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Sample records for pressure waves

  1. Characteristics of pressure waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Air blast characteristics generated by most types of explosions are discussed. Data cover both negative and positive blast load phases and net transverse pressure as a function of time. The effects of partial or total confinement, atmospheric propagation, absorption of energy by ground shock or cratering, and transmission over irregular terrain on blast wave properties were also considered.

  2. Arterial pulse wave pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, C.; Gorelick, D.; Chen, W. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An arterial pulse wave pressure transducer is introduced. The transducer is comprised of a fluid filled cavity having a flexible membrane disposed over the cavity and adapted to be placed on the skin over an artery. An arterial pulse wave creates pressure pulses in the fluid which are transduced, by a pressure sensitive transistor in direct contact with the fluid, into an electric signal. The electrical signal is representative of the pulse waves and can be recorded so as to monitor changes in the elasticity of the arterial walls.

  3. Effects of pressure waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Two parameters, side on overpressure and side on impulse loads, and their application to the determination of structural damage to buildings and vehicles in the vicinity of an explosion are investigated. Special consideration was given to what constitutes damage and what level of damage is acceptable. Solutions were sorted through the examination of glass breakage, curve fit to bomb damage, overturning of marginal structures (buses, trucks, mobile homes) subject to toppling, and initiation of yielding in either beam or plate structural components. Three different empirical pressure versus impulse diagrams were presented - the first is for minor structural damage involving wrenched joints and partitions, the second is for major damage structural damage with load bearing members at least partially destroyed, and the third is for 50% to 75% of the building demolished. General guidelines were obtained from the results when the accurate structural details are unknown.

  4. Fluid pressure waves trigger earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Fluids-essentially meteoric water-are present everywhere in the Earth's crust, occasionally also with pressures higher than hydrostatic due to the tectonic strain imposed on impermeable undrained layers, to the impoundment of artificial lakes or to the forced injections required by oil and gas exploration and production. Experimental evidence suggests that such fluids flow along preferred paths of high diffusivity, provided by rock joints and faults. Studying the coupled poroelastic problem, we find that such flow is ruled by a nonlinear partial differential equation amenable to a Barenblatt-type solution, implying that it takes place in form of solitary pressure waves propagating at a velocity which decreases with time as v ∝ t [1/(n - 1) - 1] with n ≳ 7. According to Tresca-Von Mises criterion, these waves appear to play a major role in earthquake triggering, being also capable to account for aftershock delay without any further assumption. The measure of stress and fluid pressure inside active faults may therefore provide direct information about fault potential instability.

  5. Investigation of Pressurized Wave Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Dimofte, Florin

    2003-01-01

    The wave bearing has been pioneered and developed by Dr. Dimofte over the past several years. This bearing will be the main focus of this research. It is believed that the wave bearing offers a number of advantages over the foil bearing, which is the bearing that NASA is currently pursuing for turbomachinery applications. The wave bearing is basically a journal bearing whose film thickness varies around the circumference approximately sinusoidally, with usually 3 or 4 waves. Being a rigid geometry bearing, it provides precise control of shaft centerlines. The wave profile also provides good load capacity and makes the bearing very stable. Manufacturing techniques have been devised that should allow the production of wave bearings almost as cheaply as conventional full-circular bearings.

  6. Pressure diffusion waves in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, Dmitry; Korneev, Valeri; Goloshubin, Gennady

    2003-04-08

    Pressure diffusion wave in porous rocks are under consideration. The pressure diffusion mechanism can provide an explanation of the high attenuation of low-frequency signals in fluid-saturated rocks. Both single and dual porosity models are considered. In either case, the attenuation coefficient is a function of the frequency.

  7. Blast wave parameters at diminished ambient pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silnikov, M. V.; Chernyshov, M. V.; Mikhaylin, A. I.

    2015-04-01

    Relation between blast wave parameters resulted from a condensed high explosive (HE) charge detonation and a surrounding gas (air) pressure has been studied. Blast wave pressure and impulse differences at compression and rarefaction phases, which traditionally determine damage explosive effect, has been analyzed. An initial pressure effect on a post-explosion quasi-static component of the blast load has been investigated. The analysis is based on empirical relations between blast parameters and non-dimensional similarity criteria. The results can be directly applied to flying vehicle (aircraft or spacecraft) blast safety analysis.

  8. Modulated pressure waves in large elastic tubes.

    PubMed

    Mefire Yone, G R; Tabi, C B; Mohamadou, A; Ekobena Fouda, H P; Kofané, T C

    2013-09-01

    Modulational instability is the direct way for the emergence of wave patterns and localized structures in nonlinear systems. We show in this work that it can be explored in the framework of blood flow models. The whole modified Navier-Stokes equations are reduced to a difference-differential amplitude equation. The modulational instability criterion is therefore derived from the latter, and unstable patterns occurrence is discussed on the basis of the nonlinear parameter model of the vessel. It is found that the critical amplitude is an increasing function of α, whereas the region of instability expands. The subsequent modulated pressure waves are obtained through numerical simulations, in agreement with our analytical expectations. Different classes of modulated pressure waves are obtained, and their close relationship with Mayer waves is discussed. PMID:24089964

  9. Modulated pressure waves in large elastic tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mefire Yone, G. R.; Tabi, C. B.; Mohamadou, A.; Ekobena Fouda, H. P.; Kofané, T. C.

    2013-09-01

    Modulational instability is the direct way for the emergence of wave patterns and localized structures in nonlinear systems. We show in this work that it can be explored in the framework of blood flow models. The whole modified Navier-Stokes equations are reduced to a difference-differential amplitude equation. The modulational instability criterion is therefore derived from the latter, and unstable patterns occurrence is discussed on the basis of the nonlinear parameter model of the vessel. It is found that the critical amplitude is an increasing function of α, whereas the region of instability expands. The subsequent modulated pressure waves are obtained through numerical simulations, in agreement with our analytical expectations. Different classes of modulated pressure waves are obtained, and their close relationship with Mayer waves is discussed.

  10. Pressure wave charged repetitively pulsed gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarny, Vijay A.

    1982-01-01

    A repetitively pulsed gas laser in which a system of mechanical shutters bracketing the laser cavity manipulate pressure waves resulting from residual energy in the cavity gas following a lasing event so as to draw fresh gas into the cavity and effectively pump spent gas in a dynamic closed loop.

  11. Implications of pressure diffusion for shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ram, Ram Bachan

    1989-01-01

    The report deals with the possible implications of pressure diffusion for shocks in one dimensional traveling waves in an ideal gas. From this new hypothesis all aspects of such shocks can be calculated except shock thickness. Unlike conventional shock theory, the concept of entropy is not needed or used. Our analysis shows that temperature rises near a shock, which is of course an experimental fact; however, it also predicts that very close to a shock, density increases faster than pressure. In other words, a shock itself is cold.

  12. Pressure waves generated by steady flames.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhl, A. L.; Kamel, M. M.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of pressure waves that can be generated by clouds of explosive gas mixtures in a free atmosphere which is initially at a uniform state. The treatment is restricted only to the final stage of constant flame velocity when the flowfield is self-similar. By the introduction of reduced blast-wave parameters as phase-plane coordinates, the problem is resolved into the determination of the appropriate integral curves on this plane. Results, including space profiles of gasdynamic parameters, have been computed for a specific case of a hydrocarbon-air mixture characterized by a specific heat ratio of 1.3, sound speed at NTP of 345 m/sec, and volumetric expansion ratio corresponding to constant pressure deflagration of 7. Maximum overpressure ratios that can be generated by such flames in point-and line-symmetrical waves range from .00053, for the lower bound in the burning speed, up to 6 for the deflagration, while, for the average speeds of 5 to 10 m/sec, they are at a level of 0.05 to 0.10.

  13. Pressure measurements of nonplanar stress waves

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, G.H.; Charest, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Measuring the pressure of non-planar stress waves using thin piezo-resistive gages requires correcting for induced strain parallel to the sensing elements. A technique has been developed that permits such measurements, making use of a dual element gage. One element, Manganin, is sensitive to stress both parallel and perpendicular to the sensing element; the other element, Constantan, is primarily sensitive to stress parallel to the sensing element. The change in resistance in the Constantan element is thereby used to correct for the strain effect parallel to the Manganin element axis. Individual and combined Manganin and Constantan elements were subjected to controlled gas gun impact tests in the pressure and strain ranges of 0 to 50 kbar and 0 to 7%, respectively. From planar wave tests, the piezoresistivity of Constantan was found to be positive but negligible in comparison with Manganin. From combined stress and strain environments, the compression and tension strain factors of Constantan were found to be constant and equal to 2.06. The strain factors of Manganin were found to increase from 1.2 to 2.0 asymptotically in the range of 0 to 3% strain. It was experimentally demonstrated that, because of the closeness of their strain factors, the Manganin-Constantan dual element gage could be used in the differential recording mode to yield pressure directly. In this mode the gage is a strain compensating gage. Analytical techniques have also been developed for more accurate strain compensation.

  14. Surface wave propagation characteristics in atmospheric pressure plasma column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    2007-04-01

    In the typical experiments of surface wave sustained plasma columns at atmospheric pressure the ratio of collision to wave frequency (ν/ω) is much greater than unity. Therefore, one might expect that the usual analysis of the wave dispersion relation, performed under the assumption ν/ω = 0, cannot give adequate description of the wave propagation characteristics. In order to study these characteristics we have analyzed the wave dispersion relationship for arbitrary ν/ω. Our analysis includes phase and wave dispersion curves, attenuation coefficient, and wave phase and group velocities. The numerical results show that a turning back point appears in the phase diagram, after which a region of backward wave propagation exists. The experimentally observed plasma column is only in a region where wave propagation coefficient is higher than the attenuation coefficient. At the plasma column end the electron density is much higher than that corresponding to the turning back point and the resonance.

  15. Numerical Study of Unsteady Supercavitation Perturbed by a Pressure Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J. G.; Khoo, B. C.

    2016-06-01

    The unsteady features of supercavitation disturbed by an introduced pressure wave are investigated numerically using a one-fluid cavitation model. The supercavitating flow is assumed to be the homogeneous mixture of liquid and vapour which are locally under both kinetic and thermodynamic equilibrium. The compressibility effects of liquid water are taken into account to model the propagation of pressure wave through flow and its interaction with supercavitation bubble. The interaction between supercavity enveloping an underwater flat-nose cylinder and pressure wave is simulated and the resulting unsteady behavior of supercavitation is illustrated. It is observed that the supercavity will become unstable under the impact of the pressure wave and may collapse locally, which depends on the strength of perturbation. The huge pressure surge accompanying the collapse of supercavitation may cause the material erosion, noise, vibration and efficiency loss of operating underwater devices.

  16. Influence of Plasma Pressure Fluctuation on RF Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiwei; Bao, Weimin; Li, Xiaoping; Liu, Donglin; Zhou, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Pressure fluctuations in the plasma sheath from spacecraft reentry affect radio-frequency (RF) wave propagation. The influence of these fluctuations on wave propagation and wave properties is studied using methods derived by synthesizing the compressible turbulent flow theory, plasma theory, and electromagnetic wave theory. We study these influences on wave propagation at GPS and Ka frequencies during typical reentry by adopting stratified modeling. We analyzed the variations in reflection and transmission properties induced by pressure fluctuations. Our results show that, at the GPS frequency, if the waves are not totally reflected then the pressure fluctuations can remarkably affect reflection, transmission, and absorption properties. In extreme situations, the fluctuations can even cause blackout. At the Ka frequency, the influences are obvious when the waves are not totally transmitted. The influences are more pronounced at the GPS frequency than at the Ka frequency. This suggests that the latter can mitigate blackout by reducing both the reflection and the absorption of waves, as well as the influences of plasma fluctuations on wave propagation. Given that communication links with the reentry vehicles are susceptible to plasma pressure fluctuations, the influences on link budgets should be taken into consideration. supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2014CB340205) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61301173)

  17. Coalescence of two pressure waves associated with stream interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1984-01-01

    An MHD unsteady 1-D model is used to simulate the interaction and coalescence of two pressure waves in the outer heliosphere. Each of the two pressure waves was a compression region bounded by a shock pair. Computer simulation using Voyager data as input demonstrates the interaction and coalescence process involving one pressure wave associated with a fast stream and the other pressure wave without a fast stream. The process produced a significant change in the magnetic field and plasma signatures. The propagation of the forward and reverse shocks first widened the radial dimension of the shock compression region with increasing heliocentric distances. The shocks belonging to two neighboring compression regions eventually collided and two compression regions began to overlap with each other. This type of interaction is a dominant dynamical process in the outer heliosphere, and significantly and irreversible alters the structure of the medium.

  18. Corotating pressure waves without streams in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.

    1983-01-01

    Voyager 1 and 2 magnetic field and plasma data are presented which demonstrate the existence of large scale, corotating, non-linear pressure waves between 2 AU and 4 AU that are not accompanied by fast streams. The pressure waves are presumed to be generated by corotating streams near the Sun. For two of the three pressure waves that are discussed, the absence of a stream is probably a real, physical effect, viz., a consequence of deceleration of the stream by the associated compression wave. For the third pressure wave, the apparent absence of a stream may be a geometrical effect; it is likely that the stream was at latitudes just above those of the spacecraft, while the associated shocks and compression wave extended over a broader range of latitudes so that they could be observed by the spacecraft. It is suggested that the development of large-scale non-linear pressure waves at the expense of the kinetic energy of streams produces a qualitative change in the solar wind in the outer heliosphere. Within a few AU the quasi-stationary solar wind structure is determined by corotating streams whose structure is determined by the boundary conditions near the Sun.

  19. Novel wave power analysis linking pressure-flow waves, wave potential, and the forward and backward components of hydraulic power.

    PubMed

    Mynard, Jonathan P; Smolich, Joseph J

    2016-04-15

    Wave intensity analysis provides detailed insights into factors influencing hemodynamics. However, wave intensity is not a conserved quantity, so it is sensitive to diameter variations and is not distributed among branches of a junction. Moreover, the fundamental relation between waves and hydraulic power is unclear. We, therefore, propose an alternative to wave intensity called "wave power," calculated via incremental changes in pressure and flow (dPdQ) and a novel time-domain separation of hydraulic pressure power and kinetic power into forward and backward wave-related components (ΠP±and ΠQ±). Wave power has several useful properties:1) it is obtained directly from flow measurements, without requiring further calculation of velocity;2) it is a quasi-conserved quantity that may be used to study the relative distribution of waves at junctions; and3) it has the units of power (Watts). We also uncover a simple relationship between wave power and changes in ΠP±and show that wave reflection reduces transmitted power. Absolute values of ΠP±represent wave potential, a recently introduced concept that unifies steady and pulsatile aspects of hemodynamics. We show that wave potential represents the hydraulic energy potential stored in a compliant pressurized vessel, with spatial gradients producing waves that transfer this energy. These techniques and principles are verified numerically and also experimentally with pressure/flow measurements in all branches of a central bifurcation in sheep, under a wide range of hemodynamic conditions. The proposed "wave power analysis," encompassing wave power, wave potential, and wave separation of hydraulic power provides a potent time-domain approach for analyzing hemodynamics. PMID:26873972

  20. Estimating Sinusoidal Pressure Waves In A Pump Volute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Roland J.; Chon, Juliet T.

    1994-01-01

    Closed-form equation approximates principal traveling-wave sinusoidal components of fluctuations of pressure in volute of centrifugal pump. Equation incorporated into Blade Vane Interaction Code (BVIC) computer program, which produces estimates for various pump speeds and various locations in volute. Intended use of BVIC in analysis of undesired interactions between pressure field and pump structure.

  1. Acoustic Wave Propagation in Pressure Sense Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitarius, Patrick; Gregory, Don A.; Wiley, John; Korman, Valentin

    2003-01-01

    Sense lines are used in pressure measurements to passively transmit information from hostile environments to areas where transducers can be used. The transfer function of a sense line can be used to obtain information about the measured environment from the protected sensor. Several properties of this transfer function are examined, including frequency dependence, Helmholtz resonance, and time of flight delay.

  2. Diaphragm Pressure Wave Generator Developments at Industrial Research Ltd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughley, A. J.; Emery, N.; Glasson, N. D.

    2010-04-01

    Industrial Research Ltd (IRL) have been developing a unique diaphragm based pressure wave generator technology for pulse tube and Stirling cryocoolers. Our system uses a metal diaphragm to separate the clean cryocooler gas circuit from a conventionally lubricated mechanical driver, thus producing a clean pressure wave with a long life drive that does not require the precision manufacture and associated costs of large linear motors. The first successful diaphragm pressure wave generator produced 3.2 kW of acoustic power at an electro-acoustic efficiency of 72% with a swept volume of 200 ml and a prototype has now accumulated over 2500 hours running. This paper describes recent developments in the technology. To explore scaling, a small diaphragm pressure wave generator with a swept volume of 20 ml has been constructed and has delivered 454 W of acoustic power at an electro-acoustic efficiency of 60%. Improvements have been made to the hydraulic force amplifier mechanism for driving the diaphragms resulting in a cheaper and lighter mechanism than the mechanical linkage originally used. To meet a customer's specific requirements, the 200 ml pressure wave generator's stroke was extended to achieve 240 ml of swept volume thereby increasing its acoustic power delivery to 4.1 kW without compromising efficiency.

  3. Dual mode acoustic wave sensor for precise pressure reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Xiaojing; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Wang, Yong; Randles, Andrew Benson; Chuan Chai, Kevin Tshun; Cai, Hong; Gu, Yuan Dong

    2014-09-01

    In this letter, a Microelectromechanical system acoustic wave sensor, which has a dual mode (lateral field exited Lamb wave mode and surface acoustic wave (SAW) mode) behavior, is presented for precious pressure change read out. Comb-like interdigital structured electrodes on top of piezoelectric material aluminium nitride (AlN) are used to generate the wave modes. The sensor membrane consists of single crystalline silicon formed by backside-etching of the bulk material of a silicon on insulator wafer having variable device thickness layer (5 μm-50 μm). With this principle, a pressure sensor has been fabricated and mounted on a pressure test package with pressure applied to the backside of the membrane within a range of 0 psi to 300 psi. The temperature coefficient of frequency was experimentally measured in the temperature range of -50 °C to 300 °C. This idea demonstrates a piezoelectric based sensor having two modes SAW/Lamb wave for direct physical parameter—pressure readout and temperature cancellation which can operate in harsh environment such as oil and gas exploration, automobile and aeronautic applications using the dual mode behavior of the sensor and differential readout at the same time.

  4. Acoustic waves in gases with strong pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, William E.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of strong pressure gradients on the acoustic modes (standing waves) of a rectangular cavity is investigated analytically. When the cavity response is represented by a sum of modes, each mode is found to have two resonant frequencies. The lower frequency is near the Viaesaela-Brundt frequency, which characterizes the buoyant effect, and the higher frequency is above the ordinary acoustic resonance frequency. This finding shows that the propagation velocity of the acoustic waves is increased due to the pressure gradient effect.

  5. Theoretical pressure distribution and wave drags for conical boattails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, John R

    1953-01-01

    Afterbody pressure distributions and wave drag were calculated using a second-order theory for a variety of conical boattails at zero angle of attack. Results are presented for Mach numbers from 1.5 to 4.5, area ratios from 0.200 to 0.800, and boattail angle from 3 degrees to 11 degrees. The results indicate that for a given boattail angle, the wave drag decreases with increasing Mach number and area ratio. The wave drag, for a constant area ratio, increases with increasing boattail angle. For a specific Mach number, area ratio, and fineness ratio, a comparison of the wave-drag coefficients for conical, tangent-parabolic, and secant-parabolic boattails showed the conical boattail to have the smallest wave drag.

  6. Rapid miniature fiber optic pressure sensors for blast wave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Xiaotian; Wu, Nan; Tian, Ye; Niezrecki, Christopher; Chen, Julie; Wang, Xingwei

    2013-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious potential threat to soldiers who are exposed to explosions. Since the pathophysiology of TBI associated with a blast wave is not clearly defined, it is crucial to have a sensing system to accurately quantify the blast wave dynamics. This paper presents an ultra-fast fiber optic pressure sensor based on Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometric principle that is capable of measuring the rapid pressure changes in a blast event. The blast event in the experiment was generated by a starter pistol blank firing at close range, which produced a more realistic wave profile compared to using compressed air driven shock tubes. To the authors' knowledge, it is also the first study to utilize fiber optic pressure sensors to measure the ballistics shock wave of a pistol firing. The results illustrated that the fiber optic pressure sensor has a rise time of 200 ns which demonstrated that the sensor has ability to capture the dynamic pressure transient during a blast event. Moreover, the resonant frequency of the sensor was determined to be 4.11 MHz, which agrees well with the specific designed value.

  7. Air pressure waves from Mount St. Helens eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.W.

    1987-10-20

    Weather station barograph records as well as infrasonic recordings of the pressure wave from the Mount St. Helens eruption of May 18, 1980, have been used to estimate an equivalent explosion airblast yield for this event. Pressure amplitude versus distance patterns in various directions compared with patterns from other large explosions, such as atmospheric nuclear tests, the Krakatoa eruption, and the Tunguska comet impact, indicate that the wave came from an explosion equivalent of a few megatons of TNT. The extent of tree blowdown is considerably greater than could be expected from such an explosion, and the observed forest damage is attributed to outflow of volcanic material. The pressure-time signature obtained at Toledo, Washington, showed a long, 13-min duration negative phase as well as a second, hour-long compression phase, both probably caused by ejacta dynamics rather than standard explosion wave phenomenology. The peculiar audibility pattern, with the blast being heard only at ranges beyond about 100 km, is explicable by finite amplitude propagation effects. Near the source, compression was slow, taking more than a second but probably less than 5 s, so that it went unnoticed by human ears and susceptible buildings were not damaged. There was no damage as Toledo (54 km), where the recorded amplitude would have broken windows with a fast compression. An explanation is that wave emissions at high elevation angles traveled to the upper stratosphere, where low ambient air pressures caused this energetic pressure oscillation to form a shock wave with rapid, nearly instantaneous compression. Atmospheric refraction then returned part of this wave to ground level at long ranges, where the fast compressions were clearly audible. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  8. Utilization of sparker induced pressure waves to tenderize meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the feasibility of tenderizing meat using high pressure waves generated from a sparker source. Beef strip loins were cut into steaks from the anterior end and one to two steaks from each strip loin were randomly selected to serve as non-treated controls and the remaining ste...

  9. Pressure induced Superconductivity in the Charge Density Wave Compound Tritelluride

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlin, J.J.; Zocco, D.A.; Sayles, T.A.; Maple, M.B.; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2010-02-15

    A series of high-pressure electrical resistivity measurements on single crystals of TbTe{sub 3} reveal a complex phase diagram involving the interplay of superconducting, antiferromagnetic and charge density wave order. The onset of superconductivity reaches a maximum of almost 4 K (onset) near {approx} 12.4 GPa.

  10. Measurement of Blast Waves from Bursting Pressureized Frangible Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esparza, E. D.; Baker, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    Small-scale experiments were conducted to obtain data on incident overpressure at various distances from bursting pressurized spheres. Complete time histories of blast overpressure generated by rupturing glass spheres under high internal pressure were obtained using eight side-on pressure transducers. A scaling law is presented, and its nondimensional parameters are used to compare peak overpressures, arrival times, impulses, and durations for different initial conditions and sizes of blast source. The nondimensional data are also compared, whenever possible, with results of theoretical calculations and compiled data for Pentolite high explosive. The scaled data are repeatable and show significant differences from blast waves generated by condensed high-explosives.

  11. Attenuation characteristics of nonlinear pressure waves propagating in pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to investigate temporal and spatial velocity distributions of fluid flow in 3-in. open-end pipes of various lengths up to 210 ft, produced by the propagation of nonlinear pressure waves of various intensities. Velocity profiles across each of five sections along the pipes were measured as a function of time with the use of hot-film and hot-wire anemometers for two pressure waves produced by a piston. Peculiar configurations of the velocity profiles across the pipe section were noted, which are uncommon for steady pipe flow. Theoretical consideration was given to this phenomenon of higher velocity near the pipe wall for qualitative confirmation. Experimentally time-dependent velocity distributions along the pipe axis were compared with one-dimensional theoretical results obtained by the method of characteristics with or without diffusion term for the purpose of determining the attenuation characteristics of the nonlinear wave propagation in the pipes.

  12. Internal wave-turbulence pressure above sloping sea bottoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Haren, Hans

    2011-12-01

    An accurate bottom pressure sensor has been moored at different sites varying from a shallow sea strait via open ocean guyots to a 1900 m deep Gulf of Mexico. All sites show more or less sloping bottom topography. Focusing on frequencies (σ) higher than tidal, the pressure records are remarkably similar, to within the 95% statistical significance bounds, in the internal gravity wave continuum (IWC) band up to buoyancy frequency N. The IWC has a relatively uniform spectral slope: log(P(σ)) = -αlog(σ), α = 2 ± 1/3. The spectral collapse is confirmed from independent internal hydrostatic pressure estimate, which suggests a saturated IWC. For σ > N, all pressure-spectra transit to a bulge that differs in magnitude. This bulge is commonly attributed to long surface waves. For the present data it is suggested to be due to stratified turbulence-internal wave coupling, which is typically large over sloping topography. The bulge drops off at a more or less common frequency of 2-3 × 10-2 Hz, which is probably related with typical turbulent overturning scales.

  13. Propagation of waves in a medium with high radiation pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisnovatyy-Kogan, G. S.; Blinnikov, S. I.

    1979-01-01

    The propagation and mutual transformation of acoustic and thermal waves are investigated in media with a high radiative pressure. The equations of hydrodynamics for matter and the radiative transfer equations in a moving medium in the Eddington approximation are used in the investigation. Model problems of waves in a homogeneous medium with an abrupt jump in opacity and in a medium of variable opacity are presented. The characteristic and the times of variability are discussed. Amplitude for the brightness fluctuations for very massive stars are discussed.

  14. Plateau Waves of Intracranial Pressure and Partial Pressure of Cerebral Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Lang, Erhard W; Kasprowicz, Magdalena; Smielewski, Peter; Pickard, John; Czosnyka, Marek

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates 55 intracranial pressure (ICP) plateau waves recorded in 20 patients after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) with a focus on a moving correlation coefficient between mean arterial pressure (ABP) and ICP, called PRx, which serves as a marker of cerebrovascular reactivity, and a moving correlation coefficient between ABP and cerebral partial pressure of oxygen (pbtO2), called ORx, which serves as a marker for cerebral oxygen reactivity. ICP and ICPamplitude increased significantly during the plateau waves, whereas CPP and pbtO2 decreased significantly. ABP, ABP amplitude, and heart rate remained unchanged. In 73 % of plateau waves PRx increased during the wave. ORx showed an increase during and a decrease after the plateau waves, which was not statistically significant. Our data show profound cerebral vasoparalysis on top of the wave and, to a lesser extent, impairment of cerebral oxygen reactivity. The different behavior of the indices may be due to the different latencies of the cerebral blood flow and oxygen level control mechanisms. While cerebrovascular reactivity is a rapidly reacting mechanism, cerebral oxygen reactivity is slower. PMID:27165902

  15. An oxygen pressure sensor using surface acoustic wave devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighty, Bradley D.; Upchurch, Billy T.; Oglesby, Donald M.

    1993-01-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) piezoelectric devices are finding widespread applications in many arenas, particularly in the area of chemical sensing. We have developed an oxygen pressure sensor based on coating a SAW device with an oxygen binding agent which can be tailored to provide variable sensitivity. The coating is prepared by dissolving an oxygen binding agent in a toluene solution of a copolymer which is then sprayed onto the surface of the SAW device. Experimental data shows the feasibility of tailoring sensors to measure the partial pressure of oxygen from 2.6 to 67 KPa (20 to 500 torr). Potential applications of this technology are discussed.

  16. Air pressure waves from Mount St. Helens eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    Barograms from a number of National Weather Service stations were assembled for the May 18, 1980, eruption and compared to airblast wave propagations from large explosions. Wave amplitudes at 50 to 300 km distances were about what might be expected from a nuclear explosion of between 1 megaton and 10 megaton yield. Pressure-time signatures could not be resolved for the first compression phase, because of the slow paper recording speed. The 900 s negative phase duration was much too long for comparison with the negative phase of an explosion. Nevertheless, positive and negative amplitudes were about equal, as often observed at long distances from explosions. Calculations have been made for a simple finite amplitude propagation model. These show rough bounds on the source compression rate, to give the observed inaudible waves at least to 54 km distance, yet cause audibly rapid compression at Seattle, near 150 km, and beyond.

  17. Wavelet analysis of blood pressure waves in vasovagal syncope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrone, A.; Polosa, A. D.; Scioscia, G.; Stramaglia, S.; Zenzola, A.

    1999-09-01

    We describe the multiresolution wavelet analysis of blood pressure waves in vasovagal syncope affected patients compared with healthy people. We argue that there exist discriminating criteria which allow us to isolate particular features, common to syncope-affected patients sample, indicating a tentative, alternative diagnosis methodology for this syndrome. We perform a throughout analysis both in the Haar basis and in a Gaussian one, with an attempt to grasp the underlying dynamics.

  18. Wave pressure acting on V-shaped floating breakwater in random seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Ding, Ning; Lin, Jie; Hou, Jiajia

    2015-12-01

    Wave pressure on the wet surface of a V-shaped floating breakwater in random seas is investigated. Considering the diffraction effect, the unit velocity potential caused by the single regular waves around the breakwater is solved using the finite-depth Green function and boundary element method, in which the Green function is solved by integral method. The Response-Amplitude Operator (RAO) of wave pressure is acquired according to the Longuet-Higgins' wave model and the linear Bernoulli equation. Furthermore, the wave pressure's response spectrum is calculated according to the wave spectrum by discretizing the frequency domain. The wave pressure's characteristic value corresponding to certain cumulative probability is determined according to the Rayleigh distribution of wave heights. The numerical results and field test results are compared, which indicates that the wave pressure calculated in random seas agrees with that of field measurements. It is found that the bigger angle between legs will cause the bigger pressure response, while the increase in leg length does not influence the pressure significantly. The pressure at the side of head sea is larger than that of back waves. When the incident wave angle changes from 0° to 90°, the pressure at the side of back waves decreases clearly, while at the side of head sea, the situation is more complicated and there seems no obvious tendency. The concentration of wave energy around low frequency (long wavelength) will induce bigger wave pressure, and more attention should be paid to this situation for the structure safety.

  19. Numerical Investigations of High Pressure Acoustic Waves in Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athavale, Mahesh; Pindera, Maciej; Daniels, Christopher C.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation presents work on numerical investigations of nonlinear acoustic phenomena in resonators that can generate high-pressure waves using acoustic forcing of the flow. Time-accurate simulations of the flow in a closed cone resonator were performed at different oscillation frequencies and amplitudes, and the numerical results for the resonance frequency and fluid pressure increase match the GRC experimental data well. Work on cone resonator assembly simulations has started and will involve calculations of the flow through the resonator assembly with and without acoustic excitation. A new technique for direct calculation of resonance frequency of complex shaped resonators is also being investigated. Script-driven command procedures will also be developed for optimization of the resonator shape for maximum pressure increase.

  20. Radiation-pressure-driven dust waves inside bursting interstellar bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochsendorf, B. B.; Verdolini, S.; Cox, N. L. J.; Berné, O.; Kaper, L.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2014-06-01

    Massive stars drive the evolution of the interstellar medium through their radiative and mechanical energy input. After their birth, they form "bubbles" of hot gas surrounded by a dense shell. Traditionally, the formation of bubbles is explained through the input of a powerful stellar wind, even though direct evidence supporting this scenario is lacking. Here we explore the possibility that interstellar bubbles seen by the Spitzer- and Herschel space telescopes, blown by stars with log (L/L⊙) ≲ 5.2, form and expand because of the thermal pressure that accompanies the ionization of the surrounding gas. We show that density gradients in the natal cloud or a puncture in the swept-up shell lead to an ionized gas flow through the bubble into the general interstellar medium, which is traced by a dust wave near the star, which demonstrates the importance of radiation pressure during this phase. Dust waves provide a natural explanation for the presence of dust inside H II bubbles, offer a novel method to study dust in H II regions and provide direct evidence that bubbles are relieving their pressure into the interstellar medium through a champagne flow, acting as a probe of the radiative interaction of a massive star with its surroundings. We explore a parameter space connecting the ambient density, the ionizing source luminosity, and the position of the dust wave, while using the well studied H II bubbles RCW 120 and RCW 82 as benchmarks of our model. Finally, we briefly examine the implications of our study for the environments of super star clusters formed in ultraluminous infrared galaxies, merging galaxies, and the early Universe, which occur in very luminous and dense environments and where radiation pressure is expected to dominate the dynamical evolution.

  1. Pressure wave generated by the Mount St. Helens eruption

    SciTech Connect

    Banister, J.B.

    1984-06-20

    Histories of the air pressure wave radiated from the eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980, were calculated for two models of the eruption cloud expansion. The first considered the wave radiated from an accelerated plane surface, while the second examined the wave radiated from an expanding hemisphere. Two histories of eruption cloud motion based on photographs were used. Peak positive overpressures were about the same for these cloud motion histories of expansion into a hemisphere was assumed. If an accelerated planar source model was used, the peak positive pressures have again about the same value in east and west direction, but values are about half in the north and south direction. Observed peak overpressures at microbarograph stations are somewhat higher than the calculated with the most marked departures at the greater surface ranges. These observed overpressures may have been about half the correct values, however. Microbarograph records show a weaker rarefaction than calculated histories or none at all. This can be explained, in part, by a lack of a real motion coherence in the slowing eruption cloud. If it is also possible the net ash cloud volume increased considerably after its vertical growth ceased and weakened the negative phase as well as lengthening the positive phase.

  2. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    SciTech Connect

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  3. Model of a small surface wave discharge at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A.; Kiss'ovski, Zh

    2016-05-01

    Self-consistent model of a small microwave plasma source based on a surface wave sustained discharge at 2.45 GHz is presented in this study. The model includes dispersion relation of azimuthally symmetric surface waves, sustaining the discharge in a high permittivity ceramic tube (εd = 9.3) and the radial distribution of the field components at curtain values of the electron density are obtained. The electron Boltzmann equation under the local approximation is solved together with the heavy particle balance equations. A detailed collisional-radiative model for argon discharge at atmospheric pressure is implemented in the model. The changes in the EEDF shape and the mean electron energy with the value of the electron density are investigated. Results show that the EEDF is close to Maxwellian at our experimental conditions for the plasma density above 2.1020 (m-3).

  4. Tunnel pressure waves - A smartphone inquiry on rail travel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Andreas; Hirth, Michael; Kuhn, Jochen

    2016-02-01

    When traveling by rail, you might have experienced the following phenomenon: The train enters a tunnel, and after some seconds a noticeable pressure change occurs, as perceived by your ears or even by a rapid wobbling of the train windows. The basic physics is that pressure waves created by the train travel down the tunnel, are reflected at its other end, and travel back until they meet the train again. Here we will show (i) how this effect can be well understood as a kind of large-scale outdoor case of a textbook paradigm, and (ii) how, e.g., a prediction of the tunnel length from the inside of a moving train on the basis of this model can be validated by means of a mobile phone measurement.

  5. On the Generation of Multiple Atmospheric Pressure Waves Observed During Violent Volcanic Eruptions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medici, E. F.; Waite, G. P.

    2015-12-01

    One or more atmospheric pressure waves followed by a supersonic jet may be generated during the over pressurized vapor-solid-liquid mixture ejection of a violent volcanic eruption. The source of these multiple atmospheric pressure waves could have different origins. Among the physical mechanisms that could explain these behaviors are pulsating eruptions, the dynamics of shock waves, coupled pressure wave-supersonic jet interaction, or a combination of all these factors. In order to elucidate the causes of these complex fluid flow dynamics, a series of analog volcanic eruption experiments using an atmospheric shock tube were performed. During the testing, single and multiple pressure waves and the subsequent supersonic jet were generated. The controlled laboratory conditions enable studies of the most relevant variables potentially responsible for the formation of the multiple pressure waves. The tests were performed using dry, compressed nitrogen at standard room temperature that was free of particles. Yet, under this idealization of a real volcanic eruption, multiple pressure waves were observed on the high-speed video imaging and recorded on the pressure transducer. The amount of energy being released on each test was varied to achieve different discharge dynamics and the formation of single and multiple pressure waves. The preliminary experimental observations indicate a coupled pressure wave-jet interaction as source of multiple pressure waves.

  6. Wave-Induced Pressure Under an Internal Solitary Wave and Its Impact at the Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Gustavo; Diamesis, Peter; Jenkins, James; Berzi, Diego

    2015-11-01

    The bottom boundary layer (BBL) under a mode-1 internal solitary wave (ISW) of depression propagating against an oncoming model barotropic current is examined using 2-D direct numerical simulation based on a spectral multidomain penalty method model. Particular emphasis is placed on the diffusion into the bed of the pressure field driven by the wake and any near-bed instabilities produced under specific conditions. To this end, a spectral nodal Galerkin approach is used for solving the diffusion equation for the wave-induced pressure. At sufficiently high ISW amplitude, the BBL undergoes a global instability which produces intermittent vortex shedding from within the separation bubble in the lee of the wave. The interplay between the bottom shear stress field and pressure perturbations during vortex ejection events and the subsequent evolution of the vortices is examined. The potential for bed failure upon the passage of the ISW trough and implications for resuspension of bottom particulate matter are both discussed in the context of specific sediment transport models.

  7. Internal wave pressure, velocity, and energy flux from density perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allshouse, Michael R.; Lee, Frank M.; Morrison, Philip J.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2016-05-01

    Determination of energy transport is crucial for understanding the energy budget and fluid circulation in density varying fluids such as the ocean and the atmosphere. However, it is rarely possible to determine the energy flux field J =p u , which requires simultaneous measurements of the pressure and velocity perturbation fields p and u , respectively. We present a method for obtaining the instantaneous J (x ,z ,t ) from density perturbations alone: A Green's function-based calculation yields p ; u is obtained by integrating the continuity equation and the incompressibility condition. We validate our method with results from Navier-Stokes simulations: The Green's function method is applied to the density perturbation field from the simulations and the result for J is found to agree typically to within 1% with J computed directly using p and u from the Navier-Stokes simulation. We also apply the Green's function method to density perturbation data from laboratory schlieren measurements of internal waves in a stratified fluid and the result for J agrees to within 6 % with results from Navier-Stokes simulations. Our method for determining the instantaneous velocity, pressure, and energy flux fields applies to any system described by a linear approximation of the density perturbation field, e.g., to small-amplitude lee waves and propagating vertical modes. The method can be applied using our matlab graphical user interface EnergyFlux.

  8. A Boussinesq-scaled, pressure-Poisson water wave model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, Aaron S.; Zhang, Yao; Kennedy, Andrew B.; Westerink, Joannes J.; Panda, Nishant; Dawson, Clint

    2015-02-01

    Through the use of Boussinesq scaling we develop and test a model for resolving non-hydrostatic pressure profiles in nonlinear wave systems over varying bathymetry. A Green-Nagdhi type polynomial expansion is used to resolve the pressure profile along the vertical axis, this is then inserted into the pressure-Poisson equation, retaining terms up to a prescribed order and solved using a weighted residual approach. The model shows rapid convergence properties with increasing order of polynomial expansion which can be greatly improved through the application of asymptotic rearrangement. Models of Boussinesq scaling of the fully nonlinear O (μ2) and weakly nonlinear O (μN) are presented, the analytical and numerical properties of O (μ2) and O (μ4) models are discussed. Optimal basis functions in the Green-Nagdhi expansion are determined through manipulation of the free-parameters which arise due to the Boussinesq scaling. The optimal O (μ2) model has dispersion accuracy equivalent to a Padé [2,2] approximation with one extra free-parameter. The optimal O (μ4) model obtains dispersion accuracy equivalent to a Padé [4,4] approximation with two free-parameters which can be used to optimize shoaling or nonlinear properties. In comparison to experimental results the O (μ4) model shows excellent agreement to experimental data.

  9. Effect of the initial pressure of multicomponent bubble media on the characteristics of detonation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sychev, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of the initial pressure of multicomponent bubble media on the conditions of initiation, the structure, the velocity, and the pressure of detonation waves is experimentally studied. The variation of the initial pressure of a bubble medium is found to be an effective method to control the parameters of bubble detonation waves.

  10. Producing ion waves from acoustic pressure waves in pulsed ICP: Modeling vs. Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despiau-Pujo, Emilie; Cunge, Gilles; Darnon, Maxime; Sadeghi, Nader; Braithwaite, Nicholas

    2015-09-01

    Neutral depletion is an important phenomenon in CW high-density plasmas, mostly caused by gas heating - with a small contribution due to electron pressure Pe - under typical material processing conditions. In pulsed ICP, neutral depletion plays an important role on radical transport in the afterglow. At the beginning of the afterglow, Pe drops rapidly (10 μs) by electron cooling and the gas cools down as well. It generates a neutral pressure gradient between the plasma bulk and the reactor walls, which in turn forces the cold surrounding gas to move rapidly towards the center, thus launching an acoustic wave in the reactor. Fast gas displacement is evidenced by measuring Al atoms drift velocity in the early afterglow of a Cl2/Ar discharge by time-resolved LIF, the acoustic wave in the chamber being observed by mass spectrometry. 2D fluid simulations of Cl2 pulsed ICP predict similar results. These phenomena are further studied during both the plasma ignition and afterglow using modeling and experiments. Strong oscillations are observed both on the Cl2 neutral densities and on the ion flux. As neutrals are pushed towards (or outwards) the chamber walls by the pressure gradient, ions are also pushed in that direction through collisions, as well captured by our ion flux probe.

  11. Influence of flow and pressure on wave propagation in the canine aorta.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Histand, M. B.; Anliker, M.

    1973-01-01

    Data on wave speed acquired from 20 anesthetized dogs showed that the thoracic aorta was essentially nondispersive for small artificially generated pressure waves traveling in the downstream or the upstream direction and having frequencies between 40 and 120 Hz. The amplitude of these waves decayed exponentially with the distance traveled. Theoretical studies are cited which have shown that changes in wave speed due to variations in pressure and flow produce marked nonlinear effects in hemodynamics.

  12. Mass Spectrometry of Atmospheric Pressure Surface Wave Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridenti, M. A.; Souza-Corrêa, J. A.; Amorim, J.

    2016-05-01

    By applying mass spectrometry techniques, we carried out measurements of ionic mass spectrum and their energy distribution in order to investigate an atmospheric argon discharge by using a surfatron surface-wave device. The mass and energy distribution measurements were performed with fixed flow rate (2.5 SLM) of pure argon gas (99.999%) and different Ar-O2 gas mixture compositions (99-1, 98-2 and 97-3). The mass spectra and energy distributions were recorded for Ar+, O+, O+ 2, N+ and N2 +. The axial distribution profiles of ionic mass and their energy were obtained for different experimental conditions as a function of the plasma length. The results showed that the peak of the positive ion energy distributions shifted to higher energies and also that the distribution width increased as the distance between the sampling orifice and the launcher gap was increased. It was also found that under certain experimental conditions the ion flux of atomic species were higher than the ion flux of their diatomic counterpart. The motivation of this study was to obtain a better understanding of a surface wave discharge in atmospheric pressure that may play a key role on new second generation biofuel technologies.

  13. A thoracic mechanism of mild traumatic brain injury due to blast pressure waves.

    PubMed

    Courtney, A C; Courtney, M W

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms by which blast pressure waves cause mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are an open question. Possibilities include acceleration of the head, direct passage of the blast wave via the cranium, and propagation of the blast wave to the brain via a thoracic mechanism. The hypothesis that the blast pressure wave reaches the brain via a thoracic mechanism is considered in light of ballistic and blast pressure wave research. Ballistic pressure waves, caused by penetrating ballistic projectiles or ballistic impacts to body armor, can only reach the brain via an internal mechanism and have been shown to cause cerebral effects. Similar effects have been documented when a blast pressure wave has been applied to the whole body or focused on the thorax in animal models. While vagotomy reduces apnea and bradycardia due to ballistic or blast pressure waves, it does not eliminate neural damage in the brain, suggesting that the pressure wave directly affects the brain cells via a thoracic mechanism. An experiment is proposed which isolates the thoracic mechanism from cranial mechanisms of mTBI due to blast wave exposure. Results have implications for evaluating risk of mTBI due to blast exposure and for developing effective protection. PMID:18829180

  14. Investigations of High Pressure Acoustic Waves in Resonators with Seal-Like Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Christopher C.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Finkbeiner, Joshua R.; Li, Xiao-Fan; Raman, Ganesh

    2004-01-01

    1) Standing waves with maximum pressures of 188 kPa have been produced in resonators containing ambient pressure air; 2) Addition of structures inside the resonator shifts the fundamental frequency and decreases the amplitude of the generated pressure waves; 3) Addition of holes to the resonator does reduce the magnitude of the acoustic waves produced, but their addition does not prohibit the generation of large magnitude non-linear standing waves; 4) The feasibility of reducing leakage using non-linear acoustics has been confirmed.

  15. An application of Love SH waves for the viscosity measurement of triglycerides at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostocki, A. J.; Siegoczyński, R. M.; Kiełczyński, P.; Szalewski, M.

    2010-03-01

    A new ultrasonic method of viscosity measurements at a high-pressure conditions has been presented. The method is based on the Love wave amplitude measurement. The same electronic setup as in the Bleustein-Gulyaev (B-G) wave method applied by the authors recently for a high-pressure measurement was adopted. The new sensors were made of metallic materials, which make them more reliable at high-pressure conditions. The method has been successfully applied for the viscosity measurement of some triglycerides at high-pressure conditions up to 1 GPa. The results have been compared with the earlier results obtained using B-G waves. This comparison has shown that Love wave method sensors are more reliable than B-G wave sensors and are also cheaper in fabrication, although the sensitivity of Love wave sensors is lower. During the measurement, the phase transitions in the investigated liquids were observed.

  16. a Low Cost Pressure Wave Generator Using Diaphragms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughley, A. J.; Haywood, D. J.; Wang, C.

    2008-03-01

    The high cost of Pressure Wave Generators (PWGs) is a major barrier to the more widespread use of high-efficiency pulse tube and Stirling cryocoolers. This paper describes the development and testing of a low-cost industrial-style PWG which employs metal diaphragms. The use of diaphragms removes the need for rubbing or clearance seals, and eliminates contamination problems by hermetically separating the gas circuit and the lubricated driving mechanism. A conventional low-cost electric motor is used for power input, via a novel high-efficiency kinematic linkage. A first prototype of the diaphragm PWG produced 3.2 kW of PV power with a measured electro-acoustic efficiency of 72%. Accelerated testing predicts a diaphragm life time in excess of 40,000 hours. An additional advantage of the use of diaphragms is the ability to directly cool the gas in the compression space. This eliminates or significantly reduces the requirement for an after cooler, and further decreases the cost of the whole cryocooler system. A pulse tube cryocooler has been successfully run at Industrial Research Ltd to 59K with the diaphragm PWG and no aftercooler. Another pulse tube cryocooler with the diaphragm PWG is undergoing development at Cryomech, the results of which will be given in another presentation.

  17. Predicting S-wave velocities for unconsolidated sediments at low effective pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate S-wave velocities for shallow sediments are important in performing a reliable elastic inversion for gas hydrate-bearing sediments and in evaluating velocity models for predicting S-wave velocities, but few S-wave velocities are measured at low effective pressure. Predicting S-wave velocities by using conventional methods based on the Biot-Gassmann theory appears to be inaccurate for laboratory-measured velocities at effective pressures less than about 4-5 megapascals (MPa). Measured laboratory and well log velocities show two distinct trends for S-wave velocities with respect to P-wave velocity: one for the S-wave velocity less than about 0.6 kilometer per second (km/s) which approximately corresponds to effective pressure of about 4-5 MPa, and the other for S-wave velocities greater than 0.6 km/s. To accurately predict S-wave velocities at low effective pressure less than about 4-5 MPa, a pressure-dependent parameter that relates the consolidation parameter to shear modulus of the sediments at low effective pressure is proposed. The proposed method in predicting S-wave velocity at low effective pressure worked well for velocities of water-saturated sands measured in the laboratory. However, this method underestimates the well-log S-wave velocities measured in the Gulf of Mexico, whereas the conventional method performs well for the well log velocities. The P-wave velocity dispersion due to fluid in the pore spaces, which is more pronounced at high frequency with low effective pressures less than about 4 MPa, is probably a cause for this discrepancy.

  18. The Pressure in a Deep-Water Stokes Wave of Greatest Height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Tony

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we investigate the qualitative behaviour of the pressure function beneath an extreme Stokes wave over infinite depth. The presence of a stagnation point at the wave-crest of an extreme Stokes wave introduces a number of mathematical difficulties resulting in the irregularity of the free surface profile. It will be proven that the pressure decreases in the horizontal direction between a crest-line and subsequent trough-line, except along these lines themselves where the pressure is stationary with respect to the horizontal coordinate. In addition we will prove that the pressure strictly increases with depth throughout the fluid body.

  19. The Pressure in a Deep-Water Stokes Wave of Greatest Height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Tony

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the qualitative behaviour of the pressure function beneath an extreme Stokes wave over infinite depth. The presence of a stagnation point at the wave-crest of an extreme Stokes wave introduces a number of mathematical difficulties resulting in the irregularity of the free surface profile. It will be proven that the pressure decreases in the horizontal direction between a crest-line and subsequent trough-line, except along these lines themselves where the pressure is stationary with respect to the horizontal coordinate. In addition we will prove that the pressure strictly increases with depth throughout the fluid body.

  20. Influence of the initial pressure in bubble media on the detonation wave parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sychev, A. I.

    2015-04-01

    The influence of the initial pressure in bubble media on the initiation, structure, velocity, and pressure of detonation waves in single-component bubble media is studied. The test medium (bubbles of a stoichiometric acetylene-oxygen mixture in a hydroglyceric solution) falls under the category of "chemically inactive liquid—bubbles of a chemically active gas." It is found that one can effectively control the parameters of bubble detonation waves by varying the initial pressure in the bubble medium.

  1. Relationship between orientation to a blast and pressure wave propagation inside the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Chavko, Mikulas; Watanabe, Tomas; Adeeb, Saleena; Lankasky, Jason; Ahlers, Stephen T; McCarron, Richard M

    2011-01-30

    Exposure to a blast wave generated during an explosion may result in brain damage and related neurological impairments. Several mechanisms by which the primary blast wave can damage the brain have been proposed, including: (1) a direct effect of the shock wave on the brain causing tissue damage by skull flexure and propagation of stress and shear forces; and (2) an indirect transfer of kinetic energy from the blast, through large blood vessels and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), to the central nervous system. To address a basic question related to the mechanisms of blast brain injury, pressure was measured inside the brains of rats exposed to a low level of blast (~35kPa), while positioned in three different orientations with respect to the primary blast wave; head facing blast, right side exposed to blast and head facing away from blast. Data show different patterns and durations of the pressure traces inside the brain, depending on the rat orientation to blast. Frontal exposures (head facing blast) resulted in pressure traces of higher amplitude and longer duration, suggesting direct transmission and reflection of the pressure inside the brain (dynamic pressure transfer). The pattern of the pressure wave inside the brain in the head facing away from blast exposures assumes contribution of the static pressure, similar to hydrodynamic pressure to the pressure wave inside the brain. PMID:21129403

  2. A Non-Intrusive Pressure Sensor by Detecting Multiple Longitudinal Waves.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongliang; Lin, Weibin; Ge, Xiaocheng; Zhou, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Pressure vessels are widely used in industrial fields, and some of them are safety-critical components in the system-for example, those which contain flammable or explosive material. Therefore, the pressure of these vessels becomes one of the critical measurements for operational management. In the paper, we introduce a new approach to the design of non-intrusive pressure sensors, based on ultrasonic waves. The model of this sensor is built based upon the travel-time change of the critically refracted longitudinal wave (LCR wave) and the reflected longitudinal waves with the pressure. To evaluate the model, experiments are carried out to compare the proposed model with other existing models. The results show that the proposed model can improve the accuracy compared to models based on a single wave. PMID:27527183

  3. Rogue wave formation under the action of quasi-stationary pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrashkin, A. A.; Oshmarina, O. E.

    2016-05-01

    The process of rogue wave formation on deep water is considered. A wave of extreme amplitude is born against the background of uniform waves (Gerstner waves) under the action of external pressure on free surface. The pressure distribution has a form of a quasi-stationary "pit". The fluid motion is supposed to be a vortex one and is described by an exact solution of equations of 2D hydrodynamics for an ideal fluid in Lagrangian coordinates. Liquid particles are moving around circumferences of different radii in the absence of drift flow. Values of amplitude and wave steepness optimal for rogue wave formation are found numerically. The influence of vorticity distribution and pressure drop on parameters of the fluid is investigated.

  4. Propagation of pore pressure diffusion waves in saturated dual-porosity media (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Duoxing; Li, Qi; Zhang, Lianzhong

    2016-04-01

    A mechanism has been established for pressure diffusion waves in dual-porosity media. Pressure diffusion waves are heavily damped with relatively low velocities and short wavelengths. The characteristic frequency dominates the attenuation behavior of pressure diffusions and separates wave fields into two asymptotic regimes: relaxed and unrelaxed. Characteristic delay times control the pressure diffusion between the matrix and the fractures. The transition zones in wavelength and attenuation peak shift toward high frequencies when the characteristic delay time decreases. In contrast, the transition zones in both phase and group velocity shift toward low frequencies as the characteristic time of the delay increases. In a spatially dependent diffusivity field, the pressure diffusion waves in dual-porosity media obey an accumulation-depletion law.

  5. Using Clifford Algebra to Understand the Nature of Negative Pressure Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClellan, Gene

    2014-03-01

    The geometric algebra of 3-D Euclidean space, a sub-discipline of Clifford algebra, is a useful tool for analyzing wave propagation. We use geometric algebra to explore the concept of negative pressure. In free space a straightforward extension of Maxwell's equations using geometric algebra yields a theory in which classical electromagnetic waves coexist with nonelectromagnetic waves having retrograde momentum. By retrograde momentum we mean waves carrying momentum pointing in the opposite direction of energy flow. If such waves exist, they would have negative pressure. In rebounding from a wall, they would pull rather than push. In this presentation we use standard methods of analyzing energy and momentum conservation and their flow through the surface of an enclosed volume to illustrate the properties of both the electromagnetic and nonelectromagnetic solutions of the extended Maxwell equations. The nonelectromagnetic waves consist of coupled scalar and electric waves and coupled magnetic and pseudoscalar waves. They superimpose linearly with electromagnetic waves. We show that the nonelectromagnetic waves, besides having negative pressure, propagate with the speed of light and do not interact with conserved electric currents. Hence, they have three properties in common with dark energy.

  6. Elastic wave velocities of a MORB at pressures of the mantle transition region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Y.; Higo, Y.; Ohfuji, H.; Ohnishi, I.; Inoue, T.; Irifune, T.

    2006-12-01

    Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities of synthetic basalt at around 18 GPa and 1100 °C with MORB composition were measured up to 16 GPa under room temperature conditions. The basalt was synthesized in advance from MORB glass, and was found to consist of well-sintered, microcrystalline garnet and stishovite. Ultrasonic measurement was carried out in a multi-anvil apparatus. Details of the experimental procedures were described in Higo et al. (2006). Pressures were estimated from the load-pressure calibration using ZnTe pressure standard. The result showed a significant increase in both P- and S-wave velocities with increasing pressure, while the pressure dependence of P-wave velocity was larger than that of S-wave velocity. The pressure derivatives of P- and S-wave velocities are 0.07 and 0.02 (km/s)/GPa, respectively. Bulk (K) and shear (G) moduli and their pressure derivatives were calculated directly from the experimentally determined P- and S-wave velocities. The calculated K0 and G0 values were 174 and 104 GPa, respectively. The pressure derivatives of K (4.8) and G (1.5) of the basalt are markedly higher than those of major mineral constituents of mantle transition zone, that is, wadsleyite (4.2 and 1.5, respectively) (Li et al., 2001), ringwoodite (Fo91) (4.3 and 1.2, respectively) and majorite with pyrolite minus olivine composition (4.3 and 1.1, respectively) (Higo et al., unpublished data), for example. Stronger pressure dependence of P- and S-wave velocities is indicated in basaltic composition, as compared with those in pyrolitic or peridotitic compositions under the P-T conditions of the mantle transition zone. Combined ultrasonic and in situ X-ray measurements under high pressure and high temperature conditions for the present MORB composition are also currently being pursued at SPring-8.

  7. Measuring high pressure equation of state of polystyrene using laser driven shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Hua; Huang, Xiuguang; Ye, Junjian; Wu, Jiang; Jia, Guo; Fang, Zhiheng; Xie, Zhiyong; Zhou, Huazhen; Fu, Sizu

    2015-11-01

    High precision polystyrene equation of state data were measured using laser-driven shock waves with pressures from 180 GPa to 700 GPa. α quartz was used as standard material, the shock wave trajectory in quartz and polystyrene was measured using the Velocity Interferometer for Any Reflector (VISAR). Instantaneous shock velocity in quartz and polystyrene was obtained when the shock wave pass the interface. This provided ~1% precision in shock velocity measurements.

  8. Theoretical calculation of plane wave speeds for alkali metals under pressure.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eftis, J.; Macdonald, D. E.; Arkilic, G. M.

    1971-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of the variation with pressure of small amplitude plane wave speeds are performed for sodium and potassium at zero temperature. The results obtained for wave speeds associated with volume dependent second-order elastic coefficients show better agreement with experimental data than for wave speeds associated with shear dependent coefficients. This result is believed to be due to omission of the band structure correction to the strain energy density.

  9. [Research on the Method of Blood Pressure Monitoring Based on Multiple Parameters of Pulse Wave].

    PubMed

    Miao, Changyun; Mu, Dianwei; Zhang, Cheng; Miao, Chunjiao; Li, Hongqiang

    2015-10-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of blood pressure measurement in wearable devices, this paper presents a method for detecting blood pressure based on multiple parameters of pulse wave. Based on regression analysis between blood pressure and the characteristic parameters of pulse wave, such as the pulse wave transit time (PWTT), cardiac output, coefficient of pulse wave, the average slope of the ascending branch, heart rate, etc. we established a model to calculate blood pressure. For overcoming the application deficiencies caused by measuring ECG in wearable device, such as replacing electrodes and ECG lead sets which are not convenient, we calculated the PWTT with heart sound as reference (PWTT(PCG)). We experimentally verified the detection of blood pressure based on PWTT(PCG) and based on multiple parameters of pulse wave. The experiment results showed that it was feasible to calculate the PWTT from PWTT(PCG). The mean measurement error of the systolic and diastolic blood pressure calculated by the model based on multiple parameters of pulse wave is 1.62 mm Hg and 1.12 mm Hg, increased by 57% and 53% compared to those of the model based on simple parameter. This method has more measurement accuracy. PMID:26964321

  10. Observations of height-dependent pressure-perturbation structure of a strong mesoscale gravity wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, David O'C.; Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Weng, Chi Y.

    1992-01-01

    Airborne observations using a downward-looking, dual-frequency, near-infrared, differential absorption lidar system provide the first measurements of the height-dependent pressure-perturbation field associated with a strong mesoscale gravity wave. A pressure-perturbation amplitude of 3.5 mb was measured within the lowest 1.6 km of the atmosphere over a 52-km flight line. Corresponding vertical displacements of 250-500 m were inferred from lidar-observed displacement of aerosol layers. Accounting for probable wave orientation, a horizontal wavelength of about 40 km was estimated. Satellite observations reveal wave structure of a comparable scale in concurrent cirrus cloud fields over an extended area. Smaller-scale waves were also observed. Local meteorological soundings are analyzed to confirm the existence of a suitable wave duct. Potential wave-generation mechanisms are examined and discussed. The large pressure-perturbation wave is attributed to rapid amplification or possible wave breaking of a gravity wave as it propagated offshore and interacted with a very stable marine boundary layer capped by a strong shear layer.

  11. Electromagnetic cyclotron waves in the dayside subsolar outer magnetosphere generated by enhanced solar wind pressure: EMIC wave coherency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remya, B.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Reddy, R. V.; Lakhina, G. S.; Hajra, R.

    2015-09-01

    Electromagnetic ion (proton) cyclotron (EMIC) waves and whistler mode chorus are simultaneously detected in the Earth's dayside subsolar outer magnetosphere. The observations were made near the magnetic equator 3.1°-1.5° magnetic latitude at 1300 magnetic local time from L = 9.9 to 7.0. It is hypothesized that the solar wind external pressure caused preexisting energetic 10-100 keV protons and electrons to be energized in the T⊥ component by betatron acceleration and the resultant temperature anisotropy (T⊥>T∥) formed led to the simultaneous generation of both EMIC (ion) and chorus (electron) waves. The EMIC waves had maximum wave amplitudes of ˜6 nT in a ˜60 nT ambient field B0. The observed EMIC wave amplitudes were about ˜10 times higher than the usually observed chorus amplitudes (˜0.1-0.5 nT). The EMIC waves are found to be coherent to quasi-coherent in nature. Calculations of relativistic ˜1-2 MeV electron pitch angle transport are made using the measured wave amplitudes and wave packet lengths. Wave coherency was assumed. Calculations show that in a ˜25-50 ms interaction with an EMIC wave packet, relativistic electron can be transported ˜27° in pitch. Assuming dipole magnetic field lines for a L = 9 case, the cyclotron resonant interaction is terminated ˜±20° away from the magnetic equator due to lack of resonance at higher latitudes. It is concluded that relativistic electron anomalous cyclotron resonant interactions with coherent EMIC waves near the equatorial plane is an excellent loss mechanism for these particles. It is also shown that E > 1 MeV electrons cyclotron resonating with coherent chorus is an unlikely mechanism for relativistic microbursts. Temporal structures of ˜30 keV precipitating protons will be ˜2-3 s which will be measurable at the top of the ionosphere.

  12. Wave Journal Bearing. Part 2: Experimental Pressure Measurements and Fractional Frequency Whirl Threshold for Wave and Plain Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James F.; Dimofte, Florin; Addy, Harold E., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    A new hydrodynamic bearing concept, the wave journal bearing, is being developed because it has better stability characteristics than plain journal bearings while maintaining similar load capacity. An analysis code to predict the steady state and dynamic performance of the wave journal bearing is also part of the development. To verify numerical predictions and contrast the wave journal bearing's stability characteristics to a plain journal bearing, tests were conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center using an air bearing test rig. Bearing film pressures were measured at 16 ports located around the bearing circumference at the middle of the bearing length. The pressure measurements for both a plain journal bearing and a wave journal bearing compared favorably with numerical predictions. Both bearings were tested with no radial load to determine the speed threshold for self-excited fractional frequency whirl. The plain journal bearing started to whirl immediately upon shaft start-up. The wave journal did not incur self-excited whirl until 800 to 900 rpm as predicted by the analysis. Furthermore, the wave bearing's geometry limited the whirl orbit to less than the bearing's clearance. In contrast, the plain journal bearing did not limit the whirl orbit, causing it to rub.

  13. A simplified physical model of pressure wave dynamics and acoustic wave generation induced by laser absorption in the retina.

    PubMed

    Till, S J; Milsom, P K; Rowlands, G

    2004-07-01

    Shock waves have been proposed in the literature as a mechanism for retinal damage induced by ultra-short laser pulses. For a spherical absorber, we derive a set of linear equations describing the propagation of pressure waves. We show that the formation of shock fronts is due to the form of the absorber rather than the inclusion of nonlinear terms in the equations. The analytical technique used avoids the need for a Laplace transform approach and is easily applied to other absorber profiles. Our analysis suggests that the 'soft' nature of the membrane surrounding retinal melanosomes precludes shock waves as a mechanism for the retinal damage induced by ultra-short pulse lasers. The quantitative estimates of the pressure gradients induced by laser absorption which are made possible by this work, together with detailed meso-scale or molecular modelling, will allow alternative damage mechanisms to be identified. PMID:15210319

  14. The Propagation of Nonlinear Pressure Waves Through Regions of Non-Uniform Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dizinno, Nicholas; Vradis, George; Otugen, Volkan

    2006-11-01

    A numerical study of wave propagation through gases with non-uniform temperature distributions will be presented. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of temperature gradients on high-intensity pressure waves of various initial wave forms. Emphasis is paid to wave reflection and transmission. Ultimately, the performance of thermal barriers in attenuating nonlinear waves is evaluated. The concept of using regions of hot gas inside an ambient environment has potential in aeroacoustic applications, such as jet screech mitigation. This analysis considers the one-dimensional compressible unsteady Euler's equations with an ideal gas state equation. The domain is composed of two regions with uniform and equal gas properties separated by a third region with higher gas temperature (lower density). Pressure is uniform throughout the domain. We introduce various high-intensity wave forms into this medium. Our investigation studies how the shape and extent of the thermal zone affect transmission and reflection of the wave. This is done for a range of wave and thermal field parameters. A Fourier analysis will study the frequency content of the incident, transmitted and reflected waves. These results will help determine the effectiveness of using thermal barriers for nonlinear wave attenuation.

  15. Ultrafast Time Response Pressure-Sensitive Paint for Unsteady Shock-Wave Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numata, Daiju; Asai, Keisuke

    Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) is an optical pressure measurement technique widely used in aerodynamic experiments, and has been applied to unsteady shock-wave phenomena [1, 2]. However, one of the largest problems to apply PSP to high-speed and unsteady phenomena is the response time of PSP.

  16. Two Dimensional Finite Element Analysis for the Effect of a Pressure Wave in the Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce L., Ernesto; Ponce S., Daniel

    2008-11-01

    Brain injuries in people of all ages is a serious, world-wide health problem, with consequences as varied as attention or memory deficits, difficulties in problem-solving, aggressive social behavior, and neuro degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Brain injuries can be the result of a direct impact, but also pressure waves and direct impulses. The aim of this work is to develop a predictive method to calculate the stress generated in the human brain by pressure waves such as high power sounds. The finite element method is used, combined with elastic wave theory. The predictions of the generated stress levels are compared with the resistance of the arterioles that pervade the brain. The problem was focused to the Chilean mining where there are some accidents happen by detonations and high sound level. There are not formal medical investigation, however these pressure waves could produce human brain damage.

  17. Amplification of Pressure Waves during Vibrational Equilibration of Excited Chemical Reaction Products

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M

    2004-05-11

    The Non-Equilibrium Zeldovich - von Neumann - Doring (NEZND) theory of self-sustaining detonation identified amplification of pressure wavelets during equilibration of vibrationally excited reaction products in the reaction zone as the physical mechanism by which exothermic chemical energy release sustains detonation waves. This mechanism leads to the formation of the well-known, complex three-dimensional structure of a self-sustaining detonation wave. This amplification mechanism is postulated to be a general property of subsonic and supersonic reactive flows occurring during: shock to detonation transition (SDT); hot spot ignition and growth; deflagration to detonation transition (DDT); flame acceleration by shock or compression waves; and acoustic (sound) wave amplification. The existing experimental and theoretical evidence for pressure wave amplification by chemical energy release into highly vibrationally excited product molecules under these reactive flow conditions is reviewed in this paper.

  18. Characterization of laser-driven shock waves in solids using a fiber optic pressure probe

    SciTech Connect

    Cranch, Geoffrey A.; Lunsford, Robert; Grun, Jacob; Weaver, James; Compton, Steve; May, Mark; Kostinski, Natalie

    2013-11-08

    Measurement of laser-driven shock wave pressure in solid blocks of polymethyl methacrylate is demonstrated using fiber optic pressure probes. Three probes based on a fiber Fabry–Perot, fiber Bragg grating, and interferometric fiber tip sensor are tested and compared. Shock waves are generated using a high-power laser focused onto a thin foil target placed in close proximity to the test blocks. The fiber Fabry–Perot sensor appears capable of resolving the shock front with a rise time of 91 ns. As a result, the peak pressure is estimated, using a separate shadowgraphy measurement, to be 3.4 GPa.

  19. Quantification of wave reflection in the human aorta from pressure alone: a proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Westerhof, Berend E; Guelen, Ilja; Westerhof, Nico; Karemaker, John M; Avolio, Alberto

    2006-10-01

    Wave reflections affect the proximal aortic pressure and flow waves and play a role in systolic hypertension. A measure of wave reflection, receiving much attention, is the augmentation index (AI), the ratio of the secondary rise in pressure and pulse pressure. AI can be limiting, because it depends not only on the magnitude of wave reflection but also on wave shapes and timing of incident and reflected waves. More accurate measures are obtainable after separation of pressure in its forward (P(f)) and reflected (P(b)) components. However, this calculation requires measurement of aortic flow. We explore the possibility of replacing the unknown flow by a triangular wave, with duration equal to ejection time, and peak flow at the inflection point of pressure (F(tIP)) and, for a second analysis, at 30% of ejection time (F(t30)). Wave form analysis gave forward and backward pressure waves. Reflection magnitude (RM) and reflection index (RI) were defined as RM=P(b)/P(f) and RI=P(b)/(P(f)+P(b)), respectively. Healthy subjects, including interventions such as exercise and Valsalva maneuvers, and patients with ischemic heart disease and failure were analyzed. RMs and RIs using F(tIP) and F(t30) were compared with those using measured flow (F(m)). Pressure and flow were recorded with high fidelity pressure and velocity sensors. Relations are: RM(tIP)=0.82RM(mf)+0.06 (R(2)=0.79; n=24), RM(t30)=0.79RM(mf)+0.08 (R(2)=0.85; n=29) and RI(tIP)=0.89RI(mf)+0.02 (R(2)=0.81; n=24), RI(t30)=0.83RI(mf)+0.05 (R(2)=0.88; n=29). We suggest that wave reflection can be derived from uncalibrated aortic pressure alone, even when no clear inflection point is distinguishable and AI cannot be obtained. Epidemiological studies should establish its clinical value. PMID:16940207

  20. Low-pressure sustainment of surface-wave microwave plasma with modified microwave coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasai, Kensuke; Suzuki, Haruka; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    Sustainment of long-scale surface-wave plasma (SWP) at pressures below 1 Pa is investigated for the application of the SWP as an assisting plasma source for roll-to-roll sputter deposition. A modified microwave coupler (MMC) for easier surface-wave propagation is proposed, on the basis of the concept of the power direction alignment of the slot antenna and surface-wave propagation. The superiority of the MMC-SWP over conventional SWPs is shown at a sustainment pressure as low as 0.6 Pa and an electron density as high as 3 × 1017 m-3. A polymer film is treated with the MMC-SWP at a low pressure of 0.6 Pa, and surface modification at a low pressure is proved using Ar plasma. These results show the availability of the MMC-SWP as the surface treatment plasma source that is compatible with sputter deposition in the same processing chamber.

  1. New ultrasonic Bleustein-Gulyaev wave method for measuring the viscosity of liquids at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiełczyński, P.; Szalewski, M.; Siegoczyński, R. M.; Rostocki, A. J.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, a new method for measuring the viscosity of liquids at high pressure is presented. To this end the authors have applied an ultrasonic method using the Bleustein-Gulyaev (BG) surface acoustic wave. By applying the perturbation method, we can prove that the change in the complex propagation constant of the BG wave produced by the layer of liquid loading the waveguide surface is proportional to the shear mechanical impedance of the liquid. In the article, a measuring setup employing the BG wave for the purpose of measuring the viscosity of liquids at high pressure (up to 1GPa) is presented. The results of high-pressure viscosity measurements of triolein and castor oil are also presented. In this paper the model of a Newtonian liquid was applied. Using this new method it is also possible to measure the viscosity of liquids during the phase transition and during the decompression process (hysteresis of the dependence of viscosity on pressure).

  2. Modelling and Experimental Verification of Pressure Wave Following Gaseous Helium Storage Tank Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorowski, M.; Grabowski, M.; Jędrusyna, A.; Wach, J.

    Helium inventory in high energy accelerators, tokamaks and free electron lasers may exceed tens of tons. The gaseous helium is stored in steel tanks under a pressure of about 20 bar and at environment temperature. Accidental rupture of any of the tanks filled with the gaseous helium will create a rapid energy release in form of physical blast. An estimation of pressure wave distribution following the tank rupture and potential consequences to the adjacent research infrastructure and buildings is a very important task, critical in the safety aspect of the whole cryogenic system. According to the present regulations the TNT equivalent approach is to be applied to evaluate the pressure wave following a potential gas storage tank rupture. A special test stand was designed and built in order to verify experimentally the blast effects in controlled conditions. In order to obtain such a shock wave a pressurized plastic tank was used. The tank was ruptured and the resulting pressure wave was recorded using a spatially-distributed array of pressure sensors connected to a high-speed data acquisition device. The results of the experiments and the comparison with theoretical values obtained from thermodynamic model of the blast are presented. A good agreement between the simulated and measured data was obtained. Recommendations regarding the applicability of thermodynamic model of physical blast versus TNT approach, to estimate consequences of gas storage tank rupture are formulated. The laboratory scale experimental results have been scaled to ITER pressurized helium storage tanks.

  3. The impact of hepatic pressurization on liver shear wave speed estimates in constrained versus unconstrained conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotemberg, V.; Palmeri, M.; Nightingale, R.; Rouze, N.; Nightingale, K.

    2012-01-01

    Increased hepatic venous pressure can be observed in patients with advanced liver disease and congestive heart failure. This elevated portal pressure also leads to variation in acoustic radiation-force-derived shear wave-based liver stiffness estimates. These changes in stiffness metrics with hepatic interstitial pressure may confound stiffness-based predictions of liver fibrosis stage. The underlying mechanism for this observed stiffening behavior with pressurization is not well understood and is not explained with commonly used linear elastic mechanical models. An experiment was designed to determine whether the stiffness increase exhibited with hepatic pressurization results from a strain-dependent hyperelastic behavior. Six excised canine livers were subjected to variations in interstitial pressure through cannulation of the portal vein and closure of the hepatic artery and hepatic vein under constrained conditions (in which the liver was not free to expand) and unconstrained conditions. Radiation-force-derived shear wave speed estimates were obtained and correlated with pressure. Estimates of hepatic shear stiffness increased with changes in interstitial pressure over a physiologically relevant range of pressures (0-35 mmHg) from 1.5 to 3.5 m s-1. These increases were observed only under conditions in which the liver was free to expand while pressurized. This behavior is consistent with hyperelastic nonlinear material models that could be used in the future to explore methods for estimating hepatic interstitial pressure noninvasively.

  4. Prediction of the characteristics of two types of pressure waves in the cochlea: Theoretical considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Masayoshi; Wada, Hiroshi

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to predict the characteristics of two types of cochlear pressure waves, so-called fast and slow waves. A two-dimensional finite-element model of the organ of Corti (OC), including fluid-structure interaction with the surrounding lymph fluid, was constructed. The geometry of the OC at the basal turn was determined from morphological measurements of others in the gerbil hemicochlea. As far as mechanical properties of the materials within the OC are concerned, previously determined mechanical properties of portions within the OC were adopted, and unknown mechanical features were determined from the published measurements of static stiffness. Time advance of the fluid-structure scheme was achieved by a staggered approach. Using the model, the magnitude and phase of the fast and slow waves were predicted so as to fit the numerically obtained pressure distribution in the scala tympani with what is known about intracochlear pressure measurement. When the predicted pressure waves were applied to the model, the numerical result of the velocity of the basilar membrane showed good agreement with the experimentally obtained velocity of the basilar membrane documented by others. Thus, the predicted pressure waves appeared to be reliable. Moreover, it was found that the fluid-structure interaction considerably influences the dynamic behavior of the OC at frequencies near the characteristic frequency.

  5. Pressure waves generated by metastable intermolecular composites in an aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maines, G.; Radulescu, M.; Bacciochini, A.; Jodoin, B.; Lee, J. J.

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, pressure waves generated by a metastable intermolecular composite (MIC) have been measured experimentally in an aqueous environment and correlated with flame speed measurements. Underwater experiments were performed in a 1.0 L high-pressure chamber mounted with high-resolution pressure transducers and designed with optical access. Samples consisting of a stoichiometric mixture of aluminium and copper(II)-oxide particles were evaluated. Two types of samples were synthesized; a mixture of micron-sized raw powders, and ball-milled powders with a fine-scale nano-structure. A planetary mill was used to refine reactant powders from micron- to nano-scale dimensions. The dynamics of the pressure wave and high-pressure gas bubble were monitored via pressure histories and high-speed Schlieren visualization. The effect of reactant particle size has been evaluated quantitatively. The dynamics of the pressure wave were correlated with the rate of expansion of the high-pressure gas bubble.

  6. A computational study of pressure wave reflections in the pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, M Umar; Hill, N A

    2015-12-01

    Experiments using wave intensity analysis suggest that the pulmonary circulation in sheep and dogs is characterized by negative or open-end type wave reflections, that reduce the systolic pressure. Since the pulmonary physiology is similar in most mammals, including humans, we test and verify this hypothesis by using a subject specific one-dimensional model of the human pulmonary circulation and a conventional wave intensity analysis. Using the simulated pressure and velocity, we also analyse the performance of the P-U loop and sum of squares techniques for estimating the local pulse wave velocity in the pulmonary arteries, and then analyse the effects of these methods on linear wave separation in the main pulmonary artery. P-U loops are found to provide much better estimates than the sum of squares technique at proximal locations, but both techniques accumulate progressive error at distal locations away from heart, particularly near junctions. The pulse wave velocity estimated using the sum of squares method also gives rise to an artificial early systolic backward compression wave. Finally, we study the influence of three types of pulmonary hypertension viz. pulmonary arterial hypertension, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary hypertension associated with hypoxic lung disease. Simulating these conditions by changing the relevant parameters in the model and then applying the wave intensity analysis, we observe that for each group the early systolic backward decompression wave reflected from proximal junctions is maintained, whilst the initial forward compression and the late systolic backward compression waves amplify with increasing pathology and contribute significantly to increases in systolic pressure. PMID:25754476

  7. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Pressure Wave Attenuation due to Bubbly Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaprakash, Arvind; Fourmeau, Tiffany; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Chahine, Georges; Dynaflow Inc. Team

    2013-03-01

    In this work, the effects of dispersed microbubbles on a steep pressure wave and its attenuation are investigated both numerically and experimentally. Numerical simulations were carried out using a compressible Euler equation solver, where the liquid-gas mixture was modeled using direct numerical simulations involving discrete deforming bubbles. To reduce computational costs a 1D configuration is used and the bubbles are assumed distributed in layers and the initial pressure profile is selected similar to that of a one-dimensional shock tube problem. Experimentally, the pressure pulse was generated using a submerged spark electric discharge, which generates a large vapor bubble, while the microbubbles in the bubbly layer are generated using electrolysis. High speed movies were recorded in tandem with high fidelity pressure measurements. The dependence of pressure wave attenuation on the bubble radii, the void fraction, and the bubbly layer thickness were parametrically studied. It has been found that the pressure wave attenuation can be seen as due to waves reflecting and dispersing in the inter-bubble regions, with the energy absorbed by bubble volume oscillations and re-radiation. Layer thickness and small bubble sizes were also seen as having a strong effect on the attenuation with enhanced attenuation as the bubble size is reduced for the same void fraction. This study was supported by the Department of Energy, under SBIR Phase II Contract DE-FG02-07ER84839.

  8. Wave reflection quantification based on pressure waveforms alone--methods, comparison, and clinical covariates.

    PubMed

    Hametner, Bernhard; Wassertheurer, Siegfried; Kropf, Johannes; Mayer, Christopher; Holzinger, Andreas; Eber, Bernd; Weber, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Within the last decade the quantification of pulse wave reflections mainly focused on measures of central aortic systolic pressure and its augmentation through reflections based on pulse wave analysis (PWA). A complementary approach is the wave separation analysis (WSA), which quantifies the total amount of arterial wave reflection considering both aortic pulse and flow waves. The aim of this work is the introduction and comparison of aortic blood flow models for WSA assessment. To evaluate the performance of the proposed modeling approaches (Windkessel, triangular and averaged flow), comparisons against Doppler measurements are made for 148 patients with preserved ejection fraction. Stepwise regression analysis between WSA and PWA parameters are performed to provide determinants of methodological differences. Against Doppler measurement mean difference and standard deviation of the amplitudes of the decomposed forward and backward pressure waves are comparable for Windkessel and averaged flow models. Stepwise regression analysis shows similar determinants between Doppler and Windkessel model only. The results indicate that the Windkessel method provides accurate estimates of wave reflection in subjects with preserved ejection fraction. The comparison with waveforms derived from Doppler ultrasound as well as recently proposed simple triangular and averaged flow waves showed that this approach may reduce variability and provide realistic results. PMID:23107159

  9. Generation and Propagation of Long Waves due to Spatial and Temporal Pressure Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metin, A. D.; Yalçıner, A. C.; Ozyurt Tarakcıoglu, G.; Zaytsev, A.

    2015-12-01

    An abnormal wave event was observed between 23 and 27 June 2014 in the Mediterranean and Black Seas. First, sea level oscillations began in Ciutadella Inlet (Spain) after midnight of 22 June. The phenomena continued with observation of strong oscillations (up to 3 m wave height) in the Adriatic Sea, Mediterranean Sea and Black Sea on 25-26 June. Finally, at noon on 27 June on a calm and sunny day, the abnormal waves suddenly struck coasts of Odessa with 1-2 m wave height injuring a number of people. This tsunami-like event which is called meteotsunami is generated by different types of meteorological disturbances such as atmospheric gravity waves, pressure jumps and squall lines and the significant consequences necessitates the research to understand, model and simulate such events accurately. Thus, using the 2014 event as a case study, the waves generated by the change of atmospheric pressure distribution is studied. A static water level drop due to high atmospheric pressure in a region and rise due to low atmospheric pressure in another region deform the water level throughout the entire sea area. To compute the sea level change, the relation between the pressure difference and change of water level from normal position (ζ=0.99ΔP) is used where ζ is the change of water level (cm) according to the pressure difference from normal pressure ΔP. This relation gives that 1 hPa (1millibar) depression in air pressure from normal water level position (under 1000millibar) creates almost 1 cm rise in mean sea level. The respective small amplitude long waves propagate along the sea which is continuously excited by the spatial and temporal changes of atmospheric pressure. And, the amplification becomes important to understand the occurrence of unexpected water level changes, especially near the coastal zone. In this study, this long wave propagation due to water surface deformation is modelled by solving nonlinear shallow water equations. The model results are compared

  10. Pressure dependence of the charge-density-wave gap in rare-earth tritellurides.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, A; Arcangeletti, E; Perucchi, A; Baldassarre, L; Postorino, P; Lupi, S; Ru, N; Fisher, I R; Degiorgi, L

    2007-01-12

    We investigate the pressure dependence of the optical properties of CeTe3, which exhibits an incommensurate charge-density-wave (CDW) state already at 300 K. Our data are collected in the midinfrared spectral range at room temperature and at pressures between 0 and 9 GPa. The energy for the single particle excitation across the CDW gap decreases upon increasing the applied pressure, similarly to the chemical pressure by rare-earth substitution. The broadening of the bands upon lattice compression removes the perfect nesting condition of the Fermi surface and therefore diminishes the impact of the CDW transition on the electronic properties of RTe3. PMID:17358625

  11. Molecular modeling of high-pressure ramp waves in tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, J. Matthew D.; Lim, Hojun; Brown, Justin L.

    2015-03-01

    Ramp wave compression experiments of bcc metals under extreme conditions have produced differing measurements of material strength response. These variations are often attributed to differing experimental techniques, and varying material factors such as microstructure, and strain-rate. We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of tantalum for single crystal and two polycrystalline nanostructures out to 250 GPa, over strain states ranging from 108 to 1011 1/s. Results will be compared to recent Z-machine strength experiments, meso-scale crystal plasticity models and continuum-scale polycrystalline model. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Wave pattern in the wake of an arbitrary moving surface pressure disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Sha; Liu, Yuming

    2015-12-01

    We study the problem of wave pattern in the wake of an arbitrary surface pressure disturbance that moves forward at constant speed U in deep water. We seek the dependence of the location of the maximum amplitude of waves upon the pressure distribution and the Froude number F ≡ U / √{ g L } , where L is the characteristic length of the pressure disturbance and g is the gravitational acceleration. We show by theoretical analysis and direct numerical evaluation that half of the included angle (ϕmax) of the V-shape corresponding to the maximum amplitude of the waves in the wake at large Froude numbers behaves asymptotically as ϕ max = C F - a for F > F c , with the constant a, coefficient C, and threshold value of Froude number F c all being functions of the pressure distribution. It is found that for most pressure disturbances, a equals 1, but a can equal 2 for special non-smooth pressure disturbances. The condition in terms of the order of discontinuity and distribution shape of the pressure disturbance for the result of a = 2 is provided. These findings imply that for ship wakes, ϕmax generally decreases with increasing F at large Froude numbers, while the exact value of ϕmax is dependent on ship geometry and F .

  13. Influence of ambient air pressure on the energy conversion of laser-breakdown induced blast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2013-09-01

    Influence of ambient pressure on energy conversion efficiency from a Nd : glass laser pulse (λ = 1.053 µm) to a laser-induced blast wave was investigated at reduced pressure. Temporal incident and transmission power histories were measured using sets of energy meters and photodetectors. A half-shadowgraph half-self-emission method was applied to visualize laser absorption waves. Results show that the blast energy conversion efficiency ηbw decreased monotonically with the decrease in ambient pressure. The decrease was small, from 40% to 38%, for the pressure change from 101 kPa to 50 kPa, but the decrease was considerable, to 24%, when the pressure was reduced to 30 kPa. Compared with a TEA-CO2-laser-induced blast wave (λ = 10.6 µm), higher fraction absorption in the laser supported detonation regime ηLSD of 90% was observed, which is influenced slightly by the reduction of ambient pressure. The conversion fraction ηbw/ηLSD≈90% was achieved at pressure >50 kPa, which is significantly higher than that in a CO2 laser case.

  14. Pressure waves generated by metastable intermolecular composites in an aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maines, Geoff; Radulescu, Matei; Bacciochini, Antoine; Jodoin, Bertrand; Lee, Julian

    2013-06-01

    In the present study, pressure waves generated by a metastable intermolecular composite (MIC) have been measured experimentally in an aqueous environment. Experiments were performed in a 1.0 L high pressure chamber mounted with high resolution pressure transducers and designed with optical access. Samples consisting of a stoichiometric mixture of aluminum and copper(II)oxide particles were evaluated. Two types of samples were constructed; a mixture of micron-sized raw powders, and ball milled powders with a lamellated nanostructure. A planetary mill was used to refine reactant powders from micron- to nano-scale dimensions. Manual compaction and cold spray deposition techniques were used to consolidate powders in various densities. The dynamics of the pressure wave and high pressure gas bubble were monitored via pressure data and high-speed Schlieren visualization. The effects of reactant particle size and sample density have been evaluated quantitatively and compared with equilibrium calculations. Dynamics of the pressure wave were correlated with the amount of gas released and the rate of burning of the sample material. Work supported by DRDC Suffield (Dr. Julian J. Lee).

  15. The effect of convection and shear on the damping and propagation of pressure waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiel, Barry Vincent

    Combustion instability is the positive feedback between heat release and pressure in a combustion system. Combustion instability occurs in the both air breathing and rocket propulsion devices, frequently resulting in high amplitude spinning waves. If unchecked, the resultant pressure fluctuations can cause significant damage. Models for the prediction of combustion instability typically include models for the heat release, the wave propagation and damping. Many wave propagation models for propulsion systems assume negligible flow, resulting in the wave equation. In this research the effect of flow on wave propagation was studied both numerically and experimentally. Two experiential rigs were constructed, one with axial flow to study the longitudinal waves, the other with swirling flow to study circumferential waves. The rigs were excited with speakers and the resultant pressure was measured simultaneously at many locations. Models of the rig were also developed. Equations for wave propagation were derived from the Euler Equations. The resultant resembled the wave equation with three additional terms, two for the effect of the convection and a one for the effect of shear of the mean flow on wave propagation. From the experimental and numerical data several conclusions were made. First, convection and shear both act as damping on the wave propagation, reducing the magnitude of the Frequency Response Function and the resonant frequency of the modes. Second, the energy extracted from the mean flow as a result of turbulent shear for a given condition is frequency dependent, decreasing with increasing frequency. The damping of the modes, measured for the same shear flow, also decreased with frequency. Finally, the two convective terms cause the anti-nodes of the modes to no longer be stationary. For both the longitudinal and circumferential waves, the anti-nodes move through the domain even for mean flow Mach numbers less than 0.10. It was concluded that convection

  16. New experimental capabilities and theoretical insights of high pressure compression waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlikowski, Daniel

    2007-06-01

    While some high pressure, compression wave research seeks ever high pressures(>10 Mbar), the exciting developments of high pressure research for gas-gun generated compression waves have spawned novel compression experiments as well as new theoretical insights into compression wave dissipation. The first half of the discussion covers the unique gradient density impactor (GDI) developed at LLNL, that has just matured into a viable tool to examine the material response along and significantly away from the principal paths of the Hugoniot and isentrope. This gives direct access to hot planetary isentropes or cyclic paths to understand hysteretic response at moderately high pressures (<5 Mbar). Recently, significant material design challenges pertaining to material control, planarity, parallel layers, and reproducibility have been overcome in the manufacturing of these impactors used to create (within 2μs) compression waves. These compression waves consist of the standard monotonic compression and of unique non-monotonic compression waves, which widens the field of research to include previously inaccessible parts of the thermodynamic phase diagram for a given material. These developments will be addressed in conjunction with hydrodynamic simulations discussing several interesting experiments that have taken place in the pursuit of understanding the high-pressure phase diagram of water and of understanding high-pressure strength. Closely connected to these compression experiments, in general, is the interpretation of the recorded particle velocity histories and the assumptions used to quantify those results, e.g. stress versus density. Therefore, a second theoretical discussion of solitary wave structure is given suggested by recent experimental observations. Dissipative and dispersive effects are expected to exist in general, however, these effects are not usually discussed within the context of the Korteweg-de Vries(KdV)-Burgers equation, thus, leading to a possible

  17. Helical guided waves in liquid-filled cylindrical shells subjected to static pressurization stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubuc, Brennan; Ebrahimkhanlou, Arvin; Salamone, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    Helical guided waves in pipelines are studied under the effects of pressurization stresses from a contained liquid. The pipeline is approximated by an "unwrapped" plate waveguide, and a transfer matrix method is used to solve for guided wave velocity and attenuation dispersion curves in a multilayered plate waveguide subject to an arbitrary triaxial state of initial stress. The matrix-based model is able to incorporate both elastic and viscoelastic solid materials, as well as approximate non-uniform distributions in initial stress through the thickness of a waveguide. Experiments on a steel pipe filled with pressurized water are carried out to validate the modeling approach.

  18. In-situ determination of SH-channel wave velocity and the influence of overburden pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, J.J.; Major, M.W.

    1982-04-01

    In the Dutch Creek 1 Mine at Coal Basin, Colorado, SH-channel waves have been transmitted through floor coal underneath a gob (cave darea) produced by an advancing longwall panel. For any given source, only the receiver directly adjacent or closest to the source was monitored by the Geometrics ES 1210 F seismograph. Two sources were used to excite channel waves at each source location; one an explosive charge, the other a hammer blow. Tests showed that variation in overburden pressure on coal can be detected seismically using channel waves passing through the coal.

  19. Finite-amplitude pressure waves in the radial mode of a cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubo, I.; Moore, F. K.

    1972-01-01

    A numerical study of finite-strength, isentropic pressure waves transverse to the axis of a circular cylinder was made for the radial resonant mode. The waves occur in a gas otherwise at rest, filling the cylinder. A method of characteristics was used for the numerical solution. For small but finite amplitudes, calculations indicate the existence of waves of permanent potential form. For larger amplitudes, a shock is indicated to occur. The critical value of the initial amplitude parameter in the power series is found to be 0.06 to 0.08, under various types of initial conditions.

  20. Experimental observation of standing wave effect in low-pressure very-high-frequency capacitive discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yong-Xin; Gao, Fei; Liu, Jia; Wang, You-Nian

    2014-07-28

    Radial uniformity measurements of plasma density were carried out by using a floating double probe in a cylindrical (21 cm in electrode diameter) capacitive discharge reactor driven over a wide range of frequencies (27–220 MHz). At low rf power, a multiple-node structure of standing wave effect was observed at 130 MHz. The secondary density peak caused by the standing wave effect became pronounced and shifts toward the axis as the driving frequency further to increase, indicative of a much more shortened standing-wave wavelength. With increasing rf power, the secondary density peak shift toward the radial edge, namely, the standing-wave wavelength was increased, in good qualitative agreement with the previous theory and simulation results. At higher pressures and high frequencies, the rf power was primarily deposited at the periphery of the electrode, due to the fact that the waves were strongly damped as they propagated from the discharge edge into the center.

  1. Propagation of terahertz waves in an atmospheric pressure microplasma with Epstein electron density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Chengxun; Zhou Zhongxiang; Zhang, Jingwen W.; Sun Hongguo; Wang He; Du Yanwei; Xiang Xiaoli

    2011-03-15

    Propagation properties of terahertz (THz) waves in a bounded atmospheric-pressure microplasma (AMP) are analyzed in this study. A modified Epstein profile model is used to simulate the electron density distribution caused by the plasma sheaths. By introducing the dielectric constant of a Drude-Lorentz model and using the method of dividing the plasma into a series of subslabs with uniform electron density, the coefficients of power reflection, transmission, and absorption are derived for a bounded microplasma structure. The effects of size of microplasma, electron density profile, and collision frequency on the propagation of THz waves are analyzed numerically. The results indicate that the propagation of THz waves in AMPs depend greatly on the above three parameters. It is demonstrated that the THz wave can play an important role in AMPs diagnostics; meanwhile, the AMP can be used as a novel potential tool to control THz wave propagation.

  2. Rubber-induced uniform laser shock wave pressure for thin metal sheets microforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zongbao; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Huixia; Wang, Yayuan; Wang, Cuntang

    2015-02-01

    Laser shock microforming of thin metal sheets is a new high velocity forming technique, which employs laser shock wave to deform the thin metal sheets. The spatial distribution of forming pressure is mainly dependent on the laser beam. A new type of laser shock loading method is introduced which gives a uniform pressure distribution. A low density rubber is inserted between the laser beam and the thin metal sheets. The mechanism of rubber-induced smoothing effect on confined laser shock wave is proposed. Plasticine is used to perform the smoothing effect experiments due to its excellent material flow ability. The influence of rubber on the uniformity of laser shock wave pressure is studied by measuring the surface micro topography of the deformed plasticine. And the four holes forming experiment is used to verify the rubber-induced uniform pressure on thin metal sheets surface. The research results show the possibility of smoothing laser shock wave pressure using rubber. And the good surface quality can be obtained under rubber dynamic loading.

  3. Modeling and simulation of pressure waves generated by nano-thermite reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martirosyan, Karen S.; Zyskin, Maxim; Jenkins, Charles M.; (Yuki) Horie, Yasuyuki

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports the modeling of pressure waves from the explosive reaction of nano-thermites consisting of mixtures of nanosized aluminum and oxidizer granules. Such nanostructured thermites have higher energy density (up to 26 kJ/cm3) and can generate a transient pressure pulse four times larger than that from trinitrotoluene (TNT) based on volume equivalence. A plausible explanation for the high pressure generation is that the reaction times are much shorter than the time for a shock wave to propagate away from the reagents region so that all the reaction energy is dumped into the gaseous products almost instantaneously and thereby a strong shock wave is generated. The goal of the modeling is to characterize the gas dynamic behavior for thermite reactions in a cylindrical reaction chamber and to model the experimentally measured pressure histories. To simplify the details of the initial stage of the explosive reaction, it is assumed that the reaction generates a one dimensional shock wave into an air-filled cylinder and propagates down the tube in a self-similar mode. Experimental data for Al/Bi2O3 mixtures were used to validate the model with attention focused on the ratio of specific heats and the drag coefficient. Model predictions are in good agreement with the measured pressure histories.

  4. a New Approach of Dynamic Blood Pressure Measurement Based on the Time Domain Analysis of the Pulse Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimei, Su; Wei, Xu; Hui, Yu; Fei, Du; Jicun, Wang; Kexin, Xu

    2009-08-01

    In this study the pulse wave characteristics were used as a new approach to measure the human blood pressure. Based the principle of pulse wave and theory of the elastic vascular, the authors analyzed the characteristic of the pulse waveforms and revealed the characteristics points which could be used to represent the blood pressure. In this investigation the relevant mathematical feature was used to identify the relationship between the blood pressure and pulse wave parameters in a more accurate way. It also provided an experimental basis to carry out continuing non-invasive blood pressure monitoring using the pulse wave method.

  5. The effects of pressure, temperature, and pore water on velocities in Westerly granite. [for seismic wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. W., Jr.; Nur, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    A description is presented of an experimental assembly which has been developed to conduct concurrent measurements of compressional and shear wave velocities in rocks at high temperatures and confining pressures and with independent control of the pore pressure. The apparatus was used in studies of the joint effects of temperature, external confining pressure, and internal pore water on sonic velocities in Westerly granite. It was found that at a given temperature, confining pressure has a larger accelerating effect on compressional waves in dry rock, whereas at a given confining pressure, temperature has a larger retarding effect on shear waves.

  6. Increasing pulse wave velocity in a realistic cardiovascular model does not increase pulse pressure with age

    PubMed Central

    Mohiuddin, Mohammad W.; Rihani, Ryan J.; Laine, Glen A.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of the well-documented increase in aortic pulse pressure (PP) with age is disputed. Investigators assuming a classical windkessel model believe that increases in PP arise from decreases in total arterial compliance (Ctot) and increases in total peripheral resistance (Rtot) with age. Investigators assuming a more sophisticated pulse transmission model believe PP rises because increases in pulse wave velocity (cph) make the reflected pressure wave arrive earlier, augmenting systolic pressure. It has recently been shown, however, that increases in cph do not have a commensurate effect on the timing of the reflected wave. We therefore used a validated, large-scale, human arterial system model that includes realistic pulse wave transmission to determine whether increases in cph cause increased PP with age. First, we made the realistic arterial system model age dependent by altering cardiac output (CO), Rtot, Ctot, and cph to mimic the reported changes in these parameters from age 30 to 70. Then, cph was theoretically maintained constant, while Ctot, Rtot, and CO were altered. The predicted increase in PP with age was similar to the observed increase in PP. In a complementary approach, Ctot, Rtot, and CO were theoretically maintained constant, and cph was increased. The predicted increase in PP was negligible. We found that increases in cph have a limited effect on the timing of the reflected wave but cause the system to degenerate into a windkessel. Changes in PP can therefore be attributed to a decrease in Ctot. PMID:22561301

  7. Internal combustion engine supercharging: turbocharger vs. pressure wave compressor. Performance comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Atanasiu; Chiru, Anghel

    2014-06-01

    This paper aims on comparison between a turbocharged engine and a pressure wave charged engine. The comparison was accomplished using the engine simulation software AVL Boost, version 2010. The grahps were extracted using AVL Impress, version 2010. The performance increase is limited by the mechanical side of the simulated engine.

  8. Pressure-induced superconducting phase in the charge-density-wave compound terbium tritelluride.

    PubMed

    Hamlin, J J; Zocco, D A; Sayles, T A; Maple, M B; Chu, J-H; Fisher, I R

    2009-05-01

    A series of high-pressure electrical resistivity measurements on single crystals of TbTe3 reveal a complex phase diagram involving the interplay of superconducting, antiferromagnetic and charge-density-wave order. The onset of superconductivity reaches a maximum of almost 4 K (onset) near approximately 12.4 GPa. PMID:19518815

  9. Control and reduction of unsteady pressure loads in separated shock wave turbulent boundary layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolling, David S.; Barter, John W.

    1995-01-01

    The focus was on developing means of controlling and reducing unsteady pressure loads in separated shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions. Section 1 describes how vortex generators can be used to effectively reduce loads in compression ramp interaction, while Section 2 focuses on the effects of 'boundary-layer separators' on the same interaction.

  10. Continuous-wave dye laser pumped by a high-pressure argon arc

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, E.; Zander, C.; Drexhage, K.

    1988-11-01

    Continuous-wave operation of a Rhodamine 6G dye laser, incoherently pumped by a high-pressure argon arc, has been achieved. A special electrode design reduces melting of the electrode tips, and thus the arc provides the necessary brightness for periods of the order of hours.

  11. Arterial blood pressure measurement and pulse wave analysis--their role in enhancing cardiovascular assessment.

    PubMed

    Avolio, Alberto P; Butlin, Mark; Walsh, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The most common method of clinical measurement of arterial blood pressure is by means of the cuff sphygmomanometer. This instrument has provided fundamental quantitative information on arterial pressure in individual subjects and in populations and facilitated estimation of cardiovascular risk related to levels of blood pressure obtained from the brachial cuff. Although the measurement is taken in a peripheral limb, the values are generally assumed to reflect the pressure throughout the arterial tree in large conduit arteries. Since the arterial pressure pulse becomes modified as it travels away from the heart towards the periphery, this is generally true for mean and diastolic pressure, but not for systolic pressure, and so pulse pressure. The relationship between central and peripheral pulse pressure depends on propagation characteristics of arteries. Hence, while the sphygmomanometer gives values of two single points on the pressure wave (systolic and diastolic pressure), there is additional information that can be obtained from the time-varying pulse waveform that enables an improved quantification of the systolic load on the heart and other central organs. This topical review will assess techniques of pressure measurement that relate to the use of the cuff sphygmomanometer and to the non-invasive registration and analysis of the peripheral and central arterial pressure waveform. Improved assessment of cardiovascular function in relation to treatment and management of high blood pressure will result from future developments in the indirect measurement of arterial blood pressure that involve the conventional cuff sphygmomanometer with the addition of information derived from the peripheral arterial pulse. PMID:19940350

  12. Pressure fluctuations beneath instability wave packets and turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Katya M.

    During atmospheric reentry, hypersonic vehicles are subjected to high levels of boundary-layer pressure fluctuations that cause vibration of internal components. Current models are not adequate to predict these fluctuations. A more physics-based approach can be obtained by using a turbulent-spot model of transition. In order to gain a better understanding of the pressure-fluctuation field and the growth of turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer, the development of disturbances was studied on the nozzle wall of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel. Under quiet flow conditions, the nozzle wall boundary layer remains laminar and grows very thick over the long nozzle length. This allows the development of large disturbances that can be well-resolved with high-frequency pressure transducers. For a controlled study, disturbances were created by pulsed glow perturbations and studied at various freestream conditions. Both the centerline and the spanwise distribution of pressure fluctuations were measured as boundary-layer disturbances grew from linear instability wave packets into turbulent spots. A disturbance first grows into a linear instability wave packet and then quickly becomes nonlinear. At this point, the wave packet is still concentrated near the disturbance centerline, but weaker disturbances are seen spreading from the center. Throughout the nonlinear growth of the wave packets, large harmonics are visible in the power spectra. Breakdown to turbulence begins in the core of the wave packets where the wave amplitudes are largest. As breakdown begins, the peak amplitudes of the instability waves and harmonics decrease into the rising broadband frequencies. Second-mode waves are still evident in front of and behind the breakdown point and can be seen propagating in the spanwise direction at a spreading angle. The turbulent core grows downstream, resulting in a turbulent spot with a typical arrowhead shape. However, the spot is not merely a localized patch

  13. Pressure estimation for a low-speed detonation wave in pressed TEN

    SciTech Connect

    Martynyuk, V.F.; Sulimov, A.A.; Sukoyan, M.K.; Obmenin, A.V.

    1988-05-01

    This paper examined the dynamic deformation in steel shells with stationary low-speed detonation propagating in pressed TEN. Shell expansion was recorded with a ZhLV-2 triggered photographic system with the shell seen against a bright screen. The pressure pattern behind the front was shown to be stationary by the constant mode of shell expansion. Pressure in the stationary low-speed detonation was estimated from the photographic data. An expression was derived for calculating the estimated pressure from an equation for radial expansion of the shell. A dynamic deformation pattern was found which was used to calculate the explosive burnup in stationary low-speed detonation waves.

  14. Effect of the dynamic pressure on the shock wave structure in a rarefied polyatomic gas

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Shigeru Sugiyama, Masaru; Arima, Takashi; Ruggeri, Tommaso

    2014-01-15

    We study the shock wave structure in a rarefied polyatomic gas based on a simplified model of extended thermodynamics in which the dissipation is due only to the dynamic pressure. In this case the differential system is very simple because it is a variant of Euler system with a new scalar equation for the dynamic pressure [T. Arima, S. Taniguchi, T. Ruggeri, and M. Sugiyama, Phys. Lett. A 376, 2799–2803 (2012)]. It is shown that this theory is able to describe the three types of the shock wave structure observed in experiments: the nearly symmetric shock wave structure (Type A, small Mach number), the asymmetric structure (Type B, moderate Mach number), and the structure composed of thin and thick layers (Type C, large Mach number)

  15. Modeling wave-induced pore pressure and effective stress in a granular seabed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtès, Luc; Chareyre, Bruno; Michallet, Hervé; Catalano, Emanuele; Marzougui, Donia

    2014-08-01

    The response of a sandy seabed under wave loading is investigated on the basis of numerical modeling using a multi-scale approach. To that aim, the discrete element method is coupled to a finite volume method specially enhanced to describe compressible fluid flow. Both solid and fluid phase mechanics are upscaled from considerations established at the pore level. Model's predictions are validated against poroelasticity theory and discussed in comparison with experiments where a sediment analog is subjected to wave action in a flume. Special emphasis is put on the mechanisms leading the seabed to liquefy under wave-induced pressure variation on its surface. Liquefaction is observed in both dilative and compactive regimes. It is shown that the instability can be triggered for a well-identified range of hydraulic conditions. Particularly, the results confirm that the gas content, together with the permeability of the medium are key parameters affecting the transmission of pressure inside the soil.

  16. Modeling wave-induced pore pressure and effective stress in a granular seabed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtès, Luc; Chareyre, Bruno; Michallet, Hervé; Catalano, Emanuele; Marzougui, Donia

    2015-01-01

    The response of a sandy seabed under wave loading is investigated on the basis of numerical modeling using a multi-scale approach. To that aim, the discrete element method is coupled to a finite volume method specially enhanced to describe compressible fluid flow. Both solid and fluid phase mechanics are upscaled from considerations established at the pore level. Model's predictions are validated against poroelasticity theory and discussed in comparison with experiments where a sediment analog is subjected to wave action in a flume. Special emphasis is put on the mechanisms leading the seabed to liquefy under wave-induced pressure variation on its surface. Liquefaction is observed in both dilative and compactive regimes. It is shown that the instability can be triggered for a well-identified range of hydraulic conditions. Particularly, the results confirm that the gas content, together with the permeability of the medium are key parameters affecting the transmission of pressure inside the soil.

  17. Amplified-response-spectrum analysis of sodium-water reaction pressure waves. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Knittle, D.E.

    1981-10-28

    This report deals with a frequency spectrum evaluation of the SWAAM I predicted double rupture disc assembly operation pressure wave generated in the LLTR Series II A-2 test. It also evaluates the same wave predicted by the TRANSWRAP II code and the pressure wave actually measured upstream of the rupture disc assembly by the test instrumentation in Test A-2. The SWAAM I and TRANSWRAP II codes currently use the same analytical model to characterize the rupture disc until the disc strikes the knife edges. Thereafter, the SWAAM I code relies on analytical techniques to characterize the phenomena, whereas the TRANSWRAP II code uses empirical parameters based on A-2 test data to represent the disc behavior. Any differences in the predicted dynamic pipe loads caused by double rupture disc assembly operation, using the forcing functions predicted by the codes can, therefore, be traced to this difference.

  18. Three-dimensional visualization of shear wave propagation generated by dual acoustic radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Yuta; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    An elastic property of biological soft tissue is an important indicator of the tissue status. Therefore, quantitative and noninvasive methods for elasticity evaluation have been proposed. Our group previously proposed a method using acoustic radiation pressure irradiated from two directions for elastic property evaluation, in which by measuring the propagation velocity of the shear wave generated by the acoustic radiation pressure inside the object, the elastic properties of the object were successfully evaluated. In the present study, we visualized the propagation of the shear wave in a three-dimensional space by the synchronization of signals received at various probe positions. The proposed method succeeded in visualizing the shear wave propagation clearly in the three-dimensional space of 35 × 41 × 4 mm3. These results show the high potential of the proposed method to estimate the elastic properties of the object in the three-dimensional space.

  19. Ultrafast high strain rate acoustic wave measurements at high static pressure in a diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, M; Crowhurst, J; Reed, E; Zaug, J

    2008-02-04

    We have used sub-picosecond laser pulses to launch ultra-high strain rate ({approx} 10{sup 9} s{sup -1}) nonlinear acoustic waves into a 4:1 methanol-ethanol pressure medium which has been precompressed in a standard diamond anvil cell. Using ultrafast interferometry, we have characterized acoustic wave propagation into the pressure medium at static compression up to 24 GPa. We find that the velocity is dependent on the incident laser fluence, demonstrating a nonlinear acoustic response which may result in shock wave behavior. We compare our results with low strain, low strain-rate acoustic data. This technique provides controlled access to regions of thermodynamic phase space that are otherwise difficult to obtain.

  20. Effects of Shelves on Amplification of Long Waves Generated by Atmospheric Pressure Differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duha Metin, Ayse; Cevdet Yalciner, Ahmet; Ozyurt Tarakcıoglu, Gulizar; Zaytsev, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Meteotsunami is a type of long period ocean wave generated by different types of meteorological disturbances such as atmospheric gravity waves, spatial and temporal pressure distributions and squall lines. The main idea behind the occurrence of this type of long wave is that low atmospheric pressure leads to static water level rise in a part of the marine area and high atmospheric pressure leads to static water level drop in another zone. Then, it causes deformation of the water level throughout the entire sea area. The relation between the pressure difference and change of water level from normal position (η =0.99Δ P where η is the water level change (cm) according to the pressure difference from normal pressure Δ P) can be used to determine the sea level deformation. The relation represents that 1 hPa decrease in air pressure causes 1 cm rise in mean sea level. Due to the spatial and temporal changes of atmospheric pressure, the respective small amplitude long waves propagate along the entire marine area. This type of tsunami-like waves can propagate through long distances and can also be amplified due to resonant effects in the enclosed basins, offshore shelves, and nearshore/offshore coastal morphology. Therefore, it can result in considerable amplifications and causes unexpected effects in some coastal regions. This study is mainly focused on understanding of amplification of long waves generated by atmospheric pressure differences when they encounter the offshore shelves while it is propagating towards to the shore. The problem is investigated by numerically solving nonlinear shallow water equations by using regular shaped basins with different depth and shelf characteristics. In all cases, the rectangular shape large basin is triggered by spatial and temporal distributions of atmospheric pressure. The water depth and shelf formation is changed for different cases. Initially, a deep flat bottom basin is used in simulations and the reference data of water

  1. Syrinx fluid transport: modeling pressure-wave-induced flux across the spinal pial membrane.

    PubMed

    Elliott, N S J

    2012-03-01

    Syrinxes are fluid-filled cavities of the spinal cord that characterize syringomyelia, a disease involving neurological damage. Their formation and expansion is poorly understood, which has hindered successful treatment. Syrinx cavities are hydraulically connected with the spinal subarachnoid space (SSS) enveloping the spinal cord via the cord interstitium and the network of perivascular spaces (PVSs), which surround blood vessels penetrating the pial membrane that is adherent to the cord surface. Since the spinal canal supports pressure wave propagation, it has been hypothesized that wave-induced fluid exchange across the pial membrane may play a role in syrinx filling. To investigate this conjecture a pair of one-dimensional (1-d) analytical models were developed from classical elastic tube theory coupled with Darcy's law for either perivascular or interstitial flow. The results show that transpial flux serves as a mechanism for damping pressure waves by alleviating hoop stress in the pial membrane. The timescale ratio over which viscous and inertial forces compete was explicitly determined, which predicts that dilated PVS, SSS flow obstructions, and a stiffer and thicker pial membrane-all associated with syringomyelia-will increase transpial flux and retard wave travel. It was also revealed that the propagation of a pressure wave is aided by a less-permeable pial membrane and, in contrast, by a more-permeable spinal cord. This is the first modeling of the spinal canal to include both pressure-wave propagation along the spinal axis and a pathway for fluid to enter and leave the cord, which provides an analytical foundation from which to approach the full poroelastic problem. PMID:22482686

  2. Continuous blood pressure monitoring during exercise using pulse wave transit time measurement.

    PubMed

    Lass, J; Meigas, K; Karai, D; Kattai, R; Kaik, J; Rossmann, M

    2004-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of a research, which is focused on the development of the convenient device for continuous non-invasive monitoring of arterial blood pressure. The blood pressure estimation method is based on a presumption that there is a singular relationship between the pulse wave propagation time in arterial system and blood pressure. The parameter used in this study is pulse wave transit time (PWTT). The measurement of PWTT involves the registration of two time markers, one of which is based on ECG R peak detection and another on the detection of pulse wave in peripheral arteries. The reliability of beat to beat systolic blood pressure calculation during physical exercise was the main focus for the current paper. Sixty-one subjects (healthy and hypertensive) were studied with the bicycle exercise test. As a result of current study it is shown that with the correct personal calibration it is possible to estimate the beat to beat systolic arterial blood pressure during the exercise with comparable accuracy to conventional noninvasive methods. PMID:17272172

  3. Experimental Study on a Standing Wave Thermoacoustic Prime Mover with Air Working Gas at Various Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Ikhsan; Achmadin, Wahyu N.; Murti, Prastowo; Nohtomi, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    Thermoacoustic prime mover is an energy conversion device which converts thermal energy into acoustic work (sound wave). The advantages of this machine are that it can work with air as the working gas and does not produce any exhaust gases, so that it is environmentally friendly. This paper describes an experimental study on a standing wave thermoacoustic prime mover with air as the working gas at various pressures from 0.05 MPa to 0.6 MPa. We found that 0.2 MPa is the optimum pressure which gives the lowest onset temperature difference of 355 °C. This pressure value would be more preferable in harnessing low grade heat sources to power the thermoacoustic prime mover. In addition, we find that the lowest onset temperature difference is obtained when rh /δ k ratio is 2.85, where r h is the hydraulic radius of the stack and δ k is the thermal penetration depth of the gas. Moreover, the pressure amplitude of the sound wave is significantly getting larger from 2.0 kPa to 9.0 kPa as the charged pressure increases from 0.05 MPa up to 0.6 MPa.

  4. Mild neurotrauma indicates a range-specific pressure response to low level shock wave exposure.

    PubMed

    Vandevord, Pamela J; Bolander, Richard; Sajja, Venkata Siva Sai Sujith; Hay, Kathryn; Bir, Cynthia A

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the level of overpressure required to create physiological deficits is vital to advance prevention, diagnostic, and treatment strategies for individuals exposed to blasts. In this study, a rodent model of primary blast neurotrauma was employed to determine the pressure at which acute neurological alterations occurred. Rats were exposed to a single low intensity shock wave at a pressure of 0, 97, 117, or 153 kPa. Following exposure, rats were assessed for acute cognitive alterations using the Morris water maze and motor dysfunction using the horizontal ladder test. Subsequently, histological analyses of three brain regions (primary motor cortex, the hippocampal dentate gyrus region, and the posteromedial cortical amygdala) were conducted. Histological parameters included measuring the levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) to identify astrocyte activation, cleaved caspase-3 for early apoptosis identification and Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) which labels degenerating neurons within the brain tissue. The results demonstrated that an exposure to a single 117 kPa shock wave revealed a significant change in overall neurological deficits when compared to controls and the other pressures. The animals showed significant alterations in water maze parameters and a histological increase in the number of GFAP, caspase-3, and FJB-positive cells. It is suggested that when exposed to a low level shock wave, there may be a biomechanical response elicited by a specific pressure range which can cause low level neurological deficits within the rat. These data indicate that neurotrauma induced from a shock wave may lead to cognitive deficits in short-term learning and memory of rats. Additional histological evidence supports significant and diffuse glial activation and cellular damage. Further investigation into the biomechanical aspects of shock wave exposure is required to elucidate this pressure range-specific phenomenon. PMID:21994066

  5. Dynamics of quantum-classical hybrid systems: Effect of matter-wave pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, J.; Huang, X. L.; Yi, X. X.; Wu Chunfeng; Oh, C. H.

    2010-12-15

    Radiation pressure affects the kinetics of a system exposed to radiation and it constitutes the basis of laser cooling. In this article, we study matter-wave pressure through examining the dynamics of a quantum-classical hybrid system. The quantum and classical subsystems are affected mutually via a changing boundary condition. Two systems, that is, an atom and a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), are considered as the quantum subsystems, while an oscillating wall is taken as the classical subsystem. We show that the classical subsystem would experience a force proportional to Q{sup -3} from the quantum atom, where Q denotes the distance between the two walls, whereas it acquires an additional force proportional to Q{sup -2} from the BEC due to the atom-atom interaction in the BEC. These forces can be understood as the matter-wave pressure.

  6. Measurement of the normal component of compressive wave pressure in a rock with Manganin sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Virchenko, V.A.; Egorov, A.P.; Krasavin, S.V.

    1985-03-01

    Measurement of dynamic pressures in compressed media with manganin wire sensors has become common in the past few years. The increased interest in this method is due to the technological simplicity of measurement and the ease of manufacturing the manganin pickup. The method has been continually improved and put to new applications. In this paper the authors describe an experiment using manganin sensors to measure the normal component of a compressive pressure wave in rocks (marble, schist, and diabase) generated by industrial blasts. Subtle effects not previously identified include: decomposition of the shockwave in the rock and identification of an elastic precursor; features of damping of the normal component of compressive wave pressure as a function of distance from the load application point; and the pattern of destruction of brittle materials. The authors conclude that manganin sensors can be broadly applied in mining for studies of the efficacy of various types of explosives and in investigations of the mechanism of rock destruction.

  7. Time-resolved wave profile measurements in copper to Megabar pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L C; Asay, J R

    1981-01-01

    Many time-resolved techniques have been developed which have greatly aided in the understanding of dynamic material behavior such as the high pressure-dynamic strength of materials. In the paper, time-resolved measurements of copper (at shock-induced high pressures and temperatures) are used to illustrate the capability of using such techniques to investigate high pressure strength. Continuous shock loading and release wave profiles have been made in copper to 93 GPa using velocity interferometric techniques. Fine structure in the release wave profiles from the shocked state indicates an increase in shear strength of copper to 1.5 GPa at 93 GPa from its ambient value of 0.08 GPa.

  8. Computation of the pressure field generated by surface acoustic waves in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Darinskii, A N; Weihnacht, M; Schmidt, H

    2016-07-01

    The high-frequency pressure induced by a surface acoustic wave in the fluid filling a microchannel is computed by solving the full scattering problem. The microchannel is fabricated inside a container attached to the top of a piezoelectric substrate where the surface wave propagates. The finite element method is used. The pressure found in this way is compared with the pressure obtained by solving boundary-value problems formulated on the basis of simplifications which have been introduced in earlier papers by other research studies. The considered example shows that the difference between the results can be significant, ranging from several tens of percent up to several times in different points inside the channel. PMID:27314212

  9. Comparison of actinide production in traveling wave and pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, A.G.; Smith, T.A.; Deinert, M.R.

    2013-07-01

    The geopolitical problems associated with civilian nuclear energy production arise in part from the accumulation of transuranics in spent nuclear fuel. A traveling wave reactor is a type of breed-burn reactor that could, if feasible, reduce the overall production of transuranics. In one possible configuration, a cylinder of natural or depleted uranium would be subjected to a fast neutron flux at one end. The neutrons would transmute the uranium, producing plutonium and higher actinides. Under the right conditions, the reactor could become critical, at which point a self-stabilizing fission wave would form and propagate down the length of the reactor cylinder. The neutrons from the fission wave would burn the fissile nuclides and transmute uranium ahead of the wave to produce additional fuel. Fission waves in uranium are driven largely by the production and fission of {sup 239}Pu. Simulations have shown that the fuel burnup can reach values greater than 400 MWd/kgIHM, before fission products poison the reaction. In this work we compare the production of plutonium and minor actinides produced in a fission wave to that of a UOX fueled light water reactor, both on an energy normalized basis. The nuclide concentrations in the spent traveling wave reactor fuel are computed using a one-group diffusion model and are verified using Monte Carlo simulations. In the case of the pressurized water reactor, a multi-group collision probability model is used to generate the nuclide quantities. We find that the traveling wave reactor produces about 0.187 g/MWd/kgIHM of transuranics compared to 0.413 g/MWd/kgIHM for a pressurized water reactor running fuel enriched to 4.95 % and burned to 50 MWd/kgIHM. (authors)

  10. Pressure fluctuations beneath turbulent spots and instability wave packets in a hypersonic boundary layer.

    SciTech Connect

    Beresh, Steven Jay; Casper, Katya M.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2010-12-01

    The development of turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer was studied on the nozzle wall of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel. Under quiet flow conditions, the nozzle wall boundary layer remains laminar and grows very thick over the long nozzle length. This allows the development of large turbulent spots that can be readily measured with pressure transducers. Measurements of naturally occurring wave packets and developing turbulent spots were made. The peak frequencies of these natural wave packets were in agreement with second-mode computations. For a controlled study, the breakdown of disturbances created by spark and glow perturbations were studied at similar freestream conditions. The spark perturbations were the most effective at creating large wave packets that broke down into turbulent spots. The flow disturbances created by the controlled perturbations were analyzed to obtain amplitude criteria for nonlinearity and breakdown as well as the convection velocities of the turbulent spots. Disturbances first grew into linear instability waves and then quickly became nonlinear. Throughout the nonlinear growth of the wave packets, large harmonics are visible in the power spectra. As breakdown begins, the peak amplitudes of the instability waves and harmonics decrease into the rising broad-band frequencies. Instability waves are still visible on either side of the growing turbulent spots during this breakdown process.

  11. Thermal-hydraulic behaviors of vapor-liquid interface due to arrival of a pressure wave

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Akira; Fujii, Yoshifumi; Matsuzaki, Mitsuo

    1995-09-01

    In the vapor explosion, a pressure wave (shock wave) plays a fundamental role for triggering, propagation and enhancement of the explosion. Energy of the explosion is related to the magnitude of heat transfer rate from hot liquid to cold volatile one. This is related to an increasing rate of interface area and to an amount of transient heat flux between the liquids. In this study, the characteristics of transient heat transfer and behaviors of vapor film both on the platinum tube and on the hot melt tin drop, under same boundary conditions have been investigated. It is considered that there exists a fundamental mechanism of the explosion in the initial expansion process of the hot liquid drop immediately after arrival of pressure wave. The growth rate of the vapor film is much faster on the hot liquid than that on the solid surface. Two kinds of roughness were observed, one due to the Taylor instability, by rapid growth of the explosion bubble, and another, nucleation sites were observed at the vapor-liquid interface. Based on detailed observation of early stage interface behaviors after arrival of a pressure wave, the thermal fragmentation mechanism is proposed.

  12. The dynamics of pressure and form drag on a sloping headland: Internal waves versus eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Sally J.; MacCready, Parker

    2014-03-01

    Topographically generated eddies and internal waves have traditionally been studied separately even though bathymetry that creates both phenomena is abundant in coastal regions. Here a numerical model is used to understand the dynamics of eddy and wave generation as tidal currents flow past Three Tree Point, a 1 km long, 200 m deep, sloping headland in Puget Sound, WA. Bottom pressure anomalies due to vertical perturbations of the sea surface and isopycnals are used to calculate form drag in different regions of the topography to assess the relative importance of eddies versus internal waves. In regions where internal waves dominate, sea surface and isopycnal perturbations tend to work together to create drag, whereas in regions dominated by eddies, sea surface, and isopycnal perturbations tend to counteract each other. Both phenomena are found to produce similar amounts of form drag even though the bottom pressure anomalies from the eddy have much larger magnitudes than those created by the internal waves. Topography like Three Tree Point is common in high latitude, coastal regions, and therefore the findings here have implications for understanding how coastal topography removes energy from tidal currents.

  13. Direct analysis of dispersive wave fields from near-field pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Hörchens, Lars

    2011-10-01

    Flexural waves play a significant role for the radiation of sound from plates. The analysis of flexural wave fields enables the detection of sources and transmission paths in plate-like structures. The measurement of these wave fields can be carried out indirectly by means of near-field acoustic holography, which determines the vibrational wave field from pressure information measured in a plane close to the plate under investigation. The reconstruction of the plate vibration is usually obtained by inverting the forward radiation problem, i.e., by inversion of an integral operator. In this article, it is shown that a pressure measurement taken in the extreme near-field of a vibrating plate can directly be used for the approximate analysis of the dispersive flexural wave field. The inversion step of near-field acoustic holography is not necessarily required if such an approximate solution is sufficient. The proposed method enables fast and simple analysis of dispersion characteristics. Application of dispersion compensation to the measured field allows for visualizations of propagating wavefronts, such that sources and scatterers in the plate can be detected. The capabilities of the described approach are demonstrated on several measurements. PMID:21973358

  14. Characterization of a Setup to test the Impact of High-Amplitude Pressure Waves on Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Mischa; Kahlert, Ulf; Wessolleck, Johanna; Maciaczyk, Donata; Merkt, Benjamin; Maciaczyk, Jaroslaw; Osterholz, Jens; Nikkhah, Guido; Steinhauser, Martin O.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of pressure waves on cells may provide several possible applications in biology and medicine including the direct killing of tumors, drug delivery or gene transfection. In this study we characterize the physical properties of mechanical pressure waves generated by a nanosecond laser pulse in a setup with well-defined cell culture conditions. To systematically characterize the system on the relevant length and time scales (micrometers and nanoseconds) we use photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV) and obtain velocity profiles of the cell culture vessel at the passage of the pressure wave. These profiles serve as input for numerical pressure wave simulations that help to further quantify the pressure conditions on the cellular length scale. On the biological level we demonstrate killing of glioblastoma cells and quantify experimentally the pressure threshold for cell destruction. PMID:24458018

  15. Characterization of a Setup to test the Impact of High-Amplitude Pressure Waves on Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Mischa; Kahlert, Ulf; Wessolleck, Johanna; Maciaczyk, Donata; Merkt, Benjamin; Maciaczyk, Jaroslaw; Osterholz, Jens; Nikkhah, Guido; Steinhauser, Martin O.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of pressure waves on cells may provide several possible applications in biology and medicine including the direct killing of tumors, drug delivery or gene transfection. In this study we characterize the physical properties of mechanical pressure waves generated by a nanosecond laser pulse in a setup with well-defined cell culture conditions. To systematically characterize the system on the relevant length and time scales (micrometers and nanoseconds) we use photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV) and obtain velocity profiles of the cell culture vessel at the passage of the pressure wave. These profiles serve as input for numerical pressure wave simulations that help to further quantify the pressure conditions on the cellular length scale. On the biological level we demonstrate killing of glioblastoma cells and quantify experimentally the pressure threshold for cell destruction.

  16. Influence of equivalence ratio on the mechanism of pressure wave generation during knocking combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Hiroshi; Koshi, Mitsuo

    2015-11-01

    Knocking in spark-assisted engines is known as a severe pressure oscillation mainly caused by hot-spot autoignition in end-gas regions. In this study, knocking combustion of n-heptane/air mixtures modeled in a one-dimensional constant volume reactor is simulated with particular emphasis on the effects of equivalence ratio (0.6 to 2.0) on the mechanism of pressure wave generation. An efficient compressible flow solver with detailed chemical kinetics of n-heptane (373 species and 1071 reactions) is applied. The results demonstrate that the presence of negative temperature coefficient region significantly influence the knocking timing and knocking intensity, i.e., pressure wave amplitude in end-gas regions. The condition with equivalence ratios lower than 1.0 mostly leads to the reduction of the knocking intensity because of slower heat release rates of end-gas autoignition. On the other hand, the results with higher equivalence ratios of 1.2 to 2.0 indicate that a significant peak in the knocking intensity is produced at an equivalence ratio, which varies with initial temperature conditions. The final presentation will address the relationship between the knocking intensity and equivalence ratio with the discussion on detailed physics of pressure wave generation.

  17. Solitary and transitional waves in pressure-driven two-layer microchannel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisoev, G. M.; Bennett, C. J.

    2014-04-01

    Similar to the case of the gravity-driven flow (Sisoev and Bennett 2013 Fluid Dyn. Res. 45 015503) we use the integral method to derive evolution equations modeling a pressure-driven two-layer flow of immiscible viscous fluids in a plane microchannel. It is shown that the system possesses a vast set of steady-traveling solitary and transitional waves. Analysis of the phase trajectories of the relevant dynamical system indicates the existence of families of steady-traveling periodic waves.

  18. Pressure wave measurements from thermal cook-off of an HMX based high explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A; Garcia, F; Greenwood, D W; Vandersall, K S

    2000-10-10

    A better understanding of thermal cook-off is important for safe handling and storing explosive devices. A number of safety issues exist about what occurs when a cased explosive thermally cooks off. For example, violence of the events as a function of confinement are important for predictions of collateral damage. This paper demonstrates how adjacent materials can be gauged to measure the resulting pressure wave and how this wave propagates in this adjacent material. The output pulse from the thermal cook-off explosive containing fixture is of obvious interest for assessing many scenarios.

  19. Pressure Wave Measurements from Thermal Cook-Off of an HMX Based High Explosive PBX 9501

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, F; Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A; Greenwood, D W; Vandersall, K S

    2001-05-31

    A better understanding of thermal cook-off is important for safe handling and storing explosive devices. A number of safety issues exist about what occurs when a cased explosive thermally cooks off. For example, violence of the events as a function of confinement are important for predictions of collateral damage. This paper demonstrates how adjacent materials can be gauged to measure the resulting pressure wave and how this wave propagates in this adjacent material. The output pulse from the thermal cook-off explosive containing fixture is of obvious interest for assessing many scenarios.

  20. Pressure Wave Measurements from Thermal Cook-off of an HMX Based Explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A; Garcia, F; Greenwood, D W; Vandersall, K S

    2001-05-09

    A better understanding of thermal cook-off is important for safe handling and storing explosive devices. A number of safety issues exist about what occurs when a cased explosive thermally cooks off. For example, violence of the events as a function of confinement are important for predictions of collateral damage. This paper demonstrates how adjacent materials can be gauged to measure the resulting pressure wave and how this wave propagates in this adjacent material. The output pulse from the thermal cook-off explosive containing fixture is of obvious interest for assessing many scenarios.

  1. Wave propagation with different pressure signals: an experimental study on the latex tube.

    PubMed

    Ursino, M; Artioli, E; Gallerani, M

    1993-07-01

    To have deeper insight into the main factors affecting wave propagation in real hydraulic lines, we measured the true propagation coefficient in two latex rubber tubes via the three-point pressure method. The measurements were performed using both sinusoidal pressure signals of different amplitudes and periodic square waves as well as aperiodic pressure impulses. The results obtained were then compared with those predicted by a classic linear model valuable for a purely elastic maximally tethered tube. Our measurements demonstrate that the three-point pressure method may introduce significant errors at low frequencies (below 1 Hz in the present experiments) when the distance between two consecutive transducers becomes much lower than the wavelength. The pattern of phase velocity in the range 2-20 Hz turns out to be about 10 per cent higher than the theoretical one computed using the static value of the Young modulus. This result supports the idea that the dynamic Young modulus of the material is slightly higher than that measured in static conditions. The experimental attenuation per wavelength is significantly higher than the theoretical one over most of the frequencies examined, and settles at a constant value as frequency increases. Introduction of wall viscoelasticity in the theoretical model can explain only a portion of the observed high frequency damping and wave attenuation. Finally, increasing the amplitude of pressure changes significantly affects the measured value of the propagation coefficient, especially at those frequencies for which direct and reflected waves sum together in a positive fashion. In these conditions we observed a moderate increase in phase velocity and a much more evident increase in attenuation per wavelength. PMID:8231298

  2. Radial energy transport by magnetospheric ULF waves: Effects of magnetic curvature and plasma pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouznetsov, Igor; Lotko, William

    1995-01-01

    The 'radial' transport of energy by internal ULF waves, stimulated by dayside magnetospheric boundary oscillations, is analyzed in the framework of one-fluid magnetohydrodynamics. (the term radial is used here to denote the direction orthogonal to geomagnetic flux surfaces.) The model for the inhomogeneous magnetospheric plasma and background magnetic field is axisymmetric and includes radial and parallel variations in the magnetic field, magnetic curvature, plasma density, and low but finite plasma pressure. The radial mode structure of the coupled fast and intermediate MHD waves is determined by numerical solution of the inhomogeneous wave equation; the parallel mode structure is characterized by a Wentzel-Kramer-Brillouin (WKB) approximation. Ionospheric dissipation is modeled by allowing the parallel wave number to be complex. For boudnary oscillations with frequencies in the range from 10 to 48 mHz, and using a dipole model for the background magnetic field, the combined effects of magnetic curvature and finite plasma pressure are shown to (1) enhance the amplitude of field line resonances by as much as a factor of 2 relative to values obtained in a cold plasma or box-model approximation for the dayside magnetosphere; (2) increase the energy flux delivered to a given resonance by a factor of 2-4; and (3) broaden the spectral width of the resonance by a factor of 2-3. The effects are attributed to the existence of an 'Alfven buoyancy oscillation,' which approaches the usual shear mode Alfven wave at resonance, but unlike the shear Alfven mode, it is dispersive at short perpendicular wavelengths. The form of dispersion is analogous to that of an internal atmospheric gravity wave, with the magnetic tension of the curved background field providing the restoring force and allowing radial propagation of the mode. For nominal dayside parameters, the propagation band of the Alfven buoyancy wave occurs between the location of its (field line) resonance and that of the

  3. Optimizing OBS data using shielding and by removing ocean wave loading noise with Pressure and Horizontal Pressure Gradient Sensor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Spahr C.; Barclay, Andrew H.

    2016-04-01

    Ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) data, particularly from sites in shallow water are notoriously noisy. Ocean currents generate forces on an unshielded OBS sensor causing time varying tilt that greatly raises noise levels. Shallow burial can mitigate this source of noise, but is expensive and difficult to accomplish, particularly for large fleets of instruments. Large shields can provide significant reduction in noise levels as demonstrated with Cascadia Array OBS data. A recent test deployment investigated the relative motion of the shield and the sensor within the shield, providing guidance on the effectiveness of shielding. Even with shielding or burial, deformation of the seafloor caused by loading by the ocean waves raises seismic noise levels. We have previously shown the vertical component noise can be reduced using data from pressure sensors to predict the vertical deformation and remove it from the vertical record. We recently deployed a new OBS instrument in shallow water (80m) that measured two horizontal components of pressure gradient and show these data can be used to reduce wave induced deformation noise from horizontal component seismic data.

  4. Negative Pressures and Spallation in Water Drops Subjected to Nanosecond Shock Waves.

    PubMed

    Stan, Claudiu A; Willmott, Philip R; Stone, Howard A; Koglin, Jason E; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L; Robinson, Joseph S; Gumerlock, Karl L; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G; Boutet, Sébastien; Guillet, Serge A H; Curtis, Robin H; Vetter, Sharon L; Loos, Henrik; Turner, James L; Decker, Franz-Josef

    2016-06-01

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below -100 MPa were reached in the drops. We model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures. PMID:27182751

  5. Negative pressures and spallation in water drops subjected to nanosecond shock waves

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stan, Claudiu A.; Willmott, Philip R.; Stone, Howard A.; Koglin, Jason E.; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Gumerlock, Karl L.; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G.; et al

    2016-05-16

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below –100 MPamore » were reached in the drops. As a result, we model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures.« less

  6. Arterial pulse pressure amplification described by means of a nonlinear wave model: characterization of human aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, M.; Cymberknop, L.; Armentano, R.; Pessana, F.; Wray, S.; Legnani, W.

    2016-04-01

    The representation of blood pressure pulse as a combination of solitons captures many of the phenomena observed during its propagation along the systemic circulation. The aim of this work is to analyze the applicability of a compartmental model for propagation regarding the pressure pulse amplification associated with arterial aging. The model was applied to blood pressure waveforms that were synthesized using solitons, and then validated by waveforms obtained from individuals from differentiated age groups. Morphological changes were verified in the blood pressure waveform as a consequence of the aging process (i.e. due to the increase in arterial stiffness). These changes are the result of both a nonlinear interaction and the phenomena present in the propagation of nonlinear mechanic waves.

  7. Combined ultrasonic elastic wave velocity and microtomography measurements at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Yoshio; Yamada, Akihiro; Wang, Yanbin; Yu, Tony; Inoue, Toru

    2011-02-01

    Combined ultrasonic and microtomographic measurements were conducted for simultaneous determination of elastic property and density of noncrystalline materials at high pressures. A Paris-Edinburgh anvil cell was placed in a rotation apparatus, which enabled us to take a series of x-ray radiography images under pressure over a 180° angle range and construct accurately the three-dimensional sample volume using microtomography. In addition, ultrasonic elastic wave velocity measurements were carried out simultaneously using the pulse reflection method with a 10° Y-cut LiNbO3 transducer attached to the end of the lower anvil. Combined ultrasonic and microtomographic measurements were carried out for SiO2 glass up to 2.6 GPa and room temperature. A decrease in elastic wave velocities of the SiO2 glass was observed with increasing pressure, in agreement with previous studies. The simultaneous measurements on elastic wave velocities and density allowed us to derive bulk (Ks) and shear (G) moduli as a function of pressure. Ks and G of the SiO2 glass also decreased with increasing pressure. The negative pressure dependence of Ks is stronger than that of G, and as a result the value of Ks became similar to G at 2.0-2.6 GPa. There is no reason why we cannot apply this new technique to high temperatures as well. Hence the results demonstrate that the combined ultrasonic and microtomography technique is a powerful tool to derive advanced (accurate) P-V-Ks-G-(T) equations of state for noncrystalline materials.

  8. Combined ultrasonic elastic wave velocity and microtomography measurements at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Kono, Yoshio; Yamada, Akihiro; Wang, Yanbin; Yu, Tony; Inoue, Toru

    2011-09-16

    Combined ultrasonic and microtomographic measurements were conducted for simultaneous determination of elastic property and density of noncrystalline materials at high pressures. A Paris-Edinburgh anvil cell was placed in a rotation apparatus, which enabled us to take a series of x-ray radiography images under pressure over a 180{sup o} angle range and construct accurately the three-dimensional sample volume using microtomography. In addition, ultrasonic elastic wave velocity measurements were carried out simultaneously using the pulse reflection method with a 10{sup o} Y-cut LiNbO{sub 3} transducer attached to the end of the lower anvil. Combined ultrasonic and microtomographic measurements were carried out for SiO{sub 2} glass up to 2.6 GPa and room temperature. A decrease in elastic wave velocities of the SiO{sub 2} glass was observed with increasing pressure, in agreement with previous studies. The simultaneous measurements on elastic wave velocities and density allowed us to derive bulk (K{sub s}) and shear (G) moduli as a function of pressure. K{sub s} and G of the SiO{sub 2} glass also decreased with increasing pressure. The negative pressure dependence of K{sub s} is stronger than that of G, and as a result the value of K{sub s} became similar to G at 2.0-2.6 GPa. There is no reason why we cannot apply this new technique to high temperatures as well. Hence the results demonstrate that the combined ultrasonic and microtomography technique is a powerful tool to derive advanced (accurate) P-V-Ks-G-(T) equations of state for noncrystalline materials.

  9. Combined ultrasonic elastic wave velocity and microtomography measurements at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Kono, Yoshio; Yamada, Akihiro; Inoue, Toru; Wang Yanbin; Yu, Tony

    2011-02-15

    Combined ultrasonic and microtomographic measurements were conducted for simultaneous determination of elastic property and density of noncrystalline materials at high pressures. A Paris-Edinburgh anvil cell was placed in a rotation apparatus, which enabled us to take a series of x-ray radiography images under pressure over a 180 deg. angle range and construct accurately the three-dimensional sample volume using microtomography. In addition, ultrasonic elastic wave velocity measurements were carried out simultaneously using the pulse reflection method with a 10 deg. Y-cut LiNbO{sub 3} transducer attached to the end of the lower anvil. Combined ultrasonic and microtomographic measurements were carried out for SiO{sub 2} glass up to 2.6 GPa and room temperature. A decrease in elastic wave velocities of the SiO{sub 2} glass was observed with increasing pressure, in agreement with previous studies. The simultaneous measurements on elastic wave velocities and density allowed us to derive bulk (K{sub s}) and shear (G) moduli as a function of pressure. K{sub s} and G of the SiO{sub 2} glass also decreased with increasing pressure. The negative pressure dependence of K{sub s} is stronger than that of G, and as a result the value of K{sub s} became similar to G at 2.0-2.6 GPa. There is no reason why we cannot apply this new technique to high temperatures as well. Hence the results demonstrate that the combined ultrasonic and microtomography technique is a powerful tool to derive advanced (accurate) P-V-K{sub s}-G-(T) equations of state for noncrystalline materials.

  10. Cavitation inception by the backscattering of pressure waves from a bubble interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahira, Hiroyuki; Ogasawara, Toshiyuki; Mori, Naoto; Tanaka, Moe

    2015-10-01

    The secondary cavitation that occurs by the backscattering of focused ultrasound from a primary cavitation bubble caused by the negative pressure part of the ultrasound (Maxwell, et al., 2011) might be useful for the energy exchange due to bubble oscillations in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). The present study is concerned with the cavitation inception by the backscattering of ultrasound from a bubble. In the present experiment, a laser-induced bubble which is generated by a pulsed focused laser beam with high intensity is utilized as a primary cavitation bubble. After generating the bubble, focused ultrasound is emitted to the bubble. The acoustic field and the bubble motion are observed with a high-speed video camera. It is confirmed that the secondary cavitation bubble clouds are generated by the backscattering from the laser-induced bubble. The growth of cavitation bubble clouds is analyzed with the image processing method. The experimental results show that the height and width of the bubble clouds grow in stepwise during their evolution. The direct numerical simulations are also conducted for the backscattering of incident pressure waves from a bubble in order to evaluate a pressure field near the bubble. It is shown that the ratio of a bubble collapse time t0 to a characteristic time of wave propagation tS, η = t0/ts, is an important determinant for generating negative pressure region by backscattering. The minimum pressure location by the backscattering in simulations is in good agreement with the experiment.

  11. CMOS-compatible ruggedized high-temperature Lamb wave pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropelnicki, P.; Muckensturm, K.-M.; Mu, X. J.; Randles, A. B.; Cai, H.; Ang, W. C.; Tsai, J. M.; Vogt, H.

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel ruggedized high-temperature pressure sensor operating in lateral field exited (LFE) Lamb wave mode. The comb-like structure electrodes on top of aluminum nitride (AlN) were used to generate the wave. A membrane was fabricated on SOI wafer with a 10 µm thick device layer. The sensor chip was mounted on a pressure test package and pressure was applied to the backside of the membrane, with a range of 20-100 psi. The temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) was experimentally measured in the temperature range of -50 °C to 300 °C. By using the modified Butterworth-van Dyke model, coupling coefficients and quality factor were extracted. Temperature-dependent Young's modulus of composite structure was determined using resonance frequency and sensor interdigital transducer (IDT) wavelength which is mainly dominated by an AlN layer. Absolute sensor phase noise was measured at resonance to estimate the sensor pressure and temperature sensitivity. This paper demonstrates an AlN-based pressure sensor which can operate in harsh environment such as oil and gas exploration, automobile and aeronautic applications.

  12. Bromoform (CHBr sub 3 ) -- A very high-pressure shock-wave analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    McQueen, R.G.; Isaak, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    Bromoform, CHBr{sub 3}, appears to radiate like a black body. This means that the amount of radiation emitted from the shock front is extremely sensitive to temperature and hence even more sensitive to pressure. This feature has been exploited to locate overtake waves in impact experiments. Heretofore, Bromoform was used only for making timing measurements. However, if its P, V, E, and T EOS are known it could be used as high-pressure analyzer. Measurements to determine the Hugoniot, the Grueneisen parameter, {gamma}, and its optical radiation characterization are described, and preliminary data are presented. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Numerical simulation of pressure waves in the cochlea induced by a microwave pulse.

    PubMed

    Yitzhak, Nir M; Ruppin, Raphael; Hareuveny, Ronen

    2014-10-01

    The pressure waves developing at the cochlea by the irradiation of the body with a plane wave microwave pulse are obtained by numerical simulation, employing a two-step finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm. First, the specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution is obtained by solving the Maxwell equations on a FDTD grid. Second, the temperature rise due to this SAR distribution is used to formulate the thermoelastic equations of motion, which are discretized and solved by the FDTD method. The calculations are performed for anatomically based full body human models, as well as for a head model. The dependence of the pressure amplitude at the cochlea on the frequency, the direction of propagation, and the polarization of the incident electromagnetic radiation, as well as on the pulse width, was investigated. PMID:25099875

  14. Instantaneous and efficient surface wave excitation of a low pressure gas or gases

    DOEpatents

    Levy, Donald J.; Berman, Samuel M.

    1988-01-01

    A system for instantaneously ionizing and continuously delivering energy in the form of surface waves to a low pressure gas or mixture of low pressure gases, comprising a source of rf energy, a discharge container, (such as a fluorescent lamp discharge tube), an rf shield, and a coupling device responsive to rf energy from the source to couple rf energy directly and efficiently to the gas or mixture of gases to ionize at least a portion of the gas or gases and to provide energy to the gas or gases in the form of surface waves. The majority of the rf power is transferred to the gas or gases near the inner surface of the discharge container to efficiently transfer rf energy as excitation energy for at least one of the gases. The most important use of the invention is to provide more efficient fluorescent and/or ultraviolet lamps.

  15. New experimental capabilities and theoretical insights of high pressure compression waves

    SciTech Connect

    Orlikowski, D; Nguyen, J; Patterson, J R; Minich, R; Martin, L P; Holmes, N

    2007-07-20

    Currently there are three platforms that offer quasi-isentropic compression or ramp-wave compression (RWC): light-gas gun, magnetic flux (Z-pinch), and laser. We focus here on the light-gas gun technique and on some current theoretical insights from experimental data. A gradient impedance through the length of the impactor provides the pressure pulse upon impactor to the subject material. Applications and results are given concerning high-pressure strength and liquid to solid, phase transition of water plus its associated phase fraction history. We also introduce the Korteweg-deVries-Burgers equation as a means to understand the evolution these RWC waves that propagate through the thickness of the subject material. This equation has the necessary competition between non-linear, dispersion, and dissipation processes, which is shown through observed structures that are manifested in the experimental particle velocity histories. Such methodology points towards a possible quantifiable dissipation, through which RWC experiments may be analyzed.

  16. Shock wave reflection induced detonation (SWRID) under high pressure and temperature condition in closed cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Qi, Y.; Liu, H.; Zhang, P.; He, X.; Wang, J.

    2016-07-01

    Super-knock is one of the major obstacles for improving power density in advanced internal combustion engines (ICE). This work studied the mechanism of super-knock initiation using a rapid compression machine that simulated conditions relevant to ICEs and provided excellent optical accessibility. Based on the high-speed images and pressure traces of the stoichiometric iso-octane/oxygen/nitrogen combustion under high-temperature and high-pressure conditions, it was observed that detonation was first initiated in the near-wall region as a result of shock wave reflection. Before detonation was initiated, the speed of the combustion wave front was less than that of the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) detonation speed (around 1840 m/s). In the immediate vicinity of the initiation, the detonation speed was much higher than that of the C-J detonation.

  17. Pressure broadening measurement of submillimeter-wave lines of O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, M. M.; Amano, T.

    2005-10-01

    The pressure broadening coefficients and their temperature dependences for two submillimeter-wave transitions of ozone, one being monitored with Odin and the other to be monitored with JEM/SMILES and EOS-MLS, have been determined by using a BWO based submillimeter-wave spectrometer. The measurements have also been extended to one of the symmetric isotopic species, 16O18O16O. The isotopic species is observed in natural abundance and as a consequence the temperature dependence is not determined due to weak signal intensity. The pressure broadening parameters are determined with better than 1% accuracy, while the temperature dependence exponents are obtained within 1.5 3% accuracy for the normal species transitions.

  18. Cross-Sectional Relations of Arterial Stiffness, Pressure Pulsatility, Wave Reflection and Arterial Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Connie W.; Pencina, Karol M.; Massaro, Joseph M.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Levy, Daniel; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Hoffmann, Udo; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Mitchell, Gary F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Arterial hemodynamics and vascular calcification are associated with increased risk for CVD, but their inter-relations remain unclear. We sought to examine the associations of arterial stiffness, pressure pulsatility, and wave reflection with arterial calcification in individuals free of prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD). Approach and Results Framingham Heart Study Third Generation and Offspring Cohort participants free of CVD underwent applanation tonometry to measure arterial stiffness, pressure pulsatility, and wave reflection, including carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (CFPWV), central pulse pressure (CPP), forward wave amplitude, and augmentation index (AI). Participants in each cohort (n=1905, 45±6 years and n=1015, 65±9 years, respectively) underwent multi-detector computed tomography to assess presence and quantity of thoracic (TAC) and abdominal (AAC) aortic calcification and coronary artery calcification (CAC). In multivariable-adjusted models, both higher CFPWV and CPP were associated with greater TAC and AAC, whereas higher AI was associated with AAC. Among the tonometry measures, CFPWV was the strongest correlate of all calcification measures in multivariable-adjusted models (odds ratio [OR] per SD for TAC 2.69 (95%CI 2.17-3.35), AAC 1.47 (95%CI 1.26-1.73), and CAC 1.48 (95%CI 1.28-1.72), all p<0.001, respectively). We observed stronger relations of CFPWV, CPP, and forward wave amplitude with nearly all continuous calcification measures in the younger Third Generation Cohort as compared with the Offspring Cohort. Conclusions In community-dwelling individuals without prevalent CVD, abnormal central arterial hemodynamics were positively associated with vascular calcification, and were observed at younger ages than previously recognized. The mechanisms of these associations may be bidirectional and deserve further study. PMID:25169933

  19. Increasing pulse wave velocity in a realistic cardiovascular model does not increase pulse pressure with age.

    PubMed

    Mohiuddin, Mohammad W; Rihani, Ryan J; Laine, Glen A; Quick, Christopher M

    2012-07-01

    The mechanism of the well-documented increase in aortic pulse pressure (PP) with age is disputed. Investigators assuming a classical windkessel model believe that increases in PP arise from decreases in total arterial compliance (C(tot)) and increases in total peripheral resistance (R(tot)) with age. Investigators assuming a more sophisticated pulse transmission model believe PP rises because increases in pulse wave velocity (c(ph)) make the reflected pressure wave arrive earlier, augmenting systolic pressure. It has recently been shown, however, that increases in c(ph) do not have a commensurate effect on the timing of the reflected wave. We therefore used a validated, large-scale, human arterial system model that includes realistic pulse wave transmission to determine whether increases in c(ph) cause increased PP with age. First, we made the realistic arterial system model age dependent by altering cardiac output (CO), R(tot), C(tot), and c(ph) to mimic the reported changes in these parameters from age 30 to 70. Then, c(ph) was theoretically maintained constant, while C(tot), R(tot), and CO were altered. The predicted increase in PP with age was similar to the observed increase in PP. In a complementary approach, C(tot), R(tot), and CO were theoretically maintained constant, and c(ph) was increased. The predicted increase in PP was negligible. We found that increases in c(ph) have a limited effect on the timing of the reflected wave but cause the system to degenerate into a windkessel. Changes in PP can therefore be attributed to a decrease in C(tot). PMID:22561301

  20. Heart rate variability during plateau waves of intracranial pressure: A pilot descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Luís, A; Santos, A S; Dias, C; Almeida, R; Rocha, A P

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to describe heart rate variability during the first episode of plateau waves of intracranial pressure (ICP) in Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in order to characterize and identify at bedside this cerebrovascular phenomenon. The general behavior of the heart rate variability (HRV) spectral measures expressed in the medians across patients is concordant with an increased HRV in the latter part of the baseline and plateau wave, followed by a decrease after the event and a new increase during the recovery. In low and high frequency bands the same increase is more marked in the parametric analysis. Interpretation of HRV may help clinicians to better identify the plateau waves and allow earlier management. PMID:26737694

  1. Bottom shear stress and pressure perturbations under an internal solitary wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Gustavo; Diamessis, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The bottom boundary layer (BBL) under a mode-1 internal solitary wave (ISW) of depression propagating against an oncoming model barotropic current is examined using 2-D direct numerical simulation based on a spectral multidomain penalty method model. Use of a postprocessing projection onto a modified set of divergence-free basis functions enables investigation of wave-based Reynolds numbers within the range [105 ,106 ] . At sufficiently high ISW amplitude, the BBL undergoes a global instability which produces intermittent vortex shedding from within the separation bubble in the lee of the wave. The interplay between the bottom shear stress field and pressure perturbations during vortex ejection events and the subsequent evolution of the vortices is the focus of this presentation. Implications for resuspension of bottom particulate matter are discussed in the context of specific sediment transport models. Support from the Cornell Sloan Diversity Fellowship program is gratefully acknowledged.

  2. Combustion and pressure wave interaction in enclosed mixtures initiated by temperature nonuniformities

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, H.J.; Mack, A.; Roth, P. . Inst. fuer Verbrennung und Gasdynamik)

    1994-06-01

    The dynamics of one-dimensional combustion waves originating from hot-spot ignition was studied numerically by solving the corresponding conservation equations for mass, species, energy, and momentum. The mathematical model included a multispecies transport model and a detailed reaction mechanism. The numerical solution of the time-dependent conservation equations was based on the method of lines and on a dynamic adaptive grid technique. Due to the stiffness of the resulting system of ordinary differential equations, the BDF-code DASSL was used to integrate the equations. The results of the simulations show that the interaction of combustion and pressure wave can lead to deflagration to detonation transition. Depending on the temperature levels and the shape of the temperature nonuniformity, ordinary flame propagation, deflagration to detonation transition or to deflagration waves, depending on the initial conditions.

  3. Elastic wave velocities of peridotite KLB-1 at mantle pressures and implications for mantle velocity modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Zou, Yongtao; Liebermann, Robert C.; Li, Baosheng

    2015-05-01

    Compressional (VP) and shear (VS) wave velocities of a synthetic KLB-1 peridotite were measured for the first time up to 10 GPa using ultrasonic interferometry. Analysis of the P and S wave velocities yielded K0 = 123(1) GPa, K0' = 5.1(2), G0 = 75(1) GPa, and G0'= 1.3(1) for the bulk and shear moduli and their pressure derivatives. Comparison with Voigt-Reuss-Hill (VRH) calculations based on literature elasticity data for its constituent minerals indicates that the experimentally measured P and S wave velocities, densities, bulk sound velocities, and VP/VS ratios fall close to the lower limit of VRH averages associated with the uncertainties of the mineral elasticity data. A comparison with previous modeling of mantle compositions implies that the velocities for an aggregate with the pyrolitic composition of KLB-1 are in close agreement with seismic data at the depths of the Earth's upper mantle.

  4. Underwater blast wave pressure sensor based on polymer film fiber Fabry-Perot cavity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjie; Wang, Meng; Xu, Jian; Peng, Li; Yang, Minghong; Xia, Minghe; Jiang, Desheng

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the theoretical and experimental aspects of an optical underwater shock wave sensor based on a polymer film optical fiber Fabry-Perot cavity manufactured by vacuum deposition technology. The transduction mechanism of the sensor involves a normally incident acoustic stress wave that changes the thickness of the polymer film, thereby giving rise to a phase shift. This transient interferometric phase is interrogated by a three-phase-step algorithm. Theoretically, the sensor-acoustic-field interaction principle is analyzed, and the phase modulation sensitivity based on the theory of waves in the layered media is calculated. Experimentally, a static calibration test and a dynamic calibration test are conducted using a piston-type pressure calibration machine and a focusing-type electromagnetic shock wave. Results indicate that the repeatability, hysteresis, nonlinearity, and the overall measurement accuracy of the sensor within the full pressure range of 55 MPa are 1.82%, 0.86%, 1.81%, and 4.49%, respectively. The dynamic response time is less than 0.767 μs. Finally, three aspects that need further study for practical use are pointed out. PMID:25322237

  5. Head orientation affects the intracranial pressure response resulting from shock wave loading in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dal Cengio Leonardi, Alessandra; Keane, Nickolas J; Bir, Cynthia A; Ryan, Anne G; Xu, Liaosa; Vandevord, Pamela J

    2012-10-11

    Since an increasing number of returning military personnel are presenting with neurological manifestations of traumatic brain injury (TBI), there has been a great focus on the effects resulting from blast exposure. It is paramount to resolve the physical mechanism by which the critical stress is being inflicted on brain tissue from blast wave encounters with the head. This study quantitatively measured the effect of head orientation on intracranial pressure (ICP) of rats exposed to a shock wave. Furthermore, the study examined how skull maturity affects ICP response of animals exposed to shock waves at various orientations. Results showed a significant increase in ICP values in larger rats at any orientation. Furthermore, when side-ICP values were compared to the other orientations, the peak pressures were significantly lower suggesting a relation between ICP and orientation of the head due to geometry of the skull and location of sutures. This finding accentuates the importance of skull dynamics in explaining possible injury mechanisms during blast. Also, the rate of pressure change was measured and indicated that the rate was significantly higher when the top of the head was facing the shock front. The results confirm that the biomechanical response of the superior rat skull is distinctive compared to other areas of the skull, suggesting a skull flexure mechanism. These results not only present insights into the mechanism of brain injury, but also provide information which can be used for designing more effective protective head gear. PMID:22947434

  6. Non-invasive measurement of local pulse pressure by pulse wave-based ultrasound manometry (PWUM)

    PubMed Central

    Vappou, J; Luo, J; Okajima, K; Di Tullio, M; Konofagou, E E

    2014-01-01

    The central Blood Pressure (CBP) has been established as a relevant indicator of cardiovascular disease. Despite its significance, CBP remains particularly challenging to measure in standard clinical practice. The objective of this study is to introduce Pulse Wave-based Ultrasound Manometry (PWUM) as a simple-touse, non-invasive ultrasound-based method for quantitative measurement of the central pulse pressure. Arterial wall displacements are estimated using radiofrequency (RF) ultrasound signals acquired at high frame rates and the pulse pressure waveform is estimated using both the distension waveform and the local Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV). The method was tested on the abdominal aorta of 11 healthy subjects (age 35.7± 16 y.o.). PWUM pulse pressure measurements were compared to those obtained by radial applanation tonometry using a commercial system. The average intra-subject variability of the pulse pressure amplitude was found to be equal to 4.2 mmHg, demonstrating good reproducibility of the method. Excellent correlation was found between the waveforms obtained by PWUM and those obtained by tonometry in all subjects (0.94 pressure waveform at the imaged location, and may offer therefore the possibility to estimate the pulse pressure at different arterial sites. Future developments include the validation of the method against invasive estimates on patients, as well as its application to other large arteries. PMID:21904023

  7. Elastic wave velocities of Fe-bearing ringwoodite under pressure and temperature conditions of the mantle transition region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higo, Y.; Inoue, T.; Irifune, T.; Li, B.; Liebermann, R. C.

    2005-12-01

    Ringwoodite (high pressure polymorph of olivine) is considered to be the most abundant mineral at depths between 520km and 660km in the mantle transition region, and it is important to accurately determine the elastic wave velocities in order to discuss the mineralogy and composition of the mantle transition region. In this study, We have developed ultrasonic interferometry conjunction with in situ X-radiation techniques (X-ray diffraction and X-radiography) in a DIA-type cubic anvil high-pressure apparatus, in order to obtain high-quality elastic wave velocity data under the conditions of the mantle transition region and measured the elastic wave velocity of iron-bearing ringwoodite under high temperature and high pressure. The specimen was hot-pressed at 19GPa and 1473K in a 3000-ton high pressure apparatus (ORANGE-3000: GRC at ehime university). High-pressure ultrasonic experiments were performed using Kawai-type high-pressure apparatus SPEED-1500 at BL04B1. The unit cell constants of pressure marker (NaCl, Au) and sample (ringwoodite) were measured for estimation of pressure and sample length. Also, X-radiography was used in this study for direct measurement of sample length at high pressure and high temperature. The ultrasonic signals were generated and received by a LiNbO3 transducer (10° Y-cut), which can produce both longitudinal and shear waves at the same time. The waveforms were very clear and the each echoes both P-wave and S-wave were identifiable at high temperature and high pressure. P-wave and S-wave velocities increasing with increasing pressure. And P-wave and S-wave velocities decrease with increasing temperature. Especially, S-wave velocity has large temperature dependence, which velocity (at 18 GPa, 1673 K) slower than those of ambient condition. The results of our high-pressure experiment, including the elastic moduli and their pressure dependence, effect of iron on the elastic moduli, as well as their implication for the mantle transition

  8. Radiation pressure of standing waves on liquid columns and small diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiessen, David B.; Marr-Lyon, Mark J.; Wei, Wei; Marston, Philip L.

    2002-11-01

    The radiation pressure of standing ultrasonic waves in air is demonstrated in this investigation to influence the dynamics of liquid columns and small flames. With the appropriate choice of the acoustic amplitude and wavelength, the natural tendency of long columns to break because of surface tension was suppressed in reduced gravity [M. J. Marr-Lyon, D. B. Thiessen, and P. L. Marston, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 2293-2296 (2001); 87(20), 9001(E) (2001)]. Evaluation of the radiation force shows that narrow liquid columns are attracted to velocity antinodes. The response of a small vertical diffusion flame to ultrasonic radiation pressure in a horizontal standing wave was observed in normal gravity. In agreement with our predictions of the distribution of ultrasonic radiation stress on the flame, the flame is attracted to a pressure antinode and becomes slightly elliptical with the major axis in the plane of the antinode. The radiation pressure distribution and the direction of the radiation force follow from the dominance of the dipole scattering for small flames. Understanding radiation stress on flames is relevant to the control of hot fluid objects. [Work supported by NASA.

  9. Evolution of the charge density wave superstructure in ZrTe3 under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoesch, Moritz; Garbarino, Gaston; Battaglia, Corsin; Aebi, Philipp; Berger, Helmuth

    2016-03-01

    The material ZrTe3 is a well-known example of an incommensurate periodic lattice distortion (PLD) at low temperatures due to a charge density wave (CDW). Previous studies have found a sharp boundary as a function of pressure between CDW below 5 GPa and bulk superconductivity above this value. We present a study of low-temperature-high-pressure single crystal x-ray diffraction along with ab initio density functional theory calculations. The modulation vector qCDW is found to change smoothly with pressure until the PLD is lost. Fermi surface calculations reproduce these changes, but neither these nor the experimental crystal lattice structure show a particular step change at 5 GPa, thus leading to the conclusion that the CDW is lost accidentally by tipping the balance of CDW formation in the Fermi surface nesting that stabilizes it.

  10. Landslide stability: Role of rainfall-induced, laterally propagating, pore-pressure waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Priest, G.R.; Schulz, W.H.; Ellis, W.L.; Allan, J.A.; Niem, A.R.; Niem, W.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Johnson Creek Landslide is a translational slide in seaward-dipping Miocene siltstone and sandstone (Astoria Formation) and an overlying Quaternary marine terrace deposit. The basal slide plane slopes sub-parallel to the dip of the Miocene rocks, except beneath the back-tilted toe block, where it slopes inland. Rainfall events raise pore-water pressure in the basal shear zone in the form of pulses of water pressure traveling laterally from the headwall graben down the axis of the slide at rates of 1-6 m/hr. Infiltration of meteoric water and vertical pressure transmission through the unsaturated zone has been measured at ~50 mm/hr. Infiltration and vertical pressure transmission were too slow to directly raise head at the basal shear zone prior to landslide movement. Only at the headwall graben was the saturated zone shallow enough for rainfall events to trigger lateral pulses of water pressure through the saturated zone. When pressure levels in the basal shear zone exceeded thresholds defined in this paper, the slide began slow, creeping movement as an intact block. As pressures exceeded thresholds for movement in more of the slide mass, movement accelerated, and differential displacement between internal slide blocks became more pronounced. Rainfall-induced pore-pressure waves are probably a common landslide trigger wherever effective hydraulic conductivity is high and the saturated zone is located near the surface in some part of a slide. An ancillary finding is apparently greater accuracy of grouted piezometers relative to those in sand packs for measurement of pore pressures at the installed depth.

  11. Aortic stenosis in adults. Non-invasive estimation of pressure differences by continuous wave Doppler echocardiography.

    PubMed Central

    Hegrenaes, L; Hatle, L

    1985-01-01

    The peak and mean aortic transvalvar pressure differences measured invasively and non-invasively by continuous wave Doppler echocardiography were compared in 87 consecutive patients with aortic stenosis. The mean values were calculated from the maximal velocities of the aortic jet recorded with a spectral display of the Doppler frequency shifts and by applying a modified Bernoulli equation. Technically satisfactory velocity curves for estimating the mean pressure differences could not be obtained in three patients and invasive measurements were not obtained in two. In all patients the peak transvalvar pressure difference was calculated since the aortic jet was identified non-invasively. The peak and mean pressure differences measured invasively and non-invasively correlated well--with only minor underestimation of the pressure differences measured with the Doppler technique--regardless of age, sex, and the presence or absence of aortic valvar regurgitation, or other valvar lesions. With a systematic search for the highest velocities in the aortic jet and with on line spectral analysis of the Doppler frequencies the peak and the mean aortic pressure differences can be determined non-invasively with a high degree of precision in almost all patients. Images PMID:4052281

  12. Numerical Analysis of Secondary Undulations in Urauchi Bay Caused by an Eastward Pressure Wave over the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saita, T.; Asano, T.

    2012-12-01

    Background and Methods Seiches, called abiki in Japanese, are frequently observed along the west coast of Kyushu Island, Japan. In 2009, an abiki of almost 3 m in total height occurred in Urauchi Bay at the Koshiki Islands located off Kyushu Island. The Seiches in the bay have been attributed to a meteorological disturbance over the East China Sea. Here, the response of the East China Sea to propagating pressure waves and the resulting oscillations in Urauchi Bay are evaluated by numerical analysis. The computational domains are the East China Sea (Domain I) and Urauchi Bay (Domain II). The primitive equations are a continuity equation and nonlinear shallow-water equations, taking into account the effect of an atmospheric pressure gradient at the sea surface. Results (1) Development of long-period waves in the East China Sea The water surface undulations generated by pressure waves propagating eastward over the East China Sea are evaluated. In the calculations, the shapes of pressure waves are simplified such that barometric pressure changes along the east-west direction only. The pressure is constant along the meridional direction. The pressure waves move from west to east in Domain I at a constant speed. Calculations are executed under 891 conditions where the wave lengths L, amplitude Pmax, and phase velocity Cp of the pressure waves are changed in the ranges of 10-140 km, 1-3 hPa, and 60-210 km/h, respectively. Eastward pressure waves over the East China Sea generate water level fluctuations of sufficient duration to put Urauchi Bay into resonance. For Cp of 80-140 km/h, surface wave heights become especially large. The increase in wave height is attributed to Proudman resonance because Cp is close to 88.3 km/h which is the propagation speed of a surface wave estimated for the mean water depth in the western area of the Okinawa Trough. A smaller L increases the amplitude of water level fluctuations and shortens their period. L of 10-40 km leads to fluctuations

  13. Observations of dayside subauroral proton arcs and EMIC waves associated with increases in solar wind pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Dasrath, D. K.; Frey, H. U.; Yeoman, T. K.; Lessard, M.

    2013-12-01

    We present three examples of simultaneous subauroral proton arcs in the southern hemisphere near local noon recorded by the Far Ultraviolet (FUV) instrument on the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) spacecraft and associated Pc1 waves recorded by ground based magnetometers at high latitude stations in Antarctica. Each event appeared to be triggered by a large increase in solar wind dynamic pressure during otherwise quiet geomagnetic conditions. The resulting compression of the dayside magnetosphere triggered ~0.5 Hz EMIC waves which were observed by search coil magnetometers at Halley and South Pole Station, Antarctica. These waves in turn caused energetic protons to precipitate into the southern high latitude ionosphere where they caused the appearance of an aurora several degrees of latitude equatorward of the steady southern auroral oval, and generated plasma irregularities which were detected by the Halley SuperDARN radar. Two additional proton arcs at similar latitude but in the dusk sector occurred shortly after the main phase of minor geomagnetic storms, and were not associated with solar wind pressure increases.

  14. Experimental validation of a millimeter wave radar technique to remotely sense atmospheric pressure at the Earth's surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.; Bradford, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments with a millimeter wave radar operating on the NASA CV-990 aircraft which validate the technique for remotely sensing atmospheric pressure at the Earth's surface are described. Measurements show that the precise millimeter wave observations needed to deduce pressure from space with an accuracy of 1 mb are possible, that sea surface reflection properties agree with theory and that the measured variation of differential absorption with altitude corresponds to that expected from spectroscopic models.

  15. Cavitation inception by the backscattering of pressure waves from a bubble interface

    SciTech Connect

    Takahira, Hiroyuki Ogasawara, Toshiyuki Mori, Naoto Tanaka, Moe

    2015-10-28

    The secondary cavitation that occurs by the backscattering of focused ultrasound from a primary cavitation bubble caused by the negative pressure part of the ultrasound (Maxwell, et al., 2011) might be useful for the energy exchange due to bubble oscillations in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). The present study is concerned with the cavitation inception by the backscattering of ultrasound from a bubble. In the present experiment, a laser-induced bubble which is generated by a pulsed focused laser beam with high intensity is utilized as a primary cavitation bubble. After generating the bubble, focused ultrasound is emitted to the bubble. The acoustic field and the bubble motion are observed with a high-speed video camera. It is confirmed that the secondary cavitation bubble clouds are generated by the backscattering from the laser-induced bubble. The growth of cavitation bubble clouds is analyzed with the image processing method. The experimental results show that the height and width of the bubble clouds grow in stepwise during their evolution. The direct numerical simulations are also conducted for the backscattering of incident pressure waves from a bubble in order to evaluate a pressure field near the bubble. It is shown that the ratio of a bubble collapse time t{sub 0} to a characteristic time of wave propagation t{sub S}, η = t{sub 0}/t{sub s}, is an important determinant for generating negative pressure region by backscattering. The minimum pressure location by the backscattering in simulations is in good agreement with the experiment.

  16. The 24-hour pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index, and central blood pressure in normotensive volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Tatyana Y; Korneva, Viktoria A; Bryantseva, Evgeniya N; Barkan, Vitaliy S; Orlov, Artemy V; Posokhov, Igor N; Rogoza, Anatoly N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index corrected for heart rate 75 (AIx@75), and central systolic and diastolic blood pressure during 24-hour monitoring in normotensive volunteers. Overall, 467 subjects (206 men and 261 women) were recruited in this study. Participants were excluded from the study if they were less than 19 years of age, had blood test abnormalities, had a body mass index greater than 2 7.5 kg/m2, had impaired glucose tolerance, or had hypotension or hypertension. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) with the BPLab® device was performed in each subject. ABPM waveforms were analyzed using the special automatic Vasotens® algorithm, which allows the calculation of pulse wave velocity, AIx@75, central systolic and diastolic blood pressure for “24-hour”, “awake”, and “asleep” periods. Circadian rhythms and sex differences in these indexes were identified. Pending further validation in prospective outcome-based studies, our data may be used as preliminary diagnostic values for the BPLab ABPM additional index in adult subjects. PMID:24812515

  17. Pressure Generation from Micro-Bubble Collapse at Shock Wave Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Akihisa; Ohtani, Kiyonobu; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Nishio, Shigeru; Mimura, Haruo; Takeda, Minoru

    This paper reports the result of a primary experimental and analytical study used to explore a reliable technology that is potentially applicable to the inactivation of micro-creatures contained in ship ballast water. A shock wave generated by the micro-explosion of a 10mg silver azide pellet in a 10mm wide parallel test section was used to interact with a bubble cloud consisting of bubbles with average diameter 10µm produced by a swirling flow type micro-bubble generator. Observations were carried out with a high-speed camera, IMACON200, and the corresponding rebound pressures of the collapsing bubbles were measured with a fiber optic probe pressure transducer that provides high spatial and temporal resolutions. We found that micro-bubbles collapse in several hundred nanoseconds after the shock exposure and the resulting peak pressure pulses that repeatedly occurred exceeded well over 200MPa measured at the 20mm distance from the explosion center. These continued for well over 20µs. The experimental pressure responses were explained by solving the one-dimensional bubble Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Such high peak pressures could be used effectively for the inactivation of micro-creatures contained in ship ballast water.

  18. A Study of Standing Pressure Waves Within Open and Closed Acoustic Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, C.; Steinetz, B.; Finkbeiner, J.; Raman, G.; Li, X.

    2002-01-01

    The first section of the results presented herein was conducted on an axisymmetric resonator configured with open ventilation ports on either end of the resonator, but otherwise closed and free from obstruction. The remaining section presents the results of a similar resonator shape that was closed, but contained an axisymmetric blockage centrally located through the axis of the resonator. Ambient air was used as the working fluid. In each of the studies, the resonator was oscillated at the resonant frequency of the fluid contained within the cavity while the dynamic pressure, static pressure, and temperature of the fluid were recorded at both ends of the resonator. The baseline results showed a marked reduction in the amplitude of the dynamic pressure waveforms over previous studies due to the use of air instead of refrigerant as the working fluid. A sharp reduction in the amplitude of the acoustic pressure waves was expected and recorded when the configuration of the resonators was modified from closed to open. A change in the resonant frequency was recorded when blockages of differing geometries were used in the closed resonator, while acoustic pressure amplitudes varied little from baseline measurements.

  19. Effects of the air pressure on the wave-packet dynamics of gaseous iodine molecules at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Rongwei; He, Ping; Chen, Deying; Xia, Yuanqin; Yu, Xin; Wang, Jialing; Jiang, Yugang

    2013-02-01

    Based on ultrafast laser pulses, time-resolved resonance enhancement coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (RE-CARS) is applied to investigate wave-packet dynamics in gaseous iodine. The effects of air pressure on the wave-packet dynamics of iodine molecules are studied at pressures ranging from 1.5 Torr to 750 Torr. The RE-CARS signals are recorded in a gas cell filled with a mixture of about 0.3 Torr iodine in air buffer gas at room temperature. The revivals and fractional revival structures in the wave-packet signal are found to gradually disappear with rising air pressure up to 750 Torr, and the decay behaviors of the excited B-state and ground X-state become faster with increasing air pressure, which is due to the collision effects of the molecules and the growing complexity of the spectra at high pressures.

  20. Self-consistent axial modeling of surface-wave-produced discharges at low and intermediate pressures.

    PubMed

    Petrova, T; Benova, E; Petrov, G; Zhelyazkov, I

    1999-07-01

    A model for description of the axial structure of a surface-wave-produced and -sustained plasma based on numerical calculation of a complete set of electrodynamic and kinetic equations is presented. The model includes a self-consistent solution to the electron Boltzmann equation, a set of particle balance equations for electrons, excited atoms, atomic and molecular ions, as well as Maxwell's equations with appropriate boundary conditions. A gas thermal balance equation is used to predict the neutral gas temperature self-consistently. Precise calculations of discharge characteristics of an argon plasma column sustained by an azimuthally symmetric surface wave at low and intermediate gas pressures have been performed. A comparison with available experimental data is done in order to test the validity of the model. PMID:11969832

  1. Fluctuation of the charge density wave in TTF-TCNQ under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Keizo; Weng, Yufeng; Seno, Yuki; Rani Tamilselvan, Natarajan; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Arumugam, Sonachalam; Takashima, Yusaku; Yoshino, Harukazu; Kato, Reizo

    2009-03-01

    Temperature dependence of the resistivity of TTF-TCNQ along the b-(1D)- and a-axes was studied under hydrostatic pressure up to 8 GPa. A striking contrast was seen between the b-(1D)- and a-axes in the power-law dependence of resistivity ρ=ρ0Tα in the metallic region as well as the activation energy in the charge density wave (CDW) insulating state. We note that the careful terminal configuration is essentially important to obtain these properties.

  2. Study of the Pressure Rise Across Shock Waves Required to Separate Laminar and Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, Coleman Dup; Lange, Roy H

    1952-01-01

    Results are presented of a dimensional study and an experimental investigation of the pressure rise across a shock wave which causes separation of the boundary layer on a flat plate. The experimental part of the investigation was conducted at a Mach number of 3.03 for a Reynolds number range of 2 x 10 (sup) 6 to 19 x 10 (sup) 6. The available experimental data are compared with the predictions of the present study, and the significance of the results obtained is discussed relative to certain practical design problems.

  3. Evaluation of mechanical losses in a linear motor pressure wave generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Subhash; Rangasamy, Karunanithi; Jonnalagadda, Kranthi Kumar; Chakkala, Damu; Achanur, Mallappa; Govindswamy, Jagadish; Gour, Abhay Singh

    2012-06-01

    A moving magnet linear motor compressor or pressure wave generator (PWG) of 2 cc swept volume with dual opposed piston configuration has been developed to operate miniature pulse tube coolers. Prelimnary experiments yielded only a no-load cold end temperature of 180 K. Auxiliary tests and the interpretation of detailed modeling of a PWG suggest that much of the PV power has been lost in the form of blow-by at piston seals due to large and non-optimum clearance seal gap between piston and cylinder. The results of experimental parameters simulated using Sage provide the optimum seal gap value for maximizing the delivered PV power.

  4. Seismic attenuation: effects of interfacial impedance on wave-induced pressure diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Qiaomu; Müller, Tobias M.; Rubino, J. Germán

    2014-12-01

    Seismic attenuation and dispersion in layered sedimentary structures are often interpreted in terms of the classical White model for wave-induced pressure diffusion across the layers. However, this interlayer flow is severely dependent on the properties of the interface separating two layers. This interface behaviour can be described by a pressure jump boundary condition involving a non-vanishing interfacial impedance. In this paper, we incorporate the interfacial impedance into the White model by solving a boundary value problem in the framework of quasi-static poroelasticity. We show that the White model predictions for attenuation and dispersion substantially change. These changes can be attributed to petrophysically plausible scenarios such as imperfect hydraulic contacts or the presence of capillarity.

  5. Enhanced acoustic sensing through wave compression and pressure amplification in anisotropic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongyao; Liu, Haijun; Reilly, Michael; Bae, Hyungdae; Yu, Miao

    2014-10-01

    Acoustic sensors play an important role in many areas, such as homeland security, navigation, communication, health care and industry. However, the fundamental pressure detection limit hinders the performance of current acoustic sensing technologies. Here, through analytical, numerical and experimental studies, we show that anisotropic acoustic metamaterials can be designed to have strong wave compression effect that renders direct amplification of pressure fields in metamaterials. This enables a sensing mechanism that can help overcome the detection limit of conventional acoustic sensing systems. We further demonstrate a metamaterial-enhanced acoustic sensing system that achieves more than 20 dB signal-to-noise enhancement (over an order of magnitude enhancement in detection limit). With this system, weak acoustic pulse signals overwhelmed by the noise are successfully recovered. This work opens up new vistas for the development of metamaterial-based acoustic sensors with improved performance and functionalities that are highly desirable for many applications.

  6. Design and fabrication of dielectric diaphragm pressure sensors for applications to shock wave measurement in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, W.; Djakov, V.; Barton, J. S.; Watson, S.; MacPherson, W. N.; Stevenson, J. T. M.; Dunare, C. C.

    2007-07-01

    Optical fibre pressure sensors have potential performance advantages over electrical sensors in measuring rapid transients such as shock waves from explosive blasts. We report the development of micromachined optical fibre Fabry-Pérot pressure sensors using a silicon dioxide or nitride diaphragm and detail the fabrication stages of the sensor body and diaphragm. The planar technology used is based on silicon deep etching and direct fusion bonding of silicon wafers. Test results for both types of diaphragm are presented. Sensors with rise times better than 3 µs, range 0.1 to 1 MPa and resolution ~500 Pa have been demonstrated in explosives trials. Despite the difference in the sign of stress for the two diaphragm types, both demonstrated excellent high-speed response to explosively generated air shocks.

  7. Studies on an improved indigenous pressure wave generator and its testing with a pulse tube cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, S.; Karunanithi, R.; Narsimham, G. S. V. L.; Kranthi, J. Kumar; Damu, C.; Praveen, T.; Samir, M.; Mallappa, A.

    2014-01-01

    Earlier version of an indigenously developed Pressure Wave Generator (PWG) could not develop the necessary pressure ratio to satisfactorily operate a pulse tube cooler, largely due to high blow by losses in the piston cylinder seal gap and due to a few design deficiencies. Effect of different parameters like seal gap, piston diameter, piston stroke, moving mass and the piston back volume on the performance is studied analytically. Modifications were done to the PWG based on analysis and the performance is experimentally measured. A significant improvement in PWG performance is seen as a result of the modifications. The improved PWG is tested with the same pulse tube cooler but with different inertance tube configurations. A no load temperature of 130 K is achieved with an inertance tube configuration designed using Sage software. The delivered PV power is estimated to be 28.4 W which can produce a refrigeration of about 1 W at 80 K.

  8. High Definition Oscillometry: Non-invasive Blood Pressure Measurement and Pulse Wave Analysis.

    PubMed

    Egner, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive monitoring of blood pressure has become increasingly important in research. High-Definition Oscillometry (HDO) delivers not only accurate, reproducible and thus reliable blood pressure but also visualises the pulse waves on screen. This allows for on-screen feedback in real time on data validity but even more on additional parameters like systemic vascular resistance (SVR), stroke volume (SV), stroke volume variances (SVV), rhythm and dysrhythmia. Since complex information on drug effects are delivered within a short period of time, almost stress-free and visible in real time, it makes HDO a valuable technology in safety pharmacology and toxicology within a variety of fields like but not limited to cardiovascular, renal or metabolic research. PMID:26091643

  9. On the influence of the hysteretic behavior of the capillary pressure on the wave propagation in partially saturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Bettina

    2016-06-01

    It is well known that the capillary pressure curve of partially saturated soils exhibits a hysteresis. For the same degree of saturation it has different values depending on the initial state of the soil, thus for drying of a wet soil or wetting of a dry soil. The influence of these different values of the capillary pressure on the propagation of sound waves is studied by use of a linear hyperbolic model. Even if the model does not contain a hysteresis operator, the effect of hysteresis in the capillary pressure curve is accounted for. In order to obtain the limits of phase speeds and attenuations for the two processes the correspondent values for main drying and main wetting are inserted into the model separately. This is done for two examples of soils, namely for Del Monte sand and for a silt loam both filled by an air-water mixture. The wave analysis reveals four waves: one transversal wave and three longitudinal waves. The waves which are driven by the immiscible pore fluids are influenced by the hysteresis in the capillary pressure curve while the waves which are mainly driven by the solid are not.

  10. An Experimental Investigation of the Free Surface Profiles Generated by a Moving Pressure Source: Solitary Capillary-Gravity Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diorio, J. D.; Watkins, N.; Zuech, J.; Duncan, J. H.

    2008-11-01

    There have been several recent numerical investigations that have shown the existence of three-dimensional nonlinear solitary surface wave patterns that propagate with speeds less than the minimum wave phase speed prescribed by linear theory (23 cm/s for clean water). In the present study, wave patterns were generated by translating a small-diameter region of high pressure across a water surface. The high-pressure region was created by forcing air through a small-diameter vertically oriented tube attached to a carriage that propelled it horizontally at speeds near 23 cm/s. The wave pattern was measured with a cinematic LIF technique. It was found that a steady solitary wave pattern can exist at speeds below the linear-theory minimum phase speed, while for speeds above the minimum, a pattern of gravity-capillary waves was produced. The solitary wave pattern, which only appeared when the pressure forcing was large, dissipated rapidly when the forcing was turned off. The streamwise dimension of the solitary wave was much smaller than the transverse dimension.

  11. Effect of anisotropic dust pressure and superthermal electrons on propagation and stability of dust acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, M. F.; Behery, E. E.; El-Taibany, W. F.

    2015-06-15

    Employing the reductive perturbation technique, Zakharov–Kuznetzov (ZK) equation is derived for dust acoustic (DA) solitary waves in a magnetized plasma which consists the effects of dust anisotropic pressure, arbitrary charged dust particles, Boltzmann distributed ions, and Kappa distributed superthermal electrons. The ZK solitary wave solution is obtained. Using the small-k expansion method, the stability analysis for DA solitary waves is also discussed. The effects of the dust pressure anisotropy and the electron superthermality on the basic characteristics of DA waves as well as on the three-dimensional instability criterion are highlighted. It is found that the DA solitary wave is rarefactive (compressive) for negative (positive) dust. In addition, the growth rate of instability increases rapidly as the superthermal spectral index of electrons increases with either positive or negative dust grains. A brief discussion for possible applications is included.

  12. On the unsteady free surface wave pattern found behind a localized pressure distribution moving at speeds just below the minimum phase speed of linear gravity capillary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masnadi, N.; Duncan, J. H.

    2012-11-01

    The non-linear response of a water free surface to a localized pressure distribution moving at constant speed just below the minimum phase speed (Cmin ~ 23 cm/s) of gravity-capillary waves is studied experimentally in a long tank. The pressure distribution is generated by blowing air onto the water surface via a vertically oriented 2-mm-ID tube that is mounted on an instrument carriage that is in turn set to move along the tank at constant speeds between 20 and 23 cm/s. A cinematic light refraction method is used to obtain quantitative measurements of the surface deformation pattern behind the air jet. At towing speeds just below Cmin, an unsteady V-shaped wave pattern appears behind the pressure source. From observations of the wave pattern evolution, it is found that localized depressions are generated near the pressure source and propagate in pairs along the two arms of the V-shaped pattern. These are eventually shed from the tips of the pattern and rapidly decay. Measurements of the evolution of the speed of these localized depression patterns are compared to existing measurements of the speeds of steady three-dimensional solitary gravity-capillary waves (lumps) that appear behind the pressure source at even lower towing speeds. Supported by the National Science Foundation Division of Ocean Sciences.

  13. Experimental determination of radiated internal wave power without pressure field data

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Frank M.; Morrison, P. J.; Paoletti, M. S.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2014-04-15

    We present a method to determine, using only velocity field data, the time-averaged energy flux (J) and total radiated power P for two-dimensional internal gravity waves. Both (J) and P are determined from expressions involving only a scalar function, the stream function ψ. We test the method using data from a direct numerical simulation for tidal flow of a stratified fluid past a knife edge. The results for the radiated internal wave power given by the stream function method agree to within 0.5% with results obtained using pressure and velocity data from the numerical simulation. The results for the radiated power computed from the stream function agree well with power computed from the velocity and pressure if the starting point for the stream function computation is on a solid boundary, but if a boundary point is not available, care must be taken to choose an appropriate starting point. We also test the stream function method by applying it to laboratory data for tidal flow past a knife edge, and the results are found to agree with the direct numerical simulation. The supplementary material includes a Matlab code with a graphical user interface that can be used to compute the energy flux and power from two-dimensional velocity field data.

  14. Vibration and pressure wave therapy for calf strains: a proposed treatment

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Amol; St. Louis, Marie; Fournier, Magali

    2013-01-01

    Summary Calf (lower leg) strains have a variety of treatment regimens with variable outcomes and return to activity (RTA) time frames. These injuries involve disruption of portions or the entire gastrocnemius-soleus myo-tendinous complex. Conservative treatment initially consists of rest, ice, compression, elevation (RICE). Immediately following calf injury, patients can utilize cryotherapy, massage, passive range of motion, and progressive exercise. In general, Grade I through Grade III calf strains can take up to 6 weeks before the athlete can return to training. It can also involve the loss of more than 50% of muscle integrity. Recently, vibration therapy and radial pressure waves have been utilized to treat muscular strains and other myo-tendinous injuries that involve trigger points. Studies have suggested vibration therapy with rehabilitation can increase muscle strength and flexibility in patients. Segmental vibration therapy (SVT) is treatment to a more focal area. Vibration therapy (VT) is applied directly to the area of injury. VT is a mechanical stimulus that is thought to stimulate the sensory receptors, as well as decrease inflammatory cells and receptors. Therefore, VT could be a valuable tool in treating athlete effectively and decreasing their recovery time. The purpose of this paper is to give the reader baseline knowledge of VT and propose a treatment protocol for calf strains using this technology along with radial pressure waves. PMID:23888287

  15. Stone Comminution Correlates with the Average Peak Pressure Incident on a Stone during Shock Wave Lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, N.; Zhong, P.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the roles of lithotripter shock wave (LSW) parameters and cavitation in stone comminution, a series of in vitro fragmentation experiments have been conducted in water and 1,3-butanediol (a cavitation-suppressive fluid) at a variety of acoustic field positions of an electromagnetic shock wave lithotripter. Using field mapping data and integrated parameters averaged over a circular stone holder area (Rh = 7 mm), close logarithmic correlations between the average peak pressure (P+(avg)) incident on the stone (D = 10 mm BegoStone) and comminution efficiency after 500 and 1,000 shocks have been identified. Moreover, the correlations have demonstrated distinctive thresholds in P+(avg) (5.3 MPa and 7.6 MPa for soft and hard stones, respectively), that are required to initiate stone fragmentation independent of surrounding fluid medium and LSW dose. These observations, should they be confirmed using other shock wave lithotripters, may provide an important field parameter (i.e., P+(avg)) to guide appropriate application of SWL in clinics, and facilitate device comparison and design improvements in future lithotripters. PMID:22935690

  16. Nonlinear wave evolution in pressure-driven stratified flow of Newtonian and Herschel-Bulkley fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valluri, Prashant; Sahu, Kirti; Ding, Hang; Spelt, Peter; Matar, Omar; Lawrence, Chris

    2007-11-01

    Pressure-driven stratified channel flow of a Newtonian fluid flowing over a Herschel-Bulkley (HB) fluid is considered. The effects of yield stress and shear-thinning rheology on the nonlinear wave evolution are studied using numerical simulations; the HB rheology is regularized at low shear rates using a bi-viscosity formulation. Two different numerical methods were used to carry out the computations: a level-set method (based on that by Spelt, J. Comput. Phys. 2005) and a diffuse-interface method (based on that by Ding et al., J. Comput. Phys., in press). The simulations, which account for fluid inertia, surface tension and gravity are validated against linear theory predictions at early times. The results at later times show the spatio-temporal evolution into the nonlinear regime wherein waves are strongly deformed, leading to the onset of drop entrainment. It is shown that the apparent viscosity in the region of the HB fluid directly involved in the onset of entrainment is almost constant; unyielded regions are confined to wave troughs at late stages of the nonlinear evolution.

  17. External and internal waves in stream-potential pressure-coordinate dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirk, Marko; Rõõm, Rein

    2014-05-01

    In stream-potential dynamics pressure coordinate velocity -→v = {dx/dt,dy/dt,dp/dt} = {vx,vy,vp} = {u,v,ω } is presented in terms of 4D stream-potential {ψ0,ψx,ψy,ψp} -→v = downtriangleψ0 + downtriangle× -→ψ leftrightarrow vi = Giαδαψ0 + ɛαβγδβψγ, with diagonal metric tensor with main elements G11 = G22 = 1, G33 = p2/H2 (H = RT/g is the height scale). Vector potential -→ ψ is further expressed via horizontal curl and divergence of the stream function ω = δxψy - δyψx ≠¡ dp/dt, Ξ = δxψx + δyψy. The wave-vector components in linearized stream-potential dynamics are the scalar flow potential ψ0, surface pressure fluctuation p's, horizontal divergence Ξ and curl ω of the fluctuative part -→ψ' of complete vector potential -→ψ = -→ψ + -→ψ' . Equations for ψ0 and p's form the external wave subsystem δp' δ« ps dξ0 - -→- p2 δ2 -s+ downtriangle2 ψ0dp = 0, -+gH downtriangle2(p's/ps) = A0(ψ ,ω,Ξ), L0ψ0 = ξ0, L0 =-2 -2+downtriangle2, δt 0 dt H δp (1) while the equations for Ξ, ω and temperature fluctuation T' form the internal wave subsystem d-→ξ -→ -→- dT ' Tiω ( ) ( p2 δ2 ) p2 -dt = A (ψ,ω,Ξ), -dt = -p-+Q, L0Ξ = δp p2ξp/H2 , H2- δp2 + downtriangle2 ω = H2-(δyξx - δxξy) (2) with Ti = (R/cp)T - pδpT. In these equations 0 -→ α -→ -→ i iαβ ξ = downtriangle · v = δαv , ξ = downtriangle ×v leftrightarrow ξ = ɛ δαvβ are the 3D divergence and curl of velocity. In the presentation equation systems (1) and (2) are solved both analytically and numerically. Interaction of external waves with stationary internal orographic waves is investigated.

  18. Effects of Blood Pressure and Sex on the Change of Wave Reflection: Evidence from Gaussian Fitting Method for Radial Artery Pressure Waveform

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengyu; Zhao, Lina; Liu, Changchun

    2014-01-01

    An early return of the reflected component in the arterial pulse has been recognized as an important indicator of cardiovascular risk. This study aimed to determine the effects of blood pressure and sex factor on the change of wave reflection using Gaussian fitting method. One hundred and ninety subjects were enrolled. They were classified into four blood pressure categories based on the systolic blood pressures (i.e., ≤110, 111–120, 121–130 and ≥131 mmHg). Each blood pressure category was also stratified for sex factor. Electrocardiogram (ECG) and radial artery pressure waveforms (RAPW) signals were recorded for each subject. Ten consecutive pulse episodes from the RAPW signal were extracted and normalized. Each normalized pulse episode was fitted by three Gaussian functions. Both the peak position and peak height of the first and second Gaussian functions, as well as the peak position interval and peak height ratio, were used as the evaluation indices of wave reflection. Two-way ANOVA results showed that with the increased blood pressure, the peak position of the second Gaussian significantly shorten (P<0.01), the peak height of the first Gaussian significantly decreased (P<0.01) and the peak height of the second Gaussian significantly increased (P<0.01), inducing the significantly decreased peak position interval and significantly increased peak height ratio (both P<0.01). Sex factor had no significant effect on all evaluation indices (all P>0.05). Moreover, the interaction between sex and blood pressure factors also had no significant effect on all evaluation indices (all P>0.05). These results showed that blood pressure has significant effect on the change of wave reflection when using the recently developed Gaussian fitting method, whereas sex has no significant effect. The results also suggested that the Gaussian fitting method could be used as a new approach for assessing the arterial wave reflection. PMID:25384042

  19. Methodology and evaluation of intracranial pressure response in rats exposed to complex shock waves.

    PubMed

    Dal Cengio Leonardi, Alessandra; Keane, Nickolas J; Hay, Kathryn; Ryan, Anne G; Bir, Cynthia A; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2013-12-01

    Studies on blast neurotrauma have focused on investigating the effects of exposure to free-field blast representing the simplest form of blast threat scenario without considering any reflecting surfaces. However, in reality personnel are often located within enclosures or nearby reflecting walls causing a complex blast environment, that is, involving shock reflections and/or compound waves from different directions. The purpose of this study was to design a complex wave testing system and perform a preliminary investigation of the intracranial pressure (ICP) response of rats exposed to a complex blast wave environment (CBWE). The effects of head orientation in the same environment were also explored. Furthermore, since it is hypothesized that exposure to a CBWE would be more injurious as compared to a free-field blast wave environment (FFBWE), a histological comparison of hippocampal injury (cleaved caspase-3 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)) was conducted in both environments. Results demonstrated that, regardless of orientation, peak ICP values were significantly elevated over the peak static air overpressure. Qualitative differences could be noticed compared to the ICP response in rats exposed to simulated FFBWE. In the CBWE scenario, after the initial loading the skull/brain system was not allowed to return to rest and was loaded again reaching high ICP values. Furthermore, results indicated consistent and distinct ICP-time profiles according to orientation, as well as distinctive values of impulse associated with each orientation. Histologically, cleaved caspase-3 positive cells were significantly increased in the CBWE as compared to the FFBWE. Overall, these findings suggest that the geometry of the skull and the way sutures are distributed in the rats are responsible for the difference in the stresses observed. Moreover, this increase stress contributes to correlation of increased injury in the CBWE. PMID:23904049

  20. In the trail of a fiber Bragg grating sensor to assess the central arterial pressure wave profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitão, Cátia; Antunes, Paulo; Bastos, José M.; André, Paulo; Pinto, João. L.

    2013-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are one of the primary causes of death in the world. Hemodynamics is the study of the blood propagation and the physics aspects concerned to it, relating pressure, flow and resistance. One of the most important topics on hemodynamics is the evaluation of arterial wave reflections. Recently this physical parameter of the pressure wave propagation through the arterial tree was considered as a novel strong risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Arterial pressure reflections can be quantified by central pressure profile analysis. In this work we study in the trial of an optical fibre Bragg grating based sensor of assess the central pressure profile, with the goal of to achieve a superior sensitivity, with a better signal quality than electromechanical probes, measured directly in the carotid artery.

  1. The Numerical Simulation of Unsteady Cavitation Evolution Induced by Pressure Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, B. C.; Zheng, J. G.

    2014-11-01

    The present study is focused on the numerical simulation of pressure wave propagation through the cavitating compressible liquid flow, its interaction with cavitation bubble and the resulting unsteady cavitation evolution. The compressibility effects of liquid water are taken into account and the cavitating flow is governed by one-fluid cavitation model which is based on the compressible Euler equations with the assumption that the cavitation is the homogeneous mixture of liquid and vapour which are locally under both kinetic and thermodynamic equilibrium. Several aspects of the method employed to solve the governing equations are outlined. The unsteady features of cavitating flow due to the external perturbation, such as the cavitation deformation and collapse and consequent pressure increase are resolved numerically and discussed in detail. It is observed that the cavitation bubble collapse is accompanied by the huge pressure surge of order of 100 bar, which is thought to be responsible for the material erosion, noise, vibration and loss of efficiency of operating underwater devices.

  2. Experimental feasibility of investigating acoustic waves in Couette flow with entropy and pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Zorumski, William E.; Rawls, John W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility is discussed for an experimental program for studying the behavior of acoustic wave propagation in the presence of strong gradients of pressure, temperature, and flow. Theory suggests that gradients effects can be experimentally observed as resonant frequency shifts and mode shape changes in a waveguide. A convenient experimental geometry for such experiments is the annular region between two co-rotating cylinders. Radial temperature gradients in a spinning annulus can be generated by differentially heating the two cylinders via electromagnetic induction. Radial pressure gradients can be controlled by varying the cylinder spin rates. Present technology appears adequate to construct an apparatus to allow independent control of temperature and pressure gradients. A complicating feature of a more advanced experiment, involving flow gradients, is the requirement for independently controlled cylinder spin rates. Also, the boundary condition at annulus terminations must be such that flow gradients are minimally disturbed. The design and construction of an advanced apparatus to include flow gradients will require additional technology development.

  3. The relationship between gas hydrate saturation and P-wave velocity of pressure cores obtained in the Eastern Nankai Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Y.; Yoneda, J.; Jin, Y.; Kida, M.; Suzuki, K.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Fujii, T.; Nagao, J.

    2014-12-01

    P-wave velocity is an important parameter to estimate gas hydrate saturation in sediments. In this study, the relationship between gas hydrate saturation and P-wave velocity have been analyzed using natural hydrate-bearing-sediments obtained in the Eastern Nankai Trough, Japan. The sediment samples were collected by the Hybrid Pressure Coring System developed by Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology during June-July 2012, aboard the deep sea drilling vessel CHIKYU. P-wave velocity was measured on board by the Pressure Core Analysis and Transfer System developed by Geotek Ltd. The samples were maintained at a near in-situ pressure condition during coring and measurement. After the measurement, the samples were stored core storage chambers and transported to MHRC under pressure. The samples were manipulated and cut by the Pressure-core Non-destructive Analysis Tools or PNATs developed by MHRC. The cutting sections were determined on the basis of P-wave velocity and visual observations through an acrylic window equipped in the PNATs. The cut samples were depressurized to measure gas volume for saturation calculations. It was found that P-wave velocity correlates well with hydrate saturation and can be reproduced by the hydrate frame component model. Using pressure cores and pressure core analysis technology, nondestructive and near in-situ correlation between gas hydrate saturation and P-wave velocity can be obtained. This study was supported by funding from the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium) planned by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), Japan.

  4. LIGHT PRESSURE: Theoretical study of the light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle of an arbitrary size in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzatov, D. V.; Gaida, L. S.; Afanas'ev, Anatolii A.

    2008-12-01

    The light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves is studied in detail for different particle radii and angles of incidence of waves.

  5. Effect of Pressure and Chemical Substitutions on the Charge-Density-Wave in LaAgSb2

    SciTech Connect

    Budko,S.; Weiner, T.; Ribeiro, R.; Canfield, P.; Lee, Y.; Vogt, T.; Lacerda

    2006-01-01

    We present data on the crystal structure and evolution of the electrical resistivity in lightly doped La{sub 1-x}R{sub x}AgSb{sub 2} (R=Gd, Y, Ce, and Nd) at ambient pressure and in LaAgSb{sub 2} under hydrostatic pressure. The upper charge density wave transition is suppressed by both doping and pressure with substitution-related disorder being the dominant mechanism for this suppression in the former case and the anisotropic pressure dependence of the unit cell dimensions (as seen in the c/a ratio) prevailing in the latter case.

  6. Experimental investigation of the unsteady response of premixed flame fronts to acoustic pressure waves

    SciTech Connect

    Wangher, Athena; Searby, Geoff; Quinard, Joel

    2008-07-15

    Using OH{sup *} chemiluminescence, we measure the experimental unsteady response of a 1-D premixed flame to an acoustic pressure wave for a range of frequencies below and above the inverse of the flame transit time. We find that the response is positive and, at low frequency, the order of magnitude is comparable with existing theoretical analyses. However, if it is assumed that the chemiluminescence is proportional to the mass consumption rate, despite some uncertainty in the interpretation of the chemiluminescence signal we find that the frequency dependence of the measured response is not compatible with the predictions of the standard flame model for one-step Arrhenius kinetics. A better, but not perfect, correlation is obtained for the heat release rate. We conclude that the standard model does not provide an adequate description of the unsteady response of real flames and that it is necessary to investigate more realistic chemical models. (author)

  7. Sensing the characteristic acoustic impedance of a fluid utilizing acoustic pressure waves

    PubMed Central

    Antlinger, Hannes; Clara, Stefan; Beigelbeck, Roman; Cerimovic, Samir; Keplinger, Franz; Jakoby, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonic sensors can be used to determine physical fluid parameters like viscosity, density, and speed of sound. In this contribution, we present the concept for an integrated sensor utilizing pressure waves to sense the characteristic acoustic impedance of a fluid. We note that the basic setup generally allows to determine the longitudinal viscosity and the speed of sound if it is operated in a resonant mode as will be discussed elsewhere. In this contribution, we particularly focus on a modified setup where interferences are suppressed by introducing a wedge reflector. This enables sensing of the liquid's characteristic acoustic impedance, which can serve as parameter in condition monitoring applications. We present a device model, experimental results and their evaluation. PMID:23565036

  8. Effects of oxygen radicals in low-pressure surface-wave plasma on sterilization

    SciTech Connect

    Nagatsu, Masaaki; Terashita, Fumie; Nonaka, Hiroyuki; Xu, Lei; Nagata, Toshi; Koide, Yukio

    2005-05-23

    The effects of oxygen radicals on sterilization were studied using a 2.45 GHz surface-wave oxygen plasma. A population of 1.5x10{sup 6} Bacillus stearothermophilus spores was irradiated for 3 min or more with oxygen plasma, generated at pressures between 6 and 14 Pa. The decimal reduction value (D value), a measure of the effectiveness of sterilization, was determined to be about 15-25 s. Using only oxygen radicals, excluding all charged particles, the 1.5x10{sup 6} spores were sterilized with a D value of 30-45 s after 5 min or more of irradiation. On scanning electron microscopy, the length and width of the spores changed significantly due to chemical etching by oxygen radicals.

  9. Effects of oxygen radicals in low-pressure surface-wave plasma on sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatsu, Masaaki; Terashita, Fumie; Nonaka, Hiroyuki; Xu, Lei; Nagata, Toshi; Koide, Yukio

    2005-05-01

    The effects of oxygen radicals on sterilization were studied using a 2.45GHz surface-wave oxygen plasma. A population of 1.5×106 Bacillus stearothermophilus spores was irradiated for 3min or more with oxygen plasma, generated at pressures between 6 and 14Pa. The decimal reduction value (D value), a measure of the effectiveness of sterilization, was determined to be about 15-25s. Using only oxygen radicals, excluding all charged particles, the 1.5×106 spores were sterilized with a D value of 30-45s after 5min or more of irradiation. On scanning electron microscopy, the length and width of the spores changed significantly due to chemical etching by oxygen radicals.

  10. Magnetospheric ULF waves with increasing amplitude related to solar wind dynamic pressure changes: The Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X. C.; Zong, Q.-G.; Shi, Q. Q.; Tian, A. M.; Sun, W. J.; Wang, Y. F.; Zhou, X. Z.; Fu, S. Y.; Hartinger, M. D.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2015-09-01

    Ultralow frequency (ULF) waves play an important role in transferring energy by buffeting the magnetosphere with solar wind pressure impulses. The amplitudes of magnetospheric ULF waves, which are induced by solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements or shocks, are thought to damp in one half a wave cycle or an entire wave cycle. We report in situ observations of solar wind dynamic pressure impulse-induced magnetospheric ULF waves with increasing amplitudes. We found six ULF wave events induced by solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements with slow but clear wave amplitude increase. During three or four wave cycles, the amplitudes of ion velocities and electric field of these waves increased continuously by 1.3-4.4 times. Two significant events were selected to further study the characteristics of these ULF waves. We found that the wave amplitude growth is mainly contributed by the toroidal mode wave. Three possible mechanisms of causing the wave amplitude increase are discussed. First, solar wind dynamic pressure perturbations, which are observed in a duration of 20-30 min, might transfer energy to the magnetospheric ULF waves continually. Second, the wave amplitude increase in the radial electric field may be caused by superposition of two wave modes, a standing wave excited by the solar wind dynamic impulse and a propagating compressional wave directly induced by solar wind oscillations. When superposed, the two wave modes fit observations as does a calculation that superposes electric fields from two wave sources. Third, the normal of the solar wind discontinuity is at an angle to the Sun-Earth line. Thus, the discontinuity will affect the dayside magnetopause continuously for a long time.

  11. The Role of Compression and Traveling Wave Pressures in the Transmission of Sound Out of the Gerbil Cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wei; Olson, Elizabeth S.

    2009-02-01

    Cochlear emissions provide a noninvasive probe of cochlear mechanics, but their utility is hindered by incomplete understanding of their relationship to intracochlear activity. In particular, recent work has uncovered a question about the mode by which emissions travel out of the cochlea - whether they emerge via a "fast" compression pressure or a "slow" traveling-wave pressure. We further probed this question with simultaneous measurements of intracochlear distortion products (DPs) at two well-separated locations and DP oto-acoustic emissions (DPOAEs). In the broad frequency range of the local best frequency (BF), the DP responses demonstrate the now well-known forward-traveling-wave character. However, at frequencies substantially lower than the BF, comparisons of both DPOAEs to DPs and of DPs at two locations support a reverse-traveling-wave. Finally, a compression pressure DP was observed when stimulating at high levels (90 dB) with frequencies that were well above the BF. Therefore, the compression / reverse-traveling-wave question appears to be a quantitative question of the relative size of these different pressure modes. In previous and present results we find that the reverse-traveling-wave mode can be dominant both within the cochlea and in the production of DPOAEs.

  12. On the influence of low initial pressure and detonation stochastic nature on Mach reflection of gaseous detonation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. J.; Guo, C. M.

    2014-09-01

    The two-dimensional, time-dependent and reactive Navier-Stokes equations were solved to obtain an insight into Mach reflection of gaseous detonation in a stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture diluted by 25 % argon. This mixture generates a mode-7 detonation wave under an initial pressure of 8.00 kPa. Chemical kinetics was simulated by an eight-species, forty-eight-reaction mechanism. It was found that a Mach reflection mode always occurs for a planar detonation wave or planar air shock wave sweeping over wedges with apex angles ranging from to . However, for cellular detonation waves, regular reflection always occurs first, which then transforms into Mach reflection. This phenomenon is more evident for detonations ignited under low initial pressure. Low initial pressure may lead to a curved wave front, that determines the reflection mode. The stochastic nature of boundary shape and transition distance, during deflagration-to-detonation transition, leads to relative disorder of detonation cell location and cell shape. Consequently, when a detonation wave hits the wedge apex, there appears a stochastic variation of triple point origin and variation of the angle between the triple point trajectory and the wedge surface. As the wedge apex angle increases, the distance between the triple point trajectory origin and the wedge apex increases, and the angle between the triple point trajectory and the wedge surface decreases exponentially.

  13. Pressure-induced quenching of the charge-density-wave state observed by x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sacchetti, A.

    2010-05-03

    We report an x-ray diffraction study on the charge-density-wave (CDW) LaTe{sub 3} and CeTe{sub 3} compounds as a function of pressure. We extract the lattice constants and the CDW modulation wave-vector, and provide direct evidence for a pressure-induced quenching of the CDW phase. We observe subtle differences between the chemical and mechanical compression of the lattice. We account for these with a scenario where the effective dimensionality in these CDW systems is dependent on the type of lattice compression and has a direct impact on the degree of Fermi surface nesting and on the strength of fluctuation effects.

  14. Diagnostics of surface wave driven low pressure plasmas based on indium monoiodide-argon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ögün, C. M.; Kaiser, C.; Kling, R.; Heering, W.

    2015-06-01

    Indium monoiodide is proposed as a suitable alternative to hazardous mercury, i.e. the emitting component inside the compact fluorescent lamps (CFL), with comparable luminous efficacy. Indium monoiodide-argon low pressure lamps are electrodelessly driven with surface waves, which are launched and coupled into the lamp by the ‘surfatron’, a microwave coupler optimized for an efficient operation at a frequency of 2.45 GHz. A non intrusive diagnostic method based on spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy is employed to characterize the plasma parameters. The line emission coefficients of the plasma are derived by means of Abel’s inversion from the measured spectral radiance data. The characteristic plasma parameters, e.g. electron temperature and density are determined by comparing the experimentally obtained line emission coefficients with simulated ones from a collisional-radiative model. Additionally, a method to determine the absolute plasma efficiency via irradiance measurements without any goniometric setup is presented. In this way, the relationship between the plasma efficiency and the plasma parameters can be investigated systematically for different operating configurations, e.g. electrical input power, buffer gas pressure and cold spot temperature. The performance of indium monoiodide-argon plasma is compared with that of conventional CFLs.

  15. Numerical study of the direct pressure effect of acoustic waves in planar premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, H.; Jimenez, C.

    2010-08-15

    Recently the unsteady response of 1-D premixed flames to acoustic pressure waves for the range of frequencies below and above the inverse of the flame transit time was investigated experimentally using OH chemiluminescence Wangher (2008). They compared the frequency dependence of the measured response to the prediction of an analytical model proposed by Clavin et al. (1990), derived from the standard flame model (one-step Arrhenius kinetics) and to a similar model proposed by McIntosh (1991). Discrepancies between the experimental results and the model led to the conclusion that the standard model does not provide an adequate description of the unsteady response of real flames and that it is necessary to investigate more realistic chemical models. Here we follow exactly this suggestion and perform numerical studies of the response of lean methane flames using different reaction mechanisms. We find that the global flame response obtained with both detailed chemistry (GRI3.0) and a reduced multi-step model by Peters (1996) lies slightly above the predictions of the analytical model, but is close to experimental results. We additionally used an irreversible one-step Arrhenius reaction model and show the effect of the pressure dependence of the global reaction rate in the flame response. Our results suggest first that the current models have to be extended to capture the amplitude and phase results of the detailed mechanisms, and second that the correlation between the heat release and the measured OH* chemiluminescence should be studied deeper. (author)

  16. Improved Performance of an Indigenous Stirling Type Pulse Tube Cooler and Pressure Wave Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, J. Kranthi; Jacob, S.; Karunanithi, R.; Narasimham, G. S. V. L.; Damu, C.; Praveen, T.; Samir, M.

    Sustained efforts have been made in our laboratory to improve the performance of an indigenously developed pressure wave gen- erator by reducing the mechanical losses and the required input power. An acoustically matching pulse tube cooler, with a design target of 0.5 W at 80 K, was designed using Sage and experience gained from previous studies. The pulse tube cooler was fabri- cated and tested. The effect of regenerator stacking pattern on the cooler performance was studied by filling the regenerator with mesh of the same size #400 and with multi meshes #250, 325, 400. In present experiments, regenerator with #400 mesh at 30 bar filling pressure performed better with more energy efficiency. A no load temperature of 74 K was achieved with input power of 59 W corresponding to a cooling power of 0.22 W at 80 K. Parasitic heat load to the cooler was measured be 0.68 W. This heat load is primarily by heat conduction through the regenerator and pulse tube wall. By reducing the wall thickness from 0.30 mm to 0.15 mm, the parasitic loads can be reduced by 50%.

  17. Optimization of pressure waveform, distribution and sequence in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufeng

    This work aims to improve shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) technology by increasing stone comminution efficiency while reducing simultaneously the propensity of tissue injury. First, the mechanism of vascular injury in SWL was investigated. Based on in vitro vessel phantom experiment and theoretical calculation, it was found that SWL-induced large intraluminal bubble expansion may constitute a primary mechanism for the rupture of capillaries and small blood vessels. However, when the large intraluminal bubble expansion is suppressed by inversion of the pressure waveform of the lithotripter shock wave (LSW), rupture of a 200-mum cellulose hollow fiber vessel phantom can be avoided. Based on these experimental observations and theoretical assessment of bubble dynamics using the Gilmore model an in situ pulse superposition technique was developed to reduce tissue injury without compromising stone comminution in SWL. A thin shell ellipsoidal reflector insert was fabricated to fit snugly with the original HM-3 reflector. Using the Hamilton model, the effects of reflector geometry on the pulse profile and sequence of the shock waves were evaluated qualitatively. Guided by this analysis, the design of the reflector insert had been refined to suppress the intraluminal bubble expansion, which was confirmed by high-speed imaging of bubble dynamics both in free field and inside a vessel phantom. The pulse pressure, beam size and stone comminution efficiency of the upgraded reflector were all found to be comparable to those of the original reflector. However, the greatest difference lies in the propensity for tissue injury. At the lithotripter focus, about 30 shocks are needed to cause a rupture of the vessel phantom using the original reflector, but no rupture can be produced after 200 shocks by the upgraded reflector. Overall, the upgraded reflector could significantly reduce the propensity of vessel rupture while maintaining satisfactory stone comminution. Second, to improve

  18. Pressure Wave Propagation along the Décollement of the Nankai Accretionary Wedge: Implications for Aseismic Slip Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, A.; Appold, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic and hydrologic observations of the Nankai subduction zone made by the Ocean Drilling Program suggest that pore fluid pressures within the accretionary wedge décollement are highly overpressured to near lithostatic values below depths of 2 km beneath the sea floor as a result of sediment diagenesis and dehydration of the subducting oceanic plate. This overpressured zone is also observed to discharge pulses of high fluid pressure that migrate up-dip along the décollement at rates of 1's of km/day. These high pressure pulses along the décollement may cause large enough reductions in the local effective stress to account for aseismic slip events that have been found to propagate also at rates of 1's of km/day. Because elevated fluid pressure and correspondingly decreased effective stress can lead to a dilation of porosity, the pressure waves may become effective agents of fluid transport that can travel more quickly than fluids flowing in the background Darcian flow regime. The purpose of the present study was to seek theoretical confirmation that pressure waves are able to travel quickly enough to account for the seismic and hydrological observations documented. This confirmation was sought through a transient one-dimensional numerical solution to the differential fluid mass conservation equation for an elastic porous medium. Results of the numerical simulations show that when overpressures at depths greater than 2 km in the décollement exceed lithostatic pressure by at least 3%, pressure waves are formed that migrate up-dip at rates fast enough to account for aseismic slip over a broad range of geologic conditions. Pressure waves spawned from these depths in the décollement may travel fast enough to account for aseismic slip when overpressures there are as low as 99% of lithostatic pressure, but require low specific storage of 3×10-6 m-1, high sensitivity of permeability to effective stress, low permeability no higher than about 10-21 m2 at depths below

  19. Macro-mechanical modeling of blast-wave mitigation in foams. Part II: reliability of pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britan, A.; Liverts, M.; Shapiro, H.; Ben-Dor, G.

    2013-02-01

    A phenomenological study of the process occurring when a plane shock wave reflected off an aqueous foam column filling the test section of a vertical shock tube has been undertaken. The experiments were conducted with initial shock wave Mach numbers in the range 1.25le {M}_s le 1.7 and foam column heights in the range 100-450 mm. Miniature piezotrone circuit electronic pressure transducers were used to record the pressure histories upstream and alongside the foam column. The aim of these experiments was to find a simple way to eliminate a spatial averaging as an artifact of the pressure history recorded by the side-on transducer. For this purpose, we discuss first the common behaviors of the pressure traces in extended time scales. These observations evidently quantify the low frequency variations of the pressure field within the different flow domains of the shock tube. Thereafter, we focus on the fronts of the pressure signals, which, in turn, characterize the high-frequency response of the foam column to the shock wave impact. Since the front shape and the amplitude of the pressure signal most likely play a significant role in the foam destruction, phase changes and/or other physical factors, such as high capacity, viscosity, etc., the common practice of the data processing is revised and discussed in detail. Generally, side-on pressure measurements must be used with great caution when performed in wet aqueous foams, because the low sound speed is especially prone to this effect. Since the spatial averaged recorded pressure signals do not reproduce well the real behaviors of the pressure rise, the recorded shape of the shock wave front in the foam appears much thicker. It is also found that when a thin liquid film wet the sensing membrane, the transducer sensitivity was changed. As a result, the pressure recorded in the foam could exceed the real amplitude of the post-shock wave flow. A simple procedure, which allows correcting this imperfection, is discussed in

  20. Effects of Heat Wave on Body Temperature and Blood Pressure in the Poor and Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soyeon; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Ahn, Byungok; Choi, Kyusik

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to investigate the acute effects of heat stress on body temperature and blood pressure of elderly individuals living in poor housing conditions. Methods Repeated measurements of the indoor temperature, relative humidity, body temperature, and blood pressure were conducted for 20 elderly individuals living in low-cost dosshouses in Seoul during hot summer days in 2010. Changes in the body temperature, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) according to variations in the indoor and outdoor temperature and humidity were analyzed using a repeated-measures ANOVA controlling for age, sex, alcohol, and smoking. Results Average indoor and outdoor temperatures were 31.47℃ (standard deviation [SD], 0.97℃) and 28.15℃ (SD, 2.03℃), respectively. Body temperature increased by 0.21℃ (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.16 to 0.26℃) and 0.07℃ (95% CI, 0.04 to 0.10℃) with an increase in the indoor and outdoor temperature of 1℃. DBP decreased by 2.05 mmHg (95% CI, 0.05 to 4.05 mmHg), showing a statistical significance, as the indoor temperature increased by 1℃, while it increased by 0.20 mmHg (95% CI, -0.83 to 1.22 mmHg) as outdoor temperature increased by 1℃. SBP decreased by 1.75 mmHg (95% CI, -1.11 to 4.61 mmHg) and 0.35 mmHg (95% CI, -1.04 to 1.73 mmHg), as the indoor and outdoor temperature increased by 1℃, respectively. The effects of relative humidity on SBP and DBP were not statistically significant for both indoor and outdoor. Conclusions The poor and elderly are directly exposed to heat waves, while their vital signs respond sensitively to increase in temperature. Careful adaptation strategies to climate change considering socioeconomic status are therefore necessary. PMID:22888472

  1. Dual simulations of fluid flow and seismic wave propagation in a fractured network: effects of pore pressure on seismic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlastos, S.; Liu, E.; Main, I. G.; Schoenberg, M.; Narteau, C.; Li, X. Y.; Maillot, B.

    2006-08-01

    Fluid flow in the Earth's crust plays an important role in a number of geological processes. In relatively tight rock formations such flow is usually controlled by open macrofractures, with significant implications for ground water flow and hydrocarbon reservoir management. The movement of fluids in the fractured media will result in changes in the pore pressure and consequently will cause changes to the effective stress, traction and elastic properties. The main purpose of this study is to numerically examine the effect of pore pressure changes on seismic wave propagation (i.e. the effects of pore pressures on amplitude, arrival time, frequency content). This is achieved by using dual simulations of fluid flow and seismic propagation in a common 2-D fracture network. Note that the dual simulations are performed separately as the coupled simulations of fluid flow and seismic wave propagations in such fracture network is not possible because the timescales of fluid flow and wave propagation are considerably different (typically, fluid flows in hours, whereas wave propagation in seconds). The flow simulation updates the pore pressure at consecutive time steps, and thus the elastic properties of the rock, for the seismic modelling. In other words, during each time step of the flow simulations, we compute the elastic response corresponding to the pore pressure distribution. The relationship between pore pressure and fractures is linked via an empirical relationship given by Schoenberg and the elastic response of fractures is computed using the equivalent medium theory described by Hudson and Liu. Therefore, we can evaluate the possibility of inferring the changes of fluid properties directly from seismic data. Our results indicate that P waves are not as sensitive to pore pressure changes as S and coda (or scattered) waves. The increase in pore pressure causes a shift of the energy towards lower frequencies, as shown from the spectrum (as a result of scattering

  2. Signal Analysis and Waveform Reconstruction of Shock Waves Generated by Underwater Electrical Wire Explosions with Piezoelectric Pressure Probes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haibin; Zhang, Yongmin; Han, Ruoyu; Jing, Yan; Wu, Jiawei; Liu, Qiaojue; Ding, Weidong; Qiu, Aici

    2016-01-01

    Underwater shock waves (SWs) generated by underwater electrical wire explosions (UEWEs) have been widely studied and applied. Precise measurement of this kind of SWs is important, but very difficult to accomplish due to their high peak pressure, steep rising edge and very short pulse width (on the order of tens of μs). This paper aims to analyze the signals obtained by two kinds of commercial piezoelectric pressure probes, and reconstruct the correct pressure waveform from the distorted one measured by the pressure probes. It is found that both PCB138 and Müller-plate probes can be used to measure the relative SW pressure value because of their good uniformities and linearities, but none of them can obtain precise SW waveforms. In order to approach to the real SW signal better, we propose a new multi-exponential pressure waveform model, which has considered the faster pressure decay at the early stage and the slower pressure decay in longer times. Based on this model and the energy conservation law, the pressure waveform obtained by the PCB138 probe has been reconstructed, and the reconstruction accuracy has been verified by the signals obtained by the Müller-plate probe. Reconstruction results show that the measured SW peak pressures are smaller than the real signal. The waveform reconstruction method is both reasonable and reliable. PMID:27110789

  3. Signal Analysis and Waveform Reconstruction of Shock Waves Generated by Underwater Electrical Wire Explosions with Piezoelectric Pressure Probes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haibin; Zhang, Yongmin; Han, Ruoyu; Jing, Yan; Wu, Jiawei; Liu, Qiaojue; Ding, Weidong; Qiu, Aici

    2016-01-01

    Underwater shock waves (SWs) generated by underwater electrical wire explosions (UEWEs) have been widely studied and applied. Precise measurement of this kind of SWs is important, but very difficult to accomplish due to their high peak pressure, steep rising edge and very short pulse width (on the order of tens of μs). This paper aims to analyze the signals obtained by two kinds of commercial piezoelectric pressure probes, and reconstruct the correct pressure waveform from the distorted one measured by the pressure probes. It is found that both PCB138 and Müller-plate probes can be used to measure the relative SW pressure value because of their good uniformities and linearities, but none of them can obtain precise SW waveforms. In order to approach to the real SW signal better, we propose a new multi-exponential pressure waveform model, which has considered the faster pressure decay at the early stage and the slower pressure decay in longer times. Based on this model and the energy conservation law, the pressure waveform obtained by the PCB138 probe has been reconstructed, and the reconstruction accuracy has been verified by the signals obtained by the Müller-plate probe. Reconstruction results show that the measured SW peak pressures are smaller than the real signal. The waveform reconstruction method is both reasonable and reliable. PMID:27110789

  4. Wave numbers and pressure-induced shifts of Ar I atomic lines measured by Fourier transform spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veza, Damir; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Salit, Marc L.; Travis, John C.

    2012-06-01

    Wave numbers and pressure-induced shifts of 19 blue argon emission lines belonging to the 3p56p-3p54s and 3p55p-3p54s transition arrays were measured with high accuracy using a UV/visible Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). The measurements were made using electrodeless lamps containing traces of 198Hg and argon at pressures of 33 Pa (1/4 Torr), 400 Pa (3 Torr), 933 Pa (7 Torr) and 1333 Pa (10 Torr). Calibration of the FTS wave number scale was obtained using the four most prominent lines of 198Hg as internal standards. The pressure-induced shifts of the argon emission lines are in reasonable agreement with theoretical predictions. These results are of importance for astronomers and analytical chemists who use argon lines for practical wavelength standards as well as for theoreticians calculating argon-argon interactions and potential energy curves of diatomic argon molecules.

  5. Polydiagnostic calibration performed on a low pressure surface wave sustained argon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, N.; Palomares, J. M.; Iordanova, E. I.; van Veldhuizen, E. M.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.

    2008-10-01

    The electron density and electron temperature of a low pressure surface wave sustained argon plasma have been determined using passive and active (laser) spectroscopic methods simultaneously. In this way the validity of the various techniques is established while the plasma properties are determined more precisely. The electron density, ne, is determined with Thomson scattering (TS), absolute continuum measurements, Stark broadening and an extrapolation of the atomic state distribution function (ASDF). The electron temperature, Te, is obtained using TS and absolute line intensity (ALI) measurements combined with a collisional-radiative (CR) model for argon. At an argon pressure of 15 mbar, the ne values obtained with TS and Stark broadening agree with each other within the error bars and are equal to (4 ± 0.5) × 1019 m-3, whereas the ne value (2 ± 0.5) × 1019 m-3 obtained from the continuum is about 30% lower. This suggests that the used formula and cross-section values for the continuum method have to be reconsidered. The electron density determined by means of extrapolation of the ASDF to the continuum is too high (~1020 m-3). This is most probably related to the fact that the plasma is strongly ionizing so that the extrapolation method is not justified. At 15 mbar, the Te values obtained with TS are equal to 13 400 ± 1100 K while the ALI/CR-model yields an electron temperature that is about 10% lower. It can be concluded that the passive results are in good or fair agreement with the active results. Therefore, the calibrated passive methods can be applied to other plasmas in a similar regime for which active diagnostic techniques cannot be used.

  6. Influence of Pore-Fluid Pressure on Elastic Wave Velocity and Electrical Conductivity in Water-Saturated Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, A.; Watanabe, T.

    2013-12-01

    Pore-fluid pressure in seismogenic zones can play a key role in the occurrence of earthquakes (e.g., Sibson, 2009). Its evaluation via geophysical observations can lead to a good understanding of seismic activities. The evaluation requires a thorough understanding of the influence of the pore-fluid pressure on geophysical observables like seismic velocity and electrical conductivity. We have studied the influence of pore-fluid pressure on elastic wave velocity and electrical conductivity in water-saturated rocks. Fine grained (100-500μm) biotite granite (Aji, Kagawa pref., Japan) was used as rock samples. The density is 2.658-2.668 g/cm3, and the porosity 0.68-0.87%. The sample is composed of 52.8% plagioclase, 36.0% Quartz, 3.0% K-feldspar, 8.2% biotite. SEM images show that a lot of grain boundaries are open. Few intracrystalline cracks were observed. Following the method proposed by David and Zimmerman (2012), the distribution function of crack aspect ratio was evaluated from the pressure dependence of compressional and shear wave velocities in a dry sample. Cylindrical sample has dimensions of 25 mm in diameter and 30 mm in length, and saturated with 0.01 mol/l KCl aqueous solution. Compressional and shear wave velocities were measured with the pulse transmission technique (PZT transducers, f=2 MHz), and electrical conductivity the two-electrode method (Ag-AgCl electrodes, f=1 Hz-100 kHz). Simultaneous measurements of velocities and conductivity were made using a 200 MPa hydrostatic pressure vessel, in which confining and pore-fluid pressures can be separately controlled. The pore-fluid is electrically insulated from the metal work of the pressure vessel by using a newly designed plastic device (Watanabe and Higuchi, 2013). The confining pressure was progressively increased up to 25 MPa, while the pore-fluid pressure was kept at 0.1 MPa. It took five days or longer for the electrical conductivity to become stationary after increasing the confining pressure

  7. Shear waves in the diamond-anvil cell reveal pressure-induced instability in (Mg,Fe)O.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Steven D; Spetzler, Hartmut; Reichmann, Hans J; Smyth, Joseph R

    2004-04-20

    The emerging picture of Earth's deep interior from seismic tomography indicates more complexity than previously thought. The presence of lateral anisotropy and heterogeneity in Earth's mantle highlights the need for fully anisotropic elasticity data from mineral physics. A breakthrough in high-frequency (gigahertz) ultrasound has resulted in transmission of pure-mode elastic shear waves into a high-pressure diamond-anvil cell using a P-to-S elastic-wave conversion. The full elastic tensor (c(ij)) of high-pressure minerals or metals can be measured at extreme conditions without optical constraints. Here we report the effects of pressure and composition on shear-wave velocities in the major lower-mantle oxide, magnesiowüstite-(Mg,Fe)O. Magnesiowüstite containing more than approximately 50% iron exhibits pressure-induced c(44) shear-mode softening, indicating an instability in the rocksalt structure. The oxide closer to expected lower-mantle compositions ( approximately 20% iron) shows increasing shear velocities more similar to MgO, indicating that it also should have a wide pressure-stability field. A complete sign reversal in the c(44) pressure derivative points to a change in the topology of the (Mg,Fe)O phase diagram at approximately 50-60% iron. The relative stability of Mg-rich (Mg,Fe)O and the strong compositional dependence of shear-wave velocities (and partial differential c(44)/ partial differential P) in (Mg,Fe)O implies that seismic heterogeneity in Earth's lower mantle may result from compositional variations rather than phase changes in (Mg,Fe)O. PMID:15079080

  8. Shear waves in the diamond-anvil cell reveal pressure-induced instability in (Mg,Fe)O

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Steven D.; Spetzler, Hartmut; Reichmann, Hans J.; Smyth, Joseph R.

    2004-01-01

    The emerging picture of Earth's deep interior from seismic tomography indicates more complexity than previously thought. The presence of lateral anisotropy and heterogeneity in Earth's mantle highlights the need for fully anisotropic elasticity data from mineral physics. A breakthrough in high-frequency (gigahertz) ultrasound has resulted in transmission of pure-mode elastic shear waves into a high-pressure diamond-anvil cell using a P-to-S elastic-wave conversion. The full elastic tensor (cij) of high-pressure minerals or metals can be measured at extreme conditions without optical constraints. Here we report the effects of pressure and composition on shear-wave velocities in the major lower-mantle oxide, magnesiowüstite-(Mg,Fe)O. Magnesiowüstite containing more than ≈50% iron exhibits pressure-induced c44 shear-mode softening, indicating an instability in the rocksalt structure. The oxide closer to expected lower-mantle compositions (≈20% iron) shows increasing shear velocities more similar to MgO, indicating that it also should have a wide pressure-stability field. A complete sign reversal in the c44 pressure derivative points to a change in the topology of the (Mg,Fe)O phase diagram at ≈50–60% iron. The relative stability of Mg-rich (Mg,Fe)O and the strong compositional dependence of shear-wave velocities (and ∂c44/∂P) in (Mg,Fe)O implies that seismic heterogeneity in Earth's lower mantle may result from compositional variations rather than phase changes in (Mg,Fe)O. PMID:15079080

  9. Systolic aortic pressure-time area is a useful index describing arterial wave properties in rats with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ru-Wen; Chang, Chun-Yi; Wu, Ming-Shiou; Yu, Hsi-Yu; Luo, Jian-Ming; Chen, Yih-Sharng; Lin, Fang-Yue; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Wang, Chih-Hsien; Chang, Kuo-Chu

    2015-01-01

    The accurate measurement of arterial wave properties in terms of arterial wave transit time (τw) and wave reflection factor (Rf) requires simultaneous records of aortic pressure and flow signals. However, in clinical practice, it will be helpful to describe the pulsatile ventricular afterload using less-invasive parameters if possible. We investigated the possibility of systolic aortic pressure-time area (PTAs), calculated from the measured aortic pressure alone, acting as systolic workload imposed on the rat diabetic heart. Arterial wave reflections were derived using the impulse response function of the filtered aortic input impedance spectra. The cardiovascular condition in the rats with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes was characterized by (1) an elevation in PTAs; and (2) an increase in Rf and decrease in τw. We found that an inverse linear correlation between PTAs and arterial τw reached significance (τw = 38.5462 - 0.0022 × PTAs; r = 0.7708, P < 0.0001). By contrast, as the PTAs increased, the reflection intensity increased: Rf = -0.5439 + 0.0002 × PTAs; r = 0.8701; P <0 .0001. All these findings suggested that as diabetes stiffened aortas, the augmented aortic PTAs might act as a useful index describing the diabetes-related deterioration in systolic ventricular workload. PMID:26620634

  10. Temperature-Pressure Phase Diagram in TTF-TCNQ: Strong Suppression of Charge-Density-Wave State under Extremely High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuzuka, Syuma; Murata, Keizo; Arimoto, Taro; Kato, Reizo

    2007-03-01

    We have measured the resistivity of the organic conductor TTF-TCNQ under high pressure up to 8.0 GPa using a cubic anvil apparatus. Below 3 GPa, the pressure dependence of the charge-density-wave (CDW) transition temperature, TCDW, is consistent with previous results, except for the observation of the “49 K-transition” at around 1 GPa. Above 3 GPa, TCDW decreases with increasing pressure but the CDW state survives even at 8.0 GPa. At 8.0 GPa, however, the resistivity shows metallic behavior below 25 K after the CDW transition with TCDW = 31 K. The origin of suppression is discussed in terms of the imperfect nesting originating from the increase in the interchain transfer integral, the significant deviation from the third-order commensurability, as well as the bandwidth broadening for both TTF and TCNQ stacks. The complete suppression of the CDW phase is expected near 9 GPa.

  11. Abnormal pressure-wave reflection in pregnant women with chronic hypertension: association with maternal and fetal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tomimatsu, Takuji; Fujime, Mika; Kanayama, Tomoko; Mimura, Kazuya; Koyama, Shinsuke; Kanagawa, Takeshi; Endo, Masayuki; Shimoya, Koichiro; Kimura, Tadashi

    2014-11-01

    The current study tested the hypothesis that abnormal pressure-wave reflection may have an important role in identifying pregnant women with chronic hypertension who might develop pre-eclampsia (PE) and/or fetal growth restriction. Pulse-wave analyses were performed to assess maternal arterial stiffness during 26-32 weeks of gestation in 41 women with chronic hypertension. We measured the central systolic pressure (CSP) and augmentation index (AIx) noninvasively using pulse waveforms of the radial artery with an automated applanation tonometric system. In a multiple regression analysis that included AIx-75 (AIx at a heart rate of 75 beats per minute), brachial systolic pressure, maternal height, smoking status, gestational age at testing and the presence of antihypertensive treatment at testing as independent determinants, AIx-75 was the only significant determinant of birth weight, whereas the brachial systolic pressure was not. In pregnant women with chronic hypertension who subsequently developed both superimposed PE and fetal growth restriction, CSP, AIx, AIx-75, and the brachial systolic and pulse pressures were all significantly higher than those who did not develop superimposed PE nor small for gestational age. In contrast, AIx-75 was the only significantly elevated hemodynamic parameter in patients who developed fetal growth restriction but not superimposed PE. In addition, CSP was the only significantly elevated hemodynamic parameter in patients who developed superimposed PE but not fetal growth restriction. Abnormal pressure-wave reflection during 26-32 weeks of gestation showed a stronger correlation with birth weight than conventional brachial blood pressure. Our findings might provide new insight into the pathophysiology of fetal growth restriction as well as superimposed PE in pregnancies complicated with chronic hypertension. PMID:24965168

  12. Numerical simulation of the nonlinear ultrasonic pressure wave propagation in a cavitating bubbly liquid inside a sonochemical reactor.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Hakan; Popov, Viktor

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the acoustic wave propagation in bubbly liquid inside a pilot sonochemical reactor which aims to produce antibacterial medical textile fabrics by coating the textile with ZnO or CuO nanoparticles. Computational models on acoustic propagation are developed in order to aid the design procedures. The acoustic pressure wave propagation in the sonoreactor is simulated by solving the Helmholtz equation using a meshless numerical method. The paper implements both the state-of-the-art linear model and a nonlinear wave propagation model recently introduced by Louisnard (2012), and presents a novel iterative solution procedure for the nonlinear propagation model which can be implemented using any numerical method and/or programming tool. Comparative results regarding both the linear and the nonlinear wave propagation are shown. Effects of bubble size distribution and bubble volume fraction on the acoustic wave propagation are discussed in detail. The simulations demonstrate that the nonlinear model successfully captures the realistic spatial distribution of the cavitation zones and the associated acoustic pressure amplitudes. PMID:26611813

  13. Fluid Pressure Increases in Hydrothermal Systems Induced by Seismic Waves: Possible Triggers of Earthquakes and Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeloffs, E.

    2002-12-01

    That seismic waves trigger microseismicity in hydrothermal settings hundreds of km from the epicenter is plausibly linked to seismic-wave-induced fluid pressure changes at these distances. Although fluid pressure decreases have been observed in diverse settings, in the hydrothermal system at Long Valley, California, that seismic waves from earthquakes increase fluid pressure or discharge. Other published data, from thermal springs in Japan, Yellowstone, and Klamath Falls, Oregon, support the idea that seismic waves have induced pressure and discharge changes and that, in hydrothermal systems, these changes are usually increases. Temperature increases in seafloor hydrothermal vents within days after earthquakes as distant as 220 km imply, moreover, that seismic waves enhance conductance of vertical fluid flow pathways. The influence of seismic waves (wavelengths of km), on hot, fluid-filled subsurface fractures (apertures of mm to cm) could proceed by several mechanisms. Local fluid flow induced at crack walls could remove mineral seals. Spatially uniform acceleration can move gas bubbles relative to denser liquid and solid phases. Thermal expansion can elevate pressure around hot fluid that has penetrated upward. By lowering effective stress and directly weakening faults that are themselves flow paths, seismic waves could initiate processes leading to volcanic eruptions or other earthquakes where sufficient subsurface magma or elastic strain energy have previously accumulated. This type of earthquake-volcano linkage could explain why volcanos statistically erupt more frequently up to 5 years after M>7 earthquakes hundreds of km distant. For example, 11 months elapsed after the Ms 7.8 Luzon (Phillipines) earthquake before Mount Pinatubo erupted on June 15, 1991, 100 km away. Steam emission and 3 M4+ earthquakes in the Pinatubo area followed within days of the Luzon event, however, and a hydrothermal explosion on April 2 started the continuous unrest that built to

  14. Strong anharmonicity induces quantum melting of charge density wave in 2 H -NbSe2 under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, Maxime; Errea, Ion; Le Tacon, Mathieu; Souliou, Sofia-Michaela; Garbarino, Gaston; Cario, Laurent; Bosak, Alexey; Mauri, Francesco; Calandra, Matteo; Rodière, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    The pressure and temperature dependence of the phonon dispersion of 2 H -NbSe2 is measured by inelastic x-ray scattering. A strong temperature dependent soft phonon mode, reminiscent of the charge density wave (CDW), is found to persist up to a pressure as high as 16 GPa, far above the critical pressure at which the CDW disappears at 0 K. By using ab initio calculations beyond the harmonic approximation, we obtain an accurate, quantitative description of the (P ,T ) dependence of the phonon spectrum. Our results show that the rapid destruction of the CDW under pressure is related to the zero mode vibrations—or quantum fluctuations—of the lattice renormalized by the anharmonic part of the lattice potential. The calculations also show that the low-energy longitudinal acoustic mode that drives the CDW transition barely contributes to superconductivity, explaining the insensitivity of the superconducting critical temperature to the CDW transition.

  15. Comparison of the capillary wave method and pressure tensor route for calculation of interfacial tension in molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Stella; Frost, Denzil S; Phelan, Harrison; Dai, Lenore L

    2013-12-01

    We have studied the calculation of surface and interfacial tension for a variety of liquid-vapor and liquid-liquid interfaces using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Because of the inherently small scale of MD systems, large pressure fluctuations can cause imprecise calculations of surface tension using the pressure tensor route. The capillary wave method exhibited improved precision and stability throughout all of the simulated systems in this study. In order to implement this method, the interface was defined by fitting an error function to the density profile. However, full mapping of the interface from coordinate files produced enhanced accuracy. Upon increasing the system size, both methods exhibited higher precision, although the capillary wave method was still more reliable. PMID:24122780

  16. Pressure waves in liquid mercury target from pulsed heat loads and the possible way controlling their effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, L.; Skala, K.

    1996-06-01

    In ESS project liquid metals are selected as the main target for the pulsed spallation neutron source. Since the very high instantaneous energy is deposited on the heavy molten target in a very short period time, pressure waves are generated. They travel through the liquid and cause high stress in the container. Also, additional stress should be considered in the wall which is the result of direct heating of the target window. These dynamic processes were simulated with computational codes with the static response being analized first. The total resulting dynamic wall stress has been found to have exceeded the design stress for the selected container material. Adding a small amount of gas bubbles in the liquid could be a possible way to reduce the pressure waves.

  17. Turbulent Heating and Wave Pressure in Solar Wind Acceleration Modeling: New Insights to Empirical Forecasting of the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolsey, L. N.; Cranmer, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    The study of solar wind acceleration has made several important advances recently due to improvements in modeling techniques. Existing code and simulations test the competing theories for coronal heating, which include reconnection/loop-opening (RLO) models and wave/turbulence-driven (WTD) models. In order to compare and contrast the validity of these theories, we need flexible tools that predict the emergent solar wind properties from a wide range of coronal magnetic field structures such as coronal holes, pseudostreamers, and helmet streamers. ZEPHYR (Cranmer et al. 2007) is a one-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics code that includes Alfven wave generation and reflection and the resulting turbulent heating to accelerate solar wind in open flux tubes. We present the ZEPHYR output for a wide range of magnetic field geometries to show the effect of the magnetic field profiles on wind properties. We also investigate the competing acceleration mechanisms found in ZEPHYR to determine the relative importance of increased gas pressure from turbulent heating and the separate pressure source from the Alfven waves. To do so, we developed a code that will become publicly available for solar wind prediction. This code, TEMPEST, provides an outflow solution based on only one input: the magnetic field strength as a function of height above the photosphere. It uses correlations found in ZEPHYR between the magnetic field strength at the source surface and the temperature profile of the outflow solution to compute the wind speed profile based on the increased gas pressure from turbulent heating. With this initial solution, TEMPEST then adds in the Alfven wave pressure term to the modified Parker equation and iterates to find a stable solution for the wind speed. This code, therefore, can make predictions of the wind speeds that will be observed at 1 AU based on extrapolations from magnetogram data, providing a useful tool for empirical forecasting of the sol! ar wind.

  18. Apparatus and method for enhanced chemical processing in high pressure and atmospheric plasmas produced by high frequency electromagnetic waves

    DOEpatents

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Helfritch, Dennis J.

    1989-11-28

    An apparatus and method for creating high temperature plasmas for enhanced chemical processing of gaseous fluids, toxic chemicals, and the like, at a wide range of pressures, especially at atmospheric and high pressures includes an electro-magnetic resonator cavity, preferably a reentrant cavity, and a wave guiding structure which connects an electro-magnetic source to the cavity. The cavity includes an intake port and an exhaust port, each having apertures in the conductive walls of the cavity sufficient for the intake of the gaseous fluids and for the discharge of the processed gaseous fluids. The apertures are sufficiently small to prevent the leakage of the electro-magnetic radiation from the cavity. Gaseous fluid flowing from the direction of the electro-magnetic source through the guiding wave structure and into the cavity acts on the plasma to push it away from the guiding wave structure and the electro-magnetic source. The gaseous fluid flow confines the high temperature plasma inside the cavity and allows complete chemical processing of the gaseous fluids at a wide range of pressures.

  19. Small model experiment on the gradient of pressure wave formed by train entering into the tunnel at 160km/h

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemoto, Temma; Endo, Hirokazu; Meguro, Fumiya; Ota, Masanori; Maeno, Kazuo

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, running speed of the trains of conventional lines becomes faster with improving vehicle and rail performance. At the high-speed range compression wave is formed when a high speed train enters a tunnel. This compression wave propagates in the tunnel at the speed of sound. This propagated wave is called "tunnel pressure wave". In some cases, when the station of conventional lines is located in the tunnel, problems such as breaking the window glass have been reported by the tunnel pressure wave at the station. Though the research on pressure wave inside the tunnel of the Shinkansen has been widely studied in connection with "tunnel micro-pressure wave" problems, the number of research reports on the operating speed of conventional lines(130~160km/h) is insufficient. In this study we focused on Hokuhoku line which has maximum operating speed of conventional lines in Japan (160km/h), and we performed the experiment on the gradient of the pressure wave by using diaphragmless driver acceleration system, small train nose model, and tunnel model of the limited express of Hokuhoku line. We have performed the pressure-time variation measurement on the tunnel model, including a station model or signal crossing station [SCS] model. As the thpical train model, we used Streamline-type or Gangway-type for train nose geometry. We have obtained pressure gradient data on several running conditions and observed the temporal .behavior in the tunnel pressure wave. As a result, we clarified large difference in pressure gradient with the train nose geometry and with the cross-sectional area of the tunnel.

  20. A simplified method for quantifying the subject-specific relationship between blood pressure and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity.

    PubMed

    Butlin, Mark; Hathway, Peta J; Kouchaki, Zahra; Peebles, Karen; Avolio, Alberto P

    2015-08-01

    Devices that estimate blood pressure from arterial pulse wave velocity (PWV) potentially provide continuous, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Accurate blood pressure estimation requires reliable quantification of the relationship between blood pressure and PWV. Regression to population normal values or, when using limb artery PWV, changing hydrostatic blood pressure within the limb provides a calibration index. Population lookup tables require accurate anthropometric correlates, assuming no individual variation. Only devices that measure PWV in the limb can use limb position changes. This study proposes a method for developing a calibration curve independent of lookup tables and useful for large artery PWV measurement, such as carotid-femoral PWV (PWVcf). PWVcf was measured in 27 normal subjects (15 female, 36±19 years) in both the supine and standing position. The change in systemic pressure was measured and hydrostatic pressure change calculated from estimated vessel path length height, measured using body surface distances. Brachial diastolic blood pressure increased for all subjects from supine to standing (supine 70±8 mmHg, standing 83±8 mmHg, p<;0.001) with an additional hydrostatic change across the carotid-femoral path length of 19±2 mmHg (p<;0.001). PWVcf also increased in all subjects (supine 5.2±1.3 m/s, standing 7.3±2.2 m/s, p<;0.001). The subject-specific calibration index (ΔDP/ΔPWVcf) varied amongst the cohort (20±8 mmHg/m/s), was correlated with age (-0.57, p=0.002) and seated aortic systolic pressure (-0.38, p=0.048) and was always greater than zero. Thus, this study describes a simple but novel method of measuring an individualized calibration index using blood pressure and PWV measurements in the supine and standing position. PMID:26737588

  1. The dependence on geomagnetic conditions and solar wind dynamic pressure of the spatial distributions of EMIC waves observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikin, A. A.; Zhang, J.-C.; Smith, C. W.; Spence, H. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2016-05-01

    A statistical examination on the spatial distributions of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves observed by the Van Allen Probes against varying levels of geomagnetic activity (i.e., AE and SYM-H) and dynamic pressure has been performed. Measurements taken by the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science for the first full magnetic local time (MLT) precession of the Van Allen Probes (September 2012-June 2014) are used to identify over 700 EMIC wave events. Spatial distributions of EMIC waves are found to vary depending on the level of geomagnetic activity and solar wind dynamic pressure. EMIC wave events were observed under quiet (AE ≤ 100 nT, 325 wave events), moderate (100 nT < AE ≤ 300 nT, 218 wave events), and disturbed (AE > 300 nT, 228 wave events) geomagnetic conditions and are primarily observed in the prenoon sector (~800 < MLT ≤ ~1100) at L ≈ 5.5 during quiet activity times. As AE increases to disturbed levels, the peak occurrence rates shift to the afternoon sector (1200 < MLT ≤ 1800) between L = 4 and L = 6. A majority of EMIC wave events (~56%) were observed during nonstorm times (defined by SYM-H). Consistent with the quiet AE levels, nonstorm EMIC waves are observed in the prenoon sector. EMIC waves observed through the duration of a geomagnetic storm are primarily located in the afternoon sector. High solar wind pressure (Pdyn > 3 nPa) correlates to mostly afternoon EMIC wave observations.

  2. Excitation of ion rarefaction waves in a low pressure plasma by applying a short high negative voltage pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, S.; Mukherjee, S.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2011-05-15

    The ion rarefaction response to a high negative voltage pulse (U{sub 0} >> kT{sub e}/e) applied to a metal plate immersed in a low pressure argon plasma, for time duration lower than ion plasma period, is experimentally examined. In the present experiment the pulse duration is kept intermediate between the ion and electron plasma response times. Such a pulse duration is chosen so that ions are collectively undisturbed and, according to general understanding, no force is given to ions. Hence no ion rarefaction wave should be excited. But contrary to the general understanding, excitation of a rarefaction wave is observed. The results indicate that the speed of the rarefaction waves for various conditions (like plasma density, applied pulse magnitude, and pulse duration) is supersonic. After a distance from the exciter (biased plate), typically three-fourth of the exciter diameter, the rarefaction waves are turned into ion acoustic waves. The experimental results indicate that even though the bias durations are shorter than the ion plasma period, if the bias magnitude is large enough, some collective plasma behavior can still be excited.

  3. SMALL-SCALE PRESSURE-BALANCED STRUCTURES DRIVEN BY OBLIQUE SLOW MODE WAVES MEASURED IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Shuo; He, J.-S.; Tu, C.-Y.; Wang, L.-H.; Marsch, E.

    2013-09-01

    Recently, small-scale pressure-balanced structures (PBSs) were identified in the solar wind, but their formation mechanism remains unclear. This work aims to reveal the dependence of the properties of small-scale PBSs on the background magnetic field (B{sub 0}) direction and thus to corroborate the in situ mechanism that forms them. We analyze the plasma and magnetic field data obtained by WIND in the quiet solar wind at 1 AU. First, we use a developed moving-average method to obtain B{sub 0}(s, t) for every temporal scale (s) at each time moment (t). By wavelet cross-coherence analysis, we obtain the correlation coefficients between the thermal pressure P{sub th} and the magnetic pressure P{sub B}, distributing against the temporal scale and the angle {theta}{sub xB} between B{sub 0}(s, t) and Geocentric Solar Ecliptic coordinates (GSE)-x. We note that the angle coverage of a PBS decreases with shorter temporal scale, but the occurrence of the PBSs is independent of {theta}{sub xB}. Suspecting that the isolated small PBSs are formed by compressive waves in situ, we continue this study by testing the wave modes forming a small-scale PBS with B{sub 0}(s, t) quasi-parallel to GSE-x. As a result, we identify that the cross-helicity and the compressibility attain values for a slow mode from theoretical calculations. The wave vector is derived from minimum variance analysis. Besides, the proton temperatures obey T < T{sub Parallel-To} derived from the velocity distribution functions, excluding a mirror mode, which is the other candidate for the formation of PBSs in situ. Thus, a small-scale PBS is shown to be driven by oblique, slow-mode waves in the solar wind.

  4. Aortic pressure wave reconstruction during exercise is improved by adaptive filtering: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Stok, Wim J; Westerhof, Berend E; Guelen, Ilja; Karemaker, John M

    2011-08-01

    Reconstruction of central aortic pressure from a peripheral measurement by a generalized transfer function (genTF) works well at rest and mild exercise at lower heart rates, but becomes less accurate during heavy exercise. Particularly, systolic and pulse pressure estimations deteriorate, thereby underestimating central pressure. We tested individualization of the TF (indTF) by adapting its resonance frequency at the various levels of exercise. In seven males (age 44-57) with coronary artery disease, central and peripheral pressures were measured simultaneously. The optimal resonance frequency was predicted from regression formulas using variables derived from the individual's peripheral pressure pulse, including a pulse contour estimation of cardiac output (pcCO). In addition, reconstructed pressures were calibrated to central mean and diastolic pressure at each exercise level. Using a genTF and without calibration, the error in estimated aortic pulse pressure was -7.5 ± 6.4 mmHg, which was reduced to 0.2 ± 5.7 mmHg with the indTFs using pcCO for prediction. Calibration resulted in less scatter at the cost of a small bias (2.7 mmHg). In exercise, the indTFs predict systolic and pulse pressure better than the genTF. This pilot study shows that it is possible to individualize the peripheral to aortic pressure transfer function, thereby improving accuracy in central blood pressure assessment during exercise. PMID:21720842

  5. Analysis of reflected blast wave pressure profiles in a confined room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvan, P. E.; Sochet, I.; Trélat, S.

    2012-05-01

    To understand the blast effects of confined explosions, it is necessary to study the characteristic parameters of the blast wave in terms of overpressure, impulse and arrival time. In a previous study, experiments were performed using two different scales of a pyrotechnic workshop. The main purpose of these experiments was to compare the TNT equivalent for solid and gaseous explosives in terms of mass to define a TNT equivalent in a reflection field and to validate the similitude between real and small scales. To study the interactions and propagations of the reflected shock waves, the present study was conducted by progressively building a confined volume around the charge. In this way, the influence of each wall and the origins of the reflected shock waves can be determined. The purpose of this paper is to report the blast wave interactions that resulted from the detonation of a stoichiometric propane-oxygen mixture in a confined room.

  6. Extreme storm wave influence on sandy beach macrofauna with distinct human pressures.

    PubMed

    Machado, Phillipe M; Costa, Leonardo L; Suciu, Marjorie C; Tavares, Davi C; Zalmon, Ilana R

    2016-06-15

    We evaluated the influence of storm waves on the intertidal community structure of urbanized and non-urbanized areas of a sandy beach on the northern coast of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The macrofauna was sampled before (PREV) and after two storm wave events (POEV I; POEV II) in 2013 and 2014. Significant differences in community structure between PREV and POEV I in the urbanized sector demonstrate higher macrofauna vulnerability, and the community recovery within 41days on this scenario of less frequent events in 2013. On the other hand, significant differences in the macrofauna only in the urbanized sector between PREV and POEV II also highlight macrofauna vulnerability and community recovery failure within 42days on this scenario of more frequent storm in 2014. Urbanization and wave height were the variables that most influenced species, indicating that high storm wave events and increasing urbanization synergism are a threat to the macrofauna. PMID:27103425

  7. Study on Excessive Pressure of Underwater Shock Wave Generated in Confined Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, H.; Abe, A.

    Recently, the underwater shock waves have been widely applied to the fields of mechanical engineering, medical treatments, food science, and so on [1, 2]. In the field of maritime sciences, it is expected that the using of underwater shock waves would solve some problems. Ships usually use seawater as ballast to ensure safety on navigation under the unloaded condition. Some of marine creatures contained in the ballast water are carried to another port and finally discharged.

  8. Mechanisms of strong pressure wave generations during knocking combustion: compressible reactive flow simulations with detailed chemical kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Hiroshi; Koshi, Mitsuo

    2014-11-01

    Knocking is a very severe pressure oscillation caused by interactions between flame propagation and end-gas autoignition in spark-assisted engines. In this study, knocking combustion modeled in one-dimensional space is simulated using a highly efficient compressible flow solver with detailed chemical kinetics for clarifying the process of knocking occurrence. Especially, mechanisms of strong pressure wave generation are addressed. A robust and fast explicit integration method is used to efficiently handle stiff chemistry, and species bundling for effectively estimating the diffusion coefficients. The detailed mechanisms such as n-butane of 113 species and n-heptane of 373 species are directly applied. Results demonstrate that the negative temperature coefficient (NTC) region of n-heptane significantly influence the knocking timing and intensity. In the NTC region, stronger pressure wave is generated due to rapid heat release of a very small portion in the end-gas, which is attributed to low temperature oxidation and inhomogeneous temperature distributions in the end-gas. The knocking intensity is thus amplified in the NTC region, taking a maximum value. In the case of n-butane with no NTC region, relatively weak knocking intensity is observed in all conditions with no clear peak.

  9. Preeclampsia Is Associated with Increased Central Aortic Pressure, Elastic Arteries Stiffness and Wave Reflections, and Resting and Recruitable Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Torrado, Juan; Farro, Ignacio; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Federico; Sosa, Claudio; Scasso, Santiago; Alonso, Justo; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. An altered endothelial function (EF) could be associated with preeclampsia (PE). However, more specific and complementary analyses are required to confirm this topic. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD), low-flow-mediated constriction (L-FMC), and hyperemic-related changes in carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (PWVcr) offer complementary information about "recruitability" of EF. Objectives. To evaluate, in healthy and hypertensive pregnant women (with and without PE), central arterial parameters in conjunction with "basal and recruitable" EF. Methods. Nonhypertensive (HP) and hypertensive pregnant women (gestational hypertension, GH; preeclampsia, PE) were included. Aortic blood pressure (BP), wave reflection parameters (AIx@75), aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVcf) and PWVcr, and brachial and common carotid stiffness and intima-media thickness were measured. Brachial FMD and L-FMC and hyperemic-related change in PWVcr were measured. Results. Aortic BP and AIx@75 were elevated in PE. PE showed stiffer elastic but not muscular arteries. After cuff deflation, PWVcr decreased in HP, while GH showed a blunted PWVcr response and PE showed a tendency to increase. Maximal FMD and L-FMC were observed in HP followed by GH; PE did not reach significant arterial constriction. Conclusion. Aortic BP and wave reflections as well as elastic arteries stiffness are increased in PE. PE showed both "resting and recruitable" endothelial dysfunctions. PMID:26351578

  10. Modeling radiation belt electron acceleration by ULF fast mode waves, launched by solar wind dynamic pressure fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degeling, A. W.; Rankin, R.; Zong, Q.-G.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the magnetospheric MHD and energetic electron response to a Storm Sudden Commencement (SSC) and subsequent magnetopause buffeting, focusing on an interval following an SSC event on 25 November 2001. We find that the electron flux signatures observed by LANL, Cluster, and GOES spacecraft during this event can largely be reproduced using an advective kinetic model for electron phase space density, using externally prescribed electromagnetic field inputs, (herein described as a "test-kinetic model") with electromagnetic field inputs provided by a 2-D linear ideal MHD model for ULF waves. In particular, we find modulations in electron flux phase shifted by 90° from the local azimuthal ULF wave electric field (Eφ) and a net enhancement in electron flux after 1.5 h for energies between 500 keV and 1.5 MeV near geosynchronous orbit. We also demonstrate that electrons in this energy range satisfy the drift resonance condition for the ULF waves produced by the MHD model. This confirms the conclusions reached by Tan et al. (2011), that the energization process in this case is dominated by drift-resonant interactions between electrons and MHD fast mode waves, produced by fluctuations in solar wind dynamic pressure.