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Sample records for pressure static pressure

  1. Measurement of static pressure on aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gracey, William

    1958-01-01

    Existing data on the errors involved in the measurement of static pressure by means of static-pressure tubes and fuselage vents are presented. The errors associated with the various design features of static-pressure tubes are discussed for the condition of zero angle of attack and for the case where the tube is inclined to flow. Errors which result from variations in the configuration of static-pressure vents are also presented. Errors due to the position of a static-pressure tube in the flow field of the airplane are given for locations ahead of the fuselage nose, ahead of the wing tip, and ahead of the vertical tail fin. The errors of static-pressure vents on the fuselage of an airplane are also presented. Various methods of calibrating static-pressure installations in flight are briefly discussed.

  2. 14 CFR 29.1325 - Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static pressure and pressure altimeter...: Installation § 29.1325 Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems. (a) Each instrument with static air...

  3. 14 CFR 29.1325 - Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Static pressure and pressure altimeter...: Installation § 29.1325 Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems. (a) Each instrument with static air...

  4. 14 CFR 29.1325 - Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static pressure and pressure altimeter...: Installation § 29.1325 Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems. (a) Each instrument with static air...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static pressure system. 23.1325 Section 23...: Installation § 23.1325 Static pressure system. (a) Each instrument provided with static pressure...

  6. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static pressure system. 23.1325 Section 23...: Installation § 23.1325 Static pressure system. (a) Each instrument provided with static pressure...

  7. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Static pressure system. 23.1325 Section 23...: Installation § 23.1325 Static pressure system. (a) Each instrument provided with static pressure...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...instrument with static air case connections must...manner that the static pressure system performance is...the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure...such that— (1) Positive drainage of...

  9. 14 CFR 25.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...instrument with static air case connections must...manner that the static pressure system performance is...the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure...such that— (1) Positive drainage of...

  10. 14 CFR 25.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...instrument with static air case connections must...manner that the static pressure system performance is...the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure...such that— (1) Positive drainage of...

  11. 14 CFR 25.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...instrument with static air case connections must...manner that the static pressure system performance is...the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure...such that— (1) Positive drainage of...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...instrument with static air case connections must...manner that the static pressure system performance is...the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure...such that— (1) Positive drainage of...

  13. 14 CFR 27.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...port must be designed and located in such manner that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not altered when the rotorcraft encounters icing conditions. An...

  14. 14 CFR 27.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...port must be designed and located in such manner that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not altered when the rotorcraft encounters icing conditions. An...

  15. 14 CFR 27.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...port must be designed and located in such manner that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not altered when the rotorcraft encounters icing conditions. An...

  16. 14 CFR 27.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...port must be designed and located in such manner that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not altered when the rotorcraft encounters icing conditions. An...

  17. 14 CFR 27.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...port must be designed and located in such manner that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not altered when the rotorcraft encounters icing conditions. An...

  18. 14 CFR 29.1325 - Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...port must be designed and located in such manner that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not altered when the rotorcraft encounters icing conditions. An...

  19. 14 CFR 29.1325 - Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...port must be designed and located in such manner that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not altered when the rotorcraft encounters icing conditions. An...

  20. 14 CFR 29.1325 - Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...port must be designed and located in such manner that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not altered when the rotorcraft encounters icing conditions. An...

  1. 14 CFR 29.1325 - Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...port must be designed and located in such manner that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not altered when the rotorcraft encounters icing conditions. An...

  2. 14 CFR 29.1325 - Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...port must be designed and located in such manner that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not altered when the rotorcraft encounters icing conditions. An...

  3. Martian Atmospheric Pressure Static Charge Elimination Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    A Martian pressure static charge elimination tool is currently in development in the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory (ESPL) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. In standard Earth atmosphere conditions, static charge can be neutralized from an insulating surface using air ionizers. These air ionizers generate ions through corona breakdown. The Martian atmosphere is 7 Torr of mostly carbon dioxide, which makes it inherently difficult to use similar methods as those used for standard atmosphere static elimination tools. An initial prototype has been developed to show feasibility of static charge elimination at low pressure, using corona discharge. A needle point and thin wire loop are used as the corona generating electrodes. A photo of the test apparatus is shown below. Positive and negative high voltage pulses are sent to the needle point. This creates positive and negative ions that can be used for static charge neutralization. In a preliminary test, a floating metal plate was charged to approximately 600 volts under Martian atmospheric conditions. The static elimination tool was enabled and the voltage on the metal plate dropped rapidly to -100 volts. This test data is displayed below. Optimization is necessary to improve the electrostatic balance of the static elimination tool.

  4. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...b) If a static pressure system is necessary...installation of a static pressure system must be such that— (i) Positive drainage of moisture...integrity of the static pressure system in the following...correlation between air pressure in the...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...b) If a static pressure system is necessary...installation of a static pressure system must be such that— (i) Positive drainage of moisture...integrity of the static pressure system in the following...correlation between air pressure in the...

  6. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...b) If a static pressure system is necessary...installation of a static pressure system must be such that— (i) Positive drainage of moisture...integrity of the static pressure system in the following...correlation between air pressure in the...

  7. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...b) If a static pressure system is necessary...installation of a static pressure system must be such that— (i) Positive drainage of moisture...integrity of the static pressure system in the following...correlation between air pressure in the...

  8. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...b) If a static pressure system is necessary...installation of a static pressure system must be such that— (i) Positive drainage of moisture...integrity of the static pressure system in the following...correlation between air pressure in the...

  9. 30 CFR 18.67 - Static-pressure tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Static-pressure tests. 18.67 Section 18.67....67 Static-pressure tests. Static-pressure tests shall be conducted by the applicant on each enclosure... pressure to be applied shall be 150 pounds per square inch (gage) or one and one-half times the...

  10. 30 CFR 18.67 - Static-pressure tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Static-pressure tests. 18.67 Section 18.67....67 Static-pressure tests. Static-pressure tests shall be conducted by the applicant on each enclosure... pressure to be applied shall be 150 pounds per square inch (gage) or one and one-half times the...

  11. 30 CFR 18.67 - Static-pressure tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Static-pressure tests. 18.67 Section 18.67....67 Static-pressure tests. Static-pressure tests shall be conducted by the applicant on each enclosure... pressure to be applied shall be 150 pounds per square inch (gage) or one and one-half times the...

  12. 30 CFR 18.67 - Static-pressure tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static-pressure tests. 18.67 Section 18.67....67 Static-pressure tests. Static-pressure tests shall be conducted by the applicant on each enclosure... pressure to be applied shall be 150 pounds per square inch (gage) or one and one-half times the...

  13. 30 CFR 18.67 - Static-pressure tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Static-pressure tests. 18.67 Section 18.67....67 Static-pressure tests. Static-pressure tests shall be conducted by the applicant on each enclosure... pressure to be applied shall be 150 pounds per square inch (gage) or one and one-half times the...

  14. Intense cavitation at extreme static pressure.

    PubMed

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A; Gutierrez, Joel; Dunbar, Wylene W; Philpott, Richard W

    2016-02-01

    Cavitation is usually performed at hydrostatic pressures at or near 0.1MPa. Higher static pressure produces more intense cavitation, but requires an apparatus that can build high amplitude acoustic waves with rarefactions exceeding the cavitation threshold. The absence of such an apparatus has prevented the achievement of intense acoustic cavitation, hindering research and the development of new applications. Here we describe a new high-pressure spherical resonator system, as well as experimental and modeling results in water and liquid metal (gallium), for cavitation at hydrostatic pressures between 10 and 150MPa. Our computational data, using HYADES plasma hydrodynamics code, show the formation of dense plasma that, under these conditions, reaches peak pressures of about three to four orders of magnitude greater than the hydrostatic pressure in the bulk liquid and temperatures in the range of 100,000K. Passive cavitation detection (PCD) data validate both a linear increase in shock wave amplitude and the production of highly intense concentrations of mechanical energy in the collapsing bubbles. High-speed camera observations show the formation of bubble clusters from single bubbles. The increased shock wave amplitude produced by bubble clusters, measured using PCD and fiber optic probe hydrophone, was consistent with current understanding that bubble clusters enable amplification of energy produced. PMID:26341849

  15. 14 CFR 25.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not changed when the airplane is exposed to the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 25.1325 Section 25... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented to the...

  16. 14 CFR 27.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ambient atmospheric static pressure is not altered when the rotorcraft encounters icing conditions. An... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 27.1325 Section 27... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented so that the...

  17. 14 CFR 27.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ambient atmospheric static pressure is not altered when the rotorcraft encounters icing conditions. An... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 27.1325 Section 27... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented so that the...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not changed when the airplane is exposed to the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 25.1325 Section 25... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented to the...

  19. 14 CFR 25.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not changed when the airplane is exposed to the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 25.1325 Section 25... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented to the...

  20. 14 CFR 27.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ambient atmospheric static pressure is not altered when the rotorcraft encounters icing conditions. An... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 27.1325 Section 27... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented so that the...

  1. 30 CFR 7.307 - Static pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Static pressure test. 7.307 Section 7.307... pressure test. (a) Test procedure. (1) The enclosure shall be internally pressurized to a minimum of 150 psig and the pressure maintained for a minimum of 10 seconds. (2) Following the pressure hold,...

  2. 30 CFR 7.307 - Static pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Static pressure test. 7.307 Section 7.307... pressure test. (a) Test procedure. (1) The enclosure shall be internally pressurized to a minimum of 150 psig and the pressure maintained for a minimum of 10 seconds. (2) Following the pressure hold,...

  3. 30 CFR 7.307 - Static pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Static pressure test. 7.307 Section 7.307... pressure test. (a) Test procedure. (1) The enclosure shall be internally pressurized to a minimum of 150 psig and the pressure maintained for a minimum of 10 seconds. (2) Following the pressure hold,...

  4. 30 CFR 7.307 - Static pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static pressure test. 7.307 Section 7.307... pressure test. (a) Test procedure. (1) The enclosure shall be internally pressurized to a minimum of 150 psig and the pressure maintained for a minimum of 10 seconds. (2) Following the pressure hold,...

  5. 30 CFR 7.307 - Static pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Static pressure test. 7.307 Section 7.307... pressure test. (a) Test procedure. (1) The enclosure shall be internally pressurized to a minimum of 150 psig and the pressure maintained for a minimum of 10 seconds. (2) Following the pressure hold,...

  6. 30 CFR 7.104 - Internal static pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Internal static pressure test. 7.104 Section 7... Internal static pressure test. (a) Test procedures. (1) Isolate and seal each segment of the intake system... system or exhaust system to four times the maximum pressure observed in each segment during the tests...

  7. 30 CFR 7.104 - Internal static pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Internal static pressure test. 7.104 Section 7... Internal static pressure test. (a) Test procedures. (1) Isolate and seal each segment of the intake system... system or exhaust system to four times the maximum pressure observed in each segment during the tests...

  8. 30 CFR 7.104 - Internal static pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Internal static pressure test. 7.104 Section 7... Internal static pressure test. (a) Test procedures. (1) Isolate and seal each segment of the intake system... system or exhaust system to four times the maximum pressure observed in each segment during the tests...

  9. 30 CFR 7.104 - Internal static pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Internal static pressure test. 7.104 Section 7... Internal static pressure test. (a) Test procedures. (1) Isolate and seal each segment of the intake system... system or exhaust system to four times the maximum pressure observed in each segment during the tests...

  10. 14 CFR 29.1325 - Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems. 29.1325 Section 29.1325 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Instruments: Installation § 29.1325 Static pressure...

  11. 14 CFR 33.64 - Pressurized engine static parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.64 Pressurized engine static parts. (a)...

  12. 14 CFR 33.64 - Pressurized engine static parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.64 Pressurized engine static parts. (a)...

  13. 14 CFR 27.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 27.1325 Section 27.1325 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Instruments: Installation § 27.1325 Static pressure systems. (a) Each instrument...

  14. 14 CFR 25.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 25.1325 Section 25.1325 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Instruments: Installation § 25.1325 Static pressure systems. (a) Each instrument...

  15. 14 CFR 27.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 27.1325 Section 27.1325 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Instruments: Installation § 27.1325 Static pressure systems. (a) Each instrument...

  16. Lead plated aluminum ring provides static high pressure seal for large diameter pressure vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, J. N.

    1967-01-01

    Lead plated aluminum ring provides a positive static seal for a large diameter pressure vessel for use in a hazardous environment at cryogenic temperatures with high pressure fluid flow. This design can be used in high and low pressure lines of any diameter for any fluid, with appropriate material modification.

  17. Miniature Flow-Direction/Pitot-Static Pressure Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, George C., Jr.; Coombs, David S.; Eves, John W.; Price, Howard E.; Vasquez, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Precision flow-direction/pitot-static pressure probes, ranging from 0.035 to 0.090 inch (0.89 to 2.29 mm) in outside diameter, successfully fabricated and calibrated for use in Langley 20-inch Mach 6 Tunnel. Probes simultaneously measure flow direction and static and pitot pressures in flow fields about configurations in hypersonic flow at temperatures up to 500 degree F (260 degree C).

  18. A bellow pressure fiber optic sensor for static ice pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Li-Qin; Long, Xin; Qin, Jian-Min

    2015-06-01

    Static ice pressure affects safe operation of hydraulic structures. However, current detection methods are hindered by the following limitations: poor real-time performance and errors owing to the partial pressure of the surrounding wall on traditional electrical resistance strain bellow pressure sensors. We developed a fiber optic sensor with a special pressure bellow to monitor the static ice pressure on hydraulic structures and used the sensor to measure static pressure in laboratory ice growth and melting tests from -30°C to 5°C. The sensor resolution is 0.02 kPa and its sensitivity is 2.74 × 10-4/kPa. The experiments suggest that the static ice pressure peaks twice during ice growth and melting. The first peak appears when the ice temperature drops to -15°C owing to the liquid water to solid ice transition. The second peak appears at 0°C owing to the thermal expansion of the ice during ice melting. The novel fiber optic sensor exhibits stable performance, high resolution, and high sensitivity and it can be used to monitor the static ice pressure during ice growth and melting.

  19. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Static pressure system. 23.1325 Section 23.1325 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Instruments: Installation § 23.1325 Static...

  20. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Static pressure system. 23.1325 Section 23.1325 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Instruments: Installation § 23.1325 Static...

  1. Static filling pressure in patients during induced ventricular fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Schipke, J D; Heusch, G; Sanii, A P; Gams, E; Winter, J

    2003-12-01

    The static pressure resulting after the cessation of flow is thought to reflect the filling of the cardiovascular system. In the past, static filling pressures or mean circulatory filling pressures have only been reported in experimental animals and in human corpses, respectively. We investigated arterial and central venous pressures in supine, anesthetized humans with longer fibrillation/defibrillation sequences (FDSs) during cardioverter/defibrillator implantation. In 82 patients, the average number of FDSs was 4 +/- 2 (mean +/- SD), and their duration was 13 +/- 2 s. In a total of 323 FDSs, arterial blood pressure decreased with a time constant of 2.9 +/- 1.0 s from 77.5 +/- 34.4 to 24.2 +/- 5.3 mmHg. Central venous pressure increased with a time constant of 3.6 +/- 1.3 s from 7.5 +/- 5.2 to 11.0 +/- 5.4 mmHg (36 points, 141 FDS). The average arteriocentral venous blood pressure difference remained at 13.2 +/- 6.2 mmHg. Although it slowly decreased, the pressure difference persisted even with FDSs lasting 20 s. Lack of true equilibrium pressure could possibly be due to a waterfall mechanism. However, waterfalls were identified neither between the left ventricle and large arteries nor at the level of the diaphragm in supine patients. We therefore suggest that static filling pressures/mean circulatory pressures can only be directly assessed if the time after termination of cardiac pumping is adequate, i.e., >20 s. For humans, such times are beyond ethical options. PMID:12907428

  2. 33 CFR 183.580 - Static pressure test for fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Static pressure test for fuel tanks. 183...Tests § 183.580 Static pressure test for fuel tanks. A... (a) Fill the tank with air or inert gas to the pressure marked on the tank label...

  3. 33 CFR 183.580 - Static pressure test for fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Static pressure test for fuel tanks. 183...Tests § 183.580 Static pressure test for fuel tanks. A... (a) Fill the tank with air or inert gas to the pressure marked on the tank label...

  4. 33 CFR 183.580 - Static pressure test for fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Static pressure test for fuel tanks. 183...Tests § 183.580 Static pressure test for fuel tanks. A... (a) Fill the tank with air or inert gas to the pressure marked on the tank label...

  5. 33 CFR 183.580 - Static pressure test for fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Static pressure test for fuel tanks. 183...Tests § 183.580 Static pressure test for fuel tanks. A... (a) Fill the tank with air or inert gas to the pressure marked on the tank label...

  6. 33 CFR 183.580 - Static pressure test for fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Static pressure test for fuel tanks. 183...Tests § 183.580 Static pressure test for fuel tanks. A... (a) Fill the tank with air or inert gas to the pressure marked on the tank label...

  7. 30 CFR 7.104 - Internal static pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Internal static pressure test. 7.104 Section 7.104 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Diesel Power Packages Intended for Use in Areas of Underground Coal Mines...

  8. 14 CFR 33.64 - Pressurized engine static parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pressurized engine static parts. 33.64 Section 33.64 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.64...

  9. 14 CFR 33.64 - Pressurized engine static parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pressurized engine static parts. 33.64 Section 33.64 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.64...

  10. 14 CFR 33.64 - Pressurized engine static parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pressurized engine static parts. 33.64 Section 33.64 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.64...

  11. 14 CFR 33.64 - Pressurized engine static parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pressurized engine static parts. 33.64 Section 33.64 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.64...

  12. Radio jet refraction in galactic atmospheres with static pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, R. N.; Vallee, J. P.; Bridle, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    A theory of double radio sources which have a 'Z' or 'S' morphology is proposed, based on the refraction of radio jets in the extended atmosphere of an elliptical galaxy. The model describes a collimated jet of supersonic material bending self-consistently under the influence of external static pressure gradients. Gravity and magnetic fields are neglected in the simplest case except insofar as they determine the static pressure distribution. The calculation is a straightforward extension of a method used to calculate a ram-pressure model for twin radio trails ('C' morphology). It may also be described as a continuous-jet version of a buoyancy model proposed in 1973. The model has the added virtue of invoking a galactic atmosphere similar to those already indicated by X-ray measurements of some other radio galaxies and by models for the collimation of other radio jets.

  13. A hot-film static-pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, G. C., Jr.; Weinstein, L. M.

    1982-01-01

    The procedure described involves calibrating the probe in the gas of interest over the range of temperatures and pressures anticipated in the wind-tunnel tests and then applying the calibration to reduce the data from those tests. Pressure readings from two probes, one having two hot-film sensors and an internal sonic orifice and the other connected to a conventional pressure gage, are recorded for several Reynolds numbers and compared. The conventional static-pressure probe with a pair of hot-film sensors and an interior sonic orifice is shown to provide the means of surveying flowfields in hypersonic flow at a rapid rate and with an accuracy of better than + or - 10%.

  14. Static and dynamic high pressure experiments on cerium

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Brian J; Velisavljevic, Nenad; Cherne, Frank J; Stevens, Gerald; Tschauner, Oliver

    2011-01-25

    There is a scientific need to obtain dynamic data to develop and validate multi phase equation-of-state (EOS) models for metals. Experiments are needed to examine the relevant pure phases, to locate phase boundaries and the associated transition kinetics, and other material properties such as strength. Cerium is an ideal material for such work because it exhibits a complex multiphase diagram at relatively moderate pressures readily accessible using standard shock wave methods. In the current work, shock wave (dynamic) and diamond anvil cell (static) experiments were performed to examine the high pressure, low temperature region of the phase diagram to obtain EOS data and to search for the {alpha}-{var_epsilon} boundary. Past work examining the shock-melt transition and the low-pressure {gamma}-{alpha} transition will be presented in brief followed by details of recent results obtained from DAC and double-shock experiments.

  15. Plume diagnostics of SRM static firings for pressure perturbation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambamurthi, J. K.; Alvarado, Alexis; Mathias, Edward C.

    1995-01-01

    During the shuttle launches, the solid rocket motors (SRM) occasionally experience pressure perturbations (8-13 psi) between 65 and 75 seconds into the motor burn time. The magnitudes of these perturbations are very small in comparison with the operating motor chamber pressure, which is over 600 psi during this time frame. These SRM pressure perturbations are believed to be caused primarily by the expulsion of slag (aluminum oxide). Two SRM static tests, TEM-11 and FSM-4, were instrumented extensive]y for the study of the phenomenon associated with pressure perturbations. The test instrumentation used included nonintrusive optical and infrared diagnostics of the plume, such as high-speed photography, radiometers, and thermal image cameras. Results from all these nonintrusive observations strongly support the scenario that the pressure perturbation event in the shuttle SRM is caused primarily by the expulsion of molten slag. The slag was also expelled preferentially near the bottom of the nozzle due to slag accumulation at the bottom of the aft end of the horizontally oriented motor.

  16. Experimental cavity pressure measurements at subsonic and transonic speeds. Static-pressure results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plentovich, E. B.; Stallings, Robert L., Jr.; Tracy, M. B.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine cavity flow-characteristics at subsonic and transonic speeds. A rectangular box cavity was tested in the Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.20 to 0.95 at a unit Reynolds number of approximately 3 x 10(exp 6) per foot. The boundary layer approaching the cavity was turbulent. Cavities were tested over a range of length-to-depth ratios (l/h) of 1 to 17.5 for cavity width-to-depth ratios of 1, 4, 8, and 16. Fluctuating- and static-pressure data in the cavity were obtained; however, only static-pressure data is analyzed. The boundaries between the flow regimes based on cavity length-to-depth ratio were determined. The change to transitional flow from open flow occurs at l/h at approximately 6-8 however, the change from transitional- to closed-cavity flow occurred over a wide range of l/h and was dependent on Mach number and cavity configuration. The change from closed to open flow as found to occur gradually. The effect of changing cavity dimensions showed that if the vlaue of l/h was kept fixed but the cavity width was decreased or cavity height was increased, the cavity pressure distribution tended more toward a more closed flow distribution.

  17. New findings in static high-pressure science

    SciTech Connect

    Hemley, R.J.; Mao, H.-k.

    2010-11-16

    Recent static high P-T experiments using diamond anvil cell techniques reveal an array of phenomena and provide new links to dynamic compression experiments. Selected recent developments are reviewed, including new findings in hot dense hydrogen, the creation of new metals and superconductors, new transitions in molecular and other low-Z systems, the behavior of iron and transition metals, chemical changes of importance in geoscience and planetary science, and the creation of new classes of high-pressure devices based on CVD diamond. These advances have set the stage for the next set of developments in this rapidly growing area.

  18. Spherically symmetric static matter configurations with vanishing radial pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirukkanesh, S.; Govender, M.; Lortan, D. B.

    2015-11-01

    We present a new family of spherically symmetric, static solutions of the Einstein field equations in isotropic, comoving coordinates. The radial pressure at each interior point of these models vanishes yet equilibrium is still possible. The constant density Florides solution which describes the gravitational field inside an Einstein cluster is obtained as a special case of our solution-generating method. We show that our solutions can be utilized to model strange star candidates such as Her. X-1, SAX J1808.4-3658(SS2), SAX J1808.4-3658(SS1) and PSR J1614-2230.

  19. Uncertainty of Five-Hole Probe Measurements. [of total flow pressure, static pressure, and flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichert, Bruce A.; Wendt, Bruce J.

    1994-01-01

    A new algorithm for five-hole probe calibration and data reduction using a non-nulling technique was developed, verified, and reported earlier (Wendt and Reichert, 1993). The new algorithm's simplicity permits an analytical treatment of the propagation of uncertainty in five-hole probe measurement. The objectives of the uncertainty analysis are to quantify the uncertainty of five-hole probe results (e.g., total pressure, static pressure, and flow direction) and to determine the dependence of the result uncertainty on the uncertainty of all underlying experimental and calibration measurands. This study outlines a general procedure that other researchers may use to determine five-hole probe result uncertainty and provides guidance for improving the measurement technique.

  20. Static Pressure of Hot Gas: Its Effect on the Gas Disks of Galaxies

    E-print Network

    Anatoly V. Zasov; Alexander V. Khoperskov

    2008-10-29

    The static pressure of the hot gas that fills clusters and groups of galaxies can affect significantly the volume density and thickness of the gas disks in galaxies. In combination with the dynamic pressure, the static pressure allows several observed peculiarities of spiral galaxies surrounded by a hot medium to be explained.

  1. 14 CFR 33.64 - Pressurized engine static parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) 35 kPa (5 p.s.i.) above the normal working pressure. (2) Exhibit fracture or burst when subjected to... the maximum working pressure; or (iii) 35 kPa (5 p.s.i.) above the maximum possible pressure....

  2. Radio jet refraction in galactic atmospheres with static pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, R. N.; Vallee, J. P.; Bridle, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    A theory based on the refraction of radio jets in the extended atmosphere of an elliptical galaxy, is proposed for double radio sources with a Z or S morphology. The model describes a collimated jet of supersonic material that bends self-consistently under the influence of external static pressure gradients, and may alternatively be seen as a continuous-jet version of the buoyancy model proposed by Gull (1973). Emphasis is placed on (1) S-shaped radio sources identified with isolated galaxies, such as 3C 293, whose radio structures should be free of distortions resulting from motion relative to a cluster medium, and (2) small-scale, galaxy-dominated rather than environment-dominated S-shaped sources such as the inner jet structure of Fornax A.

  3. A novel tubular superconductor stabilized with static pressurized helium

    SciTech Connect

    Lvovsky, Y.M.; Kral, S.F.; Rackov, P.M.

    1994-07-01

    A new superconductor concept for encapsulated, medium-size magnets with a significantly increased stability margin is presented. A tubular superconductor (TSC) of a few millimeters outer diameter is drawn from a billet (normal metal + superconducting inserts). After winding, the TSC is filled with static gaseous helium under pressure, which serves as an enthalpy stabilizer. The approach is beneficial both for NbTi and Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets, including conductively cooled magnets. For example, Nb{sub 3}Sn TSC magnet for 8 T, 8 K operation has a stability margin up to 8 times greater than a corresponding magnet using a conventional conductor. The stability margin against slow (steady-state) and transient disturbances has been analyzed for TSC and cable-in-conduit conductors (CICC). Analytical expressions for the stability margin have been obtained and optimal helium cross-section have been determined. Results can be used to design helium-filled conductors for magnets operating to maximum stability margin.

  4. Effects of static fingertip loading on carpal tunnel pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rempel, D.; Keir, P. J.; Smutz, W. P.; Hargens, A.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between carpal tunnel pressure and fingertip force during a simple pressing task. Carpal tunnel pressure was measured in 15 healthy volunteers by means of a saline-filled catheter inserted percutaneously into the carpal tunnel of the nondominant hand. The subjects pressed on a load cell with the tip of the index finger and with 0, 6, 9, and 12 N of force. The task was repeated in 10 wrist postures: neutral; 10 and 20 degrees of ulnar deviation; 10 degrees of radial deviation; and 15, 30, and 45 degrees of both flexion and extension. Fingertip loading significantly increased carpal tunnel pressure for all wrist angles (p = 0.0001). Post hoc analyses identified significant increase (p < 0.05) in carpal tunnel pressure between unloaded (0 N) and all loaded conditions, as well as between the 6 and 12 N load conditions. This study demonstrates that the process whereby fingertip loading elevates carpal tunnel pressure is independent of wrist posture and that relatively small fingertip loads have a large effect on carpal tunnel pressure. It also reveals the response characteristics of carpal tunnel pressure to fingertip loading, which is one step in understanding the relationship between sustained grip and pinch activities and the aggravation or development of median neuropathy at the wrist.

  5. 14 CFR 29.1325 - Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... connections must be vented to the outside atmosphere through an appropriate piping system. (b) Each vent must.... (d) Except for the vent into the atmosphere, each system must be airtight. (e) Each pressure altimeter must be approved and calibrated to indicate pressure altitude in a standard atmosphere with...

  6. Warm Pressurant Gas Effects on the Static Bubble Point Pressure for Cryogenic LADs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John; Chato, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for the liquid hydrogen and nitrogen bubble point tests using warm pressurant gases conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The purpose of the test series was to determine the effect of elevating the temperature of the pressurant gas on the performance of a liquid acquisition device (LAD). Three fine mesh screen samples (325x2300, 450x2750, 510x3600) were tested in liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen using cold and warm non-condensable (gaseous helium) and condensable (gaseous hydrogen or nitrogen) pressurization schemes. Gases were conditioned from 0K - 90K above the liquid temperature. Results clearly indicate degradation in bubble point pressure using warm gas, with a greater reduction in performance using condensable over non-condensable pressurization. Degradation in the bubble point pressure is inversely proportional to screen porosity, as the coarsest mesh demonstrated the highest degradation. Results here have implication on both pressurization and LAD system design for all future cryogenic propulsion systems. A detailed review of historical heated gas tests is also presented for comparison to current results.

  7. On Static Pressure Fluctuation between Sirocco Fan Blades in a Car Air-Conditioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yasuhiko; Kato, Takaaki; Moriguchi, Yuu; Sakai, Masaharu; Ito, Kouji; Mitsuishi, Yasushi; Nagata, Kouji; Kubo, Takashi

    In this study, special attention is directed to static pressure fluctuation in a sirocco fan for a car air-conditioning system, because it is expected that there is a close connection between the fluid noise and the pressure fluctuation. The final purpose of this study is to clarify the relationship between the static pressure fluctuation between fan blades and the sound noise emitted to the outside of the fan, and to develop an air-conditioning system with highly low noise level. For this purpose, first of all, a new micro probe for the measurement of static pressure fluctuation has been developed. This new micro probe is composed of an L-type static pressure tube (the outer diameter is 0.5 mm and the inner diameter is 0.34 mm) and a very small pressure transducer. This probe exhibits a flat frequency response until approximately 2,000 Hz, and it is set between the blades of the fan rotating at 1,500 rpm. The measurements of the static pressure fluctuation between the blades have been performed, and the intensity of sound source was quantified from the second derivative of the phase-averaged static pressure fluctuation signals on the basis of Ribner's formula (Ribner 1962). The experiments have been made in two different modes, i.e., the cooling mode (FACE MODE) and the heating mode (FOOT MODE). It is shown that the static pressure increases rapidly as the blade approaches to the nose of the casing. It is also found that the sound source for FACE MODE shows the larger value than that for FOOT MODE as a whole. In particular, the largest intensity of sound source is observed when the blade approaches to the nose. From these results, it is confirmed that the present new static pressure probe is useful to specify the distributions of sound source in a sirocco fan.

  8. DEFLAGRATION RATES OF SECONDARY EXPLOSIVES UNDER STATIC MPA - GPA PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Zaug, J; Young, C; Long, G; Maienschein, J; Glascoe, E; Hansen, D; Wardell, J; Black, C; Sykora, G

    2009-07-30

    We provide measurements of the chemical reaction propagation rate (RPR) as a function of pressure using diamond anvil cell (DAC) and strand burner technologies. Materials investigated include HMX and RDX crystalline powders, LX-04 (85% HMX and 15% Viton A), and Composition B (63% RDX, 36% TNT, 1% wax). The anomalous correspondence between crystal structure, including in some instances isostructural phase transitions, on pressure dependent RPRs of HMX and RDX are correlated to confocal micro-Raman spectroscopic results. The contrast between DAC GPa and strand burner MPa regime measurements yield insight into explosive material burn phenomena. Here we highlight pressure dependent physicochemical mechanisms that appear to affect the deflagration rate of precompressed energetic materials.

  9. Effect of revised high-heeled shoes on foot pressure and static balance during standing.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Ko, Mansoo; Park, Young-Soul; Lee, Suk-Min

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of revised high-heeled shoes on the foot pressure ratio and static balance during standing. [Subjects and Methods] A single-subject design was used, 15 healthy women wearing revised high-heeled shoes and general high-heeled shoes in a random order. The foot pressure ratio and static balance scores during standing were measured using a SpaceBalance 3D system. [Results] Forefoot and rearfoot pressures were significantly different between the 2 types of high-heeled shoes. Under the 3 conditions tested, the static balance score was higher for the revised high-heeled shoes than for the general high-heeled shoes, but this difference was not statistically significant. [Conclusion] Revised high-heeled shoes are preferable to general high-heeled shoes, as they result in normalization of normalized foot pressure and a positive effect on static balance. PMID:25995572

  10. An Investigation of Alternative Methods for Measuring Static Pressure of Unitary Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps 

    E-print Network

    Wheeler, Grant Benson

    2013-08-12

    This project was created to address an important issue currently faced by test facilities measuring static pressure for air-conditioning and heat pumps. Specifically, ASHRAE Standard 37, the industry standard for test ...

  11. Hot-film static-pressure probe for surveying flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, G. C., Jr.; Weinstein, L. M.

    1981-01-01

    A static pressure probe employing hot-film sensors has been developed for the rapid measurement of the static pressure fields surrounding analytic shapes in hypersonic flows. The hot-film probe is a modification of the standard static pressure probe, consisting of a front hot-film sensor operated as a resistance thermometer, a rear sensor operated at an overheat ratio of 1.5 to 1.8 and a small sonic orifice installed inside the tubing of a conventional device. The probe has been calibrated in helium and air over a range of temperatures and pressures in a bell jar apparatus, with a repeatability of the data to within + or - 0.015 mm Hg. Comparative tests of the hot-film and conventional static pressure probes in a hypersonic helium wind tunnel at Mach 20 and various Reynolds numbers have indicated the settling time of the hot-film probe to be on the order of milliseconds, as compared with 30 sec for the conventional probe. The pressures measured by the two probes were found to be within 10% of each other. Although the hot-film probe makes flow-field static pressure surveys more practical in blowdown hypersonic wind tunnels, viscous and flow angle effects still must be assessed under the conditions of use.

  12. 30 CFR 550.1153 - When must I conduct a static bottomhole pressure survey?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: If you have . . . Then you must conduct . . . (1) A new producing reservoir, A static bottomhole pressure survey within 90 days after the date of first continuous production. (2) A reservoir with three or... wells to establish an average reservoir pressure. The Regional Supervisor may require that...

  13. Effect of empennage arrangement on single-engine nozzle/afterbody static pressures at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, William P.; Burley, James R., II

    1987-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the effects on empennage arrangement on single-engine nozzle/afterbody static pressures. Tests were done at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.20, nozzle pressure ratios from 1.0 (jet off) to 8.0. and angles of attack from -3 to 9 deg (at jet off conditions), depending on Mach number. Three empennage arrangements (aft, staggered, and forward) were investigated. Extensive measurements were made of static pressure on the nozzle/afterbody in the vicinity of the tail surfaces.

  14. Static pressure measurements in A 30 kWe class arcjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, William J.; O'Hair, Edgar A.; Hatfield, Lynn L.; Kristiansen, M.; Grimes, Montgomery D.

    1991-01-01

    A series of cold and hot flow static pressure measurements have been made as a function of distance along the principal axis of a 30 kWe arcjet. During these experiments, the background pressure was varied from atmospheric pressure to less than 1 Torr. The experimental arcjet used in these tests had the same constrictor and conical nozzle dimensions as the baseline MOD-1 ammonia arcjet developed at NASA-JPL, but used nitrogen as the propellant gas. Comparison of the measured static pressure profiles with the arc erosion patterns on the anode surface showed that anode arc attachment points directly coincided with the minimum static pressure points. The dual voltage modes commonly observed in 30 kWe class arcjet thrusters are also believed to be caused by the presence of two pressure minima in the arcjet, one at the constrictor entrance and the other in the expansion nozzle. The static pressure profiles also suggest that the sonic flow transition occurs at the entrance to the nozzle, indicating the existence of very thick boundary layers in the arcjet constrictor.

  15. The most incompressible metal osmium at static pressures above 750 gigapascals.

    PubMed

    Dubrovinsky, L; Dubrovinskaia, N; Bykova, E; Bykov, M; Prakapenka, V; Prescher, C; Glazyrin, K; Liermann, H-P; Hanfland, M; Ekholm, M; Feng, Q; Pourovskii, L V; Katsnelson, M I; Wills, J M; Abrikosov, I A

    2015-09-10

    Metallic osmium (Os) is one of the most exceptional elemental materials, having, at ambient pressure, the highest known density and one of the highest cohesive energies and melting temperatures. It is also very incompressible, but its high-pressure behaviour is not well understood because it has been studied so far only at pressures below 75 gigapascals. Here we report powder X-ray diffraction measurements on Os at multi-megabar pressures using both conventional and double-stage diamond anvil cells, with accurate pressure determination ensured by first obtaining self-consistent equations of state of gold, platinum, and tungsten in static experiments up to 500 gigapascals. These measurements allow us to show that Os retains its hexagonal close-packed structure upon compression to over 770 gigapascals. But although its molar volume monotonically decreases with pressure, the unit cell parameter ratio of Os exhibits anomalies at approximately 150 gigapascals and 440 gigapascals. Dynamical mean-field theory calculations suggest that the former anomaly is a signature of the topological change of the Fermi surface for valence electrons. However, the anomaly at 440 gigapascals might be related to an electronic transition associated with pressure-induced interactions between core electrons. The ability to affect the core electrons under static high-pressure experimental conditions, even for incompressible metals such as Os, opens up opportunities to search for new states of matter under extreme compression. PMID:26302297

  16. The most incompressible metal osmium at static pressures above 750 gigapascals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovinsky, L.; Dubrovinskaia, N.; Bykova, E.; Bykov, M.; Prakapenka, V.; Prescher, C.; Glazyrin, K.; Liermann, H.-P.; Hanfland, M.; Ekholm, M.; Feng, Q.; Pourovskii, L. V.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Wills, J. M.; Abrikosov, I. A.

    2015-09-01

    Metallic osmium (Os) is one of the most exceptional elemental materials, having, at ambient pressure, the highest known density and one of the highest cohesive energies and melting temperatures. It is also very incompressible, but its high-pressure behaviour is not well understood because it has been studied so far only at pressures below 75 gigapascals. Here we report powder X-ray diffraction measurements on Os at multi-megabar pressures using both conventional and double-stage diamond anvil cells, with accurate pressure determination ensured by first obtaining self-consistent equations of state of gold, platinum, and tungsten in static experiments up to 500 gigapascals. These measurements allow us to show that Os retains its hexagonal close-packed structure upon compression to over 770 gigapascals. But although its molar volume monotonically decreases with pressure, the unit cell parameter ratio of Os exhibits anomalies at approximately 150 gigapascals and 440 gigapascals. Dynamical mean-field theory calculations suggest that the former anomaly is a signature of the topological change of the Fermi surface for valence electrons. However, the anomaly at 440 gigapascals might be related to an electronic transition associated with pressure-induced interactions between core electrons. The ability to affect the core electrons under static high-pressure experimental conditions, even for incompressible metals such as Os, opens up opportunities to search for new states of matter under extreme compression.

  17. 14 CFR 25.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... atmosphere through an appropriate piping system. (b) Each static port must be designed and located in such... is airtight except for the port into the atmosphere. A proof test must be conducted to demonstrate... in a standard atmosphere, with a minimum practicable calibration error when the corresponding...

  18. Impacts of Static Pressure Reset on VAV System Air Leakage, Fan Power and Thermal Energy - Part I: Theoretical Model and Simulation 

    E-print Network

    Liu, M.; Feng, J.; Wang, Z.; Wu, L.; Zheng, K.; Pang, W.

    2007-01-01

    As for a variable air volume (VAV) system, the air duct static pressure is a typical control variable maintained by modulating supply fan speed. The static pressure equals to the summation of the duct pressure loss downstream of the sensor...

  19. Cygnus Pressurized Cargo Module (PCM) Flight Inertial Load Static Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgia, Giovanni; Mancini, Simone; Palmieri, Paolo; Rutigliano, Luigi

    2012-07-01

    Cygnus PCM Flight Inertial Load Static Test campaign has been performed by Thales Alenia Space - Italy (TAS-I) to achieve the Static Qualification of its Primary Structure. A “Proto-flight Approach” has been followed (as per [1] and [2]), thus the first flight unit, the PCM0, has been tested up to qualification level (qualification/acceptance factor equivalent to 1.2 [1]). The PCM0 has been constrained to a dummy Service Module (the second member of Cygnus Spacecraft), representative in terms of interfaces provisions, and flight load conditions have been reproduced with proper forces that have been applied by means of hydraulic jacks at internal PCM secondary structure interfaces. Test load cases have been defined in order to simulate load paths and relevant stress fields associated to the worst flight load conditions by using the FE model analyses. Tests have been monitored by means of gauges and displacement transducers and results have been utilized to correlate the PCM FEM following [3] requirements.

  20. Energy concentration and positional stability of sonoluminescent bubbles in sulfuric acid for different static pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosselló, Juan Manuel; Dellavale, Damián; Bonetto, Fabián José

    2013-09-01

    In this study we report several experimental and numerical results on the influence of static pressure (P0) over the main parameters in single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL), using a sulfuric acid aqueous solution (SA) with low concentrations of argon gas dissolved. Bifrequency driving was used in the experiments to enhance spatial stability of the bubbles. The experimental results were compared with simulations provided by a numerical code that models the radial dynamics of the bubbles. The results showed that an increase on the static pressure of the system shifts the Bjerknes instability threshold, allowing the bubble to access higher acoustic pressures (PAc). Furthermore, a decrease in the measured ambient radius R0 and the calculated relative gas concentration c?/c0 were observed. A notorious increment in the bubble collapse violence and energy focusing for P0 above 1 bar was achieved. These were mainly indicated by the growth of the bubble expansion ratio (Rmax/R0), the bubble mechanical energy density, and the maximum bubble wall velocity dR/dt. In agreement with the previous statement, the maximum temperature during the bubble collapse predicted by the model is augmented as well. The use of different harmonics in the ultrasound pressure field regarding energy focusing is also discussed. Finally, we analyzed the stability regions of the R0-PAc parameter space via numerical predictions for P0 above the measured, identifying the shape instabilities as the main limiting agent to obtain further energy concentration in SA systems at high static pressures.

  1. Static Pressure Losses in 6, 8, and 10-inch Non-Metallic Flexible Ducts 

    E-print Network

    Weaver, K.; Culp, C.

    2006-01-01

    This study measured airflow static pressure losses through non-metallic flexible ducts in compliance with ASHRAE Standard 120-1999, Methods of Testing to Determine Flow Resistance of HVAC Air Ducts and Fittings (ASHRAE 1999). Duct sizes of 6, 8...

  2. Quasi-static vapor pressure measurements on reactive systems in inert atmosphere box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, A. K.

    1968-01-01

    Apparatus makes vapor pressure measurements on air-sensitive systems in an inert atmosphere glove box. Once the apparatus is loaded with the sample and all connections made, all measuring operations may be performed outside the box. The apparatus is a single-tube adaptation of the double-tube quasi-static technique.

  3. Plantar pressures in individuals with normal and pronated feet according to static squat depths

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Da Hyun; Lee, Jong Dae; Kim, Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to investigate differences in plantar pressure between individuals with normal and pronated feet according to 3 static squat depths. [Subjects and Methods] Study subjects were 10 young adults with normal and pronated feet. Plantar pressures were measured in the standing position and static squat positions at 45° (semi-squat) and 90° (half-squat) knee flexion using the F-Mat. Subjects’ plantar pressures were analyzed by dividing the foot into 4 areas: forefoot medial, forefoot lateral, midfoot, and heel. [Results] In the half-squat position, the pronated foot group showed a higher foot pressure in the forefoot medial than was seen in the normal group, whereas the normal group exhibited a higher foot pressure in the heel than was seen in the pronated foot group. [Conclusion] An increase in squat depth led to the transfer of plantar pressure to the heel in normal feet and to the forefoot medial in pronated feet. PMID:26504304

  4. Fingertip skin–inspired microstructured ferroelectric skins discriminate static/dynamic pressure and temperature stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jonghwa; Kim, Marie; Lee, Youngoh; Lee, Heon Sang; Ko, Hyunhyub

    2015-01-01

    In human fingertips, the fingerprint patterns and interlocked epidermal-dermal microridges play a critical role in amplifying and transferring tactile signals to various mechanoreceptors, enabling spatiotemporal perception of various static and dynamic tactile signals. Inspired by the structure and functions of the human fingertip, we fabricated fingerprint-like patterns and interlocked microstructures in ferroelectric films, which can enhance the piezoelectric, pyroelectric, and piezoresistive sensing of static and dynamic mechanothermal signals. Our flexible and microstructured ferroelectric skins can detect and discriminate between multiple spatiotemporal tactile stimuli including static and dynamic pressure, vibration, and temperature with high sensitivities. As proof-of-concept demonstration, the sensors have been used for the simultaneous monitoring of pulse pressure and temperature of artery vessels, precise detection of acoustic sounds, and discrimination of various surface textures. Our microstructured ferroelectric skins may find applications in robotic skins, wearable sensors, and medical diagnostic devices. PMID:26601303

  5. Study of stator-vane fluctuating pressures in a turbofan engine for static and flight tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, A. W.

    1984-04-01

    As part of a program to study the fan noise generated from turbofan engines, fluctuating surface pressures induced by fan-rotor wakes were measured on core- and bypass-stator outlet guide vanes of a modified JT15D-1 engine. Tests were conducted with the engine operating on an outdoor test stand and in flight. The amplitudes of pressures measured at fan-rotor blade-passage fundamental frequencies were generally higher and appeared less stable for the static tests than for the flight tests. Fluctuating pressures measured at the blade-passage frequency of the high-speed core compressor were interpreted to be acoustic; however, disturbance trace velocities for either the convected rotor wakes or acoustic pressures were difficult to interpret because of the complex environment.

  6. Study of stator-vane fluctuating pressures in a turbofan engine for static and flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, A. W.

    1984-01-01

    As part of a program to study the fan noise generated from turbofan engines, fluctuating surface pressures induced by fan-rotor wakes were measured on core- and bypass-stator outlet guide vanes of a modified JT15D-1 engine. Tests were conducted with the engine operating on an outdoor test stand and in flight. The amplitudes of pressures measured at fan-rotor blade-passage fundamental frequencies were generally higher and appeared less stable for the static tests than for the flight tests. Fluctuating pressures measured at the blade-passage frequency of the high-speed core compressor were interpreted to be acoustic; however, disturbance trace velocities for either the convected rotor wakes or acoustic pressures were difficult to interpret because of the complex environment.

  7. A combined theoretical and experimental investigation of uranium dioxide under high static pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowhurst, J. C.; Jeffries, J. R.; Åberg, D.; Zaug, J. M.; Dai, Z. R.; Siekhaus, W. J.; Teslich, N. E.; Holliday, K. S.; Knight, K. B.; Nelson, A. J.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2015-07-01

    We have investigated the behavior of uranium dioxide (UO2) under high static pressure using a combination of experimental and theoretical techniques. We have made Raman spectroscopic measurements up to 87 GPa, electrical transport measurements up to 50 GPa from 10 K to room temperature, and optical transmission measurements up to 28 GPa. We have also carried out theoretical calculations within the GGA + U framework. We find that Raman frequencies match to a large extent, theoretical predictions for the cotunnite (Pnma) structure above 30 GPa, but at higher pressures some behavior is not captured theoretically. The Raman measurements also imply that the low-pressure fluorite phase coexists with the cotunnite phase up to high pressures, consistent with earlier reports. Electrical transport measurements show that the resistivity decreases by more than six orders of magnitude with increasing pressure up to 50 GPa but that the material never adopts archetypal metallic behavior. Optical transmission spectra show that while UO2 becomes increasingly opaque with increasing pressure, a likely direct optical band gap of more than 1 eV exists up to at least 28 GPa. Together with the electrical transport measurements, we conclude that the high pressure electrical conductivity of UO2 is mediated by variable-range hopping.

  8. A quasi-static phase-field approach to pressurized fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikeli?, Andro; Wheeler, Mary F.; Wick, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we present a quasi-static formulation of a phase-field model for a pressurized crack in a poroelastic medium. The mathematical model represents a linear elasticity system with a fading Gassman tensor as the crack grows, that is coupled with a variational inequality for the phase-field variable containing an entropy inequality. We introduce a novel incremental approximation that decouples displacement and phase-field problems. We establish convergence to a solution of the quasi-static problem, including Rice's condition, when the time discretization step goes to zero. Numerical experiments confirm the robustness and efficiency of this approach for multidimensional test cases.

  9. Analysis of Fluctuating Static Pressure Measurements in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igoe, William B.

    1996-01-01

    Dynamic measurements of fluctuating static pressure levels were taken with flush-mounted, high-frequency response pressure transducers at 11 locations in the circuit of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) across the complete operating range of this wind tunnel. Measurements were taken at test-section Mach numbers from 0.1 to 1.2, at pressures from 1 to 8.6 atm, and at temperatures from ambient to -250 F, which resulted in dynamic flow disturbance measurements at the highest Reynolds numbers available in a transonic ground test facility. Tests were also made by independent variation of the Mach number, the Reynolds number, or the fan drive power while the other two parameters were held constant, which for the first time resulted in a distinct separation of the effects of these three important parameters.

  10. Improvement of Young modulus estimation by ultrasound using static pressure steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brum, J.; Balay, G.; Bia, D.; Benech, N.; Ramos, A.; Armentano, R.; Negreira, C.

    2010-01-01

    In this work the radial displacement of the arterial wall is measured using a cross correlation algorithm. An elastic model for static pressure conditions is developed, fit to the boundary conditions of the physical problem. Measuring the wall displacements as pressure changes the biomechanical behavior of the arterial wall can be characterized. Validation measurements were performed in a calibrated latex tube. The obtained experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical model. Human arteries were also characterized. The typical non linear pressure-diameter behavior due to the presence of elastine and collagen was observed. Human arteries with atheroma plaques were also studied presenting a different Young modulus than the healthy ones. From these results we conclude that this method could be used in the characterization of arterial mechanical alterations and/or in the post-implant biomechanical evaluation of vascular grafts.

  11. Static pressure drives proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells via caveolin-1/ERK1/2 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Di-xian; Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083; The First People's Hospital of Chenzhou City, Chenzhou, Hunan 421001 ; Cheng, Jiming; Suzhou Health College of Technology, 20 Shuyuanxiang, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215002 ; Xiong, Yan; Li, Junmo; Xia, Chenglai; School of Pharmaceutics, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515 ; Xu, Canxin; Wang, Chun; Zhu, Bingyang; Hu, Zhuowei; Liao, Duan-fang

    2010-01-22

    Intimal hyperplasia plays an important role in various types of vascular remodeling. Mechanical forces derived from blood flow are associated with the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). This contributes to many vascular disorders such as hypertension, atherosclerosis and restenosis after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). In this study, we show that static pressure induces the proliferation of VSMC and activates its related signal pathway. VSMC from a rat aorta were treated with different pressures (0, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 mm Hg) in a custom-made pressure incubator for 24 h. The most active proliferation of VSMC was detected at a pressure of 120 mm Hg. VSMC was also incubated under a static pressure of 120 mm Hg for different time intervals (0, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 h). We found that static pressure significantly stimulates VSMC proliferation. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation showed a peak at the pressure of 120 mm Hg at 4-h time point. Moreover, caveolin-1 expression was significantly inhibited by rising static pressure. Downregulation of VSMC proliferation could be found after PD98059 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation inhibitor) treatment. Our data also showed that a siRNA-mediated caveolin-1 knock down increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation and VSMC proliferation. These results demonstrate that static pressure promotes VSMC proliferation via the Caveolin-1/ERK1/2 pathway.

  12. A Novel Procedure to Determine Optimal Air Static Pressure Set-points and Reset Schedules in VAV Air Handling Units 

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Y.; Liu, M.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Powell, T.

    1998-01-01

    Controller (DDDFVA V-DDC) The DDC controller has the capability to reset the air static pressure schedules based on the building load conditions which include air flow rate of the unit, fan speed, VFD PID loop output and outside air dry bulb temperature... or has the VFD PID loop output V, then the static pressure can be reset based on one of these factors. Assume the flow rate CFM,,,= can be measured by EMCS DDC system, then the S will be: Step 3: Determine the optimal air static pressure reset...

  13. Transient cavitation in high-quality-factor resonators at high static pressures.

    PubMed

    Gaitan, D Felipe; Tessien, Ross A; Hiller, Robert A; Gutierrez, Joel; Scott, Corey; Tardif, Henry; Callahan, Brant; Matula, Thomas J; Crum, Lawrence A; Holt, R Glynn; Church, Charles C; Raymond, Jason L

    2010-06-01

    It is well known that cavitation collapse can generate intense concentrations of mechanical energy, sufficient to erode even the hardest metals and to generate light emissions visible to the naked eye [sonoluminescence (SL)]. Considerable attention has been devoted to the phenomenon of "single bubble sonoluminescence" (SBSL) in which a single stable cavitation bubble radiates light flashes each and every acoustic cycle. Most of these studies involve acoustic resonators in which the ambient pressure is near 0.1 MPa (1 bar), and with acoustic driving pressures on the order of 0.1 MPa. This study describes a high-quality factor, spherical resonator capable of achieving acoustic cavitation at ambient pressures in excess of 30 MPa (300 bars). This system generates bursts of violent inertial cavitation events lasting only a few milliseconds (hundreds of acoustic cycles), in contrast with the repetitive cavitation events (lasting several minutes) observed in SBSL; accordingly, these events are described as "inertial transient cavitation." Cavitation observed in this high pressure resonator is characterized by flashes of light with intensities up to 1000 times brighter than SBSL flashes, as well as spherical shock waves with amplitudes exceeding 30 MPa at the resonator wall. Both SL and shock amplitudes increase with static pressure. PMID:20550245

  14. Impacts of Static Pressure Reset on VAV System Air Leakage, Fan Power and Thermal Energy - Part 2: Case Demonstration for a Typical Climate System 

    E-print Network

    Liu, M.; Zheng, K.; Wu, L.; Wang, Z.; Johnson, C.

    2007-01-01

    In Part 1 of this paper, the theoretical models, integrating the fan airflow, fan head, air leakage factors, are developed to analyze the impacts of the static pressure reset on both pressure dependent and pressure independent terminal boxes...

  15. Au-Ag Alloy Static High Pressure EOS measurements: FY09 summary of results

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, W J; Jenei, Z

    2009-09-17

    Static high-pressure measurements of the equation of state of a Gold-Silver alloy (23.5 wt-% Ag) at room temperature were performed up to a pressure of approximately 100 GPA (1 megabar). Measurements were made using an energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction method. The data was analyzed, yielding crystal structure lattice constants and volume/density as a function of pressure. The results are extremely precise yielding accuracy of better than 1%. The experiments were carried out at the HPCAT 16BM-D beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. Two experiments on separate samples were carried out using conventional membrane diamond anvil cells. To achieve hydrostatic conditions, we loaded a 50-100 micron piece of the Au-Ag alloy into the cell and surrounded it with neon and mineral oil pressure media in the respective experiments. The differing pressure media demonstrated no measurable difference on the resultant crystal structures, lattice constants or pressure-volume curves. Results of our work are shown in the figures below. Up to the maximum pressure of 100 GPa the sample remained in the face-centered cubic structure, e.g., we observed no change in crystal structure. EOS curves of silver and gold, taken from the literature, are shown for comparison. We fit our data to a Vinet EOS functional form, and the parameters for this EOS were found to be, Reference (ambient pressure) volume, V{sub 0} = 16.965435 {angstrom}{sup 3}; Reference (ambient pressure) density, {rho}{sub 0} = 16.14584 g/cm{sup 3}; Bulk Modulus, K{sub 0} = 144 GPa; and Bulk Mod Derivative, K{prime}{sub 0} = 5.66. As one might expect the Au-Ag alloy lies between the gold and silver EOS curves, and tracks more closely to the gold EOS. These data are useful in validating and developing predictive EOS models of the pressure-dependent behavior of Au-Ag alloys.

  16. Optimized Fan Control In Variable Air Volume HVAC Systems Using Static Pressure Resets: Strategy Selection and Savings Analysis 

    E-print Network

    Kimla, John

    2010-07-14

    The potential of static pressure reset (SPR) control to save fan energy in variable air volume HVAC systems has been well documented. Current research has focused on the creation of reset strategies depending on specific system features...

  17. Ultrafast high strain rate acoustic wave measurements at high static pressure in a diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, M; Crowhurst, J; Reed, E; Zaug, J

    2008-02-04

    We have used sub-picosecond laser pulses to launch ultra-high strain rate ({approx} 10{sup 9} s{sup -1}) nonlinear acoustic waves into a 4:1 methanol-ethanol pressure medium which has been precompressed in a standard diamond anvil cell. Using ultrafast interferometry, we have characterized acoustic wave propagation into the pressure medium at static compression up to 24 GPa. We find that the velocity is dependent on the incident laser fluence, demonstrating a nonlinear acoustic response which may result in shock wave behavior. We compare our results with low strain, low strain-rate acoustic data. This technique provides controlled access to regions of thermodynamic phase space that are otherwise difficult to obtain.

  18. Subsonic wind-tunnel tests of a trailing-cone device for calibrating aircraft static pressure systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, F. L., Jr.; Ritchie, V. S.

    1973-01-01

    A trailing-cone device for calibrating aircraft static-pressure systems was tested in a transonic wind tunnel to investigate the pressure-sensing characteristics of the device including effects of several configuration changes. The tests were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.30 to 0.95 with Reynolds numbers from (0.9 x one million to 4.1 x one million per foot). The results of these tests indicated that the pressures sensed by the device changed slightly but consistently as the distance between the device pressure orifices and cone was varied from 4 to 10 cone diameters. Differences between such device-indicated pressures and free-stream static pressure were small, however, and corresponded to Mach number differences of less than 0.001 for device configurations with pressure orifices located 5 or 6 cone diameters ahead of the cone. Differences between device-indicated and free-stream static pressures were not greatly influenced by a protection skid at the downstream end of the pressure tube of the device nor by a 2-to-1 change in test Reynolds number.

  19. The effects of confining pressure and stress difference on static fatigue of granite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranz, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    Samples of Barre granite were creep tested at room temperature at confining pressures up to 2 kilobars. The time to fracture increased with decreasing stress difference at every pressure, but the rate of change of fracture time with respect to the stress difference increased with pressure. At 87% of the short-term fracture strength, the time to fracture increased from about 4 minutes at atmospheric pressure to longer than one day at 2 Kb of pressure. The inelastic volumetric strain at the onset of tertiary creep, delta, was constant within 25% at any particular pressure but increased with pressure in a manner analogous to the increase of strength with pressure. At the onset of tertiary creep, the number of cracks and their average length increased with pressure. The crack angle and crack length spectra were quite similar, however, at each pressure at the onset of tertiary creep.

  20. Modeling and testing of static pressure within an optical fiber cable spool using distributed fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chengju; Ren, Liyong; Qu, Enshi; Tang, Feng; Liang, Quan

    2012-11-01

    Based on the force analysis, we establish a theoretical model to study the static pressure distribution of the fiber cable spool for the fiber optic guided missile (FOG-M). Simulations indicate that for each fiber layer in the fiber cable spool, the applied static pressure on it asymptotically converges as the number of fiber layers increases. Using the distributed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing technique, the static pressure of fiber cable layers in the spool on the cable winding device was measured. Experiments show that the Bragg wavelength of FBG in every layer varies very quickly at the beginning and then becomes gently as the subsequent fiber cable was twisted onto the spool layer by layer. Theoretical simulations agree qualitatively with experimental results. This technology provides us a real-time method to monitor the pressure within the fiber cable layer during the cable winding process.

  1. Static and dynamic fatigue behavior of glass filament-wound pressure vessels at ambient and cryogenic temperatures.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, M. P.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation of the pressure load carrying capacity and fatigue strength of filament-wound glass-reinforced plastic pressure vessels subjected to static and cyclic loading at ambient and cryogenic (liquid nitrogen) temperature environments. The results indicate that the static fatigue problem is not critical at cryogenic temperatures. Under static loading at liquid nitrogen temperature, a reinforced plastic cylinder sustained pressurization for 88 days without failure at about 90% of the single cycle burst strength. At ambient temperature, the static life at 90% of the burst strength was about 7 min. Under cyclic loading in liquid nitrogen, no failure resulted after 1509 cycles at 55% of the single cycle burst strength. Under the same cyclic loading at ambient temperature, the test results would predict failure in the reinforced plastic. The results of similar tests upon adhesively bonded polyimide aluminum-foil lined cylinders are also reviewed.-

  2. Error in Airspeed Measurement Due to the Static-Pressure Field Ahead of an Airplane at Transonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Bryan, Thomas C; Danforth, Edward C B; Johnston, J Ford

    1955-01-01

    The magnitude and variation of the static-pressure error for various distances ahead of sharp-nose bodies and open-nose air inlets and for a distance of 1 chord ahead of the wing tip of a swept wing are defined by a combination of experiment and theory. The mechanism of the error is discussed in some detail to show the contributing factors that make up the error. The information presented provides a useful means for choosing a proper location for measurement of static pressure for most purposes.

  3. Blood pressure

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body’s organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart ...

  4. Fluid Statics When the fluid velocity is zero, called the hydrostatic condition, the pressure variation is due only to the

    E-print Network

    Bahrami, Majid

    of the element: Gage pressure and vacuum pressure The actual pressure at a given position is called the absolute pressure, and it is measured relative to absolute vacuum. The measure pressure may be either lower (called vacuum pressure) or higher (gage pressure) than the local atmosphere. #12; M

  5. Minimal static excess pressure minimises the effect of extracorporeal shock waves on cells and reduces it on gallstones.

    PubMed

    Delius, M

    1997-01-01

    The effects of extracorporeal shock waves on haemoglobin release, membrane permeabilisation and stone fragmentation were examined at minimal static excess pressures. Shock waves from an electrohydraulic lithotripter were applied at 15, 20 and 25 kV to red blood cells in plastic pipettes pressurised with 0, 30, 50, 75, 100, 200, 300 and 400 kPa of static excess pressure; the freed haemoglobin was determined as a marker of cell destruction. Using 15-kV discharges, 30-kPa excess pressure reduced the freed haemoglobin from 1.21 g/L at ambient pressure to 0.39 g/L, 20-kV discharges reduced it from 2.01 g/L to 0.92 g/ L and 25-kV discharges from 2.56 g/L to 1.61 g/L. Haemoglobin values at 400-kPa excess pressure were reduced to 0.03 g/L (15-kV discharges), 0.07 g/L (20-kV discharges) and 0.09 g/L (25-kV discharges), which is a 95%-97% reduction of the values obtained at ambient pressure. There was a steep initial drop from 30-100 kPa excess pressure followed by a plateau at low level. Propidium iodide uptake by L1210 tumour cells, a marker for transient membrane permeabilisation by shock waves, was reduced by 90% at these slight excess pressures. Stone fragmentation was also suppressed by excess pressure yet not as markedly as at cells; 100 kPa reduced the amount of gallstone fragments by 20%, and 400 kPa reduced it by 65%. A further reduction, by 93%, was obtained when 1-MPa excess pressure was applied to gallstones in a Plexiglas cylinder. Shock wave-gas bubble interaction has been previously proposed to mediate the shock wave action. It is suggested that the excess pressure reduced the size or number of the bubbles, thus reducing this interaction, at least in the case of the cellular effects. The reduced effect of shock waves on cells, in contrast to the effect on stones, might open up a new approach to the design of lithotripters that would reduce tissue damage yet keep fragmentation up at a similar level. PMID:9232770

  6. The effects of confining pressure and stress difference on static fatigue of granite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranz, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Samples of Barre granite have been creep tested at room temperature at confining pressures up to 2 kbar. Experimental procedures are described and the results of observations and analysis are presented. It is noted that the effect of pressure is to increase the amount of inelastic deformation the rock can sustain before becoming unstable. It is also shown that this increased deformation is due to longer and more numerous microcracks.

  7. Pressure ulcer

    MedlinePLUS

    A pressure ulcer is an area of skin that breaks down when something keeps rubbing or pressing against the skin. ... form. You are more likely to get a pressure ulcer if you: Use a wheelchair or stay in ...

  8. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePLUS

    Pressure sores are areas of damaged skin caused by staying in one position for too long. They ... wheelchair, or are unable to change your position. Pressure sores can cause serious infections, some of which ...

  9. Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Birkholzer, J.T.; Nicot, J.-P.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Zhou, Q.; Kraemer, S.; Bandilla, K.W.

    2011-05-01

    Industrial-scale storage of CO{sub 2} in saline sedimentary basins will cause zones of elevated pressure, larger than the CO{sub 2} plume itself. If permeable conduits (e.g., leaking wells) exist between the injection reservoir and overlying shallow aquifers, brine could be pushed upwards along these conduits and mix with groundwater resources. This paper discusses the potential for such brine leakage to occur in temperature- and salinity-stratified systems. Using static mass-balance calculations as well as dynamic well flow simulations, we evaluate the minimum reservoir pressure that would generate continuous migration of brine up a leaking wellbore into a freshwater aquifer. Since the brine invading the well is denser than the initial fluid in the wellbore, continuous flow only occurs if the pressure perturbation in the reservoir is large enough to overcome the increased fluid column weight after full invasion of brine into the well. If the threshold pressure is exceeded, brine flow rates are dependent on various hydraulic (and other) properties, in particular the effective permeability of the wellbore and the magnitude of pressure increase. If brine flow occurs outside of the well casing, e.g., in a permeable fracture zone between the well cement and the formation, the fluid/solute transfer between the migrating fluid and the surrounding rock units can strongly retard brine flow. At the same time, the threshold pressure for continuous flow to occur decreases compared to a case with no fluid/solute transfer.

  10. Standard Test Method for Water Penetration of Flat Plate Solar Collectors by Uniform Static Air Pressure Difference

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1986-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the resistance of flat plate solar collectors to water penetration when water is applied to their outer surfaces with a static air pressure at the outer surface higher than the pressure at the interior of the collector. 1.2 This test method is applicable to any flat plate solar collector. 1.3 The proper use of this test method requires a knowledge of the principles of pressure and deflection measurement. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. Specific precautionary information is contained in Section 6.

  11. Static pressure accelerates ox-LDL-induced cholesterol accumulation via SREBP-1-mediated caveolin-1 downregulation in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Di-xian; Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, College of Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan; First People's Hospital of Chenzhou City, Chenzhou 423000, Hunan ; Xia, Cheng-lai; Department of Pharmacy, Third Affiliated Hospital Medical College of Guangzhou, Guangzhou 510150, Guangdong ; Li, Jun-mu; Xiong, Yan; Yuan, Hao-yu; Lusong Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Zhuzhou 412000, Hunan ; TANG, Zhen-Wang; Zeng, Yixin; Liao, Duan-fang; Department of Traditional Chinese Diagnostics, School of Pharmacy, Hunan University of Chinese Medicine, Changsha 420108, Hunan

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Vertical static pressure accelerates ox-LDL-induced cholesterol accumulation in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. {yields} Static pressure induces SREBP-1 activation. {yields} Static pressure downregulates the expressions of caveolin-1 by activating SREBP-1. {yields} Static pressure also downregulates the transcription of ABCA1 by activating SREBP-1. {yields} Static pressure increases ox-LDL-induced cholesterol accumulation by SREBP-1-mediated caveolin-1 downregulation in vascular smooth muscle cells cultured in vitro. -- Abstract: Objective: To investigate the effect of static pressure on cholesterol accumulation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and its mechanism. Methods: Rat-derived VSMC cell line A10 treated with 50 mg/L ox-LDL and different static pressures (0, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180 mm Hg) in a custom-made pressure incubator for 48 h. Intracellular lipid droplets and lipid levels were assayed by oil red O staining and HPLC; The mRNA levels of caveolin-1 and ABCA1, the protein levels of caveolin-1 SREBP-1 and mature SREBP-1 were respectively detected by RT-PCR or western blot. ALLN, an inhibitor of SREBP metabolism, was used to elevate SREBP-1 protein level in VSMCs treated with static pressure. Results: Static pressures significantly not only increase intracellular lipid droplets in VSMCs, but also elevate cellular lipid content in a pressure-dependent manner. Intracellular free cholesterol (FC), cholesterol ester (CE), total cholesterol (TC) were respectively increased from 60.5 {+-} 2.8 mg/g, 31.8 {+-} 0.7 mg/g, 92.3 {+-} 2.1 mg/g at atmosphere pressure (ATM, 0 mm Hg) to 150.8 {+-} 9.4 mg/g, 235.9 {+-} 3.0 mg/g, 386.7 {+-} 6.4 mg/g at 180 mm Hg. At the same time, static pressures decrease the mRNA and protein levels of caveolin-1, and induce the activation and nuclear translocation of SREBP-1. ALLN increases the protein level of mature SREBP-1 and decreases caveolin-1 expression, so that cellular lipid levels were upregulated. Conclusion: Static pressures stimulate ox-LDL-induced cholesterol accumulation in cultured VSMCs through decreasing caveolin-1 expression via inducing the maturation and nuclear translocation of SREBP-1.

  12. Dynamic and static effects of pressure: Spin transition kinetics and zero-field splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    1998-10-01

    The first chapter of this thesis is on the spin relaxation kinetics of Fe(II) coordination compounds in crystals under applied external pressure. The ligand- field strength of these complexes is such that the high- spin 5T 2g state is close in energy but above the low-spin 1A 1g state. The high- spin to low-spin relaxation process in these compounds deviates from Arrhenius behavior at low temperatures and is associated with a large change of the Fe-ligand bond length. The relaxation can be treated as a nuclear tunneling process along the Fe-ligand totally symmetric stretching normal coordinate. The tunneling rates of three octahedral Fe(II) complexes doped in their Zn and Mn analogs are measured as a function of pressure. A large increase of the tunneling rates with pressure was observed, including a nine orders of magnitude increase over 27 kbar for (Fe(mepy)3tren) (PF6)2. The key to the acceleration of the rates is the shift of the relative position of the potential energy surfaces under pressure. The data are well described with a rate law derived from Fermi's Golden Rule and modified by the Gruneisen approximation. In the second chapter addresses the effect of pressure on the pressure on the zero-field splitting of monocyclic aromatic diazines. The zero-field splitting parameters D and E of the lowest triplet states of pyrimidine, pyrazine, and s-tetramethylpyrazine in various hosts are measured as a function of pressure using the optically- detected magnetic resonance technique. The value of D decreases with pressure for most of the systems, with the largest decrease for s-tetramethylpyrazine, The value of E either increases or is fairly constant. For pyrimidine in benzene system, the parameters changed abruptly due to a phase transition of benzene at 14 kbar. The results for these systems are compared with the results of another aza-aromatic molecule, quinoxaline, and a system exhibiting vibronic coupling, p-benzoquinone. The data are explained in terms of the interactions of the guest and host molecules.

  13. Inelastic X-ray scattering experiments on B[subscript 4]C under high static pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ravhi S.; Dandekar, Dattatraya; Leithe-Jasper, Andres; Tanaka, Takaho; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul; Nicol, Malcolm F.; Cornelius, Andrew L.

    2010-05-04

    Boron K-edge inelastic X-ray scattering experiments were performed on clean B{sub 4}C and shock impact recovered boron carbide up to 30 GPa and at ambient temperature to understand the pressure induced bonding changes. The spectral features corresponding to the boron site in the interlinking chain remained unchanged up to 30 GPa. The results of our experiments indicate that pressure induces less distortion to the boron sites and the local amorphization observed in the previous reports are due to the rearrangement of carbon atoms under extreme conditions without affecting the boron environment.

  14. Static internal pressure capacity of Hanford Single-Shell Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Julyk, L.J.

    1994-07-19

    Underground single-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, generate gaseous mixtures that could be ignited, challenging the structural integrity of the tanks. The structural capacity of the single-shell tanks to internal pressure is estimated through nonlinear finite-element structural analyses of the reinforced concrete tank. To determine their internal pressure capacity, designs for both the million-gallon and the half-million-gallon tank are evaluated on the basis of gross structural instability.

  15. Selection and static calibration of the Marsh J1678 pressure gauge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oxendine, Charles R.; Smith, Howard W.

    1993-01-01

    During the experimental testing of the ultralight, it was determined that a pressure gauge would be required to monitor the simulated flight loads. After analyzing several factors, which are indicated in the discussion section of this report, the Marsh J1678 pressure gauge appeared to be the prominent candidate for the task. However, prior to the final selection, the Marsh pressure gauge was calibrated twice by two different techniques. As a result of the calibration, the Marsh gauge was selected as the appropriate measuring device during the structural testing of the ultralight. Although, there are commerical pressure gauges available on the market that would have proven to be more efficient and accurate. However, in order to obtain these characteristics in a gauge, one has to pay the price on the price tag, and this value is an exponential function of the degree of accuracy efficiency, precision, and many other features that may be designed into the gauge. After analyzing the extent of precision and accuracy that would be required, a more expensive gauge wouldn't have proven to be a financial benefit towards the outcome of the experiment.

  16. Static Pressure Loss in 12”, 14”, and 16” Non-metallic Flexible Duct 

    E-print Network

    Cantrill, David Lee

    2013-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of compression on pressure drops in non-metallic flexible duct. Duct sizes of 12”, 14” and 16” diameters were tested at a five different compression ratios (maximum stretch, 4%, 15%, 30% and 45...

  17. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY OF WATER UNDER STATIC PRESSURE M. D. McCluskey1,2

    E-print Network

    McCluskey, Matthew

    data. The sample can be translated vertically, allowing one to obtain three dimensional (3D) image. In this paper, we describe a method to obtain a 3D image reconstruction of a sample in a high-pressure cell laser scanning microscope with a 488 nm excitation wavelength and x5 objective with numerical aperture

  18. Influence of surface modification and static pressure on microdialysis protein extraction efficiency.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jiangtao; Undin, Torgny; Lind, Sara Bergström; Hjort, Klas; Dahlin, Andreas P

    2015-10-01

    There is growing interest in using microdialysis (MD) for monitoring larger and more complex molecules such as neuropeptides and proteins. This promotes the use of MD membranes with molecular weight cut off (MWCO) of 100 kDa or above. The hydrodynamic property of the membrane goes to ultrafiltration or beyond, making the MD catheters more sensitive to pressure. In the meantime, despite the large pore size, studies have shown that membrane biofouling still lead to unstable catheter performance. The objective is to study in vitro how 500 kDa dextran and Poloxamer 407 surface modification affect the fluid recovery (FR) and extraction efficiency (EE) of 100 kDa MWCO MD catheters. A pressure chamber was designed to facilitate the tests, using as MD sample a protein standard with similar concentrations as in human cerebral spinal fluid, comparing native and Poloxamer 407 modified MD catheters. The collected dialysate fractions were examined for FR and protein EE, employing Dot-it Spot-it Protein Assay for total protein EE and targeted mass spectrometry (MS) for EE of individual proteins and peptides. The FR results suggested that the surface modified catheters were less sensitive to the pressure and provide higher precision, and provided a FR closer to 100%. The surface modification did not show a significant effect on the protein EE. The average total protein EE of surface modified catheters was slightly higher than that of the native ones. The MS EE data of individual proteins showed a clear trend of complex response in EE with pressure. PMID:26342494

  19. Changes in extracellular muscle volume affect heart rate and blood pressure responses to static exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, K.; Essfeld, D.; Stegemann, J.

    To investigate the effect of ?g-induced peripheral extracellular fluid reductions on heart rate and blood pressure during isometric exercise, six healthy male subjects performed three calf ergometer test with different extracellular volumes of working muscles. In all tests, body positions during exercise were identical (supine with the knee joint flexed to 900). After a pre-exercise period of 25 min, during which calf volumes were manipulated, subjects had to counteract an external force of 180 N for 5 min. During the pre-exercise period three different protocols were applied. Test A: Subjects rested in the exercise position; test B: Body position was the same as in A but calf volume was increased by venous congestion (cuffs inflated to 80 mm Hg); test C: Calf volumes were decreased by a negative hydrostatic pressure (calves about 40 cm above heart level with the subjects supine). To clamp the changed calf volumes in tests B and C, cuffs were inflated to 300 mm Hg 5 min before the onset of exercise. This occlusion was maintained until termination of exercise. Compared to tests A and B, the reduced volume of test C led to significant increases in heart rate and blood pressure during exercise. Oxygen uptake did not exceed resting levels in B and C until cuffs were deflated, indicating that exclusively calf muscles contributed to the neurogenic peripheral drive. It is concluded that changes in extracellular muscle volume have to be taken into account when comparing heart rate and blood pressure during lg- and ?g- exercise.

  20. Study of the Laser-Induced Decomposition of HNO3/2-NITROPROPANE Mixture at Static High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouyer, V.; Hébert, P.; Doucet, M.

    2007-12-01

    The objective of the work presented here is to study the laser-induced decomposition of a condensed HNO3/2-nitropropane mixture containing 58% nitric acid. On the macroscopic scale, this energetic material detonates. Under static high pressure, the formation of an H-bonded complex with that particular composition was demonstrated in a previous study. The high pressure behavior of the complex showed the presence of a solid-solid phase transition around 18 GPa. The combustion front propagation velocity was recorded between 6 and 31 GPa. The analysis of the optical properties of the reaction products as well as the recording of their Raman spectra showed two different combustion regimes. Below 18 GPa, total combustion takes place in the sample and a black residue only composed of soot remains in the cell. Above 18 GPa, the combustion leads to a clear residue with little carbon present. However, the Raman spectra of the remaining sample show new features indicating the presence of species which are not yet clearly identified. The pressure limit between these two behaviors corresponds to the phase transition pressure measured for the complex.

  1. Study of the laser-induced decomposition of HNO{sub 3}/2-nitropropane mixture at static high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Bouyer, V.; Hebert, P.; Doucet, M.

    2007-12-12

    The objective of the work presented here is to study the laser-induced decomposition of a condensed HNO{sub 3}/2-nitropropane mixture containing 58% nitric acid. On the macroscopic scale, this energetic material detonates. Under static high pressure, the formation of an H-bonded complex with that particular composition was demonstrated in a previous study. The high pressure behavior of the complex showed the presence of a solid-solid phase transition around 18 GPa. The combustion front propagation velocity was recorded between 6 and 31 GPa. The analysis of the optical properties of the reaction products as well as the recording of their Raman spectra showed two different combustion regimes. Below 18 GPa, total combustion takes place in the sample and a black residue only composed of soot remains in the cell. Above 18 GPa, the combustion leads to a clear residue with little carbon present. However, the Raman spectra of the remaining sample show new features indicating the presence of species which are not yet clearly identified. The pressure limit between these two behaviors corresponds to the phase transition pressure measured for the complex.

  2. Analysis of Fluctuating Static Pressure Measurements in a Large High Reynolds Number Transonic Cryogenic Wind Tunnel. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igoe, William B.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamic measurements of fluctuating static pressure levels were made using flush mounted high frequency response pressure transducers at eleven locations in the circuit of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) over the complete operating range of this wind tunnel. Measurements were made at test section Mach numbers from 0.2 to 1.2, at pressure from 1 to 8.6 atmospheres and at temperatures from ambient to -250 F, resulting in dynamic flow disturbance measurements at the highest Reynolds numbers available in a transonic ground test facility. Tests were also made independently at variable Mach number, variable Reynolds number, and variable drivepower, each time keeping the other two variables constant thus allowing for the first time, a distinct separation of these three important variables. A description of the NTF emphasizing its flow quality features, details on the calibration of the instrumentation, results of measurements with the test section slots covered, downstream choke, effects of liquid nitrogen injection and gaseous nitrogen venting, comparisons between air and nitrogen, isolation of the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and fan drive power, and identification of the sources of significant flow disturbances is included. The results indicate that primary sources of flow disturbance in the NTF may be edge-tones generated by test section sidewall re-entry flaps and the venting of nitrogen gas from the return leg of the tunnel circuit between turns 3 and 4 in the cryogenic mode of operation. The tests to isolate the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and drive power indicate that Mach number effects predominate. A comparison with other transonic wind tunnels shows that the NTF has low levels of test section fluctuating static pressure especially in the high subsonic Mach number range from 0.7 to 0.9.

  3. Pressurization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Pressurized systems' development and operation are presented for effective use in design. Article reviews and accesses current design practices to establish guidance to achieve greater consistency in design, product, and greater efficiency in design effort.

  4. Pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. D.

    1969-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive transducer, consisting of a series of spindle-supported electrically conductive metal washers connected to electrical sensing circuitry, determines the force exerted between a mounting bolt and nut on relatively fragile components.

  5. Pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mee, David K.; Ripley, Edward B.; Nienstedt, Zachary C.; Nienstedt, Alex W.; Howell, Jr., Layton N.

    2015-09-29

    Disclosed is a passive, in-situ pressure sensor. The sensor includes a sensing element having a ferromagnetic metal and a tension inducing mechanism coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The tension inducing mechanism is operable to change a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal based on a change in pressure in the sensing element. Changes in pressure are detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal when subjected to an alternating magnetic field caused by the change in the tensile stress. The sensing element is embeddable in a closed system for detecting pressure changes without the need for any penetrations of the system for power or data acquisition by detecting changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  6. Evaluation of static pressure drops and PM10 and TSP emissions for modified 1D-3D cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, G.A.; Baker, R.V.; Hughs, S.E.

    1999-12-01

    Five modifications of a standard 1D3D cyclone were tested and compared against the standard 1D3D design in the areas of particulate emissions and static pressure drop across the cyclone. The modifications to the 1D3D design included a 2D2D inlet, a 2D2D air outlet, a D/3 trash exit, an expansion chamber with a D/3 trash exit, and a tapered air outlet duct. The 1D3D modifications that exhibited a significant improvement in reducing both PM10 and total suspended particulate (TSP) emissions were the designs with the 2D2D inlet and air exhaust combined with either the conical D/3 tail cone or the expansion chamber. In reference to the standard 1D3D cyclone, the average reduction in PM10 emissions was 24 to 29% with a 29 to 35% reduction observed in TSP emissions. The modifications with the tapered air outlets did not show any significant improvements in controlling PM10 emissions. However, the modification with the tapered air outlet/expansion chamber combination exhibited statistical significance in reducing TSP emissions by 18% compared to the 1D3D cyclone. All modifications tested exhibited lower static pressure drops than the standard 1D3D.

  7. Differential Pressures on a Pitot-venturi and a Pitot-static Nozzle over 360 Degrees Pitch and Yaw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bear, R M

    1928-01-01

    Measurements of the differential pressures on two navy air-speed nozzles, consisting of a Zahm type Pitot-Venturi tube and a SQ-16 two-pronged Pitot-static tube, in a tunnel air stream of fixed speed at various angles of pitch and yaw between 0 degrees and plus or minus 180 degrees. This shows for a range over -20 degrees to +20 degrees pitch and yaw, indicated air speeds varying very slightly over 2 per cent for the Zahm type and a maximum of about 5 per cent for the SQ-16 type from the calibrated speed at 0 degree. For both types of air-speed nozzle the indicated air speed increases slightly as the tubes are pitched or yawed several degrees from their normal 0 degrees altitude, attains a maximum around plus or minus 15 degrees to 25 degrees, declines rapidly therefrom as plus or minus 40 degrees is passed, to zero in the vicinity of plus or minus 70 degrees to 100 degrees, and thence fluctuates irregular from thereabouts to plus or minus 180 degrees. The complete variation in indicated air speed for the two tubes over 360 degree pitch and yaw is graphically portrayed in figures 9 and 10. For the same air speed and 0 degree pitch and yaw the differential pressure of the Zahm type Pitot-Venturi nozzle is about seven times that of the SQ-16 type two-prolonged Pitot-static nozzle.

  8. External Interference Effects of Flow Through Static-Pressure Orifices of an Airspeed Head at Several Supersonic Mach Numbers and Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silsby, Norman S.

    1959-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests have been made to determine the static-pressure error resulting from external interference effects of flow through the static-pressure orifices of an NACA airspeed head at Mach numbers of 2.4, 3.0, and 4.0 for angles of attack of 0 deg, 5 deg, 10 deg, and 15 deg. Within the accuracy of the measurements and for the range of mass flow covered, the static-pressure error increased linearly with increasing mass-flow rate for both the forward and rear sets of orifices at all Mach numbers and angles of attack of the investigation. For a given value of flow coefficient, the static-pressure error varied appreciably with Mach number but only slightly with angle of attack. For example, for a flow coefficient out of the orifices of 0.01 (the approximate value for a vertically climbing airplane for which the airspeed system incorporates an airspeed meter, a Mach meter, and an altimeter), the error increased from about 5 percent to about 12 percent of the static pressure as the Mach number increased from 2.4 to 4.0 with the airspeed head at an angle of attack of 0 deg.

  9. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  10. Static and dynamic characteristics for a two-axial-groove bearing and a pressure-dam bearing 

    E-print Network

    Al Jughaiman, Bader K.

    2009-06-02

    -dimensional damping versus Sommerfeld number....53 Fig. 29 Axial groove bearing added mass coefficients vs. speed.....................................55 Fig. 30 Axial groove bearing non-dimensional added mass vs. S and 0 ? .......................59 Fig. 31 Axial... ........................................................................................................70 Fig. 39 Pressure-dam bearing power loss vs. rotor speed ................................................71 Fig. 40 Pressure-dam bearing stiffness coefficients.........................................................75 Fig. 41 Pressure...

  11. Flutter Sensitivity to Boundary Layer Thickness, Structural Damping, and Static Pressure Differential for a Shuttle Tile Overlay Repair Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Robert C.; Bartels, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the aeroelastic stability of an on-orbit installable Space Shuttle patch panel. CFD flutter solutions were obtained for thick and thin boundary layers at a free stream Mach number of 2.0 and several Mach numbers near sonic speed. The effect of structural damping on these flutter solutions was also examined, and the effect of structural nonlinearities associated with in-plane forces in the panel was considered on the worst case linear flutter solution. The results of the study indicated that adequate flutter margins exist for the panel at the Mach numbers examined. The addition of structural damping improved flutter margins as did the inclusion of nonlinear effects associated with a static pressure difference across the panel.

  12. Pressure Alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Kate E; Yesudian, PD

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative or pressure alopecia (PA) is an infrequently reported group of scarring and non-scarring alopecias. It has been reported after immobilization of the head during surgery and following prolonged stays on intensive care units, and may be analogous to a healed pressure ulcer. This review presents a summary of cases published in pediatrics and after cardiac, gynecological, abdominal and facial surgeries. PA may manifest as swelling, tenderness, and ulceration of the scalp in the first few postoperative days; in other cases, the alopecia may be the presenting feature with a history of scalp immobilization in the previous four weeks. The condition may cause considerable psychological distress in the long term. Regular head turning schedules and vigilance for the condition should be used as prophylaxis to prevent permanent alopecia. A multi-center study in high-risk patients would be beneficial to shed further light on the etiology of the condition. PMID:23180911

  13. Pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, T.T.; Roop, C.J.; Schmidt, K.J.; Gunchin, E.R.

    1987-02-13

    A pressure transducer suitable for use in high temperature environments includes two pairs of induction coils, each pair being bifilarly wound together, and each pair of coils connected as opposite arms of a four arm circuit; an electrically conductive target moveably positioned between the coil pairs and connected to a diaphragm such that deflection of the diaphragm causes axial movement of the target and an unbalance in the bridge output. 7 figs.

  14. Pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Thomas T. (Downers Grove, IL); Roop, Conard J. (Lockport, IL); Schmidt, Kenneth J. (Midlothian, IL); Gunchin, Elmer R. (Lockport, IL)

    1989-01-01

    A pressure transducer suitable for use in high temperature environments includes two pairs of induction coils, each pair being bifilarly wound together, and each pair of coils connected as opposite arms of a four arm circuit; an electrically conductive target moveably positioned between the coil pairs and connected to a diaphragm such that deflection of the diaphragm causes axial movement of the target and an unbalance in the bridge output.

  15. Blood pressure measurement

    MedlinePLUS

    Diastolic blood pressure; Systolic blood pressure; Blood pressure reading; Measuring blood pressure ... your health care provider will wrap the blood pressure cuff snugly around your upper arm. The lower ...

  16. Static ultra-high pressure study of lanthanide and actinide metals using a diamond-anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Akella, J.; Smith, G.S.; Weir, S.T.

    1993-06-30

    Structural phase transformation in lanthanides and actinides were investigated as a function of pressure up to 300 GPa at room temperature. Except in Ce and Pr, no large volume changes were noticed for these metals as thy went through several phase changes. The appearance of a bct ultra-high pressure phase in Ce, Sm, Th, and possibly in Np, raises the possibility that the ultimate high pressure structure for the 4f and 5f metals may be the bct structure. On the other hand, it is also possible that this is a precursor to another close-packed structure at even higher pressure.

  17. Effect of H2O on the density of silicate melts at high pressures: Static experiments and the application of a

    E-print Network

    Effect of H2O on the density of silicate melts at high pressures: Static experiments in revised form 1 March 2012; available online 13 March 2012 Abstract Density of ultramafic silicate melts- tions range from 9 to 15 GPa and from 2173 to 2473 K. The sinking and floatation of density markers were

  18. Gradual Rewarming with Gradual Increase in Pressure during Machine Perfusion after Cold Static Preservation Reduces Kidney Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mahboub, Paria; Ottens, Petra; Seelen, Marc; t Hart, Nails; Van Goor, Harry; Ploeg, Rutger; Martins, Paulo; Leuvenink, Henri

    2015-01-01

    In this study we evaluated whether gradual rewarming after the period of cold ischemia would improve organ quality in an Isolated Perfused Kidney Model. Left rat kidneys were statically cold stored in University of Wisconsin solution for 24 hours at 4°C. After cold storage kidneys were rewarmed in one of three ways: perfusion at body temperature (38°C), or rewarmed gradually from 10°C to 38°C with stabilization at 10°C for 30 min and rewarmed gradually from 10°C to 38°C with stabilization at 25°C for 30 min. In the gradual rewarming groups the pressure was increased stepwise to 40 mmHg at 10°C and 70 mmHg at 25°C to counteract for vasodilatation leading to low perfusate flows. Renal function parameters and injury biomarkers were measured in perfusate and urine samples. Increases in injury biomarkers such as aspartate transaminase and lactate dehydrogenase in the perfusate were lower in the gradual rewarming groups versus the control group. Sodium re-absorption was improved in the gradual rewarming groups and reached significance in the 25°C group after ninety minutes of perfusion. HSP-70, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 mRNA expressions were decreased in the 10°C and 25°C groups. Based on the data kidneys that underwent gradual rewarming suffered less renal parenchymal, tubular injury and showed better endothelial preservation. Renal function improved in the gradual rewarming groups versus the control group. PMID:26630031

  19. Simulated thin pericardial bioprosthetic valve leaflet deformation under static pressure-only loading conditions: implications for percutaneous valves.

    PubMed

    Li, Kewei; Sun, Wei

    2010-08-01

    Percutaneous aortic valve (PAV) replacement is currently being investigated as an endovascular alternative to conventional open-chest valve surgery for patients with severe aortic stenosis. The results of multi-center clinical trials of PAV devices have been encouraging. However, there are serious adverse events associated with this procedure. Furthermore, long-term durability and safety of PAV need to be studied carefully. In this study, we developed a thin pericardial bioprosthetic valve model, which has similar design features of PAV. We utilized this model to investigate PAV deformation under static, pressure-only loading conditions using Finite Element method. Mechanical properties of PAV leaflet were obtained from planar biaxial testing of glutaraldehyde treated thin bovine pericardium (BP) and porcine pericardium (PP), and characterized by the Fung-elastic model. Simulations were performed to examine the effects of tissue thickness and anisotropy on the valve deformation and stress distribution. The results indicated peak stress and strain occurred in the vicinity of commissures. The peak maximum principal stresses (MPS) were reduced with the increase of leaflet tissue thickness, by 36% and 59% from the mean thickness to 0.35 mm for BP and PP, respectively. The PAV with BP leaflet had a lower peak MPS than that with PP leaflet. Moreover, leaflet material orientation had a significant influence on the peak MPS of PAV. PMID:20336372

  20. Bedsores (Pressure Ulcers)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ulcer. Overview Bedsores (pressure ulcers), also known as pressure sores or decubitus ulcers, result from prolonged pressure that ... down. The skin is especially likely to develop pressure sores if it is exposed to rubbing (friction) and ...

  1. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Description of High Blood Pressure Español High blood pressure is a common disease ... defines high blood pressure severity levels. Stages of High Blood Pressure in Adults Stages Systolic (top number) Diastolic (bottom ...

  2. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home » High Blood Pressure Heath and Aging High Blood Pressure What Is Blood Pressure? Do You Have High ... is stated as 120/80. Do You Have High Blood Pressure? One reason to have regular visits to the ...

  3. Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

    MedlinePLUS

    ... evaluate unusually low blood pressure readings. How is high blood pressure diagnosed? Your healthcare providers will want to get ... learn more about your blood pressure numbers . Interactive High Blood Pressure Guide Find videos, quizzes, trackers and more with ...

  4. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Information Page Synonym(s): Hydrocephalus - Normal Pressure Table ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus? Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is an abnormal ...

  5. Differential pressure pin discharge apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, David J. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01

    Disclosed is a discharge assembly for allowing elongate pins to be discharged from an area of relatively low pressure to an area of relatively greater pressure. The discharge assembly includes a duck valve having a lip piece made of flexible material. The flexible lip piece responds to a fluctuating pressure created downstream by an aspirator. The aspirator reduces the downstream pressure sensed by the duck valve when the discharge assembly is in the open position. This allows elongate pins to be moved through the duck valve with no backflow because the aspirator pressure is less than the pressure in the low pressure area from which the pins originate. Closure of the assembly causes the aspirator static pressure to force the flexible duck valve lip piece into a tightly sealed position also preventing backflow. The discharge assembly can be easily controlled using a single control valve which blocks the flow of aspirator gas and closes the pin passageway extending through the assembly.

  6. Differential pressure pin discharge apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, D.J.

    1984-05-30

    Disclosed is a discharge assembly for allowing elongate pins to be discharged from an area of relatively low pressure to an area of relatively greater pressure. The discharge assembly includes a duck valve having a lip piece made of flexible material. The flexible lip piece responds to a fluctuating pressure created downstream by an aspirator. The aspirator reduces the downstream pressure sensed by the duck valve when the discharge assembly is in the open position. This allows elongate pins to be moved through the duck valve with no backflow because the aspirator pressure is less than the pressure in the low pressure area from which the pins originate. Closure of the assembly causes the aspirator static pressure to force the flexible duck valve lip piece into a tightly sealed position also preventing backflow. The discharge assembly can be easily controlled using a single control valve which blocks the flow of aspirator gas and closes the pins passageway extending through the assembly.

  7. Pressurant requirements for discharge of liquid methane from a 1.52-meter-(5-ft-) diameter spherical tank under both static and slosh conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, R. L.; Mcintire, T. O.

    1974-01-01

    Pressurized expulsion tests were conducted to determine the effect of various physical parameters on the pressurant gas (methane, helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen) requirements during the expulsion of liquid methane from a 1.52-meter-(5-ft-) diameter spherical tank and to compare results with those predicted by an analytical program. Also studied were the effects on methane, helium, and hydrogen pressurant requirements of various slosh excitation frequencies and amplitudes, both with and without slosh suppressing baffles in the tank. The experimental results when using gaseous methane, helium, and hydrogen show that the predictions of the analytical program agreed well with the actual pressurant requirements for static tank expulsions. The analytical program could not be used for gaseous nitrogen expulsions because of the large quantities of nitrogen which can dissolve in liquid methane. Under slosh conditions, a pronounced increase in gaseous methane requirements was observed relative to results obtained for the static tank expulsions. Slight decreases in the helium and hydrogen requirements were noted under similar test conditions.

  8. On the propagation of a quasi-static disturbance in a heterogeneous, deformable, and porous medium with pressure-dependent properties

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, D.W.

    2011-10-01

    Using an asymptotic technique, valid when the medium properties are smoothly-varying, I derive a semi-analytic expression for the propagation velocity of a quasi-static disturbance traveling within a nonlinear-elastic porous medium. The phase, a function related to the propagation time, depends upon the properties of the medium, including the pressure-sensitivities of the medium parameters, and on pressure and displacement amplitude changes. Thus, the propagation velocity of a disturbance depends upon its amplitude, as might be expected for a nonlinear process. As a check, the expression for the phase function is evaluated for a poroelastic medium, when the material properties do not depend upon the fluid pressure. In that case, the travel time estimates agree with conventional analytic estimates, and with values calculated using a numerical simulator. For a medium with pressure-dependent permeability I find general agreement between the semi-analytic estimates and estimates from a numerical simulation. In this case the pressure amplitude changes are obtained from the numerical simulator.

  9. Brine Flow Up a Borehole Caused by Pressure Perturbation From CO2 Storage: Static and Dynamic Evaluations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Industrial-scale storage of CO2 in saline sedimentary basins will cause zones of elevated pressure, larger than the CO2 plume itself. If permeable conduits (e.g., leaking wells) exist between the injection reservoir and overlying shallow aquifers, brine could be pushed upwards al...

  10. Measurements of Capillary Pressure-Saturation Relationships for Silica Sands Using Light Transmission Visualization and a Rapid Pseudo Static Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurement of water saturation in porous media is essential for many types of studies including subsurface water flow, subsurface colloids transport and contaminant remediation to name a few. Water saturation (S) in porous media is dependent on the capillary pressure (Pc) which,...

  11. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... normal blood pressure 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure Between 120 and 139 for the top number, ... prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High ...

  12. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... En Español Who is at risk? How is high blood pressure treated? Understanding your blood pressure: What do the ...

  13. Preventing pressure ulcers

    MedlinePLUS

    Pressure ulcers are also called bedsores, or pressure sores. They can form when your skin and soft tissue ... become damaged or die. When this happens, a pressure ulcer may form. You have a risk of developing ...

  14. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    MedlinePLUS

    ... head. The monitor senses the pressure inside the skull and sends measurements to a recording device. ... are three ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is ...

  15. Skin (Pressure) Sores

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Topic Skin dryness Next Topic Sleep problems Skin (pressure) sores A skin or pressure sore develops when the blood supply to an ... is bedridden or always in a wheelchair puts pressure on the same places much of the time. ...

  16. Round-robin pretest analyses of a 1:6-scale reinforced concrete containment model subject to static internal pressurization

    SciTech Connect

    Clauss, D.B.

    1987-05-01

    Analyses of a 1:6-scale reinforced concrete containment model that will be tested to failure at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 1987 were conducted by the following organizations in the United States and Europe: Sandia National Laboratories (USA), Argonne National Laboratory (USA), Electric Power Research Institute (USA), Commissariat a L'Energie Atomique (France), HM Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (UK), Comitato Nazionale per la ricerca e per lo sviluppo dell'Energia Nucleare e delle Energie Alternative (Italy), UK Atomic Energy Authority, Safety and Reliability Directorate (UK), Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit (FRG), Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA), and Central Electricity Generating Board (UK). Each organization was supplied with a standard information package, which included construction drawings and actual material properties for most of the materials used in the model. Each organization worked independently using their own analytical methods. This report includes descriptions of the various analytical approaches and pretest predictions submitted by each organization. Significant milestones that occur with increasing pressure, such as damage to the concrete (cracking and crushing) and yielding of the steel components, and the failure pressure (capacity) and failure mechanism are described. Analytical predictions for pressure histories of strain in the liner and rebar and displacements are compared at locations where experimental results will be available after the test. Thus, these predictions can be compared to one another and to experimental results after the test.

  17. Mixing Water and Oil Under Static High Pressure H.K. Ploeg1, M.D. McCluskey2,3, G.J. Hanna2,3

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    Mixing Water and Oil Under Static High Pressure H.K. Ploeg1, M.D. McCluskey2,3, G.J. Hanna2,3 1The. Turning the screws on the cell increases the pressure on the sample. The sample consists of water and O. Grasset, Journal of Chemical Physics 127, 124506 (2007) Citations: Water in Oil: Procedure: ·The

  18. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. High Blood Pressure What Is High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a common disease in ... the heart, kidneys, brain, and eyes. Types of High Blood Pressure There are two main types of high blood ...

  19. Neural Network Burst Pressure Prediction in Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Eric v. K.; Dion, Seth-Andrew T.; Karl, Justin O.; Spivey, Nicholas S.; Walker, James L., II

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic emission data were collected during the hydroburst testing of eleven 15 inch diameter filament wound composite overwrapped pressure vessels. A neural network burst pressure prediction was generated from the resulting AE amplitude data. The bottles shared commonality of graphite fiber, epoxy resin, and cure time. Individual bottles varied by cure mode (rotisserie versus static oven curing), types of inflicted damage, temperature of the pressurant, and pressurization scheme. Three categorical variables were selected to represent undamaged bottles, impact damaged bottles, and bottles with lacerated hoop fibers. This categorization along with the removal of the AE data from the disbonding noise between the aluminum liner and the composite overwrap allowed the prediction of burst pressures in all three sets of bottles using a single backpropagation neural network. Here the worst case error was 3.38 percent.

  20. Constant-pressure Blowers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, E

    1940-01-01

    The conventional axial blowers operate on the high-pressure principle. One drawback of this type of blower is the relatively low pressure head, which one attempts to overcome with axial blowers producing very high pressure at a given circumferential speed. The Schicht constant-pressure blower affords pressure ratios considerably higher than those of axial blowers of conventional design with approximately the same efficiency.

  1. Measuring Time-Averaged Blood Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Neil S.

    1988-01-01

    Device measures time-averaged component of absolute blood pressure in artery. Includes compliant cuff around artery and external monitoring unit. Ceramic construction in monitoring unit suppresses ebb and flow of pressure-transmitting fluid in sensor chamber. Transducer measures only static component of blood pressure.

  2. Fracture resistance of welded thick-walled high-pressure vessels in power plants. Report No. 2. Approach to evaluating static strength

    SciTech Connect

    Gorynin, I.V.; Filatov, V.M.; Ignatov, V.A.; Timofeev, B.T.; Zvezdin, Yu. I.

    1986-07-01

    The authors examine data on the effect of defects on the fracture resistance of high-pressure vessels and their models obtained within the framework of the HSST program. Results of internal-pressure tests of two types of vessels with a wall thickness of 152 mm made from forgings of steels SA508 and SA533, as well as small vessels with a wall thickness of 11.5 and 23mm made of steel SA533 are shown. The authors state that testing thick-walled welded high-pressure vessels and thin-walled vessels with surface defects of different sizes has demonstrated that there are substantial static-strength reserves in structures designed by existing domestic and foreign standards on the strength of power-plant equipment. A correction was proposed for the presently used method of calculating the resistance of highpressure vessels to brittle fracture that allows for the dimensions of the defects in relation to the type of vessel, the manufacturing technology, and the method of inspection.

  3. The static pressure field as a driving mechanism for the streamwise corner flow in the presence of an inclined transverse plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, Demos P.; Milidonis, Kypros F.

    2014-03-01

    Streamwise corner flows are characterized by the strong interaction among the boundary layers on the two walls that create the junction. The nature of this interaction defines some critical aspects of the corner flow, such as instability and laminar-turbulent transition, turbulence statistics and local shear friction and heat transfer intensities. The studies so far (both experimental and analytical) have investigated the configurations where the mainstream is mostly parallel to both walls. Under such conditions, the interaction is mainly viscous. Hence, a correct understanding of the flow dynamics requires a comprehensive knowledge of the velocity (mean and turbulent) field. In a number, however, of important applications (especially in turbomachinery blades and aircraft wing junctions), the mainstream flow is inclined against the blocking wall. This generates strong pressure gradients that modify significantly the structure of the relevant flowfield. The present study investigates experimentally the significance of the static pressure field associated with such geometries, focusing on the magnitudes and the directions along which the pressure pushes the flow. The results indicate that (1) the basic model explaining the flow interactions near a streamwise corner must be modified, and (2) the presence of an inclined wall modifies the relevant field significantly, by forcing a more intensive rotation on the mainstream, which leads to more intensive streamwise accelerations and wall jet effects near the corner.

  4. Chronic blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Brands, Michael W

    2012-10-01

    Chronic blood pressure is maintained within very narrow limits around an average value. However, the multitude of physiologic processes that participate in blood pressure control present a bewildering array of possibilities to explain how such tight control of arterial pressure is achieved. Guyton and Coleman and colleagues addressed this challenge by creating a mathematical model that integrated the short- and long-term control systems for overall regulation of the circulation. The hub is the renal-body fluid feedback control system, which links cardiac function and vascular resistance and capacitance with fluid volume homeostasis as the foundation for chronic blood pressure control. The cornerstone of that system is renal sodium excretory capability, which is defined by the direct effect of blood pressure on urinary sodium excretion, that is, "pressure natriuresis." Steady-state blood pressure is the pressure at which pressure natriuresis balances sodium intake over time; therefore, renal sodium excretory capability is the set point for chronic blood pressure. However, this often is misinterpreted as dismissing, or minimizing, the importance of nonrenal mechanisms in chronic blood pressure control. This article explains the renal basis for the blood pressure set point by focusing on the absolute dependence of our survival on the maintenance of sodium balance. Two principal threats to sodium balance are discussed: (1) a change in sodium intake or renal excretory capability and (2) a change in blood pressure. In both instances, circulatory homeostasis is maintained because the sodium balance blood pressure set point is reached. PMID:23720255

  5. An investigation to determine the static pressure distribution of the 0.00548 scale shuttle solid rocket booster (MSFC model number 468) during reentry in the NASA/MSFC 14 inch trisonic wind tunnel (SA28F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braddock, W. F.; Streby, G. D.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a pressure test of a .00548 scale 146 inch Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) with and without protuberances, conducted in a 14 x 14 inch trisonic wind tunnel are presented. Static pressure distributions for the SRB at reentry attitudes and flight conditions were obtained. Local longitudinal and ring pressure distributions are presented in tabulated form. Integration of the pressure data was performed. The test was conducted at Mach numbers of 0.40 to 4.45 over an angle of attack range from 60 to 185 degrees. Roll angles of 0, 45, 90 and 315 degrees were investigated. Reynolds numbers per foot varied for selected Mach numbers.

  6. Pressure Dome for High-Pressure Electrolyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Timothy; Schmitt, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    A high-strength, low-weight pressure vessel dome was designed specifically to house a high-pressure [2,000 psi (approx. = 13.8 MPa)] electrolyzer. In operation, the dome is filled with an inert gas pressurized to roughly 100 psi (approx. = 690 kPa) above the high, balanced pressure product oxygen and hydrogen gas streams. The inert gas acts to reduce the clamping load on electrolyzer stack tie bolts since the dome pressure acting axially inward helps offset the outward axial forces from the stack gas pressure. Likewise, radial and circumferential stresses on electrolyzer frames are minimized. Because the dome is operated at a higher pressure than the electrolyzer product gas, any external electrolyzer leak prevents oxygen or hydrogen from leaking into the dome. Instead the affected stack gas stream pressure rises detectably, thereby enabling a system shutdown. All electrical and fluid connections to the stack are made inside the pressure dome and require special plumbing and electrical dome interfaces for this to be accomplished. Further benefits of the dome are that it can act as a containment shield in the unlikely event of a catastrophic failure. Studies indicate that, for a given active area (and hence, cell ID), frame outside diameter must become ever larger to support stresses at higher operating pressures. This can lead to a large footprint and increased costs associated with thicker and/or larger diameter end-plates, tie-rods, and the frames themselves. One solution is to employ rings that fit snugly around the frame. This complicates stack assembly and is sometimes difficult to achieve in practice, as its success is strongly dependent on frame and ring tolerances, gas pressure, and operating temperature. A pressure dome permits an otherwise low-pressure stack to operate at higher pressures without growing the electrolyzer hardware. The pressure dome consists of two machined segments. An O-ring is placed in an O-ring groove in the flange of the bottom segment and is trapped by the flange on the top dome segment when these components are bolted together with high-strength bolts. The pressure dome has several unique features. It is made (to ASME Pressure Vessel guidelines) in a high-strength aluminum alloy with the strength of stainless steel and the weight benefits of aluminum. The flange of the upper dome portion contains specially machined flats for mounting the dome, and other flats dedicated to the special feedthroughs for electrical connections. A pressure dome can be increased in length to house larger stacks (more cells) of the same diameter with the simple addition of a cylindrical segment. To aid in dome assembly, two stainless steel rings are employed. One is used beneath the heads of the high-strength bolts in lieu of individual hardened washers, and another is used instead of individual nuts. Like electrolyzers could be operated at low or high pressures simply by operating the electrolyzer outside or inside a pressurized dome.

  7. Air flow and pressure inside a pressure-swirl spray and their effects on spray development

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Seoksu; Bae, Choongsik; Abo-Serie, Essam

    2009-01-15

    Air flow and pressure inside a pressure-swirl spray for direct injection (DI) gasoline engines and their effects on spray development have been analyzed at different injector operating conditions. A simulation tool was utilized and the static air pressure at the centerline of the spray was measured to investigate the static pressure and flow structure inside the swirl spray. To investigate the effect of static air pressure on swirl spray development, a liquid film model was applied and the Mie-scattered images were captured. The simulation and experiment showed that recirculation vortex and air pressure drop inside the swirl spray were observable and the air pressure drop was greater at high injection pressure. At high fuel temperature, the air pressure at the nozzle exit showed higher value compared to the atmospheric pressure and then continuously decreased up to few millimeters distance from the nozzle exit. The pressure drop at high fuel temperatures was more than that of atmospheric temperature. This reduced air pressure was recovered to the atmospheric pressure at further downstream. The results from the liquid film model and macroscopic spray images showed that the air pressure started to affect the liquid film trajectory about 3 mm from the nozzle exit and this effect was sustained until the air pressure recovered to the atmospheric pressure. However, the entrained air motion and droplet size have more significant influence on the spray development after the most of the liquid sheet is broken-up and the spray loses its initial momentum. (author)

  8. Dynamic and Static Shell Properties of White and Brown Shell Eggs Exposed to Modified-pressure Microcrack Detection Technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dynamic and static shell properties of eggs provide important insight to egg quality. Understanding how processing and handling procedures affect both dynamic and static shell properties can enhance the safety and quality of egg reaching consumers. A study was conducted to determine if dynamic she...

  9. Flutter spectral measurements using stationary pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurkov, A. P.

    1980-01-01

    Engine-order sampling was used to eliminate the integral harmonics from the flutter spectra corresponding to a case-mounted static pressure transducer. Using the optical displacement data, it was demonstrated that the blade-order sampling of pressure data may yield erroneous results due to the interference caused by blade vibration. Two methods are presented which effectively eliminate this interference yielding the blade-pressure-difference spectra. The phase difference between the differential-pressure and the displacement spectra was evaluated.

  10. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Visitor Information RePORT NIH Fact Sheets Home > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) Small Text Medium Text Large Text Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) YESTERDAY Hypertension is a silent killer because it ...

  11. High blood pressure - infants

    MedlinePLUS

    Hypertension - infants ... and blood vessels The health of the kidneys High blood pressure in infants may be due to kidney or ... Bronchopulmonary dysplasia Renal artery stenosis In newborn babies, high blood pressure is often caused by a blood clot in ...

  12. The Root Pressure Phenomenon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    Describes experiments demonstrating that root pressure in plants is probably controlled by a circadian rhythm (biological clock). Root pressure phenomenon plays significant part in water transport in contradiction with prevalent belief. (PS)

  13. Pressure stockings (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... blood from pooling. They are tightest at the ankle and gradually decrease in pressure up the leg. ... blood from pooling. They are tightest at the ankle and gradually decrease in pressure up the leg. ...

  14. Pressure Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Bencic, T.; Sullivan, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews new advances and applications of pressure sensitive paints in aerodynamic testing. Emphasis is placed on important technical aspects of pressure sensitive paint including instrumentation, data processing, and uncertainty analysis.

  15. Atmospheric Pressure Indicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salzsieder, John C.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses observable phenomena related to air pressure. Describes a simple, unobtrusive, semiquantitative device to monitor the changes in air pressure that are associated with altitude, using a soft-drink bottle and a balloon. (JRH)

  16. Blood Pressure Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... reducing sodium in your diet, you may need medicines. Blood pressure medicines work in different ways to lower blood pressure. ... and widen blood vessels. Often, two or more medicines work better than one. NIH: National Heart, Lung, ...

  17. Brain Pressure Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A transducer originally used to measure air pressure in aircraft wind tunnel tests is the basis for a development important in diagnosis and treatment of certain types of brain damage. A totally implantable device, tbe intracranial pressure monitor measures and reports brain pressure by telemetry.

  18. Inertia diaphragm pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seegmiller, H. L. B.

    1971-01-01

    Transducer measures gas pressure profiles in high temperature, short duration, gas flows usually found in devices where pressure pulses may have durations of few microseconds to several milliseconds. Assembly includes fluid delay line, delay chamber, and flow restrictor for equalizing steady state pressure on diaphragm's sides

  19. 49 CFR 179.15 - Pressure relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of the static head and gas padding pressure and the lading vapor pressure at the following reference... tank burst pressure but no more than 33 percent of the minimum tank burst pressure. (3) The vapor tight... detection device must be closed during transportation. (3) The vapor tight pressure and the...

  20. 49 CFR 179.15 - Pressure relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of the static head and gas padding pressure and the lading vapor pressure at the following reference... tank burst pressure but no more than 33 percent of the minimum tank burst pressure. (3) The vapor tight... detection device must be closed during transportation. (3) The vapor tight pressure and the...

  1. 49 CFR 179.15 - Pressure relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... equal to the sum of the static head and gas padding pressure and the lading vapor pressure at the.... (3) The vapor tight pressure of a reclosing pressure relief valve must be at least 80 percent of the... indicator. The detection device must be closed during transportation. (3) The vapor tight pressure and...

  2. 49 CFR 179.15 - Pressure relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of the static head and gas padding pressure and the lading vapor pressure at the following reference... tank burst pressure but no more than 33 percent of the minimum tank burst pressure. (3) The vapor tight... detection device must be closed during transportation. (3) The vapor tight pressure and the...

  3. 49 CFR 179.15 - Pressure relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of the static head and gas padding pressure and the lading vapor pressure at the following reference... tank burst pressure but no more than 33 percent of the minimum tank burst pressure. (3) The vapor tight... detection device must be closed during transportation. (3) The vapor tight pressure and the...

  4. Pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Woodard, Charles R; Buschbacher, Ralph M; Long, William B; Gebhart, Jocelynn H; Ma, Eva K

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this collective review is to outline the predisposing factors in the development of pressure ulcers and to identify a pressure ulcer prevention program. The most frequent sites for pressure ulcers are areas of skin overlying bony prominences. There are four critical factors contributing to the development of pressure ulcers: pressure, shearing forces, friction, and moisture. Pressure is now viewed as the single most important etiologic factor in pressure ulcer formation. Prolonged immobilization, sensory deficit, circulatory disturbances, and poor nutrition have been identified as important risk factors in the development of pressure ulcer formation. Among the clinical assessment scales available, only two, the Braden Scale and Norton Scale, have been tested extensively for reliability and/or validity. The most commonly used risk assessment tools for pressure ulcer formation are computerized pressure monitoring and measurement of laser Doppler skin blood flow. Pressure ulcers can predispose the patient to a variety of complications that include bacteremia, osteomyelitis, squamous cell carcinoma, and sinus tracts. The three components of pressure ulcer prevention that must be considered in any patient include management of incontinence, nutritional support, and pressure relief. The pressure relief program must be individualized for non-weight-bearing individuals as well as those that can bear weight. For those that can not bear weight and passively stand, the RENAISSANCE Mattress Replacement System is recommended for the immobile patient who lies supine on the bed, the stretcher, or operating room table. This alternating pressure system is unique because it has three separate cells that are not interconnected. It is specifically designed so that deflation of each individual cell will reach a ZERO PRESSURE during each alternating pressure cycle. The superiority of this system has been documented by comprehensive clinical studies in which this system has been compared to the standard hospital bed as well as to two other commercially available pressure relief mattresses. The most recent advance in pressure ulcer prevention is the development of the ALTERN8* seating system. This seating system provides regular periods of pressure relief and stimulation of blood flow to skin areas while users are seated. By offering the combination of pressure relief therapy and an increase in blood flow, the ALTERN8* reportedly creates an optimum pressure ulcer healing environment. Foam is the most commonly used material for pressure reduction and pressure ulcer prevention and treatment for the mobile individual. For those immobilized individuals who can achieve a passive standing position, a powered wheelchair that allows the individual to achieve a passive standing position is recommended. The beneficial effects of passive standing have been documented by comprehensive scientific studies. These benefits include reduction of seating pressure, decreased bone demineralization, increased blander pressure, enhanced orthostatic circulatory regulation, reduction in muscular tone, decrease in upper extremity muscle stress, and enhanced functional status in general. In the absence of these dynamic alternating pressure seating systems and mattresses, there are enormous medicolegal implications to the healthcare facility. Because there is not sufficient staff to provide pressure relief to rotate the patient every 2 hours in a hospital setting, with the exception of the intensive care unit, the immobile patient is prone to develop pressure ulcers. The cost of caring for these preventable pressure ulcers may now be as high as 60,000 dollars per patient. The occupational physical strain sustained by nursing personnel in rotating their patients has led to occupational back pain in nurses, a major source of morbidity in the healthcare environment. PMID:15447627

  5. Gravastars must have anisotropic pressures

    E-print Network

    Celine Cattoen; Tristan Faber; Matt Visser

    2005-06-08

    One of the very small number of serious alternatives to the usual concept of an astrophysical black hole is the "gravastar" model developed by Mazur and Mottola; and a related phase-transition model due to Laughlin et al. We consider a generalized class of similar models that exhibit continuous pressure -- without the presence of infinitesimally thin shells. By considering the usual TOV equation for static solutions with negative central pressure, we find that gravastars cannot be perfect fluids -- anisotropic pressures in the "crust" of a gravastar-like object are unavoidable. The anisotropic TOV equation can then be used to bound the pressure anisotropy. The transverse stresses that support a gravastar permit a higher compactness than is given by the Buchdahl--Bondi bound for perfect fluid stars. Finally we comment on the qualitative features of the equation of state that gravastar material must have if it is to do the desired job of preventing horizon formation.

  6. Pressure sensitive conductive rubber blends

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, H.H. ); Abdel-Bary, E.M. ); El-Mansy, M.K.; Khodair, H.A. )

    1989-12-01

    Butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber (NBR) was blended with polychloroprene (CR) according to standard techniques. The blend was mixed with different concentrations of ZnO. The vulcanized sample was subjected to electrical conductivity ({sigma}) measurements while different values of static pressure were applied on the sample. It was found that samples containing 7.5 phr ZnO showed a reasonable pressure sensitive increase of {sigma}. Furthermore, the {sigma} vs pressure relationship of rubber blend mixed with different concentrations of Fast Extrusion Furnace black (FEF) was investigated. It was found that rubber vulcanizate containing 40 phr FEF resulted in a negative value of the pressure coefficient of conductivity {approx equal} {minus} 4.5 KPa{sup {minus}1}.

  7. High pressure ices

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Andreas; Ashcroft, N. W.; Hoffmann, Roald

    2012-01-01

    H2O will be more resistant to metallization than previously thought. From computational evolutionary structure searches, we find a sequence of new stable and meta-stable structures for the ground state of ice in the 1–5 TPa (10 to 50 Mbar) regime, in the static approximation. The previously proposed Pbcm structure is superseded by a Pmc21 phase at p = 930 GPa, followed by a predicted transition to a P21 crystal structure at p = 1.3 TPa. This phase, featuring higher coordination at O and H, is stable over a wide pressure range, reaching 4.8 TPa. We analyze carefully the geometrical changes in the calculated structures, especially the buckling at the H in O-H-O motifs. All structures are insulating—chemistry burns a deep and (with pressure increase) lasting hole in the density of states near the highest occupied electronic levels of what might be component metallic lattices. Metallization of ice in our calculations occurs only near 4.8 TPa, where the metallic C2/m phase becomes most stable. In this regime, zero-point energies much larger than typical enthalpy differences suggest possible melting of the H sublattice, or even the entire crystal. PMID:22207625

  8. Pressure (Or No Royal Road)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, J.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses how difficult the various problems of pressure, partial pressure, gas laws, and vapor pressure are for students. Outlines the evolution of the concept of pressure, the gas equation for a perfect gas, partial pressures, saturated vapor pressure, Avogadro's hypothesis, Raoult's law, and the vapor pressure of ideal solutions. (JR)

  9. Air pressure measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, H. N.

    1978-01-01

    The pressure measurement was made by a Model 830J Rosemont sensor which utilized the principle of a changing pressure to change correspondingly the capacitance of the pressure sensitive element. The sensor's range was stated to be from zero to 100 Torr (14 km); however, the sensor was not activated until an altitude of 20 km (41 Torr) was reached during the balloon ascent. The resolution of the sensor was specified by the manufacturer as infinitesimal; however, associated electronic and pressure readout systems limit the resolution to .044 Torr. Thus in the vicinity of an altitude of 30 km the pressure resolution corresponded to an altitude resolution of approximately 33 meters.

  10. The coefficient of earth pressure at rest and deformation and densification of granular soils subjected to static and dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardhanabhuti, Barames

    The coefficient of earth pressure at rest, Ko, of granular soil deposits and backfills is a significant parameter in geotechnical engineering profession. A knowledge of Ko value in granular deposits and backfills not only is necessary for many geotechnical construction, but could also assist engineers and researchers in interpretations of laboratory and in situ tests. The primary purpose of the study is to gain a better understanding of K o behavior of granular soils during loading, unloading, and vibration, especially produced by vibratory surface compaction equipments. Compressibility and rebound behaviors of granular soils were studied, and effect of particle damage on Ko and one-dimensional compression behavior were also reviewed. Influence of dynamic stress characteristics, including maximum dynamic vertical stress increase and frequency, on the change in Ko and minimum achievable void ratio of granular soils during vibration were determined. A comprehensive laboratory testing program, mainly the series of oedometer test with lateral stress measurement, were conducted on Ottawa, Lake Michigan Beach, Niigata, and Toyoura sand. Reconstituted dry sand specimens were subjected to 7 different loading histories, and the maximum effective vertical stress was 341 kPa. Different characteristics of dynamic vertical stresses, including periodic impulse stresses (f = 61 Hz, fp = 1,170 Hz), approximately sinusoidal dynamic stresses (f = 60 to 120 Hz, fp = 120 to 180 Hz), as well as 'cyclic loading' (loading-unloading-reloading, f ? 0 Hz), with various maximum dynamic stress amplitudes and durations of vibration, were applied to the sand specimens. A total of 155 oedometer tests with lateral stress measurement were completed. Particle modification, if any occurred during the oedometer test, was investigated through results of grain size and SEM analyses of sand particles before and after the oedometer test, and compression behavior of sand specimens observed during the oedometer test.

  11. Miniaturized pressurization system

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, John C. (Davis, CA); Swink, Don G. (Woodinville, WA)

    1991-01-01

    The invention uses a fluid stored at a low pressure and provides the fluid at a high pressure. The invention allows the low pressure fluid to flow to a fluid bore of a differential pump and from the pump to a fluid pressure regulator. After flowing through the regulator the fluid is converted to a gas which is directed to a gas bore of the differential pump. By controlling the flow of gas entering and being exhausted from the gas bore, the invention provides pressure to the fluid. By setting the regulator, the high pressure fluid can be set at predetermined values. Because the invention only needs a low pressure fluid, the inventive apparatus has a low mass, and therefore would be useful in rocket propulsion systems.

  12. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, J.C.; Dilgard, L.W.

    1995-10-10

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure is disclosed. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes. 10 figs.

  13. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, John C. (Davis, CA); Dilgard, Lemoyne W. (Willits, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes.

  14. In Situ Measurement of Magnesium Carbonate Formation from CO2 Using Static High-Pressure and -Temperature 13

    E-print Network

    Skemer, Philip

    method that possesses the ability to monitor the chemical evolution of supercritical CO2 in relevant(OH)2, with supercritical CO2 (88 bar) in aqueous conditions at 80 °C. The in situ conversion of CO2In Situ Measurement of Magnesium Carbonate Formation from CO2 Using Static High

  15. Evaluation of Nodal Reactor Physics Methods for Quasi-Static and Time-Dependent Coupled Neutronic Thermal - Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltus, Madeline Anne

    1990-01-01

    This thesis examines coupled time-dependent thermal -hydraulic (T/H) and neutronics solution methods for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) transient analysis. The degree of equivalence is evaluated between the typical quasi-static approach and a newly-developed iterative tandem method. Four specific PWR transients that exhibit a wide range of Reactor Coolant System (RCS) T/H response were investigated: (1) a Station Blackout Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS), (2) a Loss of Feedwater ATWS, (3) a Total Loss of RCS Flow with Scram, and (4) a Main Steam Line Break (MSLB). Rather than using simplified RCS and core models, the theory and method in this thesis were applied practically by using realistic models for an actual four-loop Westinghouse PWR plant. The time-dependent STAR kinetics code, based on the QUANDRY Analytic Nodal Method, and the RETRAN and MCPWR T/H systems codes were used to develop a new, fully coupled, tandem STAR/MCPWRQ methodology that runs tandemly on an enhanced 386/387 IBM PC architecture. MCPWRQ uses externally calculated power input rather than point kinetics power level results. The tandem method was compared to quasi -static STAR and time-dependent STAR 2-D and 3-D kinetics results. The new STAR/MCPWRQ method uses RETRAN time-dependent T/H and point kinetics power input as a first estimate. STAR and MCPWRQ are used tandemly to couple STAR 3-D, time-dependent core power results with the MCPWRQ RCS T/H phenomena. This thesis shows that: (a) quasi-static and point kinetics methods are not able to describe severe PWR transient phenomena adequately; and (b) fully coupled, 3-D, time -dependent, tandem (or possibly parallel) analysis methods should be used for PWR reactor transients instead. By tandemly coupling the RCS response in terms of updated core inlet conditions with 3-D time-dependent core kinetics response, the core power response and T/H conditions are forced to be self-consistent during the entire transient. The transient analyses show that a time-dependent, 3-D method is needed when non-equilibrium conditions exist in either the RCS T/H or core neutronic behavior. In general, the quasi-static approach predicts the nodal power distributions incorrectly. Point kinetics and quasi-static methods should be used only after a thermal -hydraulically coupled, time-dependent 3-D neutronics tandem method has been used to validate such simplifying approximations.

  16. Respiratory monitoring system based on the nasal pressure technique for the analysis of sleep breathing disorders: Reduction of static and dynamic errors, and comparisons with thermistors and pneumotachographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves de Mesquita, Jayme; Lopes de Melo, Pedro

    2004-03-01

    Thermally sensitive devices—thermistors—have usually been used to monitor sleep-breathing disorders. However, because of their long time constant, these devices are not able to provide a good characterization of fast events, like hypopneas. Nasal pressure recording technique (NPR) has recently been suggested to quantify airflow during sleep. It is claimed that the short time constants of the devices used to implement this technique would allow an accurate analysis of fast abnormal respiratory events. However, these devices present errors associated with nonlinearities and acoustic resonance that could reduce the diagnostic value of the NPR. Moreover, in spite of the high scientific and clinical potential, there is no detailed description of a complete instrumentation system to implement this promising technique in sleep studies. In this context, the purpose of this work was twofold: (1) describe the development of a flexible NPR device and (2) evaluate the performance of this device when compared to pneumotachographs (PNTs) and thermistors. After the design details are described, the system static accuracy is evaluated by a comparative analysis with a PNT. This analysis revealed a significant reduction (p<0.001) of the static error when system nonlinearities were reduced. The dynamic performance of the NPR system was investigated by frequency response analysis and time constant evaluations and the results showed that the developed device response was as good as PNT and around 100 times faster (?=5,3 ms) than thermistors (?=512 ms). Experimental results obtained in simulated clinical conditions and in a patient are presented as examples, and confirmed the good features achieved in engineering tests. These results are in close agreement with physiological fundamentals, supplying substantial evidence that the improved dynamic and static characteristics of this device can contribute to a more accurate implementation of medical research projects and to improve the diagnoses of sleep-breathing disorders.

  17. PressureText: Pressure Input for Mobile Phone Text Entry

    E-print Network

    PressureText: Pressure Input for Mobile Phone Text Entry Abstract Pressure sensitive buttons presses are currently necessary to record an action. We present PressureText, a text-entry technique for a pressure augmented mobile phone. In a study comparing PressureText to MultiTap, we found that despite

  18. Stroke and High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Stroke and High Blood Pressure Updated:Jan 6,2015 Stroke is a leading ... to heart disease and stroke. Start exploring today ! High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) • Why HBP ...

  19. BIOMACROMOLECULES UNDER HIGH HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE

    E-print Network

    Gruner, Sol M.

    BIOMACROMOLECULES UNDER HIGH HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE A Dissertation Presented to the Faculty HIGH HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE Nozomi Ando, Ph.D. Cornell University 2009 Protein pressure denaturation denaturation studies. Recent studies imply that the mechanism of pressure denaturation is the penetration

  20. Blade pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivers, J. W. H.

    Three measurement techniques which enable rotating pressures to be measured during the normal operation of a gas turbine or a component test rig are described. The first technique was developed specifically to provide steady and transient blade surface pressure data to aid both fan flutter research and general fan performance development. This technique involves the insertion of miniature high frequency response pressure transducers into the fan blades of a large civil gas turbine. The other two techniques were developed to measure steady rotating pressures inside and on the surface of engine or rig turbine blades and also rotating pressures in cooling feed systems. These two low frequency response systems are known as the "pressure pineapple' (a name which resulted from the shape of the original prototype) and the rotating scanivalve.

  1. Measurement of endolymphatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Mom, T; Pavier, Y; Giraudet, F; Gilain, L; Avan, P

    2015-04-01

    Endolymphatic pressure measurement is of interest both to researchers in the physiology and pathophysiology of hearing and ENT physicians dealing with Menière's disease or similar conditions. It is generally agreed that endolymphatic hydrops is associated with Menière's disease and is accompanied by increased hydrostatic pressure. Endolymphatic pressure, however, cannot be measured precisely without endangering hearing, making the association between hydrops and increased endolymphatic pressure difficult to demonstrate. Several integrated in vivo models have been developed since the 1960s, but only a few allow measurement of endolymphatic hydrostatic pressure. Models associating measurement of hydrostatic pressure and endolymphatic potential and assessment of cochlear function are of value to elucidate the pathophysiology of endolymphatic hydrops. The present article presents the main types of models and discusses their respective interest. PMID:25467202

  2. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOEpatents

    Echtler, J. Paul (Pittsburgh, PA); Scandrol, Roy O. (Library, PA)

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  3. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Chae Un (Ithaca, NY); Gruner, Sol M. (Ithaca, NY)

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  4. Bag pressure monitor

    DOEpatents

    Vaughn, Mark Roy (Albuquerque, NM); Miller, Alva Keith (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    An inexpensive mechanical indicator for measuring low pressure in an inflating bag includes a pair of sides connected to each other at one edge and pivotally connected at spaced parallel locations on the bag. A spring biases the sides towards each other in opposition to tension in the inflating bag. The distance between the sides is indicative of the pressure in the bag. The device is accurate at pressures below 0.05 psi.

  5. Common Questions About Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Raetz, Jaqueline G M; Wick, Keren H

    2015-11-15

    Patients with limited mobility due to physical or cognitive impairment are at risk of pressure ulcers. Primary care physicians should examine at-risk patients because pressure ulcers are often missed in inpatient, outpatient, and long-term care settings. High-risk patients should use advanced static support surfaces to prevent pressure ulcers and air-fluidized beds to treat pressure ulcers. Physicians should document the size and clinical features of ulcers. Cleansing should be done with saline or tap water, while avoiding caustic agents, such as hydrogen peroxide. Dressings should promote a moist, but not wet, wound healing environment. The presence of infection is determined through clinical judgment; if uncertain, a tissue biopsy should be performed. New or worsening pain may indicate infection of a pressure ulcer. When treating patients with pressure ulcers, it is important to keep in mind the patient's psychological, behavioral, and cognitive status. The patient's social, financial, and caregiver resources, as well as goals and long-term prognosis, should also be considered in the treatment plan. PMID:26554282

  6. Sapphire tube pressure vessel

    DOEpatents

    Outwater, John O. (Cambridge, MA)

    2000-01-01

    A pressure vessel is provided for observing corrosive fluids at high temperatures and pressures. A transparent Teflon bag contains the corrosive fluid and provides an inert barrier. The Teflon bag is placed within a sapphire tube, which forms a pressure boundary. The tube is received within a pipe including a viewing window. The combination of the Teflon bag, sapphire tube and pipe provides a strong and inert pressure vessel. In an alternative embodiment, tie rods connect together compression fittings at opposite ends of the sapphire tube.

  7. Low Blood Pressure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cardiovascular Library has detailed animations and illustrations to help you learn about conditions, treatments and procedures related to heart disease and ... Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure ...

  8. CC Pressure Test

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.; /Fermilab

    1990-07-12

    The inner vessel heads including bypass and beam tubes had just been welded into place and dye penetrant checked. The vacuum heads were not on at this time but the vacuum shell was on covering the piping penetrating into the inner vessel. Signal boxes with all feed through boards, the instrumentation box, and high voltage boxes were all installed with their pump outs capped. All 1/4-inch instrumentation lines were terminated at their respective shutoff valves. All vacuum piping used for pumping down the inner vessel was isolated using o-ring sealed blind flanges. PV215A (VAT Series 12), the 4-inch VRC gate valve isolating the cyropump, and the rupture disk had to be removed and replaced with blind flanges before pressurizing due to their pressure limitations. Stresses in plates used as blind flanges were checked using Code calcualtions. Before the CC test, vacuum style blanks and clamps were hydrostatically pressure tested to 150% of the maximum test pressure, 60 psig. The Code inspector and Research Division Safety had all given their approval to the test pressure and procedure prior to filling the vessel with argon. The test was a major success. Based on the lack of any distinguishable pressure drop indicated on the pressure gages, the vessel appeared to be structurally sound throughout the duration of the test (approx. 3 hrs.). A major leak in the instrumentation tubing was discovered at half of the maximum test pressure and was quickly isolated by crimping and capping with a compression fitting. There were some slight deviations in the actual procedure used. The 44 psig relief valve located just outside the cleanroom had to be capped until the pressure in the vessel indicated 38 psi. This was to allow higher supply pressures and hence, higher flows through the pressurizing line. Also, in order to get pressure readings at the cryostat without exposing any personnel to the potentially dangerous stored energy near the maximum test pressure, a camera was installed at the top of the vessel to view the indicator mounted there. The monitor was viewed at the ante room adjacent to the cleanroom. The holding pressure of 32 psig (4/5 of the maximum test pressure) was only maintained for about 20 minutes instead of the half hour recommendation in the procedure. We felt that this was sufficient time to Snoop test and perform the pressure drop test. After the test was completed, the inspector for CBI Na-Con and the Research Divison Safety Officer signed all of required documentation.

  9. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, J.

    1996-03-19

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine. 1 fig.

  10. Blood Pressure Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Engineering Development Laboratory developed a system for the cardiovascular study of weightless astronauts. This was designed to aid people with congestive heart failure and diabetes. While in space, astronauts' blood pressure rises, heart rate becomes unstable, and there are sometimes postflight lightheadedness or blackouts. The Baro-Cuff studies the resetting of blood pressure. When a silicone rubber chamber is strapped to the neck, the Baro-Cuff stimulates the carotid arteries by electronically controlled pressure application. Blood pressure controls in patients may be studied.

  11. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, Juhani (Karhula, FI)

    1996-01-01

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine.

  12. Pressure Dependence of Plasma Actuated Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valerioti, Joseph; Corke, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine how Single Dielectric-Barrier Discharge (SDBD) plasma actuators performed under variable ambient pressure. The static pressure was varied from 0.17 to 9.0 bar. The plasma initiation voltage and static thrust were measured and compared to similar data in literature. The results showed that at a given pressure, the plasma initiation voltage scaled with the actuator capacitor per unit area. The measured thrust showed the previously observed power-law relation with voltage, but the exponent varied with pressure. These trends were evaluated against simulations from the SDBD Space-Time Lumped Element Model. Parameters in the model affected by ambient pressure (capacitance, resistance, and Debye length of the air) were then systematically investigated to determine their effects on the plasma-produced body force. The overall trends were best modeled through a pressure dependence of the Debye length.

  13. Dual shell pressure balanced vessel

    DOEpatents

    Fassbender, Alexander G. (West Richland, WA)

    1992-01-01

    A dual-wall pressure balanced vessel for processing high viscosity slurries at high temperatures and pressures having an outer pressure vessel and an inner vessel with an annular space between the vessels pressurized at a pressure slightly less than or equivalent to the pressure within the inner vessel.

  14. Manufacturing Diamond Under Very High Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronov, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    A process for manufacturing bulk diamond has been made practical by the invention of the High Pressure and Temperature Apparatus capable of applying the combination of very high temperature and high pressure needed to melt carbon in a sufficiently large volume. The apparatus includes a reaction cell wherein a controlled static pressure as high as 20 GPa and a controlled temperature as high as 5,000 C can be maintained.

  15. In situ measurement of magnesium carbonate formation from CO2 using static high-pressure and -temperature 13C NMR.

    PubMed

    Surface, J Andrew; Skemer, Philip; Hayes, Sophia E; Conradi, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    We explore a new in situ NMR spectroscopy method that possesses the ability to monitor the chemical evolution of supercritical CO(2) in relevant conditions for geological CO(2) sequestration. As a model, we use the fast reaction of the mineral brucite, Mg(OH)(2), with supercritical CO(2) (88 bar) in aqueous conditions at 80 °C. The in situ conversion of CO(2) into metastable and stable carbonates is observed throughout the reaction. After more than 58 h of reaction, the sample was depressurized and analyzed using in situ Raman spectroscopy, where the laser was focused on the undisturbed products through the glass reaction tube. Postreaction, ex situ analysis was performed on the extracted and dried products using Raman spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and magic-angle spinning (1)H-decoupled (13)C NMR. These separate methods of analysis confirmed a spatial dependence of products, possibly caused by a gradient of reactant availability, pH, and/or a reaction mechanism that involves first forming hydroxy-hydrated (basic, hydrated) carbonates that convert to the end-product, anhydrous magnesite. This carbonation reaction illustrates the importance of static (unmixed) reaction systems at sequestration-like conditions. PMID:22676479

  16. Pressure vessel flex joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B. (inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An airtight, flexible joint is disclosed for the interfacing of two pressure vessels such as between the Space Station docking tunnel and the Space Shuttle Orbiter bulkhead adapter. The joint provides for flexibility while still retaining a structural link between the two vessels required due to the loading created by the internal/external pressure differential. The joint design provides for limiting the axial load carried across the joint to a specific value, a function returned in the Orbiter/Station tunnel interface. The flex joint comprises a floating structural segment which is permanently attached to one of the pressure vessels through the use of an inflatable seal. The geometric configuration of the joint causes the tension between the vessels created by the internal gas pressure to compress the inflatable seal. The inflation pressure of the seal is kept at a value above the internal/external pressure differential of the vessels in order to maintain a controlled distance between the floating segment and pressure vessel. The inflatable seal consists of either a hollow torus-shaped flexible bladder or two rolling convoluted diaphragm seals which may be reinforced by a system of straps or fabric anchored to the hard structures. The joint acts as a flexible link to allow both angular motion and lateral displacement while it still contains the internal pressure and holds the axial tension between the vessels.

  17. Constant-Pressure Sawing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orris, G. M.; Gerrety, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    Attachment for reciprocating power-saw maintains nearly constant cutting pressure even though kerf length varies. Attachment developed for wire saws used to slice cylindrical silicon ingots into wafers for semiconductor devices. By maintaining constant pressure, attachment helps to ensure smooth, flat, uniform wafers. Principle adaptable to straight, toothed saws as well as to wire saws.

  18. Man Under Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, D. J.

    1964-01-01

    Current achievements in environments at pressures higher than atmospheric are reviewed, ranging from the uses of hyperbaric oxygen for treatment to the concept of residence at high pressure for extended Continental Shelf exploration and very deep caisson work. A case is made for the use of high oxygen pressures in the treatment of hypoxias of acute onset, of certain infections, and as an adjunct to radiotherapy. Achievement of the desired high tissue tensions of oxygen while avoiding toxicity requires careful choice of both pressure and duration of exposure. Man has successfully dived to 1000 feet in the sea, and has remained for weeks at high pressures. Adequate prophylactic decompression remains a major problem, since current recompression procedures are to a large extent empirically derived. There are grounds for expecting improved prophylactic and therapeutic procedures when present studies are completed. PMID:14217256

  19. PRESSURE ACTIVATED SEALANT TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Romano

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this project is to develop new, efficient, cost effective methods of internally sealing natural gas pipeline leaks through the application of differential pressure activated sealants. In researching the current state of the art for gas pipeline sealing technologies we concluded that if the project was successful, it appeared that pressure activated sealant technology would provide a cost effective alternative to existing pipeline repair technology. From our analysis of current field data for a 13 year period from 1985 to 1997 we were able to identify 205 leaks that were candidates for pressure activated sealant technology, affirming that pressure activated sealant technology is a viable option to traditional external leak repairs. The data collected included types of defects, areas of defects, pipe sizes and materials, incident and operating pressures, ability of pipeline to be pigged and corrosion states. This data, and subsequent analysis, was utilized as a basis for constructing applicable sealant test modeling.

  20. Velocity and pressure characterization of coaxial jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgenthaler, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Mean velocity and stagnation pressures of a coaxial air jet injected into an ambient atmosphere were measured and local free-stream static pressure profiles were derived from these measurements. The mean velocity profiles show a dramatic decrease in the velocity of the central jet immediately downstream of the injection station. It is found that the high velocity outer jet creates a reduction in static pressure through an aspiration effect, which causes the central jet to spread, thereby reducing its velocity. Results demonstrate that even for the simple coaxial injector geometry often used in H2/O2 rockets, conventional modeling techniques do not apply.

  1. Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) Purpose A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers* Setting Canadian Prevalence,% (95% CI) Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n) Acute care 25 (23.8–26.3) 23.9–29.7 (3418) Nonacute care† 30 (29.3–31.4) 30.0–53.3 (1165) Community care 15 (13.4–16.8) 13.2 (91) Mixed health care‡ 22 (20.9–23.4) 13.1–25.7 (3100) All health care settings 26 (25.2–26.8) 13.1–53.3 (7774) * CI indicates confidence interval. † Nonacute care included sub-acute care, chronic care, complex continuing care, long-term care, and nursing home care. ‡ Mixed health care includes a mixture of acute, nonacute, and/or community care health care delivery settings. Pressure ulcers have a considerable economic impact on health care systems. In Australia, the cost of treating a single stage IV ulcer has been estimated to be greater than $61,000 (AUD) (approximately $54,000 CDN), (3) while in the United Kingdom the total cost of pressure ulcers has been estimated at £1.4–£2.1 billion annually or 4% of the National Health Service expenditure. (4) Because of the high physical and economic burden of pressure ulcers, this review was undertaken to determine which interventions are effective at preventing the development of pressure ulcers in an at-risk population. Review Strategy The main objective of this systematic review is to determine the effectiveness of pressure ulcer preventive interventions including Risk Assessment, Distribution Devices, Nutritional Supplementation, Repositioning, and Incontinence Management. A comprehensive literature search was completed for each of the above 5 preventive interventions. The electronic databases searched included MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature. As well, the bibliographic references of selected studies were searched. All studies meeting explicit inclusion and exclusion criteria for each systematic review section were retained and the quality of the body of evidence was determined using the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. (5) Where appropriate, a meta-analysis was undertaken to determine the overall estimate of effect of the preventive intervention under review. Summary of Findings Ris

  2. Pressurizer tank upper support

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Tod H. (O'Hara Township, Allegheny County, PA); Ott, Howard L. (Kiski Township, Armstrong County, PA)

    1994-01-01

    A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90.degree. intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure.

  3. Pressurizer tank upper support

    DOEpatents

    Baker, T.H.; Ott, H.L.

    1994-01-11

    A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90[degree] intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure. 10 figures.

  4. Pressure Measurement Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    System 8400 is an advanced system for measurement of gas and liquid pressure, along with a variety of other parameters, including voltage, frequency and digital inputs. System 8400 offers exceptionally high speed data acquisition through parallel processing, and its modular design allows expansion from a relatively inexpensive entry level system by the addition of modular Input Units that can be installed or removed in minutes. Douglas Juanarena was on the team of engineers that developed a new technology known as ESP (electronically scanned pressure). The Langley ESP measurement system was based on miniature integrated circuit pressure-sensing transducers that communicated pressure information to a minicomputer. In 1977, Juanarena formed PSI to exploit the NASA technology. In 1978 he left Langley, obtained a NASA license for the technology, introduced the first commercial product, the 780B pressure measurement system. PSI developed a pressure scanner for automation of industrial processes. Now in its second design generation, the DPT-6400 is capable of making 2,000 measurements a second and has 64 channels by addition of slave units. New system 8400 represents PSI's bid to further exploit the $600 million U.S. industrial pressure measurement market. It is geared to provide a turnkey solution to physical measurement.

  5. Please cite this article in press as: Birkholzer, J.T., et al., Brine flow up a well caused by pressure perturbation from geologic carbon sequestration: Static and dynamic evaluations. Int. J. Greenhouse Gas Control (2011), doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2011.01.003

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Quanlin

    2011-01-01

    by pressure perturbation from geologic carbon sequestration: Static and dynamic evaluations. Int. J.elsevier.com/locate/ijggc Brine flow up a well caused by pressure perturbation from geologic carbon sequestration: Static carbon sequestration (GCS) has drawn increasing con- sideration as a promising method to mitigate

  6. High Temperature Dynamic Pressure Measurements Using Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Meredith, Roger D.; Chang, Clarence T.; Savrun, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Un-cooled, MEMS-based silicon carbide (SiC) static pressure sensors were used for the first time to measure pressure perturbations at temperatures as high as 600 C during laboratory characterization, and subsequently evaluated in a combustor rig operated under various engine conditions to extract the frequencies that are associated with thermoacoustic instabilities. One SiC sensor was placed directly in the flow stream of the combustor rig while a benchmark commercial water-cooled piezoceramic dynamic pressure transducer was co-located axially but kept some distance away from the hot flow stream. In the combustor rig test, the SiC sensor detected thermoacoustic instabilities across a range of engine operating conditions, amplitude magnitude as low as 0.5 psi at 585 C, in good agreement with the benchmark piezoceramic sensor. The SiC sensor experienced low signal to noise ratio at higher temperature, primarily due to the fact that it was a static sensor with low sensitivity.

  7. Atmospheric Pressure During Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This figure shows the variation with time of pressure (dots) measured by the Pathfinder MET instrument during the landing period shown in image PIA00797. The two diamonds indicate the times of bridal cutting and 1st impact. The overall trend in the data is of pressure increasing with time. This is almost certainly due to the lander rolling downhill by roughly 10 m. The spacing of the horizontal dotted lines indicates the pressure change expected from 10 m changes in altitude. Bounces may also be visible in the data.

  8. High Blood Pressure and Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More High Blood Pressure and Women Updated:Aug 13,2014 Many people ... content was last reviewed on 08/04/14. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) • Why HBP ...

  9. Blood Pressure Medicine: Special Instructions

    E-print Network

    Shen, Jun

    Diary Lifestyle Changes To Help Reduce High Blood Pressure Talk with your doctor about the lifestyle your blood pressure. Carry This Card To Help Prevent or Control High Blood Pressure My Blood PressureBlood Pressure Medicine: Special Instructions: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

  10. Pressure gradients affecting the labyrinth during hypobaric pressure. Experimental study.

    PubMed

    Konrádsson, K S; Carlborg, B I; Farmer, J C

    1997-06-01

    Hypobaric effects on the perilymph pressure were investigated in 18 cats. The perilymph, tympanic cavity, cerebrospinal fluid, and systemic and ambient pressure changes were continuously recorded relative to the atmospheric pressure. The pressure equilibration of the eustachian tube and the cochlear aqueduct was studied, as well as the effects of blocking these channels. During ascent, the physiologic opening of the eustachian tube reduced the pressure gradients across the tympanic membrane. The patent cochlear aqueduct equilibrated perilymph pressure to cerebrospinal fluid compartment levels with a considerable pressure gradient across the oval and round windows. With the aqueduct blocked, the pressure decrease within the labyrinth and tympanic cavities was limited, resulting in large pressure gradients toward the chamber and the cerebrospinal fluid compartments, respectively. We conclude that closed cavities with limited pressure release capacities are the cause of the pressure gradients. The strain exerted by these pressure gradients is potentially harmful to the ear. PMID:9199610

  11. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Commercial Diving Operations Periodic Tests and Inspections of Diving Equipment § 197.462 Pressure vessels and pressure piping. (a) The diving supervisor shall ensure that each pressure vessel, including each volume tank, cylinder and...

  12. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Commercial Diving Operations Periodic Tests and Inspections of Diving Equipment § 197.462 Pressure vessels and pressure piping. (a) The diving supervisor shall ensure that each pressure vessel, including each volume tank, cylinder and...

  13. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Commercial Diving Operations Periodic Tests and Inspections of Diving Equipment § 197.462 Pressure vessels and pressure piping. (a) The diving supervisor shall ensure that each pressure vessel, including each volume tank, cylinder and...

  14. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Commercial Diving Operations Periodic Tests and Inspections of Diving Equipment § 197.462 Pressure vessels and pressure piping. (a) The diving supervisor shall ensure that each pressure vessel, including each volume tank, cylinder and...

  15. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Commercial Diving Operations Periodic Tests and Inspections of Diving Equipment § 197.462 Pressure vessels and pressure piping. (a) The diving supervisor shall ensure that each pressure vessel, including each volume tank, cylinder and...

  16. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... pressure using the breathing mixture normally used in service. (3) Equivalent nondestructive testing may be conducted in lieu of pressure testing. Proposals to use nondestructive testing in lieu of pressure...

  17. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... pressure using the breathing mixture normally used in service. (3) Equivalent nondestructive testing may be conducted in lieu of pressure testing. Proposals to use nondestructive testing in lieu of pressure...

  18. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... pressure using the breathing mixture normally used in service. (3) Equivalent nondestructive testing may be conducted in lieu of pressure testing. Proposals to use nondestructive testing in lieu of pressure...

  19. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... pressure using the breathing mixture normally used in service. (3) Equivalent nondestructive testing may be conducted in lieu of pressure testing. Proposals to use nondestructive testing in lieu of pressure...

  20. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... pressure using the breathing mixture normally used in service. (3) Equivalent nondestructive testing may be conducted in lieu of pressure testing. Proposals to use nondestructive testing in lieu of pressure...

  1. Internal pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dowalo, James A. (Blackfoot, ID) [Blackfoot, ID

    2010-03-16

    A pressure sensor for sensing changes in pressure in an enclosed vessel may include a first chamber having at least one expandable section therein that allows that first chamber to change in length. A reference member mounted within the first chamber moves as a result of changes in length of the first chamber. A second chamber having an expandable section therein allows the second chamber to change in length in response to changes in pressure in the enclosed vessel. The second chamber is operatively associated with the first chamber so that changes in length of the second chamber result in changes in length of the first chamber. A sensor operatively associated with the reference member detects changes in position of the reference member. Changes in position of the reference member are related to changes in pressure in the enclosed vessel.

  2. Osteomyelitis beneath pressure sores

    SciTech Connect

    Sugarman, B.; Hawes, S.; Musher, D.M.; Klima, M.; Young, E.J.; Pircher, F.

    1983-04-01

    Twenty-eight pressure sores were evaluated prospectively. Osteomyelitis was reported histologically in nine of 28 bones and pressure-related changes were reported in 14 bones. Roentgenograms suggested the presence of osteomyelitis in four instances of histologically proved osteomyelitis. Technetium Tc 99m medronate bone scans were highly sensitive, showing increased uptake in all cases of osteomyelitis; however, increased uptake also occurred commonly in uninfected bones due to pressure-related changes or other noninfectious causes. Cultures of bone biopsy samples usually disclosed anaerobic bacteria, gram-negative bacilli, or both. The diagnosis of osteomyelitis must be considered if a pressure sore does not respond to local therapy. If the technetium Tc 99m medronate uptake is increased in the involved area, or roentgenographic findings are abnormal, the diagnosis can only be made with certainty by histologic examination of bone. Antibacterial treatment should be selected based on the results of bone culture.

  3. Preventing Pressure Sores

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... sores? What's the best way to do daily skin inspections? What are the most important things for ... in bed to prevent pressure sores? What is “skin tolerance” and how can it be increased? What ...

  4. Blood Pressure Checker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    An estimated 30 million people in the United States have high blood pressure, or hypertension. But a great many of them are unaware of it because hypertension, in its initial stages, displays no symptoms. Thus, the simply-operated blood pressure checking devices now widely located in public places are useful health aids. The one pictured above, called -Medimax 30, is a direct spinoff from NASA technology developed to monitor astronauts in space. For manned space flights, NASA wanted a compact, highly-reliable, extremely accurate method of checking astronauts' blood pressure without the need for a physician's interpretive skill. NASA's Johnson Space Center and Technology, Inc., a contractor, developed an electronic sound processor that automatically analyzes blood flow sounds to get both systolic (contracting arteries) and diastolic (expanding arteries) blood pressure measurements. NASA granted a patent license for this technology to Advanced Life Sciences, Inc., New York City, manufacturers of Medimax 30.

  5. High blood pressure medications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... may go away over time. Some common side effects of high blood pressure medicines include: Cough Diarrhea or constipation Dizziness or light-headedness Erection problems Feeling nervous Feeling tired, weak, ...

  6. On Time Performance Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda; Wichner, David; Jakey, Abegael

    2013-01-01

    Within many operations, the pressures for on-time performance are high. Each month, on-time statistics are reported to the Department of Transportation and made public. There is a natural tendency for employees under pressure to do their best to meet these objectives. As a result, pressure to get the job done within the allotted time may cause personnel to deviate from procedures and policies. Additionally, inadequate or unavailable resources may drive employees to work around standard processes that are seen as barriers. However, bypassing practices to enable on-time performance may affect more than the statistics. ASRS reports often highlight on-time performance pressures which may result in impact across all workgroups in an attempt to achieve on-time performance. Reporters often provide in-depth insights into their experiences which can be used by industry to identify and focus on the implementation of systemic fixes.

  7. Capacitance pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Eaton, William P. (Tijeras, NM); Staple, Bevan D. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, James H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) capacitance pressure sensor integrated with electronic circuitry on a common substrate and a method for forming such a device are disclosed. The MEM capacitance pressure sensor includes a capacitance pressure sensor formed at least partially in a cavity etched below the surface of a silicon substrate and adjacent circuitry (CMOS, BiCMOS, or bipolar circuitry) formed on the substrate. By forming the capacitance pressure sensor in the cavity, the substrate can be planarized (e.g. by chemical-mechanical polishing) so that a standard set of integrated circuit processing steps can be used to form the electronic circuitry (e.g. using an aluminum or aluminum-alloy interconnect metallization).

  8. [Negative pressure therapy: NPT].

    PubMed

    Maillard, H

    2015-01-01

    Negative pressure therapy or treatment (NPT) is used very frequently in hospitals in both surgical and medical departments. NPT consists of maintaining the wound surface at a pressure below ambient atmospheric pressure by means of a specially designed dressing attached to a depressurisation device as well as a system to drain exudate. NPT has been shown to be beneficial in increasing blood flow, thanks to feedback resulting from the decreased oxygen pressure, angiogenesis and reduction of the wound surface area. The French Health Authority (HAS) has issued recommendations for good use in a specific and limited series of applications. NPT may be used in post-traumatic or post-surgical wounds, burns, and in chronic wounds, such as bedsores and ulcers. It is also effective as an adjuvant treatment for infected wounds. In recent years, various different NPT devices have become commercially available. PMID:26249531

  9. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hydrocephalus Overview What Is Dementia? Types of Dementia Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Dementia with Lewy Bodies Down Syndrome Frontotemporal Dementia ... Lewy Bodies Mixed Dementia Vascular Dementia Frontotemporal ... Pressure Hydrocephalus Huntington's Disease Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome ...

  10. Pressurized Vessel Slurry Pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Pound, C.R.

    2001-09-17

    This report summarizes testing of an alternate ''pressurized vessel slurry pumping'' apparatus. The principle is similar to rural domestic water systems and ''acid eggs'' used in chemical laboratories in that material is extruded by displacement with compressed air.

  11. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... risk for stroke, heart disease, heart attack, and kidney failure. Controlling your blood pressure can reduce these risks. ... risks and benefits of taking this medicine? Could alternative therapies such as meditation, yoga or acupuncture help lower ...

  12. Pressure multiplying dispenser

    DOEpatents

    DeFord, Henry S. (Kennewick, WA); Moss, Owen R. (Kennewick, WA)

    1986-01-01

    A pressure multiplying dispenser for delivering fluid, preferably as a spray to the atmosphere, from a source of fluid, preferably a spray bottle, is described. The dispenser includes in combination a hollow cylindrical member, a nozzle delivery tube within the cylindrical member and a hollow actuator piston slideable within the cylindrical member which acts to multiply the pressure of a squeeze applied to the spray bottle.

  13. Radial pressure flange seal

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1989-01-24

    This invention provides an all metal seal for vacuum or pressure vessels or systems. This invention does not use gaskets. The invention uses a flange which fits into a matching groove. Fluid pressure is applied in a chamber in the flange causing at least one of the flange walls to radially press against a side of the groove creating the seal between the flange wall and the groove side. 5 figs.

  14. High-pressure microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjort, K.

    2015-03-01

    When using appropriate materials and microfabrication techniques, with the small dimensions the mechanical stability of microstructured devices allows for processes at high pressures without loss in safety. The largest area of applications has been demonstrated in green chemistry and bioprocesses, where extraction, synthesis and analyses often excel at high densities and high temperatures. This is accessible through high pressures. Capillary chemistry has been used since long but, just like in low-pressure applications, there are several potential advantages in using microfluidic platforms, e.g., planar isothermal set-ups, large local variations in geometries, dense form factors, small dead volumes and precisely positioned microstructures for control of reactions, catalysis, mixing and separation. Other potential applications are in, e.g., microhydraulics, exploration, gas driven vehicles, and high-pressure science. From a review of the state-of-art and frontiers of high pressure microfluidics, the focus will be on different solutions demonstrated for microfluidic handling at high pressures and challenges that remain.

  15. Pressure Core Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates form under high fluid pressure and low temperature, and are found in permafrost, deep lakes or ocean sediments. Hydrate dissociation by depressurization and/or heating is accompanied by a multifold hydrate volume expansion and host sediments with low permeability experience massive destructuration. Proper characterization requires coring, recovery, manipulation and testing under P-T conditions within the stability field. Pressure core technology allows for the reliable characterization of hydrate bearing sediments within the stability field in order to address scientific and engineering needs, including the measurement of parameters used in hydro-thermo-mechanical analyses, and the monitoring of hydrate dissociation under controlled pressure, temperature, effective stress and chemical conditions. Inherent sampling effects remain and need to be addressed in test protocols and data interpretation. Pressure core technology has been deployed to study hydrate bearing sediments at several locations around the world. In addition to pressure core testing, a comprehensive characterization program should include sediment analysis, testing of reconstituted specimens (with and without synthetic hydrate), and in situ testing. Pressure core characterization technology can be used to study other gas-charged formations such as deep sea sediments, coal bed methane and gas shales.

  16. Prevention of High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Prevention of High Blood Pressure Healthy lifestyle habits, proper use of medicines, and ... prevent high blood pressure or its complications. Preventing High Blood Pressure Onset Healthy lifestyle habits can help prevent high ...

  17. Helping Teens Resist Sexual Pressure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Helping Teens Resist Sexual Pressure Article Body Teens are more ... younger the first time they had intercourse. Helping Teens Resist Sexual Pressure “The pressure on teenagers to ...

  18. Blood pressure monitors for home

    MedlinePLUS

    ... type of blood pressure monitor for home use. DIGITAL BLOOD PRESSURE MONITORS A digital device will also have a cuff that wraps ... on its own. The screen will show a digital readout of your systolic and diastolic blood pressure. ...

  19. Optical zero-differential pressure switch and its evaluation in a multiple pressure measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The design of a clamped-diaphragm pressure switch is described in which diaphragm motion is detected by a simple fiber-optic displacement sensor. The switch was evaluated in a pressure measurement system where it detected the zero crossing of the differential pressure between a static test pressure and a tank pressure that was periodically ramped from near zero to fullscale gage pressure. With a ramping frequency of 1 hertz and a full-scale tank pressure of 69 N/sq cm gage (100 psig), the switch delay was as long as 2 milliseconds. Pressure measurement accuracies were 0.25 to 0.75 percent of full scale. Factors affecting switch performance are also discussed.

  20. Automated high pressure cell for pressure jump x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Nicholas J.; Gauthe, Beatrice L. L. E.; Templer, Richard H.; Ces, Oscar; Seddon, John M.; Terrill, Nick J.; Rogers, Sarah E.

    2010-06-15

    A high pressure cell for small and wide-angle x-ray diffraction measurements of soft condensed matter samples has been developed, incorporating a fully automated pressure generating network. The system allows both static and pressure jump measurements in the range of 0.1-500 MPa. Pressure jumps can be performed as quickly as 5 ms, both with increasing and decreasing pressures. Pressure is generated by a motorized high pressure pump, and the system is controlled remotely via a graphical user interface to allow operation by a broad user base, many of whom may have little previous experience of high pressure technology. Samples are loaded through a dedicated port allowing the x-ray windows to remain in place throughout an experiment; this facilitates accurate subtraction of background scattering. The system has been designed specifically for use at beamline I22 at the Diamond Light Source, United Kingdom, and has been fully integrated with the I22 beamline control systems.

  1. Cryogenic High Pressure Sensor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  2. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  3. Passive blast pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

    2013-03-19

    A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

  4. Diamondoids under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, F.; Lin, Y.; Mao, W. L.

    2012-12-01

    Diamondoid molecules are ultra-stable, saturated hydrocarbons consisting of fused carbon cages superimposing on the diamond lattice, originally found in petroleum. These hydrocarbons, especially higher diamondoids, have been of great interest in recent years due to their potential role in nanotechnology, electronics,and medical technologies. However, the large number of possible intermediates, reaction pathways, and complex reaction kinetics make the synthesis of higher diamondoids extremely difficult. Here we report our efforts in investigating the [121] tetramantane at high pressure by combining x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy up to 20 GPa. XRD shows that the [121] tetramantane in a monoclinic structure starts to transform into a high pressure phase at approximately 6 GPa and the transition was almost complete at around 20 GPa. In addition, the high pressure phase displays a large metastability field upon decompression. Raman studies also confirmed this phase transition and the metastability of the high pressure phase based on the peak splitting and pressure shifts, as well as changes in the relative intensity of the most intense peaks. Our study may have implications for developing alternative approaches to synthesize higher diamondoids.

  5. Automated Blood Pressure Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The Vital-2 unit pictured is a semi-automatic device that permits highly accurate blood pressure measurement, even by untrained personnel. Developed by Meditron Instrument Corporation, Milford, New Hampshire, it is based in part on NASA technology found in a similar system designed for automatic monitoring of astronauts' blood pressure. Vital-2 is an advancement over the familiar arm cuff, dial and bulb apparatus customarily used for blood pressure checks. In that method, the physician squeezes the bulb to inflate the arm cuff, which restricts the flow of blood through the arteries. As he eases the pressure on the arm, he listens, through a stethoscope, to the sounds of resumed blood flow as the arteries expand and contract. Taking dial readings related to sound changes, he gets the systolic (contracting) and diastolic (expanding) blood pressure measurements. The accuracy of the method depends on the physician's skill in interpreting the sounds. Hospitals sometimes employ a more accurate procedure, but it is "invasive," involving insertion of a catheter in the artery.

  6. Flow compensating pressure regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F. (inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for regulating pressure of treatment fluid during ophthalmic procedures is described. Flow sensing and pressure regulating diaphragms are used to modulate a flow control valve. The pressure regulating diaphragm is connected to the flow control valve to urge the valve to an open position due to pressure being applied to the diaphragm by bias means such as a spring. The flow sensing diaphragm is mechanically connected to the flow control valve and urges it to an opened position because of the differential pressure on the diaphragm generated by a flow of incoming treatment fluid through an orifice in the diaphragm. A bypass connection with a variable restriction is connected in parallel relationship to the orifice to provide for adjusting the sensitivity of the flow sensing diaphragm. A multiple lever linkage system is utilized between the center of the second diaphragm and the flow control valve to multiply the force applied to the valve by the other diaphragm and reverse the direction of the force.

  7. A Microwave Pressure Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    An instrument to measure atmospheric pressure at the earth's surface from an orbiting satellite would be a valuable addition to the expanding inventory of remote sensors. The subject of this report is such an instrument - the Microwave Pressure Sounder (MPS). It is shown that global-ocean coverage is attainable with sufficient accuracy, resolution and observational frequency for meteorological, oceanographic and climate research applications. Surface pressure can be deduced from a measurement of the absorption by an atmospheric column at a frequency in the wing of the oxygen band centered on 60 GHz. An active multifrequency instrument is needed to make this measurement with sufficient accuracy. The selection of optimum operating frequencies is based upon accepted models of surface reflection, oxygen, water vapor and cloud absorption. Numerical simulation using a range of real atmospheres defined by radiosonde observations were used to validate the frequency selection procedure. Analyses are presented of alternative system configurations that define the balance between accuracy and achievable resolution.

  8. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

  9. Magnetostrictive Pressure Regulating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A. (Inventor); Pickens, Herman L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A magnetostrictive pressure regulating system includes a magnetostrictive valve that incorporates a magnetostrictive actuator with at least one current-carrying coil disposed thereabout. A pressure force sensor, in fluid communication with the fluid exiting the valve, includes (i) a magnetostrictive material, (ii) a magnetic field generator in proximity to the magnetostrictive material for inducing a magnetic field in and surrounding the magnetostrictive material wherein lines of magnetic flux passing through the magnetostrictive material are defined, and (iii) a sensor positioned adjacent to the magnetostrictive material and in the magnetic field for measuring changes in at least one of flux angle and flux density when the magnetostrictive material experiences an applied force that is aligned with the lines of magnetic flux. The pressure of the fluid exiting the valve causes the applied force. A controller coupled to the sensor and to the current-carrying coil adjusts a current supplied to the current-carrying coil based on the changes so-measured.

  10. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  11. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1994-01-01

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  12. [Myth of optimal pressure].

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, E J; Maltha, J C

    2000-04-01

    Orthodontic tooth movement always follows the same pattern. Four phases can be distinguished. During the last phase, the linear phase, the tooth moves through the alveolar bone. One could assume that the rate of tooth displacement is related to the magnitude of the force or to the pressure in the periodontal ligament. No consensus exists on the optimal pressure for orthodontic tooth movement. In literature pressures are advocated, ranging from 2 to 30 KPa. Animal experiments show that a large range of force magnitudes results in an equal rate of tooth movement. A dose-response relation is only feasible when forces are used which are far below those used in an everyday practice. PMID:11382967

  13. Circumferential pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Harlan K. (inventor); Moore, Thomas C. (inventor); Fantl, Andrew J. (inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A probe for measuring circumferential pressure inside a body cavity is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, a urodynamic pressure measurement probe for evaluating human urinary sphincter function is disclosed. Along the length of the probe are disposed a multiplicity of deformable wall sensors which typically comprise support tube sections with flexible side wall areas. These are arranged along the length of the probe in two areas, one just proximal to the tip for the sensing of fluid pressure inside the bladder, and five in the sensing section which is positioned within the urethra at the point at which the urinary sphincter constricts to control the flow of urine. The remainder of the length of the probe comprises multiple rigid support tube sections interspersed with flexible support tube sections in the form of bellows to provide flexibility.

  14. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Townsend, Harold E. (San Jose, CA)

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

  15. Blood Pressure Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Engineering Development Lab., Inc.'s E-2000 Neck Baro Reflex System was developed for cardiovascular studies of astronauts. It is regularly used on Space Shuttle Missions, and a parallel version has been developed as a research tool to facilitate studies of blood pressure reflex controls in patients with congestive heart failure, diabetes, etc. An advanced version, the PPC-1000, was developed in 1991, and the technology has been refined substantially. The PPC provides an accurate means of generating pressure for a broad array of laboratory applications. An improved version, the E2010 Barosystem, is anticipated.

  16. Tal Carmon Radiation pressure induced

    E-print Network

    Tal Carmon Radiation pressure induced vibrations Tal Carmon RP induced vibrations RP induced #12;Tal Carmon Radiation pressure induced vibrations Tal Carmon RP induced vibrations · First proposed radiation pressure to be the reason. Who is interested in radiation pressure? #12;Tal Carmon Radiation

  17. Myths about High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Myths About High Blood Pressure Updated:Aug 12,2014 You CAN manage your ... content was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) Introduction What ...

  18. Living with High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With High Blood Pressure If you have high blood pressure, the best thing to do is to talk ... help you track your blood pressure. Pregnancy Planning High blood pressure can cause problems for mother and baby. High ...

  19. Potassium and High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Potassium and High Blood Pressure Updated:Aug 14,2014 A diet that includes ... content was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) • Why HBP ...

  20. Saltstone Osmotic Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, Ralph L.; Dixon, Kenneth L.

    2013-09-23

    Recent research into the moisture retention properties of saltstone suggest that osmotic pressure may play a potentially significant role in contaminant transport (Dixon et al., 2009 and Dixon, 2011). The Savannah River Remediation Closure and Disposal Assessments Group requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct a literature search on osmotic potential as it relates to contaminant transport and to develop a conceptual model of saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. This report presents the findings of the literature review and presents a conceptual model for saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. The task was requested through Task Technical Request HLW-SSF-TTR-2013-0004. Simulated saltstone typically has very low permeability (Dixon et al. 2008) and pore water that contains a large concentration of dissolved salts (Flach and Smith 2013). Pore water in simulated saltstone has a high salt concentration relative to pore water in concrete and groundwater. This contrast in salt concentration can generate high osmotic pressures if simulated saltstone has the properties of a semipermeable membrane. Estimates of osmotic pressure using results from the analysis of pore water collected from simulated saltstone show that an osmotic pressure up to 2790 psig could be generated within the saltstone. Most semi-permeable materials are non-ideal and have an osmotic efficiency <1 and as a result actual osmotic pressures are less than theoretical pressures. Observations from laboratory tests of simulated saltstone indicate that it may exhibit the behavior of a semi-permeable membrane. After several weeks of back pressure saturation in a flexible wall permeameter (FWP) the membrane containing a simulated saltstone sample appeared to have bubbles underneath it. Upon removal from the FWP the specimen was examined and it was determined that the bubbles were due to liquid that had accumulated between the membrane and the sample. One possible explanation for the accumulation of solution between the membrane and sample is the development of osmotic pressure within the sample. Osmotic pressure will affect fluid flow and contaminant transport and may result in the changes to the internal structure of the semi-permeable material. B?nard et al. 2008 reported swelling of wet cured Portland cement mortars containing salts of NaNO{sub 3}, KNO{sub 3}, Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}x12H {sub 2}O, and K{sub 3}PO{sub 4} when exposed to a dilute solution. Typically hydraulic head is considered the only driving force for groundwater in groundwater models. If a low permeability material containing a concentrated salt solution is present in the hydrogeologic sequence large osmotic pressures may develop and lead to misinterpretation of groundwater flow and solute transport. The osmotic pressure in the semi-permeable material can significantly impact groundwater flow in the vicinity of the semi-permeable material. One possible outcome is that groundwater will flow into the semi-permeable material resulting in hydrologic containment within the membrane. Additionally, hyperfiltration can occur within semi-permeable materials when water moves through a membrane into the more concentrated solution and dissolved constituents are retained in the lower concentration solution. Groundwater flow and transport equations that incorporate chemical gradients (osmosis) have been developed. These equations are referred to as coupled flow equations. Currently groundwater modeling to assess the performance of saltstone waste forms is conducted using the PORFLOW groundwater flow and transport model. PORFLOW does not include coupled flow from chemico-osmotic gradients and therefore numerical simulation of the effect of coupled flow on contaminant transport in and around saltstone cannot be assessed. Most natural semi-permeable membranes are non-ideal membranes and do not restrict all movement of solutes and as a result theoretical osmotic potential is not realized. Osmotic efficiency is a parameter in the coupled flow equation that accounts for the

  1. Reactor pressure vessel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C. (Livermore, CA); Upton, Hubert A. (Morgan Hill, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A nozzle for joining a pool of water to a nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a tubular body having a proximal end joinable to the pressure vessel and a distal end joinable in flow communication with the pool. The body includes a flow passage therethrough having in serial flow communication a first port at the distal end, a throat spaced axially from the first port, a conical channel extending axially from the throat, and a second port at the proximal end which is joinable in flow communication with the pressure vessel. The inner diameter of the flow passage decreases from the first port to the throat and then increases along the conical channel to the second port. In this way, the conical channel acts as a diverging channel or diffuser in the forward flow direction from the first port to the second port for recovering pressure due to the flow restriction provided by the throat. In the backflow direction from the second port to the first port, the conical channel is a converging channel and with the abrupt increase in flow area from the throat to the first port collectively increase resistance to flow therethrough.

  2. Arterial Pressure Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heusner, A. A.; Tracy, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a simple hydraulic analog which allows students to explore some physical aspects of the cardiovascular system and provides them with a means to visualize and conceptualize these basic principles. Simulates the behavior of arterial pressure in response to changes in heart rate, stroke volume, arterial compliance, and peripheral…

  3. Characteristics of pressure waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Air blast characteristics generated by most types of explosions are discussed. Data cover both negative and positive blast load phases and net transverse pressure as a function of time. The effects of partial or total confinement, atmospheric propagation, absorption of energy by ground shock or cratering, and transmission over irregular terrain on blast wave properties were also considered.

  4. Pressure wall patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamsen, Joel E.; Weddendorf, Bruce

    1992-10-01

    A rigid patch body for placing over a damaged portion (hole) of an external wall of a pressurized vessel, such as a space vehicle or a habitat, is discussed. The rigid patch body allows an astronaut to make temporary repairs to the pressurized vessel from the exterior of the vessel, which enables more permanent repairs to be made from the interior of the vessel. The pressure wall patch of the present invention includes a floor surrounded by four side members. Each side member includes a threaded screw for anchoring the patch body to the external wall of the pressurized vessel and a recess in its lower surface for supporting an inflatable bladder for surrounding the damaged portion (hole) of the external wall to seal the area surrounding the damaged portion. This allows the vessel to be repressurized. The floor of the rigid patch body supports a source of gas that is connected to the gas supply valve and a gas supply gauge in communication with the gas supply valve and the inflatable bladder.

  5. Pressure wall patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamsen, Joel E.; Weddendorf, Bruce C.

    1994-01-01

    A rigid patch body for placing over a damaged portion (hole) of an external wall of a pressurized vessel, such as a space vehicle or a habitat, is discussed. The rigid patch body allows an astronaut to make temporary repairs to the pressurized vessel from the exterior of the vessel, which enables more permanent repairs to be made from the interior of the vessel. The pressure wall patch of the present invention includes a floor surrounded by four side members. Each side member includes a threaded screw for anchoring the patch body to the external wall of the pressurized vessel and a recess in its lower surface for supporting an inflatable bladder for surrounding the damaged portion (hole) of the external wall to seal the area surrounding the damaged portion. This allows the vessel to be repressurized. The floor of the rigid patch body supports a source of gas that is connected to the gas supply valve and a gas supply gauge in communication with the gas supply valve and the inflatable bladder.

  6. Controlling High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... that can lead to healthy tomorrows. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Health Statistics High Blood Pressure About MedlinePlus Site Map ... Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page ...

  7. Normal pressure hydrocephalus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... means "water on the brain." Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is a rise in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in ... There is no known cause for NPH. But the chance of developing NPH is high in someone who has had any of the following: Bleeding from a blood vessel ...

  8. Cellular Pressure-Actuated Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, John R.

    2003-01-01

    A modification of a pressure-actuated joint has been proposed to improve its pressure actuation in such a manner as to reduce the potential for leakage of the pressurizing fluid. The specific joint for which the modification is proposed is a field joint in a reusable solid-fuel rocket motor (RSRM), in which the pressurizing fluid is a mixture of hot combustion gases. The proposed modification could also be applicable to other pressure-actuated joints of similar configuration.

  9. Pressure relieving support surfaces (PRESSURE) trial: cost effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, Cynthia; Nixon, Jane; Cranny, Gillian; Nelson, E Andrea; Hawkins, Kim; Phillips, Angela; Torgerson, David; Mason, Su; Cullum, Nicky

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess the cost effectiveness of alternating pressure mattresses compared with alternating pressure overlays for the prevention of pressure ulcers in patients admitted to hospital. Design Cost effectiveness analysis carried out alongside the pressure relieving support surfaces (PRESSURE) trial; a multicentre UK based pragmatic randomised controlled trial. Setting 11 hospitals in six UK NHS trusts. Participants Intention to treat population comprising 1971 participants. Main outcome measures Kaplan Meier estimates of restricted mean time to development of pressure ulcers and total costs for treatment in hospital. Results Alternating pressure mattresses were associated with lower overall costs (£283.6 per patient on average, 95% confidence interval - £377.59 to £976.79) mainly due to reduced length of stay in hospital, and greater benefits (a delay in time to ulceration of 10.64 days on average, - 24.40 to 3.09). The differences in health benefits and total costs for hospital stay between alternating pressure mattresses and alternating pressure overlays were not statistically significant; however, a cost effectiveness acceptability curve indicated that on average alternating pressure mattresses compared with alternating pressure overlays were associated with an 80% probability of being cost saving. Conclusion Alternating pressure mattresses for the prevention of pressure ulcers are more likely to be cost effective and are more acceptable to patients than alternating pressure overlays. PMID:16740528

  10. Pressure natriuresis and the renal control of arterial blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ivy, Jessica R; Bailey, Matthew A

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of extracellular fluid volume by renal sodium excretion lies at the centre of blood pressure homeostasis. Renal perfusion pressure can directly regulate sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule. This acute pressure natriuresis response is a uniquely powerful means of stabilizing long-term blood pressure around a set point. By logical extension, deviation from the set point can only be sustained if the pressure natriuresis mechanism is impaired, suggesting that hypertension is caused or sustained by a defect in the relationship between renal perfusion pressure and sodium excretion. Here we describe the role of pressure natriuresis in blood pressure control and outline the cascade of biophysical and paracrine events in the renal medulla that integrate the vascular and tubular response to altered perfusion pressure. Pressure natriuresis is impaired in hypertension and mechanistic insight into dysfunction comes from genetic analysis of blood pressure disorders. Transplantation studies in rats show that blood pressure is determined by the genotype of the kidney and Mendelian hypertension indicates that the distal nephron influences the overall natriuretic efficiency. These approaches and the outcomes of genome-wide-association studies broaden our view of blood pressure control, suggesting that renal sympathetic nerve activity and local inflammation can impair pressure natriuresis to cause hypertension. Understanding how these systems interact is necessary to tackle the global burden of hypertension. PMID:25107929

  11. Study of the laser-induced decomposition of energetic materials at static high-pressure by time-resolved absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebert, Philippe; Saint-Amans, Charles

    2013-06-01

    A detailed description of the reaction rates and mechanisms occurring in shock-induced decomposition of condensed explosives is very important to improve the predictive capabilities of shock-to-detonation transition models. However, direct measurements of such experimental data are difficult to perform during detonation experiments. By coupling pulsed laser ignition of an explosive in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) with time-resolved streak camera recording of transmitted light, it is possible to make direct observations of deflagration phenomena at detonation pressure. We have developed an experimental set-up that allows combustion front propagation rates and time-resolved absorption spectroscopy measurements. The decomposition reactions are initiated using a nanosecond YAG laser and their kinetics is followed by time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. The results obtained for two explosives, nitromethane (NM) and HMX are presented in this paper. For NM, a change in reactivity is clearly seen around 25 GPa. Below this pressure, the reaction products are essentially carbon residues whereas at higher pressure, a transient absorption feature is first observed and is followed by the formation of a white amorphous product. For HMX, the evolution of the absorption as a function of time indicates a multi-step reaction mechanism which is found to depend on both the initial pressure and the laser fluence.

  12. Home monitoring of blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Barry P

    2015-01-01

    Summary Home blood pressure monitoring is the self-measurement of blood pressure by patients. In the diagnosis and management of high blood pressure it is complementary to 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and clinic blood pressure measurements. Home monitoring can also help to identify white-coat and masked hypertension. Home monitoring has good reproducibility, is well tolerated and relatively inexpensive. It is superior to blood pressure taken in the clinic in predicting cardiovascular events and mortality. Twice-daily measurements are recommended, usually in the morning and evening for a minimum of five days. The threshold for defining hypertension is an average home blood pressure of 135/85 mmHg or above. Patients are engaged with their management when they monitor their own blood pressure. This results in increased adherence to therapy and lower blood pressure.

  13. Implanted Blood-Pressure-Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischell, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    Arterial pressure compared with ambient bodily-fluid pressure. Implanted apparatus, capable of measuring blood pressure of patient, includes differential-pressure transducer connected to pressure sensor positioned in major artery. Electrical signal is function of differential pressure between blood-pressure sensor and reference-pressure sensor transmitted through skin of patient to recorder or indicator.

  14. Configurational constant pressure molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Carlos; Travis, Karl P.

    2006-03-01

    We propose two new algorithms for generating isothermal-isobaric molecular dynamics. The algorithms are based on an extended phase space dynamics where two extra degrees of freedom, representing the thermostat and the barostat, are included. These new methods adopt a totally different approach towards molecular dynamics simulation in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. They are fully configurational in the sense that only the particle positions are required in the control of the system temperature and pressure. Following on from the works of Delhommelle and Evans [Mol. Phys., 99, 1825 (2001)] and of Braga and Travis [J. Chem. Phys., 123, 134101 (2005)] concerning configurational canonical dynamics, these new algorithms can be seen as a natural extension to the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. We have validated both of our new configurational isothermal-isobaric schemes by conducting molecular dynamics simulations of a Lennard-Jones fluid and comparing the static and dynamic properties for a single state point. We find that both schemes generate similar results compared with schemes which use kinetic temperature and pressure control. We have also monitored the response of the system to a series of isothermal compressions and isobaric quenches. We find that the configurational schemes performed at least as well as the kinetic based scheme in bringing the system temperature and pressure into line with the set point values of these variables. These new methods will potentially play a significant role in simulations where the calculation of the kinetic temperature and pressure can be problematic. A well known example resides in the field of nonequilibrium simulations where the kinetic temperature and pressure require a knowledge of the streaming velocity of the fluid in order to calculate the true peculiar velocities (or momenta) that enter into their definitions. These are completely avoided by using our configurational thermostats and barostats, since these are independent of momenta. By extending the analysis of Kusnezov et al. [Ann. Phys., 204, 155 (1990)] in order to derive a set of generalized Nosé-Hoover equations of motion which can generate isothermal-isobaric dynamics in a number of different ways, we are able to show that both of our new configurational barostats and Hoover's kinetic isothermal-isobaric scheme are special cases of this more general set of equations. This generalization can be very powerful in generating constant pressure dynamics for a variety of systems.

  15. High pressure oxygen furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

  16. High pressure oxygen furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, D.E.

    1992-07-14

    A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized, the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 5 figs.

  17. High pressure furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

  18. High pressure furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, D.E.

    1993-09-14

    A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum)). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 19 figures.

  19. Continuous pressure letdown system

    DOEpatents

    Sprouse, Kenneth M.; Matthews, David R.; Langowski, Terry

    2010-06-08

    A continuous pressure letdown system connected to a hopper decreases a pressure of a 2-phase (gas and solid) dusty gas stream flowing through the system. The system includes a discharge line for receiving the dusty gas from the hopper, a valve, a cascade nozzle assembly positioned downstream of the discharge line, a purge ring, an inert gas supply connected to the purge ring, an inert gas throttle, and a filter. The valve connects the hopper to the discharge line and controls introduction of the dusty gas stream into the discharge line. The purge ring is connected between the discharge line and the cascade nozzle assembly. The inert gas throttle controls a flow rate of an inert gas into the cascade nozzle assembly. The filter is connected downstream of the cascade nozzle assembly.

  20. Pressure activated diaphragm bonder

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Leland B. (Antioch, CA); Malba, Vincent (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A device is available for bonding one component to another, particularly for bonding electronic components of integrated circuits, such as chips, to a substrate. The bonder device in one embodiment includes a bottom metal block having a machined opening wherein a substrate is located, a template having machined openings which match solder patterns on the substrate, a thin diaphragm placed over the template after the chips have been positioned in the openings therein, and a top metal block positioned over the diaphragm and secured to the bottom block, with the diaphragm retained therebetween. The top block includes a countersink portion which extends over at least the area of the template and an opening through which a high pressure inert gas is supplied to exert uniform pressure distribution over the diaphragm to keep the chips in place during soldering. A heating means is provided to melt the solder patterns on the substrate and thereby solder the chips thereto.

  1. Pressure activated diaphragm bonder

    DOEpatents

    Evans, L.B.; Malba, V.

    1997-05-27

    A device is available for bonding one component to another, particularly for bonding electronic components of integrated circuits, such as chips, to a substrate. The bonder device in one embodiment includes a bottom metal block having a machined opening wherein a substrate is located, a template having machined openings which match solder patterns on the substrate, a thin diaphragm placed over the template after the chips have been positioned in the openings therein, and a top metal block positioned over the diaphragm and secured to the bottom block, with the diaphragm retained therebetween. The top block includes a countersink portion which extends over at least the area of the template and an opening through which a high pressure inert gas is supplied to exert uniform pressure distribution over the diaphragm to keep the chips in place during soldering. A heating means is provided to melt the solder patterns on the substrate and thereby solder the chips thereto. 4 figs.

  2. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1994-10-04

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein. 3 figs.

  3. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein.

  4. Columbus pressurized module verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messidoro, Piero; Comandatore, Emanuele

    1986-01-01

    The baseline verification approach of the COLUMBUS Pressurized Module was defined during the A and B1 project phases. Peculiarities of the verification program are the testing requirements derived from the permanent manned presence in space. The model philosophy and the test program have been developed in line with the overall verification concept. Such critical areas as meteoroid protections, heat pipe radiators and module seals are identified and tested. Verification problem areas are identified and recommendations for the next development are proposed.

  5. High pressure storage vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qiang

    2013-08-27

    Disclosed herein is a composite pressure vessel with a liner having a polar boss and a blind boss a shell is formed around the liner via one or more filament wrappings continuously disposed around at least a substantial portion of the liner assembly combined the liner and filament wrapping have a support profile. To reduce susceptible to rupture a locally disposed filament fiber is added.

  6. Dynamic Pressure Microphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, E.

    In 1876, Alexander Graham Bell described his first telephone with a microphone using magnetic induction to convert the voice input into an electric output signal. The basic principle led to a variety of designs optimized for different needs, from hearing impaired users to singers or broadcast announcers. From the various sound pressure versions, only the moving coil design is still in mass production for speech and music application.

  7. A flexible pressure monitoring system for pressure ulcer prevention

    E-print Network

    Yip, Marcus

    Pressure ulcers are painful sores that arise from prolonged exposure to high pressure points, which restricts blood flow and leads to tissue necrosis. This is a common occurrence among patients with impaired mobility, ...

  8. Hybrid Inflatable Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raboin, Jasen; Valle, Gerard D.; Edeen, Gregg; DeLaFuente, Horacio M.; Schneider, William C.; Spexarth, Gary R.; Johnson, Christopher J.; Pandya, Shalini

    2004-01-01

    Figure 1 shows a prototype of a large pressure vessel under development for eventual use as a habitable module for long spaceflight (e.g., for transporting humans to Mars). The vessel is a hybrid that comprises an inflatable shell attached to a rigid central structural core. The inflatable shell is, itself, a hybrid that comprises (1) a pressure bladder restrained against expansion by (2) a web of straps made from high-strength polymeric fabrics. On Earth, pressure vessels like this could be used, for example, as portable habitats that could be set up quickly in remote locations, portable hyperbaric chambers for treatment of decompression sickness, or flotation devices for offshore platforms. In addition, some aspects of the design of the fabric straps could be adapted to such other items as lifting straps, parachute straps, and automotive safety belts. Figure 2 depicts selected aspects of the design of a vessel of this type with a toroidal configuration. The bladder serves as an impermeable layer to keep air within the pressure vessel and, for this purpose, is sealed to the central structural core. The web includes longitudinal and circumferential straps. To help maintain the proper shape upon inflation after storage, longitudinal and circumferential straps are indexed together at several of their intersections. Because the web is not required to provide a pressure seal and the bladder is not required to sustain structural loads, the bladder and the web can be optimized for their respective functions. Thus, the bladder can be sealed directly to the rigid core without having to include the web in the seal substructure, and the web can be designed for strength. The ends of the longitudinal straps are attached to the ends of the rigid structural core by means of clevises. Each clevis pin is surrounded by a roller, around which a longitudinal strap is wrapped to form a lap seam with itself. The roller is of a large diameter chosen to reduce bending of the fibers in the strap. The roller also serves to equalize the load in the portions of the strap on both sides of the clevis pin. The lap seam is formed near the clevis by use of a tapered diamond stitch: This stitch is designed specifically to allow fibers in the stitch and strap to relax under load in such a manner that the load becomes more nearly evenly distributed among all fibers in the stitch region. Thus, the tapered diamond stitch prevents load concentrations that could cause premature failure of the strap and thereby increases the strength of the strap/structural-core joint. The lap seam can be rated at >90 percent of the strength of the strap material.

  9. High Blood Pressure Fact Sheet

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Web Sites with More Information About High Blood Pressure ...

  10. What Causes High Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Causes of High Blood Pressure Changes, either from genes or the environment, in ... and blood vessel structure and function. Biology and High Blood Pressure Researchers continue to study how various changes in ...

  11. Controlling your high blood pressure

    MedlinePLUS

    Hypertension is another term used to describe high blood pressure. High blood pressure can lead to: Stroke Heart attack Heart failure Kidney disease Early death You are more likely to have high blood ...

  12. Medications for High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Medications for High Blood Pressure Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... age and you cannot tell if you have high blood pressure by the way you feel, so have your ...

  13. Flow-compensating pressure regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F.

    1979-01-01

    Pressure regulator developed for use with cataract-surgery instrument controls intraocular pressure during substantial variations in flow rate of infusion fluid. Device may be applicable to variety of eye-surgery instruments.

  14. Vapor Pressure measurements for dichlorosilane 

    E-print Network

    Morris, Tony Knimbula

    1997-01-01

    trichlorosilane and silicon tetrachloride, or other chemicals which are not in the silane family. Accurate information about the vapor pressure is necessary in the production of these mixtures. Measurements reported previously for the vapor pressure of pure...

  15. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... above. Confirming High Blood Pressure A blood pressure test is easy and painless and can be done ... provider’s office or clinic. To prepare for the test: Don’t drink coffee or smoke cigarettes for ...

  16. High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the baby. Controlling your blood pressure during pregnancy and getting regular prenatal care are important for ... your baby. Treatments for high blood pressure in pregnancy may include close monitoring of the baby, lifestyle ...

  17. Genes That Influence Blood Pressure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Matters September 26, 2011 Genes that Influence Blood Pressure In one of the largest genomic studies ever, ... consortium identified 29 genetic variations that influence blood pressure. More than half of these variants were previously ...

  18. Condensed Matters Under Negative Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imre, Attila R.

    2011-07-01

    Condensed matters can be expanded into negative pressure states. Although these states are metastable, their long life-time makes them appropriate for experimental investigations. Some relevant behaviour of liquids and solids under negative pressure will be reviewed.

  19. Economics of Steam Pressure Reduction 

    E-print Network

    Sylva, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    Economics of Steam Pressure Reduction is a technical paper that addresses the operating and economic advantages associated with the program to lower the steam operating pressure. Evaluation of a testing program will be discussed. The paper...

  20. Stability and breakdown of Ca13CO3 melt associated with formation of 13C-diamond in static high pressure experiments up to 43 GPa and 3900 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivak, A. V.; Litvin, Yu. A.; Ovsyannikov, S. V.; Dubrovinskaia, N. A.; Dubrovinsky, L. S.

    2012-07-01

    Melting of calcium carbonate Ca13CO3, stability of the melt and its decomposition were studied in static high pressure experiments at pressures of 11-43 GPa and temperatures of 1600-3900 K using diamond anvil cell technique with laser heating. We observed formation of 13C-graphite (below 16 GPa) and 13C-diamond (between 16 and 43 GPa) on decomposition of the Ca13CO3 melt at temperatures above 3400 K. At temperatures below 3400 K congruent melting of calcium carbonate was confirmed. The experimental results were applied to construction of the phase diagram of CaCO3 up to 43 GPa and 3900 K focusing at the melting curve of calcium carbonate and the decomposition phase boundary of CaCO3 melt.

  1. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  2. Gas Pressure-Drop Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal

    2010-01-01

    Most chemical engineering undergraduate laboratories have fluid mechanics experiments in which pressure drops through pipes are measured over a range of Reynolds numbers. The standard fluid is liquid water, which is essentially incompressible. Since density is constant, pressure drop does not depend on the pressure in the pipe. In addition, flow…

  3. The Myth of Peer Pressure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ungar, Michael T.

    2000-01-01

    The construct of peer pressure was examined as part of a qualitative study of the determinants of mental health for 41 high-risk adolescents. While the concept of peer pressure enables adults to explain youths' troubling behaviors, content analysis of the participants' accounts of their lives reveals peer pressure to be a myth. (Author/MKA)

  4. Hydrostatic pressure mimics gravitational pressure in characean cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staves, M. P.; Wayne, R.; Leopold, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrostatic pressure applied to one end of a horizontal Chara cell induces a polarity of cytoplasmic streaming, thus mimicking the effect of gravity. A positive hydrostatic pressure induces a more rapid streaming away from the applied pressure and a slower streaming toward the applied pressure. In contrast, a negative pressure induces a more rapid streaming toward and a slower streaming away from the applied pressure. Both the hydrostatic pressure-induced and gravity-induced polarity of cytoplasmic streaming respond identically to cell ligation, UV microbeam irradiation, external Ca2+ concentrations, osmotic pressure, neutral red, TEA Cl-, and the Ca2+ channel blockers nifedipine and LaCl3. In addition, hydrostatic pressure applied to the bottom of a vertically-oriented cell can abolish and even reverse the gravity-induced polarity of cytoplasmic streaming. These data indicate that both gravity and hydrostatic pressure act at the same point of the signal transduction chain leading to the induction of a polarity of cytoplasmic streaming and support the hypothesis that characean cells respond to gravity by sensing a gravity-induced pressure differential between the cell ends.

  5. Chromium at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Rafael

    2012-02-01

    Chromium has long served as the archetype of spin density wave magnetism. Recently, Jaramillo and collaborators have shown that Cr also serves as an archetype of magnetic quantum criticality. Using a combination of x-ray diffraction and electrical transport measurements at high pressures and cryogenic temperatures in a diamond anvil cell, they have demonstrated that the N'eel transition (TN) can be continuously suppressed to zero, with no sign of a concurrent structural transition. The order parameter undergoes a broad regime of exponential suppression, consistent with the weak coupling paradigm, before deviating from a BCS-like ground state within a narrow but accessible quantum critical regime. The quantum criticality is characterized by mean field scaling of TN and non mean field scaling of the transport coefficients, which points to a fluctuation-induced reconstruction of the critical Fermi surface. A comparison between pressure and chemical doping as means to suppress TN sheds light on different routes to the quantum critical point and the relevance of Fermi surface nesting and disorder at this quantum phase transition. The work by Jaramillo et al. is broadly relevant to the study of magnetic quantum criticality in a physically pure and theoretically tractable system that balances elements of weak and strong coupling. [4pt] [1] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. Wang & T. F. Rosenbaum. Signatures of quantum criticality in pure Cr at high pressure. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 107, 13631 (2010). [0pt] [2] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. C. Lang, Z. Islam, G. Srajer, P. B. Littlewood, D. B. McWhan & T. F. Rosenbaum. Breakdown of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer ground state at a quantum phase transition. Nature 459, 405 (2009).

  6. Unibody Composite Pressurized Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rufer, Markus; Conger, Robert; Bauer, Thomas; Newman, John

    2013-01-01

    An integrated, generic unibody composite pressurized structure (UCPS) combined with a positive expulsion device (PED), consisting of an elastomeric bladder for monopropellant hydrazine, has been quasi-standardized for spacecraft use. The combination functions as an all-composite, non-metallic, propellant tank with bladder. The integrated UCPS combines several previous innovations - specifically, the linerless, all-composite cryogenic tank technology; all-composite boss; resin formulation; and integrated stringer system. The innovation combines the UCPS with an integrated propellant management device (PMD), the PED or bladder, to create an entirely unique system for in-space use. The UCPS is a pressure vessel that incorporates skirts, stringers, and other structures so that it is both an in-space hydrazine tank, and also a structural support system for a spacecraft in a single, all-composite unit. This innovation builds on the progress in the development of a previous SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) Phase I with Glenn Research Center and an SBIR III with Johnson Space Center that included the fabrication of two 42-in. (˜107-cm) diameter all-composite cryogenic (LOX and liquid methane) UCPS test tanks for a lunar lander. This Phase II provides hydra zine compatibility testing of the elastomeric bladder, a see-through PED to validate the expulsion process and model, and a complete UCPS-based PED with stringers and skirts that will be used to conduct initial qualification and expulsion tests. This extends the UCPS technology to include hydrazine-based, in-space pro - pulsion applications and can also be used for electric propulsion. This innovation creates a system that, in comparison to the traditional approach, is lower in weight, cost, volume, and production time; is stronger; and is capable of much higher pressures. It also has fewer failure modes, and is applicable to both chemical and electric propulsion systems.

  7. Melting at High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. E.; Vorberger, J.; Militzer, B.; Caracas, R.; Gygi, F.

    2008-12-01

    At high pressures, melts tend to become more similar to the crystalline solid phases. In general, the change in volume with melting, ? V, becomes small and the entropy of melting, ? S, becomes constant leading to a melting curve that bends over and approaches a constant. [1] Solids near melting also show approaching dynamical instabilities near melting, such as enhanced diffusivities in a premelting region. [2] Some materials display different behavior. Na, for example, shows a melting curve with a maximum followed by a negative pressure slope down to low temperatures. [3] Raty et al. proposed that the electronic structure of liquid and solid sodium are different, due to opening of a pseudogap in liquid Na, leading to increased density of the liquid and a negative melting slope. [4] We have performed first-principles molecular dynamics simulations for solid and liquid sodium as a function of P and T, and find no evidence of a pseudogap or electronic transition in Na. Rather we find that liquid Na is denser due to closer first neighbors with icosohedral packing due to softening of the potential such as occurs in a Gaussian core potential. We are also performing first-principles MD for Mg2SiO4 liquid to understand diffusivity and dynamical properties of the melt using the QBOX code. Initial results show D=(14, 3.2, 16) 10-6 m2/s for (Mg,Si,O) at P=0 and 6000K and D=(5.7, 1.9, 9.2) 10-6 m2/s at 5000K. Lower temperature and higher pressure simulations are in progress. [1] R. E. Cohen, and Z. Gong, Phys. Rev. B 50, 12301 (1994). [2] R. E. Cohen, and J. Weitz, in Properties of Earth and Planetary Materials at High Pressure and Temperature, edited by M. H. Manghnani, and T. Yagi (AGU, Washington, D.C., 1998), pp. 185. [3] E. Gregoryanz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 185502 (2005). [4] J.-Y. Raty, E. Schwegler, and S. A. Bonev, Nature 449, 448 (2007). [5] F. H. Stillinger, and P. G. Debenedetti, Biophysical Chemistry 105, 211 (2003).

  8. Urodynamic pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    A transducer system was developed for measuring the closing pressure profile along the female urethra, which provides up to five sensors within the functional length of the urethra. This new development is an improvement over an earlier measurement method that has a smaller sensor area and was unable to respond to transient events. Three sensors were constructed; one of them was subjected to approximately eight hours of use in a clinical setting during which 576 data points were obtained. The complete instrument system, including the signal conditioning electronics, data acquisition unit, and the computer with its display and printer is described and illustrated.

  9. Barotrauma: Tooth under Pressure.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satheesh; Kumar, Preeti Satheesh; John, Jins; Patel, Ruchi

    2015-04-01

    With the growing number of air passengers, flight attendants, leisure pilots, as well as military and airline pilots, dentists may encounter physiological and pathological phenomena precipitated by high altitude. With the introduction of the self-contained breathing apparatus (SCUBA), many of these manifestations caused by changes in atmospheric pressure were reported in association with diving as well. Limited literature exists on this subject. Hence, this article aims to review literature concerning the classification, etiology and manifestations of barodontalgia, as well as important clinical considerations for its management. PMID:26094359

  10. Barotrauma: Tooth Under Pressure.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satheesh; Kumar, Preeti Satheesh; John, Jins; Patel, Ruchi

    2015-11-01

    With the growing number of air passengers, flight attendants, leisure pilots, as well as military and airline pilots, dentists may encounter physiological and pathological phenomena precipitated by high altitude. With the introduction of the self-contained breathing apparatus (SCUBA), many of these manifestations caused by changes in atmospheric pressure were reported in association with diving as well. Limited literature exists on this subject. Hence, this article aims to review literature concerning the classification, etiology and manifestations of barodontalgia, as well as important clinical considerations for its management. PMID:26697664

  11. Pressure suit joint analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.; Webbon, B. W. (inventors)

    1982-01-01

    A measurement system for simultaneously measuring torque and angular flexure in a pressure suit joint is described. One end of a joint under test is held rigid. A torque transducer is pivotably supported on the other movable end of a joint. A potentiometer is attached to the transducer by an arm. The wiper shaft of the potentiometer is gripped by a reference arm that rotates the wiper shaft the same angle as the flexure of joint. A signal is generated by the potentiometer which is representative of the joint flexure. A compensation circuit converts the output of the transducer to a signal representative of joint torque.

  12. Pressure-confined Lyman-alpha clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baron, E.; Carswell, R. F.; Hogan, C. J.; Weymann, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented of numerical models of pressure-confined spherical gas clouds which produce absorption resembling the low to intermediate atomic column density lines found in high-redshift QSO spectra. One-dimensional hydrodynamical models including electron conduction are described, and the rate equations are solved to find ionization and excitation states. Results are presented for both static and adiabatically expanding confining media covering a range of initial pressures. It is found that Ly-alpha lines are very similar over a wide range of conditions and that the most promising diagnostic of pressure is to compare the column density in H I to that in He I and He II. No single-pressure model can explain the wide range of observed H I column densities.

  13. Pressure-confined Lyman-alpha clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, E.; Carswell, R.F.; Hogan, C.J.; Weymann, R.J.

    1989-02-01

    Results are presented of numerical models of pressure-confined spherical gas clouds which produce absorption resembling the low to intermediate atomic column density lines found in high-redshift QSO spectra. One-dimensional hydrodynamical models including electron conduction are described, and the rate equations are solved to find ionization and excitation states. Results are presented for both static and adiabatically expanding confining media covering a range of initial pressures. It is found that Ly-alpha lines are very similar over a wide range of conditions and that the most promising diagnostic of pressure is to compare the column density in H I to that in He I and He II. No single-pressure model can explain the wide range of observed H I column densities. 18 references.

  14. Correlation and spectral measurements of fluctuating pressures and velocities in annular turbulent flow. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.J.; Jones, B.G.; Roy, R.P.

    1980-02-01

    An experimental study of the fluctuating velocity field, the fluctuating static wall pressure and the in-stream fluctuating static pressure in an annular turbulent air flow system with a radius ratio of 4.314 has been conducted. The study included direct measurements of the mean velocity profile, turbulent velocity field; fluctuating static wall pressure and in-stream fluctuating static pressure from which the statistical values of the turbulent intensity levels, power spectral densities of the turbulent quantities, the cross-correlation between the fluctuating static wall pressure and the fluctuating static pressure in the core region of the flow and the cross-correlation between the fluctuating static wall pressure and the fluctuating velocity field in the core region of the flow were obtained.

  15. Management of Chronic Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) conducted a systematic review on interventions used to treat pressure ulcers in order to answer the following questions: Do currently available interventions for the treatment of pressure ulcers increase the healing rate of pressure ulcers compared with standard care, a placebo, or other similar interventions? Within each category of intervention, which one is most effective in promoting the healing of existing pressure ulcers? Background A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in conjunction with shear and/or friction. Many areas of the body, especially the sacrum and the heel, are prone to the development of pressure ulcers. People with impaired mobility (e.g., stroke or spinal cord injury patients) are most vulnerable to pressure ulcers. Other factors that predispose people to pressure ulcer formation are poor nutrition, poor sensation, urinary and fecal incontinence, and poor overall physical and mental health. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in Ontario has been estimated to range from a median of 22.1% in community settings to a median of 29.9% in nonacute care facilities. Pressure ulcers have been shown to increase the risk of mortality among geriatric patients by as much as 400%, to increase the frequency and duration of hospitalization, and to decrease the quality of life of affected patients. The cost of treating pressure ulcers has been estimated at approximately $9,000 (Cdn) per patient per month in the community setting. Considering the high prevalence of pressure ulcers in the Ontario health care system, the total cost of treating pressure ulcers is substantial. Technology Wounds normally heal in 3 phases (inflammatory phase, a proliferative phase of new tissue and matrix formation, and a remodelling phase). However, pressure ulcers often fail to progress past the inflammatory stage. Current practice for treating pressure ulcers includes treating the underlying causes, debridement to remove necrotic tissues and contaminated tissues, dressings to provide a moist wound environment and to manage exudates, devices and frequent turning of patients to provide pressure relief, topical applications of biologic agents, and nutritional support to correct nutritional deficiencies. A variety of adjunctive physical therapies are also in use. Method Health technology assessment databases and medical databases were searched from 1996 (Medline), 1980 (EMBASE), and 1982 (CINAHL) systematically up to March 2008 to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the following treatments of pressure ulcers: cleansing, debridement, dressings, biological therapies, pressure-relieving devices, physical therapies, nutritional therapies, and multidisciplinary wound care teams. Full literature search strategies are reported in appendix 1. English-language studies in previous systematic reviews and studies published since the last systematic review were included if they had more than 10 subjects, were randomized, and provided objective outcome measures on the healing of pressure ulcers. In the absence of RCTs, studies of the highest level of evidence available were included. Studies on wounds other than pressure ulcers and on surgical treatment of pressure ulcers were excluded. A total of 18 systematic reviews, 104 RCTs, and 4 observational

  16. 49 CFR 195.304 - Test pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Test pressure. 195.304 Section 195.304... PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.304 Test pressure. The test pressure for each pressure test conducted under... continuous hours at a pressure equal to 125 percent, or more, of the maximum operating pressure and, in...

  17. 49 CFR 195.304 - Test pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Test pressure. 195.304 Section 195.304... PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.304 Test pressure. The test pressure for each pressure test conducted under... continuous hours at a pressure equal to 125 percent, or more, of the maximum operating pressure and, in...

  18. 49 CFR 195.304 - Test pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Test pressure. 195.304 Section 195.304... PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.304 Test pressure. The test pressure for each pressure test conducted under... continuous hours at a pressure equal to 125 percent, or more, of the maximum operating pressure and, in...

  19. 49 CFR 195.304 - Test pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Test pressure. 195.304 Section 195.304... PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.304 Test pressure. The test pressure for each pressure test conducted under... continuous hours at a pressure equal to 125 percent, or more, of the maximum operating pressure and, in...

  20. Microbial activity at gigapascal pressures.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anurag; Scott, James H; Cody, George D; Fogel, Marilyn L; Hazen, Robert M; Hemley, Russell J; Huntress, Wesley T

    2002-02-22

    We observed physiological and metabolic activity of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1 and Escherichia coli strain MG1655 at pressures of 68 to 1680 megapascals (MPa) in diamond anvil cells. We measured biological formate oxidation at high pressures (68 to 1060 MPa). At pressures of 1200 to 1600 MPa, living bacteria resided in fluid inclusions in ice-VI crystals and continued to be viable upon subsequent release to ambient pressures (0.1 MPa). Evidence of microbial viability and activity at these extreme pressures expands by an order of magnitude the range of conditions representing the habitable zone in the solar system. PMID:11859192

  1. Pressure polymerization of polyester

    DOEpatents

    Maurer, Charles J. (Matthews, NC); Shaw, Gordon (Charlotte, NC); Smith, Vicky S. (Greer, SC); Buelow, Steven J. (Los Alamos, NM); Tumas, William (Los Alamos, NM); Contreras, Veronica (San Antonio, TX); Martinez, Ronald J. (Santa Cruz, NM)

    2000-08-29

    A process is disclosed for the preparation of a polyester polymer or polyester copolymer under superatmospheric pressure conditions in a pipe or tubular reaction under turbannular flow conditions. Reaction material having a glycol equivalents to carboxylic acid equivalents mole ratio of from 1.0:1 to 1.2:1, together with a superatmospheric dense gaseous medium are fed co-currently to the reactor. Dicarboxylic acid and/or diol raw materials may be injected into any of the reaction zones in the process during operation to achieve the overall desired mole ratio balance. The process operates at temperatures of from about 220.degree. C. to about 320.degree. C., with turbannular flow achieved before the polymer product and gas exit the reactor process. The pressure in the reaction zones can be in the range from 15 psia to 2500 psia. A polymer product having a DP of a greater than 40, more preferably at least about 70, is achieved by the transfer of water from the reacting material polymer melt to the gaseous medium in the reactor.

  2. Airway obstruction with cricoid pressure.

    PubMed

    Hartsilver, E L; Vanner, R G

    2000-03-01

    Cricoid pressure may cause airway obstruction. We investigated whether this is related to the force applied and to the technique of application. We recorded expired tidal volumes and inflation pressures during ventilation via a face-mask and oral airway in 52 female patients who were anaesthetised and about to undergo elective surgery. An inspired tidal volume of 900 ml was delivered using a ventilator. Ventilation was assessed under five different conditions: no cricoid pressure, backwards cricoid pressure applied with a force of 30 N, cricoid pressure applied in an upward and backward direction with a force of 30 N, backwards cricoid pressure with a force of 44 N and through a tracheal tube. An expired tidal volume of < 200 ml was taken to indicate airway obstruction. Airway obstruction did not occur without cricoid pressure, but did occur in one patient (2%) with cricoid pressure at 30 N, in 29 patients (56%) with 30 N applied in an upward and backward direction and in 18 (35%) patients with cricoid pressure at 44 N. Cricoid pressure applied with a force of 44 N can cause airway obstruction but if cricoid pressure is applied with a force of 30 N, airway obstruction occurs less frequently (p = 0.0001) unless the force is applied in an upward and backward direction. PMID:10671836

  3. Thermodynamic equilibrium at heterogeneous pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrijmoed, J. C.; Podladchikov, Y. Y.

    2015-07-01

    Recent advances in metamorphic petrology point out the importance of grain-scale pressure variations in high-temperature metamorphic rocks. Pressure derived from chemical zonation using unconventional geobarometry based on equal chemical potentials fits mechanically feasible pressure variations. Here, a thermodynamic equilibrium method is presented that predicts chemical zoning as a result of pressure variations by Gibbs energy minimization. Equilibrium thermodynamic prediction of the chemical zoning in the case of pressure heterogeneity is done by constrained Gibbs minimization using linear programming techniques. In addition to constraining the system composition, a certain proportion of the system is constrained at a specified pressure. Input pressure variations need to be discretized, and each discrete pressure defines an additional constraint for the minimization. The Gibbs minimization method provides identical results to a geobarometry approach based on chemical potentials, thus validating the inferred pressure gradient. The thermodynamic consistency of the calculation is supported by the similar result obtained from two different approaches. In addition, the method can be used for multi-component, multi-phase systems of which several applications are given. A good fit to natural observations in multi-phase, multi-component systems demonstrates the possibility to explain phase assemblages and zoning by spatial pressure variations at equilibrium as an alternative to pressure variation in time due to disequilibrium.

  4. Assessment of fiber optic pressure sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemian, H.M.; Black, C.L.; Farmer, J.P.

    1995-04-01

    This report presents the results of a six-month Phase 1 study to establish the state-of-the-art in fiber optic pressure sensing and describes the design and principle of operation of various fiber optic pressure sensors. This study involved a literature review, contact with experts in the field, an industrial survey, a site visit to a fiber optic sensor manufacturer, and laboratory testing of a fiber optic pressure sensor. The laboratory work involved both static and dynamic performance tests. In addition, current requirements for environmental and seismic qualification of sensors for nuclear power plants were reviewed to determine the extent of the qualification tests that fiber optic pressure sensors may have to meet before they can be used in nuclear power plants. This project has concluded that fiber optic pressure sensors are still in the research and development stage and only a few manufacturers exist in the US and abroad which supply suitable fiber optic pressure sensors for industrial applications. Presently, fiber optic pressure sensors are mostly used in special applications for which conventional sensors are not able to meet the requirements.

  5. The vapor pressures of explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.; Atkinson, David A.; Grate, Jay W.; Hotchkiss, Peter

    2013-01-05

    The vapor pressures of many explosive compounds are extremely low and thus determining accurate values proves difficult. Many researchers, using a variety of methods, have measured and reported the vapor pressures of explosives compounds at single temperatures, or as a function of temperature using vapor pressure equations. There are large variations in reported vapor pressures for many of these compounds, and some errors exist within individual papers. This article provides a review of explosive vapor pressures and describes the methods used to determine them. We have compiled primary vapor pressure relationships traceable to the original citations and include the temperature ranges for which they have been determined. Corrected values are reported as needed and described in the text. In addition, after critically examining the available data, we calculate and tabulate vapor pressures at 25 °C.

  6. High pressure mechanical seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babel, Henry W. (Inventor); Anderson, Raymond H. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A relatively impervious mechanical seal is formed between the outer surface of a tube and the inside surface of a mechanical fitting of a high pressure fluid or hydraulic system by applying a very thin soft metal layer onto the outer surface of the hard metal tube and/or inner surface of the hard metal fitting. The thickness of such thin metal layer is independent of the size of the tube and/or fittings. Many metals and alloys of those metals exhibit the requisite softness, including silver, gold, tin, platinum, indium, rhodium and cadmium. Suitably, the coating is about 0.0025 millimeters (0.10 mils) in thickness. After compression, the tube and fitting combination exhibits very low leak rates on the order or 10.sup.-8 cubic centimeters per second or less as measured using the Helium leak test.

  7. High pressure mechanical seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babel, Henry W. (Inventor); Fuson, Phillip L. (Inventor); Chickles, Colin D. (Inventor); Jones, Cherie A. (Inventor); Anderson, Raymond H. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A relatively impervious mechanical seal is formed between the outer surface of a tube and the inside surface of a mechanical fitting of a high pressure fluid or hydraulic system by applying a very thin soft metal layer onto the outer surface of the hard metal tube and/or inner surface of the hard metal fitting, prior to swaging the fitting onto the tube. The thickness of such thin metal layer is independent of the size of the tube and/or fittings. Many metals and alloys of those metals exhibit the requisite softness, including silver, gold, nickel, tin, platinum, indium, rhodium and cadmium. Suitably, the coating is about 0.0025 millimeters (0.10 mils) in thickness. After swaging, the tube and fitting combination exhibits very low leak rates on the order or 10.sup.-8 cubic centimeters per second or less as meaured using the Helium leak test.

  8. Pressurized continuous chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Canon, R.M.; Begovich, J.M.; Sisson, W.G.

    1980-04-01

    A pressurized continuous annular chromatograph has been developed for preparative separations. This device utilizes a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material, fixed multiple feed points, and fixed withdrawal locations. Most of our investigations have been performed with a 28-cm-diam column, but a larger model is being designed and constructed. The separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt components from a carbonate solution has been studied in detail. This solution simulates the leach liquor from the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. Use of continuous gradient elution has been demonstrated. Recent studies have investigated several separations, including that of zirconium and hafnium (necessary for the production of zirconium for use in nuclear reactors), on a preparative scale. This system, because of its continuous feed and product withdrawal, its adaptability to large-scale operations, and its ability to separate many components, is expected to make chromatography a more competitive process in the industrial sector.

  9. Cradle and pressure grippers

    DOEpatents

    Muniak, John E. (New York, NY)

    2001-01-01

    A gripper that is designed to incorporate the functions of gripping, supporting and pressure tongs into one device. The gripper has two opposing finger sections with interlocking fingers that incline and taper to form a wedge. The interlocking fingers are vertically off-set so that the opposing finger sections may close together allowing the inclined, tapered tips of the fingers to extend beyond the plane defined by the opposing finger section's engagement surface. The range of motion defined by the interlocking relationship of the finger sections allows the gripper to grab, lift and support objects of varying size and shape. The gripper has one stationary and one moveable finger section. Power is provided to the moveable finger section by an actuating device enabling the gripper to close around an object to be lifted. A lifting bail is attached to the gripper and is supported by a crane that provides vertical lift.

  10. A Constant Pressure Bomb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1924-01-01

    This report describes a new optical method of unusual simplicity and of good accuracy suitable to study the kinetics of gaseous reactions. The device is the complement of the spherical bomb of constant volume, and extends the applicability of the relationship, pv=rt for gaseous equilibrium conditions, to the use of both factors p and v. The method substitutes for the mechanical complications of a manometer placed at some distance from the seat of reaction the possibility of allowing the radiant effects of reaction to record themselves directly upon a sensitive film. It is possible the device may be of use in the study of the photoelectric effects of radiation. The method makes possible a greater precision in the measurement of normal flame velocities than was previously possible. An approximate analysis shows that the increase of pressure and density ahead of the flame is negligible until the velocity of the flame approaches that of sound.

  11. Possible Pressure Waves of Supersolid Helium at High Pressure

    E-print Network

    Kwang-Hua W. Chu

    2006-10-02

    We make comments on Kim and Chan's [{\\it Phys. Rev. Lett.} 97, 115302 (2006)] letter. Based on their pressure-dependent measurements (by a torsional oscillator technique), we propose that the {\\it supersolid} fraction ($\\rho_s/\\rho$) might be relevant to an sound absorption or attenuation (fluctuations of pressure waves) in microscopic domain since there is no apparent change in $T_c$ with pressure.

  12. Pressure Inactivation of Bacillus Endospores

    PubMed Central

    Margosch, Dirk; Gänzle, Michael G.; Ehrmann, Matthias A.; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2004-01-01

    The inactivation of bacterial endospores by hydrostatic pressure requires the combined application of heat and pressure. We have determined the resistance of spores of 14 food isolates and 5 laboratory strains of Bacillus subtilis, B. amyloliquefaciens, and B. licheniformis to treatments with pressure and temperature (200 to 800 MPa and 60 to 80°C) in mashed carrots. A large variation in the pressure resistance of spores was observed, and their reduction by treatments with 800 MPa and 70°C for 4 min ranged from more than 6 log units to no reduction. The sporulation conditions further influenced their pressure resistance. The loss of dipicolinic acid (DPA) from spores that varied in their pressure resistance was determined, and spore sublethal injury was assessed by determination of the detection times for individual spores. Treatment of spores with pressure and temperature resulted in DPA-free, phase-bright spores. These spores were sensitive to moderate heat and exhibited strongly increased detection times as judged by the time required for single spores to grow to visible turbidity of the growth medium. The role of DPA in heat and pressure resistance was further substantiated by the use of the DPA-deficient mutant strain B. subtilis CIP 76.26. Taken together, these results indicate that inactivation of spores by combined pressure and temperature processing is achieved by a two-stage mechanism that does not involve germination. At a pressure between 600 and 800 MPa and a temperature greater than 60°C, DPA is released predominantly by a physicochemical rather than a physiological process, and the DPA-free spores are inactivated by moderate heat independent of the pressure level. Relevant target organisms for pressure and temperature treatment of foods are proposed, namely, strains of B. amyloliquefaciens, which form highly pressure-resistant spores. PMID:15574932

  13. Gas/oil capillary pressure at chalk at elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Christoffersen, K.R.; Whitson, C.H.

    1995-09-01

    Accurate capillary pressure curves are essential for studying the recovery of oil by gas injection in naturally fractured chalk reservoirs. A simple and fast method to determine high-pressure drainage capillary pressure curves has been developed. The effect of gas/oil interfacial tension (IFT) on the capillary pressure of chalk cores has been determined for a methane/n-pentane system. Measurements on a 5-md outcrop chalk core were made at pressures of 70, 105, and 130 bar, with corresponding IFT`s of 6.3, 3.2, and 1.5 mN/m. The results were both accurate and reproducible. The measured capillary pressure curves were not a linear function of IFT when compared with low-pressure centrifuge data. Measured capillary pressures were considerably lower than IFT-scaled centrifuge data. It appears that the deviation starts at an IFT of about 5 mN/m. According to the results of this study, the recovery of oil by gravity drainage in naturally fractured chalk reservoirs may be significantly underestimated if standard laboratory capillary pressure curves are scaled by IFT only. However, general conclusions cannot be made on the basis on only this series of experiments on one chalk core.

  14. Ion channels under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, A G

    2002-03-01

    Hydrostatic pressure (<100 MPa) affects the kinetics of ion channels but not their conductance. In voltage-gated channels, pressure acts on the movement of the charge sensor and on the conformational change involved in opening the channel pore. It has also been shown to act on N-type inactivation ball-binding, C-type inactivation and to activate BK channels. There is little doubt that these are sites of adaptation to high pressure in the channels of deep-sea animals. Pressure studies should not be regarded in isolation; they relate well to experiments using other variables such as osmotic pressure, solvent viscosity and temperature. Furthermore ion channels could transduce pressure in the sensory system of aquatic animals, providing information about the animals' depth, a prediction supported by our knowledge of heat-activated channels in mammals. PMID:11867284

  15. High pressure, high temperature transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrolyk, John J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The pressure measurement system utilizes two bourdon tubes with an active side connected to a test specimen and a reference side connected to an outside source. The tubes are attached to a single extensometer measuring relative displacement. The active side deflects when gases vent a specimen failure. The reference side is independently pressurized to a test pressure and provides a zero reference while providing a pressure calibration reference for the active side. The deflection noted by the active side at specimen failure is duplicated on the reference side by venting until an appropriate magnitude of pressure versus deflection is determined. In this way the pressure which existed inside the specimen prior to failure can be determined.

  16. Steam Oxidation at High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Carney, Casey

    2013-07-19

    A first high pressure test was completed: 293 hr at 267 bar and 670{degrees}C; A parallel 1 bar test was done for comparison; Mass gains were higher for all alloys at 267 bar than at 1 bar; Longer term exposures, over a range of temperatures and pressures, are planned to provide information as to the commercial implications of pressure effects; The planned tests are at a higher combination of temperatures and pressures than in the existing literature. A comparison was made with longer-term literature data: The short term exposures are largely consistent with the longer-term corrosion literature; Ferritic steels--no consistent pressure effect; Austenitic steels--fine grain alloys less able to maintain protective chromia scale as pressure increases; Ni-base alloys--more mass gains above 105 bar than below. Not based on many data points.

  17. To estimate vapor pressure easily

    SciTech Connect

    Yaws, C.L.; Yang, H.C. )

    1989-10-01

    Vapor pressures as functions of temperature for approximately 700 major organic chemical compounds are given. The tabulation also gives the temperature range for which the data are applicable. Minimum and maximum temperatures are denoted by TMIN and TMAX. The Antoine equation that correlates vapor pressure as a function of temperature is described. A representative comparison of calculated and actual data values for vapor pressure is shown for ethyl alcohol. The coefficient tabulation is based on both literature (experimental data) and estimated values.

  18. Multilayer Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom

    2005-01-01

    A method has been devised to enable the fabrication of lightweight pressure vessels from multilayer composite materials. This method is related to, but not the same as, the method described in gMaking a Metal- Lined Composite-Overwrapped Pressure Vessel h (MFS-31814), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 3 (March 2005), page 59. The method is flexible in that it poses no major impediment to changes in tank design and is applicable to a wide range of tank sizes. The figure depicts a finished tank fabricated by this method, showing layers added at various stages of the fabrication process. In the first step of the process, a mandrel that defines the size and shape of the interior of the tank is machined from a polyurethane foam or other suitable lightweight tooling material. The mandrel is outfitted with metallic end fittings on a shaft. Each end fitting includes an outer flange that has a small step to accommodate a thin layer of graphite/epoxy or other suitable composite material. The outer surface of the mandrel (but not the fittings) is covered with a suitable release material. The composite material is filament- wound so as to cover the entire surface of the mandrel from the step on one end fitting to the step on the other end fitting. The composite material is then cured in place. The entire workpiece is cut in half in a plane perpendicular to the axis of symmetry at its mid-length point, yielding two composite-material half shells, each containing half of the foam mandrel. The halves of the mandrel are removed from within the composite shells, then the shells are reassembled and bonded together with a belly band of cured composite material. The resulting composite shell becomes a mandrel for the subsequent steps of the fabrication process and remains inside the final tank. The outer surface of the composite shell is covered with a layer of material designed to be impermeable by the pressurized fluid to be contained in the tank. A second step on the outer flange of each end fitting accommodates this layer. Depending on the application, this layer could be, for example, a layer of rubber, a polymer film, or an electrodeposited layer of metal. If the fluid to be contained in the tank is a gas, then the best permeation barrier is electrodeposited metal (typically copper or nickel), which can be effective at a thickness of as little as 0.005 in (.0.13 mm). The electrodeposited metal becomes molecularly bonded to the second step on each metallic end fitting. The permeation-barrier layer is covered with many layers of filament-wound composite material, which could be the same as, or different from, the composite material of the inner shell. Finally, the filament-wound composite material is cured in an ov

  19. The infinite line pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englund, D. R.; Richards, W. B.

    1984-01-01

    The infinite line pressure probe provides a means for measuring high frequency fluctuating pressures in difficult environments. A properly designed infinite line probe does not resonate; thus its frequency response is not limited by acoustic resonance in the probe tubing, as in conventional probes. The characteristics of infinite line pressure probes are reviewed and some applications in turbine engine research are described. A probe with a flat-oval cross section, permitting a constant-impedance pressure transducer installation, is described. Techniques for predicting the frequency response of probes with both circular and flat-oval cross sections are also cited.

  20. Bidirectional Pressure-Regulator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth; Miller, John R.

    2008-01-01

    A bidirectional pressure-regulator system has been devised for use in a regenerative fuel cell system. The bidirectional pressure-regulator acts as a back-pressure regulator as gas flows through the bidirectional pressure-regulator in one direction. Later, the flow of gas goes through the regulator in the opposite direction and the bidirectional pressure-regulator operates as a pressure- reducing pressure regulator. In the regenerative fuel cell system, there are two such bidirectional regulators, one for the hydrogen gas and another for the oxygen gas. The flow of gases goes from the regenerative fuel cell system to the gas storage tanks when energy is being stored, and reverses direction, flowing from the storage tanks to the regenerative fuel cell system when the stored energy is being withdrawn from the regenerative fuel cell system. Having a single bidirectional regulator replaces two unidirectional regulators, plumbing, and multiple valves needed to reverse the flow direction. The term "bidirectional" refers to both the bidirectional nature of the gas flows and capability of each pressure regulator to control the pressure on either its upstream or downstream side, regardless of the direction of flow.

  1. Nutrition systems for pressure suits.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, C. S.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Rapp, R. M.; Smith, M. C., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Nutrition systems were successfully developed in the Apollo Program for astronauts wearing pressure suits during emergency decompression situations and during lunar surface explorations. These nutrition systems consisted of unique dispensers, water, flavored beverages, nutrient-fortified beverages, and intermediate moisture food bars. The emergency decompression system dispensed the nutrition from outside the pressure suit by interfacing with a suit helmet penetration port. The lunar exploration system utilized dispensers stowed within the interior layers of the pressure suit. These systems could be adapted for provision of nutrients in other situations requiring the use of pressure suits.

  2. [High Pressure Gas Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quintana, Rolando

    2002-01-01

    Four high-pressure gas tanks, the basis of this study, were especially made by a private contractor and tested before being delivered to NASA Kennedy Space Center. In order to insure 100% reliability of each individual tank the staff at KSC decided to again submit the four tanks under more rigorous tests. These tests were conducted during a period from April 10 through May 8 at KSC. This application further validates the predictive safety model for accident prevention and system failure in the testing of four high-pressure gas tanks at Kennedy Space Center, called Continuous Hazard Tracking and Failure Prediction Methodology (CHTFPM). It is apparent from the variety of barriers available for a hazard control that some barriers will be more successful than others in providing protection. In order to complete the Barrier Analysis of the system, a Task Analysis and a Biomechanical Study were performed to establish the relationship between the degree of biomechanical non-conformities and the anomalies found within the system on particular joints of the body. This relationship was possible to obtain by conducting a Regression Analysis to the previously generated data. From the information derived the body segment with the lowest percentage of non-conformities was the neck flexion with 46.7%. Intense analysis of the system was conducted including Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA), Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA), and Barrier Analysis. These analyses resulted in the identification of occurrences of conditions, which may be becoming hazardous in the given system. These conditions, known as dendritics, may become hazards and could result in an accident, system malfunction, or unacceptable risk conditions. A total of 56 possible dendritics were identified. Work sampling was performed to observe the occurrence each dendritic. The out of control points generated from a Weighted c control chart along with a Pareto analysis indicate that the dendritics "Personnel not Wearing Proper Protective and Hose/tubing located in high-traffic area" which account for 59.18% of total dendritic frequency need to be addressed to reduce the chance of a hazard from occurring. However, the occurrences of some dendritics are more important than others. As a result immediate, from a Weighted c perspective, corrective action should be taken to ameliorate the cause of the Class A dendritic "Personnel located under suspended or moving loads" rather than just the most commonly occurring dendritics. In any case the vast majority of data obtained indicates that testing operations possess a relatively high degree of safety.

  3. A dynamic pressure source for the calibration of pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vezzetti, C. F.; Hilten, J. S.; Mayo-Wells, J. F.; Lederer, P. S.

    1976-01-01

    A dynamic pressure source is described for producing sinusoidally varying pressures of up to 34 kPa zero to peak, over the frequency range of approximately 50 Hz to 2 kHz. The source is intended for the dynamic calibration of pressure transducers. The transducer to be calibrated is mounted near the base of the thick walled aluminum tube forming the vessel so that the pressure sensitive element is in contact with the liquid in the tube. A section of the tube is filled with small steel balls to damp the motion of the 10-St dimethyl siloxane working fluid in order to extend the useful frquency range to higher frequencies than would be provided by an undamped system. The dynamic response of six transducers provided by the sponsor was evaluated using the pressure sources; the results of these calibrations are given.

  4. Advanced Pressure Boundary Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, Michael L; Shingledecker, John P

    2007-01-01

    Increasing the operating temperatures of fossil power plants is fundamental to improving thermal efficiencies and reducing undesirable emissions such as CO{sub 2}. One group of alloys with the potential to satisfy the conditions required of higher operating temperatures is the advanced ferritic steels such as ASTM Grade 91, 9Cr-2W, and 12Cr-2W. These are Cr-Mo steels containing 9-12 wt% Cr that have martensitic microstructures. Research aimed at increasing the operating temperature limits of the 9-12 wt% Cr steels and optimizing them for specific power plant applications has been actively pursued since the 1970's. As with all of the high strength martensitic steels, specifying upper temperature limits for tempering the alloys and heat treating weldments is a critical issue. To support this aspect of development, thermodynamic analysis was used to estimate how this critical temperature, the A{sub 1} in steel terminology, varies with alloy composition. The results from the thermodynamic analysis were presented to the Strength of Weldments subgroup of the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code and are being considered in establishing maximum postweld heat treatment temperatures. Experiments are also being planned to verify predictions. This is part of a CRADA project being done with Alstom Power, Inc.

  5. Cyanoacetohydrazide under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borstad, Gustav; Ciezak-Jenkins, Jennifer

    2015-06-01

    The application of pressure to molecular crystals generates dramatic changes in the properties through the modification of the intermolecular interactions, the crystal structure, and the molecular bonding. Typical changes as the density increases involve the breaking of chemical bonds and the formation of new bonds. This results in the increase in the coordination number and the formation of polymers. The novel materials thus produced may possess novel properties such as high-energy density, super-hardness, high electrical and thermal conductivities and optical activity. Nevertheless, recovering these novel materials to ambient conditions has proven challenging. One approach to overcome this is seeking appropriate chemical precursors which will yield enhanced stability of the recovered material. In this poster, we present Raman data of cyanoacetohydrazide compressed using diamond anvil cell techniques. These data suggest evidence of an irreversible transformation near 20 GPa. The characteristics and stability of the recovered sample are also discussed. During this project, coauthor GB was supported in part by an appointment to the Postdoctoral Research Program at the US Army Research Laboratory administered by the Oak Ridge Associated Universities.

  6. High-pressure and temperature investigations of energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gump, J. C.

    2014-05-01

    Static high-pressure measurements are extremely useful for obtaining thermodynamic and phase stability information from a wide variety of materials. However, studying energetic materials can be challenging when extracting information from static high-pressure measurements. Energetic materials are traditionally C, H, N, O compounds with low crystalline symmetry, producing weak signal in commonly performed x-ray diffraction measurements. The small sample volume available in a static high-pressure cell exacerbates this issue. Additionally, typical hydrostatic compression media, such as methanol/ethanol, may react with many energetic materials. However, characterization of their thermodynamic parameters and phase stability is critical to understanding explosive performance and sensitivity. Crystalline properties, such as bulk modulus and thermal expansion, are necessary to accurately predict the behaviour of shocked solids using hydrodynamic codes. In order to obtain these values, equations of state of various energetic materials were investigated using synchrotron angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction experiments at static high-pressure and temperature. Intense synchrotron radiation overcomes the weak x-ray scattering of energetic materials in a pressure cell. The samples were hydrostatically compressed using a non-reactive hydrostatic medium and heated using a heated diamond anvil cell. Pressure - volume data for the materials were fit to the Birch-Murnaghan and Vinet formalisms to obtain bulk modulus and its first pressure derivative. Temperature - volume data at ambient pressure were fit to obtain the volume thermal expansion coefficient. Data from several energetic materials will be presented and compared.

  7. High-pressure and temperature investigations of energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gump, Jared

    2013-06-01

    Static high-pressure measurements are extremely useful for obtaining thermodynamic and phase stability information from a wide variety of materials. However, studying energetic materials can be challenging when extracting information from static high-pressure measurements. Energetic materials are traditionally C, H, N, O compounds with low crystalline symmetry, producing weak signal in commonly performed x-ray diffraction measurements. The small sample volume available in a static high-pressure cell exacerbates this issue. Additionally, typical hydrostatic compression media, such as methanol/ethanol, may react with many energetic materials. However, characterization of their thermodynamic parameters and phase stability is critical to understanding explosive performance and sensitivity. Crystalline properties, such as bulk modulus and thermal expansion, are necessary to accurately predict the behavior of shocked solids using hydrodynamic codes. In order to obtain these values, equations of state of various energetic materials were investigated using synchrotron angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction experiments at static high-pressure and temperature. Intense synchrotron radiation overcomes the weak x-ray scattering of energetic materials in a pressure cell. The samples were hydrostatically compressed using a non-reactive hydrostatic medium and heated using a heated diamond anvil cell. Pressure - volume data for the materials were fit to the Birch-Murnaghan and Vinet formalisms to obtain bulk modulus and its first pressure derivative. Temperature - volume data at ambient pressure were fit to obtain the volume thermal expansion coefficient. Data from several energetic materials will be presented and compared.

  8. 42 CFR 84.157 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...requirements. (a) The static pressure in the facepiece shall...water-column height. (b) The pressure in the facepiece shall not fall below atmospheric at inhalation...

  9. 42 CFR 84.157 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...requirements. (a) The static pressure in the facepiece shall...water-column height. (b) The pressure in the facepiece shall not fall below atmospheric at inhalation...

  10. 42 CFR 84.157 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...requirements. (a) The static pressure in the facepiece shall...water-column height. (b) The pressure in the facepiece shall not fall below atmospheric at inhalation...

  11. 42 CFR 84.157 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...requirements. (a) The static pressure in the facepiece shall...water-column height. (b) The pressure in the facepiece shall not fall below atmospheric at inhalation...

  12. 42 CFR 84.157 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...requirements. (a) The static pressure in the facepiece shall...water-column height. (b) The pressure in the facepiece shall not fall below atmospheric at inhalation...

  13. A pressurized gas squeeze film journal damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiffler, A. K.

    1977-01-01

    A lumped parameter model is developed to determine the stiffness and damping characteristics of inherently compensated gas film bearings. The model relies on the average static pressure over a one dimensional strip bearing. Results of the model are compared with known computer solutions for the distributed strip and a two dimensional square bearing. The results for the stiffness agree well with the computer solutions although the model proved to be inadequate for predicting the film damping.

  14. High pressure and high temperature apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Voronov, Oleg A.

    2005-09-13

    A design for high pressure/high temperature apparatus and reaction cell to achieve .about.30 GPa pressure in .about.1 cm volume and .about.100 GPa pressure in .about.1 mm volumes and 20-5000.degree. C. temperatures in a static regime. The device includes profiled anvils (28) action on a reaction cell (14, 16) containing the material (26) to be processed. The reaction cell includes a heater (18) surrounded by insulating layers and screens. Surrounding the anvils are cylindrical inserts and supporting rings (30-48) whose hardness increases towards the reaction cell. These volumes may be increased considerably if applications require it, making use of presses that have larger loading force capability, larger frames and using larger anvils.

  15. dc arc interruption in pressurized gasses

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhuri,P.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the possibility of achieving (1) short interruption time and (2) minimum contact erosion in a dc circuit interrupter. Arc interruption tests were performed on a 100-A, 600-V dc contactor under atmospheres of argon dry air, nitrogen, helium and hydrogen, each at four pressures 0.17, 0.34, 0.52, and 0.69 MPa (25, 50, 75 and 100 psig). It was found that the average arcing time in helium and hydrogen was the shortest, and that in argon the longest for the circuit conditions used. The contact erosion in hydrogen was the worst, and that in argon the best for the contact materials used in the tests. The static pressure in the chamber did not appear to have much effect on the arc interruption phenomenon for the contactor and gas pressures used.

  16. A novel target-type low pressure drop bidirectional optoelectronic air flow sensor for infant artificial ventilation: Measurement principle and static calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Silvestri, Sergio

    2011-02-15

    An optoelectronic target-type volumetric air flow-rate transducer for bidirectional measurements is presented. The sensor is composed of a T-shaped target and two nominally identical LED-photodiode couples which are operated in differential mode. The sensitive surfaces of the photodiodes are differentially shadowed by the deflection of the target, which in turn depends on the gas flow-rate. The principle of operation is described in mathematical terms and the design parameters have been optimized in order to obtain the highest sensitivity along with minimal pressure drop and reduced dimensions. The sensor is placed in a 20 mm diameter hose and was tested with air flow-rate in the typical temperature range of mechanical ventilation between 20 and 40 deg. C. The theoretical model was validated through experiments carried out in the volumetric flow range from -7.0 to +7.0 l min{sup -1}. The nonlinear behavior allows sensitivities equal to 0.6 V l{sup -1} min for flow rates ranging from -2.0 to +2.0 l min{sup -1}, equal to 2.0 V l{sup -1} min for flow rates ranging from -3.0 to -2.0 l min{sup -1} and from +2.0 to +3.0 l min{sup -1}, up to 5.7 V l{sup -1} min at higher flow rates ranging from -7.0 to -3.0 l min{sup -1} and from +3.0 to +7.0 l min{sup -1}. The linear range extends from 3.0 to 7.0 l min{sup -1} with constant sensitivity equal to 5.7 V l{sup -1} min. The sensor is able to detect a flow-rate equal to 1.0 l min{sup -1} with a sensitivity of about 400 mV l{sup -1} min. The differential nature of the output minimizes the influence of the LEDs' power supply variations and allows to obtain a repeatability in the order of 3% of full scale output. The small pressure drop produced by the sensor placed in-line the fluid stream, of about 2.4 Pa at 7 l min{sup -1}, corresponds to a negligible fluid dynamic resistance lower than 0.34 Pa l{sup -1} min.

  17. A novel target-type low pressure drop bidirectional optoelectronic air flow sensor for infant artificial ventilation: Measurement principle and static calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Silvestri, Sergio

    2011-02-01

    An optoelectronic target-type volumetric air flow-rate transducer for bidirectional measurements is presented. The sensor is composed of a T-shaped target and two nominally identical LED-photodiode couples which are operated in differential mode. The sensitive surfaces of the photodiodes are differentially shadowed by the deflection of the target, which in turn depends on the gas flow-rate. The principle of operation is described in mathematical terms and the design parameters have been optimized in order to obtain the highest sensitivity along with minimal pressure drop and reduced dimensions. The sensor is placed in a 20 mm diameter hose and was tested with air flow-rate in the typical temperature range of mechanical ventilation between 20 and 40 °C. The theoretical model was validated through experiments carried out in the volumetric flow range from -7.0 to +7.0 l min-1. The nonlinear behavior allows sensitivities equal to 0.6 V l-1 min for flow rates ranging from -2.0 to +2.0 l min-1, equal to 2.0 V l-1 min for flow rates ranging from -3.0 to -2.0 l min-1 and from +2.0 to +3.0 l min-1, up to 5.7 V l-1 min at higher flow rates ranging from -7.0 to -3.0 l min-1 and from +3.0 to +7.0 l min-1. The linear range extends from 3.0 to 7.0 l min-1 with constant sensitivity equal to 5.7 V l-1 min. The sensor is able to detect a flow-rate equal to 1.0 l min-1 with a sensitivity of about 400 mV l-1 min. The differential nature of the output minimizes the influence of the LEDs' power supply variations and allows to obtain a repeatability in the order of 3% of full scale output. The small pressure drop produced by the sensor placed in-line the fluid stream, of about 2.4 Pa at 7 l min-1, corresponds to a negligible fluid dynamic resistance lower than 0.34 Pa l-1 min.

  18. Diabetes and blood pressure (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    People with diabetes have a higher risk for heart attacks and strokes. Your doctor or nurse should check your blood pressure ... People with diabetes have a higher risk for heart attacks and strokes. Your doctor or nurse should check your blood pressure ...

  19. Pulmonary capillary pressure. A review.

    PubMed

    Ganter, C C; Ganter, C G; Jakob, S M; Takala, J

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary capillary pressure (Pcap) is the predominant force that drives fluid out of the pulmonary capillaries into the interstitium. Increasing hydrostatic capillary pressure is directly proportional to the lung's transvascular filtration rate, and in the extreme leads to pulmonary edema. In the pulmonary circulation, blood flow arises from the transpulmonary pressure gradient, defined as the difference between pulmonary artery (diastolic) pressure and left atrial pressure. The resistance across the pulmonary vasculature consists of arterial and venous components, which interact with the capacitance of the compliant pulmonary capillaries. In pathological states such as acute respiratory distress syndrome, sepsis, and high altitude or neurogenic lung edema, the longitudinal distribution of the precapillary arterial and the postcapillary venous resistance varies. Subsequently, the relationship between Pcap and pulmonary artery occlusion pressure (PAOP) is greatly variable and Pcap can no longer be predicted from PAOP. In clinical practice, PAOP is commonly used to guide fluid therapy, and Pcap as a hemodynamic target is rarely assessed. This approach is potentially misleading. In the presence of a normal PAOP and an increased pressure gradient between Pcap and PAOP, the tendency for fluid leakage in the capillaries and subsequent edema development may substantially be underestimated. Tho-roughly validated methods have been developed to assess Pcap in humans. At the bedside, measurement of Pcap can easily be determined by analyzing a pressure transient after an acute pulmonary artery occlusion with the balloon of a Swan-Ganz catheter. PMID:16407804

  20. Magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1991-07-01

    Self-consistent magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure is obtained by employing an iterative metric method for solving the inverse equilibrium equation in an optimal flux coordinate system. A method of determining plasma parallel and perpendicular pressures from either analytic particle distribution or particle distribution measured along the satellite's path is presented. The numerical results of axisymmetric magnetospheric equilibrium including the effects of finite beta, pressure anisotropy, and boundary conditions are presented for a bi-Maxwellian particle distribution. For the isotropic pressure cases, the finite beta effect produces an outward expansion of the constant magnetic flux surfaces in relation to the dipole field lines, and along the magnetic field the toroidal ring current is maximum at the magnetic equator. The effect of pressure anisotropy is found to further expand the flux surfaces outward. Along the magnetic field lines the westward ring current can be peak away from the equator due to an eastward current contribution resulting from pressure anisotropy. As pressure anisotropy increases, the peak westward current can become more singular. The outer boundary flux surface has significant effect on the magnetospheric equilibrium. For the outer flux boundary resembling dayside compressed flux surface due to solar wind pressure, the deformation of the magnetic field can be quite different from that for the outer flux boundary resembling the tail-like surface. 23 refs., 17 figs.

  1. Microwave Atmospheric-Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.; Bradford, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    Report describes tests of microwave pressure sounder (MPS) for use in satellite measurements of atmospheric pressure. MPS is multifrequency radar operating between 25 and 80 GHz. Determines signal absorption over vertical path through atmosphere by measuring strength of echoes from ocean surface. MPS operates with cloud cover, and suitable for use on current meteorological satellites.

  2. Electrokinetically pumped high pressure sprays

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Paul, Phillip H.; Schoeniger, Luke

    2005-11-01

    An electrokinetic pump capable of producing high pressure is combined with a nozzle having a submicron orifice to provide a high pressure spray device. Because of its small size, the device can be contained within medical devices such as an endoscope for delivering biological materials such as DNA, chemo therapeutic agents, or vaccines to tissues and cells.

  3. Electrokinetically pumped high pressure sprays

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Paul, Phillip H.; Schoeniger, Luke

    2002-01-01

    An electrokinetic pump capable of producing high pressure is combined with a nozzle having a submicron orifice to provide a high pressure spray device. Because of its small size, the device can be contained within medical devices such as an endoscope for delivering biological materials such as DNA, chemo therapeutic agents, or vaccines to tissues and cells.

  4. Paediatric blood pressure and anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Mather, C M

    1991-05-01

    One percent of children have appreciably and consistently raised arterial blood pressure. A 7-year-old girl admitted for routine tonsillectomy, had unrecognised hypertension which put her at increased risk. Should anaesthetic practice take more note of paediatric blood pressures? PMID:2035786

  5. High-Pressure Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maeno, Akihiro; Akasaka, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The combination of fluorescence and pressure perturbation is a widely used technique to study the effect of pressure on a protein system to obtain thermodynamic, structural and kinetic information on proteins. However, we often encounter the situation where the available pressure range up to 400 MPa of most commercial high-pressure fluorescence spectrometers is insufficient for studying highly pressure-stable proteins like inhibitors and allergenic proteins. To overcome the difficulty, we have recently developed a new high-pressure fluorescence system that allows fluorescence measurements up to 700 MPa. Here we describe the basic design of the apparatus and its application to study structural and thermodynamic properties of a couple of highly stable allergenic proteins, hen lysozyme and ovomucoid, using Tryptophan and Tyrosine/Tyrosinate fluorescence, respectively. Finally, we discuss the utility and the limitation of Trp and Tyr fluorescence. We discuss pitfalls of fluorescence technique and importance of simultaneous use of other high-pressure spectroscopy, particularly high-pressure NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26174405

  6. Pressure Reducer for Coal Gasifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, James M., Sr.

    1983-01-01

    Quasi-porous-plug pressure reducer is designed for gases containing abrasive particles. Gas used to generate high pressure steam to drive electric power generators. In giving up heat to steam, gas drops in temperature. Device used for coal gasification plants.

  7. Pressurized Lunar Rover (PLR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creel, Kenneth; Frampton, Jeffrey; Honaker, David; Mcclure, Kerry; Zeinali, Mazyar; Bhardwaj, Manoj; Bulsara, Vatsal; Kokan, David; Shariff, Shaun; Svarverud, Eric

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this project was to design a manned pressurized lunar rover (PLR) for long-range transportation and for exploration of the lunar surface. The vehicle must be capable of operating on a 14-day mission, traveling within a radius of 500 km during a lunar day or within a 50-km radius during a lunar night. The vehicle must accommodate a nominal crew of four, support two 28-hour EVA's, and in case of emergency, support a crew of six when near the lunar base. A nominal speed of ten km/hr and capability of towing a trailer with a mass of two mt are required. Two preliminary designs have been developed by two independent student teams. The PLR 1 design proposes a seven meter long cylindrical main vehicle and a trailer which houses the power and heat rejection systems. The main vehicle carries the astronauts, life support systems, navigation and communication systems, lighting, robotic arms, tools, and equipment for exploratory experiments. The rover uses a simple mobility system with six wheels on the main vehicle and two on the trailer. The nonpressurized trailer contains a modular radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) supplying 6.5 kW continuous power. A secondary energy storage for short-term peak power needs is provided by a bank of lithium-sulfur dioxide batteries. The life support system is partly a regenerative system with air and hygiene water being recycled. A layer of water inside the composite shell surrounds the command center allowing the center to be used as a safe haven during solar flares. The PLR 1 has a total mass of 6197 kg. It has a top speed of 18 km/hr and is capable of towing three metric tons, in addition to the RTG trailer. The PLR 2 configuration consists of two four-meter diameter, cylindrical hulls which are passively connected by a flexible passageway, resulting in the overall vehicle length of 11 m. The vehicle is driven by eight independently suspended wheels. The dual-cylinder concept allows articulated as well as double Ackermann steering. The primary power of 8 kW is supplied by a dynamic isotope system using a closed Brayton cycle with a xenon-hydrogen mixture as the working fluid. A sodium-sulfur battery serves as the secondary power source. Excess heat produced by the primary power system and other rover systems is rejected by radiators located on the top of the rear cylinder. The total mass of the PLR 2 is 7015 kg. Simplicity and low total weight have been the driving principles behind the design of PLR 1. The overall configuration consists of a 7-m-long, 3-m-diameter cylindrical main vehicle and a two-wheeled trailer. The cylinder of the main body is capped by eight-section, faceted, semi-hemispherical ends. The trailer contains the RTG power source and is not pressurized. The shell of the main body is constructed of a layered carbon fiber/foam/Kevlar sandwich structure. Included in the shell is a layer of water for radiation protection. The layer of water extends from the front of the rover over the crew compartment and creates a safe haven for the crew during a solar flare-up. The carbon fiber provides the majority of the strength and stiffness and the Kevlar provides protection from micrometeoroids. The Kevlar is covered with a gold foil and multi-layer insulation (MLI) to reduce radiation degradation and heat transfer through the wall. A thin thermoplastic layer seals the fiber and provides additional strength.

  8. Pressurized Lunar Rover (PLR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creel, Kenneth; Frampton, Jeffrey; Honaker, David; McClure, Kerry; Zeinali, Mazyar; Bhardwaj, Manoj; Bulsara, Vatsal; Kokan, David; Shariff, Shaun; Svarverud, Eric

    The objective of this project was to design a manned pressurized lunar rover (PLR) for long-range transportation and for exploration of the lunar surface. The vehicle must be capable of operating on a 14-day mission, traveling within a radius of 500 km during a lunar day or within a 50-km radius during a lunar night. The vehicle must accommodate a nominal crew of four, support two 28-hour EVA's, and in case of emergency, support a crew of six when near the lunar base. A nominal speed of ten km/hr and capability of towing a trailer with a mass of two mt are required. Two preliminary designs have been developed by two independent student teams. The PLR 1 design proposes a seven meter long cylindrical main vehicle and a trailer which houses the power and heat rejection systems. The main vehicle carries the astronauts, life support systems, navigation and communication systems, lighting, robotic arms, tools, and equipment for exploratory experiments. The rover uses a simple mobility system with six wheels on the main vehicle and two on the trailer. The nonpressurized trailer contains a modular radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) supplying 6.5 kW continuous power. A secondary energy storage for short-term peak power needs is provided by a bank of lithium-sulfur dioxide batteries. The life support system is partly a regenerative system with air and hygiene water being recycled. A layer of water inside the composite shell surrounds the command center allowing the center to be used as a safe haven during solar flares. The PLR 1 has a total mass of 6197 kg. It has a top speed of 18 km/hr and is capable of towing three metric tons, in addition to the RTG trailer. The PLR 2 configuration consists of two four-meter diameter, cylindrical hulls which are passively connected by a flexible passageway, resulting in the overall vehicle length of 11 m. The vehicle is driven by eight independently suspended wheels. The dual-cylinder concept allows articulated as well as double Ackermann steering. The primary power of 8 kW is supplied by a dynamic isotope system using a closed Brayton cycle with a xenon-hydrogen mixture as the working fluid. pressurized. The shell of the main body is constructed of a layered carbon fiber/foam/Kevlar sandwich structure. %Included in the shell is a layer of water for radiation protection. The layer of water extends from the front of the rover over the crew compartment and creates a safe haven for the crew during a solar flare-up. The carbon fiber provides the majority of the strength and stiffness and the Kevlar provides protection from micrometeoroids. The Kevlar is covered with a gold foil and multi-layer insulation (MLI) to reduce radiation degradation and heat transfer through the wall. @A thin thermoplastic layer seals the fiber and provides additional strength.

  9. Balanced pressure gerotor fuel pump

    DOEpatents

    Raney, Michael Raymond; Maier, Eugen

    2004-08-03

    A gerotor pump for pressurizing gasoline fuel is capable of developing pressures up to 2.0 MPa with good mechanical and volumetric efficiency and satisfying the durability requirements for an automotive fuel pump. The pump has been designed with optimized clearances and by including features that promote the formation of lubricating films of pressurized fuel. Features of the improved pump include the use of a shadow port in the side plate opposite the outlet port to promote balancing of high fuel pressures on the opposite sides of the rotors. Inner and outer rotors have predetermined side clearances with the clearances of the outer rotor being greater than those of the inner rotor in order to promote fuel pressure balance on the sides of the outer rotor. Support of the inner rotor and a drive shaft on a single bushing with bearing sleeves maintains concentricity. Additional features are disclosed.

  10. Pressure rig for repetitive casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Peter (inventor); Hutto, William R. (inventor); Philips, Albert R. (inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention is a pressure rig for repetitive casting of metal. The pressure rig performs like a piston for feeding molten metal into a mold. Pressure is applied to an expandable rubber diaphragm which expands like a balloon to force the metal into the mold. A ceramic cavity which holds molten metal is lined with blanket-type insulating material, necessitating only a relining for subsequent use and eliminating the lengthy cavity preparation inherent in previous rigs. In addition, the expandable rubber diaphragm is protected by the insulating material thereby decreasing its vulnerability to heat damage. As a result of the improved design the life expectancy of the pressure rig contemplated by the present invention is more than doubled. Moreover, the improved heat protection has allowed the casting of brass and other alloys with higher melting temperatures than possible in the conventional pressure rigs.

  11. Fundamentals of high pressure adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y.P.; Zhou, L.

    2009-12-15

    High-pressure adsorption attracts research interests following the world's attention to alternative fuels, and it exerts essential effect on the study of hydrogen/methane storage and the development of novel materials addressing to the storage. However, theoretical puzzles in high-pressure adsorption hindered the progress of application studies. Therefore, the present paper addresses the major theoretical problems that challenged researchers: i.e., how to model the isotherms with maximum observed in high-pressure adsorption; what is the adsorption mechanism at high pressures; how do we determine the quantity of absolute adsorption based on experimental data. Ideology and methods to tackle these problems are elucidated, which lead to new insights into the nature of high-pressure adsorption and progress in application studies, for example, in modeling multicomponent adsorption, hydrogen storage, natural gas storage, and coalbed methane enrichment, was achieved.

  12. Organic electronics based pressure sensor towards intracranial pressure monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Pratyush; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2010-04-01

    The intra-cranial space, which houses the brain, contains cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that acts as a fluid suspension medium for the brain. The CSF is always in circulation, is secreted in the cranium and is drained out through ducts called epidural veins. The venous drainage system has inherent resistance to the flow. Pressure is developed inside the cranium, which is similar to a rigid compartment. Normally a pressure of 5-15 mm Hg, in excess of atmospheric pressure, is observed at different locations inside the cranium. Increase in Intra-Cranial Pressure (ICP) can be caused by change in CSF volume caused by cerebral tumors, meningitis, by edema of a head injury or diseases related to cerebral atrophy. Hence, efficient ways of monitoring ICP need to be developed. A sensor system and monitoring scheme has been discussed here. The system architecture consists of a membrane less piezoelectric pressure sensitive element, organic thin film transistor (OTFT) based signal transduction, and signal telemetry. The components were fabricated on flexible substrate and have been assembled using flip-chip packaging technology. Material science and fabrication processes, subjective to the device performance, have been discussed. Capability of the device in detecting pressure variation, within the ICP pressure range, is investigated and applicability of measurement scheme to medical conditions has been argued for. Also, applications of such a sensor-OTFT assembly for logic sensor switching and patient specific-secure monitoring system have been discussed.

  13. Experimental investigation of shock-cell noise reduction for dual-stream nozzles in simulated flight comprehensive data report. Volume 2: Laser velocimeter data, static pressures and shadowgraph photos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Janardan, B. A.; Brausch, J. F.; Hoerst, D. J.; Price, A. O.

    1984-01-01

    Parameters which contribute to supersonic jet shock noise were investigated for the purpose of determining means to reduce such noise generation to acceptable levels. Six dual-stream test nozzles with varying flow passage and plug closure designs were evaluated under simulated flight conditions in an anechoic chamber. All nozzles had combined convergent-divergent or convergent flow passages. Mean velocity and turbulence velocity measurements of 25 selected flow conditions were performed employing a laser Doppler velocimeter. Static pressure measurements were made to define the actual convergence-divergence condition. Test point definition, tabulation of aerodynamic test conditions, velocity histograms, and shadowgraph photographs are presented. Flow visualization through shadowgraph photography can contribute to the development of an analytical prediction model for shock noise from coannular plug nozzles.

  14. Sounding experiments of high pressure gas discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Biele, Joachim K.

    1998-07-10

    A high pressure discharge experiment (200 MPa, 5{center_dot}10{sup 21} molecules/cm{sup 3}, 3000 K) has been set up to study electrically induced shock waves. The apparatus consists of the combustion chamber (4.2 cm{sup 3}) to produce high pressure gas by burning solid propellant grains to fill the electrical pump chamber (2.5 cm{sup 3}) containing an insulated coaxial electrode. Electrical pump energy up to 7.8 kJ at 10 kV, which is roughly three times of the gas energy in the pump chamber, was delivered by a capacitor bank. From the current-voltage relationship the discharge develops at rapidly decreasing voltage. Pressure at the combustion chamber indicating significant underpressure as well as overpressure peaks is followed by an increase of static pressure level. These data are not yet completely understood. However, Lorentz forces are believed to generate pinching with subsequent pinch heating, resulting in fast pressure variations to be propagated as rarefaction and shock waves, respectively. Utilizing pure axisymmetric electrode initiation rather than often used exploding wire technology in the pump chamber, repeatable experiments were achieved.

  15. Pressurized lunar rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creel, Kenneth; Frampton, Jeffrey; Honaker, David; Mcclure, Kerry; Zeinali, Mazyar

    1992-01-01

    The pressurized lunar rover (PLR) consists of a 7 m long, 3 m diameter cylindrical main vehicle and a trailer which houses the power and heat rejection systems. The main vehicle carries the astronauts, life support systems, navigation and communication systems, directional lighting, cameras, and equipment for exploratory experiments. The PLR shell is constructed of a layered carbon-fiber/foam composite. The rover has six 1.5 m diameter wheels on the main body and two 1.5 m diameter wheels on the trailer. The wheels are constructed of composites and flex to increase traction and shock absorption. The wheels are each attached to a double A-arm aluminum suspension, which allows each wheel 1 m of vertical motion. In conjunction with a 0.75 m ground clearance, the suspension aids the rover in negotiating the uneven lunar terrain. The 15 N-m torque brushless electric motors are mounted with harmonic drive units inside each of the wheels. The rover is steered by electrically varying the speeds of the wheels on either side of the rover. The PLR trailer contains a radiosotope thermoelectric generator providing 6.7 kW. A secondary back-up energy storage system for short-term high-power needs is provided by a bank of batteries. The trailer can be detached to facilitate docking of the main body with the lunar base via an airlock located in the rear of the PLR. The airlock is also used for EVA operation during missions. Life support is a partly regenerative system with air and hygiene water being recycled. A layer of water inside the composite shell surrounds the command center. The water absorbs any damaging radiation, allowing the command center to be used as a safe haven during solar flares. Guidance, navigation, and control are supplied by a strapdown inertial measurement unit that works with the on-board computer. Star mappers provide periodic error correction. The PLR is capable of voice, video, and data transmission. It is equipped with two 5 W X-band transponder, allowing simultaneous transmission and reception. An S-band transponder is used to communicate with the crew during EVA. The PLR has a total mass of 6197 kg. It has a nominal speed of 10 km/hr and a top speed of 18 km/hr. The rover is capable of towing 3 metric tons (in addition to the RTG trailer).

  16. Pressurized lunar rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creel, Kenneth; Frampton, Jeffrey; Honaker, David; McClure, Kerry; Zeinali, Mazyar

    1992-05-01

    The pressurized lunar rover (PLR) consists of a 7 m long, 3 m diameter cylindrical main vehicle and a trailer which houses the power and heat rejection systems. The main vehicle carries the astronauts, life support systems, navigation and communication systems, directional lighting, cameras, and equipment for exploratory experiments. The PLR shell is constructed of a layered carbon-fiber/foam composite. The rover has six 1.5 m diameter wheels on the main body and two 1.5 m diameter wheels on the trailer. The wheels are constructed of composites and flex to increase traction and shock absorption. The wheels are each attached to a double A-arm aluminum suspension, which allows each wheel 1 m of vertical motion. In conjunction with a 0.75 m ground clearance, the suspension aids the rover in negotiating the uneven lunar terrain. The 15 N-m torque brushless electric motors are mounted with harmonic drive units inside each of the wheels. The rover is steered by electrically varying the speeds of the wheels on either side of the rover. The PLR trailer contains a radiosotope thermoelectric generator providing 6.7 kW. A secondary back-up energy storage system for short-term high-power needs is provided by a bank of batteries. The trailer can be detached to facilitate docking of the main body with the lunar base via an airlock located in the rear of the PLR. The airlock is also used for EVA operation during missions. Life support is a partly regenerative system with air and hygiene water being recycled. A layer of water inside the composite shell surrounds the command center. The water absorbs any damaging radiation, allowing the command center to be used as a safe haven during solar flares. Guidance, navigation, and control are supplied by a strapdown inertial measurement unit that works with the on-board computer. Star mappers provide periodic error correction.

  17. Stability and breakdown of Ca{sup 13}CO{sub 3} melt associated with formation of {sup 13}C-diamond in static high pressure experiments up to 43 GPa and 3900 K

    SciTech Connect

    Spivak, A.V.; Litvin, Yu.A.; Ovsyannikov, S.V.; Dubrovinskaia, N.A.; Dubrovinsky, L.S.

    2012-07-15

    Melting of calcium carbonate Ca{sup 13}CO{sub 3}, stability of the melt and its decomposition were studied in static high pressure experiments at pressures of 11-43 GPa and temperatures of 1600-3900 K using diamond anvil cell technique with laser heating. We observed formation of {sup 13}C-graphite (below 16 GPa) and {sup 13}C-diamond (between 16 and 43 GPa) on decomposition of the Ca{sup 13}CO{sub 3} melt at temperatures above 3400 K. At temperatures below 3400 K congruent melting of calcium carbonate was confirmed. The experimental results were applied to construction of the phase diagram of CaCO{sub 3} up to 43 GPa and 3900 K focusing at the melting curve of calcium carbonate and the decomposition phase boundary of CaCO{sub 3} melt. - Graphical abstract: Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase states of CaCO{sub 3} were studied at P=11-43 GPa and T=1600-3900 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {sup 13}C-diamond easily crystallizes in carbonate-carbon (Ca{sup 13}CO{sub 3-}{sup 13}C-graphite) melt-solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ca-carbonate melts congruently that was observed in experiments in DAC with laser heating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decomposition of CaCO{sub 3} melt, indicated by formation of graphite and/or diamond. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decomposition of CaCO{sub 3} was observed at temperatures above 3400 K in the pressure interval studied.

  18. A Formulation for the Static Permittivity of Water and Steam at Temperatures from 238 K to 873 K at Pressures up to 1200 MPa, Including Derivatives and Debye-Hückel Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, D. P.; Goodwin, A. R. H.; Lemmon, Eric W.; Levelt Sengers, J. M. H.; Williams, R. C.

    1997-07-01

    A new formulation is presented of the static relative permittivity or dielectric constant of water and steam, including supercooled and supercritical states. The range is from 238 K to 873 K, at pressures up to 1200 MPa. The formulation is based on the ITS-90 temperature scale. It correlates a selected set of data from a recently published collection of all experimental data. The set includes new data in the liquid water and the steam regions that have not been part of earlier correlations. The physical basis for the formulation is the so-called g-factor in the form proposed by Harris and Alder. An empirical 12-parameter form for the g-factor as a function of the independent variables temperature and density is used. For the conversion of experimental pressures to densities, the newest formulation of the equation of state of water on the ITS-90, prepared by Wagner and Pruss, has been used. All experimental data are compared with the formulation. The reliability of the new formulation is assessed in all subregions. Comparisons with previous formulations are presented. Auxiliary dielectric-constant formulations as functions of temperature are included for the saturated vapor and liquid states. The pressure and temperature derivatives of the dielectric constant and the Debye-Hückel limiting-law slopes are calculated, their reliability is estimated, and they are compared with experimentally derived values and with previous correlations. All equations are given in this paper, along with short tables. An implementation of this formulation for the dielectric constant is available on disk [A. H. Harvey, A. P. Peskin, and S. A. Klein, NIST/ASME Steam Properties, NIST Standard Reference Database 10, Version 2.1, Standard Reference Data Program, NIST, Gaithersburg, MD (1997)].

  19. Serotonin and Blood Pressure Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Shaun F.; Davis, Robert Patrick; Barman, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) was discovered more than 60 years ago as a substance isolated from blood. The neural effects of 5-HT have been well investigated and understood, thanks in part to the pharmacological tools available to dissect the serotonergic system and the development of the frequently prescribed selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors. By contrast, our understanding of the role of 5-HT in the control and modification of blood pressure pales in comparison. Here we focus on the role of 5-HT in systemic blood pressure control. This review provides an in-depth study of the function and pharmacology of 5-HT in those tissues that can modify blood pressure (blood, vasculature, heart, adrenal gland, kidney, brain), with a focus on the autonomic nervous system that includes mechanisms of action and pharmacology of 5-HT within each system. We compare the change in blood pressure produced in different species by short- and long-term administration of 5-HT or selective serotonin receptor agonists. To further our understanding of the mechanisms through which 5-HT modifies blood pressure, we also describe the blood pressure effects of commonly used drugs that modify the actions of 5-HT. The pharmacology and physiological actions of 5-HT in modifying blood pressure are important, given its involvement in circulatory shock, orthostatic hypotension, serotonin syndrome and hypertension. PMID:22407614

  20. Dorsomedial/Perifornical Hypothalamic Stimulation Increases Intraocular Pressure, Intracranial Pressure, and the Translaminar Pressure Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Brian C.; Hammes, Nathan M.; Johnson, Philip L.; Shekhar, Anantha; McKinnon, Stuart J.; Allingham, R. Rand

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Intraocular pressure (IOP) fluctuation has recently been identified as a risk factor for glaucoma progression. Further, decreases in intracranial pressure (ICP), with postulated increases in the translaminar pressure gradient across the lamina cribrosa, has been reported in glaucoma patients. We hypothesized that circadian fluctuations in IOP and the translaminar pressure gradient are influenced, at least in part, by central autonomic regulatory neurons within the dorsomedial and perifornical hypothalamus (DMH/PeF). This study examined whether site-directed chemical stimulation of DMH/PeF neurons evoked changes in IOP, ICP, and the translaminar pressure gradient. Methods. The GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline methiodide (BMI) was stereotaxically microinjected into the DMH/PeF region of isoflurane-anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 19). The resulting peripheral cardiovascular (heart rate [HR] and mean arterial pressure [MAP]), IOP, and ICP effects were recorded and alterations in the translaminar pressure gradient calculated. Results. Chemical stimulation of DMH/PeF neurons evoked significant increases in HR (+69.3 ± 8.5 beats per minute); MAP (+22.9 ± 1.6 mm Hg); IOP (+7.1 ± 1.9 mm Hg); and ICP (+3.6 ± 0.7 mm Hg) compared with baseline values. However, the peak IOP increase was significantly delayed compared with ICP (28 vs. 4 minutes postinjection), resulting in a dramatic translaminar pressure gradient fluctuation. Conclusions. Chemical stimulation of DMH/PeF neurons evokes substantial increases in IOP, ICP, and the translaminar pressure gradient in the rat model. Given that the DMH/PeF neurons may be a key effector pathway for circadian regulation of autonomic tone by the suprachiasmatic nucleus, these findings will help elucidate novel mechanisms modulating circadian fluctuations in IOP and the translaminar pressure gradient. PMID:23033392

  1. Pressure Systems Energy Release Protection (Gas Pressurized Systems)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, S. J. (editor)

    1986-01-01

    A survey of studies into hazards associated with closed or pressurized system rupture and preliminary guidelines for the performance design of primary, secondary, and protective receptors of these hazards are provided. The hazards discussed in the survey are: blast, fragments, ground motion, heat radiation, biological, and chemical. Performance guidelines for receptors are limited to pressurized systems that contain inert gas. The performance guidelines for protection against the remaining unaddressed degenerative hazards are to be covered in another study.

  2. Pressure sensor for sealed containers

    DOEpatents

    Hodges, Franklin R. (Loudon, TN)

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic pressure sensor for sensing a pressure change inside a sealed container. The sensor includes a sealed deformable vessel having a first end attachable to an interior surface of the sealed container, and a second end. A magnet mounted to the vessel second end defining a distance away from the container surface provides an externally detectable magnetic field. A pressure change inside the sealed container causes deformation of the vessel changing the distance of the magnet away from the container surface, and thus the detectable intensity of the magnetic field.

  3. Arterial pulse wave pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, C.; Gorelick, D.; Chen, W. (inventors)

    1974-01-01

    An arterial pulse wave pressure transducer is introduced. The transducer is comprised of a fluid filled cavity having a flexible membrane disposed over the cavity and adapted to be placed on the skin over an artery. An arterial pulse wave creates pressure pulses in the fluid which are transduced, by a pressure sensitive transistor in direct contact with the fluid, into an electric signal. The electrical signal is representative of the pulse waves and can be recorded so as to monitor changes in the elasticity of the arterial walls.

  4. High pressure pulsed capillary viscometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. L.; Walowitt, J. A.; Pan, C. H. T.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical and test program was conducted in order to establish the feasibility of a multichamber pulsed-capillary viscometer. The initial design incorporated a piston, ram, and seals which produced measured pulses up to 30,000 psi in the closed chamber system. Pressure pulses from one to ten milliseconds were investigated in a system volume of 1 cuin. Four test fluids: a MIL-L-7808, a 5P4E polyphenyl ether, a MIL-L-23699A, and a synthetic hydrocarbon were examined in the test pressure assembly. The pressure-viscosity coefficient and viscosity delay time were determined for the MIL-L-7808 lubricant tested.

  5. Self pressuring HTP feed systems

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J.

    1999-10-14

    Hydrogen peroxide tanks can be pressurized with decomposed HTP (high test hydrogen peroxide) originating in the tank itself. In rocketry, this offers the advantage of eliminating bulky and heavy inert gas storage. Several prototype self-pressurizing HTP systems have recently been designed and tested. Both a differential piston tank and a small gas-driven pump have been tried to obtain the pressure boost needed for flow through a gas generator and back to the tank. Results include terrestrial maneuvering tests of a prototype microsatellite, including warm gas attitude control jets.

  6. Precision ozone vapor pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D.; Mauersberger, K.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure above liquid ozone has been measured with a high accuracy over a temperature range of 85 to 95 K. At the boiling point of liquid argon (87.3 K) an ozone vapor pressure of 0.0403 Torr was obtained with an accuracy of + or - 0.7 percent. A least square fit of the data provided the Clausius-Clapeyron equation for liquid ozone; a latent heat of 82.7 cal/g was calculated. High-precision vapor pressure data are expected to aid research in atmospheric ozone measurements and in many laboratory ozone studies such as measurements of cross sections and reaction rates.

  7. Gas Hydrate and Pore Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinivella, Umberta; Giustiniani, Michela

    2014-05-01

    Many efforts have been devoted to quantify excess pore pressures related to gas hydrate dissociation in marine sediments below the BSR using several approaches. Dissociation of gas hydrates in proximity of the BSR, in response to a change in the physical environment (i.e., temperature and/or pressure regime), can liberate excess gas incrising the local pore fluid pressure in the sediment, so decreasing the effective normal stress. So, gas hydrate dissociation may lead to excess pore pressure resulting in sediment deformation or failure, such as submarine landslides, sediment slumping, pockmarks and mud volcanoes, soft-sediment deformation and giant hummocks. Moreover, excess pore pressure may be the result of gas hydrate dissociation due to continuous sedimentation, tectonic uplift, sea level fall, heating or inhibitor injection. In order to detect the presence of the overpressure below the BSR, we propose two approachs. The fist approach models the BSR depth versus pore pressure; in fact, if the free gas below the BSR is in overpressure condition, the base of the gas hydrate stability is deeper with respect to the hydrostatic case. This effect causes a discrepancy between seismic and theoretical BSR depths. The second approach models the velocities versus gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and pore pressure, considering the approximation of the Biot theory in case of low frequency, i.e. seismic frequency. Knowing the P and S seismic velocity from seismic data analysis, it is possibile to jointly estimate the gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and the pore pressure regime. Alternatively, if the S-wave velocity is not availbale (due to lack of OBS/OBC data), an AVO analysis can be performed in order to extract information about Poisson ratio. Our modeling suggests that the areas characterized by shallow waters (i.e., areas in which human infrastructures, such as pipelines, are present) are significantly affected by the presence of overpressure condition. Moreover, the knoweledge of seismic velocities can be considered an powerful tool to detect the overpressure in case that the pore pressure is equal to the hydrostatic pressure plus the 50% of the difference between the lithostatic and the hydrostatic pressure. In conclusions, an accurate analysis of the BSR nature and the pore pressure are required to improve the reliability of the gas-phase estimation for different target, such as gas hydrate and free gas exploitations and environmental studies.

  8. Graphite filament wound pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, A.; Damico, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    Filament wound NOL rings, 4-inch and 8-inch diameter closed-end vessels involving three epoxy resin systems and three graphite fibers were tested to develop property data and fabrication technology for filament wound graphite/epoxy pressure vessels. Vessels were subjected to single-cycle burst tests at room temperature. Manufacturing parameters were established for tooling, winding, and curing that resulted in the development of a pressure/vessel performance factor (pressure x volume/weight) or more than 900,000 in. for an oblate spheroid specimen.

  9. Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Rakestraw, David J. (Fremont, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A compact high pressure hydraulic pump having no moving mechanical parts for converting electric potential to hydraulic force. The electrokinetic pump, which can generate hydraulic pressures greater than 2500 psi, can be employed to compress a fluid, either liquid or gas, and manipulate fluid flow. The pump is particularly useful for capillary-base systems. By combining the electrokinetic pump with a housing having chambers separated by a flexible member, fluid flow, including high pressure fluids, is controlled by the application of an electric potential, that can vary with time.

  10. Micro packaged MEMS pressure sensor for intracranial pressure measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Liu; Yan, Yao; Jiahao, Ma; Yanhang, Zhang; Qian, Wang; Zhaohua, Zhang; Tianling, Ren

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a micro packaged MEMS pressure sensor for intracranial pressure measurement which belongs to BioMEMS. It can be used in lumbar puncture surgery to measure intracranial pressure. Miniaturization is key for lumbar puncture surgery because the sensor must be small enough to allow it be placed in the reagent chamber of the lumbar puncture needle. The size of the sensor is decided by the size of the sensor chip and package. Our sensor chip is based on silicon piezoresistive effect and the size is 400 × 400 ?m2. It is much smaller than the reported polymer intracranial pressure sensors such as liquid crystal polymer sensors. In terms of package, the traditional dual in-line package obviously could not match the size need, the minimal size of recently reported MEMS-based intracranial pressure sensors after packaging is 10 × 10 mm2. In this work, we are the first to introduce a quad flat no-lead package as the package form of piezoresistive intracranial pressure sensors, the whole size of the sensor is minimized to only 3 × 3 mm2. Considering the liquid measurement environment, the sensor is gummed and waterproof performance is tested; the sensitivity of the sensor is 0.9 × 10-2 mV/kPa. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61025021, 61434001), and the ‘Thousands Talents’ Program for Pioneer Researchers and Its Innovation Team, China.

  11. Micro Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) Pressure Sensor for Footwear

    DOEpatents

    Kholwadwala, Deepesh K. (Albuquerque, NM); Rohrer, Brandon R. (Albuquerque, NM); Spletzer, Barry L. (Albuquerque, NM); Galambos, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, Jason W. (Albuquerque, NM); Hobart, Clinton G. (Albuquerque, NM); Givler, Richard C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-09-23

    Footwear comprises a sole and a plurality of sealed cavities contained within the sole. The sealed cavities can be incorporated as deformable containers within an elastic medium, comprising the sole. A plurality of micro electro-mechanical system (MEMS) pressure sensors are respectively contained within the sealed cavity plurality, and can be adapted to measure static and dynamic pressure within each of the sealed cavities. The pressure measurements can provide information relating to the contact pressure distribution between the sole of the footwear and the wearer's environment.

  12. High Blood Pressure and Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More High Blood Pressure and Metabolic Syndrome Updated:Aug 12,2014 Metabolic ... content was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) Introduction What ...

  13. 49 CFR 195.304 - Test pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Test pressure. 195.304 Section 195.304... PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.304 Test pressure. The test pressure for each pressure test conducted under... case of a pipeline that is not visually inspected for leakage during the test, for at least...

  14. 46 CFR 154.452 - External pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false External pressure. 154.452 Section 154.452 Shipping... Independent Tank Type C and Process Pressure Vessels § 154.452 External pressure. The design external pressure...) for tanks without a vacuum relief valve. P2=0, or the pressure relief valve setting for an...

  15. 46 CFR 154.452 - External pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false External pressure. 154.452 Section 154.452 Shipping... Independent Tank Type C and Process Pressure Vessels § 154.452 External pressure. The design external pressure...) for tanks without a vacuum relief valve. P2=0, or the pressure relief valve setting for an...

  16. 46 CFR 154.452 - External pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false External pressure. 154.452 Section 154.452 Shipping... Independent Tank Type C and Process Pressure Vessels § 154.452 External pressure. The design external pressure...) for tanks without a vacuum relief valve. P2=0, or the pressure relief valve setting for an...

  17. 46 CFR 154.452 - External pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false External pressure. 154.452 Section 154.452 Shipping... Independent Tank Type C and Process Pressure Vessels § 154.452 External pressure. The design external pressure...) for tanks without a vacuum relief valve. P2=0, or the pressure relief valve setting for an...

  18. 46 CFR 154.452 - External pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External pressure. 154.452 Section 154.452 Shipping... Independent Tank Type C and Process Pressure Vessels § 154.452 External pressure. The design external pressure...) for tanks without a vacuum relief valve. P2=0, or the pressure relief valve setting for an...

  19. High blood pressure and diet

    MedlinePLUS

    Hypertension - diet ... diet is a proven way to help control high blood pressure . These changes can also help you lose weight ... DIET The low-salt Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet is proven to help lower blood ...

  20. Self-Calibrating Pressure Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A self-calibrating pressure transducer is disclosed. The device uses an embedded zirconia membrane which pumps a determined quantity of oxygen into the device. The associated pressure can be determined, and thus, the transducer pressure readings can be calibrated. The zirconia membrane obtains oxygen .from the surrounding environment when possible. Otherwise, an oxygen reservoir or other source is utilized. In another embodiment, a reversible fuel cell assembly is used to pump oxygen and hydrogen into the system. Since a known amount of gas is pumped across the cell, the pressure produced can be determined, and thus, the device can be calibrated. An isolation valve system is used to allow the device to be calibrated in situ. Calibration is optionally automated so that calibration can be continuously monitored. The device is preferably a fully integrated MEMS device. Since the device can be calibrated without removing it from the process, reductions in costs and down time are realized.

  1. Pressure ulcer good practice published.

    PubMed

    2015-06-17

    Patients admitted to hospital or a nursing home should have a pressure ulcer risk assessment within six hours of admission, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has said. PMID:26080953

  2. High pressure synthesis gas fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The construction of the high pressure gas phase fermentation system has been completed. Photographs of the various components of the system are presented, along with an operating procedure for the equipment.

  3. Blood Pressure vs. Heart Rate

    MedlinePLUS

    ... pressure. If you take your pulse (measuring your heart rate) before, during and after physical activity, you'll notice your pulse will increase over the course of the exercise. The greater the intensity and the more energy ...

  4. Intraocular pressure reduction and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F.; Mcgannon, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    System designed to reduce intraocular pressure hydraulically to any level desired by physician over set time and in controlled manner has number of uses in ophthalmology. Device may be most immediately useful in treatment of glaucoma.

  5. Taking Care of Pressure Sores

    MedlinePLUS

    ... way, you will rebuild your skin pressure tolerance. University of Washington-operated SCI Clinics: Harborview Medical Center ... Spinal Cord Injury Clinic nurses: 206-744-5862. University of Washington Medical Center Rehabilitation Medicine Clinic 1959 ...

  6. Pressure-actuated joint system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, John R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A pressure vessel is provided that includes first and second case segments mated with one another. First and second annular rubber layers are disposed inboard of the first and second case segments, respectively. The second annular rubber layer has a slot extending from the radial inner surface across a portion of its thickness to define a main body portion and a flexible portion. The flexible portion has an interfacing surface portion abutting against an interfacing surface portion of the first annular rubber layer to follow movement of the first annular rubber layer during operation of the pressure vessel. The slot receives pressurized gas and establishes a pressure-actuated joint between the interfacing surface portions. At least one of the interfacing surface portions has a plurality of enclosed and sealed recesses formed therein.

  7. High-pressure gas hydrates 

    E-print Network

    Loveday, J. S.; Nelmes, R. J.

    pressures. Clathrate hydrates have been extensively studied because they occur widely in nature, have important industrial applications, and provide insight into water-guest hydrophobic interactions. Until recently, the expectation-based on calculations...

  8. Pressure compensated flow control valve

    DOEpatents

    Minteer, Daniel J. (West Richland, WA)

    1999-01-01

    The invention is an air flow control valve which is capable of maintaining a constant flow at the outlet despite changes in the inlet or outlet pressure. The device consists of a shell assembly with an inlet chamber and outlet chamber separated by a separation plate. The chambers are connected by an orifice. Also located within the inlet chamber is a port controller assembly. The port controller assembly consists of a differential pressure plate and port cap affixed thereon. The cap is able to slide in and out of the orifice separating the inlet and outlet chambers. When the pressure differential is sufficient, the differential pressure plate rises or falls to maintain a constant air flow. Movement of the port controller assembly does not require the use of seals, diaphragms, tight tolerances, bushings, bearings, hinges, guides, or lubricants.

  9. Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.; Arnold, Don W.; Hencken, Kenneth R.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Neyer, David W.

    2003-06-03

    An electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic pump for manipulating fluids in capillary-based system. The pump uses electro-osmotic flow to provide a high pressure hydraulic system, having no moving mechanical parts, for pumping and/or compressing fluids, for providing valve means and means for opening and closing valves, for controlling fluid flow rate, and manipulating fluid flow generally and in capillary-based systems (microsystems), in particular. The compact nature of the inventive high pressure hydraulic pump provides the ability to construct a micro-scale or capillary-based HPLC system that fulfills the desire for small sample quantity, low solvent consumption, improved efficiency, the ability to run samples in parallel, and field portability. Control of pressure and solvent flow rate is achieved by controlling the voltage applied to an electrokinetic pump.

  10. Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Rakestraw, David J. (Fremont, CA); Arnold, Don W. (Livermore, CA); Hencken, Kenneth R. (Pleasanton, CA); Schoeniger, Joseph S. (Oakland, CA); Neyer, David W. (Castro Valley, CA)

    2001-01-01

    An electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic pump for manipulating fluids in capillary-based systems. The pump uses electro-osmotic flow to provide a high pressure hydraulic system, having no moving mechanical parts, for pumping and/or compressing fluids, for providing valve means and means for opening and closing valves, for controlling fluid flow rate, and manipulating fluid flow generally and in capillary-based systems (Microsystems), in particular. The compact nature of the inventive high pressure hydraulic pump provides the ability to construct a micro-scale or capillary-based HPLC system that fulfills the desire for small sample quantity, low solvent consumption, improved efficiency, the ability to run samples in parallel, and field portability. Control of pressure and solvent flow rate is achieved by controlling the voltage applied to an electrokinetic pump.

  11. Onsite testing of pressure sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallory, R.

    1980-01-01

    Portable test instrument containing controller, pressure port identification, 5-V power source for transducer excitation, and digital voltmeter to test pressure sampling valves completely, including leak and plug check before, during, or after installation in any location or environment. Controller comprises 117/24-Vac 100-watt transformer, bridge rectifier, capacitive-discharge stepper, and constant voltage source for homing sampling valve. It also includes 5-V regulated power supply and bipolar digital voltmeter having 10-uV resolution.

  12. Membrane Bioreactor With Pressure Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efthymiou, George S.; Shuler, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    Improved class of multilayer membrane bioreactors uses convention forced by differences in pressure to overcome some of diffusional limitations of prior bioreactors. In reactor of new class, flow of nutrient solution reduces adverse gradients of concentration, keeps cells supplied with fresh nutrient, and sweeps away products faster than diffusion alone. As result, overall yield and rate of reaction increased. Pressures in sweeping gas and nutrient alternated to force nutrient liquid into and out of biocatalyst layer through hyrophilic membrane.

  13. Extrusion energy and pressure requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, M.; Hanna, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Corn gluten meal samples at moisture contents of 14, 20 and 26% dry basis were extruded at barrel temperatures of 120, 145 and 170/sup 0/C with screw speeds of 100, 150 and 200 rpm. The specific energy requirements and specific operating pressure decreases as the moisture content and temperature were increased. The effect of screw speed on specific energy and pressure was inconclusive.

  14. Indirect Blood Pressure Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hum, L.; Cole, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    Design and performance of a blood pressure recording device for pediatric use are reported. A strain gage transducer with a copper-beryllium strip as force sensing element is used to monitor skin movements and to convert them into electrical signals proportional to those displacements. Experimental tests with this device in recording of force developed above the left femoral artery of a dog accurately produced a blood pressure curve.

  15. Direct Measurement of Intracellular Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Ryan J.; Koo, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    A method to directly measure the intracellular pressure of adherent, migrating cells is described in the Basic Protocol. This approach is based on the servo-null method where a microelectrode is introduced into the cell to directly measure the physical pressure of the cytoplasm. We also describe the initial calibration of the microelectrode as well as the application of the method to cells migrating inside three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM). PMID:24894836

  16. Pressure Modulator Radiometer (PMR) tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odell, E. L. G.; Cosmi, F. M.; Kreft, A. E.; Racette, G. W.; Maresca, T. J.; Pancoast, F. O.; Rutecki, D. J.; Yager, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    The pressure modulator technique was evaluated for monitoring pollutant gases in the Earth's atmosphere of altitude levels corresponding to the mid and lower troposphere. Using an experimental set up and a 110 cm sample cell, pressure modulator output signals resulting from a range of gas concentrations in the sample cell were examined. Then a 20 cm sample cell was modified so that trace gas properties in the atmosphere could be simulated in the laboratory. These gas properties were measured using an infrared sensor.

  17. Pressure-Redistributing Support Surface Use and Pressure Ulcer Incidence in Elderly Hip Fracture Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Shayna E.; Shardell, Michelle; Hawkes, William G.; Margolis, David J.; Amr, Sania; Miller, Ram; Baumgarten, Mona

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the association between pressure-redistributing support surface (PRSS) use and incident pressure ulcers in older adults with hip fracture. DESIGN Secondary analysis of data from prospective cohort with assessments performed as soon as possible after hospital admission and on alternating days for 21 days. SETTING Nine hospitals in the Baltimore Hip Studies network and 105 postacute facilities to which participants were discharged. PARTICIPANTS Six hundred fifty-eight people aged 65 and older who underwent surgery for hip fracture. MEASUREMENTS Full-body examination for pressure ulcers; bedbound status; and PRSS use, recorded as none, powered (alternating pressure mattresses, low-air-loss mattresses, and alternating pressure overlays), or nonpowered (high-density foam, static air, or gel-filled mattresses or pressure-redistributing overlays except for alternating pressure overlays). RESULTS Incident pressure ulcers (IPUs), Stage 2 or higher, were observed at 4.2% (195/4,638) of visits after no PRSS use, 4.5% (28/623) of visits after powered PRSS use, and 3.6% (54/1,496) of visits after nonpowered PRSS use. The rate of IPU per person-day of follow-up did not differ significantly between participants using powered PRSSs and those not using PRSSs. The rate also did not differ significantly between participants using nonpowered PRSSs and those not using PRSSs, except in the subset of bedbound participants (incidence rate ratio = 0.3, 95% confidence interval = 0.1–0.7). CONCLUSION PRSS use was not associated with a lower IPU rate. Clinical guidelines may need revision for the limited effect of PRSS use, and it may be appropriate to target PRSS use to bedbound patients at risk of pressure ulcers. PMID:21649630

  18. Measuring the pressure in ultrahigh-pressure mercury arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Hechtfischer, U.; Engelbrecht, B.; Carpaij, M.; Fischer, E.; Koerber, A.

    2009-09-01

    Ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) mercury lamps are important as high-brightness light sources for digital projection. Hg pressures are usually above 20 MPa and difficult to measure. We have built special UHP lamps with a liquid Hg condensate in a temperature-controlled reservoir, allowing us to tune the Hg vapor pressure p between 14 and 30 MPa. As a simple measure for p, we recorded the width DELTAlambda of the 546 nm Hg line while varying p and also the lamp current I and voltage U. The data define a function p(DELTAlambda,I,U) that will deliver p to better than 3% from simple measurements of DELTAlambda, I, and U for most UHP lamps in the important 100-200 W power range. The method is applied to sample lamps, yielding pressures up to 26 MPa and demonstrating how filled Hg amount, burning position, arc gap, and lamp power affect the pressure. The effective temperature of typical UHP lamps is found to be 2400 K. We also derive an improved characteristic U(d,p,I) for the dependence of the arc voltage on arc gap, pressure, and current for electrode-stabilized Hg discharges in the UHP regime. Some aspects of the experiment are of general interest in the field of discharge lamps, such as a model for the heat balance of the Hg condensate under conductive, radiative, and evaporative cooling/heating, a short discussion of high-temperature vapor-pressure data for Hg, and an improved Hg equation of state for UHP conditions.

  19. Challenges in pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Dealey, Carol; Brindle, C Tod; Black, Joyce; Alves, Paulo; Santamaria, Nick; Call, Evan; Clark, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Although this article is a stand-alone article, it sets the scene for later articles in this issue. Pressure ulcers are considered to be a largely preventable problem, and yet despite extensive training and the expenditure of a large amount of resources, they persist. This article reviews the current understanding of pressure ulcer aetiology: pressure, shear and microclimate. Individual risk factors for pressure ulceration also need to be understood in order to determine the level of risk of an individual. Such an assessment is essential to determine appropriate prevention strategies. The main prevention strategies in terms of reducing pressure and shear and managing microclimate are studied in this article. The problem of pressure ulceration related to medical devices is also considered as most of the standard prevention strategies are not effective in preventing this type of damage. Finally, the possibility of using dressings as an additional preventive strategy is raised along with the question: is there enough evidence to support their use? PMID:23786251

  20. Hazards in high pressure systems

    SciTech Connect

    Priddy, T.G.

    1985-08-01

    The High Pressure Systems Committee (HPSC) of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers is writing a set of rules and guides which will eventually be approved for treatment of safety concerns in high pressure operations. An introductory section of the proposed standard is being written to describe the hazards in high pressure. This paper is an edited version of the early draft of that section which is numbered 2000. Taking Section 2000 out of context (separately printing it from the remainder of the proposed standard) poses a possible misunderstanding in that high pressure is not necessarily synonymous with a lack of safety. There are many high pressure systems in operation with very acceptable safety records. However, when the potential for damage is great, it becomes more essential that safety be comprehensively engineered and practiced. Everyone concerned should be aware to some degree of the dangers that could happen in such operations. This paper is written in an attempt to share the concerns (appraisal of the risks) that members of the HPSC have for high pressure as interpreted and edited by this author. 22 refs.

  1. Hazards in high pressure systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priddy, T. G.

    1985-08-01

    The High Pressure Systems Committee (HPSC) of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers is writing a set of rules and guides which will eventually be approved for treatment of safety concerns in high pressure operations. An introductory section of the proposed standard is being written to describe the hazards in high pressure. This paper is an edited version of the early draft of that section which is numbered 2000. Taking Section 2000 out of context (separately printing it from the remainder of the proposed standard) poses a possible misunderstanding in that high pressure is not necessarily synonymous with a lack of safety. There are many high pressure systems in operation with very acceptable safety records. However, when the potential for damage is great, it becomes more essential that safety be comprehensively engineered and practiced. Everyone concerned should be aware to some degree of the dangers that could happen in such operations. This paper is written in an attempt to share the concerns (appraisal of the risks) that members of the HPSC have for high pressure as interpreted and edited by this author.

  2. Pressure Ratio to Thermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Pedro; Wang, Winston

    2012-01-01

    A pressure ratio to thermal environments (PRatTlE.pl) program is a Perl language code that estimates heating at requested body point locations by scaling the heating at a reference location times a pressure ratio factor. The pressure ratio factor is the ratio of the local pressure at the reference point and the requested point from CFD (computational fluid dynamics) solutions. This innovation provides pressure ratio-based thermal environments in an automated and traceable method. Previously, the pressure ratio methodology was implemented via a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and macro scripts. PRatTlE is able to calculate heating environments for 150 body points in less than two minutes. PRatTlE is coded in Perl programming language, is command-line-driven, and has been successfully executed on both the HP and Linux platforms. It supports multiple concurrent runs. PRatTlE contains error trapping and input file format verification, which allows clear visibility into the input data structure and intermediate calculations.

  3. Avoid the Consequences of High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Avoid the Consequences of High Blood Pressure Infographic Updated:Jun 19,2014 View a downloadable version of this infographic High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) • Why HBP ...

  4. High blood pressure and eye disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Hypertensive retinopathy is damage to the retina from high blood pressure. The retina is the layer of tissue at ... High blood pressure can damage blood vessels in the retina. The higher the blood pressure and the longer it ...

  5. Tackifier Dispersions to Make Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    Development of new processes for tackifier dispersion could improve the production of pressure sensitive adhesives. Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) have the ability to adhere to different surfaces with manual or finger pressure.

  6. Pressure ulcers - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePLUS

    Pressure ulcers are also called bedsores, or pressure sores. They can form when your skin and soft tissue ... become damaged or die. When this happens, a pressure ulcer may form. Below are some questions you may ...

  7. 40 CFR 796.1950 - Vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...with relatively low vapor pressures, high adsorptivity onto...chemicals with high vapor pressures or with low water solubility...and are prime candidates for atmospheric oxidation and photolysis...and water. (iii) Vapor pressure data are an important...

  8. 40 CFR 796.1950 - Vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...with relatively low vapor pressures, high adsorptivity onto...chemicals with high vapor pressures or with low water solubility...and are prime candidates for atmospheric oxidation and photolysis...and water. (iii) Vapor pressure data are an important...

  9. 40 CFR 796.1950 - Vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...with relatively low vapor pressures, high adsorptivity onto...chemicals with high vapor pressures or with low water solubility...and are prime candidates for atmospheric oxidation and photolysis...and water. (iii) Vapor pressure data are an important...

  10. 40 CFR 796.1950 - Vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...with relatively low vapor pressures, high adsorptivity onto...chemicals with high vapor pressures or with low water solubility...and are prime candidates for atmospheric oxidation and photolysis...and water. (iii) Vapor pressure data are an important...

  11. 40 CFR 796.1950 - Vapor pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...with relatively low vapor pressures, high adsorptivity onto...chemicals with high vapor pressures or with low water solubility...and are prime candidates for atmospheric oxidation and photolysis...and water. (iii) Vapor pressure data are an important...

  12. 49 CFR 229.107 - Pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...STANDARDS Safety Requirements Steam Generators § 229.107 Pressure gauge. (a) Each steam generator shall have an illuminated steam gauge...allowed working pressure of the steam generator. (b) Each steam pressure gauge...

  13. 49 CFR 229.107 - Pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...STANDARDS Safety Requirements Steam Generators § 229.107 Pressure gauge. (a) Each steam generator shall have an illuminated steam gauge...allowed working pressure of the steam generator. (b) Each steam pressure gauge...

  14. 49 CFR 229.107 - Pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...STANDARDS Safety Requirements Steam Generators § 229.107 Pressure gauge. (a) Each steam generator shall have an illuminated steam gauge...allowed working pressure of the steam generator. (b) Each steam pressure gauge...

  15. 49 CFR 229.107 - Pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...STANDARDS Safety Requirements Steam Generators § 229.107 Pressure gauge. (a) Each steam generator shall have an illuminated steam gauge...allowed working pressure of the steam generator. (b) Each steam pressure gauge...

  16. 49 CFR 229.107 - Pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...STANDARDS Safety Requirements Steam Generators § 229.107 Pressure gauge. (a) Each steam generator shall have an illuminated steam gauge...allowed working pressure of the steam generator. (b) Each steam pressure gauge...

  17. 46 CFR 197.336 - Pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 false Pressure piping. 197.336 Section...GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.336 Pressure piping. Piping systems...facility, carrying fluids under pressures exceeding 15 psig...

  18. 46 CFR 197.336 - Pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Pressure piping. 197.336 Section...GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.336 Pressure piping. Piping systems...facility, carrying fluids under pressures exceeding 15 psig...

  19. 46 CFR 197.336 - Pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 false Pressure piping. 197.336 Section...GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.336 Pressure piping. Piping systems...facility, carrying fluids under pressures exceeding 15 psig...

  20. 46 CFR 197.336 - Pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false Pressure piping. 197.336 Section...GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.336 Pressure piping. Piping systems...facility, carrying fluids under pressures exceeding 15 psig...

  1. 46 CFR 197.336 - Pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 false Pressure piping. 197.336 Section...GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.336 Pressure piping. Piping systems...facility, carrying fluids under pressures exceeding 15 psig...

  2. Automatic blood pressure measuring system (M092)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolte, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The Blood Pressure Measuring System is described. It measures blood pressure by the noninvasive Korotkoff sound technique on a continual basis as physical stress is imposed during experiment M092, Lower Body Negative Pressure, and experiment M171, Metabolic Activity.

  3. Spray bottle apparatus with pressure multiplying pistons

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R. (Kennewick, WA); Gordon, Norman R. (Kennewick, WA); DeFord, Henry S. (Kennewick, WA)

    1990-01-01

    The present invention comprises a spray bottle in which the pressure resulting from the gripping force applied by the user is amplified and this increased pressure used in generating a spray such as an aerosol or fluid stream. In its preferred embodiment, the invention includes a high pressure chamber and a corresponding piston which is operative for driving fluid out of this chamber at high pressure through a spray nozzle and a low pressure chamber and a corresponding piston which is acted upon the hydraulic pressure within the bottle resulting from the gripping force. The low pressure chamber and piston are of larger size than the high pressure chamber and piston. The pistons are rigidly connected so that the force created by the pressure acting on the piston in the low pressure chamber is transmitted to the piston in the high pressure chamber where it is applied over a more limited area thereby generating greater hydraulic pressure for use in forming the spray.

  4. Accuracy of blood pressure monitors available in high street pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Ware, Adam; Stevens, Richard; Selwood, Mary; Fleming, Susannah

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of automated blood pressure monitors on sale to the UK general public. We conducted static pressure accuracy testing on all compatible (19 out of 22 available) blood pressure monitors available for sale in pharmacies within the city of Oxford, UK, and tested two devices for accuracy in measurement of systolic and diastolic blood pressures in 21 adults. The devices showed good accuracy when measuring static pressure in laboratory bench testing, with the median error per device ranging from -2.2 to +1.2?mmHg; however, the two devices tested performed worse in vivo than in laboratory tests, with median errors as high as 6?mmHg. The monitors showed good accuracy in static pressure testing, with a lack of correlation between monitor price and accuracy. However, higher error rates seen during in-vivo testing of a subset of monitors may indicate that static testing may not be appropriate for routine accuracy assessment of these monitors. PMID:26427055

  5. FEA of CMUTs Suitable for Wide Gas Pressure Range Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Min-Chieh; Kupnik, Mario; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2010-01-01

    The ability of ultrasound transducers to operate over a wide and varying pressure range is essential in applications such as ultrasonic flow metering (UFM) of flare gas. We propose a new operational mode for capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs), in which the plate is in permanent contact with the bottom of the cavity, even at zero DC bias and 1 atm pressure. Finite element analysis (FEA) software was used to investigate the performance of these CMUTs within the pressure range of 1 to 20 atm. First, we performed a static analysis to determine the plate deflection and, thus, the gap height. Further, from the static analysis, we obtained the static and free capacitances for calculating the coupling efficiency, and a modal analysis identified possible design geometries for frequencies lower than ~ 300 kHz. Our calculations show that conventionally operated CMUTs have huge changes in static operational point at different pressures, while our proposed mode exhibits an acceptable frequency range (73 – 340 kHz) over 1 – 20 atm pressure and an improved coupling efficiency at lower dc bias voltages. A donut shape partial electrode further allows us to tune the coupling efficiency, which translates into a better performance, especially at the higher pressure range. FEA shows that our proposed operation mode is a promising solution for flare gas metering applications. PMID:21874100

  6. FEA of CMUTs Suitable for Wide Gas Pressure Range Applications.

    PubMed

    Ho, Min-Chieh; Kupnik, Mario; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2010-10-11

    The ability of ultrasound transducers to operate over a wide and varying pressure range is essential in applications such as ultrasonic flow metering (UFM) of flare gas. We propose a new operational mode for capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs), in which the plate is in permanent contact with the bottom of the cavity, even at zero DC bias and 1 atm pressure. Finite element analysis (FEA) software was used to investigate the performance of these CMUTs within the pressure range of 1 to 20 atm. First, we performed a static analysis to determine the plate deflection and, thus, the gap height. Further, from the static analysis, we obtained the static and free capacitances for calculating the coupling efficiency, and a modal analysis identified possible design geometries for frequencies lower than ~ 300 kHz. Our calculations show that conventionally operated CMUTs have huge changes in static operational point at different pressures, while our proposed mode exhibits an acceptable frequency range (73 - 340 kHz) over 1 - 20 atm pressure and an improved coupling efficiency at lower dc bias voltages. A donut shape partial electrode further allows us to tune the coupling efficiency, which translates into a better performance, especially at the higher pressure range. FEA shows that our proposed operation mode is a promising solution for flare gas metering applications. PMID:21874100

  7. Optical pressure/density measuring means

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    1995-05-09

    An apparatus and method for rapidly and accurately determining the pressure of a fluid medium in either a static or dynamic state. The pressure is determined by making a measurement of the velocity of a light beam that is directed through the fluid medium along a pathway that enables an integrated pressure measurement to be made along the pathway, rather than making such a measurement only at a single point in the medium. A HeNe laser is configured to emit a beam of two frequencies separated by about 2 MHz. One of these beam frequencies is directed through the fluid medium and is reflected back through the medium to a non-linear diode detector. The other beam frequency is passed directly to a diode detector without traversing said medium. The diode detector is operated to determine the frequency shift or beat frequency between the two beam frequencies. Any variation in the frequency of said reflected beam that is caused by a change in its velocity as it is passed through the fluid medium causes a change in the beat frequency. This beat frequency change is then converted to an output signal value corresponding to the pressure of the medium. The measurement instrument apparatus is remotely positioned relative to the medium being measured, thus the apparatus is immune from electro-magnetic interference and can operate in conditions of high radiation, corrosion and extraordinarily high temperature.

  8. Optical pressure/density measuring means

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-05-09

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for rapidly and accurately determining the pressure of a fluid medium in either a static or dynamic state. The pressure is determined by making a measurement of the velocity of a light beam that is directed through the fluid medium along a pathway that enables an integrated pressure measurement to be made along the pathway, rather than making such a measurement only at a single point in the medium. A HeNe laser is configured to emit a beam of two frequencies separated by about 2 MHz. One of these beam frequencies is directed through the fluid medium and is reflected back through the medium to a non-linear diode detector. The other beam frequency is passed directly to a diode detector without traversing said medium. The diode detector is operated to determine the frequency shift or beat frequency between the two beam frequencies. Any variation in the frequency of said reflected beam that is caused by a change in its velocity as it is passed through the fluid medium causes a change in the beat frequency. This beat frequency change is then converted to an output signal value corresponding to the pressure of the medium. The measurement instrument apparatus is remotely positioned relative to the medium being measured, thus the apparatus is immune from electro-magnetic interference and can operate in conditions of high radiation, corrosion and extraordinarily high temperature. 4 figs.

  9. Linear ruby scale and one megabar. [high pressure fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, A. L.

    1979-01-01

    The accuracy and validity of certain techniques used in studying high-pressure transitions have been investigated. Experiments which place upper limits of about 20 GPa and about 50 GPa on pressures practically attainable using uniaxial supported opposed anvil devices with tungsten carbide pistons and uniaxial opposed flat anvil diamond devices, respectively, are reported. Direct static determinations of the transition pressures of GaP by two different methods are described. The values obtained indicate that the linear ruby scale increasingly overestimates the transition pressure as the pressure rises above 10 GPa. It is further shown that the use of shock-based marker materials, such as silver, as the basis of pressure measurement in X-ray diffraction studies leads to bulk moduli of cubic carbides which are in extreme disagreement with expected values.

  10. Preeclampsia and High Blood Pressure During Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ034 PREGNANCY Preeclampsia and High Blood Pressure During Pregnancy • What is high blood pressure? • What is chronic hypertension? • What is gestational hypertension? • ...

  11. Measuring Intracranial Pressure And Volume Noninvasively

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    1994-01-01

    Ultrasonic technique eliminates need to drill into brain cavity. Intracranial dynamics instrument probes cranium ultrasonically to obtain data for determination of intracranial pressure (ICP) and pressure-volume index (PVI). Instrument determines sensitivity of skull to changes in pressure and by use of mechanical device to exert external calibrated pressure on skull. By monitoring volume of blood flowing into jugular vein, one determines change of volume of blood in cranial system. By measuring response of skull to increasing pressure (where pressure increased by tilting patient known amount) and by using cranial blood pressure, one determines intial pressure in cerebrospinal fluid. Once PVI determined, ICP determined.

  12. Flexible Pressure Sensors: Modeling and Experimental Characterization

    E-print Network

    Viana, J.C.

    Flexible capacitive pressure sensors fabricated with nanocomposites were experimentally characterized and results compared with simulations from analytical modeling. Unlike traditional diaphragm silicon pressure sensors, ...

  13. Population pressures: threat to democracy.

    PubMed

    1992-06-01

    The desire for political freedom and representative government is spreading throughout the world. The stability of democratic bodies is dependent on wise leaders, foreign aid, and slowing population growth. Rapid population growth strains political institutions and increases pressure on services. A Population Crisis Committee study found that only a few democratic countries with serious demographic pressures remained stable. The most stable countries were ones with lower levels of population pressure. Most of the 31 unstable countries were in Africa and in a band stretching from the Middle East to South Asia, and almost all had serious demographic pressures. Only 5 stable countries had high or very high demographic pressures. Since countries in the world are interdependent, population pressures have adverse consequences everywhere. Population pressures in the developing world are considered enhanced by the rapid growth of cities. Both the developed and the developing world face the problems of clogged highways, loss of wilderness, polluted lakes and streams, and stifling smog and acid rain conditions. The sociopolitical implications of demographic changes vary from country to country, but rapid growth and maldistribution of population strains existing political, social, and economic structures and relations between nations. Urban areas are the arena for clashes of cultures, competition for scarce housing and jobs, the breakdown of traditional family and social structures, and juxtapositions of extreme wealth next to extreme poverty. The growth of independent nation states since the 1940s has not allowed much time for development of effective political institutions. There are many obstacles to national unity and popular political participation. The potential for political instability is correlated with a number of factors: large youth populations in overcrowded cities with too high expectations and limited opportunities, diverse and intense ethnic and religious factors, and oppressive governments which violate human rights. Rapid growth has a harmful impact on the environment. PMID:12179234

  14. Chapter 7 Atmospheric PressureChapter 7 Atmospheric Pressure and Windand Wind

    E-print Network

    Tang, Youmin

    Chapter 7 Atmospheric PressureChapter 7 Atmospheric Pressure and Windand Wind · Pressure Essentials · Atmospheric Patterns of Motion · Horizontal Pressure Gradients · Cyclones and Anticyclones #12;#12;General Concept - Atmospheric (air) pressure: P Definition: The pressure exerted by the mass of air above a given

  15. Evaluation of the effect of pressurized bushings on seismic qualification of SF sub 6 circuit breakers

    SciTech Connect

    Okuno, M.; Setoyama, T.; Murase, S. ); Hellested, R. )

    1990-04-01

    Stresses on the porcelain of high voltage switchgear under seismic vibration are statically biased by internal pressure. However, restrictions from the seismic test facility pose some difficulties in practical procedure of test with pressure. This paper discusses the effect of pressure on the strain and proposes an equivalent test method to simulate a pressurized condition without actually filling the SF{sub 6} gas to the operating pressure.

  16. Blade Tip Pressure Measurements Using Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Oliver D.; Watkins, Anthony Neal; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Crafton, James; Forlines, Alan; Goss, Larry; Gregory, James W.; Juliano, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of pressure sensitive paint using laser-based excitation for measurement of the upper surface pressure distribution on the tips of rotor blades in hover and simulated forward flight. The testing was conducted in the Rotor Test Cell and the 14- by 22-ft Subsonic Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center on the General Rotor Model System (GRMS) test stand. The Mach-scaled rotor contained three chordwise rows of dynamic pressure transducers for comparison with PSP measurements. The rotor had an 11 ft 1 in. diameter, 5.45 in. main chord and a swept, tapered tip. Three thrust conditions were examined in hover, C(sub T) = 0.004, 0.006 and 0.008. In forward flight, an additional thrust condition, C(sub T) = 0.010 was also examined. All four thrust conditions in forward flight were conducted at an advance ratio of 0.35.

  17. Constant-Differential-Pressure Two-Fluid Accumulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piecuch, Benjamin; Dalton, Luke T.

    2010-01-01

    A two-fluid accumulator has been designed, built, and demonstrated to provide an acceptably close approximation to constant differential static pressure between two fluids over the full ranges of (1) accumulator stroke, (2) rates of flow of the fluids, and (3) common static pressure applied to the fluids. Prior differential- pressure two-fluid accumulators are generally not capable of maintaining acceptably close approximations to constant differential pressures. The inadequacies of a typical prior differential-pressure two-fluid accumulator can be summarized as follows: The static differential pressure is governed by the intrinsic spring rate (essentially, the stiffness) of an accumulator tank. The spring rate can be tailored through selection of the tank-wall thickness, selection of the number and/or shape of accumulator convolutions, and/or selection of accumulator material(s). Reliance on the intrinsic spring rate of the tank results in three severe limitations: (1) The spring rate and the expulsion efficiency tend to be inversely proportional to each other: that is to say, as the stiffness (and thus the differential pressure) is increased, the range of motion of the accumulator is reduced. (2) As the applied common static pressure increases, the differential pressure tends to decrease. An additional disadvantage, which may or may not be considered limiting, depending on the specific application, is that an increase in stiffness entails an increase in weight. (3) The additional weight required by a low expulsion efficiency accumulator eliminates the advantage given to such gas storage systems. The high expulsion efficiency provided by this two-fluid accumulator allows for a lightweight, tightly packaged system, which can be used in conjunction with a fuel cell-based system.

  18. 49 CFR 179.15 - Pressure relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...padding pressure and the lading vapor pressure at the following reference temperatures...burst pressure. (3) The vapor tight pressure of a reclosing pressure relief...transportation. (3) The vapor tight pressure and the...

  19. 49 CFR 179.15 - Pressure relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...padding pressure and the lading vapor pressure at the following reference temperatures...burst pressure. (3) The vapor tight pressure of a reclosing pressure relief...transportation. (3) The vapor tight pressure and the...

  20. 49 CFR 179.15 - Pressure relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...padding pressure and the lading vapor pressure at the following reference temperatures...burst pressure. (3) The vapor tight pressure of a reclosing pressure relief...transportation. (3) The vapor tight pressure and the...