of the OSD model, in the space of initial data, contains collapse evolutions that go to a naked singularity outcome. This gives an intriguing insight on the nature of naked singularity formation in gravitational collapse.

  7. Delayed onset muscle soreness: is massage effective?

    PubMed

    Nelson, Nicole

    2013-10-01

    Despite the widespread occurrence of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), there is little consensus as to the exact cause or which treatments may be most effective at alleviating symptoms. Greater understanding of DOMS can give sports medicine and fitness professionals an opportunity to help prevent or speed recovery of this performance limiting condition. This article will review the DOMS literature, including the potential role of psychosocial factors and explore studies which involve massage therapy as a treatment modality. Articles from PubMed, MEDLINE, Google Scholar, and references from articles are included in this review. Search words and phrases included delayed onset muscle soreness, repeated bout effect, massage effectiveness, exercise induced muscle damage, and eccentric exercise. PMID:24139006

  8. Fluid Pressure Anomalies in Shallow Intraplate Argillaceous Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuzil, C.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid transport in shales and other argillaceous formations is difficult to study because these materials often have extremely low permeability. However, recent investigations have revealed a number of instances of apparently isolated highs or lows in pore fluid potential in shallow (< ~ 1 km depth) argillaceous formations in intraplate settings. The presence (or absence) of such pressure anomalies may provide clues to fluid flow. Formations with the pressure anomalies are distinguished by (1) smaller ratios of hydraulic conductivity to formation thickness and (2) smaller hydraulic (or pressure) diffusivities than those without anomalies. This is consistent with water-saturated transient Darcian flow caused by strain at rates of ~ 10-17 to 10-16 s-1, by significant perturbing events in the past 104 to 106 years or by some combination of the two. Plausible causes include erosional downwasting, tectonic strain, and glaciation. In this conceptualization the anomalies constrain formation-scale flow properties, flow history, and local geological forcing in the last 106 years and in particular indicate zones of low permeability (10-19 - 10-22 m2) that could be useful for isolation of nuclear waste.

  9. Pressure regimes and core formation in the accreting earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, H. E.

    1992-01-01

    Recent work suggests that a large degree of melting is required to segregate metal from silicates, suggesting a connection with the formation of magma oceans. At low pressures metallic liquids do not wet silicate minerals, preventing the metal from aggregating into large masses that can sink. At high pressures, above 25 GPa, the dihedral angles of grains in contact with oxygen-rich metallic liquids may be reduced enough to allow percolation of metal, but this has not been confirmed. Physical models of core formation and accretion may therefore involve the formation of magma oceans and the segregation of metal at both high and low pressures. Models of core formation involving different pressure regimes are discussed as well as chemical evidence bearing on the models. Available geophysical data is ambiguous. The nature of the 670 km boundary (chemical difference or strictly phase change) between the upper and lower mantle is in doubt. There is some evidence that plumes are derived from the lower mantle, and seismic tomography strongly indicates that penetration of subducting oceanic crust into the lower mantle, but the tomography data also indicates that the 670 km discontinuity is a significant barrier to general mantle convection. The presence of the D' layer at the base of the lower mantle could be a reaction zone between the mantle and core indicating core-mantle disequilibrium, or D' layer could be subducted material. The abundance of the siderophile elements in the mantle could provide clues to the importance of high pressure processes in Earth, but partition coefficients at high pressures are only beginning to be measured.

  10. RELIABILITY AND APPLICABILITY OF DSTS AND BOTTOMHOLE PRESSURE MEASUREMENTS IN TEXAS GULF TERTIARY FORMATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pressure data gathered from drillstem tests (DSTs) and bottomhole pressure measurements provide critical information toward formation and can be used for an assessment of prevailing pressure regimes and their influence on the migration potential of formation fluids. Reliability o...

  11. Sore throat in a young man: guess what…

    PubMed Central

    Lazarescu, Roxana Elena; Prabhu, Vinay; Wallace, Camari; Htet, Hein

    2014-01-01

    Sore throat is a common complaint in the outpatient and emergency room settings. Typically, little workup is necessary and includes visual inspection with or without swabs for bacterial infection. We present a case that demonstrates an important entity to be excluded by simple history and physical examination in patients presenting with pain in the throat or neck. The most important cause of pneumomediastinum is previous instrumentation. Spontaneous pneumomediastinum is uncommonly seen in young adults. Most cases of spontaneous pneumomediastinum are uncomplicated, as mediastinal pressures rarely mount to dangerous levels. However, when the patient presents with distended neck veins, cyanosis or marked dyspnoea, further action is necessary. Lastly, since pneumomediastinum can be caused by oesophageal rupture and occasionally present with concurrent pneumothorax, these dangerous entities must be excluded. PMID:24951599

  12. Conductivity affects nanosecond electrical pulse induced pressure transient formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Caleb C.; Barnes, Ronald A.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope T.; Glickman, Randolph D.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoporation occurs in cells exposed to high amplitude short duration (< 1μs) electrical pulses. The biophysical mechanism(s) responsible for nanoporation is unknown although several theories exist. Current theories focus exclusively on the electrical field, citing electrostriction, water dipole alignment and/or electrodeformation as the primary mechanisms for pore formation. Our group has shown that mechanical forces of substantial magnitude are also generated during nsEP exposures. We hypothesize that these mechanical forces may contribute to pore formation. In this paper, we report that alteration of the conductivity of the exposure solution also altered the level of mechanical forces generated during a nsEP exposure. By reducing the conductivity of the exposure solutions, we found that we could completely eliminate any pressure transients normally created by nsEP exposure. The data collected for this proceeding does not definitively show that the pressure transients previously identified contribute to nanoporation; however; it indicates that conductivity influences both survival and pressure transient formation.

  13. Treating Sore Throats: Practice vs. Theory

    PubMed Central

    Hutten-Czapski, P.

    1987-01-01

    The management of a seemingly simple and common ailment, the sore throat, is shrouded in considerable controversy. At present, authoritarian opinion, stressing prevention of acute rheumatic fever (ARF), is in conflict with the practices of a large segment of the profession, whose members seem to treat primarily for symptom relief. Recent developments, in fields as diverse as epidemiology of ARF, clinical decision making, laboratory tests for streptococcus, and clinical trials of penicillin, are in support of management that is directed primarily towards symptom relief and secondarily towards prevention of ARF. PMID:21263777

  14. Laser homeostatics on delayed onset muscle soreness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T. C. Y.; Fu, D. R.; Liu, X. G.; Tian, Z. X.

    2011-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and its photobiomodulation were reviewed from the viewpoint of function-specific homeostasis (FSH) in this paper. FSH is a negative-feedback response of a biosystem to maintain the function-specific fluctuations inside the biosystem so that the function is perfectly performed. A stressor may destroy a FSH. A stress is a response of a biosystem to a stressor and may also be in stress-specific homeostasis (StSH). A low level light (LLL) is so defined that it has no effects on a function in its FSH or a stress in its StSH, but it modulate a function far from its FSH or a stress far from its StSH. For DOMS recovery, protein metabolism in the Z-line streaming muscular cell is the essential process, but the inflammation, pain and soreness are non-essential processes. For many DOMS phenomena, protein metabolism in the Z-line streaming muscular cell is in protein metabolism-specific homeostasis (PmSH) so that there are no effects of LLL although the inflammation can be inhibited and the pain can be relieved. An athlete or animal in the dysfunctional conditions such as blood flow restriction and exercise exhaustion is far from PmSH and the protein metabolism can be improved with LLL.

  15. Does Postexercise Static Stretching Alleviate Delayed Muscle Soreness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buroker, Katherine C.; Schwane, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Because many experts recommend stretching after exercise to relieve muscle soreness, 23 subjects performed a 30-minute step test to induce delayed muscle soreness. There was neither temporary relief of pain immediately after stretching nor a reduction in pain during the 3-day postexercise period. (Author/SM)

  16. FILAMENT FORMATION BY ESCHERICHIA COLI AT INCREASED HYDROSTATIC PRESSURES1

    PubMed Central

    Zobell, Claude E.; Cobet, Andre B.

    1964-01-01

    ZoBell, Claude E. (University of California, La Jolla), and Andre B. Cobet. Filament formation by Escherichia coli at increased hydrostatic pressures. J. Bacteriol. 87:710–719. 1964.—The reproduction as well as the growth of Escherichia coli is retarded by hydrostatic pressures ranging from 200 to 500 atm. Reproduction was indicated by an increase in the number of cells determined by plating on EMB Agar as well as by direct microscopic counts. Growth, which is not necessarily synonymous with reproduction, was indicated by increase in dry weight and protein content of the bacterial biomass. At increased pressures, cells of three different strains of E. coli tended to form long filaments. Whereas most normal cells of E. coli that developed at 1 atm were only about 2 μ long, the mean length of those that developed at 475 atm was 2.93 μ for strain R4, 3.99 μ for strain S, and 5.82 μ for strain B cells. Nearly 90% of the bacterial biomass produced at 475 atm by strain B was found in filaments exceeding 5 μ in length; 74.7 and 16.4% of the biomass produced at 475 atm by strains S and R4, respectively, occurred in such filaments. Strain R4 formed fewer and shorter (5 to 35 μ) filaments than did the other two strains, whose filaments ranged in length from 5 to >100 μ. The bacterial biomass produced at all pressures had approximately the same content of protein and nucleic acids. But at increased pressures appreciably more ribonucleic acid (RNA) and proportionately less deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was found per unit of biomass. Whereas the RNA content per cell increased with cell length, the amount of DNA was nearly the same in long filaments formed at increased pressure as in cells of normal length formed at 1 atm. The inverse relationship between the concentration of DNA and cell length in all three strains of E. coli suggests that the failure of DNA to replicate at increased pressure may be responsible for a repression of cell division and consequent filament

  17. Modeling of formation of extended NH solids under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batyrev, Iskander G.

    Structure of N-H extended network under high pressure was modelled using the evolutionary algorithm program USPEX based on plane wave DFT calculations (VASP). Concentration ratio of N2 to H2 gases was 3:1, 4:1, and 9:1. Range of the studied pressures was 10 - 50 GPa on compression, and from 50 to 1 GPa on isotropic decompression of the extended network. Formation of an extended network with covalent bonds occurs between 30-50 GPa. Higher concentration of N requires higher pressure to form a covalent bond network. New structure of NH extended solids with covalent bonds are predicted: with P-1(CI-1) symmetry group for 9:1 ratio, with PBAM (D2H +9) symmetry group for 4:1 ratio, and with P-1(CI-1) for 3:1 ratio of N2 to H2 gas. Calculations of the mixtures of N2 and H2 gases at pressures in the range of 10-20 GPa resulted in a variety of structures without a covalent network, but consisting of nitrogen-containing molecules. For example, the lowest energy structure for a 3:1 ratio of N to H atoms consists of tetrazene and N2 molecules. At 10 GPa the lowest energy structure appears to be a combination of protonated ammonia and N2 molecules.

  18. Fluid pressure and reaction zone formation at a lithological interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Podladchikov, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    Chemical composition variations in reaction zones between two distinct lithologies are generally interpreted in terms of chemical potential gradients and diffusion process. Concentration profiles can then be used to quantify the species diffusion coefficients or the time scale of geological events. However, chemical potential gradients are also functions of temperature and pressure and local variations of these parameters can thus potentially modify the diffusion process. In northern Corsica, a centimeter scale reaction zone formed under blueschist conditions at a serpentinite - marble contact of sedimentary origin. Three sub-zones having chemical compositions evolving from one rock end-member to another divide the reaction zone along sharp interfaces. At the reaction zone - marble interface, marble decarbonation occurs to form wollastonite and carbonaceous matter. Thermodynamic calculations for this reaction and the respective increase in density of 25 % and 7 % in the bulk rock and in the garnet minerals are interpreted as records of a pressure gradient during reaction zone formation. Moreover, the formation of a volatile-free sub-zone in the reaction zone from reaction between the H2O-bearing serpentinite and the CO2-bearing marble released fluids at the contact. The impact of such a release on the fluid pressure was modelled by considering the effects of both the rock compaction and the transport of fluid by hydraulic diffusion. Modelling results indicates that > 0.5 GPa fluid overpressure can be generated at the contact if devolatilization rates are of the order of the one experimentally measured (> 10-5 kg of fluid/m3 of rock/s). The resulting pressure gradient is of the order of magnitude of the one necessary to counter-balance the effect on chemical potential of the chemical composition variations across the contact. Finally, after the reaction has run to completion, the model predicts that fluid rapidly diffuses away from the interface which thus stops

  19. Pressure broadening of the ((dt. mu. )dee)* formation resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.S.; Leon, M.; Padial, N.T.

    1988-12-27

    The treatment of ((dt..mu..)dee)* formation at high densities as a pressure broadening process is discussed. Cross sections for collisions of the complex (dt..mu..)dee, and of the D/sub 2/ molecule from which it is formed, with the bath molecules have been accurately calculated. These cross sections are used to calculate the collisional width in three variations of the impact approximation that have been proposed for this problem. In general, the quasistatic approximation is shown to satisfy the usual conditions of muon-catalyzed fusion better than does the impact approximation. A preliminary rough treatment is presented to illustrate the quasistatic approximation.

  20. Electrical characteristics and formation mechanism of atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lijuan; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Weijing; Meng, Ying; Ouyang, Jiting

    2014-06-16

    The behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma jet produced by a coplanar dielectric barrier discharge in helium in external electrostatic and magnetic field is investigated. Net negative charges in the plasma jet outside the tube were detected. The deflection of the plume in the external field was observed. The plasma jet is suggested to be formed by the electron beam from the temporal cathode which is accelerated by a longitudinal field induced by the surface charges on the dielectric tube or interface between the helium and ambient air. The helium flow is necessary for the jet formation in the surrounding air.

  1. Magma chambers: Formation, local stresses, excess pressures, and compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, Agust

    2012-09-01

    An existing magma chamber is normally a necessary condition for the generation of a large volcanic edifice. Most magma chambers form through repeated magma injections, commonly sills, and gradually expand and change their shapes. Highly irregular magma-chamber shapes are thermo-mechanically unstable; common long-term equilibrium shapes are comparatively smooth and approximate those of ellipsoids of revolution. Some chambers, particularly small and sill-like, may be totally molten. Most chambers, however, are only partially molten, the main part of the chamber being crystal mush, a porous material. During an eruption, magma is drawn from the crystal mush towards a molten zone beneath the lower end of the feeder dyke. Magma transport to the feeder dyke, however, depends on the chamber's internal structure; in particular on whether the chamber contains pressure compartments that are, to a degree, isolated from other compartments. It is only during large drops in the hydraulic potential beneath the feeder dyke that other compartments become likely to supply magma to the erupting compartment, thereby contributing to its excess pressure (the pressure needed to rupture a magma chamber) and the duration of the eruption. Simple analytical models suggest that during a typical eruption, the excess-pressure in the chamber decreases exponentially. This result applies to a magma chamber that (a) is homogeneous and totally fluid (contains no compartments), (b) is not subject to significant replenishment (inflow of new magma into the chamber) during the eruption, and (c) contains magma where exsolution of gas has no significant effect on the excess pressure. For a chamber consisting of pressure compartments, the exponential excess-pressure decline applies primarily to a single erupting compartment. When more than one compartment contributes magma to the eruption, the excess pressure may decline much more slowly and irregularly. Excess pressure is normally similar to the in

  2. Pregame Sore Throat, Postgame Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Stork, Natalie C; Smoot, M Kyle

    2016-05-01

    A collegiate football athlete presented, on game day, with an acute onset of sore throat. He was afebrile, speaking in full sentences, without signs of respiratory distress. His examination was negative for lymphadenopathy or tonsillar enlargement or exudate. Twelve hours after initial presentation, he developed acute epiglottitis. He underwent urgent fiberoptic intubation and was empirically treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics and corticosteroids. Currently, there are no published reports of acute epiglottitis in athletes. Consequently, there is no evidence to guide return to play decisions. Return to play, following acute epiglottitis, should include resolution of symptoms and a graded return to play, taking into consideration the level of deconditioning the athlete experienced from hospitalization. PMID:26247550

  3. Sore throat may be a clue to the early diagnosis of spontaneous pneumomediastinum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke-Wei; Chiu, Wen-Yi; Lo, Yi-Hao

    2015-02-01

    Spontaneous pneumomediastinum is defined as presence of air in the mediastinum without obvious cause such as esophageal perforation or abscess formation. It is a benign condition and usually resolved by itself in 1 to 2 weeks. The main symptom of spontaneous pneumomediastinum is retrosternal chest pain. Here, we present a young adult who complained about sore throat initially. Marked retropharyngeal emphysema was noted by neck x-ray. Pneumomediastinum was confirmed with chest x-ray and computed tomographic scan later on.We want to emphasize the importance of thorough history taking and lateral soft tissue neck radiograph on retropharyngeal emphysema in real time, which is key to the diagnostic workup for patients who present with persistent sore throat and dysphagia in young adult. PMID:25070194

  4. Carbonate formation in Wyoming montmorillonite under high pressure carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Tae-Bong; Baltrus, John P.; Howard, Bret H.; Harbert, William P.; Romanov, Vyacheslav N.

    2013-03-01

    Carbonation reaction with silicate minerals that are common components of the host rock and cap rock within geological storage reservoirs and the associated structural deformation were investigated for better understanding of the geochemical reactions associated with geologic CO2 storage. Exposure of a model expanding clay, Wyoming montmorillonite, SWy-2, to high-pressure CO2 resulted in the formation of a mineral carbonate phase via dry CO2–clay mineral interactions at two different temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that the properties of CO2 fluid at 70 °C provide more favorable conditions for carbonate formation at the clay surface less accessible to CO2 at 22 °C. The carbonation reaction occurred predominantly within the first couple of days of exposure to the fluid and then proceeded slower with continuing exposure. As compared to the as-received clay under the same ambient conditions, the (0 0 1) basal spacing of the clay bearing carbonates (after the CO2 exposure) was slightly expanded at a relative humidity (RH) level of 12% but it was slightly collapsed at the RH level of 40%. Finally, experimental observations suggest that the carbonation reaction occurs at the external surface as well as internal surface (interlayer) of the clay particles.

  5. Controlling and assessing pressure conditions during treatment of tar sands formations

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Etuan; Beer, Gary Lee

    2015-11-10

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the tar sands formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. Heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. A pressure in the portion of the formation is controlled such that the pressure remains below a fracture pressure of the formation overburden while allowing the portion of the formation to heat to a selected average temperature of at least about 280.degree. C. and at most about 300.degree. C. The pressure in the portion of the formation is reduced to a selected pressure after the portion of the formation reaches the selected average temperature.

  6. A ram-pressure threshold for star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitworth, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    In turbulent fragmentation, star formation occurs in condensations created by converging flows. The condensations must be sufficiently massive, dense and cool to be gravitationally unstable, so that they start to contract; and they must then radiate away thermal energy fast enough for self-gravity to remain dominant, so that they continue to contract. For the metallicities and temperatures in local star-forming clouds, this second requirement is only met robustly when the gas couples thermally to the dust, because this delivers the capacity to radiate across the full bandwidth of the continuum, rather than just in a few discrete spectral lines. This translates into a threshold for vigorous star formation, which can be written as a minimum ram pressure PCRIT ˜ 4 × 10-11 dyne. PCRIT is independent of temperature, and corresponds to flows with molecular hydrogen number density n_{{H_2.FLOW}} and velocity vFLOW satisfying n_{{H_2.FLOW}} v_{FLOW}^2≳ 800 cm^{-3} (km s^{-1})^2. This in turn corresponds to a minimum molecular hydrogen column density for vigorous star formation, N_{{H_2.CRIT}} ˜ 4 × 10^{21} cm^{-2} (ΣCRIT ˜ 100 M⊙ pc-2), and a minimum visual extinction AV, CRIT ˜ 9 mag. The characteristic diameter and line density for a star-forming filament when this threshold is just exceeded - a sweet spot for local star formation regions - are 2RFIL ˜ 0.1 pc and μFIL ˜ 13 M⊙ pc-2. The characteristic diameter and mass for a prestellar core condensing out of such a filament are 2RCORE ˜ 0.1 pc and MCORE ˜ 1 M⊙. We also show that fragmentation of a shock-compressed layer is likely to commence while the convergent flows creating the layer are still ongoing, and we stress that, under this circumstance, the phenomenology and characteristic scales for fragmentation of the layer are fundamentally different from those derived traditionally for pre-existing layers.

  7. Just a sore throat? Uncommon causes of significant respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Wahab, Dalia; Bichard, Julia; Shah, Anand; Mann, Bhupinder

    2013-01-01

    We present two uncommon underlying causes of a sore throat which, if missed or delayed in diagnosis, can lead to disastrous consequences. Our first case is of Lemierre's syndrome diagnosed in a 21-year-old man presenting with a 5-day history of sore throat, fever, right-sided pleuritic chest pain and bilateral pulmonary nodules on CT imaging. Fusobacterium necrophorum cultured from peripheral blood and an occluded left internal jugular vein on ultrasound lead to an eventual diagnosis. Our second case presents a 29-year-old woman with a 5-day history of sore throat, fever and right-sided pleuritic chest pain. A left-sided quinsy was diagnosed and aspirated and the patient was discharged home. She represented shortly with worsening pleuritic pain and was found to have a right-sided pleural effusion with descending mediastinitis originating from the tonsillar abscess. Delayed diagnosis resulted in open thoracotomy, decortication and prolonged intravenous antibiotics. PMID:23632177

  8. Just a sore throat? Uncommon causes of significant respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Wahab, Dalia; Bichard, Julia; Shah, Anand; Mann, Bhupinder

    2013-01-01

    We present two uncommon underlying causes of a sore throat which, if missed or delayed in diagnosis, can lead to disastrous consequences. Our first case is of Lemierre's syndrome diagnosed in a 21-year-old man presenting with a 5-day history of sore throat, fever, right-sided pleuritic chest pain and bilateral pulmonary nodules on CT imaging. Fusobacterium necrophorum cultured from peripheral blood and an occluded left internal jugular vein on ultrasound lead to an eventual diagnosis. Our second case presents a 29-year-old woman with a 5-day history of sore throat, fever and right-sided pleuritic chest pain. A left-sided quinsy was diagnosed and aspirated and the patient was discharged home. She represented shortly with worsening pleuritic pain and was found to have a right-sided pleural effusion with descending mediastinitis originating from the tonsillar abscess. Delayed diagnosis resulted in open thoracotomy, decortication and prolonged intravenous antibiotics. PMID:23632177

  9. A pressure-induced, magnetic transition in pyrrhotite: Implications for the formation pressure of meteorites and diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilder, S. A.; Egli, R.; Hochleitner, R.; Roud, S. C.; Volk, M. W. R.; Le Goff, M.; de Wit, M.

    2012-04-01

    Meteorites and diamonds encounter high pressures during their formation or subsequent evolution. These materials sometimes contain magnetic inclusions of pyrrhotite. Because magnetic properties are sensitive to strain, pyrrhotite can potentially record the shock or formation pressures of its host. Moreover, pyrrhotite undergoes a pressure-induced phase transition between 1.6 and 6.2 GPa, but the magnetic signature of this transition is poorly known. Here we report room temperature magnetic measurements on multi- and single domain pyrrhotite under non-hydrostatic pressure up to 4.5 GPa. We find that the ratio of magnetic coercivity and remanence follows a logarithmic law with respect to pressure, which can potentially be used as a geobarometer. Due to the greater thermal expansion of pyrrhotite with respect to diamond, pyrrhotite inclusions in diamond experience a confining pressure at the Earth's surface. Applying our experimentally derived magnetic geobarometer to pyrrhotite-bearing diamonds from Botswana and the Central African Republic suggests the pressures of the pyrrhotite inclusions in the diamonds range from 1.3 to 2.1 GPa. These overpressures constrain the mantle source pressures from 5.4 to 9.5 GPa, depending on which bulk modulus and thermal expansion coefficients of the two phases are used. We are now trying to develop magnetic barometers on other magnetic phases to apply to meteorites, ultimately to constrain the minimum pressure in which the meteorite formed and, hence, information regarding the planetesmal's size, and/or depth, in which the meteorite was derived.

  10. Theoretical assessment of bonaccordite formation in pressurized water reactors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rak, Zsolt; O'Brien, Chris; Shin, Dongwon; Andersson, Anders David; Stanek, Christopher; Brenner, Donald

    2016-03-04

    The free energy of formation of bonaccordite (Ni2FeBO5) as a function of temperature has been calculated using a technique that combines first principles calculations with experimental free energies of formation of aqueous species. The results suggest that bonaccordite formation from aqueous metal ions (Ni2+ andFe3+) and boric acid is thermodynamically favorable at elevated temperature and pH that have been predicted to exist at the CRUD-clad interface in deposits thicker than 60 μm.

  11. Theoretical assessment of bonaccordite formation in pressurized water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rak, Zs; O'Brien, C. J.; Shin, D.; Andersson, A. D.; Stanek, C. R.; Brenner, D. W.

    2016-06-01

    The free energy of formation of bonaccordite (Ni2FeBO5) as a function of temperature has been calculated using a technique that combines first principles calculations with experimental free energies of formation of aqueous species. The results suggest that bonaccordite formation from aqueous metal ions (Ni2+ andFe3+) and boric acid is thermodynamically favorable at elevated temperature and pH that have been predicted to exist at the CRUD-clad interface in deposits thicker than 60 μm.

  12. Theoretical assessment of bonaccordite formation in pressurized water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rak, Zs; O'Brien, C. J.; Shin, D.; Andersson, A. D.; Stanek, C. R.; Brenner, D. W.

    2016-06-01

    The free energy of formation of bonaccordite (Ni2FeBO5) as a function of temperature has been calculated using a technique that combines first principles calculations with experimental free energies of formation of aqueous species. The results suggest that bonaccordite formation from aqueous metal ions (Ni2+ andFe3+) and boric acid is thermodynamically favorable at elevated temperature and pH that have been predicted to exist at the CRUD-clad interface in deposits thicker than 60 μm.

  13. Density fluctuations as an intrinsic mechanism of pressure profile formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vershkov, V. A.; Shelukhin, D. A.; Subbotin, G. F.; Dnestrovskij, Yu. N.; Danilov, A. V.; Melnikov, A. V.; Eliseev, L. G.; Maltsev, S. G.; Gorbunov, E. P.; Sergeev, D. S.; Krylov, S. V.; Myalton, T. B.; Ryzhakov, D. V.; Trukhin, V. M.; Chistiakov, V. V.; Cherkasov, S. V.

    2015-06-01

    This article provides new insight into previous and new experimental data regarding behaviour of small-scale density fluctuations in T-10 ohmic and electron cyclotron resonance heated (ECRH) discharges. The experiments demonstrate the existence of certain peaked-‘marginal’ normalized plasma pressure profiles in both ohmic and discharges with on-axis ECRH. Strong particle confinement degradation occurred when the normalized plasma pressure gradient exceeded this marginal profile gradient (fast density decay in ohmic, ‘density pump out’ in ECRH). The marginal profile could be achieved either with a flat density and peaked temperature profile or vice versa. Minimal turbulence level did not depend on heating power and was observed with the ‘optimal’ pressure profile, which was slightly broader than the marginal profile. The density fluctuations did not significantly contribute to the heat transport but determined particle fluxes to maintain the pressure profile. The experimental density behaviour could be reasonably described with the modified model of canonical profiles, which includes particle confinement deterioration under marginal pressure profile conditions.

  14. Recommendations for the Avoidance of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymanski, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the possible causes of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), which include buildup of lactic acid in muscle, increased intracellular calcium concentration, increased intramuscular inflammation, and muscle fiber and connective tissue damage. Proposed methods to reduce DOMS include warming up before exercise and performing repeated bouts…

  15. Hemispheric Asymmetry and Pun Comprehension: When Cowboys Have Sore Calves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulson, Seana; Severens, Els

    2007-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded as healthy participants listened to puns such as ''During branding, cowboys have sore calves.'' To assess hemispheric differences in pun comprehension, visually presented probes that were either highly related (COW), moderately related (LEG), or unrelated, were presented in either the left or right…

  16. School Nurses on the Front Lines of Medicine: A Student With Fever and Sore Throat.

    PubMed

    Olympia, Robert P

    2016-05-01

    Fever and sore throat are common chief complaints encountered by school nurses. This article explains the etiology of both fever and sore throat in children, describes the office assessment, and delineates life-threatening complications associated with fever and sore throat that may prompt the school nurse to transfer the child to a local emergency department. PMID:27091630

  17. Pressure-driven formation and stabilization of superconductive chromium hydrides

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuyin; Jia, Xiaojing; Frapper, Gilles; Li, Duan; Oganov, Artem R.; Zeng, Qingfeng; Zhang, Litong

    2015-01-01

    Chromium hydride is a prototype stoichiometric transition metal hydride. The phase diagram of Cr-H system at high pressures remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in dealing with the high activation barriers and complications in handing hydrogen under pressure. We have performed an extensive structural study on Cr-H system at pressure range 0 ∼ 300 GPa using an unbiased structure prediction method based on evolutionary algorithm. Upon compression, a number of hydrides are predicted to become stable in the excess hydrogen environment and these have compositions of Cr2Hn (n = 2–4, 6, 8, 16). Cr2H3, CrH2 and Cr2H5 structures are versions of the perfect anti-NiAs-type CrH with ordered tetrahedral interstitial sites filled by H atoms. CrH3 and CrH4 exhibit host-guest structural characteristics. In CrH8, H2 units are also identified. Our study unravels that CrH is a superconductor at atmospheric pressure with an estimated transition temperature (T c) of 10.6 K, and superconductivity in CrH3 is enhanced by the metallic hydrogen sublattice with T c of 37.1 K at 81 GPa, very similar to the extensively studied MgB2. PMID:26626579

  18. Pressure-driven formation and stabilization of superconductive chromium hydrides.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuyin; Jia, Xiaojing; Frapper, Gilles; Li, Duan; Oganov, Artem R; Zeng, Qingfeng; Zhang, Litong

    2015-01-01

    Chromium hydride is a prototype stoichiometric transition metal hydride. The phase diagram of Cr-H system at high pressures remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in dealing with the high activation barriers and complications in handing hydrogen under pressure. We have performed an extensive structural study on Cr-H system at pressure range 0 ∼ 300 GPa using an unbiased structure prediction method based on evolutionary algorithm. Upon compression, a number of hydrides are predicted to become stable in the excess hydrogen environment and these have compositions of Cr2Hn (n = 2-4, 6, 8, 16). Cr2H3, CrH2 and Cr2H5 structures are versions of the perfect anti-NiAs-type CrH with ordered tetrahedral interstitial sites filled by H atoms. CrH3 and CrH4 exhibit host-guest structural characteristics. In CrH8, H2 units are also identified. Our study unravels that CrH is a superconductor at atmospheric pressure with an estimated transition temperature (T c) of 10.6 K, and superconductivity in CrH3 is enhanced by the metallic hydrogen sublattice with T c of 37.1 K at 81 GPa, very similar to the extensively studied MgB2. PMID:26626579

  19. Swimming movements initiate bubble formation in fish decompressed from elevated gas pressures.

    PubMed

    McDonough, P M; Hemmingsen, E A

    1985-01-01

    Young specimens of trout, catfish, sculpin and salamanders were equilibrated with elevated gas pressures, then rapidly decompressed to ambient pressure. The newly hatched forms tolerated extremely high gas supersaturations; equilibration pressures of 80-120 atm argon or 150-250 atm helium were required for in vivo bubble formation. During subsequent larval development, the equilibration pressures required decreased to just 5-10 atm and bubbles originated in the fins. Anesthetising older fish before decompression prevented bubble formation in the fins; this suggests that swimming movements mechanically initiate bubbles, possibly by a tribonucleation mechanism. PMID:2859954

  20. Anatomy of a pressure-induced, ferromagnetic-to-paramagnetic transition in pyrrhotite: Implications for the formation pressure of diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilder, Stuart A.; Egli, Ramon; Hochleitner, Rupert; Roud, Sophie C.; Volk, Michael W. R.; Le Goff, Maxime; de Wit, Maarten

    2011-10-01

    Meteorites and diamonds encounter high pressures during their formation or subsequent evolution. These materials commonly contain magnetic inclusions of pyrrhotite. Because magnetic properties are sensitive to strain, pyrrhotite can potentially record the shock or formation pressures of its host. Moreover, pyrrhotite undergoes a pressure-induced phase transition between 1.6 and 6.2 GPa, but the magnetic signature of this transition is poorly known. Here we report room temperature magnetic measurements on multidomain and single-domain pyrrhotite under nonhydrostatic pressure. Magnetic remanence in single-domain pyrrhotite is largely insensitive to pressure until 2 GPa, whereas the remanence of multidomain pyrrhotite increases 50% over that of initial conditions by 2 GPa, and then decreases until only 33% of the original remanence remains by 4.5 GPa. In contrast, magnetic coercivity increases with increasing pressure to 4.5 GPa. Below ˜1.5 GPa, multidomain pyrrhotite obeys Néel theory with a positive correlation between coercivity and remanence; above ˜1.5 GPa, it behaves single domain-like yet distinctly different from uncompressed single-domain pyrrhotite. The ratio of magnetic coercivity and remanence follows a logarithmic law with respect to pressure, which can potentially be used as a geobarometer. Owing to the greater thermal expansion of pyrrhotite with respect to diamond, pyrrhotite inclusions in diamonds experience a confining pressure at Earth's surface. Applying our experimentally derived magnetic geobarometer to pyrrhotite-bearing diamonds from Botswana and the Central African Republic suggests the pressures of the pyrrhotite inclusions in the diamonds range from 1.3 to 2.1 GPa. These overpressures constrain the mantle source pressures from 5.4 to 9.5 GPa, depending on which bulk modulus and thermal expansion coefficients of the two phases are used.

  1. Dynamics of plasma flow formation in a pulsed accelerator operating at a constant pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baimbetov, F. B.; Zhukeshov, A. M.; Amrenova, A. U.

    2007-01-01

    Features in the dynamics of plasma flow formation at a constant pressure in a pulsed coaxial accelerator have been studied. The temperature and density of electrons in a plasma bunch have been determined using a probe technique.

  2. Combined V-Y Fasciocutaneous Advancement and Gluteus Maximus Muscle Rotational Flaps for Treating Sacral Sores

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun Jeong; Moon, Suk Ho; Lee, Yoon Jae

    2016-01-01

    The sacral area is the most common site of pressure sore in bed-ridden patients. Though many treatment methods have been proposed, a musculocutaneous flap using the gluteus muscles or a fasciocutaneous flap is the most popular surgical option. Here, we propose a new method that combines the benefits of these 2 methods: combined V-Y fasciocutaneous advancement and gluteus maximus muscle rotational flaps. A retrospective review was performed for 13 patients who underwent this new procedure from March 2011 to December 2013. Patients' age, sex, accompanying diseases, follow-up duration, surgical details, complications, and recurrence were documented. Computed tomography was performed postoperatively at 2 to 4 weeks and again at 4 to 6 months to identify the thickness and volume of the rotational muscle portion. After surgery, all patients healed within 1 month; 3 patients experienced minor complications. The average follow-up period was 13.6 months, during which time 1 patient had a recurrence (recurrence rate, 7.7%). Average thickness of the rotated muscle was 9.43 mm at 2 to 4 weeks postoperatively and 9.22 mm at 4 to 6 months postoperatively (p = 0.087). Muscle thickness had not decreased, and muscle volume was relatively maintained. This modified method is relatively simple and easy for reconstructing sacral sores, provides sufficient padding, and has little muscle donor-site morbidity. PMID:27366755

  3. A pressure-induced, magnetic transition in pyrrhotite: Implications for the formation pressure of meteorites and diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilder, S. A.; Egli, R.; Hochleitner, R.; Roud, S. C.; Volk, M.; Le Goff, M.; de Wit, M.

    2010-12-01

    Meteorites and diamonds encounter high-pressures during their geologic histories. These materials commonly contain magnetic inclusions of pyrrhotite, and because magnetic properties are sensitive to strain, pyrrhotite can potentially record the shock or formation pressures of its host. Moreover, pyrrhotite undergoes a pressure-induced phase transition between 1.6 and 6.2 GPa, but the magnetic signature of this transition is poorly known. Here we report magnetic measurements performed at high-pressures on single and multi-domain pyrrhotite. A magnetic hysteresis model based on our observations suggests that multidomain pyrrhotite transforms into single domain-like material, and once in the single domain state, hysteresis loops become progressively squarer and then squatter with increasing pressure, until they ultimately collapse approaching the paramagnetic state at the transition. The ratio of the bulk magnetic coercive force to magnetic remanence for pure pyrrhotite is reversible with pressure and follows a logarithmic law as a function of pressure, which can be used as a magnetic barometer for natural systems.

  4. Effect of plasticity and atmospheric pressure on the formation of donut- and croissantlike buckles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamade, S.; Durinck, J.; Parry, G.; Coupeau, C.; Cimetière, A.; Grilhé, J.; Colin, J.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of donut- and croissantlike buckles has been observed onto the free surface of gold thin films deposited on silicon substrates. Numerical simulations clearly evidence that the coupling effect between the atmospheric pressure acting on the free surface and the plastic folding of the ductile film is responsible for the circular blister destabilization and the formation of the donut- and croissantlike buckling patterns.

  5. Polar format statistical image processing based fiber optic pressure sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alver, Muhammed B.; Toker, Onur; Fidanboylu, Kemal

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents detailed study on the development of a fiber optic sensor system to design a pressure sensor with different sensor configurations. The sensor used in the experiments is based on modal power distribution (MPD) technique. MPD technique is spatial modulation of the modal power in multimode fibers. Stress measurements and CCD camera based techniques were investigated in this research. Differently from earlier MPD works, all of the data gathered from CCD camera are used instead of using some part of the data, the ring shaped pictures taken from the CCD camera converted to polar coordinates, and so stripe shaped pictures are obtained. Four different features are calculated from these converted pictures. R component of the center of mass in the polar form is the first feature. It is calculated because it was expected to decrease monotonically with respect to increasing applied pressure. Second and third features are ring thickness in polar form with taking brightness of each pixel into account and ring thickness in polar form without taking brightness of each pixel into account. These features are calculated to analyze the effect of each pixel's brightness. It was expected for these two features that there will not be a big margin between them. Fourth feature is the ratio between third feature and first feature. A MATLAB code is written to correlate these features and applied force to the sensor. Various experiments conducted to analyze this correlation. Pictures are taken from CCD camera with 1 kg steps and from the written MATLAB code, graphics of each feature versus the applied force are generated. Experimental results showed that, the sensitivity of the proposed sensor is much higher than sensors that uses only some part of the collected data in earlier MPD studies. Furthermore, results are almost exactly the same that what was expected for the four proposed features. Results also showed that converting pictures to the polar form increases the

  6. Soot formation and temperature field structure in laminar propane-air diffusion flames at elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Bento, Decio S.; Guelder, OEmer L.; Thomson, Kevin A.

    2006-06-15

    The effect of pressure on soot formation and the structure of the temperature field was studied in coflow propane-air laminar diffusion flames over the pressure range of 0.1 to 0.73 MPa in a high-pressure combustion chamber. The fuel flow rate was selected so that the soot was completely oxidized within the visible flame and the flame was stable at all pressures. Spectral soot emission was used to measure radially resolved soot volume fraction and soot temperature as a function of pressure. Additional soot volume fraction measurements were made at selected heights using line-of-sight light attenuation. Soot concentration values from these two techniques agreed to within 30% and both methods exhibited similar trends in the spatial distribution of soot concentration. Maximum line-of-sight soot concentration along the flame centerline scaled with pressure; the pressure exponent was about 1.4 for pressures between 0.2 and 0.73 MPa. Peak carbon conversion to soot, defined as the percentage of fuel carbon content converted to soot, also followed a power-law dependence on pressure, where the pressure exponent was near to unity for pressures between 0.2 and 0.73 MPa. Soot temperature measurements indicated that the overall temperatures decreased with increasing pressure; however, the temperature gradients increased with increasing pressure. (author)

  7. Adhesive tablet effective for treating canker sores in humans.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, Boaz; Golenser, Jacob; Wolnerman, Joseph S; Domb, Abraham J

    2004-12-01

    A new mucoadhesive tablet, which releases natural active agents for pain reduction and rapid healing of canker sores, has been prepared and characterized. Adhesive tablets were prepared by compression molding of mixed powders of crosslinked polyacrylic acid and hydroxypropyl cellulose, absorbed with citrus oil and magnesium salt. The rate of tablet erosion and the rates of citrus oil and magnesium release were determined as well as the adhesiveness of the tablet using bovine gingival tissue and an Instron tensiometer. A clinical trial was conducted on 248 volunteers who had canker sores. Tablets adhere well to the mucosal tissue and gradually erode for 8 h releasing the citrus oil in a zero-order pattern whereas the magnesium is released during a period of 2 h. Both experimental and plain tablets were effective in reducing pain and decreasing healing time (p < 0.05) without adverse side effects. However, the tablets loaded with active agents were more effective. PMID:15459950

  8. Laminar plume formation by high pressure CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadal, Francois; Meunier, Patrice; Pouligny, Bernard; Laurichesse, Eric

    2012-11-01

    Convection flows have often revealed the presence of plumes, especially in the earth's mantle where the Schmidt number is large. There has thus been a large number of studies on plumes created by a point source. However, there are very few results on plumes generated by an extended source. Here, we present experimental, numerical and theoretical results on the flow created by high pressure CO2 dissolved into distilled water. The thin layer of dense fluid created at the surface destabilizes through the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and leads to a laminar and parallel stationary plume. The plume width and amplitude are measured by Particle Image Velocimetry for various aspect ratios, Bond and Rayleigh numbers. They are in good agreement with the numerical result if a no-slip boundary condition is assumed at the free surface. Finally, the theory for a plume generated by a point source is adapted for an extended source, which leads to different scaling exponents (with a logarithmic dependence), in excellent agreement with the experimental and numerical results. This study thus provides a simple and accurate description of axisymmetric plumes generated by an extended source.

  9. JET FORMATION FROM MASSIVE YOUNG STARS: MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS VERSUS RADIATION PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Bhargav; Porth, Oliver; Fendt, Christian; Beuther, Henrik E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2011-11-20

    Observations indicate that outflows from massive young stars are more collimated during their early evolution compared to later stages. Our paper investigates various physical processes that impact the outflow dynamics, i.e., its acceleration and collimation. We perform axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations particularly considering the radiation pressure exerted by the star and the disk. We have modified the PLUTO code to include radiative forces in the line-driving approximation. We launch the outflow from the innermost disk region (r < 50 AU) by magnetocentrifugal acceleration. In order to disentangle MHD effects from radiative forces, we start the simulation in pure MHD and later switch on the radiation force. We perform a parameter study considering different stellar masses (thus luminosity), magnetic flux, and line-force strength. For our reference simulation-assuming a 30 M{sub Sun} star-we find substantial de-collimation of 35% due to radiation forces. The opening angle increases from 20 Degree-Sign to 32 Degree-Sign for stellar masses from 20 M{sub Sun} to 60 M{sub Sun }. A small change in the line-force parameter {alpha} from 0.60 to 0.55 changes the opening angle by {approx}8 Degree-Sign . We find that it is mainly the stellar radiation that affects the jet dynamics. Unless the disk extends very close to the star, its force is too small to have much impact. Essentially, our parameter runs with different stellar masses can be understood as a proxy for the time evolution of the star-outflow system. Thus, we have shown that when the stellar mass (thus luminosity) increases with age, the outflows become less collimated.

  10. Self-regulating galaxy formation. I - H II disk and Lyman-alpha pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. P.

    1985-01-01

    The nascent interstellar medium and star formation model are incorporated into a scenario for the formation epoch of spiral galaxies. The structure, star formation time scale, and luminosity of a self-gravitating isothermal disk are evaluated as functions of the disk surface density. The importance of radiation pressure, particularly that of Lyman-alpha, in maintaining an inflated disk and halting infall is discussed. The Lyman-alpha pressure also supports a considerable halo of material in the vicinity of the disk. A first-order infall scenario and the time-dependent properties of the system it constructs are presented. Disk properties are evaluated at the epoch at which further material is supportable against infall by Lyman-alpha pressure. The two-dimensional family of disk galaxies whose scales and surface density are expressible in terms of fundamental constants and which arise from the three parameter sets of perturbations in the Hubble flow are determined.

  11. A NEW MECHANISM FOR MASS ACCRETION UNDER RADIATION PRESSURE IN MASSIVE STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2010-05-01

    During the formation of a massive star, strong radiation pressure from the central star acts on the dust sublimation front and tends to halt the accretion flow. To overcome this strong radiation pressure, it has been considered that a strong ram pressure produced by a high-mass accretion rate of 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} or more is needed. We reinvestigated the necessary condition to overcome the radiation pressure and found a new mechanism for overcoming it. Accumulated mass in a stagnant flow near the dust sublimation front helps the mass accretion by its weight. This mechanism relaxes the condition for the massive star formation. We call this mechanism the 'OMOSHI effect', where OMOSHI is an acronym for 'One Mechanism for Overcoming Stellar High radiation pressure by weIght'. Additionally, in Japanese, OMOSHI is a noun meaning a weight that is put on something to prevent it from moving. We investigate the generation of the OMOSHI effect using local one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations. The radiation pressure and the gravitational force are connected through the gas pressure, and to sum up, the radiation pressure is balanced or overcome by the gravitational force. We also discuss the global structure and temporal variation of the accretion flow.

  12. A New Mechanism for Mass Accretion Under Radiation Pressure in Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2010-05-01

    During the formation of a massive star, strong radiation pressure from the central star acts on the dust sublimation front and tends to halt the accretion flow. To overcome this strong radiation pressure, it has been considered that a strong ram pressure produced by a high-mass accretion rate of 10-3 M sun yr-1 or more is needed. We reinvestigated the necessary condition to overcome the radiation pressure and found a new mechanism for overcoming it. Accumulated mass in a stagnant flow near the dust sublimation front helps the mass accretion by its weight. This mechanism relaxes the condition for the massive star formation. We call this mechanism the "OMOSHI effect," where OMOSHI is an acronym for "One Mechanism for Overcoming Stellar High radiation pressure by weIght." Additionally, in Japanese, OMOSHI is a noun meaning a weight that is put on something to prevent it from moving. We investigate the generation of the OMOSHI effect using local one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations. The radiation pressure and the gravitational force are connected through the gas pressure, and to sum up, the radiation pressure is balanced or overcome by the gravitational force. We also discuss the global structure and temporal variation of the accretion flow.

  13. The effect of ram pressure on the star formation, mass distribution and morphology of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapferer, Wolfgang; Schindler, Sabine; Ziegler, Bodo; Ferrari, Chiara

    We investigate the dependence of star formation and the distribution of the components of galaxies on the strength of ram pressure. Several mock observations in X-ray, H and HI wavelength for different ram-pressure scenarios are presented. By applying a combined N-body/hydrodynamic description (GADGET-2) with radiative cooling and a recipe for star formation and stellar feedback 12 different ram-pressure stripping scenarios for disc galaxies were calculated. Special emphasis was put on the gas within the disc and in the surroundings. The star formation of a galaxy is enhanced by more than a magnitude in the simulation with a high ram-pressure (5 x 10-11 dyn/cm2 ) in comparison to the same system evolving in isolation. The enhancement of the star formation depends more on the surrounding gas density than on the relative velocity. Up to 95% of all newly formed stars can be found in the wake of the galaxy out to distances of more than 350 kpc behind the stellar disc. Continuously stars fall back to the old stellar disc, building up a bulge-like structure. Young stars can be found throughout the stripped wake with surface densities locally comparable to values in the inner stellar disc. Ram-pressure stripping can shift the location of star formation from the disc into the wake on very short timescales. As the gas in a galaxy has a complex velocity pattern due to the rotation and spiral arms, the superposition of the internal velocity field and the ram pressure causes complex structures in the gaseous wake which survive dynamically up to several 100 Myr. Fi-nally we provide simulated X-ray, Hα and HI observations to be able to compare our results with observations in these wavebands. These simulated observations show many features which depend strongly both on the strength and the duration of the external ram pressure.

  14. Control of tetrahedron satellite formation flying in the geosynchronous orbit using solar radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yong-Gang; Zhang, Ming-Jiang; Zhao, Chang-Yin; Sun, Rong-Yu

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the control of tetrahedron satellite formation flying in the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) using solar radiation pressure is investigated. The long term disturbing effect of the main zonal and tesseral harmonics J2 and J_{22} of the geopotential are eliminated by adjusting the initial orbital elements, and a tetrahedron satellite formation flying in the GEO is designed. Then a control system using solar radiation pressure is further proposed to maintain the tetrahedron satellite formation, in which a sliding mode control (SMC) is developed to determine the control force. The control force is acquired from the solar sails equipped on the satellites, and the final control law and strategy using solar radiation pressure are presented. Moreover, three kinds of numerical simulations are especially given to verify the validity of the control system using solar radiation. It shows that Laplace precession of the GEO satellite can be avoided effectively, and the in-plane and out-of-plane errors of the formation can be eliminated easily. And hence the control of tetrahedron satellite formation flying in the GEO using solar radiation pressure is proved to be feasible.

  15. Effect of plasticity and atmospheric pressure on the formation of donut- and croissantlike buckles.

    PubMed

    Hamade, S; Durinck, J; Parry, G; Coupeau, C; Cimetière, A; Grilhé, J; Colin, J

    2015-01-01

    The formation of donut- and croissantlike buckles has been observed onto the free surface of gold thin films deposited on silicon substrates. Numerical simulations clearly evidence that the coupling effect between the atmospheric pressure acting on the free surface and the plastic folding of the ductile film is responsible for the circular blister destabilization and the formation of the donut- and croissantlike buckling patterns. PMID:25679631

  16. Injection well with high-pressure, high-temperature in situ down-hole steam formation

    SciTech Connect

    Marr, A.W.

    1981-12-01

    A portion of an injection well adjacent an oil-bearing earth formation is sealed off by spaced-apart high-pressure-resistant plugs, and water is charged into the bore-hole space between the plugs at a sufficient rate to effect sustained water pressure in the range of from 400 to 25,000 psi. Under such pressure sufficient current is passed between two electrodes in the water to convert from 10 to 33 barrels of water per hour into steam.

  17. Pressure-controlled formation of crystalline, Janus, and core-shell supraparticles.

    PubMed

    Kister, Thomas; Mravlak, Marko; Schilling, Tanja; Kraus, Tobias

    2016-07-21

    Binary mixtures of nanoparticles self-assemble in the confinement of evaporating oil droplets and form regular supraparticles. We demonstrate that moderate pressure differences on the order of 100 kPa change the particles' self-assembly behavior. Crystalline superlattices, Janus particles, and core-shell particle arrangements form in the same dispersions when changing the working pressure or the surfactant that sets the Laplace pressure inside the droplets. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that pressure-dependent interparticle potentials affect the self-assembly route of the confined particles. Optical spectrometry, small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy are used to compare experiments and simulations and confirm that the onset of self-assembly depends on particle size and pressure. The overall formation mechanism reminds of the demixing of binary alloys with different phase diagrams. PMID:27340805

  18. Pressure Dependence and Metastable State Formation in the Photolysis of Dichlorine Monoxide (Cl2O)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickolaisen, Scott; Miller, Charles; Sander, Stanley; Hand, Michael; Williams, Ian; Francisco, Joseph

    1995-01-01

    Physics%K photolysis, dichlorine monoxide, pressure%U http://techreports.jpl.nasa.gov/1995/95-0924.pdfThe photodissociation of dichlorine monoxide (Cl2O) was studied using broadband flash photolysis to investigate the influence of variations in the photolysis wavelength domain, bath gas pressure, and bath gas identity on the yield and temporal dependence of the ClO product. ClO yields were independent of bath gas pressure when the photolysis spectral band extended to 200 nm (quartz cutoff) but for photolysis restricted to wavelengths longer than about 250 nm, ClO yields decreased with increasing bath gas pressure and there was a pressure-dependent delay in the formation of ClO.!.

  19. Life threatening complication of sore throat: Lemierre's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khan, Arif; Ganesan, Subramanian; Arora, Manish; Hussain, Nahin

    2013-12-01

    The authors report a case of previously healthy toddler who presented with acute sore throat that led to bacteremia, septic shock, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, encephalopathy and pleural effusion. Magnetic resonance imaging and venogram showed thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. He was successfully treated with antibiotics and low molecular weight heparin. The authors review the literature and explore the presentation, management and the role of anticoagulation in this condition. To the authors' knowledge, this is one of the youngest patient reports with this condition in the literature. PMID:23275185

  20. Pressure-controlled formation of crystalline, Janus, and core-shell supraparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kister, Thomas; Mravlak, Marko; Schilling, Tanja; Kraus, Tobias

    2016-07-01

    Binary mixtures of nanoparticles self-assemble in the confinement of evaporating oil droplets and form regular supraparticles. We demonstrate that moderate pressure differences on the order of 100 kPa change the particles' self-assembly behavior. Crystalline superlattices, Janus particles, and core-shell particle arrangements form in the same dispersions when changing the working pressure or the surfactant that sets the Laplace pressure inside the droplets. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that pressure-dependent interparticle potentials affect the self-assembly route of the confined particles. Optical spectrometry, small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy are used to compare experiments and simulations and confirm that the onset of self-assembly depends on particle size and pressure. The overall formation mechanism reminds of the demixing of binary alloys with different phase diagrams.Binary mixtures of nanoparticles self-assemble in the confinement of evaporating oil droplets and form regular supraparticles. We demonstrate that moderate pressure differences on the order of 100 kPa change the particles' self-assembly behavior. Crystalline superlattices, Janus particles, and core-shell particle arrangements form in the same dispersions when changing the working pressure or the surfactant that sets the Laplace pressure inside the droplets. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that pressure-dependent interparticle potentials affect the self-assembly route of the confined particles. Optical spectrometry, small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy are used to compare experiments and simulations and confirm that the onset of self-assembly depends on particle size and pressure. The overall formation mechanism reminds of the demixing of binary alloys with different phase diagrams. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C6NR01940D

  1. Plasma formation in atmospheric pressure helium discharges under different background air pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yaoge; Hao Yanpeng; Zheng Bin

    2012-09-15

    Atmospheric pressure glow discharges generated between parallel-plate electrodes in helium have been characterized using temporally resolved emission spectra. The variation of typical spectral lines over time has been analyzed. In helium with a low concentration of N{sub 2}, the emission of He at 706.5 nm is dominant and appears 500 ns earlier than N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative bands, indicating low reaction rates of Penning ionization and charge transfer in the initial stage. During the decay, it is the Penning ionization caused by He metastables with a long lifetime rather than the charge transfer reaction that leads to the long decay of N{sub 2}{sup +} emissions. When helium contains a higher concentration of N{sub 2} molecules, the N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative bands become the most intense, and emissions from He, N{sub 2}{sup +}, and O exhibit similar behavior as they increase. The emissions last for a shorter time under such conditions because of rapid consumption of He metastables and He{sub 2}{sup +}.

  2. Glass formation and cluster evolution in the rapidly solidified monatomic metallic liquid Ta under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dejun; Wen, Dadong; Tian, Zean; Liu, Rangsu

    2016-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to examine the glass formation and cluster evolution during the rapid solidification of monatomic metallic liquid Ta under high pressure. The atomic structures in the systems are characterized by the radical distribution function (RDF), Honeycutt-Anderson (H-A) bond-type index method and cluster-type index method (CTIM). It is observed that the defective icosahedra play the critical role in the formation of Ta monatomic metallic glasses (MGs) rather than (12 0 12 0) perfect icosahedra, which have been identified as the basic local atomic units in many multi-component MGs. With the increase of pressure P, the fraction of icosahedral type clusters decreases remarkably in Ta MGs, while the fraction of bcc type clusters rises evidently. The evolution of vitrification degree (DSRO or DMRO) of the rapidly cooled metal Ta system further reveals that a higher pressure P is disadvantageous to the formation of Ta monatomic MGs. The weaker glass forming ability (GFA) of liquid metal Ta obtained under higher pressure P can be contributed to the decrease of DSRO or DMRO which is induced by increasing high pressure P to some extent.

  3. Rogue wave formation under the action of quasi-stationary pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrashkin, A. A.; Oshmarina, O. E.

    2016-05-01

    The process of rogue wave formation on deep water is considered. A wave of extreme amplitude is born against the background of uniform waves (Gerstner waves) under the action of external pressure on free surface. The pressure distribution has a form of a quasi-stationary "pit". The fluid motion is supposed to be a vortex one and is described by an exact solution of equations of 2D hydrodynamics for an ideal fluid in Lagrangian coordinates. Liquid particles are moving around circumferences of different radii in the absence of drift flow. Values of amplitude and wave steepness optimal for rogue wave formation are found numerically. The influence of vorticity distribution and pressure drop on parameters of the fluid is investigated.

  4. OMOSHI Effect: A New Mechanism for Mass Accretion under the Radiation Pressure in Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kei; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2009-08-01

    In a massive-star formation process, a high-mass accretion rate is considered to be needed to overcome the strong radiation pressure at the dust sublimation front. We examined the accretion structure near the dust sublimation front and found a new mechanism to overcome this radiation pressure. The weight of the accumulated mass in a stagnant flow near the dust sublimation front helps with the mass accretion. We call this mechanism the ``OMOSHI effect,'' where OMOSHI is an acronym for ``One Mechanism for Overcoming Stellar High radiation pressure by weight.'' OMOSHI is also a Japanese noun meaning a weight that is put on something to prevent it from moving. This mechanism relaxes the condition for the massive star formation.

  5. Pressure-dependent formation of i-motif and G-quadruplex DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Sugimoto, N

    2015-12-14

    Pressure is an important physical stimulus that can influence the fate of cells by causing structural changes in biomolecules such as DNA. We investigated the effect of high pressure on the folding of duplex, DNA i-motif, and G-quadruplex (G4) structures; the non-canonical structures may be modulators of expression of genes involved in cancer progression. The i-motif structure was stabilized by high pressure, whereas the G4 structure was destabilized. The melting temperature of an intramolecular i-motif formed by 5'-dCGG(CCT)10CGG-3' increased from 38.8 °C at atmospheric pressure to 61.5 °C at 400 MPa. This effect was also observed in the presence of 40 wt% ethylene glycol, a crowding agent. In the presence of 40 wt% ethylene glycol, the G4 structure was less destabilized than in the absence of the crowding agent. P-T stability diagrams of duplex DNA with a telomeric sequence indicated that the duplex is more stable than G4 and i-motif structures under low pressure, but the i-motif dominates the structural composition under high pressure. Under crowding conditions, the P-T diagrams indicated that the duplex does not form under high pressure, and i-motif and G4 structures dominate. Our findings imply that temperature regulates the formation of the duplex structure, whereas pressure triggers the formation of non-canonical DNA structures like i-motif and G4. These results suggest that pressure impacts the function of nucleic acids by stabilizing non-canonical structures; this may be relevant to deep sea organisms and during evolution under prebiotic conditions. PMID:26387909

  6. The nursing rounds system: effect of patient's call light use, bed sores, fall and satisfaction level.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Bassem S; Nusair, Hussam; Al Zubadi, Nariman; Al Shloul, Shams; Saleh, Usama

    2011-06-01

    The nursing round system (NRS) means checking patients on an hourly basis during the A (0700-2200 h) shift and once every 2 h during the B (2200-0700 h) by the assigned nursing staff. The overall goal of this prospective study is to implement an NRS in a major rehabilitation centre-Sultan Bin Abdulaziz Humanitarian City-in the Riyadh area of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The purposes of this study are to measure the effect of the NRS on: (i) the use of patient call light; (ii) the number of incidences of patients' fall; (iii) the number of incidences of hospital-acquired bed sores; and (iv) the level of patients' satisfaction. All patients hospitalized in the male stroke unit will be involved in this study. For the period of 8 weeks (17 December 2009-17 February 2010) All Nursing staff on the unit will record each call light and the patient's need. Implementation of the NRS would start on 18 February 2010 and last for 8 weeks, until 18 April 2010. Data collected throughout this period will be compared with data collected during the 8 weeks period immediately preceding the implementation of the NRS (17 December 2009-17 February 2010) in order to measure the impact of the call light use. The following information were collected on all subjects involved in the study: (i) the Demographic Information Form; (ii) authors' developed NRS Audit Form; (iii) Patient Call Light Audit Form; (iv) Patient Fall Audit Record; (v) Hospital-Acquired Bed Sores Audit Form; and (vi) hospital developed Patient Satisfaction Records. The findings suggested that a significant reduction on the use of call bell (P < 0.001), a significant reduction of fall incidence (P < 0.01) while pressure ulcer reduced by 50% before and after the implementation of NRS. Also, the implementation of NRS increased patient satisfaction by 7/5 (P < 0.05). PMID:21605271

  7. Effects of hydrogen partial pressure on autotrophic growth and product formation of Acetobacterium woodii.

    PubMed

    Kantzow, Christina; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2016-08-01

    Low aqueous solubility of the gases for autotrophic fermentations (e.g., hydrogen gas) results in low productivities in bioreactors. A frequently suggested approach to overcome mass transfer limitation is to increase the solubility of the limiting gas in the reaction medium by increasing the partial pressure in the gas phase. An increased inlet hydrogen partial pressure of up to 2.1 bar (total pressure of 3.5 bar) was applied for the autotrophic conversion of hydrogen and carbon dioxide with Acetobacterium woodii in a batch-operated stirred-tank bioreactor with continuous gas supply. Compared to the autotrophic batch process with an inlet hydrogen partial pressure of 0.4 bar (total pressure of 1.0 bar) the final acetate concentration after 3.1 days was reduced to 50 % (29.2 g L(-1) compared to 59.3 g L(-1)), but the final formate concentration was increased by a factor of 18 (7.3 g L(-1) compared to 0.4 g L(-1)). Applying recombinant A. woodii strains overexpressing either genes for enzymes in the methyl branch of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway or the genes phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase at an inlet hydrogen partial pressure of 1.4 bar reduced the final formate concentration by up to 40 % and increased the final dry cell mass and acetate concentrations compared to the wild type strain. Solely the overexpression of the two genes for ATP regeneration at the end of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway resulted in an initial switch off of formate production at increased hydrogen partial pressure until the maximum of the hydrogen uptake rate was reached. PMID:27059835

  8. Silicon nitride-aluminum oxide solid solution (SiAION) formation and densification by pressure sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. C.; Sanders, W. A.; Fiyalko, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Stirred-ball-mill-blended Si3N4 and Al2O3 powders were pressure sintered in order to investigate the mechanism of solid solution formation and densification in the Si3N4-Al2O3 system. Powder blends with Si3N4:Al2O3 mole ratios of 4:1, 3:2, and 2:3 were pressure sintered at 27.6-MN/sq m pressure at temperatures to 17000 C (3090 F). The compaction behavior of the powder blends during pressure sintering was determined by observing the density of the powder compact as a function of temperature and time starting from room temperature. This information, combined with the results of X-ray diffraction and metallographic analyses regarding solutioning and phase transformation phenomena in the Si3N4-Al2O3 system, was used to describe the densification behavior.

  9. An unusual case of a sore throat and otalgia in a 4-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Siupšinskienė, Nora; Padervinskis, Evaldas; Poškienė, Lina; Endeley, Nganjo; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2012-01-01

    A sore throat, otalgia, and snoring are the common symptoms seen in children presenting to an otorhinolaryngological clinic. Sometimes, however, these symptoms may be suggestive of an aggressive malignancy. We present a rare case of Burkitt's lymphoma of the tonsil in a young child, which initially manifested as a sore throat and otalgia. PMID:22864276

  10. 21 CFR 201.315 - Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Specific Labeling Requirements for Specific Drug Products § 201.315 Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning. The Food...

  11. 21 CFR 201.315 - Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Specific Labeling Requirements for Specific Drug Products § 201.315 Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning. The Food...

  12. 21 CFR 201.315 - Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats... Drug Products § 201.315 Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning. The Food and... anesthetic, chewing gum containing aspirin, various mouth washes and gargles and other articles sold over...

  13. 21 CFR 201.315 - Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats... Drug Products § 201.315 Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning. The Food and... anesthetic, chewing gum containing aspirin, various mouth washes and gargles and other articles sold over...

  14. 21 CFR 201.315 - Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats... Drug Products § 201.315 Over-the-counter drugs for minor sore throats; suggested warning. The Food and... anesthetic, chewing gum containing aspirin, various mouth washes and gargles and other articles sold over...

  15. Effect of negative pressure on growth, secretion and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Li, Tongtong; Wang, Guoqi; Yin, Peng; Li, Zhirui; Zhang, Licheng; Liu, Jianheng; Li, Ming; Zhang, Lihai; Han, Li; Tang, Peifu

    2015-10-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has gained popularity in the management of contaminated wounds as an effective physical therapy, although its influence on the bacteria in the wounds remains unclear. In this study, we attempted to explore the effect of negative pressure conditions on Staphylococcus aureus, the most frequently isolated pathogen during wound infection. S. aureus was cultured in Luria-Bertani medium at subatmospheric pressure of -125 mmHg for 24 h, with the bacteria grown at ambient pressure as the control. The application of negative pressure was found to slow down the growth rate and inhibit biofilm development of S. aureus, which was confirmed by static biofilm assays. Furthermore, decreases in the total amount of virulence factors and biofilm components were observed, including α-hemolysin, extracellular adherence protein, polysaccharide intercellular adhesin and extracellular DNA. With quantitative RT-PCR analysis, we also revealed a significant inhibition in the transcription of virulence and regulatory genes related to wound infections and bacterial biofilms. Together, these findings indicated that negative pressure could inhibit the growth, virulence and biofilm formation of S. aureus. A topical subatmospheric pressure condition, such as NPWT, may be a potential antivirulence and antibiofilm strategy in the field of wound care. PMID:26272011

  16. Does Pressure Accentuate General Relativistic Gravitational Collapse and Formation of Trapped Surfaces?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Abhas

    2013-04-01

    It is widely believed that though pressure resists gravitational collapse in Newtonian gravity, it aids the same in general relativity (GR) so that GR collapse should eventually be similar to the monotonous free fall case. But we show that, even in the context of radiationless adiabatic collapse of a perfect fluid, pressure tends to resist GR collapse in a manner which is more pronounced than the corresponding Newtonian case and formation of trapped surfaces is inhibited. In fact there are many works which show such collapse to rebound or become oscillatory implying a tug of war between attractive gravity and repulsive pressure gradient. Furthermore, for an imperfect fluid, the resistive effect of pressure could be significant due to likely dramatic increase of tangential pressure beyond the "photon sphere." Indeed, with inclusion of tangential pressure, in principle, there can be static objects with surface gravitational redshift z → ∞. Therefore, pressure can certainly oppose gravitational contraction in GR in a significant manner in contradiction to the idea of Roger Penrose that GR continued collapse must be unstoppable.

  17. TURBULENCE SETS THE INITIAL CONDITIONS FOR STAR FORMATION IN HIGH-PRESSURE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Rathborne, J. M.; Contreras, Y.; Longmore, S. N.; Bastian, N.; Jackson, J. M.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Alves, J. F.; Bally, J.; Foster, J. B.; Garay, G.; Testi, L.; Walsh, A. J.

    2014-11-10

    Despite the simplicity of theoretical models of supersonically turbulent, isothermal media, their predictions successfully match the observed gas structure and star formation activity within low-pressure (P/k < 10{sup 5} K cm{sup –3}) molecular clouds in the solar neighborhood. However, it is unknown whether or not these theories extend to clouds in high-pressure (P/k > 10{sup 7} K cm{sup –3}) environments, like those in the Galaxy's inner 200 pc central molecular zone (CMZ) and in the early universe. Here, we present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array 3 mm dust continuum emission within a cloud, G0.253+0.016, which is immersed in the high-pressure environment of the CMZ. While the log-normal shape and dispersion of its column density probability distribution function (PDF) are strikingly similar to those of solar neighborhood clouds, there is one important quantitative difference: its mean column density is one to two orders of magnitude higher. Both the similarity and difference in the PDF compared to those derived from solar neighborhood clouds match predictions of turbulent cloud models given the high-pressure environment of the CMZ. The PDF shows a small deviation from log-normal at high column densities confirming the youth of G0.253+0.016. Its lack of star formation is consistent with the theoretically predicted, environmentally dependent volume density threshold for star formation which is orders of magnitude higher than that derived for solar neighborhood clouds. Our results provide the first empirical evidence that the current theoretical understanding of molecular cloud structure derived from the solar neighborhood also holds in high-pressure environments. We therefore suggest that these theories may be applicable to understand star formation in the early universe.

  18. The effect of ram pressure on the star formation, mass distribution and morphology of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapferer, W.; Sluka, C.; Schindler, S.; Ferrari, C.; Ziegler, B.

    2009-05-01

    Aims: We investigate the dependence of star formation and the distribution of the components of galaxies on the strength of ram pressure. Several mock observations in X-ray, Hα and HI wavelength for different ram-pressure scenarios are presented. Methods: By applying a combined N-body/hydrodynamic description (GADGET-2) with radiative cooling and a recipe for star formation and stellar feedback 12 different ram-pressure stripping scenarios for disc galaxies were calculated. Special emphasis was put on the gas within the disc and in the surroundings. All gas particles within the computational domain having the same mass resolution. The relative velocity was varied from 100 km s-1 to 1000 km s-1 in different surrounding gas densities in the range from 1 × 10-28 to 5 × 10-27 g/cm^3. The temperature of the surrounding gas was initially 1 × 107 K. Results: The star formation of a galaxy is enhanced by more than a magnitude in the simulation with a high ram-pressure (5 × 10-11 dyn/cm^2) in comparison to the same system evolving in isolation. The enhancement of the star formation depends more on the surrounding gas density than on the relative velocity. Up to 95% of all newly formed stars can be found in the wake of the galaxy out to distances of more than 350 kpc behind the stellar disc. Continuously stars fall back to the old stellar disc, building up a bulge-like structure. Young stars can be found throughout the stripped wake with surface densities locally comparable to values in the inner stellar disc. Ram-pressure stripping can shift the location of star formation from the disc into the wake on very short timescales. As the gas in a galaxy has a complex velocity pattern due to the rotation and spiral arms, the superposition of the internal velocity field and the ram pressure causes complex structures in the gaseous wake which survive dynamically up to several 100 Myr. Finally we provide simulated X-ray, Hα and HI observations to be able to compare our results

  19. Pressure-temperature evolution of Neoproterozoic metamorphism in the Welayati Formation (Kabul Block), Afghanistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, Stephen; Faryad, Shah Wali

    2015-11-01

    The Welayati Formation, consisting of alternating layers of mica-schist and quartzite with lenses of amphibolite, unconformably overlies the Neoarchean Sherdarwaza Formation of the Kabul Block that underwent Paleoproterozoic granulite-facies and Neoproterozoic amphibolite-facies metamorphic events. To analyze metamorphic history of the Welayati Formation and its relations to the underlying Sherdarwaza Formation, petrographic study and pressure-temperature (P-T) pseudosection modeling were applied to staurolite- and kyanite-bearing mica-schists, which crop out to the south of Kabul City. Prograde metamorphism, identified by inclusion trails and chemical zonation in garnet from the micaschists indicates that the rocks underwent burial from around 6.2 kbar at 525 °C to maximum pressure conditions of around 9.5 kbar at temperatures of around 650 °C. Decompression from peak pressures under isothermal or moderate heating conditions are indicated by formation of biotite and plagioclase porphyroblasts which cross-cut and overgrow the dominant foliation. The lack of sillimanite and/or andalusite suggests that cooling and further decompression occurred in the kyanite stability field. The results of this study indicate a single amphibolite-facies metamorphism that based on P-T conditions and age dating correlates well with the Neoproterozoic metamorphism in the underlying Sherdarwaza Formation. The rocks lack any paragenetic evidence for a preceding granulite-facies overprint or subsequent Paleozoic metamorphism. Owing to the position of the Kabul Block, within the India-Eurasia collision zone, partial replacement of the amphibolite-facies minerals in the micaschist could, in addition to retrogression of the Neoproterozoic metamorphism, relate to deformation associated with the Alpine orogeny.

  20. The formation of chondrules at high gas pressures in the solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Galy, A; Young, E D; Ash, R D; O'Nions, R K

    2000-12-01

    High-precision magnesium isotope measurements of whole chondrules from the Allende carbonaceous chondrite meteorite show that some aluminum-rich Allende chondrules formed at or near the time of formation of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions and that some others formed later and incorporated precursors previously enriched in magnesium-26. Chondrule magnesium-25/magnesium-24 correlates with [magnesium]/[aluminum] and size, the aluminum-rich, smaller chondrules being the most enriched in the heavy isotopes of magnesium. These relations imply that high gas pressures prevailed during chondrule formation in the solar nebula. PMID:11099410

  1. Reconsidering sore throats. Part I: Problems with current clinical practice.

    PubMed Central

    McIsaac, W. J.; Goel, V.; Slaughter, P. M.; Parsons, G. W.; Woolnough, K. V.; Weir, P. T.; Ennet, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide evidence-based answers to clinical questions posed by family physicians about Group A streptococcus pharyngitis and to further understanding of why management is controversial. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Evidence from randomized trials was not found for most questions. The most critical information came from high-quality community prevalence studies and criterion standard studies of physician clinical judgement. MAIN FINDINGS: Expert recommendations for physician management are not likely to help prevent rheumatic fever, as most people with sore throats do not seek medical care. Current clinical practices result in overuse of antibiotics because accuracy of clinical judgment is limited. CONCLUSIONS: Costs associated with visits for upper respiratory infections as well as increasing antibiotic resistance necessitate reconsidering the current clinical approach. An alternative management strategy is presented in part 2. PMID:9116520

  2. Formation processes of nanometer sized particles in low pressure Ar/CH{sub 4} rf plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Beckers, J.; Vacaresse, G. D. G. J.; Stoffels, W. W.

    2008-09-07

    In this paper, formation and growth processes of nanometer and micrometer sized dust particles in low pressure Ar/CH{sub 4} rf (13.56 MHz) plasmas are investigated as function of temperature in the range 25-100 deg. C. During experiments the pressure was typically 0.8 mbar and the forward power to the plasma was {approx}70 Watt. Measuring the fundamental voltage, current and phase angle together with their harmonics (up to the fourth) gives a good method to monitor the creation and growth of these dust particles in time. Furthermore, laser light scattering measurements are performed to give information about the dust particle density. It has been shown that dust particle formation in these conditions depends greatly on temperature.

  3. Moist Heat or Dry Heat for Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Petrofsky, Jerrold; Berk, Lee; Bains, Gurinder; Khowailed, Iman Akef; Hui, Timothy; Granado, Michael; Laymon, Mike; Lee, Haneul

    2013-01-01

    Background Heat is commonly used in physical therapy following exercise induced delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Most heat modalities used in a clinical setting for DOMS are only applied for 5 to 20 minutes. This minimal heat exposure causes little, if any, change in deep tissue temperature. For this reason, long duration dry chemical heat packs are used at home to slowly and safely warm tissue and reduce potential heat damage while reducing pain associated from DOMS. Clinically, it has been shown that moist heat penetrates deep tissue faster than dry heat. Therefore, in home use chemical moist heat may be more efficacious than dry heat to provide pain relief and reduce tissue damage following exercise DOMS. However, chemical moist heat only lasts for 2 hours compared to the 8 hours duration of chemical dry heat packs. The purpose of this study was to compare the beneficial effect of dry heat versus moist heat on 100 young subjects after exercise induce DOMS. Methods One hundred subjects exercised for 15 minutes accomplishing squats. Before and for 3 days after, strength, muscle soreness, tissue resistance, and the force to passively move the knee were recorded. Heat and moist heat were applied in different groups either immediately after exercise or 24 hours later. Results The research results of this study showed that immediate application of heat, either dry (8 hours application) or moist (2 hours application), had a similar preservation of quadriceps muscle strength and muscle activity. Results also revealed that the greatest pain reduction was shown after immediate application of moist heat. Never the less, immediate application of dry heat had a similar effect but to a lesser extent. Conclusion It should be noted that moist heat had not only similar benefits of dry heat but in some cases enhanced benefits, and with only 25% of the time of application of the dry heat. PMID:24171053

  4. Pressure broadening of the ((dt. mu. )dee)/sup */ formation resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.S.; Leon, M.; Padial, N.T.

    1988-01-01

    The treatment of ((dt..mu..)dee)/sup */ formation at high densities as a pressure broadening process is discussed. The quasistatic approximation is shown to satisfy the usual conditions of muon-catalyzed fusion better than does the impact approximation. Complete accurate results are shown for the impact approximation, and a preliminary rough treatment is presented to illustrate the quasistatic approximation. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Polymorphism and Formation Mechanism of Nanobipods in Manganese Sulfide Nanocrystals Induced by Temperature or Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xinyi; Wang, Yingnan; Wang, Kai; Sui, Yongming; Zhang, Meiguang; Li, Bing; Ma, Yanming; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Guangtian; Zou, Bo

    2012-03-15

    Manganese sulfide (MnS) nanocrystals (NCs) with three different phases were synthesized by one-pot solvent thermal approach. The crystal structures and morphologies were investigated using powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. We found that the crystal structure and morphology of MnS NCs could be controlled by simply varying the reaction temperature. The detailed growth process of MnS nanobipods, including the zinc blende (ZB)-core formation and wurtzite (WZ)-arms growth, provides direct experimental evidence for the polymorphism model. Furthermore, we have studied the stability of metastable ZB- and WZ-MnS NCs under high pressure and found that ZB-nanoparticles and ZB/WZ-nanobipods are stable below their critical pressure, 5.3 and 2.9 GPa, respectively. When pressures exceed the critical point, all these metastable MnS NCs directly convert to the stable rock salt MnS.

  6. Dipyrenylphosphatidylcholines as membrane fluidity probes. Pressure and temperature dependence of the intramolecular excimer formation rate.

    PubMed Central

    Sassaroli, M; Vauhkonen, M; Somerharju, P; Scarlata, S

    1993-01-01

    We have measured the pressure dependence of the intramolecular excimer formation rate, K(p), for di-(1'-pyrenedecanoyl)-phosphatidylcholine (dipy10PC) probes in single-component lipid multilamellar vesicles (MLV) as a function of temperature. Apparent volumes of activation (V(a)) for intramolecular excimer formation are obtained from the slopes of plots of log K(p) versus P. For liquid-crystalline saturated lipid MLV (DMPC and DPPC), these plots are linear and yield a unique V(a) at each temperature, whereas for unsaturated lipids (POPC and DOPC) they are curvilinear and V(a) appears to decrease with pressure. The isothermal pressure induced phase transition is marked by an abrupt drop in the values of K(p). The pressure to temperature equivalence values, dPm/dT, estimated from the midpoint of the transitions, are 47.0, 43.5, and 52.5 bar degree C-1 for DMPC, DPPC, and POPC, respectively. In liquid-crystalline DMPC, V(a) decreases linearly as a function of temperature, with a coefficient -dVa/dT = 0.65 +/- 0.11 ml degree C-1 mol-1. Using a modified free volume model of diffusion, we show that this value corresponds to the thermal expansivity of DMPC. Both the apparent energy and entropy of activation, Ea and delta Sa, increase with pressure in DMPC, whereas both decrease in POPC and DOPC. This difference is attributed to the sensitivity of the dynamics and/or packing of the dipy10PC probes to the location of the cis-double bonds in the chains of the unsaturated host phospholipids. Finally, the atmospheric pressure values of Ea and delta Sa for the four host MLV examined are shown to be linearly related. The relevance of this finding with respect to the structure of the excimers formed by the dipy10PC probes is briefly discussed. PMID:8431538

  7. Simulation of non-ionic surfactant micelle formation across a range of temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custer, Gregory; Das, Payel; Matysiak, Silvina

    Non-ionic surfactants can, at certain concentrations and thermodynamic conditions, aggregate into micelles due to their amphiphilic nature. Our work looks at the formation and behavior of micelles at extremes of temperature and pressure. Due to the large system size and simulation time required to study micelle formation, we have developed a coarse-grained (CG) model of our system. This CG model represents each heavy atom with a single CG bead. We use the multibody Stillinger-Weber potential, which adds a three-body angular penalty to a two-body potential, to emulate hydrogen bonds in the system. We simulate the linear surfactant C12E5 , which has a nonpolar domain of 12 carbons and a polar domain of 5 ethers. Our CG model has been parameterized to match structural properties from all-atom simulations of single and dimer surfactant systems. Simulations were performed using a concentration above the experimental critical micelle concentration at 300K and 1atm. We observe an expected region of stable micelle formation at intermediate temperature, with a breakdown at high and low temperature, as well as at high pressure. The driving forces behind the destabilization of micelles and the mechanism of micelle formation at different thermodynamic conditions will be discussed.

  8. Ionized gas pressure correlates with star formation intensity in nearby starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tianxing; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Yang, Huan

    2016-06-01

    We estimate the electron density of the ionized gas and thus the thermal pressure in HII regions; and compare that to the SFR (star formation rate) surface density for a combined sample of about 40 green peas and Lyman Break Analogs at z < 0.30. The electron density of the ionized gas is measured from sulfur line ratio ([SII] 6716 / 6731). We find that the SFR surface density is correlated with the electron density and the thermal pressure in HII regions for the star-forming galaxies with SFR surface density above a certain threshold. This work shows quantitatively the correlation between SFR surface density and electron density and that between SFR surface density and the thermal pressure in HII regions for the nearby starburst galaxies. This is consistent with theoretical models of disks (e.g. Kim et al. (2011) if we assume that the thermal pressure in HII regions is comparable to the total diffuse gas pressure at the midplane of the diffuse neutral gas. It is also in agreement with the results from star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2.5. We might infer that the starburst galaxies at low-redshift (z < 0.3) share similar physical properties to the galaxies at high redshift (z ~ 2.5).

  9. Study the formation mechanism of silicon carbide polytype by silicon carbide nanobelts sintered under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guodong; Zhang, Guangqian; Gao, Fenmei; Zheng, Jinju; Qin, Yanfen; Han, Wei; Qin, Weiping; Yang, Weiyou

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, in order to reveal the formation mechanism of SiC polytype, four SiC specimens sintered under high pressure has been investigated, after being prepared from SiC nanobelts as initial powders. The structure and morphology variation dependence of SiC specimens with temperature and pressure was studied based on experimental data obtained by XRD, SEM, and Raman. The results show that SiC lattice structure and the crystallite size are greatly affected by pressure between 2 and 4 GPa under different sintering temperatures of 800 and 1200 degrees C. At the largest applied pressure and temperature, 4 GPa and 1200 degrees C, 3C-SiC crystal structure can be changed into to R-SiC due to the stress resulted in dislocations instead of planar defects. Based on our results, the multiquantum-well structure based a single one-dimensional nanostructure can be achieved by applying high pressure at certain sintered temperature. PMID:22413287

  10. Analysis of Pore Pressure and Stress Distribution around a Wellbore Drilled in Chemically Active Elastoplastic Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshan, Hamid; Rahman, S. S.

    2011-09-01

    Drilling in low-permeable reactive shale formations with water-based drilling mud presents significant challenges, particularly in high-pressure and high-temperature environments. In previous studies, several models were proposed to describe the thermodynamic behaviour of shale. Most shale formations under high pressure are expected to undergo plastic deformation. An innovative algorithm including work hardening is proposed in the framework of thermo-chemo-poroelasticity to investigate the effect of plasticity on stresses around the wellbore. For this purpose a finite-element model of coupled thermo-chemo-poro-elastoplasticity is developed. The governing equations are based on the concept of thermodynamics of irreversible processes in discontinuous systems. In order to solve the plastic problem, a single-step backward Euler algorithm containing a yield surface-correction scheme is used to integrate the plastic stress-strain relation. An initial stress method is employed to solve the non-linearity of the plastic equation. In addition, super convergent patch recovery is used to accurately evaluate the time-dependent stress tensor from nodal displacement. The results of this study reveal that thermal and chemical osmosis can significantly affect the fluid flow in low-permeable shale formations. When the salinity of drilling mud is higher than that of pore fluid, fluid is pulled out of the formation by chemical osmotic back flow. Similar results are observed when the temperature of drilling mud is lower than that of the formation fluid. It is found that linear elastic approaches to wellbore stability analysis appear to overestimate the tangential stress around the wellbore and produce more conservative stresses compared to the results of field observation. Therefore, the drilling mud properties obtained from the elastoplastic wellbore stability in shales provide a safer mud weight window and reduce drilling cost.

  11. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  12. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation--O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  13. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  14. High-pressure soot formation and diffusion flame extinction characteristics of gaseous and liquid fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatas, Ahmet Emre

    High-pressure soot formation and flame stability characteristics were studied experimentally in laminar diffusion flames. For the former, radially resolved soot volume fraction and temperature profiles were measured in axisymmetric co-flow laminar diffusion flames of pre-vaporized n-heptane-air, undiluted ethylene-air, and nitrogen and carbon dioxide diluted ethylene-air at elevated pressures. Abel inversion was used to re-construct radially resolved data from the line-of-sight spectral soot emission measurements. For the latter, flame extinction strain rate was measured in counterflow laminar diffusion flames of C1-4 alcohols and hydrocarbon fuels of n-heptane, n-octane, iso-octane, toluene, Jet-A, and biodiesel. The luminous flame height, as marked by visible soot radiation, of the nitrogen- and helium-diluted n-heptane and nitrogen- and carbon dioxide-diluted ethylene flames stayed constant at all pressures. In pure ethylene flames, flame heights initially increased with pressure, but changed little above 5 atm. The maximum soot yield as a function of pressure in nitrogen-diluted n-heptane diffusion flames indicate that n-heptane flames are slightly more sensitive to pressure than gaseous alkane hydrocarbon flames at least up to 7 atm. Ethylene's maximum soot volume fractions were much higher than those of ethane and n-heptane diluted with nitrogen (fuel to nitrogen mass flow ratio is about 0.5). Pressure dependence of the peak carbon conversion to soot, defined as the percentage of fuel's carbon content converted to soot, was assessed and compared to previous measurements with other gaseous fuels. Maximum soot volume fractions were consistently lower in carbon dioxide-diluted flames between 5 and 15 atm but approached similar values to those in nitrogen-diluted flames at 20 atm. This observation implies that the chemical soot suppression effect of carbon dioxide, previously demonstrated at atmospheric pressure, is also present at elevated pressures up to 15 atm

  15. Mixing unmixables: Unexpected formation of Li-Cs alloys at low pressure

    PubMed Central

    Desgreniers, Serge; Tse, John S.; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Ohishi, Yasuo; Tse, Justin J.

    2015-01-01

    Contrary to the empirical Miedema and Hume-Rothery rules and a recent theoretical prediction, we report experimental evidence on the formation of Li-Cs alloys at very low pressure (>0.1 GPa). We also succeeded in synthesizing a pure nonstoichiometric and ordered crystalline phase from an approximately equimolar mixture and resolved its structure using the maximum entropy method. The new alloy has a primitive cubic cell with the Li atom situated in the center and the Cs at the corners. This structure is stable to at least 10 GPa and has an anomalously high coefficient of thermal expansion at low pressure. Analysis of the valence charge density shows that electrons are donated from Cs to the Li “p”-orbitals, resulting in a rare formal oxidation state of −1 for Li. The observation indicates the diversity in the bonding of the seeming simple group I Li element. PMID:26601304

  16. Mixing unmixables: Unexpected formation of Li-Cs alloys at low pressure.

    PubMed

    Desgreniers, Serge; Tse, John S; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Ohishi, Yasuo; Tse, Justin J

    2015-10-01

    Contrary to the empirical Miedema and Hume-Rothery rules and a recent theoretical prediction, we report experimental evidence on the formation of Li-Cs alloys at very low pressure (>0.1 GPa). We also succeeded in synthesizing a pure nonstoichiometric and ordered crystalline phase from an approximately equimolar mixture and resolved its structure using the maximum entropy method. The new alloy has a primitive cubic cell with the Li atom situated in the center and the Cs at the corners. This structure is stable to at least 10 GPa and has an anomalously high coefficient of thermal expansion at low pressure. Analysis of the valence charge density shows that electrons are donated from Cs to the Li "p"-orbitals, resulting in a rare formal oxidation state of -1 for Li. The observation indicates the diversity in the bonding of the seeming simple group I Li element. PMID:26601304

  17. Subnanosecond processes in the stage of breakdown formation in gas at a high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Yu. D.; Bykov, N. M.; Ivanov, S. N.

    2008-12-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the prebreakdown stage of a discharge in nitrogen at pressures of a few tens of atmospheres, gap voltages higher than 140 kV, and a voltage rise time of about 1 ns. Breakdown occurs at the front of the voltage pulse; i.e., the time of breakdown formation is shorter than the front duration. It is shown that, in gaps with a nonuniform electric field, the breakdown formation time is mainly determined by the time of avalanche development to the critical number of charge carriers. The subsequent stages of breakdown (the development of the ionization wave and the buildup of the conductivity in the weakly conducting channel bridging the gap) turn out to be shorter than this time or comparable to it.

  18. Self-regulating galaxy formation. Part 1: HII disk and Lyman alpha pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    Assuming a simple but physically based prototype for behavior of interstellar material during formation of a disk galaxy, coupled with the lowest order description of infall, a scenario is developed for self-regulated disk galaxy formation. Radiation pressure, particularly that of Lyman depha (from fluorescence conversion Lyman continuum), is an essential component, maintaining an inflated disk and stopping infall when only a small fraction of the overall perturbation has joined the disk. The resulting galaxies consist of a two dimensional family whose typical scales and surface density are expressable in terms of fundamental constants. The model leads naturally to galaxies with a rich circumgalactic environment and flat rotation curves (but is weak in its analysis of the subsequent evolution of halo material).

  19. The integrated method to select drilling muds for abnormally high pressure formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorev, V. S.; Dmitriev, A. Yu; Boyko, I. A.; Kayumova, N. S.; Rakhimov, T. R.

    2016-03-01

    The article describes the method for choosing a drilling mud for drilling abnormally high pressure formations. A carefully selected drilling mud formulation would not only enhance an array of interrelated fluid properties, but also minimize the impact on the pay zones when the drill bit first penetrates the pay. To ensure a better assessment of drilling mud impact on the pay zone, it is reasonable to carry out the study focused on the analysis of technological parameters, involving filtration, acid and drilling mud tests, as well as formation damage analysis. This would enable evaluating the degree of mudding off, reservoirs acid fracturing effect and the risks of pipe sticking at significant depth. The article presents the results of the above-described study with regard to the currently used drilling mud and new experimental formulations developed at National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University (Drilling Mud and Cement Slurry Laboratory).

  20. Effects of stretching before and after exercising on muscle soreness and risk of injury: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Rob D; Gabriel, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of stretching before and after exercising on muscle soreness after exercise, risk of injury, and athletic performance. Method Systematic review. Data sources Randomised or quasi-randomised studies identified by searching Medline, Embase, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, and PEDro, and by recursive checking of bibliographies. Main outcome measures Muscle soreness, incidence of injury, athletic performance. Results Five studies, all of moderate quality, reported sufficient data on the effects of stretching on muscle soreness to be included in the analysis. Outcomes seemed homogeneous. Stretching produced small and statistically non-significant reductions in muscle soreness. The pooled estimate of reduction in muscle soreness 24 hours after exercising was only 0.9 mm on a 100 mm scale (95% confidence interval −2.6 mm to 4.4 mm). Data from two studies on army recruits in military training show that muscle stretching before exercising does not produce useful reductions in injury risk (pooled hazard ratio 0.95, 0.78 to 1.16). Conclusions Stretching before or after exercising does not confer protection from muscle soreness. Stretching before exercising does not seem to confer a practically useful reduction in the risk of injury, but the generality of this finding needs testing. Insufficient research has been done with which to determine the effects of stretching on sporting performance. What is already known on this topicReviews of the effects of stretching before exercising have drawn conflicting conclusionsThe literature on effects of stretching before and after exercising on muscle soreness and risk of injury has not been systematically reviewedWhat this study addsStretching before and after exercising does not confer protection from muscle soreness and stretching before exercise does not seem to confer a practically useful reduction in the risk of injury PMID:12202327

  1. Formation of nanoclusters under radiation pressure in solution: A Brownian dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Prasanth P.; Bagchi, Biman

    2002-02-01

    When radiation is scattered by a medium, a part of its momentum is transferred to the target particles. This is purely a mechanical force which comes into effect when radiation is not coherently interacting. This force is known in literature as radiation pressure. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated the feasibility of using radiation pressure of a laser beam as a tool for cluster formation in solution. In this paper we describe the Brownian dynamics simulation of solute molecules under the perturbation induced by laser radiation. Here the force field generated by a laser beam in the fundamental mode is modeled as that of a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator. The radial distribution function of the perturbed system gives indication of high inhomogeneities in the solute distribution. An explicit analysis of the nature of these clusters is carried out by calculating the density-density correlation functions in the plane perpendicular to beam direction g(rxy); and along the direction of beam g(z), they give an average picture of shell structure formation in the different directions. The relaxation time of the first shell structure calculated from the van Hove correlation function is found to be relatively large in the perturbed solution. This is the signature of formation of stable nanoclusters in the presence of the radiation field. Our study on the dynamics of solute molecules during the cluster formation and dissolution gives the duration of collective relaxation, far away from the equilibrium to an equilibrium distribution. This relaxation time is found to be large for a perturbed solution.

  2. Periodic seepage face formation and water pressure distribution along a vertical boundary of an aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jazayeri Shoushtari, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Nielsen, Peter; Cartwright, Nick; Perrochet, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Detailed measurements of the piezometric head from sand flume experiments of an idealised coastal aquifer forced by a simple harmonic boundary condition across a vertical boundary are presented. The measurements focus on the pore pressures very close to the interface (x = 0.01m) and throw light on the details of the boundary condition, particularly with respect to meniscus suction and seepage face formation during the falling tide. Between the low and the mean water level, the response is consistent with meniscus suction free models in terms of both the vertical mean head and oscillation amplitude profiles and is consistent with the observation that this area of the interface was generally within the seepage face. Above the mean water level, the influence of meniscus formation is significant with the mean pressure head being less than that predicted by capillary free theory and oscillation amplitudes decaying faster than predicted by suction free models. The reduced hydraulic conductivity in this area due to partial drainage of pores on the falling tide also causes a delay in the response to the rising tide. The combined influence of seepage face formation, meniscus suction and reduced hydraulic conductivity generate higher harmonics with amplitudes of up to 26% of the local main harmonic. To model the influence of seepage face formation and meniscus suction a numerical solution of the Richards' equation was developed and evaluated against the data. The model-data comparison shows a good agreement with the behaviour high above the water table sensitive to the choice of moisture retention parameters.

  3. Significant Enhancement of H2 Formation in Disk Galaxies under Strong Ram Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Benjamin; Bekki, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    We show for the first time that H2 formation on dust grains can be enhanced in disk galaxies under strong ram pressure (RP). We numerically investigate how the time evolution of H i and H2 components in disk galaxies orbiting a group/cluster of galaxies can be influenced by the hydrodynamical interaction between the gaseous components of the galaxies and the hot intracluster medium. We find that compression of H i caused by RP increases H2 formation in disk galaxies before RP rapidly strips H i, cutting off the fuel supply and causing a drop in H2 density. We also find that the level of this H2 formation enhancement in a disk galaxy under RP depends on the mass of its host cluster dark matter halo, the initial positions and velocities of the disk galaxy, and the disk inclination angle with respect to the orbital plane. We demonstrate that dust growth is a key factor in the evolution of the H i and H2 mass in disk galaxies under strong RP. We discuss how the correlation between H2 fractions and surface gas densities of disk galaxies evolves with time in the galaxies under RP. We also discuss whether galaxy-wide star formation rates (SFRs) in cluster disk galaxies can be enhanced by RP if the SFRs depend on H2 densities.

  4. A Computational, Tissue-Realistic Model of Pressure Ulcer Formation in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Solovyev, Alexey; Allegretti, Ana; Krishnan, Shilpa; Henzel, M. Kristi; Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Brienza, David; An, Gary; Mi, Qi; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    People with spinal cord injury (SCI) are predisposed to pressure ulcers (PU). PU remain a significant burden in cost of care and quality of life despite improved mechanistic understanding and advanced interventions. An agent-based model (ABM) of ischemia/reperfusion-induced inflammation and PU (the PUABM) was created, calibrated to serial images of post-SCI PU, and used to investigate potential treatments in silico. Tissue-level features of the PUABM recapitulated visual patterns of ulcer formation in individuals with SCI. These morphological features, along with simulated cell counts and mediator concentrations, suggested that the influence of inflammatory dynamics caused simulations to be committed to “better” vs. “worse” outcomes by 4 days of simulated time and prior to ulcer formation. Sensitivity analysis of model parameters suggested that increasing oxygen availability would reduce PU incidence. Using the PUABM, in silico trials of anti-inflammatory treatments such as corticosteroids and a neutralizing antibody targeted at Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern molecules (DAMPs) suggested that, at best, early application at a sufficiently high dose could attenuate local inflammation and reduce pressure-associated tissue damage, but could not reduce PU incidence. The PUABM thus shows promise as an adjunct for mechanistic understanding, diagnosis, and design of therapies in the setting of PU. PMID:26111346

  5. Ligand-free Ni nanocluster formation at atmospheric pressure via rapid quenching in a microplasma process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Kang, Seungkoo; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; Ouyang, Hui; Hogan, Christopher J.; Mohan Sankaran, R.

    2014-09-01

    The production of metal nanoclusters composed of less than 103 atoms is important for applications in energy conversion and medicine, and for fundamental studies of nanomaterial nucleation and growth. Unfortunately, existing synthesis methods do not enable adequate control of cluster formation, particularly at atmospheric pressure wherein formation typically occurs on sub-millisecond timescales. Here, we demonstrate that ligand-free, unagglomerated nickel nanoclusters can be continuously synthesized at atmospheric pressure via the decomposition of bis(cyclopentadienyl)nickel(II) (nickelocene) in a spatially-confined microplasma process that rapidly quenches particle growth and agglomeration. The clusters were measured on line by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and further analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results reveal that stable clusters with spherical equivalent mean diameters below 10 \\dot{A} are produced, and by controlling the nickelocene concentration, the mean diameter can be tuned up to ˜50 \\dot{A}. Although diameter is often the sole metric used in nanocluster and nanoparticle characterization, to infer the number of atoms in AFM and IMS detected clusters, we compare measured AFM heights and IMS inferred collision cross sections to theoretical predictions based on both bulk matter approximations and density functional theory and Hartree-Fock calculated Ni nanocluster structures (composed of 2-15 atoms for the latter). The calculations suggest that Ni nanoclusters composed of less than 102 atoms can be produced repeatably with simple microplasma reactors.

  6. A Computational, Tissue-Realistic Model of Pressure Ulcer Formation in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Solovyev, Alexey; Allegretti, Ana; Krishnan, Shilpa; Henzel, M Kristi; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Brienza, David; An, Gary; Mi, Qi; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2015-06-01

    People with spinal cord injury (SCI) are predisposed to pressure ulcers (PU). PU remain a significant burden in cost of care and quality of life despite improved mechanistic understanding and advanced interventions. An agent-based model (ABM) of ischemia/reperfusion-induced inflammation and PU (the PUABM) was created, calibrated to serial images of post-SCI PU, and used to investigate potential treatments in silico. Tissue-level features of the PUABM recapitulated visual patterns of ulcer formation in individuals with SCI. These morphological features, along with simulated cell counts and mediator concentrations, suggested that the influence of inflammatory dynamics caused simulations to be committed to "better" vs. "worse" outcomes by 4 days of simulated time and prior to ulcer formation. Sensitivity analysis of model parameters suggested that increasing oxygen availability would reduce PU incidence. Using the PUABM, in silico trials of anti-inflammatory treatments such as corticosteroids and a neutralizing antibody targeted at Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern molecules (DAMPs) suggested that, at best, early application at a sufficiently high dose could attenuate local inflammation and reduce pressure-associated tissue damage, but could not reduce PU incidence. The PUABM thus shows promise as an adjunct for mechanistic understanding, diagnosis, and design of therapies in the setting of PU. PMID:26111346

  7. Nanoparticle formation by laser ablation in air and by spark discharges at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itina, T. E.; Voloshko, A.

    2013-12-01

    Recent promising methods of nanoparticle fabrication include laser ablation and spark discharge. Despite different experimental conditions, a striking similarity is often observed in the sizes of the obtained particles. To explain this result, we elucidate physical mechanisms involved in the formation of metallic nanoparticles. In particular, we compare supersaturation degree and sizes of critical nucleus obtained under laser ablation conditions with that obtained for spark discharge in air. For this, the dynamics of the expansion of either ablated or eroded products is described by using a three-dimensional blast wave model. Firstly, we consider nanosecond laser ablation in air. In the presence of a background gas, the plume expansion is limited by the gas pressure. Nanoparticles are mostly formed by nucleation and condensation taking place in the supersaturated vapor. Secondly, we investigate nanoparticles formation by spark discharge at atmospheric pressure. After efficient photoionization and streamer expansion, the cathode material suffers erosion and NPs appear. The calculation results allow us to examine the sizes of critical nuclei as function of the experimental parameters and to reveal the conditions favorable for the size reduction and for the increase in the nanoparticle yield.

  8. High Pressure and Temperature Core Formation as an Alternative to the "Late Veneer" Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin; Pando, K.; Humayun, M.; Danielson, L.

    2011-01-01

    The highly siderophile elements (HSE; Re, Au and the Platinum Group Elements - Pd Pt, Rh, Ru, Ir, Os) are commonly utilized to constrain accretion processes in terrestrial differentiated bodies due to their affinity for FeNi metal [1]. These eight elements exhibit highly siderophile behavior, but nonetheless have highly diverse metal-silicate partition coefficients [2]. Therefore the near chondritic relative concentrations of HSEs in the terrestrial and lunar mantles, as well as some other bodies, are attributed to late accretion rather than core formation [1]. Evaluation of competing theories, such as high pressure metal-silicate partitioning or magma ocean hypotheses has been hindered by a lack of relevant partitioning data for this group of eight elements. In particular, systematic studies isolating the effect of one variable (e.g. temperature or melt compositions) are lacking. Here we undertake new experiments on all eight elements, using Fe metal and FeO-bearing silicate melts at fixed pressure, but variable temperatures. These experiments, as well as some additional planned experiments should allow partition coefficients to be more accurately calculated or estimated at the PT conditions and compositions at which core formation is thought to have occurred.

  9. Ligand-free Ni nanocluster formation at atmospheric pressure via rapid quenching in a microplasma process.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Kang, Seungkoo; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; Ouyang, Hui; Hogan, Christopher J; Sankaran, R Mohan

    2014-09-26

    The production of metal nanoclusters composed of less than 10(3) atoms is important for applications in energy conversion and medicine, and for fundamental studies of nanomaterial nucleation and growth. Unfortunately, existing synthesis methods do not enable adequate control of cluster formation, particularly at atmospheric pressure wherein formation typically occurs on sub-millisecond timescales. Here, we demonstrate that ligand-free, unagglomerated nickel nanoclusters can be continuously synthesized at atmospheric pressure via the decomposition of bis(cyclopentadienyl)nickel(II) (nickelocene) in a spatially-confined microplasma process that rapidly quenches particle growth and agglomeration. The clusters were measured on line by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and further analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results reveal that stable clusters with spherical equivalent mean diameters below 10 Åare produced, and by controlling the nickelocene concentration, the mean diameter can be tuned up to ∼50 Å. Although diameter is often the sole metric used in nanocluster and nanoparticle characterization, to infer the number of atoms in AFM and IMS detected clusters, we compare measured AFM heights and IMS inferred collision cross sections to theoretical predictions based on both bulk matter approximations and density functional theory and Hartree-Fock calculated Ni nanocluster structures (composed of 2-15 atoms for the latter). The calculations suggest that Ni nanoclusters composed of less than 10(2) atoms can be produced repeatably with simple microplasma reactors. PMID:25180756

  10. Low-pressure clathrate-hydrate formation in amorphous astrophysical ice analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, D. F.; Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S.; Hudgins, D.; Freund, F.

    1991-01-01

    In modeling cometary ice, the properties of clathrate hydrates were used to explain anomalous gas release at large radial distances from the Sun, and the retention of particular gas inventories at elevated temperatures. Clathrates may also have been important early in solar system history. However, there has never been a reasonable mechanism proposed for clathrate formation under the low pressures typical of these environments. For the first time, it was shown that clathrate hydrates can be formed by warming and annealing amorphous mixed molecular ices at low pressures. The complex microstructures which occur as a result of clathrate formation from the solid state may provide an explanation for a variety of unexplained phenomena. The vacuum and imaging systems of an Hitachi H-500H Analytical Electron Microscope was modified to study mixed molecular ices at temperatures between 12 and 373 K. The resulting ices are characterized by low-electron dose Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED). The implications of these results for the mechanical and gas release properties of comets are discussed. Laboratory IR data from similar ices are presented which suggest the possibility of remotely observing and identifying clathrates in astrophysical objects.

  11. Shock Formation by Plasma Filaments of Microwave Discharge under Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2016-03-01

    A one-dimensional compressible fluid calculation was coupled with a finite- difference time-domain code and a particle-in-cell code with collision to reproduce propagation of electromagnetic wave, ionization process of plasma, and shock wave formation in atmospheric microwave discharge. Plasma filaments are driven toward the microwave source at 1 atm, and the distance between each filament is one-fifth of the wavelength of the incident microwave. The strong shock wave is generated due to the high plasma density at the atmospheric pressure. A simple analysis of the microwave propagation into the plasma shows that cut-off density of the microwave becomes smaller with the pressure decrease in a collisional plasma. At the lower pressure, the smaller density plasma is obtained with a diffusive pattern because of the smaller cut-off density and the larger diffusion effect. In contrast with the 1-atm case, the weak shock wave is generated at a rarefied condition, which lowers performance of microwave thruster.

  12. Pressure-induced bonding and compound formation in xenon-hydrogen solids

    SciTech Connect

    Somayazulu, Maddury; Dera, Przemyslaw; Goncharov, Alexander F; Gramsch, Stephen A; Liermann, Peter; Yang, Wenge; Liu, Zhenxian; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, Russell J

    2010-11-03

    Closed electron shell systems, such as hydrogen, nitrogen or group 18 elements, can form weakly bound stoichiometric compounds at high pressures. An understanding of the stability of these van der Waals compounds is lacking, as is information on the nature of their interatomic interactions. We describe the formation of a stable compound in the Xe-H{sub 2} binary system, revealed by a suite of X-ray diffraction and optical spectroscopy measurements. At 4.8 GPa, a unique hydrogen-rich structure forms that can be viewed as a tripled solid hydrogen lattice modulated by layers of xenon, consisting of xenon dimers. Varying the applied pressure tunes the Xe-Xe distances in the solid over a broad range from that of an expanded xenon lattice to the distances observed in metallic xenon at megabar pressures. Infrared and Raman spectra indicate a weakening of the intramolecular covalent bond as well as persistence of semiconducting behaviour in the compound to at least 255 GPa.

  13. The formation of optical membrane reflector surfaces using uniform pressure loading

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, L.M.; Tuan, C.

    1987-08-01

    Potentially high quality optical reflector surfaces are attainable with the use of pressure formed membranes. Such reflector surfaces offer the prospect of very low weight and low cost. The formation of such surfaces, using initially flat circular membranes with uniform pressure loading, is studied in this paper. Finite axisymmetric deformations, along with both linear and nonlinear material response is considered. A wide range of focal-length-to-diameter ratios (above 0.6) are addressed and the structural/optical response mechanisms that lead to optical distortions relative to ideal parabolic reflector shapes are also considered. Results show that elastic material response can often lead to a significantly larger deviation from the ideal shape than will inelastic material response. This results primarily from the ability to limit stress nonuniformities when inelastic material response is operative. Furthermore, when under pressure loading the membrane focal length decreases monotonically with increasing radius for both linear and nonlinear material response. Further, the predicted focal length variation is increasingly nonlinear near the membrane support.

  14. Structural analysis of high-pressure shear zones (Bacariza Formation, Cabo Ortegal, NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puelles, P.; Mulchrone, K. F.; Ábalos, B.; Ibarguchi, J. I. Gil

    2005-06-01

    High-pressure granulites of the Bacariza Formation (Cabo Ortegal Complex, NW Spain) exhibit spectacular examples of ductile shear zones developed at different scales in rocks containing pre-existing foliations. A detailed structural analysis was carried out on these shear zones in order to unravel and compare the role of various parameters controlling the deformation process (i.e. heterogeneous simple shear, components of homogeneous deformation, heterogeneous volume change and degree of non-coaxiality). Although heterogeneous simple shear largely dominated, negligible deviations from the ideal simple shear model were detected involving shortening along the structural directions perpendicular to the stretching axis (within the foliation plane) of the finite strain ellipsoid. The relationship between displacement parallel to a half-shear zone and the normal distance from its boundary provided the basis for the estimation of the stress exponent in the power-law constitutive flow equation associated with each shear zone, which is interpreted as a rheological indicator. These geometric and rheological results, and the thermobaric conditions of high-pressure shear zone deformation, indicate that these shear zones accommodated dominant plastic rock flow coeval with high-pressure and high-temperature deformations under moderate stress levels concomitant with elevated strain rates.

  15. The collaborative effect of ram pressure and merging on star formation and stripping fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischko, J. C.; Steinhauser, D.; Schindler, S.

    2015-04-01

    Aims: We investigate the effect of ram pressure stripping (RPS) on several simulations of merging pairs of gas-rich spiral galaxies. We are concerned with the changes in stripping efficiency and the time evolution of the star formation rate. Our goal is to provide an estimate of the combined effect of merging and RPS compared to the influence of the individual processes. Methods: We make use of the combined N-body/hydrodynamic code GADGET-2. The code features a threshold-based statistical recipe for star formation, as well as radiative cooling and modeling of galactic winds. In our simulations, we vary mass ratios between 1:4 and 1:8 in a binary merger. We sample different geometric configurations of the merging systems (edge-on and face-on mergers, different impact parameters). Furthermore, we vary the properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) in rough steps: the speed of the merging system relative to the ICM between 500 and 1000 km s-1, the ICM density between 10-29 and 10-27 g cm-3, and the ICM direction relative to the mergers' orbital plane. Ram pressure is kept constant within a simulation time period, as is the ICM temperature of 107 K. Each simulation in the ICM is compared to simulations of the merger in vacuum and the non-merging galaxies with acting ram pressure. Results: Averaged over the simulation time (1 Gyr) the merging pairs show a negligible 5% enhancement in SFR, when compared to single galaxies under the same environmental conditions. The SFRs peak at the time of the galaxies first fly-through. There, our simulations show SFRs of up to 20 M⊙ yr-1 (compared to 3 M⊙ yr-1 of the non-merging galaxies in vacuum). In the most extreme case, this constitutes a short-term (<50 Myr) SFR increase of 50 % over the non-merging galaxies experiencing ram pressure. The wake of merging galaxies in the ICM typically has a third to half the star mass seen in the non-merging galaxies and 5% to 10% less gas mass. The joint effect of RPS and merging, according

  16. Experimental constraints on formation of hematite in olivine at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanfei; Wang, Chao; Wu, Yao; Liu, Wenlong; Jin, Zhenmin

    2015-10-01

    Iron-rich oxides, such as magnetite or hematite, have been reported in olivine grains in many orogenic garnet peridotites from continental collision zones. Whether these iron-rich minerals originate from dry oxidation, dehydrogenation-oxidation or exsolution from a precursor wadsleyite phase is debatable. This paper explores high-pressure and high-temperature experiments in a hydrous harzburgite system, by taking advantage of electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analyses, to examine the formation of hematite in olivine. Experimental results show that hematite can be formed within olivine grains at pressures >6 GPa and temperatures in the 1073-1473 K range. EBSD analysis suggests that hematite rods (not associated with clinopyroxene) and host olivine have the following crystallographic relations: < 0001 rangle _{{Hem}} // [100]_{{Ol}} , < 10{-}10rangle _{{Hem}} //[001]_{{Ol}} , < 11{-}20rangle _{{Hem}} //[010]_{{Ol}} , which are consistent with those observed in natural garnet peridotite from the Dabie-Sulu ultra-high-pressure (UHP) metamorphic terrane. It is postulated that both hydroxide (OH-) and hydrogen (H+) ions have the potential to oxidize Fe2+ to Fe3+, followed by rapid dehydrogenation and slow Fe diffusion, thus forming hematite within the olivine grains. It is proposed that dehydrogenation-oxidation is the most likely formation mechanism of hematite inclusions within olivine, with the following two requirements: an ample amount of H2O and specific P- T conditions (>6 GPa, at 1073 K). Such conditions are consistent with those calculated in natural garnet peridotites from the Dabie-Sulu UHP metamorphic terranes. The present study also indicates that hematite (or magnetite?) inclusions in olivine contain important clues about the tectonic evolution of UHP rocks in continental crust collision zones.

  17. Superior vena caval pressure elevation causes pleural effusion formation in sheep.

    PubMed

    Allen, S J; Laine, G A; Drake, R E; Gabel, J C

    1988-09-01

    The effect of superior vena caval pressure (SVCP) elevation on the formation of pleural effusions (PE) was studied in sheep. Through a right thoracotomy, a Silastic cuff was placed around the superior vena cava. Catheters for monitoring SVCP and pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) were also placed. After a 1- to 3-wk recovery period, we measured the SVCP, PAP, cardiac output, and plasma protein concentration (Cp). We then elevated the SVCP to various levels from base line [5.3 +/- 2.6 (SD) mmHg] to 33 mmHg. The cardiac output, PAP, and Cp were remeasured 1-2 h and 24 h after SVCP elevation. At the end of the 24-h period, the animals were killed. The PE volume and pleural fluid protein concentration (Cpl) were measured, and the Cpl/Cp was calculated. PE generally did not occur until the SVCP was elevated above 15 mmHg. To study the effect of the thoracotomy on the subsequent pleural effusion, we studied six additional sheep in which we did not perform a thoracotomy. In these animals, the SVCP was elevated to between 5 and 28 mmHg for 24 h by use of a 16-Fr balloon catheter placed via a left external jugular vein and a right carotid-external jugular shunt. We found that the PE volume, for a given SVCP elevation, was similar to that present in sheep that received a thoracotomy. For all sheep the volume of PE was related to SVCP by the equation PE (ml) = 0.24e0.26SVCP, r = 0.85. In the sheep without a thoracotomy, Cpl/Cp rose with increasing volume of PE. Our data demonstrate that elevation of SVCP greater than 15 mmHg for 24 h results in the formation of PE. The rise in Cpl/Cp with PE volume suggests that filtration through the pleural vessels is not the major contributor to PE formation. PMID:3414816

  18. Effects of the taxanes paclitaxel and docetaxel on edema formation and interstitial fluid pressure.

    PubMed

    Brønstad, Aurora; Berg, Ansgar; Reed, Rolf K

    2004-08-01

    Interstitial fluid pressure (P(if)) is important for maintaining constant interstitial fluid volume. In several acute inflammatory reactions, a dramatic lowering of P(if) has been observed, increasing transcapillary filtration pressure and favoring initial and rapid edema formation. This lowering of P(if) seems to involve dynamic beta(1)-integrin-mediated interactions between connective tissue cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) fibers. beta(1)-Integrins are adhesion receptors responsible for the attachment of connective tissue cells to the ECM providing a force-transmitting physical link between the ECM and cytoskeleton. Disruption of actin filaments leads to lowering of P(if) and edema formation, suggesting a role for actin filaments. The aim of this study was to further investigate the role of the cytoskeleton in the control of P(if) by studying the effect of microtubuli fixation using paclitaxel and docetaxel. P(if) was measured with the micropuncture technique. Albumin extravasation (E(alb)) was measured using (125)I-labeled albumin. Paclitaxel and docetaxel were tested locally on foot skin in female Wistar rats. Paclitaxel (6 mg/ml) reduced P(if) from -1.5 +/- 1.0 mmHg in controls to -4.9 +/- 2.6 mmHg after 30 min (P < 0.05) in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05). Docetaxel caused a similar lowering of P(if). Both paclitaxel and docetaxel increased E(alb) compared with Cremophor EL and saline control (P < 0.05). Pretreatment with phalloidin before paclitaxel, causing fixation of actin filaments, abolished the lowering of P(if) caused by paclitaxel. This study confirms several previous studies demonstrating that connective tissue cells influence P(if) and edema formation. PMID:15059777

  19. Ozone kinetics in low-pressure discharges: vibrationally excited ozone and molecule formation on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, Daniil; Guerra, Vasco; Guaitella, Olivier; Booth, Jean-Paul; Rousseau, Antoine

    2013-10-01

    A combined experimental and modeling investigation of the ozone kinetics in the afterglow of pulsed direct current discharges in oxygen is carried out. The discharge is generated in a cylindrical silica tube of radius 1 cm, with short pulse durations between 0.5 and 2 ms, pressures in the range 1-5 Torr and discharge currents ˜40-120 mA. Time-resolved absolute concentrations of ground-state atoms and ozone molecules were measured simultaneously in situ, by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence and ultraviolet absorption, respectively. The experiments were complemented by a self-consistent model developed to interpret the results and, in particular, to evaluate the roles of vibrationally excited ozone and of ozone formation on surfaces. It is found that vibrationally excited ozone, O_3^{*} , plays an important role in the ozone kinetics, leading to a decrease in the ozone concentration and an increase in its formation time. In turn, the kinetics of O_3^{*} is strongly coupled with those of atomic oxygen and O2(a 1Δg) metastables. Ozone formation at the wall does not contribute significantly to the total ozone production under the present conditions. Upper limits for the effective heterogeneous recombination probability of O atoms into ozone are established.

  20. Pressure morphology of the relaxed lower esophageal sphincter: the formation and collapse of the phrenic ampulla.

    PubMed

    Kwiatek, Monika A; Nicodème, Frédéric; Pandolfino, John E; Kahrilas, Peter J

    2012-02-01

    This study aimed to apply novel high-resolution manometry with eight-sector radial pressure resolution (3D-HRM technology) to resolve the deglutitive pressure morphology at the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) before, during, and after bolus transit. A hybrid HRM assembly, including a 9-cm-long 3D-HRM array, was used to record EGJ pressure morphology in 15 normal subjects. Concurrent videofluoroscopy was used to relate bolus movement to pressure morphology and EGJ anatomy, aided by an endoclip marking the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ). The contractile deceleration point (CDP) marked the time at which luminal clearance slowed to 1.1 cm/s and the location (4 cm proximal to the elevated SCJ) at which peristalsis terminated. The phrenic ampulla spanned from the CDP to the SCJ. The subsequent radial and axial collapse of the ampulla coincided with the reconstitution of the effaced and elongated lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Following ampullary emptying, the stretched LES (maximum length 4.0 cm) progressively collapsed to its baseline length of 1.9 cm (P < 0.001). The phrenic ampulla is a transient structure comprised of the stretched, effaced, and axially displaced LES that serves as a "yield zone" to facilitate bolus transfer to the stomach. During ampullary emptying, the LES circular muscle contracts, and longitudinal muscle shortens while that of the adjacent esophagus reelongates. The likely LES elongation with the formation of the ampulla and shortening to its native length after ampullary emptying suggest that reduction in the resting tone of the longitudinal muscle within the LES segment is a previously unrecognized component of LES relaxation. PMID:22114118

  1. Pressure morphology of the relaxed lower esophageal sphincter: the formation and collapse of the phrenic ampulla

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatek, Monika A.; Nicodème, Frédéric; Pandolfino, John E.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to apply novel high-resolution manometry with eight-sector radial pressure resolution (3D-HRM technology) to resolve the deglutitive pressure morphology at the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) before, during, and after bolus transit. A hybrid HRM assembly, including a 9-cm-long 3D-HRM array, was used to record EGJ pressure morphology in 15 normal subjects. Concurrent videofluoroscopy was used to relate bolus movement to pressure morphology and EGJ anatomy, aided by an endoclip marking the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ). The contractile deceleration point (CDP) marked the time at which luminal clearance slowed to 1.1 cm/s and the location (4 cm proximal to the elevated SCJ) at which peristalsis terminated. The phrenic ampulla spanned from the CDP to the SCJ. The subsequent radial and axial collapse of the ampulla coincided with the reconstitution of the effaced and elongated lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Following ampullary emptying, the stretched LES (maximum length 4.0 cm) progressively collapsed to its baseline length of 1.9 cm (P < 0.001). The phrenic ampulla is a transient structure comprised of the stretched, effaced, and axially displaced LES that serves as a “yield zone” to facilitate bolus transfer to the stomach. During ampullary emptying, the LES circular muscle contracts, and longitudinal muscle shortens while that of the adjacent esophagus reelongates. The likely LES elongation with the formation of the ampulla and shortening to its native length after ampullary emptying suggest that reduction in the resting tone of the longitudinal muscle within the LES segment is a previously unrecognized component of LES relaxation. PMID:22114118

  2. The usefulness of a clinical 'scorecard' in managing patients with sore throat in general practice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Objective: To evaluate the usefulness of a clinical scorecard in managing sore throat in general practice. Design: Validation study of scorecard for sore throat with a throat swab culture used as the 'gold standard'. Setting: A solo family practice in rural New South Wales, Australia Participants: Patients attending with sore throat. Methods Patients from the age of 5 years and above presenting with the main symptom of a sore throat, and who have not had any antibiotic treatment in the previous two weeks, were invited to participate in the study. The doctor completed a scorecard for each patient participating and took a throat swab for culture. Adult patients (> 16 yrs) were asked to complete a patient satisfaction questionnaire, while guardians accompanying children (5 yr to < 16 yrs old) were asked to complete a similar, guardian questionnaire. Main outcome measures: 1. Ability of a new scorecard to differentiate between bacterial and non-bacterial sore throat. 2. Patients' trust in the scorecard. Results The scorecard has a sensitivity of 93.33%, a specificity of 63.16%, a positive predictive value of 50% and a negative predictive value of 96%. The sensitivity is better than other sore throat scorecards that have been published but with a slightly lower specificity. There was a high level of patient trust in the scorecard was (85.8% agreement). Patients also trusted their doctor's judgement based on the scorecard (90.6% agreement). Conclusions As the scorecard has a high sensitivity but only a moderate specificity, this means that it is more reliable for negative results, i.e. when the result suggests a viral infection. When the result favours a bacterial sore throat, then a high sensitivity can mean that there are a number of false positives. GPs can be confident in withholding antibiotics when the scorecard indicates a viral infection. PMID:20670439

  3. Effect of pressure on structure and NO sub X formation in CO-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, H. G.; Miller, I. M.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made of nitric oxide formation in a laminar CO-air diffusion flame over a pressure range from 1 to 50 atm. The carbon monoxide (CO) issued from a 3.06 mm diameter port coaxially into a coflowing stream of air confined within a 20.5 mm diameter chimney. Nitric oxide concentrations from the flame were measured at two carbon monoxide (fuel) flow rates: 73 standard cubic/min and 146 sccm. Comparison of the present data with data in the literature for a methane-air diffusion flame shows that for flames of comparable flame height (8 to 10 mm) and pseudoequivalence ratio (0.162), the molar emission index of a CO-air flame is significantly greater than that of a methane-air flame.

  4. Gas bubble formation and its pressure signature in T-junction of a microreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouya, Shahram; Koochesfahani, Manoochehr

    2013-11-01

    The segmented gas-liquid flow is of particular interest in microreactors used for high throughput material synthesis with enhanced mixing and more efficient reaction. A typical geometry to introduce gas plugs into the reactor is a T-junction where the dispersed liquid is squeezed and pinched by the continuous fluid in the main branch of the junction. We present experimental data of time resolved pressure along with synchronous imaging of the drop formation at the junction to show the transient behavior of the process. The stability of the slug regime and the regularity of the slug/plug pattern are investigated in this study. This work was supported by the CRC Program of the National Science Foundation, Grant Number CHE-0714028.

  5. Formations of negative ions in Sf6/N2 mixtures and their transport at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Yui; Sabo, Martin; Itoh, Haruo; Matejčík, Štefan

    2013-02-01

    Formation of negative ions initiated by interaction of thermal electrons and in the corona discharge (CD) in N2 with small admixture of SF6; was studied using the ion mobility spectrometry- orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry (IMS-oaTOF) at atmospheric pressure. The negative ions have been analyzed by the ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) and two-dimensional spectra (2D IMS-MS) have been recorded. We discuss the mechanisms of the negative ion formation in the N2/SF6 mixtures (0.003-0.018%) as well as the transport parameters of the ions in these mixtures. The values of the reduced ion mobilities of negative ions formed in these mixtures were determined (2.43 cm2/V s for HF2- (HF)n, 2.32 cm2/V s for NO3- (HF)n, 2.08 cm2/V s for SF5-, 2.01 cm2/V s for SOF5-, 2.00 for SOF4- 1.99 cm2/V s for SF6-, 1.83 cm2/V s for SOF5-(H2O)n and 1.73 for SOF5-(H2O)n(HF)m). The assignment of the ion mobility peaks was performed on the basis of the 2D IMS-MS spectra. Contribution to the Topical Issue "13th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (Hakone XIII)", Edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Henryca Danuta Stryczewska and Yvan Ségui.

  6. Pressure-temperature dependence of nanowire formation in the arsenic-sulfur system

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Sundaram, S. K.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Williford, Rick E.; Olmstead, Juliana D.

    2006-12-01

    Nanowire Formation in Arsenic Trisulfide Brian J. Riley, S.K. Sundaram*, Bradley R. Johnson, Mark Engelhard Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 * Corresponding author: Phone: 509-373-6665; Fax: 509-376-3108, E-mail: sk.Sundaram@pnl.gov Abstract: Arsenic trisulfide (As2S3) nanowires, nano-droplets, and micro-islands were synthesized on fused silica substrates, using a sublimation-condensation process at reduced pressures (70 mtorr – 70 torr) in a sealed ampoule. Microstructural control of the deposited thin film was achieved by controlling initial pressure, substrate temperature and substrate surface treatment. Microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). Surface topography and chemistry of the substrates were characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Semi-quantitative image analysis and basic curve-fitting were used to develop empirical models to mathematically describe the variation of microstructure as a function of initial pressure and substrate temperature and map out the regions of different microstructures in P-T space. Thermodyamic properties (available from literature) of this system are also incorporated in this map. Nanowires of an amorphous, transparent in visible-LWIR region, semi-conducting material, like As2S3, provide new opportunities for the development of novel nano-photonic and electronic devices. Additionally, this system provides an excellent opportunity to model (and control) microstructure development from nanometer to micron scales in a physical vapor deposition process, which is of great value to nanoscience and nanotechnology in general.

  7. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.

    1998-01-01

    Flame structure and soot formation were studied within soot-containing laminar premixed mc1hane/oxygen flames at atmospheric pressure. The following measurements were made: soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscope (TEM), major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and gas velocities by laser velocimetry. Present measurements of gas species concentrations were in reasonably good agreement with earlier measurements due to Ramer et al. as well as predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt: the predictions also suggest that H atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot formation region. Using this information, it was found that measured soot surface growth rates could be correlated successfully by predictions based on the hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of both Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall, extending an earlier assessment of these mechanisms for premixed ethylene/air flames to conditions having larger H/C ratios and acetylene concentrations. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates were somewhat lower than the earlier observations for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames and were significantly lower than corresponding rates in laminar diffusion flames. for reasons that still must be explained.

  8. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Flame structure and soot formation were studied within soot-containing laminar premixed methanefoxygen flames at atmospheric pressure. The following measurements were made: soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscope (TEM), major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and gas velocities by laser velocimetry. Present measurements of gas species concentrations were in reasonably good agreement with earlier measurements due to Ramer et al. as well as predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt; the predictions also suggest that H atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot formation region. Using this information, it was found that measured soot surface growth rates could be correlated successfully by predictions based on the hydrogenabstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of both Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall, extending an earlier assessment of these mechanisms for premixed ethylene/air flames to conditions having larger H/C ratios and acetylene concentrations. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates were somewhat lower than the earlier observations for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames and were significantly lower than corresponding rates in laminar diffusion flames, for reasons that still must be explained.

  9. Experimental investigation of the garnet formation in the CMNAS system at high pressure under deviatoric stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidelbach, F.

    2015-12-01

    The formation of eclogite in basaltic rocks during subduction of crustal material is a crucial process in the geodynamic cycle. This transition and also the formation of garnetite at greater depth (>10 GPa) have been investigated closely in experiments under hydrostatic conditions. However studies of naturally occurring eclogites indicate concurrent plastic deformation and deviatoric stresses during the phase transition may influence the microstructures as well as the rheology of the forming eclogite. In the present project we aim to investigate the influence of plastic deformation on the gabbro to eclogite transition in a simplified basaltic material as well as the transition of eclogite to garnetite at higher pressures. Starting materials with a simplified CMNAS composition were synthesized from glass in piston cylinder experiments at 0.5/3 GPa and 950-1000°/1200°C respectively, yielding fine grained (~10-20μm) mixtures of orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and plagioclase ('gabbro') and omphacite, garnet and quartz ('eclogite'). Transformation experiments were then performed in a pressure range from 3 to 12 GPa at 1200°C in a Dia-type mulitanvil press with six independently movable rams. Pure shear deformation of up to 30% was imposed in the deformation runs with strain rates ranging from 5x10-5 to 5x10-6 sec-1. For comparison static transformation experiments were performed with the same duration (100 to 1000 min). The reaction of the crystalline starting materials was generally sluggish and relatively large overstepping of phase boundaries was needed to induce notable reaction progress as determined by SEM-EDS, -EBSD and EPMA. Preliminary results suggest that concurrent deformation enhanced reaction progress in comparison to static experiments for both investigated transitions, however more experiments are needed to quantify this effect. Deformation was accommodated by intracrystalline plasticity of omphacite as well as diffusion assisted grain (phase) boundary

  10. Soot formation and temperature structure in small methane-oxygen diffusion flames at subcritical and supercritical pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Hyun I.; Guelder, Oemer L.

    2010-06-15

    An experimental study was conducted to examine the characteristics of laminar methane-oxygen diffusion flames up to 100 atmospheres. The influence of pressure on soot formation and on the structure of the temperature field was investigated over the pressure range of 10-90 atmospheres in a high-pressure combustion chamber using a non-intrusive, line-of-sight spectral soot emission diagnostic technique. Two distinct zones characterized the appearance of a methane and pure oxygen diffusion flame: an inner luminous zone similar to the methane-air diffusion flames, and an outer diffusion flame zone which is mostly blue. The flame height, marked by the visible soot radiation emission, was reduced by over 50% over the pressure range of 10-100 atmospheres. Between 10 and 40 atmospheres, the soot levels increased with increasing pressure; however, above 40 atmospheres the soot concentrations decreased with increasing pressure. (author)

  11. DIRECT STELLAR RADIATION PRESSURE AT THE DUST SUBLIMATION FRONT IN MASSIVE STAR FORMATION: EFFECTS OF A DUST-FREE DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2011-10-01

    In massive star formation ({approx}> 40 M{sub sun}) by core accretion, the direct stellar radiation pressure acting on the dust particles exceeds the gravitational force and interferes with mass accretion at the dust sublimation front, the first absorption site. Ram pressure generated by high accretion rates of 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} is thought to be required to overcome the direct stellar radiation pressure. We investigate the direct stellar irradiation on the dust sublimation front, including the inner accretion disk structure. We show that the ram pressure of the accretion disk is lower than the stellar radiation pressure at the dust sublimation front. Thus, another mechanism must overcome the direct stellar radiation pressure. We suggest that the inner hot dust-free region is optically thick, shielding the dust sublimation front from direct stellar irradiation. Thus, accretion would not halt at the dust sublimation front, even at lower accretion rates.

  12. Thickness of mouthguard sheets after vacuum-pressure formation: influence of mouthguard sheet material.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mutsumi; Koide, Kaoru; Iwasaki, Shin-Ichi

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the thickness of mouthguard sheet after vacuum-pressure formation based on the mouthguard sheet material. Three mouthguard sheet materials (4.0 mm thick) were compared: ethylene-vinyl acetate co-polymer (EVA), olefin co-polymer (OL), and polyolefin-polystyrene co-polymer (OS). The working model was made by hard gypsum that was trimmed to the height of 20 mm at the cutting edge of the maxillary central incisor and 15 mm at the mesiobuccal cusp of the maxillary first molar. Where the center of the softened sheet sagged 15 mm lower than the clamp, the sheet was pressed against the working model, followed by vacuum forming for 10 s and compression molding for 2 min. The thickness of mouthguard sheets after fabrication was determined for the incisal portion (incisal edge and labial surface) and molar portion (cusp and buccal surface), and dimensional measurements were obtained using a measuring device. Differences in the change in thickness due to sheet materials were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (anova) followed by Bonferroni's multiple comparison tests. The OL sheet was thickest at all measurement points. At the incisal edge and cusp, thickness after formation was highest for OL, then EVA and finally OS. At the labial surface and buccal surface, the thickness after formation was highest for OL, then OS and finally EVA. This study suggested that post-fabrication mouthguard thickness differed according to sheet material, with the olefin co-polymer sheet having the smallest thickness reduction. PMID:26446242

  13. Prophylactic Effects of Sauna on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness of the Wrist Extensors

    PubMed Central

    Khamwong, Peanchai; Paungmali, Aatit; Pirunsan, Ubon; Joseph, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Background: High-intensity of exercise or unaccustomed eccentric exercise can cause the phenomenon of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage (EIMD) which usually results in cramps, muscle strain, impaired muscle function and delayed-onset muscle soreness. Objectives: This study investigated the prophylactic effects of sauna towards the symptoms associated with muscle damage from eccentric exercises of wrist extensor muscle group. Patients and Methods: A total of twenty-eight subjects (mean age 20.9 years old, SD = 1.6) were randomly divided into the sauna group (n = 14) and the control group (n = 14). In the sauna group, subjects received sauna before eccentric exercise of the wrist extensor. The eccentric exercises were conducted on the non-dominant arm by using an isokinetic dynamometer. Pain Intensity (PI), Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) and passive range of motion of wrist flexion (PF-ROM) and extension (PE-ROM) were measured as pain variables. Grip Strength (GS) and Wrist Extension Strength (WES) were measured as variables of wrist extensor muscle function. All the measurements were performed at baseline, immediately after and from 1st to 8th days after the exercise-induced muscle damage. Results: The sauna group significantly demonstrated a lower deficit in ROM (passive flexion and passive extension), GS and WES following exercise than that of the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Sauna application prior to the exercise-induced muscle damage demonstrated effectiveness in reduction of sensory impairment (PF-ROM and PE-ROM) and improvement of muscle functions (GS, and WES) in wrist extensor muscle group. PMID:26446307

  14. Awareness about sore-throat, rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in a rural community.

    PubMed

    Arya, R K

    1992-01-01

    This I.C.M.R. study was conducted in 74 villages of Chiraigaon block, Varanasi, U.P., during the period March 1983 and December 1986. Before and after health education awareness survey about sore throat, rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease was carried out by interviewing 315 persons by stratified random sampling. The study shows that there is significant increase in the knowledge about most of the symptoms, causes, consequences and preventive measures of sore throat, rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease. This paper highlights the importance of health education as a vital component of rheumatic heart disease control programme. PMID:1303991

  15. [The plasty for the hip region sores, using the flap, consisting of M. tensor fasciae latae].

    PubMed

    Pasichniy, D A

    2015-02-01

    The method of plasty for the hip region sores, based on transposition of proximal part of m. tensor fascia latae in content of the flap, using her transsection between place of attachment to spina iliaca anterior superior and place of the main vascular pedicle entry into the muscle, was proposed, what permits to prevent vast mobilization of the muscle and to secure existing in normal conditions and formed in pathological conditions anas- tomoses between vascular net of the flap and surrounding tissues. The method proposed was successfully applied for plasty of the hip region sores of degrees III-IV in 2 patients. PMID:25985701

  16. Implications for Core Formation of the Earth from High Pressure-Temperature Au Partitioning Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Sharp, T. G.; Hervig, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    Siderophile elements in the Earth.s mantle are depleted relative to chondrites. This is most pronounced for the highly siderophile elements (HSEs), which are approximately 400x lower than chondrites. Also remarkable is the relative chondritic abundances of the HSEs. This signature has been interpreted as representing their sequestration into an iron-rich core during the separation of metal from silicate liquids early in the Earth's history, followed by a late addition of chondritic material. Alternative efforts to explain this trace element signature have centered on element partitioning experiments at varying pressures, temperatures, and compositions (P-T-X). However, first results from experiments conducted at 1 bar did not match the observed mantle abundances, which motivated the model described above, a "late veneer" of chondritic material deposited on the earth and mixed into the upper mantle. Alternatively, the mantle trace element signature could be the result of equilibrium partitioning between metal and silicate in the deep mantle, under P-T-X conditions which are not yet completely identified. An earlier model determined that equilibrium between metal and silicate liquids could occur at a depth of approximately 700 km, 27(plus or minus 6) GPa and approximately 2000 (plus or minus 200) C, based on an extrapolation of partitioning data for a variety of moderately siderophile elements obtained at lower pressures and temperatures. Based on Ni-Co partitioning, the magma ocean may have been as deep as 1450 km. At present, only a small range of possible P-T-X trace element partitioning conditions has been explored, necessitating large extrapolations from experimental to mantle conditions for tests of equilibrium models. Our primary objective was to reduce or remove the additional uncertainty introduced by extrapolation by testing the equilibrium core formation hypothesis at P-T-X conditions appropriate to the mantle.

  17. Estimating Hydraulic Conductivities in a Fractured Shale Formation from Pressure Pulse Testing and 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courbet, C.; DICK, P.; Lefevre, M.; Wittebroodt, C.; Matray, J.; Barnichon, J.

    2013-12-01

    In the framework of its research on the deep disposal of radioactive waste in shale formations, the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has developed a large array of in situ programs concerning the confining properties of shales in their underground research laboratory at Tournemire (SW France). One of its aims is to evaluate the occurrence and processes controlling radionuclide migration through the host rock, from the disposal system to the biosphere. Past research programs carried out at Tournemire covered mechanical, hydro-mechanical and physico-chemical properties of the Tournemire shale as well as water chemistry and long-term behaviour of the host rock. Studies show that fluid circulations in the undisturbed matrix are very slow (hydraulic conductivity of 10-14 to 10-15 m.s-1). However, recent work related to the occurrence of small scale fractures and clay-rich fault gouges indicate that fluid circulations may have been significantly modified in the vicinity of such features. To assess the transport properties associated with such faults, IRSN designed a series of in situ and laboratory experiments to evaluate the contribution of both diffusive and advective process on water and solute flux through a clay-rich fault zone (fault core and damaged zone) and in an undisturbed shale formation. As part of these studies, Modular Mini-Packer System (MMPS) hydraulic testing was conducted in multiple boreholes to characterize hydraulic conductivities within the formation. Pressure data collected during the hydraulic tests were analyzed using the nSIGHTS (n-dimensional Statistical Inverse Graphical Hydraulic Test Simulator) code to estimate hydraulic conductivity and formation pressures of the tested intervals. Preliminary results indicate hydraulic conductivities of 5.10-12 m.s-1 in the fault core and damaged zone and 10-14 m.s-1 in the adjacent undisturbed shale. Furthermore, when compared with neutron porosity data from borehole

  18. High Pressure Dehydration of Antigorite in Nature: Embrittlement and melt formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, B. W.; Cowan, D. S.

    2011-12-01

    Almirez spinifex olivines, and the presence in them of crystal-rich "fluid" inclusions. Thus, this complex provides not only a unique field example of the high-pressure breakdown reaction of antigorite, but possibly also of dehydration embrittlement and local melt formation.

  19. Aerobic endurance training reduces bubble formation and increases survival in rats exposed to hyperbaric pressure

    PubMed Central

    Wisløff, Ulrik; Brubakk, Alf O

    2001-01-01

    The formation of bubbles is the basis for injury to divers after decompression, a condition known as decompression illness. In the present study we investigated the effect of endurance training in the rat on decompression-induced bubble formation. A total of 52 adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (300-370 g) were randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups: training or sedentary control. Trained rats exercised on a treadmill for 1.5 h per day for 1 day, or for 2 or 6 weeks (5 days per week) at exercise intervals that alternated between 8 min at 85-90 % of maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2,max) and 2 min at 50-60 % of V̇O2,max. Rats were compressed (simulated dive) in a decompression chamber in pairs, one sedentary and one trained, at a rate of 200 kPa min−1 to a pressure of 700 kPa, and maintained for 45 min breathing air. At the end of the exposure period, rats were decompressed linearly to the ‘surface’ (100 kPa) at a rate of 50 kPa min−1. Immediately after reaching the ‘surface’ (100 kPa) the animals were anaesthetized and the right ventricle was insonated using Doppler ultrasound. Intensity-controlled interval training significantly increased V̇O2,max by 12 and 60 % after 2 and 6 weeks, respectively. At 6 weeks, left and right ventricular weights were 14 and 17 % higher, respectively, in trained compared to control rats. No effect of training was observed on skeletal muscle weight. Bubble formation was significantly reduced in trained rats after both 2 and 6 weeks. However, the same effect was seen after a single bout of aerobic exercise lasting 1.5 h on the day prior to decompression. All of the rats that exercised for 1.5 h and 2 weeks, and most of those that trained for 6 weeks, survived the protocol, whereas most sedentary rats died within 60 min post-decompression. This study shows that aerobic exercise protects rats from severe decompression and death. This may be a result of less bubbling in the trained animals. The data showed that the

  20. Electrohydrodynamic pressure enhanced by free space charge for electrically induced structure formation with high aspect ratio.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hongmiao; Wang, Chunhui; Shao, Jinyou; Ding, Yucheng; Li, Xiangming

    2014-10-28

    Electrically induced structure formation (EISF) is an interesting and unique approach for generating a microstructured duplicate from a rheological polymer by a spatially modulated electric field induced by a patterned template. Most of the research on EISF have so far used various dielectric polymers (with an electrical conductivity smaller than 10(-10) S/m that can be considered a perfect dielectric), on which the electric field induces a Maxwell stress only due to the dipoles (or bounded charges) in the polymer molecules, leading to a structure with a small aspect ratio. This paper presents a different approach for improving the aspect ratio allowed in EISF by doping organic salt into the perfect dielectric polymer, i.e., turning the perfect dielectric into a leaky dielectric, considering the fact that the free space charges enriched in the leaky dielectric polymer can make an additional contribution to the Maxwell stress, i.e., electrohydrodynamic pressure, which is desirable for high aspect ratio structuring. Our numerical simulations and experimental tests have shown that a leaky dielectric polymer, with a small conductivity comparable to that of deionized water, can be much more effective at being electrohydrodynamically deformed into a high aspect ratio in comparison with a perfect dielectric polymer when both of them have roughly the same dielectric constant. PMID:25268463

  1. Groundwater compatibility with formation water and pay zone rocks in Pervomaysk oil-gas-condensate field to maintain formation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, N.; Nazarov, A.; Alekseev, S.

    2016-03-01

    The paper describes the research results in determining the compatibility of groundwater from Aptain-Albian-Cenomanian aquifer with formation water and pay zone rocks in U1 layer sediments, Pervomaysk oil field.

  2. Isomekes: A fundamental tool to determine the formation pressure for diamond-inclusion pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvaro, Matteo; Angel, Ross; Mazzucchelli, Mattia; Nestola, Fabrizio; Domeneghetti, Chiara

    2014-05-01

    Because diamond is almost chemically pure carbon and extremely chemically inert, the structure and chemistry of diamond reveals very little about its conditions of formation. Much of what is believed about the genesis and distribution of diamond in the Earth's mantle has therefore been deduced indirectly from the characterisation of its mineral inclusions. The possible depths of entrapment of an inclusion within a host phase (and hence the depth of growth of the host diamond) can be determined if (1) the final pressure of the inclusion can be measured, (2) the Equations of State (EoS) of the host and inclusion phases are known, and (3) the elastic interaction between the host and inclusion can be calculated without gross assumptions. Given knowledge of all three, an isomeke line in P-T space (from the Greek "equal" and "length", Adams et al. 1975) can be calculated. The isomeke defines the conditions at which the host and inclusion would have had the same P, T and volume, and thus represents possible entrapment conditions. The recent application (Nestola et al. 2011; Howell et al. 2012) of in-situ diffraction techniques to the measurement of entrapped inclusions provides accurate final inclusion pressures. We have reformulated the elasticity problem so that, unlike previous work, these calculations can be performed with any form of equation of state and thermal expansion, and are not restricted to linear elasticity or just invertible EoS. This alone has significant advantages in the precision of the calculated depths of formation. Numerical calculations have been performed with a new module of EoS routines (Angel et al. 2014) that has been added to the publicly-available CrysFML library. The question remains as to what uncertainties in calculated depths of formation arise from uncertainties in experimentally-determined EoS. We will present two geologically-relevant examples, for olivine and garnet in diamond. Our calculations show that there is still a clear need

  3. Diagenesis, compaction, and fluid chemistry modeling of a sandstone near a pressure seal: Lower Tuscaloosa Formation, Gulf Coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weedman, S.D.; Brantley, S.L.; Shiraki, R.; Poulson, S.R.

    1996-01-01

    Petrographic, isotopic, and fluid-inclusion evidence from normally and overpressured sandstones of the lower Tuscaloosa Formation (Upper Cretaceous) in the Gulf Coast documents quartz-overgrowth precipitation at 90??C or less, calcite cement precipitation at approximately 100?? and 135??C, and prismatic quartz cement precipitation at about 125??C. Textural evidence suggests that carbonate cement dissolution occurred before the second phases of calcite and quartz precipitation, and was followed by precipitation of grain-rimming chlorite and pore-filling kaolinite. Geochemical calculations demonstrate that present-day lower Tuscaloosa Formation water from 5500 m depth could either dissolve or precipitate calcite cements in model simulations of upward water flow. Calcite dissolution or precipitation depends on PCO2 variability with depth (i.e., whether there is one or two-phase flow) or on the rate of generation of CO2 with depth. Calculations suggest that 105-106 rock volumes of water are required to flow through the section to precipitate 1-10% calcite cement. Compaction analysis suggests that late-stage compaction occurred in normally pressured sandstones after dissolution of carbonate cements, but was hindered in overpressured sandstones despite the presence of high porosity. These results document the inhibition of compaction by overpressured fluids and constrain the timing of pressure seal formation. Modeling results demonstrate that the proposed paragenesis used to constrain timing of pressure seal formation is feasible, and that most of the cement diagenesis occurred before the pressure seal became effective as a permeability barrier.

  4. Underground structure of terrestrial mud volcanoes and abnormal water pressure formation in Niigata, Central JAPAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K.; Shinya, T.; Miyata, Y.; Tokuyasu, S.

    2005-12-01

    Activity of mud volcano is thought to be caused by an abnormal water pressure generated in deep underground and make a serious problem for underground constructions such as railway tunnel, underground facility for radwaste and so on. It is important to investigate the underground structure of a mud volcano and the mechanism of abnormal water formation for site selection and safety assessment of such facilities. Serious trouble such as tunnel wall collapse due to the rock swelling has happened 180m deep under mud volcanoes. It took more than 10 years to excavate the section of 150 m long. 4 terrestrial mud volcanoes were found in the Tertiary sedimentary basin in Niigata, central Japan All the mud volcanoes are distributed along the rim of the topographic basin that is located at the NE-SW trending crest of mountainous area and distributed along the wing of anticline. Geological structure inside basin is heavily disturbed. The extinct mud volcano is exposed in the side-slope of newly constructed road and the internal vent structure of mud volcano can be observed. The vent is 30 m in diameter and is consisted of mud breccia and scaly network clay that is thought to be generated by hydro-fracturing and the following water-rock interaction between mudstone and groundwater. Groundwater erupted from mud volcano is highly saline with electric conductivity of 15 mS/cm and high 18 O/16 O isotope ratio of 1.2 parmillage. Also, the vitrinite reflectance is 1.5 to 1.9 % that is not expected in the sedimentary rocks exposed near ground surface. As a result, it is assumed that these erupted materials were introduced from the deep underground about 4000 m deep. CSA-MT geophysical exploration was carried out to survey the underground structure and obtained the profile of electrical resistivity from the surface to 800 m in depth. It is found that the disk-shaped low resistivity zone less than 1 m due to the high salinity content is identified in underground 600 m deep, 200 m thick

  5. Neutrophilia and an Anti-Inflammatory Drug as Markers of Inflammation in Delayed Muscle Soreness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lucille L.; And Others

    This study reexamined the concept that delayed muscle soreness (DMS) is a form of inflammatory pain. This was accomplished by having 32 male volunteers perform exercise known to induce DMS and then assess the total and differential white blood cell changes. In addition, an anti-inflammatory drug, idomethacin, was administered to determine whether…

  6. Effects of whole-body vibration after eccentric exercise on muscle soreness and muscle strength recovery

    PubMed Central

    Timon, Rafael; Tejero, Javier; Brazo-Sayavera, Javier; Crespo, Carmen; Olcina, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not a single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise can reduce muscle soreness and enhance muscle recovery. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty untrained participants were randomly assigned to two groups: a vibration group (n=10) and control group (n=10). Participants performed eccentric quadriceps training of 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 120% 1RM, with 4 min rest between sets. After that, the vibration group received 3 sets of 1 min whole body vibration (12 Hz, 4 mm) with 30 s of passive recovery between sets. Serum creatine kinase, blood urea nitrogen, muscle soreness (visual analog scale) and muscle strength (peak isometric torque) were assessed. [Results] Creatine kinase was lower in the vibration group than in the control group at 24 h (200.2 ± 8.2 vs. 300.5 ± 26.1 U/L) and at 48 h (175.2 ± 12.5 vs. 285.2 ± 19.7 U/L) post-exercise. Muscle soreness decreased in vibration group compared to control group at 48 h post-exercise (34.1 ± 11.4 vs. 65.2 ± 13.2 mm). [Conclusion] Single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise reduced delayed onset muscle soreness but it did not affect muscle strength recovery. PMID:27390415

  7. Interleukin-6 and Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness Do Not Vary during the Menstrual Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaffin, Morgan E.; Berg, Kris E.; Meendering, Jessica R.; Llewellyn, Tamra L.; French, Jeffrey A.; Davis, Jeremy E.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a difference in interleukin-6 (IL-6) and delayed onset muscles soreness (DOMS) exists in two different phases of the menstrual cycle. Nine runners performed one 75-min high-intensity interval running session during the early follicular (EF) phase and once during the midluteal (ML) phase of the…

  8. Effects of whole-body vibration after eccentric exercise on muscle soreness and muscle strength recovery.

    PubMed

    Timon, Rafael; Tejero, Javier; Brazo-Sayavera, Javier; Crespo, Carmen; Olcina, Guillermo

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not a single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise can reduce muscle soreness and enhance muscle recovery. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty untrained participants were randomly assigned to two groups: a vibration group (n=10) and control group (n=10). Participants performed eccentric quadriceps training of 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 120% 1RM, with 4 min rest between sets. After that, the vibration group received 3 sets of 1 min whole body vibration (12 Hz, 4 mm) with 30 s of passive recovery between sets. Serum creatine kinase, blood urea nitrogen, muscle soreness (visual analog scale) and muscle strength (peak isometric torque) were assessed. [Results] Creatine kinase was lower in the vibration group than in the control group at 24 h (200.2 ± 8.2 vs. 300.5 ± 26.1 U/L) and at 48 h (175.2 ± 12.5 vs. 285.2 ± 19.7 U/L) post-exercise. Muscle soreness decreased in vibration group compared to control group at 48 h post-exercise (34.1 ± 11.4 vs. 65.2 ± 13.2 mm). [Conclusion] Single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise reduced delayed onset muscle soreness but it did not affect muscle strength recovery. PMID:27390415

  9. Soot volume fraction measurement in low-pressure methane flames by combining laser-induced incandescence and cavity ring-down spectroscopy: Effect of pressure on soot formation

    SciTech Connect

    Desgroux, P.; Mercier, X.; Lefort, B.; Lemaire, R.; Therssen, E.; Pauwels, J.F.

    2008-10-15

    Soot volume fraction (f{sub v}) profiles are recorded in low-pressure methane/oxygen/nitrogen flat flames using laser-induced incandescence (LII). Experiments are performed from 20 to 28 kPa in flames having the same equivalence ratio (2.32). Calibration is performed by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and indicates a very weak soot volume fraction (0.066 ppb at 21.33 kPa and 0.8 ppb at 26.66 kPa in the burnt gases). Soot volume fraction is found to increase continuously after a given distance above the burner (HAB) and tends to level off in the burnt gases. The reaction time resolution available in low-pressure flames makes it possible to examine the early steps of soot formation. The variation of the LII signal with laser energy before the LII ''plateau'' region is much weaker at the beginning of soot formation than after a given reaction time. The LII time decays are nearly constant within the first millimetres, whereas an increase in the decay, correlated with the growth of the primary soot particle, is observed later. The growth of soot volume fraction is then analysed by considering the variation of the derivative function df{sub v}/dt with f{sub v}. Three regimes having respectively a positive slope, a constant slope, and a negative slope are observed and are interpreted with respect to the soot inception process. Finally, a very important sensitivity of f{sub v} with pressure P (at 30 mm HAB) is observed, leading to a power law, f{sub v}=KP{sup 11}, confirmed by extinction measurements (by CRDS). The observed dependence of f{sub v} with pressure could be a result of the prominence of the early soot inception process in the investigated low-pressure flames. (author)

  10. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Ethylene/Air Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Sunderland, P. B.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Soot formation was studied within laminar premixed ethylene/air flames (C/O ratios of 0.78-0.98) stabilized on a flat-flame burner operating at atmospheric pressure. Measurements included soot volume fractions by both laser extinction and gravimetric methods, temperatures by multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscopy, major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of condensable hydrocarbons by gravimetric sampling. and velocities by laser velocimetry. These data were used to find soot surface growth rates and primary soot particle nucleation rates along the axes of the flames. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates were correlated successfully by predictions based on typical hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall. These results suavest that reduced soot surface growth rates with increasing residence time seen in the present and other similar flames were mainly caused by reduced rates of surface activation due to reduced H atom concentrations as temperatures decrease as a result of radiative heat losses. Primary soot particle nucleation rates exhibited variations with temperature and acetylene concentrations that were similar to recent observations for diffusion flames; however, nucleation rates in the premixed flames were significantly lower than in, the diffusion flames for reasons that still must be explained. Finally, predictions of yields of major gas species based on mechanisms from both Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt were in good agreement with present measurements and suggest that H atom concentrations (relevant to HACA mechanisms) approximate estimates based on local thermodynamic equilibrium in the present flames.

  11. In situ characterization of formation and growth of high-pressure phases in single-crystal silicon during nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hu; Yan, Jiwang

    2016-04-01

    Pressure-induced intermediate phases of silicon exhibit unique characteristics in mechanics, chemistry, optics, and electrics. Clarifying the formation and growth processes of these new phases is essential for the preparation and application of them. For in situ characterization of the formation and growth of high-pressure phases in single-crystal silicon, a quantitative parameter, namely displacement change of indenter (Δ h) during the unloading holding process in nanoindentation, was proposed. Nanoindentation experiments under various unloading holding loads and loading/unloading rates were performed to investigate their effects on Δ h. Results indicate that Δ h varies significantly before and after the occurrence of pop-out; for the same maximum indentation load, it tends to increase with the decrease in the holding load and to increase with the increase in the loading/unloading rate. Thus, the value of Δ h can be regarded as an indicator that reflects the formation and growth processes of the high-pressure phases. Using Δ h, the initial position for the nucleation of the high-pressure phases, their growth, and their correlation to the loading/unloading rate were predictable.

  12. Methane hydrate synthesis from ice: Influence of pressurization and ethanol on optimizing formation rates and hydrate yield

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Po-Chun.; Huang, Wuu-Liang; Stern, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    Polycrystalline methane gas hydrate (MGH) was synthesized using an ice-seeding method to investigate the influence of pressurization and ethanol on the hydrate formation rate and gas yield of the resulting samples. When the reactor is pressurized with CH4 gas without external heating, methane hydrate can be formed from ice grains with yields up to 25% under otherwise static conditions. The rapid temperature rise caused by pressurization partially melts the granular ice, which reacts with methane to form hydrate rinds around the ice grains. The heat generated by the exothermic reaction of methane hydrate formation buffers the sample temperature near the melting point of ice for enough time to allow for continuous hydrate growth at high rates. Surprisingly, faster rates and higher yields of methane hydrate were found in runs with lower initial temperatures, slower rates of pressurization, higher porosity of the granular ice samples, or mixtures with sediments. The addition of ethanol also dramatically enhanced the formation of polycrystalline MGH. This study demonstrates that polycrystalline MGH with varied physical properties suitable for different laboratory tests can be manufactured by controlling synthesis procedures or parameters. Subsequent dissociation experiments using a gas collection apparatus and flowmeter confirmed high methane saturation (CH 4·2O, with n = 5.82 ± 0.03) in the MGH. Dissociation rates of the various samples synthesized at diverse conditions may be fitted to different rate laws, including zero and first order.

  13. Valley formation by groundwater seepage, pressurized groundwater outbursts and crater-lake overflow in flume experiments with implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Wouter A.; Braat, Lisanne; Baar, Anne W.; Kleinhans, Maarten G.

    2014-04-01

    Remains of fluvial valleys on Mars reveal the former presence of water on the surface. However, the source of water and the hydrological setting is not always clear, especially in types of valleys that are rare on Earth and where we have limited knowledge of the processes involved. We investigated three hydrological scenarios for valley formation on Mars: hydrostatic groundwater seepage, release of pressurized groundwater and crater-lake overflow. Using physical modeling in laboratory experiments and numerical hydrological modeling we quantitatively studied the morphological development and processes involved in channel formation that result from these different sources of water in unconsolidated sediment. Our results show that valleys emerging from seeping groundwater by headward erosion form relatively slowly as fluvial transport takes place in a channel much smaller than the valley. Pressurized groundwater release forms a characteristic source area at the channel head by fluidization processes. This head consist of a pit in case of superlithostatic pressure and may feature small radial channels and collapse features. Valleys emerging from a crater-lake overflow event develop quickly in a run-away process of rim erosion and discharge increase. The valley head at the crater outflow point has a converging fan shape, and the rapid incision of the rim leaves terraces and collapse features. Morphological elements observed in the experiments can help in identifying the formative processes on Mars, when considerations of experimental scaling and lithological characteristics of the martian surface are taken into account. These morphological features might reveal the associated hydrological settings and formative timescales of a valley. An estimate of formative timescale from sediment transport is best based on the final channel dimensions for groundwater seepage valleys and on the valley dimensions for pressurized groundwater release and crater-lake overflow valleys. Our

  14. Influence of the Gas Pressure on Single-wall Carbon Nanotubes Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkov, I.; Farhat, S.; Scott, C. D.

    2005-01-01

    Experiments and modeling have been performed to predict the effect of gas pressure on species distribution and nanotube growth rate under specific conditions of synthesis of singlewall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by arc discharge. Numerical results were compared with experiments in order to find a consistent correlation between the nanotube growth and the pressure. We used argon and helium as buffer gases with a total pressure varied between 0.1 and 1 bar. We experimentally observed that both the anode erosion rate and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of the as produced nanotube soot material are very sensitive to the total gas pressure in the reactor

  15. Evaluation of Displacement and Pore Pressure change Due to the Injections of Fluid in Geological Formations and Mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Hsu, K.

    2011-12-01

    Cap rock plays an important role in the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide capture and storage. It indicates the effectiveness of the storage formation and controls the leakance of carbon dioxide and serves the need for geological repair and restoration. In this study, analytical solutions were devived based on the poroelastic theory. The effects of properties geological formation and mineralization were investigated on the change of pore pressure and the displacement of caprock. The results can be used for monitoring the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide.

  16. Cenosphere formation from heavy fuel oil: a numerical analysis accounting for the balance between porous shells and internal pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Vanteru M.; Rahman, Mustafa M.; Gandi, Appala N.; Elbaz, Ayman M.; Schrecengost, Robert A.; Roberts, William L.

    2016-01-01

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) as a fuel in industrial and power generation plants ensures the availability of energy at economy. Coke and cenosphere emissions from HFO combustion need to be controlled by particulate control equipment such as electrostatic precipitators, and collection effectiveness is impacted by the properties of these particulates. The cenosphere formation is a function of HFO composition, which varies depending on the source of the HFO. Numerical modelling of the cenosphere formation mechanism presented in this paper is an economical method of characterising cenosphere formation potential for HFO in comparison to experimental analysis of individual HFO samples, leading to better control and collection. In the present work, a novel numerical model is developed for understanding the global cenosphere formation mechanism. The critical diameter of the cenosphere is modelled based on the balance between two pressures developed in an HFO droplet. First is the pressure (Prpf) developed at the interface of the liquid surface and the inner surface of the accumulated coke due to the flow restriction of volatile components from the interior of the droplet. Second is the pressure due to the outer shell strength (PrC) gained from van der Walls energy of the coke layers and surface energy. In this present study it is considered that when PrC ≥ Prpf the outer shell starts to harden. The internal motion in the shell layer ceases and the outer diameter (DSOut) of the shell is then fixed. The entire process of cenosphere formation in this study is analysed in three phases: regression, shell formation and hardening, and post shell hardening. Variations in pressures during shell formation are analysed. Shell (cenosphere) dimensions are evaluated at the completion of droplet evaporation. The rate of fuel evaporation, rate of coke formation and coke accumulation are analysed. The model predicts shell outer diameters of 650, 860 and 1040 µm, and inner diameters are 360, 410

  17. Kinetic studies of NO formation in pulsed air-like low-pressure dc plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, M.; Gortschakow, S.; Guaitella, O.; Marinov, D.; Rousseau, A.; Röpcke, J.; Loffhagen, D.

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics of the formation of NO in pulsed air-like dc plasmas at a pressure of 1.33 mbar and mean currents between 50 and 150 mA of discharge pulses with 5 ms duration has been investigated both experimentally and by self-consistent numerical modelling. Using time-resolved quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy, the densities of NO, NO2 and N2O have been measured in synthetic air as well as in air with 0.8% of NO2 and N2O, respectively. The temporal evolution of the NO density shows four distinct phases during the plasma pulse and the early afterglow in the three gas mixtures that were used. In particular, a steep density increase during the ignition phase and after termination of the discharge current pulse has been detected. The NO concentration has been found to reach a constant value of 0.57× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , 1.05× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , and 1.3× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} for mean plasma currents of 50 mA, 100 mA and 150 mA, respectively, in the afterglow. The measured densities of NO2 and N2O in the respective mixture decrease exponentially during the plasma pulse and remain almost constant in the afterglow, especially where the admixture of NO2 has a remarkable impact on the NO production during the ignition. The numerical results of the coupled solution of a set of rate equations for the various heavy particles and the time-dependent Boltzmann equation of the electrons agree quite well with the experimental findings for the different air-like plasmas. The main reaction processes have been analysed on the basis of the model calculations and the remaining differences between the experiment and modelling especially during the afterglow are discussed.

  18. "Real-time" core formation experiments using X-ray tomography at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, H. C.; Anzures, B.; Yu, T.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The process of differentiation is a defining moment in a planet's history. Direct observation of this process at work is impossible in our solar system because it was complete within the first few tens of millions of years. Geochemical and geophysical evidence points to magma ocean scenarios to explain differentiation of large planets such as Earth. Smaller planets and planetesimals likely never achieved the high temperatures necessary for wide scale melting. In these smaller bodies, silicates may have only partially melted, or not melted at all. Furthermore, isotopic signatures in meteorites suggest that some planetesimals differentiated within just a few million years. Achieving efficient core segregation on this rapid timescale is difficult, particularly in a solid or semi-solid silicate matrix. Direct measurements of metallic melt migration velocities have been difficult due to experimental limitations and most previous work has relied on geometric models based on 2-D observations in quenched samples. We have employed a relatively new technique of in-situ, high pressure, high temperature, X-ray micro-tomography coupled with 3-D numerical simulations to evaluate the efficiency of melt percolation in metal/silicate systems. From this, we can place constraints on the timing of core formation in early solar system bodies. Mixtures of olivine and KLB-1 peridotite and up to 12 vol% FeS were pre-synthesized to achieve an initial equilibrium microstructure of silicate and sulfide. The samples were then were then pressed again to ~2GPa, and heated to ~1300°C to collect X-ray tomography images as the partially molten samples were undergoing shear deformation. The reconstructed 3-D images of melt distribution were used as the input for lattice Boltzmann simulations of fluid flow through the melt network and calculations of permeability and melt migration velocity. Our in-situ x-ray tomography results are complemented by traditional 2-D image analysis and high

  19. Interpretation of in-situ pressure and flow measurements of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, S.M.; Peterson, E.W.; Lagus, P.L.; Lie, K.; Finley, S.J.; Nowak, E.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary interpretation of in-situ pressure and flow measurements of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The WIPP facility is located 660 m underground in the Salado, a bedded salt deposit. Shut-in pressure tests were conducted prior to, and subsequent to, the mining of a circular drift in order to evaluate excavation effects on pore pressure, permeability, and host rock heterogeneity. Borehole deformation was measured during these tests and used to correct for changes in the test region volume due to salt creep effects. Preliminary pre-excavation results indicate that the flow properties of this layered host rock are heterogeneous. Resulting pore pressures range from 1 to 14 MPa and permeabilities range from below measurable to about 1 nanodarcy. Normalized borehole diameter change rates were between {minus}4 and 63 microstrains/day. Shut-in pressures and borehole diameters in all test boreholes were affected by the excavation of Room Q coincident with the advances of the boring machine. Preliminary results from post-excavation test results show decreased pore pressures compared to pre-excavation values.

  20. Diagenesis, compaction, and fluid chemistry modeling of a sandstone near a pressure seal: Lower Tuscaloosa Formation, Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Weedman, S.D.; Brantley, S.L.; Shiraki, R.; Poulson, S.R.

    1996-07-01

    Petrographic, isotopic, and fluid-inclusion evidence from normally and overpressured sandstones of the lower Tuscaloosa Formation (Upper Cretaceous) in the Gulf Coast documents quartz-overgrowth precipitation at 90{degrees}C or less, calcite cement precipitation at approximately 100{degrees} and 135{degrees}C, and prismatic quartz cement precipitation at about 125{degrees}C. Textural evidence suggests that carbonate cement dissolution occurred before the second phases of calcite and quartz precipitation, and was followed by precipitation of grain-rimming chlorite and pore-filling kaolinite. Geochemical calculations demonstrate that present-day lower Tuscaloosa Formation water from 5500 m depth could either dissolve or precipitate calcite cements in model simulations of upward water flow. Calcite dissolution or precipitation depends on P{sub CO{sub 2}} variability with depth (i.e., whether there is one or two-phase flow) or on the rate of generation of CO{sub 2} with depth. Calculations suggest that 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} rock volumes of water are required to flow through the section to precipitate 1-10% calcite cement. Compaction analysis suggests that late-stage compaction occurred in normally pressured sandstones after dissolution of carbonate cements, but was hindered in overpressured sandstones despite the presence of high porosity. These results document the inhibition of compaction by overpressured fluids and constrain the timing of pressure seal formation. Modeling results demonstrate that the proposed paragenesis used to constrain timing of pressure seal formation is feasible, and that most of the cement diagenesis occurred before the pressure seal became effective as a permeability barrier.

  1. On Porosity Formation in Metal Matrix Composites Made with Dual-Scale Fiber Reinforcements Using Pressure Infiltration Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etemadi, Reihaneh; Pillai, Krishna M.; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.; Hamidi, Sajad Ahmad

    2015-05-01

    This is the first such study on porosity formation phenomena observed in dual-scale fiber preforms during the synthesis of metal matrix composites (MMCs) using the gas pressure infiltration process. In this paper, different mechanisms of porosity formation during pressure infiltration of Al-Si alloys into Nextel™ 3D-woven ceramic fabric reinforcements (a dual-porosity or dual-scale porous medium) are studied. The effect of processing conditions on porosity content of the ceramic fabric infiltrated by the alloys through the gas PIP (PIP stands for "Pressure Infiltration Process" in which liquid metal is injected under pressure into a mold packed with reinforcing fibers.) is investigated. Relative density (RD), defined as the ratio of the actual MMC density and the density obtained at ideal 100 pct saturation of the preform, was used to quantify the overall porosity. Increasing the infiltration temperature led to an increase in RD due to reduced viscosity of liquid metal and enhanced wettability leading to improved feedability of the liquid metal. Similarly, increasing the infiltration pressure led to enhanced penetration of fiber tows and resulted in higher RD and reduced porosity. For the first time, the modified Capillary number ( Ca*), which is found to predict formation of porosity in polymer matrix composites quite well, is employed to study porosity in MMCs made using PIP. It is observed that in the high Ca* regime which is common in PIP, the overall porosity shows a strong downward trend with increasing Ca*. In addition, the effect of matrix shrinkage on porosity content of the samples is studied through using a zero-shrinkage Al-Si alloy as the matrix; usage of this alloy as the matrix led to a reduction in porosity content.

  2. Method and tool for controlling fluid flow from a tubing string into a low pressure earth formation

    SciTech Connect

    Gurley, D.G.; Nelson, W.F.

    1981-04-07

    A tool is disclosed for controlling flow of treating fluid from a tubing string into an earth formation, in which the bottom hole pressure is less than the hydrostatic pressure of the fluid in the string. In another application, the tool is used in conjunction with a wash tool to wash sediment out of casing perforations and slotted liners. Before the downhole operation is commenced, a slidable piston in this tool closes off fluid outlet ports, to prevent the fluid from ''gravity flowing'' out of the tubing string. The piston is held in the closed position by the co-action of an adjusting bolt and a compression spring. The fluid is released from the tubing string by applying sufficient fluid pressure against the piston to overcome the spring load and thus move the piston downwardly past the fluid outlet port.

  3. New insights in the formation of silanol defects in silicalite-1 by water intrusion under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Karbowiak, Thomas; Saada, Mohamed-Ali; Rigolet, Séverinne; Ballandras, Anthony; Weber, Guy; Bezverkhyy, Igor; Soulard, Michel; Patarin, Joël; Bellat, Jean-Pierre

    2010-10-01

    The "water-silicalite-1" system is known to act as a molecular spring. The successive intrusion-extrusion cycles of liquid water in small crystallites (6 × 3 × 0.5 μm(3)) of hydrophobic silicalite-1 were studied by volumetric and calorimetric techniques. The experiments displayed a decrease of the intrusion pressure between the first intrusion-extrusion cycle and the consecutive ones, whereas the extrusion pressures remained unchanged. However, neither XRD studies nor SEM observations revealed any structural and morphological modifications of silicalite-1 at the long-range order. Such a shift in the value of the intrusion pressure after the first water intrusion-extrusion cycle is attributed to the creation of silanol groups during the first water intrusion. Detailed FTIR and solid-state NMR spectroscopic characterizations provided a molecular evidence of chemical modification of zeolite framework with the formation of local silanol defects created by the breaking of siloxane bonds. PMID:20676454

  4. The effect of ram-pressure stripping and starvation on the star formation properties of cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, A.; Boissier, S.; Cortese, L.; Gavazzi, G.

    2009-12-01

    We have combined UV to radio centimetric observations of resolved galaxies in the Virgo cluster with multizone, chemo-spectrophotometric models of galaxy evolution especially tailored to take into account the effects of the cluster environment (ram pressure stripping and starvation). This exercise has shown that anemic spirals with truncated radial profiles of the gas component and of the young stellar populations, typical in rich clusters of galaxies, have been perturbed by a recent (˜100 Myr) ram pressure stripping event induced by their interaction with the cluster intergalactic medium. Starvation is not able to reproduce the observed truncated radial profiles. Both ram pressure and starvation induce a decrease of the stellar surface brightness of the perturbed disc, and thus can hardly be invoked to explain the formation of lenticular galaxies inhabiting rich clusters, which are characterised by higher surface brightnesses than early type spirals of similar luminosity. In dwarfs the ram pressure stripping event is so efficient to totally remove their gas thus stopping on short time scales (<2 Gyr) their star formation activity. Low luminosity star forming discs can be transformed in dE galaxies.

  5. Durability of SRP Waste Glass - Effects of Pressure and Formation of Surface Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Wicks, G.G.

    2001-10-17

    This report discusses results of an assessment of pressure at anticipated storage temperature on the chemical durability of Savannah River Plant waste glass. Surface interactions were also examined and corrosion mechanisms discussed.

  6. Active CO2 Reservoir Management: A Strategy for Controlling Pressure, CO2 and Brine Migration in Saline-Formation CCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscheck, T. A.; Sun, Y.; Hao, Y.; Court, B.; Celia, M. A.; Wolery, T.; Tompson, A. F.; Aines, R. D.; Friedmann, J.

    2010-12-01

    CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) in deep geological formations is regarded as a promising means of lowering the amount of CO2 emitted to the atmosphere and thereby mitigate global warming. The most promising systems for CCS are depleted oil reservoirs, particularly those suited to CO2-based Enhanced Oil Recovery (CCS-EOR), and deep saline formations, both of which are well separated from the atmosphere. For conventional, industrial-scale, saline-formation CCS, pressure buildup can have a limiting effect on CO2 storage capacity. To address this concern, we analyze Active CO2 Reservoir Management (ACRM), which combines brine extraction and residual-brine reinjection with CO2 injection, comparing it with conventional saline-formation CCS. We investigate the influence of brine extraction on pressure response and CO2 and brine migration using the NUFT code. By extracting brine from the lower portion of the storage formation, from locations progressively further from the center of injection, we can counteract buoyancy that drives CO2 to the top of the formation, which is useful in dipping formations. Using “push-pull” manipulation of the CO2 plume, we expose less of the caprock seal to CO2 and more of the storage formation to CO2, with more of the formation utilized for trapping mechanisms. Plume manipulation can also counteract the influence of heterogeneity. We consider the impact of extraction ratio, defined as net extracted brine volume (extraction minus reinjection) divided by injected CO2 volume. Pressure buildup is reduced with increasing extraction ratio, which reduces CO2 and brine migration, increases CO2 storage capacity, and reduces other risks, such as leakage up abandoned wells, caprock fracturing, fault activation, and induced seismicity. For a 100-yr injection period, a 10-yr delay in brine extraction does not diminish the magnitude of pressure reduction. Moreover, it is possible to achieve pressure management with just a few brine-extraction wells

  7. Barometric pressure transient testing applications at the Nevada Test Site: formation permeability analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, J.M.

    1984-12-01

    The report evaluates previous investigations of the gas permeability of the rock surrounding emplacement holes at the Nevada Test Site. The discussion sets the framework from which the present uncertainty in gas permeability can be overcome. The usefulness of the barometric pressure testing method has been established. Flow models were used to evaluate barometric pressure transients taken at NTS holes U2fe, U19ac and U20ai. 31 refs., 103 figs., 18 tabs. (ACR)

  8. High-pressure synthesis of new materials via formation of new bonding patterns and unusual stoichiometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, Alexander

    2013-06-01

    The search for new materials synthesized under extreme conditions of high pressure and high pressure is currently actively pursued. There are multiple theoretical predictions for superior material properties, such as ultra-hardness, superior transport properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity, high energy-density, high-temperature superconductivity, ability to storage hydrogen, etc. Synthesis of new materials at high pressures is based on changes in the equilibrium chemical bonding. Moreover, materials with ``unusual'' stoichiometries have been predicted to become thermodynamically stable at high pressures. Implications of this novel extreme chemistry for synthesis of new materials for practical applications remain challenging because high-pressure bonding patterns are often thermodynamically unstable at ambient pressure. Search for a recovery mechanisms or attempts of synthesis in nominally metastable conditions require detailed knowledge of the energy landscape; extensive collaborative efforts of experiment and theory are needed for its determination. Here, I emphasize the importance for this task of in situ fast diagnostic methods. I will present new results on synthesis of materials with new bonding patterns and unusual stoichiometries containing hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon, and halogens. This work has been performed in collaboration with M. Somayazulu, V. V. Struzhkin, V. Prakapenka, E. Stavrou, T. Muramatsu,A. Oganov, W. Zhang, Q. Zhu, S. E. Boulfelfel, A. O. Lyakhov, Z. Konopkova, H.-P. Liermann, D.-Y. Kim. I acknowledge the support of NSF, EFRee (DOE), DARPA, Army Research Office, Deep Carbon Observatory.

  9. Abiotic Formation of Valine Peptides Under Conditions of High Temperature and High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Otake, Tsubasa; Ishiguro, Takato; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the oligomerization of solid valine and the stabilities of valine and valine peptides under conditions of high temperature (150-200 °C) and high pressure (50-150 MPa). Experiments were performed under non-aqueous condition in order to promote dehydration reaction. After prolonged exposure of monomeric valine to elevated temperatures and pressures, the products were analyzed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry comparing their retention times and masses. We identified linear peptides that ranged in size from dimer to hexamer, as well as a cyclic dimer. Previous studies that attempted abiotic oligomerization of valine in the absence of a catalyst have never reported valine peptides larger than a dimer. Increased reaction temperature increased the dissociative decomposition of valine and valine peptides to products such as glycine, β-alanine, ammonia, and amines by processes such as deamination, decarboxylation, and cracking. The amount of residual valine and peptide yields was greater at higher pressures at a given temperature, pressure, and reaction time. This suggests that dissociative decomposition of valine and valine peptides is reduced by pressure. Our findings are relevant to the investigation of diagenetic processes in prebiotic marine sediments where similar pressures occur under water-poor conditions. These findings also suggest that amino acids, such as valine, could have been polymerized to peptides in deep prebiotic marine sediments within a few hundred million years.

  10. The prophylactic effect of dexamethasone on postoperative sore throat in prone position surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Ho; Lee, Yoon Chan; Choi, So Ron; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Jong Hwan; Chung, Chan Jong

    2016-01-01

    Background Sore throat and hoarseness are common complications after general anesthesia with tracheal intubation. The position for patients can affect the incidence of postoperative sore throat (POST) by causing displacement of the endotracheal tube. This study investigated the prophylactic effect of dexamethasone in prone position surgeries. Methods One hundred-fifty patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery (18-75 yr) were randomly allocated into the normal saline group (group P, n = 50), dexamethasone 0.1 mg/kg group (group D1, n = 50) or dexamethasone 0.2 mg/kg group (group D2, n = 50). The incidence and severity of POST, hoarseness, and cough were measured using direct interview at 1, 6, and 24 h after tracheal extubation. The severity of POST, hoarseness, and cough were graded using a 4-point scale. Results At 1, 6, and 24 h after extubation, the incidence of sore throat was significantly lower in group D1 (1 h; P = 0.015, 6 h; P < 0.001, 24 h; P = 0.038) and group D2 (1 h; P < 0.001, 6 h; P < 0.001, 24 h; P = 0.017) compared to group P. There were less number of patients in the groups D1 and D2 than group P suffering from moderate grade of POST at 1, 24 h after extubation. The incidence of hoarseness at 1, 6, and 24 h after extubation was significantly lower in groups D2 than group P (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in the incidence of cough among the three groups. Conclusions The prophylactic use of dexamethasone 0.1 mg/kg and 0.2 mg/kg in prone surgery reduces the incidence of postoperative sore throat and dexamethasone 0.2 mg/kg decreases the incidence of hoarseness. PMID:27274371

  11. Predictive Factors for Medical Consultation for Sore Throat in Adults with Recurrent Pharyngotonsillitis

    PubMed Central

    Koskenkorva, T.; Koivunen, P.; Alho, O.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Objects. To seek patient- and episode-related factors that associate with medical consultation for acute sore throat because these factors may affect the patient being referred to specialist care and tonsillectomy for recurrent pharyngotonsillitis. Methods. In a secondary analysis of two prior randomised controlled trials, sore throat episodes and medical visits were explored among 156 adult patients referred for tonsillectomy because of recurrent pharyngotonsillitis. Results. The 156 patients (104 females, mean age of 26 years) suffered from 208 acute pharyngotonsillitis episodes during 5-6 months of follow-up. Forty (25%) patients visited a physician, and female gender (adjusted hazard ratio, HR, 3.3; 95% confidence interval 1.4–8.0) and finding of chronically infected tonsils (HR 2.7; 1.2–6.1) were associated with medical consultation. Thirty-six (17%) episodes led to medical consultation during the first 7 days of symptoms. Presence of severe throat pain was related to medical visit (HR 4.3; 1.0–18.5). Conclusions. Even among patients with recurrent pharyngotonsillitis, the acute sore throat episodes were usually mild and only few resulted in medical consultation, with female gender, chronically infected tonsils, and having severe throat pain increasing the consultation rate.

  12. The Evolution of Web-based Medical Information on Sore Throat: a Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Buonuomo, Paola Sabrina; De Rose, Paola; Onesimo, Roberta; Vituzzi, Andrea; D'Atri, Alessandro

    2003-01-01

    Background The content of a page can change and is likely to change over time; this is one of the useful qualities of the Web, but also a dangerous one. Objective To monitor the evolution of Web page contents on sore throat over a 3 year period. Methods Two medical doctors independently evaluated 34 Web pages on sore throat. Pages were found using a metasearch engine. The evaluation factors were: the adherence of medical contents to a gold standard (American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations) composed of 5 subfactors (epidemiological, clinical, complications, diagnosis, and therapy); the completeness of the contents in terms of considered/missed factors of the gold standard; references to medical literature; and a specified last update of the page. During the observation period these sites were revisited twice, after 28 and 39 months, to examine any changes therein since the first visit. Results The degree of adherence to the gold standard did not significantly change. Variations (both positive and negative) were recorded solely with regard to the update and references factors as well as with regard to the availability of the pages over time (18% disappeared during the observation period). Conclusions In 3 years medical contents have not changed significantly and despite the contemporary epochal Internet revolution (in terms of, eg, technology, graphics, and access) and the increase in the number of sites dealing with the issue of sore throat, there has been no corresponding qualitative increase in the contents of the pages monitored. PMID:12857666

  13. Development and distribution of bed-parallel compaction bands and pressure solution seams in carbonates (Bolognano Formation, Majella Mountain, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustichelli, A.; Tondi, E.; Agosta, F.; Cilona, A.; Giorgioni, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Oligo-Miocene ramp carbonates pertaining to the Bolognano Formation, cropping out at the Majella Mountain, Central Italy, are diffusely crosscut by bed-parallel structural elements such as compaction bands and pressure solution seams. These bed-parallel structural elements formed under a vertical loading, during the progressive burial of the carbonates. The present field and laboratory study focuses on the control exerted, on development and distribution of bed-parallel compaction bands and pressure solution seams, by compositional, sedimentological and pore network characteristics of a variety of carbonate rocks (skeletal grainstones and packstones, marly wackestones to mudstones). The main results are consistent with the following statements: (i) bed-parallel compaction bands formed only within poorly cemented, porous grainstones (2D porosity > 10%; 3D porosity > 15%). Their dimensional parameters (i.e., length, spacing, thickness) were strongly controlled by both sorting and sphericity of the carbonate grains, as well as by the amount of intergranular macroporosity. All these rock characteristics enhanced all physical processes (i.e. grain rotation, translation and fracturing) associated to compaction banding; (ii) bed-parallel pressure solution seams predominantly formed within fine-grained packstones made up of well-sorted and spherical carbonate grains with absence of internal pores, and small amounts of clayish matrix (2-4% of total rock volume). High contents of pre-existing cement also enhanced pressure solution; (iii) well-sorted carbonates with spherical grains may be suitable to both compaction banding and pressure solution; (iv) skeletal grain types which compose grain-supported carbonate rocks (grainstones and packstones), in many cases, indirectly influence the distribution of both bed-parallel compaction bands and pressure solution seams. Considering that the containment and migration capacity of geofluids in the subsurface within carbonate

  14. Group A streptococcal sore throat in a periurban population of northern India: a one-year prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, S.; Kumar, R.; Ray, P.; Vohra, H.; Ganguly, N. K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the incidence and risk factors of group A streptococcus (GAS) sore throat among school-aged children living in a periurban slum area of Chandigarh, North India. METHODS: A total of 536 children aged 5-15 years from 261 families identified by a systematic random selection method were enrolled in the study. Episodes of sore throat were recorded through fortnightly home visits over a one-year period. The local vernacular (Hindi) terms gala kharab (bad throat) and khansi jukam (cough and cold) were used to identify symptoms of sore throat, and throat swab specimens were collected from children who had these symptoms on the day of the home visit. Bacterial culture was carried out and the isolation of GAS was confirmed using group-A-specific antiserum. FINDINGS: The incidences of sore throat and GAS sore throat were, respectively, 7.05 and 0.95 episodes per child-year. The incidence was higher in the following situations: among 11-year-olds, during the winter (November to January) and rainy (August) months (a bimodal peak), among children living in houses where there was no separate room for the kitchen, and in homes that included a tobacco smoker. CONCLUSION: The results show that the incidence of GAS sore throat was related to age, season, and indoor air pollution. PMID:11436474

  15. Prophylactic Effects of Lidocaine or Beclomethasone Spray on Post-Operative Sore Throat and Cough after Orotracheal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Banihashem, Nadia; Alijanpour, Ebrahim; Hasannasab, Bahman; Zarei, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Post-operative sore throat and cough are common complications of endotracheal intubation. These conditions may be very distressing for the patient and may lead to unpleasant memories. This study was performed in order to determine whether beclomethasone and lidocaine spray could reduce the frequency of post-operative sore throat and hoarseness after tracheal extubation. Materials and Methods: Ninety women (18–60 years of age) with an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I or II and undergoing elective mastoidectomy were randomized into three groups of 30 patients. The endotracheal tubes in each group were sprayed with 50% beclomethasone, 10% lidocaine hydrochloride, or normal saline (control group) before endotracheal intubation. Patients were examined for sore throat (none, mild, moderate, or severe), cough, and hoarseness at 1 and 24 h after extubation. Results: There was a significantly lower incidence and severity of post-operative sore throat in the beclomethasone group than the lidocaine and control groups (P<0.05) at each observation time point. At 24 h after extubation, the incidence and severity of sore throat and cough was significantly lower in the lidocaine compared with the control group. The incidence of hoarseness was not significantly different among the three groups. Conclusion: Spraying beclomethasone and lidocaine on the endotracheal tube is a simple and effective method to reduce the incidence and severity of post-operative sore throat. PMID:26082898

  16. Postoperative Sore Throat After Laryngoscopy With Macintosh or Glide Scope Video Laryngoscope Blade in Normal Airway Patients

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Atabak; Imani, Farsad; Makarem, Jalil; Khajavi, Mohammad Reza; Etezadi, Farhad; Habibi, Shirin; Shariat Moharari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Glide Scope videolaryngoscope provides a suitable view for intubation, with less force required. Objectives: The present study was conducted, to compare postoperative sore throat and hoarseness after laryngoscopy and intubation, by Macintosh blade or Glide Scope video laryngoscope in normal airway patients. Patients and Methods: Three hundred patients were randomly allocated into two groups of 150: Macintosh blade laryngoscope or Glide Scope video laryngoscope. The patients were evaluated for 48 hours for sore throat and hoarseness by an interview. Results: The incidence and severity of sore throat in the Glide Scope group, at 6, 24 and 48 hours after the operation, were significantly lower than in the Macintosh laryngoscope group. In addition, the incidence of hoarseness in the Glide Scope group, at 6 and 24 hours after the operation, were significantly lower than in the Macintosh laryngoscope group. The incidence and severity of sore throat in men, at 6 and 24 hours after the operation, were significantly lower than in the women. Conclusions: The incidence and severity of sore throat and hoarseness after tracheal intubation by Glide Scope were lower than in the Macintosh laryngoscope. The incidence and severity of sore throat were increased by intubation and longer operation times. PMID:24660157

  17. Effect of high pressure on the formation of ordered phases in Ta-C systems

    SciTech Connect

    Markhasev, B.I.; Dzhamarov, S.S.; Geshko, E.I.; Klyugvant, V.V.; Pilipovskii, Y.L.; Shamatov, Y.M.

    1985-03-01

    This paper considers the effect of pressure on the completion of the transformations TaC /SUB x/ Ta/sub 4/C/sub 3/ and TaC /SUB x/ Ta/sub 2/C. The data show that in the samples with C/Ta = 0.68 and 0.71, the applied pressure substantially increases the diffraction peak heights of the ordered phases, Ta/sub 4/C/sub 3/ and Ta/sub 2/C. In samples with C/Ta = 0.76, high pressure does not generally increase the intensities of the diffracted peaks of Ta/sub 4/C/sub 3/ and Ta/sub 2/C, however the equilibrium between them is displaced to the side of increased Ta/sub 2/C content. In one of the samples a complete disappearance of the disordered TaC /SUB x/ is not observed. It is concluded that high pressure ( about7GPa) promotes the transition of nonstoichiometric TaC /SUB x/ into ordered Ta/sub 4/C/sub 3/ and Ta/sub 2/C as well as broadens the existence region of the latter. A complete transformation of TaC /SUB x/ into the ordered phase does not occur even at pressures up to about 9 GPa.

  18. The Effect of Warm-Up and Cool-Down Exercise on Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness in the Quadriceps Muscle: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Olav; Sjøhaug, Mona; van Beekvelt, Mireille; Mork, Paul Jarle

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of warm-up and cool-down exercise on delayed onset of muscle soreness at the distal and central parts of rectus femoris following leg resistance exercise. Thirty-six volunteers (21 women, 15 men) were randomly assigned to the warm-up (20 min ergometer cycling prior to the resistance exercise), cool-down (20 min cycling after the resistance exercise), or control group performing resistance exercise only. The resistance exercise consisted of front lunges (10×5 repetitions/sets) with external loading of 40% (women) and 50% (men) of body mass. Primary outcomes were pressure pain threshold along rectus femoris and maximal isometric knee extension force. Data were recorded before the resistance exercise and on the two consecutive days. Pressure pain threshold at the central muscle belly was significantly reduced for the control group on both day 2 and 3 (p≤0.003) but not for the warm-up group (p≥0.21). For the cool-down group, pressure pain threshold at the central muscle belly was significantly reduced on day 2 (p≤0.005) and was also lower compared to the warm-up group (p=0.025). Force was significantly reduced on day 2 and 3 for all groups (p<0.001). This study indicates that aerobic warm-up exercise performed prior to resistance exercise may prevent muscle soreness at the central but not distal muscle regions, but it does not prevent loss of muscle force. PMID:23486850

  19. Investigation Of Adhesion Formation In New Stainless Steel Trim Spring Operated Pressure Relief Valves

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Robert E.; Bukowski, Julia V.; Goble, William M.

    2013-04-16

    Examination of proof test data for new (not previously installed) stainless steel (SS) trim spring operated pressure relief valves (SOPRV) reveals that adhesions form between the seat and disc in about 46% of all such SOPRV. The forces needed to overcome these adhesions can be sufficiently large to cause the SOPRV to fail its proof test (FPT) prior to installation. Furthermore, a significant percentage of SOPRV which are found to FPT are also found to ''fail to open'' (FTO) meaning they would not relief excess pressure in the event of an overpressure event. The cases where adhesions result in FTO or FPT appear to be confined to SOPRV with diameters < 1 in and set pressures < 150 psig and the FTO are estimated to occur in 0.31% to 2.00% of this subpopulation of SS trim SOPRV. The reliability and safety implications of these finding for end-users who do not perform pre-installation testing of SOPRV are discussed.

  20. Dissociation of CH4 at high pressures and temperatures: diamond formation in giant planet interiors?

    PubMed

    Benedetti, L R; Nguyen, J H; Caldwell, W A; Liu, H; Kruger, M; Jeanloz, R

    1999-10-01

    Experiments using laser-heated diamond anvil cells show that methane (CH4) breaks down to form diamond at pressures between 10 and 50 gigapascals and temperatures of about 2000 to 3000 kelvin. Infrared absorption and Raman spectroscopy, along with x-ray diffraction, indicate the presence of polymeric hydrocarbons in addition to the diamond, which is in agreement with theoretical predictions. Dissociation of CH4 at high pressures and temperatures can influence the energy budgets of planets containing substantial amounts of CH4, water, and ammonia, such as Uranus and Neptune. PMID:10506552

  1. Enhancing Magnesite Formation at Low Temperature and High CO2 Pressure: The Impact of Seed Crystals and Minor Components

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Qafoku, Odeta; Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor; Liu, Jia; Perea, Daniel E.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2015-02-24

    The formation of magnesite was followed in aqueous solution containing initially added Mg(OH)2 equilibrated with supercritical carbon dioxide (90 atm pressure, 50°C) in the presence of introduced magnesite particles and minor components, Co(II). As expected, the introduction of magnesite particles accelerated the formation of magnesite from solution. However, the formation rate of magnesite was even greater when small concentrations of Co(II) were introduced, indicating that the increased rate of magnesite formation in the presence of Co(II) was not solely due to the addition of a growth promoting surface. Detailed analysis of the magnesite particles by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and atom probe tomography (APT) revealed that the originally added Co(II) was concentrated in the center but also present throughout the growing magnesite particles. Addition of the Co(II) in different chemical forms (i.e. as solid phase CoCO3 or Co(OH)2) could alter the growth rate of magnesite depending upon the addition of bicarbonate to the starting solution. Geochemical modeling calculations indicate that this difference is related to the thermodynamic stability of these different phases in the initial solutions. More broadly, these results indicate that the presence of even small concentrations of foreign ions that form carbonate compounds with a similar structure as magnesite can be incorporated into the magnesite lattice, accelerating the formation of anhydrous carbonates in natural environments.

  2. Transdermal deferoxamine prevents pressure-induced diabetic ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Duscher, Dominik; Neofytou, Evgenios; Wong, Victor W.; Maan, Zeshaan N.; Rennert, Robert C.; Januszyk, Michael; Rodrigues, Melanie; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Whitmore, Arnetha J.; Galvez, Michael G.; Whittam, Alexander J.; Brownlee, Michael; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    There is a high mortality in patients with diabetes and severe pressure ulcers. For example, chronic pressure sores of the heels often lead to limb loss in diabetic patients. A major factor underlying this is reduced neovascularization caused by impaired activity of the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). In diabetes, HIF-1α function is compromised by a high glucose-induced and reactive oxygen species-mediated modification of its coactivator p300, leading to impaired HIF-1α transactivation. We examined whether local enhancement of HIF-1α activity would improve diabetic wound healing and minimize the severity of diabetic ulcers. To improve HIF-1α activity we designed a transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) containing the FDA-approved small molecule deferoxamine (DFO), an iron chelator that increases HIF-1α transactivation in diabetes by preventing iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen stress. Applying this TDDS to a pressure-induced ulcer model in diabetic mice, we found that transdermal delivery of DFO significantly improved wound healing. Unexpectedly, prophylactic application of this transdermal delivery system also prevented diabetic ulcer formation. DFO-treated wounds demonstrated increased collagen density, improved neovascularization, and reduction of free radical formation, leading to decreased cell death. These findings suggest that transdermal delivery of DFO provides a targeted means to both prevent ulcer formation and accelerate diabetic wound healing with the potential for rapid clinical translation. PMID:25535360

  3. High-temperature- and high-pressure-induced formation of the Laves-phase compound XeS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiaozhen; Chen, Yangmei; Xiang, Shikai; Kuang, Xiaoyu; Bi, Yan; Chen, Haiyan

    2016-06-01

    We explore the reactivity of xenon with sulfur under high pressure, using unbiased structure searching techniques combined with first-principles calculations, which identify a stable XeS2 compound crystallized in a Laves phase with hypercoordinated (16-fold) Xe at 191 GPa and 0 K. Taking the thermal effects into account, we find that increasing the temperature could further stabilize it. The formation of XeS2 is a consequence of pressure-induced charge transfer from Xe to S atoms and the delocalization of Xe 5 p and S 3 p electrons. Meanwhile, the stabilization into a Laves phase of XeS2 is the result of delocalized chemical bonding and the need for optimum structure packing. The present discussion of the formation mechanism in XeS2 is general, and conclusions can be used to understand the formation of other Laves-phase compounds and the Xe chemistry that allows closed-shell Xe to participate in chemical reactions.

  4. First Evidence of Rh Nano-Hydride Formation at Low Pressure.

    PubMed

    Zlotea, Claudia; Oumellal, Yassine; Msakni, Mariem; Bourgon, Julie; Bastide, Stéphane; Cachet-Vivier, Christine; Latroche, Michel

    2015-07-01

    Rh-based nanoparticles supported on a porous carbon host were prepared with tunable average sizes ranging from 1.3 to 3.0 nm. Depending on the vacuum or hydrogen environment during thermal treatment, either Rh metal or hydride is formed at nanoscale, respectively. In contrast to bulk Rh that can form a hydride phase under 4 GPa pressure, the metallic Rh nanoparticles (∼2.3 nm) absorb hydrogen and form a hydride phase at pressure below 0.1 MPa, as evidenced by the presence of a plateau pressure in the pressure-composition isotherm curves at room temperature. Larger metal nanoparticles (∼3.0 nm) form only a solid solution with hydrogen under similar conditions. This suggests a nanoscale effect that drastically changes the Rh-H thermodynamics. The nanosized Rh hydride phase is stable at room temperature and only desorbs hydrogen above 175 °C. Within the present hydride particle size range (1.3-2.3 nm), the hydrogen desorption is size-dependent, as proven by different thermal analysis techniques. PMID:26098365

  5. Magnesite formation from MgO and CO2 at the pressures and temperatures of Earth's mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Henry P.; Doczy, Vincent M.; Frank, Mark R.; Hasan, Maggie; Lin, Jung-Fu; Yang, Jing

    2013-08-02

    Magnesite (MgCO3) is an important phase for the carbon cycle in and out of the Earth’s mantle. Its comparably large P-T stability has been inferred for several years based on the absence of its decomposition in experiments. Here we report the first experimental evidence for synthesis of magnesite out of its oxide components (MgO and CO2) at P-T conditions relevant to the Earth’s mantle. Magnesite formation was observed in situ using synchrotron X-ray diffraction, coupled with laser-heated diamond-anvil cells (DACs), at pressures and temperatures of Earth’s mantle. Despite the existence of multiple high-pressure CO2 polymorphs, the magnesite-forming reaction was observed to proceed at pressures ranging from 5 to 40 GPa and temperatures between 1400 and 1800 K. No other pressure-quenchable materials were observed to form via the MgO + CO2 = MgCO3 reaction. This work further strengthens the notion that magnesite may indeed be the primary host phase for oxidized carbon in the deep Earth.

  6. Influence of flowing helium gas on plasma plume formation in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Konda, Kohmei; Ogura, Kazuo

    2015-05-15

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and a foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. The helium gas flowing out of quartz tube mixes with air, and the flow channel is composed of the regions of flowing helium gas and air. The plasma plume length is equivalent to the reachable distance of flowing helium gas. Although the amount of helium gas on the flow channel increases by increasing the inner diameter of quartz tube at the same gas flow velocity, the plasma plume length peaks at around 8 m/s of gas flow velocity, which is the result that a flow of helium gas is balanced with the amount of gas. The plasma plume is formed at the boundary region where the flow of helium gas is kept to the wall of the air.

  7. Theory of Filamentary Plasma Array Formation in Microwave Breakdown at Near-Atmospheric Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Sang Ki; Verboncoeur, John P.

    2009-07-31

    Recently reported observations of filamentation during high power microwaves breakdown of near-atmospheric pressure gas are explained using a one-dimensional fluid model coupled to a theoretical wave-plasma model. This self-consistent treatment allows for time-dependent effects, plasma growth and diffusion, and partial absorption and reflection of waves. Simulation results, consistent with experiments, show the evolution of the plasma filaments spaced less than one-quarter wavelength, the sequential discrete light emission propagating back toward the source, and the diffusion and decay of the plasma. The model allows examination of many features not easily obtained experimentally, including dependence on field strength and frequency, pressure, and gas composition, which influence the breakdown and emission properties, including the spacing and speed of propagation of the filaments.

  8. Kinetics of microstructure formation of high-pressure induced gel from a whey protein isolate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jin-Song; Yang, Hongwei; Zhu, Wanpeng; Mu, Tai-Hua

    2010-03-01

    The kinetic process of pressure-induced gelation of whey protein isolate (WPI) solutions was studied using in situ light scattering. The relationship of the logarithm of scattered light intensity (I) versus time (t) was linear after the induced time and could be described by the Cahn-Hilliard linear theory. With increasing time, the scattered intensity deviated from the exponential relationship, and the time evolution of the scattered light intensity maximum Im and the corresponding wavenumber qm could be described in terms of the power-law relationship as Im~fβ and qm~f-α, respectively. These results indicated that phase separation occurred during the gelation of WPI solutions under high pressure.

  9. Anomalous structure-property relationships in metallic glasses through pressure-mediated glass formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jun; Asta, Mark; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2016-04-01

    Metallic glasses are commonly found to favor denser packing structures and icosahedral order in experiments, simulations, and theoretical models. Here we present a molecular dynamics simulation study of Cu-Zr metallic glasses, prepared through a pressure-mediated pathway. The resulting glasses exhibit anomalous structure-property relationships; these glasses are less energetically stable, concomitant with a denser atomic packing and a significant increase in icosahedral short-range order. The enhanced icosahedral order is shown to be accompanied by a pressure-mediated change in chemical short-range order. The results demonstrate that in amorphous alloys (nonmonatomic), theoretical frameworks of the two-order-parameter model must be generalized to account for chemical degrees of freedom.

  10. Theory of filamentary plasma array formation in microwave breakdown at near-atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sang Ki; Verboncoeur, John P

    2009-07-31

    Recently reported observations of filamentation during high power microwaves breakdown of near-atmospheric pressure gas are explained using a one-dimensional fluid model coupled to a theoretical wave-plasma model. This self-consistent treatment allows for time-dependent effects, plasma growth and diffusion, and partial absorption and reflection of waves. Simulation results, consistent with experiments, show the evolution of the plasma filaments spaced less than one-quarter wavelength, the sequential discrete light emission propagating back toward the source, and the diffusion and decay of the plasma. The model allows examination of many features not easily obtained experimentally, including dependence on field strength and frequency, pressure, and gas composition, which influence the breakdown and emission properties, including the spacing and speed of propagation of the filaments. PMID:19792510