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Sample records for pressure vessel stress

  1. Discontinuity stresses in metallic pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The state of the art, criteria, and recommended practices for the theoretical and experimental analyses of discontinuity stresses and their distribution in metallic pressure vessels for space vehicles are outlined. The applicable types of pressure vessels include propellant tanks ranging from main load-carrying integral tank structure to small auxiliary tanks, storage tanks, solid propellant motor cases, high pressure gas bottles, and pressurized cabins. The major sources of discontinuity stresses are discussed, including deviations in geometry, material properties, loads, and temperature. The advantages, limitations, and disadvantages of various theoretical and experimental discontinuity analysis methods are summarized. Guides are presented for evaluating discontinuity stresses so that pressure vessel performance will not fall below acceptable levels.

  2. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Stress Rupture Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Nathanael J.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Leifeste, Mark R.; Yoder, Tommy B.; Keddy, Chris P.; Forth, Scott C.; Russell, Rick W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports stress rupture testing of Kevlar(TradeMark) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) at NASA White Sands Test Facility. This 6-year test program was part of the larger effort to predict and extend the lifetime of flight vessels. Tests were performed to characterize control parameters for stress rupture testing, and vessel life was predicted by statistical modeling. One highly instrumented 102-cm (40-in.) diameter Kevlar(TradeMark) COPV was tested to failure (burst) as a single-point model verification. Significant data were generated that will enhance development of improved NDE methods and predictive modeling techniques, and thus better address stress rupture and other composite durability concerns that affect pressure vessel safety, reliability and mission assurance.

  3. Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessels: Mechanics and Stress Rupture Lifing Philosophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, Leigh

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has been conducting an independent technical assessment to address safety concerns related to the known stress rupture failure mode of filament wound pressure vessels in use on Shuttle and the International Space Station. The Shuttle's Kevlar-49 fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar-49 filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of load sharing liners and the complex manufacturing procedures, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. Indeed non-conservative life predictions have been made where stress rupture data and lifing procedures have ignored the contribution of the liner in favor of applied pressure as the controlling load parameter. With the aid of analytical and finite element results, this paper examines the fundamental mechanical response of composite overwrapped pressure vessels including the influence of elastic-plastic liners and degraded/creeping overwrap properties. Graphical methods are presented describing the non-linear relationship of applied pressure to Kevlar-49 fiber stress/strain during manufacturing, operations and burst loadings. These are applied to experimental measurements made on a variety of vessel systems to demonstrate the correct calibration of fiber stress as a function of pressure. Applying this analysis to the actual qualification burst data for Shuttle flight hardware revealed that the nominal fiber stress at burst was in some cases 23% lower than what had previously been used to predict stress rupture life. These results motivate a detailed discussion of the appropriate stress rupture lifing philosophy for COPVs including the correct transference of stress rupture life data between dissimilar vessels and test articles.

  4. Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessels: Mechanics and Stress Rupture Lifting Philosophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. L.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has been conducting an independent technical assessment to address safety concerns related to the known stress rupture failure mode of filament wound pressure vessels in use on Shuttle and the International Space Station. The Shuttle s Kevlar-49 (DuPont) fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar-49 filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of load sharing liners and the complex manufacturing procedures, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. Indeed nonconservative life predictions have been made where stress rupture data and lifing procedures have ignored the contribution of the liner in favor of applied pressure as the controlling load parameter. With the aid of analytical and finite element results, this paper examines the fundamental mechanical response of composite overwrapped pressure vessels including the influence of elastic plastic liners and degraded/creeping overwrap properties. Graphical methods are presented describing the non-linear relationship of applied pressure to Kevlar-49 fiber stress/strain during manufacturing, operations and burst loadings. These are applied to experimental measurements made on a variety of vessel systems to demonstrate the correct calibration of fiber stress as a function of pressure. Applying this analysis to the actual qualification burst data for Shuttle flight hardware revealed that the nominal fiber stress at burst was in some cases 23 percent lower than what had previously been used to predict stress rupture life. These results motivate a detailed discussion of the appropriate stress rupture lifing philosophy for COPVs including the correct transference of stress rupture life data between dissimilar vessels and test articles.

  5. Residual stresses in weld deposited clad pressure vessels and nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.P.; Mabe, W.R.; Shadley, J.R.; Rybicki, E.F.

    1998-04-01

    Results of through-thickness residual stress measurements are provided for a variety of samples of weld deposited 308/309L stainless steel and Alloy 600 cladding on low-alloy pressure vessel ferritic steels. Clad thicknesses between 5 and 9mm on samples that vary in thickness from 45 to 200mm were studied. The samples were taken from flat plates, from a spherical head of a pressure vessel, from a ring-segment of a nozzle bore, and from the transition radius between a nozzle and a pressure vessel shell. A layer removal method was used to measure the residual stresses. The effects of uncertainties in elastic constants (Young`s modulus and Poisson`s ratio) as well as experimental error are assessed. All measurements were done at room temperature. The results of this work indicate that curvature plays a significant role in cladding residual stress and that tensile residual stresses as high as the yield stress can be measured in the cladding material. Since the vessel from which the spherical and nozzle corner samples were taken was hydrotested, and the flat plate specimens were taken from specimens used in mechanical fatigue testing, these results suggest that rather high tensile residual stresses can be retained in the cladding material even after some mechanical loading associated with hydrotesting and that higher levels of hydrotest loading would be required to alter the cladding residual stresses.

  6. Residual Stress Measurements of Explosively Clad Cylindrical Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Douglas J; Watkins, Thomas R; Hubbard, Camden R; Hill, M. R.; Meith, W. A.

    2012-01-01

    Tantalum refractory liners were explosively clad into cylindrical pressure vessels, some of which had been previously autofrettaged. Using explosive cladding, the refractory liner formed a metallurgical bond with the steel of the pressure vessel at a cost of induced strain. Two techniques were employed to determine the residual stress state of the clad steel cylinders: neutron diffraction and mechanical slitting. Neutron diffraction is typically nondestructive; however, due to attenuation along the beam path, the cylinders had to be sectioned into rings that were nominally 25 mm thick. Slitting is a destructive method, requiring the sectioning of the cylindrical samples. Both techniques provided triaxial stress data and useful information on the effects of explosive cladding. The stress profiles in the hoop and radial directions were similar for an autofrettaged, nonclad vessel and a clad, nonautofrettaged vessel. The stress profiles in the axial direction appeared to be different. Further, the data suggested that residual stresses from the autofrettage and explosive cladding processes were not additive, in part due to evidence of reverse yielding. The residual stress data are presented, compared and discussed.

  7. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) Stress Rupture Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard; Flynn, Howard; Forth, Scott; Greene, Nathanael; Kezian, Michael; Varanauski, Don; Yoder, Tommy; Woodworth, Warren

    2009-01-01

    One of the major concerns for the aging Space Shuttle fleet is the stress rupture life of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). Stress rupture life of a COPV has been defined as the minimum time during which the composite maintains structural integrity considering the combined effects of stress levels and time. To assist in the evaluation of the aging COPVs in the Orbiter fleet an analytical reliability model was developed. The actual data used to construct this model was from testing of COPVs constructed of similar, but not exactly same materials and pressure cycles as used on Orbiter vessels. Since no actual Orbiter COPV stress rupture data exists the Space Shuttle Program decided to run a stress rupture test to compare to model predictions. Due to availability of spares, the testing was unfortunately limited to one 40" vessel. The stress rupture test was performed at maximum operating pressure at an elevated temperature to accelerate aging. The test was performed in two phases. The first phase, 130 F, a moderately accelerated test designed to achieve the midpoint of the model predicted point reliability. The more aggressive second phase, performed at 160 F was designed to determine if the test article will exceed the 95% confidence interval of the model. This paper will discuss the results of this test, it's implications and possible follow-on testing.

  8. Stress Rupture Life Reliability Measures for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Thesken, John C.; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie

    2007-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are often used for storing pressurant gases onboard spacecraft. Kevlar (DuPont), glass, carbon and other more recent fibers have all been used as overwraps. Due to the fact that overwraps are subjected to sustained loads for an extended period during a mission, stress rupture failure is a major concern. It is therefore important to ascertain the reliability of these vessels by analysis, since the testing of each flight design cannot be completed on a practical time scale. The present paper examines specifically a Weibull statistics based stress rupture model and considers the various uncertainties associated with the model parameters. The paper also examines several reliability estimate measures that would be of use for the purpose of recertification and for qualifying flight worthiness of these vessels. Specifically, deterministic values for a point estimate, mean estimate and 90/95 percent confidence estimates of the reliability are all examined for a typical flight quality vessel under constant stress. The mean and the 90/95 percent confidence estimates are computed using Monte-Carlo simulation techniques by assuming distribution statistics of model parameters based also on simulation and on the available data, especially the sample sizes represented in the data. The data for the stress rupture model are obtained from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL) stress rupture testing program, carried out for the past 35 years. Deterministic as well as probabilistic sensitivities are examined.

  9. Stress distribution in continuously heterogeneous thick laminated pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Verijenko, V.E.; Adali, S.; Tabakov, P.Y.

    1995-11-01

    Stress analysis of multilayered pressure vessels possessing cylindrical anisotropy and under internal, external and interlaminar pressure is given. The special case when the axis of anisotropy coincides with the axis of symmetry Oz and the stresses do not vary long the generator is investigated. In this case there exists a plane of elastic symmetry normal to this axis at every point of the cylinder so that each layer may be considered s orthotropic. However, elastic properties can vary through the thickness of a layer. Exact elasticity solutions are obtained for both open-ended and closed-ended cylinders using a stress function approach. The method of solution allows the forces on the layer interfaces to be taken into account with relative ease. Numerical results are presented for thick cylinders with isotropic and orthotropic layers, and stress distributions across the thickness are given.

  10. Terahertz NDE of Stressed Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels - Initial Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madaras, Eric I.; Seebo, Jeffrey P.; Anatasi, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    Terahertz radiation nondestructive evaluation was applied to a set of Kevlar composite overwrapped pressure vessel bottles that had undergone a series of thermal and pressure tests to simulate stress rupture effects. The bottles in these nondestructive evaluation tests were bottles that had not ruptured but had survived various times at the elevated load and temperature levels. Some of the bottles showed evidence of minor composite failures. The terahertz radiation did detect visible surface flaws, but did not detect any internal chemical or material degradation of the thin overwraps.

  11. Stresses in reactor pressure vessel nozzles -- Calculations and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Brumovsky, M.; Polachova, H.

    1995-11-01

    Reactor pressure vessel nozzles are characterized by a high stress concentration which is critical in their low-cycle fatigue assessment. Program of experimental verification of stress/strain field distribution during elastic-plastic loading of a reactor pressure vessel WWER-1000 primary nozzle model in scale 1:3 is presented. While primary nozzle has an ID equal to 850 mm, the model nozzle has ID equal to 280 mm, and was made from 15Kh2NMFA type of steel. Calculation using analytical methods was performed. Comparison of results using different analytical methods -- Neuber`s, Hardrath-Ohman`s as well as equivalent energy ones, used in different reactor Codes -- is shown. Experimental verification was carried out on model nozzles loaded statically as well as by repeated loading, both in elastic-plastic region. Strain fields were measured using high-strain gauges, which were located in different distances from center of nozzle radius, thus different stress concentration values were reached. Comparison of calculated and experimental data are shown and compared.

  12. RESIDUAL STRESS DISTRIBUTIONS FOR MULTI-PASS WELDS IN PRESSURE VESSEL AND PIPING COMPONENTS

    E-print Network

    Michaleris, Panagiotis

    RESIDUAL STRESS DISTRIBUTIONS FOR MULTI-PASS WELDS IN PRESSURE VESSEL AND PIPING COMPONENTS, 1984). Early efforts to evaluate residual stress in piping components involve imposing on a cylinder components. A compendium residual stress distributions is generated for common pressure vessel and piping

  13. Experimental investigation of stress for cylindrical pressure vessel with different type of nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Nan; Qian Songwen; Li Xiaoyan; Ma Xiaoming

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the stress distribution of a cylindrical shell with radial, oblique and tangent nozzles. Experimental results show that the stress level of cylindrical vessel with non-radial nozzle is higher than that with radial nozzle. The influences of nozzle type on the strength of pressure vessel and the decrement of the boundary stresses are also investigated based on the test results.

  14. ADDITIONAL STRESS AND FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSES OF PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL NOZZLES

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Matthew; Yin, Shengjun; Stevens, Gary; Sommerville, Daniel; Palm, Nathan; Heinecke, Carol

    2012-01-01

    In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP) Conferences. This work is also relevant to the ongoing efforts of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code, Section XI, Working Group on Operating Plant Criteria (WGOPC) efforts to incorporate nozzle fracture mechanics solutions into a revision to ASME B&PV Code, Section XI, Nonmandatory Appendix G.

  15. Stress and Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Boiling Water Reactor and Pressurized Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Shengjun; Bass, Bennett Richard; Stevens, Gary; Kirk, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes stress analysis and fracture mechanics work performed to assess boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) nozzles located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Various RPV nozzle geometries were investigated: 1. BWR recirculation outlet nozzle; 2. BWR core spray nozzle3 3. PWR inlet nozzle; ; 4. PWR outlet nozzle; and 5. BWR partial penetration instrument nozzle. The above nozzle designs were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-license (EOL) to require evaluation as part of establishing the allowed limits on heatup, cooldown, and hydrotest (leak test) conditions. These nozzles analyzed represent one each of the nozzle types potentially requiring evaluation. The purpose of the analyses performed on these nozzle designs was as follows: To model and understand differences in pressure and thermal stress results using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) versus a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for all nozzle types. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated; To verify the accuracy of a selected linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solution for stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for both thermal and pressure loading for all nozzle types; To assess the significance of attached piping loads on the stresses in the nozzle corner region; and To assess the significance of applying pressure on the crack face with respect to the stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack.

  16. AN IMPROVED TREATMENT OF RESIDUAL STRESSES IN FLAW ASSESSMENT OF PIPES AND PRESSURE VESSELS FABRICATED FROM FERRITIC STEELS

    E-print Network

    Michaleris, Panagiotis

    AN IMPROVED TREATMENT OF RESIDUAL STRESSES IN FLAW ASSESSMENT OF PIPES AND PRESSURE VESSELS for an improved treatment of residual stresses produced by welding in pipes and pressure vessels fabricated from and calculated residual stresses are included. These data demonstrate that the residual stresses in piping

  17. Experimental Investigation of the Shuttle Transportation System Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels for Stress Rupture Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Nathanael; Saulsberry, Regor; Yoder, Tommy; Forsyth, Brad; Carillo, Marlene; Thesken, John

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing stress rupture testing on Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) is shown. The topics include: 1) Purpose for Testing; 2) NASA WSTF COPV Test Program; 3) NASA WSTF Test Facilities; 4) COPV Impact Study; 5) Fluids Compatibility Testing; 6) Stress Rupture Testing; and 7) COPV Lifting.

  18. Effects of dynamic shear and transmural pressure on wall shear stress sensitivity in collecting lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Gasheva, Olga Y; Mukherjee, Anish; Zawieja, David C; Dixon, J Brandon

    2015-11-01

    Given the known mechanosensitivity of the lymphatic vasculature, we sought to investigate the effects of dynamic wall shear stress (WSS) on collecting lymphatic vessels while controlling for transmural pressure. Using a previously developed ex vivo lymphatic perfusion system (ELPS) capable of independently controlling both transaxial pressure gradient and average transmural pressure on an isolated lymphatic vessel, we imposed a multitude of flow conditions on rat thoracic ducts, while controlling for transmural pressure and measuring diameter changes. By gradually increasing the imposed flow through a vessel, we determined the WSS at which the vessel first shows sign of contraction inhibition, defining this point as the shear stress sensitivity of the vessel. The shear stress threshold that triggered a contractile response was significantly greater at a transmural pressure of 5 cmH2O (0.97 dyne/cm(2)) than at 3 cmH2O (0.64 dyne/cm(2)). While contraction frequency was reduced when a steady WSS was applied, this inhibition was reversed when the applied WSS oscillated, even though the mean wall shear stresses between the conditions were not significantly different. When the applied oscillatory WSS was large enough, flow itself synchronized the lymphatic contractions to the exact frequency of the applied waveform. Both transmural pressure and the rate of change of WSS have significant impacts on the contractile response of lymphatic vessels to flow. Specifically, time-varying shear stress can alter the inhibition of phasic contraction frequency and even coordinate contractions, providing evidence that dynamic shear could play an important role in the contractile function of collecting lymphatic vessels. PMID:26333787

  19. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) Stress Rupture Test: Part 2. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard; Flynn, Howard; Forth, Scott; Greene, Nathanael; Kezirian, Michael; Varanauski, Don; Leifeste, Mark; Yoder, Tommy; Woodworth, Warren

    2010-01-01

    One of the major concerns for the aging Space Shuttle fleet is the stress rupture life of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). Stress rupture life of a COPY has been defined as the minimum time during which the composite maintains structural integrity considering the combined effects of stress levels and time. To assist in the evaluation of the aging COPVs in the Orbiter fleet an analytical reliability model was developed. The actual data used to construct this model was from testing of COPVs constructed of similar, but not exactly same materials and pressure cycles as used on Orbiter vessels. Since no actual Orbiter COPV stress rupture data exists the Space Shuttle Program decided to run a stress rupture test to compare to model predictions. Due to availability of spares, the testing was unfortunately limited to one 40" vessel. The stress rupture test was performed at maximum operating pressure at an elevated temperature to accelerate aging. The test was performed in two phases. The first phase, 130 F, a moderately accelerated test designed to achieve the midpoint of the model predicted point reliability. A more aggressive second phase, performed at 160 F, was designed to determine if the test article will exceed the 95% confidence interval ofthe model. In phase 3, the vessel pressure was increased to above maximum operating pressure while maintaining the phase 2 temperature. After reaching enough effectives hours to reach the 99.99% confidence level of the model phase 4 testing began when the temperature was increased to greater than 170 F. The vessel was maintained at phase 4 conditions until it failed after over 3 million effect hours. This paper will discuss the results of this test, it's implications and possible follow-on testing.

  20. Residual stress distributions for multi-pass welds in pressure vessel and piping components

    SciTech Connect

    Michaleris, P.

    1996-12-01

    A welding simulation methodology is implemented and experimentally validated to predict residual stresses on multi-pass welds. The simulation involves performing thermo-elasto-plastic analyses using a consistent element activation approach in the mechanical analysis. A compendium of residual stress distributions in common pressure vessel and piping components is generated by using the multi-pass finite element methodology. Residual stresses are computed for circumferential girth welds on thin- and thick-walled pipes with various radius to thickness ratios. Both single- and double-V weld joints are investigated. Additional analyses are performed to evaluate seam welds and the effects of end restraint and hydrotest.

  1. Stress-intensity-factor influence coefficients for semielliptical inner-surface flaws in clad pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeney, J. A.; Bryson, J. W.

    A problem of particular interest in pressure vessel technology is the calculation of accurate stress-intensity factors for semielliptical surface cracks in cylinders. Computing costs for direct solution techniques can be prohibitive when applied to three-dimensional (3-D) geometries with time-varying boundary conditions such as those associated with pressurized thermal shock. An alternative superposition technique requires the calculation of a set of influence coefficients for a given 3-D crack model that can be superimposed to obtain mode-I stress-intensity factors. This paper presents stress-intensity-factor influence coefficients (SIFIC's) for axially and circumferentially oriented finite-length semielliptical inner-surface flaws with aspect ratios (total crack length (2c) to crack depth (a)) of 2, 6, and 10 for clad cylinders having an internal radius (R(sub i)) to wall thickness (t) ratio of 10. SEFIC's are computed for flaw depths in the range of 0.01 less than or equal a/t less than or equal 0.5 and two cladding thicknesses. The incorporation of this SEFIC data base in fracture mechanics codes will facilitate the generation of fracture mechanics solutions for a wide range of flaw geometries as may be required in structural integrity assessments of pressurized-water and boiling-water reactors.

  2. Design prediction for long term stress rupture service of composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Ernest Y.

    1992-01-01

    Extensive stress rupture studies on glass composites and Kevlar composites were conducted by the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory beginning in the late 1960's and extending to about 8 years in some cases. Some of the data from these studies published over the years were incomplete or were tainted by spurious failures, such as grip slippage. Updated data sets were defined for both fiberglass and Kevlar composite stand test specimens. These updated data are analyzed in this report by a convenient form of the bivariate Weibull distribution, to establish a consistent set of design prediction charts that may be used as a conservative basis for predicting the stress rupture life of composite pressure vessels. The updated glass composite data exhibit an invariant Weibull modulus with lifetime. The data are analyzed in terms of homologous service load (referenced to the observed median strength). The equations relating life, homologous load, and probability are given, and corresponding design prediction charts are presented. A similar approach is taken for Kevlar composites, where the updated stand data do show a turndown tendency at long life accompanied by a corresponding change (increase) of the Weibull modulus. The turndown characteristic is not present in stress rupture test data of Kevlar pressure vessels. A modification of the stress rupture equations is presented to incorporate a latent, but limited, strength drop, and design prediction charts are presented that incorporate such behavior. The methods presented utilize Cartesian plots of the probability distributions (which are a more natural display for the design engineer), based on median normalized data that are independent of statistical parameters and are readily defined for any set of test data.

  3. Stress Rupture Testing and Analysis of the NASA WSTF-JPL Carbon Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Nathanael; Yoder, Tommy; Saulsberry, Regor; Grimes, Lorie; Thesken, John; Phoenix, Leigh

    2007-01-01

    Carbon composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) are widely used in applications from spacecraft to life support. COPV technology provides a pressurized media storage advantage over amorphous technology with weight savings on the order of 30 percent. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been supporting the development of this technology since the early 1970's with an interest in safe application of these components to reduce mass to orbit. NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) has been testing components in support of this objective since the 1980s and has been involved in test development and analysis to address affects of impact, propellant and cryogenic fluids exposure on Kevlar and carbon epoxy. The focus of this paper is to present results of a recent joint WSTF-Jet Propulsion Laboratories (JPL) effort to assess safe life of these components. The WSTF-JPL test articles consisted of an aluminum liner and a carbon fiber overwrap in an industry standard epoxy resin system. The vessels were specifically designed with one plus-minus helical wrap and one hoop wrap over the helical and they measured 4.23 x 11.4 in. long. 120 test articles were manufactured in August of 1998 of one lot fiber and resin and the 110 test articles were delivered to WSTF for test. Ten of the 120 test articles were burst tested at the manufacturer to establish the delivered fiber stress. Figure 1 shows a test article in a pre burst condition and with a hoop fiber failure (no leak of pressurized media) and post burst (failure of liner and loss of pressurized media).

  4. Stress Corrosion Cracking and Fatigue Crack Growth Studies Pertinent to Spacecraft and Booster Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. R.; Finger, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    This experimental program was divided into two parts. The first part evaluated stress corrosion cracking in 2219-T87 aluminum and 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI) titanium alloy plate and weld metal. Both uniform height double cantilever beam and surface flawed specimens were tested in environments normally encountered during the fabrication and operation of pressure vessels in spacecraft and booster systems. The second part studied compatibility of material-environment combinations suitable for high energy upper stage propulsion systems. Surface flawed specimens having thicknesses representative of minimum gage fuel and oxidizer tanks were tested. Titanium alloys 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI), 6Al-4V annealed, and 6Al-4V STA were tested in both liquid and gaseous methane. Aluminum alloy 2219 in the T87 and T6E46 condition was tested in fluorine, a fluorine-oxygen mixture, and methane. Results were evaluated using modified linear elastic fracture mechanics parameters.

  5. Hydrogen Cracking and Stress Corrosion of Pressure Vessel Steel ASTM A543

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlShawaf, Ali Hamad

    The purpose of conducting this research is to develop fundamental understanding of the weldability of the modern Quenched and Tempered High Strength Low Alloy (Q&T HSLA) steel, regarding the cracking behavior and susceptibility to environmental cracking in the base metal and in the heat affected zone (HAZ) when welded. A number of leaking cracks developed in the girth welds of the pressure vessel after a short time of upgrading the material from plain carbon steel to Q&T HSLA steel. The new vessels were constructed to increase the production of the plant and also to save weight for the larger pressure vessel. The results of this research study will be used to identify safe welding procedure and design more weldable material. A standardized weldability test known as implant test was constructed and used to study the susceptibility of the Q&T HSLA steel to hydrogen cracking. The charged hydrogen content for each weld was recorded against the applied load during weldability testing. The lack of understanding in detail of the interaction between hydrogen and each HAZ subzone in implant testing led to the need of developing the test to obtain more data about the weldability. The HAZ subzones were produced using two techniques: standard furnace and GleebleRTM machine. These produced subzones were pre-charged with hydrogen to different levels of concentration. The hydrogen charging on the samples simulates prior exposure of the material to high humidity environment during welding process. Fractographical and microstructural characterization of the HAZ subzones were conducted using techniques such as SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). A modified implant test using the mechanical tensile machine was also used to observe the effects of the hydrogen on the cracking behavior of each HAZ subzone. All the experimental weldability works were simulated and validated using a commercial computational software, SYSWELD. The computational simulation of implant testing of Q&T HSLA with the previously used plain carbon steel and other currently used pressure vessel steels was successfully completed. The experimental and computational results of the Q&T HSLA steel agreed well with each other. The susceptibility of the Q&T A543 steel to stress corrosion cracking was investigated using the slow strain rate testing under different environments and conditions. Also, advanced corrosion study using the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was done at different conditions. The corrosion study revealed that this A543 steel is prone to form pits in most of the conditions. The model results in the corrosion study were validated with the Gamry Echem Analyst software that A543 steel tends to form pits in the tested environment.

  6. A Comparison of Various Stress Rupture Life Models for Orbiter Composite Pressure Vessels and Confidence Intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie; Murthy, Pappu, L. N.; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Glaser, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    In conjunction with a recent NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) investigation of flight worthiness of Kevlar Ovenvrapped Composite Pressure Vessels (COPVs) on board the Orbiter, two stress rupture life prediction models were proposed independently by Phoenix and by Glaser. In this paper, the use of these models to determine the system reliability of 24 COPVs currently in service on board the Orbiter is discussed. The models are briefly described, compared to each other, and model parameters and parameter error are also reviewed to understand confidence in reliability estimation as well as the sensitivities of these parameters in influencing overall predicted reliability levels. Differences and similarities in the various models will be compared via stress rupture reliability curves (stress ratio vs. lifetime plots). Also outlined will be the differences in the underlying model premises, and predictive outcomes. Sources of error and sensitivities in the models will be examined and discussed based on sensitivity analysis and confidence interval determination. Confidence interval results and their implications will be discussed for the models by Phoenix and Glaser.

  7. A Comparison of Various Stress Rupture Life Models for Orbiter Composite Pressure Vessels and Confidence Intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Glaser, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    In conjunction with a recent NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) investigation of flight worthiness of Kevlar Overwrapped Composite Pressure Vessels (COPVs) on board the Orbiter, two stress rupture life prediction models were proposed independently by Phoenix and by Glaser. In this paper, the use of these models to determine the system reliability of 24 COPVs currently in service on board the Orbiter is discussed. The models are briefly described, compared to each other, and model parameters and parameter uncertainties are also reviewed to understand confidence in reliability estimation as well as the sensitivities of these parameters in influencing overall predicted reliability levels. Differences and similarities in the various models will be compared via stress rupture reliability curves (stress ratio vs. lifetime plots). Also outlined will be the differences in the underlying model premises, and predictive outcomes. Sources of error and sensitivities in the models will be examined and discussed based on sensitivity analysis and confidence interval determination. Confidence interval results and their implications will be discussed for the models by Phoenix and Glaser.

  8. Dual shell pressure balanced vessel

    DOEpatents

    Fassbender, Alexander G. (West Richland, WA)

    1992-01-01

    A dual-wall pressure balanced vessel for processing high viscosity slurries at high temperatures and pressures having an outer pressure vessel and an inner vessel with an annular space between the vessels pressurized at a pressure slightly less than or equivalent to the pressure within the inner vessel.

  9. Pressure vessel flex joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B. (inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An airtight, flexible joint is disclosed for the interfacing of two pressure vessels such as between the Space Station docking tunnel and the Space Shuttle Orbiter bulkhead adapter. The joint provides for flexibility while still retaining a structural link between the two vessels required due to the loading created by the internal/external pressure differential. The joint design provides for limiting the axial load carried across the joint to a specific value, a function returned in the Orbiter/Station tunnel interface. The flex joint comprises a floating structural segment which is permanently attached to one of the pressure vessels through the use of an inflatable seal. The geometric configuration of the joint causes the tension between the vessels created by the internal gas pressure to compress the inflatable seal. The inflation pressure of the seal is kept at a value above the internal/external pressure differential of the vessels in order to maintain a controlled distance between the floating segment and pressure vessel. The inflatable seal consists of either a hollow torus-shaped flexible bladder or two rolling convoluted diaphragm seals which may be reinforced by a system of straps or fabric anchored to the hard structures. The joint acts as a flexible link to allow both angular motion and lateral displacement while it still contains the internal pressure and holds the axial tension between the vessels.

  10. Stress corrosion cracking of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels under boiling water reactor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, H. P.; Ritter, S.

    2008-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of different reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels and weld filler/heat-affected zone materials was characterized under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) normal water (NWC) and hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) conditions by periodical partial unloading, constant and ripple load tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens. The experiments were performed in oxygenated or hydrogenated high-purity or sulphate/chloride containing water at temperatures from 150 to 288 °C. In good agreement with field experience, these investigations revealed a very low susceptibility to SCC crack growth and small crack growth rates (<0.6 mm/year) under most BWR/NWC and material conditions. Critical water chemistry, loading and material conditions, which can result in sustained and fast SCC well above the 'BWRVIP-60 SCC disposition lines' were identified, but many of them generally appeared atypical for current optimized BWR power operation practice or modern RPVs. Application of HWC always resulted in a significant reduction of SCC crack growth rates by more than one order of magnitude under these critical system conditions and growth rates dropped well below the 'BWRVIP-60 SCC disposition lines'.

  11. Pressurized Vessel Slurry Pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Pound, C.R.

    2001-09-17

    This report summarizes testing of an alternate ''pressurized vessel slurry pumping'' apparatus. The principle is similar to rural domestic water systems and ''acid eggs'' used in chemical laboratories in that material is extruded by displacement with compressed air.

  12. Sapphire tube pressure vessel

    DOEpatents

    Outwater, John O. (Cambridge, MA)

    2000-01-01

    A pressure vessel is provided for observing corrosive fluids at high temperatures and pressures. A transparent Teflon bag contains the corrosive fluid and provides an inert barrier. The Teflon bag is placed within a sapphire tube, which forms a pressure boundary. The tube is received within a pipe including a viewing window. The combination of the Teflon bag, sapphire tube and pipe provides a strong and inert pressure vessel. In an alternative embodiment, tie rods connect together compression fittings at opposite ends of the sapphire tube.

  13. Strain Measurement during Stress Rupture of Composite Over-Wrapped Pressure Vessel with Fiber Bragg Gratings Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Curtis E.; Grant, Joseph; Russell, Sam; Arnett, Shawn

    2008-01-01

    Fiber optic Bragg gratings were used to measure strain fields during Stress Rupture (SSM) test of Kevlar Composite Over-Wrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV). The sensors were embedded under the over-wrapped attached to the liner released from the Kevlar and attached to the Kevlar released from the liner. Additional sensors (foil gages and fiber bragg gratings) were surface mounted on the COPY liner.

  14. Reactor pressure vessel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C. (Livermore, CA); Upton, Hubert A. (Morgan Hill, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A nozzle for joining a pool of water to a nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a tubular body having a proximal end joinable to the pressure vessel and a distal end joinable in flow communication with the pool. The body includes a flow passage therethrough having in serial flow communication a first port at the distal end, a throat spaced axially from the first port, a conical channel extending axially from the throat, and a second port at the proximal end which is joinable in flow communication with the pressure vessel. The inner diameter of the flow passage decreases from the first port to the throat and then increases along the conical channel to the second port. In this way, the conical channel acts as a diverging channel or diffuser in the forward flow direction from the first port to the second port for recovering pressure due to the flow restriction provided by the throat. In the backflow direction from the second port to the first port, the conical channel is a converging channel and with the abrupt increase in flow area from the throat to the first port collectively increase resistance to flow therethrough.

  15. High pressure storage vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qiang

    2013-08-27

    Disclosed herein is a composite pressure vessel with a liner having a polar boss and a blind boss a shell is formed around the liner via one or more filament wrappings continuously disposed around at least a substantial portion of the liner assembly combined the liner and filament wrapping have a support profile. To reduce susceptible to rupture a locally disposed filament fiber is added.

  16. Hybrid Inflatable Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raboin, Jasen; Valle, Gerard D.; Edeen, Gregg; DeLaFuente, Horacio M.; Schneider, William C.; Spexarth, Gary R.; Johnson, Christopher J.; Pandya, Shalini

    2004-01-01

    Figure 1 shows a prototype of a large pressure vessel under development for eventual use as a habitable module for long spaceflight (e.g., for transporting humans to Mars). The vessel is a hybrid that comprises an inflatable shell attached to a rigid central structural core. The inflatable shell is, itself, a hybrid that comprises (1) a pressure bladder restrained against expansion by (2) a web of straps made from high-strength polymeric fabrics. On Earth, pressure vessels like this could be used, for example, as portable habitats that could be set up quickly in remote locations, portable hyperbaric chambers for treatment of decompression sickness, or flotation devices for offshore platforms. In addition, some aspects of the design of the fabric straps could be adapted to such other items as lifting straps, parachute straps, and automotive safety belts. Figure 2 depicts selected aspects of the design of a vessel of this type with a toroidal configuration. The bladder serves as an impermeable layer to keep air within the pressure vessel and, for this purpose, is sealed to the central structural core. The web includes longitudinal and circumferential straps. To help maintain the proper shape upon inflation after storage, longitudinal and circumferential straps are indexed together at several of their intersections. Because the web is not required to provide a pressure seal and the bladder is not required to sustain structural loads, the bladder and the web can be optimized for their respective functions. Thus, the bladder can be sealed directly to the rigid core without having to include the web in the seal substructure, and the web can be designed for strength. The ends of the longitudinal straps are attached to the ends of the rigid structural core by means of clevises. Each clevis pin is surrounded by a roller, around which a longitudinal strap is wrapped to form a lap seam with itself. The roller is of a large diameter chosen to reduce bending of the fibers in the strap. The roller also serves to equalize the load in the portions of the strap on both sides of the clevis pin. The lap seam is formed near the clevis by use of a tapered diamond stitch: This stitch is designed specifically to allow fibers in the stitch and strap to relax under load in such a manner that the load becomes more nearly evenly distributed among all fibers in the stitch region. Thus, the tapered diamond stitch prevents load concentrations that could cause premature failure of the strap and thereby increases the strength of the strap/structural-core joint. The lap seam can be rated at >90 percent of the strength of the strap material.

  17. Graphite filament wound pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, A.; Damico, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    Filament wound NOL rings, 4-inch and 8-inch diameter closed-end vessels involving three epoxy resin systems and three graphite fibers were tested to develop property data and fabrication technology for filament wound graphite/epoxy pressure vessels. Vessels were subjected to single-cycle burst tests at room temperature. Manufacturing parameters were established for tooling, winding, and curing that resulted in the development of a pressure/vessel performance factor (pressure x volume/weight) or more than 900,000 in. for an oblate spheroid specimen.

  18. Testing of Carbon Fiber Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel Stress-Rupture Lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Beeson, Harold; Yoder, Tommy; Greene, Nathaniel

    2006-01-01

    This paper contains summaries of testing procedures and analysis of stress rupture life testing for two stress rupture test programs, one for Kevlar COPVs performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the other a joint study between NASA JSC White Sands Test Facility and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. These will be discussed in detail including test setup and issues encountered during testing. Lessons learned from testing in these two programs will be discussed.

  19. Stress-intensity factors for internal surface cracks in cylindrical pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Raju, I. S.

    1979-01-01

    The stress intensity factors were calculated by a three dimensional finite element method. The finite element models employed singularity elements along the crack front and linear strain elements elsewhere. The models had about 6500 degrees of freedom. The stress intensity factors were evaluated from a nodal force method. An equation for the stress intensity factors was obtained form the results of the present analysis. The equation applies over a wide range of configuration parameters and was within about 5 percent of the present results. A comparison was made between the present results and other analyses of internal surface cracks in cylinders. The results from a boundary integral equation method were in agreement (+ or - 2 percent) and those from another finite element were in fair agreement (+ or - 8 percent) with the present results.

  20. Multilayer Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom

    2005-01-01

    A method has been devised to enable the fabrication of lightweight pressure vessels from multilayer composite materials. This method is related to, but not the same as, the method described in gMaking a Metal- Lined Composite-Overwrapped Pressure Vessel h (MFS-31814), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 3 (March 2005), page 59. The method is flexible in that it poses no major impediment to changes in tank design and is applicable to a wide range of tank sizes. The figure depicts a finished tank fabricated by this method, showing layers added at various stages of the fabrication process. In the first step of the process, a mandrel that defines the size and shape of the interior of the tank is machined from a polyurethane foam or other suitable lightweight tooling material. The mandrel is outfitted with metallic end fittings on a shaft. Each end fitting includes an outer flange that has a small step to accommodate a thin layer of graphite/epoxy or other suitable composite material. The outer surface of the mandrel (but not the fittings) is covered with a suitable release material. The composite material is filament- wound so as to cover the entire surface of the mandrel from the step on one end fitting to the step on the other end fitting. The composite material is then cured in place. The entire workpiece is cut in half in a plane perpendicular to the axis of symmetry at its mid-length point, yielding two composite-material half shells, each containing half of the foam mandrel. The halves of the mandrel are removed from within the composite shells, then the shells are reassembled and bonded together with a belly band of cured composite material. The resulting composite shell becomes a mandrel for the subsequent steps of the fabrication process and remains inside the final tank. The outer surface of the composite shell is covered with a layer of material designed to be impermeable by the pressurized fluid to be contained in the tank. A second step on the outer flange of each end fitting accommodates this layer. Depending on the application, this layer could be, for example, a layer of rubber, a polymer film, or an electrodeposited layer of metal. If the fluid to be contained in the tank is a gas, then the best permeation barrier is electrodeposited metal (typically copper or nickel), which can be effective at a thickness of as little as 0.005 in (.0.13 mm). The electrodeposited metal becomes molecularly bonded to the second step on each metallic end fitting. The permeation-barrier layer is covered with many layers of filament-wound composite material, which could be the same as, or different from, the composite material of the inner shell. Finally, the filament-wound composite material is cured in an ov

  1. Modeling flow stress constitutive behavior of SA508-3 steel for nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingyue; Hao, Luhan; Li, Shijian; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    2011-11-01

    Based on the measured stress-strain curves under different temperatures and strain rates, a series of flow stress constitutive equations for SA508-3 steel were firstly established through the classical theories on work hardening and softening. The comparison between the experimental and modeling results has confirmed that the established constitutive equations can correctly describe the mechanical responses and microstructural evolutions of the steel under various hot deformation conditions. We further represented a successful industrial application of this model to simulate a forging process for a large conical shell used in a nuclear steam generator, which evidences its practical and promising perspective of our model with an aim of widely promoting the hot plasticity processing for heavy nuclear components of fission reactors.

  2. Carbon fiber internal pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Internal pressure vessels were designed; the filament was wound of carbon fibers and epoxy resin and tested to burst. The fibers used were Thornel 400, Thornel 75, and Hercules HTS. Additional vessels with type A fiber were made. Polymeric linears were used, and all burst testing was done at room temperature. The objective was to produce vessels with the highest attainable PbV/W efficiencies. The type A vessels showed the highest average efficiency: 2.56 x 10 to the 6th power cm. Next highest efficiency was with Thornel 400 vessels: 2.21 x 10 to the 6th power cm. These values compare favorably with efficiency values from good quality S-glass vessels, but strains averaged 0.97% or less, which is less than 1/3 the strain of S-glass vessels.

  3. Detection of stress corrosion cracks and wastage in reactor pressure vessels and primary coolant system studs

    SciTech Connect

    Light, G.M.; Joshi, N.R.

    1986-01-01

    Over the last few years, nuclear plants have experienced stud bolt failures due to stress corrosion cracking and corrosion wastage. Many of these stud bolts were over 1 m long and had no heater hole. The use of conventional longitudinal wave inspection for bolts longer than 1 m has shown inconsistent results. A nondestructive testing technique was needed to inspect the stud bolts in place. The cylindrically guided wave technique was developed to inspect stud bolts of various lengths (up to 3 m) and various diameters. This technique is based on the fact that an ultrasonic wave traveling in a long cylinder becomes guided by the geometry of the cylinder. The wave begins to spread in the cylinder as interaction with the outer wall produces mode conversions. A large number of model stud bolts were tested to verify that the cylindrically guided wave technique could be used to detect crack-like defects and simulated corrosion wastage. This work shows that the cylindrically guided wave technique can be used on a wide variety of stud bolt configurations, and that the technique can be used to effectively detect the two most common modes of stud bolt failure (corrosion cracking and corrosion wastage) at early stages of development.

  4. Warm PreStress effect on highly irradiated reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hure, J.; Vaille, C.; Wident, P.; Moinereau, D.; Landron, C.; Chapuliot, S.; Benhamou, C.; Tanguy, B.

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the Warm Prestress (WPS) effect on 16MND5 (A508 Cl3) RPV steel, irradiated up to a fluence of 13 ·1023 n .m-2 (E > 1 MeV) at a temperature of 288 ° C, corresponding to more than 60 years of operations in a French Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Mechanical properties, including tensile tests with different strain rates and tension-compression tests on notched specimens, have been characterized at unirradiated and irradiated states and used to calibrate constitutive equations to describe the mechanical behavior as a function of temperature and fluence. Irradiation embrittlement has been determined based on Charpy V-notch impact tests and isothermal quasi-static toughness tests. Assessment of WPS effect has been done through various types of thermomechanical loadings performed on CT(0.5 T) specimens. All tests have confirmed the non-failure during the thermo-mechanical transients. Experimental data obtained in this study have been compared to both engineering-based models and to a local approach (Beremin) model for cleavage fracture. It is shown that both types of modeling give good predictions for the effective toughness after warm prestressing.

  5. Cuff for Blood-Vessel Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.

    1982-01-01

    Pressure within blood vessel is measured by new cufflike device without penetration of vessel. Device continuously monitors blood pressure for up to 6 months or longer without harming vessel. Is especially useful for vessels smaller than 4 or 5 millimeters in diameter. Invasive methods damage vessel wall, disturb blood flow, and cause clotting. They do not always give reliable pressure measurements over prolonged periods.

  6. 46 CFR 169.249 - Pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...169.249 Section 169.249 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Inspection and Certification Inspections § 169.249 Pressure vessels. Pressure vessels must...

  7. 46 CFR 169.249 - Pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...169.249 Section 169.249 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Inspection and Certification Inspections § 169.249 Pressure vessels. Pressure vessels must...

  8. 46 CFR 169.249 - Pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...169.249 Section 169.249 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Inspection and Certification Inspections § 169.249 Pressure vessels. Pressure vessels must...

  9. 46 CFR 169.249 - Pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure vessels. 169.249 Section 169.249 Shipping COAST... and Certification Inspections § 169.249 Pressure vessels. Pressure vessels must meet the requirements of part 54 of this chapter. The inspection procedures for pressure vessels are contained in...

  10. 46 CFR 182.330 - Pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure vessels. 182.330 Section 182.330 Shipping COAST...) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Auxiliary Machinery § 182.330 Pressure vessels. All unfired pressure vessels must be... unfired pressure vessels must meet the applicable requirements of subchapter F (Marine Engineering)...

  11. 46 CFR 169.249 - Pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure vessels. 169.249 Section 169.249 Shipping COAST... and Certification Inspections § 169.249 Pressure vessels. Pressure vessels must meet the requirements of part 54 of this chapter. The inspection procedures for pressure vessels are contained in...

  12. 46 CFR 169.249 - Pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure vessels. 169.249 Section 169.249 Shipping COAST... and Certification Inspections § 169.249 Pressure vessels. Pressure vessels must meet the requirements of part 54 of this chapter. The inspection procedures for pressure vessels are contained in...

  13. 46 CFR 182.330 - Pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure vessels. 182.330 Section 182.330 Shipping COAST...) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Auxiliary Machinery § 182.330 Pressure vessels. All unfired pressure vessels must be... unfired pressure vessels must meet the applicable requirements of subchapter F (Marine Engineering)...

  14. 46 CFR 182.330 - Pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure vessels. 182.330 Section 182.330 Shipping COAST...) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Auxiliary Machinery § 182.330 Pressure vessels. All unfired pressure vessels must be... unfired pressure vessels must meet the applicable requirements of subchapter F (Marine Engineering)...

  15. 46 CFR 169.249 - Pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure vessels. 169.249 Section 169.249 Shipping COAST... and Certification Inspections § 169.249 Pressure vessels. Pressure vessels must meet the requirements of part 54 of this chapter. The inspection procedures for pressure vessels are contained in...

  16. 46 CFR 182.330 - Pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure vessels. 182.330 Section 182.330 Shipping COAST...) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Auxiliary Machinery § 182.330 Pressure vessels. All unfired pressure vessels must be... unfired pressure vessels must meet the applicable requirements of subchapter F (Marine Engineering)...

  17. 46 CFR 182.330 - Pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure vessels. 182.330 Section 182.330 Shipping COAST...) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Auxiliary Machinery § 182.330 Pressure vessels. All unfired pressure vessels must be... unfired pressure vessels must meet the applicable requirements of subchapter F (Marine Engineering)...

  18. 46 CFR 169.249 - Pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure vessels. 169.249 Section 169.249 Shipping COAST... and Certification Inspections § 169.249 Pressure vessels. Pressure vessels must meet the requirements of part 54 of this chapter. The inspection procedures for pressure vessels are contained in...

  19. Pressure vessel having continuous sidewall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Xavier D. (Inventor); Barackman, Victor J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A spacecraft pressure vessel has a tub member. A sidewall member is coupled to the tub member so that a bottom section of the sidewall member extends from an attachment intersection with the tub member and away from the tub member. The bottom section of the sidewall member receives and transfers a load through the sidewall member.

  20. 46 CFR 119.330 - Pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure vessels. 119.330 Section 119.330 Shipping COAST... Machinery § 119.330 Pressure vessels. All unfired pressure vessels must be installed to the satisfaction of the cognizant OCMI. The design, construction, and original testing of such unfired pressure...

  1. 46 CFR 119.330 - Pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure vessels. 119.330 Section 119.330 Shipping COAST... Machinery § 119.330 Pressure vessels. All unfired pressure vessels must be installed to the satisfaction of the cognizant OCMI. The design, construction, and original testing of such unfired pressure...

  2. 46 CFR 119.330 - Pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure vessels. 119.330 Section 119.330 Shipping COAST... Machinery § 119.330 Pressure vessels. All unfired pressure vessels must be installed to the satisfaction of the cognizant OCMI. The design, construction, and original testing of such unfired pressure...

  3. 46 CFR 119.330 - Pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure vessels. 119.330 Section 119.330 Shipping COAST... Machinery § 119.330 Pressure vessels. All unfired pressure vessels must be installed to the satisfaction of the cognizant OCMI. The design, construction, and original testing of such unfired pressure...

  4. 46 CFR 119.330 - Pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure vessels. 119.330 Section 119.330 Shipping COAST... Machinery § 119.330 Pressure vessels. All unfired pressure vessels must be installed to the satisfaction of the cognizant OCMI. The design, construction, and original testing of such unfired pressure...

  5. Development of Residual Stress Improvement for Nuclear Pressure Vessel Instrumentation Nozzle Weld Joint (P-43+P-8) by Means of Induction Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Takuro Terajima; Takashi Hirano

    2006-07-01

    As a counter measurement of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in boiling water reactors, the induction heating stress improvement (IHSI) has been developed as a method to improve the stress factor, especially residual stresses in affected areas of pipe joint welds. In this method, a pipe is heated from the outside by an induction coil and cooled from the inside with water simultaneously. By thermal stresses to produce a temperature differential between the inner and outer pipe surfaces, the residual stress inside the pipe is improved compression. IHSI had been applied to weld joints of austenitic stainless steel pipes (P-8+P-8). However IHSI had not been applied to weld joints of nickel-chromium-iron alloy (P-43) and austenitic stainless steel (P-8). This weld joint (P-43+P-8) is used for instrumentation nozzles in nuclear power plants' reactor pressure vessels. Therefore for the purpose of applying IHSI to this one, we studied the following: Investigation of IHSI conditions (Essential Variables); Residual stresses after IHSI; Mechanical properties after IHSI. This paper explains that IHSI is sufficiently effective in improvement of the residual stresses for this weld joint (P-43+P-8), and that IHSI does not cause negative effects by results of mechanical properties, and IHSI is verified concerning applying it to this kind of weld joint. (authors)

  6. Static-stress analysis of dual-axis safety vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bultman, D. H.

    1992-11-01

    An 8 ft diameter safety vessel, made of HSLA-100 steel, is evaluated to determine its ability to contain the quasi-static residual pressure from a high explosive (HE) blast. The safety vessel is designed for use with the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrotest (DARHT) facility being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A smaller confinement vessel fits inside the safety vessel and contains the actual explosion, and the safety vessel functions as a second layer of containment in the unlikely case of a confinement vessel leak. The safety vessel is analyzed as a pressure vessel based on the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section 8, Division 1, and the Welding Research Council Bulletin, WRC107. Combined stresses that result from internal pressure and external loads on nozzles are calculated and compared to the allowable stresses for HSLA-100 steel. Results confirm that the shell and nozzle components are adequately designed for a static pressure of 830 psi, plus the maximum expected external loads. Shell stresses at the 'shell to nozzle' interface, produced from external loads on the nozzles, were less than 700 psi. The maximum combined stress resulting from the internal pressure plus external loads was 17,384 psi, which is significantly less than the allowable stress of 42,375 psi for HSLA-100 steel.

  7. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Commercial Diving Operations Periodic Tests and Inspections of Diving Equipment § 197.462 Pressure vessels and pressure piping. (a) The diving supervisor shall ensure that each pressure vessel, including each volume tank, cylinder and...

  8. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Commercial Diving Operations Periodic Tests and Inspections of Diving Equipment § 197.462 Pressure vessels and pressure piping. (a) The diving supervisor shall ensure that each pressure vessel, including each volume tank, cylinder and...

  9. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Commercial Diving Operations Periodic Tests and Inspections of Diving Equipment § 197.462 Pressure vessels and pressure piping. (a) The diving supervisor shall ensure that each pressure vessel, including each volume tank, cylinder and...

  10. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Commercial Diving Operations Periodic Tests and Inspections of Diving Equipment § 197.462 Pressure vessels and pressure piping. (a) The diving supervisor shall ensure that each pressure vessel, including each volume tank, cylinder and...

  11. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Commercial Diving Operations Periodic Tests and Inspections of Diving Equipment § 197.462 Pressure vessels and pressure piping. (a) The diving supervisor shall ensure that each pressure vessel, including each volume tank, cylinder and...

  12. Static-stress analysis of dual-axis confinement vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bultman, D. H.

    1992-11-01

    This study evaluates the static-pressure containment capability of a 6-ft-diameter, spherical vessel, made of HSLA-100 steel, to be used for high-explosive (HE) containment. The confinement vessel is designed for use with the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrotest Facility (DARHT) being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Two sets of openings in the vessel are covered with x-ray transparent covers to allow radiographic imaging of an explosion as it occurs inside the vessel. The confinement vessel is analyzed as a pressure vessel based on the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section 8, Division 1, and the Welding Research Council Bulletin, WRC-107. Combined stresses resulting from internal pressure and external loads on nozzles are calculated and compared with the allowable stresses for HSLA-100 steel. Results confirm that the shell and nozzles of the confinement vessel are adequately designed to safely contain the maximum residual pressure of 1675 psi that would result from an HE charge of 24.2 kg detonated in a vacuum. Shell stresses at the shell-to-nozzle interface, produced from external loads on the nozzles, were less than 400 psi. The maximum combined stress resulting from the internal pressure plus external loads was 16,070 psi, which is less than half the allowable stress of 42,375 psi for HSLA-100 steel.

  13. Quantification of Processing Effects on Filament Wound Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, Robert A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1999-01-01

    A computational simulation procedure is described which is designed specifically for the modeling and analysis of filament wound pressure vessels. Cylindrical vessels with spherical or elliptical end caps can be generated automatically. End caps other than spherical or elliptical may be modeled by varying circular sections along the x-axis according to the C C! end cap shape. The finite element model generated is composed of plate type quadrilateral shell elements on the entire vessel surface. This computational procedure can also be sued to generate grid, connectivity and material cards (bulk data) for component parts of a larger model. These bulk data are assigned to a user designated file for finite element structural/stress analysis of composite pressure vessels. The procedure accommodates filament would pressure vessels of all types of shells-of-revolution. It has provisions to readily evaluate initial stresses due to pretension in the winding filaments and residual stresses due to cure temperature.

  14. Quantification of Processing Effects on Filament Wound Pressure Vessels. Revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, Robert A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    2002-01-01

    A computational simulation procedure is described which is designed specifically for the modeling and analysis of filament wound pressure vessels. Cylindrical vessels with spherical or elliptical end caps can be generated automatically. End caps other than spherical or elliptical may be modeled by varying circular sections along the x-axis according to the end cap shape. The finite element model generated is composed of plate type quadrilateral shell elements on the entire vessel surface. This computational procedure can also be used to generate grid, connectivity and material cards (bulk data) for component parts of a larger model. These bulk data are assigned to a user designated file for finite element structural/stress analysis of composite pressure vessels. The procedure accommodates filament wound pressure vessels of all types of shells-of -revolution. It has provisions to readily evaluate initial stresses due to pretension in the winding filaments and residual stresses due to cure temperature.

  15. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOEpatents

    Sawabe, James K. (San Jose, CA)

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell.

  16. Stiffness Study of Wound-Filament Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.

    1986-01-01

    Report presents theoretical and experimental study of stiffness of lightweight, jointed pressure vessels made of wound graphite fibers and epoxy. Specimens fabricated from layers of graphite fibers, wet with epoxy, on aluminum mandrel. Segment ends thickened with interspersed layers of axially oriented fibers to reduce pinhole bearing stresses and local deformations. Segments cured at 390 degrees F (199 degrees C). Report presents results of vibrational tests of one-quarter-scale models of wound-filament pressure vessels.

  17. 46 CFR 61.10-5 - Pressure vessels in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...and all pressure vessels used in refrigeration service. (2) If your vessel's...and all pressure vessels used in refrigeration service. (3) No more than 3 years... (2) Pressure vessels used in refrigeration service. (3) Hydraulic...

  18. 46 CFR 61.10-5 - Pressure vessels in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...and all pressure vessels used in refrigeration service. (2) If your vessel's...and all pressure vessels used in refrigeration service. (3) No more than 3 years... (2) Pressure vessels used in refrigeration service. (3) Hydraulic...

  19. 46 CFR 61.10-5 - Pressure vessels in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...and all pressure vessels used in refrigeration service. (2) If your vessel's...and all pressure vessels used in refrigeration service. (3) No more than 3 years... (2) Pressure vessels used in refrigeration service. (3) Hydraulic...

  20. 46 CFR 61.10-5 - Pressure vessels in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...and all pressure vessels used in refrigeration service. (2) If your vessel's...and all pressure vessels used in refrigeration service. (3) No more than 3 years... (2) Pressure vessels used in refrigeration service. (3) Hydraulic...

  1. 46 CFR 61.10-5 - Pressure vessels in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...and all pressure vessels used in refrigeration service. (2) If your vessel's...and all pressure vessels used in refrigeration service. (3) No more than 3 years... (2) Pressure vessels used in refrigeration service. (3) Hydraulic...

  2. Optimization of multilayered composite pressure vessels using exact elasticity solution

    SciTech Connect

    Adali, S.; Verijenko, V.E.; Tabakov, P.Y.; Walker, M.

    1995-11-01

    An approach for the optimal design of thick laminated cylindrical pressure vessels is given. The maximum burst pressure is computed using an exact elasticity solution and subject to the Tsai-Wu failure criterion. The design method is based on an accurate 3-D stress analysis. Exact elasticity solutions are obtained using the stress function approach where the radial, circumferential and shear stresses are determined taking the closed ends of the cylindrical shell into account. Design optimization of multilayered composite pressure vessels are based on the use of robust multidimensional methods which give fast convergence. Two methods are used to determine the optimum ply angles, namely, iterative and gradient methods. Numerical results are given for optimum fiber orientation of each layer for thick and thin-walled multilayered pressure vessels.

  3. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOEpatents

    Sawabe, J.K.

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell. 6 figures.

  4. LPT. EBOR reactor vessel in TAN 646. Pressure vessel head ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LPT. EBOR reactor vessel in TAN 646. Pressure vessel head being installed in vault. Refueling port extension (right) and control rod nozzles (center). Camera facing northwest. Photographer: Comiskey. Date: January 20, 1965. INEEL negative no. 65-241 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Thick-wall Kevlar 49/Epoxy pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of thick-wall composite vessels for very high pressure applications is demonstrated. Prototype vessels, in both spherical and cylindrical geometries, were designed, fabricated and burst tested. It is shown that experimental burst pressures are in excellent agreement with predicted values for burst pressures up to 60 ksi. Each unit consisted of a thin, seamless, copper liner with stainless steel fill stems and a filament-wound Kevlar 49/epoxy outer shell. Analysis of vessel performance accounted for liner thickness and yield strengths, composite thickness, mechanical properties and fiber volume fraction, and stress concentrations caused by the fill stem. Spherical vessels of three different sizes (inside diameters of 2.15 inches, 4.0 inches and 5.3 inches) with either 30 ksi or 60 ksi design burst pressure are discussed. Also, cylindrical vessels with identical liners but of two different composite thicknesses are described. These vessels achieved 50 ksi and 57 ksi burst pressures, respectively. In addition to the design considerations alluded to throughout the paper, the stress state in a thin metal liner during cyclic loading and the life prediction of composite vessels under sustained loading are discussed.

  6. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, F.; Myers, B.; Magnotta, F.

    1998-08-25

    A lightweight, low permeability liner is described for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using tori spherical or near tori spherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film sealed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life. 19 figs.

  7. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, Fred (1125 Canton Ave., Livermore, CA 94550); Myers, Blake (4650 Almond Cir., Livermore, CA 94550); Magnotta, Frank (1206 Bacon Way, Lafayette, CA 94549)

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight, low permeability liner for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using torispherical or near torispherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film seamed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life.

  8. Organic fiber/epoxy pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiao, T. T.; Hamstad, M. A.; Marcon, M. A.

    1974-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of an organic fiber in an epoxy matrix by winding 20-cm diam spherical and cylindrical pressure vessels of various designs. For the spherical vessels, we used soft aluminum liners 0.76 mm thick for a double boss design and 2 mm thick for a single boss design. For the cylindrical vessels, we used both 0.5-mm rubber liners and 0.76-mm soft aluminum liners. Vessels of both types were tested for burst pressure and cyclic fatigue at room temperature and liquid hydrogen temperature. The effects of temperature and vessel shape on the vessel performance factor were negligible. Our vessel fatigue data were marred by premature failure of the liners.

  9. Method of manufacturing an overwrapped pressure vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Emory J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A pressure vessel of the type wherein a metallic liner in the shape of a cylindrical portion with a dome-shaped portion at each end thereof is overwrapped by a plurality of layers of resin coated, single fiberglass filaments. A four-step wrapping technique reinforces the vessel with overwrap material at the most likely areas for vessel failure. Overwrapping of the vessel is followed by a sizing pressurization cycle which induces a compressive prestress into the liner and thereby permits the liner to deform elastically through an increased strain range.

  10. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel flaw distribution development

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, E.L.; Foulds, J.R.; Basin, S.L. )

    1991-12-01

    Previous attempts to develop flaw distributions for probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses of pressurized water reactor (PWR) vessels have aimed at the estimation of a generic'' distribution applicable to all PWR vessels. In contrast, this report describes (1) a new flaw distribution development analytic methodology that can be applied to the analysis of vessel-specific inservice inspection (ISI) data, and (2) results of the application of the methodology to the analysis of flaw data for each vessel case (ISI data on three PWR vessels and laboratory inspection data on sections of the Midland reactor vessel). Results of this study show significant variation among the flaw distributions derived from the various data sets analyzed, strongly suggesting than a vessel-specific flaw distribution (for vessel integrity prediction under pressurized thermal shock) is preferred over a generic'' distribution. In addition, quantitative inspection system flaw sizing accuracy requirements have been identified for developing a flaw distribution from vessel ISI data. The new flaw data analysis methodology also permits quantifying the reliability of the flaw distribution estimate. Included in the report are identified needs for further development of several aspects of ISI data acquisition and vessel integrity prediction practice.

  11. Composite overwrapped nickel-hydrogen pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reagan, John; Lewis, Joe

    1992-01-01

    The presentation is made in viewgraph format, the first of which states the purpose, which is to stimulate interest in composite overwrapped pressure vessel technology as applied to nickel hydrogen battery pressure vessels. The next viewgraph presents the history of nickel hydrogen pressure vessels over the last 15 years including materials, operating conditions, and market expansion to internationals. Basic materials properties are itemized such as thermal conductivity, corrosion resistance, and strength to weight ratio. The monolithic and composite overwrapped construction approaches are compared. A detailed description is presented of the advantages of composite overwrapped pressure vessels showing weight savings, manufacturing schedule reductions, and improved fatigue life. A discussion is also presented of B-1 application, the wide range of usable materials, and a sketch of a possible optimized design.

  12. Summary of Activities for Health Monitoring of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels Updated January 2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skow, Miles G.

    2014-01-01

    This three year project (FY12-14) will design and demonstrate the ability of new Magnetic Stress Gages for the measurement of stresses on the inner diameter of a Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel overwrap.

  13. Beryllium pressure vessels for creep tests in magnetic fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Neef, W.S.

    1990-07-20

    Beryllium has interesting applications in magnetic fusion experimental machines and future power-producing fusion reactors. Chief among the properties of beryllium that make these applications possible is its ability to act as a neutron multiplier, thereby increasing the tritium breeding ability of energy conversion blankets. Another property, the behavior of beryllium in a 14-MeV neutron environment, has not been fully investigated, nor has the creep behavior of beryllium been studied in an energetic neutron flux at thermodynamically interesting temperatures. This small beryllium pressure vessel could be charged with gas to test pressures around 3, 000 psi to produce stress in the metal of 15,000 to 20,000 psi. Such stress levels are typical of those that might be reached in fusion blanket applications of beryllium. After contacting R. Powell at HEDL about including some of the pressure vessels in future test programs, we sent one sample pressure vessel with a pressurizing tube attached (Fig. 1) for burst tests so the quality of the diffusion bond joints could be evaluated. The gas used was helium. Unfortunately, budget restrictions did not permit us to proceed in the creep test program. The purpose of this engineering note is to document the lessons learned to date, including photographs of the test pressure vessel that show the tooling necessary to satisfactorily produce the diffusion bonds. This document can serve as a starting point for those engineers who resume this task when funds become available.

  14. Design of high pressure vessels with radial crossbores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaaban, A.; Burns, D. J.

    1986-05-01

    Three dimensional finite element methods have been used to investigate the stress fields around radial crossbores in cylindrical high pressure vessels. Elastic analyses have been used to show the effects of crossbore and main cylinder diameter ratios on stress concentration factors. Elastic-plastic analyses have been used to study residual stress fields in crossbores overstained during autofrettage, proof-testing or the first operational cycle. The very beneficial influence of these residual stresses on fatigue performance is discussed. Other factors influencing fatigue life are briefly reviewed.

  15. Safety evaluation design of filament wound structures - Cases of pressure vessels and pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Masanori; Mori, Takao; Hirase, Yosihiro; Katoh, Akihiko; Ishihara, Toshio

    Procedures are presented for the safety-related evaluation of filament-wound composite products, such as pressure vessels and pipes. In order to increase the fatigue strength of pressure vessel metallic liners subject to cyclic internal pressures, by controlling residual stresses, the 'autofrettage' overpressuring treatment has been devised.

  16. Flexible Composite-Material Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Glen; Haggard, Roy; Harris, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    A proposed lightweight pressure vessel would be made of a composite of high-tenacity continuous fibers and a flexible matrix material. The flexibility of this pressure vessel would render it (1) compactly stowable for transport and (2) more able to withstand impacts, relative to lightweight pressure vessels made of rigid composite materials. The vessel would be designed as a structural shell wherein the fibers would be predominantly bias-oriented, the orientations being optimized to make the fibers bear the tensile loads in the structure. Such efficient use of tension-bearing fibers would minimize or eliminate the need for stitching and fill (weft) fibers for strength. The vessel could be fabricated by techniques adapted from filament winding of prior composite-material vessels, perhaps in conjunction with the use of dry film adhesives. In addition to the high-bias main-body substructure described above, the vessel would include a low-bias end substructure to complete coverage and react peak loads. Axial elements would be overlaid to contain damage and to control fiber orientation around side openings. Fiber ring structures would be used as interfaces for connection to ancillary hardware.

  17. Liquid Nitrogen Subcooler Pressure Vessel Engineering Note

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1997-04-24

    The normal operating pressure of this dewar is expected to be less than 15 psig. This vessel is open to atmospheric pressure thru a non-isolatable vent line. The backpressure in the vent line was calculated to be less than 1.5 psig at maximum anticipated flow rates.

  18. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  19. 46 CFR 50.30-15 - Class II pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class II pressure vessels. 50.30-15 Section 50.30-15... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-15 Class II pressure vessels. (a) Class II pressure vessels shall be subject to... pressure vessels shall be performed during the welding of the longitudinal joint. At this time the...

  20. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  1. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  2. 46 CFR 50.30-15 - Class II pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class II pressure vessels. 50.30-15 Section 50.30-15... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-15 Class II pressure vessels. (a) Class II pressure vessels shall be subject to... pressure vessels shall be performed during the welding of the longitudinal joint. At this time the...

  3. 46 CFR 61.10-5 - Pressure vessels in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure vessels in service. 61.10-5 Section 61.10-5... INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Pressure Vessels § 61.10-5 Pressure vessels in service. (a) Basic requirements. Each pressure vessel must be examined or tested every 5 years. The extent of the test...

  4. 46 CFR 61.10-5 - Pressure vessels in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure vessels in service. 61.10-5 Section 61.10-5... INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Pressure Vessels § 61.10-5 Pressure vessels in service. (a) Basic requirements. Each pressure vessel must be examined or tested every 5 years. The extent of the test...

  5. 46 CFR 50.30-15 - Class II pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class II pressure vessels. 50.30-15 Section 50.30-15... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-15 Class II pressure vessels. (a) Class II pressure vessels shall be subject to... pressure vessels shall be performed during the welding of the longitudinal joint. At this time the...

  6. 46 CFR 61.10-5 - Pressure vessels in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure vessels in service. 61.10-5 Section 61.10-5... INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Pressure Vessels § 61.10-5 Pressure vessels in service. (a) Basic requirements. Each pressure vessel must be examined or tested every 5 years. The extent of the test...

  7. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  8. 46 CFR 61.10-5 - Pressure vessels in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure vessels in service. 61.10-5 Section 61.10-5... INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Pressure Vessels § 61.10-5 Pressure vessels in service. (a) Basic requirements. Each pressure vessel must be examined or tested every 5 years. The extent of the test...

  9. 46 CFR 50.30-15 - Class II pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Class II pressure vessels. 50.30-15 Section 50.30-15... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-15 Class II pressure vessels. (a) Class II pressure vessels shall be subject to... pressure vessels shall be performed during the welding of the longitudinal joint. At this time the...

  10. 46 CFR 50.30-15 - Class II pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class II pressure vessels. 50.30-15 Section 50.30-15... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-15 Class II pressure vessels. (a) Class II pressure vessels shall be subject to... pressure vessels shall be performed during the welding of the longitudinal joint. At this time the...

  11. 46 CFR 61.10-5 - Pressure vessels in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure vessels in service. 61.10-5 Section 61.10-5... INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Pressure Vessels § 61.10-5 Pressure vessels in service. (a) Basic requirements. Each pressure vessel must be examined or tested every 5 years. The extent of the test...

  12. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  13. Threaded insert for compact cryogenic-capable pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Espinosa-Loza, Francisco; Ross, Timothy O.; Switzer, Vernon A.; Aceves, Salvador M.; Killingsworth, Nicholas J.; Ledesma-Orozco, Elias

    2015-06-16

    An insert for a cryogenic capable pressure vessel for storage of hydrogen or other cryogenic gases at high pressure. The insert provides the interface between a tank and internal and external components of the tank system. The insert can be used with tanks with any or all combinations of cryogenic, high pressure, and highly diffusive fluids. The insert can be threaded into the neck of a tank with an inner liner. The threads withstand the majority of the stress when the fluid inside the tank that is under pressure.

  14. A Survey of Pressure Vessel Code Compliance for Superconducting RF Cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Thomas; Klebaner, Arkadiy; Nicol, Tom; Theilacker, Jay; Hayano, Hitoshi; Kako, Eiji; Nakai, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Akira; Jensch, Kay; Matheisen, Axel; Mammosser, John; /Jefferson Lab

    2011-06-07

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made from niobium and cooled with liquid helium are becoming key components of many particle accelerators. The helium vessels surrounding the RF cavities, portions of the niobium cavities themselves, and also possibly the vacuum vessels containing these assemblies, generally fall under the scope of local and national pressure vessel codes. In the U.S., Department of Energy rules require national laboratories to follow national consensus pressure vessel standards or to show ''a level of safety greater than or equal to'' that of the applicable standard. Thus, while used for its superconducting properties, niobium ends up being treated as a low-temperature pressure vessel material. Niobium material is not a code listed material and therefore requires the designer to understand the mechanical properties for material used in each pressure vessel fabrication; compliance with pressure vessel codes therefore becomes a problem. This report summarizes the approaches that various institutions have taken in order to bring superconducting RF cryomodules into compliance with pressure vessel codes. In Japan, Germany, and the U.S., institutions building superconducting RF cavities integrated in helium vessels or procuring them from vendors have had to deal with pressure vessel requirements being applied to SRF vessels, including the niobium and niobium-titanium components of the vessels. While niobium is not an approved pressure vessel material, data from tests of material samples provide information to set allowable stresses. By means of procedures which include adherence to code welding procedures, maintaining material and fabrication records, and detailed analyses of peak stresses in the vessels, or treatment of the vacuum vessel as the pressure boundary, research laboratories around the world have found methods to demonstrate and document a level of safety equivalent to the applicable pressure vessel codes.

  15. Proactive life extension of pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mager, Lloyd

    1998-03-01

    For a company to maintain its competitive edge in today's global market every opportunity to gain an advantage must be exploited. Many companies are strategically focusing on improved utilization of existing equipment as well as regulatory compliance. Abbott Laboratories is no exception. Pharmaceutical companies such as Abbott Laboratories realize that reliability and availability of their production equipment is critical to be successful and competitive. Abbott Laboratories, like many of our competitors, is working to improve safety, minimize downtime and maximize the productivity and efficiency of key production equipment such as the pressure vessels utilized in our processes. The correct strategy in obtaining these objectives is to perform meaningful inspection with prioritization based on hazard analysis and risk. The inspection data gathered in Abbott Laboratories pressure vessel program allows informed decisions leading to improved process control. The results of the program are reduced risks to the corporation and employees when operating pressure retaining equipment. Accurate and meaningful inspection methods become the cornerstone of a program allowing proper preventative maintenance actions to occur. Successful preventative/predictive maintenance programs must utilize meaningful nondestructive evaluation techniques and inspection methods. Nondestructive examination methods require accurate useful tools that allow rapid inspection for the entire pressure vessel. Results from the examination must allow the owner to prove compliance of all applicable regulatory laws and codes. At Abbott Laboratories the use of advanced NDE techniques, primarily B-scan ultrasonics, has provided us with the proper tools allowing us to obtain our objectives. Abbott Laboratories uses B-scan ultrasonics utilizing a pulse echo pitch catch technique to provide essential data on our pressure vessels. Equipment downtime is reduced because the nondestructive examination usually takes place while our vessels are in service. As the inspection takes place we are able to view a real time image of detected discontinuities on a video monitor. The B-scan ultrasonic technique is allowing us to perform fast accurate examinations covering up to 95% of the surface area of each pressure vessel. Receiving data on 95% of a pressure vessel provides us with a lot of useful information. We use this data to determine the condition of each pressure vessel. Once the condition is known the vessels are classed by risk. The risk level is then managed by making decisions related to repair, operating parameters, accepting and monitoring or replacement of the equipment. Inspection schedules are set at maximum intervals and reinspection is minimized for the vessels that are not at risk. The remaining life of each pressure vessel is determined, mechanical integrity is proven and regulatory requirements are met. Abbott Laboratories is taking this proactive approach because we understand that our process equipment is a critical element for successful operation. A run to failure practice would never allow Abbott Laboratories to achieve the corporation's objective of being the world's leading health care company. Nondestructive state of the art technology and the understanding of its capabilities and limitations are key components of a proactive program for life extension of pressure vessels. 26

  16. 46 CFR 115.812 - Pressure vessels and boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure vessels and boilers. 115.812 Section 115.812 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE... CERTIFICATION Material Inspections § 115.812 Pressure vessels and boilers. (a) Pressure vessels must be...

  17. 46 CFR 115.812 - Pressure vessels and boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure vessels and boilers. 115.812 Section 115.812 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE... CERTIFICATION Material Inspections § 115.812 Pressure vessels and boilers. (a) Pressure vessels must be...

  18. 46 CFR 115.812 - Pressure vessels and boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure vessels and boilers. 115.812 Section 115.812 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE... CERTIFICATION Material Inspections § 115.812 Pressure vessels and boilers. (a) Pressure vessels must be...

  19. 46 CFR 115.812 - Pressure vessels and boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure vessels and boilers. 115.812 Section 115.812 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE... CERTIFICATION Material Inspections § 115.812 Pressure vessels and boilers. (a) Pressure vessels must be...

  20. Guidelines for pressure vessel safety assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukawa, S.

    1990-04-01

    A technical overview and information on metallic pressure containment vessels and tanks is given. The intent is to provide Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) personnel and other persons with information to assist in the evaluation of the safety of operating pressure vessels and low pressure storage tanks. The scope is limited to general industrial application vessels and tanks constructed of carbon or low alloy steels and used at temperatures between -75 and 315 C (-100 and 600 F). Information on design codes, materials, fabrication processes, inspection and testing applicable to the vessels and tanks are presented. The majority of the vessels and tanks are made to the rules and requirements of ASME Code Section VIII or API Standard 620. The causes of deterioration and damage in operation are described and methods and capabilities of detecting serious damage and cracking are discussed. Guidelines and recommendations formulated by various groups to inspect for the damages being found and to mitigate the causes and effects of the problems are presented.

  1. Pressurized wet digestion in open vessels.

    PubMed

    Maichin, B; Zischka, M; Knapp, G

    2003-07-01

    The High Pressure Asher (HPA-S) was adapted with a Teflon liner for pressurized wet digestion in open vessels. The autoclave was partly filled with water containing 5% (vol/vol) hydrogen peroxide. The digestion vessels dipped partly into the water or were arranged on top of the water by means of a special rack made of titanium or PTFE-coated stainless steel. The HPA-S was closed and pressurized with nitrogen up to 100 bars. The maximum digestion temperature was 250 degrees C for PFA vessels and 270 degrees C for quartz vessels. Digestion vessels made of quartz or PFA-Teflon with volumes between 1.5 mL (auto sampler cups) and 50 mL were tested. The maximum sample amount for quartz vessels was 0.5-1.5 g and for PFA vessels 0.2-0.5 g, depending on the material. Higher sample intake may lead to fast reactions with losses of digestion solution. The samples were digested with 5 mL HNO(3) or with 2 mL HNO(3)+6 mL H(2)O+2 mL H(2)O(2). The total digestion time was 90-120 min and 30 min for cooling down to room temperature. Auto sampler cups made of PFA were used as digestion vessels for GFAAS. Sample material (50 mg) was digested with 0.2 mL HNO(3)+0.5 mL H(2)O+0.2 mL H(2)O(2). The analytical data of nine certified reference materials are also within the confidential intervals for volatile elements like mercury, selenium and arsenic. No cross contamination between the digestion vessels could be observed. Due to the high gas pressure, the diffusion rate of volatile species is low and losses of elements by volatilisation could be observed only with diluted nitric acid and vessels with large cross section. In addition, cocoa, walnuts, nicotinic acid, pumpkin seeds, lubrication oil, straw, polyethylene and coal were digested and the TOC values measured. The residual carbon content came to 0.2-10% depending on the sample matrix and amount. PMID:12802569

  2. Structural design, analysis, and code evaluation of an odd-shaped pressure vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezvani, M. A.; Ziada, H. H.

    1992-12-01

    An effort to design, analyze, and evaluate a rectangular pressure vessel is described. Normally pressure vessels are designed in circular or spherical shapes to prevent stress concentrations. In this case, because of operational limitations, the choice of vessels was limited to a rectangular pressure box with a removable cover plate. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code is used as a guideline for pressure containments whose width or depth exceeds 15.24 cm (6.0 in.) and where pressures will exceed 103.4 KPa (15.0 lbf/in(sup 2)). This evaluation used Section 8 of this Code, hereafter referred to as the Code. The dimensions and working pressure of the subject vessel fall within the pressure vessel category of the Code. The Code design guidelines and rules do not directly apply to this vessel. Therefore, finite-element methodology was used to analyze the pressure vessel, and the Code then was used in qualifying the vessel to be stamped to the Code. Section 8, Division 1 of the Code was used for evaluation. This action was justified by selecting a material for which fatigue damage would not be a concern. The stress analysis results were then checked against the Code, and the thicknesses adjusted to satisfy Code requirements. Although not directly applicable, the Code design formulas for rectangular vessels were also considered and presented.

  3. Reactor pressure vessel with forged nozzles

    DOEpatents

    Desai, Dilip R. (Fremont, CA)

    1993-01-01

    Inlet nozzles for a gravity-driven cooling system (GDCS) are forged with a cylindrical reactor pressure vessel (RPV) section to which a support skirt for the RPV is attached. The forging provides enhanced RPV integrity around the nozzle and substantial reduction of in-service inspection costs by eliminating GDCS nozzle-to-RPV welds.

  4. Material Issues in Space Shuttle Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, James K.; Jensen, Brian J.; Gates, Thomas S.; Morgan, Roger J.; Thesken, John C.; Phoenix, S. Leigh

    2006-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) store gases used in four subsystems for NASA's Space Shuttle Fleet. While there are 24 COPV on each Orbiter ranging in size from 19-40", stress rupture failure of a pressurized Orbiter COPV on the ground or in flight is a catastrophic hazard and would likely lead to significant damage/loss of vehicle and/or life and is categorized as a Crit 1 failure. These vessels were manufactured during the late 1970's and into the early 1980's using Titanium liners, Kevlar 49 fiber, epoxy matrix resin, and polyurethane coating. The COPVs are pressurized periodically to 3-5ksi and therefore experience significant strain in the composite overwrap. Similar composite vessels were developed in a variety of DOE Programs (primarily at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories or LLNL), as well as for NASA Space Shuttle Fleet Leader COPV program. The NASA Engineering Safety Center (NESC) formed an Independent Technical Assessment (ITA) team whose primary focus was to investigate whether or not enough composite life remained in the Shuttle COPV in order to provide a strategic rationale for continued COPV use aboard the Space Shuttle Fleet with the existing 25-year-old vessels. Several material science issues were examined and will be discussed in this presentation including morphological changes to Kevlar 49 fiber under stress, manufacturing changes in Kevlar 49 and their effect on morphology and tensile strength, epoxy resin strain, composite creep, degradation of polyurethane coatings, and Titanium yield characteristics.

  5. (Irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels)

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.

    1990-09-24

    The traveler served as a member of the two-man US Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsored team who visited the Prometey Complex in Leningrad to assess the potential for expanded cooperative research concerning integrity of the primary pressure boundary in commercial light-water reactors. The emphasis was on irradiation embrittlement, structural analysis, and fracture mechanics research for reactor pressure vessels. At the irradiation seminar in Cologne, presentations were made by German, French, Finnish, Russian, and US delegations concerning many aspects of irradiation of pressure vessel steels. The traveler made presentations on mechanisms of irradiation embrittlement and on important aspects of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program results of irradiated fracture mechanics tests.

  6. Corrosion fatigue characterization of reactor pressure vessel steels. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Sluys, W.A.

    1982-12-01

    During routine operation, light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels are subjected to a variety of transients that result in time-varying stresses. Consequently, fatigue and environmentally-assisted fatigue are mechanisms of growth relevant to flaws in these pressure vessels. To provide a better understanding of the resistance of nuclear pressure vessel steels to these flaw growth processes, fracture mechanics data were generated on the rates of fatigue crack growth for SA508-2 and SA533B-1 steels in both room temperature air and 288/sup 0/C water. Areas investigated were: the relationship of crack growth rate to prior loading history; the effects of loading frequency and R ratio (K/sub min//K/sub max/) on crack growth rate as a function of the stress intensity factor range (..delta..K); transient aspects of the fatigue crack growth behavior; the effect of material chemistry (sulphur content) on fatigue crack; and growth rate; water chemistry effects (high-purity water versus simulated pressurized water reactotr (PWR) primary coolant).

  7. Inspection techniques for composite overwrapped pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Nokes, J.P.; Johnson, E.C.

    1995-11-01

    This paper documents findings from a feasibility study regarding the application of four NDE methods to the problem of detecting and locating impact sites on Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs). The four NDE methods employed in the study were ultrasound, thermography, electronic shearography and acoustic emission monitoring. The results of the investigation show that the threshold for detection, in terms of impact energy, for an impact site depends not only on the NDE method applied, but also on the size and shape of the vessel and the location (e.g., membrane, dome) of the impact. For the three vessel configurations examined, detection thresholds ranged from 10 J to 20 J, while the onset of visible impact indications ranged from 20 J to over 50 J.

  8. Experimental Investigation of Composite Pressure Vessel Performance and Joint Stiffness for Pyramid and Inverted Pyramid Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhage, Joseph M.; Bower, Mark V.; Gilbert, Paul A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The focus of this study is on the suitability in the application of classical laminate theory analysis tools for filament wound pressure vessels with adhesive laminated joints in particular: pressure vessel wall performance, joint stiffness and failure prediction. Two 18-inch diameter 12-ply filament wound pressure vessels were fabricated. One vessel was fabricated with a 24-ply pyramid laminated adhesive double strap butt joint. The second vessel was fabricated with the same number of plies in an inverted pyramid joint. Results from hydrostatic tests are presented. Experimental results were used as input to the computer programs GENLAM and Laminate, and the output compared to test. By using the axial stress resultant, the classical laminate theory results show a correlation within 1% to the experimental results in predicting the pressure vessel wall pressure performance. The prediction of joint stiffness for the two adhesive joints in the axial direction is within 1% of the experimental results. The calculated hoop direction joint stress resultant is 25% less than the measured resultant for both joint configurations. A correction factor is derived and used in the joint analysis. The correction factor is derived from the hoop stress resultant from the tank wall performance investigation. The vessel with the pyramid joint is determined to have failed in the joint area at a hydrostatic pressure 33% value below predicted failure. The vessel with the inverted pyramid joint failed in the wall acreage at a hydrostatic pressure within 10% of the actual failure pressure.

  9. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) Materials Aging Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the issues concerning the aging of the materials in a Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV). The basic composition of the COPV is a Boss, a composite overwrap, and a metallic liner. The lifetime of a COPV is affected by the age of the overwrap, the cyclic fatigue of the metallic liner, and stress rupture life, a sudden and catastrophic failure of the overwrap while holding at a stress level below the ultimate strength for an extended time. There is information about the coupon tests that were performed, and a test on a flight COPV.

  10. Composite Pressure Vessel Including Crack Arresting Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A pressure vessel includes a ported fitting having an annular flange formed on an end thereof and a tank that envelopes the annular flange. A crack arresting barrier is bonded to and forming a lining of the tank within the outer surface thereof. The crack arresting barrier includes a cured resin having a post-curing ductility rating of at least approximately 60% through the cured resin, and further includes randomly-oriented fibers positioned in and throughout the cured resin.

  11. Guide for certifying pressure vessels and systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundy, Floyd; Krusa, Paul W.

    1992-01-01

    This guide is intended to provide methodology and describe the intent of the Pressure Vessel and System (PV/S) Certification program. It is not meant to be a mandated document, but is intended to transmit a basic understanding of the PV/S program, and include examples. After the reader has familiarized himself with this publication, he should have a basic understanding of how to go about developing a PV/S certification program.

  12. Macrosegregation and Microstructural Evolution in a Pressure-Vessel Steel

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Macrosegregation and Microstructural Evolution in a Pressure-Vessel Steel E.J. Pickering and H evolution during solid-state transformations in a continuously-cooled pressure-vessel steel (SA508 Grade 3 during casting. In the large steel ingots used to produce pressure vessels, these distances can range

  13. 46 CFR 115.812 - Pressure vessels and boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure vessels and boilers. 115.812 Section 115.812... CERTIFICATION Material Inspections § 115.812 Pressure vessels and boilers. (a) Pressure vessels must be tested... testing requirements for boilers are contained in § 61.05 in subchapter F of this chapter....

  14. 46 CFR 115.812 - Pressure vessels and boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

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  15. 46 CFR 176.812 - Pressure vessels and boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

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  16. 46 CFR 115.812 - Pressure vessels and boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

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  17. 46 CFR 176.812 - Pressure vessels and boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

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  18. 46 CFR 176.812 - Pressure vessels and boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

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  19. 46 CFR 115.812 - Pressure vessels and boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

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  20. 46 CFR 176.812 - Pressure vessels and boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

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  1. 46 CFR 176.812 - Pressure vessels and boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Pressure vessels and boilers. 176.812 Section 176.812 Shipping...Inspections § 176.812 Pressure vessels and boilers. (a) Pressure vessels must be...inspection and testing requirements for boilers are contained in § 61.05 in...

  2. 46 CFR 115.812 - Pressure vessels and boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

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  3. 46 CFR 115.812 - Pressure vessels and boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

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  4. 46 CFR 58.60-3 - Pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure vessel. 58.60-3 Section 58.60-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND... Pressure vessel. A pressure vessel that is a component in an industrial system under this subpart must...

  5. 46 CFR 58.60-3 - Pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

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  6. 46 CFR 58.60-3 - Pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure vessel. 58.60-3 Section 58.60-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND... Pressure vessel. A pressure vessel that is a component in an industrial system under this subpart must...

  7. 46 CFR 176.812 - Pressure vessels and boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure vessels and boilers. 176.812 Section 176.812... TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Material Inspections § 176.812 Pressure vessels and boilers. (a) Pressure vessels must be tested and inspected in accordance with part 61, subpart 61.10, of this...

  8. 46 CFR 176.812 - Pressure vessels and boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure vessels and boilers. 176.812 Section 176.812... TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Material Inspections § 176.812 Pressure vessels and boilers. (a) Pressure vessels must be tested and inspected in accordance with part 61, subpart 61.10, of this...

  9. 46 CFR 176.812 - Pressure vessels and boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure vessels and boilers. 176.812 Section 176.812... TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Material Inspections § 176.812 Pressure vessels and boilers. (a) Pressure vessels must be tested and inspected in accordance with part 61, subpart 61.10, of this...

  10. 46 CFR 176.812 - Pressure vessels and boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure vessels and boilers. 176.812 Section 176.812... TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Material Inspections § 176.812 Pressure vessels and boilers. (a) Pressure vessels must be tested and inspected in accordance with part 61, subpart 61.10, of this...

  11. Reliability Considerations for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels on Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie; Phoenix, S. L.

    2007-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are used to store gases under high pressure onboard spacecraft. These are used for a variety of purposes such as propelling liquid fuel etc, Kevlar, glass, Carbon and other more recent fibers have all been in use to overwrap the vessels. COPVs usually have a thin metallic liner with the primary purpose of containing the gases and prevent any leakage. The liner is overwrapped with filament wound composite such as Kevlar, Carbon or Glass fiber. Although the liner is required to perform in the leak before break mode making the failure a relatively benign mode, the overwrap can fail catastrophically under sustained load due to stress rupture. It is this failure mode that is of major concern as the stored energy of such vessels is often great enough ta cause loss of crew and vehicle. The present paper addresses some of the reliability concerns associated specifically with Kevlar Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels. The primary focus of the paper is on how reliability of COPV's are established for the purpose of deciding in general their flight worthiness and continued use. Analytical models based on existing design data will be presented showing how to achieve the required reliability metric to the end of a specific period of performance. Uncertainties in the design parameters and how they affect reliability and confidence intervals will be addressed as well. Some trade studies showing how reliability changes with time during a program period will be presented.

  12. Glass Fiber Reinforced Metal Pressure Vessel Design Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landes, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    The Engineering Guide presents curves and general equations for safelife design of lightweight glass fiber reinforced (GFR) metal pressure vessels operating under anticipated Space Shuttle service conditions. The high composite vessel weight efficiency is shown to be relatively insensitive to shape, providing increased flexibility to designers establishing spacecraft configurations. Spheres, oblate speroids, and cylinders constructed of GFR Inconel X-750, 2219-T62 aluminum, and cryoformed 301 stainless steel are covered; design parameters and performance efficiencies for each configuration are compared at ambient and cryogenic temperature for an operating pressure range of 690 to 2760 N/sq cm (1000 to 4000 psi). Design variables are presented as a function of metal shell operating to sizing (proof) stress ratios for use with fracture mechanics data generated under a separate task of this program.

  13. Neural Network Burst Pressure Prediction in Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Eric v. K.; Dion, Seth-Andrew T.; Karl, Justin O.; Spivey, Nicholas S.; Walker, James L., II

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic emission data were collected during the hydroburst testing of eleven 15 inch diameter filament wound composite overwrapped pressure vessels. A neural network burst pressure prediction was generated from the resulting AE amplitude data. The bottles shared commonality of graphite fiber, epoxy resin, and cure time. Individual bottles varied by cure mode (rotisserie versus static oven curing), types of inflicted damage, temperature of the pressurant, and pressurization scheme. Three categorical variables were selected to represent undamaged bottles, impact damaged bottles, and bottles with lacerated hoop fibers. This categorization along with the removal of the AE data from the disbonding noise between the aluminum liner and the composite overwrap allowed the prediction of burst pressures in all three sets of bottles using a single backpropagation neural network. Here the worst case error was 3.38 percent.

  14. Vehicular Storage of Hydrogen in Insulated Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Berry, G D; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinosa-Loza, F

    2005-01-03

    This paper describes the development of an alternative technology for storing hydrogen fuel onboard automobiles. Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can accept cryogenic liquid fuel, cryogenic compressed gas or compressed gas at ambient temperature. Insulated pressure vessels offer advantages over conventional H{sub 2} storage approaches. Insulated pressure vessels are more compact and require less carbon fiber than GH{sub 2} vessels. They have lower evaporative losses than LH{sub 2} tanks, and are much lighter than metal hydrides. After outlining the advantages of hydrogen fuel and insulated pressure vessels, the paper describes the experimental and analytical work conducted to verify that insulated pressure vessels can be used safely for vehicular H{sub 2} storage. The paper describes tests that have been conducted to evaluate the safety of insulated pressure vessels. Insulated pressure vessels have successfully completed a series of DOT, ISO and SAE certification tests. A draft procedure for insulated pressure vessel certification has been generated to assist in a future commercialization of this technology. An insulated pressure vessel has been installed in a hydrogen fueled truck and it is currently being subjected to extensive testing.

  15. Welded repairs of punctured thin-walled aluminum pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. J.

    1969-01-01

    Punctures in thin-walled aluminum pressure vessels are repaired by plugging the hole with an interference-fit disc and welding the unit. The repaired vessels withstood test pressures in excess of vessel ultimate design values for 2-, 4-, and 6-inch holes in 0.202-inch-thick aluminum alloy parent material.

  16. Nonlinear finite element analysis of mechanical characteristics on CFRP composite pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong-xia; Liang, Li; Li, Ming

    2010-06-01

    CFRP(Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic) composite pressure vessel was calculated using finite element program of ANSYS for their mechanical characteristics in this paper. The elastic-plastic model and elements of Solid95 were selected for aluminium alloys of gas cylinder. Also liner-elastic model and layer elements of Shell99 were adopted for carbon fibre/epoxy resin. The stress state of CFRP composite pressure vessel was calculated under different internal pressures include pre-stressing pressures, working pressures, test hydraulic pressures, minimum destructive pressures etcetera to determine the size of gas cylinder and layer parameter of carbon fibre. The mechanical characteristics CFRP composite vessel could were using to design and test of gas cylinder. Numerical results showed that finite element model and calculating method were efficient for study of CFRP gas cylinder and useful for engineering design.

  17. Three-Dimensional Digital Image Correlation of a Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel During Hydrostatic Pressure Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revilock, Duane M., Jr.; Thesken, John C.; Schmidt, Timothy E.

    2007-01-01

    Ambient temperature hydrostatic pressurization tests were conducted on a composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) to understand the fiber stresses in COPV components. Two three-dimensional digital image correlation systems with high speed cameras were used in the evaluation to provide full field displacement and strain data for each pressurization test. A few of the key findings will be discussed including how the principal strains provided better insight into system behavior than traditional gauges, a high localized strain that was measured where gages were not present and the challenges of measuring curved surfaces with the use of a 1.25 in. thick layered polycarbonate panel that protected the cameras.

  18. Midland reactor pressure vessel flaw distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Foulds, J.R.; Kennedy, E.L.; Rosinski, S.T.

    1993-12-01

    The results of laboratory nondestructive examination (NDE), and destructive cross-sectioning of selected weldment sections of the Midland reactor pressure vessel were analyzed per a previously developed methodology in order to develop a flaw distribution. The flaw distributions developed from the NDE results obtained by two different ultrasonic test (UT) inspections (Electric Power Research Institute NDE Center and Pacific Northwest Laboratories) were not statistically significantly different. However, the distribution developed from the NDE Center`s (destructive) cross-sectioning-based data was found to be significantly different than those obtained through the UT inspections. A fracture mechanics-based comparison of the flaw distributions showed that the cross-sectioning-based data, conservatively interpreted (all defects considered as flaws), gave a significantly lower vessel failure probability when compared with the failure probability values obtained using the UT-based distributions. Given that the cross-sectioning data were reportedly biased toward larger, more significant-appearing (by UT) indications, it is concluded that the nondestructive examinations produced definitively conservative results. In addition to the Midland vessel inspection-related analyses, a set of twenty-seven numerical simulations, designed to provide a preliminary quantitative assessment of the accuracy of the flaw distribution method used here, were conducted. The calculations showed that, in more than half the cases, the analysis produced reasonably accurate predictions.

  19. Finite element analysis of filament-wound composite pressure vessel under internal pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, S.; Borazjani, S.; Tang, S. H.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, finite element analysis (FEA) of composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV), using commercial software ABAQUS 6.12 was performed. The study deals with the simulation of aluminum pressure vessel overwrapping by Carbon/Epoxy fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP). Finite element method (FEM) was utilized to investigate the effects of winding angle on filament-wound pressure vessel. Burst pressure, maximum shell displacement and the optimum winding angle of the composite vessel under pure internal pressure were determined. The Laminae were oriented asymmetrically for [00,00]s, [150,-150]s, [300,-300]s, [450,-450]s, [550,-550]s, [600,-600]s, [750,-750]s, [900,-900]s orientations. An exact elastic solution along with the Tsai-Wu, Tsai-Hill and maximum stress failure criteria were employed for analyzing data. Investigations exposed that the optimum winding angle happens at 550 winding angle. Results were compared with the experimental ones and there was a good agreement between them.

  20. Acoustic emission testing of 12-nickel maraging steel pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunegan, H. L.

    1973-01-01

    Acoustic emission data were obtained from three point bend fracture toughness specimens of 12-nickel maraging steel, and two pressure vessels of the same material. One of the pressure vessels contained a prefabricated flaw which was extended and sharpened by fatigue cycling. It is shown that the flawed vessel had similar characteristics to the fracture specimens, thereby allowing estimates to be made of its nearness to failure during a proof test. Both the flawed and unflawed pressure vessel survived the proof pressure and 5 cycles to the working pressure, but it was apparent from the acoustic emission response during the proof cycle and the 5 cycles to the working pressure that the flawed vessel was very near failure. The flawed vessel did not survive a second cycle to the proof pressure before failure due to flaw extension through the wall (causing a leak).

  1. Long-life assessment of graphite epoxy materials for Space Station Freedom pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Donald A.

    1992-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy composite overwrapped pressure vessels are being considered for use on Space Station Freedom because of their light weight and high efficiency. These composite pressure vessels weigh roughly one-third of comparable all-metal aluminum pressure vessels, and could result in a 15,000-lb weight saving for the propulsion and fluid management and distribution systems. These vessels must resist failures under sustained pressure loads for crew safety considerations and adequate protection of the space structure during their 30-yr life. Weibull statistical analysis techniques have been applied, and a model developed, for predicting long-term stress-rupture behavior based on published short-term test data on composite strands and pressure vessels. Graphite/epoxy materials are calculated to have a 99.99-percent probability of surviving stress rupture for 30 yr under a sustained load of 50 percent ultimate failure strength. Stress-rupture lifetimes are predicted to increase as the size of the pressure vessels increases in support of the viscoelastic load-transfer mechanism proposed for stress rupture of fiber/epoxy composite materials.

  2. High pressure magnetic resonance imaging with metallic vessels.

    PubMed

    Han, Hui; Ouellette, Matthew; MacMillan, Bryce; Goora, Frederic; MacGregor, Rodney; Green, Derrick; Balcom, Bruce J

    2011-12-01

    High pressure measurements in most scientific fields rely on metal vessels given the superior tensile strength of metals. We introduce high pressure magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements with metallic vessels. The developed MRI compatible metallic pressure vessel concept is very general in application. Macroscopic physical systems are now amenable to spatially resolved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study at variable pressure and temperature. Metallic pressure vessels not only provide inherently high tensile strengths and efficient temperature control, they also permit optimization of the MRI RF probe sensitivity. An MRI compatible pressure vessel is demonstrated with a rock core holder fabricated using non-magnetic stainless steel. Water flooding through a porous rock under pressure is shown as an example of its applications. High pressure NMR spectroscopy plays an indispensable role in several science fields. This work will open new vistas of study for high pressure material science MRI and MR. PMID:21962929

  3. High pressure magnetic resonance imaging with metallic vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hui; Ouellette, Matthew; MacMillan, Bryce; Goora, Frederic; MacGregor, Rodney; Green, Derrick; Balcom, Bruce J.

    2011-12-01

    High pressure measurements in most scientific fields rely on metal vessels given the superior tensile strength of metals. We introduce high pressure magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements with metallic vessels. The developed MRI compatible metallic pressure vessel concept is very general in application. Macroscopic physical systems are now amenable to spatially resolved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study at variable pressure and temperature. Metallic pressure vessels not only provide inherently high tensile strengths and efficient temperature control, they also permit optimization of the MRI RF probe sensitivity. An MRI compatible pressure vessel is demonstrated with a rock core holder fabricated using non-magnetic stainless steel. Water flooding through a porous rock under pressure is shown as an example of its applications. High pressure NMR spectroscopy plays an indispensable role in several science fields. This work will open new vistas of study for high pressure material science MRI and MR.

  4. Comparative analysis of pressure vessel integrity for various LOCA conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çolak, Üner; Özdere, Oya

    2001-09-01

    In this study, integrity analysis is performed for a classical four loop PWR pressure vessel fabricated from SA533B type ferritic steel. Pressure vessel behavior is analyzed by deterministic and probabilistic methods under transient conditions, which may cause pressurized thermal shock (PTS). In deterministic analysis, the change of material properties and the mechanical state of the vessel are analyzed against changes in coolant pressure and temperature. Probabilistic analysis is performed to obtain pressure vessel beltline region weld failure probabilities in transient conditions. Overall vessel failure probabilities are evaluated based on the results of deterministic analyses. Computer code VISA-II is utilized for the calculation of vessel failure probabilities. Among three cases considered in this study, a medium break loss of coolant accident induced by a 50 cm2 break in the hot leg yields the highest vessel rupture probability. The maximum nil ductility temperature in all cases is still below the NRC PTS limit.

  5. Environmental Testing of Glass-Fiber/Epoxy Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    Pair of reports discusses long-term environmental tests of glassfiber/epoxy composite pressure vessels. Strength diminishes during long exposure to environment. Since such data necessary for accurate design of long-life structures such as pressure vessels, NASA Lewis Research Center built outdoor test stand in 1973. Test stand maintains system under constant pressure loading without frequent intervention of personnel.

  6. Asymmetric Bulkheads for Cylindrical Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Donald B.

    2007-01-01

    Asymmetric bulkheads are proposed for the ends of vertically oriented cylindrical pressure vessels. These bulkheads, which would feature both convex and concave contours, would offer advantages over purely convex, purely concave, and flat bulkheads (see figure). Intended originally to be applied to large tanks that hold propellant liquids for launching spacecraft, the asymmetric-bulkhead concept may also be attractive for terrestrial pressure vessels for which there are requirements to maximize volumetric and mass efficiencies. A description of the relative advantages and disadvantages of prior symmetric bulkhead configurations is prerequisite to understanding the advantages of the proposed asymmetric configuration: In order to obtain adequate strength, flat bulkheads must be made thicker, relative to concave and convex bulkheads; the difference in thickness is such that, other things being equal, pressure vessels with flat bulkheads must be made heavier than ones with concave or convex bulkheads. Convex bulkhead designs increase overall tank lengths, thereby necessitating additional supporting structure for keeping tanks vertical. Concave bulkhead configurations increase tank lengths and detract from volumetric efficiency, even though they do not necessitate additional supporting structure. The shape of a bulkhead affects the proportion of residual fluid in a tank that is, the portion of fluid that unavoidably remains in the tank during outflow and hence cannot be used. In this regard, a flat bulkhead is disadvantageous in two respects: (1) It lacks a single low point for optimum placement of an outlet and (2) a vortex that forms at the outlet during outflow prevents a relatively large amount of fluid from leaving the tank. A concave bulkhead also lacks a single low point for optimum placement of an outlet. Like purely concave and purely convex bulkhead configurations, the proposed asymmetric bulkhead configurations would be more mass-efficient than is the flat bulkhead configuration. In comparison with both purely convex and purely concave configurations, the proposed asymmetric configurations would offer greater volumetric efficiency. Relative to a purely convex bulkhead configuration, the corresponding asymmetric configuration would result in a shorter tank, thus demanding less supporting structure. An asymmetric configuration provides a low point for optimum location of a drain, and the convex shape at the drain location minimizes the amount of residual fluid.

  7. Holographic and acoustic emission evaluation of pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, D.M.

    1980-03-05

    Optical holographic interfereometry and acoustic emission monitoring were simultaneously used to evaluate two small, high pressure vessels during pressurization. The techniques provide pressure vessel designers with both quantitative information such as displacement/strain measurements and qualitative information such as flaw detection. The data from the holographic interferograms were analyzed for strain profiles. The acoustic emission signals were monitored for crack growth and vessel quality.

  8. Designing of a Fleet-Leader Program for Carbon Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L.N.; Phoenix, S. Leigh

    2009-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are often used for storing pressurant gases on board spacecraft when mass saving is a prime requirement. Substantial weight savings can be achieved compared to all metallic pressure vessels. For example, on the space shuttle, replacement of all metallic pressure vessels with Kevlar COPVs resulted in a weight savings of about 30 percent. Mass critical space applications such as the Ares and Orion vehicles are currently being planned to use as many COPVs as possible in place of all-metallic pressure vessels to minimize the overall mass of the vehicle. Due to the fact that overwraps are subjected to sustained loads during long periods of a mission, stress rupture failure is a major concern. It is, therefore, important to ascertain the reliability of these vessels by analysis, since it is practically impossible to show by experimental testing the reliability of flight quality vessels. Also, it is a common practice to set aside flight quality vessels as "fleet leaders" in a test program where these vessels are subjected to slightly accelerated operating conditions so that they lead the actual flight vessels both in time and load. The intention of fleet leaders is to provide advanced warning if there is a serious design flaw in the vessels so that a major disaster in the flight vessels can be averted with advance warning. On the other hand, the accelerating conditions must be not so severe as to be prone to false alarms. The primary focus of the present paper is to provide an analytical basis for designing a viable fleet leader program for carbon COPVs. The analysis is based on a stress rupture behavior model incorporating Weibull statistics and power-law sensitivity of life to fiber stress level.

  9. Hydroide Storage Vessel wall stress measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.; Pechersky, M.J.

    1997-07-31

    Holographic Interferometry and strain gauge measurements were used to determine whether a prototype Hydride Storage Vessel (HSV) swelled while it was loaded in eleven stages with hydrogen. Bed swelling is inferred from deformation of the surface of the HSV. No swelling was detected, even after saturating the hydride material inside the HSV. The large chunky morphology of the titanium is likely responsible for the lack of wall stress. This morphology also implies that decay helium that remains in the titanium hydride (that is, helium that is not released as gas to the free volume) should not cause significant wall stresses when the HSV is used for long-term tritium storage. Holographic interferometry proved to be an extremely sensitive technique to measure swelling, having a detection limit of about 3 microns surface displacement.

  10. Reactor pressure vessel stud management automation strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Biach, W.L.; Hill, R.; Hung, K. )

    1992-01-01

    The adoption of hydraulic tensioner technology as the standard for bolting and unbolting the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) head 35 yr ago represented an incredible commitment to new technology, but the existing technology was so primitive as to be clearly unacceptable. Today, a variety of approaches for improvement make the decision more difficult. Automation in existing installations must meet complex physical, logistic, and financial parameters while addressing the demands of reduced exposure, reduced critical path, and extended plant life. There are two generic approaches to providing automated RPV stud engagement and disengagement: the multiple stud tensioner and automated individual tools. A variation of the latter would include the handling system. Each has its benefits and liabilities.

  11. Proceedings of the ASME 2013 Pressure Vessels & Piping Division / HP-2 Conference ASME/PVP 2013

    E-print Network

    Faraon, Andrei

    Proceedings of the ASME 2013 Pressure Vessels & Piping Division / HP-2 Conference ASME/PVP 2013 July 14-18, 2013, Paris, France PVP2013-97148 ON THE ADEQUACY OF SHELL MODELS FOR PREDICTING STRESSES@caltech.edu ABSTRACT This paper analyzes the adequacy of shell models for pre- dicting stresses and strains in thick

  12. Fracture analysis of surface and through-cracks in cylindrical pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A previously developed fracture criterion was applied to surface- and through-cracked cylindrical pressure vessels to see how well the criterion can correlate fracture data. Fracture data from the literature on surface cracks in aluminum alloy, steel, and epoxy vessels and on through cracks in aluminum alloy, titanium alloy, steel, and brass vessels were analyzed using the fracture criterion. The criterion correlated the failure stresses to within + or - 10 percent for either surface or through cracks over a wide range of crack size and vessel diameter. The fracture criterion was also found to correlate failure stresses from flat plates (center-crack or double-edge-crack tension specimens) and cylindrical pressure vessels containing through - cracks within + or - 10 percent.

  13. Fracture analysis of surface and through cracks in cylindrical pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A previously developed fracture criterion was applied to fracture data for surface- and through-cracked cylindrical pressure vessels to see how well the criterion can correlate fracture data. Fracture data from the literature on surface cracks in aluminum alloy, steel, and epoxy vessels, and on through cracks in aluminum alloy, titanium alloy steel, and brass vessels were analyzed by using the fracture criterion. The criterion correlated the failure stresses to within + or - 10 percent for either surface or through cracks over a wide range of crack size and vessel diameter. The fracture criterion was also found to correlate failure stresses to within + or - 10 percent for flat plates (center-crack or double-edge-crack tension specimens) and cylindrical pressure vessels containing through cracks.

  14. Ex vivo lymphatic perfusion system for independently controlling pressure gradient and transmural pressure in isolated vessels.

    PubMed

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A; Dixon, J Brandon

    2014-08-01

    In addition to external forces, collecting lymphatic vessels intrinsically contract to transport lymph from the extremities to the venous circulation. As a result, the lymphatic endothelium is routinely exposed to a wide range of dynamic mechanical forces, primarily fluid shear stress and circumferential stress, which have both been shown to affect lymphatic pumping activity. Although various ex vivo perfusion systems exist to study this innate pumping activity in response to mechanical stimuli, none are capable of independently controlling the two primary mechanical forces affecting lymphatic contractility: transaxial pressure gradient, [Formula: see text], which governs fluid shear stress; and average transmural pressure, [Formula: see text], which governs circumferential stress. Hence, the authors describe a novel ex vivo lymphatic perfusion system (ELPS) capable of independently controlling these two outputs using a linear, explicit model predictive control (MPC) algorithm. The ELPS is capable of reproducing arbitrary waveforms within the frequency range observed in the lymphatics in vivo, including a time-varying [Formula: see text] with a constant [Formula: see text], time-varying [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], and a constant [Formula: see text] with a time-varying [Formula: see text]. In addition, due to its implementation of syringes to actuate the working fluid, a post-hoc method of estimating both the flow rate through the vessel and fluid wall shear stress over multiple, long (5 s) time windows is also described. PMID:24809724

  15. Radiation effects on reactor pressure vessel supports

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.E.; Lipinski, R.E.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the findings from the work done in accordance with the Task Action Plan developed to resolve the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Generic Safety Issue No. 15, (GSI-15). GSI-15 was established to evaluate the potential for low-temperature, low-flux-level neutron irradiation to embrittle reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports to the point of compromising plant safety. An evaluation of surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had suggested that some materials used for RPV supports in pressurized-water reactors could exhibit higher than expected embrittlement rates. However, further tests designed to evaluate the applicability of the HFIR data to reactor RPV supports under operating conditions led to the conclusion that RPV supports could be evaluated using traditional method. It was found that the unique HFIR radiation environment allowed the gamma radiation to contribute significantly to the embrittlement. The shielding provided by the thick steel RPV shell ensures that degradation of RPV supports from gamma irradiation is improbable or minimal. The findings reported herein were used, in part, as the basis for technical resolution of the issue.

  16. Analysis of pressure vessel and heat exchanger components-1990

    SciTech Connect

    Short, W.E. ); Brooks, G.N. )

    1990-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at a pressure vessels and piping conference. Included are the following: The design and fabrication of a very large pressure vessel, Spring constants for rectangular attachments to cylindrical shells, and Analysis of tube-tubesheet joints with grooves.

  17. 46 CFR 176.812 - Pressure vessels and boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure vessels and boilers. 176.812 Section 176.812... TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Material Inspections § 176.812 Pressure vessels and boilers. (a.... (b) Periodic inspection and testing requirements for boilers are contained in § 61.05 in subchapter...

  18. Large boron--epoxy filament-wound pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, W. M.; Bailey, R. L.; Knoell, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    Advanced composite material used to fabricate pressure vessel is prepeg (partially cured) consisting of continuous, parallel boron filaments in epoxy resin matrix arranged to form tape. To fabricate chamber, tape is wound on form which must be removable after composite has been cured. Configuration of boron--epoxy composite pressure vessel was determined by computer program.

  19. 46 CFR 58.60-3 - Pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Industrial Systems and Components on Mobile Offshore Drilling Units (MODU) § 58.60-3 Pressure vessel. A pressure vessel that is a component in an industrial system under this subpart must...

  20. 46 CFR 58.60-3 - Pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Industrial Systems and Components on Mobile Offshore Drilling Units (MODU) § 58.60-3 Pressure vessel. A pressure vessel that is a component in an industrial system under this subpart must...

  1. Fatigue life improvement of an autofrettage thick-walled pressure vessel with an external groove

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Seung K.; Stephens, Ralph I.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents an investigation into a fatigue life improvement of an autofrettaged thick-walled pressure vessel with an external groove subjected to pulsating internal pressure, along with mean strain and mean stress effects on strain-controlled low cycle fatigue behavior. Linear elastic stress analysis of an autofrettaged thick-walled pressure vessel with an external groove is done using a finite element method. Autofrettage loading is performed using a thermal loading analogy. Change of external groove geometry is made using a quasi-optimization technique and finite element method to achieve longer fatigue life by relieving the stress concentration at the groove root. Surface treatment using shot peening is employed to produce compressive residual stresses at the vulnerable surface of the groove root to counteract the high tensile stresses. An evaluation of the fatigue life of an autofrettaged thick-walled pressure vessel with an external groove is done through a series of simulation fatigue tests using C-shaped specimens taken from the thick-walled pressure vessel.

  2. High-performance fiber/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiao, T. T.; Hamstad, M. A.; Jessop, E. S.; Toland, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Activities described include: (1) determining the applicability of an ultrahigh-strength graphite fiber to composite pressure vessels; (2) defining the fatigue performance of thin-titanium-lined, high-strength graphite/epoxy pressure vessel; (3) selecting epoxy resin systems suitable for filament winding; (4) studying the fatigue life potential of Kevlar 49/epoxy pressure vessels; and (5) developing polymer liners for composite pressure vessels. Kevlar 49/epoxy and graphite fiber/epoxy pressure vessels, 10.2 cm in diameter, some with aluminum liners and some with alternation layers of rubber and polymer were fabricated. To determine liner performance, vessels were subjected to gas permeation tests, fatigue cycling, and burst tests, measuring composite performance, fatigue life, and leak rates. Both the metal and the rubber/polymer liner performed well. Proportionately larger pressure vessels (20.3 and 38 cm in diameter) were made and subjected to the same tests. In these larger vessels, line leakage problems with both liners developed the causes of the leaks were identified and some solutions to such liner problems are recommended.

  3. Firefighter's compressed air breathing system pressure vessel development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, E. J.

    1974-01-01

    The research to design, fabricate, test, and deliver a pressure vessel for the main component in an improved high-performance firefighter's breathing system is reported. The principal physical and performance characteristics of the vessel which were required are: (1) maximum weight of 9.0 lb; (2) maximum operating pressure of 4500 psig (charge pressure of 4000 psig); (3) minimum contained volume of 280 in. 3; (4) proof pressure of 6750 psig; (5) minimum burst pressure of 9000 psig following operational and service life; and (6) a minimum service life of 15 years. The vessel developed to fulfill the requirements described was completely sucessful, i.e., every category of performence was satisfied. The average weight of the vessel was found to be about 8.3 lb, well below the 9.0 lb specification requirement.

  4. Common/Dependent-Pressure-Vessel Nickel-Hydrogen Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmerman, Paul J.

    2003-01-01

    The term "common/dependent pressure vessel" (C/DPV) denotes a proposed alternative configuration for a nickelhydrogen battery. The C/DPV configuration is so named because it is a hybrid of two prior configurations called "common pressure vessel" (CPV) and "dependent pressure vessel" (DPV). The C/DPV configuration has been proposed as a basis for designing highly reliable, long-life Ni/H2-batteries and cells for anticipated special applications in which it is expected that small charge capacities will suffice and sizes and weights must be minimized.

  5. 29 CFR 1915.172 - Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 1915.172... Portable, Unfired Pressure Vessels, Drums and...1915.172 Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a)...

  6. 29 CFR 1915.172 - Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 1915.172... Portable, Unfired Pressure Vessels, Drums and...1915.172 Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a)...

  7. 29 CFR 1915.172 - Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 1915.172... Portable, Unfired Pressure Vessels, Drums and...1915.172 Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a)...

  8. 29 CFR 1915.172 - Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 1915.172... Portable, Unfired Pressure Vessels, Drums and...1915.172 Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a)...

  9. 29 CFR 1915.172 - Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 1915.172... Portable, Unfired Pressure Vessels, Drums and...1915.172 Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a)...

  10. 46 CFR 196.30-1 - Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 false Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 196.30-1...Equipment § 196.30-1 Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the...

  11. 46 CFR 167.25-5 - Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances...Engineering § 167.25-5 Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances. The inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping...

  12. 46 CFR 97.30-1 - Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 97.30-1...Equipment § 97.30-1 Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the...

  13. 46 CFR 196.30-1 - Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 false Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 196.30-1...Equipment § 196.30-1 Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the...

  14. 46 CFR 97.30-1 - Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 false Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 97.30-1...Equipment § 97.30-1 Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the...

  15. 46 CFR 167.25-5 - Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances...Engineering § 167.25-5 Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances. The inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping...

  16. 46 CFR 167.25-1 - Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances... Marine Engineering § 167.25-1 Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances...with one of the following standards for boilers, pressure vessels, piping and...

  17. 46 CFR 167.25-1 - Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances... Marine Engineering § 167.25-1 Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances...with one of the following standards for boilers, pressure vessels, piping and...

  18. 46 CFR 196.30-1 - Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 196.30-1...Equipment § 196.30-1 Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the...

  19. 46 CFR 167.25-5 - Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances...Engineering § 167.25-5 Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances. The inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping...

  20. 46 CFR 167.25-1 - Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances... Marine Engineering § 167.25-1 Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances...with one of the following standards for boilers, pressure vessels, piping and...

  1. 46 CFR 78.33-1 - Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels. 78.33-1...Equipment § 78.33-1 Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels,...

  2. 46 CFR 196.30-1 - Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 196.30-1...Equipment § 196.30-1 Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the...

  3. 46 CFR 97.30-1 - Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 false Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 97.30-1...Equipment § 97.30-1 Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the...

  4. 46 CFR 167.25-1 - Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances... Marine Engineering § 167.25-1 Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances...with one of the following standards for boilers, pressure vessels, piping and...

  5. 46 CFR 78.33-1 - Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 false Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels. 78.33-1...Equipment § 78.33-1 Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels,...

  6. 46 CFR 97.30-1 - Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 97.30-1...Equipment § 97.30-1 Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the...

  7. 46 CFR 167.25-5 - Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances...Engineering § 167.25-5 Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances. The inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping...

  8. 46 CFR 167.25-5 - Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances...Engineering § 167.25-5 Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances. The inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping...

  9. 46 CFR 78.33-1 - Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 false Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels. 78.33-1...Equipment § 78.33-1 Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels,...

  10. 46 CFR 97.30-1 - Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 false Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 97.30-1...Equipment § 97.30-1 Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the...

  11. 46 CFR 196.30-1 - Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 false Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 196.30-1...Equipment § 196.30-1 Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the...

  12. 46 CFR 78.33-1 - Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 false Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels. 78.33-1...Equipment § 78.33-1 Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels,...

  13. 46 CFR 167.25-1 - Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances... Marine Engineering § 167.25-1 Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances...with one of the following standards for boilers, pressure vessels, piping and...

  14. 46 CFR 78.33-1 - Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels. 78.33-1...Equipment § 78.33-1 Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels,...

  15. 46 CFR 154.650 - Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding. 154.650 Section 154.650 Shipping... Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding. (a) Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding must meet Subpart 54.05 and Part 57...

  16. 46 CFR 154.650 - Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding. 154.650 Section 154.650 Shipping... Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding. (a) Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding must meet Subpart 54.05 and Part 57...

  17. 46 CFR 154.650 - Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding. 154.650 Section 154.650 Shipping... Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding. (a) Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding must meet Subpart 54.05 and Part 57...

  18. 46 CFR 154.650 - Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding. 154.650 Section 154.650 Shipping... Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding. (a) Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding must meet Subpart 54.05 and Part 57...

  19. 46 CFR 154.650 - Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding. 154.650 Section 154.650 Shipping... Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding. (a) Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding must meet Subpart 54.05 and Part 57...

  20. 46 CFR 54.01-10 - Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies...General Requirements § 54.01-10 Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies... (a) Pressure vessels in which steam is generated are classed as...

  1. 46 CFR 54.01-10 - Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies...General Requirements § 54.01-10 Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies... (a) Pressure vessels in which steam is generated are classed as...

  2. 46 CFR 54.01-10 - Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies...General Requirements § 54.01-10 Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies... (a) Pressure vessels in which steam is generated are classed as...

  3. 46 CFR 54.01-10 - Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies...General Requirements § 54.01-10 Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies... (a) Pressure vessels in which steam is generated are classed as...

  4. 46 CFR 54.01-10 - Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies...General Requirements § 54.01-10 Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies... (a) Pressure vessels in which steam is generated are classed as...

  5. 46 CFR 54.01-17 - Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-17 Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). Pressure vessels for human occupancy...requirements of subpart B (Commercial Diving Operations) of part 197...

  6. 46 CFR 54.01-17 - Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-17 Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). Pressure vessels for human occupancy...requirements of subpart B (Commercial Diving Operations) of part 197...

  7. 46 CFR 54.01-17 - Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-17 Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). Pressure vessels for human occupancy...requirements of subpart B (Commercial Diving Operations) of part 197...

  8. 46 CFR 54.01-17 - Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-17 Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). Pressure vessels for human occupancy...requirements of subpart B (Commercial Diving Operations) of part 197...

  9. 46 CFR 54.01-17 - Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-17 Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). Pressure vessels for human occupancy...requirements of subpart B (Commercial Diving Operations) of part 197...

  10. Lightweight cryogenic-compatible pressure vessels for vehicular fuel storage

    DOEpatents

    Aceves, Salvador; Berry, Gene; Weisberg, Andrew H.

    2004-03-23

    A lightweight, cryogenic-compatible pressure vessel for flexibly storing cryogenic liquid fuels or compressed gas fuels at cryogenic or ambient temperatures. The pressure vessel has an inner pressure container enclosing a fuel storage volume, an outer container surrounding the inner pressure container to form an evacuated space therebetween, and a thermal insulator surrounding the inner pressure container in the evacuated space to inhibit heat transfer. Additionally, vacuum loss from fuel permeation is substantially inhibited in the evacuated space by, for example, lining the container liner with a layer of fuel-impermeable material, capturing the permeated fuel in the evacuated space, or purging the permeated fuel from the evacuated space.

  11. On the optimal pretensioning of cylindrical and spherical pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Kalamkarov, A.L.; Drozdov, A.D.

    1995-11-01

    Filament winding of pressure vessels and pipes is always realized with some pretensioning, and some external loads may be applied. It is important to determine such an optimal preload regime that ensures the maximum load-carrying capacity of the vessel subject to internal pressure. In the present study, the optimal preload distribution is analyzed in the filament winding fabrication of the cylindrical or spherical pressure vessels that are treated as growing elastic solids subjected to aging. In the case of cylindrical vessels, the dependence of the optimal preload intensity versus the polar radius is obtained for both nonaging and aging material of the fibers. In the case of spherical pressure vessels, the optimal regime of internal pressure applied during the winding process is obtained. The optimal loading of a spherical vessel at both infinitesimal and finite strains is analyzed. The new solutions obtained and the recommendations formulated are of a special practical importance for the optimal design and fabrication of the composite pressure vessels and pipes.

  12. Neutron shielding panels for reactor pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Norman R. (Murrysville, PA)

    2011-11-22

    In a nuclear reactor neutron panels varying in thickness in the circumferential direction are disposed at spaced circumferential locations around the reactor core so that the greatest radial thickness is at the point of highest fluence with lesser thicknesses at adjacent locations where the fluence level is lower. The neutron panels are disposed between the core barrel and the interior of the reactor vessel to maintain radiation exposure to the vessel within acceptable limits.

  13. Influence of operation factors on brittle fracture initiation and critical local normal stress in SE(B) type specimens of VVER reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshova, E. A.; Erak, A. D.; Kiselev, A. S.; Bubyakin, S. A.; Bandura, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    A complex of mechanical tests and fractographic studies of VVER-1000 RPV SE(B) type surveillance specimens was carried out: the brittle fracture origins were revealed (non-metallic inclusions and structural boundaries) and the correlation between fracture toughness parameters (CTOD) and fracture surface parameters (CID) was established. A computational and experimental method of the critical local normal stress determination for different origin types was developed. The values of the critical local normal stress for the structural boundary origin type both for base and weld metal after thermal exposure and neutron irradiation are lower than that for initial state due to the lower cohesive strength of grain boundaries as a result of phosphorus segregation.

  14. 46 CFR 58.60-3 - Pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Industrial Systems and Components on Mobile Offshore...pressure vessel that is a component in an industrial system under this subpart must...

  15. 46 CFR 58.60-3 - Pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Industrial Systems and Components on Mobile Offshore...pressure vessel that is a component in an industrial system under this subpart must...

  16. 46 CFR 58.60-3 - Pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Industrial Systems and Components on Mobile Offshore...pressure vessel that is a component in an industrial system under this subpart must...

  17. 46 CFR 58.60-3 - Pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Industrial Systems and Components on Mobile Offshore...pressure vessel that is a component in an industrial system under this subpart must...

  18. 46 CFR 58.60-3 - Pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Industrial Systems and Components on Mobile Offshore...pressure vessel that is a component in an industrial system under this subpart must...

  19. Low-Cost, Lightweight Pressure Vessel Proof Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanez, Eric

    This experiment seeks to determine the burst strength of the low-cost, lightweight pressure vessel fabricated by the Suborbital Center of Excellence (SCE). Moreover, the test explores the effects of relatively large gage pressures on material strain for ‘pumpkin-shaped' pressure vessels. The SCE team used pressure transducers and analog gauges to measure the gage pressure while a video camera assembly recorded several gores in the shell for strain analysis. The team loaded the vessel in small intervals of pressure until the structure failed. Upon test completion, the pressure readings and video recordings were analyzed to determine the burst strength and material strain in the shell. The analysis yielded a burst pressure of 13.5 psi while the strain analysis reported in the shell. While the results of this proof test are encouraging, the structure's factor of safety must be increased for actual balloon flights. Furthermore, the pressure vessel prototype must be subjected to reliability tests to show the design can sustain gage pressures for the length of a balloon flight.

  20. Proposed external pressure design rules for pressure vessels for human occupancy

    SciTech Connect

    Maison, J.R.; Briggs, E.M.

    1980-12-01

    The safety of externally pressurized manned diving bells, submersibles and underwater work systems resides in the ability of the system to rise to the surface in case of an emergency. Use of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section VIII design rules, lead to unacceptably heavy structures, and thus substantially compromise the sought-for safety in underwater manned systems. A recognition on the part of the diving industry of the inherent limitations in using the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for design of underwater pressure vessels, motivated the formation of the ASME Safety Code Committee on Pressure Vessels for Human Occupancy (PVHO) in 1974. A subcommittee of the PVHO Safety Code Committee was formed to address the specific problems of external pressure vessel design. The mathematical development which provided the basis for the proposed rules are presented. The restrictions imposed by the External Pressure Subcommittee are also presented.

  1. Reliability of Space-Shuttle Pressure Vessels with Random Batch Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, Alan H.; Kulkarni, Pandurang M.

    2000-01-01

    In this article we revisit the problem of estimating the joint reliability against failure by stress rupture of a group of fiber-wrapped pressure vessels used on Space-Shuttle missions. The available test data were obtained from an experiment conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) in which scaled-down vessels were subjected to life testing at four accelerated levels of pressure. We estimate the reliability assuming that both the Shuttle and LLL vessels were chosen at random in a two-stage process from an infinite population with spools of fiber as the primary sampling unit. Two main objectives of this work are: (1) to obtain practical estimates of reliability taking into account random spool effects and (2) to obtain a realistic assessment of estimation accuracy under the random model. Here, reliability is calculated in terms of a 'system' of 22 fiber-wrapped pressure vessels, taking into account typical pressures and exposure times experienced by Shuttle vessels. Comparisons are made with previous studies. The main conclusion of this study is that, although point estimates of reliability are still in the 'comfort zone,' it is advisable to plan for replacement of the pressure vessels well before the expected Lifetime of 100 missions per Shuttle Orbiter. Under a random-spool model, there is simply not enough information in the LLL data to provide reasonable assurance that such replacement would not be necessary.

  2. Jam proof closure assembly for lidded pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Ciolett, O.C.

    1992-06-09

    This patent describes a pressure vessel cover adapted for sealing engagement with an outer peripheral lip of an underlying pressure vessel and having a compressible annular gasket overlying the lip, the cover further comprising: a spaced peripheral array of cylindrical bored passageways communicating between outer and inner planar surfaces of the vessel cover; a rigid, comparatively thick-walled, annular sleeve insert; a substantially rigid retainer element configured to seat tightly against the inserted sleeve; bolt threaded to engage an inner surface of the positioned sleeve insert.

  3. Crashworthy sealed pressure vessel for plutonium transport

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    A rugged transportation package for the air shipment of radioisotopic materials was recently developed. This package includes a tough, sealed, stainless steel inner containment vessel of 1460 cc capacity. This vessel, intended for a mass load of up to 2 Kg PuO/sub 2/ in various isotopic forms (not to exceed 25 watts thermal activity), has a positive closure design consisting of a recessed, shouldered lid fastened to the vessel body by twelve stainless-steel bolts; sealing is accomplished by a ductile copper gasket in conjunction with knife-edge sealing beads on both the body and lid. Follow-on applications of this seal in newer, smaller packages for international air shipments of plutonium safeguards samples, and in newer, more optimized packages for greater payload and improved efficiency and utility, are briefly presented.

  4. Reversible high-pressure carbon nanotube vessel

    E-print Network

    Wang, Lifeng

    Applying a full pressure loop, i.e., loading and unloading, on a nanocrystal with in situ observation remains a challenge to experimentalists up until now. Using a multiwalled carbon nanotube, we realize the pressure loop ...

  5. Primo Vessel Stressed by Lipopolysaccharide in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Rie; Rho, Min-Suk; Hong, Ye-Ji; Ha, Yae-Eun; Kim, Ji-Young; Noh, Young-Il; Park, Do-Young; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Eun-Jung; Jang, In-Ho; Kang, Suk-Yun; Lee, Sang-Suk

    2015-12-01

    For tracking the primo vascular system, we observed the primo vessels in vivo in situ using the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) response in the lymphatic vessels of a rabbit. Injection of LPS (200 ?g/kg) into the lymph nodes resulted in greatly stained primo vessels, which were swollen in some cases. We were able to obtain comparative images through alcian blue and diaminobenzidine staining, which clearly showed different morphologies of the primo vessels. The mechanism causing the response of the primo vessels to the injected LPS is still unclear; however, these results might be a first attempt at giving an explanation of the function of the primo vascular system and identifying the changes in the structure and function of the primo vascular system in response to an external stimulus such as an injection of LPS. PMID:26742914

  6. Summary of Activities for Health Monitoring of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Rick; Skow, Miles

    2013-01-01

    This three-year project (FY12-14) will design and demonstrate the ability of new Magnetic Stress Gages for the measurement of stresses on the inner diameter of a Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel overwrap. The sensors are being tested at White Sands Testing Facility (WSTF) where the results will be correlated with a known nondestructive technique acoustic emission. The gages will be produced utilizing Meandering Winding Magnetometer (MWM) and/or MWM array eddy current technology. The ultimate goal is to utilize this technology for the health monitoring of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels for all future flight programs. The first full-scale pressurization test was performed at WSTF in June 2012. The goals of this test were to determine adaptations of the magnetic stress gauge instrumentation that would be necessary to allow multiple sensors to monitor the vessel's condition simultaneously and to determine how the sensor response changes with sensor selection and orientation. The second full scale pressurization test was performed at WSTF in August 2012. The goals of this test were to monitor the vessel's condition with multiple sensors simultaneously, to determine the viability of the multiplexing units (MUX) for the application, and to determine if the sensor responses in different orientations are repeatable. For both sets of tests the vessel was pressured up to 6,000 psi to simulate maximum operating pressure. Acoustic events were observed during the first pressurization cycle. This suggested that the extended storage period prior to use of this bottle led to a relaxation of the residual stresses imparted during auto-frettage. The pressurization tests successfully demonstrated the use of multiplexers with multiple MWM arrays to monitor a vessel. It was discovered that depending upon the sensor orientation, the frequencies, and the sense element, the MWM arrays can provide a variety of complementary information about the composite overwrapped pressure vessel load conditions. For example, low frequency measurements can be used to monitor the overwrap thickness and changes associated with pressure level. High frequency data is dominated by the properties of the overwrap, including the fiber orientations and lay-up of the layers.

  7. Transportable, small high-pressure preservation vessel for cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, N.; Sotome, S.; Nakajima, K.; Yoshimura, Y.; Shimizu, A.

    2010-03-01

    We have previously reported that the survival rate of astrocytes increases under high-pressure conditions at 4°C. However, pressure vessels generally have numerous problems for use in cell preservation and transportation: (1) they cannot be readily separated from the pressurizing pump in the pressurized state; (2) they are typically heavy and expensive due the use of materials such as stainless steel; and (3) it is difficult to regulate pressurization rate with hand pumps. Therefore, we developed a transportable high-pressure system suitable for cell preservation under high-pressure conditions. This high-pressure vessel has the following characteristics: (1) it can be easily separated from the pressurizing pump due to the use of a cock-type stop valve; (2) it is small and compact, is made of PEEK and weighs less than 200 g; and (3) pressurization rate is regulated by an electric pump instead of a hand pump. Using this transportable high-pressure vessel for cell preservation, we found that astrocytes can survive for 4 days at 1.6 MPa and 4°C.

  8. Validation and Verification of Composite Pressure Vessel Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreger, Stephen T.; Ortyl, Nicholas; Grant, Joseph; Taylor, F. Tad

    2006-01-01

    Ten composite pressure vessels were instrumented with fiber Bragg grating sensors and pressure tested Through burst. This paper and presentation will discuss the testing methodology, the test results, compare the testing results to the analytical model, and also compare the fiber Bragg grating sensor data with data obtained against that obtained from foil strain gages.

  9. Advanced technology for minimum weight pressure vessel system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamstad, M. A.; Jessop, E. S.; Toland, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    Bosses were made of fiber/resin composite materials to evaluate their potential in lightweight pressure vessels. An approximate 25% weight savings over the standard aluminum boss was achieved without boss failures during burst tests. Polymer liners and metal liners are used in fiber composite pressure vessels for containment of gases. The internal support of these liners required during the filament winding process has previously been provided by dissolvable salt mandrels. An internal pressurization technique has been developed which allows overwinding the liner without other means of support and without collapse. Study was made of several additional concepts including styrene/Saran, styrene/flexible epoxy.

  10. Weld evaluation on spherical pressure vessels using holographic interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, D.M.; Wilcox, W.W.

    1980-05-14

    Waist welds on spherical experimental pressure vessels have been evaluated under pressure using holographic interferometry. A coincident viewing and illumination optical configuration coupled with a parabolic mirror was used so that the entire weld region could be examined with a single hologram. Positioning the pressure vessel at the focal point of the parabolic mirror provides a relatively undistorted 360 degree view of the waist weld. Double exposure and real time holography were used to obtain displacement information on the weld region. Results are compared with radiographic and ultrasonic inspections.

  11. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... pressure using the breathing mixture normally used in service. (3) Equivalent nondestructive testing may be conducted in lieu of pressure testing. Proposals to use nondestructive testing in lieu of pressure...

  12. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... pressure using the breathing mixture normally used in service. (3) Equivalent nondestructive testing may be conducted in lieu of pressure testing. Proposals to use nondestructive testing in lieu of pressure...

  13. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... pressure using the breathing mixture normally used in service. (3) Equivalent nondestructive testing may be conducted in lieu of pressure testing. Proposals to use nondestructive testing in lieu of pressure...

  14. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... pressure using the breathing mixture normally used in service. (3) Equivalent nondestructive testing may be conducted in lieu of pressure testing. Proposals to use nondestructive testing in lieu of pressure...

  15. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... pressure using the breathing mixture normally used in service. (3) Equivalent nondestructive testing may be conducted in lieu of pressure testing. Proposals to use nondestructive testing in lieu of pressure...

  16. 29 CFR 1915.172 - Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, Rules for Construction of Unfired Pressure Vessels... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels... SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Portable, Unfired Pressure Vessels, Drums and Containers, Other Than Ship's...

  17. 46 CFR 54.01-17 - Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). 54.01-17 Section 54.01-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-17 Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). Pressure vessels for human occupancy (PVHO's) must...

  18. 46 CFR 54.01-10 - Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). 54... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-10 Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). (a) Pressure vessels in which steam is generated are classed as “Unfired Steam Boilers” except...

  19. 46 CFR 54.01-10 - Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). 54... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-10 Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). (a) Pressure vessels in which steam is generated are classed as “Unfired Steam Boilers” except...

  20. 46 CFR 54.01-10 - Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). 54... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-10 Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). (a) Pressure vessels in which steam is generated are classed as “Unfired Steam Boilers” except...

  1. 46 CFR 54.01-10 - Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). 54... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-10 Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). (a) Pressure vessels in which steam is generated are classed as “Unfired Steam Boilers” except...

  2. 46 CFR 54.01-10 - Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). 54... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-10 Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). (a) Pressure vessels in which steam is generated are classed as “Unfired Steam Boilers” except...

  3. 46 CFR 54.01-17 - Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). 54.01-17... PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-17 Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). Pressure vessels for human occupancy (PVHO's) must meet the requirements of subpart B (Commercial Diving...

  4. 46 CFR 54.01-17 - Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). 54.01-17... PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-17 Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). Pressure vessels for human occupancy (PVHO's) must meet the requirements of subpart B (Commercial Diving...

  5. 46 CFR 54.01-17 - Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). 54.01-17... PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-17 Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). Pressure vessels for human occupancy (PVHO's) must meet the requirements of subpart B (Commercial Diving...

  6. 46 CFR 54.01-17 - Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). 54.01-17... PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-17 Pressure vessel for human occupancy (PVHO). Pressure vessels for human occupancy (PVHO's) must meet the requirements of subpart B (Commercial Diving...

  7. Cyclic crack growth behavior of reactor pressure vessel steels in light water reactor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Sluys, W.A.; Emanuelson, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    During normal operation light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels are subjected to a variety of transients resulting in time varying stresses. Consequently, fatigue and environmentally assisted fatigue are growth mechanisms relevant to flaws in these pressure vessels. In order to provide a better understanding of the resistance of nuclear pressure vessel steels to flaw growth process, a series of fracture mechanics experiments were conducted to generate data on the rate of cyclic crack growth in SA508-2 and SA533b-1 steels in simulated 550/sup 0/F boiling water reactor (BWR) and 550/sup 0/F pressurized water reactor (PWR) environments. Areas investigated over the course of the test program included the effects of loading frequency and r ratio (Kmin-Kmax) on crack growth rate as a function of the stress intensity factor (deltaK) range. In addition, the effect of sulfur content of the test material on the cyclic crack growth rate was studied. Cyclic crack growth rates were found to be controlled by deltaK, R ratio, and loading frequency. The sulfur impurity content of the reactor pressure vessel steels studied had a significant effect on the cyclic crack growth rates. The higher growth rates were always associated with materials of higher sulfur content. For a given level of sulfur, growth rates were in a 550/sup 0/F simulated BWR environment than in a 550/sup 0/F simulated PWR environment. In both environments cyclic crack growth rates were a strong function of the loading frequency.

  8. Summary of Activities for Health Monitoring of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Rick

    2012-01-01

    This new start project (FY12-14) will design and demonstrate the ability of nondestructive evaluation sensors for the measurement of stresses on the inner diameter of a Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel overwrap. Results will be correlated with other nondestructive evaluation technologies such as Acoustic Emission. The project will build upon a proof of concept study performed at KSC which demonstrated the ability of Magnetic Stress Gages to measure stresses at internal overwraps and upon current acoustic emission research being performed at WSTF; The gages will be produced utilizing Maundering Winding Magnetometer and/or Maundering Winding Magnetometer-array eddy current technology. The proof-of-concept study demonstrated a correlation between the sensor response and pressure or strain. The study also demonstrated the ability of Maundering Winding Magnetometer technology to monitor the stresses in a Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel at different orientations and depths. The ultimate goal is to utilize this technology for the health monitoring of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels for all future flight programs.

  9. Report of the terawatt laser pressure vessel committee

    SciTech Connect

    Woodle, M.H.; Beauman, R.; Czajkowski, C.; Dickinson, T.; Lynch, D.; Pogorelsky, I.; Skjaritka, J.

    2000-09-25

    In 1995 the ATF project sent out an RFP for a CO2 Laser System having a TeraWatt output. Eight foreign and US firms responded. The Proposal Evaluation Panel on the second round selected Optoel, a Russian firm based in St. Petersburg, on the basis of the technical criteria and cost. Prior to the award, BNL representatives including the principal scientist, cognizant engineer and a QA representative visited the Optoel facilities to assess the company's capability to do the job. The contract required Optoel to provide a x-ray preionized high pressure amplifier that included: a high pressure cell, x-ray tube, internal optics and a HV pulse forming network for the main discharge and preionizer. The high-pressure cell consists of a stainless steel pressure vessel with various ports and windows that is filled with a gas mixture operating at 10 atmospheres. In accordance with BNL Standard ESH 1.4.1 ''Pressurized Systems For Experimental Use'', the pressure vessel design criteria is required to comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code In 1996 a Preliminary Design Review was held at BNL. The vendor was requested to furnish drawings so that we could confirm that the design met the above criteria. The vendor furnished drawings did not have all dimensions necessary to completely analyze the cell. Never the less, we performed an analysis on as much of the vessel as we could with the available information. The calculations concluded that there were twelve areas of concern that had to be addressed to assure that the pressure vessel complied with the requirements of the ASME code. This information was forwarded to the vendor with the understanding that they would resolve these concerns as they continued with the vessel design and fabrication. The assembled amplifier pressure vessel was later hydro tested to 220 psi (15 Atm) as well as pneumatically to 181 psi (12.5 Atm) at the fabricator's Russian facility and was witnessed by a BNL engineer. The unit was shipped to the US and installed at the ATF. As part of the commissioning of the device the amplifier pressure vessel was disassembled several times at which time it became apparent that the vendor had not addressed 7 of the 12 issues previously identified. Closer examination of the vessel revealed some additional concerns including quality of workmanship. Although not required by the contract, the vendor furnished radiographs of a number of pressure vessel welds. A review of the Russian X-rays revealed radiographs of both poor and unreadable quality. However, a number of internal weld imperfections could be observed. All welds in question were excavated and then visually and dye penetrant inspected. These additional inspections confirmed that the weld techniques used to make some of these original welds were substandard. The applicable BNL standard, ESH 1.4.1, addresses the problem of pressure vessel non-compliance by having a committee appointed by the Department Chairman review the design and provide engineering solutions to assure equivalent safety. On January 24, 2000 Dr. M. Hart, the NSLS Chairman, appointed this committee with this charge. This report details the engineering investigations, deliberations, solutions and calculations which were developed by members of this committee to determine that with repairs, new components, appropriate NDE, and lowering the design pressure, the vessel can be considered safe to use.

  10. Universal treatment of plumes and stresses for pressurized thermal shock evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Theofanous, T.G.; Angelini, S.; Yan, H. . Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering)

    1992-06-01

    The thermal field in a reactor vessel downcomer and resulting thermal/stress response in the adjacent reactor vessel wall during high-pressure safety injection are examined, especially with regard to departures from one-dimensional behavior. Similarity solutions for the stratification (in the cold leg) that creates the downcomer plumes, and scaling considerations for the thermal conduction and stress fields in the vessel wall are developed to provide generalized criteria for the adequacy of the one-dimensional treatment.

  11. Neural network/acoustic emission burst pressure prediction for impact damaged composite pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.L.; Workman, G.L.; Russell, S.S.; Hill, E.V.K.

    1997-08-01

    Acoustic emission signal analysis has been used to measure the effect impact damage has on the burst pressure of 146 mm (5.75 in.) diameter graphite/epoxy and the organic polymer, Kevlar/epoxy filament wound pressure vessels. Burst pressure prediction models were developed by correlating the differential acoustic emission amplitude distribution collected during low level hydroproof tests to known burst pressures using backpropagation artificial neural networks. Impact damage conditions ranging from barely visible to obvious fiber breakage, matrix cracking, and delamination were included in this work. A simulated (inert) propellant was also cast into a series of the vessels from each material class, before impact loading, to provide boundary conditions during impact that would simulate those found on solid rocket motors. The results of this research effort demonstrate that a quantitative assessment of the effects that impact damage has on burst pressure can be made for both organic polymer/epoxy and graphite/epoxy pressure vessels. Here, an artificial neural network analysis of the acoustic emission parametric data recorded during low pressure hydroproof testing is used to relate burst pressure to the vessel`s acoustic signature. Burst pressure predictions within 6.0% of the actual failure pressure are demonstrated for a series of vessels.

  12. A DISLOCATION-BASED CLEAVAGE INITIATION MODEL FOR PRESSURE VESSEL

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, Kristine B; Erickson, Marjorie A; Williams, Paul T; Klasky, Hilda B; Bass, Bennett Richard

    2012-01-01

    Efforts are under way to develop a theoretical, multi-scale model for the prediction of fracture toughness of ferritic steels in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) region that accounts for temperature, irradiation, strain rate, and material condition (chemistry and heat treatment) effects. This new model is intended to address difficulties associated with existing empirically-derived models of the DBTT region that cannot be extrapolated to conditions for which data are unavailable. Dislocation distribution equations, derived from the theories of Yokobori et al., are incorporated to account for the local stress state prior to and following initiation of a microcrack from a second-phase particle. The new model is the basis for the DISlocation-based FRACture (DISFRAC) computer code being developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The purpose of this code is to permit fracture safety assessments of ferritic structures with only tensile properties required as input. The primary motivation for the code is to assist in the prediction of radiation effects on nuclear reactor pressure vessels, in parallel with the EURATOM PERFORM 60 project.

  13. Simulating the Mineral Scale by High Pressure Thermal Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. H.; Liu, H. L.; Chen, H. F.; Song, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    The generating capacity of Chingshui geothermal power plant decreased rapidly after it had operated three years. Chinese Petroleum Corporation (CPC) attributed the main reason was the depletion of reservoir. One reason was that the reservoir did not be recharged. And the other was the mineral scale in reservoir and pipes which caused flow rate decreased. There are abundant geothermal energy in Taiwan. But in Chingshui, the spring has amount content of carbonate. Most scaling are calcium carbonate and silica. These two materials have different solubility in various pH and physical conditions. Because the pressure reduced in the process of upwelling, the hot spring from the reservoir deposited calcium carbonate immediately by large carbon dioxide escape. This result caused the diameter of pipeline reduced. Besides, as the temperature decreased, the silica would scaling in the part of heat exchanger. To avoid the failure experience in Chingshui , how to prevent the mineral scaling is the key point that we need to solve. Our study will use hydrothermal experiments by High Pressure Thermal Vessel to simulate the process of spring water upwelling from reservoir to surface, to understand whether calcium carbonate and silica scaling or not in different temperature and pressure. This study choose the Hongchailin well as objects to simulate, and the target layers of drilling well were set as Szeleng sandstone and Lushan slate. We used pure water and saturated water pressure in our experiments. There were four vessels in High thermal vessel. The first vessel was used to simulate the condition of reservoir. The second and third vessel were simulated the conditions in the well when spring water upwelling to the surface. And the last vessel was simulated the conditions on surface surroundings. We hope to get the temperature and pressure when the scaling occurred, and verified with the computing result, thus we can inhibit the scaling.

  14. 46 CFR 97.30-1 - Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 97.30-1 Section... VESSELS OPERATIONS Reports of Accidents, Repairs, and Unsafe Equipment § 97.30-1 Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the chief...

  15. 46 CFR 196.30-1 - Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 196.30-1... VESSELS OPERATIONS Reports of Accidents, Repairs, and Unsafe Equipment § 196.30-1 Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the Chief...

  16. 46 CFR 196.30-1 - Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 196.30-1... VESSELS OPERATIONS Reports of Accidents, Repairs, and Unsafe Equipment § 196.30-1 Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the Chief...

  17. 46 CFR 97.30-1 - Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 97.30-1 Section... VESSELS OPERATIONS Reports of Accidents, Repairs, and Unsafe Equipment § 97.30-1 Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the chief...

  18. 46 CFR 97.30-1 - Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 97.30-1 Section... VESSELS OPERATIONS Reports of Accidents, Repairs, and Unsafe Equipment § 97.30-1 Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the chief...

  19. 46 CFR 97.30-1 - Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 97.30-1 Section... VESSELS OPERATIONS Reports of Accidents, Repairs, and Unsafe Equipment § 97.30-1 Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the chief...

  20. 46 CFR 196.30-1 - Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 196.30-1... VESSELS OPERATIONS Reports of Accidents, Repairs, and Unsafe Equipment § 196.30-1 Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the Chief...

  1. 46 CFR 97.30-1 - Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 97.30-1 Section... VESSELS OPERATIONS Reports of Accidents, Repairs, and Unsafe Equipment § 97.30-1 Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the chief...

  2. 46 CFR 196.30-1 - Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 196.30-1... VESSELS OPERATIONS Reports of Accidents, Repairs, and Unsafe Equipment § 196.30-1 Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the Chief...

  3. 46 CFR 196.30-1 - Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 196.30-1... VESSELS OPERATIONS Reports of Accidents, Repairs, and Unsafe Equipment § 196.30-1 Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the Chief...

  4. Individual Pressure Vessel (PV) and Common Pressure Vessel (CPV) Nickel-Hydrogen Battery Performance Under LEO Cycling Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Thomas B.; Lewis, Harlan L.

    2004-01-01

    LEO life cycle testing of Individual Pressure Vessel (PV) and Common Pressure Vessel (CPV) nickel-hydrogen cell packs have been sponsored by the NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Program. The cell packs have cycled under both 35% and 60% depth-of- discharge and temperature conditions of -5 C and +lO C. The packs have been on test since as early as 1992 and have generated a substantial database. This report will provide insight into performance trends as a function of the specific cell configuration and manufacturer for eight separate nickel-hydrogen battery cell packs.

  5. Multilayer Pressure Vessel Materials Testing and Analysis. Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardinal, Joseph W.; Popelar, Carl F.; Page, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    To provide NASA a comprehensive suite of materials strength, fracture toughness and crack growth rate test results for use in remaining life calculations for aging multilayer pressure vessels, Southwest Research Institute (R) (SwRI) was contracted in two phases to obtain relevant material property data from a representative vessel. This report describes Phase 1 of this effort which includes a preliminary material property assessment as well as a fractographic, fracture mechanics and fatigue crack growth analyses of an induced flaw in the outer shell of a representative multilayer vessel that was subjected to cyclic pressure test. SwRI performed this Phase 1 effort under contract to the Digital Wave Corporation in support of their contract to Jacobs ATOM for the NASA Ames Research Center.

  6. Creep of A508/533 Pressure Vessel Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Wright

    2014-08-01

    ABSTRACT Evaluation of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels has been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design studies. These design studies have generally focused on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Initially, three candidate materials were identified by this process: conventional light water reactor (LWR) RPV steels A508 and A533, 2¼Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and Grade 91 steel. The low strength of 2¼Cr-1Mo at elevated temperature has eliminated this steel from serious consideration as the VHTR RPV candidate material. Discussions with the very few vendors that can potentially produce large forgings for nuclear pressure vessels indicate a strong preference for conventional LWR steels. This preference is based in part on extensive experience with forging these steels for nuclear components. It is also based on the inability to cast large ingots of the Grade 91 steel due to segregation during ingot solidification, thus restricting the possible mass of forging components and increasing the amount of welding required for completion of the RPV. Grade 91 steel is also prone to weld cracking and must be post-weld heat treated to ensure adequate high-temperature strength. There are also questions about the ability to produce, and very importantly, verify the through thickness properties of thick sections of Grade 91 material. The availability of large components, ease of fabrication, and nuclear service experience with the A508 and A533 steels strongly favor their use in the RPV for the VHTR. Lowering the gas outlet temperature for the VHTR to 750°C from 950 to 1000°C, proposed in early concept studies, further strengthens the justification for this material selection. This steel is allowed in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for nuclear service up to 371°C (700°F); certain excursions above that temperature are allowed by Code Case N-499-2 (now incorporated as an appendix to Section III Division 5 of the Code). This Code Case was developed with a rather sparse data set and focused primarily on rolled plate material (A533 specification). Confirmatory tests of creep behavior of both A508 and A533 are described here that are designed to extend the database in order to build higher confidence in ensuring the structural integrity of the VHTR RPV during off-normal conditions. A number of creep-rupture tests were carried out at temperatures above the 371°C (700°F) Code limit; longer term tests designed to evaluate minimum creep behavior are ongoing. A limited amount of rupture testing was also carried out on welded material. All of the rupture data from the current experiments is compared to historical values from the testing carried out to develop Code Case N-499-2. It is shown that the A508/533 basemetal tested here fits well with the rupture behavior reported from the historical testing. The presence of weldments significantly reduces the time to rupture. The primary purpose of this report is to summarize and record the experimental results in a single document.

  7. Design Guide for glass fiber reinforced metal pressure vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landes, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Design Guide has been prepared for pressure vessel engineers concerned with specific glass fiber reinforced metal tank design or general tank tradeoff study. Design philosophy, general equations, and curves are provided for safelife design of tanks operating under anticipated space shuttle service conditions.

  8. Lead plated aluminum ring provides static high pressure seal for large diameter pressure vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, J. N.

    1967-01-01

    Lead plated aluminum ring provides a positive static seal for a large diameter pressure vessel for use in a hazardous environment at cryogenic temperatures with high pressure fluid flow. This design can be used in high and low pressure lines of any diameter for any fluid, with appropriate material modification.

  9. Evaluation of Acoustic Emission NDE of Kevlar Composite Over Wrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2008-01-01

    Pressurization and failure tests of small Kevlar/epoxy COPV bottles were conducted during 2006 and 2007 by Texas Research Institute Austin, Inc., at TRI facilities. This is a report of the analysis of the Acoustic Emission (AE) data collected during those tests. Results of some of the tests indicate a possibility that AE can be used to track the stress-rupture degradation of COPV vessels.

  10. Relating surveillance capsule measurements to pressure vessel damage

    SciTech Connect

    Carew, J.F.; Min, D.K.; Aronson, A.L.

    1980-01-01

    As part of the pressure vessel (PV) materials surveillance program, surveillance capsules including material specimens and neutron flux dosimeters are generally required to monitor changes in the fracture toughness properties of the reactor vessel materials. These capsules are withdrawn sequentially according to a predetermined schedule covering the service life of the vessel, and specimen material changes and dosimeter activation measured. The neutron fluence accumulated by the flux dosimeters is determined from the measured dosimeter activation and known reaction cross section (in practice, the /sup 54/Fe(n,p)/sup 54/Mn reaction.) The capsule fluence and material changes are then extrapolated to the pressure vessel using a fluence lead-factor determined from detailed multigroup neutron transport calculations. Typically, in this extrapolation changes in neutron spectrum are neglected. The purpose of this study is twofold; first, to determine the effect of including spectral changes in the extrapolation from capsule to vessel and second, to evaluate the effect of using the latest ENDF/B-V /sup 54/Fe(n,p)/sup 54/Mn cross sections in converting dosimeter activation to fluence.

  11. ECN Pressure and Vacuum Vessel Engineering Notes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Dixon, K.; /Fermilab

    1991-10-17

    The following calculations arranged in a spreadsheet format derive the flowrate from both ECN relieving devices. In this case it is assumed that the ECN is full of liquid argon and it is in its steady state cooling mode. One of the other cryostats is assumed to be cooling down while the other is being filled with LAr. Other assumptions in this analysis include: (1) Pressure in the cryostat is 19.75 psig (1.16X(MAWP+FV)). (2) Gaseous Nitrogen is concurrently flowing in the vent piping at a rate of 3477 lb/hr. This is derived from 0.3 gpm required for ECN steady state conditions, 4 gpm required for cooldown (max.), and 5 gpm required for filling with LAr (max.). (3) Mixture mass flows are at their maximum at the junction of the relief device outlets on the ECN (GN2 mass flow actually increases gradually at junctions toward the ECS and there is a short segment of piping between the GAr outlets and the condenser exhaust). (4) The temperature in the vent piping is negligible since a large majority of this piping is insulated. (5) All flows are treated as incompressible (max. Mach No. < 0.3). (6) The temperature of the GN2 prior to mixing in the vent manifold is 84 K, saturated property at 2 atm. (7) Flow equations apply to weight-averaged mixture densities and viscosities.

  12. 46 CFR 109.421 - Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 109... Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. Before making repairs, except normal repairs and maintenance such as replacement of valves or pressure seals, to boilers or unfired pressure vessels...

  13. 46 CFR 109.421 - Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 109... Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. Before making repairs, except normal repairs and maintenance such as replacement of valves or pressure seals, to boilers or unfired pressure vessels...

  14. 46 CFR 109.421 - Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 109... Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. Before making repairs, except normal repairs and maintenance such as replacement of valves or pressure seals, to boilers or unfired pressure vessels...

  15. 46 CFR 109.421 - Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 109... Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. Before making repairs, except normal repairs and maintenance such as replacement of valves or pressure seals, to boilers or unfired pressure vessels...

  16. 46 CFR 109.421 - Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 109... Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. Before making repairs, except normal repairs and maintenance such as replacement of valves or pressure seals, to boilers or unfired pressure vessels...

  17. 46 CFR 109.421 - Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 109.421 Section...Notifications § 109.421 Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. Before making...replacement of valves or pressure seals, to boilers or unfired pressure vessels in...

  18. 46 CFR 109.421 - Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 109.421 Section...Notifications § 109.421 Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. Before making...replacement of valves or pressure seals, to boilers or unfired pressure vessels in...

  19. 46 CFR 109.421 - Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 109.421 Section...Notifications § 109.421 Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. Before making...replacement of valves or pressure seals, to boilers or unfired pressure vessels in...

  20. 46 CFR 109.421 - Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 109.421 Section...Notifications § 109.421 Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. Before making...replacement of valves or pressure seals, to boilers or unfired pressure vessels in...

  1. 46 CFR 109.421 - Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. 109.421 Section...Notifications § 109.421 Report of repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. Before making...replacement of valves or pressure seals, to boilers or unfired pressure vessels in...

  2. Improved Attachment in a Hybrid Inflatable Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Patterson, Ross; Spexarth, Gary R.

    2010-01-01

    The vessel is a hybrid that comprises an inflatable shell attached to a rigid structure. The inflatable shell is, itself, a hybrid that comprises (1) a pressure bladder restrained against expansion by (2) a restraint layer that comprises a web of straps made from high-strength polymeric fabrics. The present improvements are intended to overcome deficiencies in those aspects of the original design that pertain to attachment of the inflatable shell to the rigid structure. In a typical intended application, such attachment(s) would be made at one or more window or hatch frames to incorporate the windows or hatches as integral parts of the overall vessel.

  3. 30 CFR 56.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 56.13015 Section... Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other...

  4. 30 CFR 57.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 57.13015 Section... Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other...

  5. 30 CFR 57.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 57.13015 Section... Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other...

  6. 30 CFR 56.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 56.13015 Section... Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other...

  7. 30 CFR 56.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 56.13015 Section... Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other...

  8. 30 CFR 57.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 57.13015 Section... Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other...

  9. 30 CFR 57.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 57.13015 Section... Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other...

  10. 30 CFR 57.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 57.13015 Section... Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other...

  11. 30 CFR 56.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 56.13015 Section... Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other...

  12. 30 CFR 56.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. 56.13015 Section... Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other...

  13. 30 CFR 57.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. 57.13001 Section...METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 57.13001 General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. All...

  14. 30 CFR 56.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. 56.13001 Section...METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13001 General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. All...

  15. 30 CFR 57.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. 57.13001 Section...METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 57.13001 General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. All...

  16. 30 CFR 56.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. 56.13001 Section...METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13001 General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. All...

  17. 30 CFR 56.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. 56.13001 Section...METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13001 General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. All...

  18. 30 CFR 57.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. 57.13001 Section...METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 57.13001 General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. All...

  19. 30 CFR 56.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. 56.13001 Section...METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13001 General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. All...

  20. 30 CFR 57.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. 57.13001 Section...METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 57.13001 General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. All...

  1. 30 CFR 56.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. 56.13001 Section...METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13001 General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. All...

  2. 30 CFR 57.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. 57.13001 Section...METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 57.13001 General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. All...

  3. 46 CFR 50.05-5 - Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 50.05-5 Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems. (a) Whenever doubt exists as to the safety of an existing boiler, pressure vessel, or piping system, the...

  4. Design Considerations For Blast Loads In Pressure Vessels.

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, E. A.; Nickell, Robert E.; Pepin, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), conducts confined detonation experiments utilizing large, spherical, steel pressure vessels to contain the reaction products and hazardous materials from high-explosive (HE) events. Structural design and analysis considerations include: (a) Blast loading phase (i.e., impulsive loading); (b) Dynamic structural response; (c) Fragment (i.e., shrapnel) generation and penetration; (d) Ductile and non-ductile fracture; and (e) Design Criteria to ASME Code Sec. VIII, Div. 3, Impulsively Loaded Vessels. These vessels are designed for one-time-use only, efficiently utilizing the significant plastic energy absorption capability of ductile vessel materials. Alternatively, vessels may be designed for multiple-detonation events, in which case the material response is restricted to elastic or near-elastic range. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10 Part 50 provides requirements for commercial nuclear reactor licensing; specifically dealing with accidental combustible gases in containment structures that might cause extreme loadings. The design philosophy contained herein may be applied to extreme loading events postulated to occur in nuclear reactor and non-nuclear systems or containments.

  5. Lightweight pressure vessels and unitized regenerative fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mitlitsky, F.; Myers, B.; Weisberg, A.H.

    1996-09-06

    Energy storage systems have been designed using lightweight pressure vessels with unitized regenerative fuel cells (URFCs). The vessels provide a means of storing reactant gases required for URFCs; they use lightweight bladder liners that act as inflatable mandrels for composite overwrap and provide a permeation barrier. URFC systems have been designed for zero emission vehicles (ZEVs); they are cost competitive with primary FC powered vehicles that operate on H/air with capacitors or batteries for power peaking and regenerative braking. URFCs are capable of regenerative braking via electrolysis and power peaking using low volume/low pressure accumulated oxygen for supercharging the power stack. URFC ZEVs can be safely and rapidly (<5 min.) refueled using home electrolysis units. Reversible operation of cell membrane catalyst is feasible without significant degradation. Such systems would have a rechargeable specific energy > 400 Wh/kg.

  6. Lessons Learned From Developing Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Embrittlement Database

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John

    2010-08-01

    Materials behaviors caused by neutron irradiation under fission and/or fusion environments can be little understood without practical examination. Easily accessible material information system with large material database using effective computers is necessary for design of nuclear materials and analyses or simulations of the phenomena. The developed Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) at ORNL is this comprehensive collection of data. EDB database contains power reactor pressure vessel surveillance data, the material test reactor data, foreign reactor data (through bilateral agreements authorized by NRC), and the fracture toughness data. The lessons learned from building EDB program and the associated database management activity regarding Material Database Design Methodology, Architecture and the Embedded QA Protocol are described in this report. The development of IAEA International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials (IDRPVM) and the comparison of EDB database and IAEA IDRPVM database are provided in the report. The recommended database QA protocol and database infrastructure are also stated in the report.

  7. Evaluation of Agency Non-Code Layered Pressure Vessels (LPVs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    2014-01-01

    In coordination with the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance and the respective Center Pressure System Managers (PSMs), the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to formulate a consensus draft proposal for the development of additional testing and analysis methods to establish the technical validity, and any limitation thereof, for the continued safe operation of facility non-code layered pressure vessels. The PSMs from each NASA Center were asked to participate as part of the assessment team by providing, collecting, and reviewing data regarding current operations of these vessels. This report contains the outcome of the assessment and the findings, observations, and NESC recommendations to the Agency and individual NASA Centers.

  8. An Acoustic Emission and Acousto-Ultrasonic Analysis of Impact Damaged Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary L.; Workman, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    The research presented herein summarizes the development of acoustic emission (AE) and acousto-ultrasonic (AU) techniques for the nondestructive evaluation of filament wound composite pressure vessels. Vessels fabricated from both graphite and kevlar fibers with an epoxy matrix were examined prior to hydroburst using AU and during hydroburst using AE. A dead weight drop apparatus featuring both blunt and sharp impactor tips was utilized to produce a single known energy 'damage' level in each of the vessels so that the degree to which the effects of impact damage could be measured. The damage levels ranged from barely visible to obvious fiber breakage and delamination. Independent neural network burst pressure prediction models were developed from a sample of each fiber/resin material system. Here, the cumulative AE amplitude distribution data collected from low level proof test (25% of the expected burst for undamaged vessels) were used to measure the effects of the impact on the residual burst pressure of the vessels. The results of the AE/neural network model for the inert propellant filled graphite/epoxy vessels 'IM7/3501-6, IM7/977-2 and IM7/8553-45' demonstrated that burst pressures can be predicted from low level AE proof test data, yielding an average error of 5.0%. The trained network for the IM7/977-2 class vessels was also able to predict the expected burst pressure of taller vessels (three times longer hoop region length) constructed of the same material and using the same manufacturing technique, with an average error of 4.9%. To a lesser extent, the burst pressure prediction models could also measure the effects of impact damage to the kevlar/epoxy 'Kevlar 49/ DPL862' vessels. Here though, due to the higher attenuation of the material, an insufficient amount of AE amplitude information was collected to generate robust network models. Although, the worst case trial errors were less than 6%, when additional blind predictions were attempted, errors as high as 50% were produced. An acousto-ultrasonic robotic evaluation system (AURES) was developed for mapping the effects of damage on filament wound pressure vessels prior to hydroproof testing. The AURES injects a single broadband ultrasonic pulse into each vessel at preprogrammed positions and records the effects of the interaction of that pulse on the material volume with a broadband receiver. A stress wave factor in the form of the energy associated with the 750 to 1000 kHz and 1000 to 1250 kHz frequency bands were used to map the potential failure sites for each vessel. The energy map associated with the graphite/epoxy vessels was found to decrease in the region of the impact damage. The kevlar vessels showed the opposite trend, with the energy values increasing around the damage/failure sites.

  9. H.B. Robinson-2 pressure vessel benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Remec, I.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1998-02-01

    The H. B. Robinson Unit 2 Pressure Vessel Benchmark (HBR-2 benchmark) is described and analyzed in this report. Analysis of the HBR-2 benchmark can be used as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the qualification of the methodology for calculating neutron fluence in pressure vessels, as required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide DG-1053, Calculational and Dosimetry Methods for Determining Pressure Vessel Neutron Fluence. Section 1 of this report describes the HBR-2 benchmark and provides all the dimensions, material compositions, and neutron source data necessary for the analysis. The measured quantities, to be compared with the calculated values, are the specific activities at the end of fuel cycle 9. The characteristic feature of the HBR-2 benchmark is that it provides measurements on both sides of the pressure vessel: in the surveillance capsule attached to the thermal shield and in the reactor cavity. In section 2, the analysis of the HBR-2 benchmark is described. Calculations with the computer code DORT, based on the discrete-ordinates method, were performed with three multigroup libraries based on ENDF/B-VI: BUGLE-93, SAILOR-95 and BUGLE-96. The average ratio of the calculated-to-measured specific activities (C/M) for the six dosimeters in the surveillance capsule was 0.90 {+-} 0.04 for all three libraries. The average C/Ms for the cavity dosimeters (without neptunium dosimeter) were 0.89 {+-} 0.10, 0.91 {+-} 0.10, and 0.90 {+-} 0.09 for the BUGLE-93, SAILOR-95 and BUGLE-96 libraries, respectively. It is expected that the agreement of the calculations with the measurements, similar to the agreement obtained in this research, should typically be observed when the discrete-ordinates method and ENDF/B-VI libraries are used for the HBR-2 benchmark analysis.

  10. Microwave determination of the volume of a pressure vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldover, M. R.; Schmidt, J. W.; Gillis, K. A.; Mehl, J. B.; Wright, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Using microwave techniques that are scalable to very large volumes, we measured the interior volume of a 0.3?m3, commercially manufactured pressure vessel with a relative uncertainty of 0.06%, as confirmed by independent, more-accurate gas-expansion measurements. This pressure vessel (or a much larger one of a similar design) could be used as either a calibrated volume standard or as a gas source and/or a gas collector for the calibration of gas-flow meters. In addition, we determined the expansion of the vessel with temperature (?V/?T)p/V = (35.3? ± ?1.9) × 10-6?K-1, and we estimated the pressure expansion (?V/?p)T/V = 0.9? × ?10-3?MPa-1. The volume measurement did not require careful thermostatting; its uncertainty was dominated by imperfect modeling of the volume’s shape. (The estimated uncertainties are one standard uncertainty with coverage factor k = 1 corresponding to 68% confidence level.)

  11. Composite Pressure Vessel Variability in Geometry and Filament Winding Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven J.; Greene, Nathanael J.

    2012-01-01

    Composite pressure vessels (CPVs) are used in a variety of applications ranging from carbon dioxide canisters for paintball guns to life support and pressurant storage on the International Space Station. With widespread use, it is important to be able to evaluate the effect of variability on structural performance. Data analysis was completed on CPVs to determine the amount of variation that occurs among the same type of CPV, and a filament winding routine was developed to facilitate study of the effect of manufacturing variation on structural response.

  12. 46 CFR 78.33-1 - Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels. 78.33-1 Section... OPERATIONS Reports of Accidents, Repairs, and Unsafe Equipment § 78.33-1 Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the chief engineer...

  13. 46 CFR 50.05-5 - Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems. 50... ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 50.05-5 Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems. (a) Whenever doubt exists as to the safety of an existing boiler, pressure vessel, or piping system, the...

  14. 46 CFR 167.25-5 - Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and...) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Marine Engineering § 167.25-5 Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances. The inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and...

  15. 46 CFR 78.33-1 - Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels. 78.33-1 Section... OPERATIONS Reports of Accidents, Repairs, and Unsafe Equipment § 78.33-1 Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the chief engineer...

  16. 46 CFR 167.25-5 - Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and...) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Marine Engineering § 167.25-5 Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances. The inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and...

  17. 46 CFR 167.25-1 - Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances. 167... SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Marine Engineering § 167.25-1 Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and... the following standards for boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances: (1)...

  18. 46 CFR 50.05-5 - Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems. 50... ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 50.05-5 Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems. (a) Whenever doubt exists as to the safety of an existing boiler, pressure vessel, or piping system, the...

  19. 46 CFR 50.05-5 - Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems. 50... ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 50.05-5 Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems. (a) Whenever doubt exists as to the safety of an existing boiler, pressure vessel, or piping system, the...

  20. 46 CFR 50.05-5 - Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems. 50... ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 50.05-5 Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems. (a) Whenever doubt exists as to the safety of an existing boiler, pressure vessel, or piping system, the...

  1. 46 CFR 167.25-5 - Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and...) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Marine Engineering § 167.25-5 Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances. The inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and...

  2. 46 CFR 167.25-1 - Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances. 167... SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Marine Engineering § 167.25-1 Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and... the following standards for boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances: (1)...

  3. 46 CFR 78.33-1 - Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels. 78.33-1 Section... OPERATIONS Reports of Accidents, Repairs, and Unsafe Equipment § 78.33-1 Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the chief engineer...

  4. 46 CFR 167.25-1 - Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances. 167... SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Marine Engineering § 167.25-1 Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and... the following standards for boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances: (1)...

  5. 46 CFR 167.25-1 - Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances. 167... SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Marine Engineering § 167.25-1 Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and... the following standards for boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances: (1)...

  6. 46 CFR 167.25-5 - Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and...) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Marine Engineering § 167.25-5 Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances. The inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and...

  7. 46 CFR 78.33-1 - Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels. 78.33-1 Section... OPERATIONS Reports of Accidents, Repairs, and Unsafe Equipment § 78.33-1 Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the chief engineer...

  8. 46 CFR 78.33-1 - Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels. 78.33-1 Section... OPERATIONS Reports of Accidents, Repairs, and Unsafe Equipment § 78.33-1 Repairs of boiler and pressure vessels. (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels, the chief engineer...

  9. 46 CFR 50.05-5 - Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems...Application § 50.05-5 Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems...exists as to the safety of an existing boiler, pressure vessel, or piping...

  10. 46 CFR 50.05-5 - Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems...Application § 50.05-5 Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems...exists as to the safety of an existing boiler, pressure vessel, or piping...

  11. 46 CFR 50.05-5 - Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems...Application § 50.05-5 Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems...exists as to the safety of an existing boiler, pressure vessel, or piping...

  12. 46 CFR 50.05-5 - Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems...Application § 50.05-5 Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems...exists as to the safety of an existing boiler, pressure vessel, or piping...

  13. 46 CFR 50.05-5 - Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems...Application § 50.05-5 Existing boilers, pressure vessels or piping systems...exists as to the safety of an existing boiler, pressure vessel, or piping...

  14. Distributed sensing of Composite Over-wrapped Pressure Vessel using Fiber-Bragg Gratings at Ambient and Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings are use to monitor the structural properties of composite pressure vessels. These gratings optically inscribed into the core of a single mode fiber are used as a tool to monitor the stress strain relation in laminate structure. The fiber Bragg sensors are both embedded within the composite laminates and bonded to the surface of the vessel with varying orientations with respect to the carbon fiber in the epoxy matrix. The response of these fiber-optic sensors is investigated by pressurizing the cylinder up to its burst pressure of around 2800 psi. This is done at both ambient and cryogenic temperatures using water and liquid nitrogen. The recorded response is compared with the response from conventional strain gauge also present on the vessel. Additionally, several vessels were tested that had been damaged to simulate different type of events, such as cut tow, delimitation and impact damage.

  15. Distributed Sensing of Composite Over-wrapped Pressure Vessel Using Fiber-Bragg Gratings at Ambient and Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings are use to monitor the structural properties of composite pressure vessels. These gratings optically inscribed into the core of a single mode fiber are used as a tool to monitor the stress strain relation in laminate structure. The fiber Bragg sensors are both embedded within the composite laminates and bonded to the surface of the vessel with varying orientations with respect to the carbon fiber in the epoxy matrix. The response of these fiber-optic sensors is investigated by pressurizing the cylinder up to its burst pressure of around 2800 psi. This is done at both ambient and cryogenic temperatures using water and liquid nitrogen. The recorded response is compared with the response from conventional strain gauge also present on the vessel. Additionally, several vessels were tested that had been damaged to simulate different type of events, such as cut tow, delimitation and impact damage.

  16. Neutron flux reduction programs for reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Kim, B.C.

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this work is to implement various fast neutron flux reduction programs on the belt-line region of the reactor pressure vessel to reduce the increasing rate of reference temperature for pressurized thermal shock (RT PTS) for Korea Nuclear Unit 1. A pressurized thermal shock (PTS) event is an event or transient in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) causing severe overcooling (thermal shock) concurrent with or followed by significant pressure in the reactor vessel. A PTS concern arises if one of these transients acts in the belt-line region of a reactor vessel where a reduced fracture resistance exists because of neutron irradiation. Generally, the RT PTS value is continuously increasing according to the fast neutron irradiation during the reactor operation, and it can reach the screening criterion prior to the expiration of the operating license. To reduce the increasing rate of RT PTS, various neutron flux reduction programs can be implemented, which are focused on license renewal. In this paper, neutron flux reduction programs, such as low leakage loading pattern strategy, loading of neutron absorber rods, and dummy fuel assembly loading are considered for Korea Nuclear Unit 1, of which the RT PTS value of the leading material (circumferential weld) is going to reach the screening criterion in the near future. To evaluate the effects of the neutron flux reduction programs, plant and cycle specific forward neutron transport calculations for the various neutron flux reduction programs were carried out. For the analysis, all transport calculations were carried out by using the DORT 3.1 discrete ordinate code and BUGLE-96 cross-section library. (authors)

  17. Stress anisotropy and concentration effects in high pressure measurements. [sodium chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. A., Jr.; Ruoff, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    Sodium chloride is used as an internal pressure standard in high pressure research. Possible corrections are discussed which are needed in the calibration of this standard due to the independent effects of stress anisotropy and stress concentration in pressure vessels. The first is due to the lack of a truly hydrostatic state of stress in solid state pressure vessels. The second is due to the difference in the compressibilities between the pressure transmitting substances (sodium chloride) and a stiffer test specimen. These two corrections are then combined and a total correction, as a function of measured pressure, is discussed for two systems presently in use. The predicted value of the combined effect is about 5-10% of the pressure at 30 GPa.

  18. High pressure ejection of melt from a reactor pressure vessel. The discharge phase. Revision 7

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, M.; Tarbell, W.M.

    1985-09-01

    Recent probabilistic risk-assessment studies identified potential accident sequences in which reactor vessel failure occurs while the primary system is at elevated pressure. The phenomenology of the discharge phase is reviewed here. We propose an improved model for hole ablation following vessel failure, and we compare the model with experiment data. Gas blowthrough is identified as a mechanism that allows steam to escape through the vessel breach before melt ejection is complete. Gas blowthrough leads to pneumatic atomization of the remaining melt before significant depressurization of the primary system occurs.

  19. Evaluation of Data-Logging Transducer to Passively Collect Pressure Vessel p/T History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wnuk, Stephen P.; Le, Son; Loew, Raymond A.

    2013-01-01

    Pressure vessels owned and operated by NASA are required to be regularly certified per agency policy. Certification requires an assessment of damage mechanisms and an estimation of vessel remaining life. Since detail service histories are not typically available for most pressure vessels, a conservative estimate of vessel pressure/temperature excursions is typically used in assessing fatigue life. This paper details trial use of a data-logging transducer to passively obtain actual pressure and temperature service histories of pressure vessels. The approach was found to have some potential for cost savings and other benefits in certain cases.

  20. Testing of Full Scale Flight Qualified Kevlar Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Nathanael; Saulsberry, Regor; Yoder, Tommy; Forsyth, Brad; Thesken, John; Phoenix, Leigh

    2007-01-01

    Many decades ago NASA identified a need for low-mass pressure vessels for carrying various fluids aboard rockets, spacecraft, and satellites. A pressure vessel design known as the composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) was identified to provide a weight savings over traditional single-material pressure vessels typically made of metal and this technology has been in use for space flight applications since the 1970's. A typical vessel design consisted of a thin liner material, typically a metal, overwrapped with a continuous fiber yarn impregnated with epoxy. Most designs were such that the overwrapped fiber would carry a majority of load at normal operating pressures. The weight advantage for a COPV versus a traditional singlematerial pressure vessel contributed to widespread use of COPVs by NASA, the military, and industry. This technology is currently used for personal breathing supply storage, fuel storage for auto and mass transport vehicles and for various space flight and aircraft applications. The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was recently asked to review the operation of Kevlar 2 and carbon COPVs to ensure they are safely operated on NASA space flight vehicles. A request was made to evaluate the life remaining on the Kevlar COPVs used on the Space Shuttle for helium and nitrogen storage. This paper provides a review of Kevlar COPV testing relevant to the NESC assessment. Also discussed are some key findings, observations, and recommendations that may be applicable to the COPV user community. Questions raised during the investigations have revealed the need for testing to better understand the stress rupture life and age life of COPVs. The focus of this paper is to describe burst testing of Kevlar COPVs that has been completed as a part of an the effort to evaluate the effects of ageing and shelf life on full scale COPVs. The test articles evaluated in this discussion had a diameter of 22 inches for S/N 014 and 40 inches for S/N 011. The time between manufacture and burst was 28 and 22 years. Visual inspection, shearography, heat soak thermography and borescope inspection were performed on vessel S/N 011 and all but shearography was performed on S/N 014 before they were tested and details of this work can be found in a companion paper titled, "Nondestructive Methods and Special Test Instrumentation Supporting NASA Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel Assessments." The vessels were instrumented so that measurements could be made to aid in the understanding of vessel response. Measurements made on the test articles included girth, boss displacement, internal volume, multiple point strain, full field strain, eddy current, acoustic emission (AE) pressure and temperature. The test article before and during burst is shown with the pattern used for digital image correlation full field strain measurement blurring as the vessel fails.

  1. Jam proof closure assembly for lidded pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Cioletti, Olisse C. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1992-01-01

    An expendable closure assembly is provided for use (in multiple units) with a lockable pressure vessel cover along its rim, such as of an autoclave. This assembly is suited to variable compressive contact and locking with the vessel lid sealing gasket. The closure assembly consists of a thick walled sleeve insert for retention in the under bores fabricated in the cover periphery and the sleeve is provided with internal threading only. A snap serves as a retainer on the underside of the sleeve, locking it into an under bore retention channel. Finally, a standard elongate externally threaded bolt is sized for mating cooperation with the so positioned sleeve, whereby the location of the bolt shaft in the cover bore hole determines its compressive contact on the underlying gasket.

  2. Jam proof closure assembly for lidded pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Cioletti, O.C.

    1991-12-31

    An expendable closure assembly is provided for use (in multiple units) with a lockable pressure vessel cover along its rim, such as of an autoclave. This assembly is suited to variable compressive contact and locking with the vessel lid sealing gasket. The closure assembly consists of a thick walled sleeve insert for retention in the under bores fabricated in the cover periphery and the sleeve is provided with internal threading only. A snap serves as a retainer on the underside of the sleeve, locking it into an under bore retention channel. Finally, a standard elongate externally threaded bolt is sized for mating cooperation with the so positioned sleeve, whereby the location of the bolt shaft in the cover bore hole determines its compressive contact an the underlying gasket.

  3. Jam proof closure assembly for lidded pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Cioletti, O.C.

    1991-01-01

    An expendable closure assembly is provided for use (in multiple units) with a lockable pressure vessel cover along its rim, such as of an autoclave. This assembly is suited to variable compressive contact and locking with the vessel lid sealing gasket. The closure assembly consists of a thick walled sleeve insert for retention in the under bores fabricated in the cover periphery and the sleeve is provided with internal threading only. A snap serves as a retainer on the underside of the sleeve, locking it into an under bore retention channel. Finally, a standard elongate externally threaded bolt is sized for mating cooperation with the so positioned sleeve, whereby the location of the bolt shaft in the cover bore hole determines its compressive contact an the underlying gasket.

  4. PRESSURIZATION OF CONTAINMENT VESSELS FROM PLUTONIUM OXIDE CONTENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hensel, S.

    2012-03-27

    Transportation and storage of plutonium oxide is typically done using a convenience container to hold the oxide powder which is then placed inside a containment vessel. Intermediate containers which act as uncredited confinement barriers may also be used. The containment vessel is subject to an internal pressure due to several sources including; (1) plutonium oxide provides a heat source which raises the temperature of the gas space, (2) helium generation due to alpha decay of the plutonium, (3) hydrogen generation due to radiolysis of the water which has been adsorbed onto the plutonium oxide, and (4) degradation of plastic bags which may be used to bag out the convenience can from a glove box. The contributions of these sources are evaluated in a reasonably conservative manner.

  5. A Theoretical Investigation of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Mechanics Applied to NASA Full Scale Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, N.; Thesken, J. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Phoenix, S. L.; Palko, J.; Eldridge, J.; Sutter, J.; Saulsberry, R.; Beeson, H.

    2006-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the factors controlling the stress rupture life of the National Aeronautics and Space Agency's (NASA) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) continues. Kevlar(TradeMark) fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar(TradeMark) filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However, due to the presence of a load sharing liner, the manufacturing induced residual stresses and the complex mechanical response, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. This paper is a companion to the experimental investigation reported in [1] and develops a theoretical framework necessary to design full-scale pathfinder experiments and accurately interpret the experimentally observed deformation and failure mechanisms leading up to static burst in COPVs. The fundamental mechanical response of COPVs is described using linear elasticity and thin shell theory and discussed in comparison to existing experimental observations. These comparisons reveal discrepancies between physical data and the current analytical results and suggest that the vessel's residual stress state and the spatial stress distribution as a function of pressure may be completely different from predictions based upon existing linear elastic analyses. The 3D elasticity of transversely isotropic spherical shells demonstrates that an overly compliant transverse stiffness relative to membrane stiffness can account for some of this by shifting a thin shell problem well into the realm of thick shell response. The use of calibration procedures are demonstrated as calibrated thin shell model results and finite element results are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The successes reported here have lead to continuing work with full scale testing of larger NASA COPV hardware.

  6. A Theoretical Investigation of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Mechanics Applied to NASA Full Scale Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. L.; Greene, N.; Palko, Joseph L.; Eldridge, Jeffrey; Sutter, James; Saulsberry, R.; Beeson, H.

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the factors controlling the stress rupture life of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) continues. Kevlar (DuPont) fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of a load sharing liner, the manufacturing induced residual stresses and the complex mechanical response, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. This paper is a companion to a previously reported experimental investigation and develops a theoretical framework necessary to design full-scale pathfinder experiments and accurately interpret the experimentally observed deformation and failure mechanisms leading up to static burst in COPVs. The fundamental mechanical response of COPVs is described using linear elasticity and thin shell theory and discussed in comparison to existing experimental observations. These comparisons reveal discrepancies between physical data and the current analytical results and suggest that the vessel s residual stress state and the spatial stress distribution as a function of pressure may be completely different from predictions based upon existing linear elastic analyses. The 3D elasticity of transversely isotropic spherical shells demonstrates that an overly compliant transverse stiffness relative to membrane stiffness can account for some of this by shifting a thin shell problem well into the realm of thick shell response. The use of calibration procedures are demonstrated as calibrated thin shell model results and finite element results are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The successes reported here have lead to continuing work with full scale testing of larger NASA COPV hardware.

  7. Proof test criteria for thin walled pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    A proof test criterion for assuring minimum service life requirements for aerospace pressure vessels is provided. The criteria proposed are based on the results of several experimental programs conducted on surface flaw specimens fabricated from 2219 aluminum base and weld metal. A description is presented of the stable crack growth behavior of surface flaws during loading. Conclusions derived from an experimental program are discussed. It is found that significant stable crack growth under increasing load can occur prior to failure. However, significant variability in results can be anticipated even when carefully controlled laboratory procedures are employed.

  8. Prediction of Composite Pressure Vessel Failure Location using Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreger, Steven T.; Taylor, F. Tad; Ortyl, Nicholas E.; Grant, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Ten composite pressure vessels were instrumented with fiber Bragg grating sensors in order to assess the strain levels of the vessel under various loading conditions. This paper and presentation will discuss the testing methodology, the test results, compare the testing results to the analytical model, and present a possible methodology for predicting the failure location and strain level of composite pressure vessels.

  9. Making a Metal-Lined Composite-Overwrapped Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom

    2005-01-01

    process has been devised for the fabrication of a pressure vessel that comprises a composite-material (matrix/fiber) shell with a metal liner on its inner surface. The use of the composite material makes it possible for the tank to be strong enough to withstand the anticipated operating pressure and yet weigh less than does an equivalent all-metal tank. The metal liner is used as a barrier against permeation: In the absence of such a barrier, the pressurized gas in the tank could leak by diffusing through the composite-material shell. The figure depicts workpieces at four key stages in the process, which consists of the following steps: 1. A mandrel that defines the size and shape of the pressure vessel is made by either molding or machining a piece of tooling wax. 2. Silver paint is applied to the surface of the mandrel to make it electrically conductive. 3. The ends of the mandrel are fitted with metal bosses. 4. The mandrel is put into a plating bath, wherein the metal liner is electrodeposited. Depending on the applications, the liner metal could be copper, nickel, gold, or an alloy. Typical liner thicknesses range from 1 to 10 mils (0.025 to 0.25 mm). 5. The wax is melted from within, leaving the thin metal liner. 6. A hollow shaft that includes holes and fittings through which the liner can be pressurized is sealed to both ends of the liner. The liner is pressurized to stiffen (and hence stabilize) it for the next step. 7. The pressurized liner is placed in a filament-winding machine, which is then operated to cover the liner with multiple layers of an uncured graphite-fiber/epoxy-matrix or other suitable composite material. 8. The composite-overwrapped liner is cured in an oven. 9. The pressure is relieved and the shaft is removed. The tank is then ready for use. The process as described above accommodates variations: a) The mandrel could be made of a wax that melts at a higher temperature and not removed until the tank is cured in the oven. b) The tank need not be cylindrical or axisymmetric, as long as the filament-winding machine can accommodate the chosen shape. c) Shallow grooves could be formed on the surface of the mandrel to give the liner a bellows-like character for reinforcement and/or to accommodate expansion and contraction.

  10. Improved fireman's compressed air breathing system pressure vessel development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, H. A.; Morris, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    Prototype high pressure glass filament-wound, aluminum-lined pressurant vessels suitable for use in a fireman's compressed air breathing system were designed, fabricated, and acceptance tested in order to demonstrate the feasibility of producing such high performance, lightweight units. The 4000 psi tanks have a 60 standard cubic foot (SCF) air capacity, and have a 6.5 inch diamter, 19 inch length, 415 inch volume, weigh 13 pounds when empty, and contain 33 percent more air than the current 45 SCF (2250 psi) steel units. The current steel 60 SCF (3000 psi) tanks weigh approximately twice as much as the prototype when empty, and are 2 inches, or 10 percent shorter. The prototype units also have non-rusting aluminum interiors, which removes the hazard of corrosion, the need for internal coatings, and the possibility of rust particles clogging the breathing system.

  11. Reassessment of PWR pressure-vessel integrity during overcooling accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Ball, D.G.

    1983-01-01

    A continuing analysis of the PTS problem associated with PWR postuated OCA's indicates that the previously accepted degree of conservatism in the fracture-mechanics model needs to be more closely evaluated, and if excessive, reducted. One feature that was believed to be conservative was the use of two-dimensional as opposed to finite-length (three-dimensional) flaws. A flaw of particular interest is one that is located in an axial weld of a plate-type vessel. For those vessels that suffer relatively high radiation damage in the welds, the length of the flaw will be no greater than the length of the weld, and recent calculations indicate that a deep flaw of that length (approx. 2 m) is not effectively infinitely long, contrary to previous thinking. The benefit to be derived from consideration of the 2-m flaw and also a semielliptical flaw with a length-to-depth ratio of 6/1 was investigated by analyzing several postulated transients. In doing so the sensitivity of the benefit to a specified maximum crack arrest toughness and to the duration of the transient was investigated. Results of the analysis indicate that for some conditions the benefit in using the 2-m flaw is substantial, but it decreases with increasing pressure, and above a certain pressure there may be no benefit, depending on the duration of the transient and the limit on crack arrest toughness.

  12. Flux effect analysis in WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, A.; Blagoeva, D.; Debarberis, L.

    2013-11-01

    The results of long term research programme concerning the determination of irradiation embrittlement dependence on fast neutron flux for WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels before and after annealing are presented in this paper. The study of flux effect was carried out on commercial WWER-440 steels which differ significantly in phosphorous (0.013-0.036 wt%) and copper (0.08-0.20 wt%) contents. All specimens were irradiated in surveillance channel positions under similar conditions at high ˜4 × 1012 ?m-2 s-1 and low ˜6 × 1011 ?m-2 s-1 fluxes (E > 0.5 MeV) at a temperature of 270 °?. The radiation embrittlement was evaluated by transition temperature shift on the basis of Charpy specimens test results. In case of low flux, the measured Tk shifts could be 25-50 °C bigger than the Tk shifts obtained from high flux data. A significant flux effect is observed in WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels with higher copper content (>0.13 wt%).

  13. Simply actuated closure for a pressure vessel - Design for use to trap deep-sea animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yayanos, A. A.

    1977-01-01

    A pressure vessel is described that can be closed by a single translational motion within 1 sec. The vessel is a key component of a trap for small marine animals and operates automatically on the sea floor. As the vessel descends to the sea floor, it is subjected both internally and externally to the high pressures of the deep sea. The mechanism for closing the pressure vessel on the sea floor is activated by the timed release of the ballast which was used to sink the trap. As it rises to the sea surface, the internal pressure of the vessel remains near the value present on the sea floor. The pressure vessel has been used in simulated ocean deployments and in the deep ocean (9500 m) with a 75%-85% retention of the deep-sea pressure. Nearly 100% retention of pressure can be achieved by using an accumulator filled with a gas.

  14. 10 CFR 50.66 - Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel. (a) For those light water nuclear power reactors where neutron radiation has reduced the fracture toughness of the reactor vessel materials, a thermal annealing may be applied...

  15. 10 CFR 50.66 - Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel. (a) For those light water nuclear power reactors where neutron radiation has reduced the fracture toughness of the reactor vessel materials, a thermal annealing may be applied...

  16. 10 CFR 50.66 - Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel. (a) For those light water nuclear power reactors where neutron radiation has reduced the fracture toughness of the reactor vessel materials, a thermal annealing may be applied...

  17. 10 CFR 50.66 - Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel. (a) For those light water nuclear power reactors where neutron radiation has reduced the fracture toughness of the reactor vessel materials, a thermal annealing may be applied...

  18. 10 CFR 50.66 - Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel. (a) For those light water nuclear power reactors where neutron radiation has reduced the fracture toughness of the reactor vessel materials, a thermal annealing may be applied...

  19. Stress concentration factors for circular, reinforced penetrations in pressurized cylindrical shells. Ph.D. Thesis - Virginia Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, J. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The effect on stresses in a cylindrical shell with a circular penetration subject to internal pressure was investigated in thin, shallow linearly, elastic cylindrical shells. Results provide numerical predictions of peak stress concentration factors around nonreinforced and reinforced penetrations in pressurized cylindrical shells. Analytical results were correlated with published formulas, as well as theoretical and experimental results. An accuracy study was made of the finite element program for each of the configurations considered important in pressure vessel technology. A formula is developed to predict the peak stress concentration factor for analysis and/or design in conjunction with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

  20. Transmitted ultrasound pressure variation in micro blood vessel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shengping; Kruse, Dustin E; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2008-06-01

    Silica, cellulose and polymethylmethacrylate tubes with inner diameters of ten to a few hundred microns are commonly used as blood vessel phantoms in in vitro studies of microbubble or nanodroplet behavior during insonation. However, a detailed investigation of the ultrasonic fields within these micro-tubes has not yet been performed. This work provides a theoretical analysis of the ultrasonic fields within micro-tubes. Numerical results show that for the same tube material, the interaction between the micro-tube and megaHertz-frequency ultrasound may vary drastically with incident frequency, tube diameter and wall thickness. For 10 MHz ultrasonic insonation of a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) tube with an inner diameter of 195 microm and an outer diameter of 260 microm, the peak pressure within the tube can be up to 300% of incident pressure amplitude. However, using 1 MHz ultrasound and a silica tube with an inner diameter of 12 microm and an outer diameter of 50 microm, the peak pressure within the tube is only 12% of the incident pressure amplitude and correspondingly, the spatial-average-time-average intensity within the tube is only 1% of the incident intensity. PMID:18395962

  1. Pressurized thermal shock probabilistic fracture mechanics sensitivity analysis for Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, T.L.; Cheverton, R.D.; Bryson, J.W.; Bass, B.R.; Shum, D.K.M.; Keeney, J.A.

    1993-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform a pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) sensitivity analysis for the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel, for the fluences corresponding to the end of operating cycle 22, using a specific small-break-loss- of-coolant transient as the loading condition. Regions of the vessel with distinguishing features were to be treated individually -- upper axial weld, lower axial weld, circumferential weld, upper plate spot welds, upper plate regions between the spot welds, lower plate spot welds, and the lower plate regions between the spot welds. The fracture analysis methods used in the analysis of through-clad surface flaws were those contained in the established OCA-P computer code, which was developed during the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) Program. The NRC request specified that the OCA-P code be enhanced for this study to also calculate the conditional probabilities of failure for subclad flaws and embedded flaws. The results of this sensitivity analysis provide the NRC with (1) data that could be used to assess the relative influence of a number of key input parameters in the Yankee Rowe PTS analysis and (2) data that can be used for readily determining the probability of vessel failure once a more accurate indication of vessel embrittlement becomes available. This report is designated as HSST report No. 117.

  2. Recent advances in lightweight, filament-wound composite pressure vessel technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    A review of recent advances is presented for lightweight, high performance composite pressure vessel technology that covers the areas of design concepts, fabrication procedures, applications, and performance of vessels subjected to single cycle burst and cyclic fatigue loading. Filament wound fiber/epoxy composite vessels were made from S glass, graphite, and Kevlar 49 fibers and were equipped with both structural and nonstructural liners. Pressure vessels structural efficiencies were attained which represented weight savings, using different liners, of 40 to 60 percent over all titanium pressure vessels. Significant findings in each area are summarized.

  3. 30 CFR 57.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure... NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 57.13001 General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. All boilers and pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed, and maintained in accordance...

  4. 30 CFR 56.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standards and specifications of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure... MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13001 General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels....

  5. 30 CFR 56.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure... MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13001 General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. All boilers and pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed, and maintained in accordance with...

  6. 30 CFR 57.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure... NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 57.13001 General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. All boilers and pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed, and maintained in accordance...

  7. 30 CFR 57.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure... NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 57.13001 General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. All boilers and pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed, and maintained in accordance...

  8. 30 CFR 57.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure... NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 57.13001 General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. All boilers and pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed, and maintained in accordance...

  9. 30 CFR 57.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure... NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 57.13001 General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. All boilers and pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed, and maintained in accordance...

  10. 30 CFR 56.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure... MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13001 General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. All boilers and pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed, and maintained in accordance with...

  11. 30 CFR 56.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure... MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13001 General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. All boilers and pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed, and maintained in accordance with...

  12. 30 CFR 56.13001 - General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false General requirements for boilers and pressure... MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13001 General requirements for boilers and pressure vessels. All boilers and pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed, and maintained in accordance with...

  13. Polymer-lined filament-wound pressure vessels for nitrogen containment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamstad, M. A.; Chiao, T. T.; Jessop, E. S.

    1974-01-01

    A program has been started to develop fatigue-resistant polymeric liners for a filament-wound pressure vessel to contain nitrogen gas at room temperature. First, nitrogen permeation of butyl rubber sheet coated with Saran and Parylene C was studied in flat specimens. Then four 10-cm-diam cylindrical pressure vessels were prepared with chlorobutyl rubber liners coated with the same materials. These vessels were valved off after nitrogen gas pressurization to approximately 65% of their expected failure pressure. One vessel leaked. The other three vessels showed an average pressure loss of less than 1% per month. These pressure vessels have an average performance factor of about 370 kPa x cu m/kg based on composite mass.

  14. Polymer-lined filament-wound pressure vessels for nitrogen containment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamstad, M. A.; Chiao, T. T.; Jessop, E. S.

    1974-01-01

    A program has been started to develop fatigue-resistant polymeric liners for a filament-wound pressure vessel to contain nitrogen gas at room temperature. First, nitrogen permeation of butyl rubber sheet coated with Saran and Parylene C was studied in flat specimens. Then four 10-cm-diam cylindrical pressure vessels were prepared with chlorobutyl rubber liners coated with the same materials. These vessels were valved off after nitrogen gas pressurization to approximately 65% (approximately 11.7 MPa or 1700 psig) of their expected failure pressure. One vessel leaked. The other three vessels showed an average pressure loss of less than 1% per month. These pressure vessels have an average performance factor of approximately 370 kPa-cu m/kg (1,500,000 in.) based on composite mass.

  15. Thin-metal lined PRD 49-III composite vessels. [evaluation of pressure vessels for burst strength and fatigue performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoggatt, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    Filament wound pressure vessels of various configurations were evaluated for burst strength and fatigue performance. The dimensions and characteristics of the vessels are described. The types of tests conducted are explained. It was determined that all vessels leaked in a relatively few cycles (20 to 60 cycles) with failure occurring in all cases in the metallic liner. The thin liner would de-bond from the composite and buckling took place during depressurization. No composite failures or indications of impeding composite failures were obtained in the metal-lined vessels.

  16. Predicting burst pressures in filament-wound composite pressure vessels by using acoustic emission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Eric V. K.

    1992-12-01

    Multivariate statistical analysis was used to generate equations for predicting burst pressures in 14.6 cm dia. fiberglass-epoxy and 45.7 cm dia. graphite-epoxy pressure vessels from acoustic emission (AE) data taken during hydroproof. Using the AE energy and amplitude measurements as the primary independent variables, the less accurate of the two linear equations was able to predict burst pressures to within +/- 0.841 MPa of the value given by the 95 percent prediction interval. Moreover, this equation included the effects of two bottles that contained simulated manufacturing defects. Because the AE data used to generate the burst-pressure equations were both taken at or below 25 percent of the expected burst pressures, it is anticipated that by using this approach, it would be possible to lower proof pressures in larger filament-wound composite pressure vessels such as rocket motor cases. This would minimize hydroproof damage to the composite structure and the accompanying potential for premature failure in service.

  17. Swim Pressure: Stress Generation in Active Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatori, S. C.; Yan, W.; Brady, J. F.

    2014-07-01

    We discover a new contribution to the pressure (or stress) exerted by a suspension of self-propelled bodies. Through their self-motion, all active matter systems generate a unique swim pressure that is entirely athermal in origin. The origin of the swim pressure is based upon the notion that an active body would swim away in space unless confined by boundaries—this confinement pressure is precisely the swim pressure. Here we give the micromechanical basis for the swim stress and use this new perspective to study self-assembly and phase separation in active soft matter. The swim pressure gives rise to a nonequilibrium equation of state for active matter with pressure-volume phase diagrams that resemble a van der Waals loop from equilibrium gas-liquid coexistence. Theoretical predictions are corroborated by Brownian dynamics simulations. Our new swim stress perspective can help analyze and exploit a wide class of active soft matter, from swimming bacteria to catalytic nanobots to molecular motors that activate the cellular cytoskeleton.

  18. Techniques for Embedding Instrumentation in Pressure Vessel Test Articles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelius, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Many interesting structural and thermal events occur in materials that are housed within a surrounding pressure vessel. In order to measure the environment during these events and explore their causes instrumentation must be installed on or in the material. Transducers can be selected that are small enough to be embedded within the test material but these instruments must interface with an external system in order to apply excitation voltages and output the desired data. The methods for installing the instrumentation and creating an interface are complicated when the material is located in a case or housing containing high pressures and hot gases. Installation techniques for overcoming some of these difficulties were developed while testing a series of small-scale solid propellant and hybrid rocket motors at Marshall Space Flight Center. These techniques have potential applications in other test articles where data are acquired from materials that require containment due to the severe environment encountered during the test process. This severe environment could include high pressure, hot gases, or ionized atmospheres. The development of these techniques, problems encountered, and the lessons learned from the ongoing testing process are summarized.

  19. Techniques for embedding instrumentation in pressure vessel test articles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, Michael

    2006-05-01

    Many interesting structural and thermal events occur in materials that are housed within a surrounding pressure vessel. In order to measure the environment during these events and explore their causes instrumentation must be installed on or in the material. Transducers can be selected that are small enough to be embedded within the test material but these instruments must interface with an external system in order to apply excitation voltages and output the desired data. The methods for installing the instrumentation and creating an interface are complicated when the material is located in a case or housing containing high pressures and hot gases. Installation techniques for overcoming some of these difficulties were developed while testing a series of small-scale solid propellant and hybrid rocket motors at Marshall Space Flight Center. These techniques have potential applications in other test articles where data are acquired from materials that require containment due to the severe environment encountered during the test process. This severe environment could include high pressure, hot gases, or ionized atmospheres. The development of these techniques, problems encountered, and the lessons learned from the ongoing testing process are summarized.

  20. Structural considerations in design of lightweight glass-fiber composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The development of structurally efficient, metal-lined, glass-fiber composite pressure vessels. Both the current state-of-the-art and current problems are discussed along with fracture mechanics considerations for the metal liner. The design concepts used for metal-lined, glass-fiber, composite pressure vessels are described and the structural characteristics of the composite designs are compared with each other and with homogeneous metal pressure vessels. Specific design techniques and available design data are identified. Results of a current program to evaluate flaw growth and fracture characteristics of the metal liners are reviewed and the impact of these results on composite pressure vessel designs is discussed.

  1. Proof test criteria for thin walled pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Proof tests were conducted on surface-flaw pressure-vessel specimens of 2219-T87 aluminum base metal and weld metal at three different temperatures: 72, -320, and -423 F, and for three different metal sheet thicknesses: 0.125, 0.250, and 0.375 in. It was found that significant stable crack growth under increasing load can occur prior to failure. Initial flaw shapes and material conditions have a significant effect on the extent of crack growth. Stable crack growth initiates at a lower K sub Ii/K sub cr ratio and is more severe in weld metal specimens than in base metal specimens. Low aspect ratio flaws experience more growth in the depthwise direction than higher aspect ratio flaws. Proof testing assures that any first cycle failure will be by leakage, not by catastrophic failure.

  2. Low Temperature Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John

    2015-08-01

    The embrittlement trend curve development project for HFIR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was carried out with three major tasks. Which are (1) data collection to match that used in HFIR steel embrittlement trend published in 1994 Journal Nuclear Material by Remec et. al, (2) new embrittlement data of A212B steel that are not included in earlier HFIR RPV trend curve, and (3) the adjustment of nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDTT) shift data with the consideration of the irradiation temperature effect. An updated HFIR RPV steel embrittlement trend curve was developed, as described below. NDTT( C) = 23.85 log(x) + 203.3 log (x) + 434.7, with 2- uncertainty of 34.6 C, where parameter x is referred to total dpa. The developed update HFIR RPV embrittlement trend curve has higher embrittlement rate compared to that of the trend curve developed in 1994.

  3. Macrosegregation and Microstructural Evolution in a Pressure-Vessel Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, E. J.; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.

    2014-06-01

    This work assesses the consequences of macrosegregation on microstructural evolution during solid-state transformations in a continuously cooled pressure-vessel steel (SA508 Grade 3). Stark spatial variations in microstructure are observed following a simulated quench from the austenitization temperature, which are found to deliver significant variations in hardness. Partial-transformation experiments are used to show the development of microstructure in segregated material. Evidence is presented which indicates the bulk microstructure is not one of upper bainite, as it has been described in the past, but one comprised of Widmanstätten ferrite and pockets of lower bainite. Segregation is observed on three different length scales, and the origins of each type are proposed. Suggestions are put forward for how the segregation might be minimized, and its detrimental effects suppressed by heat treatments.

  4. Continuous Cooling Transformations in Nuclear Pressure Vessel Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pous-Romero, Hector; Bhadeshia, Harry K. D. H.

    2014-10-01

    A class of low-alloy steels often referred to as SA508 represent key materials for the manufacture of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. The alloys have good properties, but the scatter in properties is of prime interest in safe design. Such scatter can arise from microstructural variations but most studies conclude that large components made from such steels are, following heat treatment, fully bainitic. In the present work, we demonstrate with the help of a variety of experimental techniques that the microstructures of three SA508 Gr.3 alloys are far from homogeneous when considered in the context of the cooling rates encountered in practice. In particular, allotriomorphic ferrite that is expected to lead to a deterioration in toughness, is found in the microstructure for realistic combinations of austenite grain size and the cooling rate combination. Parameters are established to identify the domains in which SA508 Gr.3 steels transform only into the fine bainitic microstructures.

  5. Multipurpose Pressure Vessel Scanner and Photon Doppler Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Tayera

    2015-01-01

    Critical flight hardware typically undergoes a series of nondestructive evaluation methods to screen for defects before it is integrated into the flight system. Conventionally, pressure vessels have been inspected for flaws using a technique known as fluorescent dye penetrant, which is biased to inspector interpretation. An alternate method known as eddy current is automated and can detect small cracks better than dye penetrant. A new multipurpose pressure vessel scanner has been developed to perform internal and external eddy current scanning, laser profilometry, and thickness mapping on pressure vessels. Before this system can be implemented throughout industry, a probability of detection (POD) study needs to be performed to validate the system’s eddy current crack/flaw capabilities. The POD sample set will consist of 6 flight-like metal pressure vessel liners with defects of known size. Preparation for the POD includes sample set fabrication, system operation, procedure development, and eddy current settings optimization. For this, collaborating with subject matter experts was required. This technical paper details the preparation activities leading up to the POD study currently scheduled for winter 2015/2016. Once validated, this system will be a proven innovation for increasing the safety and reliability of necessary flight hardware.Additionally, testing of frangible joint requires Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) and Digital Image Correlation instrumentation. There is often noise associated with PDV data, which necessitates a frequency modulation (FM) signal-to-noise pre-test. Generally, FM radio works by varying the carrier frequency and mixing it with a fixed frequency source, creating a beat frequency which is represented by audio frequency that can be heard between about 20 to 20,000 Hz. Similarly, PDV reflects a shifted frequency (a phenomenon known as the Doppler Effect) from a moving source and mixes it with a fixed source frequency, which results in a beat frequency. However, for PDV, discerning the signal from the noise is difficult without a moving source to induce the modulation. A rotating wheel is currently being used as the moving source but its configuration is impractical and has cumbersome placement inside the current frangible joint test cell. As a way to combat this problem and verify a satisfactory signal-to-noise ratio, a reflective moving crystal piezo will be used to modulate a beat frequency, and an absorptive target will be used to block the signal in order to determine any back reflection coming from the probe and discern the true signal-to noise ratio. The piezo will be mounted and inserted onto the test table on an extendable telescopic antenna grounded by a magnetic base in the test zone. This piezo configuration will be more compatible within the test zone and allow for easy removal of the disk following acceptable signal verification and prior to frangible joint tests.Additionally, topics of what was learned and smaller tasks given at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) will be discussed. All statements in this paper are newly gained knowledge of what I have learned, observed, and have done while at WSTF.

  6. Multipurpose Pressure Vessel Scanner and Photon Doppler Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Tayera

    2015-01-01

    Critical flight hardware typically undergoes a series of nondestructive evaluation methods to screen for defects before it is integrated into the flight system. Conventionally, pressure vessels have been inspected for flaws using a technique known as fluorescent dye penetrant, which is biased to inspector interpretation. An alternate method known as eddy current is automated and can detect small cracks better than dye penetrant. A new multipurpose pressure vessel scanner has been developed to perform internal and external eddy current scanning, laser profilometry, and thickness mapping on pressure vessels. Before this system can be implemented throughout industry, a probability of detection (POD) study needs to be performed to validate the system's eddy current crack/flaw capabilities. The POD sample set will consist of 6 flight-like metal pressure vessel liners with defects of known size. Preparation for the POD includes sample set fabrication, system operation, procedure development, and eddy current settings optimization. For this, collaborating with subject matter experts was required. This technical paper details the preparation activities leading up to the POD study currently scheduled for winter 2015/2016. Once validated, this system will be a proven innovation for increasing the safety and reliability of necessary flight hardware. Additionally, testing of frangible joint requires Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) and Digital Image Correlation instrumentation. There is often noise associated with PDV data, which necessitates a frequency modulation (FM) signal-to-noise pre-test. Generally, FM radio works by varying the carrier frequency and mixing it with a fixed frequency source, creating a beat frequency which is represented by audio frequency that can be heard between about 20 to 20,000 Hz. Similarly, PDV reflects a shifted frequency (a phenomenon known as the Doppler Effect) from a moving source and mixes it with a fixed source frequency, which results in a beat frequency. However, for PDV, discerning the signal from the noise is difficult without a moving source to induce the modulation. A rotating wheel is currently being used as the moving source but its configuration is impractical and has cumbersome placement inside the current frangible joint test cell. As a way to combat this problem and verify a satisfactory signal-to-noise ratio, a reflective moving crystal piezo will be used to modulate a beat frequency, and an absorptive target will be used to block the signal in order to determine any back reflection coming from the probe and discern the true signal-to-noise ratio. The piezo will be mounted and inserted onto the test table on an extendable telescopic antenna grounded by a magnetic base in the test zone. This piezo configuration will be more compatible within the test zone and allow for easy removal of the disk following acceptable signal verification and prior to frangible joint tests.

  7. ASTM Standards for Reactor Dosimetry and Pressure Vessel Surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    GRIFFIN, PATRICK J.

    1999-09-14

    The ASTM standards provide guidance and instruction on how to field and interpret reactor dosimetry. They provide a roadmap towards understanding the current ''state-of-the-art'' in reactor dosimetry, as reflected by the technical community. The consensus basis to the ASTM standards assures the user of an unbiased presentation of technical procedures and interpretations of the measurements. Some insight into the types of standards and the way in which they are organized can assist one in using them in an expeditious manner. Two example are presented to help orient new users to the breadth and interrelationship between the ASTM nuclear metrology standards. One example involves the testing of a new ''widget'' to verify the radiation hardness. The second example involves quantifying the radiation damage at a pressure vessel critical weld location through surveillance dosimetry and calculation.

  8. Low cycle fatigue behavior of a ferritic reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Apu; Kumawat, Bhupendra K.; Chakravartty, J. K.

    2015-07-01

    The cyclic stress-strain response and the low cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of 20MnMoNi55 pressure vessel steel were studied. Tensile strength and LCF properties were examined at room temperature (RT) using specimens cut from rolling direction of a rolled block. The fully reversed strain-controlled LCF tests were conducted at a constant total strain rate with different axial strain amplitude levels. The cyclic strain-stress relationships and the strain-life relationships were obtained through the test results, and related LCF parameters of the steel were calculated. The studied steel exhibits cyclic softening behavior. Furthermore, analysis of stabilized hysteresis loops showed that the steel exhibits non-Masing behavior. Complementary scanning electron microscopy examinations were also carried out on fracture surfaces to reveal dominant damage mechanisms during crack initiation, propagation and fracture. Multiple crack initiation sites were observed on the fracture surface. The investigated LCF behavior can provide reference for pressure vessel life assessment and fracture mechanisms analysis.

  9. The behavior of shallow flaws in reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Rolfe, S.T. )

    1991-11-01

    Both analytical and experimental studies have shown that the effect of crack length, a, on the elastic-plastic toughness of structural steels is significant. The objective of this report is to recommend those research investigations that are necessary to understand the phenomenon of shallow behavior as it affects fracture toughness so that the results can be used properly in the structural margin assessment of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) with flaws. Preliminary test results of A 533 B steel show an elevated crack-tip-opening displacement (CTOD) toughness similar to that observed for structural steels tested at the University of Kansas. Thus, the inherent resistance to fracture initiation of A 533 B steel with shallow flaws appears to be higher than that used in the current American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) design curves based on testing fracture mechanics specimens with deep flaws. If this higher toughness of laboratory specimens with shallow flaws can be transferred to a higher resistance to failure in RPV design or analysis, then the actual margin of safety in nuclear vessels with shallow flaws would be greater than is currently assumed on the basis of deep-flaw test results. This elevation in toughness and greater resistance to fracture would be a very desirable situation, particularly for the pressurized-thermal shock (PTS) analysis in which shallow flaws are assumed to exist. Before any advantage can be taken of this possible increase in initiation toughness, numerous factors must be analyzed to ensure the transferability of the data. This report reviews those factors and makes recommendations of studies that are needed to assess the transferability of shallow-flaw toughness test results to the structural margin assessment of RPV with shallow flaws. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV): Flight Rationale for the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kezirian, Michael T.; Johnson, Kevin L.; Phoenix, Stuart L.

    2011-01-01

    Each Orbiter Vehicle (Space Shuttle Program) contains up to 24 Kevlar49/Epoxy Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) for storage of pressurized gases. In the wake of the Columbia accident and the ensuing Return To Flight (RTF) activities, Orbiter engineers reexamined COPV flight certification. The original COPV design calculations were updated to include recently declassified Kevlar COPV test data from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and to incorporate changes in how the Space Shuttle was operated as opposed to orinigially envisioned. 2005 estimates for the probability of a catastrophic failure over the life of the program (from STS-1 through STS-107) were one-in-five. To address this unacceptable risk, the Orbiter Project Office (OPO) initiated a comprehensive investigation to understand and mitigate this risk. First, the team considered and eventually deemed unfeasible procuring and replacing all existing flight COPVs. OPO replaced the two vessels with the highest risk with existing flight spare units. Second, OPO instituted operational improvements in ground procedures to signficiantly reduce risk, without adversely affecting Shuttle capability. Third, OPO developed a comprehensive model to quantify the likelihood of occurrance. A fully-instrumented burst test (recording a lower burst pressure than expected) on a flight-certified vessel provided critical understanding of the behavior of Orbiter COPVs. A more accurate model was based on a newly-compiled comprehensive database of Kevlar data from LLNL and elsewhere. Considering hardware changes, operational improvements and reliability model refinements, the mean reliability was determined to be 0.998 for the remainder of the Shuttle Program (from 2007, for STS- 118 thru STS-135). Since limited hardware resources precluded full model validation through multiple tests, additional model confidence was sought through the first-ever Accelerated Stress Rupture Test (ASRT) of a flown flight article. A Bayesian statistical approach was developed to interpret possible test results. Since the lifetime observed in the ASRT exceeded initial estimates by one to two orders of magnitude, the Space Shuttle Program deemed there was significant conservatism in the model and accepted continued operation with existing flight hardware. Given the variability in tank-to-tank original prooftest response, a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique utilizing Raman Spectroscopy was developed to directly measure COPV residual stress state. Preliminary results showed that patterns of low fiber elastic strains over the outside vessel surface, together with measured permanent volume growth during proof, could be directly correlated to increased fiber stress ratios on the inside fibers adjacent to the liner, and thus reduced reliability.

  11. D-Zero Central Calorimeter Pressure Vessel and Vacuum Vessel Safety Notes

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; Luther, R.; /Fermilab

    1990-10-25

    The relief valve and relief piping capacity was calculated to be 908 sefm air. This exceeds all relieving conditions. The vessel also has a rupture disc with a 2640 scfm air stamped capacity. In order to significantly decrease the amount of time required to fill the cryostats, it is desired to raise the setpoint of the 'operating' relief valve on the argon storage dewar to 20 psig from its existing 16 psig setting. This additional pressure increases the flow to the cryostats and will overwhelm the relief capacity if the temperature of the modules within these vessels is warm enough. Using some conservative assumptions and simple calculations within this note, the maximum average temperature that the modules within each cryostat can be at prior to filling from the storage dewar with liquid argon is at least 290 K. The average temperature of the module mass for any of the three cryostats can be as high as 290 K prior to filling that particular cryostat. This should not be confused with the average temperature of a single type or location which is useful in protecting the modules-not necessarily the vessel itself. A few modules of each type and at different elevations should be used in an average which would account for the different weights of each module. Note that at 290 K, the actual flow of argon through the relief valve and the rupture disk was under the maximum theoretical flows for each relief device. This means that the bulk temperature could actually have been raised to flow argon through the reliefs at their maximum capacity. Therefore, the temperature of 290 K is a conservative value for the calculated flow rate of 12.3 gpm. Safeguards in addition to and used in conjunction with operating procedures shall be implemented in such a way so that the above temperature limitation is not exceeded and such that it is exclusive of the programmable logic controller (PLC). One suggestion is using a toggle switch for each cryostat mounted in the PLC I/O box which would maintain control of the signals to open the cold fill valves of each cryostat. With the safeguards in place while carefully monitoring the temperatures during a cooldown cycle in each cryostat, the set pressure in the argon storage dewar can safely be increased to 20 psig.

  12. A Neural Network/Acoustic Emission Analysis of Impact Damaged Graphite/Epoxy Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Hill, Erik v. K.; Workman, Gary L.; Russell, Samuel S.

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) signal analysis has been used to measure the effects of impact damage on burst pressure in 5.75 inch diameter, inert propellant filled, filament wound pressure vessels. The AE data were collected from fifteen graphite/epoxy pressure vessels featuring five damage states and three resin systems. A burst pressure prediction model was developed by correlating the AE amplitude (frequency) distribution, generated during the first pressure ramp to 800 psig (approximately 25% of the average expected burst pressure for an undamaged vessel) to known burst pressures using a four layered back propagation neural network. The neural network, trained on three vessels from each resin system, was able to predict burst pressures with a worst case error of 5.7% for the entire fifteen bottle set.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Impact Damage Induced by Orbital Debris on Shielded Wall of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniaev, Aleksandr; Telichev, Igor

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a methodology for numerical simulation of the formation of the front wall damage in composite overwrapped pressure vessels under hypervelocity impact. Both SPH particles and Lagrangian finite elements were employed in combination for numerical simulations. Detailed numerical models implementing two filament winding patterns with different degree of interweaving were developed and used to simulate 2.5 km/s and 5.0 km/s impacts of 5 mm-diameter spherical aluminum-alloy projectile. Obtained results indicate that winding pattern may have a pronounced effect on vessel damage in case of orbital debris impact, influencing propagation of the stress waves in composite material.

  14. 46 CFR 167.25-1 - Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances. 167.25-1 Section 167.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Marine Engineering § 167.25-1 Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances. (a) Except as otherwise...

  15. 46 CFR 167.25-5 - Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances. 167.25-5 Section 167.25-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Marine Engineering § 167.25-5 Inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances....

  16. Stresses & Deformations in Vessel Containing Copper Magnet & Shielding Bob Weggel 5/2731/2011

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    Stresses & Deformations in Vessel Containing Copper Magnet & Shielding Bob Weggel 5/2731/2011 Model: Vessel (bore tube, flanges & cylindrical shell) are of steel; specific gravity = 7.85; E = 200 Radius of Bore Tube that Flares Elliptically with Axial Distance #12; Fig. 2: Isometric view of vessel

  17. Fundamental study of failure mechanisms of pressure vessels under thermo-mechanical cycling in multiphase environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penso Mula, Jorge Antonio

    Cracking and bulging in welded and internally lined pressure vessels that work in thermal-mechanical cycling services have been well known problems in the petrochemical, power and nuclear industries. Published literature and industry surveys show that similar problems have been occurring during the last 50 years. Understanding the causes of cracking and bulging would lead to improvements in the reliability of these pressure vessels. This study attempts to add information required for improving the knowledge and fundamental understanding of these problems. Cracking and bulging, most often in the weld areas, commonly experienced in delayed coking units (e.g. coke drums) in oil refineries are typical examples. The coke drum was selected for this study because of the existing field experience and past industrial investigation results that were available to serve as the baseline references for the analytical studies performed for this dissertation. Another reason for selecting the delayed coking units for this study was due to their high economical yields. Shutting down these units would cause a high negative economic impact on the refinery operations. Several failure mechanisms were hypothesized. The finite element method was used to analyze these significant variables and to verify the hypotheses. In conclusion, a fundamental explanation of the occurrence of bulging and cracking in pressure vessels in multiphase environments has been developed. Several important factors have been identified, including the high convection coefficient of the boiling layer during filling and quenching, the mismatch in physical, thermal and mechanical properties in the dissimilar weld of the clad plates and process conditions such as heating and quenching rate and warming time. Material selection for coke drums should consider not only fatigue strength but also corrosion resistance at high temperatures and low temperatures. Cracking occurs due to low cycle fatigue and corrosion. The FEA-subroutine process simulation was able to capture the important aspects of the thermo-mechanical cycle that influence the thermal and stress gradients in the shell.

  18. Vulnerability analysis of a pressurized aluminum composite vessel against hypervelocity impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hereil, Pierre-Louis; Plassard, Fabien; Mespoulet, Jérôme

    2015-09-01

    Vulnerability of high pressure vessels subjected to high velocity impact of space debris is analyzed with the response of pressurized vessels to hypervelocity impact of aluminum sphere. Investigated tanks are CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced plastics) overwrapped Al vessels. Explored internal pressure of nitrogen ranges from 1 bar to 300 bar and impact velocity are around 4400 m/s. Data obtained from Xrays radiographies and particle velocity measurements show the evolution of debris cloud and shock wave propagation in pressurized nitrogen. Observation of recovered vessels leads to the damage pattern and to its evolution as a function of the internal pressure. It is shown that the rupture mode is not a bursting mode but rather a catastrophic damage of the external carbon composite part of the vessel.

  19. Design of a standalone-type beryllium vessel for high-pressure protein crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Tsukamoto, Masayuki; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Matsumoto, Masamitsu; Nagasawa, Makoto; Tamura, Katsuhiro

    2010-08-01

    A standalone-type beryllium (Be) high-pressure crystallography vessel has been developed. Using a coupler-joint unit and a pressure valve, we could keep the pressure in the vessel constant at 100±1 MPa for more than 24 h without connecting to a pressure-generating apparatus. Diffraction spots of a glucose isomerase (GI) crystal under 100 MPa were collected using the vessel and a rotating copper-anode in-house x-ray generator (0.8 kW). We successfully collected a 2.0 Å resolution data set of a 0.5 mm size GI crystal in an aqueous solution at 100 MPa.

  20. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV): Developing Flight Rationale for the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kezirian, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Introducing composite vessels into the Space Shuttle Program represented a significant technical achievement. Each Orbiter vehicle contains 24 (nominally) Kevlar tanks for storage of pressurized helium (for propulsion) and nitrogen (for life support). The use of composite cylinders saved 752 pounds per Orbiter vehicle compared with all-metal tanks. The weight savings is significant considering each Shuttle flight can deliver 54,000 pounds of payload to the International Space Station. In the wake of the Columbia accident and the ensuing Return to Flight activities, the Space Shuttle Program, in 2005, re-examined COPV hardware certification. Incorporating COPV data that had been generated over the last 30 years and recognizing differences between initial Shuttle Program requirements and current operation, a new failure mode was identified, as composite stress rupture was deemed credible. The Orbiter Project undertook a comprehensive investigation to quantify and mitigate this risk. First, the engineering team considered and later deemed as unfeasible the option to replace existing all flight tanks. Second, operational improvements to flight procedures were instituted to reduce the flight risk and the danger to personnel. Third, an Orbiter reliability model was developed to quantify flight risk. Laser profilometry inspection of several flight COPVs identified deep (up to 20 mil) depressions on the tank interior. A comprehensive analysis was performed and it confirmed that these observed depressions were far less than the criterion which was established as necessary to lead to liner buckling. Existing fleet vessels were exonerated from this failure mechanism. Because full validation of the Orbiter Reliability Model was not possible given limited hardware resources, an Accelerated Stress Rupture Test of a flown flight vessel was performed to provide increased confidence. A Bayesian statistical approach was developed to evaluate possible test results with respect to the model credibility and thus flight rationale for continued operation of the Space Shuttle with existing flight hardware. A non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique utilizing Raman Spectroscopy was developed to directly measure the overwrap residual stress state. Preliminary results provide optimistic results that patterns of fluctuation in fiber elastic strains over the outside vessel surface could be directly correlated with increased fiber stress ratios and thus reduced reliability.

  1. Fatigue performance of metal-lined graphite/epoxy pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamstad, M. A.; Chiao, T. T.; Patterson, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    Using an ultrahigh-strength graphite fiber, a program was started to develop a thin metal-lined fiber/epoxy pressure vessel that would have a fatigue life of over 1000 cycles. First, the performance factor of the fiber/epoxy composite was found to be 351 kN m/kg from the average of 18 rubber-lined pressure vessels. Then, both aluminum- and titanium-lined vessels were filament wound with the graphite fiber in an epoxy matrix. Several of these metal-lined vessels were subjected to hydraulic fatigue testing to about 50% of their expected burst pressures. The average fatigue life of the aluminum-lined vessels was 462 cycles; the average for the titanium-lined vessels was 2190 cycles.

  2. 46 CFR 53.01-3 - Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 53...CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS General Requirements § 53.01-3 Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code....

  3. 46 CFR 52.01-2 - Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 52...CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-2 Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code....

  4. 46 CFR 53.01-3 - Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 53...CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS General Requirements § 53.01-3 Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code....

  5. 46 CFR 53.01-3 - Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 53...CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS General Requirements § 53.01-3 Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code....

  6. 46 CFR 52.01-2 - Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 52...CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-2 Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code....

  7. 46 CFR 53.01-3 - Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 53...CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS General Requirements § 53.01-3 Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code....

  8. 46 CFR 53.01-3 - Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 53...CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS General Requirements § 53.01-3 Adoption of section IV of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code....

  9. 46 CFR 52.01-2 - Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 52...CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-2 Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code....

  10. 46 CFR 52.01-2 - Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 52...CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-2 Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code....

  11. 46 CFR 52.01-2 - Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. 52...CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-2 Adoption of section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code....

  12. Co-evolution of solid stress and interstitial fluid pressure in tumors during progression: Implications for vascular collapse

    PubMed Central

    Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos; Martin, John D.; Snuderl, Matija; Mpekris, Fotios; Jain, Saloni R.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2013-01-01

    The stress harbored by the solid phase of tumors is known as solid stress. Solid stress can be either applied externally by the surrounding normal tissue or induced by the tumor itself due to its growth. Fluid pressure is the isotropic stress exerted by the fluid phase. We recently demonstrated that growth-induced solid stress is on the order of 1.3–13.0 kPa (10–100 mmHg) - high enough to cause compression of fragile blood vessels resulting in poor perfusion and hypoxia. However, the evolution of growth-induced stress with tumor progression and its effect on cancer cell proliferation in vivo is not understood. To this end, we developed a mathematical model for tumor growth that takes into account all three types of stresses: growth-induced stress, externally applied stress and fluid pressure. First, we performed in vivo experiments and found that growth-induced stress is related to tumor volume through a bi-exponential relationship. Then, we incorporated this information into our mathematical model and showed that due to the evolution of growth-induced stress, total solid stress levels are higher in the tumor interior and lower in the periphery. Elevated compressive solid stress in the interior of the tumor is sufficient to cause the collapse of blood vessels and results in a lower growth rate of cancer cells compared to the periphery, independently from that caused by the lack of nutrients due to vessel collapse. Furthermore, solid stress in the periphery of the tumor causes blood vessels in the surrounding normal tissue to deform to elliptical shapes. We present histological sections of human cancers that demonstrate such vessel deformations. Finally, we found that fluid pressure increases with tumor growth due to increased vascular permeability and lymphatic impairment, and is governed by the microvascular pressure. Crucially, fluid pressure does not cause vessel compression of tumor vessels. Major Findings. Growth-induced solid stress is accumulated in tumors during growth. Growth-induced and externally applied solid stresses are additive and might affect cancer cell growth in two ways: directly by compressing cancer cells and indirectly by deforming blood vessels and thus, reducing delivery of nutrients. PMID:23633490

  13. ANSI/AIAA S-081A, Pressure Vessel Standards Implementation Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Nathanael J.

    2009-01-01

    The stress rupture specification for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) is discussed. The composite shell of the COPV shall be designed to meet the design life considering the time it is under sustained load. A Mechcanical Damage Control Plan (MDCP) shall be created and implemented that assures the COPV will not fail due to mechanical damage due to manufacturing, testing, shipping, installation, or flight. Proven processes and procedures for fabrication and repair shall be used to preclude damage or material degradation during material processing, manufacturing operations, and refurbushment.Selected NDI techniques for the liner and/or boss(es) shall be performed before overwrapping with composite. When visual inspection reveals mechanical damage or defects exceeding manufacturing specification levels (and standard repair procedures), the damaged COPV shall be submitted to a material review board (MRB) for disposition. Every COPV shall be subjected to visual and other non-destructive inspection (NDI), per the inspection plan.

  14. Non-invasive method and apparatus for measuring pressure within a pliable vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M. (inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A non-invasive method and apparatus is disclosed for measuring pressure within a pliable vessel such as a blood vessel. The blood vessel is clamped by means of a clamping structure having a first portion housing a pressure sensor and a second portion extending over the remote side of the blood vessel for pressing the blood vessel into engagement with the pressure sensing device. The pressure sensing device includes a flat deflectable diaphragm portion arranged to engage a portion of the blood vessel flattened against the diaphragm by means of the clamp structure. In one embodiment, the clamp structure includes first and second semicylindrical members held together by retaining rings. In a second embodiment the clamp structure is of one piece construction having a solid semicylindrical portion and a hollow semicylindrical portion with a longitudinal slot in the follow semicylindrical portion through which a slip the blood vessel. In a third embodiment, an elastic strap is employed for clamping the blood vessel against the pressure sensing device.

  15. Evaluation of Progressive Failure Analysis and Modeling of Impact Damage in Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) is leading an evaluation effort in advanced destructive and nondestructive testing of composite pressure vessels and structures. WSTF is using progressive finite element analysis methods for test design and for confirmation of composite pressure vessel performance. Using composite finite element analysis models and failure theories tested in the World-Wide Failure Exercise, WSTF is able to estimate the static strength of composite pressure vessels. Additionally, test and evaluation on composites that have been impact damaged is in progress so that models can be developed to estimate damage tolerance and the degradation in static strength.

  16. Evidence for neutron irradiation-induced metallic precipitates in model alloys and pressure-vessel weld steel

    E-print Network

    Motta, Arthur T.

    Evidence for neutron irradiation-induced metallic precipitates in model alloys and pressure-vessel the pressure-vessel weld steel) showed evidence for both irradiation-induced metallic precipitation. Introduction Current models used to explain the embrittlement of pressure-vessel steel during neutron

  17. 46 CFR 35.25-5 - Repairs of boilers and unfired pressure vessels and reports of repairs or accidents by chief...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Repairs of boilers and unfired pressure vessels and reports...Department § 35.25-5 Repairs of boilers and unfired pressure vessels and reports... (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels,...

  18. 46 CFR 35.25-5 - Repairs of boilers and unfired pressure vessels and reports of repairs or accidents by chief...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 false Repairs of boilers and unfired pressure vessels and reports...Department § 35.25-5 Repairs of boilers and unfired pressure vessels and reports... (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels,...

  19. 46 CFR 35.25-5 - Repairs of boilers and unfired pressure vessels and reports of repairs or accidents by chief...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false Repairs of boilers and unfired pressure vessels and reports...Department § 35.25-5 Repairs of boilers and unfired pressure vessels and reports... (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels,...

  20. 46 CFR 35.25-5 - Repairs of boilers and unfired pressure vessels and reports of repairs or accidents by chief...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 false Repairs of boilers and unfired pressure vessels and reports...Department § 35.25-5 Repairs of boilers and unfired pressure vessels and reports... (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels,...

  1. 46 CFR 35.25-5 - Repairs of boilers and unfired pressure vessels and reports of repairs or accidents by chief...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 false Repairs of boilers and unfired pressure vessels and reports...Department § 35.25-5 Repairs of boilers and unfired pressure vessels and reports... (a) Before making any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels,...

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF ASME SECTION X CODE RULES FOR HIGH PRESSURE COMPOSITE HYDROGEN PRESSURE VESSELS WITH NON-LOAD SHARING LINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Rawls, G.; Newhouse, N.; Rana, M.; Shelley, B.; Gorman, M.

    2010-04-13

    The Boiler and Pressure Vessel Project Team on Hydrogen Tanks was formed in 2004 to develop Code rules to address the various needs that had been identified for the design and construction of up to 15000 psi hydrogen storage vessel. One of these needs was the development of Code rules for high pressure composite vessels with non-load sharing liners for stationary applications. In 2009, ASME approved new Appendix 8, for Section X Code which contains the rules for these vessels. These vessels are designated as Class III vessels with design pressure ranging from 20.7 MPa (3,000 ps)i to 103.4 MPa (15,000 psi) and maximum allowable outside liner diameter of 2.54 m (100 inches). The maximum design life of these vessels is limited to 20 years. Design, fabrication, and examination requirements have been specified, included Acoustic Emission testing at time of manufacture. The Code rules include the design qualification testing of prototype vessels. Qualification includes proof, expansion, burst, cyclic fatigue, creep, flaw, permeability, torque, penetration, and environmental testing.

  3. Strength-toughness requirements for thick-walled high pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapp, Joseph A.

    1992-05-01

    The strength and toughness requirements of materials used in high pressure vessels has been the subject of some discussion in the meetings of the Materials Task Group of the Special Working Group - High Pressure Vessels. A fracture mechanics analysis has been performed to theoretically establish the required toughness for a high pressure vessel. The analysis is based on the validity requirement for plane-strain fracture of fracture toughness test specimens. This means that at fracture, the crack length, uncracked ligament, and vessel length must each be greater than fifty times the crack tip plastic zone since for brittle fracture to occur. For high pressure piping applications, the limiting physical dimension is the uncracked ligament, since it can be assumed that the other dimensions are always greater than fifty times the crack tip plastic zone. To perform the fracture mechanics analysis, several parameters must be known, including vessel dimensions, material strength, degree of autofrettage, and design pressure. Remarkably, the results of the analysis show that the effects of radius ratio, pressure, and degree of autofrettage can be ignored when establishing strength and toughness requirements for design code purposes. The only parameters that enter into the calculation are yield strength, toughness and vessel thickness. The final results can easily be represented as a graph of yield strength against toughness on which several curves, one for each vessel thickness, are plotted.

  4. High Pressure Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Development Tests at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, David M.; Greene, Nathanael J.; Revilock, Duane; Sneddon, Kirk; Anselmo, Estelle

    2008-01-01

    Development tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of 2 COPV designs at cryogenic temperatures. This allows for risk reductions for critical components for a Gaseous Helium (GHe) Pressurization Subsystem for an Advanced Propulsion System (APS) which is being proposed for NASA s Constellation project and future exploration missions. It is considered an advanced system since it uses Liquid Methane (LCH4) as the fuel and Liquid Oxygen (LO2) as the oxidizer for the propellant combination mixture. To avoid heating of the propellants to prevent boil-off, the GHe will be stored at subcooled temperatures equivalent to the LO2 temperature. Another advantage of storing GHe at cryogenic temperatures is that more mass of the pressurized GHe can be charged in to a vessel with a smaller volume, hence a smaller COPV, and this creates a significant weight savings versus gases at ambient temperatures. The major challenge of this test plan is to verify that a COPV can safely be used for spacecraft applications to store GHe at a Maximum Operating Pressure (MOP) of 4,500 psig at 140R to 160R (-320 F to -300 F). The COPVs for these tests were provided by ARDE , Inc. who developed a resin system to use at cryogenic conditions and has the capabilities to perform high pressure testing with LN2.

  5. Nondestructive Methods and Special Test Instrumentation Supporting NASA Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry, Regor; Greene, Nathanael; Cameron, Ken; Madaras, Eric; Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie; Thesken, John; Phoenix, Leigh; Murthy, Pappu; Revilock, Duane

    2007-01-01

    Many aging composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), being used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are currently under evaluation to better quantify their reliability and clarify their likelihood of failure due to stress rupture and age-dependent issues. As a result, some test and analysis programs have been successfully accomplished and other related programs are still in progress at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) and other NASA centers, with assistance from the commercial sector. To support this effort, a group of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) experts was assembled to provide NDE competence for pretest evaluation of test articles and for application of NDE technology to real-time testing. Techniques were required to provide assurance that the test article had adequate structural integrity and manufacturing consistency to be considered acceptable for testing and these techniques were successfully applied. Destructive testing is also being accomplished to better understand the physical and chemical property changes associated with progression toward "stress rupture" (SR) failure, and it is being associated with NDE response, so it can potentially be used to help with life prediction. Destructive work also includes the evaluation of residual stresses during dissection of the overwrap, laboratory evaluation of specimens extracted from the overwrap to evaluate physical property changes, and quantitative microscopy to inform the theoretical micromechanics.

  6. Evaluation of polyimide/glass fiber composites for construction of light weight pressure vessels for cryogenic propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petker, I.; Segimoto, M.

    1973-01-01

    The application of polyimide resin as a matrix for glass filament-wound thin metal-lined pressure vessels was studied over a temperature range of (minus) 320 to 600 F. Keramid 601 polyimide was found to perform quite well over the entire range of temperature. Hoop stress values of 425 ksi were determined at 75 F which is equivalent to epoxy resin in similar structures. At -320 and 600 F, 125 and 80% of this strength was retained. Thermal ageing at 500 F for up to 50 hours was studied with severe reduction in strength, but there is evidence that this reduction could be improved. Another polyimide resin studied was P10PA which was found to have processing characteristics inappropriate for filament-winding. NOL ring tensile and shear data was determined from both resins with S-glass. Pressure vessel design, fabrication and test procedures are described in detail.

  7. Filament-reinforced metal composite pressure vessel evaluation and performance demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landes, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    Two different Kevlar-49 filament-reinforced metal sphere designs were developed, and six vessels of each type were fabricated and subjected to fatigue cycling, sustained loading, and hydrostatic burst. The 61 cm (24 inch) diameter Kevlar-49/cryoformed 301 stainless steel pressure vessels demonstrated the required pressure cycle capability, burst factor of safety, and a maximum pressure times volume divided by weight (pV/W) performance of 210 J/g (834 000 in-lb/lbm) at burst; this represented a 25 to 30% weight saving over the lightest weight comparable, 6A1-4V Ti, homogeneous pressure vessel. Both the Kevlar/stainless steel design and the 97 cm (38 inch) diameter Kevlar-49/2219-T62 aluminum sphere design demonstrated nonfragmentation and controlled failure mode features when pressure cycled to failure at operating pressure. When failure occurred during pressure cycling, the mode was localized leakage and not catastrophic. Kevlar/stainless steel vessels utilized a unique conical boss design, and Kevlar/aluminum vessels incorporated a tie-rod to carry port loads; both styles of polar fittings performed as designed during operational testing of the vessels.

  8. Pressure vessels fabricated with high-strength wire and electroformed nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, B.

    1966-01-01

    Metal pressure vessels of various shapes having high strength-to-weight ratios are fabricated by using known techniques of filament winding and electroforming. This eliminates nonuniform wall thickness and unequal wall strength which resulted from welding formed vessel segments together.

  9. 77 FR 16270 - Updated Aging Management Criteria for Reactor Vessel Internal Components of Pressurized Water...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... availability was published in the Federal Register on June 22, 2010 (75 FR 35510). The NRC staff has determined... Updated Aging Management Criteria for Reactor Vessel Internal Components of Pressurized Water Reactors... PWR Reactor Vessel Internal Components.'' This draft LR-ISG revises the guidance in the...

  10. Photoacoustic sample vessel and method of elevated pressure operation

    DOEpatents

    Autrey, Tom; Yonker, Clement R.

    2004-05-04

    An improved photoacoustic vessel and method of photoacoustic analysis. The photoacoustic sample vessel comprises an acoustic detector, an acoustic couplant, and an acoustic coupler having a chamber for holding the acoustic couplant and a sample. The acoustic couplant is selected from the group consisting of liquid, solid, and combinations thereof. Passing electromagnetic energy through the sample generates an acoustic signal within the sample, whereby the acoustic signal propagates through the sample to and through the acoustic couplant to the acoustic detector.

  11. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel flaw distribution development. Phase 2, Methodology and application

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, E.L.; Foulds, J.R.; Basin, S.L.

    1991-12-01

    Previous attempts to develop flaw distributions for probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses of pressurized water reactor (PWR) vessels have aimed at the estimation of a ``generic`` distribution applicable to all PWR vessels. In contrast, this report describes (1) a new flaw distribution development analytic methodology that can be applied to the analysis of vessel-specific inservice inspection (ISI) data, and (2) results of the application of the methodology to the analysis of flaw data for each vessel case (ISI data on three PWR vessels and laboratory inspection data on sections of the Midland reactor vessel). Results of this study show significant variation among the flaw distributions derived from the various data sets analyzed, strongly suggesting than a vessel-specific flaw distribution (for vessel integrity prediction under pressurized thermal shock) is preferred over a ``generic`` distribution. In addition, quantitative inspection system flaw sizing accuracy requirements have been identified for developing a flaw distribution from vessel ISI data. The new flaw data analysis methodology also permits quantifying the reliability of the flaw distribution estimate. Included in the report are identified needs for further development of several aspects of ISI data acquisition and vessel integrity prediction practice.

  12. Substantiation of Thermodynamic Criteria of Explosion Safety in Process of Severe Accidents in Pressure Vessel Reactors

    E-print Network

    V. I. Skalozubov; V. N. Vashchenko; S. S. Jarovoj; V. Yu. Kochnyeva

    2012-03-27

    The paper represents original development of thermodynamic criteria of occurrence conditions of steam-gas explosions in the process of severe accidents. The received results can be used for modelling of processes of severe accidents in pressure vessel reactors.

  13. Pressure Vessel and Internals of the International Reactor Innovative and Secure

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, C.V.; Padovani, E.; Cammi, A.; Collado, J.M.; Santoro, R.T.; Barnes, J.M.

    2002-07-01

    IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) is a modular, integral light water cooled, low-to-medium power reactor, which addresses the requirements defined by the US DOE for Generation IV reactors. Its integrated layout features a pressure vessel containing all the main primary circuit components: the internals and the biological shield, here described together with the pressure vessel, plus the steam generators, the pressurizer, and the main coolant pumps described in companion papers. For this reason the pressure vessel is a crucial component of the plant, which deserves the most demanding design effort. The wide inner annulus around the core is exploited to insert steel plates, in order to improve the inner shielding capability up to the elimination of the external biological shielding and to simplify decommissioning activities by having all the irradiated components inside the vessel. (authors)

  14. Workbook for predicting pressure wave and fragment effects of exploding propellant tanks and gas storage vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W. E.; Kulesz, J. J.; Ricker, R. E.; Bessey, R. L.; Westine, P. S.; Parr, V. B.; Oldham, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    Technology needed to predict damage and hazards from explosions of propellant tanks and bursts of pressure vessels, both near and far from these explosions is introduced. Data are summarized in graphs, tables, and nomographs.

  15. Hydrogen degradation and microstructural effects of the near-threshold fatigue resistance of pressure vessel steels

    E-print Network

    Fuquen-Molano, Rosendo

    1982-01-01

    Safety of pressure vessels for applications such as coal conversion reactors requires understanding of the mechanism of environmentally-induced crack propagation and the mechanism by which process-induced microstructures ...

  16. LWR Pressure-Vessel Surveillance Dosimetry-Improvement Program. Quarterly progress report, April 1982-June 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, G.L.; McElroy, W.N.

    1983-01-01

    The Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Dosimetry Improvement Program (LWR-PV-SDIP) has been established by NRC to improve, test, verify, and standardize the physics-dosimetry-metallurgy, damage correlation, and the associated reactor analysis methods, procedures and data that are used to predict the integrated effect of neutron exposure to LWR pressure vessels and their support structures. Research activities by the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory are reviewed.

  17. Analysis and Design of Cryogenic Pressure Vessels for Automotive Hydrogen Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa-Loza, Francisco Javier

    Cryogenic pressure vessels maximize hydrogen storage density by combining the high pressure (350-700 bar) typical of today's composite pressure vessels with the cryogenic temperature (as low as 25 K) typical of low pressure liquid hydrogen vessels. Cryogenic pressure vessels comprise a high-pressure inner vessel made of carbon fiber-coated metal (similar to those used for storage of compressed gas), a vacuum space filled with numerous sheets of highly reflective metalized plastic (for high performance thermal insulation), and a metallic outer jacket. High density of hydrogen storage is key to practical hydrogen-fueled transportation by enabling (1) long-range (500+ km) transportation with high capacity vessels that fit within available spaces in the vehicle, and (2) reduced cost per kilogram of hydrogen stored through reduced need for expensive structural material (carbon fiber composite) necessary to make the vessel. Low temperature of storage also leads to reduced expansion energy (by an order of magnitude or more vs. ambient temperature compressed gas storage), potentially providing important safety advantages. All this is accomplished while simultaneously avoiding fuel venting typical of cryogenic vessels for all practical use scenarios. This dissertation describes the work necessary for developing and demonstrating successive generations of cryogenic pressure vessels demonstrated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The work included (1) conceptual design, (2) detailed system design (3) structural analysis of cryogenic pressure vessels, (4) thermal analysis of heat transfer through cryogenic supports and vacuum multilayer insulation, and (5) experimental demonstration. Aside from succeeding in demonstrating a hydrogen storage approach that has established all the world records for hydrogen storage on vehicles (longest driving range, maximum hydrogen storage density, and maximum containment of cryogenic hydrogen without venting), the work also demonstrated a methodology for computationally efficient detailed modeling of cryogenic pressure vessels. The work continues with support of the US Department of Energy to demonstrate a new generation of cryogenic vessels anticipated to improve on the hydrogen storage performance figures previously imposed in this project. The author looks forward to further contributing to a future of long-range, inexpensive, and safe zero emissions transportation.

  18. A Review of Large-Scale Fracture Experiments Relevant to Pressure Vessel Integrity Under Pressurized Thermal Shock Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, C.E.

    2001-01-29

    Numerous large-scale fracture experiments have been performed over the past thirty years to advance fracture mechanics methodologies applicable to thick-wall pressure vessels. This report first identifies major factors important to nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) integrity under pressurized thermal shock (PTS) conditions. It then covers 20 key experiments that have contributed to identifying fracture behavior of RPVs and to validating applicable assessment methodologies. The experiments are categorized according to four types of specimens: (1) cylindrical specimens, (2) pressurized vessels, (3) large plate specimens, and (4) thick beam specimens. These experiments were performed in laboratories in six different countries. This report serves as a summary of those experiments, and provides a guide to references for detailed information.

  19. Structural considerations in design of lightweight glass-fiber composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The design concepts used for metal-lined glass-fiber composite pressure vessels are described, comparing the structural characteristics of the composite designs with each other and with homogeneous metal pressure vessels. Specific design techniques and available design data are identified. The discussion centers around two distinctly different design concepts, which provide the basis for defining metal lined composite vessels as either (1) thin-metal lined, or (2) glass fiber reinforced (GFR). Both concepts are described and associated development problems are identified and discussed. Relevant fabrication and testing experience from a series of NASA-Lewis Research Center development efforts is presented.

  20. Pressure Vessel with Impact and Fire Resistant Coating and Method of Making Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An impact and fire resistant coating laminate is provided which serves as an outer protective coating for a pressure vessel such as a composite overwrapped vessel with a metal lining. The laminate comprises a plurality of fibers (e.g., jute twine or other, stronger fibers) which are wound around the pressure vessel and an epoxy matrix resin for the fibers. The epoxy matrix resin including a plurality of microspheres containing a temperature responsive phase change material which changes phase in response to exposure thereof to a predetermined temperature increase so as to afford increased insulation and hear absorption.

  1. Pressure vessel with impact and fire resistant coating and method of making same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An impact and fire resistant coating laminate is provided which serves as an outer protective coating for a pressure vessel such as a composite overwrapped vessel with a metal lining. The laminate comprises a plurality of fibers (e.g., jute twine or other, stronger fibers) which are wound around the pressure vessel and an epoxy matrix resin for the fibers. The epoxy matrix resin including a plurality of microspheres containing a temperature responsive phase change material which changes phase in response to exposure thereof to a predetermined temperature increase so as to afford increased insulation and heat absorption.

  2. Multilayer Pressure Vessel Materials Testing and Analysis Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popelar, Carl F.; Cardinal, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    To provide NASA with a suite of materials strength, fracture toughness and crack growth rate test results for use in remaining life calculations for the vessels described above, Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®) was contracted in two phases to obtain relevant material property data from a representative vessel. An initial characterization of the strength, fracture and fatigue crack growth properties was performed in Phase 1. Based on the results and recommendations of Phase 1, a more extensive material property characterization effort was developed in this Phase 2 effort. This Phase 2 characterization included additional strength, fracture and fatigue crack growth of the multilayer vessel and head materials. In addition, some more limited characterization of the welds and heat affected zones (HAZs) were performed. This report

  3. Guide for inservice inspection of ground-based pressure vessels and systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    This guide includes recommendations for inservice inspection and recertification of ground based, unfired pressure vessels and all pressurized systems including those served by fired pressure vessels hereinafter referred to as pressure vessels, systems and components of systems. It covers the vast array of pound based industrial and special purpose pressurized components and systems used at NASA field installations for research and development and those utility systems and components that require more than routine maintenance to insure continued structural integrity for their useful life. Through surveillance and correction of inservice deterioration, NASA will maintain a safe working environment for their own and contractor personnel, safety for the public sector and protection against loss of capital investment.

  4. HFIR Vessel Pressure/Temperature Limits Corresponding to the Upgrade Design

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Bryson, J.W.

    2000-03-01

    Pressure/temperature limits were calculated for the HFIR pressure vessel for a temperature range of 40 to 120 F. New values were necessary for the upgrade design of the reactor and were calculated using a probabilistic fracture mechanics approach that accounts for the success of periodic hydrostatic proof testing. The range of calculated pressure corresponding to the specific range of temperatures is 634 to 987 psi for ''pressure safety limit'' and 564 to 895 psi for the ''limiting conditions for operation.''

  5. Analysis of gamma ray displacement damage in Light Water Reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.E.; Rehn, L.E.

    1995-05-01

    In addition to fast neutrons, the copious energetic gamma rays, present in a reactor environment, induce displacement damage in the reactor pressure vessel. The contribution of gamma ray damage to embrittlement is most pronounced in reactors with large water gaps separating the core from the reactor pressure vessel. Water moderates the energies of fast neutrons much more effectively than it attenuates the high energy gamma flux, and thus enhances the high energy gamma flux, incident on the vessel relative to the fast neutron flux. In this paper, an analysis of computer transport calculations is presented which quantifies the relative contribution of gamma ray damage in various pressure vessels. The results indicate that gamma ray damage must be included for accurate predictions of radiation-induced embrittlement.

  6. Influence of long-time stress relief treatments on the dynamic fracture toughness properties of ASME SA508 C1 2a and ASME SA533 GR B C12 pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Logsdon, W.A.

    1982-03-01

    Dynamic fracture toughness tests were performed on materials which had been subjected to one of three long-time post weld type stress relief heat treatments: 48 hours at 1000/degree/F (538/degree/C), 24 hours at 1125/degree/F (607/degree/C), and 48 hours at 1125/degree/F (607/degree/C). Linear elastic K/sub Id/ results were obtained at low temperatures while J-integral techniques were utilized to evaluate dynamic fracture toughness over the transition and upper shelf temperature ranges. Tensile, Charpy impact, and drop weight nil-ductility transition tests as well as room temperature, air environment fatigue crack growth rate tests (SA508 Cl 2a only) were also performed. The fracture toughness of both materials exceeded the ASME specified minimum reference toughness K/sub IR/ curve. 17 refs.

  7. Creep failure of a reactor pressure vessel lower head under severe accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, M.M.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; Chu, T.Y.; Rashid, Y.R.

    1998-08-01

    A severe accident in a nuclear power plant could result in the relocation of large quantities of molten core material onto the lower head of he reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the absence of inherent cooling mechanisms, failure of the RPV ultimately becomes possible under the combined effects of system pressure and the thermal heat-up of the lower head. Sandia National Laboratories has performed seven experiments at 1:5th scale simulating creep failure of a RPV lower head. This paper describes a modeling program that complements the experimental program. Analyses have been performed using the general-purpose finite-element code ABAQUS-5.6. In order to make ABAQUS solve the specific problem at hand, a material constitutive model that utilizes temperature dependent properties has been developed and attached to ABAQUS-executable through its UMAT utility. Analyses of the LHF-1 experiment predict instability-type failure. Predicted strains are delayed relative to the observed strain histories. Parametric variations on either the yield stress, creep rate, or both (within the range of material property data) can bring predictions into agreement with experiment. The analysis indicates that it is necessary to conduct material property tests on the actual material used in the experimental program. The constitutive model employed in the present analyses is the subject of a separate publication.

  8. Under Pressure: Sensing Stress of Computer Users Javier Hernandez1

    E-print Network

    Under Pressure: Sensing Stress of Computer Users Javier Hernandez1 Pablo Paredes2 Asta Roseway3 when computer users are stressed can help reduce their frustration and prevent a large variety of negative health conditions associated with chronic stress. However, measuring stress non

  9. 30 CFR 56.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inspection of compressed-air receivers and... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13015 Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure...

  10. 30 CFR 56.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inspection of compressed-air receivers and... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13015 Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure...

  11. 30 CFR 56.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inspection of compressed-air receivers and... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13015 Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure...

  12. 30 CFR 56.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inspection of compressed-air receivers and... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13015 Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure...

  13. 30 CFR 56.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inspection of compressed-air receivers and... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13015 Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure...

  14. 77 FR 59408 - Finding of Equivalence; Alternate Pressure Relief Valve Settings on Certain Vessels Carrying...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Finding of Equivalence; Alternate Pressure Relief Valve Settings on Certain Vessels... Coast Guard announces the availability of CG-ENG Policy Letter 04-12, ``Alternative Pressure Relief... adopted the stricter standards of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and...

  15. A novel high pressure, high temperature vessel used to conduct long-term stability measurements of silicon MEMS pressure transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewiski, David

    2014-03-01

    The need to quantify and to improve long-term stability of pressure transducers is a persistent requirement from the aerospace sector. Specifically, the incorporation of real-time pressure monitoring in aircraft landing gear, as exemplified in Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS), has placed greater demand on the pressure transducer for improved performance and increased reliability which is manifested in low lifecycle cost and minimal maintenance downtime through fuel savings and increased life of the tire. Piezoresistive (PR) silicon MEMS pressure transducers are the primary choice as a transduction method for this measurement owing to their ability to be designed for the harsh environment seen in aircraft landing gear. However, these pressure transducers are only as valuable as the long-term stability they possess to ensure reliable, real-time monitoring over tens of years. The "heart" of the pressure transducer is the silicon MEMS element, and it is at this basic level where the long-term stability is established and needs to be quantified. A novel High Pressure, High Temperature (HPHT) vessel has been designed and constructed to facilitate this critical measurement of the silicon MEMS element directly through a process of mechanically "floating" the silicon MEMS element while being subjected to the extreme environments of pressure and temperature, simultaneously. Furthermore, the HPHT vessel is scalable to permit up to fifty specimens to be tested at one time to provide a statistically significant data population on which to draw reasonable conclusions on long-term stability. With the knowledge gained on the silicon MEMS element, higher level assembly to the pressure transducer envelope package can also be quantified as to the build-effects contribution to long-term stability in the same HPHT vessel due to its accommodating size. Accordingly, a HPHT vessel offering multiple levels of configurability and robustness in data measurement is presented, along with 10 year long-term stability results.

  16. Distributed Sensing of Carbon-Epoxy Composites and Filament Wound Pressure Vessels Using Fiber-Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J.; Kaul, R.; Taylor, S.; Myer, G.; Jackson, K.; Osei, A.; Sharma, A.

    2003-01-01

    Multiple Fiber Bragg-gratings are embedded in carbon-epoxy laminates as well as in composite wound pressure vessel. Structural properties of such composites are investigated. The measurements include stress-strain relation in laminates and Poisson's ratio in several specimens with varying orientation of the optical fiber Bragg-sensor with respect to the carbon fiber in an epoxy matrix. Additionally, fiber Bragg gratings are bonded on the surface of these laminates and cylinders fabricated out of carbon-epoxy composites and multiple points are monitored and compared for strain measurements at several locations.

  17. Design of a standalone-type beryllium vessel for high-pressure protein crystallography.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Tsukamoto, Masayuki; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Matsumoto, Masamitsu; Nagasawa, Makoto; Tamura, Katsuhiro

    2010-08-01

    A standalone-type beryllium (Be) high-pressure crystallography vessel has been developed. Using a coupler-joint unit and a pressure valve, we could keep the pressure in the vessel constant at 100+/-1 MPa for more than 24 h without connecting to a pressure-generating apparatus. Diffraction spots of a glucose isomerase (GI) crystal under 100 MPa were collected using the vessel and a rotating copper-anode in-house x-ray generator (0.8 kW). We successfully collected a 2.0 A resolution data set of a 0.5 mm size GI crystal in an aqueous solution at 100 MPa. PMID:20815618

  18. Bobbin-Tool Friction-Stir Welding of Thick-Walled Aluminum Alloy Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E C; Pastrnak, J W; Engel, J; Forrest, R S; Kokko, E; Ternan, K M; Waldron, D

    2007-06-06

    It was desired to assemble thick-walled Al alloy 2219 pressure vessels by bobbin-tool friction-stir welding. To develop the welding-process, mechanical-property, and fitness-for-service information to support this effort, extensive friction-stir welding-parameter studies were conducted on 2.5 cm. and 3.8 cm. thick 2219 Al alloy plate. Starting conditions of the plate were the fully-heat-treated (-T62) and in the annealed (-O) conditions. The former condition was chosen with the intent of using the welds in either the 'as welded' condition or after a simple low-temperature aging treatment. Since preliminary stress-analyses showed that stresses in and near the welds would probably exceed the yield-strength of both 'as welded' and welded and aged weld-joints, a post-weld solution-treatment, quenching, and aging treatment was also examined. Once a suitable set of welding and post-weld heat-treatment parameters was established, the project divided into two parts. The first part concentrated on developing the necessary process information to be able to make defect-free friction-stir welds in 3.8 cm. thick Al alloy 2219 in the form of circumferential welds that would join two hemispherical forgings with a 102 cm. inside diameter. This necessitated going to a bobbin-tool welding-technique to simplify the tooling needed to react the large forces generated in friction-stir welding. The bobbin-tool technique was demonstrated on both flat-plates and plates that were bent to the curvature of the actual vessel. An additional issue was termination of the weld, i.e. closing out the hole left at the end of the weld by withdrawal of the friction-stir welding tool. This was accomplished by friction-plug welding a slightly-oversized Al alloy 2219 plug into the termination-hole, followed by machining the plug flush with both the inside and outside surfaces of the vessel. The second part of the project involved demonstrating that the welds were fit for the intended service. This involved determining the room-temperature tensile and elastic-plastic fracture-toughness properties of the bobbin-tool friction-stir welds after a post-weld solution-treatment, quenching, and aging heat-treatment. These mechanical properties were used to conduct fracture-mechanics analyses to determine critical flaw sizes. Phased-array and conventional ultrasonic non-destructive examination was used to demonstrate that no flaws that match or exceed the calculated critical flaw-sizes exist in or near the friction-stir welds.

  19. J-integral patch for finite element analysis of dynamic fracture due to impact of pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunin, Boris I.

    1993-01-01

    Prediction of whether a pressurized cylinder will fail catastrophically when impacted by a projectile has important applications ranging from perforation of an airplane's skin by a failed turbine blade to meteorite impact of a space station habitation module. This report summarizes the accomplishment of one task for a project whose aim is to simulate numerically the outcome of a high velocity impact of pressure vessels. A finite element patch covering the vicinity of a growing crack has been constructed to estimate the J-integral (crack driving force) during the impact. Explicit expressions for the J-integral through the nodal values of displacement, strain, and stress have been written. The patch is to be used repeatedly to estimate the amount of crack growth during the time of the impact. The resulting crack size is to be compared to an estimated critical crack size for the pressurized cylinder.

  20. Evaluation of hydrogen pressure vessels using slow strain rate testing and fracture mechanics analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, S.H.; Desai, V.H.

    1998-12-31

    A total of 108 seamless, forged pressure vessels, fabricated from ASTM A372 type IV (UNS K14508) and type V low alloy steel, are currently in 4,200 psi (29 MPa) gaseous hydrogen (GH{sub 2}) service at the Kennedy Space Center`s (KSC) Space Shuttle Launch Complex 39 (LC-39). The vessels were originally used in 6,000 psi (41 MPa) GH{sub 2} service during the Apollo program. NASA recently received a letter of warning from the manufacturer of the vessels stating that the subject vessels should be now be removed from GH{sub 2} service due to the fact that the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of many of the vessels exceeds the maximum limit of 126 ksi (869 MPa) now imposed on A372 steel intended for GH{sub 2} service, and therefore are susceptible to hydrogen environment embrittlement. Due to the expense associated with vessel replacement, it was decided to determine by testing and analysis whether or not the vessels needed to be removed from GH{sub 2} service. Slow strain rate testing was performed under hydrogen charging conditions to determine the value of the threshold fracture toughness for sustained loading crack growth in GH{sub 2}, (K{sub H}) for the vessel material, this value was then used in a fracture mechanics safe-life analysis (a 20-year service life was modeled) that indicated the vessels are safe for continued use.

  1. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Nibur, Kevin A.

    2010-11-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  2. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Nibur, Kevin A.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; Sofronis, Petros; Somerday, Brian P.; Foulk, James W., III; Hayden, Gary A.

    2010-07-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  3. Variabilities detected by acoustic emission from filament-wound Aramid fiber/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamstad, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty Aramid fiber/epoxy pressure vessels were filament-wound over spherical aluminum mandrels under controlled conditions typical for advanced filament-winding. A random set of 30 vessels was proof-tested to 74% of the expected burst pressure; acoustic emission data were obtained during the proof test. A specially designed fixture was used to permit in situ calibration of the acoustic emission system for each vessel by the fracture of a 4-mm length of pencil lead (0.3 mm in diameter) which was in contact with the vessel. Acoustic emission signatures obtained during testing showed larger than expected variabilities in the mechanical damage done during the proof tests. To date, identification of the cause of these variabilities has not been determined.

  4. Reactor pressure vessel head vents and methods of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Gels, John L; Keck, David J; Deaver, Gerald A

    2014-10-28

    Internal head vents are usable in nuclear reactors and include piping inside of the reactor pressure vessel with a vent in the reactor upper head. Piping extends downward from the upper head and passes outside of the reactor to permit the gas to escape or be forcibly vented outside of the reactor without external piping on the upper head. The piping may include upper and lowers section that removably mate where the upper head joins to the reactor pressure vessel. The removable mating may include a compressible bellows and corresponding funnel. The piping is fabricated of nuclear-reactor-safe materials, including carbon steel, stainless steel, and/or a Ni--Cr--Fe alloy. Methods install an internal head vent in a nuclear reactor by securing piping to an internal surface of an upper head of the nuclear reactor and/or securing piping to an internal surface of a reactor pressure vessel.

  5. Pressure vessel with improved impact resistance and method of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor); Patterson, James E. (Inventor); Olson, Michael A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A composite overwrapped pressure vessel is provided which includes a composite overwrapping material including fibers disposed in a resin matrix. At least first and second kinds of fibers are used. These fibers typically have characteristics of high strength and high toughness to provide impact resistance with increased pressure handling capability and low weight. The fibers are applied to form a pressure vessel using wrapping or winding techniques with winding angles varied for specific performance characteristics. The fibers of different kinds are dispersed in a single layer of winding or wound in distinct separate layers. Layers of fabric comprised of such fibers are interspersed between windings for added strength or impact resistance. The weight percentages of the high toughness and high strength materials are varied to provide specified impact resistance characteristics. The resin matrix is formed with prepregnated fibers or through wet winding. The vessels are formed with or without liners.

  6. Considerations for acoustic emission monitoring of spherical Kevlar/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamstad, M. A.; Patterson, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    We are continuing to research the applications of acoustic emission testing for predicting burst pressure of filament-wound Kevlar 49/epoxy pressure vessels. This study has focused on three specific areas. The first area involves development of an experimental technique and the proper instrumentation to measure the energy given off by the acoustic emission transducer per acoustic emission burst. The second area concerns the design of a test fixture in which to mount the composite vessel so that the acoustic emission transducers are held against the outer surface of the composite. Included in this study area is the calibration of the entire test setup including couplant, transducer, electronics, and the instrument measuring the energy per burst. In the third and final area of this study, we consider the number, location, and sensitivity of the acoustic emission transducers used for proof testing composite pressure vessels.

  7. Aging results for PRD 49 III/epoxy and Kevlar 49/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamstad, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Kevlar 49/epoxy composite is growing in use as a structural material because of its high strength-to-weight ratio. Currently, it is used for the Trident rocket motor case and for various pressure vessels on the Space Shuttle. In 1979, the initial results for aging of filament-wound cylindrical pressure vessels which were manufactured with preproduction Kevlar 49 (Hamstad, 1979) were published. This preproduction fiber was called PRD 49 III. This report updates the continuing study to 10-year data and also presents 7.5-year data for spherical pressure vessels wound with production Kevlar 49. For completeness, this report will again describe the specimens of the original study with PRD 49 as well as specimens for the new study with Kevlar 49.

  8. Effect of gravitation stress and hypokinesia on blood vessels of the testicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazhchenko, E. F.

    1979-01-01

    Rabbits were exposed to single maximum endurable stresses of cranio-caudal direction, hypokinesia for periods of one to eight weeks, and hypokinesia followed by gravitation stresses. The stresses caused dilatation of vessels, greater sinuosity, and occasional ruptures of the walls and extravasation. The greater part of the capillaries were dilated; the greatest part constricted. In hypokinesia there was an increasing atrophy of the testes. Significant results are reported.

  9. Performance features of 22-cell, 19Ah single pressure vessel nickel hydrogen battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    1996-01-01

    Two 22-cells 19Ah Nickel-Hydrogen (Ni-H2) Single Pressure Vessel (SPV) Qual batteries, one each from EPI/Joplin and EPI/Butler, were designed and procured. The two batteries differ in the cell encapsulation technology, stack preload, and activation procedure. Both the Butler and Joplin batteries met the specified requirements when subjected to qualification testing and completed 2100 and 1300 LEO cycles respectively, with nominal performance. This paper discusses advantages, design features, testing procedures, and results of the two single pressure vessel Ni-H2 batteries.

  10. Evaluation of Agency Non-Code Layered Pressure Vessels (LPVs) . Volume 2; Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    2014-01-01

    In coordination with the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance and the respective Center Pressure System Managers (PSMs), the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to formulate a consensus draft proposal for the development of additional testing and analysis methods to establish the technical validity, and any limitation thereof, for the continued safe operation of facility non-code layered pressure vessels. The PSMs from each NASA Center were asked to participate as part of the assessment team by providing, collecting, and reviewing data regarding current operations of these vessels. This document contains the appendices to the main report.

  11. Managing Pressure Vessel Equipment as a Capital Asset.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Glenn; Trombley, Robert; Shultes, Kenneth

    1999-01-01

    Argues the importance of treating facility pressure equipment as capital assets and discusses three steps in their management process. The following steps are discussed: understanding the condition of all major equipment; altering maintenance practices and procedures; and developing a long-term equipment strategy such as increased monitoring,…

  12. Ten year environmental test of glass fiber/epoxy pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    By the beginning of the 1970's composite pressure vessels had received a significant amount of development effort, and applications were beginning to be investigated. One of the first applications grew out of NASA Johnson Space Center efforts to develop a superior emergency breathing system for firemen. While the new breathing system provided improved wearer comfort and an improved mask and regulator, the primary feature was low weight which was achieved by using a glass fiber reinforced aluminum pressure vessel. Part of the development effort was to evaluate the long term performance of the pressure vessel and as a consequence, some 30 bottles for a test program were procured. These bottles were then provided to NASA Lewis Research Center where they were maintained in an outdoor environment in a pressurized condition for a period of up to 10 yr. During this period, bottles were periodically subjected to cyclic and burst testing. There was no protective coating applied to the fiberglass/epoxy composite, and significant loss in strength did occur as a result of the environment. Similar bottles stored indoors showed little, if any, degradation. This report contains a description of the pressure vessels, a discussion of the test program, data for each bottle, and appropriate plots, comparisons, and conclusions.

  13. Mechanical design of heat exchangers and pressure vessel components

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K.P.; Soler, A.I.

    1984-01-01

    The twenty-two chapters in this book are prefaced by brief descriptions of the computer codes referenced or listed within the pages that follow. The first chapter, which contains an outline of the more accepted heat-exchanger types and basic design considerations, is followed by another outlining various design-stress criteria. The next twenty chapters contain considerable detailed information concerning the design and operation of heat exchangers. The authors devote 121 pages to one of the most important design considerations, flow-induced vibration. Another chapter is dedicated to methods of seismic analysis. The remaining chapters address mechanical and thermal design as well as manufacturing.

  14. Fast neutron fluence of yonggwang nuclear unit 1 reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.; Km, B.; Chang, K.; Leeand, S.; Park, J.

    2006-07-01

    The Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 50, Appendix H, requires that the neutron dosimetry be present to monitor the reactor vessel throughout plant life. The Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry System has been installed for Yonggwang Nuclear Unit 1 after complete withdrawal of all six in-vessel surveillance capsules. This system has been installed in the reactor cavity annulus in order to measure the fast neutron spectrum coming out through the reactor pressure vessel. Cycle specific neutron transport calculations were performed to obtain the energy dependent neutron flux throughout the reactor geometry including dosimetry positions. Comparisons between calculations and measurements were performed for the reaction rates of each dosimetry sensors and results show good agreements. (authors)

  15. Subcritical crack growth of selected aerospace pressure vessel materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. R.; Bixler, W. D.

    1972-01-01

    This experimental program was undertaken to determine the effects of combined cyclic/sustained loads, stress level, and crack shape on the fatigue crack growth rate behavior of cracks subjected to plane strain conditions. Material/environment combinations tested included: 2219-T87 aluminum plate in gaseous helium, room air, and 3.5% NaCl solution at room temperature, liquid nitrogen, and liquid hydrogen; 5Al-2.5 Sn (ELI) titanium plate in liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen and 6AL-4V (ELI) STA titanium plate in gaseous helium and methanol at room temperature. Most testing was accomplished using surface flawed specimens instrumented with a clip gage to continuously monitor crack opening displacements at the specimen surface. Tapered double cantilever beam specimens were also tested. Static fracture and ten hour sustained load tests were conducted to determine fracture toughness and apparent threshold stress intensity values. Cyclic tests were performed using sinusoidal loading profiles at 333 MHz (20 cpm) and trapezoidal loading profiles at both 8.3 MHz (0.5 cpm) and 3.3 MHz (0.2 cpm). Data were evaluated using modified linear elastic fracture mechanics parameters.

  16. Reactor Pressure Vessel Temperature Analysis for Prismatic and Pebble-Bed VHTR Designs

    SciTech Connect

    H. D. Gougar; C. B. Davis

    2006-04-01

    Analyses were performed to determine maximum temperatures in the reactor pressure vessel for two potential Very-High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs during normal operation and during a depressurized conduction cooldown accident. The purpose of the analyses was to aid in the determination of appropriate reactor vessel materials for the VHTR. The designs evaluated utilized both prismatic and pebble-bed cores that generated 600 MW of thermal power. Calculations were performed for fluid outlet temperatures of 900 and 950 °C, corresponding to the expected range for the VHTR. The analyses were performed using the RELAP5-3D and PEBBED-THERMIX computer codes. Results of the calculations were compared with preliminary temperature limits derived from the ASME pressure vessel code.

  17. Microfabricated pressure and shear stress sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chang (Inventor); Chen, Jack (Inventor); Engel, Jonathan (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A microfabricated pressure sensor. The pressure sensor comprises a raised diaphragm disposed on a substrate. The diaphragm is configured to bend in response to an applied pressure difference. A strain gauge of a conductive material is coupled to a surface of the raised diaphragm and to at least one of the substrate and a piece rigidly connected to the substrate.

  18. Nuclear Technology. Course 30: Mechanical Inspection. Module 30-7, Pressure Vessel Inspection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kupiec, Chet; Espy, John

    This seventh in a series of eight modules for a course titled Mechanical Inspection is devoted to the design and fabrication of the reactor pressure vessel. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject matter, (6)…

  19. 30 CFR 57.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inspection of compressed-air receivers and...-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 57.13015 Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired...

  20. 30 CFR 57.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inspection of compressed-air receivers and...-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 57.13015 Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired...