Science.gov

Sample records for pressure ulcer

  1. Pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    O'Byrne, Deborah

    2016-04-13

    My nursing experience is in acute care. Acute medical nurses are well placed to assess skin integrity, identify patients at risk of pressure ulcer development, and commence appropriate interventions to prevent or treat pressure ulcers. PMID:27073966

  2. Neonatal Pressure Ulcer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Scheans, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of pressure ulcers in acutely ill infants and children ranges up to 27 percent in intensive care units, with a range of 16-19 percent in NICUs. Anatomic, physiologic, and developmental factors place ill and preterm newborns at risk for skin breakdown. Two case studies illustrate these factors, and best practices for pressure ulcer prevention are described. PMID:26803094

  3. Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) Purpose A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers* Setting Canadian Prevalence,% (95% CI) Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n) Acute care 25 (23.8–26.3) 23.9–29.7 (3418) Nonacute care† 30 (29.3–31.4) 30.0–53.3 (1165) Community care 15 (13.4–16.8) 13.2 (91) Mixed health care‡ 22 (20.9

  4. Management of Chronic Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) conducted a systematic review on interventions used to treat pressure ulcers in order to answer the following questions: Do currently available interventions for the treatment of pressure ulcers increase the healing rate of pressure ulcers compared with standard care, a placebo, or other similar interventions? Within each category of intervention, which one is most effective in promoting the healing of existing pressure ulcers? Background A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in conjunction with shear and/or friction. Many areas of the body, especially the sacrum and the heel, are prone to the development of pressure ulcers. People with impaired mobility (e.g., stroke or spinal cord injury patients) are most vulnerable to pressure ulcers. Other factors that predispose people to pressure ulcer formation are poor nutrition, poor sensation, urinary and fecal incontinence, and poor overall physical and mental health. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in Ontario has been estimated to range from a median of 22.1% in community settings to a median of 29.9% in nonacute care facilities. Pressure ulcers have been shown to increase the risk of mortality among geriatric patients by

  5. Clinical management of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David R

    2013-05-01

    Pressure ulcers are chronic and difficult to heal. Pressure-reducing devices are clearly superior to a standard hospital mattress in preventing pressure ulcers, but only limited evidence and clinical intuition supports pressure-reducing devices in improving the healing rate of pressure ulcers. Local wound treatment should aim at maintaining a moist wound environment. The choice of a particular dressing depends on wound characteristics, such as the amount of exudate, dead space, or wound location. Nutritional status should be addressed as a process of good care. Debridement may improve time to a clean wound bed, but no clearly superior approach has been demonstrated. PMID:23571035

  6. Common Questions About Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Raetz, Jaqueline G M; Wick, Keren H

    2015-11-15

    Patients with limited mobility due to physical or cognitive impairment are at risk of pressure ulcers. Primary care physicians should examine at-risk patients because pressure ulcers are often missed in inpatient, outpatient, and long-term care settings. High-risk patients should use advanced static support surfaces to prevent pressure ulcers and air-fluidized beds to treat pressure ulcers. Physicians should document the size and clinical features of ulcers. Cleansing should be done with saline or tap water, while avoiding caustic agents, such as hydrogen peroxide. Dressings should promote a moist, but not wet, wound healing environment. The presence of infection is determined through clinical judgment; if uncertain, a tissue biopsy should be performed. New or worsening pain may indicate infection of a pressure ulcer. When treating patients with pressure ulcers, it is important to keep in mind the patient's psychological, behavioral, and cognitive status. The patient's social, financial, and caregiver resources, as well as goals and long-term prognosis, should also be considered in the treatment plan. PMID:26554282

  7. Nutrition management of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Doley, Jennifer

    2010-02-01

    Despite our knowledge of how to prevent pressure ulcers, and improvements in treatment, pressure ulcers remain prevalent and impose a significant burden on financial and labor resources in the healthcare industry. Although there is no known role for specific nutrients in the prevention of pressure ulcers, undernutrition is a risk factor, and nutrition therapy plays a crucial role in pressure ulcer treatment. Limitations in research make it difficult to develop evidence-based nutrition guidelines, so it is important that clinicians conduct a comprehensive assessment that includes weight and intake history, biochemical data, and comorbidities as well as symptoms that may affect the intake, absorption, or excretion of nutrients. These data, combined with clinical judgment, must be used to estimate energy and protein needs, considering the size and severity of the pressure ulcer. Micronutriture is difficult to assess; usual intake, comorbidities and disease symptoms must be considered in addition to biochemical data. Micronutrients should be replaced if depleted, but routine supplementation of vitamins and minerals in all pressure ulcer patients is not warranted. PMID:20130157

  8. Pressure ulcers. Local wound care.

    PubMed

    Goode, P S; Thomas, D R

    1997-08-01

    Local care of pressure ulcers includes wound cleansing, débridement, and dressings. Wound cleansing should remove loose debris and exudate but should not damage viable tissue. Saline irrigation is the standard. Débridement is often necessary for Stage III and IV pressure ulcers and can be performed autolytically, mechanically, enzymatically, or sharply. Prompt débridement is essential for infected wounds. Dressings should keep the wound bed continuously moist, should not be toxic to granulation tissue, and should keep the surrounding intact skin dry. Randomized, controlled clinical trials are necessary to define optimal local wound care further. PMID:9227943

  9. Pressure ulcer prevention in the community setting.

    PubMed

    Jones, Donna

    Pressure ulcers are associated with reduced quality of life, affecting individuals physically, socially and emotionally. The financial cost to the NHS of preventing and treating such ulcers is substantial. Although largely preventable, pressure ulcers are still common. The Department of Health is committed to eliminating all avoidable pressure ulcers in NHS-provided care. This article explores methods of preventing pressure ulcers, with particular focus on risk assessment, skin inspection, pressure-relieving measures, nutrition and hydration, and patient and carer education. PMID:24044860

  10. Engaging patients in pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Hudgell, Lynne; Dalphinis, Julie; Blunt, Chris; Zonouzi, Maryam; Procter, Susan

    2015-05-01

    As patients increasingly care for themselves at home, they require accessible information to enable informed self-care. This article describes the development of an educational electronic application (app) designed for use by patients at risk of pressure ulcers, and their carers. The app can be downloaded to Windows, Android or Apple smartphones or tablets. The app is based on the current pressure ulcer prevention and management guidelines from the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, and is designed to educate patients and carers about how to prevent a pressure ulcer, how to recognise a pressure ulcer, and what to do if they suspect they are developing a pressure ulcer. We hope the app will be used to help with educational conversations among patients, carers and healthcare professionals. PMID:25942988

  11. Pressure ulcer prevention in frail older people.

    PubMed

    Barry, Maree; Nugent, Linda

    2015-12-16

    Pressure ulcers are painful and cause discomfort, have a negative effect on quality of life, and are costly to treat. The incidence and severity of preventable pressure ulcers is an important indicator of quality of care; it is essential that healthcare providers monitor prevalence and incidence rates to ensure that care strategies implemented are effective. Frail older people are at increased risk of developing pressure ulcers. This article discusses the complexities of preventing pressure ulcers in frail older people and emphasises the importance of structured educational programmes that incorporate effective clinical leadership and multidisciplinary teamwork. PMID:26669407

  12. Practice recommendations for preventing heel pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Evonne; Scott-Williams, Suzy; McGuire, James B

    2008-10-01

    Heels are the second most common anatomical location for pressure ulcers. A combination of risk factors, including pressure, may cause ulceration. Heel pressure ulcers are a particular concern for surgical patients. A review of the literature, including poster presentations, shows that controlled clinical studies to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of available interventions are not available. Case series (with or without historical controls) as well as pressure ulcer guideline recommendations suggest the most important aspect of heel ulcer prevention is pressure relief (offloading). It also has been documented that the incidence of heel ulcers can be reduced using a total-patient care approach and heel offloading devices. Guidelines, observational studies, and expert opinion intimate that reducing heel ulceration rates can be expected to improve patient outcomes, decrease costs associated with their care, and avoid costs related to hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. The heel pressure ulcer prevention strategies reviewed should be implemented until the results of prospective, randomized controlled studies to compare the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of these strategies are available. PMID:18927483

  13. Pressure ulcer classification: defining early skin damage.

    PubMed

    Russell, Linda

    2002-09-01

    This article is the second of a two-part series. The first part (Russell, 2002) looked at various systems and pitfalls of pressure ulcer classification systems. This article focuses on the difficulties of defining early skin damage. Patients' quality of life suffers significantly with a pressure ulcer. The smell of the exudate may be an embarrassment to the patient. The pain and the distress the patient will experience will not easily be forgotten, i.e. the number of dressings required for a deep pressure ulcer, even after the pressure ulcer has healed, will be a memorable intrusion to the patient's daily routine. Early detection of pressure ulcers and timely intervention are essential in the management of patients with pressure ulcers. Controversy exists over the definition of the first three stages of pressure ulcers, but there is consensus on the definition of deep tissue damage. If the pressure ulcer is covered with black necrotic tissue it is difficult to establish depth of the tissue damage. Intact skin can cause problems, as a sacrum may be purple but intact. There is still considerable debate with regard to reactive hyperaemia, as the exact time parameters for persistent erythema to occur are unknown. Little is understood with regard to the exact pathophysiology of reactive hyperaemia and this area requires further investigation. Blistered skin and skin tone also cause confusion in grading of pressure ulcers. The problems associated with classification of pressure ulcers, using colour classification systems, are discussed and the implications for practice are considered. The confusion surrounding early classification of pressure ulcers is discussed and it is hoped that such confusion can be addressed by standardizing training using one national classification system. PMID:12362151

  14. The prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chester H; Bogie, Kath

    2007-05-01

    Pressure ulcers remain a significant secondary complication for many individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Technological advances have the potential to affect both the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. The focus of this article is hi-tech devices and methodologies. The current state-of-the-art methods are discussed and conceptual approaches are presented. PMID:17543771

  15. Pressure ulcers: Back to the basics

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Karoon; Chauhan, Neha

    2012-01-01

    Pressure ulcer in an otherwise sick patient is a matter of concern for the care givers as well as the medical personnel. A lot has been done to understand the disease process. So much so that USA and European countries have established advisory panels in their respective continents. Since the establishment of these organizations, the understanding of the pressure ulcer has improved significantly. The authors feel that the well documented and well publicized definition of pressure ulcer is somewhat lacking in the correct description of the disease process. Hence, a modified definition has been presented. This disease is here to stay. In the process of managing these ulcers the basic pathology needs to be understood well. Pressure ischemia is the main reason behind the occurrence of ulceration. Different extrinsic and intrinsic factors have been described in detail with review of literature. There are a large number of risk factors causing ulceration. The risk assessment scales have eluded the surgical literature and mostly remained in nursing books and websites. These scales have been reproduced for completion of the basics on decubitus ulcer. The classification of the pressure sores has been given in a comparative form to elucidate that most of the classifications are the same except for minor variations. The management of these ulcers is ever evolving but the age old saying of “prevention is better than cure” suits this condition the most. PMID:23162223

  16. Enhancing Documentation of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Interventions: A Quality Improvement Strategy to Reduce Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Therese M; Thompson, Susan L; Halvorson, Anna M; Zeitler, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers requires the implementation of evidence-based interventions. A quality improvement project was conducted to provide nurses with data on the frequency with which pressure ulcer prevention interventions were performed as measured by documentation. Documentation reports provided feedback to stakeholders, triggering reminders and reeducation. Intervention reports and modifications to the documentation system were effective both in increasing the documentation of pressure ulcer prevention interventions and in decreasing the number of avoidable hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. PMID:26863048

  17. Pressure ulcer prevention: utilizing unlicensed assistive personnel.

    PubMed

    Walker Sewill, Danielle K; Van Sell, Sharon; Kindred, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide education to the RN regarding pressure ulcer prevention and best practice interventions. This investigation focuses on the definition of a pressure ulcer, risk factors for pressure ulcers, and the benefits and importance of using unlicensed assistive personnel to help prevent pressure ulcers. A comprehensive literature review was completed using the Texas Woman's University Library, the Texas Christian University Library, and the World Wide Web. The search engine used was Google. The databases included were CINAHL, Academic Search Complete, Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, and ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Source. The literature was current, defined as from the last 10 years, and the primary language searched was English. Full-text articles from these databases were included as well as print publications from the university collections. The key search terms from the literature review included (a) pressure ulcer, (b) prevention, (c) unlicensed assistive personnel, (d) nursing assistant, (e) theory of nursing knowledge, (f) incidence, (g) prevalence, (h) Braden scale, (i) moisture, and (j) repositioning. Best practice guidelines were reviewed via the Joanna Briggs database, National Guideline Clearinghouse, Cochrane Library, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, and the National Institutes of Health. Literature was synthesized to define evidence-based practices that would justify the use of unlicensed assistive personnel for the prevention and care of pressure ulcers. PMID:20827067

  18. The role of nutrition for pressure ulcer management: national pressure ulcer advisory panel, European pressure ulcer advisory panel, and pan pacific pressure injury alliance white paper.

    PubMed

    Posthauer, Mary Ellen; Banks, Merrilyn; Dorner, Becky; Schols, Jos M G A

    2015-04-01

    Nutrition and hydration play an important role in preserving skin and tissue viability and in supporting tissue repair for pressure ulcer (PrU) healing. The majority of research investigating the relationship between nutrition and wounds focuses on PrUs. This white paper reviews the 2014 National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, and Pan Pacific Pressure Injury Alliance Nutrition Guidelines and discusses nutrition strategies for PrU management. PMID:25775201

  19. A programme to reduce acquired pressure ulcers in care homes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Trish Morris; Marks-Maran, Di

    Prevention of pressure ulcers is a major health concern, especially for older people. Much of the literature related to prevention of pressure ulcers focuses on hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. There is less literature related to prevention of pressure ulcers in care homes. This article presents a review of the literature related to prevention of pressure ulcers in care homes and an ambitious project undertaken by one care home provider to raise awareness of pressure ulcers, provide training in prevention and monitor and evaluate pressure ulcers in over 200 care home across the UK. Known as MI SKIN, the project involves ongoing training to all levels of care staff, a robust system of monitoring pressure ulcers and a mechanism to investigate and learn from any incident of pressure ulcer using root cause analysis. PMID:26110989

  20. A communication project to prevent pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Lyn

    A strategic health authority cluster-wide programme was established in 2011 with the aim of minimising occurrences of avoidable grade 2, 3 and 4 pressure ulcers. This aim was achieved using an engagement programme, a SSKIN care bundle for frontline staff, a pressure ulcer collaborative and a communications campaign. This article focuses on the communications campaign developed to support the SHA ambition, discussing the social marketing approach used and describing some of the resources developed to raise awareness among staff. Implications for practice are highlighted. PMID:24358559

  1. Pressure ulcers: prevention, evaluation, and management.

    PubMed

    Bluestein, Daniel; Javaheri, Ashkan

    2008-11-15

    A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin or underlying tissue, usually over a bony prominence, as a result of unrelieved pressure. Predisposing factors are classified as intrinsic (e.g., limited mobility, poor nutrition, comorbidities, aging skin) or extrinsic (e.g., pressure, friction, shear, moisture). Prevention includes identifying at-risk persons and implementing specific prevention measures, such as following a patient repositioning schedule; keeping the head of the bed at the lowest safe elevation to prevent shear; using pressure-reducing surfaces; and assessing nutrition and providing supplementation, if needed. When an ulcer occurs, documentation of each ulcer (i.e., size, location, eschar and granulation tissue, exudate, odor, sinus tracts, undermining, and infection) and appropriate staging (I through IV) are essential to the wound assessment. Treatment involves management of local and distant infections, removal of necrotic tissue, maintenance of a moist environment for wound healing, and possibly surgery. Debridement is indicated when necrotic tissue is present. Urgent sharp debridement should be performed if advancing cellulitis or sepsis occurs. Mechanical, enzymatic, and autolytic debridement methods are nonurgent treatments. Wound cleansing, preferably with normal saline and appropriate dressings, is a mainstay of treatment for clean ulcers and after debridement. Bacterial load can be managed with cleansing. Topical antibiotics should be considered if there is no improvement in healing after 14 days. Systemic antibiotics are used in patients with advancing cellulitis, osteomyelitis, or systemic infection. PMID:19035067

  2. Malnutrition as a Precursor of Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Litchford, Mary D.; Dorner, Becky; Posthauer, Mary Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Numerous studies have reported associations between declining nutrition status and risk for pressure ulcers. Oral eating problems, weight loss, low body weight, undernutrition, and malnutrition are associated with an increased risk for pressure ulcers. Moreover, inadequate nutrient intake and low body weight are associated with slow and nonhealing wounds. However, the biologic significance of deterioration in nutrition status and consistent methodologies to quantify malnutrition and diminished micronutrient stores as predictors of skin breakdown remains controversial. Recent Advances: The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy) and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) Consensus Statement: Characteristics Recommended for the Identification and Documentation of Adult Malnutrition provide a standardized and measureable set of criterion for all health professionals to use to identify malnutrition. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality identified malnutrition as one of the common geriatric syndromes associated with increased risk for institutionalization and mortality that may be impacted by primary and secondary preventions. Critical Issues: The purpose of this article is to examine the Academy/ASPEN consensus statement on characteristics of adult malnutrition in the context of the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP)/European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (EPUAP) Guidelines on the Prevention and Treatment of Pressure Ulcers. Future Directions: Moreover, clinicians, and in particular, registered dietitians have the opportunity to integrate the Characteristics of Malnutrition with the NPUAP/EPUAP 2009 Prevention and Treatment Clinical Practice Guidelines, into clinical assessment and documentation using the Nutrition Care Process. Consensus guidelines will provide consistent research criteria yielding more useful data than presently available. PMID:24761345

  3. Malnutrition as a Precursor of Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Litchford, Mary D; Dorner, Becky; Posthauer, Mary Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Numerous studies have reported associations between declining nutrition status and risk for pressure ulcers. Oral eating problems, weight loss, low body weight, undernutrition, and malnutrition are associated with an increased risk for pressure ulcers. Moreover, inadequate nutrient intake and low body weight are associated with slow and nonhealing wounds. However, the biologic significance of deterioration in nutrition status and consistent methodologies to quantify malnutrition and diminished micronutrient stores as predictors of skin breakdown remains controversial. Recent Advances: The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy) and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) Consensus Statement: Characteristics Recommended for the Identification and Documentation of Adult Malnutrition provide a standardized and measureable set of criterion for all health professionals to use to identify malnutrition. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality identified malnutrition as one of the common geriatric syndromes associated with increased risk for institutionalization and mortality that may be impacted by primary and secondary preventions. Critical Issues: The purpose of this article is to examine the Academy/ASPEN consensus statement on characteristics of adult malnutrition in the context of the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP)/European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (EPUAP) Guidelines on the Prevention and Treatment of Pressure Ulcers. Future Directions: Moreover, clinicians, and in particular, registered dietitians have the opportunity to integrate the Characteristics of Malnutrition with the NPUAP/EPUAP 2009 Prevention and Treatment Clinical Practice Guidelines, into clinical assessment and documentation using the Nutrition Care Process. Consensus guidelines will provide consistent research criteria yielding more useful data than presently available. PMID:24761345

  4. Multidisciplinary approaches to the pressure ulcer problem.

    PubMed

    Bogie, Kath M; Ho, Chester H

    2007-10-01

    Multiple factors affect the specific condition and overall clinical profile of individuals at risk for chronic wounds. The complexity of the pressure ulcer problem lends itself to the application of the National Institute of Health Roadmap Initiative that encourages interdisciplinary research and new organizational models. An overview of research studies relevant to telemedicine and neuromuscular electrical stimulation in the care and prevention of pressure ulcers as well as preliminary results of an innovative multidisciplinary skin care team approach to the primary and tertiary prevention of pressure ulcers are encouraging. The team's pilot study results indicate that patients are satisfied with telehealth provision of care; however, literature and experience also suggest that discrepancies in the inter-rater assessment of wounds using digital photography remain, particularly with regard to wound dimension variables assessed (P<0.01). In another endeavor, the skin care team developed a Longitudinal Analysis with Self-Registration statistical algorithm to assess the effects of electrical stimulation; in a preliminary study, this tool documented improvement in gluteus maximus health and resultant ability to withstand pressure. As the number of groups pursuing multidisciplinary research and care increases, so, too, will the evidence base required to address these common, and complex, chronic wounds. PMID:17978412

  5. Management of pressure ulcers - What is new?

    PubMed Central

    Gude, Dilip

    2011-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are an important aspect of geriatrics and palliative care that amplifies morbidity of the chronically bed-ridden patients posing a threat to health-care economy and resources. PUs can interfere with functional recovery, may be complicated by pain and infection and can prolong hospital length of stay. Their presence may be a marker of poor overall prognosis and premature mortality. The pathogenesis and progress in the management of PUs is discussed. PMID:22408340

  6. Pressure ulcer grading and appropriate equipment selection.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Sarah

    2014-08-12

    This article explores the process and rationale for designing a poster to support community nurses in selecting appropriate pressure-relieving equipment based on accurate risk assessment and correct pressure ulcer grading. The project was prompted by the requirement to update community nurses' knowledge and ensure pressure-relieving equipment selection was evidence-based and not reliant on personal preference. The 2012 NHS Midlands and East 'Stop the pressure' campaign provided community nurses with a framework for pressure ulcer prevention and management. The attention to support surfaces highlighted the need for appropriate equipment. However the tissue viability team found that the introduction of this pathway alone did not help with the practical issues of appropriate equipment selection. The poster was designed with consideration as to how adults learn, and by looking to the Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) cycle. This provided the framework for enabling new ideas and changes to practice to be tested on a small scale before full implementation. PMID:25117600

  7. Determinants of mortality among older adults with pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Khor, Hui Min; Tan, Juan; Saedon, Nor Izzati; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul B; Chin, Ai Vyrn; Poi, Philip J H; Tan, Maw Pin

    2014-01-01

    The presence of pressure ulcers imposes a huge burden on the older person's quality of life and significantly increases their risk of dying. The objective of this study was to determine patient characteristics associated with the presence of pressure ulcers and to evaluate the risk factors associated with mortality among older patients with pressure ulcers. A prospective observational study was performed between Oct 2012 and May 2013. Patients with preexisting pressure ulcers on admission and those with hospital acquired pressure ulcers were recruited into the study. Information on patient demographics, functional status, nutritional level, stages of pressure ulcer and their complications were obtained. Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to assess the risk of death in all patients. 76/684 (11.1%) patients had pre-existing pressure ulcers on admission and 30/684 (4.4%) developed pressure ulcers in hospital. There were 68 (66%) deaths by the end of the median follow-up period of 12 (IQR 2.5-14) weeks. Our Cox regression model revealed that nursing home residence (Hazard Ratio, HR=2.33, 95% confidence interval, CI=1.30, 4.17; p=0.005), infected deep pressure ulcers (HR=2.21, 95% CI=1.26, 3.87; p=0.006) and neutrophilia (HR=1.76; 95% CI 1.05, 2.94; p=0.031) were independent predictors of mortality in our elderly patients with pressure ulcers. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in our setting is comparable to previously reported figures in Europe and North America. Mortality in patients with pressure ulcer was high, and was predicted by institutionalization, concurrent infection and high neutrophil counts. PMID:25091603

  8. Cohort study of atypical pressure ulcers development.

    PubMed

    Jaul, Efraim

    2014-12-01

    Atypical pressure ulcers (APU) are distinguished from common pressure ulcers (PU) with both unusual location and different aetiology. The occurrence and attempts to characterise APU remain unrecognised. The purpose of this cohort study was to analyse the occurrence of atypical location and the circumstances of the causation, and draw attention to the prevention and treatment by a multidisciplinary team. The cohort study spanned three and a half years totalling 174 patients. The unit incorporates two weekly combined staff meetings. One concentrates on wound assessment with treatment decisions made by the physician and nurse, and the other, a multidisciplinary team reviewing all patients and coordinating treatment. The main finding of this study identified APU occurrence rate of 21% within acquired PU over a three and a half year period. Severe spasticity constituted the largest group in this study and the most difficult to cure wounds, located in medial aspects of knees, elbows and palms. Medical devices caused the second largest occurrence of atypical wounds, located in the nape of the neck, penis and nostrils. Bony deformities were the third recognisable atypical wound group located in shoulder blades and upper spine. These three categories are definable and time observable. APU are important to be recognisable, and can be healed as well as being prevented. The prominent role of the multidisciplinary team is primary in identification, prevention and treatment. PMID:23374746

  9. Pressure ulcers or moisture lesions: the theatre perspective.

    PubMed

    Rego, A

    2016-04-01

    Pressure ulcers continue to be a cause for concern in the healthcare industry (IHI 2015). Unfortunately older patients are at a greater risk of developing pressure ulcers (Kottner et al 2013); moisture lesions and the presence of other comorbidities could have long term effects on the patient's health and recovery. PMID:27290758

  10. Biomechanical modeling to prevent ischial pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Luboz, Vincent; Petrizelli, Marion; Bucki, Marek; Diot, Bruno; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Payan, Yohan

    2014-07-18

    With 300,000 paraplegic persons only in France, ischial pressure ulcers represent a major public health issue. They result from the buttocks׳ soft tissues compression by the bony prominences. Unfortunately, the current clinical techniques, with - in the best case - embedded pressure sensor mats, are insufficient to prevent them because most are due to high internal strains which can occur even with low pressures at the skin surface. Therefore, improving prevention requires using a biomechanical model to estimate internal strains from skin surface pressures. However, the buttocks׳ soft tissues׳ stiffness is still unknown. This paper provides a stiffness sensitivity analysis using a finite element model. Different layers with distinct Neo Hookean materials simulate the skin, fat and muscles. With Young moduli in the range [100-500 kPa], [25-35 kPa], and [80-140 kPa] for the skin, fat, and muscles, respectively, maximum internal strains reach realistic 50 to 60% values. The fat and muscle stiffnesses have an important influence on the strain variations, while skin stiffness is less influent. Simulating different sitting postures and changing the muscle thickness also result in a variation in the internal strains. PMID:24873863

  11. The role of dressings in the prevention of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Julie

    2016-08-11

    Pressure ulceration is a significant global healthcare problem and represents a considerable burden on healthcare resources. Within the literature an increasing number of studies have examined the role prophylactic dressings play in redistributing pressure and helping to protect the skin from the effects of friction and shear. The use of dressings to prevent pressure ulcers may be considered a controversial issue, as previous opinion has been that dressings do not reduce the effects of pressure. This article will critically evaluate the literature to examine the role dressings play in the prevention of pressure ulceration. PMID:27523773

  12. A resource-efficient planning for pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Ostadabbas, Sarah; Yousefi, Rasoul; Nourani, Mehrdad; Faezipour, Miad; Tamil, Lakshman; Pompeo, Matthew Q

    2012-11-01

    Pressure ulcer is a critical problem for bed-ridden and wheelchair-bound patients, diabetics, and the elderly. Patients need to be regularly repositioned to prevent excessive pressure on a single area of body, which can lead to ulcers. Pressure ulcers are extremely costly to treat and may lead to several other health problems, including death. The current standard for prevention is to reposition at-risk patients every two hours. Even if it is done properly, a fixed schedule is not sufficient to prevent all ulcers. Moreover, it may result in nurses being overworked by turning some patients too frequently. In this paper, we present an algorithm for finding a nurse-effort optimal repositioning schedule that prevents pressure ulcer formation for a finite planning horizon. Our proposed algorithm uses data from a commercial pressure mat assembled on the beds surface and provides a sequence of next positions and the time of repositioning for each patient. PMID:22922729

  13. Pressure Ulcers: Factors Contributing to Their Development in the OR.

    PubMed

    Engels, Dawn; Austin, Melody; McNichol, Laurie; Fencl, Jennifer; Gupta, Sat; Kazi, Haseeb

    2016-03-01

    The prevention of health care-associated pressure ulcers (HAPUs) is an important quality measure because HAPUs are considered a never event. The literature suggests that the prevalence rate of pressure ulcers is 8.5% or higher among patients who undergo surgical procedures that last longer than three hours. We performed a retrospective chart review to determine what factors contribute to the development of pressure ulcers in patients who undergo surgical procedures. The sample population included patients who acquired a pressure ulcer that was not present at admission and developed during their postoperative hospital stay. The project revealed consistent risk factors that may contribute to the development of pressure ulcers in patients who have undergone surgical procedures. These findings can drive the implementation of preventive measures to reduce the occurrence of HAPUs associated with surgical procedures. PMID:26924365

  14. The VCU Pressure Ulcer Summit-Developing Centers of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence: A Framework for Sustainability.

    PubMed

    Creehan, Sue; Cuddigan, Janet; Gonzales, Dana; Nix, Denise; Padula, William; Pittman, Joyce; Pontieri-Lewis, Vicky; Walden, Christine; Wells, Belinda; Wheeler, Robinetta

    2016-01-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcer occurrences have declined over the past decade as reimbursement policies have changed, evidence-based practice guidelines have been implemented, and quality improvement initiatives have been launched. However, the 2006-2008 Institute for Healthcare Improvement goal of zero pressure ulcers remains difficult to achieve and even more challenging to sustain. Magnet hospitals tend to have lower hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates than non-Magnet hospitals, yet many non-Magnet hospitals also have robust pressure ulcer prevention programs. Successful programs share commonalities in structure, processes, and outcomes. A national summit of 55 pressure ulcer experts was convened at the Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center in March 2014. The group was divided into 3 focus groups; each was assigned a task to develop a framework describing components of a proposed Magnet-designated Center of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence. Systematic literature reviews, analysis of exemplars, and nominal group process techniques were used to create the framework. This article presents a framework describing the proposed Magnet-designated Centers of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence. Critical attributes of Centers of Excellence are identified and organized according to the 4 domains of the ANCC model for the Magnet Recognition Program: transformational leadership; structural empowerment; exemplary professional practice; and new knowledge innovation and improvements. The structures, processes, and outcome measures necessary to become a proposed Center of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Excellence are discussed. PMID:26808304

  15. Unusual localisation of pressure ulcer--the vulva.

    PubMed

    Rakic, Vesna S; Colic, Miodrag M; Lazovic, Goran D

    2011-06-01

    Only a few papers have been published about unusual localisations of pressure ulcer. To date, no papers were published presenting pressure ulcer on external genitals in women. The paper presents the mechanism of origin of vulval pressure ulcer, surgical treatment (excision of lesion tissue of the pressure ulcer) and reconstruction of the vulva. The patient, aged 50, has been paraplegic for 20 years. During the last 3 years she has had a wound which was spreading in the region of the vulva. The pressure ulcer was surgically removed, external female genitals were reconstructed using advancement skin flap and the function and natural appearance of organs were re-established. The presence of all three aetiological factors for the formation of pressure ulcer - presence of prolonged pressure, swelling and infection - were proven in the described patient. For this reason, we are able to claim that this was in fact a pressure ulcer of the vulva. Reconstruction was simple without any complications and donor-site morbidity. PMID:21561536

  16. Animal Models in Pressure Ulcer Research

    PubMed Central

    Salcido, Richard; Popescu, Adrian; Ahn, Chulhyun

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: Research targeting the pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of pressure ulcers (PrUs) continue to be a significant priority for clinical and basic science research. Spinal cord injury patients particularly benefit from PrU research, because the prevalence of chronic wounds in this category is increasing despite standardized medical care. Because of practical, ethical, and safety considerations, PrUs in the human environment are limited to studies involving patients with pre-existing ulcers. Therefore, we are limited in our basic knowledge pertaining to the development, progression, and healing environment in this devastating disease. Methods: This review provides a synopsis of literature and a discussion of techniques used to induce PrUs in animal models. The question of what animal model best mimics the human PrU environment has been a subject of debate by investigators, peer review panels, and editors. The similarities in wound development and healing in mammalian tissue make murine models a relevant model for understanding the causal factors as well as the wound healing elements. Although we are beginning to understand some of the mechanisms of PrU development, a key dilemma of what makes an apparently healthy tissue develop a PrU waits to be solved. Results and Conclusions: No single method of induction and exploring PrUs in animals can address all the aspects of the pathology of chronic wounds. Each model has its particular strengths and weaknesses. Certain types of models can selectively identify specific aspects of wound development, quantify the extent of lesions, and assess outcomes from interventions. The appropriate interpretation of these methods is significant for proper study design, an understanding of the results, and extrapolation to clinical relevance. PMID:17591222

  17. Prevention and management of pressure ulcers: support surfaces.

    PubMed

    Moore, Zena; Stephen Haynes, Jackie; Callaghan, Rosie

    Pressure ulcers are a common and debilitating problem in health care, impacting negatively on health-related quality of life and compounding challenges in achieving patient safety targets. Pressure ulcer prevention is a multidisciplinary team effort, involving a myriad of interventions, such as nutrition, skin care and repositioning. This article discusses the factors influencing pressure ulcer development, and then elaborates on the principles of prevention. This is followed by a focused discussion on the use of redistribution devices and the importance of the cover of such equipment in contributing to achieving good standards in prevention. PMID:24690750

  18. Managing pressure ulcers and moisture lesions with new hydrocolloid technology.

    PubMed

    Linthwaite, Adele; Bethell, Elaine

    In efforts to reduce the number of avoidable pressure ulcers in a large trust, a number of initiatives have taken place to increase staff awareness about the importance of preventing and treating pressure ulcers and moisture lesions. New documentation, the use of the 'Think Pink' folders and a social media campaign have all proved successful in seeing the number of avoidable pressure ulcers reported within the trust reduce. As part of this initiative an evaluation took place of a new hydrocolloid dressing. This proved effective at reducing healing times, reducing dressing spend and facilitating regular inspection of the affected areas. PMID:27126753

  19. Factors Associated With Pressure Ulcers in Individuals With Spina Bifida

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sunkyung; Ward, Elisabeth; Dicianno, Brad E.; Clayton, Gerald H.; Sawin, Kathleen J.; Beierwaltes, Patricia; Thibadeau, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe factors associated with pressure ulcers in individuals with spina bifida (SB) enrolled in the National Spina Bifida Patient Registry (NSBPR). Design Unbalanced longitudinal multicenter cohort study. Setting Nineteen SB clinics. Participants Individuals with SB (N=3153) enrolled in 19 clinic sites that participate in the NSBPR. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Pressure ulcer status (yes/no) at the annual visit between 2009 and 2012. Results Of 3153 total participants, 19% (n=603) reported ulcers at their most recent annual clinic visit. Seven factors–level of lesion, wheelchair use, urinary incontinence, shunt presence, above the knee orthopedic surgery, recent surgery, and male sex–were significantly associated with the presence of pressure ulcers. Of these factors, level of lesion, urinary incontinence, recent surgery, and male sex were included in the final logistic regression model. The 3 adjusting variables–SB type, SB clinic, and age group–were significant in all analyses (all P<.001). Conclusions By adjusting for SB type, SB clinic, and age group, we found that 7 factors–level of lesion, wheelchair use, urinary incontinence, shunt presence, above the knee orthopedic surgery, recent surgery, and male sex–were associated with pressure ulcers. Identifying key factors associated with the onset of pressure ulcers can be incorporated into clinical practice in ways that prevent and enhance treatment of pressure ulcers in the population with SB. PMID:25796136

  20. Reducing hospital acquired pressure ulcers in intensive care

    PubMed Central

    Cullen Gill, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are a definite problem in our health care system and are growing in numbers. Unfortunately, it is usually the most weak and vulnerable of our culture that faces these complications, causing the patient and their families discomfort, anguish, and economic hardship due to their expensive treatment. Data collected by the tissue viability department showed high incidence of hospital acquire pressure ulcers in the intensive care unit in March 2013. An action plan was initiated and implemented by the tissue viability team, senior nursing management, pressure ulcer prevention (PUP) team and respiratory therapists (RT's) within the ICU. Our objective was to reduce hospital acquired pressure ulcers in the intensive care unit using the plan, do, check, act quality improvement process. PMID:26734370

  1. Pressure ulcers: Current understanding and newer modalities of treatment.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, R K

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the mechanism, symptoms, causes, severity, diagnosis, prevention and present recommendations for surgical as well as non-surgical management of pressure ulcers. Particular focus has been placed on the current understandings and the newer modalities for the treatment of pressure ulcers. The paper also covers the role of nutrition and pressure-release devices such as cushions and mattresses as a part of the treatment algorithm for preventing and quick healing process of these wounds. Pressure ulcers develop primarily from pressure and shear; are progressive in nature and most frequently found in bedridden, chair bound or immobile people. They often develop in people who have been hospitalised for a long time generally for a different problem and increase the overall time as well as cost of hospitalisation that have detrimental effects on patient's quality of life. Loss of sensation compounds the problem manifold, and failure of reactive hyperaemia cycle of the pressure prone area remains the most important aetiopathology. Pressure ulcers are largely preventable in nature, and their management depends on their severity. The available literature about severity of pressure ulcers, their classification and medical care protocols have been described in this paper. The present treatment options include various approaches of cleaning the wound, debridement, optimised dressings, role of antibiotics and reconstructive surgery. The newer treatment options such as negative pressure wound therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, cell therapy have been discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of current and newer methods have also been described. PMID:25991879

  2. Pressure ulcers: Current understanding and newer modalities of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the mechanism, symptoms, causes, severity, diagnosis, prevention and present recommendations for surgical as well as non-surgical management of pressure ulcers. Particular focus has been placed on the current understandings and the newer modalities for the treatment of pressure ulcers. The paper also covers the role of nutrition and pressure-release devices such as cushions and mattresses as a part of the treatment algorithm for preventing and quick healing process of these wounds. Pressure ulcers develop primarily from pressure and shear; are progressive in nature and most frequently found in bedridden, chair bound or immobile people. They often develop in people who have been hospitalised for a long time generally for a different problem and increase the overall time as well as cost of hospitalisation that have detrimental effects on patient's quality of life. Loss of sensation compounds the problem manifold, and failure of reactive hyperaemia cycle of the pressure prone area remains the most important aetiopathology. Pressure ulcers are largely preventable in nature, and their management depends on their severity. The available literature about severity of pressure ulcers, their classification and medical care protocols have been described in this paper. The present treatment options include various approaches of cleaning the wound, debridement, optimised dressings, role of antibiotics and reconstructive surgery. The newer treatment options such as negative pressure wound therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, cell therapy have been discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of current and newer methods have also been described. PMID:25991879

  3. [Innovation in pressure ulcer care: application of electrotherapy].

    PubMed

    Navarro Susana Postigo; Puerta Francisco Rivera

    2013-02-01

    Nowadays, pressure ulcers are a mayor health problem with serious consequences for the patient, directly influence by the increase of morbid-mortality and the detriment of the quality of life. Today we know that the best care for pressure ulcers is the prevention and every effort must be oriented in this direction, specially when it is estimated that almost the 95% of the pressure ulcers are preventable and a 60% of the occasions are initiated and developed in hospital. The study's objective is to promote healing of ulcers with a joint technical nursing care and the application of electric current by physiotherapist. This is a descriptive research design and intervention. The sample is composed grade IV ulcer patients who are admitted to the high level of nursing care unit in Complejo Asistencial Benito Menni (Ciempozuelos-Madrid). These patients have different associated pathologies and the study shows the process from the beginning of the ulcer until the end of treatment. The most relevant results show that the application of electric currents favors nursing techniques, promoting a better and faster cleaning, vascularization and subsequent the healing of ulcers. PMID:23527444

  4. Developing eLearning for pressure ulcer prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Rosie; Rodgers, Angela; Welsh, Lynn; McGown, Katrina

    2014-08-12

    The impact of pressure ulcers is psychologically, physically and clinically challenging for both patients and NHS staff. NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (NHS GGC), in line with the Scottish Best Practice Statement for the Prevention and Management of Pressure Ulcers ( Quality Improvement Scotland, 2009 ), and the NHS Health Improvement Scotland (2011) Preventing Pressure Ulcers Change Package, launched an awareness campaign throughout the organisation in April 2012 and has more recently adopted a 'zero-tolerance' approach to pressure damage. The tissue viability service in NHS GGC recognised that in order to achieve this aim, education of front-line staff is essential. An educational framework for pressure ulcer prevention was developed for all levels of healthcare staff involved in the delivery of patient care. As a means to support the framework, an initiative to develop web-based eLearning modules has been taken forward. This has resulted in the creation of an accessible, cost-effective, stimulating, relevant, and evidence-based education programme designed around the educational needs of all healthcare staff. In conjunction with the organisation's 'top ten tools' for pressure ulcer prevention and management, the modular online education programme addresses the aims of quality improvement and zero tolerance by supporting the provision of safe and effective person-centered care. PMID:25117595

  5. [Prevention of ulcers by pressure as a universal right].

    PubMed

    Blanco, Jaime Zabala

    2013-02-01

    The title of the article matches the of the "Declaration of Rio de Janeiro on the prevention of ulcers by pressure as a Universal right" [ 1], promoted by numerous groups and associations related to the problematic of ulcers by pressure (UPP) at the international level, and is a decisive step for joint efforts to give visibility to a problem of global dimension. Efforts previously, and in what refers to our country, have been left reflected in statements [2] pressure driven by the National group for study and advice on ulcers and wounds chronicles (GNEAUPP). The Declaration dealt with masterfully what will be our thesis, beyond a clinical problem--that is--the UPP, and specifically its prevention, constitute a problem primarily ethical character and, more specifically, minimum ethics, as we already reflected more widely in another article [3], by what remains essential to influencing this aspect often underestimated. PMID:23527438

  6. [Risk assessment for pressure ulcer in critical patients].

    PubMed

    Gomes, Flávia Sampaio Latini; Bastos, Marisa Antonini Ribeiro; Matozinhos, Fernanda Penido; Temponi, Hanrieti Rotelli; Velásquez-Meléndez, Gustavo

    2011-04-01

    Bedridden patients are in risk to developing pressure ulcers and represent a priority group to be studied to identify this condition. To reach this goal, specific instruments are used to assess this problem. The objective of this study was to analyze the risk factors to developing pressure ulcers in adult patients hospitalized in ICUs. This is a sectional analytical study, in which evaluations were performed on 140 patients, hospitalized in 22 ICUs, using the Braden scale. Results showed that patients hospitalized from 15 days or more showed some level of risk. The highest frequencies of pressure ulcers were found in patients in the following categories: sensorial perception (completely limited), moistness (constantly moist), mobility (completely immobilized), activity (bedridden), nutrition (adequate) and friction and shear (problem). In conclusion, the use of this scale is an important strategy when providing care to patients in intensive treatment. PMID:21655778

  7. Ethical issues and accountability in pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Lynn

    2014-10-28

    Pressure ulcers represent a considerable cost, both in terms of healthcare spending and quality of life. They are increasingly viewed in terms of patient harm. For clinicians involved in pressure ulcer prevention, ethical issues surrounding accountability may arise from both policy and practice perspectives. It may be useful for clinicians to refer to ethical theories and principles to create frameworks when addressing ethical dilemmas. However, such theories and principles have been criticised for their simplicity and over-generalisation. Alternative theories, for example, virtue ethics and experiential learning, can provide more comprehensive guidance and promote a pluralistic approach to tackling ethical dilemmas. PMID:25335632

  8. The use of sensory electrical stimulation for pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jennifer; Ho, Chester H; Wang, Xiaofeng; Bogie, Kath

    2010-11-01

    Pressure ulcer prevention is critically important for many people with reduced mobility. The authors investigated whether sensory (sub-motor-threshold) electrical stimulation (ES) may provide a convenient preventive intervention. A double-blinded, repeated measures study design was used to test the hypothesis that repeated use of sensory surface ES improves tissue health status in individuals with motor paralysis. Six adult males with complete spinal cord injury (SCI) were randomly assigned to treatment or control groups. The treatment group received the ES intervention, whereas the control group received a control sham intervention. Repeated tissue health assessments included transcutaneous oxygen tension (T(c)PO(2)), interface pressure mapping, and gluteal computed tomography (CT) studies. An initial increase in T(c)PO(2) following use of subthreshold ES was observed but was not sustained at follow-up. No statistically significant changes before and after treatment were found in regional T(c)PO(2), gluteal muscle area or pressure distribution. Thus subthreshold ES does not appear to have any sustained effects on tissue health status indicative of reduced pressure ulcer risk for individuals with SCI. This implies that a contractile muscle response is critically important and further that subthreshold ES is unlikely to prevent pressure ulcers. Further studies are needed to find solutions for preventing pressure ulcers in high-risk populations. PMID:20649492

  9. Transdermal deferoxamine prevents pressure-induced diabetic ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Duscher, Dominik; Neofytou, Evgenios; Wong, Victor W.; Maan, Zeshaan N.; Rennert, Robert C.; Januszyk, Michael; Rodrigues, Melanie; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Whitmore, Arnetha J.; Galvez, Michael G.; Whittam, Alexander J.; Brownlee, Michael; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    There is a high mortality in patients with diabetes and severe pressure ulcers. For example, chronic pressure sores of the heels often lead to limb loss in diabetic patients. A major factor underlying this is reduced neovascularization caused by impaired activity of the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). In diabetes, HIF-1α function is compromised by a high glucose-induced and reactive oxygen species-mediated modification of its coactivator p300, leading to impaired HIF-1α transactivation. We examined whether local enhancement of HIF-1α activity would improve diabetic wound healing and minimize the severity of diabetic ulcers. To improve HIF-1α activity we designed a transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) containing the FDA-approved small molecule deferoxamine (DFO), an iron chelator that increases HIF-1α transactivation in diabetes by preventing iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen stress. Applying this TDDS to a pressure-induced ulcer model in diabetic mice, we found that transdermal delivery of DFO significantly improved wound healing. Unexpectedly, prophylactic application of this transdermal delivery system also prevented diabetic ulcer formation. DFO-treated wounds demonstrated increased collagen density, improved neovascularization, and reduction of free radical formation, leading to decreased cell death. These findings suggest that transdermal delivery of DFO provides a targeted means to both prevent ulcer formation and accelerate diabetic wound healing with the potential for rapid clinical translation. PMID:25535360

  10. Clinical workflow for personalized foot pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Bucki, M; Luboz, V; Perrier, A; Champion, E; Diot, B; Vuillerme, N; Payan, Y

    2016-09-01

    Foot pressure ulcers are a common complication of diabetes because of patient's lack of sensitivity due to neuropathy. Deep pressure ulcers appear internally when pressures applied on the foot create high internal strains nearby bony structures. Monitoring tissue strains in persons with diabetes is therefore important for an efficient prevention. We propose to use personalized biomechanical foot models to assess strains within the foot and to determine the risk of ulcer formation. Our workflow generates a foot model adapted to a patient's morphology by deforming an atlas model to conform it to the contours of segmented medical images of the patient's foot. Our biomechanical model is composed of rigid bodies for the bones, joined by ligaments and muscles, and a finite element mesh representing the soft tissues. Using our registration algorithm to conform three datasets, three new patient models were created. After applying a pressure load below these foot models, the Von Mises equivalent strains and "cluster volumes" (i.e. volumes of contiguous elements with strains above a given threshold) were measured within eight functionally meaningful foot regions. The results show the variability of both location and strain values among the three considered patients. This study also confirms that the anatomy of the foot has an influence on the risk of pressure ulcer. PMID:27212210

  11. Evidence-based guidelines for pressure ulcer management at the end of life.

    PubMed

    Langemo, Diane; Haesler, Emily; Naylor, Wayne; Tippett, Aletha; Young, Trudie

    2015-05-01

    It is important to develop an individualised plan of care for people at the end of life to prevent pressure ulcers, and to treat them if they do occur. This article discusses patient and risk assessment, prevention and care for pressure ulcers for the palliative care patient and the recommendations given in the palliative care section of the Prevention and Treatment of Pressure Ulcers: Clinical Practice Guideline (National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and Pan Pacific Pressure Injury Alliance, 2014). PMID:26107544

  12. The Braden Q+P: a pediatric perioperative pressure ulcer risk assessment and intervention tool.

    PubMed

    Galvin, Patricia A; Curley, Martha A Q

    2012-09-01

    Pressure ulcers continue to be a personally and financially expensive complication of surgery and hospitalization. The effects of anesthesia, immobilization during surgery, and use of multiple medical devices all place the surgical patient at high risk for pressure-related skin injury. As part of a comprehensive pressure ulcer prevention initiative, nurses in the cardiac and main ORs at Children's Hospital Boston, Massachusetts, became concerned that current pressure ulcer risk assessment tools did not adequately capture the intense but short-term risk posed in the operating and procedural suites. A team, formed to investigate this matter, developed a tool to guide nursing assessment of patient risk and to plan nursing interventions to prevent pressure ulcers. Results after implementation of the Braden Q+P tool appear to show improvement in preventing pressure ulcers. Increased awareness of pressure ulcer prevention, a hospital focus on skin care, and nursing education about pressure ulcers supported this improvement. PMID:22935255

  13. Microcontrolled air-mattress for ulcer by pressure prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasluosta, Cristian F.; Fontana, Juan M.; Beltramone, Diego A.; Taborda, Ricardo A. M.

    2007-11-01

    An ulcer by pressure is produced when a constant pressure is exerted over the skin. This generates the collapse of the blood vessels and, therefore, a lack in the contribution of the necessary nutrients for the affected zone. As a consequence, the skin deteriorates, eventually causing an ulcer. In order to prevent it, a protocol must be applied to the patient, which is reflected on time and cost of treatment. There are some air mattresses available for this purpose, but whose performance does not fulfill all requirements. The prototype designed in our laboratory is based on the principle of the air mattress. Its objective is to improve on existing technologies and, due to an increased automation, reduce time dedication for personnel in charge of the patient. A clinical experience was made in the local Emergencies Hospital and also in an institution dedicated to aged patients care. In both cases, the results obtained and the comments from the personnel involved were favorable.

  14. [Pressure ulcer prevention and therapy: results of a descriptive study].

    PubMed

    Schlüer, Anna-Barbara; Cignacco, Eva; Halfens, Ruud J

    2008-03-01

    Pressure ulcers are a common nursing care issue in hospitals. Sick children, premature infants and toddlers, but also disabled and impaired children are at a high risk of developing pressure ulcers. The aim of this descriptive cross-sectional study was to describe the patients at risk as well as to identify the preventive and therapeutic interventions in a pediatric care setting. Of 213 hospitalised children, 155 (82 percent) from the age of 0 to 18 years could be included in the study. Altogether, preventive actions of any kind were performed with 92 percent of the patients. These were repositioning (84 percent), mobilisation of the patients (75 percent), followed by skin inspection (61 percent) and the application of lotions (56 percent). The high risk rate of pediatric patients considered at risk according to the Braden Scale is disconcerting and requires further exploration in terms of effective preventive and therapeutic interventions to improve the outcome for this patient group. PMID:18450264

  15. Assessment of sacrococcygeal pressure ulcers using diffuse correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, David; Lafontant, Alec; Neidrauer, Michael; Weingarten, Michael S.; DiMaria-Ghalili, Rose Ann; Fried, Guy W.; Rece, Julianne; Lewin, Peter A.; Zubkov, Leonid

    2016-03-01

    Microcirculation is essential for proper supply of oxygen and nutritive substances to the biological tissue and the removal of waste products of metabolism. The determination of microcirculatory blood flow (mBF) is therefore of substantial interest to clinicians for assessing tissue health; particularly in pressure ulceration and suspected deep tissue injury. The goal of this pilot clinical study was to assess deep-tissue pressure ulceration by non-invasively measuring mBF using Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy (DCS). DCS provides information about the flow of red blood cells in the capillary network by measuring the temporal autocorrelation function of scattering light intensity. A novel optical probe was developed in order to obtain measurements under the load of the subject's body as pressure is applied (ischemia) and then released (reperfusion) on sacrococcygeal tissue in a hospital bed. Prior to loading measurements, baseline readings of the sacral region were obtained by measuring the subjects in a side-lying position. DCS measurements from the sacral region of twenty healthy volunteers have been compared to those of two patients who initially had similar non-blanchable redness. The temporal autocorrelation function of scattering light intensity of the patient whose redness later disappeared was similar to that of the average healthy subject. The second patient, whose redness developed into an advanced pressure ulcer two weeks later, had a substantial decrease in blood flow while under the loading position compared to healthy subjects. Preliminary results suggest the developed system may potentially predict whether non-blanchable redness will manifest itself as advanced ulceration or dissipate over time.

  16. Pressure ulcer risk of patient handling sling use.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Matthew J; Kahn, Julie A; Kerrigan, Michael V; Gutmann, Joseph M; Harrow, Jeffrey J

    2015-01-01

    Patient handling slings and lifts reduce the risk of musculoskeletal injuries for healthcare providers. However, no published evidence exists of their safety with respect to pressure ulceration for vulnerable populations, specifically persons with spinal cord injury, nor do any studies compare slings for pressure distribution. High-resolution interface pressure mapping was used to describe and quantify risks associated with pressure ulceration due to normal forces and identify at-risk anatomical locations. We evaluated 23 patient handling slings with 4 nondisabled adults. Sling-participant interface pressures were recorded while participants lay supine on a hospital bed and while suspended during typical patient transfers. Sling-participant interface pressures were greatest while suspended for all seated and supine slings and exceeded 200 mm Hg for all seated slings. Interface pressures were greatest along the sling seams (edges), regardless of position or sling type. The anatomical areas most at risk while participants were suspended in seated slings were the posterior upper and lower thighs. For supine slings, the perisacral area, ischial tuberosities, and greater trochanters were most at risk. The duration of time spent in slings, especially while suspended, should be limited. PMID:26237005

  17. The incidence, risk factors and characteristics of pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qixia; Li, Xiaohua; Qu, Xiaolong; Liu, Yun; Zhang, Liyan; Su, Chunyin; Guo, Xiujun; Chen, Yuejuan; Zhu, Yajun; Jia, Jing; Bo, Suping; Liu, Li; Zhang, Rui; Xu, Ling; Wu, Leyan; Wang, Hai; Wang, Jiandong

    2014-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are very common in hospital patients. Though many studies have been reported in many countries, the large-scale benchmarking prevalence of pressure ulcers in China is not available. The aim of this study is to quantify the prevalence of pressure ulcers and the incidence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers and analyze risk factors in hospitalized patients in China. A multi-central cross-sectional survey was conducted in one university hospital and 11 general hospitals in China. The Minimum Data Set (MDS) recommended by European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (EUPAP) was used to collect information of inpatients. All patients stayed in hospital more than 24 hours and older than 18 years signed consent form and were included. Data from 39952 out of 40415 (98.85%) inpatients were analyzed. Of the 39952 patients, 631 patients (including 1024 locations) had pressure ulcers. The prevalence rate of pressure ulcers in 12 hospitals was 1.58% (0.94-2.97%). The incidence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) was 0.63% (0.20-1.20%). The most common locations developed pressure ulcers were sacrum, heels, and iliac crests. The common stages of pressure ulcers were stage I and II. Patients in Intensive Care Unit, Geriatric and Neurological Department were easier to develop pressure ulcers. The prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcers in China was lower than that reported in European and other countries. The stages of pressure ulcers in China were different than that reported in European countries. Our study provides with a baseline value for intensive research on pressure ulcer in China. PMID:24966973

  18. Who determines the treatment for pressure ulcers in the elderly?

    PubMed

    Jaul, Efraim

    2013-09-01

    The issue of professional responsibility for the treatment and care of the patient with pressure ulcers (PU) is crucial as it impacts on mortality, financial costs and the patient's quality of life. Pressure ulcers in the elderly present a complicated health problem with multifactorial etiologies. Since the pressure ulcer is the final common pathway of multiple underlying factors and medical conditions, the approach when dealing with the elderly is not only local wound management but systemic--i.e., it relates to the patient's overall condition, comorbidities, nutritional status, and disabilities. With the increase in longevity and disability, the prevalence of PU is higher and has concomitant severity and complications. For treatment to be effective it must be comprehensive and multidisciplinary. The traditional, and pivotal, role of the nurse in coordinating treatment has expanded and now includes more active collaboration with the physician and the multidisciplinary team regarding the development and course of the wound. Physicians are required to be knowledgeable, actively involved, and alert to reversible multifactorial etiologies, in order to determine the goal and level of aggressive treatment during the course of PU. PMID:24340845

  19. Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... have one. Ulcers can also be caused by anti-inflammatory medicines. Although most people take these medicines without ... may damage the stomach lining and cause ulcers. Anti-inflammatory drugs include aspirin, ibuprofen (one brand name: Motrin), ...

  20. Friction-induced skin injuries-are they pressure ulcers? An updated NPUAP white paper.

    PubMed

    Brienza, David; Antokal, Steven; Herbe, Laura; Logan, Susan; Maguire, Jeanine; Van Ranst, Jennifer; Siddiqui, Aamir

    2015-01-01

    Friction injuries are often misdiagnosed as pressure ulcers. The reason for the misdiagnosis may be a misinterpretation of classic pressure ulcer literature that reported friction increased the susceptibility of the skin to pressure damage. This analysis assesses the classic literature that led to the inclusion of friction as a causative factor in the development of pressure ulcers in light of more recent research on the effects of shear. The analysis in this article suggests that friction can contribute to pressure ulcers by creating shear strain in deeper tissues, but friction does not appear to contribute to pressure ulcers in the superficial layers of the skin. Injuries to the superficial layers of the skin caused by friction are not pressure ulcers and should not be classified or treated as such. PMID:25549310

  1. Mobile health platform for pressure ulcer monitoring with electronic health record integration.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Joel J P C; Pedro, Luís M C C; Vardasca, Tomé; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; Martins, Henrique M G

    2013-12-01

    Pressure ulcers frequently occur in patients with limited mobility, for example, people with advanced age and patients wearing casts or prostheses. Mobile information communication technologies can help implement ulcer care protocols and the monitoring of patients with high risk, thus preventing or improving these conditions. This article presents a mobile pressure ulcer monitoring platform (mULCER), which helps control a patient's ulcer status during all stages of treatment. Beside its stand-alone version, it can be integrated with electronic health record systems as mULCER synchronizes ulcer data with any electronic health record system using HL7 standards. It serves as a tool to integrate nursing care among hospital departments and institutions. mULCER was experimented with in different mobile devices such as LG Optimus One P500, Samsung Galaxy Tab, HTC Magic, Samsung Galaxy S, and Samsung Galaxy i5700, taking into account the user's experience of different screen sizes and processing characteristics. PMID:24255053

  2. The role of nutrition in preventing pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Leaker, Sarah Helen

    Old age, pressure ulcers and malnutrition may co-exist. Wounds in older people may already be slow to heal as a result of compromised skin integrity, which occurs as part of the normal ageing process. Malnutrition is also more common in older people, and evidence has shown that inadequate nutrition may lead to impaired and prolonged wound healing. This article explores the relationship between nutrition and wound healing, and promotes optimum nutrition in old age as an essential component of effective wound management. PMID:24128252

  3. [Pressure ulcer and tetanus in an elderly person].

    PubMed

    Laine, Heikki; Vuorinen, Sakari; Simula, Sakari

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium tetani, the bacterium causing tetanus, can be found both in the soil and intestinal normal flora. While the majority of the Finnish population has adequate vaccination protection, part of the population exhibits weakened protection. We describe a case in which a patient developed tetanus as a consequence of pressure ulcer. The symptoms extended to the respiratory muscle region, resulting in respiratory insufficiency and cardiac arrest for the patient. The patient, however, recovered after successful resuscitation and extended intensive care as required by tetanus. PMID:24605433

  4. Pressure ulcers and nutritional support: a partnership to improve patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Roseann; Tuttle, Virginia; Whalen, Elizabeth; Gatchell, Carolyn; Dawe, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Prevention of pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients represents a challenge with great financial impact for hospitals and serious consequences for patients. A partnership composed of dieticians and nurses was assembled to identify best practices for providing nutritional support and intervention to patients at risk for pressure ulcers. This article describes the process, outcomes, recommendations, and lessons learned by the pressure ulcer/nutrition work group. PMID:19707154

  5. Plantar Pressure in Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Patients with Active Foot Ulceration, Previous Ulceration and No History of Ulceration: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Malindu Eranga; Crowther, Robert George; Pappas, Elise; Lazzarini, Peter Anthony; Cunningham, Margaret; Sangla, Kunwarjit Singh; Buttner, Petra; Golledge, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Aims Elevated dynamic plantar pressures are a consistent finding in diabetes patients with peripheral neuropathy with implications for plantar foot ulceration. This meta-analysis aimed to compare the plantar pressures of diabetes patients that had peripheral neuropathy and those with neuropathy with active or previous foot ulcers. Methods Published articles were identified from Medline via OVID, CINAHL, SCOPUS, INFORMIT, Cochrane Central EMBASE via OVID and Web of Science via ISI Web of Knowledge bibliographic databases. Observational studies reporting barefoot dynamic plantar pressure in adults with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, where at least one group had a history of plantar foot ulcers were included. Interventional studies, shod plantar pressure studies and studies not published in English were excluded. Overall mean peak plantar pressure (MPP) and pressure time integral (PTI) were primary outcomes. The six secondary outcomes were MPP and PTI at the rear foot, mid foot and fore foot. The protocol of the meta-analysis was published with PROPSERO, (registration number CRD42013004310). Results Eight observational studies were included. Overall MPP and PTI were greater in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients with foot ulceration compared to those without ulceration (standardised mean difference 0.551, 95% CI 0.290–0.811, p<0.001; and 0.762, 95% CI 0.303–1.221, p = 0.001, respectively). Sub-group analyses demonstrated no significant difference in MPP for those with neuropathy with active ulceration compared to those without ulcers. A significant difference in MPP was found for those with neuropathy with a past history of ulceration compared to those without ulcers; (0.467, 95% CI 0.181– 0.753, p = 0.001). Statistical heterogeneity between studies was moderate. Conclusions Plantar pressures appear to be significantly higher in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy with a history of foot ulceration compared to those with diabetic neuropathy

  6. [Evaluation of pressure ulcers area using the softwares Motic and AutoCAD®].

    PubMed

    Reis, Camila Letícia Dias dos; Cavalcante, Janaína Mortosa; Rocha Júnior, Edvar Ferreira da; Neves, Rinaldo Souza; Santana, Levy Aniceto; Guadagnin, Renato da Veiga; Brasil, Lourdes Mattos

    2012-01-01

    Pressure ulcer is a lesion that affects skin layers in some regions of the body and its healing can be followed up using image processing. The analysis of pressure ulcer area is relevant to evaluate its evolution and response to therapeutic procedures. Such areas can be evaluated through contour marking with the softwares Motic and AutoCAD®. In this study 35 volunteers computed areas from two grade III pressure ulcers using these instruments. It was possible to conclude that results are clinically equivalent and so can be considered to follow up healing evolution from pressure ulcers. PMID:22911414

  7. The growing problem of pressure ulcers. Evaluation and management for an aging population.

    PubMed

    Dharmarajan, T S; Ahmed, Shamim

    2003-05-01

    Pressure ulcers, an important concern in older adults with restricted mobility, promise to become an even bigger issue as the US population ages. These ulcers can lead to devastating complications and place demands on an already stressed healthcare system. They also can be a quality indicator of the preventive measures taken in healthcare facilities. In this article, Drs Dharmarajan and Ahmed present guidelines for the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. PMID:12764898

  8. Lifestyle Changes and Pressure Ulcer Prevention in Adults With Spinal Cord Injury in the Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study Lifestyle Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ghaisas, Samruddhi; Pyatak, Elizabeth A.; Blanche, Erna; Clark, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PrUs) are a major burden to patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), affecting their psychological, physical, and social well-being. Lifestyle choices are thought to contribute to the risk of developing PrUs. This article focuses on the interaction between lifestyle choices and the development of PrUs in community settings among participants in the University of Southern California–Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study (PUPS II), a randomized controlled trial of a lifestyle intervention for adults with SCI. We conducted a secondary cross-case analysis of treatment notes of 47 PUPS II participants and identified four patterns relating PrU development to lifestyle changes: positive PrU changes (e.g., healing PrUs) with positive lifestyle changes, negative or no PrU changes with positive lifestyle changes, positive PrU changes with minor lifestyle changes, and negative or no PrU changes with no lifestyle changes. We present case studies exemplifying each pattern. PMID:25553751

  9. [Skin Care to Prevent Development of Pressure Ulcers in Bedridden Nursing Home Residents from Developing Pressure Ulcers in Nursing Home Residents].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Chie

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify whether skincare products are effective in preventing development of pressure ulcers in bedridden nursing home residents. The study sample consisted of 21 nursing home residents at a nursing home in Osaka, Japan who use diapers. Participants were assigned to 3 groups and compared to a control group. None of the subjects developed a pressure ulcer and had improved skin condition around the anus. PMID:26809416

  10. Pressure Ulcers in Adults: Prediction and Prevention. Clinical Practice Guideline Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This package includes a clinical practice guideline, quick reference guide for clinicians, and patient's guide to predicting and preventing pressure ulcers in adults. The clinical practice guideline includes the following: overview of the incidence and prevalence of pressure ulcers; clinical practice guideline (introduction, risk assessment tools…

  11. Building a Biopsychosocial Conceptual Framework to Explore Pressure Ulcer Pain for Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junglyun; Ahn, Hyochol; Lyon, Debra E; Stechmiller, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    Although pressure ulcers are a prevalent condition, pain associated with pressure ulcers is not fully understood. Indeed, previous studies do not shed light on the association between pressure ulcer stages and the experience of pain. Especially, pain characteristics of suspected deep tissue injury, which is a new category that was recently added by the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, are yet unknown. This is concerning because the incidence of pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients has increased exponentially over the last two decades, and health care providers are struggling to ensure providing adequate care. Thus, in order to facilitate the development of effective interventions, this paper presents a conceptual framework to explore pressure ulcer pain in hospitalized patients. The concepts were derived from a biopsychosocial model of pain, and the relationships among each concept were identified through a literature review. Major propositions are presented based on the proposed conceptual framework, which integrates previous research on pressure ulcer pain, to ultimately improve understanding of pain in hospitalized patients with pressure ulcers. PMID:27417595

  12. Prevention Practice Differences Among Persons With Spinal Cord Injuries Who Rarely Versus Frequently Sustain Pressure Ulcers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Michael L.; Marini, Irmo; Slate, John R.

    2005-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are common among people with spinal cord injury (SCI) and not only are costly to treat but also affect the quality of life of those affected by them. Despite a plethora of literature on prevention, there are few wellness studies focusing on the practices of people who do not develop pressure ulcers. This preliminary study sought to…

  13. Building a Biopsychosocial Conceptual Framework to Explore Pressure Ulcer Pain for Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junglyun; Ahn, Hyochol; Lyon, Debra E.; Stechmiller, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    Although pressure ulcers are a prevalent condition, pain associated with pressure ulcers is not fully understood. Indeed, previous studies do not shed light on the association between pressure ulcer stages and the experience of pain. Especially, pain characteristics of suspected deep tissue injury, which is a new category that was recently added by the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, are yet unknown. This is concerning because the incidence of pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients has increased exponentially over the last two decades, and health care providers are struggling to ensure providing adequate care. Thus, in order to facilitate the development of effective interventions, this paper presents a conceptual framework to explore pressure ulcer pain in hospitalized patients. The concepts were derived from a biopsychosocial model of pain, and the relationships among each concept were identified through a literature review. Major propositions are presented based on the proposed conceptual framework, which integrates previous research on pressure ulcer pain, to ultimately improve understanding of pain in hospitalized patients with pressure ulcers. PMID:27417595

  14. Enteral nutrition in the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers in adult critical care patients.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jill; Rasmussen, Louisa

    2014-12-01

    Prevention and healing of pressure ulcers in critically ill patients can be especially challenging because of the patients' burden of illness and degree of physiological compromise. Providing adequate nutrition may help halt the development or worsening of pressure ulcers. Optimization of nutrition can be considered an essential ingredient in prevention and healing of pressure ulcers. Understanding malnutrition in critical care patients, the effect of nutrition on wound healing, and the application of evidence-based nutritional guidelines are important aspects for patients at high risk for pressure ulcers. Appropriate screenings for nutritional status and risk for pressure ulcers, early collaboration with a registered dietician, and administration of appropriate feeding formulations and micronutrient and macronutrient supplementation to promote wound healing are practical solutions to improve the nutritional status of critical care patients. Use of nutritional management and enteral feeding protocols may provide vital elements to augment nutrition and ultimately result in improved clinical outcomes. PMID:25452406

  15. Role of Nutrition in the Treatment and Prevention of Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David R

    2014-06-24

    Undernutrition has been associated with pressure ulcers in epidemiological studies over several decades. Accumulating evidence from recent systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials has shown that nutrition therapy has only modest effects on prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. Since undernutrition should be responsive to the provision of adequate nutrients, the poor response suggests a different nutrition construct is required. Weight loss and changes in acute inflammatory reactants may reflect the syndrome of cachexia rather than simple undernutrition. Nutrition prescriptions should be individually tailored to persons with pressure ulcers with regard to both macro- and micronutrients. This review evaluates effects of malnutrition on pressure ulcers and analyzes effects of nutrition on pressure ulcer prevention and healing. PMID:24961876

  16. Predictive Validity of Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment Tools for Elderly: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Hi; Lee, Young-Shin; Kwon, Young-Mi

    2016-04-01

    Preventing pressure ulcers is one of the most challenging goals existing for today's health care provider. Currently used tools which assess risk of pressure ulcer development rarely evaluate the accuracy of predictability, especially in older adults. The current study aimed at providing a systemic review and meta-analysis of 29 studies using three pressure ulcer risk assessment tools: Braden, Norton, and Waterlow Scales. Overall predictive validities of pressure ulcer risks in the pooled sensitivity and specificity indicated a similar range with a moderate accuracy level in all three scales, while heterogeneity showed more than 80% variability among studies. The studies applying the Braden Scale used five different cut-off points representing the primary cause of heterogeneity. Results indicate that commonly used screening tools for pressure ulcer risk have limitations regarding validity and accuracy for use with older adults due to heterogeneity among studies. PMID:26337859

  17. Efficacy of one-stage surgical treatment and clinical features in patients with multiple pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Han, Hyun Ho; Choi, Eun Jeong; Choi, Jong Yun; Rhie, Jong Won

    2016-03-01

    Treating patients with multiple pressure ulcers is a very challenging task for physicians. However, there are very few reports on treatment protocols for multiple pressure ulcers and treatment outcomes. The authors have consistently treated multiple pressure ulcers in a one-stage operation rather than a staged operation. We evaluated multiple pressure ulcers patients who underwent a one-stage operation from 2007 to 2014. A comparison was made between 20 patients who underwent a one-stage operation on 44 foci and 68 patients with a single focus. Though the results, we could conclude that one-stage operation of multiple pressure ulcers was found to have a shorter recovery period and shorter hospitalization without a significant increase in complications. PMID:26847934

  18. Electronic SSKIN pathway: reducing device-related pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Natalie

    2016-08-11

    This article describes how an interprofessional project in a London NHS Foundation Trust was undertaken to develop an intranet-based medical device-related pressure ulcer prevention and management pathway for clinical staff working across an adult critical care directorate, where life-threatening events require interventions using medical devices. The aim of this project was to improve working policies and processes to define key prevention strategies and provide clinicians with a clear, standardised approach to risk and skin assessment, equipment use, documentation and reporting clinical data using the Trust's CareVue (electronic medical records), Datix (incident reporting and risk-management tool) and eTRACE (online clinical protocol ordering) systems. The process included the development, trial and local implementation of the pathway using collaborative teamwork and the SSKIN care bundle tool. The experience of identifying issues, overcoming challenges, defining best practice and cascading SSKIN awareness training is shared. PMID:27523768

  19. Effects of a comprehensive nutritional program on pressure ulcer healing, length of hospital stay, and charges to patients.

    PubMed

    Allen, Beverlin

    2013-05-01

    The burden of pressure ulcers will intensify because of a rapidly increasing elderly population. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a comprehensive, interdisciplinary nutritional protocol on pressure ulcer wound healing, length of hospital stays, and charges for pressure ulcer management. The pre/post quasi-experimental design study comprised of 100 patients (50 patients in each group) 60 years or older with pressure ulcer. Research questions were analyzed using descriptive statistics, frequencies, chi-square tests, and t tests. Study findings indicate that the intervention was effective in improving pressure ulcer wound healing, decreasing both hospital length of stay (LOS) for treatment of pressure ulcer and total hospital LOS, while showing no significant additional charges for treatment of pressure ulcers. The older adults are at the highest risk of developing pressure ulcers that result in prolonged hospitalization, high health care costs, increased mortality, and decreased quality of life. PMID:22964824

  20. Intraoperative acquired pressure ulcer on lower lip: a complication of rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Masanobu; Nishio, Akiko; Daizo, Haruhisa; Kishibe, Miyuki; Shimada, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Device-related pressure ulcers are not rare. However, few studies have reported pressure ulcers of the lower lip. We encountered 2 patients with an intraoperative pressure ulcer on the lower lip caused by an endotracheal tube during rhinoplasty. A 46-year-old man showed a deviated nose and nasal obstruction. Surgery was performed under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. The surgery time was 270 minutes. A 23-year-old man also showed a deviated nose and nasal obstruction. Surgery was performed under general anesthesia in the same fashion. The surgery time was 273 minutes. A preformed endotracheal tube was inserted and positioned over the mandible and secured with polyurethane film intraoperatively. Both patients had pressure ulcers on their lower lip. One showed a slightly visible scar. Care must be taken to avoid ulcers of the lower lip in rhinoplasty patients. PMID:24275776

  1. Pressure Ulcer Prevention in the Hospital Setting Using Silicone Foam Dressings

    PubMed Central

    Grigson, Eileen; Patel, Maulik; Liu, Xinwei

    2016-01-01

    Patient care is of the utmost importance in the hospital setting. Bedrest and immobility during hospitalization, especially in the surgical and intensive care setting, place the patient at high risk for pressure ulcers. It is very important to prevent or notice a pressure ulcer forming due to the significant health care costs involved and patient health associated with them. Various measures are in place to prevent patients from getting pressure ulcers, but a newer material, silicone foam dressings, has been introduced as an alternative solution for the prevention of these ulcers. We review the current literature to examine whether the standard protocol or silicone material is superior to the prevention of pressure ulcer formation. We conclude that silicone foam dressings, when used as prophylactic treatment, seems very promising and may even be superior to the standard care of prevention. However, there were limitations to some studies and further research is needed to confirm the role of silicone foam dressings.

  2. First ray joint limitation, pressure, and ulceration of the first metatarsal head in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Birke, J A; Franks, B D; Foto, J G

    1995-05-01

    Measurements of first ray mobility, pressure, and other variables were made on 19 diabetic patients with a history of ulceration at the first metatarsal head, 20 diabetic patients with a history of ulceration at other locations of the forefoot, 19 matched diabetic controls, and 19 matched nondiabetic controls. Patients with a history of first metatarsal head ulceration had significantly less first ray mobility and significantly higher pressure at the first metatarsal head compared with the other groups. Regression analysis found a moderate inverse linear relationship between first ray dorsiflexion and peak pressure at the first metatarsal head (R2 = 0.46, P < .0001). Results showed that sensory loss, duration of diabetes, and limited range of motion at the hip, ankle, and foot were related to ulcerations at all forefoot locations, Limited first ray mobility and high pressure at the first metatarsal head were related to ulcerations only at the first metatarsal head location. PMID:7633584

  3. Adverse Outcomes after Major Surgery in Patients with Pressure Ulcer: A Nationwide Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chia-Lun; Lee, Woan-Ruoh; Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Shih, Chun-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Postoperative adverse outcomes in patients with pressure ulcer are not completely understood. This study evaluated the association between preoperative pressure ulcer and adverse events after major surgeries. Methods Using reimbursement claims from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database, we conducted a nationwide retrospective cohort study of 17391 patients with preoperative pressure ulcer receiving major surgery in 2008-2010. With a propensity score matching procedure, 17391 surgical patients without pressure ulcer were selected for comparison. Eight major surgical postoperative complications and 30-day postoperative mortality were evaluated among patients with pressure ulcer of varying severity. Results Patients with preoperative pressure ulcer had significantly higher risk than controls for postoperative adverse outcomes, including septicemia, pneumonia, stroke, urinary tract infection, and acute renal failure. Surgical patients with pressure ulcer had approximately 1.83-fold risk (95% confidence interval 1.54-2.18) of 30-day postoperative mortality compared with control group. The most significant postoperative mortality was found in those with serious pressure ulcer, such as pressure ulcer with local infection, cellulitis, wound or treatment by change dressing, hospitalized care, debridement or antibiotics. Prolonged hospital or intensive care unit stay and increased medical expenditures were also associated with preoperative pressure ulcer. Conclusion This nationwide propensity score-matched retrospective cohort study showed increased postoperative complications and mortality in patients with preoperative pressure ulcer. Our findings suggest the urgency of preventing and managing preoperative pressure ulcer by a multidisciplinary medical team for this specific population. PMID:26000606

  4. Wound fixation for pressure ulcers: a new therapeutic concept based on the physical properties of wounds.

    PubMed

    Mizokami, Fumihiro; Takahashi, Yoshiko; Nemoto, Tetsuya; Nagai, Yayoi; Tanaka, Makiko; Utani, Atsushi; Furuta, Katsunori; Isogai, Zenzo

    2015-02-01

    A pressure ulcer is defined as damage to skin and other tissues over a bony prominence caused by excess pressure. Deep pressure ulcers that develop over specific bony prominences often exhibit wound deformity, defined as a change in the 3-dimensional shape of the wound. Subsequently, the wound deformity can result in undermining formation, which is a characteristic of deep pressure ulcers. However, to date, a concept with respect to alleviating wound deformity has yet to be defined and described. To clarify the issue, we propose a new concept called "wound fixation" based on the physical properties of deep pressure ulcers with wound deformity. Wound fixation is defined here as the alleviation of wound deformity by exogenous materials. The wound fixation methods are classified as traction, anchor, and insertion based on the relation between the wound and action point by the exogenous materials. A retrospective survey of a case series showed that wound fixation was preferentially used for deep pressure ulcers at specific locations such as the sacrum, coccyx, and greater trochanter. Moreover, the methods of wound fixation were dependent on the pressure ulcer location. In conclusion, our new concept of wound fixation will be useful for the practical treatment and care of pressure ulcers. Further discussion and validation by other experts will be required to establish this concept. PMID:25660756

  5. Should care homes adopt a static-led approach to pressure ulcer prevention?

    PubMed

    Keen, Delia Catherine

    A static-led approach refers to the provision of high-specification foam mattresses for the whole of a population at risk of pressure damage. Such mattresses have been found to reduce the risk of pressure ulceration and cost less overall than standard mattresses, even in populations where only 1 in 100 patients develops a pressure ulcer. Reduced pressure ulcer prevalence and reduced costs resulting from decreased expenditure on dynamic mattresses following the implementation of a static-led approach have been reported. Pressure ulcers cause pain, a reduced quality of life, loss of independence, depression and social isolation for those in whom they develop. Organizations are increasingly having to pay out large sums of money following litigation surrounding pressure ulcers. This article explains why NHS healthcare providers and private care organizations need to work together to consider implementing a static-led approach to pressure ulcer prevention within care homes in order to reduce pressure ulcer incidence cost-effectively within their local populations. PMID:20081672

  6. Characterization of a Murine Pressure Ulcer Model to Assess Efficacy of Adipose-derived Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Amy L.; Bowles, Annie C.; MacCrimmon, Connor P.; Lee, Stephen J.; Frazier, Trivia P.; Katz, Adam J.; Gawronska-Kozak, Barbara; Bunnell, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: As the world’s population lives longer, the number of individuals at risk for pressure ulcers will increase considerably in the coming decades. In developed countries, up to 18% of nursing home residents suffer from pressure ulcers and the resulting hospital costs can account for up to 4% of a nation’s health care budget. Although full-thickness surgical skin wounds have been used as a model, preclinical rodent studies have demonstrated that repeated cycles of ischemia and reperfusion created by exposure to magnets most closely mimic the human pressure ulcer condition. Methods: This study uses in vivo and in vitro quantitative parameters to characterize the temporal kinetics and histology of pressure ulcers in young, female C57BL/6 mice exposed to 2 or 3 ischemia-reperfusion cycles. This pressure ulcer model was validated further in studies examining the efficacy of adipose-derived stromal/stem cell administration. Results: Optimal results were obtained with the 2-cycle model based on the wound size, histology, and gene expression profile of representative angiogenic and reparative messenger RNAs. When treated with adipose-derived stromal/stem cells, pressure ulcer wounds displayed a dose-dependent and significant acceleration in wound closure rates and improved tissue histology. Conclusion: These findings document the utility of this simplified preclinical model for the evaluation of novel tissue engineering and medical approaches to treat pressure ulcers in humans. PMID:25878945

  7. Longitudinal pressure ulcer rates since the adoption of culture change in Veterans Health Administration nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Christine W.; Shwartz, Michael; Zhao, Shibei; Palmer, Jennifer A.; Berlowitz, Dan R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine facility-level pressure ulcer development rates and variations in these rates after a system-wide adoption of culture change in Veterans Health Administration (VHA) nursing homes. Design 4-year retrospective longitudinal design. Setting 109 VHA facilities representing 132 nursing homes, known as Community Living Centers (CLCs). Measurements Pressure ulcers were identified using FY08-11 Minimum Data Set (MDS) data. Pressure ulcer development was defined as a stage 2 or larger pressure ulcer on an MDS assessment with no pressure ulcer on the previous assessment. A risk adjustment model was developed using 105,274 MDS observations to predict the likelihood of pressure ulcers (c statistic = 0.72). A Bayesian hierarchical model that adjusted for differences in the precision of pressure ulcer rates from differently sized facilities was used to calculate smoothed risk-adjusted (SRA) rates for each facility. The statistical significance of the trend over the 4 years was determined by examining the 95% interval estimate for the slope. Results Over the 4 year period, the beginning of which coincided with the VHA’s system-wide adoption of culture change as a performance measure, median SRA facility pressure ulcer development rates were fairly consistent at approximately 4%. The range in SRA rates declined from 14.8% to 10.1%. Some facilities had significantly improving SRA rates (e.g., declined steadily from 5.5% to 3.9%) and some had significantly worsening SRA rates (e.g., increased steadily from 5.1% to 7.9%). Seven sites had significantly improving rates (p<.001) that were below the median across all 4 years. Conclusion CLC pressure ulcer development rates were unaffected by a system-wide culture change implementation. There was, however, significant variation in facility rates and some facilities exhibited sustained high performance. PMID:26782865

  8. A Randomized Clinical Trial on Preventing Pressure Ulcers with Wheelchair Seat Cushions

    PubMed Central

    Brienza, David; Kelsey, Sheryl; Karg, Patricia; Allegretti, Ana; Olson, Marian; Schmeler, Mark; Zanca, Jeanne; Geyer, Mary Jo; Kusturiss, Marybeth; Holm, Margo

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine the efficacy of skin protection wheelchair seat cushions in preventing pressure ulcers in the elderly, nursing home population Design Clinical trial with participants assigned at random to either a skin protection or segmented foam cushion. Two hundred thirty two participants were recruited between June 2004 and May 2008 and followed for 6 months or until pressure ulcer incidence. Setting Twelve nursing homes Participants Nursing home residents’ age ≥ 65, using wheelchairs ≥6 hours/day, Braden score ≤ 18, and combined Braden activity and mobility score ≤ 5. Participants were recruited from a referred sample. Intervention All participants were provided a fitted wheelchair and randomized into skin protection (SPC) or segmented foam (SFC) cushion groups. The SPC group received an air, viscous fluid/foam, or gel/foam cushion. The SFC group received a 7.6 cm crosscut foam cushion. Measurements Pressure ulcer incidence over 6 months for wounds near the ischial tuberosities (IT ulcers) were measured. Secondary analysis was performed on combined IT and sacral/coccyx ulcers. Results One hundred eighty participants reached a study endpoint and 42 were lost to follow-up. Ten did not receive the intervention. There were 8/119 (6.7%) IT ulcers in the SFC group and 1/113 (0.9%) in the SPC group (p<0.04). In the group of combined IT and sacral/coccyx ulcers, there were 21/119 pressure ulcers (17.6%) in the SFC group and 12/113 (10.6%) in the SPC group (p=0.14). Conclusion Skin protection cushions used with fitted wheelchairs lower pressure ulcer incidence for elderly, nursing home residents and should be used to help prevent pressure ulcers. PMID:21070197

  9. Providers' Perceptions of Spinal Cord Injury Pressure Ulcer Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Susan S; Evitt, Celinda P; Harrow, Jeffrey J; Love, Linda; Moore, D. Helen; Mullins, Maria A; Powell-Cope, Gail; Nelson, Audrey L

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: Pressure ulcers are a serious complication for people with spinal cord injury (SCI). The Consortium for Spinal Cord Medicine (CSCM) published clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) that provided guidance for pressure ulcer prevention and treatment after SCI. The aim of this study was to assess providers' perceptions for each of the 32 CPG recommendations regarding their agreement with CPGs, degree of CPG implementation, and CPG implementation barriers and facilitators. Methods: This descriptive mixed-methods study included both qualitative (focus groups) and quantitative (survey) data collection approaches. The sample (n = 60) included 24 physicians and 36 nurses who attended the 2004 annual national conferences of the American Paraplegia Society or American Association of Spinal Cord Injury Nurses. This sample drew from two sources: a purposive sample from a list of preregistered participants and a convenience sample of conference attendee volunteers. We analyzed quantitative data using descriptive statistics and qualitative data using a coding scheme to capture barriers and facilitators. Results: The focus groups agreed unanimously on the substance of 6 of the 32 recommendations. Nurse and physician focus groups disagreed on the degree of CGP implementation at their sites, with nurses as a group perceiving less progress in implementation of the guideline recommendations. The focus groups identified only one recommendation, complications of surgery, as being fully implemented at their sites. Categories of barriers and facilitators for implementation of CPGs that emerged from the qualitative analysis included (a) characteristics of CPGs: need for research/evidence, (b) characteristics of CPGs: complexity of design and wording, (c) organizational factors, (d) lack of knowledge, and (e) lack of resources. Conclusions: Although generally SCI physicians and nurses agreed with the CPG recommendations as written, they did not feel these recommendations

  10. Pressure Ulcer in Norway—A Snapshot of Pressure Ulcer Occurrence across Various Care Sites and Recommendations for Improved Preventive Care

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Edda; Bakken, Linda N.; Moore, Zena

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PU) are common in all care settings, although most ulcers are preventable. Much evidence exists on Hospital Acquired Pressure Ulcers (HAPU), however, few studies describe PU in community care. From a Norwegian perspective, little is known about pressure ulcer prevalence and prevention strategies across the variety of healthcare sectors. Therefore, this study explored PU prevalence and preventive care in home care, nursing homes and hospitals. Seventeen postgraduate wound care students collected data. A data collection instrument by Jordan O’Brien and Cowman was used together with an online forum in which students described how to improve practice to reduce PU incidence. This study showed that pressure ulcers are a problem across all care settings in Norway; however, nursing homes had the highest proportion of at risk patients and the highest prevalence. By implementing the care bundle provided by the Patient Safety Programme across all care settings, increasing staff competency and make sure that access to appropriate equipment for beds and chairs is readily available, a structured and evidence based approach to prevention could be ensured. PMID:27417771

  11. Incontinence-associated dermatitis and pressure ulcers in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kottner, J; Beeckman, D

    2015-12-01

    The key characteristics of geriatric patients are advanced age, multimorbidity, a decrease of psychical performance and care dependency. In addition, advanced age, chronic and acute diseases and treatments (e.g. polypharmacy) lead, either directly or indirectly, to a wide range of skin and tissue problems. Incontinence-associated dermatitis and pressure ulcers (PUs) belong to the most prevalent in geriatric settings. Prolonged exposure of the skin to urine and/or stool can cause an irritant contact dermatitis. Skin surface 'wetness', increased skin surface pH, digestive intestinal enzymes, repeated skin cleansing activities, and a possible occlusive environment contribute to irritation and inflammation. Prevention and treatment includes activities to maintain and to enhance continence and to limit, to reduce exposure of the skin to urine and stool, and to promote healing and reepithelialisation. In frail aged skin, it is recommended to use incontinence products with smooth and breathable materials with maximum absorption capacity. Immediate skin cleansing after soiling using mild cleansers and protective and caring leave-on products are recommended. PUs are localized injuries to the skin and/or underlying tissue caused by sustained deformations of skin and underlying soft tissues. PUs management includes risk assessment, repositioning and mobilization, and the use of appropriate support surfaces. Patients must be never positioned directly on an existing PU. Especially at end of life, the PU closure and wound healing may not be the primary therapeutic goal. PMID:26186379

  12. Development of a pressure ulcer trigger tool for the neonatal population.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Bette; Askew, Mary; Otten, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    A large Midwest level IIIb neonatal intensive care unit located in a 500-bed teaching hospital implemented quarterly skin prevalence surveys to monitor prevalence of altered skin integrity including pressure ulcers, diaper dermatitis (incontinence-associated dermatitis), and skin damage as a result of intravenous therapy, adhesive, or medical devices. Pressure ulcer prevalence varied from 0% to 1% per quarter, and no pressure ulcer risk assessment tool was regularly implemented. Therefore, a working group was formed to identify a risk assessment. The Iowa Model for Evidence-Based Practice was used to guide the project. A literature review was completed to identify validated instruments, but available tools were judged lengthy for routine clinical use. Therefore, we developed a short trigger tool comprising 3 questions to identify infants at risk for pressure ulcer development. PMID:22948496

  13. Medicaid claims history of Florida long-term care facility residents hospitalized for pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Baker, J

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify patterns of admission, discharge, and readmission between hospital and long-term care facility among a group of Florida long-term care facility residents with pressure ulcers whose care was paid for by Medicaid. A patient-specific, longitudinal claims history database was constructed from data provided by the Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services. This database was used to determine and analyze hospital admissions for pressure ulcer care among Medicaid recipients cared for in a long-term care facility. Analysis of the data determined that more than half of the Medicaid-covered long-term care facility residents who formed the target study group (54.57%) had multiple hospital admissions associated with pressure ulcers. Pressure ulcer hospital admissions amounted to a program cost of $9.9 million. PMID:8704846

  14. Methodological Issues in Studies of the Effectiveness of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Baumgarten, Mona; Shardell, Michelle; Rich, Shayna

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To enhance the wound care practitioner's understanding of the research methods used to obtain information about the effectiveness of pressure ulcer prevention interventions. TARGET AUDIENCE This continuing education activity is intended for physicians and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. OBJECTIVES After reading this article and taking this test, the reader should be able to: 1. Differentiate between randomized, historical, and nonrandomized comparison studies. 2. Explain terminology and concepts associated with pressure ulcer prevention research. PMID:19325278

  15. Portrait of practice: developing a systematic approach for the management of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lackey, T C; Bickford, B E; Howe, K P

    1992-03-01

    Pressure ulcer management is an increasingly serious problem for the healthcare industry. It is necessary for acute care facilities to examine the benefits of developing a comprehensive skin care protocol for pressure ulcer management. Increased and continuous staff awareness produces quality patient care and cost effectiveness. The description of the development, use, and auditing of a skin care protocol by Western Reserve Care System is representative of many institutions across the country. PMID:1558693

  16. Using statistical process control for monitoring the prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Kottner, Jan; Halfens, Ruud

    2010-05-01

    Institutionally acquired pressure ulcers are used as outcome indicators to assess the quality of pressure ulcer prevention programs. Determining whether quality improvement projects that aim to decrease the proportions of institutionally acquired pressure ulcers lead to real changes in clinical practice depends on the measurement method and statistical analysis used. To examine whether nosocomial pressure ulcer prevalence rates in hospitals in the Netherlands changed, a secondary data analysis using different statistical approaches was conducted of annual (1998-2008) nationwide nursing-sensitive health problem prevalence studies in the Netherlands. Institutions that participated regularly in all survey years were identified. Risk-adjusted nosocomial pressure ulcers prevalence rates, grade 2 to 4 (European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel system) were calculated per year and hospital. Descriptive statistics, chi-square trend tests, and P charts based on statistical process control (SPC) were applied and compared. Six of the 905 healthcare institutions participated in every survey year and 11,444 patients in these six hospitals were identified as being at risk for pressure ulcers. Prevalence rates per year ranged from 0.05 to 0.22. Chi-square trend tests revealed statistically significant downward trends in four hospitals but based on SPC methods, prevalence rates of five hospitals varied by chance only. Results of chi-square trend tests and SPC methods were not comparable, making it impossible to decide which approach is more appropriate. P charts provide more valuable information than single P values and are more helpful for monitoring institutional performance. Empirical evidence about the decrease of nosocomial pressure ulcer prevalence rates in the Netherlands is contradictory and limited. PMID:20511685

  17. Potential efficiency of antioxidants to prevent pressure ulcers. A neglected hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Bonne, Claude

    2016-06-01

    Pressure ulcers are necrotic lesions mainly due to capillary hypoperfusion. It is well known that hypoxia and also subsequent oxygenation at reperfusion provoke the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsible for cell death. The hypothesis of their participation in the pathogenesis of pressure ulcers has already been tested; several antioxidants have the capacity to inhibit skin necrosis in animal models but their efficiency in preventing bedsores has never been demonstrated in patients. The failure of clinical trials to show the protective activity of some antioxidants does not rule out the involvement of ROS in ischemic ulcers and the potential efficacy of other antioxidants in preventing their formation remains possible. PMID:27142137

  18. Spinal Cord Injury and Pressure Ulcer Prevention: Using Functional Activity in Pressure Relief

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, May; Gillan, Cathy; Morton, Julie; Gardner, Evie; Sprigle, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Background. People with spinal cord injury (SCI) are at increased risk of pressure ulcers due to prolonged periods of sitting. Concordance with pressure relieving movements is poor amongst this population, and one potential alternative to improve this would be to integrate pressure relieving movements into everyday functional activities. Objectives. To investigate both the current pressure relieving behaviours of SCI individuals during computer use and the application of an ergonomically adapted computer-based activity to reduce interface pressure. Design. Observational and repeated measures design. Setting. Regional Spinal Cord Injury Unit. Participants. Fourteen subjects diagnosed with SCI (12 male, 2 female). Intervention.Comparing normal sitting to seated movements and induced forward reaching positions. Main Outcome Measures. Interface pressure measurements: dispersion index (DI), peak pressure index (PPI), and total contact area (CA). The angle of trunk tilt was also measured. Results. The majority of movements yielded less than 25% reduction in interface pressure compared to normal sitting. Reaching forward by 150% of arm length during an adapted computer activity significantly reduced DI (P < 0.05), angle of trunk tilt (p<0.05), and PPI for both ischial tuberosity regions (P < 0.001) compared to normal sitting. Conclusion. Reaching forward significantly redistributed pressure at the seating interface, as evidenced by the change in interface pressures compared to upright sitting. PMID:23691301

  19. Concurrent and Lagged Effects of Registered Nurse Turnover and Staffing on Unit-Acquired Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin Hye; Boyle, Diane K; Bergquist-Beringer, Sandra; Staggs, Vincent S; Dunton, Nancy E

    2014-01-01

    Objective We examined the concurrent and lagged effects of registered nurse (RN) turnover on unit-acquired pressure ulcer rates and whether RN staffing mediated the effects. Data Sources/Setting Quarterly unit-level data were obtained from the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators for 2008 to 2010. A total of 10,935 unit-quarter observations (2,294 units, 465 hospitals) were analyzed. Methods This longitudinal study used multilevel regressions and tested time-lagged effects of study variables on outcomes. Findings The lagged effect of RN turnover on unit-acquired pressure ulcers was significant, while there was no concurrent effect. For every 10 percentage-point increase in RN turnover in a quarter, the odds of a patient having a pressure ulcer increased by 4 percent in the next quarter. Higher RN turnover in a quarter was associated with lower RN staffing in the current and subsequent quarters. Higher RN staffing was associated with lower pressure ulcer rates, but it did not mediate the relationship between turnover and pressure ulcers. Conclusions We suggest that RN turnover is an important factor that affects pressure ulcer rates and RN staffing needed for high-quality patient care. Given the high RN turnover rates, hospital and nursing administrators should prepare for its negative effect on patient outcomes. PMID:24476194

  20. The effect of nitric oxide releasing cream on healing pressure ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Saidkhani, Vahid; Asadizaker, Marziyeh; Khodayar, Mohammad Javad; Latifi, Sayed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pressure ulcer is one of the main concerns of nurses in medical centers around the world, which, if untreated, causes irreparable problems for patients. In recent years, nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed as an effective method for wound healing. This study was conducted to determine the effect of nitric oxide on pressure ulcer healing. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 58 patients with pressure ulcer at hospitals affiliated to Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences were homogenized and later divided randomly into two groups of treatment (nitric oxide cream; n = 29) and control (placebo cream; n = 29). In this research, the data collection tool was the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH). At the outset of the study (before using the cream), the patients' ulcers were examined weekly in terms of size, amount of exudates, and tissue type using the PUSH tool for 3 weeks. By integrating these three factors, wound healing was determined. Data were analyzed using SPSS. Results: Although no significant difference was found in terms of the mean of score size, the amount of exudates, and the tissue type between the two groups, the mean of total score (healing) between the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.04). Conclusions: Nitric oxide cream seems to accelerate wound healing. Therefore, considering its easy availability and cost-effectiveness, it can be used for treating pressure ulcers in the future. PMID:27186212

  1. Pressure ulcers--randomised controlled trial comparing hydrocolloid and saline gauze dressings.

    PubMed

    Chang, K W; Alsagoff, S; Ong, K T; Sim, P H

    1998-12-01

    An open comparative randomised study comparing the performance of hydrocolloid dressings (DuoDERM CGF) to saline gauze dressings in the treatment of pressure ulcers was done to evaluate the overall dressing performance, wound healing and cost effectiveness. Thirty-four subjects were enrolled at the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur over a 643 days period. Inclusion criteria were Stage II or III pressure ulcers, at least 18 years of age and written informed consent. Only one pressure ulcer per subject was enrolled in the study. Patients with infected pressure ulcers, diabetes mellitus, an immuno-compromised status and known sensitivity to the study dressings were excluded. Subjects who met the enrollment criteria were randomised to one of the two dressing regimes. They were expected to participate in the study for a maximum of eight weeks or until the pressure ulcer healed, which ever occurred first. Overall subject age averaged 58 years and the mean duration of pressure ulcer existence was about 1 month. Twenty-one of the thirty-four ulcers enrolled were stage II and thirteen were stage III. The majority of the ulcers (88%) were located in the sacral area and seventeen subjects (50%) were incontinent. In the evaluation of dressing performance in terms of adherence to wound bed, exudate handling ability, overall comfort and pain during dressing removal; all favoured the hydrocolloid dressing by a statistically significant margin (p < 0.001). Subjects assigned the hydrocolloid dressing experienced a mean 34% reduction from their baseline surface area measurement compared to a mean 9% increase by subjects assigned gauze dressings. This was not statistically significant (p = 0.2318). In cost evaluation of the study products, there was no statistical significance in the total cost of wound management per subject. When only labour time and cost was evaluated, there was a statistically significant advantage towards hydrocolloid dressings. PMID:10971989

  2. Treatment of pressure ulcers with autologous bone marrow nuclear cells in patients with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sarasúa, J González; López, S Pérez; Viejo, M Álvarez; Basterrechea, M Pérez; Rodríguez, A Fernández; Gutiérrez, A Ferrero; Gala, J García; Menéndez, Y Menéndez; Augusto, D Escudero; Arias, A Pérez; Hernández, J Otero

    2011-01-01

    Context Pressure ulcers are especially difficult to treat in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and recurrence rates are high. Prompted by encouraging results obtained using bone marrow stem cells to treat several diseases including chronic wounds, this study examines the use of autologous stem cells from bone marrow to promote the healing of pressure ulcers in patients with SCI. Objective To obtain preliminary data on the use of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) to treat pressure ulcers in terms of clinical outcome, procedure safety, and treatment time. Participants Twenty-two patients with SCI (19 men, 3 women; mean age 56.41 years) with single type IV pressure ulcers of more than 4 months duration. Interventions By minimally invasive surgery, the ulcers were debrided and treated with BM-MNCs obtained by Ficoll density gradient separation of autologous bone marrow aspirates drawn from the iliac crest. Results In 19 patients (86.36%), the pressure ulcers treated with BM-MNCs had fully healed after a mean time of 21 days. The number of MNCs isolated was patient dependent, although similar clinical outcomes were observed in each case. Compared to conventional surgical treatment, mean intra-hospital stay was reduced from 85.16 to 43.06 days. Following treatment, 5 minutes of daily wound care was required per patient compared to 20 minutes for conventional surgery. During a mean follow-up of 19 months, none of the resolved ulcers recurred. Conclusions Our data indicate that cell therapy using autologous BM-MNCs could be an option to treat type IV pressure ulcers in patients with SCI, avoiding major surgical intervention. PMID:21756569

  3. Pressure ulcers induced by drug administration: A new concept and report of four cases in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Mizokami, Fumihiro; Takahashi, Yoshiko; Hasegawa, Keiko; Hattori, Hideyuki; Nishihara, Keiji; Endo, Hidetoshi; Furuta, Katsunori; Isogai, Zenzo

    2016-04-01

    Drug-induced akinesia is a potential cause of pressure ulcers. However, pressure ulcers that are caused by drug-induced akinesia are not considered an adverse drug reaction (ADR). We propose that drug-induced pressure ulcers (DIPU) are pressure ulcers that are caused by an external force that is experienced after drug administration, and we considered resolution of these ulcers after drug discontinuation to be a supportive finding. In this report, we reviewed the medical records of pressure ulcer cases from a 300-bed hospital. Among 148 patients, four patients with pressure ulcers met the criterion for DIPU. In these cases, the suspected DIPU were related to treatment with olanzapine, fluvoxamine, valproic acid, clotiazepam, triazolam and rilmazafone. These drugs were administrated to manage the patients' behavioral and psychological symptoms that accompanied dementia. The DIPU in these patients were categorized as stage IV according to the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel criteria. Discontinuation of the causal drugs led to significant improvements or complete healing of the pressure ulcers, and the patients subsequently recovered their mobility. Therefore, we propose that DIPU are potential ADR that have been overlooked in clinical practice. Thus, recognition of DIPU as an ADR may be important in preventing and appropriately managing pressure ulcers among elderly patients. PMID:26364579

  4. Evaluation of the bacterial diversity of Pressure ulcers using bTEFAP pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Decubitus ulcers, also known as bedsores or pressure ulcers, affect millions of hospitalized patients each year. The microflora of chronic wounds such as ulcers most commonly exist in the biofilm phenotype and have been known to significantly impair normal healing trajectories. Methods Bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP), a universal bacterial identification method, was used to identify bacterial populations in 49 decubitus ulcers. Diversity estimators were utilized and wound community compositions analyzed in relation to metadata such as Age, race, gender, and comorbidities. Results Decubitus ulcers are shown to be polymicrobial in nature with no single bacterium exclusively colonizing the wounds. The microbial community among such ulcers is highly variable. While there are between 3 and 10 primary populations in each wound there can be hundreds of different species present many of which are in trace amounts. There is no clearly significant differences in the microbial ecology of decubitus ulcer in relation to metadata except when considering diabetes. The microbial populations and composition in the decubitus ulcers of diabetics may be significantly different from the communities in non-diabetics. Conclusions Based upon the continued elucidation of chronic wound bioburdens as polymicrobial infections, it is recommended that, in addition to traditional biofilm-based wound care strategies, an antimicrobial/antibiofilm treatment program can be tailored to each patient's respective wound microflora. PMID:20854691

  5. Diagnosing pelvic osteomyelitis beneath pressure ulcers in spinal cord injured patients: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Brunel, A-S; Lamy, B; Cyteval, C; Perrochia, H; Téot, L; Masson, R; Bertet, H; Bourdon, A; Morquin, D; Reynes, J; Le Moing, V

    2016-03-01

    There is no consensus on a diagnostic strategy for osteomyelitis underlying pressure ulcers. We conducted a prospective study to assess the accuracy of multiple bone biopsies and imaging to diagnose pelvic osteomyelitis. Patients with clinically suspected osteomyelitis beneath pelvic pressure ulcers were enrolled. Bone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and surgical bone biopsies (three or more for microbiology and one for histology per ulcer) were performed. Bacterial osteomyelitis diagnosis relied upon the association of positive histology and microbiology (at least one positive culture for non-commensal microorganisms or three or more for commensal microorganisms of the skin). From 2011 to 2014, 34 patients with 44 pressure ulcers were included. Bacterial osteomyelitis was diagnosed for 28 (82.3%) patients and 35 (79.5%) ulcers according to the composite criterion. Discrepancy was observed between histology and microbiology for 5 (11.4%) ulcers. Most common isolates were Staphylococcus aureus (77.1%), Peptostreptococcus (48.6%) and Bacteroides (40%), cultured in three or more samples in 42.9% of ulcers for S. aureus and ≥20% for anaerobes. Only 2.8% of ulcers had three or more positive specimens with coagulase-negative staphylococci, group B Streptococcus, and nil with enterococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus and group milleri Streptococcus were recovered from one sample in 22.8%, 11.4% and 11.4% of ulcers, respectively. Agreement was poor between biopsies and MRI (κ 0.2). Sensitivity of MRI was 94.3% and specificity was 22.2%. The diagnosis of pelvic osteomyelitis relies on multiple surgical bone biopsies with microbiological and histological analyses. At least three bone samples allows the detection of pathogens and exclusion of contaminants. MRI is not routinely useful for diagnosis. PMID:26620686

  6. A topical haemoglobin spray for oxygenating pressure ulcers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Joy

    2015-03-01

    The effect of pressure ulcers on patient quality of life have been recognised as a real problem for many years, and the need for robust and effective management of pressure ulcers is now a prominent national health-care issue. Myriad different interventions exist for the treatment of pressure ulcers, including clinically effective dressings and pressure-relieving devices, yet many pressure ulcers still do not heal and often become a chronic wound. This is the second of a series of articles (Norris, 2014) discussing the clinical evaluation of a topical oxygen therapy in practice. It describes a small evaluation involving 18 patients with pressure ulcers. The study set out to determine the effect of a topical oxygen therapy on wound size. The therapy comprises a canister that sprays pure haemoglobin in a water solution into or onto the wound. The haemoglobin spray needs to be used at least once every 3 days, does not require training on its use and can be used in any care setting. Overall, results identified wound healing progression in all 18 wounds and wound size reduction in 17 of the 18 wounds. PMID:25757379

  7. Systemic factors and mortality in elderly patients with pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Jaul, Efraim; Calderon-Margalit, Ronit

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this article was to identify specific systemic factors associated with existence of pressure ulcers (PUs) and the effect on survival from the time of admission. Patients admitted to the Skilled Nursing Department of the Herzog Hospital, Jerusalem, between 1 July 2008 and 31 December 2011. Of the 174 admitted patients (mean age: 77·4 ± 13·2 years), 107 (61·5%) had pre-existing PUs and 67 (38·5%) did not have PUs. Major systemic factors were assessed for each patient at the time of admission: sociodemographic characteristics, comorbidities, use of urinary catheter, tube feeding and tracheostomy; nutritional state; Global Deterioration Scale, Glasgow Coma Scale and Norton Scale. Complications such as the number of provided antibiotic courses, and length and outcomes of hospitalisation were identified at the end of the study. In the univariate analysis, patients in the PU group had significantly prevalent characteristics including advanced age, low cognitive and consciousness function, low Norton scale, Parkinson's disease and anaemia due to chronic diseases, low nutritional parameters and higher number of antibiotics provided. Conditions that were associated with PUs in multiple regression analyses included advanced dementia (OR = 3·0, 95% CI: 1·4-6·3; P = 0·002), urinary catheter usage (OR = 2·25, 95% CI: 1·06-4·7; P = 0·03), low body mass index, BMI (OR = 0·92, 95% CI: 0·86-0·99; P = 0·02) and anaemia level (OR = 0·7, 95% CI: 0·58-0·9; P = 0·004). The median survival time of patients with PUs was significantly lower than the non PUs group (94 versus 414 days, respectively) (P = 0·005, log rank test). Length of stay was also significantly lower in the PU group (166 versus 270 days, P = 0·02). The existence of PUs may indicate a final common pathway of various systemic factors (geriatric conditions, diseases and frailty dysfunction). PMID:23692122

  8. Assessment and management of pressure ulcers in the elderly: current strategies.

    PubMed

    Jaul, Efraim

    2010-04-01

    Pressure ulcers (pressure sores) continue to be a common health problem, particularly among the physically limited or bedridden elderly. The problem exists within the entire health framework, including hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities and private homes. For many elderly patients, pressure ulcers may become chronic for no apparent reason and remain so for prolonged periods, even for the remainder of the patient's lifetime. A large number of grade 3 and 4 pressure ulcers become chronic wounds, and the afflicted patient may even die from an ulcer complication (sepsis or osteomyelitis). The presence of a pressure ulcer constitutes a geriatric syndrome consisting of multifactorial pathological conditions. The accumulated effects of impairment due to immobility, nutritional deficiency and chronic diseases involving multiple systems predispose the aging skin of the elderly person to increasing vulnerability. The assessment and management of a pressure ulcer requires a comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach in order to understand the patient with the ulcer. Factors to consider include the patient's underlying pathologies (such as obstructive lung disease or peripheral vascular disease), severity of his or her primary illness (such as an infection or hip fracture), co-morbidities (such as dementia or diabetes mellitus), functional state (activities of daily living), nutritional status (swallowing difficulties), and degree of social and emotional support; focusing on just the wound itself is not enough. An understanding of the physiological and pathological processes of aging skin throws light on the aetiology and pathogenesis of the development of pressure ulcers in the elderly. Each health discipline (nursing staff, aides, physician, dietitian, occupational and physical therapists, and social worker) has its own role to play in the assessment and management of the patient with a pressure ulcer. The goals of treating a pressure ulcer include avoiding any

  9. The prevalence of pain at pressure areas and pressure ulcers in hospitalised patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with pressure ulcers (PUs) report that pain is their most distressing symptom, but there are few PU pain prevalence studies. We sought to estimate the prevalence of unattributed pressure area related pain (UPAR pain) which was defined as pain, soreness or discomfort reported by patients, on an “at risk” or PU skin site, reported at a patient level. Methods We undertook pain prevalence surveys in 2 large UK teaching hospital NHS Trusts (6 hospitals) and a district general hospital NHS Trust (3 hospitals) during their routine annual PU prevalence audits. The hospitals provide secondary and tertiary care beds in acute and elective surgery, trauma and orthopaedics, burns, medicine, elderly medicine, oncology and rehabilitation. Anonymised individual patient data were recorded by the ward nurse and PU prevalence team. The analysis of this prevalence survey included data summaries; no inferential statistical testing was planned or undertaken. Percentages were calculated using the total number of patients from the relevant population as the denominator (i.e. including all patients with missing data for that variable). Results A total of 3,397 patients in 9 acute hospitals were included in routine PU prevalence audits and, of these, 2010 (59.2%) patients participated in the pain prevalence study. UPAR pain prevalence was 16.3% (327/2010). 1769 patients had no PUs and of these 223 patients reported UPAR pain, a prevalence of 12.6%. Of the 241 people with pressure ulcers, 104 patients reported pain, a UPAR pain prevalence of 43.2% (104/241). Conclusion One in six people in acute hospitals experience UPAR pain on ‘at risk’ or PU skin sites; one in every 8 people without PUs and, more than 2 out of every five people with PUs. The results provide a clear indication that all patients should be asked if they have pain at pressure areas even when they do not have a PU. PMID:23902583

  10. Differential assessment of trunk wounds: pressure ulceration versus incontinence associated dermatitis versus intertriginous dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Dorothy

    2012-04-01

    Differential assessment of trunk wounds is a critical element of their effective management. In reviewing the pathology and typical presentation for pressure necrosis, IAD, and ITD, four factors provide guidance in differential assessment: location, depth, characteristics, and exposure. Pressure ulcers are full-thickness lesions located over bony prominences or under medical devices. IAD and ITD are superficial lesions that occur in areas exposed to urine and/or stool (IAD) or trapped perspiration (ITD). Undermining and tunneling are common features of pressure ulcers, but never occur with IAD or ITD. Similarly, pressure ulcers frequently present with tissue necrosis, whereas ITD and IAD are commonly associated with maceration of the surrounding skin. PMID:22570912

  11. Development of a simple, noninvasive, clinically relevant model of pressure ulcers in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Istvan; Zhang, Ren-Yu; Oskoui, Phillip; Whittaker, Megan S; Lanzafame, Raymond J

    2004-01-01

    The formation of pressure ulcers and other skin wounds is considered to be a multifactorial process. Cycles of ischemia-reperfusion have been considered to be significant contributing factors in the pathogenesis of pressure ulcers. This study reports the development of a reproducible murine model of ischemia-reperfusion injury by the external application of magnets. Mice were sedated with 50% CO2:50% O2 for 50-60 s. Dorsal hair was shaved and the area cleaned. The skin was gently pulled and placed between two round ceramic magnetic plates (5 x 12 mm diameter, 2.4 g weight, 1000 G magnetic force). The resultant "pinch" procedure was designed to leave a 5-mm skin bridge between the magnets, creating 50 mm Hg pressure between the plates. Three 12-h ischemia-reperfusion cycles were employed to cause pressure ulcer formation. Animals tolerated the procedure well. They returned to normal activity a few minutes after magnet placement. The lesions reached their maximum at 10 days postinjury. Full-thickness skin loss with damage and necrosis of subcutaneous tissue (ulcer stage 3) was observed in all cases, reaching a mean stage score of 3.6 +/- 0.6 of based on a 0-5 scale for extent of injury by visual assessment. Thus, an inexpensive, reproducible murine pressure ulcer model was developed, which results in graded injury without long-term immobilization of the animals. This method will facilitate the development of new prevention and management strategies. PMID:15371164

  12. Development and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Pressure Ulcers scale and short form

    PubMed Central

    Kisala, Pamela A.; Tulsky, David S.; Choi, Seung W.; Kirshblum, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a self-reported measure of the subjective impact of pressure ulcers on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) as part of the SCI quality of life (SCI-QOL) measurement system. Design Grounded-theory based qualitative item development methods, large-scale item calibration testing, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and item response theory-based psychometric analysis. Setting Five SCI Model System centers and one Department of Veterans Affairs medical center in the United States. Participants Adults with traumatic SCI. Main Outcome Measures SCI-QOL Pressure Ulcers scale. Results 189 individuals with traumatic SCI who experienced a pressure ulcer within the past 7 days completed 30 items related to pressure ulcers. CFA confirmed a unidimensional pool of items. IRT analyses were conducted. A constrained Graded Response Model with a constant slope parameter was used to estimate item thresholds for the 12 retained items. Conclusions The 12-item SCI-QOL Pressure Ulcers scale is unique in that it is specifically targeted to individuals with spinal cord injury and at every stage of development has included input from individuals with SCI. Furthermore, use of CFA and IRT methods provide flexibility and precision of measurement. The scale may be administered in its entirety or as a 7-item “short form” and is available for both research and clinical practice. PMID:26010965

  13. Marjolin’s Ulcer Complicating a Pressure Sore: The Clock is Ticking

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Kamran; Giannone, Anna Lucia; Mehrabi, Erfan; Khan, Ayda; Giannone, Roberto E.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 85 Final Diagnosis: Marjolin’s ulcer (squamous cell carcinoma) Symptoms: None Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Ulcer excision and split thickness skin graft placement Specialty: Dermatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Malignant degeneration in any chronic wound is termed a Marjolin’s ulcer (MU). The overall metastatic rate of MU is approximately 27.5%. However, the prognosis of MU specific to pressure sores is poor, with a reported metastatic rate of 61%. This is due to insidious, asymptomatic malignant degeneration, a lack of healthcare provider awareness, and, ultimately, delayed management. Case Report: An 85-year-old white male was noted by his wound-care nurse to have a rapidly developing growth on his lower back over a period of 4 months. There was history of a non-healing, progressive pressure ulcer of the lower back for the past 10 years. On examination, there was a 4×4 cm pressure ulcer of the lower back, with a superimposed 1.5×2 cm growth in the superior region. There was an absence of palpable regional lymphadenopathy. Punch biopsy revealed squamous cell carcinoma consistent with Marjolin’s ulcer. The ulcer underwent excision with wide margins, and a skin graft was placed. Due to the prompt recognition of an abnormality by the patient’s wound-care nurse, metastasis was not evident on imaging. There are no signs of recurrence at 1-year follow-up. Conclusions: Marjolin’s ulcer has a rapid progression from local disease to widespread metastasis. Therefore, it is essential that wound-care providers are aware of the clinical signs and symptoms of malignant degeneration in chronic wounds. PMID:26898816

  14. The VCU Pressure Ulcer Summit: The Search for a Clearer Understanding and More Precise Clinical Definition of the Unavoidable Pressure Injury.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Oscar M; Brindle, C Tod; Langemo, Diane; Kennedy-Evans, Karen Lou; Krasner, Diane L; Brennan, Mary R; Levine, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the findings of the Unavoidable Pressure Ulcer Committee (of the VCU Pressure Ulcer Summit) that was tasked with addressing key issues associated with pressure injuries that are unavoidable or unpreventable. Our goals were (1) to clarify nomenclature and descriptions surrounding "terminal ulceration," (2) to describe the medical complications and comorbid conditions that can lead to skin failure and/or terminal ulceration, (3) to describe the variable possible causes of unavoidable pressure injuries, and (4) to present clinical cases to exemplify pressure injuries considered to be unavoidable. PMID:27509367

  15. Hematological change parameters in patients with pressure ulcer at long-term care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Neiva, Giselle Protta; Carnevalli, Julia Romualdo; Cataldi, Rodrigo Lessa; Furtado, Denise Mendes; Fabri, Rodrigo Luiz; Silva, Pâmela Souza

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess factors associated with the development of pressure ulcers, and to compare the effectiveness of pharmacological treatments. Methods The factors associated with the development of pressure ulcers were compared in lesion-carrying patients (n=14) and non-carriers (n=16). Lesion-carrying patients were treated with 1% silver sulfadiazine or 0.6IU/g collagenase and were observed for 8 weeks. The data collected was analyzed with p<0.05 being statistically relevant. Results The prevalence of pressure ulcers was about 6%. The comparison of carrier and non-carrier groups of pressure ulcers revealed no statistically significant difference in its occurrence with respect to age, sex, skin color, mobility, or the use of diapers. However, levels of hemoglobin, hematocrit, and red blood cells were found to be statistically different between groups, being lower in lesion-carrying patients. There was no significant difference found in lesion area between patients treated with collagenase or silver sulfadiazine, although both groups showed an overall reduction in lesion area through the treatment course. Conclusion Hematologic parameters showed a statistically significant difference between the two groups. Regarding the treatment of ulcers, there was no difference in the area of the lesion found between the groups treated with collagenase and silver sulfadiazine. PMID:25295450

  16. Intervention with Formulated Collagen Gel for Chronic Heel Pressure Ulcers in Older Adults with Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Agosti, Jennifer K; Chandler, Lois A

    2015-11-01

    Chronic pressure ulcers (PrUs), ulcers that fail to progress through the expected phases of wound healing in a timely fashion, are not only a concern for the patients afflicted with them, but are also a significant burden for the long-term-care facilities in which patients reside. The heel is the second most common location for PrUs. Morbidity and mortality rates for heel PrUs, particularly in the diabetic population, are alarming. Therefore, a consistently effective, cost-conscious, and user-friendly topical treatment for heel ulcers would be welcomed by patients and clinicians. This article describes a marked and rapid improvement in wound granulation in 3 older adult patients following weekly treatment for 8 weeks of chronic (≥1-year duration) heel ulcers with an easy-to-use, cost-effective, topical, formulated collagen gel. PMID:26479694

  17. Using heel protectors for the prevention of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Rajpaul, Kumal; Acton, Claire

    2016-03-01

    Pressure ulcers are a frequent, but often preventable, occurrence among patients in acute care facilities, and the heel is one of the anatomical locations most commonly affected. Multiple clinical guidelines recommend the use of robust assessments to identify at-risk patients and the application of heel protection devices to reduce the likelihood of developing heel pressure ulcers. A quality improvement initiative involving robust skin-assessment practices, staff education, and the use of heel protection devices was analysed retrospectively to evaluate the efficacy of current practice interventions. These analyses revealed that the incidence of heel pressure ulcers was inversely correlated with the number of heel protectors used at two large acute NHS teaching hospitals in inner London, and that the consistent and early use of heel protectors improved patient outcomes and reduced costs of care. PMID:27019180

  18. Identifying and classifying quality-of-life tools for assessing pressure ulcers after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Hitzig, Sander L.; Balioussis, Christina; Nussbaum, Ethne; McGillivray, Colleen F.; Catharine Craven, B.; Noreau, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Context Although pressure ulcers may negatively influence quality of life (QoL) post-spinal cord injury (SCI), our understanding of how to assess their impact is confounded by conceptual and measurement issues. To ensure that descriptions of pressure ulcer impact are appropriately characterized, measures should be selected according to the domains that they evaluate and the population and pathologies for which they are designed. Objective To conduct a systematic literature review to identify and classify outcome measures used to assess the impact of pressure ulcers on QoL after SCI. Methods Electronic databases (Medline/PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycInfo) were searched for studies published between 1975 and 2011. Identified outcome measures were classified as being either subjective or objective using a QoL model. Results Fourteen studies were identified. The majority of tools identified in these studies did not have psychometric evidence supporting their use in the SCI population with the exception of two objective measures, the Short-Form 36 and the Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique, and two subjective measures, the Life Situation Questionnaire-Revised and the Ferrans and Powers Quality of Life Index SCI-Version. Conclusion Many QoL outcome tools showed promise in being sensitive to the presence of pressure ulcers, but few of them have been validated for use with SCI. Prospective studies should employ more rigorous methods for collecting data on pressure ulcer severity and location to improve the quality of findings with regard to their impact on QoL. The Cardiff Wound Impact Schedule is a potential tool for assessing impact of pressure ulcers-post SCI. PMID:24090238

  19. [Systematic pressure ulcer risk management.: Results of implementing multiple interventions at Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin].

    PubMed

    Hauss, Armin; Greshake, Susanne; Skiba, Thomas; Schmidt, Kristine; Rohe, Julia; Jürgensen, Jan Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Pressure ulcers impose a high burden of disease on both the affected individual and society. Demographic change and multimorbidity aggravate the problem. The present study describes the systematic implementation of a comprehensive approach to reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers in an inpatient setting. The introduction of systematic risk assessment and the subsequent risk-adjusted application of evidence-based prevention, combined with continuous feedback of outcomes as well as tailored training, were associated with a significant decline in the incidence of pressure ulcers. Especially the occurrence of high-grade ulcers could be minimized by this systems approach. PMID:27480185

  20. Nurses' Knowledge, Practices, and Barriers in Care of Patients with Pressure Ulcers in a Ugandan Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mwebaza, Ivan; Katende, Godfrey; Groves, Sara; Nankumbi, Joyce

    2014-01-01

    Pressure ulcers have been identified as a major burden of hospitalization worldwide, and nurses are at the forefront of prevention. The purpose of this study was to determine the nurses' knowledge and practices regarding risk factors, prevention, and management of pressure ulcers at a teaching hospital in Uganda. The study employed a descriptive cross-sectional design. Fifty-six Ugandan registered practicing nurses were sampled. A composite self-administered questionnaire and an observation checklist were utilized. The nurses had limited knowledge about critical parameters of pressure ulcers. Prevention practices were observed to be unreliable and uncoordinated related to a significant shortage of staff and logistics for pressure ulcer prevention. Nurses had poor access to current literature on pressure ulcer prevention. Translation of nurses' knowledge into practice is possible if barriers like staff shortage, pressure relieving devices provision, and risk assessment tools are addressed at Mulago. PMID:24707398

  1. Systematic Review and Operative Technique of Recalcitrant Pressure Ulcers Using a Fillet Flap Technique

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Venkat K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this article is to describe the indications, operative technique, outcomes, and systematic review of the literature on the reconstruction of patients with end-stage pressure ulcers using a fillet flap technique. In this technique, the femur, tibia, and fibula are removed from the thigh and leg, and the soft tissue is used as a pedicled, or free, myocutaneous flap for reconstruction. Long-term outcomes, salient surgical technique of flap elevation, and design are detailed for patients who had a fillet of leg flap for reconstruction of extensive pressure ulcers. Methods: The indications, surgical technique, and postoperative outcomes of 5 patients who had pedicled fillet flaps are reviewed including patient age, sex, underlying comorbidities, duration of paraplegia, operative technique, and complications. A systematic review of the literature was performed searching PubMed, Cochrane Database, and Medline with the following MeSH terms: pressure ulcer, pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, fillet flap, and fillet flap. Inclusion criteria were use of a fillet technique, article data on the number of reconstructions before fillet flap, complications, and English language. Results: Most of our patients were male 75% (n = 3) with an average age of 47.5 years, had been paralyzed for an average of 16 years, and had few medical comorbidities. Two patients (3 flaps) required hip disarticulation, 1 patient had a bilateral fillet flaps, and 3 patients had resection of tibia/fibula. After following patients for an average of 1.4 years (4 mo to 2 yr), complications were limited to 1 patient who had partial-thickness flap loss at the distal skin flap that healed by secondary intention and 1 patient who had ulcer recurrence because of noncompliance. Four articles met inclusion criteria for systematic review and 3 were excluded. Conclusions: The fillet of leg flap remains a useful and reliable method of reconstructing end-stage pressure ulcers. PMID:27622082

  2. Modified total thigh musculocutaneous flap: 'operation of last resort' for massive pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Paul Ting-Yuan; Adams, Brandon Michael; Chunilal, Ashwin

    2014-02-01

    Massive bilateral pressure ulcers of dependent areas may complicate spinal cord injuries. These may be life threatening to patients and challenging for reconstructive surgeons. In massive recurrent ulcers, local tissue is either inadequate or previously exhausted. The total thigh musculocutaneous flap is an operation of last resort; we present a new variation of this procedure and a case of life threatening pressure ulcers with underlying osteomyelitis. A paraplegic patient had recurrent, extensive, bilateral pressure areas with some preserved tissue bridges. The nature of the pressure areas and lack of local options in this patient required modification of previously described total thigh flaps. An extended total thigh flap was partially de-epithelialised to fill the extensive sacral defect and a tunnelled extension was fashioned to cover the contralateral trochanteric defect. The timing of surgery was determined by balancing pre-operative nutritional optimisation against life-threatening drug resistance of infective organisms. The total thigh flap can close massive bilateral pressure ulcers. Modifications are presented which preserve viable local tissue and demonstrate the versatility of this technique. It remains a 'last-resort' salvage procedure. PMID:23806262

  3. Acemannan hydrogel dressing versus saline dressing for pressure ulcers. A randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D R; Goode, P S; LaMaster, K; Tennyson, T

    1998-10-01

    Aloe vera has been used for centuries as a topical treatment for various conditions and as a cathartic. An amorphous hydrogel dressing derived from the aloe plant (Carrasyn Gel Wound Dressing, Carrington Laboratories, Inc., Irving, TX) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the management of Stages I through IV pressure ulcers. To evaluate effectiveness of this treatment, 30 patients were randomized to receive either daily topical application of the hydrogel study dressing (acemannan hydrogel wound dressing) or a moist saline gauze dressing. Complete healing of the study ulcer occurred in 19 of 30 subjects (63%) during the 10-week observation period. No difference was observed in complete healing between the experimental and the control groups (odds ratio 0.93, 95% CI 0.16, 5.2). This study indicates that the acemannan hydrogel dressing is as effective as, but is not superior to, a moist saline gauze wound dressing for the management of pressure ulcers. PMID:10326343

  4. 77 FR 72865 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for “Mobilizing Data for Pressure Ulcer Prevention...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... ( http://wiki.hl7.org/images/e/eb/PressureUlcerPrevention_DomainAnalysisModel_Oct2011pdf.zip ) ] The... Analysis Model (DAM) Application of the LOINC Nursing Subcommittee and the International Health Terminology.... Additional Information Since the Health Level 7 (HL7) Pressure Ulcer Prevention Domain Analysis Model...

  5. Effects of the magnitude of pressure on the severity of injury and capillary closure in rat experimental pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Kawamata, Seiichi; Kurose, Tomoyuki; Kubori, Yohei; Muramoto, Hiroaki; Honkawa, Yuta

    2015-03-01

    Experimental pressure ulcers were successfully produced in the rat abdominal wall at 100 mmHg in our previous study. We hypothesized that injury is less severe when pressures are lower than 100 mmHg and explored a critical pressure in the production of pressure ulcers. At 70 and 60 mmHg, repeated compressions for 4 h daily for 5 consecutive days resulted in partial skin necrosis and eschar formation in the majority of rats, whereas skin injuries were absent or very mild in most of the rats at 50 mmHg. The extent of ischemia was also examined by visualization of capillary blood flow using intravascular infusion of Lycopersicon esculentum lectin. Rat abdominal walls were compressed in the range from 0 (control) to 100 mmHg. The percentages of open capillaries were 62.8 ± 10.1% at 0 mmHg and 34.7 ± 18.5% at 10 mmHg. The ratio of open capillaries was further decreased with increasing pressure, but not pressure dependently. In conclusion, the severity of injury at 50 mmHg was drastically milder than that at 60 mmHg or higher, whereas the extent of ischemia (capillary closure) was not significantly different. The pressure is vitally important; however, other factor(s) besides ischemia is likely to promote the development of pressure ulcers. PMID:24676460

  6. Sustaining pressure ulcer best practices in a high-volume cardiac care environment.

    PubMed

    Paul, Rohini; McCutcheon, Stacey Paris; Tregarthen, Jenna Penelope; Denend, Lyn Thayer; Zenios, Stefanos A

    2014-08-01

    \\Narayana Hrudayalaya Cardiac Hospital (NHCH) in Bangalore, India (now known as the Narayana Institute of Cardiac Sciences), is one of the world's largest and busiest cardiac hospitals. In early 2009, NHCH experienced a sharp increase in the number of surgical procedures performed and a corresponding rise in hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. The hospital sought to reduce pressure ulcer prevalence by implementing a portfolio of quality improvement strategies. Baseline data showed that, over the five-month observation period, an average of 6% of all adult and pediatric surgical patients experienced a pressure ulcer while recovering in the NHCH intensive therapy unit (ITU). Phase 1 implementation efforts, which began in January 2010, focused on four areas: raising awareness, increasing education, improving documentation and communication, and implementing various preventive practices. Phase 2 implementation efforts, which began the following month, focused on changing operating room practices. The primary outcome measure was the weekly percentage of ITU patients with pressure ulcers. By July 2010, that percentage was reduced to zero; as of April 1, 2014, the hospital has maintained this result. Elements that contributed significantly to the program's success and sustainability include strong leadership, nurse and physician involvement, an emphasis on personal responsibility, improved documentation and communication, ongoing training and support, and a portfolio of low-tech changes to core workflows and behaviors. Many of these elements are applicable to U.S. acute care environments. PMID:25036664

  7. Assessment of Knowledge and Level of Satisfaction of Nursing Undergraduates in a Pressure Ulcer Online Course

    PubMed Central

    Aroldi, Juscilynne B. C.; Peres, Heloisa H. H.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the effectiveness of two different educational modalities in an online course on pressure ulcers by comparing the degree of knowledge and level of satisfaction of nursing undergraduate students. The result will ground the adoption of Information and Communication Technologies in the teaching process in nursing. PMID:24199036

  8. Concordance of Shape Risk Scale, a new pressure ulcer risk tool, with Braden Scale.

    PubMed

    Soppi, Esa T; Iivanainen, Ansa K; Korhonen, Pasi A

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of pressure ulcers was examined in a cross-sectional study in 23 health care facilities and in home care involving 548 patients. The screening of pressure ulcer risk was assessed simultaneously using the Braden Scale and the new Shape Risk Scale (SRS), and the results were compared. The overall prevalence of pressure ulcers in the study population was 15·5% (85/548). The Braden Scale was performed as described in the literature. The direct concordance of the Braden and SRS scales was 46%. In more than 90% of cases, the SRS classified patients as well as or better than the Braden Scale. The SRS allocates patients significantly different from the Braden Scale into the risk categories, especially the difference is significant between the low and medium-risk categories. The greatest advantage of SRS to Braden Scale is that it correctly identifies patients with low risk of pressure ulcers. It is interesting that the two risk scores, taking into consideration the basically different pathophysiological factors, can still give rather similar results. The users considered that both scales are easy to use. PMID:24751183

  9. Hospital-acquired pressure ulcer prevention: a burn surgeon's team approach.

    PubMed

    Maguiña, Pirko; Kirkland-Walsh, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) are a problem that has been under increased scrutiny in recent years. To help reduce the incidence of HAPUs and to improve their management, a burn unit-centered wound care team was established. The team decided to pursue two goals: to identify opportunities for improvement that may help prevent HAPUs and to evaluate all available support surfaces to identify those that might best help with pressure redistribution. To identify opportunities for improvement, the team studied each new case of HAPUs throughout our hospital with a forensic chart review for a 3-year period. To identify the best support surfaces to help reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers, we evaluated all support surfaces available at our institution by pressure mapping in healthy volunteers. From 3 years of collecting and reporting data for quality improvement, we identified 23 patients with HAPUs and obtained more than 800 data sets from pressure mapping in healthy volunteers. Most (23/24; 96%) patients with HAPUs identified in this series had undergone a surgical procedure. The results of the quality improvement studies are presented. We conclude that prevention planning of HAPUs needs to be improved in patients undergoing surgery, in particular. No single support surface can prevent pressure ulcers, but use of overlays may help reduce peak pressures over bony prominences. PMID:25144812

  10. Automatic limb identification and sleeping parameters assessment for pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Baran Pouyan, Maziyar; Birjandtalab, Javad; Nourani, Mehrdad; Matthew Pompeo, M D

    2016-08-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are common among vulnerable patients such as elderly, bedridden and diabetic. PUs are very painful for patients and costly for hospitals and nursing homes. Assessment of sleeping parameters on at-risk limbs is critical for ulcer prevention. An effective assessment depends on automatic identification and tracking of at-risk limbs. An accurate limb identification can be used to analyze the pressure distribution and assess risk for each limb. In this paper, we propose a graph-based clustering approach to extract the body limbs from the pressure data collected by a commercial pressure map system. A robust signature-based technique is employed to automatically label each limb. Finally, an assessment technique is applied to evaluate the experienced stress by each limb over time. The experimental results indicate high performance and more than 94% average accuracy of the proposed approach. PMID:27268736

  11. Developing a pressure ulcer risk factor minimum data set and risk assessment framework

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Susanne; Nelson, E Andrea; Keen, Justin; Wilson, Lyn; McGinnis, Elizabeth; Dealey, Carol; Stubbs, Nikki; Muir, Delia; Farrin, Amanda; Dowding, Dawn; Schols, Jos MGA; Cuddigan, Janet; Berlowitz, Dan; Jude, Edward; Vowden, Peter; Bader, Dan L; Gefen, Amit; Oomens, Cees WJ; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Nixon, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Aim To agree a draft pressure ulcer risk factor Minimum Data Set to underpin the development of a new evidenced-based Risk Assessment Framework. Background A recent systematic review identified the need for a pressure ulcer risk factor Minimum Data Set and development and validation of an evidenced-based pressure ulcer Risk Assessment Framework. This was undertaken through the Pressure UlceR Programme Of reSEarch (RP-PG-0407-10056), funded by the National Institute for Health Research and incorporates five phases. This article reports phase two, a consensus study. Design Consensus study. Method A modified nominal group technique based on the Research and Development/University of California at Los Angeles appropriateness method. This incorporated an expert group, review of the evidence and the views of a Patient and Public Involvement service user group. Data were collected December 2010–December 2011. Findings The risk factors and assessment items of the Minimum Data Set (including immobility, pressure ulcer and skin status, perfusion, diabetes, skin moisture, sensory perception and nutrition) were agreed. In addition, a draft Risk Assessment Framework incorporating all Minimum Data Set items was developed, comprising a two stage assessment process (screening and detailed full assessment) and decision pathways. Conclusion The draft Risk Assessment Framework will undergo further design and pre-testing with clinical nurses to assess and improve its usability. It will then be evaluated in clinical practice to assess its validity and reliability. The Minimum Data Set could be used in future for large scale risk factor studies informing refinement of the Risk Assessment Framework. PMID:24845398

  12. A retrospective study using the pressure ulcer scale for healing (PUSH) tool to examine factors affecting stage II pressure ulcer healing in a Korean acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Hee

    2014-09-01

    Stage II pressure ulcers (PUs) should be managed promptly and appropriately in order to prevent complications. To identify the factors affecting Stage II PU healing and optimize care, the electronic medical records of patients with a Stage II PU in an acute care hospital were examined. Patient and ulcer characteristics as well as nutritional assessment variables were retrieved, and ulcer variables were used to calculate Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) scores. The effect of all variables on healing status (healed versus nonhealed) and change in PUSH score for healing rate were compared. Records of 309 Stage II PUs from 155 patients (mean age 61.2 ± 15.2 [range 5-89] years, 182 [58.9%] male) were retrieved and analyzed. Of those, 221 healed and 88 were documented as not healed at the end of the study. The variables that were significantly different between patients with PUs that did and did not heal were: major diagnosis (P = 0.001), peripheral arterial disease (P = 0.007), smoking (P = 0.048), serum albumin ( <2.5 g/dL) (P = 0.002), antidepressant use (P = 0.035), vitamin use (P = 0.006), history of surgery (P <0.001), PU size (P = 0.003), Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) score (P = 0.020), Braden scale score (P = 0.003), and mean arterial pressure (MAP, mm Hg) (P = 0.026). The Cox proportional hazard model showed a significant positive difference in PUSH score change -indicative of healing - when pressure-redistribution surfaces were used (P <0.001, HR = 2.317), PU size was small (≤3.0 cm2, P = 0.006, HR = 1.670), MAP (within a range of 52-112 mm Hg) was higher P = 0.010, HR = 1.016), and patients were provided multivitamins (P = 0.037, HR=1.431). The results of this study suggest strategies for healing Stage II PUs in the acute care setting should include early recognition of lower-stage PUs, the provision of static pressure-redistribution surfaces and multivitamins, and maintaining higher MAP may facilitate healing and prevent deterioration

  13. Strategies to support prevention, identification and management of pressure ulcers in the community.

    PubMed

    Payne, Drew

    2016-06-01

    Pressure ulcers are classified as serious incidents, cause pain and distress, and are a source of infection. Unlike patients in hospital, those in the community spend only a small amount of time with healthcare practitioners, so strategies are required to ensure they remain protected against pressure damage when community nurses are not with them. A risk assessment should be carried out to outline a patient's risks and used to develop a strategy for that person. Patients have different risks so prevention strategies need to be tailored individually. Strategies, which cover issues such as pressure-relieving equipment, mattress type, mobility aids and nutrition, should be monitored to ensure they continue to meet patients' needs, as their health, carers and other matters may change. Patients and their carers may need education on ulcers, including on myths, as it is essential they are involved. PMID:27297572

  14. Assessing Predictive Validity of Pressure Ulcer Risk Scales- A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    PARK, Seong-Hi; LEE, Hea Shoon

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to present a scientific reason for pressure ulcer risk scales: Cubbin& Jackson modified Braden, Norton, and Waterlow, as a nursing diagnosis tool by utilizing predictive validity of pressure sores. Methods: Articles published between 1966 and 2013 from periodicals indexed in the Ovid Medline, Embase, CINAHL, KoreaMed, NDSL, and other databases were selected using the key word “pressure ulcer”. QUADAS-II was applied for assessment for internal validity of the diagnostic studies. Selected studies were analyzed using meta-analysis with MetaDisc 1.4. Results: Seventeen diagnostic studies with high methodological quality, involving 5,185 patients, were included. In the results of the meta-analysis, sROC AUC of Braden, Norton, and Waterflow scale was over 0.7, showing moderate predictive validity, but they have limited interpretation due to significant differences between studies. In addition, Waterlow scale is insufficient as a screening tool owing to low sensitivity compared with other scales. Conclusion: The contemporary pressure ulcer risk scale is not suitable for uninform practice on patients under standardized criteria. Therefore, in order to provide more effective nursing care for bedsores, a new or modified pressure ulcer risk scale should be developed upon strength and weaknesses of existing tools. PMID:27114977

  15. Use of negative pressure wound therapy as an adjunct to the treatment of extremity soft-tissue sarcoma with ulceration or impending ulceration

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, YU; XU, SONG-FENG; XU, MING; YU, XIU-CHUN

    2016-01-01

    Major wound complications of the extremities, following wide tumor resection and reconstruction for soft-tissue sarcomas (STSs), remain a challenge for limb-sparing surgery. Furthermore, STSs with ulceration or impending ulceration predispose patients to an increased risk of post-operative infection. The present study was conducted to assess the efficacy of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in preventing wound complications associated with surgical treatment of STSs with ulceration or impending ulceration, in patients treated between February 2012 and January 2013. A total of 5 patients, with a mean age of 48 years (range, 24–68 years), were enrolled in the present study. The diagnoses consisted of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (n=2), leiomyosarcoma (n=1), synovial sarcoma (n=1) and epithelioid sarcoma (n=1). According to American Joint Committee on Cancer criteria, 3 cases were stage III tumors, and the remaining 2 cases were of stages IIA and IIB, respectively. A total of 3 patients exhibited ulceration at diagnosis, and the remaining patients demonstrated impending ulceration. The mean wound area following wide resection of the tumor was 73 cm2 (range, 45–110 cm2). A continuous suction mode, with pressures measuring −200 to −300 mmHg, was used for 7–10 days on the soft-tissue defects as preparation for wound closure. Soft-tissue reconstruction included muscle flaps (n=2) and skin grafts (n=5). No major wound complications occurred. Post-operative functional and cosmetic outcomes were acceptable. A single patient demonstrated local recurrence 12 months after surgery and re-excision of the tumor was performed. All patients remained alive at the conclusion of follow-up, with a mean follow-up time of 26 months (range, 12–36 months). The present study demonstrated that NPWT is effective and safe when used as an adjunct to wound closure following resection of extremity STS with ulceration/impending ulceration. PMID:27347212

  16. A pilot randomised controlled trial of negative pressure wound therapy to treat grade III/IV pressure ulcers [ISRCTN69032034

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is widely promoted as a treatment for full thickness wounds; however, there is a lack of high-quality research evidence regarding its clinical and cost effectiveness. A trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III/IV pressure ulcers would be worthwhile but premature without assessing whether such a trial is feasible. The aim of this pilot randomised controlled trial was to assess the feasibility of conducting a future full trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III and IV pressure ulcers and to pilot all aspects of the trial. Methods This was a two-centre (acute and community), pilot randomised controlled trial. Eligible participants were randomised to receive either NPWT or standard care (SC) (spun hydrocolloid, alginate or foam dressings). Outcome measures were time to healing of the reference pressure ulcer, recruitment rates, frequency of treatment visits, resources used and duration of follow-up. Results Three hundred and twelve patients were screened for eligibility into this trial over a 12-month recruitment period and 12/312 participants (3.8%) were randomised: 6 to NPWT and 6 to SC. Only one reference pressure ulcer healed (NPWT group) during follow-up (time to healing 79 days). The mean number of treatment visits per week was 3.1 (NPWT) and 5.7 (SC); 6/6 NPWT and 1/6 SC participants withdrew from their allocated trial treatment. The mean duration of follow-up was 3.8 (NPWT) and 5.0 (SC) months. Conclusions This pilot trial yielded vital information for the planning of a future full study including projected recruitment rate, required duration of follow-up and extent of research nurse support required. Data were also used to inform the cost-effectiveness and value of information analyses, which were conducted alongside the pilot trial. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN69032034. PMID:22839453

  17. Pulsatile lavage for pressure ulcer management in spinal cord injury: a retrospective clinical safety review.

    PubMed

    Bogie, Kath M; Ho, Chester H

    2013-03-01

    Pressure ulcers are major complications of reduced mobility and/or sensation. Pulsatile lavage therapy delivers localized hydrotherapy directly to the wound utilizing a pulsatile pressurized stream of normal saline. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical safety of pulsatile lavage therapy, provided daily at the bedside, in routine management of Stage III and Stage IV pressure ulcers. Charts from 28 male patients with Stage III and Stage IV pressure ulcers and spinal cord injury (SCI) or spinal cord disorders (SCD) were retrospectively reviewed for documentation of adverse events/safety concerns. Mean therapy duration was 46 days (SD 37 days, range 6-152 days). Treatment was interrupted for 6 days in one patient due to minor wound bleeding. No other adverse events, including backsplash injuries, were documented. The results of this chart review suggest pulsatile lavage therapy can be administered at the patient's bedside without adverse events if appropriate protocols are followed. Additional research to confirm the efficacy and effectiveness of this treatment modality in a broader subject population is warranted. PMID:23475450

  18. Karomed armchairs and cushions in the prevention of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Collins, F

    The clinician providing seating for patients who are unwell, who have poor functional ability or who are at risk of pressure sores, is faced with an increasing choice of products. Making the decision as to which product and associated features to choose can be a difficult task. This article describes the importance of suitable seating provision in patients who are at risk and outlines the Karomed range of armchairs. PMID:11051887

  19. Pressure ulcers in an age of managed care: a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Baharestani, M

    1999-05-01

    Successful competition for acquisition of capitated groups and maintenance of existing managed care contracts require demonstrations of cost controls, positive clinical outcomes, and customer satisfaction. In preparation for, and in response to managed care, healthcare providers must assure equality in their supply and demand equation if they are to survive and prosper. Iatrogenic pressure ulcers represent a major healthcare problem illustrative of this point. Successful pressure ulcer prevention and treatment programs in all practice settings demand: 1) administrative support, 2) access to staffing and supplies, 3) multidisciplinary ownership, 4) integration of science-based knowledge of risk factors, risk assessment tools, pathophysiology, and appropriate management into clinical practice, and 5) dissemination of knowledge. PMID:10647472

  20. Comprehensive management of pressure ulcers in spinal cord injury: Current concepts and future trends

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Erwin A.; Pires, Marilyn; Ngann, Yvette; Sterling, Michelle; Rubayi, Salah

    2013-01-01

    Pressure ulcers in spinal cord injury represent a challenging problem for patients, their caregivers, and their physicians. They often lead to recurrent hospitalizations, multiple surgeries, and potentially devastating complications. They present a significant cost to the healthcare system, they require a multidisciplinary team approach to manage well, and outcomes directly depend on patients' education, prevention, and compliance with conservative and surgical protocols. With so many factors involved in the successful treatment of pressure ulcers, an update on their comprehensive management in spinal cord injury is warranted. Current concepts of local wound care, surgical options, as well as future trends from the latest wound healing research are reviewed to aid medical professionals in treating patients with this difficult problem. PMID:24090179

  1. Comprehensive management of pressure ulcers in spinal cord injury: current concepts and future trends.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Erwin A; Pires, Marilyn; Ngann, Yvette; Sterling, Michelle; Rubayi, Salah

    2013-11-01

    Pressure ulcers in spinal cord injury represent a challenging problem for patients, their caregivers, and their physicians. They often lead to recurrent hospitalizations, multiple surgeries, and potentially devastating complications. They present a significant cost to the healthcare system, they require a multidisciplinary team approach to manage well, and outcomes directly depend on patients' education, prevention, and compliance with conservative and surgical protocols. With so many factors involved in the successful treatment of pressure ulcers, an update on their comprehensive management in spinal cord injury is warranted. Current concepts of local wound care, surgical options, as well as future trends from the latest wound healing research are reviewed to aid medical professionals in treating patients with this difficult problem. PMID:24090179

  2. Manualization of Occupational Therapy Interventions: Illustrations from the Pressure Ulcer Prevention Research Program

    PubMed Central

    Blanche, Erna Imperatore; Fogelberg, Donald; Diaz, Jesus; Carlson, Mike; Clark, Florence

    2011-01-01

    The manualization of a complex occupational therapy intervention is a crucial step in ensuring treatment fidelity for both clinical application and research purposes. Towards this latter end, intervention manuals are essential for assuring trustworthiness and replicability of randomized controlled trials (RCT’s) that aim to provide evidence of the effectiveness of occupational therapy. In this paper, literature on the process of intervention manualization is reviewed. The prescribed steps are then illustrated through our experience in implementing the University of Southern California/Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center’s collaborative Pressure Ulcer Prevention Project (PUPP). In this research program, qualitative research provided the initial foundation for manualization of a multifaceted occupational therapy intervention designed to reduce incidence of medically serious pressure ulcers in people with SCI. PMID:22214116

  3. The wound/burn guidelines - 2: Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment for pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Takao; Imafuku, Shinichi; Irisawa, Ryokichi; Ohtsuka, Masaki; Kadono, Takafumi; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Asano, Yoshihide; Abe, Masatoshi; Ishii, Takayuki; Isei, Taiki; Ito, Takaaki; Inoue, Yuji; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Ogawa, Fumihide; Kodera, Masanari; Kawakami, Tamihiro; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Kukino, Ryuichi; Kono, Takeshi; Sakai, Keisuke; Takahara, Masakazu; Tanioka, Miki; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Hashimoto, Akira; Hasegawa, Minoru; Hayashi, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Manabu; Maekawa, Takeo; Matsuo, Koma; Madokoro, Naoki; Yamasaki, Osamu; Yoshino, Yuichiro; Le Pavoux, Andres; Ihn, Hironobu

    2016-05-01

    The Wound/Burn Guidelines Committee consists of members commissioned by the Board of Directors of the Japanese Dermatological Association (JDA). It held several meetings and evaluations in writing since October 2008, and drafted five guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment including commentaries on wounds in general and the Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment for Pressure Ulcers by taking opinions of the Scientific Committee and Board of Directors of JDA into consideration. PMID:26972598

  4. Detecting early stage pressure ulcer on dark skin using multispectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Dingrong; Kong, Linghua; Sprigle, Stephen; Wang, Fengtao; Wang, Chao; Liu, Fuhan; Adibi, Ali; Tummala, Rao

    2010-02-01

    We are developing a handheld multispectral imaging device to non-invasively inspect stage I pressure ulcers in dark pigmented skins without the need of touching the patient's skin. This paper reports some preliminary test results of using a proof-of-concept prototype. It also talks about the innovation's impact to traditional multispectral imaging technologies and the fields that will potentially benefit from it.

  5. Nursing and Respiratory Collaboration Prevents BiPAP-Related Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Acorda, Darlene E

    2015-01-01

    In early 2012, an increase in the incidence of BiPAP-related pressure ulcers was noted in the progressive care unit of a large pediatric facility. An interdisciplinary team of nursing and respiratory staff and leadership formed a collaborative to address the gaps in practice, recommend, and implement evidence-based interventions using a quality improvement model. Interventions included piloting new masks, changing the skin barrier from a hydrocolloid dressing to a foam dressing and using a template for better fit, including skin assessments every 4 hours as part of nursing and respiratory therapists' workflow, and implementing a notification process that included Wound Ostomy Continence Nurses, respiratory, and nursing leadership for any redness of skin noted. Weekly rounding and communication by nursing and respiratory leadership ensured consistency and sustainability of practice. Aside from implementation of interventions, the primary focus was to develop a collaborative relationship between nursing and respiratory teams for shared ownership and accountability of patients on BiPAP support. Three months after the implementation of interventions, the occurrence of BiPAP-related pressure ulcers decreased from eleven in the first three quarters to one occurrence in the fourth quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2012. In 2013, the occurrence decreased to five for the entire fiscal year. Since the end of FY 2013, there has only been one occurrence of a BiPAP-related pressure ulcer in the progressive care unit. Close collaboration between respiratory and nursing has been the primary factor in decreasing BiPAP-related pressure ulcers. An important lesson learned is that interdisciplinary collaboration leads to improved patient outcomes. PMID:25921961

  6. Health Behavior Theory for Pressure Ulcer Prevention: Root-Cause Analysis Project in Critical Care Nursing.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kristen R; Ragnoni, Jennifer A; Bickmann, Jonathan D; Saarinen, Hannah A; Gosselin, Ann K

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to use a behavioral theory to examine pressure ulcer prevention by nurses in a critical care setting. A root-cause analysis approach was used, including an integrative literature review, operationalization of behavioral constructs into a survey, and root-cause analysis application in a cardiovascular intensive care unit. This article highlights an innovative approach to quality improvement in critical care. PMID:26111143

  7. Pressure ulcer prevention and treatment: transforming research findings into consensus based clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Matthew; Pearson, Alan; Ward, Cathy

    2003-04-01

    The translation of research findings into practice guidelines is an important aspect in maintaining the currency of practice and adding value to research. While there has been a large amount of published literature regarding the treatment and prevention of pressure ulcers, very few studies have attempted to provide clear clinical guidelines. The present study proposes a model to transform research into clinical guidelines whilst developing a series of guidelines that can be applied to a variety of clinical settings. PMID:12694478

  8. A prospective evaluation of a pressure ulcer prevention and management E-Learning Program for adults with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Brace, Jacalyn A; Schubart, Jane R

    2010-08-01

    Pressure ulcers are a common complication of spinal cord injury (SCI). Pressure ulcer education programs for spinal cord injured individuals have been found to have a positive effect on care protocol adherence. A prospective study was conducted among hospitalized spinal cord-injured men and women to determine if viewing the Pressure Ulcer Prevention and Management Education for Adults with Spinal Cord Injury: E-Learning Program affects their knowledge scores. A 20-question multiple-choice pre-/post learning test was developed and validated by 12 rehabilitation nurses. Twenty (20) patients (13 men, seven women; mean age 49 years, [SD: 18.26] with injuries to the cervical [seven], thoracic [six], and lumbar [six] regions) volunteered. Most (42%) had completed high school and time since SCI ranged from 2 weeks to 27 years. Eighteen (18) participants completed both the pre- and post test. Of those, 16 showed improvement in pressure ulcer knowledge scores. The median scores improved from 65 (range 25 to 100) pre-program to 92.5 (range 75 to 100) post-program. Descriptive statistics, Student's t-test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to analyze the data. The results suggest that a single viewing of this e-learning program could improve pressure ulcer knowledge of hospitalized adults with SCI. Research to ascertain the effects of this and other educational programs on pressure ulcer rates is needed. PMID:20729562

  9. Bacteriology of pressure ulcers in individuals with spinal cord injury: What we know and what we should know

    PubMed Central

    Dana, Ali N.; Bauman, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) are at increased risk for the development of pressure ulcers. These chronic wounds are debilitating and contribute to prolonged hospitalization and worse medical outcome. However, the species of bacteria and the role that specific species may play in delaying the healing of chronic pressure ulcers in the SCI population has not been well characterized. This study will review the literature regarding what is known currently about the bacteriology of pressure ulcers in individuals with SCI. An electronic literature search of MEDLINE (1966 to February 2014) was performed. Eleven studies detailing bacterial cultures of pressure ulcers in the SCI population met inclusion criteria and were selected for review. Among these studies, bacterial cultures were often polymicrobial with both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria identified with culture techniques that varied significantly. The most common organisms identified in pressure ulcers were Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterococcus faecalis. In general, wounds were poorly characterized with minimal to no physical description and/or location provided. Our present understanding of factors that may alter the microbiome of pressure ulcers in individuals with SCI is quite rudimentary, at best. Well-designed studies are needed to assess appropriate wound culture technique, the impact of bacterial composition on wound healing, development of infection, and the optimum medical and surgical approaches to wound care. PMID:25130374

  10. Oral treatment of pressure ulcers with polaprezinc (zinc L-carnosine complex): 8-week open-label trial.

    PubMed

    Sakae, Kensaku; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-01

    Polaprezinc (zinc L-carnosine complex) is a tablet commonly prescribed for gastric ulcers in Japan. Recently, we reported the effects of polaprezinc on pressure ulcer healing at 4-week follow-up. We aimed to further evaluate the efficacy and safety of polaprezinc in 8-week treatment for chronic pressure ulcers. Patients with stage II-IV pressure ulcers for ≥ 8 weeks received 150 mg/day polaprezinc (containing 116 mg L-carnosine and 34 mg zinc) per os for a maximum of 8 weeks. We measured the severity of pressure ulcers weekly using the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) score and monitored blood biochemistry. Fourteen patients (nine men; 68.4 ± 11.8 years) were enrolled. Pressure ulcer stages were II (one patient; 7 %), III (nine; 64 %), and IV (four; 29 %). The PUSH score improved significantly from 8.1 [95 % CI, 6.0-10.3] at baseline to -1.4 [-4.0 to 1.1] after 8 weeks (P < 0.001). Differences from baseline were significant after 1 week (P < 0.05). The mean weekly improvement in PUSH score was 2.0. Eleven patients healed within 8 weeks and none dropped out. Serum zinc levels increased significantly (P < 0.001), whereas serum copper levels (P = 0.001) and copper/zinc ratios (P < 0.001) decreased significantly. In one patient, preexisting copper deficiency deteriorated. These preliminary data suggest that polaprezinc may be effective and well-tolerated in 8-week treatment of pressure ulcers and could be a candidate for their oral treatment. PMID:24691900

  11. A Computational, Tissue-Realistic Model of Pressure Ulcer Formation in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Solovyev, Alexey; Allegretti, Ana; Krishnan, Shilpa; Henzel, M. Kristi; Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Brienza, David; An, Gary; Mi, Qi; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    People with spinal cord injury (SCI) are predisposed to pressure ulcers (PU). PU remain a significant burden in cost of care and quality of life despite improved mechanistic understanding and advanced interventions. An agent-based model (ABM) of ischemia/reperfusion-induced inflammation and PU (the PUABM) was created, calibrated to serial images of post-SCI PU, and used to investigate potential treatments in silico. Tissue-level features of the PUABM recapitulated visual patterns of ulcer formation in individuals with SCI. These morphological features, along with simulated cell counts and mediator concentrations, suggested that the influence of inflammatory dynamics caused simulations to be committed to “better” vs. “worse” outcomes by 4 days of simulated time and prior to ulcer formation. Sensitivity analysis of model parameters suggested that increasing oxygen availability would reduce PU incidence. Using the PUABM, in silico trials of anti-inflammatory treatments such as corticosteroids and a neutralizing antibody targeted at Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern molecules (DAMPs) suggested that, at best, early application at a sufficiently high dose could attenuate local inflammation and reduce pressure-associated tissue damage, but could not reduce PU incidence. The PUABM thus shows promise as an adjunct for mechanistic understanding, diagnosis, and design of therapies in the setting of PU. PMID:26111346

  12. A Computational, Tissue-Realistic Model of Pressure Ulcer Formation in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Solovyev, Alexey; Allegretti, Ana; Krishnan, Shilpa; Henzel, M Kristi; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Brienza, David; An, Gary; Mi, Qi; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2015-06-01

    People with spinal cord injury (SCI) are predisposed to pressure ulcers (PU). PU remain a significant burden in cost of care and quality of life despite improved mechanistic understanding and advanced interventions. An agent-based model (ABM) of ischemia/reperfusion-induced inflammation and PU (the PUABM) was created, calibrated to serial images of post-SCI PU, and used to investigate potential treatments in silico. Tissue-level features of the PUABM recapitulated visual patterns of ulcer formation in individuals with SCI. These morphological features, along with simulated cell counts and mediator concentrations, suggested that the influence of inflammatory dynamics caused simulations to be committed to "better" vs. "worse" outcomes by 4 days of simulated time and prior to ulcer formation. Sensitivity analysis of model parameters suggested that increasing oxygen availability would reduce PU incidence. Using the PUABM, in silico trials of anti-inflammatory treatments such as corticosteroids and a neutralizing antibody targeted at Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern molecules (DAMPs) suggested that, at best, early application at a sufficiently high dose could attenuate local inflammation and reduce pressure-associated tissue damage, but could not reduce PU incidence. The PUABM thus shows promise as an adjunct for mechanistic understanding, diagnosis, and design of therapies in the setting of PU. PMID:26111346

  13. Elevated plantar pressure and ulceration in diabetic patients after panmetatarsal head resection: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, P R; Ulbrecht, J S; Caputo, G M

    1999-08-01

    Panmetatarsal head resection (variously called forefoot arthroplasty, forefoot resection arthroplasty, the Hoffman procedure, and the Fowler procedure) was developed for the relief of pain and deformity in rheumatoid arthritis. Although there are successful retrospective series reported in the literature, such an approach is not supported by carefully designed controlled trials. This procedure has also been advocated by some for the relief of plantar pressure in diabetic patients who are at risk for plantar ulceration. The efficacy of the procedure in this context is not supported by existing pressure measurements on rheumatoid arthritis patients in the literature, which has tended to show that although pain relief is obtained, the procedure results in elevation of forefoot pressure. Case reports are described of two patients (three feet) with sensory neuropathy who presented to our clinic 1 to 2 years after panmetatarsal head resections had been performed. Peak plantar pressures in these feet during first step gait were above the 99th percentile and outside the measuring range of the device used (EMED SF platform; NOVEL Electronics Inc., St. Paul, MN). Both patients had also experienced plantar ulcers subsequent to the surgery. Combining the information on patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with that from our two case studies, we conclude that panmetatarsal head resection does not necessarily eliminate focal regions of elevated plantar pressure. PMID:10473064

  14. Evaluation of the pressure ulcers risk scales with critically ill patients: a prospective cohort study 1

    PubMed Central

    Borghardt, Andressa Tomazini; do Prado, Thiago Nascimento; de Araújo, Thiago Moura; Rogenski, Noemi Marisa Brunet; Bringuente, Maria Edla de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: to evaluate the accuracy of the Braden and Waterlow risk assessment scales in critically ill inpatients. METHOD: this prospective cohort study, with 55 patients in intensive care units, was performed through evaluation of sociodemographic and clinical variables, through the application of the scales (Braden and Waterlow) upon admission and every 48 hours; and through the evaluation and classification of the ulcers into categories. RESULTS: the pressure ulcer incidence was 30.9%, with the Braden and Waterlow scales presenting high sensitivity (41% and 71%) and low specificity (21% and 47%) respectively in the three evaluations. The cut off scores found in the first, second and third evaluations were 12, 12 and 11 in the Braden scale, and 16, 15 and 14 in the Waterlow scale. CONCLUSION: the Braden scale was shown to be a good screening instrument, and the Waterlow scale proved to have better predictive power. PMID:25806628

  15. A pilot study to evaluate the role of the Spinal Cord Impairment Pressure Ulcer Monitoring Tool (SCI-PUMT) in clinical decisions for pressure ulcer treatment.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Susan S; Graves, Barbara Ann; Madaris, Linda

    2014-12-01

    The Spinal Cord Impairment Pressure Ulcer Monitoring Tool (SCI-PUMT) was designed to assess pressure ulcer (PrU) healing in the spinal cord impaired (SCI) population. The tool contains 7 variables: wound surface area, depth, edges, tunneling, undermining, exudate type, and necrotic tissue amount. A 2-phased, quantitative pilot study based on the Theory of Reasoned Action and Theory of Planned Behavior was conducted at a large SCI/Disorders Center in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). In the first phase of the study, a convenience sample of 5 physicians, 3 advanced practice registered nurses, and 3 certified wound care nurses (CWCN) was surveyed using a 2-part questionnaire to assess use of the SCI-PUMT instrument, its anticipated improvement in PrU assessment, and intent to use the SCI-PUMT in clinical practice. Attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral controls, and barriers related to the intent to use the SCI-PUMT were evaluated using a 5-point Likert scale (range: 1= extremely likely, 5 = extremely unlikely). In the second phase of the study, the electronic health records (EHR) of 24 veterans (with 30 PrUs) who had at least 2 completed SCI-PUMT scores during a 4-week period were used to evaluate whether an association existed between magnitudes of change of total SCI-PUMT scores and ordered changes in PrU treatment. The overall mean score for intent to use SCI-PUMT was 1.80 (SD 0.75). The least favorable scores were for convenience and motivation to use the SCI-PUMT. Analysis of EHR data showed no significant difference in magnitudes of change in the SCI-PUMT score and changes in PrU treatment recommendations made by the CWCNs. The significance was not affected regardless of an increase or no change in the score (χ2 with 1 degree of freedom = 1.158, P = 0.282) or for a decrease in the score (χ2 with 1 degree of freedom = 0.5, P = 0.478). In this pilot study, the expressed intent to use the SCI-PUMT in making clinical decisions was generally

  16. Adipose Stromal Cells Repair Pressure Ulcers in Both Young and Elderly Mice: Potential Role of Adipogenesis in Skin Repair

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Amy L.; Bowles, Annie C.; MacCrimmon, Connor P.; Frazier, Trivia P.; Lee, Stephen J.; Wu, Xiying; Katz, Adam J.; Gawronska-Kozak, Barbara; Bunnell, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    More than 2.5 million patients in the U.S. require treatment for pressure ulcers annually, and the elderly are at particularly high risk for pressure ulcer development. Current therapy for pressure ulcers consists of conservative medical management for shallow lesions and aggressive debridement and surgery for deeper lesions. The current study uses a murine model to address the hypothesis that adipose-derived stromal/stem cell (ASC) treatment would accelerate and enhance pressure ulcer repair. The dorsal skin of both young (2 months old [mo]) and old (20 mo) C57BL/6J female mice was sandwiched between external magnets for 12 hours over 2 consecutive days to initiate a pressure ulcer. One day following the induction, mice were injected with ASCs isolated from congenic mice transgenic for the green fluorescent protein under a ubiquitous promoter. Relative to phosphate-buffered saline-treated controls, ASC-treated mice displayed a cell concentration-dependent acceleration of wound closure, improved epidermal/dermal architecture, increased adipogenesis, and reduced inflammatory cell infiltration. The ASC-induced improvements occurred in both young and elderly recipients, although the expression profile of angiogenic, immunomodulatory, and reparative mRNAs differed as a function of age. The results are consistent with clinical reports that fat grafting improved skin architecture in thermal injuries; the authors of this published study have invoked ASC-based mechanisms to account for their clinical outcomes. Thus, the current proof-of-principle study sets the stage for clinical translation of autologous and/or allogeneic ASC treatment of pressure ulcers. Significance Adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs) promote the healing of pressure ulcer wounds in both young and old mice. ASCs enhance wound healing rates through adipogenic differentiation and regeneration of the underlying architecture of the skin. PMID:25900728

  17. The Nursing Diagnosis of risk for pressure ulcer: content validation 1

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Cássia Teixeira; Almeida, Miriam de Abreu; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to validate the content of the new nursing diagnosis, termed risk for pressure ulcer. Method: the content validation with a sample made up of 24 nurses who were specialists in skin care from six different hospitals in the South and Southeast of Brazil. Data collection took place electronically, through an instrument constructed using the SurveyMonkey program, containing a title, definition, and 19 risk factors for the nursing diagnosis. The data were analyzed using Fehring's method and descriptive statistics. The project was approved by a Research Ethics Committee. Results: title, definition and seven risk factors were validated as "very important": physical immobilization, pressure, surface friction, shearing forces, skin moisture, alteration in sensation and malnutrition. Among the other risk factors, 11 were validated as "important": dehydration, obesity, anemia, decrease in serum albumin level, prematurity, aging, smoking, edema, impaired circulation, and decrease in oxygenation and in tissue perfusion. The risk factor of hyperthermia was discarded. Conclusion: the content validation of these components of the nursing diagnosis corroborated the importance of the same, being able to facilitate the nurse's clinical reasoning and guiding clinical practice in the preventive care for pressure ulcers. PMID:27305182

  18. An Evidence-Based Cue-Selection Guide and Logic Model to Improve Pressure Ulcer Prevention in Long-term Care.

    PubMed

    Yap, Tracey L; Kennerly, Susan M; Bergstrom, Nancy; Hudak, Sandra L; Horn, Susan D

    2016-01-01

    Pressure ulcers have consistently resisted prevention efforts in long-term care facilities nationwide. Recent research has described cueing innovations that-when selected according to the assumptions and resources of particular facilities-support best practices of pressure ulcer prevention. This article synthesizes that research into a unified, dynamic logic model to facilitate effective staff implementation of a pressure ulcer prevention program. PMID:26066791

  19. [Pressure Ulcer Caused by Long-term Keeping of the Same Body Position during Epidural Labour Analgesia].

    PubMed

    Naruse, Satoshi; Uchizaki, Sakiko; Mimura, Shinichiro; Taniguchi, Mizuki; Akinaga, Chieko; Sato, Shigehito

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a 34-year-old woman (height: 153 cm, weight : 62.4 kg, non-pregnant weight : 52 kg, uniparous) without underlying diseases who developed pressure ulcer due to keeping a similar body position during long-term epidural delivery. Induction of childbirth was started in gestational week 40, causing reduction of fetal heart rate, which improved after adoption of a right lateral recumbent position. Severe contractions occurred and epidural labour analgesia was started. The fetal heart rate decreased again and induction of childbirth was suspended, but the right lateral recumbent position was maintained. Epidural administration was continued due to persistent contractions. Next morning, induction of childbirth was restarted and birth occurred in approximately 6 hours. The right lateral recumbent position was maintained for approximately 20 hours. At childbirth, a pressure ulcer was present in the intertrochanteric part of the right femur. The causes included insufficient knowledge of medical staff about the risk of pressure ulcer during epidural delivery, and no position change. A decreased sensation and blocked motor nerve caused by epidural anesthesia might have accelerated pressure ulcer development. This case suggests that preventive measures against pressure ulcer are required in epidural anesthesia in pregnant women. PMID:27483666

  20. [Venous ulcer].

    PubMed

    Böhler, Kornelia

    2016-06-01

    Venous disorders causing a permanent increase in venous pressure are by far the most frequent reason for ulcers of the lower extremity. With a prevalence of 1 % in the general population rising to 4 % in the elderly over 80 and its chronic character, 1 % of healthcare budgets of the western world are spent on treatment of venous ulcers. A thorough investigation of the underlying venous disorder is the prerequisite for a differenciated therapy. This should comprise elimination of venous reflux as well as local wound management. Chronic ulcers can successfully be treated by shave therapy and split skin grafting. Compression therapy is a basic measure not only in venous ulcer treatment but also in prevention of ulcer recurrence. Differential diagnosis which have to be considered are arterial ulcers, vasculitis and neoplasms. PMID:27405863

  1. [Plastic surgery coverage of pressure ulcers of the trunk and pelvic region].

    PubMed

    Gaab, J; Boyce, M; Vogt, P M

    2014-11-01

    Decubitus ulcers develop due to pressure on tissue resulting in decreased perfusion of the affected region. Areas with bony prominences are mainly affected. At risk are immobile patients or patients with limited mobility as well as people with sensitivity disorders. Patients in advanced age are more endangered than younger ones regarding the development of pressure ulcers and this patient population usually presents with a combination of extrinsic and intrinsic risk factors; therefore, prevention and treatment of extensive tissue lesions are a particular multidisciplinary challenge with high socioeconomic significance in respect to the demographic change with an increasing proportion of elderly people. Surgical treatment is of special importance for extensive lesions and unstable scar tissue formation. In addition to invasive wound cleaning by lavage, debridement and bacterial decontamination, procedures with local and regional tissue transfer are given priority for permanent coverage of skin defects. Free tissue flap techniques are also established but are less commonly used. Nutrition, complication management and positioning of the patient are mandatory additional measures for improved outcome. PMID:25385140

  2. A Systematic Review of Therapeutic Interventions for Pressure Ulcers Following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Mary Ann; Teasell, Robert W; Wolfe, Dalton L; Keast, David; Mortenson, William B; Aubut, Jo-Anne

    2011-01-01

    Objective To systematically review evidence on the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers in those with a spinal cord injury. Data Sources For this evidence-based review, the following data sources were used: MEDLINE®/PubMed, CINAHL®, EMBASE® and PsycINFO® Study Selection To be selected for inclusion in the current review, there had to have been an intervention, studies had to have 3 or more subjects, and 50% or more of the participating group had to have a spinal cord injury. Data Extraction Data extracted included study design, subject demographics, inclusion and exclusion criteria, study type, sample size, outcome measures used, and study results. Data Synthesis Articles selected for this review were organized into one of two categories: prevention or treatment. Within each broad category, several smaller ones were created and articles were grouped together according to the prevention (direct or indirect) or treatment intervention discussed. Conclusions Of the 26 articles selected for inclusion in the systematic review, 7 were randomized control trials that dealt with treatment for pressure ulcers, and there was one RCT on prevention. Despite the cost effectiveness of prevention, little research exists on preventative interventions, and what does exist mostly is Level 4 evidence. More research is needed for both prevention and treatment, but especially the former. PMID:19236976

  3. Biochemical Association of Metabolic Profile and Microbiome in Chronic Pressure Ulcer Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Ammons, Mary Cloud B.; Morrissey, Kathryn; Tripet, Brian P.; Van Leuven, James T.; Han, Anne; Lazarus, Gerald S.; Zenilman, Jonathan M.; Stewart, Philip S.; James, Garth A.; Copié, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Chronic, non-healing wounds contribute significantly to the suffering of patients with co-morbidities in the clinical population with mild to severely compromised immune systems. Normal wound healing proceeds through a well-described process. However, in chronic wounds this process seems to become dysregulated at the transition between resolution of inflammation and re-epithelialization. Bioburden in the form of colonizing bacteria is a major contributor to the delayed headlining in chronic wounds such as pressure ulcers. However how the microbiome influences the wound metabolic landscape is unknown. Here, we have used a Systems Biology approach to determine the biochemical associations between the taxonomic and metabolomic profiles of wounds colonized by bacteria. Pressure ulcer biopsies were harvested from primary chronic wounds and bisected into top and bottom sections prior to analysis of microbiome by pyrosequencing and analysis of metabolome using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Bacterial taxonomy revealed that wounds were colonized predominantly by three main phyla, but differed significantly at the genus level. While taxonomic profiles demonstrated significant variability between wounds, metabolic profiles shared significant similarity based on the depth of the wound biopsy. Biochemical association between taxonomy and metabolic landscape indicated significant wound-to-wound similarity in metabolite enrichment sets and metabolic pathway impacts, especially with regard to amino acid metabolism. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a statistically robust correlation between bacterial colonization and metabolic landscape within the chronic wound environment. PMID:25978400

  4. Imaging Mass Spectrometry for Assessing Cutaneous Wound Healing: Analysis of Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) was employed for the analysis of frozen skin biopsies to investigate the differences between stage IV pressure ulcers that remain stalled, stagnant, and unhealed versus those exhibiting clinical and histological signs of improvement. Our data reveal a rich diversity of proteins that are dynamically modulated, and we selectively highlight a family of calcium binding proteins (S-100 molecules) including calcyclin (S100-A6), calgranulins A (S100-A8) and B (S100-A9), and calgizzarin (S100-A11). IMS allowed us to target three discrete regions of interest: the wound bed, adjacent dermis, and hypertrophic epidermis. Plots derived using unsupervised principal component analysis of the global protein signatures within these three spatial niches indicate that these data from wound signatures have potential as a prognostic tool since they appear to delineate wounds that are favorably responding to therapeutic interventions versus those that remain stagnant or intractable in their healing status. Our discovery-based approach with IMS augments current knowledge of the molecular signatures within pressure ulcers while providing a rationale for a focused examination of the role of calcium modulators within the context of impaired wound healing. PMID:25488653

  5. Traditional Japanese Formula Kigikenchuto Accelerates Healing of Pressure-Loading Skin Ulcer in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Mari; Shibahara, Naotoshi; Hikiami, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Toshiko; Jo, Michiko; Kaneko, Maria; Nogami, Tatsuya; Fujimoto, Makoto; Goto, Hirozo; Shimada, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of kigikenchuto (KKT), a traditional Japanese formula, in a modified rat pressure-loading skin ulcer model. Rats were divided into three groups, KKT extract orally administered (250 or 500 mg/kg/day for 35 days) and control. KKT shortened the duration until healing. Immunohistochemically, KKT increased CD-31-positive vessels in early phase and increased α-smooth muscle actin-(α-SMA-) positive fibroblastic cells in early phase and decreased them in late phase of wound healing. By Western blotting, KKT showed the potential to decrease inflammatory cytokines (MCP-1, IL-1β, and TNF-α) in early phase, decrease vascular endothelial growth factor in early phase and increase it in late phase, and modulate the expression of extracellular protein matrix (α-SMA, TGF-β1, bFGF, collagen III, and collagen I). These results suggested the possibility that KKT accelerates pressure ulcer healing through decreases of inflammatory cytokines, increase of angiogenesis, and induction of extracellular matrix remodeling. PMID:21660308

  6. Use of a topical haemoglobin spray for oxygenating pressure ulcers: healing outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Joy; Bateman, Sharon Dawn

    2015-12-01

    A published evaluation ( Tickle, 2015 ) of the use of a topical haemoglobin spray plus standard care in 18 patients with pressure ulcers showed that, following 4 weeks of treatment, the wound size reduced in 17 wounds and there was a progression toward healing in all 18. All but one of the wounds were over 2 months in duration at baseline. This article reports the results of the healing rates at 3 months of the 11 patients who continued to be treated with the haemoglobin spray. Nine of the 11 wounds healed, and 2 reduced in size by week 12 (i.e. 1 wound reduced from 30 cm(2) at baseline to 7 cm(2), while the other reduced from 6 cm(2) to 4 cm(2)). Of the 10 patients who were experiencing wound pain at baseline, 9 were pain free by week 8. Rapid elimination of slough was observed in all patients. The 82% healing rate achieved at 3 months and the fact that most patients continued to receive the same standard care as they had in the 4 weeks before recruitment into the evaluation increases the likelihood that the clinical outcomes observed here can be attributed to the haemoglobin spray. Topical haemoglobin shows promise in terms of its ability to accelerate healing in chronic pressure ulcers. PMID:26639069

  7. Diabetes - foot ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... ulcer has healed. These devices will take the pressure off of the ulcer area. This will help speed healing. Be sure to wear shoes that do not put a lot of pressure on only one part of your foot. Wear ...

  8. Potential application of in vivo imaging of impaired lymphatic duct to evaluate the severity of pressure ulcer in mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasuya, Akira; Sakabe, Jun-Ichi; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2014-02-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is a cause of pressure ulcer. However, a mechanism underlying the IR injury-induced lymphatic vessel damage remains unclear. We investigated the alterations of structure and function of lymphatic ducts in a mouse cutaneous IR model. And we suggested a new method for evaluating the severity of pressure ulcer. Immunohistochemistry showed that lymphatic ducts were totally vanished by IR injury, while blood vessels were relatively preserved. The production of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) was increased in injured tissue. In vitro study showed a high vulnerability of lymphatic endothelial cells to ROS. Then we evaluated the impaired lymphatic drainage using an in vivo imaging system for intradermally injected indocyanine green (ICG). The dysfunction of ICG drainage positively correlated with the severity of subsequent cutaneous changes. Quantification of the lymphatic duct dysfunction by this imaging system could be a useful strategy to estimate the severity of pressure ulcer.

  9. Unusual cause of a facial pressure ulcer: the helmet securing the Sengstaken-Blakemore tube.

    PubMed

    Kim, S M; Ju, R K; Lee, J H; Jun, Y J; Kim, Y J

    2015-06-01

    Many medical devices, such as pulse oximetry, ventilation masks and other splints are put on critically ill patients. Although these devices are designed to deliver relatively low physical pressure to the skin of the patient, they can still cause pressure ulcers (PUs) in critically ill patients. There are reports of medical device-related PUs on the face. Here we describe forehead skin necrosis caused by the securing helmet for the Sengstaken-Blakemore tube. It is difficult to detect this kind of PU early, because most of the patients have decreased mental status or delirium due to varix bleeding. For this reason, medical staff should be aware of the risk of developing a PU by the device and take preventive measures accordingly. PMID:26075510

  10. Use of wound dressings to enhance prevention of pressure ulcers caused by medical devices.

    PubMed

    Black, Joyce; Alves, Paulo; Brindle, Christopher Tod; Dealey, Carol; Santamaria, Nick; Call, Evan; Clark, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Medical device related pressure ulcers (MDR PUs) are defined as pressure injuries associated with the use of devices applied for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes wherein the PU that develops has the same configuration as the device. Many institutions have reduced the incidence of traditional PUs (sacral, buttock and heel) and therefore the significance of MDR PU has become more apparent. The highest risk of MDR PU has been reported to be patients with impaired sensory perception, such as neuropathy, and an impaired ability for the patient to communicate discomfort, for example, oral intubation, language barriers, unconsciousness or non-verbal state. Patients in critical care units typify the high-risk patient and they often require more devices for monitoring and therapeutic purposes. An expert panel met to review the evidence on the prevention of MDR PUs and arrived at these conclusions: (i) consider applying dressings that demonstrate pressure redistribution and absorb moisture from body areas in contact with medical devices, tubing and fixators, (ii) in addition to dressings applied beneath medical devices, continue to lift and/or move the medical device to examine the skin beneath it and reposition for pressure relief and (iii) when simple repositioning does not relieve pressure, it is important not to create more pressure by placing dressings beneath tight devices. PMID:23809279

  11. Relation between the serum albumin level and nutrition supply in patients with pressure ulcers: retrospective study in an acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Sugino, Hirotaka; Hashimoto, Ichiro; Tanaka, Yuka; Ishida, Soshi; Abe, Yoshiro; Nakanishi, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    This retrospective study examined the validity of the commonly used serum albumin level as an indicator of nutrition status of patients with pressure ulcer(s), particularly because the serum albumin level is affected by various factors and may not be specific to malnutrition. Specifically, we investigated whether nutrition supply or inflammation affects the serum albumin level in 82 patients with pressure ulcers(s) (29 in whom pressure ulcer was present upon admission and 53 in whom pressure ulcer developed after hospital admission). Serum albumin levels, blood test including C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and blood count, caloric intake, and depth and healing of pressure ulcers were compared between various subgroups of patients. Serum albumin levels correlated with red blood cell counts and hemoglobin and CRP levels but not with caloric intake. The correlation with CRP before and after several weeks of pressure ulcer treatment was negative. The serum albumin level upon admission was higher in patients in whom the ulcer healed than in those in whom it did not heal as well as in patients who were discharged than in those who died in the hospital. The serum albumin level appears to reflect inflammation, wound healing, and disease severity rather than nutrition supply in patients with pressure ulcer. J. Med. Invest. 61: 15-21, February, 2014. PMID:24705743

  12. Advancing a smart air cushion system for preventing pressure ulcers using projection Moiré for large deformation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Sheng-Lin; Tsai, Tsung-Heng; Lee, Carina Jean-Tien; Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2016-03-01

    A pressure ulcer is one of the most important concerns for wheelchair bound patients with spinal cord injuries. A pressure ulcer is a localized injury near the buttocks that bear ischial tuberosity oppression over a long period of time. Due to elevated compression to blood vessels, the surrounding tissues suffer from a lack of oxygen and nutrition. The ulcers eventually lead to skin damage followed by tissue necrosis. The current medical strategy is to minimize the occurrence of pressure ulcers by regularly helping patients change their posture. However, these methods do not always work effectively or well. As a solution to fundamentally prevent pressure ulcers, a smart air cushion system was developed to detect and control pressure actively. The air cushion works by automatically adjusting a patient's sitting posture to effectively relieve the buttock pressure. To analyze the correlation between the dynamic pressure profiles of an air cell with a patient's weight, a projection Moiré system was adopted to measure the deformation of an air cell and its associated stress distribution. Combining a full-field deformation imaging with air pressure measured within an air cell, the patient's weight and the stress distribution can be simultaneously obtained. By integrating a full-field optical metrology with a time varying pressure sensor output coupled with different active air control algorithms for various designs, we can tailor the ratio of the air cells. Our preliminary data suggests that this newly developed smart air cushion has the potential to selectively reduce localized compression on the tissues at the buttocks. Furthermore, it can take a patient's weight which is an additional benefit so that medical personnel can reference it to prescribe the correct drug dosages.

  13. A Quality-Improvement Collaborative Project to Reduce Pressure Ulcers in PICUs

    PubMed Central

    King, Alice; Nie, Ann Marie; Schaffer, Pat; Taylor, Teresa; Pruitt, David; Giaccone, Mary Jo; Ashby, Marshall; Keswani, Sundeep

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Pediatric patients are at risk for developing pressure ulcers (PUs) and associated pain, infection risk, and prolonged hospitalization. Stage III and IV ulcers are serious, reportable events. The objective of this study was to develop and implement a quality-improvement (QI) intervention to reduce PUs by 50% in our ICUs. METHODS: We established a QI collaborative leadership team, measured PU rates during an initial period of rapid-cycle tests of change, developed a QI bundle, and evaluated the PU rates after the QI implementation. The prospective study encompassed 1425 patients over 54 351 patient-days in the PICU and NICU. RESULTS: The PU rate in the PICU was 14.3/1000 patient-days during the QI development and 3.7/1000 patient-days after QI implementation (P < .05), achieving the aim of 50% reduction. The PICU rates of stages I, II, and III conventional and device-related PUs decreased after the QI intervention. The PU rate in the NICU did not change significantly over time but remained at a mean of 0.9/1000 patient-days. In the postimplementation period, 3 points were outside the control limits, primarily due to an increase in PUs associated with pulse oximeters and cannulas. CONCLUSIONS: The collaborative QI model was effective at reducing PUs in the PICU. Pediatric patients, particularly neonates, are at risk for device-related ulcers. Heightened awareness, early detection, and identification of strategies to mitigate device-related injury are necessary to further reduce PU rates. PMID:23650292

  14. Promote Pressure Ulcer Healing in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury Using an Individualized Cyclic Pressure-Relief Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Makhsous, Mohsen; Lin, Fang; Knaus, Evan; Zeigler, Mary; Rowles, Diane M.; Gittler, Michelle; Bankard, James; Chen, David

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether an individualized cyclic pressure-relief protocol accelerates wound healing in wheelchair users with established pressure ulcers (PrUs). Design Randomized controlled study. Setting Spinal cord injury clinics. Participants Forty-four subjects, aged 18–79 years, with a Stage II or Stage III PrU, were randomly assigned to the control (n = 22) or treatment (n = 22) groups. Interventions Subjects in the treatment group used wheelchairs equipped with an individually adjusted automated seat that provided cyclic pressure relief, and those in the control group used a standard wheelchair. All subjects sat in wheelchairs for a minimum of 4 hours per day for 30 days during their PrU treatment. Main Outcome Measures Wound characteristics were assessed using the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) tool and wound dimensions recorded with digital photographs twice a week. Median healing time for a 30% healing relative to initial measurements, the percentage reduction in wound area, and the percentage improvement in PUSH score achieved at the end of the trial were compared between groups. Results At the end of 30 days, both groups demonstrated a general trend of healing. However, the treatment group was found to take significantly less time to achieve 30% healing for the wound measurement compared with the control group. The percentage improvement of the wound area and PUSH scores were greater in using cyclic seating (45.0 ± 21.0, P < .003; 29.9 ± 24. 6, P < .003) compared with standard seating (10.2 ± 34.9, 5.8 ± 9.2). Conclusions The authors' findings show that cyclically relieving pressure in the area of a wound for seated individuals can greatly aid wound healing. The current study provides evidence that the individualized cyclic pressure-relief protocol helps promote pressure wound healing in a clinical setting. The authors concluded that the individualized cyclic pressure relief may have substantial benefits in accelerating the healing

  15. Use of Pressure-Redistributing Support Surfaces among Elderly Hip Fracture Patients across the Continuum of Care: Adherence to Pressure Ulcer Prevention Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgarten, Mona; Margolis, David; Orwig, Denise; Hawkes, William; Rich, Shayna; Langenberg, Patricia; Shardell, Michelle; Palmer, Mary H.; McArdle, Patrick; Sterling, Robert; Jones, Patricia S.; Magaziner, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the frequency of use of pressure-redistributing support surfaces (PRSS) among hip fracture patients and to determine whether higher pressure ulcer risk is associated with greater PRSS use. Design and Methods: Patients (n = 658) aged [greater than or equal] 65 years who had surgery for hip fracture were examined by research…

  16. Evaluation of effects of nutrition intervention on healing of pressure ulcers and nutritional states (randomized controlled trial).

    PubMed

    Ohura, Takehiko; Nakajo, Toshio; Okada, Shingo; Omura, Kenji; Adachi, Kayoko

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of nutrition intervention on nutritional states and healing of pressure ulcers by standardizing or unified factors including nursing, care and treatment in a multicenter open randomized trial. Tube-fed patients with Stage III-IV pressure ulcers were selected. The control group (30 patients) received the same nutrition management as before participating in this trial, whereas the intervention group (30 patients) was given calories in the range of Basal Energy Expenditure (BEE) × 1.1 × 1.3 to 1.5. The intervention period was 12 weeks. The efficacy and safety were evaluated based on the nutritional states and the sizes of ulcers (length × width), and on the incidence of adverse events related to the study, respectively. The calories administered to the control and intervention groups were 29.1 ± 4.9 and 37.9 ± 6.5 kcal/kg/day, respectively. Significant interactions between the presence or absence of the intervention and the intervention period were noted for nutritional states (p<0.001 for body weight, p<0.05 for prealbumin). Similarly, the size of ulcers differed significantly between subjects in the intervention group and in the control group (p<0.001). The results suggest that nutrition intervention could directly enhance the healing process in pressure ulcer patients. PMID:21539650

  17. Predictors of Barefoot Plantar Pressure during Walking in Patients with Diabetes, Peripheral Neuropathy and a History of Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Barn, Ruth; Waaijman, Roelof; Nollet, Frans; Woodburn, James; Bus, Sicco A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Elevated dynamic plantar foot pressures significantly increase the risk of foot ulceration in diabetes mellitus. The aim was to determine which factors predict plantar pressures in a population of diabetic patients who are at high-risk of foot ulceration. Methods Patients with diabetes, peripheral neuropathy and a history of ulceration were eligible for inclusion in this cross sectional study. Demographic data, foot structure and function, and disease-related factors were recorded and used as potential predictor variables in the analyses. Barefoot peak pressures during walking were calculated for the heel, midfoot, forefoot, lesser toes, and hallux regions. Potential predictors were investigated using multivariate linear regression analyses. 167 participants with mean age of 63 years contributed 329 feet to the analyses. Results The regression models were able to predict between 6% (heel) and 41% (midfoot) of the variation in peak plantar pressures. The largest contributing factor in the heel model was glycosylated haemoglobin concentration, in the midfoot Charcot deformity, in the forefoot prominent metatarsal heads, in the lesser toes hammer toe deformity and in the hallux previous ulceration. Variables with local effects (e.g. foot deformity) were stronger predictors of plantar pressure than global features (e.g. body mass, age, gender, or diabetes duration). Conclusion The presence of local deformity was the largest contributing factor to barefoot dynamic plantar pressure in high-risk diabetic patients and should therefore be adequately managed to reduce plantar pressure and ulcer risk. However, a significant amount of variance is unexplained by the models, which advocates the quantitative measurement of plantar pressures in the clinical risk assessment of the patient. PMID:25647421

  18. Improving Outcomes by Implementing a Pressure Ulcer Prevention Program (PUPP): Going beyond the Basics

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Amparo; Anglade, Debbie; Stamp, Hope; Joaquin, Fortunata; Lopez, Jennifer A.; Lupe, Lori; Schmidt, Steven P.; Young, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    A multidisciplinary process improvement program was initiated at the University of Miami Hospital (UMH) in 2009 to identify the prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) at the institution and to implement interventions to reduce the incidence of HAPU. This deliberate and thoughtful committee-driven process evaluated care, monitored results, and designed evidence-based strategic initiatives to manage and reduce the rate of HAPU. As a result all inpatient beds were replaced with support surfaces, updated care delivery protocols were created, and monitored, turning schedules were addressed, and a wound, ostomy, and continence (WOC) nurse and support staff were hired. These initial interventions resulted in a decrease in the prevalence of HAPU at UMH from 11.7% of stage II to IV ulcers in the second quarter, 2009 to 2.1% the third quarter. The rate remained at or near the 2009 UMH benchmark of 3.1% until the first quarter of 2012 when the rate rose to 4.1%. At that time new skin products were introduced into practice and continuing re-education was provided. The rate of HAPU dropped to 2.76% by the second quarter of 2012 and has remained steadily low at 1%–2% for nine consecutive quarters. PMID:27417780

  19. Successful Intervention for Pressure Ulcer by Nutrition Support Team: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Inui, Shigeki; Konishi, Yuko; Yasui, Yoko; Harada, Toshiko; Itami, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    A 23-year-old woman with heart failure developed pressure ulcer on her sacral area due to a long-term bed rest and impaired hemodynamics. The ulcer improved only slightly after 2 months with povidone-iodine sugar ointment because of severe nausea and anorexia. Then, the nutrition support team (NST) started intervention and estimated the patient's malnutrition from her body weight (30.1 kg), body mass index (BMI) (13.9), triceps skinfold thickness (TSF) (3.5 mm), arm circumference (AC) (17.2 cm) and serum albumin (2.6 g/dl). The NST administrated an enteral nutrition formula through a nasogastric tube and tried to provide meals according to the patient's taste. Although DESIGN score improved to 7 (DESIGN: d2e1s2i1g1n0 = 7) 2 months later, severe nausea prevented the patient from taking any food perorally. However, after nasogastric decannulation, her appetite improved and 1 month later her body weight increased to 32.8 kg, her BMI to 15.2, TSF to 7.5 mm, AC to 19.7 cm and serum albumin to 4.1 g/dl, and the wound completely healed. PMID:20689636

  20. Temperature effects on surface pressure-induced changes in rat skin perfusion: implications in pressure ulcer development.

    PubMed

    Patel, S; Knapp, C F; Donofrio, J C; Salcido, R

    1999-07-01

    The effect of varying local skin temperature on surface pressure-induced changes in skin perfusion and deformation was determined in hairless fuzzy rats (13.5+/-3 mo, 474+/-25 g). Skin surface pressure was applied by a computer-controlled plunger with corresponding skin deformation measured by a linear variable differential transformer while a laser Doppler flowmeter measured skin perfusion. In Protocol I, skin surface perfusion was measured without heating (control, T=28 degrees C), with heating (T=36 degrees C), for control (probe just touching skin, 3.7 mmHg), and at two different skin surface pressures, 18 mmHg and 73 mmHg. Heating caused perfusion to increase at control and 18 mmHg pressure, but not at 73 mmHg. In Protocol II, skin perfusion was measured with and without heating as in Protocol I, but this time skin surface pressure was increased from 3.7 to 62 mmHg in increments of 3.7 mmHg. For unheated skin, perfusion increased as skin surface pressure increased from 3.7 to 18 mmHg. Further increases in surface pressure caused a decrease in perfusion until zero perfusion was reached for pressures over 55 mmHg. Heating increased skin perfusion for surface pressures from 3.7 to 18 mmHg, but not for pressures greater than 18 mmHg. After the release of surface pressure, the reactive hyperemia peak of perfusion increased with heating. In Protocol III, where skin deformation (creep and relaxation) was measured during the application of 3.7 and 18 mmHg, heating caused the tissue to be stiffer, allowing less deformation. It was found that for surface pressures below 18 mmHg, increasing skin temperature significantly increased skin perfusion and tissue stiffness. The clinical significance of these findings may have relevance in evaluating temperature and pressure effects on skin blood flow and deformation as well as the efficacy of using temperature as a therapeutic modality in the treatment of pressure ulcers. PMID:10659802

  1. Comparison of the treatment of hydrocolloid and saline gauze for pressure ulcer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xuemei; Li, Jieqiong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the hydrocolloid dressing versus saline gauze for the treatment of pressure ulcer. Methods: Pubmed and Web of Knowledge were searched for randomized controlled trials for the treatment of hydrocolloid and saline gauze for pressure ulcer. The random effect model was used. Sensitivity analysis and publication bias were conducted. Results: Seven randomized controlled trials involving a total of 329 participants were included in this meta-analysis. The combined results suggested that significant association in complete healing were detected among hydrocolloid dressings and saline gauze [Summary RR=2.20, 95% CI=1.21-4.02, I2=48.5%]. The associations were also significant when we only combine the results for ulcers healed and the treatment duration of 8-12 weeks. No publication bias was found. Conclusions: Our meta-analysis suggested that the use of hydrocolloid dressing increased the likelihood of complete healing by more than two-fold compared with saline gauze dressing. PMID:26885012

  2. Pressure ulcer and wounds reporting in NHS hospitals in England part 2: Survey of monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Susanne; Smith, Isabelle L; Nixon, Jane; Wilson, Lyn; Brown, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    This is the second of a two related papers describing work undertaken to compare and contrast Pressure Ulcer (PU) monitoring systems across NHS in-patient facilities in England. The work comprised 1) a PU/Wound Audit (PUWA) and 2) a survey of PU monitoring systems. This second paper focusses on the survey which explores differences in the implementation of PU adverse event monitoring systems in 24 NHS hospital Trusts in England. The survey questionnaire comprised 41 items incorporating single and multiple response options and free-text items and was completed by the PUWA Trust lead in liaison with key people in the organisation. All 24 (100%) Trusts returned the questionnaire, with high levels of data completeness (99.1%). The questionnaire results showed variation between Trusts in relation to the recording of PUs and their reporting as part of NHS prevalence and incident monitoring systems and to Trust boards and healthcare commissioners including the inclusion (or not) of device ulcers, unstageable ulcers, Deep Tissue Injury, combined PUs/Incontinence Associated Dermatitis, category ≥ 1 ulcers or category ≥ 2 ulcers, inherited ulcers, acquired ulcers, avoidable and unavoidable ulcers and the definition of Present On Admission. These fundamental differences in reporting preclude Trust to Trust comparisons of PU prevalence and incident reporting and monitoring systems due to variation in local application and data collection methods. The results of this work and the PUWA led to the development of recommendations for PU monitoring practice, many of which are internationally relevant. PMID:26774821

  3. Measuring Tissue Perfusion During Pressure Relief Maneuvers: Insights Into Preventing Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Makhsous, Mohsen; Priebe, Michael; Bankard, James; Rowles, Diana; Zeigler, Mary; Chen, David; Lin, Fang

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: To study the effect on tissue perfusion of relieving interface pressure using standard wheelchair pushups compared with a mechanical automated dynamic pressure relief system. Design: Repeated measures in 2 protocols on 3 groups of subjects. Participants: Twenty individuals with motor-complete paraplegia below T4, 20 with motor-complete tetraplegia, and 20 able-bodied subjects. Methods: Two 1-hour sitting protocols: dynamic protocol, sitting configuration alternated every 10 minutes between a normal sitting configuration and an off-loading configuration; wheelchair pushup protocol, normal sitting configuration with standard wheelchair pushup once every 20 minutes. Main Outcome Measures: Transcutaneous partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide measured from buttock overlying the ischial tuberosity and interface pressure measured at the seat back and buttocks. Perfusion deterioration and recovery times were calculated during changes in interface pressures. Results: In the off-loading configuration, concentrated interface pressure during the normal sitting configuration was significantly diminished, and tissue perfusion was significantly improved. Wheelchair pushups showed complete relief of interface pressure but incomplete recovery of tissue perfusion. Conclusions: Interface pressure analysis does not provide complete information about the effectiveness of pressure relief maneuvers. Measures of tissue perfusion may help establish more effective strategies. Relief achieved by standard wheelchair pushups may not be sufficient to recover tissue perfusion compromised during sitting; alternate maneuvers may be necessary. The dynamic seating system provided effective pressure relief with sustained reduction in interface pressure adequate for complete recovery of tissue perfusion. Differences in perfusion recovery times between subjects with spinal cord injury (SCI) and controls raise questions about the importance of changes in vascular responses

  4. Profile of patients with spinal cord injuries and occurrence of pressure ulcer at a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Paula Cristina; Caliri, Maria Helena Larcher; Haas, Vanderlei José

    2006-01-01

    Patients with traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) have an increased risk of developing pressure ulcers (PU). It is a retrospective study done by review of records in order to identify the characteristics of patients who were assisted at a tertiary hospital as well as the occurrence of PU. Most patients were male, white and 36,2% between 21 and 30 years. The most common causes of TSCI were wound by fire weapons followed by vehicle crash/overturn. There was a predominance of injury at the toracic level followed by cervical. The PU occurred in 20 pacientes (42,5%). The most frequent regions of occurrence were the sacral and heels. Only 25% of the records had PU's dimensions charted, 80% stated the aspect, and 52.1% did not state the stage. There is a need for better documentation of PU so that interventions used for treatment can be evaluated. PMID:16926993

  5. Prophylactic use of dressings for pressure ulcer prevention in the critical care unit.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Elaine

    2016-06-23

    Multiple comorbidities and intensive therapy increase the risk of pressure ulcer (PU) development in critical care unit (CCU) patients. Given the high number of risk factors that CCU patients present with, it is important to acknowledge that not all PUs are entirely preventable, and incidence is thought to be between 14% and 42%. The consequences of acquiring a PU in critical care include increased mortality, morbidity and longer length of stay. Implementing prevention strategies as soon as the patient enters the unit can significantly reduce incidence. By adopting a proactive versus reactive mind-set, one CCU abandoned traditional PU risk assessment and implemented a number of intensive interventions, including the use of a prophylactic sacral dressing as an adjunct. As a result, PU incidence fell from 19.9 per 1000 patient population to 0.84 per 1000 patient population in 2014. In addition, 310 PU-free days were achieved. PMID:27345087

  6. Implications of the New Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Pressure Ulcer Policy in Acute Care

    PubMed Central

    Fleck, Cynthia A.

    2009-01-01

    One of the leading questions on clinicians' minds is, What are the implications of the new ruling of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) in acute care, and how will it affect the wound care clinician? The CMS recently unveiled its plans for reimbursement and nonpayment for facility-acquired pressure ulcers, among other issues, in acute care. Change is coming, and this time prevention and intervention underlie the CMS payment reform ruling, which includes payment incentive for prevention and quality patient care. Intensive and comprehensive patient screenings at the outset of admission, as well as diligent prevention during patient stay, are the mainstays of this initiative. Anyone who works in a hospital will play a major role. PMID:24527115

  7. Pressure Combined with Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury Induces Deep Tissue Injury via Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in a Rat Pressure Ulcer Model

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Fei-Fei; Pan, Ying-Ying; Xie, Hao-Huang; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Shi, Hong-Xue; Xiao, Jian; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Chang, Hao-Teng; Jiang, Li-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Pressure ulcer is a complex and significant health problem in long-term bedridden patients, and there is currently no effective treatment or efficient prevention method. Furthermore, the molecular mechanisms and pathogenesis contributing to the deep injury of pressure ulcers are unclear. The aim of the study was to explore the role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and Akt/GSK3β signaling in pressure ulcers. A model of pressure-induced deep tissue injury in adult Sprague-Dawley rats was established. Rats were treated with 2-h compression and subsequent 0.5-h release for various cycles. After recovery, the tissue in the compressed regions was collected for further analysis. The compressed muscle tissues showed clear cellular degenerative features. First, the expression levels of ER stress proteins GRP78, CHOP, and caspase-12 were generally increased compared to those in the control. Phosphorylated Akt and phosphorylated GSK3β were upregulated in the beginning of muscle compression, and immediately significantly decreased at the initiation of ischemia-reperfusion injury in compressed muscles tissue. These data show that ER stress may be involved in the underlying mechanisms of cell degeneration after pressure ulcers and that the Akt/GSK3β signal pathway may play an important role in deep tissue injury induced by pressure and ischemia/reperfusion. PMID:26927073

  8. A hand-held mosaicked multispectral imaging device for early stage pressure ulcer detection.

    PubMed

    Qi, Hairong; Kong, Linghua; Wang, Chao; Miao, Lidan

    2011-10-01

    The use of a custom filter mosaic overlaying a CMOS/CCD sensor represents a novel idea to multispectral imaging. The innovation provides simple, miniaturized, low cost instrumentation that has many potential biological applications which require a hand-held detector. This makes it extremely adaptable and can serve as an integrated component to distributed diagnosis and home healthcare (D2H2). A mosaicked sensor is a monolithic array of many sensors, arranged in a geometric pattern with each sensor covered by an optical filter sensitive to a specified wavelength. In this way, only one spectral component is sensed at each pixel and the other spectral components must be estimated from neighbors. Although with great potential, one challenge faced by this device, however, is the reconstruction of the high-resolution full-spectral image from the low-resolution input. Due to the physical limitations in fabrication and the usage of the multispectral filter mosaic, two types of degradations exist, including filter misalignment and the missing spectral components, that must be corrected using intelligent algorithms to take full advantage of the hardware capability of the device. In this paper, we first describe a custom geometric correction method to restore the image from the misalignment distortion. We then present a binary tree-based generic demosaicking algorithm to efficiently estimate the missing special components and reconstruct a high-resolution full-spectral image. We choose early detection of pressure ulcer as a targeting area as early stage pressure ulcers and other subcutaneous lesions are nearly invisible in clinical settings, particularly so for dark pigmented skin. We show how the geometric correction and demosaicking algorithms successfully reconstruct a full-spectral image from which apparent contrast enhancement between damaged skin and the normal skin is observed. PMID:20703688

  9. Tailoring International Pressure Ulcer Prevention Guidelines for Nigeria: A Knowledge Translation Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Ilesanmi, Rose Ekama; Gillespie, Brigid M.; Adejumo, Prisca Olabisi; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Background: The 2014 International Pressure Ulcer Prevention (PUP) Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) provides the most current evidence based strategies to prevent Pressure Ulcer (PU). The evidence upon which these guidelines have been developed has predominantly been generated from research conducted in developed countries. Some of these guidelines may not be feasible in developing countries due to structural and resource issues; therefore there is a need to adapt these guidelines to the context thus making it culturally acceptable. Aim: To present a protocol detailing the tailoring of international PUPCPG into a care bundle for the Nigerian context. Methods: Guided by the Knowledge to Action (KTA) framework, a two phased study will be undertaken. In Phase 1, the Delphi technique with stakeholder leaders will be used to review the current PUPCPG, identifying core strategies that are feasible to be adopted in Nigeria. These core strategies will become components of a PUP care bundle. In Phase 2, key stakeholder interviews will be used to identify the barriers, facilitators and potential implementation strategies to promote uptake of the PUP care bundle. Results: A PUP care bundle, with three to eight components is expected to be developed from Phase 1. Implementation strategies to promote adoption of the PUP care bundle into clinical practice in selected Nigerian hospitals, is expected to result from Phase 2. Engagement of key stakeholders and consumers in the project should promote successful implementation and translate into better patient care. Conclusion: Using KTA, a knowledge translation framework, to guide the implementation of PUPCPG will enhance the likelihood of successful adoption in clinical practice. In implementing a PUP care bundle, developing countries face a number of challenges such as the feasibility of its components and the required resources.

  10. The Relationship of Medicaid Payment Rates, Bed Constraint Policies, and Risk-Adjusted Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, David C; Angelelli, Joseph J

    2004-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of Medicaid reimbursement rates on nursing home quality in the presence of certificate-of-need (CON) and construction moratorium laws. Data Sources/Study Setting A single cross-section of Medicaid certified nursing homes in 1999 (N=13,736). Study Design A multivariate regression model was used to examine the effect of Medicaid payment rates and other explanatory variables on risk-adjusted pressure ulcer incidence. The model is alternatively considered for all U.S. nursing home markets, those most restrictive markets, and those high-Medicaid homes to isolate potentially resource-poor environments. Data Extraction Methods A merged data file was constructed with resident-level information from the Minimum Data Set, facility-level information from the On-Line, Survey, Certification, and Reporting (OSCAR) system and market- and state-level information from various published sources. Principal Findings In the analysis of all U.S. markets, there was a positive relationship between the Medicaid payment rate and nursing home quality. The results from this analysis imply that a 10 percent increase in Medicaid payment was associated with a 1.5 percent decrease in the incidence of risk-adjusted pressure ulcers. However, there was a limited association between Medicaid payment rates and quality in the most restrictive markets. Finally, there was a strong relationship between Medicaid payment and quality in high-Medicaid homes providing strong evidence that the level of Medicaid payment is especially important within resource poor facilities. Conclusions These findings provide support for the idea that increased Medicaid reimbursement may be an effective means toward improving nursing home quality, although CON and moratorium laws may mitigate this relationship. PMID:15230928

  11. Biomechanics Analysis of Pressure Ulcer Using Damaged Interface Model between Bone and Muscle in the Human Buttock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamet, Samuel Susanto; Takano, Naoki; Tanabe, Yoshiyuki; Hatano, Asako; Nagasao, Tomohisa

    This paper aims at building up a computational procedure to study the bio-mechanism of pressure ulcer using the finite element method. Pressure ulcer is a disease that occurs in the human body after 2 hours of continuous external force. In the very early stage of pressure ulcer, it is found that the tissues inside the body are damaged, even though skin surface looks normal. This study assumes that tension and/or shear strain will cause damage to loose fibril tissue between the bone and muscle and that propagation of damaged area will lead to fatal stage. Analysis was performed using the finite element method by modeling the damaged fibril tissue as a cutout. By varying the loading directions and watching both tensile and shear strains, the risk of fibril tissue damage and propagation of the damaged area is discussed, which may give new insight for the careful nursing for patients, particularly after surgical treatment. It was found that the pressure ulcer could reoccur for a surgical flap treatment. The bone cut and surgical flap surgery is not perfect to prevent the bone-muscle interfacial damage.

  12. Transdermal Wound Oxygen Therapy on Pressure Ulcer Healing: A Single-Blind Multi-Center Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Azimian, Jalil; Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid; Pourkhaleghi, Enis; Ansari, Monireh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although healthcare quality has considerably improved in many countries, pressure ulcer is still a major health challenge worldwide. Objectives: The current study aimed to evaluate the effects of TWOT on the healing of pressure ulcers. Patients and Methods: This study was a randomized controlled trial, and the convenient sample including 100 patients hospitalized in two university-affiliated medical-surgical intensive care units and one neurology unit located in Qazvin, Iran were studied. Patients with stage II-IV pressure ulcer on the sacral or ischial areas were randomly assigned to either the control or the experimental groups. The experimental group received a 12-day transdermal wound oxygen therapy. Wound status was assessed seven times before the intervention, as well as two, four, six, eight, ten, and twelve days after the intervention. Results: After 12 days of wound oxygen therapy, the number of patients with complete wound healing in the experimental group was significantly greater than that of the control group. Moreover, the total mean of wound area in the experimental group was significantly lower than that of the control group. Conclusions: Transdermal wound oxygen therapy can effectively promote wound healing in patients with pressure ulcers. PMID:26734476

  13. Comparisons of negative pressure wound therapy and ultrasonic debridement for diabetic foot ulcers: a network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruran; Feng, Yanhua; Di, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: a network meta-analysis was performed to compare the strength and weakness of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) with ultrasound debridement (UD) as for diabetic foot ulcers (DFU). Methods: PubMed, Ovid EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane library databases, and Chinese Biomedical Literature Database were searched till February 2015. Clinical compared studies of negative pressure wound therapy and ultrasound debridement were enrolled. The primary efficacy outcomes included healed ulcers, reduction of ulcer areas and time to closure. Secondary amputation including major and minor amputations was used to assess the safety profile. Results: Out of 715 studies, 32 were selected which enrolled 2880 diabetic patients. The pooled analysis revealed that NPWT including vacuum assisted closure (VAC) and vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) were as efficacious as ultrasound debridement improving healed ulcers, odds ratio, 0.86; 95% CI 0.28 to 2.6 and 1.2; 95% CI 0.38 to 4, respectively. However, both were better to standard wound care in wound healing patients. Compared with the standard wound care treated diabetic foot ulcers, NPWT and UD resulted in a significantly superior efficacy in time to wound closure and decrement in area of wound. No significances were observed between NPWT and UD groups in both indicators. Fewer patients tended to receive amputation in NPWT and UD groups compared to standard wound care group. Conclusions: The results of the network meta-analysis indicated that negative pressure wound therapy was similar to ultrasound debridement for diabetic foot ulcers, but better than standard wound care both in efficacy and safety profile. PMID:26550165

  14. Spectroscopic detection of the blanch response at the heel of the foot: a possible diagnostic for stage I pressure ulcers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlenberg, Elicia M.; Zanca, Jeanne; Brienza, David M.; Levasseur, Michelle A.; Sowa, Michael G.

    2005-09-01

    Pressure ulcers (sores) can occur when there is constant pressure being applied to tissue for extended periods of time. Immobile people are particularly prone to this problem. Ideally, pressure damage is detected at an early stage, pressure relief is applied and the pressure ulcer is averted. One of the hallmarks of pressure damaged skin is an obliterated blanch response due to compromised microcirculation near the surface of the skin. Visible reflectance spectroscopy can noninvasively probe the blood circulation of the upper layers of skin by measuring the electronic transitions arising from hemoglobin, the primary oxygen carrying protein in blood. A spectroscopic test was developed on a mixed population of 30 subjects to determine if the blanch response could be detected in healthy skin with high sensitivity and specificity regardless of the pigmentation of the skin. Our results suggest that a spectroscopic based blanch response test can accurately detect the blanching of healthy tissue and has the potential to be developed into a screening test for early stage I pressure ulcers.

  15. Adapting a SSKIN bundle for carers to aid identification of pressure damage and ulcer risks in the community.

    PubMed

    McCoulough, Siobhan

    2016-06-01

    If pressure damage is identified and addressed at an early stage, it may be reversed. Otherwise, it may quickly progress into a serious deep tissue injury. In the community, most daily skin care is undertaken by formal and informal carers. They therefore need to know how to identify signs that pressure ulcers may develop and what immediate actions to take. NICE guidance on pressure ulcer prevention is too extensive to be a simple tool for carers, so a SSKIN bundle was adapted for community use. This ensures carers know how to prevent and identify pressure damage, and includes skin care, repositioning and use of equipment. Carers need training. This is the responsibility of all involved with the patient, including health-care and local authority services. PMID:27297573

  16. The Association between Pre-existing Diabetes Mellitus and Pressure Ulcers in Patients Following Surgery: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Zhou-Qing; Zhai, Xiao-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainty exists about the role of diabetes in the development of surgery-related pressure ulcers. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to explore the association between pre-existing diabetes mellitus and pressure ulcers among patients after surgery. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random effects models. Thirteen eligible studies of 2367 patients in total and 12053 controls were included in the final analysis. Compared with patients without diabetes, the pooled odds ratio (OR) of the incidence of pressure ulcers in diabetic patients was 1.74 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.40–2.15, I2 = 51.1%]. Estimates by type of surgery suggested similar results in cardiac surgery [OR = 2.00, 95% CI = 1.42–2.82, I2 = 0%], in general surgery [OR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.42–2.15, I2 = 0%], and in major lower limb amputations [OR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.01–2.68, I2 = 0%] for diabetic patients versus non-diabetic controls. We did not find an increased incidence of pressure ulcers in diabetic patients undergoing hip surgery compared with non-diabetic controls [OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 0.62–3.47, I2 = 93.1%]. The excess risk of pressure ulcers associated with pre-existing diabetes was significantly higher in patients undergoing surgery, specifically in patients receiving cardiac surgery. Further studies should be conducted to examine these associations in other types of surgery. PMID:26260124

  17. A Comparative Study Between Total Contact Cast and Pressure-Relieving Ankle Foot Orthosis in Diabetic Neuropathic Foot Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Ray, Sayantan; Biswas, Dibakar; Baidya, Arjun; Bhattacharjee, Rana; Mukhopadhyay, Pradip; Ghosh, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Off-loading of the ulcer area is extremely important for the healing of plantar ulcers. Off-loading with total contact cast (TCC) may be superior to other off-loading strategies studied so far, but practical limitations can dissuade clinicians from using this modality. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of TCC compared with that of a pressure-relieving ankle foot orthosis (PRAFO) in healing of diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers and their effect on gait parameters. Methods: Thirty adult diabetic patients attending the foot clinic with neuropathic plantar ulcers irrespective of sex, age, duration and type of diabetes were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 off-loading modalities (TCC and PRAFO). Main outcome measures were ulcer healing after 4 weeks of randomization and effect of each of the modalities on various gait parameters. Results: The percentage reduction of the ulcer surface area at 4 weeks from baseline was 75.75 ± 9.25 with TCC and 34.72 ± 13.07 with PRAFO, which was significantly different (P < .001). The results of this study however, showed that most of the gait parameters were better with PRAFO than with TCC. Conclusions: This study comprehensively evaluated the well known advantages and disadvantages of a removable (PRAFO) and a nonremovable device (TCC) in the treatment of diabetic neuropathic foot ulcer. Further studies are needed involving larger subjects and using 3D gait analysis to collect more accurate data on gait parameters and wound healing with different off-loading devices. PMID:25452635

  18. Pressure ulcers: avoidable or unavoidable? Results of the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Black, Joyce M; Edsberg, Laura E; Baharestani, Mona M; Langemo, Diane; Goldberg, Margaret; McNichol, Laurie; Cuddigan, Janet

    2011-02-01

    Although pressure ulcer (PrU) development is now generally considered an indicator for quality of care, questions and concerns about situations in which they are unavoidable remain. Considering the importance of this issue and the lack of available research data, in 2010 the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) hosted a multidisciplinary conference to establish consensus on whether there are individuals in whom pressure ulcer development may be unavoidable and whether a difference exists between end-of-life skin changes and pressure ulcers. Thirty-four stakeholder organizations from various disciplines were identified and invited to send a voting representative. Of those, 24 accepted the invitation. Before the conference, existing literature was identified and shared via a webinar. A NPUAP task force developed standardized consensus questions for items with none or limited evidence and an interactive protocol was used to develop consensus among conference delegates and attendees. Consensus was established to be 80% agreement among conference delegates. Unanimous consensus was achieved for the following statements: most PrUs are avoidable; not all PrUs are avoidable; there are situations that render PrU development unavoidable, including hemodynamic instability that is worsened with physical movement and inability to maintain nutrition and hydration status and the presence of an advanced directive prohibiting artificial nutrition/hydration; pressure redistribution surfaces cannot replace turning and repositioning; and if enough pressure was removed from the external body the skin cannot always survive. Consensus was not obtained on the practicality or standard of turning patients every 2 hours nor on concerns surrounding the use of medical devices vis-à-vis their potential to cause skin damage. Research is needed to examine these issues, refine preventive practices in challenging situations, and identify the limits

  19. Inferior Gluteal Artery Perforator Flap for Sacral Pressure Ulcer Reconstruction: A Retrospective Case Study of 11 Patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Ta; Ou, Kuang-Wen; Chiao, Hao-Yu; Wang, Chi-Yu; Chou, Chang-Yi; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Lee, Tzu-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in reconstruction techniques, sacral pressure ulcers continue to present a challenge to the plastic surgeon. The flap from the gluteal crease derives blood supply from the inferior gluteal artery perforator (IGAP) and reliably preserves the entire contralateral side as a donor site. To incorporate the IGAP in the reconstruction of sacral pressure ulcers, a skin paddle over the gluteal crease was created and implemented by the authors. Data from 11 patients (8 men, 3 women; mean age 67 [range 44-85] years old) whose sacral ulcers were closed with an IGAP flap between June 2006 and May 2012 were retrieved and reviewed. All patients were bedridden; 1 patient in a vegetative state with a diagnosis of carbon monoxide intoxication was referred from a local clinic, 2 patients had Parkinson's disease, and 8 patients had a history of stroke. The average defect size was 120 cm(2) (range 88-144 cm(2)). The average flap size was 85.8 cm(2) (range 56-121 cm(2)). Only 1 flap failure occurred during surgery and was converted into V-Y advancement flap; 10 of the 11 flaps survived. After surgery, the patients' position was changed every 2 hours; patients remained prone or on their side for approximately 2 weeks until the flap was healed. After healing was confirmed, patients were discharged. Complications were relatively minor and included 1 donor site wound dehiscence that required wound reapproximation. No surgery-related mortality was noted; the longest follow-up period was 24 months. In this case series, flaps from the gluteal crease were successfully used for surgical closure of sacral pressure ulcers. This flap design should be used with caution in patients with hip contractures. Studies with larger sample sizes are needed to ascertain which type of flap is best suited to surgically manage extensive pressure ulcers in a variety of patient populations. PMID:26779702

  20. Using a case-mix-adjusted pressure sore incidence study in a surgical directorate to improve patient outcomes in pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Watret, L

    1999-10-01

    The Glasgow Acute Clinical Audit Sub-Committee on Pressure Sores has previously carried out studies of incidence of pressure ulcers in the medical directorates and case-mix-adjusted the figures for length of hospital stay and risk assessment score. Case-mix classification is 'classification of people or treatment placed into groups using characteristics associated with condition, treatment or outcome that can be used to predict need, resource, use of outcomes'. In this instance, crude pressure ulcer incidence figures may be adjusted for length of hospital stay and pressure sore risk assessment score, and stratified into groups, which allows like to be compared with like. The value in case-mix-adjusted figures lies in repeating the exercise, thus determining the trend for individual areas and assessing whether improvement in the quality of care is being achieved. This is more positive than creation of 'league tables' comparing simultaneous studies in a number of areas. The figures showed that there was no statistically significant difference between surgical directorates in trusts with regard to risk assessment scores and length of hospital stay. Gathering data on the incidence of pressure ulcer development allows us to identify where new sores are occurring, but does not critically analyse the nursing intervention taken in individual cases, which identifies preventive strategies. The Glasgow group's primary aim was to gather data on case-mix-adjusted incidence of pressure damage; the secondary objectives were to scrutinize the data to gather more general information on intrinsic and extrinsic factors which may predispose to pressure ulcer development. The study was carried out in the surgical directorate. Findings showed that incidence was low (1.1%), with the majority of sores being superficial. There was a correlation between pressure ulcer development and incontinence, evidence of under-utilization of moving and handling aids for prevention of pressure ulcers

  1. A randomized, controlled trial of negative pressure wound therapy of pressure ulcers via a novel polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Marcus James Dermot; Driver, Sara; Coghlan, Patrick; Greenwood, John Edward

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the study were (1) to look for any local, clinically apparent response, within and around a debrided wound, to a novel biocompatible polyurethane foam during repeated, short-term implantation, and (2) to assess the material's efficacy as a negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) interface compared with a widely used, commercially available foam. Twenty pressure ulcers in 18 patients underwent surgical debridement, then randomization to receive novel treatment or control foam as the wound interface for NPWT. Dressing changes every 2-3 days allowed qualitative wound assessment and quantitative measurement to compare outcomes. No adverse reaction was observed in any patient receiving the new foam. The new "novel foam" performed as a NPWT interface as effectively as the control "standard foam." In deep wounds, the new foam was easier to remove, fragmented less, and showed less retention than the control foam. No marginal in-growth occurred, making removal less traumatic and reducing bleeding from cavity wall granulations. The results support previous large animal studies, and independent ISO10993 testing, that the new foam is safe and biocompatible. Its efficacy as an NPWT interface, nontraumatic removal with low fragmentation and retention rate, favors the new material, especially in deep cavity wounds. PMID:24635170

  2. Evaluation of Nutrition in the Healing of Pressure Ulcers: Are the EPUAP Nutritional Guidelines Sufficient To Heal Wounds?

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takahiro; Fujioka, Masaki; Kitamura, Riko; Yakabe, Aya; Kimura, Hironori; Katagiri, Yoshinori; Nagatomo, Hiroyo

    2009-06-01

     Malnutrition is a significant factor in the development of pressure ulcers and many nutritional guidelines for preventing pressure ulcers have been published. However, few clinical investigations have examined the energy required to heal pressure ulcers. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between nutritional intake and improvement of pressure ulcers. Total calories, which were supplied by mouth through a feeding tube and via venous alimentation were examined for 40 hospitalized bedridden inpatients who had pressure ulcers. Of these patients, 21 whose wounds improved or healed and 19 whose wounds became worse or did not improve were eligible for this retrospective study. Pressure ulcers in patients who received more than 30 kcal/kg per day improved or healed, while those of patients who received less than 20 kcal/kg per day worsened or failed to improve. Furthermore, intake of 30 kcal/kg per day enabled serum albumin levels to improve. Energy intake of 30 kcal/kg per day is comparable to the predicted total energy expenditure and is thought to be essential for improving pressure ulcers in bedridden patients . PMID:25903438

  3. Tissue repair processes in healing chronic pressure ulcers treated with recombinant platelet-derived growth factor BB.

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, G. F.; Tarpley, J. E.; Allman, R. M.; Goode, P. S.; Serdar, C. M.; Morris, B.; Mustoe, T. A.; Vande Berg, J.

    1994-01-01

    Cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the observed vulnerary effects of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor BB (rP-DGF-BB) in man have not been elucidated. In a double-blinded trial, patients having chronic pressure ulcers were treated topically with either rPDGF-BB or placebo for 28 days. To explore how rPDGF-BB may induce chronic wounds to heal, biopsies were taken from the ulcers of a cohort of 20 patients from the trial and evaluated in a blinded fashion by light microscopy for 1), fibroblast content, 2) neovessel formation, and 3), collagen deposition. Electron microscopy also was used to assess fibroblast activation and collagen deposition. Before initiation of therapy most wounds had few fibroblasts and most of those present were not activated. When mean scores for the total active treatment phase (days 8, 15, and 29) for rPDGF-BB-treated ulcers were compared with the scores for placebo-treated ulcers, fibroblast content was significantly higher for the rPDGF-BB-treated ulcers (P = 0.03, Kruskal-Wallis test). More significant differences in fibroblast and neovessel content were observed when six nonhealing wounds were eliminated from the analysis (three placebo, three treatment). Thus, in all healing wounds, rPDGF-BB therapy significantly increased fibroblast (P = 0.0007) and neovessel (P = 0.02) content. These results were correlated with increased collagen fibrillogenesis by fibroblasts from healing rPDGF-BB-treated wounds, as assessed by intracellular procollagen type I immunostaining, and by electron microscopy, and were concordant with clinical measurements (eg, area of ulcer opening and ulcer volume) which showed greater healing in rPDGF-BB-treated wounds. These results suggest induction of fibroblast proliferation and differentiation is one mechanism by which rPDGF-BB can accelerate wound healing and that rPDGF-BB can augment healing responses within a majority of, but not all, nonhealing chronic pressure ulcers in man. Images

  4. A Study of the Factors Associated with Risk for Development of Pressure Ulcers: A Longitudinal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Elizebeth; Vinodkumar, Sudhaya; Mathew, Silvia; Setia, Maninder Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pressure ulcers (PUs) are prevalent in hospitalized patients; they may cause clinical, psychological, and economic problems in these patients. Previous studies are cross-sectional, have used pooled data, or cox-regression models to assess the risk for developing PU. However, PU risk scores change over time and models that account for time varying variables are useful for cohort analysis of data. Aims and Objectives: The present longitudinal study was conducted to compare the risk of PU between surgical and nonsurgical patients, and to evaluate the factors associated with the development of these ulcers over a period of time. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 290 hospitalized patients over a 4 months period. The main outcomes for our analysis were: (1) Score on the pressure risk assessment scale; and (2) the proportion of individuals who were at severe risk for developing PUs. We used random effects models for longitudinal analysis of the data. Results: The mean PU score was significantly higher in the nonsurgical patients compared with surgical patients at baseline (15.23 [3.86] vs. 9.33 [4.57]; P < 0.01). About 7% of the total patients had a score of >20 at baseline and were considered as being at high-risk for PU; the proportion was significantly higher among the nonsurgical patients compared with the surgical patients (14% vs. 4%, P = 0.003). In the adjusted models, there was no difference for severe risk for PU between surgical and nonsurgical patients (odds ratios [ORs]: 0.37, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.01–12.80). An additional day in the ward was associated with a significantly higher likelihood of being at high-risk for PU (OR: 1.47, 95% CI: 1.16–1.86). Conclusion: There were no significant differences between patients who were admitted for surgery compared with those who were not. An additional day in the ward, however, is important for developing a high-risk score for PU on the monitoring scale, and these patients require active

  5. Patient and organisational variables associated with pressure ulcer prevalence in hospital settings: a multilevel analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bredesen, Ida Marie; Bjøro, Karen; Gunningberg, Lena; Hofoss, Dag

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association of ward-level differences in the odds of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) with selected ward organisational variables and patient risk factors. Design Multilevel approach to data from 2 cross-sectional studies. Settings 4 hospitals in Norway were studied. Participants 1056 patients at 84 somatic wards. Primary outcome measure HAPU. Results Significant variance in the odds of HAPUs was found across wards. A regression model using only organisational variables left a significant variance in the odds of HAPUs across wards but patient variables eliminated the across-ward variance. In the model including organisational and patient variables, significant ward-level HAPU variables were ward type (rehabilitation vs surgery/internal medicine: OR 0.17 (95% CI 0.04 to 0.66)), use of preventive measures (yes vs no: OR 2.02 (95% CI 1.12 to 3.64)) and ward patient safety culture (OR 0.97 (95% CI 0.96 to 0.99)). Significant patient-level predictors were age >70 vs <70 (OR 2.70 (95% CI 1.54 to 4.74)), Braden scale total score (OR 0.73 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.80)) and overweight (body mass index 25–29.99 kg/m2) (OR 0.32 (95% CI 0.17 to 0.62)). Conclusions The fact that the odds of HAPU varied across wards, and that across-ward variance was reduced when the selected ward-level variables entered the explanatory model, indicates that the HAPU problem may be reduced by ward-level organisation of care improvements, that is, by improving the patient safety culture and implementation of preventive measures. Some wards may prevent pressure ulcers better than other wards. The fact that ward-level variation was eliminated when patient-level HAPU variables were included in the model indicates that even wards with the best HAPU prevention will be challenged by an influx of high-risk patients. PMID:26316647

  6. A randomized clinical trial comparing hydrocolloid, phenytoin and simple dressings for the treatment of pressure ulcers [ISRCTN33429693

    PubMed Central

    Hollisaz, Mohammad Taghi; Khedmat, Hossein; Yari, Fatemeh

    2004-01-01

    Background Pressure sores are important and common complications of spinal cord injury. Many preventive and therapeutic approaches have been tried and new trials are evolving. One relatively recent method is application of a hydrocolloid dressing (HD). In this study we compared the therapeutic effects of HD on pressure ulcer healing with two other topical applications, phenytoin cream (PC) and simple dressing (SD). Methods Ninety-one stage I and stage II pressure ulcers of 83 paraplegic male victims of the Iran-Iraq war were randomly allocated to three treatment groups. Mean age and weight of the participants were 36.64 ± 6.04 years and 61.12 ± 5.08 kg, respectively. All the patients were managed in long term care units or in their homes for 8 weeks by a team of general practitioners and nurses, and the ulcer status was recorded as "Complete healing", "Partial healing", "Without improvement" and "Worsening". Results Complete healing of ulcers, regardless of location and stage, was better in the HD group than the PC [23/31(74.19%) vs 12/30(40%); difference: 34.19%, 95% CI = 10.85–57.52, (P < 0.01)] or the SD [23/31(74.19%) vs 8/30(26.66%); difference: 47.53%, 95% CI = 25.45–69.61, (P < 0.005)] groups. Complete healing of stage I ulcers in the HD group [11/13(85%)] was better than in the SD [5/11(45%); difference: 40%, 95% CI = 4.7–75.22, (P < 0.05)] or PC [2/9 (22%); difference: 63%, 95% CI = 29.69–96.3, (P < 0.005)] groups. Complete healing of stage II ulcer in the HD group [12/18 (67%)] was better than in the SD group [3/19(16%); difference: 51%, 95% CI = 23.73–78.26, (P < 0.005)], but not significantly different from the PC group [10/21 (48%); difference: 19%, 95% CI = -11.47–49.47, (P > 0.05)]. We performed a second analysis considering only one ulcer per patient (i.e. 83 ulcers in 83 patients). This "per patient" analysis showed that complete ulcer healing in the HD group was better than in the PC [20/28(71.4%) vs 11/28 (39.3%); difference: 32

  7. [Association of Braden subscales with the risk of development of pressure ulcer].

    PubMed

    Zambonato, Bruna Pochmann; de Assis, Michelli Cristina Silva; Beghetto, Mariur Gomes

    2013-06-01

    Pressure ulcers (PU) may increase the incidence of hospital complications, and one should prevent this damage. The Braden Scale stands out as a tool to assess the risk of PU. The study aimed to identify changes in the score of the Braden subscales are associated with the risk of developing PCU. Logistic regression was used in a retrospective cohort study conducted in Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre in adults hospitalized in surgical clinical units from October 2005 to June 2006. We evaluated the records database of 1503 patients with a mean aged 55.5 +/- 16 years, 52.7% female. The incidence of PU was 1.8% and was associated with diabetes and heart failure. There was a higher PU in patients worst in sensory perception, mobility, and activity and the presence of moisture. No association was found between nutrition and PU. Except nutrition, the other Braden sub-scales shown to be predictive of PU. PMID:24015458

  8. Management of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Meloni, Marco; Izzo, Valentina; Vainieri, Erika; Giurato, Laura; Ruotolo, Valeria; Uccioli, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot (DF) is a common complication of diabetes and the first cause of hospital admission in diabetic patients. In recent years several guidelines have been proposed to reinforce the the management of DF with a notable increase in diabetes knowledge and an overall reduction of amputations. Significant improvements have been reached in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) and nowadays clinicians have several advanced medications to apply for the best local therapy. Among these, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is a useful adjunct in the management of chronic and complex wounds to promote healing and wound bed preparation for surgical procedures such as skin grafts and flap surgery. NPWT has shown remarkable results although its mechanisms of action are not completely understood. In this paper, we offer a complete overview of this medication and its implication in the clinical setting. We have examined literature related to NPWT concerning human, animal and in vitro studies, and we have summarized why, when and how we can use NPWT to treat DFUs. Further we have associated our clinical experience to scientific evidence in the field of diabetic foot to identify a defined strategy that could guide clinician in the use of NPWT approaching to DFUs. PMID:25992316

  9. Frequent manual repositioning and incidence of pressure ulcers among bedbound elderly hip fracture patients

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Shayna E.; Margolis, David; Shardell, Michelle; Hawkes, William G.; Miller, Ram R.; Amr, Sania; Baumgarten, Mona

    2010-01-01

    Frequent manual repositioning is an established part of pressure ulcer (PU) prevention, but there is little evidence for its effectiveness. This study examined the association between repositioning and PU incidence among bedbound elderly hip fracture patients, using data from a 2004–2007 cohort study in nine Maryland and Pennsylvania hospitals. Eligible patients (n=269) were age≥65 years, underwent hip fracture surgery, and were bedbound at index study visits (during the first five days of hospitalization). Information about repositioning on the days of index visits was collected from patient charts; study nurses assessed presence of PU stage 2+ two days later. The association between frequent manual repositioning and PU incidence was estimated, adjusting for PU risk factors using generalized estimating equations and weighted estimating equations. Patients were frequently repositioned (at least every two hours) on only 53% (187/354) of index visit days. New PU developed at 12% of visits following frequent repositioning versus 10% following less frequent repositioning; the incidence rate of PU per person-day did not differ between the two groups (incidence rate ratio 1.1, 95% confidence interval 0.5–2.4). No association was found between frequent repositioning of bedbound patients and lower PU incidence, calling into question the allocation of resources for repositioning. PMID:21134034

  10. Evaluation of Cueing Innovation for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Using Staff Focus Groups

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Tracey L.; Kennerly, Susan; Corazzini, Kirsten; Porter, Kristie; Toles, Mark; Anderson, Ruth A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the manuscript is to describe long-term care (LTC) staff perceptions of a music cueing intervention designed to improve staff integration of pressure ulcer (PrU) prevention guidelines regarding consistent and regular movement of LTC residents a minimum of every two hours. The Diffusion of Innovation (DOI) model guided staff interviews about their perceptions of the intervention’s characteristics, outcomes, and sustainability. Methods: This was a qualitative, observational study of staff perceptions of the PrU prevention intervention conducted in Midwestern U.S. LTC facilities (N = 45 staff members). One focus group was held in each of eight intervention facilities using a semi-structured interview protocol. Transcripts were analyzed using thematic content analysis, and summaries for each category were compared across groups. Results: The a priori codes (observability, trialability, compatibility, relative advantage and complexity) described the innovation characteristics, and the sixth code, sustainability, was identified in the data. Within each code, two themes emerged as a positive or negative response regarding characteristics of the innovation. Moreover, within the sustainability code, a third theme emerged that was labeled “brainstormed ideas”, focusing on strategies for improving the innovation. Implications: Cueing LTC staff using music offers a sustainable potential to improve PrU prevention practices, to increase resident movement, which can subsequently lead to a reduction in PrUs.

  11. Noninfectious genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Kirshen, Carly; Edwards, Libby

    2015-12-01

    Noninfectious genital ulcers are much more common than ulcers arising from infections. Still, it is important to take a thorough history of sexual activity and a sexual abuse screen. A physical exam should include skin, oral mucosa, nails, hair, vulva, and vaginal mucosa if needed. The differential diagnosis of noninfectious genital ulcers includes: lipschütz ulcers, complex aphthosis, Behçet's syndrome, vulvar metastatic Crohn's disease, hidradenitis suppurativa, pyoderma gangrenosum, pressure ulcers, and malignancies. It is important to come to the correct diagnosis to avoid undue testing, stress, and anxiety in patients experiencing genital ulcerations. PMID:26650697

  12. Predictive capacity of risk assessment scales and clinical judgment for pressure ulcers: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Francisco Pedro; Pancorbo-Hidalgo, Pedro L; Agreda, J Javier Soldevilla

    2014-01-01

    A systematic review with meta-analysis was completed to determine the capacity of risk assessment scales and nurses' clinical judgment to predict pressure ulcer (PU) development. Electronic databases were searched for prospective studies on the validity and predictive capacity of PUs risk assessment scales published between 1962 and 2010 in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Korean, German, and Greek. We excluded gray literature sources, integrative review articles, and retrospective or cross-sectional studies. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed according to the guidelines of the Critical Appraisal Skills Program. Predictive capacity was measured as relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals. When 2 or more valid original studies were found, a meta-analysis was conducted using a random-effect model and sensitivity analysis. We identified 57 studies, including 31 that included a validation study. We also retrieved 4 studies that tested clinical judgment as a risk prediction factor. Meta-analysis produced the following pooled predictive capacity indicators: Braden (RR = 4.26); Norton (RR = 3.69); Waterlow (RR = 2.66); Cubbin-Jackson (RR = 8.63); EMINA (RR = 6.17); Pressure Sore Predictor Scale (RR = 21.4); and clinical judgment (RR = 1.89). Pooled analysis of 11 studies found adequate risk prediction capacity in various clinical settings; the Braden, Norton, EMINA (mEntal state, Mobility, Incontinence, Nutrition, Activity), Waterlow, and Cubbin-Jackson scales showed the highest predictive capacity. The clinical judgment of nurses was found to achieve inadequate predictive capacity when used alone, and should be used in combination with a validated scale. PMID:24280770

  13. A Randomized, Controlled Trial to Assess the Effect of Topical Insulin Versus Normal Saline in Pressure Ulcer Healing.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Shine; Agnihotri, Meenakshi; Kaur, Sukhpal

    2016-06-01

    Insulin has been used in wound healing to increase wound collagen, granulation tissue, wound tensile strength, and local production of insulin-like growth factors by fibroblasts. Saline is a widely used irrigating and wound dressing solution. Patients admitted to an acute care facility who had a Grade 2 or Grade 3 pressure ulcer were recruited to participate in a randomized, controlled trial to compare the effect of normal saline-impregnated gauze and insulin dressing in pressure ulcer healing. Persons with immunodeficiency, diabetes mellitus, pregnancy, osteomyelitis, and peripheral vascular illness were not eligible for the study. Study participants were randomized to receive either normal saline dressing gauze or insulin dressing twice daily for 7 days. At baseline, patient demographic data and ulcer history were recorded. Baseline and follow-up ulcer assessments (days 4 and day 7) included ulcer measurement (length and width) and completion of the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH version 3.0) tool. Patients in the control group received dressings of sterile gauze soaked with normal saline; patients in the intervention group received topical insulin (1 U/cm2 wound area). The insulin was sprayed over the wound surface with an insulin syringe, allowed to dry for 15 minutes, and then covered with sterile gauze. To ascertain the safety of study participants, blood glucose levels were measured with a glucometer 10 minutes before and 1 hour after the topical insulin application in the intervention group. Treatment efficacy was deter- mined by assessing the reduction in wound area and PUSH scores at follow-up. Statistical analysis was performed; data are expressed as mean ± SD and percentage for continuous and categorical variables respectively. The differences in PUSH score and ulcer sizes between the 2 groups were analyzed using independent t-test, and within-group differences were analyzed using ANOVA with repeated measures; Greenhouse-Geisser correction was

  14. Reliability of Pressure Ulcer Rates: How Precisely Can We Differentiate Among Hospital Units, and Does the Standard Signal-Noise Reliability Measure Reflect This Precision?

    PubMed

    Staggs, Vincent S; Cramer, Emily

    2016-08-01

    Hospital performance reports often include rankings of unit pressure ulcer rates. Differentiating among units on the basis of quality requires reliable measurement. Our objectives were to describe and apply methods for assessing reliability of hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates and evaluate a standard signal-noise reliability measure as an indicator of precision of differentiation among units. Quarterly pressure ulcer data from 8,199 critical care, step-down, medical, surgical, and medical-surgical nursing units from 1,299 US hospitals were analyzed. Using beta-binomial models, we estimated between-unit variability (signal) and within-unit variability (noise) in annual unit pressure ulcer rates. Signal-noise reliability was computed as the ratio of between-unit variability to the total of between- and within-unit variability. To assess precision of differentiation among units based on ranked pressure ulcer rates, we simulated data to estimate the probabilities of a unit's observed pressure ulcer rate rank in a given sample falling within five and ten percentiles of its true rank, and the probabilities of units with ulcer rates in the highest quartile and highest decile being identified as such. We assessed the signal-noise measure as an indicator of differentiation precision by computing its correlations with these probabilities. Pressure ulcer rates based on a single year of quarterly or weekly prevalence surveys were too susceptible to noise to allow for precise differentiation among units, and signal-noise reliability was a poor indicator of precision of differentiation. To ensure precise differentiation on the basis of true differences, alternative methods of assessing reliability should be applied to measures purported to differentiate among providers or units based on quality. © 2016 The Authors. Research in Nursing & Health published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27223598

  15. Risk Assessment Tool for Pressure Ulcer Development in Indian Surgical Wards.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sushma; Sharma, Deborshi; Rana, Anshika; Pathak, Reetesh; Lal, Romesh; Kumar, Ajay; Biswal, U C

    2015-06-01

    The aims of this paper were to compare the predictive validity of three pressure ulcer (PU) risk scales-the Norton scale, the Braden scale, and the Waterlow scale-and to choose the most appropriate calculator for predicting PU risk in surgical wards of India. This is an observational prospective cohort study in a tertiary educational hospital in New Delhi among 100 surgical ward patients from April to July 2011. The main outcomes measured included sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PVP) and negative predictive value (PVN), and the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of the three PU risk assessment scales. Based on the cutoff points found most appropriate in this study, the sensitivity, specificity, PVP, and PVN were as follows: the Norton scale (cutoff, 16) had the values of 95.6, 93.5, 44.8, and 98.6, respectively; the Braden scale (cutoff, 17) had values of 100, 89.6, 42.5, and 100, respectively; and the Waterlow scale (cutoff, 11) had 91.3, 84.4, 38.8, and 97, respectively. According to the ROC curve, the Norton scale is the most appropriate tool. Factors such as physical condition, activity, mobility, body mass index (BMI), nutrition, friction, and shear are extremely significant in determining risk of PU development (p < 0.0001). The Norton scale is most effective in predicting PU risk in Indian surgical wards. BMI, mobility, activity, nutrition, friction, and shear are the most significant factors in Indian surgical ward settings with necessity for future comparison with established scales. PMID:26246703

  16. The efficacy of negative pressure wound therapy on chemotherapeutic extravasation ulcers: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Iscı, Evren; Canter, Halil I.; Dadacı, Mehmet; Atılla, Pergin; Cakar, Ayse N.; Kecık, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Context: The extravasation of the chemotherapeutic agents is not an unusual phenomenon. Necrosis of the skin and underlying structures has been reported, depending on the cytotoxicity of the extravasating drug. Despite the presence of some antidotes, such wounds tend to enlarge with time and are likely to resist the treatment. Aims: The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) on extravasation ulcers. Settings and Design: Animals were separated into two groups; conventional dressing group and NPWT group. Materials and Methods: Extravasation necrosis was established by intradermal doxorubicin injection. Following the debridement of the necrotic areas, one group of animals was treated with the conventional dressing while NPWT was applied to the other group. The wound areas were measured, and then biopsies were taken on the 3rd, 7th and 14th days after the debridement. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS 11.5 for Windows was used. Two-way ANOVA test was used to compare wound areas between groups. Willcoxon sign test with Bonferroni correction was used to compare histological scores between groups. Chi-square test with Bonferroni correction was used to compare histological scores within the group between the days. Results: There is no significant difference in terms of inflammatory cell count, neovascularisation, granulation tissue formation between the groups. Contrary to these results wound areas at the end of the treatment were smaller in the NPWT group compared with the dressing group. Conclusion: There is the superiority of NPWT over conventional dressing in chemotherapeutic extravasation wounds as well as the wound area is concerned, but it is not proven histologically. PMID:25593426

  17. Subepidermal moisture surrounding pressure ulcers in persons with a spinal cord injury: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Harrow, Jeffrey John; Mayrovitz, Harvey N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Characterization of a non-invasive method of quantifying subepidermal moisture (SEM) surrounding stages III and IV pressure ulcers (PrUs) in spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Prospective, single-visit, single-rater, observational study, using repeated-measures analysis. Method Setting-inpatient units of one VA SCI Center. Participants Convenience sample of 16 subjects with SCI with stage III or IV PrUs over sacrum or ischium. Interventions Measurement with the MoistureMeter-D, a hand-held device using 300 MHz electromagnetic waves. Outcome measures Dielectric constant, a dimensionless number which increases with the moisture content. Each subject had a PrU site and a control site. Measurements were made at each site, on intact skin, at four points spaced angularly around the site, in triplicate. Results (1) Short-term, single-rater relative error was 2.5%. (2) Order effect: first readings were higher than second readings in 55 of 64 measurement sets. Order effect was significant for control sites (P < 0.0001) but not for PrU sites. (3) Angular effect: SEM varied by angle at the PrU sites (P < 0.01); 12 o'clock position the highest and 6 o'clock the lowest. (4) Ability to differentiate PrUs from intact skin: SEM at PrU sites was greater by 9.0% than control sites (P < 0.05). (5) Site effect: SEM was higher at sacral locations than ischial at control sites by 20% (P < 0.005). Conclusions SEM differentiates PrUs from intact skin. Future study designs must take into account order, angular, and site effects on this measure. This information will inform designers of future studies of SEM in healing of PrUs. PMID:25398030

  18. Contextual Facilitators of and Barriers to Nursing Home Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Christine W.; Solomon, Jeffrey; Palmer, Jennifer A.; Lukas, Carol VanDeusen

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Important gaps exist in the knowledge of how to achieve successful, sustained prevention of pressure ulcers (PrUs) in nursing homes. This study aimed to address those gaps by comparing nursing leadership and indirect care staff members’ impressions about the context of PrU prevention in facilities with improving and declining PrU rates. SETTING The study was conducted in a sample of 6 Veterans Health Administration nursing homes (known as community living centers) purposively selected to represent a range of PrU care performance. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS One-time 30-minute semistructured interviews with 23 community living center staff were conducted. Qualitative interview data were analyzed using an analytic framework containing (a) a priori analytic constructs based on the study’s conceptual framework and (b) sections for emerging constructs. MAIN RESULTS Analysis revealed 6 key concepts differentiating sites with improving and declining PrU care performance. These concepts were (1) structures through which the change effort is initiated; (2) organizational prioritization, alignment, and support; (3) improvement culture; (4) clarity of roles and responsibilities; (5) communication strategies; and (6) staffing and clinical practices. Results also pointed to potential contextual facilitators of and barriers to successful PrU prevention. CONCLUSIONS Leadership’s visible prioritization of and support for PrU prevention and the initiation of PrU prevention activities through formal structures were the most striking components represented at sites with improving performance, but not at ones where performance declined. Sites with improving performance were more likely to align frontline staff and leadership goals for PrU prevention. PMID:27089151

  19. VAC Therapy in Large Infected Sacral Pressure Ulcer Grade IV-Can Be an Alternative to Flap Reconstruction?

    PubMed

    Batra, R K; Aseeja, Veena

    2014-04-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a new entrant in wound care after growth factors and alginate or hydrocolloid dressing, in the treatment of pressure ulcers. We have been using this technique for diabetic foot ulcers. A young nondiabetic man presented with a large sacral bed sore after high doses of ionotropes in an intensive care unit for treating severe hypotension. His wound was debrided, and instead of flap surgery in such infected wound, he was treated with VAC therapy. The complete wound healing was achieved in 6 weeks and at half the cost of flap surgery. Moreover, the chances of flap failure and its related complications were eliminated. PMID:24891788

  20. Implementing trials of complex interventions in community settings: The USC – Rancho Los Amigos Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study (PUPS)

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Florence; Pyatak, Elizabeth A.; Carlson, Mike; Blanche, Erna Imperatore; Vigen, Cheryl; Hay, Joel; Mallinson, Trudy; Blanchard, Jeanine; Unger, Jennifer B.; Garber, Susan L.; Diaz, Jesus; Florindez, Lucia I.; Atkins, Michal; Rubayi, Salah; Azen, Stanley Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Randomized trials of complex, non-pharmacologic interventions implemented in home and community settings, such as the University of Southern California (USC)–Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center (RLANRC) Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study (PUPS), present unique challenges with respect to: (a) participant recruitment and retention, (b) intervention delivery and fidelity, (c) randomization and assessment, and (d) potential inadvertent treatment effects. Purpose We describe the methods employed to address the challenges confronted in implementing PUPS. In this randomized controlled trial, we are assessing the efficacy of a complex, preventive intervention in reducing the incidence of, and costs associated with, the development of medically serious pressure ulcers in people with spinal cord injury. Method Individuals with spinal cord injury recruited from RLANRC were assigned to either a 12-month preventive intervention group or a standard care control group. The primary outcome is the incidence of serious pressure ulcers with secondary endpoints including ulcer-related surgeries, medical treatment costs, and quality of life. These outcomes are assessed at 12 and 24 months after randomization. Additionally, we are studying the mediating mechanisms that account for intervention outcomes. Results PUPS has been successfully implemented, including recruitment of the target sample size of 170 participants, assurance of the integrity of intervention protocol delivery with an average 90% treatment adherence rate, and enactment of the assessment plan. However, implementation has been replete with challenges. To meet recruitment goals, we instituted a five-pronged approach customized for an underserved, ethnically diverse population. In intervention delivery, we increased staff time to overcome economic and cultural barriers to retention and adherence. To ensure treatment fidelity and replicability, we monitored intervention protocol delivery in accord

  1. [Gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Matsui, Shigenaga; Kashida, Hiroshi; Asakuma, Yutaka; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2015-07-01

    Recently, the acid secretion amount is increased by westernization of foods and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infected patient's decrease in Japanese. Therefore, the recent tendencies are decrease of peptic ulcer diseases by H. pylori infection and increase of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs(NSAIDs) ulcers. The endoscopic hemostasis should be performed for upper gastrointestinal bleeding from peptic ulcers in the first choice. A surgery or interventional radiology (IVR) should be performed in the unsuccessfulness of endoscopic hemostasis. H. pylori eradication therapy is effective for healing and prevention of recurrence from peptic ulcers. For prevention of recurrence of NSAIDs ulcers, therapy with proton pump inhibitor is effective. PMID:26165067

  2. Pressure ulcer prevention algorithm content validation: a mixed-methods, quantitative study.

    PubMed

    van Rijswijk, Lia; Beitz, Janice M

    2015-04-01

    Translating pressure ulcer prevention (PUP) evidence-based recommendations into practice remains challenging for a variety of reasons, including the perceived quality, validity, and usability of the research or the guideline itself. Following the development and face validation testing of an evidence-based PUP algorithm, additional stakeholder input and testing were needed. Using convenience sampling methods, wound care experts attending a national wound care conference and a regional wound ostomy continence nursing (WOCN) conference and/or graduates of a WOCN program were invited to participate in an Internal Review Board-approved, mixed-methods quantitative survey with qualitative components to examine algorithm content validity. After participants provided written informed consent, demographic variables were collected and participants were asked to comment on and rate the relevance and appropriateness of each of the 26 algorithm decision points/steps using standard content validation study procedures. All responses were anonymous. Descriptive summary statistics, mean relevance/appropriateness scores, and the content validity index (CVI) were calculated. Qualitative comments were transcribed and thematically analyzed. Of the 553 wound care experts invited, 79 (average age 52.9 years, SD 10.1; range 23-73) consented to participate and completed the study (a response rate of 14%). Most (67, 85%) were female, registered (49, 62%) or advanced practice (12, 15%) nurses, and had > 10 years of health care experience (88, 92%). Other health disciplines included medical doctors, physical therapists, nurse practitioners, and certified nurse specialists. Almost all had received formal wound care education (75, 95%). On a Likert-type scale of 1 (not relevant/appropriate) to 4 (very relevant and appropriate), the average score for the entire algorithm/all decision points (N = 1,912) was 3.72 with an overall CVI of 0.94 (out of 1). The only decision point/step recommendation

  3. Individualization of a Manualized Pressure Ulcer Prevention Program: Targeting Risky Life Circumstances Through a Community-Based Intervention for People with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Vaishampayan, Ashwini; Clark, Florence; Carlson, Mike; Blanche, Erna Imperatore

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To sensitize practitioners working with individuals with spinal cord injury to the complex life circumstances that are implicated in the development of pressure ulcers, and to document the ways that interventions can be adapted to target individual needs. Methods Content analysis of weekly fidelity/ quality control meetings that were undertaken as part of a lifestyle intervention for pressure ulcer prevention in community-dwelling adults with spinal cord injury. Results Four types of lifestyle-relevant challenges to ulcer prevention were identified: risk-elevating life circumstances, communication difficulties, equipment problems, and individual personality issues. Intervention flexibility was achieved by changing the order of treatment modules, altering the intervention content or delivery approach, or going beyond the stipulated content. Conclusion Attention to recurrent types of individual needs, along with explicit strategies for tailoring manualized interventions, has potential to enhance pressure ulcer prevention efforts for adults with spinal cord injury. Target audience This continuing education article is intended for practitioners interested in learning about a comprehensive, context-sensitive, community-based pressure ulcer prevention program for people with spinal cord injury. Objectives After reading this article, the reader should be able to: Describe some of the contextual factors that increase pressure ulcer risk in people with spinal cord injury living in the community.Distinguish between tailored and individualized intervention approaches.Identify the issues that must be taken into account to design context-sensitive, community-based pressure ulcer prevention programs for people with spinal cord injury.Describe approaches that can be used to individualize manualized interventions. PMID:21586911

  4. Treatment of pressure ulcers in patients with declining renal function using arginine, glutamine and ß-hydroxy-ß-methylbutyrate.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Y; Yuki, N; Sukegane, A; Nishi, T; Miyake, Y; Sato, H; Miyamoto, C; Mihara, C

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the efficacy on healing pressure ulcers (PU) of using a supplement combination containing arginine, glutamine and ß-hydroxy-ß-methylbutyrate, which was given to two elderly patients with renal dysfunction. The PU was surgically opened, decompressed and treated by drugs. A half quantity of the defined dose of the supplement combination, with an enteral nutrition product, was administered to the patients twice a day. This combination improved the PUs, with no effect on renal function. This novel finding may provide a nutritional rationale of arginine, glutamine and ß-hydroxy-ß-methylbutyrate for PUs associated with renal dysfunction. PMID:26488739

  5. Pressure ulcer knowledge of registered nurses, assistant nurses and student nurses: a descriptive, comparative multicentre study in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Gunningberg, Lena; Mårtensson, Gunilla; Mamhidir, Anna-Greta; Florin, Jan; Muntlin Athlin, Åsa; Bååth, Carina

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and compare the knowledge of registered nurses (RNs), assistant nurses (ANs) and student nurses (SNs) about preventing pressure ulcers (PUs). PU prevention behaviours in the clinical practice of RNs and ANs were also explored. A descriptive, comparative multicentre study was performed. Hospital wards and universities from four Swedish county councils participated. In total, 415 participants (RN, AN and SN) completed the Pressure Ulcer Knowledge Assessment Tool. The mean knowledge score for the sample was 58·9%. The highest scores were found in the themes 'nutrition' (83·1%) and 'risk assessment' (75·7%). The lowest scores were found in the themes 'reduction in the amount of pressure and shear' (47·5%) and 'classification and observation' (55·5%). RNs and SNs had higher scores than ANs on 'aetiology and causes'. SNs had higher scores than RNs and ANs on 'nutrition'. It has been concluded that there is a knowledge deficit in PU prevention among nursing staff in Sweden. A major educational campaign needs to be undertaken both in hospital settings and in nursing education. PMID:23919728

  6. The use of alternating mattresses in the management and prevention of pressure ulcers in a community setting.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Sylvie

    2016-09-01

    The district nurse and community nurse has a duty of care to provide the most appropriate care for any individual who is at risk of pressure injury. This is often difficult as time constraints mean that education can be absent or reliant on other nurses who may not be up to date with the latest thinking on prevention. Also, district and community nurses cannot be in a patient's home 24 hours a day in order to provide the turning regime that is required for prevention of pressure ulcers. Therefore, they are reliant on education for the carers and provision of the most appropriate equipment for the individual patient. It is vital that the carer not only knows what to look for, but also what to do if any redness is noted and who to call. This article will provide tips on mattress types for the high-risk patient who may or may not have a pressure injury. PMID:27594310

  7. Effect of Laser Irradiation at Different Wavelengths (940, 808, and 658 nm) on Pressure Ulcer Healing: Results from a Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Taradaj, J.; Halski, T.; Kucharzewski, M.; Urbanek, T.; Halska, U.; Kucio, C.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of laser therapy (at different wavelengths: 940, 808, and 658 nm) for treating pressure ulcers. The primary endpoint in this trial included both the percentage reduction of the ulcer surface area and the percentage of completely healed wounds after one month of therapy (ulcer healing rate). The secondary endpoint was the ulcer healing rate at the follow-up evaluation (3 months after the end of the study). In total, 72 patients with stage II and III pressure ulcers received laser therapy once daily, 5 times per week for 1 month using a (GaAlAs) diode laser with a maximum output power of 50 mW and continuous radiation emission. Three separate wavelengths were used for the laser treatment: 940 nm (group I), 808 nm (group II), and 658 nm (group III). An average dose of 4 J/cm2 was applied. In group IV, a placebo was applied (laser device was turned off). The laser therapy at a wavelength of 658 nm appeared to be effective at healing pressure ulcers. The wavelengths of 808 and 940 nm did not have any effect in our study. PMID:24159357

  8. A Real World, Observational Registry of Chronic Wounds and Ulcers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Diabetic Foot; Varicose Ulcer; Pressure Ulcer; Surgical Wound Dehiscence; Vasculitis; Skin Ulcer; Leg Ulcer; Wounds and Injuries; Pyoderma; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Diabetic Neuropathies; Lymphedema; Venous Insufficiency; Diabetes Complications; Amputation Stump

  9. Effects of pressure ulcer classification system education programme on knowledge and visual differential diagnostic ability of pressure ulcer classification and incontinence-associated dermatitis for clinical nurses in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Jin; Kim, Jung Yoon

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pressure ulcer classification system education on clinical nurses' knowledge and visual differential diagnostic ability of pressure ulcer (PU) classification and incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD). One group pre and post-test was used. A convenience sample of 407 nurses, participating in PU classification education programme of continuing education, were enrolled. The education programme was composed of a 50-minute lecture on PU classification and case-studies. The PU Classification system and IAD knowledge test (PUCS-KT) and visual differential diagnostic ability tool (VDDAT), consisting of 21 photographs including clinical information were used. Paired t-test was performed using SPSS/WIN 20.0. The overall mean difference of PUCS-KT (t = -11·437, P<0·001) and VDDAT (t = -21·113, P<0·001) was significantly increased after PU classification education. Overall understanding of six PU classification and IAD after education programme was increased, but lacked visual differential diagnostic ability regarding Stage III PU, suspected deep tissue injury (SDTI), and Unstageable. Continuous differentiated education based on clinical practice is needed to improve knowledge and visual differential diagnostic ability for PU classification, and comparison experiment study is required to examine effects of education programmes. PMID:26847936

  10. Membrane permeability during pressure ulcer formation: A computational model of dynamic competition between cytoskeletal damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, N Suhas; Tucker-Kellogg, Lisa

    2016-05-24

    Pressure ulcers are debilitating wounds that arise frequently in people who have lost mobility. Mechanical stress, oxidative stress and ischemia-reperfusion injury are potential sources of damage during pressure ulcer formation, but cross-talk between these sources has rarely been investigated. In vitro experiments with mechanically-induced cell damage previously demonstrated that non-lethal amounts of static cell deformation could induce myoblast membrane permeabilization. Permeabilization, in turn, has the potential to induce oxidative stress via leakage of calcium, myoglobin or alarmins. In this work, we constructed a hypothetical causal network of cellular-scale effects resulting from deformation and permeabilization, and we investigated the theoretical sensitivity of cell death toward various parameters and pathways of the model. Simulations showed that the survival/death outcome was particularly sensitive to the speed of membrane repair. The outcome was also sensitive to whether oxidative stress could decrease the speed of membrane repair. Finally, using the assumption that apoptosis and necrosis would have opposite effects on membrane leakage in dying cells, we showed that promoting apoptosis might under certain conditions have the paradoxical effect of decreasing, rather than increasing, total cell death. Our work illustrates that apoptosis may have hidden benefits at preventing spatial spread of death. More broadly, our work shows the importance of membrane repair dynamics and highlights the need for experiments to measure the effects of ischemia, apoptosis induction, and other co-occurring sources of cell stress toward the speed of membrane repair. PMID:26772800

  11. An Approach to Acquiring, Normalizing, and Managing EHR Data From a Clinical Data Repository for Studying Pressure Ulcer Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Padula, William V; Blackshaw, Leon; Brindle, C Tod; Volchenboum, Samuel L

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the methods that individual facilities follow to collect and store data related to hospital-acquired pressure ulcer (HAPU) occurrences are essential for improving patient outcomes and advancing our understanding the science behind this clinically relevant issue. Using an established electronic health record system at a large, urban, tertiary-care academic medical center, we investigated the process required for taking raw data of HAPU outcomes and submitting these data to a normalization process. We extracted data from 1.5 million patient shifts and filtered observations to those with a Braden score and linked tables in the electronic health record, including (1) Braden scale scores, (2) laboratory outcomes data, (3) surgical time, (4) provider orders, (5) medications, and (6) discharge diagnoses. Braden scores are important measures specific to HAPUs since these scores clarify the daily risk of a hospitalized patient for developing a pressure ulcer. The other more common measures that may be associated with HAPU outcomes are important to organize in a single data frame with Braden scores according to each patient. Primary keys were assigned to each table, and the data were processed through 3 normalization steps and 1 denormalization step. These processes created 8 tables that can be stored efficiently in a clinical database of HAPU outcomes. As hospitals focus on organizing data for review of HAPUs and other types of hospital-acquired conditions, the normalization process we describe in this article offers directions for collaboration between providers and informatics teams using a common language and structure. PMID:26727681

  12. Bacteremia due to Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. urealyticus caused by infected pressure ulcer: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Soldera, Jonathan; Nedel, Wagner Luis; Cardoso, Paulo Ricardo Cerveira; d'Azevedo, Pedro Alves

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT Coagulase-negative staphylococci are common colonizers of the human skin and have become increasingly recognized as agents of clinically significant nosocomial infections. CASE REPORT The case of a 79-year-old male patient with multi-infarct dementia who presented systemic inflammatory response syndrome is reported. This was attributed to bacteremia due to Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. urealyticus, which was grown on blood cultures originating from an infected pressure ulcer. The few cases of Staphylococcus cohnii infection reported in the literature consist of bacteremia relating to catheters, surgical prostheses, acute cholecystitis, brain abscess, endocarditis, pneumonia, urinary tract infection and septic arthritis, generally presenting a multiresistant profile, with nearly 90% resistance to methicillin. CONCLUSIONS The reported case is, to our knowledge, the first case of true bacteremia due to Staphylococcus cohnii subsp. urealyticus caused by an infected pressure ulcer. It shows that this species may be underdiagnosed and should be considered in the differential diagnosis for community-acquired skin infections. PMID:23538597

  13. A non-randomised, controlled clinical trial of an innovative device for negative pressure wound therapy of pressure ulcers in traumatic paraplegia patients.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Rajeshwar N; Dwivedi, Mukesh K; Bhagat, Amit K; Raj, Saloni; Agarwal, Rajiv; Chandra, Abhijit

    2016-06-01

    The conventional methods of treatment of pressure ulcers (PUs) by serial debridement and daily dressings require prolonged hospitalisation, associated with considerable morbidity. There is, however, recent evidence to suggest that negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) accelerates healing. The commercial devices for NPWT are costly, cumbersome, and electricity dependent. We compared PU wound healing in traumatic paraplegia patients by conventional dressing and by an innovative negative pressure device (NPD). In this prospective, non-randomised trial, 48 traumatic paraplegia patients with PUs of stages 3 and 4 were recruited. Patients were divided into two groups: group A (n = 24) received NPWT with our NPD, and group B (n = 24) received conventional methods of dressing. All patients were followed up for 9 weeks. At week 9, all patients on NPD showed a statistically significant improvement in PU healing in terms of slough clearance, granulation tissue formation, wound discharge and culture. A significant reduction in wound size and ulcer depth was observed in NPD as compared with conventional methods at all follow-up time points (P = 0·0001). NPWT by the innovative device heals PUs at a significantly higher rate than conventional treatment. The device is safe, easy to apply and cost-effective. PMID:24894079

  14. Evaluation of a new sitting concept designed for prevention of pressure ulcer on the buttock using finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Dohyung; Lin, Fang; Hendrix, Ronald W.; Moran, Brian; Fasanati, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Excessive compressive load induces pressure related soft tissue damage, i.e. pressure ulcer (PU), in buttock area in wheelchair users. In solving this problem, our previous study has introduced a concept of Off-Loading sitting, which partially removes the ischial support to reduce pressure under buttocks. However, the effect of this sitting concept has only been evaluated using the interface pressure and tissue perfusion measurements. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the Off-Loading posture for its ability to reduce internal pressure and stress in deep buttock tissues. This evaluation was performed on a 3D finite element (FE) model which was established and validated in a sitting posture and has realistic material properties and boundary conditions. FE analysis in this study confirmed that the pressure relief provided by Off-Loading posture created profound effect in reducing the mechanical stress within deep tissues. It was concluded that Off-Loading posture may prove beneficial in preventing sitting related PU. PMID:17922158

  15. Enteral n-3 fatty acids and micronutrients enhance percentage of positive neutrophil and lymphocyte adhesion molecules: a potential mediator of pressure ulcer healing in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Theilla, Miriam; Schwartz, Betty; Zimra, Yael; Shapiro, Haim; Anbar, Ronit; Rabizadeh, Esther; Cohen, Jonathan; Singer, Pierre

    2012-04-01

    n-3 Fatty acids are recognised as influencing both wound healing and immunity. We assessed the impact of a fish oil- and micronutrient-enriched formula (study formula) on the healing of pressure ulcers and on immune function in critically ill patients in an intensive care unit. A total of forty patients with pressure ulcers and receiving nutritional support were enrolled (intervention group, n 20, received study formula; and a control group, n 20, received an isoenergetic formula). Total and differential leucocyte count and percentage of adhesion molecule positive granulocyte and lymphocyte cells (CD11a, CD11b, CD18 and CD49b) were measured on days 0, 7 and 14. Percentage of positive lymphocytes for CD54, CD49b, CD49d and CD8 were also measured on days 0, 7 and 14. The state of pressure ulcers was assessed by using the pressure ulcer scale for healing tool score on days 7, 14 and 28 of treatment. No between-group differences in patient demographics, anthropometry or diagnostic class were observed. Patients who received the study formula showed significant increases in the percentage of positive CD18 and CD11a lymphocytes and of CD49b granulocytes as compared to controls (P < 0·05). While the severity of pressure ulcers was not significantly different between the two groups on admission, severity increased significantly over time for the control group (P < 0·05), but not for the study group. The present study suggests that a fish oil- and micronutrient-enriched formula may prevent worsening of pressure ulcers and that this effect may be mediated by an effect on adhesion molecule expression. PMID:22040465

  16. A retrospective cohort study evaluating efficacy in high-risk patients with chronic lower extremity ulcers treated with negative pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Yao, Min; Fabbi, Matteo; Hayashi, Hisae; Park, Nanjin; Attala, Khaled; Gu, Gousheng; French, Michael A; Driver, Vickie R

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) compared with standard of care on wound healing in high-risk patients with multiple significant comorbidities and chronic lower extremity ulcers (LEUs) across the continuum of care settings. A retrospective cohort study of 'real-world' high-risk patients was conducted using Boston University Medical Center electronic medical records, along with chart abstraction to capture detailed medical history, comorbidities, healing outcomes and ulcer characteristics. A total of 342 patients, 171 NPWT patients with LEUs were matched with 171 non-NPWT patients with respect to age and gender, were included in this cohort from 2002 to 2010. The hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated by COX proportional hazard models after adjusting for potential confounders. The NPWT patients were 2·63 times (95% CI = 1·87-3·70) more likely to achieve wound closure compared with non-NPWT patients. Moreover, incidence of wound closure in NPWT patients were increased in diabetic ulcers (HR = 3·26, 95% CI = 2·21-4·83), arterial ulcers (HR = 2·27, CI = 1·56-3·78) and venous ulcers (HR = 6·31, 95% CI = 1·49-26·6) compared with non-NPWT patients. In addition, wound healing appeared to be positively affected by the timing of NPWT application. Compared with later NPWT users (1 year or later after ulcer onset), early NPWT users (within 3 months after ulcer onset) and intermediate NPWT users (4-12 months after ulcer onset) were 3·38 and 2·18 times more likely to achieve wound healing, respectively. This study showed that despite the greater significant comorbidities, patients receiving NPWT healed faster. Early use of NPWT demonstrated better healing. The longer the interval before intervention is with NPWT, the higher the correlation is with poor outcome. PMID:23163962

  17. Venous Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  18. TexiCare: an innovative embedded device for pressure ulcer prevention. Preliminary results with a paraplegic volunteer.

    PubMed

    Chenu, Olivier; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Bucki, Marek; Diot, Bruno; Cannard, Francis; Payan, Yohan

    2013-08-01

    This paper introduces the recently developed TexiCare device that aims at preventing pressure ulcers for people with spinal cord injury. This embedded device is aimed to be mounted on the user wheelchair. Its sensor is 100% textile and allows the measurement of pressures at the interface between the cushion and the buttocks. It is comfortable, washable and low cost. It is connected to a cigarette-box sized unit that (i) measures the pressures in real time, (ii) estimates the risk for internal over-strains, and (iii) alerts the wheelchair user whenever necessary. The alert method has been defined as a result of a utility/usability/acceptability study conducted with representative end users. It is based on a tactile-visual feedback (via a watch or a smartphone for example): the tactile modality is used to discreetly alarm the person while the visual modality conveys an informative message. In order to evaluate the usability of the TexiCare device, a paraplegic volunteer equipped his wheelchair at home during a six months period. Interestingly, the first results revealed bad habits such as an inadequate posture when watching TV, rare relief maneuvers, and the occurrence of abnormal high pressures. PMID:23791763

  19. Prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers in a university hospital centre: a correlational study examining nurses' knowledge and best practice.

    PubMed

    Claudia, Gallant; Diane, Morin; Daphney, St-Germain; Danièle, Dallaire

    2010-04-01

    This descriptive correlational study had the goal of exploring if relationships existed between the level of knowledge of nurses concerning pressure ulcers, certain nurses' characteristics and the preventive care they applied. A multi-method approach was taken using a questionnaire to measure the level of knowledge of nurses (n = 256) and chart audits (n = 235) to identify the preventive care applied. The results show that the level of knowledge of the nurses is insufficient. They also show a correlation between a higher level of knowledge and (i) the sector of activities in which the nurses are working, (ii) the training periods provided by the university hospital centre, and a (iii) good perception by the nurses of their level of knowledge. However, training on its own cannot guarantee the provision of quality health care, as there is a wide discrepancy between what nurses know and what they put into practice. PMID:20487064

  20. Understanding recent regulatory guidelines for hospital-acquired catheter-related urinary tract infections and pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Hess, Cathy Thomas; Rook, Lucinda J

    2007-12-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services issued a final rule to update the hospital inpatient prospective payment system for fiscal year 2008. Included in this new ruling is the need to identify conditions present on admission as well as guidelines underscoring that payment will not be rendered for certain conditions determined to be hospital-acquired. Two of the eight conditions affect patients with incontinence: catheter-associated urinary tract infections and pressure ulcers. These conditions, if present on admission to an acute care facility, must be identified by the clinical staff and the attending physician. For patients admitted without these conditions, evidence-based, preventive protocols of care must be implemented in order to provide optimal care and prevent costly complications. PMID:18184981

  1. Perioperative Use of Bispectral Monitor (BIS) for a Pressure Ulcer patient with Lock-In Syndrome (LIS)

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Christine; Ayello, Elizabeth A.; Robins, Bryan; Salamanca, Victor R.; Bloom, Marc J.; Linton, Patrick; Brem, Harold; O'Neill, Daniel K.

    2013-01-01

    The bispectral (BIS) monitor uses brain electroencephalographic data to measure depth of sedation and pharmacological response during anesthetic procedures. In this case, the BIS monitor was used for another purpose, to demonstrate postoperatively to the nursing staff that a patient with history of locked-in syndrome (LIS), who underwent pressure ulcer debridement, had periods of wakefulness and apparent sensation, even with his eyes closed. Furthermore, as patients with LIS can feel pain, despite being unable to move, local block or general anesthesia should be provided for sharp surgical debridement and other painful procedures. This use of the BIS has shown that as a general rule, the staff should treat the patient as though he might be awake and sensate even if he does not open his eyes or move his limbs. Our goal was to continuously monitor pain level and communicate these findings to the entire wound team, ie anesthesiologists, surgeons, and nurses. PMID:25252146

  2. [Leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Unger, L; Stelzner, C; Machetanz, J; Schellong, S

    2013-11-01

    The lower leg is in particular prone to the development of ulceration. Many different causes may lead to ulceration. Thus, a thorough diagnosis is mandatory, and a biopsy is often required. By far the most common type is the classical venous ulcer due to chronic venous insufficiency, located at the medial ankle. A more complicated-and more difficult to treat-type of venous ulcer is arthrogenic congestion syndrome with its extreme variant of a "legging" ulcer. In cases with severe peripheral arterial disease, an arterial ulcer may develop. The hypertensive ulcer Martorell is associated with arterial hypertension and diabetes; the underlying pathology is occlusion of arteriolar vessels. A typical diabetic ulceration is the necrobiosis lipoidica. Important differential diagnoses of leg ulceration include pyoderma gangrenosum and the calciphylactic ulcer. Due to a long-standing course, an ulceration may turn malignant. Vice versa, ulceration may occur as sign of a primary malignant lesion. PMID:24005788

  3. The Relationship Among Evidence-Based Practice and Client Dyspnea, Pain, Falls, and Pressure Ulcer Outcomes in the Community Setting

    PubMed Central

    Doran, Diane; Lefebre, Nancy; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Estabrook, Carole A; White, Peggy; Carryer, Jennifer; Sun, Winnie; Qian, Gan; Bai, Yu Qing (Chris); Li, Mingyang

    2014-01-01

    Background There are gaps in knowledge about the extent to which home care nurses’ practice is based on best evidence and whether evidence-based practice impacts patient outcomes. Aim The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between evidence-based practice and client pain, dyspnea, falls, and pressure ulcer outcomes in the home care setting. Evidence-based practice was defined as nursing interventions based on best practice guidelines. Methods The Nursing Role Effectiveness model was used to guide the selection of variables for investigation. Data were collected from administrative records on percent of visits made by Registered Nurses (RN), total number of nursing visits, and consistency of visits by principal nurse. Charts audits were used to collect data on nursing interventions and client outcomes. The sample consisted of 338 nurses from 13 home care offices and 939 de-identified client charts. Hierarchical generalized linear regression approaches were constructed to explore which variables explain variation in client outcomes. Results The study found documentation of nursing interventions based on best practice guidelines was positively associated with improvement in dyspnea, pain, falls, and pressure ulcer outcomes. Percent of visits made by an RN and consistency of visits by a principal nurse were not found to be associated with improved client outcomes, but the total number of nursing visits was. Linking Evidence to Action Implementation of best practice is associated with improved client outcomes in the home care setting. Future research needs to explore ways to more effectively foster the documentation of evidence-based practice interventions. PMID:25099877

  4. A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Treatment of Venous Leg Ulcers Using Mechanically Versus Electrically Powered Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Marston, William A.; Armstrong, David G.; Reyzelman, Alexander M.; Kirsner, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study compares two different negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) modalities in the treatment of venous leg ulcers (VLUs), the ultraportable mechanically powered (MP) Smart Negative Pressure (SNaP®) Wound Care System to the electrically powered (EP) Vacuum-Assisted Closure (V.A.C.®) System. Approach: Patients with VLUs from 13 centers participated in this prospective randomized controlled trial. Each subject was randomly assigned to treatment with either MP NPWT or EP NPWT and evaluated for 16 weeks or complete wound closure. Results: Forty patients (n=19 MP NPWT and n=21 EP NPWT) completed the study. Primary endpoint analysis of wound size reduction found wounds in the MP NPWT group had significantly greater wound size reduction than those in the EP NPWT group at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks (p-value=0.0039, 0.0086, 0.0002, and 0.0005, respectively). Kaplan–Meier analyses showed greater acceleration in complete wound closure in the MP NPWT group. At 30 days, 50% wound closure was achieved in 52.6% (10/19) of patients treated with MP NPWT and 23.8% (5/21) of patients treated with EP NPWT. At 90 days, complete wound closure was achieved in 57.9% (11/19) of patients treated with MP NPWT and 38.15% (8/21) of patients treated with EP NPWT. Innovation: These data support the use of MP-NPWT for the treatment of VLUs. Conclusions: In this group of venous ulcers, wounds treated with MP NPWT demonstrated greater improvement and a higher likelihood of complete wound closure than those treated with EP NPWT. PMID:25713749

  5. Preliminary design of a simple passive toe exercise apparatus with a flexible metal hydride actuator for pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Ino, Shuichi; Sato, Mitsuru; Hosono, Minako; Nakajima, Sawako; Yamashita, Kazuhiko; Izumi, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    In an aging society, social demands for home-based rehabilitation and assistive technologies by healthcare and welfare services are globally increasing. The progress of quality-of-life technologies and rehabilitation science is a very important and urgent issue for elderly and disabled individuals as well as for their caregivers. Thus, there is a substantial need to develop simple bedside apparatuses for both continuous exercise of joints and for power assistance for standing to prevent and manage disuse syndromes (e.g., pressure ulcers, joint contractures and muscular atrophy). Unfortunately, there are currently no commercially-available actuators compatible with the human requirements of flexibility, quietness, lightness and a high power-to-weight ratio. To fulfill the above demands, we have developed a novel actuation device using a metal hydride (MH) alloy and a laminate film, called the flexible MH actuator, as a human-friendly force generator for healthcare and welfare services. In this paper, we show the basic structure and characteristics of the flexible MH actuator used to create a passive exercise system for preventing disuse syndromes. To evaluate the efficiency of passive exercise for bedsore prevention, subcutaneous blood flow during passive exercise at common pressure-ulcer sites is measured by a laser blood flow meter. The force and range-of-motion angle required for a passive exercise apparatus is also examined with the help of a professional physical therapist. Based on these findings, a prototype of a passive exercise apparatus is fabricated using the flexible MH actuator technology, and its operation characteristics are preliminarily verified using a thermoelectric control system. PMID:21096304

  6. Effectiveness of olive oil for the prevention of pressure ulcers caused in immobilized patients within the scope of primary health care: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcers are considered an important issue, mainly affecting immobilized older patients. These pressure ulcers increase the care burden for the professional health service staff as well as pharmaceutical expenditure. There are a number of studies on the effectiveness of different products used for the prevention of pressure ulcers; however, most of these studies were carried out at a hospital level, basically using hyperoxygenated fatty acids (HOFA). There are no studies focused specifically on the use of olive-oil-based products and therefore this research is intended to find the most cost-effective treatment and achieve an alternative treatment. Methods/design The main objective is to assess the effectiveness of olive oil, comparing it with HOFA, to treat immobilized patients at home who are at risk of pressure ulcers. As a secondary objective, the cost-effectiveness balance of this new application with regard to the HOFA will be assessed. The study is designed as a noninferiority, triple-blinded, parallel, multi-center, randomized clinical trial. The scope of the study is the population attending primary health centers in Andalucía (Spain) in the regional areas of Malaga, Granada, Seville, and Cadiz. Immobilized patients at risk of pressure ulcers will be targeted. The target group will be treated by application of an olive-oil-based formula whereas the control group will be treated by application of HOFA to the control group. The follow-up period will be 16 weeks. The main variable will be the presence of pressure ulcers in the patient. Secondary variables include sociodemographic and clinical information, caregiver information, and whether technical support exists. Statistical analysis will include the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, symmetry and kurtosis analysis, bivariate analysis using the Student’s t and chi-squared tests as well as the Wilcoxon and the Man-Whitney U tests, ANOVA and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Discussion The

  7. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology. PMID:16277953

  8. Assessing complexity of skin blood flow oscillations in response to locally applied heating and pressure in rats: Implications for pressure ulcer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Fuyuan; O'Brien, William D.; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of local heating on the complexity of skin blood flow oscillations (BFO) under prolonged surface pressure in rats. Eleven Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: 7 rats underwent surface pressure with local heating (△t=10 °C) and 4 rats underwent pressure without heating. A pressure of 700 mmHg was applied to the right trochanter area of rats for 3 h. Skin blood flow was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. The loading period was divided into nonoverlapping 30 min epochs. For each epoch, multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MDFA) was utilized to compute DFA coefficients and complexity of endothelial related metabolic, neurogenic, and myogenic frequencies of BFO. The results showed that under surface pressure, local heating led to a significant decrease in DFA coefficients of myogenic frequency during the initial epoch of loading period, a sustained decrease in complexity of myogenic frequency, and a significantly higher degree of complexity of metabolic frequency during the later phase of loading period. Surrogate tests showed that the reduction in complexity of myogenic frequency was associated with a loss of nonlinearity whereas increased complexity of metabolic frequency was associated with enhanced nonlinearity. Our results indicate that increased metabolic activity and decreased myogenic response due to local heating manifest themselves not only in magnitudes of metabolic and myogenic frequencies but also in their structural complexity. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using complexity analysis of BFO to monitor the ischemic status of weight-bearing skin and risk of pressure ulcers.

  9. Preventing Decubitus Ulcers with Cotton Sheeting Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decubitus pressure ulcers are a worldwide health crisis and their prevention and treatment has become a national priority. The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Board estimates that as many as three million people in the United States have pressure ulcers. The causes of the ailment include both extr...

  10. A Quasi-experimental Study to Assess an Interactive Educational Intervention on Nurses' Knowledge of Pressure Ulcer Prevention in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ekama Ilesanmi, Rose; Morohunfoluwa Oluwatosin, Odunayo

    2016-04-01

    Educational intervention programs are an important element to improve nurses' knowledge of pressure ulcer (PU) prevention. Various teaching methods have been used with diverse results but none have been analyzed in Nigeria. A quasi- experimental study using a pretest/post test design was conducted among 193 registered nurses with >6 months experience who worked in purposefully selected wards (neuroscience, orthopedics, renal, and cardiac) in 3 teaching hospitals to examine the level of knowledge retention after interactive instruction. Participants were randomized to intervention (IG, n = 127 from 2 hospitals) and control (CG, n = 66 from 1 hospital) groups; the IG was provided a 5-day, face-to-face interactive lecture, and the CG engaged in a 1-day, 4-hour discussion of PU prevention practices. The Pressure Ulcer Knowledge Tool, a 47-item questionnaire in which a correct answer = 1 point and an incorrect/"I don't know" answer = 0 (maximum score 47), was used to assess and compare knowledge retention at 3 time points: baseline (T1), immediately after instruction (T2), and after 3 months (T3). Three trained research assistants assisted with registration of participants and distribution and collection of the questionnaires. All questionnaires were retrieved at T1 before the intervention be- gan. Respondents were encouraged to respond to all questions. Data were analyzed using t-test and ANOVA (P = 0.05). At T1, knowledge scores were comparable between the IG and CG (32.5 ± 4.2 and 30.8 ± 5.0 for IG and CG, respectively). At T2, knowledge scores increased significantly only in the IG to 40.7 ± 3.4 (d = 1.94, P less than 0.05). The mean difference between T1 and T2 was -8.2 ± 5.4, t = -17.0, P = 0.000. Similarly, mean scores increased significantly from T2 to T3 in the IG (mean= -2.0 ± 5.5, t = -4.1, P = 0.000); scores in the CG were -6.2 ± 7.2, t = -6.3 (P = 0.000). A face-to-face interactive lecture was shown to be an effective method of program delivery for