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Sample records for pressure-gradient soliton compression

  1. Calculation of compressible adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Alston, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    Difficulties encountered in computing profile shapes in supersonic turbulent boundary layers with large pressure gradients, which result from a disagreement between data and theory, are investigated. Possible reasons given by various authors for this disagreement are discussed. Initial results seem to indicate that conventional reasons do not account for the observed difficulties. However, inclusion of the effect of curvature upon turbulent mixing has brought an improvement in calculations. Possible three-dimensional effects are also examined.

  2. Similar solutions for the compressible laminar boundary layer with heat transfer and pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Clarence B; Reshotko, Eli

    1956-01-01

    Stewartson's transformation is applied to the laminar compressible boundary-layer equations and the requirement of similarity is introduced, resulting in a set of ordinary nonlinear differential equations previously quoted by Stewartson, but unsolved. The requirements of the system are Prandtl number of 1.0, linear viscosity-temperature relation across the boundary layer, an isothermal surface, and the particular distributions of free-stream velocity consistent with similar solutions. This system admits axial pressure gradients of arbitrary magnitude, heat flux normal to the surface, and arbitrary Mach numbers. The system of differential equations is transformed to integral system, with the velocity ratio as the independent variable. For this system, solutions are found by digital computation for pressure gradients varying from that causing separation to the infinitely favorable gradient and for wall temperatures from absolute zero to twice the free-stream stagnation temperature. Some solutions for separated flows are also presented.

  3. The Compressible Laminar Boundary Layer with Heat Transfer and Arbitrary Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Clarence B; Reshotko, Eli

    1956-01-01

    An approximate method for the calculation of the compressible laminar boundary layer with heat transfer and arbitrary pressure gradient, based on Thwaites' correlation concept, is presented. With the definition of dimensionless shear and heat-transfer parameters and an assumed correlation of these parameters in terms of a momentum parameter, a complete system of relations for calculating skin friction and heat transfer results. Knowledge of velocity or temperature profiles is not necessary in using this calculation method. When the method is applied to a convergent-divergent, axially symmetric rocket nozzle, it shows that high rates of heat transfer are obtained at the initial stagnation point and at the throat of the nozzle. Also indicated are negative displacement thicknesses in the convergent portion of the nozzle; these occur because of the high density within the lower portions of the cooled boundary layer. (author)

  4. Calculation of turbulent boundary layers with heat transfer and pressure gradient utilizing a compressibility transformation. Part 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Economos, C.; Boccio, J.

    1971-01-01

    The analysis uses a compressibility transformation and utilizes higher order closure rules to complete the transformation. By requiring that the momentum equations in differential form be satisfied at the wall and at the sublayer edge, correspondence rules are obtained which relate the variable property (VP) flow to a constant property (CP) flow in which mass transfer and pressure gradient occur simultaneously. A new CP formulation is developed and numerical results for a variety of cases are presented. Comparisons with earlier forms of the transformation and with experiment are included. For the zero pressure gradient case some differences between the various predictions are observed. For the several pressure gradient cases examined, the results are found to be essentially identical to those given by first order closure rules; i.e., by a form of transformation which relates the VP flow to a CP flow with pressure gradient but zero mass transfer.

  5. Analysis and calculation by integral methods of laminar compressible boundary-layer with heat transfer and with and without pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morduchow, Morris

    1955-01-01

    A survey of integral methods in laminar-boundary-layer analysis is first given. A simple and sufficiently accurate method for practical purposes of calculating the properties (including stability) of the laminar compressible boundary layer in an axial pressure gradient with heat transfer at the wall is presented. For flow over a flat plate, the method is applicable for an arbitrarily prescribed distribution of temperature along the surface and for any given constant Prandtl number close to unity. For flow in a pressure gradient, the method is based on a Prandtl number of unity and a uniform wall temperature. A simple and accurate method of determining the separation point in a compressible flow with an adverse pressure gradient over a surface at a given uniform wall temperature is developed. The analysis is based on an extension of the Karman-Pohlhausen method to the momentum and the thermal energy equations in conjunction with fourth- and especially higher degree velocity and stagnation-enthalpy profiles.

  6. The behavior of a compressible turbulent boundary layer in a shock-wave-induced adverse pressure gradient. Ph.D. Thesis - Washington Univ., Seattle, Aug. 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, W. C.

    1973-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of the mean- and fluctuating-flow properties of a compressible turbulent boundary layer in a shock-wave-induced adverse pressure gradient are presented. The turbulent boundary layer developed on the wall of an axially symmetric nozzle and test section whose nominal free-stream Mach number and boundary-layer thickness Reynolds number were 4 and 100,000, respectively. The adverse pressure gradient was induced by an externally generated conical shock wave. Mean and time-averaged fluctuating-flow data, including the complete experimental Reynolds stress tensor and experimental turbulent mass- and heat-transfer rates are presented for the boundary layer and external flow, upstream, within and downstream of the pressure gradient. The mean-flow data include distributions of total temperature throughout the region of interest. The turbulent mixing properties of the flow were determined experimentally with a hot-wire anemometer. The calibration of the wires and the interpretation of the data are discussed. From the results of the investigation, it is concluded that the shock-wave - boundary-layer interaction significantly alters the turbulent mixing characteristics of the boundary layer.

  7. Calculation of turbulent boundary layers with heat transfer and pressure gradient utilizing a compressibility transformation. Part 2: Constant property turbulent boundary layer flow with simultaneous mass transfer and pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boccio, J.; Economos, C.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis of the incompressible turbulent boundary layer, developing under the combined effects of mass transfer and pressure gradient, is presented in this paper. A strip-integral method is employed whereby two of the three governing equations are obtained by integrating the combined momentum and continuity equation to 50 percent and 100 percent, respectively, of the boundary-layer height. The latter equation is the usual momentum-integral equation; the former equation requires specification of shear. Accordingly, Clauser's equilibrium eddy-viscosity law is assumed valid at this point. The third and final equation is obtained by specifying that Stevenson's velocity profiles apply throughout the domain of interest, from which a skin-friction law can be derived. Comparisons of the numerical results with the experiments of McQuaid, which include combined effects of variable pressure gradient and mass transfer, show good agreement.

  8. Observation of soliton compression in silicon photonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Redondo, A.; Husko, C.; Eades, D.; Zhang, Y.; Li, J.; Krauss, T.F.; Eggleton, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    Solitons are nonlinear waves present in diverse physical systems including plasmas, water surfaces and optics. In silicon, the presence of two photon absorption and accompanying free carriers strongly perturb the canonical dynamics of optical solitons. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of soliton-effect pulse compression of picosecond pulses in silicon, despite two photon absorption and free carriers. Here we achieve compression of 3.7 ps pulses to 1.6 ps with <10 pJ energy. We demonstrate a ~1-ps free-carrier-induced pulse acceleration and show that picosecond input pulses are critical to these observations. These experiments are enabled by a dispersion-engineered slow-light photonic crystal waveguide and an ultra-sensitive frequency-resolved electrical gating technique to detect the ultralow energies in the nanostructured device. Strong agreement with a nonlinear Schrödinger model confirms the measurements. These results further our understanding of nonlinear waves in silicon and open the way to soliton-based functionalities in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor-compatible platforms. PMID:24423977

  9. Second-harmonic pulse compression in the soliton regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibragimov, Edem; Struthers, Allan

    1996-10-01

    Analytical soliton solutions of the three-wave interaction equations are shown to exhibit high power conversion for a range of nonlinear materials with no satellite peaks and energy conversion close to 100%. Related numerical solutions that yield power conversion up to 10 times those of the initial waves with less than 3% energy in the small satellite peaks and high-energy efficiency are exhibited for KDP crystals; substantial compression of the fundamental pulses is observed in this case.

  10. Soliton instability and fold formation in laterally compressed graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libério de Lima, Amauri; Müssnich, Lucas A. M.; Manhabosco, Taíse M.; Chacham, Hélio; Batista, Ronaldo J. C.; Barros de Oliveira, Alan

    2015-01-01

    We investigate—through simulations and analytical calculations—the consequences of uniaxial lateral compression applied to the upper layer of multilayer graphene. The simulations of compressed graphene show that strains larger than 2.8% induce soliton-like deformations that further develop into large, mobile folds. Such folds were indeed experimentally observed in graphene and other solid lubricants two-dimensional (2D) materials. Interestingly, in the soliton-fold regime, the shear stress decreases with the strain s, initially as {{s}-2/3} and rapidly going to zero. Such instability is consistent with the recently observed negative dynamic compressibility of 2D materials. We also predict that the curvatures of the soliton-folds are given by {{r}c}=δ \\sqrt{β /2α }, where 1≤slant δ ≤slant 2, and β and α are respectively related to the layer bending modulus and to the interlayer binding energy of the material. This finding might allow experimental estimates of the β /α ratio of 2D materials from fold morphology.

  11. Soliton instability and fold formation in laterally compressed graphene.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Amauri Libério; Müssnich, Lucas A M; Manhabosco, Taíse M; Chacham, Hélio; Batista, Ronaldo J C; de Oliveira, Alan Barros

    2015-01-30

    We investigate-through simulations and analytical calculations-the consequences of uniaxial lateral compression applied to the upper layer of multilayer graphene. The simulations of compressed graphene show that strains larger than 2.8% induce soliton-like deformations that further develop into large, mobile folds. Such folds were indeed experimentally observed in graphene and other solid lubricants two-dimensional (2D) materials. Interestingly, in the soliton-fold regime, the shear stress decreases with the strain s, initially as s(-2/3) and rapidly going to zero. Such instability is consistent with the recently observed negative dynamic compressibility of 2D materials. We also predict that the curvatures of the soliton-folds are given by r(c) = δ√(β/2α) where 1 ≤ δ ≤ 2 and β and α are respectively related to the layer bending modulus and to the interlayer binding energy of the material. This finding might allow experimental estimates of the β/α ratio of 2D materials from fold morphology. PMID:25566691

  12. Compressible boundary layer with normal pressure gradients: Quasi-similarity equations - Their properties at the wall and at sharp and blunt leading edges.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.

    1972-01-01

    The failure of most viscous-inviscid interaction methods at strong interactions is attributed to the presence of a normal pressure gradient. A new theory is proposed for supersonic laminar boundary layers that can generate normal pressure gradients. The Navier-Stokes equations are reexamined by an order of magnitude analysis and all first and second order terms are retained. The approximation is found to be dependent not only on the boundary layer thickness but also on the ratio of the dimensionless viscosity and density. The equations are transformed into two quasi-similar, nonlinear, third order, ordinary integro-differential equations for the velocity and pressure as functions of a single transverse variable. The properties of the equations at the boundaries are discussed.

  13. A turbulence model for nonequilibrium adverse pressure gradient flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, C. C.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents a method for calculating compressible adverse pressure gradient boundary layers by using an algebraic eddy viscosity turbulence model that has been modified for variable pressure gradient and turbulence memory effects. The pressure gradient corrections are based on previous incompressible data correlations. Several methods for including the effects of turbulence memory are evaluated. A new lag model, which gives good agreement with available experimental data, is developed. Finally, a correlation is developed for the lag length parameter employed in the model as a function of the known experimental flow variables.

  14. Ion-acoustic compressive and rarefactive solitons in an electron-beam plasma system

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, L.L.; Tiwari, R.S.; Sharma, S.R. )

    1994-03-01

    Using the general formulation of reductive perturbation method, the Korteweg--de Vries (KdV) equation is derived for an electron-beam plasma with hot isothermal beam and plasma electrons and warm ions. The soliton solution of the KdV equation is discussed in detail. It is found that above a critical velocity of electron-beam two additional ion-acoustic soliton branches appear. It is found that corresponding to two linear modes, the system supports the existence of compressive as well as rarefactive solitons depending upon the plasma parameters, while corresponding to other two wave modes, the system supports only rarefactive solitons. The effect of different parameters on the characteristics of solitons have been investigated in detail.

  15. Compressive and rarefactive dressed solitons in plasma with nonthermal electrons and positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelwahed, H. G.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Zahran, M. A.; Elwakil, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The study of dressed solitary ion waves in a collisionless unmagnetized plasma composed warm fluid of ion, nonthermal distributed positrons and electrons are discussed. Concerning nonlinear ion acoustic waves, a reductive perturbation method is applied to obtain the KdV equation in terms of first order potential. Our results exemplify that, if soliton amplitude enlarged, the shape of the wave sidetrack from KdV equation. In order to improve the soliton shape, the perturbed KdV equation is suggest. In particular, the effects of nonthermal positrons and ionic temperature on the electrostatic dressed rarefactive and compressive soliton structures are discussed.

  16. Combined soliton pulse compression and plasma-related frequency upconversion in gas-filled photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Chang, W; Hölzer, P; Travers, J C; Russell, P St J

    2013-08-15

    We numerically investigate self-frequency blueshifting of a fundamental soliton in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. Because of the changing underlying soliton parameters, the blueshift gives rise to adiabatic soliton compression. Based on these features, we propose a device that enables frequency shifting over an octave and pulse compression from 30 fs down to 2.3 fs. PMID:24104627

  17. SOLITONS: Stimulated Raman self-scattering of femtosecond pulses. II. The self-compression of Schrödinger solitons in a spectrally inhomogeneous dispersion medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkin, Vladimir N.; Belyaeva, T. L.; Corro, G. H.; Agüero Granados, M.

    2003-05-01

    It is shown that stimulated Raman self-scattering (SRSS) can be efficiently used for the compression of femtosecond optical solitons in optical fibres with the spectrally inhomogeneous frequency dependence of the group-velocity dispersion. The SRS dynamics is studied in detail near the point of the second-order zero dispersion. The saturation of compression of femtosecond solitons in spectrally inhomogeneous fibres in the zero-dispersion region is predicted.

  18. Compressive and rarefactive DIA solitons beyond the KdV limit

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, A. A.; Deeba, F.

    2012-04-15

    The modified Gardner equation (MGE), showing the existence of compressive and rarefactive dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) solitons in a nonplanar dusty plasma (containing inertial ions, Boltzmann electrons, and negatively charged stationary dust) beyond the KdV Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) limit, is derived and numerically solved. The basic features of the compressive and rarefactive cylindrical and spherical DIA solitons, which are found to exist beyond the KdV limit, i.e., exist for {mu} {approx} 2/3 (where {mu} = Z{sub n}n{sub d0}/n{sub i0}, z{sub d} is the number of electrons residing onto the dust grain surface, n{sub d0}(n{sub i0}) is the dust (ion) number density at equilibrium, and {mu} {approx} 2/3 means that {mu} is not equal to 2/3, but it is around 2/3) are identified. These solitons (which can be referred to as DIA Gardner solitons (DIA-GSs)) are completely different from the KdV solitons because {mu} = 2/3 corresponds to the vanishing of the nonlinear coefficient of the KdV equation, and {mu} {approx} 2/3 corresponds to extremely large amplitude KdV solitons for which the validity of the reductive perturbation method breaks down. It is also shown that the properties of the nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) DIA-GSs are significantly different from those of the one dimensional planar ones.

  19. Compressive and rarefactive ion acoustic solitons in a magnetized two-ion component plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ur-Rehman, Hafeez; Mahmood, S.; Aman-ur-Rehman

    2014-10-01

    The formation of compressive (hump) and rarefactive (dip) ion acoustic solitons is studied in magnetized O+- H+- e and O+- H-- e plasmas. The hydrodynamics equations are described for cold heavy (oxygen) ions, warm light (hydrogen) ions and isothermal Boltzmann distributed electrons along with Poisson equations in the presence of a magnetic field. The reductive perturbation method is used to derive the nonlinear Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation for an ion acoustic wave in magnetized two-ion component plasma. It is found that two modes of ion acoustic waves with fast and slow speeds can propagate in the linear limit in such a plasma. It is noticed that, in the case of positively charged light hydrogen ions O+- H+- e plasmas, the slow ion acoustic wave solitons formed both potential hump as well as dip structures, while fast ion acoustic wave solitons give only hump structures. However in the case of negatively charged light hydrogen ions O+- H-- e plasmas, the slow ion acoustic wave solitons formed potential hump structures while fast ion acoustic wave solitons produce dip structures. The variations in the amplitude and width of the nonlinear slow and fast ion acoustic wave structures with density, temperature of light ions and magnetic field intensity are obtained in magnetized two-ion component plasmas. The magnetic field has its effect only on the width of the nonlinear ion acoustic wave structures in two-ion component plasmas.

  20. Soliton Pulse Compression in a Dispersion Decreasing Elliptic Birefringent Fiber with Effective Gain and Effective Phase Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapathy, R.; Kuriakose, V. C.

    We have considered soliton pulse compression in a dispersion decreasing ideal elliptical birefringent fiber with phase modulation. We have shown that there is exact balancing between the effective gain and the effective phase modulation and as a result arrive at the fundamental soliton solution. For the various dispersion decreasing profiles we have considered, we have shown that the hyperbolic profile is the best suitable choice for the dispersion decreasing profile as it provides fairly good compression even after compensating for the fiber loss.

  1. Pressure gradient influence in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuther, Nico; Kaehler, Christian J.

    2015-11-01

    Understanding wall-bounded turbulence is still an ongoing process. Although remarkable progress has been made in the last decades, many challenges still remain. Mean flow statistics are well understood in case of zero pressure gradient flows. However, almost all turbulent boundary layers in technical applications, such as aircrafts, are subjected to a streamwise pressure gradient. When subjecting turbulent boundary layers to adverse pressure gradients, significant changes in the statistical behavior of the near-wall flow have been observed in experimental studies conducted however the details dynamics and characteristics of these flows has not been fully resolved. The sensitivity to Reynolds number and the dependency on several parameters, including the dependence on the pressure gradient parameter, is still under debate and very little information exists about statistically averaged quantities such as the mean velocity profile or Reynolds stresses. In order to improve the understanding of wall-bounded turbulence, this work experimentally investigates turbulent boundary layer subjected to favorable and adverse pressure gradients by means of Particle Image Velocimetry over a wide range of Reynolds numbers, 4200 pressure gradient.

  2. Characterization and compression of dissipative-soliton-resonance pulses in fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Li, Daojing; Li, Lei; Zhou, Junyu; Zhao, Luming; Tang, Dingyuan; Shen, Deyuan

    2016-01-01

    We report numerical and experimental studies of dissipative-soliton-resonance (DSR) in a fiber laser with a nonlinear optical loop mirror. The DSR pulse presents temporally a flat-top profile and a clamped peak power. Its spectrum has a rectangle profile with characteristic steep edges. It shows a unique behavior as pulse energy increases: The rectangle part of the spectrum is unchanged while the newly emerging spectrum sits on the center part and forms a peak. Experimental observations match well with the numerical results. Moreover, the detailed evolution of the DSR pulse compression is both numerically and experimentally demonstrated for the first time. An experimentally obtained DSR pulse of 63 ps duration is compressed down to 760 fs, with low-intensity pedestals using a grating pair. Before being compressed to its narrowest width, the pulse firstly evolves into a cat-ear profile, and the corresponding autocorrelation trace shows a crown shape, which distinguishes itself from properties of other solitons formed in fiber lasers. PMID:27025189

  3. Characterization and compression of dissipative-soliton-resonance pulses in fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daojing; Li, Lei; Zhou, Junyu; Zhao, Luming; Tang, Dingyuan; Shen, Deyuan

    2016-03-01

    We report numerical and experimental studies of dissipative-soliton-resonance (DSR) in a fiber laser with a nonlinear optical loop mirror. The DSR pulse presents temporally a flat-top profile and a clamped peak power. Its spectrum has a rectangle profile with characteristic steep edges. It shows a unique behavior as pulse energy increases: The rectangle part of the spectrum is unchanged while the newly emerging spectrum sits on the center part and forms a peak. Experimental observations match well with the numerical results. Moreover, the detailed evolution of the DSR pulse compression is both numerically and experimentally demonstrated for the first time. An experimentally obtained DSR pulse of 63 ps duration is compressed down to 760 fs, with low-intensity pedestals using a grating pair. Before being compressed to its narrowest width, the pulse firstly evolves into a cat-ear profile, and the corresponding autocorrelation trace shows a crown shape, which distinguishes itself from properties of other solitons formed in fiber lasers.

  4. Characterization and compression of dissipative-soliton-resonance pulses in fiber lasers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Daojing; Li, Lei; Zhou, Junyu; Zhao, Luming; Tang, Dingyuan; Shen, Deyuan

    2016-01-01

    We report numerical and experimental studies of dissipative-soliton-resonance (DSR) in a fiber laser with a nonlinear optical loop mirror. The DSR pulse presents temporally a flat-top profile and a clamped peak power. Its spectrum has a rectangle profile with characteristic steep edges. It shows a unique behavior as pulse energy increases: The rectangle part of the spectrum is unchanged while the newly emerging spectrum sits on the center part and forms a peak. Experimental observations match well with the numerical results. Moreover, the detailed evolution of the DSR pulse compression is both numerically and experimentally demonstrated for the first time. An experimentally obtained DSR pulse of 63 ps duration is compressed down to 760 fs, with low-intensity pedestals using a grating pair. Before being compressed to its narrowest width, the pulse firstly evolves into a cat-ear profile, and the corresponding autocorrelation trace shows a crown shape, which distinguishes itself from properties of other solitons formed in fiber lasers. PMID:27025189

  5. Nonpremixed Combustion in a Transitional Flow Under Strong Pressure Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng

    2004-11-01

    The goal of this paper is to study the instability of reacting and accelerating shear layers by direct numerical simulation. A fnite difference method is developed for the unsteady, compressible Navier-Stokes equations with multiple species and chemical reactions in order to study transonic flows in a turbine-burner. Main focus will be on the instability of two-dimensional, accelerating, reacting shear layers with strong pressure gradients. Comparisons with non-reacting flows will be made. Results indicate that the unsteady vortex development has signifcant effects on the mixing and combustion process of the shear layers.

  6. Fundamental and subharmonic transition to turbulence in zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayadi, Taraneh; Hamman, Curtis W.; Moin, Parviz

    2012-09-01

    In this fluid dynamics video, recent simulations of transition to turbulence in compressible (M = 0.2), zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate boundary layers triggered by fundamental (Klebanoff K-type) and subharmonic (Herbert H-type) secondary instabilities of Tollmien-Schlichting waves are highlighted.

  7. Pressure gradient induced generation of microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelio, Alvaro; Campo-Cortes, Francisco; Gordillo, Jose Manuel

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that the controlled production of monodisperse bubbles possesses uncountable applications in medicine, pharmacy and industry. Here we provide with a detailed physical description of the bubble formation processes taking place in a type of flow where the liquid pressure gradient can be straightforwardly controlled. In our experiments, a gas flow rate discharges through a cylindrical needle into a pressurized chamber. The pressure gradient created from the exit of the injection needle towards the entrance of a extraction duct promotes the stretching of the gas ligament downstream. In our analysis, which is supported by an exhaustive experimental study in which the liquid viscosity is varied by three orders of magnitude, different regimes can be distinguished depending mainly on the Reynolds number. Through our physical modeling, we provide closed expressions for both the bubbling frequencies and for the bubble diameters as well as the conditions under which a monodisperse generation is obtained in all regimes found. The excellent agreement between our expressions and the experimental data fully validates our physical modeling.

  8. Shape optimization of pressure gradient microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norum, T. D.; Seiner, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Recently developed finite element computer programs were utilized to investigate the influence of the shape of a body on its scattering field with the aim of determining the optimal shape for a Pressure Gradient Microphone (PGM). Circular cylinders of various aspect ratios were evaluated to choose the length to diameter ratio best suited for a dual element PGM application. Alterations of the basic cylindrical shape by rounding the edges and recessing at the centerline were also studied. It was found that for a + or - 1 db deviation from a linear pressure gradient response, a circular cylinder of aspect ratio near 0.5 was most suitable, yielding a useful upper frequency corresponding to ka = 1.8. The maximum increase in this upper frequency limit obtained through a number of shape alterations was only about 20 percent. An initial experimental evaluation of a single element cylindrical PGM of aspect ratio 0.18 utilizing a piezoresistive type sensor was also performed and is compared to the analytical results.

  9. Turbulence measurements in axisymmetric supersonic boundary layer flow in adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gootzait, E.; Childs, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the mean-flow and turbulence properties in adiabatic turbulent boundary layer flows subjected to adverse pressure gradients. In the freestream region upstream of the adverse pressure gradient the Mach number was 3.86, the unit Reynolds number 5.3 million per foot. The boundary layer developed on the wall of an axisymmetric nozzle and straight test section. The pressure gradients at the test section wall were induced by contoured centerbodies mounted on the wind tunnel centerline. The flow under study simulated that which might be found in an axially symmetric engine inlet of a supersonic aircraft. The results obtained have shown good agreement to exist between the measured normalized turbulent velocity fluctuations and the results from other recent investigations of compressible boundary layers.

  10. Turbulence measurements in axisymmetric supersonic boundary layer flow in adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gootzait, E.; Childs, M. E.

    1977-01-01

    Mean flow and turbulence measurements are presented for adiabatic compressible turbulent boundary layer flow in adverse pressure gradients. The gradients were induced on the wall of an axially symmetric wind tunnel by contoured centerbodies mounted on the wind tunnel centerline. The boundary layer turbulence downstream of a boundary layer bleed section in a zero pressure gradient was also examined. The measurements were obtained using a constant temperature hot-wire anemometer. The adverse pressure gradients were found to significantly alter the turbulence properties of the boundary layer. With flow through the bleed holes there was a measureable decrease in the rms longitudinal velocity fluctuations near the wall and the turbulent shear stress in the boundary layer was reduced.

  11. Turbulent boundary layer in an adverse pressure gradient without effect of wall curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakkay, V.; Chi-Rong, W.

    1972-01-01

    The hypersonic compressible turbulent boundary layer in an adverse pressure gradient along a cylindrical axisymmetric body was studied. The tests were conducted in a Mach 6 contoured axisymmetric nozzle. An external compression cowl was used to produce the gradual adverse pressure gradient and a maximum pressure rise of 7 times the freestream static pressure was achieved in a test region of 23 cm. Boundary layer profiles of static pressure, total pressure, and total temperature, as well as wall transient heat transfer rates were measured. Comparisons of the velocity total temperature profiles to linear and quadratic relations were made. Measured heat transfer data were in good agreement with the prediction from the flat-plate reference enthalpy method. Integral parameters were also in good agreement with results of numerical solutions for compressible turbulent boundary layer equations.

  12. Two techniques for temporal pulse compression in gas-filled hollow-core kagomé photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Mak, K F; Travers, J C; Joly, N Y; Abdolvand, A; Russell, P St J

    2013-09-15

    We demonstrate temporal pulse compression in gas-filled kagomé hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) using two different approaches: fiber-mirror compression based on self-phase modulation under normal dispersion, and soliton effect self-compression under anomalous dispersion with a decreasing pressure gradient. In the first, efficient compression to near-transform-limited pulses from 103 to 10.6 fs was achieved at output energies of 10.3 μJ. In the second, compression from 24 to 6.8 fs was achieved at output energies of 6.6 μJ, also with near-transform-limited pulse shapes. The results illustrate the potential of kagomé-PCF for postprocessing the output of fiber lasers. We also show that, using a negative pressure gradient, ultrashort pulses can be delivered directly into vacuum. PMID:24104822

  13. Modeling turbulent boundary layers in adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, Stephen E.

    1991-01-01

    Many of the turbulent layers encountered in practical flows develop in adverse pressure gradients; hence, the dynamics of the thickening and possible separation of the boundary layer has important implications for design practices. What are the key physical processes that govern how a turbulent boundary layer responds to an adverse pressure gradient, and how should these processes be modeled? Despite the ubiquity of such flows in engineering and nature, these equations remain largely unanswered. The turbulence closure models presently used to describe these flows commonly use 'wall functions' that have ad hoc corrections for the effects of pressure gradients. There is, therefore, a practical and theoretical need to examine the effects of adverse pressure gradients on wall bounded turbulent flows in order to develop models based on sound physical principle. The evolution of a turbulent boundary layer on a flat wall with an externally imposed pressure gradient is studied.

  14. Comment on "Electrostatic compressive and rarefactive shocks and solitons in relativistic plasmas occurring in polar regions of pulsar"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, M. G.; Talukder, M. R.; Hossain Ali, M.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this comment is to show the solution of the KdVB equation used by Shah et al. (Astrophys. Space Sci. 335:529-537, 2011, doi: 10.1007/s10509-011-0766-y) is not correct. So, the numerical results that are predicted in this manuscript should not be helpful for further investigations in a plasma laboratory. For this reason, we have employed the Bernoulli's equation method to obtain the correct form of analytical solution to this equation, which is appropriate for the study of electrostatic compressive and rarefactive shocks and solitons in relativistic plasmas occurring in polar regions of pulsar.

  15. Zero pressure gradient boundary layer at extreme Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultmark, Marcus; Vallikivi, Margit; Smits, Alexander

    2011-11-01

    Experiments were conducted in a zero pressure gradient flat plate boundary layer using the Princeton/ONR High Reynolds number Test Facility (HRTF). The HRTF uses highly compressed air, up to 220 atmospheres, to produce Reynolds numbers up to Reθ =225,000 . This corresponds to a δ+ =65,000 which is one of the highest Reynolds numbers ever measured in a laboratory. When using pressure to achieve high Reynolds numbers the size of the measurement probes become critical, thus the need for very small sensors is acute. The streamwise component of velocity was investigated using a nanoscale thermal anemometer (NSTAP) as well as a 200 μm pitot tube. The NSTAP has a spatial resolution as well as a temporal resolution one order of magnitude better than conventional measurement techniques. The data was compared to recent data from a high Reynolds number turbulent pipe flow and it was shown that the two flows are more similar than previous data suggests. Supported under NR Grant N00014-09-1-0263 (program manager Ron Joslin) and NSF Grant CBET-1064257(program manager Henning Winter).

  16. Transition length prediction for flows with rapidly changing pressure gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, W.J.; Walker, G.J.; Gostelow, J.P.

    1996-10-01

    A new method for calculating intermittency in transitional boundary layers with changing pressure gradients is proposed and tested against standard turbomachinery flow cases. It is based on recent experimental studies, which show the local pressure gradient parameter to have a significant effect on turbulent spot spreading angles and propagation velocities (and hence transition length). This can be very important for some turbomachinery flows. On a turbine blade suction surface, for example, it is possible for transition to start in a region of favorable pressure gradient and finish in a region of adverse pressure gradient. Calculation methods that estimate the transition length from the local pressure gradient parameter at the start of transition will seriously overestimate the transition length under these conditions. Conventional methods based on correlations of zero pressure gradient transition date are similarly inaccurate. The new calculation method continuously adjusts the spot growth parameters in response to changes in the local pressure gradient through transition using correlations based on data given in the companion paper by Gostelow et al. (1996). Recent experiment correlations of Gostelow et al. (1994a) are used to estimate the turbulent spot generation rate at the start of transition. The method has been incorporated in a linear combination integral computation and tested with good results on cases that report both the intermittency and surface pressure distribution data. It has resulted in a much reduced sensitivity to errors in predicting the start of the transition zone, and can be recommended for engineering use in calculating boundary layer development on axial turbomachine blades.

  17. Effect of laser annealing of pressure gradients in a diamond-anvil cell using common solid pressure media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uts, Ilya; Glazyrin, Konstantin; Lee, Kanani K. M.

    2013-10-01

    Pressure media are one of the most effective deterrents of pressure gradients in diamond-anvil cell (DAC) experiments. The media, however, become less effective with increasing pressure, particularly for solid pressure media. One of the most popular ways of alleviating the increase in pressure gradients in DAC samples is through laser annealing of the sample. We explore the effectiveness of this technique for six common solid pressure media that include: alkali metal halides LiF, NaCl, KCl, CsCl, KBr, as well as amorphous SiO2. Pressure gradients are determined through the analysis of the first-order diamond Raman band across the sample before and after annealing the sample with a near-infrared laser to temperatures between ˜2000 and 3000 K. As expected, we find that in the absence of sample chamber geometrical changes and diamond anvil damage, laser annealing reduces pressure gradients, albeit to varying amounts. We find that under ideal conditions, NaCl provides the best deterrent to pressure gradients before and after laser annealing, at least up to pressures of 60 GPa and temperatures between ˜2000 and 3000 K. Amorphous SiO2, on the other hand, transforms in to harder crystalline stishovite upon laser annealing at high pressures resulting in increased pressure gradients upon further compression without laser annealing.

  18. Effect of pressure gradient fluctuations on boundary layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Pranav; Katz, Joseph; Liu, Xiaofeng

    2013-11-01

    The present study focuses on the effect of large-scale pressure gradient fluctuations on turbulence in both, zero pressure gradient (ZPG) and mean favorable pressure gradient (FPG) boundary layers. Time-resolved, two-dimensional PIV data in the streamwise-wall-normal plane enables us to calculate the instantaneous pressure distributions by integrating the planar projection of the material acceleration of the fluid. In both boundary layers, sweeps (u'> 0, v'< 0) mostly occur during periods of adverse pressure gradient fluctuations (∂p'/ ∂x > 0), while favorable pressure gradient fluctuations (∂p'/ ∂x < 0) accompany ejections (u'< 0, v'> 0). Conditional averaging indicates that in the ZPG boundary layer, large-scale ∂p'/ ∂x > 0 events accompanying sweeps lead to the formation of a growing region of ejection downstream, in a phenomenon resembling adverse-pressure induced flow separation. This phenomenon is much less pronounced in the FPG boundary layer, as the large-scale ∂p'/ ∂x > 0 events are for the most part significantly weaker than the mean FPG. Conditional sampling and instantaneous data in the ZPG boundary layer also confirm that although some of the ejections are preceded, and presumably initiated, by regions of adverse pressure gradients and sweeps, others are not. In the FPG boundary layer, there is no evidence of sweeps or adverse pressure gradients immediately upstream of ejections. The mechanisms initiating these structures presumably occur far upstream of the peak in favorable pressure gradient fluctuations. Sponsored by NSF, CBET Division, Fluid Dynamics program.

  19. Similarity Theory for Boundary Layers with Pressure Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Luciano

    1997-11-01

    The analysis of George et al. (1996)(George, W.K., Castillo, L. and Knecht, P. (1996). The Zero Pressure-Gradient Turbulent Boundary Layer. Tech. Rep. TRL-153a, Turb. Res. Lab., SUNY Buffalo.) for the zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer is extended to boundary layers with pressure gradient. As noted by George and Castillo (1993)(George, W.K. and Castillo, L. (1993). Boundary layers with pressure gradient: Another look at the equilibrium boundary layer, Near Wall Turbulent Flows), (So, R.M.C. et al. eds.), 901--910, Elsevier, NY., the velocity deficit scales with U_∞ and a parameter, Λ = δ /(ρ U_∞^2 dδ/dx)dP_∞/dx, which is proportional to the Clauser parameter in the limit of infinite Reynolds number. Like the zero-pressure gradient boundary layer, the velocity profile in the overlap region is also a power law in y+a where a^+ is an offset which is nearly constant and accounts for the mesolayer. In inner variables: u^+ = C_ipy^+^γ_p in outer: \\overlineu = C_op\\overliney^γ_p. It can be shown theoretically that away from separation, both C_ip and γp are equal to the zero pressure gradient values. Moreover, C_op differs from the zero-pressure gradient value only by an additive parameter which depends only on Λ. Thus, the Reynolds number dependence is independent of the pressure gradient.

  20. A finite volume discretization of the pressure gradient force using analytic integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adcroft, Alistair; Hallberg, Robert; Harrison, Matthew

    Layered ocean models can exhibit spurious thermobaric instability if the compressibility of sea water is not treated accurately enough. We find that previous solutions to this problem are inadequate for simulations of a changing climate. We propose a new discretization of the pressure gradient acceleration using the finite volume method. In this method, the pressure gradient acceleration is exhibited as the difference of the integral "contact" pressure acting on the edges of a finite volume. This integral "contact" pressure can be calculated analytically by choosing a tractable equation of state. The result is a discretization that has zero truncation error for an isothermal and isohaline layer and does not exhibit the spurious thermobaric instability.

  1. Effects of pressure gradients on turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veynante, D.; Poinsot, T.

    1995-01-01

    The influence of a constant acceleration on a turbulent premixed flame is studied by direct numerical simulation. This acceleration induces a mean pressure gradient across the flame brush, leading to a modification of the turbulent flame structure due to differential buoyancy mechanisms between heavy cold fresh and light hot burnt gases. Such a pressure gradient may be encountered in practical applications in ducted flames. A favorable pressure gradient, i.e. the pressure decreases from unburnt to burnt gases, is found to decrease the flame wrinkling, the flame brush thickness, and the turbulent flame speed. A favorable pressure gradient also promotes counter-gradient turbulent transport. On the other hand, adverse pressure gradients tend to increase the flame brush thickness and turbulent flame speed, and promote classical gradient turbulent transport. The balance equation for the turbulent flux of the Favre averaged progress variable is also analyzed. The first results show that the fluctuating pressure term, cannot be neglected as generally assumed in models. Simple models assuming that a high mean pressure gradient may only be balanced by the cross-dissipation term seem too approximate. This analysis has to be continued to compare simulation data and closure schemes proposed for the transport equation. The analysis developed by Veynante et al.(1995) has been extended to imposed acceleration and mean pressure gradients. A simple model for the turbulent flux is proposed and validated from simulation data. Then, a modified criterion is derived to delineate between counter-gradient and gradient turbulent diffusion. In fact, counter-gradient diffusion may occur in most practical applications, especially for ducted flames.

  2. Numerical Study of the Transverse Stability of Compressive and Rarefactive Alfven Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, R.; Haneberg, C.

    2015-12-01

    A numerical study of the stability of DNLS bright and dark solitons subject to oblique perturbations is reported. The DNLS equation is a weakly nonlinear, weakly dispersive and one dimensional limiting form of MHD with the inclusion of Hall dispersion which has been shown to remain valid for plane wave propagation parallel, as well as quasiparallel, to the ambient magnetic field. Related analytic work has dealt with the transverse stability of circularly polarized Alfven waves [E. Mjolhus, T. Hada, J. Plasma Phys., 43, 257 - 268 (1990)] describing stability in relation to the propagation angle of the perturbation and the wave's amplitude and wavenumber. The amplitude and wavenumber relation for transverse stability has a striking similarity to the criterion for modulational instability. A prior analytic work [M. S. Ruderman, Fluid Dyn. 22, 299, (1987)] found the dark soliton to be unstable. Our numerical results are established in the context of these analytic results. Additionally, the transverse stability properties of dark solitons will be addressed as they relate to their role in representing magnetic decreases observed in interplanetary space.

  3. The pressure gradient in the human respiratory tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chovancová, Michaela; Elcner, Jakub

    2014-03-01

    Respiratory airways cause resistance to air flow during inhalation and exhalation. The pressure gradient is necessary to transport the air from the mount (or nose) to pulmonary alveoli. The knowledge of pressure gradient (i.e. respiratory airways resistance) is also needed to solve the question of aerosol deposition in the human respiratory tract. The obtained data will be used as boundary conditions for CFD simulations of aerosol transport. Understanding of aerosol transport in the human lungs can help us to determine the health hazard of harmful particles. On the other hand it can be used to set the conditions for transport of medication to the desirable place. This article deals with the description of the mathematical equations defining the pressure gradient and resistance in the bronchial three and describes the geometry used in the calculation.

  4. Pressure Gradients and Annealing Effects in Solid Helium-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhel, Md. Abdul Halim

    The Kim and Chan experiment in 2004 gave the first experimental evidence of a possible supersolid state. Even though the origin of this state is not clear yet, several experimental and theoretical investigations suggest defects are responsible for this curious phase. We have used heat pulses and thermal quenching to study pressure gradients and annealing mechanisms in solid 4He crystals. Large pressure gradients exist in crystals grown at constant volume. These can be enhanced by phase transitions, thermal quenching or by partial melting. Annealing reduces defect densities and hence pressure gradients in crystals. Our measurements show that the pressure at different points in a crystal can behave differently, even if there is little change in the crystal's average pressure. We measured the activation energy that is associated with the annealing process.

  5. Enhanced magnetic reconnection in the presence of pressure gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Pueschel, M. J.; Terry, P. W.; Told, D.; Jenko, F.

    2015-06-15

    Magnetic reconnection in the presence of background pressure gradients is studied, with special attention to parallel (compressional) magnetic fluctuations. A process is reported that reconnects fields through coupling of drift-wave-type instabilities with current sheets. Its time scale is set not by the reconnecting field but by inhomogeneities of the background density or temperature. The observed features can be attributed to a pressure-gradient-driven linear instability which interacts with the reconnecting system but is fundamentally different from microtearing. In particular, this mode relies on parallel magnetic fluctuations and the associated drift. For turbulent reconnection, similar or even stronger enhancements are reported. In the solar corona, this yields a critical pressure gradient scale length of about 200 km below which this new process becomes dominant over the tearing instability.

  6. Evolution of a Planar Wake in Adverse Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driver, David M.; Mateer, George G.

    2016-01-01

    In the interest of improving the predictability of high-lift systems at maximum lift conditions, a series of fundamental experiments were conducted to study the effects of adverse pressure gradient on a wake flow. Mean and fluctuating velocities were measured with a two-component laser-Doppler velocimeter. Data were obtained for several cases of adverse pressure gradient, producing flows ranging from no reversed flow to massively reversed flow. While the turbulent Reynolds stresses increase with increasing size of the reversed flow region, the gradient of Reynolds stress does not. Computations using various turbulence models were unable to reproduce the reversed flow.

  7. Accurate pressure gradient calculations in hydrostatic atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, John J.; Mendez-Nunez, Luis R.; Tanrikulu, Saffet

    1987-01-01

    A method for the accurate calculation of the horizontal pressure gradient acceleration in hydrostatic atmospheric models is presented which is especially useful in situations where the isothermal surfaces are not parallel to the vertical coordinate surfaces. The present method is shown to be exact if the potential temperature lapse rate is constant between the vertical pressure integration limits. The technique is applied to both the integration of the hydrostatic equation and the computation of the slope correction term in the horizontal pressure gradient. A fixed vertical grid and a dynamic grid defined by the significant levels in the vertical temperature distribution are employed.

  8. Acoustic waves in gases with strong pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, William E.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of strong pressure gradients on the acoustic modes (standing waves) of a rectangular cavity is investigated analytically. When the cavity response is represented by a sum of modes, each mode is found to have two resonant frequencies. The lower frequency is near the Viaesaela-Brundt frequency, which characterizes the buoyant effect, and the higher frequency is above the ordinary acoustic resonance frequency. This finding shows that the propagation velocity of the acoustic waves is increased due to the pressure gradient effect.

  9. Numerical analysis of turbulent flows with pressure gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Hirofumi; Nagano, Yasutaka

    1992-12-01

    A k-epsilon turbulence model is developed to calculate wall turbulent shear flows under various pressure gradient conditions. In the present model, the dissipation rate of turbulent energy zero at a wall is made, though the wall limiting behavior of velocity fluctuations is reproduced exactly. Thus, the model assures computational expediency and convergence. The proposed model is constructed to properly take into account the effects of pressure gradients on shear layers. It was found by Nagano et al. that in adverse pressure gradient flows a Van Driest damping constant decreased with increasing dimensionless pressure gradient parameter P(sup +). Therefore, the present model has introduced the modified Van Driest damping function which is a function of P(sup +). The proposed model was tested by application to a turbulent channel flow and boundary layers with P(sup +) is less than 0, P(sup +) = 0 and P(sup +) is greater than zero. The model predictions indicate that agreement with the experiment and the direct simulation data is good over a wide range of pressure variations.

  10. Statistics of pressure and pressure gradient in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotoh, T.; Rogallo, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    The statistics of pressure and pressure gradient in stationary isotropic turbulence are measured within direct numerical simulations at low to moderate Reynolds numbers. It is found that the one-point pdf of the pressure is highly skewed and that the pdf of the pressure gradient is of stretched exponential form. The power spectrum of the pressure P(k) is found to be larger than the corresponding spectrum P(sub G)(k) computed from a Gaussian velocity field having the same energy spectrum as that of the DNS field. The ratio P(k)/P(sub G)(k), a measure of the pressure-field intermittence, grows with wavenumber and Reynolds number as -R(sub lambda)(exp 1/2)log(k/k(sub d)) for k less than k(sub d)/2 where k(sub d) is the Kolmogorov wavenumber. The Lagrangian correlations of pressure gradient and velocity are compared and the Lagrangian time scale of the pressure gradient is observed to be much shorter than that of the velocity.

  11. Three-Dimensional Turbulent Boundary Layer With Adverse Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driver, David M.; Hebbar, Sheshagiri K.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiment to measure effects of adverse pressure gradient on three-dimensional turbulent boundary-layer flow; effect of streamwise gradient of pressure on crossflow of particular interest. Production of turbulent kinetic energy grows rapidly in vicinity of step as result of steep mean-flow velocity gradients. Dissipation grows less quickly than production; leading to net growth with distance along streamline.

  12. A new simple method to estimate fracture pressure gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, L.A.; Bourgoyne, A.T.

    1994-12-31

    Projecting safer and more economic wells calls for estimating correctly the fracture pressure gradient. On the other hand, a poor prediction of the fracture pressure gradient may lead to serious accidents such as lost circulation followed by a kick. Although these kinds of accidents can occur in any phase of the well, drilling shallow formations can offer additional dangerous due to shallow gas kicks, because they have the potential of becoming a shallow gas blowout leading sometimes to the formation of craters. Often, one of the main problems when estimating the fracture pressure gradient is the lack of data. In fact, drilling engineers generally face situations where only leak off test data (frequently having questionable results) are available. This problem is normally the case when drilling shallow formations where very few information is collected. This paper presents a new method to estimate fracture pressure gradient. The proposed method has the advantage of (a) using only the knowledge of leak off test data and (b) being independent of the pore pressure. The method is based on a new concept called pseudo-overburden pressure, defined as the overburden pressure a formation would exhibit if it were plastic. The method was applied in several areas of the world such as US Gulf Coast (Mississippi Canyon and Green Canyon) with very good results.

  13. New insights into adverse pressure gradient boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, William K.; Stanislas, Michel; Laval, Jean-Philippe

    2010-11-01

    In a recent paper Shah et al. 2010 (Proc. of the WALLTURB Meeting, 2009), Lille, FR, Springer, in press) documented a number of adverse pressure gradient flows (APG's), with and without wall curvature, where the turbulence intensity peak moved quite sharply away from the wall with increasing distance. They further suggested that this peak was triggered by the adverse pressure gradient and had its origin in an instability hidden in the turbulent boundary layer, developing soon after the change of sign of the pressure gradient. They then offered that this may explain the difficulties encountered up to now in finding a universal scaling for turbulent boundary layers. We build on these observations, and show that in fact there is clear evidence in the literature (in most experiments, both old and new) for such a development downstream of the imposition of an adverse pressure gradient. The exact nature of the evolution and the distance over which it occurs depends on the upstream boundary layer and the manner in which the APG is imposed. But far enough downstream the mean velocity profile in all cases becomes an inflectional point profile with the location of the inflection point corresponding quite closely to the observed peak in the streamwise turbulence intensity. This does not seem to have been previously noticed.

  14. Pressure Gradient Effects on Hypersonic Cavity Flow Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Merski, N. Ronald; Wood, William A.; Prabhu, Ramdas K.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of a pressure gradient on the local heating disturbance of rectangular cavities tested at hypersonic freestream conditions has been globally assessed using the two-color phosphor thermography method. These experiments were conducted in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel and were initiated in support of the Space Shuttle Return-To-Flight Program. Two blunted-nose test surface geometries were developed, including an expansion plate test surface with nearly constant negative pressure gradient and a flat plate surface with nearly zero pressure gradient. The test surface designs and flow characterizations were performed using two-dimensional laminar computational methods, while the experimental boundary layer state conditions were inferred using the measured heating distributions. Three-dimensional computational predictions of the entire model geometry were used as a check on the design process. Both open-flow and closed-flow cavities were tested on each test surface. The cavity design parameters and the test condition matrix were established using the computational predictions. Preliminary conclusions based on an analysis of only the cavity centerline data indicate that the presence of the pressure gradient did not alter the open cavity heating for laminar-entry/laminar-exit flows, but did raise the average floor heating for closed cavities. The results of these risk-reduction studies will be used to formulate a heating assessment of potential damage scenarios occurring during future Space Shuttle flights.

  15. Pressure Gradient Effects on Hypersonic Cavity Flow Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Merski, N. Ronald; Wood, William A.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of a pressure gradient on the local heating disturbance of rectangular cavities tested at hypersonic freestream conditions has been globally assessed using the two-color phosphor thermography method. These experiments were conducted in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel and were initiated in support of the Space Shuttle Return-To-Flight Program. Two blunted-nose test surface geometries were developed, including an expansion plate test surface with nearly constant negative pressure gradient and a flat plate surface with nearly zero pressure gradient. The test surface designs and flow characterizations were performed using two-dimensional laminar computational methods, while the experimental boundary layer state conditions were inferred using the measured heating distributions. Three-dimensional computational predictions of the entire model geometry were used as a check on the design process. Both open-flow and closed-flow cavities were tested on each test surface. The cavity design parameters and the test condition matrix were established using the computational predictions. Preliminary conclusions based on an analysis of only the cavity centerline data indicate that the presence of the pressure gradient did not alter the open cavity heating for laminar-entry/laminar-exit flows, but did raise the average floor heating for closed cavities. The results of these risk-reduction studies will be used to formulate a heating assessment of potential damage scenarios occurring during future Space Shuttle flights.

  16. Compressive and rarefactive dust-ion-acoustic Gardner solitons in a multi-component dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ema, S. A.; Ferdousi, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-04-15

    The linear and nonlinear propagations of dust-ion-acoustic solitary waves (DIASWs) in a collisionless four-component unmagnetized dusty plasma system containing nonextensive electrons, inertial negative ions, Maxwellian positive ions, and negatively charged static dust grains have been investigated theoretically. The linear properties are analyzed by using the normal mode analysis and the reductive perturbation method is used to derive the nonlinear equations, namely, the Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV), the modified K-dV (mK-dV), and the Gardner equations. The basic features (viz., polarity, amplitude, width, etc.) of Gardner solitons (GS) are found to exist beyond the K-dV limit and these dust-ion-acoustic GS are qualitatively different from the K-dV and mK-dV solitons. It is observed that the basic features of DIASWs are affected by various plasma parameters (viz., electron nonextensivity, negative-to-positive ion number density ratio, electron-to-positive ion number density ratio, electron-to-positive ion temperature ratio, etc.) of the considered plasma system. The findings of our results obtained from this theoretical investigation may be useful in understanding the nonlinear structures and the characteristics of DIASWs propagating in both space and laboratory plasmas.

  17. The effects of pressure gradients on convective heat flux predictions in engine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, I.-Ping

    1991-02-01

    Accurate convective heat transfer predictions inside engines is important to improvements in performance, reduction of harmful exhaust emissions, and structural and material design. Current heat transfer models used in engine simulations do not incorporate the effects of pressure gradients. In this study, wall functions that use local pressure gradients to correct the friction velocity, wall shear stress, and heat flux were developed. The pressure-gradient-corrected (PGC) model predictions of nondimensional velocity and temperature were validated by experimental data available in the literature and were also compared with other models. Results showed reasonable agreement with the experimental data for both accelerated and decelerated flows before flow separation. The drag law relations predicted by the PGC wall function gave good trend analysis of skin coefficient variation over the local Reynolds number for different local pressure gradient conditions. The piecewise linear correlations between the skin friction coefficient and the Stanton number for different pressure gradients were observed. The PGC model wall function parameters which include a modified friction velocity, wall shear stress, and heat flux were calculated using the engine hydrodynamic simulation code KIVA-II. The predictions exhibited appropriate response to a variety of engine flow and operating conditions. The PGC model wall function predictions of friction velocity and wall shear stress were compared with two different models for a flat-piston and a deep-bowl engine at the same operating conditions and location. The wall heat flux predictions from the PGC model were compared with four different models for the different flow, geometry, and operating conditions from a flat-piston engine and a deep-bowl piston engine. Results of different model predictions were compared with experimental data. For the flat-piston engine, the PGC model predictions underestimated peaks and valleys in the compression

  18. Observations of ion-acoustic cylindrical solitons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hershkowitz, N.; Romesser, T.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental observations of cylindrical solitons in a collisionless plasma are presented. The data obtained show that cylindrical solitonlike objects exist and that their properties are consistent with those of one- and three-dimensional solitons. It is found that compressive density perturbations evolve into solitons. The number of the solitons is determined by the width and amplitude of the applied pulse.

  19. Computation of Turbulent Wake Flows in Variable Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duquesne, N.; Carlson, J. R.; Rumsey, C. L.; Gatski, T. B.

    1999-01-01

    Transport aircraft performance is strongly influenced by the effectiveness of high-lift systems. Developing wakes generated by the airfoil elements are subjected to strong pressure gradients and can thicken very rapidly, limiting maximum lift. This paper focuses on the effects of various pressure gradients on developing symmetric wakes and on the ability of a linear eddy viscosity model and a non-linear explicit algebraic stress model to accurately predict their downstream evolution. In order to reduce the uncertainties arising from numerical issues when assessing the performance of turbulence models, three different numerical codes with the same turbulence models are used. Results are compared to available experimental data to assess the accuracy of the computational results.

  20. Plasma Streamwise Vortex Generators in an Adverse Pressure Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Christopher; Corke, Thomas; Thomas, Flint

    2013-11-01

    A wind tunnel experiment was conducted to compare plasma streamwise vortex generators (PSVGs) and passive vortex generators (VGs). These devices were installed on a wing section by which the angle of attack could be used to vary the streamwise pressure gradient. The experiment was performed for freestream Mach numbers 0.1-0.2. Three-dimensional velocity components were measured using a 5-hole Pitot probe in the boundary layer. These measurements were used to quantify the production of streamwise vorticity and the magnitude of the reorientation term from the vorticity transport equation. The effect of Mach number, pressure gradient, operating voltage, and electrode length was then investigated for the PSVGs. The results indicate that the PSVGs could easily outperform the passive VGs and provide a suitable alternative for flow control.

  1. Six-bit all-optical quantization using photonic crystal fiber with soliton self-frequency shift and pre-chirp spectral compression techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhe; Yuan, Jin-Hui; Li, Sha; Xie, Song-Lin; Yan, Bin-Bin; Sang, Xin-Zhu; Yu, Chong-Xiu

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we propose an optical quantization scheme for all-optical analog-to-digital conversion that facilitates photonics integration. A segment of 10-m photonic crystal fiber with a high nonlinear coefficient of 62.8 W-1/km is utilized to realize large scale soliton self-frequency shift relevant to the power of the sampled optical signal. Furthermore, a 100-m dispersion-increasing fiber is used as the spectral compression module for further resolution enhancement. Simulation results show that 317-nm maximum wavelength shift is realized with 1550-nm initial wavelength and 6-bit quantization resolution is obtained with a subsequent spectral compression process.

  2. Pressure gradient torque in highly supersonic nonaxisymmetric accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Cheng; Taam, Ronald E.; Fryxell, Bruce A.; Matsuda, Takuya; Koide, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    The contribution of a pressure gradient torque to the angular momentum transfer rate in highly supersonic nonaxisymmetric accretion flows is considered. This study takes into account the contribution due to the pressure variation in the postaccretion-shock region which is significant for high Mach number accretion. For the case of accretion flow with Mach (infinity) of not less than 5, the overall accretion torque is shown to approach a constant value.

  3. On Localized Vapor Pressure Gradients Governing Condensation and Frost Phenomena.

    PubMed

    Nath, Saurabh; Boreyko, Jonathan B

    2016-08-23

    Interdroplet vapor pressure gradients are the driving mechanism for several phase-change phenomena such as condensation dry zones, interdroplet ice bridging, dry zones around ice, and frost halos. Despite the fundamental nature of the underlying pressure gradients, the majority of studies on these emerging phenomena have been primarily empirical. Using classical nucleation theory and Becker-Döring embryo formation kinetics, here we calculate the pressure field for all possible modes of condensation and desublimation in order to gain fundamental insight into how pressure gradients govern the behavior of dry zones, condensation frosting, and frost halos. Our findings reveal that in a variety of phase-change systems the thermodynamically favorable mode of nucleation can switch between condensation and desublimation depending upon the temperature and wettability of the surface. The calculated pressure field is used to model the length of a dry zone around liquid or ice droplets over a broad parameter space. The long-standing question of whether the vapor pressure at the interface of growing frost is saturated or supersaturated is resolved by considering the kinetics of interdroplet ice bridging. Finally, on the basis of theoretical calculations, we propose that there exists a new mode of frost halo that is yet to be experimentally observed; a bimodal phase map is developed, demonstrating its dependence on the temperature and wettability of the underlying substrate. We hope that the model and predictions contained herein will assist future efforts to exploit localized vapor pressure gradients for the design of spatially controlled or antifrosting phase-change systems. PMID:27463696

  4. A new simple method to estimate fracture pressure gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, L.A.; Bourgoyne, A.T.

    1996-09-01

    Projecting safety and more economic wells calls for estimating correctly the fracture pressure gradient. On the other hand, a poor prediction of the fracture pressure gradient may lead to serious accidents, such as lost circulation followed by a kick. Although these kind of accidents can occur in any phase of the well, drilling shallow formations can offer additional dangers caused by shallow gas kicks because they have the potential of becoming a shallow gas blowout leading sometimes to the formation of craters. This paper presents a new method to estimate fracture pressure gradient. The proposed method has the advantage of (1) using only the knowledge of leakoff test data and (2) being independent of the pore pressure. The method is based on a new concept called pseudo-overburden pressure, defined as the overburden pressure a formation would exhibit if it were plastic. The method was applied in several areas of the world, such as the US Gulf Coast (Mississippi Canyon and Green Canyon), with very good results.

  5. [Measuring the intracoronary pressure gradient--value and methodologic limitations].

    PubMed

    Sievert, H; Kaltenbach, M

    1987-06-01

    Measurements of pressure gradients were performed in a fluid-filled model. The hydrostatically regulated perfusion pressure, as well as the diameter of the tube segments and the regulation of the flow by peripheral resistance, were comparable to conditions in human coronary arteries. Pressure gradients above 20 mm Hg were only measured with a reduction in cross-sectional area of more than 90%. Even after increasing the flow four-fold, which corresponds to the human coronary flow reserve, as well as after probing the stenosis with different catheters (2F-5F), gradients greater than 20 mm Hg were only recorded with high-grade stenoses (more than 80% reduction in cross-sectional area). The findings in this model demonstrate that measurement of pressure gradients allows only a quantitative differentiation between high-grade (greater than 80%) and low-grade (less than 80%) stenoses. The catheter itself can substantially contribute to the gradient by vessel obstruction, depending on the diameter of the catheter and of the coronary vessel. A quantitative assessment of the stenosis therefore requires knowledge of the pre- and post-stenotic vessel diameter as well as of the catheter diameter. However, pressure measurements during transluminal coronary angioplasty should not be abandoned. They can be useful to aid catheter positioning and to estimate dilatation efficacy. Moreover, measurement of coronary capillary wedge pressure during balloon expansion provides valuable information about the extent of collateralisation. PMID:2957862

  6. Pore-pressure gradients in the proximity of a submarine buried pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Magda, W.

    1995-12-31

    This paper is concerned with the two-dimensional finite-element modeling of the wave-induced pore-pressure field in the proximity of a submarine pipeline buried in sandy seabed sediments subject to continuous loading of regular surface waves. Neglecting inertial forces, a linear elastic stress-strain relationship for the soil, and Darcy`s law for the flow of pore-fluid are assumed. The model takes into account the compressibility of both components (i.e., pore-fluid and soil skeleton) of the two-phase medium. The results of numerical computations are discussed with respect to the hydraulic gradient in the upper part of seabed sediments just above the buried submarine pipeline. The pore-pressure gradient is studied as a function of geometry (depth of burial) as well as soil and pore-fluid compressibility parameters where the later of which is defined in terms of soil saturation conditions.

  7. Characteristics of turbulence in boundary layer with zero pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klebanoff, P S

    1955-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of a turbulent boundary layer with zero pressure gradient are presented. Measurements with the hot-wire anemometer were made of turbulent energy and turbulent shear stress, probability density and flattening factor of u-fluctuation (fluctuation in x-direction), spectra of turbulent energy and shear stress, and turbulent dissipation. The importance of the region near the wall and the inadequacy of the concept of local isotropy are demonstrated. Attention is given to the energy balance and the intermittent character of the outer region of the boundary layer. Also several interesting features of the spectral distribution of the turbulent motions are discussed.

  8. Vandenberg Air Force Base Pressure Gradient Wind Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Jaclyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Warning category winds can adversely impact day-to-day space lift operations at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in California. NASA's Launch Services Program and other programs at VAFB use wind forecasts issued by the 30 Operational Support Squadron Weather Flight (30 OSSWF) to determine if they need to limit activities or protect property such as a launch vehicle. The 30 OSSWF tasked the AMU to develop an automated Excel graphical user interface that includes pressure gradient thresholds between specific observing stations under different synoptic regimes to aid forecasters when issuing wind warnings. This required the AMU to determine if relationships between the variables existed.

  9. Investigation of pressure gradient aware wall modeling in LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiry, Olivier; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Duponcheel, Matthieu

    2015-11-01

    This work focuses on the investigation of various wall modeling strategies for the simulation of high Reynolds number wall-bounded turbulent flows with acceleration and/or deceleration. Our code is based on fourth order finite differences, is momentum conserving, and is energy conserving up to fourth order. We here use a ``channel flow'' set-up, with no slip and wall modeling at the bottom, with slip at the top, and with blowing and/or suction at the top in order to generate the desired acceleration-deceleration profile. Two strategies are investigated and compared. Pressure gradient corrected algebraic models are first considered, and we investigate various local averaging techniques so as to avoid imposing mean profile laws pointwise. RANS sub-layer models are then also considered, where the turbulent viscosity is corrected to account for pressure gradient effects and for resolved LES fluctuations effects. A wall-resolved LES was also performed to provide a reference solution. Research fellow (Ph.D. student) at the F.R.S. - FNRS (Belgium).

  10. Turbulent boundary layers subjected to multiple curvatures and pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Ahmed, Anwar

    1993-01-01

    The effects of abruptly applied cycles of curvatures and pressure gradients on turbulent boundary layers are examined experimentally. Two two-dimensional curved test surfaces are considered: one has a sequence of concave and convex longitudinal surface curvatures and the other has a sequence of convex and concave curvatures. The choice of the curvature sequences were motivated by a desire to study the asymmetric response of turbulent boundary layers to convex and concave curvatures. The relaxation of a boundary layer from the effects of these two opposite sequences has been compared. The effect of the accompaying sequences of pressure gradient has also been examined but the effect of curvature dominates. The growth of internal layers at the curvature junctions have been studied. Measurements of the Gortler and corner vortex systems have been made. The boundary layer recovering from the sequence of concave to convex curvature has a sustained lower skin friction level than in that recovering from the sequence of convex to concave curvature. The amplification and suppression of turbulence due to the curvature sequences have also been studied.

  11. Effectiveness of Micro-Blowing Technique in Adverse Pressure Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.; Larosiliere, Louis M.; Hwang, Danny P.; Wood, Jerry R.

    2001-01-01

    The impact of the micro-blowing technique (MBT) on the skin friction and total drag of a strut in a turbulent, strong adverse-pressure-gradient flow is assessed experimentally over a range of subsonic Mach numbers (0.3 less than M less than 0.7) and reduced blowing fractions (0 less than or equal to 2F/C (sub f,o) less than or equal to 1.75). The MBT-treated strut is situated along the centerline of a symmetric 2-D diffuser with a static pressure rise coefficient of 0.6. In agreement with presented theory and earlier experiments in zero-pressure-gradient flows, the effusion of blowing air reduces skin friction significantly (e.g., by 60% at reduced blowing fractions near 1.75). The total drag of the treated strut with blowing is significantly lower than that of the treated strut in the limit of zero-blowing; further, the total drag is reduced below that of the baseline (solid-plate) strut, provided that the reduced blowing fractions are sufficiently high. The micro-blowing air is, however, deficient in streamwise momentum and the blowing leads to increased boundary-layer and wake thicknesses and shape factors. Diffuser performance metrics and wake surveys are used to discuss the impact of various levels of micro-blowing on the aerodynamic blockage and loss.

  12. Implicit Large-Eddy Simulations of Zero-Pressure Gradient, Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekhar, Susheel; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2015-01-01

    A set of direct simulations of zero-pressure gradient, turbulent boundary layer flows are conducted using various span widths (62-630 wall units), to document their influence on the generated turbulence. The FDL3DI code that solves compressible Navier-Stokes equations using high-order compact-difference scheme and filter, with the standard recycling/rescaling method of turbulence generation, is used. Results are analyzed at two different Re values (500 and 1,400), and compared with spectral DNS data. They show that a minimum span width is required for the mere initiation of numerical turbulence. Narrower domains ((is) less than 100 w.u.) result in relaminarization. Wider spans ((is) greater than 600 w.u.) are required for the turbulent statistics to match reference DNS. The upper-wall boundary condition for this setup spawns marginal deviations in the mean velocity and Reynolds stress profiles, particularly in the buffer region.

  13. Transition from resistive ballooning to neoclassical magnetohydrodynamic pressure-gradient-driven instability

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, D. A.; Shaing, K. C.; Carreras, B. A.; Charlton, L. A.; Callen, J. D.; Garcia, L.

    1988-10-01

    The linearized neoclassical magnetohydrodynamic equations, including perturbed neoclassical flows and currents, have been solved for parameter regimes where the neoclassical pressure-gradient-driven instability becomes important. This instability is driven by the fluctuating bootstrap current term in Ohm's law. It begins to dominate the conventional resistive ballooning mode in the banana-plateau collisionality regime ({mu}{sub e}/{nu}{sub e} approx {radical}{epsilon}/(1 + {nu}{sub *e}) > {epsilon}{sup 2}) and is characterized by a larger radial mode width and higher growth rate. The neoclassical instability persists in the absence of the usual magnetic field curvature drive and is not significantly affected by compressibility. Scalings with respect to {beta}, n (toroidal mode number), and {mu} (neoclassical viscosity) are examined using a large-aspect-ratio, three-dimensional initial-value code that solves linearized equations for the magnetic flux, fluid vorticity, density, and parallel ion flow velocity in axisymmetric toroidal geometry. 13 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Protein osmotic pressure gradients and microvascular reflection coefficients.

    PubMed

    Drake, R E; Dhother, S; Teague, R A; Gabel, J C

    1997-08-01

    Microvascular membranes are heteroporous, so the mean osmotic reflection coefficient for a microvascular membrane (sigma d) is a function of the reflection coefficient for each pore. Investigators have derived equations for sigma d based on the assumption that the protein osmotic pressure gradient across the membrane (delta II) does not vary from pore to pore. However, for most microvascular membranes, delta II probably does vary from pore to pore. In this study, we derived a new equation for sigma d. According to our equation, pore-to-pore differences in delta II increase the effect of small pores and decrease the effect of large pores on the overall membrane osmotic reflection coefficient. Thus sigma d for a heteroporous membrane may be much higher than previously derived equations indicate. Furthermore, pore-to-pore delta II differences increase the effect of plasma protein osmotic pressure to oppose microvascular fluid filtration. PMID:9277520

  15. Wake measurements in a strong adverse pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffenberg, R.; Sullivan, John P.; Schneider, S. P.

    1994-01-01

    The behavior of wakes in adverse pressure gradients is critical to the performance of high-lift systems for transport aircraft. Wake deceleration is known to lead to sudden thickening and the onset of reversed flow; this 'wake bursting' phenomenon can occur while surface flows remain attached. Although 'wake bursting' is known to be important for high-lift systems, no detailed measurements of 'burst' wakes have ever been reported. Wake bursting has been successfully achieved in the wake of a flat plate as it decelerated in a two-dimensional diffuser, whose sidewalls were forced to remain attached by use of slot blowing. Pilot probe surveys, L.D.V. measurements, and flow visualization have been used to investigate the physics of this decelerated wake, through the onset of reversed flow.

  16. Theory of neoclassical pressure-gradient-driven turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, O.J.; Diamond, P.H.; Biglari, H.

    1988-11-01

    The nonlinear evolution and saturation of neoclassical pressure- gradient-driven turbulence (NPGDT), evolving from linearly unstable bootstrap current modes, are investigated. The theoretical model is based on '' neoclassical MHD equations'' which are valid in the banana-plateau regimes of collisionality. Modes with poloidal wavelengths shorter than radial wavelengths are shown to be suppressed. From nonlinear saturation conditions, the turbulent pressure diffusivity is determined as an eigenvalue of the renormalized equations. Levels and radial scales of turbulence are determined from the pressure diffusivity and are shown to exceed mixing length estimates by powers of a nonlinear enhancement factor. The problem of the electron heat transport due to stochastic magnetic fields driven by NPGDT is revisited. The reconsideration of the radial structure of magnetic flutter leads to estimates of the electron heat transport and magnetic fluctuation levels which differ qualitatively and quantitatively from previous calculations. 25 refs.

  17. Theory of neoclassical pressure-gradient-driven turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, O.J. ); Diamond, P.H.; Biglari, H. General Atomics, Inc., San Diego, California 92138 )

    1990-02-01

    The nonlinear evolution and saturation of neoclassical pressure-gradient-driven turbulence (NPGDT), evolving from linearly unstable bootstrap-current modes, are investigated. The theoretical model is based on neoclassical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations'' that are valid in the banana-plateau regimes of collisionality. Modes with poloidal wavelengths shorter than radial wavelengths are shown to be suppressed. From nonlinear saturation conditions, the turbulent pressure diffusivity is determined as an eigenvalue of the renormalized equations. Levels and radial scales of turbulence are determined from the pressure diffusivity and are shown to exceed mixing-length estimates by powers of a nonlinear enhancement factor. The problem of the electron heat transport resulting from stochastic magnetic fields driven by NPGDT is revisited. The reconsideration of the radial structure of magnetic flutter leads to estimates of the electron heat transport and magnetic fluctuation levels that differ qualitatively and quantitatively from previous calculations.

  18. Radio jet refraction in galactic atmospheres with static pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, R. N.; Vallee, J. P.; Bridle, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    A theory of double radio sources which have a 'Z' or 'S' morphology is proposed, based on the refraction of radio jets in the extended atmosphere of an elliptical galaxy. The model describes a collimated jet of supersonic material bending self-consistently under the influence of external static pressure gradients. Gravity and magnetic fields are neglected in the simplest case except insofar as they determine the static pressure distribution. The calculation is a straightforward extension of a method used to calculate a ram-pressure model for twin radio trails ('C' morphology). It may also be described as a continuous-jet version of a buoyancy model proposed in 1973. The model has the added virtue of invoking a galactic atmosphere similar to those already indicated by X-ray measurements of some other radio galaxies and by models for the collimation of other radio jets.

  19. Radio jet refraction in galactic atmospheres with static pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, R. N.; Vallee, J. P.; Bridle, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    A theory based on the refraction of radio jets in the extended atmosphere of an elliptical galaxy, is proposed for double radio sources with a Z or S morphology. The model describes a collimated jet of supersonic material that bends self-consistently under the influence of external static pressure gradients, and may alternatively be seen as a continuous-jet version of the buoyancy model proposed by Gull (1973). Emphasis is placed on (1) S-shaped radio sources identified with isolated galaxies, such as 3C 293, whose radio structures should be free of distortions resulting from motion relative to a cluster medium, and (2) small-scale, galaxy-dominated rather than environment-dominated S-shaped sources such as the inner jet structure of Fornax A.

  20. The Pressure Gradient Force in Sigma-Co Ocean Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slørdal, Leiv Håvard

    1997-05-01

    The error in computing the horizontal pressure gradient force near steep topography is investigated in a primitive equation, -co-ordinate, numerical ocean model (Blumberg and Mellor, in Three -Dimensional Coastal Ocean Models, Vol. 4, American Geophysical Union, Washington D.C., 1987, pp. 1-16). By performing simple test experiments where the density field is allowed to vary in both the vertical and the horizontal direction, severe errors are detected in the areas where the isopycnals hit the sloping bottom. An alternative method of computing the pressure force (Stelling and van Kester, Int. j. numer. methods fluids, 18, 915-935 (1994) is adopted, resulting in substantial reduction of the errors. However, a systematic underestimation of the calculated quantities is revealed, leading to erroneous depth-mean values of the pressure force. In this study a modification of the Stelling and van Kester method is proposed which seems to improve the overall performance of the method.

  1. Diverging boundary layers with zero streamwise pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauley, Wayne R.; Eaton, John K.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of spanwise divergence on the boundary layer forming between a pair of embedded streamwise vortices with the common flow between them directed toward the wall was studied. Measurements indicate that divergence controls the rate of development of the boundary layer and that large divergence significantly retards boundary layer growth and enhances skin friction. For strongly diverging boundary layers, divergence accounts for nearly all of the local skin friction. Even with divergence, however, the local similarity relationships for two-dimensional boundary layers are satisfactory. Although divergence modifies the mean development of the boundary layer, it does not significantly modify the turbulence structure. In the present experiments with a zero streamwise pressure gradient, it was found that spanwise divergence dit not significantly affect the Reynolds stress and the turbulent triple product distributions.

  2. Pore-pressure gradients, stresses, and induced earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, P. . Geophysics Dept. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA )

    1992-01-01

    In the theory of poroelasticity, spatial gradients in pore-pressure enter the equilibrium equations in the same way as distributed body forces. Pore-pressure gradients are thus associated with poroelastic stresses in the same way that temperature gradients associated with thermoelastic stresses. The author has suggested that pore-pressure gradients caused by pumping are responsible for earthquakes near some oil and gas fields. Seismic data from a number of active oil and gas fields in California, Texas, Alberta, and elsewhere clearly show that earthquakes are occurring near fields where pore pressures have declined by several 10's of MPa. These observations can not be explained by changes in effective stress alone, which predicts that decreasing pore-fluid pressures tend to stabilize faults. He believes that poro-elastic stresses resulting from pore-fluid extraction are responsible for earthquakes in these situations. Fluid injection also induces poro-elastic stresses, however it is difficult to separate this effect from the destabilizing effect of increased pore-pressure within fault zones. To test the poroelastic model for induced seismicity, theoretical predictions are compared to data from a deep gas field in the Pyrenean foreland. Hundreds of shallow, small to moderate earthquakes have occurred there since 1969. The earthquakes are tightly clustered near the gas field. Reservoir pressure had declined by 30 MPa at the onset of seismicity. The relationship between average reservoir pressure decline and subsidence is remarkably linear, lending support to the linear poroelastic model. Using laboratory derived material parameters and in situ reservoir pressure measurements, it is possible to predict the surface deformations and the change in stress field without adjustable parameters. The computed vertical displacements are in good agreement with the observed subsidence. The poroelastic stress changes at the onset of seismicity are of the order of a few bars.

  3. A turbulent burst model for boundary layer flows with pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, L. C.; Benton, D. J.

    The object of this paper is to develop a surface renewal model of the turbulent burst phenomenon for momentum and energy transfer in the wall region for turbulent boundary layer flows with pressure gradient. In addition to obtaining inner laws for the distributions in velocity and temperature, predictions are obtained for the effect of pressure gradient on the mean burst frequency and on the turbulent Prandtl number within the wall region for slight favorable and mild adverse pressure gradients.

  4. Hepatic venous pressure gradient: clinical use in chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Portal hypertension is a severe consequence of chronic liver diseases and is responsible for the main clinical complications of liver cirrhosis. Hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) measurement is the best available method to evaluate the presence and severity of portal hypertension. Clinically significant portal hypertension is defined as an increase in HVPG to >10 mmHg. In this condition, the complications of portal hypertension might begin to appear. HVPG measurement is increasingly used in the clinical fields, and the HVPG is a robust surrogate marker in many clinical applications such as diagnosis, risk stratification, identification of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who are candidates for liver resection, monitoring of the efficacy of medical treatment, and assessment of progression of portal hypertension. Patients who had a reduction in HVPG of ≥20% or to ≤12 mmHg in response to drug therapy are defined as responders. Responders have a markedly decreased risk of bleeding/rebleeding, ascites, and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, which results in improved survival. This review provides clinical use of HVPG measurement in the field of liver disease. PMID:24757653

  5. Modeling of Propagation of Interacting Cracks Under Hydraulic Pressure Gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hai; Mattson, Earl Douglas; Podgorney, Robert Karl

    2015-04-01

    A robust and reliable numerical model for fracture initiation and propagation, which includes the interactions among propagating fractures and the coupling between deformation, fracturing and fluid flow in fracture apertures and in the permeable rock matrix, would be an important tool for developing a better understanding of fracturing behaviors of crystalline brittle rocks driven by thermal and (or) hydraulic pressure gradients. In this paper, we present a physics-based hydraulic fracturing simulator based on coupling a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) for deformation and fracturing with conjugate lattice network flow model for fluid flow in both fractures and porous matrix. Fracturing is represented explicitly by removing broken bonds from the network to represent microcracks. Initiation of new microfractures and growth and coalescence of the microcracks leads to the formation of macroscopic fractures when external and/or internal loads are applied. The coupled DEM-network flow model reproduces realistic growth pattern of hydraulic fractures. In particular, simulation results of perforated horizontal wellbore clearly demonstrate that elastic interactions among multiple propagating fractures, fluid viscosity, strong coupling between fluid pressure fluctuations within fractures and fracturing, and lower length scale heterogeneities, collectively lead to complicated fracturing patterns.

  6. Optimal Disturbances in Boundary Layers Subject to Streamwise Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumin, Anatoli; Ashpis, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Laminar-turbulent transition in shear flows is still an enigma in the area of fluid mechanics. The conventional explanation of the phenomenon is based on the instability of the shear flow with respect to infinitesimal disturbances. The conventional hydrodynamic stability theory deals with the analysis of normal modes that might be unstable. The latter circumstance is accompanied by an exponential growth of the disturbances that might lead to laminar-turbulent transition. Nevertheless, in many cases, the transition scenario bypasses the exponential growth stage associated with the normal modes. This type of transition is called bypass transition. An understanding of the phenomenon has eluded us to this day. One possibility is that bypass transition is associated with so-called algebraic (non-modal) growth of disturbances in shear flows. In the present work, an analysis of the optimal disturbances/streamwise vortices associated with the transient growth mechanism is performed for boundary layers in the presence of a streamwise pressure gradient. The theory will provide the optimal spacing of the control elements in the spanwise direction and their placement in the streamwise direction.

  7. Effects of pressure gradient on global Alfvén eigenmodes in reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Huishan; Fu, Guoyong; Lin, Liang; Ding, Weixing; Brower, D. L.; Liu, D. Y.; Hu, Y. J.

    2014-02-15

    The effects of pressure gradient on the existence of global Alfvén eigenmodes (GAE) in Reversed Field Pinch are studied by numerical calculation. It is found that GAEs near the plasma core can exist when pressure gradient is sufficiently large. The calculated mode frequency and structure are consistent with the experimental results in the Madison Symmetric Torus.

  8. Quantitative Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure Gradients in Healthy Volunteers and Patients with Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    HAYASHI, Naokazu; MATSUMAE, Mitsunori; YATSUSHIRO, Satoshi; HIRAYAMA, Akihiro; ABDULLAH, Afnizanfaizal; KURODA, Kagayaki

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can depict not only anatomical information, but also physiological factors such as velocity and pressure gradient. Measurement of these physiological factors is necessary to understand the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) environment. In this study we quantified CSF motion in various parts of the CSF space, determined changes in the CSF environment with aging, and compared CSF pressure gradient between patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) and healthy elderly volunteers. Fifty-seven healthy volunteers and six iNPH patients underwent four-dimensional (4D) phase-contrast (PC) MRI. CSF motion was observed and the pressure gradient of CSF was quantified in the CSF space. In healthy volunteers, inhomogeneous CSF motion was observed whereby the pressure gradient markedly increased in the center of the skull and gradually decreased in the periphery of the skull. For example, the pressure gradient at the ventral surface of the brainstem was 6.6 times greater than that at the convexity of the cerebrum. The pressure gradient was statistically unchanged with aging. The pressure gradient of patients with iNPH was 3.2 times greater than that of healthy volunteers. The quantitative analysis of 4D-PC MRI data revealed that the pressure gradient of CSF can be used to understand the CSF environment, which is not sufficiently given by subjective impression of the anatomical image. PMID:26226976

  9. Effect of Laser Annealing of Common Solid Pressure Media on Pressure Gradients in a Diamond Anvil Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uts, I.; Glazyrin, K.; Lee, K. K.

    2012-12-01

    Advances in experimental techniques allow for the studying of geophysics and planetary science related materials under high pressure and high temperature conditions. With the intrinsic limits of the multianvil apparatus, compression in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) has become the preferred method for creating the extreme conditions of planetary interiors. High pressures up to 1 Mbar can be routinely obtained in laboratories with the use of DACs. Additionally, as in situ laser heating is becoming progressively more affordable for DACs, it is becoming more common to find laser heating setups in many large scale facilities. After the sample material, the pressure medium is the second most important ingredient for a successful high pressure DAC experiment. Not every pressure medium is equally suitable for every experiment. For example, solid pressure media are more persistent than gaseous pressure media if high temperature heating is required. The melting point of the former is much higher, and melting of pressure media may induce undesirable sample shift in the pressure chamber. However, the most important characteristic of a pressure medium is its ability to maintain hydrostaticity in the DAC. The media, particularly solid pressure media, become less effective with increasing pressure. One of the most popular ways of alleviating pressure gradients is through laser annealing of the sample. We explore the effectiveness of this technique in relation to common pressure media, namely, alkali metal halides NaCl, CsCl, KCl, LiF, and oxide MgO. The samples were laser annealed at temperatures above 2000 K. Pressure gradients were determined through the analysis of diamond Raman and ruby fluorescence peaks before and after annealing the sample with a near-infrared laser. We find that the effect of annealing varies for different materials. For some (NaCl and KCl), it reduces pressure gradients considerably, but for the others (MgO), the effect of annealing is less profound.

  10. Comparison of ventricular emptying with and without a pressure gradient in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, R J; Criley, J M

    1985-01-01

    Thirty three patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were studied to determine whether the presence of an intraventricular pressure gradient impaired left ventricular emptying. Patients with resting gradients had a higher mean left ventricular ejection fraction (92 (6.4)%) than patients without a resting or inducible pressure gradient (75.5 (9)%). The rate and degree of emptying increased when gradients greater than 85 mm Hg were induced in two patients with insignificant mitral regurgitation. If the induced gradients had been the result of obstruction a decrease in the rate or degree of ventricular emptying would be expected. Higher ejection fractions in patients with intracavitary pressure gradients as well as enhanced rate and degree of left ventricular emptying with induced gradients are inconsistent with outflow obstruction. These findings support the concept that cavity obliteration is responsible for the pressure gradient in these patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Images PMID:4038604

  11. Estimation of pressure gradients in pulsatile flow from magnetic resonance acceleration measurements.

    PubMed

    Tasu, J P; Mousseaux, E; Delouche, A; Oddou, C; Jolivet, O; Bittoun, J

    2000-07-01

    A method for estimating pressure gradients from MR images is demonstrated. Making the usual assumption that the flowing medium is a Newtonian fluid, and with appropriate boundary conditions, the inertial forces (or acceleration components of the flow) are proportional to the pressure gradients. The technique shown here is based on an evaluation of the inertial forces from Fourier acceleration encoding. This method provides a direct measurement of the total acceleration defined as the sum of the velocity derivative vs. time and the convective acceleration. The technique was experimentally validated by comparing MR and manometer pressure gradient measurements obtained in a pulsatile flow phantom. The results indicate that the MR determination of pressure gradients from an acceleration measurement is feasible with a good correlation with the true measurements (r = 0.97). The feasibility of the method is demonstrated in the aorta of a normal volunteer. Magn Reson Med 44:66-72, 2000. PMID:10893523

  12. The relaxation of a turbulent boundary layer in an adverse pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Johnston, James P.

    1989-01-01

    Reattached turbulent boundary layer relaxation downstream of a wall fence is investigated. An adverse pressure gradient is imposed upon it which is adjusted to bring the boundary layer into equilibrium. The pressure gradient is adjusted so as to bring the Clauser parameter G down to a value of about 11.4 and then maintain it constant. In the region from the reattachment point to 2 or 3 reattachment lengths downstream, the boundary layer recovers from the initial major effects of reattachment. Farther downstream, where G is constant, the pressure-gradient parameter changes very slowly and profiles of non-dimensionalized eddy viscosity appear self-similar. However, pressure gradient and eddy viscosity are both roughly twice as large as expected on the basis of previous equilibrium turbulent boundary layer studies.

  13. Large-eddy simulations of adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobke, Alexandra; Vinuesa, Ricardo; Örlü, Ramis; Schlatter, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    Adverse pressure-gradient (APG) turbulent boundary layers (TBL) are studied by performing well-resolved large-eddy simulations. The pressure gradient is imposed by defining the free-stream velocity distribution with the description of a power law. Different inflow conditions, box sizes and upper boundary conditions are tested in order to determine the final set-up. The statistics of turbulent boundary layers with two different power-law coefficients and thus magnitudes of adverse pressure gradients are then compared to zero pressure-gradient (ZPG) data. The effect of the APG on TBLs is manifested in the mean flow through a much more prominent wake region and in the Reynolds stresses through the existence of an outer peak. The pre-multiplied energy budgets show that more energy is transported from the near-wall region to farther away from the wall.

  14. Experimental analysis of the boundary layer transition with zero and positive pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnal, D.; Jullen, J. C.; Michel, R.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of a positive pressure gradient on the boundary layer transition is studied. The mean velocity and turbulence profiles of four cases are examined. As the intensity of the pressure gradient is increased, the Reynolds number of the transition onset and the length of the transition region are reduced. The Tollmein-Schlichting waves disturb the laminar regime; the amplification of these waves is in good agreement with the stability theory. The three dimensional deformation of the waves leads finally to the appearance of turbulence. In the case of zero pressure gradient, the properties of the turbulent spots are studied by conditional sampling of the hot-wire signal; in the case of positive pressure gradient, the turbulence appears in a progressive manner and the turbulent spots are much more difficult to characterize.

  15. A model for jet-noise analysis using pressure-gradient correlations on an imaginary cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norum, T. D.

    1974-01-01

    The technique for determining the near and far acoustic field of a jet through measurements of pressure-gradient correlations on an imaginary conical surface surrounding the jet is discussed. The necessary analytical developments are presented, and their feasibility is checked by using a point source as the sound generator. The distribution of the apparent sources on the cone, equivalent to the point source, is determined in terms of the pressure-gradient correlations.

  16. A turbulent boundary layer at low Reynolds number with adverse pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watmuff, J. H.; Westphal, R. V.

    1989-01-01

    The evolution of a low Re(theta) turbulent boundary layer in an adverse pressure gradient (APG) is studied for comparison with CFD simulations by Spalart (1988). A short region of favorable pressure gradient is applied first to establish a self-preserving layer which is a suitable initial condition for the simulations. The APG is then applied rapidly such that Beta(x) of about 2 for Re(theta) of about 1500.

  17. Nonisothermal turbulent boundary-layer adverse pressure gradient large scale thermal structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bagheri, N.; White, B.R.; Lei, T.

    1994-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary-layer flow over a heated flat plate under equilibrium adverse-pressure-gradient conditions (beta = 1.8) were made for two different temperature difference cases (10 and 15 C) between the wall and the freestream. Space-time correlations of temperature fluctuations (T`) were obtained with a pair of subminiature temperature fluctuation probes. The mean convection velocities, the mean inclination angles, and coherence characteristics of the T` large-scale structure were determined. The present temperature structures measurements for a nonisothermal boundary layer are compared to the zero-pressure-gradient case with identical temperature differences previously reported, in which the mean convection velocity of the T` structure was a function of position y(sup +) and independent of the limited temperature-difference cases tested. The three major findings of the present study, as compared to the zero-pressure-gradient case, are (1) the mean convection speed of the T` structure under beta = 1.8 pressure-gradient conditions was found to be substantially lower in the logarithmic core region than the zero-pressure-gradient case. Additionally, the mean convection speed is felt by the authors to be a function of pressure-gradient parameter beta; (2) the mean inclination angle of the T` structure to the wall under the adverse-pressure-gradient flow was 32 deg, which compares favorably to the 30-deg value of the zero-pressure-gradient case; and (3) the limited data suggests that the mean convection velocity of the T` structure is a function of y(sup +) and independent of the limited temperature-difference cases tested. 11 refs.

  18. Secondary subharmonic instability of boundary layers with pressure gradient and suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, Nabil M.

    1988-01-01

    Three-dimensional linear secondary instability is investigated for boundary layers with pressure gradient and suction in the presence of a finite amplitude TS wave. The focus is on principal parametric resonance responsible for a strong growth of subharmonics in a low disturbance environment. Calculations are presented for the effect of pressure gradients and suction on controlling the onset and amplification of the secondary instability.

  19. Flow and heat transfer with pressure gradients, Reynolds number and surface curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Umur, H.

    2000-04-01

    The combined effects of pressure gradients, Reynolds number and surface curvature on heat transfer are of great importance for such as gas turbine engines so that this investigation was conducted to enhance the knowledge of heat transfer prediction. Flow and heat transfer characteristics in laminar flows were investigated with pressure gradients, streamwise distance Reynolds number and wall curvature. Measurements were carried out in a low speed wind tunnel with a dimensionless streamwise pressure gradient parameter of k{sub x}(=x/u{sub m}du{sub m}/dx) between {minus}0.4 and 1.0. Results were compared with analytical solutions and numerical predictions and a new empirical equation as a function of k{sub x}. It was found that Stanton numbers augmentation with Reynolds number became more pronounced than concave curvature. Favorable pressure gradients caused heat transfer to increase and adverse pressure gradients to decrease. The also results showed that the distribution of Stanton numbers with acceleration has similar trends with analytical solutions and numerical predictions. The proposed equation showed much better agreement with the measured Stanton numbers, in case of both adverse and favorable pressure gradients.

  20. Limits to the H-mode pedestal pressure gradient in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Groebner, R. J.; Snyder, P. B.; Osborne, T. H.; Leonard, A. W.; Rhodes, T. L.; Zeng, L.; Unterberg, Ezekial A; Yan, Z.; Mckee, G. R.; Lasnier, C. J.; Boedo, J.A.; Watkins, J. G.

    2010-01-01

    The spatial and temporal evolution of the total pedestal pressure profile has been measured during the pedestal evolution between successive edge localized modes (ELMs) of type-I ELMing H-mode discharges in DIII-D. Measurements are used to test a model that predicts that kinetic ballooning modes (KBMs) provide a strong constraint on the pedestal pressure gradient obtained during an inter-ELM cycle and cause the pedestal width to scale as the square root of the pedestal poloidal beta. Discharges in two different parameter regimes are examined for evidence that the evolution of the pressure gradient reaches a limit prior to the onset of an ELM. Both discharges show evidence of rapid evolution of the pressure profile very early in the recovery phase from an ELM. In one discharge, the pressure gradient reached approximate steady state within similar to 3 ms after the ELM event. In the other discharge, the pressure gradient just inboard of the last closed flux surface reached steady state early in the ELM recovery phase even as the pedestal expanded into the core and the maximum pressure gradient continued to rise during the remainder of the ELM cycle. Simple quantitative theoretical metrics show that pressure gradients in both discharges reached levels that were large enough to excite KBMs. In addition, the peeling-ballooning theory for the onset of type-I ELMs and the EPED1 model for pedestal height and width make predictions consistent with the data of both discharges.

  1. On determining characteristic length scales in pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinuesa, R.; Bobke, A.; Örlü, R.; Schlatter, P.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, we analyze three commonly used methods to determine the edge of pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers: two based on composite profiles, the one by Chauhan et al. ["Criteria for assessing experiments in zero pressure gradient boundary layers," Fluid Dyn. Res. 41, 021404 (2009)] and the one by Nickels ["Inner scaling for wall-bounded flows subject to large pressure gradients," J. Fluid Mech. 521, 217-239 (2004)], and the other one based on the condition of vanishing mean velocity gradient. Additionally, a new method is introduced based on the diagnostic plot concept by Alfredsson et al. ["A new scaling for the streamwise turbulence intensity in wall-bounded turbulent flows and what it tells us about the `outer' peak," Phys. Fluids 23, 041702 (2011)]. The boundary layers developing over the suction and pressure sides of a NACA4412 wing section, extracted from a direct numerical simulation at chord Reynolds number Rec = 400 000, are used as the test case, besides other numerical and experimental data from favorable, zero, and adverse pressure-gradient flat-plate turbulent boundary layers. We find that all the methods produce robust results with mild or moderate pressure gradients, although the composite-profile techniques require data preparation, including initial estimations of fitting parameters and data truncation. Stronger pressure gradients (with a Rotta-Clauser pressure-gradient parameter β larger than around 7) lead to inconsistent results in all the techniques except the diagnostic plot. This method also has the advantage of providing an objective way of defining the point where the mean streamwise velocity is 99% of the edge velocity and shows consistent results in a wide range of pressure gradient conditions, as well as flow histories. Collapse of intermittency factors obtained from a wide range of pressure-gradient and Re conditions on the wing further highlights the robustness of the diagnostic plot method to determine the

  2. A Study of Wake Development and Structure in Constant Pressure Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Flint O.; Nelson, R. C.; Liu, Xiaofeng

    2000-01-01

    Motivated by the application to high-lift aerodynamics for commercial transport aircraft, a systematic investigation into the response of symmetric/asymmetric planar turbulent wake development to constant adverse, zero, and favorable pressure gradients has been conducted. The experiments are performed at a Reynolds number of 2.4 million based on the chord of the wake generator. A unique feature of this wake study is that the pressure gradients imposed on the wake flow field are held constant. The experimental measurements involve both conventional LDV and hot wire flow field surveys of mean and turbulent quantities including the turbulent kinetic energy budget. In addition, similarity analysis and numerical simulation have also been conducted for this wake study. A focus of the research has been to isolate the effects of both pressure gradient and initial wake asymmetry on the wake development. Experimental results reveal that the pressure gradient has a tremendous influence on the wake development, despite the relatively modest pressure gradients imposed. For a given pressure gradient, the development of an initially asymmetric wake is different from the initially symmetric wake. An explicit similarity solution for the shape parameters of the symmetric wake is obtained and agrees with the experimental results. The turbulent kinetic energy budget measurements of the symmetric wake demonstrate that except for the convection term, the imposed pressure gradient does not change the fundamental flow physics of turbulent kinetic energy transport. Based on the turbulent kinetic energy budget measurements, an approach to correct the bias error associated with the notoriously difficult dissipation estimate is proposed and validated through the comparison of the experimental estimate with a direct numerical simulation result.

  3. Quantifying Dynamic Changes in Plantar Pressure Gradient in Diabetics with Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lung, Chi-Wen; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T.; Burns, Stephanie; Lin, Fang; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers remain one of the most serious complications of diabetes. Peak plantar pressure (PPP) and peak pressure gradient (PPG) during walking have been shown to be associated with the development of diabetic foot ulcers. To gain further insight into the mechanical etiology of diabetic foot ulcers, examination of the pressure gradient angle (PGA) has been recently proposed. The PGA quantifies directional variation or orientation of the pressure gradient during walking and provides a measure of whether pressure gradient patterns are concentrated or dispersed along the plantar surface. We hypothesized that diabetics at risk of foot ulceration would have smaller PGA in key plantar regions, suggesting less movement of the pressure gradient over time. A total of 27 participants were studied, including 19 diabetics with peripheral neuropathy and 8 non-diabetic control subjects. A foot pressure measurement system was used to measure plantar pressures during walking. PPP, PPG, and PGA were calculated for four foot regions – first toe (T1), first metatarsal head (M1), second metatarsal head (M2), and heel (HL). Consistent with prior studies, PPP and PPG were significantly larger in the diabetic group compared with non-diabetic controls in the T1 and M1 regions, but not M2 or HL. For example, PPP was 165% (P = 0.02) and PPG was 214% (P < 0.001) larger in T1. PGA was found to be significantly smaller in the diabetic group in T1 (46%, P = 0.04), suggesting a more concentrated pressure gradient pattern under the toe. The proposed PGA may improve our understanding of the role of pressure gradient on the risk of diabetic foot ulcers. PMID:27486576

  4. On magnetohydrodynamic solitons in jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, B.

    1987-01-01

    Nonlinear solitary wave propagation in a compressible magnetic beam model of an extragalactic radio jet is examined and shown to lead to solitons of the Benjamin-Ono type. A number of similarities between such magnetic beam models of jets and models of solar photospheric flux tubes are pointed out and exploited. A single soliton has the appearance of a symmetric bulge on the jet which propagates faster than the jet's flow.

  5. On determining characteristic length scales in pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinuesa, Ricardo; Örlü, Ramis; Schlatter, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    In the present work we analyze three methods used to determine the edge of pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers: two based on composite profiles, the one by Chauhan et al. (Fluid Dyn. Res. 41:021401, 2009) and the one by Nickels (J. Fluid Mech. 521:217–239, 2004), and the other one based on the condition of vanishing mean velocity gradient. Additionally, a new method is introduced based on the diagnostic plot concept by Alfredsson et al. (Phys. Fluids 23:041702, 2011). The boundary layer developing over the suction side of a NACA4412 wing profile, extracted from a direct numerical simulation at Rec = 400,000, is used as the test case. We find that all the methods produce robust results with mild or moderate pressure gradients, but stronger pressure gradients (with β larger than around 7) lead to inconsistent results in all the techniques except the diagnostic plot. This method also has the advantage of providing an objective way of defining the point where the mean streamwise velocity is 99% of the edge velocity, and shows consistent results in a wide range of pressure gradient conditions, as well as flow histories. Therefore, the technique based on the diagnostic plot is a robust method to determine the boundary layer thickness (equivalent to δ99) and edge velocity in pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers.

  6. Vertical two-phase flow regimes and pressure gradients: Effect of viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Da Hlaing, Nan; Sirivat, Anuvat; Siemanond, Kitipat; Wilkes, James O.

    2007-05-15

    The effect of liquid viscosity on the flow regimes and the corresponding pressure gradients along the vertical two-phase flow was investigated. Experiment was carried out in a vertical transparent tube of 0.019 m in diameter and 3 m in length and the pressure gradients were measured by a U-tube manometer. Water and a 50 vol.% glycerol solution were used as the working fluids whose kinematic viscosities were 0.85 x 10{sup -6} and 4.0 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s, respectively. In our air-liquid annular two-phase flow, the liquid film of various thicknesses flowed adjacent to the wall and the gas phase flowed at the center of the tube. The superficial air velocity, j{sub air}, was varied between 0.0021 and 58.7 m/s and the superficial liquid velocity, j{sub liquid}, was varied between 0 and 0.1053 m/s. In the bubble, the slug and the slug-churn flow regimes, the pressure gradients decreased with increasing Reynolds number. But in the annular and the mist flow regimes, pressure gradients increased with increasing Reynolds number. Finally, the experimentally measured pressure gradient values were compared and are in good agreement with the theoretical values. (author)

  7. Pressure gradient effects on the development of hairpin vortices in an initially laminar boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Blaine Keith

    An experimental study was conducted in Lehigh University's low-speed water channel to examine the effects of a zero, adverse, and favorable pressure gradients on the development of single hairpin vortices. Single hairpin vortices were generated in an initially laminar environment using controlled fluid injection through a streamwise slot at a Re(delta)* = 380, 440, and 570. Behavior of hairpin structures was determined by the use of dye and hydrogen bubble flow visualization techniques. Visualization results indicate that as a single hairpin vortex convects downstream a complicated growth process due to viscous-inviscid interactions and Biot-Savart deformation results in the generation of secondary and subsidiary vortices, eventually yielding a turbulent spot-like structure. The hairpin vortex structures are observed to be strongly affected by the presence of a pressure gradient, undergoing significant spatial growth changes, as well as experiencing significant flow structure modifications. As the hairpin initiation location is moved further into an adverse pressure gradient, the hairpin vortex lifts and rotates farther away from the surface relative to the behavior in a zero pressure gradient. Regions of low and high-velocity fluid near the surface are accentuated within an adverse pressure gradient, which amplifies the low-speed streak formation and breakdown process, accelerating the formation of vortical substructures and ejection of fluid from the surface.

  8. Intraarterial Pressure Gradients After Randomized Angioplasty or Stenting of Iliac Artery Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Tetteroo, Eric; Haaring, Cees; Graaf, Yolanda van der; Schaik, Jan P.J. van; Engelen, A.D. van; Mali, Willem P.T.M.

    1996-11-15

    Purpose: To determine initial technical results of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stent procedures in the iliac artery, mean intraarterial pressure gradients were recorded before and after each procedure. Methods: We randomly assigned 213 patients with typical intermittent claudication to primary stent placement (n= 107) or primary PTA (n= 106), with subsequent stenting in the case of a residual mean pressure gradient of > 10 mmHg (n= 45). Eligibility criteria included angiographic iliac artery stenosis (> 50% diameter reduction) and/or a peak systolic velocity ratio > 2.5 on duplex examination. Mean intraarterial pressures were simultaneously recorded above and below the lesion, at rest and also during vasodilatation in the case of a resting gradient {<=} 10 mmHg. Results: Pressure gradients in the primary stent group were 14.9 {+-} 10.4 mmHg before and 2.9 {+-} 3.5 mmHg after stenting. Pressure gradients in the primary PTA group were 17.3 {+-} 11.3 mmHg pre-PTA, 4.2 {+-} 5.4 mmHg post-PTA, and 2.5 {+-} 2.8 mmHg after selective stenting. Compared with primary stent placement, PTA plus selective stent placement avoided application of a stent in 63% (86/137) of cases, resulting in a considerable cost saving. Conclusion: Technical results of primary stenting and PTA plus selective stenting are similar in terms of residual pressure gradients.

  9. The influence of free-stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with mild adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, Jon A.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of near isotropic free-stream turbulence on the shape factors and skin friction coefficients of turbulent bounday layers is presented for the cases of zero and mild adverse pressure gradients. With free-stream turbulence, improved fluid mixing occurs in boundary layers with adverse pressure gradients relative to the zero pressure gradient condition, with the same free-stream turbulence intensity and length scale. Stronger boundary layers with lower shape factors occur as a result of a lower ratio of the integral scale of turbulence to the boundary layer thickness, and to vortex stretching of the turbulent eddies in the free stream, both of which act to improve the transmission of momentum from the free stream to the boundary layers.

  10. The influence of free-stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with mild adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, J. A.; Kassir, S. M.; Larwood, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of near isotropic free-stream turbulence on the shape factors and skin friction coefficients of turbulent boundary layers is presented for the cases of zero and mild adverse pressure gradients. With free-stream turbulence, improved fluid mixing occurs in boundary layers with adverse pressure gradients relative to the zero pressure gradient condition, with the same free-stream turbulence intensity and length scale. Stronger boundary layers with lower shape factors occur as a result of a lower ratio of the integral scale of turbulence to the boundary layer thickness, and to vortex stretching of the turbulent eddies in the free-stream, both of which act to improve the transmission of momentum from the free-stream to the boundary layers.

  11. Drag-Reduction Effectiveness of Riblet Films in Adverse Pressure Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boomsma, Aaron; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2013-11-01

    Riblet films are micro-grooved structures that are widely known to passively reduce skin friction. Past studies have almost solely focused on riblet performance in channel-flows. However, possible applications of riblets include wind turbine blades, gas turbine blades, and other complex bodies that are exposed to non-zero pressure gradient flows--specifically adverse pressure gradients. We use high-resolution large eddy simulations of turbulent flow over three-dimensional riblets under an adverse pressure gradient. We analyze the computed results to quantify drag reduction effectiveness for different riblet shapes and to examine pertinent turbulent structures to gain a fundamental understanding of riblet performance. Supported by the DOE Wind Energy Consortium

  12. DNS of turbulent channel flow driven by temporally periodic pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaki, Takahiko; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2001-11-01

    Various direct numerical simulations ( DNS ) of turbulence are performed hitherto. In most of those DNS's, the mean flow is assumed to be steady. This is because the DNS of the turbulence with an unsteady mean flow requires more computational effort to obtain a stable statistical average. In the present study, DNS of turbulent channel flow driven by temporally-changing pressure gradient is performed. The pressure gradient is so determined that the bulk mean velocity averaged over one cycle is approximately equal to the one with a steady state Reynolds number of Re_τs=180 . Four cases with different pressure gradient histories are calculated. The each period is divided into twenty phases and statistical average is obtained for various turbulence statistics. A large number of turbulence statistics are compared with steady ones. The coherent structures is discussed in detail.

  13. Effects of free-stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with mild adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, J. A.; Kassir, S. M.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of near isotropic free-stream turbulence on the shape factors and skin friction coefficients of turbulent boundary layers is presented for the cases of zero and mild adverse pressure gradients. With free-stream turbulence, improved fluid mixing occurs in boundary layers with adverse pressure gradients relative to the zero pressure gradient condition, with the same free-stream turbulence intensity and length scale. Stronger boundary layers with lower shape factors occur as a result of a lower ratio of the integral scale of turbulence to the boundary layer thickness, and to vortex stretching of the turbulent eddies in the free-stream, both of which act to improve the transmission of momentum from the free-stream to the boundary layers.

  14. Three-dimensional boundary layer flow with streamwise adverse pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driver, David M.; Johnston, James P.

    1989-01-01

    The present study examines the effects of a strong adverse pressure gradient on a 3D turbulent boundary layer in an axisymmetric spinning cylinder geometry. Velocity measurements made with a three-component laser Doppler velocimeter include all three mean flow components, all six Reynolds stress components, and all ten triple-product correlations. Total Reynolds shear stress diminishes as the flow becomes 3D. Lower levels of shear stress were found to persist under adverse pressure gradient conditions. This low stress level was observed to roughly correlate with the magnitude of the crossflow. Variations in the pressure gradient do not alter this correlation. It is inferred that a 3D boundary layer is more prone to separate than a 2D boundary layer.

  15. Arterial Pressure Gradients during Upright Posture and 30 deg Head Down Tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, E. R; William, J. M.; Ueno, T.; Ballard, R. E.; Hargens, A. R.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Gravity alters local blood pressure within the body so that arterial pressures in the head and foot are lower and higher, respectively, than that at heart level. Furthermore, vascular responses to local alterations of arterial pressure are probably important to maintain orthostatic tolerance upon return to the Earth after space flight. However, it has been difficult to evaluate the body's arterial pressure gradient due to the lack of noninvasive technology. This study was therefore designed to investigate whether finger arterial pressure (FAP), measured noninvasively, follows a normal hydrostatic pressure gradient above and below heart level during upright posture and 30 deg head down tilt (HDT). Seven healthy subjects gave informed consent and were 19 to 52 years old with a height range of 158 to 181 cm. A Finapres device measured arterial pressure at different levels of the body by moving the hand from 36 cm below heart level (BH) to 72 cm above heart level (AH) in upright posture and from 36 cm BH to 48 cm AH during HDT in increments of 12 cm. Mean FAP creased by 85 mmHg transitioning from BH to AH in upright posture, and the pressure gradient calculated from hydrostatic pressure difference (rho(gh)) was 84 mmHg. In HDT, mean FAP decreased by 65 mmHg from BH to AH, and the calculated pressure gradient was also 65 mmHg. There was no significant difference between the measured FAP gradient and the calculated pressure gradient, although a significant (p = 0.023) offset was seen for absolute arterial pressure in upright posture. These results indicate that arterial pressure at various levels can be obtained from the blood pressure at heart level by calculating rho(gh) + an offset. The offset equals the difference between heart level and the site of measurement. In summary, we conclude that local blood pressure gradients can be measured by noninvasive studies of FAP.

  16. Dynamical behaviour of three-way throttle valve with pressure gradient stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vašina, Martin; Hružík, Lumír; Bureček, Adam; Sikora, Roman

    2015-05-01

    Three-way throttle valves with pressure gradient stabilization are used in order to ensure constant flow independently of load changes of hydraulic motors in hydraulic systems. These valves are used to vibration damping in hydraulic systems too. For this reason, it is suitable to install the valves close to hydraulic motors. The valves also have a positive influence on an increasing of system eigenfrequency. The paper deals with investigation of dynamical behaviour and eigenfrequency of a three-way throttle valve with pressure gradient stabilization in consequence of transient changes.

  17. FIRST MEASUREMENT OF PRESSURE GRADIENT-DRIVEN CURRENTS IN TOKAMAK EDGE PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    THOMAS DM; LEONARD AW; LAO LL; OSBORNE TH; MUELLER HW; FINKENTHAL DK

    2003-11-01

    Localized currents driven by pressure gradients play a pivotal role in the magnetohydrodynamic stability of toroidal plasma confinement devices. We have measured the currents generated in the edge of L- (low) and H- (high confinement) mode discharges on the DIII-D tokamak, utilizing the Zeeman effect in an injected lithium beam to obtain high resolution profiles of the poloidal magnetic field. We find current densities in excess of 1 MA/m{sup 2} in a 1 to 2 cm region near the peak of the edge pressure gradient. These values are sufficient to challenge edge stability theories based on specific current formation models.

  18. Three-dimensional shear-driven boundary layer flow with streamwise adverse pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driver, David M.; Hebbar, Sheshagiri K.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of adverse pressure gradient on a three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer are studied in an axisymmetric forward-facing step geometry. Velocity measurements made using a three-component laser Doppler velocimeter include mean flow as well as Reynolds stresses and velocity triple-product correlations. Turbulent Prandtl mixing-lengths are extracted from the data, showing the effects of curvature. Streamwise pressure gradient was seen to alter streamwise velocity and Reynolds stress without significantly affecting transverse velocity and Reynolds stress. Transverse-strain was seen to have the effect of reducing the streamwise component of Reynolds stress.

  19. Rarefactive and compressive soliton waves in unmagnetized dusty plasma with non-thermal electron and ion distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Eslami, Esmaeil Baraz, Rasoul

    2014-02-15

    Sagdeev's pseudo potential method is employed to study dust acoustic solitary waves in an unmagnetized plasma containing negatively charged dusts with non-thermal electron and ion. The range of parameters for the existence of solitary waves using the analytical expression of the Sagdeev potential has been found. It is observed that, depending on the values of the plasma parameters like ion to electron temperature ratio σ, non-thermal parameters β and γ, electron to ion density ratio μ, and the value of the Mach number M, both rarefactive and compressive solitary waves may exist.

  20. Solitons riding on solitons and the quantum Newton's cradle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Manjun; Navarro, R.; Carretero-González, R.

    2016-02-01

    The reduced dynamics for dark and bright soliton chains in the one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation is used to study the behavior of collective compression waves corresponding to Toda lattice solitons. We coin the term hypersoliton to describe such solitary waves riding on a chain of solitons. It is observed that in the case of dark soliton chains, the formulated reduction dynamics provides an accurate an robust evolution of traveling hypersolitons. As an application to Bose-Einstein condensates trapped in a standard harmonic potential, we study the case of a finite dark soliton chain confined at the center of the trap. When the central chain is hit by a dark soliton, the energy is transferred through the chain as a hypersoliton that, in turn, ejects a dark soliton on the other end of the chain that, as it returns from its excursion up the trap, hits the central chain repeating the process. This periodic evolution is an analog of the classical Newton's cradle.

  1. Solitons riding on solitons and the quantum Newton's cradle.

    PubMed

    Ma, Manjun; Navarro, R; Carretero-González, R

    2016-02-01

    The reduced dynamics for dark and bright soliton chains in the one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation is used to study the behavior of collective compression waves corresponding to Toda lattice solitons. We coin the term hypersoliton to describe such solitary waves riding on a chain of solitons. It is observed that in the case of dark soliton chains, the formulated reduction dynamics provides an accurate an robust evolution of traveling hypersolitons. As an application to Bose-Einstein condensates trapped in a standard harmonic potential, we study the case of a finite dark soliton chain confined at the center of the trap. When the central chain is hit by a dark soliton, the energy is transferred through the chain as a hypersoliton that, in turn, ejects a dark soliton on the other end of the chain that, as it returns from its excursion up the trap, hits the central chain repeating the process. This periodic evolution is an analog of the classical Newton's cradle. PMID:26986326

  2. Effect of quadratic pressure gradient term on a one-dimensional moving boundary problem based on modified Darcy's law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenchao; Yao, Jun; Chen, Zhangxin; Liu, Yuewu

    2016-02-01

    A relatively high formation pressure gradient can exist in seepage flow in low-permeable porous media with a threshold pressure gradient, and a significant error may then be caused in the model computation by neglecting the quadratic pressure gradient term in the governing equations. Based on these concerns, in consideration of the quadratic pressure gradient term, a basic moving boundary model is constructed for a one-dimensional seepage flow problem with a threshold pressure gradient. Owing to a strong nonlinearity and the existing moving boundary in the mathematical model, a corresponding numerical solution method is presented. First, a spatial coordinate transformation method is adopted in order to transform the system of partial differential equations with moving boundary conditions into a closed system with fixed boundary conditions; then the solution can be stably numerically obtained by a fully implicit finite-difference method. The validity of the numerical method is verified by a published exact analytical solution. Furthermore, to compare with Darcy's flow problem, the exact analytical solution for the case of Darcy's flow considering the quadratic pressure gradient term is also derived by an inverse Laplace transform. A comparison of these model solutions leads to the conclusion that such moving boundary problems must incorporate the quadratic pressure gradient term in their governing equations; the sensitive effects of the quadratic pressure gradient term tend to diminish, with the dimensionless threshold pressure gradient increasing for the one-dimensional problem.

  3. A General Pressure Gradient Formulation for Ocean Models - Part II: Energy, Momentum, and Bottom Torque Consistency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Y.; Wright, D.

    1998-01-01

    A formulation of the pressure gradient force for use in models with topography-following coordinates is proposed and diagnostically analyzed by Song. We investigate numerical consistency with respect to global energy conservation, depth-integrated momentum changes, and the represent of the bottom pressure torque.

  4. Evaluation of turbulence models for prediction of separated turbulent boundary layer under unsteady adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Junshin; You, Donghyun

    2014-11-01

    Predicitive capabilites of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) techniques for separated flow under unsteady adverse pressure gradients have been assessed using SST k - ω model and Spalart-Allmaras model by comparing their results with direct numerical simulation (DNS) results. Both DNS and RANS have been conducted with a zero pressure gradient, a steady adverse pressure gradient, and an unsteady adverse pressure gradient, respectively. Comparative studies show that both RANS models predict earlier separation and fuller velocity profiles at the reattachment zone than DNS in the unsteady case, while reasonable agreements with DNS are observed for steady counterparts. Causes for differences in the predictive capability of RANS for steady and unsteady cases, are explained by examining the Reynolds stress term and eddy viscosity term in detail. The Reynolds stress and eddy viscosity are under-predicted by both RANS models in the unsteady case. The origin of the under-prediction of the Reynolds stress with both RANS models is revealed by investigating Reynolds stress budget terms obtained from DNS. Supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea Grant NRF-2012R1A1A2003699 and the Brain Korea 21+ program.

  5. Effect of adverse pressure gradient on high speed boundary layer transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franko, Kenneth J.; Lele, Sanjiva

    2014-02-01

    The effect of adverse pressure gradients (APG) on boundary layer stability, breakdown, and heat-transfer overshoot is investigated. Flat plate isothermal boundary layers initially at Mach 6 with APG imposed through the freestream boundary condition are simulated using suction and blowing to produce boundary layer instabilities. The three different transition mechanisms compared are first mode oblique breakdown, second mode oblique breakdown, and second mode fundamental resonance. For all of the transition mechanisms, an adverse pressure gradient increases the linear growth rates and quickens the transition to turbulence. However, the nonlinear breakdown for all three transition mechanisms is qualitatively the same as for a zero pressure gradient boundary layer. First mode oblique breakdown leads to the earliest transition location and an overshoot in heat transfer in the transitional region. Both types of Mack second mode forcing lead to a transitional boundary layer but even with the increased growth rates and N factors produced by the adverse pressure gradient, the breakdown process is still more gradual than first mode oblique breakdown because the primary Mack second mode instabilities saturate and produce streaks that breakdown further downstream.

  6. Some features of surface pressure fluctuations in turbulent boundary layers with zero and favorable pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrath, B. E.; Simpson, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of surface pressure fluctuation spectra, coherence and convective wave speeds from zero and favorable pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers are reported for momentum Reynolds numbers from 3000 to 18,800. The acceleration parameter K is near 2 x 10 to the -7 power for the favorable pressure gradient flow. The outer variables, U sub e, tau sub w and delta sub 1 non-dimensionalize and collapse the spectra for the low to middle range of frequencies for most test cases. The grouping using the inner variable, U sub tau and gamma, collapse the spectra for the middle to high range of frequencies for all test cases. The value of p'/tau sub w was near 3.8 and 2.8 for the smallest values of d+ in the zero and favorable pressure gradient flows, respectively. The coherence exhibits a decay that is not exponential in some cases, but the Corcos similarity parameters omega Delta x/U sub c and omega Delta z/U sub c collapse the data for all test cases. The ratio of U sub c/U sub e increases with omega delta sub 1/U sub e up to omega delta sub 1/U sub e on the order of unity, where U sub c/U sub e becomes nearly constant. This was observed in the present results for both streamwise pressure gradient flows. The experimental results presented show good agreement with previous research.

  7. Analytic Formulation and Numerical Implementation of an Acoustic Pressure Gradient Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seongkyu; Brentner, Kenneth S.; Farassat, Fereidoun

    2007-01-01

    The scattering of rotor noise is an area that has received little attention over the years, yet the limited work that has been done has shown that both the directivity and intensity of the acoustic field may be significantly modified by the presence of scattering bodies. One of the inputs needed to compute the scattered acoustic field is the acoustic pressure gradient on a scattering surface. Two new analytical formulations of the acoustic pressure gradient have been developed and implemented in the PSU-WOPWOP rotor noise prediction code. These formulations are presented in this paper. The first formulation is derived by taking the gradient of Farassat's retarded-time Formulation 1A. Although this formulation is relatively simple, it requires numerical time differentiation of the acoustic integrals. In the second formulation, the time differentiation is taken inside the integrals analytically. The acoustic pressure gradient predicted by these new formulations is validated through comparison with the acoustic pressure gradient determined by a purely numerical approach for two model rotors. The agreement between analytic formulations and numerical method is excellent for both stationary and moving observers case.

  8. Design of intense 1.5-cycle pulses generation at 3.6 µm through a pressure gradient hollow-core fiber.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Ding; Dai, Ye; Li, Yanyan; Guo, Xiaoyang; Li, Wenkai; Chen, Yun; Lu, Jun; Liu, Zhengzheng; Zhao, Ruirui; Leng, Yuxin

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically study the nonlinear compression of the 10-mJ, 62-fs, 3.6-µm laser pulses in an argon gas-filled hollow-core fiber with large diameter of 1000 µm. Using a pressure gradient to restrict undesirable nonlinear effect such as ionization, especially at the entrance, we obtain the intense 18.3-fs (~1.5 cycle) pulses at 3.6 µm only through compression with CaF2 crystal, which can be used as an ultrafast source for strong field driven experiments. In addition, we calculate and discuss the relation between optimal fiber length and coupling efficiency for a given bandwidth. These results are useful for the design of using hollow-core fiber to compress the high-energy pulses with long wavelength. PMID:27137543

  9. Stability and bifurcation of quasiparallel Alfven solitons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, R. L.; Kennel, C. F.; Mjolhus, E.

    1992-01-01

    The inverse scattering transformation (IST) is used to study the one-parameter and two-parameter soliton families of the derivative nonlinear Schroedinger (DNLS) equation. The two-parameter soliton family is determined by the discrete complex eigenvalue spectrum of the Kaup-Newell scattering problem and the one-parameter soliton family corresponds to the discrete real eigenvalue spectrum. The structure of the IST is exploited to discuss the existence of discrete real eigenvalues and to prove their structural stability to perturbations of the initial conditions. Also, though the two-parameter soliton is structurally stable in general, it is shown that a perturbation of the initial conditions may change the two-parameter soliton into a degenerate soliton which, in turn, is structurally unstable. This degenerate, or double pole, soliton may bifurcate due to a perturbation of the initial conditions into a pair of one-parameter solitons. If the initial profile is on compact support, then this pair of one-parameter solitons must be compressive and rarefactive respectively. Finally, the Gelfand-Levitan equations appropriate for the double pole soliton are solved.

  10. Compressing μJ-level pulses from 250  fs to sub-10  fs at 38-MHz repetition rate using two gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber stages.

    PubMed

    Mak, K F; Seidel, M; Pronin, O; Frosz, M H; Abdolvand, A; Pervak, V; Apolonski, A; Krausz, F; Travers, J C; Russell, P St J

    2015-04-01

    Compression of 250-fs, 1-μJ pulses from a KLM Yb:YAG thin-disk oscillator down to 9.1 fs is demonstrated. A kagomé-PCF with a 36-μm core-diameter is used with a pressure gradient from 0 to 40 bar of krypton. Compression to 22 fs is achieved by 1200  fs2 group-delay-dispersion provided by chirped mirrors. By coupling the output into a second kagomé-PCF with a pressure gradient from 0 to 25 bar of argon, octave spanning spectral broadening via the soliton-effect is observed at 18-W average output power. Self-compression to 9.1 fs is measured, with compressibility to 5 fs predicted. Also observed is strong emission in the visible via dispersive wave generation, amounting to 4% of the total output power. PMID:25831302

  11. Soliton production with nonlinear homogeneous lines

    SciTech Connect

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.; Coleman, Phillip D.; Moorman, Matthew W.; Petney, Sharon Joy Victor; Dudley, Evan C.; Youngman, Kevin; Penner, Tim Dwight; Fang, Lu; Myers, Katherine M.

    2015-11-24

    Low- and high-voltage Soliton waves were produced and used to demonstrate collision and compression using diode-based nonlinear transmission lines. Experiments demonstrate soliton addition and compression using homogeneous nonlinear lines. We built the nonlinear lines using commercially available diodes. These diodes are chosen after their capacitance versus voltage dependence is used in a model and the line design characteristics are calculated and simulated. Nonlinear ceramic capacitors are then used to demonstrate high-voltage pulse amplification and compression. The line is designed such that a simple capacitor discharge, input signal, develops soliton trains in as few as 12 stages. We also demonstrated output voltages in excess of 40 kV using Y5V-based commercial capacitors. The results show some key features that determine efficient production of trains of solitons in the kilovolt range.

  12. Soliton production with nonlinear homogeneous lines

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.; Coleman, Phillip D.; Moorman, Matthew W.; Petney, Sharon Joy Victor; Dudley, Evan C.; Youngman, Kevin; Penner, Tim Dwight; Fang, Lu; Myers, Katherine M.

    2015-11-24

    Low- and high-voltage Soliton waves were produced and used to demonstrate collision and compression using diode-based nonlinear transmission lines. Experiments demonstrate soliton addition and compression using homogeneous nonlinear lines. We built the nonlinear lines using commercially available diodes. These diodes are chosen after their capacitance versus voltage dependence is used in a model and the line design characteristics are calculated and simulated. Nonlinear ceramic capacitors are then used to demonstrate high-voltage pulse amplification and compression. The line is designed such that a simple capacitor discharge, input signal, develops soliton trains in as few as 12 stages. We also demonstrated outputmore » voltages in excess of 40 kV using Y5V-based commercial capacitors. The results show some key features that determine efficient production of trains of solitons in the kilovolt range.« less

  13. Sound scattering by rigid oblate spheroids, with implication to pressure gradient microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maciulaitis, A.; Seiner, J.; Norum, T. D.

    1976-01-01

    The frequency limit below which sound scattering by a microphone body is sufficiently small to permit accurate pressure gradient measurements was determined. The sound pressure was measured at various points on the surface of a rigid oblate spheroid illuminated by spherical waves generated by a point source at a large distance from the spheroid, insuring an essentially plane sound field. The measurements were made with small pressure microphones flush mounted from the inside of the spheroid model. Numerical solutions were obtained for a variety of spheroid shapes, including that of the experimental model. Very good agreement was achieved between the experimental and theoretical results. It was found that scattering effects are insignificant if the ratio of the major circumference of the spheroid to the wavelength of the incident sound is less than about 0.7, this number being dependent upon the shape of the spheroid. This finding can be utilized in the design of pressure gradient microphones.

  14. Features of a reattaching turbulent shear layer subject to an adverse pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driver, D. M.; Seegmiller, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental data have been obtained in an incompressible turbulent flow over a rearward-facing step with superimposed adverse pressure gradient. Mean velocities, Reynolds stresses and triple-products measured by a laser Doppler velocimeter are presented for two cases of adverse pressure gradient. Mixing lengths, eddy viscosities, production, convection, turbulent diffusion, and dissipation terms are extracted from the data. These data are compared with various mixing length and eddy-viscosity turbulence models. Numerical calculations incorporating the k-epsilon and the algebraic-stress turbulence models are compared with the data. When determining quantities of engineering interest, the modified algebraic-stress model (ASM) is a significant improvement over the unmodified ASM and the unmodified k-epsilon model

  15. Turbulence characteristics of separated boundary layer flow under unsteady pressure gradients using direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Junshin; Bromby, William; You, Donghyun

    2013-11-01

    To understand turbulence characteristics of separated boundary layer flow under unsteady pressure gradients, a direct numerical simulation study is performed. Steady and unsteady blowing-suction velocity distributions are imposed along the upper boundary of the computational domain to introduce steady and unsteady adverse pressure gradients leading to steady and unsteady separated turbulent boundary layers, respectively. Time averaged and phase averaged turbulence statistics such as velocity, vorticity, kinetic energy budgets, Reynolds stress budgets, wall pressure fluctuations and skin friction distributions are examined in detail with aims of gaining understanding of flow physics for unsteady separated turbulent boundary layer and the sources of incapability of the conventional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes models in predicting unsteady separation. Supported by the Army Research Office Grant W911NF1010348 and the National Research Foundation of Korea Grant NRF-2012R1A1A2003699.

  16. Direct Numerical Simulation of an Adverse Pressure Gradient Turbulent Boundary Layer at the Verge of Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitsios, Vassili; Atkinson, Callum; Sillero, Juan; Guillem, Borrell; Gungor, Ayse; Jimenéz, Javier; Soria, Julio

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the structure of an adverse pressure gradient (APG) turbulent boundary layer (TBL) at the verge of separation. The intended flow is generated via direct numerical simulation (DNS). The adopted DNS code was previously developed for a zero pressure gradient TBL. Here the farfield boundary condition (BC) is modified to generate the desired APG flow. The input parameters required for the APG BC are initially estimated from a series of Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations. The BC is implemented into the DNS code with further refinement of the BC performed. The behaviour of the large scale dynamics is illustrated via the extraction of coherent structures from the DNS using analysis of the velocity gradient tensor and vortex clustering techniques. The authors acknowledge the research funding from the Australian Research Council and European Research Council, and the computational resources provided by NCI and PRACE.

  17. Vertical two-phase flow regimes and pressure gradients under the influence of SDS surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Duangprasert, Tanabordee; Sirivat, Anuvat; Siemanond, Kitipat; Wilkes, James O.

    2008-01-15

    Two-phase gas/liquid flows in vertical pipes have been systematically investigated. Water and SDS surfactant solutions at various concentrations were used as the working fluids. In particular, we focus our work on the influence of surfactant addition on the flow regimes, the corresponding pressure gradients, and the bubble sizes and velocity. Adding the surfactant lowers the air critical Reynolds numbers for the bubble-slug flow and the slug flow transitions. The pressure gradients of SDS solutions are lower than those of pure water especially in the slug flow and the slug-churn flow regimes, implying turbulent drag reduction. At low Re{sub air}, the bubble sizes of the surfactant solution are lower than those of pure water due to the increase in viscosity. With increasing and at high Re{sub air}, the bubble sizes of the SDS solution become greater than those of pure water which is attributed to the effect of surface tension. (author)

  18. Roll-up of vorticity in adverse-pressure-gradient boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Durbin, P. A.; Leib, S. J.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown how the unsteady, nonlinear critical-layer equation determines the evolution of instability waves in a weak adverse-pressure-gradient boundary layer. Numerical solutions show that the nonlinearity halts the growth of these inviscidly unstable waves. The stabilizing effect of nonlinearity, in the present case, can be described as a consequence of either the increase (toward zero) of the phase jump across the critical layer or the roll-up of the critical-layer disturbance vorticity.

  19. The F-Region Gravity and Pressure Gradient Current Systems: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alken, P.; Maute, A.; Richmond, A. D.

    2016-07-01

    The ionospheric gravity and pressure-gradient current systems are most prominent in the low-latitude F-region due to the plasma density enhancement known as the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA). This enhancement of plasma density which builds up during the day and lasts well into the evening supports a toroidal gravity current which flows eastward around the Earth in the F-region during the daytime and evening, and eventually returns westward through the E-region. The existence of pressure-gradients in the EIA region also gives rise to a poloidal diamagnetic current system, whose flow direction acts to reduce the ambient geomagnetic field inside the plasma. The gravity and pressure-gradient currents are among the weaker ionospheric sources, with current densities of a few nA/m2, however they produce clear signatures of about 5-7 nT in magnetic measurements made by low-Earth orbiting satellites. In this work, we review relevant observational and modeling studies of these two current systems and present new results from a 3D ionospheric electrodynamics model which allows us to visualize the entire flow pattern of these currents throughout the ionosphere as well as calculate their magnetic perturbations.

  20. Sound Localization in Lizards: Functioning of a Pressure-Gradient Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hemmen, J. Leo

    2009-03-01

    Because of their small interaural distance, lizards as well as some other animals have developed a special hearing mechanism, the ``pressure-gradient receiver''. The lizard peripheral auditory system differs from the mammalian one by a coupling of the two eardrums through the internal mouth cavity. We present a three-dimensional analytical model of the pressure-gradient receiver. The central aspect of the coupling of the membranes through the mouth cavity is realized by means of the boundary conditions. Moreover, the lizard's middle ear, a simple lever construction called columella, is asymmetrically attached to the tympanic membrane. This has motivated us to solve the problem of how the middle ear influences the spatial-amplitude profile and the frequency distribution of the tympanic membrane vibration. Finally, we show results from numerical simulations of the eigenfunctions and eigenfrequencies in a lizard's internal mouth cavity bounded by the eardrums. To this end, we have constructed the complex geometry from a cast imprint of the cavity with the help of three-dimensional scans. Our results led to an interesting speculation regarding the neurobiological use of the pressure-gradient system.

  1. Pressure gradient sensors for bearing determination in shallow water tracking ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Peter J.; Euerle, Steven E.; Menoche, Richard K.; Janiesch, Robert E.

    1996-04-01

    Underwater acoustic tracking has traditionally used only the arrival time of tracking pings to localize targets. This implies that the ping transmitted from a target must be received at a minimum of three separate nodes (receiver locations) in order to determine the position. For deep water ranges this was acceptable. In shallow water, where propagation ranges are limited, this requires a large number of nodes. This makes shallow water ranges very costly. An effort is underway to use pressure gradient hydrophones as receivers and measure the bearing of the ping arrival along with arrival time, thereby locating the target using only one tracking node. This allows for increased node spacing and greatly reduced cost. However, the accuracy required for training ranges is on the order of 1 degree. Further, the directional receiver must be housed so as to withstand impacts from fishing operations. Research including design, fabrication, and testing of conventional and unconventional pressure gradient hydrophones, the housing, and signal processing methods are discussed. Extensive testing has already been conducted using a 1″ diameter by 5″ long multimode hydrophone. A shallow water tracking test was conducted at the NUWC Lake Seneca test facility. The results demonstrate the feasibility of tracking using a single pressure gradient hydrophone with an accuracy of 50 yds out to 2 kyds. The effects of multiple paths and scattering are also discussed.

  2. An inclined jet in crossflow under the effect of streamwise pressure gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletti, Filippo; Elkins, Christopher J.; Eaton, John K.

    2013-09-01

    An inclined turbulent jet discharging a passive scalar into a turbulent crossflow is investigated under conditions of favorable, zero and adverse streamwise pressure gradient. Experiments are conducted in water by means of magnetic resonance velocimetry and magnetic resonance concentration measurements. The velocity ratio and density ratio are equal to one for all cases. The flow configuration is relevant to film cooling technology, the molecular properties of the fluid being immaterial in the fully turbulent regime. Under favorable pressure gradient (FPG), the streamwise acceleration tilts the jet trajectory toward the wall, which would be beneficial for the film cooling performance. However, the counter-rotating vortex pair is strengthened in the accelerating flow by streamwise stretching. Also, the crossflow boundary layer is significantly thickened by increasingly adverse pressure gradient, which affects the mass transfer from the jet. Overall, the more intense counter-rotating vortices and the thinner boundary layer associated with increasingly FPG enhance the scalar dispersion into the main flow, hampering the film cooling performance in terms of surface effectiveness.

  3. Influence of pressure gradient on streamwise skewness factor in turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dróżdż, Artur

    2014-08-01

    The paper shows an effect of favourable and adverse pressure gradients on turbulent boundary layer. The skewness factor of streamwise velocity component was chosen as a measure of the pressure gradient impact. It appears that skewness factor is an indicator of convection velocity of coherent structures, which is not always equal to the average flow velocity. The analysis has been performed based upon velocity profiles measured with hot-wire technique in turbulent boundary layer with pressure gradient corresponding to turbomachinery conditions. The results show that the skewness factor decreases in the flow region subjected to FPG and increases in the APG conditions. The changes of convection velocity and skewness factor are caused by influence of large-scale motion through the mechanism called amplitude modulation. The large-scale motion is less active in FPG and more active in APG, therefore in FPG the production of vortices is random (there are no high and low speed regions), while in the APG the large-scale motion drives the production of vortices. Namely, the vortices appear only in the high-speed regions, therefore have convection velocity higher than local mean velocity. The convection velocity affects directly the turbulent sweep and ejection events. The more flow is dominated by large-scale motion the higher values takes both the convection velocity of small-scale structures and sweep events induced by them.

  4. Self-similar turbulent boundary layer with imposed pressure gradient. Four flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigdorovich, I. I.

    2014-11-01

    Self-similar flows of an incompressible fluid in a turbulent boundary layer, when the free-stream velocity is a power function (with the exponent m) of the longitudinal coordinate, have been studied. It has been shown that there are four different self-similar flow regimes corresponding to four individual similarity parameters one of which is the known Clauser parameter and the three other parameters have been established for the first time. At adverse pressure gradient, when the exponent m lies in a certain range depending on Reynolds number, the problem has two solutions with different values of the boundary-layer thickness and skin friction; consequently, hysteresis in a pre-separation flow is possible. Separation occurs not at the minimal value of m that corresponds to the strongest adverse pressure gradient, but at m = -0.216 -0.4 Re{/p -1/3} + O(Re{/p -2/3}), where Re p is the Reynolds number based on longitudinal pressure gradient. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  5. Assesment of turbulence models for boundary layers with pressure gradient and roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Rabijit; Piomelli, Ugo

    2015-11-01

    The performance of sand-grain-based roughness corrections for the SA, SST k - ω and k - ɛ models has been evaluated by comparing the model results with large eddy simulation (LES) data. Computations are performed for a turbulent boundary layer with both smooth and rough walls subjected to two different pressure-gradient conditions, namely, an adverse pressure gradient (APG) with separation and a realistic pressure-gradient situation encountered in a hydraulic turbine blade. A new roughness correction was developed for the SST k - ω model that gave improved results near separation. For the cases with smooth wall, RANS models give reasonable agreement in predicting skin friction coefficient (cf) at the wall. RANS models predict too high Reynolds stresses in the separated region, which lead to earlier reattachment. For the rough wall computations, the RANS models predict that cf changes sign much later than the LES data. In the LES, however, the wall stress becomes negative inside the roughness sublayer, and the flow reversal does not correspond to the separation, which occurs much later, where the separation leaves the body, and the total stress above the roughness crest changes sign. The RANS models predict the position of this point more accurately.

  6. Microbubble skin friction reduction on an axisymmetric body under the influence of applied axial pressure gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, H.; Deutsch, S.

    1991-12-01

    The influence of both a favorable and an adverse applied axial pressure gradient on microbubble-induced skin friction reduction was examined. An 87 mm diameter, 632 mm long model equipped with a 273 mm long cylindrical force balance was employed. Experiments were carried out in a 305 mm diameter water tunnel, at free-stream speeds of 4.6, 7.6, 10.7, 13.7, and 16.8 m/sec. Air was injected at rates as high as 12×10-3 m3/sec. Measurement of the static pressure along the body with gas injection demonstrated that gas injection did not alter the pressure gradient and that the flow remained axisymmetric. Reductions in skin friction for the zero pressure gradient case agreed well with the earlier results of Deutsch and Castano [Phys. Fluids 29, 3590 (1986)]. The adverse-gradient-induced separation of the boundary layer for speeds at and above 7.6 m/sec, for air injection rates in excess of 5.0×10-3 m3/sec. The favorable gradient strongly inhibited the drag reduction mechanism [47].

  7. Pressure gradient sensors for bearing determination in shallow water tracking ranges

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, P.J.; Euerle, S.E.; Menoche, R.K.; Janiesch, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    Underwater acoustic tracking has traditionally used only the arrival time of tracking pings to localize targets. This implies that the ping transmitted from a target must be received at a minimum of three separate nodes (receiver locations) in order to determine the position. For deep water ranges this was acceptable. In shallow water, where propagation ranges are limited, this requires a large number of nodes. This makes shallow water ranges very costly. An effort is underway to use pressure gradient hydrophones as receivers and measure the bearing of the ping arrival along with arrival time, thereby locating the target using only one tracking node. This allows for increased node spacing and greatly reduced cost. However, the accuracy required for training ranges is on the order of 1 degree. Further, the directional receiver must be housed so as to withstand impacts from fishing operations. Research including design, fabrication, and testing of conventional and unconventional pressure gradient hydrophones, the housing, and signal processing methods are discussed. Extensive testing has already been conducted using a 1{double_prime} diameter by 5{double_prime} long multimode hydrophone. A shallow water tracking test was conducted at the NUWC Lake Seneca test facility. The results demonstrate the feasibility of tracking using a single pressure gradient hydrophone with an accuracy of 50 yds out to 2 kyds. The effects of multiple paths and scattering are also discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Self-similar turbulent boundary layer with imposed pressure gradient. Four flow regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Vigdorovich, I. I.

    2014-11-15

    Self-similar flows of an incompressible fluid in a turbulent boundary layer, when the free-stream velocity is a power function (with the exponent m) of the longitudinal coordinate, have been studied. It has been shown that there are four different self-similar flow regimes corresponding to four individual similarity parameters one of which is the known Clauser parameter and the three other parameters have been established for the first time. At adverse pressure gradient, when the exponent m lies in a certain range depending on Reynolds number, the problem has two solutions with different values of the boundary-layer thickness and skin friction; consequently, hysteresis in a pre-separation flow is possible. Separation occurs not at the minimal value of m that corresponds to the strongest adverse pressure gradient, but at m = −0.216 −0.4 Re{sub p}{sup −1/3} + O(Re{sub p}{sup −2/3}), where Re{sub p} is the Reynolds number based on longitudinal pressure gradient. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  9. Analytic Formulation and Numerical Implementation of an Acoustic Pressure Gradient Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seongkyu; Brentner, Kenneth S.; Farassat, F.; Morris, Philip J.

    2008-01-01

    Two new analytical formulations of the acoustic pressure gradient have been developed and implemented in the PSU-WOPWOP rotor noise prediction code. The pressure gradient can be used to solve the boundary condition for scattering problems and it is a key aspect to solve acoustic scattering problems. The first formulation is derived from the gradient of the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) equation. This formulation has a form involving the observer time differentiation outside the integrals. In the second formulation, the time differentiation is taken inside the integrals analytically. This formulation avoids the numerical time differentiation with respect to the observer time, which is computationally more efficient. The acoustic pressure gradient predicted by these new formulations is validated through comparison with available exact solutions for a stationary and moving monopole sources. The agreement between the predictions and exact solutions is excellent. The formulations are applied to the rotor noise problems for two model rotors. A purely numerical approach is compared with the analytical formulations. The agreement between the analytical formulations and the numerical method is excellent for both stationary and moving observer cases.

  10. Polarization scattering by soliton-soliton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollenauer, L. F.; Gordon, J. P.; Heismann, F.

    1995-10-01

    We have discovered experimentally that soliton-soliton collisions in wavelength division multiplexing significantly alter the polarization states of the colliding solitons. Analysis shows that the change in polarization is according to the cross product of the Stokes vectors of the colliding solitons. Birefringence of the fiber spans can turn this polarization scattering into a significant source of timing jitter.

  11. Analysis of transient flow and starting pressure gradient of power-law fluid in fractal porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xiao-Hua; Li, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Lie-Hui; Liu, Jian-Yi; Cai, Jianchao

    2015-09-01

    A transient flow model for power-law fluid in fractal porous media is derived by combining transient flow theory with the fractal properties of tortuous capillaries. Pressure changes of transient flow for power-law fluid in fractal porous media are related to pore fractal dimension, tortuosity fractal dimension and the power-law index. Additionally, the starting pressure gradient model of power-law fluid in fractal porous media is established. Good agreement between the predictions of the present model and that of the traditional empirical model is obtained, the sensitive parameters that influence the starting pressure gradient are specified and their effects on the starting pressure gradient are discussed.

  12. Reevaluation of compressible-flow Preston tube calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Revised zero-pressure-gradient, adiabatic wall skin-friction-balance data covering a Mach number range from 1.6 to 4.6 led to a reevaluation of existing compressible flow Preston tube calibration equations.

  13. Visualization of turbulent wedges under favorable pressure gradients using shear-sensitive and temperature-sensitive liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Chong, Tze-Pei; Zhong, Shan; Hodson, Howard P

    2002-10-01

    Turbulent wedges induced by a three-dimensional surface roughness placed on a flat plate were studied using both shear sensitive and temperature sensitive liquid crystals, respectively denoted by SSLC and TSLC. The experiments were carried out at a free-stream velocity of 28 m/sec at three different favorable pressure gradients. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the spreading angles of the turbulent wedges, as indicated by their associated surface shear stresses and heat transfer characteristics, and to obtain more insight about the behavior of transitional momentum and thermal boundary layers when a streamwise pressure gradient exists. It was shown that under a zero pressure gradient the spreading angles indicated by the two types of liquid crystals are the same, but the difference increases as the level of the favorable pressure gradient increases. The result from the present study is important for modelling the transition of thermal boundary layers over gas turbine blades. PMID:12496003

  14. Experimental Pore-scale Study on the Dynamic Response of Blobs in Porous Media to Pressure Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, S.; Hilpert, M.

    2012-12-01

    The dynamic response of blobs, which are trapped in porous media due to capillary forces, to applied pressure gradients is of interest to petroleum reservoir detection, enhanced oil recovery, and groundwater remediation. By performing planar laser-induced fluorescence experiments, we visualized the dynamics of blobs subject to steady and oscillatory pressure gradients in porous media. By analyzing blob images, we measured the 2D/3D contact angles and mean curvatures of the liquid-liquid interfaces and furthermore quantified the effects of contact angle hysteresis on blob mobilization. Once a blob was mobilized, the subsequent movement and interface behavior, such as contact line pinning, contact line slipping, and snap off, depended very much on the magnitude of the applied pressure gradient. We also revealed the flow patterns inside moving blobs by performing particle image velocimetry experiments. For an oscillatory pressure gradient, we showed that a trapped blob can exhibit resonance which can be exploited to enhance blob mobilization by seismic waves.

  15. Stability of the flow in a soft tube deformed due to an applied pressure gradient.

    PubMed

    Verma, M K S; Kumaran, V

    2015-04-01

    A linear stability analysis is carried out for the flow through a tube with a soft wall in order to resolve the discrepancy of a factor of 10 for the transition Reynolds number between theoretical predictions in a cylindrical tube and the experiments of Verma and Kumaran [J. Fluid Mech. 705, 322 (2012)]. Here the effect of tube deformation (due to the applied pressure difference) on the mean velocity profile and pressure gradient is incorporated in the stability analysis. The tube geometry and dimensions are reconstructed from experimental images, where it is found that there is an expansion and then a contraction of the tube in the streamwise direction. The mean velocity profiles at different downstream locations and the pressure gradient, determined using computational fluid dynamics, are found to be substantially modified by the tube deformation. The velocity profiles are then used in a linear stability analysis, where the growth rates of perturbations are calculated for the flow through a tube with the wall modeled as a neo-Hookean elastic solid. The linear stability analysis is carried out for the mean velocity profiles at different downstream locations using the parallel flow approximation. The analysis indicates that the flow first becomes unstable in the downstream converging section of the tube where the flow profile is more pluglike when compared to the parabolic flow in a cylindrical tube. The flow is stable in the upstream diverging section where the deformation is maximum. The prediction for the transition Reynolds number is in good agreement with experiments, indicating that the downstream tube convergence and the consequent modification in the mean velocity profile and pressure gradient could reduce the transition Reynolds number by an order of magnitude. PMID:25974574

  16. Stability of the flow in a soft tube deformed due to an applied pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M. K. S.; Kumaran, V.

    2015-04-01

    A linear stability analysis is carried out for the flow through a tube with a soft wall in order to resolve the discrepancy of a factor of 10 for the transition Reynolds number between theoretical predictions in a cylindrical tube and the experiments of Verma and Kumaran [J. Fluid Mech. 705, 322 (2012), 10.1017/jfm.2011.55]. Here the effect of tube deformation (due to the applied pressure difference) on the mean velocity profile and pressure gradient is incorporated in the stability analysis. The tube geometry and dimensions are reconstructed from experimental images, where it is found that there is an expansion and then a contraction of the tube in the streamwise direction. The mean velocity profiles at different downstream locations and the pressure gradient, determined using computational fluid dynamics, are found to be substantially modified by the tube deformation. The velocity profiles are then used in a linear stability analysis, where the growth rates of perturbations are calculated for the flow through a tube with the wall modeled as a neo-Hookean elastic solid. The linear stability analysis is carried out for the mean velocity profiles at different downstream locations using the parallel flow approximation. The analysis indicates that the flow first becomes unstable in the downstream converging section of the tube where the flow profile is more pluglike when compared to the parabolic flow in a cylindrical tube. The flow is stable in the upstream diverging section where the deformation is maximum. The prediction for the transition Reynolds number is in good agreement with experiments, indicating that the downstream tube convergence and the consequent modification in the mean velocity profile and pressure gradient could reduce the transition Reynolds number by an order of magnitude.

  17. Coherent structures in a zero-pressure-gradient and a strongly decelerated boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simens, Mark P.; Gungor, Ayse G.; Maciel, Yvan

    2016-04-01

    Coherent structures in a strongly decelerated large-velocity-defect turbulent boundary layer (TBL) and a zero pressure gradient (ZPG) boundary layer are analysed by direct numerical simulation (DNS). The characteristics of the one-point velocity stastistics are also considered. The adverse pressure gradient (APG) TBL simulation is a new one carried out by the present authors. The APG TBL begins as a zero pressure gradient boundary layer, decelerates under a strong adverse pressure gradient, and separates near the end of the domain in the form of a very thin separation bubble. The one-point velocity statistics in the outer region of this large-defect boundary layer are compared to those of two other large-velocity-defect APG TBLs (one in dynamic equilibrium, the other in disequilibrium) and a mixing layer. In the upper half of the large-defect boundary layers, the velocity statistics are similar to those of the mixing layer. The dominant peaks of turbulence production and Reynolds stresses are located in the middle of the boundary layers. Three-dimensional spatial correlations of (u, u) and (u, v) show that coherence is lost in the streamwise and spanwise directions as the velocity defect increases. Near-wall streaks tend to disappear in the large-defect zone of the flow to be replaced by more disorganized u motions. Near-wall sweeps and ejections are also less numerous. In the outer region, the u structures tend to be shorter, less streaky, and more inclined with respect to the wall than in the ZPG TBL. The sweeps and ejections are generally bigger with respect to the boundary layer thickness in the large-defect boundary layer, even if the biggest structures are found in the ZPG TBL. Large sweeps and ejections that reach the wall region (wall-attached) are less streamwise elongated and they occupy less space than in the ZPG boundary layer. The distinction between wall-attached and wall-detached structures is not as pronounced in the large-defect TBL.

  18. Pressure-gradient effects on hypersonic turbulent skin friction and boundary-layer profiles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, E. J.; Keener, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Local skin friction, total-temperature profiles, and pitot-pressure profiles were measured on the wall of a Mach-7.4 wind tunnel. The wall to adiabatic wall temperature ratio was varied from 0.3 to 0.5. Boundary-layer characteristics were compared with those predicted by a finite-difference method. Local skin friction was predicted to within 15%. Pressure-gradient effects on the temperature and Mach number distributions and the shape factor (displacement thickness/momentum thickness) were underpredicted, but the velocity distributions were closely predicted.

  19. Direct numerical simulations of turbulent thermal boundary layers subjected to adverse streamwise pressure gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, Guillermo; Castillo, Luciano

    2013-09-01

    An innovative method for prescribing turbulent thermal inflow information in spatially developing boundary layers under streamwise pressure gradients is introduced for attached flows. The approach is tested and validated in a suite of Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of thermal boundary layers for zero (ZPG) and adverse (APG) pressure gradients with momentum thickness Reynolds numbers (Reθ) up to 3000. The turbulent thermal data are generated based on the dynamic multi-scale approach proposed by Araya et al. ["A dynamic multi-scale approach for turbulent inflow boundary conditions in spatially evolving flows," J. Fluid Mech. 670, 581-605 (2011)], which is extended to include thermal field simulations in the present article. The approach is based on the original rescaling-recycling method developed by Lund, Wu, and Squires ["Generation of turbulent inflow data for spatially developing boundary layer simulations," J. Comput. Phys. 140, 233-258 (1998)] for ZPG flows. Isothermal walls are considered for the thermal field and the molecular Prandtl number is 0.71. In addition, only inlet momentum/thermal boundary layer thicknesses must be prescribed while other flow parameters such as the inlet friction velocity, uτ, and friction temperature, Θτ, are computed dynamically based on the flow solution obtained downstream by means of a test plane. This plane is located between the inlet and recycle stations. Based on the unique and extensive DNS results of heat transfer obtained in this investigation, the effects of Reynolds numbers and adverse pressure gradients on the flow and thermal parameters are also explored and visualized. The principal outcome of adverse pressure gradient on the flow parameters has been determined as a secondary peak, particularly on the streamwise velocity fluctuations in the outer region, which shows clear evidence of energy production in the outer flow and not only in the buffer layer as traditionally known. Nevertheless, this peak is not so

  20. Turbulence model investigations on the boundary layer flow with adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Zhao; Zhi, Zong; Li, Zou; Tianlin, Wang

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a numerical study of flow in the turbulence boundary layer with adverse and pressure gradients (APGs) is conducted by using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. This research chooses six typical turbulence models, which are critical to the computing precision, and to evaluating the issue of APGs. Local frictional resistance coefficient is compared between numerical and experimental results. The same comparisons of dimensionless averaged velocity profiles are also performed. It is found that results generated by Wilcox (2006) k- w are most close to the experimental data. Meanwhile, turbulent quantities such as turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds-stress are also studied.

  1. Boundary-layer transition on a plate subjected to simultaneous spanwise and chordwise pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldman, D. R.; Brinich, P. F.

    1974-01-01

    The boundary-layer transition on a short plate was studied by means of the china-clay visual technique. The plate model was mounted in a wind tunnel so that it was subjected to small simultaneous spanwise and chordwise pressure gradients. Results of the experimental study, which was performed at three subsonic velocities, indicated that the transition pattern was appreciably curved in the spanwise direction but quite smooth and well behaved. Reasonable comparisons between predictions of transition and experiment were obtained from two finite-difference two-dimensional boundary-layer calculation methods which incorporated transition models based on the concept of a transition intermittency factor.

  2. The effect of electron thermal conduction on plasma pressure gradient during reconnection of magnetic field lines

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.K.

    1987-12-01

    The interplay of electron cross-field thermal conduction and the reconnection of magnetic field lines around an m = 1 magnetic island prior to a sawtooth crash can generate a large pressure gradient in a boundary layer adjacent to the reconnecting surface, leading to an enhanced gradient of poloidal beta to satisfy the threshold condition for ideal MHD modes. This narrow boundary layer and the short onset time of a sawtooth crash can be supported by fine-grained turbulent processes in a tokamak plasma. 11 refs.

  3. Local pressure gradients due to incipience of boiling in subcooled flows

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles, A.E.; McDuffee, J.L.

    1995-09-01

    Models for vapor bubble behavior and nucleation site density during subcooled boiling are integrated with boundary layer theory in order to predict the local pressure gradient and heat transfer coefficient. Models for bubble growth rate and bubble departure diameter are used to scale the movement of displaced liquid in the laminar sublayer. An added shear stress, analogous to a turbulent shear stress, is derived by considering the liquid movement normal to the heated surface. The resulting mechanistic model has plausible functional dependence on wall superheat, mass flow, and heat flux and agrees well with data available in the literature.

  4. Hepatic venous pressure gradient measurement before TIPS for acute variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xing-Shun; Fan, Dai-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) is an independent predictor of variceal rebleeding in patients with cirrhosis. After pharmacological and/or endoscopic therapy, the use of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) may be necessary in HVPG non-responders, but not in responders. Thus, HVPG measurement may be incorporated into the treatment algorithm for acute variceal bleeding, which further identifies the candidates that should undergo early insertion of TIPS or maintain the traditional pharmacological and/or endoscopic therapy. The potential benefits are to reduce the cost and prevent TIPS-related complications. PMID:24966625

  5. Gap heating with pressure gradients. [for Shuttle Orbiter thermal protection system tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, C. D.; Maraia, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The heating rate distribution and temperature response on the gap walls of insulating tiles is analyzed to determine significant phenomena and parameters in flows where there is an external surface pressure gradient. Convective heating due to gap flow, modeled as fully developed pipe flow, is coupled with a two-dimensional thermal model of the tiles that includes conduction and radiative heat transfer. To account for geometry and important environmental parameters, scale factors are obtained by curve-fitting measured temperatures to analytical solutions. These scale factors are then used to predict the time-dependent gap heat flux and temperature response of tile gaps on the Space Shuttle Orbiter during entry.

  6. Correlation of heat transfer for the zero pressure gradient hypersonic laminar boundary layer for several gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    A theoretical study of heat transfer for zero pressure gradient hypersonic laminar boundary layers for various gases with particular application to the flows produced in an expansion tube facility was conducted. A correlation based on results obtained from solutions to the governing equations for five gases was formulated. Particular attention was directed toward the laminar boundary layer shock tube splitter plates in carbon dioxide flows generated by high speed shock waves. Computer analysis of the splitter plate boundary layer flow provided information that is useful in interpreting experimental data obtained in shock tube gas radiation studies.

  7. Soliton turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical works in atmospheric turbulence have used the Navier-Stokes fluid equations exclusively for describing large-scale motions. Controversy over the existence of an average temperature gradient for the very large eddies in the atmosphere suggested that a new theoretical basis for describing large-scale turbulence was necessary. A new soliton formalism as a fluid analogue that generalizes the Schrodinger equation and the Zakharov equations has been developed. This formalism, processing all the nonlinearities including those from modulation provided by the density fluctuations and from convection due to the emission of finite sound waves by velocity fluctuations, treats large-scale turbulence as coalescing and colliding solitons. The new soliton system describes large-scale instabilities more explicitly than the Navier-Stokes system because it has a nonlinearity of the gradient type, while the Navier-Stokes has a nonlinearity of the non-gradient type. The forced Schrodinger equation for strong fluctuations describes the micro-hydrodynamical state of soliton turbulence and is valid for large-scale turbulence in fluids and plasmas where internal waves can interact with velocity fluctuations.

  8. Beneficial effect of cibenzoline on left ventricular pressure gradient with sigmoid septum.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Chika; Shiraishi, Jun; Muraguchi, Naoko; Ohtsuki, Katsuichi; Inoue, Miho; Tatsumi, Tetsuya; Azuma, Akihiro; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2004-10-01

    An 83-year-old woman with hypertension was admitted to hospital with episodes of dyspnea on effort after having breakfast. Physical examination revealed a systolic murmur at the left sternal border in the third to fourth intercostal space. Cross-sectional echocardiography showed a sigmoid-shaped interventricular septum markedly protruding into the left ventricle, concentric left ventricular hypertrophy, systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve, and a resultant left ventricular outflow tract obstruction with a pressure gradient of 121.8 mmHg. She began daily treatment with 60 mg metoprolol. However, the chest symptoms were not relieved and the left ventricular outflow tract obstruction was still visible on echocardiography. She was then given 200 mg daily of cibenzoline, in addition to 40 mg metoprolol, and the left ventricular pressure gradient significantly decreased and she was free of symptoms without any complications. This case shows that cibenzoline may be useful in the treatment of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction caused by sigmoid septum. PMID:15459474

  9. Effect of Freestream Turbulence over Rough, Favorable Pressure Gradient Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Nieves, Sheilla; Lebron-Bosques, Jose; Brzek, Brian; Castillo, Luciano; Bayoan Cal, Raul; Meneveau, Charles

    2007-11-01

    Laser Doppler anemometry measurements are performed downstream of an active grid in the Corrsin wind tunnel at The Johns Hopkins University to study the effect of freestream turbulence (Tu<=7%), surface roughness and external favorable pressure gradient. Overall, the effect of freestream turbulence has proven to be dominant over pressure gradient and roughness. Mean profiles show that freestream turbulence effects alter the entire boundary layer including the inner flow. A reduction in the wake is also seen. Moreover, freestream turbulence increases the Reynolds stresses, making the values near the edge of the boundary layer to be non-zero. For the streamwise fluctuations, turbulence intensity affects the inner and outer regions, while the wall-normal and shear stress only change in the outer flow. Also, it is seen that roughness prevents the streamwise fluctuations from increasing near the wall, mainly because of the destruction of the viscous regions. Furthermore, a 20% increase in the skin friction is reported, 25% more than the increase obtained over smooth surfaces.

  10. Acoustic receptivity due to weak surface inhomogeneities in adverse pressure gradient boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan; Ng, Lian; Streett, Craig

    1995-01-01

    The boundary layer receptivity to free-stream acoustic waves in the presence of localized surface disturbances is studied for the case of incompressible Falkner-Skan flows with adverse pressure gradients. These boundary layers are unstable to both viscous and inviscid (i.e., inflectional) modes, and the finite Reynolds number extension of the Goldstein-Ruban theory provides a convenient method to compare the efficiency of the localized receptivity processes in these two cases. The value of the efficiency function related to the receptivity caused by localized distortions in surface geometry is relatively insensitive to the type of instability mechanism, provided that the same reference length scale is used to normalize the efficiency function for each type of instability. In contrast, when the receptivity is induced by variations in wall suction velocity or in wall admittance distribution, the magnitudes of the related efficiency functions, as well as the resulting coupling coefficients, are smaller for inflectional (i.e., Rayleigh) modes than for the viscous Tollmien-Schlichting waves. The reduced levels of receptivity can be attributed mainly to the shorter wavelengths and higher frequencies of the inflectional modes. Because the most critical band of frequencies shifts toward higher values, the overall efficiency of the wall suction- and the wall admittance-induced receptivity decreases with an increase in the adverse pressure gradient.

  11. Internal pressure gradient errors in σ-coordinate ocean models in high resolution fjord studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berntsen, Jarle; Thiem, Øyvind; Avlesen, Helge

    2015-08-01

    Terrain following ocean models are today applied in coastal areas and fjords where the topography may be very steep. Recent advances in high performance computing facilitate model studies with very high spatial resolution. In general, numerical discretization errors tend to zero with the grid size. However, in fjords and near the coast the slopes may be very steep, and the internal pressure gradient errors associated with σ-models may be significant even in high resolution studies. The internal pressure gradient errors are due to errors when estimating the density gradients in σ-models, and these errors are investigated for two idealized test cases and for the Hardanger fjord in Norway. The methods considered are the standard second order method and a recently proposed method that is balanced such that the density gradients are zero for the case ρ = ρ(z) where ρ is the density and z is the vertical coordinate. The results show that by using the balanced method, the errors may be reduced considerably also for slope parameters larger than the maximum suggested value of 0.2. For the Hardanger fjord case initialized with ρ = ρ(z) , the errors in the results produced with the balanced method are orders of magnitude smaller than the corresponding errors in the results produced with the second order method.

  12. Pressure gradient effects on heat transfer to reusable surface insulation tile-array gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throckmorton, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to determine the effect of pressure gradient on the heat transfer within space shuttle reusable surface insulation (RSI) tile-array gaps under thick, turbulent boundary-layer conditions. Heat-transfer and pressure measurements were obtained on a curved array of full-scale simulated RSI tiles in a tunnel-wall boundary layer at a nominal free-stream Mach number and free-stream Reynolds numbers. Transverse pressure gradients of varying degree were induced over the model surface by rotating the curved array with respect to the flow. Definition of the tunnel-wall boundary-layer flow was obtained by measurement of boundary-layer pitot pressure profiles, wall pressure, and heat transfer. Flat-plate heat-transfer data were correlated and a method was derived for prediction of heat transfer to a smooth curved surface in the highly three-dimensional tunnel-wall boundary-layer flow. Pressure on the floor of the RSI tile-array gap followed the trends of the external surface pressure. Heat transfer to the surface immediately downstream of a transverse gap is higher than that for a smooth surface at the same location. Heating to the wall of a transverse gap, and immediately downstream of it, at its intersection with a longitudinal gap is significantly greater than that for the simple transverse gap.

  13. Fully coupled resonant-triad interaction in an adverse-pressure-gradient boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Lee, Sang S.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear resonant-triad interaction, proposed by Raetz (1959), Craik (1971), and others for a Blasius boundary layer, is analyzed here for an adverse-pressure-gradient boundary layer. We assume that the adverse pressure gradient is in some sense weak and, therefore, that the instability growth rate is small. This ensures that there is a well-defined critical layer located somewhere within the flow and that the nonlinear interaction is effectively confined to that layer. The initial interaction is of the parametric resonance type, even when the modal amplitudes are all of the same order. This means that the oblique instability waves exhibit faster than exponential growth and that the growth rate of the two-dimensional mode remains linear. However, the interaction and the resulting growth rates become fully coupled, once oblique-mode amplitudes become sufficiently large, but the coupling terms are now quartic, rather than quadratic as in the Craik (1971) analysis. More importantly, however, new nonlinear interactions, which were not present in the Craik-type analyses, now come into play. These interactions eventually have a dominant effect on the instability wave development.

  14. DNS of self-similar adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer at incipient separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, Julio; Kitsios, Vassili; Atkinson, Callum; Sillero, Juan; Borrell, Guillem; Gungar, Ayse; Jimenez, Javier

    2015-11-01

    A direct numerical simulation of a self-similar adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer (APG-TBL) flow at incipient separation has been carried out. The maximum Reynolds number based on the momentum thickness, Reδ2 , reached in this DNS is 6,500. A wall-normal far-field boundary condition to effect the desired APG that will lead to the desired self-similar flow at the verge of separation has been developed. The self-similar analysis of the mean turbulent boundary layer equations yields the necessary conditions for a self-similar mean flow to exists. These conditions are tested using the DNS APG-TBL data base. First and second order statistics of the velocity across the APG-TBL are also presented in the light of the self-similar analysis results and compared to the results of a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer DNS with similar mean inflow characteristics as the APG-TBL. The support of the ARC, NCI and Pawsey SCC funded by the Australian and Western Australian governments as well as the support of PRACE funded by the European Union are gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Mixed mode transition in zero and adverse pressure gradient boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Rikhi; Durbin, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Flow regimes exist where interaction of Klebanoff streaks and the Tollmien-Sclichting waves trigger transition but either mode is individually insufficient. Such interaction between orderly and bypass routes of transition is called Mixed mode transition. In zero pressure gradient boundary layers, mixed mode transition follows three routes depending upon strength of these perturbation modes. At high free-stream turbulence intensity (Tu), bypass transition is dominant and the flow is very weakly sensitive to the TS mode strength. In the presence of a strong TS mode, low Tu triggers secondary instability of the TS wave forming Λ vortices. The Λ vortices are forced response due to the weak streaks rather than resonance mechanism seen in monochromatic excitations. When both of these modes are weak, secondary instability of streaks trigger consequent breakdown to turbulent spots. Three-dimensional visualization of the perturbation fields shows toroidal n = 0 and helical n = 1 modes observed in instability of axisymmetric jets and wakes. In adverese pressure gradient boundary layers, the presence of an inflection point significantly increases the growth rate of TS mode thereby strengthening the secondary instability route and the interaction is more interesting. This work was supported by NSF grant CBET-1228195. Computer time was provided by the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE).

  16. Flow Control Device Evaluation for an Internal Flow with an Adverse Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Luther N.; Gorton, Susan Althoff; Anders, Scott G.

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of several active and passive devices to control flow in an adverse pressure gradient with secondary flows present was evaluated in the 15 Inch Low Speed Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. In this study, passive micro vortex generators, micro bumps, and piezoelectric synthetic jets were evaluated for their flow control characteristics using surface static pressures, flow visualization, and 3D Stereo Digital Particle Image Velocimetry. Data also were acquired for synthetic jet actuators in a zero flow environment. It was found that the micro vortex generator is very effective in controlling the flow environment for an adverse pressure gradient, even in the presence of secondary vortical flow. The mechanism by which the control is effected is a re-energization of the boundary layer through flow mixing. The piezoelectric synthetic jet actuators must have sufficient velocity output to produce strong longitudinal vortices if they are to be effective for flow control. The output of these devices in a laboratory or zero flow environment will be different than the output in a flow environment. In this investigation, the output was higher in the flow environment, but the stroke cycle in the flow did not indicate a positive inflow into the synthetic jet.

  17. Measurement of the Turbulence Kinetic Energy Budget of a Turbulent Planar Wake Flow in Pressure Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xiao-Feng; Thomas, Flint O.; Nelson, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) is a very important quantity for turbulence modeling and the budget of this quantity in its transport equation can provide insight into the flow physics. Turbulence kinetic energy budget measurements were conducted for a symmetric turbulent wake flow subjected to constant zero, favorable and adverse pressure gradients in year-three of research effort. The purpose of this study is to clarify the flow physics issues underlying the demonstrated influence of pressure gradient on wake development and provide experimental support for turbulence modeling. To ensure the reliability of these notoriously difficult measurements, the experimental procedure was carefully designed on the basis of an uncertainty analysis. Four different approaches, based on an isotropic turbulence assumption, a locally axisymmetric homogeneous turbulence assumption, a semi-isotropy assumption and a forced balance of the TKE equation, were applied for the estimate of the dissipation term. The pressure transport term is obtained from a forced balance of the turbulence kinetic energy equation. This report will present the results of the turbulence kinetic energy budget measurement and discuss their implication on the development of strained turbulent wakes.

  18. Mitral inertance in humans: critical factor in Doppler estimation of transvalvular pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakatani, S.; Firstenberg, M. S.; Greenberg, N. L.; Vandervoort, P. M.; Smedira, N. G.; McCarthy, P. M.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    The pressure-velocity relationship across the normal mitral valve is approximated by the Bernoulli equation DeltaP = 1/2 rhoDeltav(2) + M. dv/dt, where DeltaP is the atrioventricular pressure difference, rho is blood density, v is transmitral flow velocity, and M is mitral inertance. Although M is indispensable in assessing transvalvular pressure differences from transmitral flow, this term is poorly understood. We measured intraoperative high-fidelity left atrial and ventricular pressures and simultaneous transmitral flow velocities by using transesophageal echocardiography in 100 beats (8 patients). We computed mean mitral inertance (M) by M = integral((DeltaP)-(1/2 x rho v(2))dt/integral(dv/dt)dt and we assessed the effect of the inertial term on the transmitral pressure-flow relation. ranged from 1.03 to 5.96 g/cm(2) (mean = 3.82 +/- 1.22 g/cm(2)). DeltaP calculated from the simplified Bernoulli equation (DeltaP = 1/2. rhov(2)) lagged behind (44 +/- 11 ms) and underestimated the actual peak pressures (2.3 +/- 1.1 mmHg). correlated with left ventricular systolic pressure (r = -0.68, P < 0.0001) and transmitral pressure gradients (r = 0.65, P < 0.0001). Because mitral inertance causes the velocity to lag significantly behind the actual pressure gradient, it needs to be considered when assessing diastolic filling and the pressure difference across normal mitral valves.

  19. Experimental feasibility of investigating acoustic waves in Couette flow with entropy and pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Zorumski, William E.; Rawls, John W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility is discussed for an experimental program for studying the behavior of acoustic wave propagation in the presence of strong gradients of pressure, temperature, and flow. Theory suggests that gradients effects can be experimentally observed as resonant frequency shifts and mode shape changes in a waveguide. A convenient experimental geometry for such experiments is the annular region between two co-rotating cylinders. Radial temperature gradients in a spinning annulus can be generated by differentially heating the two cylinders via electromagnetic induction. Radial pressure gradients can be controlled by varying the cylinder spin rates. Present technology appears adequate to construct an apparatus to allow independent control of temperature and pressure gradients. A complicating feature of a more advanced experiment, involving flow gradients, is the requirement for independently controlled cylinder spin rates. Also, the boundary condition at annulus terminations must be such that flow gradients are minimally disturbed. The design and construction of an advanced apparatus to include flow gradients will require additional technology development.

  20. Acoustic solitons in inhomogeneous pair-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Asif; Mahmood, S.; Haque, Q.

    2010-12-15

    The acoustic solitons are investigated in inhomogeneous unmagnetized pair ion plasmas. The Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) like equation with an additional term due to density gradients is deduced by employing reductive perturbation technique. It is noticed that pair-ion plasma system is conducive for the propagation of compressive as well as rarefactive solitons. The increase in the temperature ratio causes the amplitude of the rarefactive soliton to decrease. However, the amplitude of the compressive solitons is found to be increased as the temperature ratio of ions is enhanced. The amplitude of both compressive and rarefactive solitons is found to be increased as the density gradient parameter is increased. The equlibrium density profile is assumed to be exponential. The numerical results are shown for illustration.

  1. Nonlinear tunneling of optical soliton in 3 coupled NLS equation with symbolic computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani Rajan, M. S.; Mahalingam, A.; Uthayakumar, A.

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the soliton solution for N coupled nonlinear Schrödinger (CNLS) equations. These equations are coupled due to the cross-phase-modulation (CPM). Lax pair of this system is obtained via the Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur (AKNS) scheme and the corresponding Darboux transformation is constructed to derive the soliton solution. One and two soliton solutions are generated. Using two soliton solutions of 3 CNLS equation, nonlinear tunneling of soliton for both with and without exponential background has been discussed. Finally cascade compression of optical soliton through multi-nonlinear barrier has been discussed. The obtained results may have promising applications in all-optical devices based on optical solitons, study of soliton propagation in birefringence fiber systems and optical soliton with distributed dispersion and nonlinearity management.

  2. The effects of adverse pressure gradients on momentum and thermal structures in transitional boundary layers. Part 1: Mean quantities

    SciTech Connect

    Mislevy, S.P.; Wang, T.

    1996-10-01

    The effects of adverse pressure gradients on the thermal and momentum characteristics of a heated transitional boundary layer were investigated with free-stream turbulence ranging from 0.3 to 0.6 %. The acceleration parameter, K, was kept constant along the test section. Both surface heat transfer and boundary layer measurements were conducted. The boundary layer measurements were conducted with a three-wire probe (two velocity wires and one temperature wire) for two representative cases, K1 = {minus}0.51 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} and K2 = {minus}1.05 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. The surface heat transfer measurements were conducted for K values ranging from {minus}0.045 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to {minus}1.44 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} over five divergent wall angles. The Stanton numbers of the cases with adverse pressure gradients were greater than that of the zero-pressure-gradient turbulent correlation in the low-Reynolds-number turbulent flow, and the difference increased as the adverse pressure gradient was increased. The adverse pressure gradient caused earlier transition onset and shorter transition length based on Re{sub x}, Re*{sub {delta}}, and Re{sub {theta}} in comparison to zero-pressure-gradient conditions. As expected, there was a reduction in skin friction as the adverse pressure gradient increased. In the U{sup +}-Y{sup +} coordinates, the adverse pressure gradients had a significant effect on the mean velocity profiles in the near-wall region for the late-laminar and early transition stations. The mean temperature profile was observed to precede the velocity profile in starting and ending the transition process, opposite to what occurred in favorable pressure gradient cases in previous studies. A curve fit of the turbulent temperature profile in the log-linear region for the K2 case gave a conduction layer thickness of Y{sup +}=9.8 and an average Pr{sub t}=0.71. The wake region of the turbulent mean temperature profile was significantly suppressed.

  3. Interpretation of the Finite Pressure Gradient Effects in the Reversed Shear Alfvén Eigenmode Theory

    SciTech Connect

    N.N. Gorelenkov, G.J. Kramer, R. Nazikian

    2008-02-21

    Ideal MHD equations employed in the NOVA code are analyzed analytically and numerically in order to investigate the role of the pressure gradient on global reversed shear Alfvén eigenmodes (RSAEs) or Alfvén cascades. We confirm both numerically and analytically conclusions obtained earlier using the ideal MHD code NOVA and analytically that the plasma pressure gradient plays a key role in the existence condition and in the dispersion relation for the mode. The effect of the plasma pressure gradient is to shift the mode frequency up at the low part of the RSAE frequency chirp and downshift the mode frequency when the frequency approaches the TAE gap This finding is opposite to predictions in a recent publication , where the pressure gradient is found to be always stabilizing by means of downshifting the RSAE frequency and enhancing its in- teraction with the continuum. We resolve this discrepancy by showing that neglecting the pressure gradient effect on the plasma equilibrium (modification of the Shafranov shift and the averaged curvature) leads to conclusions at variance to the numerical and analytical results presented here. A new variational approximation of the RSAE is introduced which compares remarkably well with NOVA solutions. With this new approximation we clearly demonstrate the diagnostic potential and limitations of the RSAE frequency measurement for MHD spectroscopy.

  4. Parameterizing large-scale dynamics with the weak pressure gradient approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edman, J. P.; Romps, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Cloud-resolving and single-column models are useful tools for understanding the dynamics of convection and developing convective parameterizations. However, these tools are severely limited by their inherent inability to simulate the dynamics of the environment in which they are imagined to be immersed. Previous attempts to solve this problem have resulted in various ';supra-domain scale' parameterizations, which allow the model to prescribe its own vertical velocity profile based on some limited information about the external environment (e.g. pressure and potential temperature profiles). Here we present a new implementation of one of these schemes, the weak pressure gradient approximation (WPG), which is shown to reproduce both the transient and steady state dynamics of a 3D atmosphere in a single column. Further, we demonstrate the skill of this new WPG method at replicating observed time series of precipitation and vertical velocity in a series of cloud-resolving simulations.

  5. A preliminary investigation of boundary-layer transition along a flat plate with adverse pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Doenhoff, Albert E

    1938-01-01

    Boundary-layer surveys were made throughout the transition region along a smooth flat plate placed in an airstream of practically zero turbulence and with an adverse pressure gradient. The boundary-layer Reynolds number at the laminar separation point was varied from 1,800 to 2,600. The test data, when considered in the light of certain theoretical deductions, indicated that transition probably began with separation of the laminar boundary layer. The extent of the transition region, defined as the distance from a calculated laminar separation point to the position of the first fully developed turbulent boundary-layer profile, could be expressed as a constant Reynolds number run of approximately 70,000. Some speculations are presented concerning the application of the foregoing concepts, after certain assumptions have been made, to the problem of the connection between transition on the upper surface of an airfoil at high angles of attack and the maximum lift.

  6. An experimental investigation of boundary layer transition in an adverse pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1991-01-01

    The evolution of a small perturbation introduced periodically into a boundary layer with a moderately strong adverse pressure gradient (APG) was investigated experimentally using the hot-wire method. The magnitude of the disturbance is found to decay with the streamwise distance in the APG before undergoing rapid growth and triggering transition in a very repetitive manner. The evidence suggests that the laminar layer separates and that the transition mechanism is an inviscid shear-layer type of instability. Contours of spanwise vorticity in the plane of the disturbance show the formation of roll-ups in the initial stages. Subsequent interaction with the wall leads to the formation of large-scale vortex loops which merge into a single vortex loop further downstream.

  7. Performance of popular turbulence models for attached and separated adverse pressure gradient flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menter, F. R.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of four popular eddy-viscosity turbulence models under adverse pressure gradient conditions is investigated. The Baldwin-Lomax, the Johnson-King, the Baldwin-Barth, and the Wilcox-omega models have been implemented into the INS code, which solves the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Results are shown for the well known Samuel-Joubert flow and two new flowfields, recently reported by D. M. Driver (1991). The two new flowfields pose a stronger test of the models than the Samuel-Joubert flow, because of the more severe retardation of the boundary layer, including separation in one case. A detailed comparison of the numerical results and the experimental data is shown.

  8. Performance of popular turbulence models for attached and separated adverse pressure gradient flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menter, F. R.

    1991-06-01

    The performance of four popular eddy-viscosity turbulence models under adverse pressure gradient conditions is investigated. The Baldwin-Lomax, the Johnson-King, the Baldwin-Barth, and the Wilcox-omega models have been implemented into the INS code, which solves the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Results are shown for the well known Samuel-Joubert flow and two new flowfields, recently reported by D. M. Driver (1991). The two new flowfields pose a stronger test of the models than the Samuel-Joubert flow, because of the more severe retardation of the boundary layer, including separation in one case. A detailed comparison of the numerical results and the experimental data is shown.

  9. Comparison between pressure gradient method and MAC method on high Re calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, C.-H.; Duh, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    A cavity flow driven by shear and buoyancy forces is used as a test problem in the application of a nonstaggered pressure gradient (PG) method in solving the two-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Twelve finite differencing schemes are used to solve the cavity flow problem. The schemes consist of various combinations of grid arrangements, upwinding treatments, and conservativeness of convection terms. An artificial source term is introduced, and the solutions are compared with those obtained by the conventional marker-and-cell (MAC) method. The comparisons favor the PG method. Numerical results obtained by the twelve schemes are compared with exact solutions in order to assess the stability and accuracy of each scheme.

  10. Influence of Pressure-gradient and Shear on Ballooning Stability in Stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    S.R. Hudson; C.C. Hegna; N. Nakajima

    2005-02-28

    Pressure-driven, ideal ballooning stability calculations are often used to predict the achievable plasma in stellarator configurations. In this paper, the sensitivity of ballooning stability to plasmas profile variations is addressed. A simple, semi-analytic method for expressing the ballooning growth rate, for each field line, as a polynomial function of the variation in the pressure gradient and the average magnetic shear from an original equilibrium has recently been introduced [Phys. Plasmas 11:9 (September 2004) L53]. This paper will apply the expression to various stellarator configurations and comment on the validity of various truncated forms of the polynomial expression. In particular, it is shown that in general it is insufficient to consider only the second order terms as previously assumed, and that higher order terms must be included to obtain accurate predictions of stability.

  11. Direct Numerical Simulation and Theories of Wall Turbulence with a Range of Pressure Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, G. N.; Garbaruk, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    2014-01-01

    A new Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of Couette-Poiseuille flow at a higher Reynolds number is presented and compared with DNS of other wall-bounded flows. It is analyzed in terms of testing semi-theoretical proposals for universal behavior of the velocity, mixing length, or eddy viscosity in pressure gradients, and in terms of assessing the accuracy of two turbulence models. These models are used in two modes, the traditional one with only a dependence on the wall-normal coordinate y, and a newer one in which a lateral dependence on z is added. For pure Couette flow and the Couette-Poiseuille case considered here, this z-dependence allows some models to generate steady streamwise vortices, which generally improves the agreement with DNS and experiment. On the other hand, it complicates the comparison between DNS and models.

  12. Probability density function method for variable-density pressure-gradient-driven turbulence and mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Bakosi, Jozsef; Ristorcelli, Raymond J

    2010-01-01

    Probability density function (PDF) methods are extended to variable-density pressure-gradient-driven turbulence. We apply the new method to compute the joint PDF of density and velocity in a non-premixed binary mixture of different-density molecularly mixing fluids under gravity. The full time-evolution of the joint PDF is captured in the highly non-equilibrium flow: starting from a quiescent state, transitioning to fully developed turbulence and finally dissipated by molecular diffusion. High-Atwood-number effects (as distinguished from the Boussinesq case) are accounted for: both hydrodynamic turbulence and material mixing are treated at arbitrary density ratios, with the specific volume, mass flux and all their correlations in closed form. An extension of the generalized Langevin model, originally developed for the Lagrangian fluid particle velocity in constant-density shear-driven turbulence, is constructed for variable-density pressure-gradient-driven flows. The persistent small-scale anisotropy, a fundamentally 'non-Kolmogorovian' feature of flows under external acceleration forces, is captured by a tensorial diffusion term based on the external body force. The material mixing model for the fluid density, an active scalar, is developed based on the beta distribution. The beta-PDF is shown to be capable of capturing the mixing asymmetry and that it can accurately represent the density through transition, in fully developed turbulence and in the decay process. The joint model for hydrodynamics and active material mixing yields a time-accurate evolution of the turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds stress anisotropy without resorting to gradient diffusion hypotheses, and represents the mixing state by the density PDF itself, eliminating the need for dubious mixing measures. Direct numerical simulations of the homogeneous Rayleigh-Taylor instability are used for model validation.

  13. Effects of Adverse Pressure Gradient on the Incompressible Reattaching Flow Over a Rearward-Facing Step

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuehn, Donald M.

    1980-01-01

    The turbulent, incompressible reattaching flow over a rearward-facing step has been studied by many researchers over the years. One of the principal quantities determined in these experiments has been the distance from the step to the point (or region) where the separated shear layer reattaches to the surface (x(r)). The values for x(r)/h, where h is the step height, have covered a wider range than can reasonably be attributed to experimental technique or inaccuracy. Often the reason for a largely different value of x(r)/h can be attributed to an incompletely developed turbulent layer, or a transitional or laminar boundary layer. However, for the majority of experiments where the boundary layer is believed to be fully developed and turbulent, x(r)/h still varies several step heights; generally, 5 1/2 approximately < x(r)/h approximately < 7 1/2. This observed variation has usually been attributed to such variables as l/h (step length to height, h/delta (step height to initial boundary-layer thickness), R(e)(theta)), or the experimental technique for determining reattachment location. However, there are so many different combinations of variables in the previous experiments that it was not possible to sort out the effects of particular conditions on the location of reattachment. In the present experiment velocity profiles have been measured in and around the region of separated flow. Results show a large influence of adverse pressure gradient on the reattaching flow over a rearward-facing step that has not been reported previously. Further, the many previous experiments for fully developed, turbulent flow in parallel-walled channels have shown a range of reattachment location that has not been explained by differences in initial flow conditions. Although these initial flow conditions might contribute to the observed variation of reattachment location, it appears that the pressure gradient effect can explain most of that variation.

  14. The Difference in Translaminar Pressure Gradient and Neuroretinal Rim Area in Glaucoma and Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Siaudvytyte, Lina; Ragauskas, Arminas; Meiliuniene, Indre; Harris, Alon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To assess differences in translaminar pressure gradient (TPG) and neuroretinal rim area (NRA) in patients with normal tension glaucoma (NTG), high tension glaucoma (HTG), and healthy controls. Methods. 27 patients with NTG, HTG, and healthy controls were included in the prospective pilot study (each group consisted of 9 patients). Intraocular pressure (IOP), intracranial pressure (ICP), and confocal laser scanning tomography were assessed. TPG was calculated as the difference of IOP minus ICP. ICP was measured using noninvasive two-depth transcranial Doppler device. The level of significance P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results. NTG patients had significantly lower IOP (13.7(1.6) mmHg), NRA (0.97(0.36) mm2), comparing with HTG and healthy subjects, P < 0.05. ICP was lower in NTG (7.4(2.7) mmHg), compared with HTG (8.9(1.9) mmHg) and healthy subjects (10.5(3.0) mmHg); however, the difference between groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The difference between TPG for healthy (5.4(7.7) mmHg) and glaucomatous eyes (NTG 6.3(3.1) mmHg, HTG 15.7(7.7) mmHg) was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Higher TPG was correlated with decreased NRA (r = −0.83; P = 0.01) in the NTG group. Conclusion. Translaminar pressure gradient was higher in glaucoma patients. Reduction of NRA was related to higher TPG in NTG patients. Further prospective studies are warranted to investigate the involvement of TPG in glaucoma management. PMID:24876948

  15. A pressure gradient facilitates mass flow in the oomycete Achlya bisexualis.

    PubMed

    Muralidhar, Abishek; Swadel, Emma; Spiekerman, Marjolein; Suei, Sandy; Fraser, Miranda; Ingerfeld, Manfred; Tayagui, Ayelen B; Garrill, Ashley

    2016-02-01

    We have used a single cell pressure probe and observed movement of microinjected oil droplets to investigate mass flow in the oomycete Achlya bisexualis. To facilitate these experiments, split Petri dishes that had media containing different sorbitol concentrations (and hence a different osmotic potential) on each side of the dish were inoculated with a single zoospore. An initial germ tube grew out from this and formed a mycelium that extended over both sides of the Petri dish. Hyphae growing on the 0 M sorbitol side of the dish had a mean turgor ( ± sem) of 0.53 ± 0.03 MPa (n = 13) and on the 0.3 M sorbitol side had a mean turgor ( ± sem) of 0.3 ± 0.027 MPa (n = 9). Oil droplets that had been microinjected into the hyphae moved towards the lower turgor area of the mycelia (i.e. retrograde movement when microinjected into hyphae on the 0 M sorbitol side of the split Petri dish and anterograde movement when microinjected into hyphae on the 0.3 M sorbitol side of the Petri dish). In contrast, the movement of small refractile vesicles occurred in both directions irrespective of the pressure gradient. Experiments with neutral red indicate that the dye is able to move through the mycelia from one side of a split Petri dish to the other, suggesting that there is no compartmentation. This study shows that hyphae that are part of the same mycelia can have different turgor pressures and that this pressure gradient can drive mass flow. PMID:26608611

  16. Observations of pressure gradient driven m = 1 internal kink mode in EAST tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Liqing; Hu Liqun; Chen Kaiyun; Li Erzhong; Wang Fudi; Xu Ming; Duan Yanmin; Shi Tonghui; Zhang Jizong; Zhou Ruijie; Chen Yebin

    2012-12-15

    Pressure gradient driven m = 1 internal kink mode destabilization that follows an L-H transition is observed in the operational region of the EAST tokamak, which manifests in periodic oscillations in soft x-ray (SXR) and Mirnov coil signals. Using tomography with the high resolution soft x-ray detection array, we find that the rotation direction of the 1/1 kink mode is in the ion diamagnetic drift direction in poloidal cross-section. A large displacement of the hot core is attributable to the shift of the 1/1 internal kink mode. In contrast to stationary oscillations with fixed frequency, various frequency chirping behavior is observed with this 1/1 kink mode. Furthermore, we also occasionally observe that a 2/1 neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) is triggered by a 1/1 internal kink mode via mode coupling in a high-performance plasma. The spatial structure of a 2/2 mode, which is the harmonic mode of the 1/1 kink mode, is also presented in this paper. Large amounts of medium-Z impurities accumulate in the central plasma region where the 1/1 kink mode instability bursts. Finally, we also find that the frequency beating associated with a 1/1 kink mode is a consequence of plasma rotation. Based on all of these observations, we propose that the plasma pressure gradient, the driving force in kink modes, is plausibly the product of an intense concentration of impurities, which are related to plasma rotation.

  17. Observations of pressure gradient driven m = 1 internal kink mode in EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liqing; Hu, Liqun; Chen, Kaiyun; Li, Erzhong; Wang, Fudi; Xu, Ming; Duan, Yanmin; Shi, Tonghui; Zhang, Jizong; Zhou, Ruijie; Chen, Yebin

    2012-12-01

    Pressure gradient driven m = 1 internal kink mode destabilization that follows an L-H transition is observed in the operational region of the EAST tokamak, which manifests in periodic oscillations in soft x-ray (SXR) and Mirnov coil signals. Using tomography with the high resolution soft x-ray detection array, we find that the rotation direction of the 1/1 kink mode is in the ion diamagnetic drift direction in poloidal cross-section. A large displacement of the hot core is attributable to the shift of the 1/1 internal kink mode. In contrast to stationary oscillations with fixed frequency, various frequency chirping behavior is observed with this 1/1 kink mode. Furthermore, we also occasionally observe that a 2/1 neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) is triggered by a 1/1 internal kink mode via mode coupling in a high-performance plasma. The spatial structure of a 2/2 mode, which is the harmonic mode of the 1/1 kink mode, is also presented in this paper. Large amounts of medium-Z impurities accumulate in the central plasma region where the 1/1 kink mode instability bursts. Finally, we also find that the frequency beating associated with a 1/1 kink mode is a consequence of plasma rotation. Based on all of these observations, we propose that the plasma pressure gradient, the driving force in kink modes, is plausibly the product of an intense concentration of impurities, which are related to plasma rotation.

  18. Nonlinear tunneling of optical soliton in 3 coupled NLS equation with symbolic computation

    SciTech Connect

    Mani Rajan, M.S.; Mahalingam, A.; Uthayakumar, A.

    2014-07-15

    We investigated the soliton solution for N coupled nonlinear Schrödinger (CNLS) equations. These equations are coupled due to the cross-phase-modulation (CPM). Lax pair of this system is obtained via the Ablowitz–Kaup–Newell–Segur (AKNS) scheme and the corresponding Darboux transformation is constructed to derive the soliton solution. One and two soliton solutions are generated. Using two soliton solutions of 3 CNLS equation, nonlinear tunneling of soliton for both with and without exponential background has been discussed. Finally cascade compression of optical soliton through multi-nonlinear barrier has been discussed. The obtained results may have promising applications in all-optical devices based on optical solitons, study of soliton propagation in birefringence fiber systems and optical soliton with distributed dispersion and nonlinearity management. -- Highlights: •We consider the nonlinear tunneling of soliton in birefringence fiber. •3-coupled NLS (CNLS) equation with variable coefficients is considered. •Two soliton solutions are obtained via Darboux transformation using constructed Lax pair. •Soliton tunneling through dispersion barrier and well are investigated. •Finally, cascade compression of soliton has been achieved.

  19. Influence of generalized external potentials on nonlinear tunneling of nonautonomous solitons: Soliton management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalingam, A.; Mani Rajan, M. S.

    2015-10-01

    Soliton control and management using generalized external potentials in an inhomogeneous fiber to the design of high speed optical devices and ultrahigh capacity transmission systems are investigated based on solving the variable-coefficient generalized nonautonomous nonlinear Schrödinger equation with the help of symbolic computation. We construct Lax pair for GNLS equation by means of AKNS method and two soliton solutions are obtained by virtue of the Darboux transformation. With symbolic computation, we manipulate the control parameters and external potentials to investigate the propagation behaviors of nonautonomous solitons. Moreover, the main evolution features of obtained two soliton solutions are exposed by some interesting figures through computer simulation. Especially, we analyze the influence of external potentials such as periodic, exponential and parabolic potential on soliton propagation. Finally, soliton propagation under the absence (vanishing) of external potential is also discussed. Obtained results confirmed that external potentials has strong influence on the soliton dynamics. Our results might provide a new method to achieve the soliton pulse compression while they passing through the potential barrier or well under the influence of external potentials.

  20. Mean and fluctuating flow measurements in axisymmetric supersonic boundary layer flow subjected to distributed adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gootzait, E.; Childs, M. E.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the mean flow properties and turbulent fluctuations in adiabatic turbulent boundary layer flows subjected to distributed adverse pressure gradients. In the freestream region upstream of the adverse pressure gradient the Mach number was 3.86, the unit Reynolds number 5.3 million per foot. The boundary layer developed on the wall of an axisymmetric nozzle and straight test section. In order to avoid the effects of streamwise surface curvature the adverse pressure gradients at the test section wall were induced by contoured centerbodies mounted on the wind tunnel centerline. The flow under study simulated that which might be found in an axially symmetric engine inlet of a supersonic aircraft.

  1. Internally mounted thin-liquid-film skin-friction meter - Comparison with floating element method with and without pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornung, Hans; Seto, Jeffrey

    1991-01-01

    A new, robust oil film skin friction meter was designed and constructed. This enables skin friction measurements remotely and from within the model, as well as avoiding the need to know the location of the leading edge of the film. The instrument was tested by comparing measurements with those given by a floating element gage in a zero pressure gradient flat plate turbulent boundary layer. Both instruments agreed satisfactorily with the well-known curve for this case. Significant discrepancies between the two instruments were observed in the case of adverse and favorable pressure gradients. The discrepancies were of opposite sign for opposite-sign pressure gradients as is consistent with the error expected from floating-element gages. Additional confidence in the oil film technique is supplied by the good agreement of the behavior of the film profile with predictions from lubrication theory.

  2. The turbulent boundary layer on a porous plate: An experimental study of the heat transfer behavior with adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, B. F.; Kays, W. M.; Moffat, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the heat transfer behavior of the near equilibrium transpired turbulent boundary layer with adverse pressure gradient has been carried out. Stanton numbers were measured by an energy balance on electrically heated plates that form the bottom wall of the wind tunnel. Two adverse pressure gradients were studied. Two types of transpiration boundary conditions were investigated. The concept of an equilibrium thermal boundary layer was introduced. It was found that Stanton number as a function of enthalpy thickness Reynolds number is essentially unaffected by adverse pressure gradient with no transpiration. Shear stress, heat flux, and turbulent Prandtl number profiles were computed from mean temperature and velocity profiles. It was concluded that the turbulent Prandtl number is greater than unity in near the wall and decreases continuously to approximately 0.5 at the free stream.

  3. Cascaded generation of coherent Raman dissipative solitons.

    PubMed

    Kharenko, Denis S; Bednyakova, Anastasia E; Podivilov, Evgeniy V; Fedoruk, Mikhail P; Apolonski, Alexander; Babin, Sergey A

    2016-01-01

    The cascaded generation of a conventional dissipative soliton (at 1020 nm) together with Raman dissipative solitons of the first (1065 nm) and second (1115 nm) orders inside a common fiber laser cavity is demonstrated experimentally and numerically. With sinusoidal (soft) spectral filtering, the generated solitons are mutually coherent at a high degree and compressible down to 300 fs. Numerical simulation shows that an even higher degree of coherence and shorter pulses could be achieved with step-like (hard) spectral filtering. The approach can be extended toward a high-order coherent Raman dissipative soliton source offering numerous applications such as frequency comb generation, pulse synthesis, biomedical imaging, and the generation of a coherent mid-infrared supercontinuum. PMID:26696187

  4. Modification of the MML turbulence model for adverse pressure gradient flows. M.S. Thesis - Akron Univ., 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Julianne M.

    1994-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics is being used increasingly to predict flows for aerospace propulsion applications, yet there is still a need for an easy to use, computationally inexpensive turbulence model capable of accurately predicting a wide range of turbulent flows. The Baldwin-Lomax model is the most widely used algebraic model, even though it has known difficulties calculating flows with strong adverse pressure gradients and large regions of separation. The modified mixing length model (MML) was developed specifically to handle the separation which occurs on airfoils and has given significantly better results than the Baldwin-Lomax model. The success of these calculations warrants further evaluation and development of MML. The objective of this work was to evaluate the performance of MML for zero and adverse pressure gradient flows, and modify it as needed. The Proteus Navier-Stokes code was used for this study and all results were compared with experimental data and with calculations made using the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic model, which is currently available in Proteus. The MML model was first evaluated for zero pressure gradient flow over a flat plate, then modified to produce the proper boundary layer growth. Additional modifications, based on experimental data for three adverse pressure gradient flows, were also implemented. The adapted model, called MMLPG (modified mixing length model for pressure gradient flows), was then evaluated for a typical propulsion flow problem, flow through a transonic diffuser. Three cases were examined: flow with no shock, a weak shock and a strong shock. The results of these calculations indicate that the objectives of this study have been met. Overall, MMLPG is capable of accurately predicting the adverse pressure gradient flows examined in this study, giving generally better agreement with experimental data than the Baldwin-Lomax model.

  5. Comparison of experiments and simulations for zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers at moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Örlü, Ramis; Schlatter, Philipp

    2013-06-01

    A detailed comparison between recent direct numerical simulation (DNS) and experiments of a turbulent boundary layer under zero pressure gradient at Re θ = 2,500 and 4,000 (based on the free-stream velocity and momentum-loss thickness) is presented. The well-resolved DNS is computed in a long spatial domain (Schlatter and Örlü in J Fluid Mech 659:116, 2010a), including the disturbance strip, while the experiments consist of single hot-wire probe and oil-film interferometry measurements. Remarkably, good agreement is obtained for integral quantities such as skin friction and shape factor, as well as mean and fluctuating streamwise velocity profiles, higher-order moments and probability density distributions. The agreement also extends to spectral/structural quantities such as the amplitude modulation of the small scales by the large-scale motion and temporal spectral maps throughout the boundary layer. Differences within the inner layer observed for statistical and spectral quantities could entirely be removed by spatially averaging the DNS to match the viscous-scaled length of the hot-wire sensor, thereby explaining observed differences solely by insufficient spatial resolution of the hot-wire sensor. For the highest Reynolds number, Re θ = 4,000, the experimental data exhibit a more pronounced secondary spectral peak in the outer region ( y/ δ 99 = 0.1) related to structures with length on the order of 5-7 boundary layer thicknesses, which is weaker and slightly moved towards lower temporal periods in the DNS. The cause is thought to be related to the limited spanwise box size which constrains the growth of the very large structures. In the light of the difficulty to obtain "canonical" flow conditions, both in DNS and the wind tunnel where effects such as boundary treatment, pressure gradient and turbulence tripping need to be considered, the present cross-validation of the data sets, at least for the present Re θ -range, provides important reference data

  6. Design and development of second order MEMS sound pressure gradient sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albahri, Shehab

    The design and development of a second order MEMS sound pressure gradient sensor is presented in this dissertation. Inspired by the directional hearing ability of the parasitoid fly, Ormia ochracea, a novel first order directional microphone that mimics the mechanical structure of the fly's ears and detects the sound pressure gradient has been developed. While the first order directional microphones can be very beneficial in a large number of applications, there is great potential for remarkable improvements in performance through the use of second order systems. The second order directional microphone is able to provide a theoretical improvement in Sound to Noise ratio (SNR) of 9.5dB, compared to the first-order system that has its maximum SNR of 6dB. Although second order microphone is more sensitive to sound angle of incidence, the nature of the design and fabrication process imposes different factors that could lead to deterioration in its performance. The first Ormia ochracea second order directional microphone was designed in 2004 and fabricated in 2006 at Binghamton University. The results of the tested parts indicate that the Ormia ochracea second order directional microphone performs mostly as an Omni directional microphone. In this work, the previous design is reexamined and analyzed to explain the unexpected results. A more sophisticated tool implementing a finite element package ANSYS is used to examine the previous design response. This new tool is used to study different factors that used to be ignored in the previous design, mainly; response mismatch and fabrication uncertainty. A continuous model using Hamilton's principle is introduced to verify the results using the new method. Both models agree well, and propose a new way for optimizing the second order directional microphone using geometrical manipulation. In this work we also introduce a new fabrication process flow to increase the fabrication yield. The newly suggested method uses the shell

  7. Comparison of hepatic venous pressure gradient and endoscopic grading of esophageal varices

    PubMed Central

    Lee, EunJi; Kim, Yong Jae; Goo, Dong Erk; Yang, Seung Boo; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Jang, Jae Young; Jeong, Soung Won

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the correlation between the hepatic venous pressure gradient and the endoscopic grade of esophageal varices. METHODS: From September 2009 to March 2013, a total of 176 measurements of hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) were done in 146 patients. Each transjugular HVPG was measured twice, first using an end whole catheter (EH-HVPG), and then using a balloon catheter (B-HVPG). The HVPG was compared with the endoscopic grade of esophageal varices (according to the general rules for recording endoscopic findings of esophagogastric varices), which was recorded within a month of the measurement of HVPG. RESULTS: The study included 110 men and 36 women, with a mean age of 56.1 years (range, 43-76 years). The technical success rate of the pressure measurements was 100% and there were no complication related to the procedures. Mean HVPG was 15.3 mmHg as measured using the end hole catheter method and 16.5 mmHg as measured using the balloon catheter method. Mean HVPG (both EH-HVPG and B-HVPG) was not significantly different among patients with different characteristics, including sex and comorbid factors, except for cases with hepatocellular carcinoma (B-HVPG, P = 0.01; EH-HVPG, P = 0.02). Portal hypertension (> 12 mmHg HVPG) occurred in 66% of patients according to EH-HVPG and 83% of patients according to B-HVGP, and significantly correlated with Child’s status (B-HVPG, P < 0.000; EH-HVGP, P < 0.000) and esophageal varies observed upon endoscopy (EH-HVGP, P = 0.003; B-HVGP, P = 0.006). One hundred and thirty-five endoscopies were performed, of which 15 showed normal findings, 27 showed grade 1 endoscopic esophageal varices, 49 showed grade 2 varices, and 44 showed grade 3 varices. When comparing endoscopic esophageal variceal grades and HVPG using univariate analysis, the P value was 0.004 for EH-HVPG and 0.002 for B-HVPG. CONCLUSION: Both EH-HVPG and B-HVPG showed a positive correlation with the endoscopic grade of esophageal varices, with B

  8. An irrotation correction on pressure gradient and orthogonal-path integration for PIV-based pressure reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongyi; Gao, Qi; Wang, Chengyue; Wei, Runjie; Wang, Jinjun

    2016-06-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV)-based pressure reconstruction has become a popular technique in experimental fluid mechanics. Noise or errors in raw velocity field would significantly affect the quality of pressure reconstruction in PIV measurement. To reduce experimental errors in pressure gradient and improve the precision of reconstructed pressure field, a minimal 2-norm criteria-based new technique called irrotation correction (IC) with orthogonal decomposition is developed. The pressure reconstruction is therefore composed of three steps: calculation of pressure gradient from time-resolved velocity fields of PIV, an irrotation correction on the pressure gradient field, and finally a simple orthogonal-path integration (OPI) for pressure. Systematic assessments of IC algorithm are performed on synthetic solid-body rotation flow, direct numerical simulations of a channel flow and an isotropic turbulent flow. The results show that IC is a robust algorithm which can significantly improve the accuracy of pressure reconstruction primarily in the low wave number domain. After irrotation correction, noisy pressure gradient field ideally becomes an irrotational field on which the pressure integration is independent of integrating paths. Therefore, an OPI algorithm is proposed to perform the pressure integration in an efficient way with very few integration paths. This makes the new technique to be a doable method on three-dimensional pressure reconstruction with acceptable computational cost.

  9. Survey and bibliography on attainment of laminar flow control in air using pressure gradient and suction, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Tuttle, M. H.

    1979-01-01

    A survey was conducted and a bibliography compiled on attainment of laminar flow in air through the use of favorable pressure gradient and suction. This report contains the survey, summaries of data for both ground and flight experiments, and abstracts of referenced reports. Much early information is also included which may be of some immediate use as background material for LFC applications.

  10. The influence of the radial pressure gradient on the blade root loss in an annular subsonic nozzle cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, D.; Weng, Z.; Xiang, Y.

    1985-09-01

    This paper presents a method for predicting the blade root loss in an annular nozzle cascade in which consideration is given to the influence of the radial pressure gradient (RPG) on it. The variation of blade root losses under different RPG is obtained experimentally, and finite element method is used to calculate the pressure distribution in the blade passage.

  11. Studies on soliton energy at critical and noncritical densities of negative ions in an inhomogeneous magnetized warm plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Dhananjay K.; Malik, Hitendra K.

    2007-11-15

    Considering an inhomogeneous plasma having finite-temperature negative and positive ions, and the isothermal electrons in the presence of an external magnetic field, the solitons at noncritical and critical densities of the negative ions are studied through Korteweg-deVries (KdV) and modified Korteweg-deVries (mKdV) equations, respectively. The compressive (rarefactive) KdV solitons are found to propagate when the negative ion concentration is less (greater) than the critical density of the negative ions. At the critical density, both the compressive and the rarefactive solitons of equal amplitudes are found to occur. The energies of the compressive KdV soliton and the mKdV solitons are found to increase and that of the rarefactive KdV soliton is found to decrease with the negative ion density. Soliton energy for both the KdV and the mKdV solitons gets lowered under the effect of stronger magnetic field. The effect of ion temperature is to increase the energy of the compressive KdV soliton, whereas the energy of the rarefactive KdV soliton as well as of the mKdV solitons gets decreased. The variation of the energy with the obliqueness of the magnetic field is different for the KdV and the mKdV solitons.

  12. Functional assessment of the stenotic carotid artery by CFD-based pressure gradient evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Heye; Ren, Lijie; Xiong, Huahua; Gao, Zhifan; Xu, Pengcheng; Huang, Wenhua; Wu, Wanqing

    2016-09-01

    The functional assessment of a hemodynamic significant stenosis base on blood pressure variation has been applied for evaluation of the myocardial ischemic event. This functional assessment shows great potential for improving the accuracy of the classification of the severity of carotid stenosis. To explore the value of grading the stenosis using a pressure gradient (PG)-we had reconstructed patient-specific carotid geometries based on MRI images-computational fluid dynamics were performed to analyze the PG in their stenotic arteries. Doppler ultrasound image data and the corresponding MRI image data of 19 patients with carotid stenosis were collected. Based on these, 31 stenotic carotid arterial geometries were reconstructed. A combinatorial boundary condition method was implemented for steady-state computer fluid dynamics simulations. Anatomic parameters, including tortuosity (T), the angle of bifurcation, and the cross-sectional area of the remaining lumen, were collected to investigate the effect on the pressure distribution. The PG is highly correlated with the severe stenosis (r = 0.902), whereas generally, the T and the angle of the bifurcation negatively correlate to the pressure drop of the internal carotid artery stenosis. The calculation required <10 min/case, which made it prepared for the fast diagnosis of the severe stenosis. According to the results, we had proposed a potential threshold value for distinguishing severe stenosis from mild-moderate stenosis (PG = 0.88). In conclusion, the PG could serve as the additional factor for improving the accuracy of grading the severity of the stenosis. PMID:27371686

  13. Large eddy simulation of zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer based on different scaling laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wan; Samtaney, Ravi

    2013-11-01

    We present results of large eddy simulation (LES) for a smooth-wall, zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer. We employ the stretched vortex sub-grid-scale model in the simulations augmented by a wall model. Our wall model is based on the virtual-wall model introduced by Chung & Pullin (J. Fluid Mech 2009). An essential component of their wall model is an ODE governing the local wall-normal velocity gradient obtained using inner-scaling ansatz. We test two variants of the wall model based on different similarity laws: one is based on a log-law and the other on a power-law. The specific form of the power law scaling utilized is that proposed by George & Castillo (Appl. Mech. Rev. 1997), dubbed the ``GC Law''. Turbulent inflow conditions are generated by a recycling method, and applying scaling laws corresponding to the two variants of the wall model, and a uniform way to determine the inlet friction velocity. For Reynolds number based on momentum thickness, Reθ , ranging from 104 to 1012 it is found that the velocity profiles generally follow the log law form rather than the power law. For large Reynolds number asymptotic behavior, LES based on different scaling laws the boundary layer thickness and turbulent intensities do not show much difference. Supported by a KAUST funded project on large eddy simulation of turbulent flows. The IBM Blue Gene P Shaheen at KAUST was utilized for the simulations.

  14. Estimation of diastolic intraventricular pressure gradients by Doppler M-mode echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, N. L.; Vandervoort, P. M.; Firstenberg, M. S.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that small intraventricular pressure gradients (IVPG) are important for efficient filling of the left ventricle (LV) and as a sensitive marker for ischemia. Unfortunately, there has previously been no way of measuring these noninvasively, severely limiting their research and clinical utility. Color Doppler M-mode (CMM) echocardiography provides a spatiotemporal velocity distribution along the inflow tract throughout diastole, which we hypothesized would allow direct estimation of IVPG by using the Euler equation. Digital CMM images, obtained simultaneously with intracardiac pressure waveforms in six dogs, were processed by numerical differentiation for the Euler equation, then integrated to estimate IVPG and the total (left atrial to left ventricular apex) pressure drop. CMM-derived estimates agreed well with invasive measurements (IVPG: y = 0.87x + 0.22, r = 0.96, P < 0.001, standard error of the estimate = 0.35 mmHg). Quantitative processing of CMM data allows accurate estimation of IVPG and tracking of changes induced by beta-adrenergic stimulation. This novel approach provides unique information on LV filling dynamics in an entirely noninvasive way that has previously not been available for assessment of diastolic filling and function.

  15. Doppler echo evaluation of pulmonary venous-left atrial pressure gradients: human and numerical model studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Greenberg, N. L.; Smedira, N. G.; Prior, D. L.; Scalia, G. M.; Thomas, J. D.; Garcia, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    The simplified Bernoulli equation relates fluid convective energy derived from flow velocities to a pressure gradient and is commonly used in clinical echocardiography to determine pressure differences across stenotic orifices. Its application to pulmonary venous flow has not been described in humans. Twelve patients undergoing cardiac surgery had simultaneous high-fidelity pulmonary venous and left atrial pressure measurements and pulmonary venous pulsed Doppler echocardiography performed. Convective gradients for the systolic (S), diastolic (D), and atrial reversal (AR) phases of pulmonary venous flow were determined using the simplified Bernoulli equation and correlated with measured actual pressure differences. A linear relationship was observed between the convective (y) and actual (x) pressure differences for the S (y = 0.23x + 0.0074, r = 0.82) and D (y = 0.22x + 0.092, r = 0.81) waves, but not for the AR wave (y = 0. 030x + 0.13, r = 0.10). Numerical modeling resulted in similar slopes for the S (y = 0.200x - 0.127, r = 0.97), D (y = 0.247x - 0. 354, r = 0.99), and AR (y = 0.087x - 0.083, r = 0.96) waves. Consistent with numerical modeling, the convective term strongly correlates with but significantly underestimates actual gradient because of large inertial forces.

  16. A new turbulence closure model for boundary layer flows with strong adverse pressure gradients and separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. A.; King, L. S.

    1984-01-01

    A new turbulence closure model designed specifically to treat two-dimensional, turbulent boundary layers with strong adverse pressure gradients and attendant separation, is presented. The influence of history effects are modeled by using an ordinary differential equation (ODE) derived from the turbulence kinetic-energy equation, to describe the streamwise development of the maximum Reynolds shear stress in conjunction with an assumed eddy-viscosity distribution which has as its velocity scale the maximum Reynolds shear stress. In the outer part of the boundary layer, the eddy viscosity is treated as a free parameter which is adjusted in order to satisfy the ODE for the maximum shear stress. Because of this, the model s not simply an eddy-viscosity model, but contains features of a Reynolds-stress model. Comparisons with experiments are presented which clearly show the proposed model to be superior to the Cebeci-Smith model in treating strongly retarded and separated flows. In contrast to two-equation, eddy-viscosity models, it requires only slightly more computational effort than simple models like the Cebeci-Smith model.

  17. Numerical simulation of adverse-pressure-gradient boundary layer with or without roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottaghian, Pouya; Yuan, Junlin; Piomelli, Ugo

    2014-11-01

    Large-eddy and direct numerical simulations are carried out on flat-plate boundary layer over smooth and rough surfaces, with adverse pressure gradient.The deceleration is achieved by imposing a wall-normal freestream velocity profile, and is strong enough to cause separation at the wall. The Reynolds number based on momentum thickness and freestream velocity at inlet is 600. Numerical sandgrain roughness is applied based on an immersed boundary method, yielding a flow that is transitionally rough. The turbulence intensity increases before separation, and reaches a higher value for the rough case, indicating stronger mixing. Roughness also causes higher momentum deficit near the wall, leading to earlier separation. This is consistent with previous observation made on rough-wall flow separation over a ramp. In both cases, the turbulent kinetic energy peaks inside the shear layer above the detachment region, with higher values in the rough case; it then decreases approaching the reattachment region. Near the wall inside the separation bubble, the near-zero turbulent intensity indicates that the turbulent structures are lifted up in the separation region. Compared with the smooth case, the shear layer is farther from the wall and the reattachment length is longer on the rough wall.

  18. Pressure gradients in oscillating flows in regenerators-analysis and application to pulse-tube refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayzus, P.; Fang, L.; Deng, X.; Bauwens, L.

    2002-05-01

    Significant pressure drops are typical in the regenerator, and their impact on performance can be significant. It is clear that irreversibilities associated with viscous friction lower efficiency. But in the pulse-tube, this is perhaps not the most crucial issue. Indeed, by virtue of having only one driven element (the compressor), the pulse-tube is a fairly inflexible device from a design standpoint. Pressure and velocity amplitude and phase determine energy fluxes. Impedances depend upon volume distribution, orifice resistances, and viscous friction in the regenerator. While the combined effect of volume distribution and orifice impedance is relatively easy to analyze, the role of the resistance in the regenerator is harder to deal with. An analysis is presented of the regenerator as an arbitrary porous medium, assuming large pressure gradients. Results are readily incorporated within a small amplitude, harmonic, model of the overall device, including the bypass, if any. For simple assumptions with respect to the temperature profile, such as linear and exponential temperature profiles, closed form solutions are obtained. Results from the model are compared with experiments and their relevance is discussed.

  19. Estimation of diastolic intraventricular pressure gradients by Doppler M-mode echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, N L; Vandervoort, P M; Firstenberg, M S; Garcia, M J; Thomas, J D

    2001-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that small intraventricular pressure gradients (IVPG) are important for efficient filling of the left ventricle (LV) and as a sensitive marker for ischemia. Unfortunately, there has previously been no way of measuring these noninvasively, severely limiting their research and clinical utility. Color Doppler M-mode (CMM) echocardiography provides a spatiotemporal velocity distribution along the inflow tract throughout diastole, which we hypothesized would allow direct estimation of IVPG by using the Euler equation. Digital CMM images, obtained simultaneously with intracardiac pressure waveforms in six dogs, were processed by numerical differentiation for the Euler equation, then integrated to estimate IVPG and the total (left atrial to left ventricular apex) pressure drop. CMM-derived estimates agreed well with invasive measurements (IVPG: y = 0.87x + 0.22, r = 0.96, P < 0.001, standard error of the estimate = 0.35 mmHg). Quantitative processing of CMM data allows accurate estimation of IVPG and tracking of changes induced by beta-adrenergic stimulation. This novel approach provides unique information on LV filling dynamics in an entirely noninvasive way that has previously not been available for assessment of diastolic filling and function. PMID:11356605

  20. Characteristic length scale of the intermediate structure in zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer flow

    PubMed Central

    Barenblatt, G. I.; Chorin, A. J.; Prostokishin, V. M.

    2000-01-01

    In a turbulent boundary layer over a smooth flat plate with zero pressure gradient, the intermediate structure between the viscous sublayer and the free stream consists of two layers: one adjacent to the viscous sublayer and one adjacent to the free stream. When the level of turbulence in the free stream is low, the boundary between the two layers is sharp, and both have a self-similar structure described by Reynolds-number-dependent scaling (power) laws. This structure introduces two length scales: one—the wall-region thickness—determined by the sharp boundary between the two intermediate layers and the second determined by the condition that the velocity distribution in the first intermediate layer be the one common to all wall-bounded flows and in particular coincide with the scaling law previously determined for pipe flows. Using recent experimental data, we determine both these length scales and show that they are close. Our results disagree with the classical model of the “wake region.” PMID:10760253

  1. Acoustic scattering by circular cylinders of various aspect ratios. [pressure gradient microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maciulaitis, A.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of acoustic scattering on the useful frequency range of pressure gradient microphones were investigated experimentally between ka values of 0.407 and 4.232 using two circular cylindrical models (L/D = 0.5 and 0.25) having a 25 cm outside diameter. Small condenser microphones, attached to preamplifiers by flexible connectors, were installed from inside the cylindrical bodies, and flush mounted on the exterior surface of the cylinders. A 38 cm diameter woofer in a large speaker enclosure was used as the sound source. Surface pressure augmentation and phase differences were computed from measured data for various sound wave incidence angles. Results are graphically compared with theoretical predictions supplied by NASA for ka = 0.407, 2.288, and 4.232. All other results are tabulated in the appendices. With minor exceptions, the experimentally determined pressure augmentations agreed within 0.75 dB with theoretical predictions. The agreement for relative phase angles was within 5 percent without any exceptions. Scattering parameter variations with ka and L/D ratio, as computed from experimental data, are also presented.

  2. Staging of liver fibrosis or cirrhosis: The role of hepatic venous pressure gradient measurement

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Ki Tae; Kim, Dong Joon

    2015-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a common histological change of chronic liver injury and it is closely related with portal hypertension which is hemodynamic complication of chronic liver disease. Currently, liver fibrosis has been known as a reversible dynamic process in previous literatures. Although liver biopsy is a gold standard for assessing the stage of liver fibrosis, it may not completely represent the stage of liver fibrosis because of sampling error or semi-quantative measurement. Recent evidences suggested that histologic, clinical, hemodynamic, and biologic features are closely associated in patients with chronic liver disease. Hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) measurement has been known as a modality to evaluate the portal pressure. The HVPG measurement has been used clinically for fibrosis diagnosis, risk stratification, preoperative screening for liver resection, monitoring the efficacy of medical treatments, and assessing the prognosis of liver fibrosis. Therefore, the HVPG measurement can be used to monitor areas the chronic liver disease but also other important areas of chronic liver disease. PMID:25848485

  3. MEMS Biomimetic Acoustic Pressure Gradient Sensitive Structure for Sound Source Localization

    PubMed Central

    An, Peng; Yuan, Weizheng; Ren, Sen

    2009-01-01

    The parasitoid fly Ormia ochracea shows an astonishing localization ability with its tiny hearing organ. A novel MEMS biomimetic acoustic pressure gradient sensitive structure was designed and fabricated by mimicking the mechanically coupled tympana of the fly. Firstly, the analytic representation formulas of the resultant force and resultant moment of the incoming plane wave acting on the structure were derived. After that, structure modal analysis was performed and the results show that the structure has out-of-phase and in-phase vibration modes, and the corresponding eigenfrequency is decided by the stiffness of vertical torsional beam and horizontal beam respectively. Acoustic-structural coupled analysis was performed and the results show that phase difference and amplitude difference between the responses of the two square diaphragms of the sensitive structure are effectively enlarged through mechanical coupling beam. The phase difference and amplitude difference increase with increasing incident angle and can be used to distinguish the direction of sound arrival. At last, the fabrication process and results of the device is also presented. PMID:22346718

  4. Non-invasive determination of transcatheter pressure gradient in stenotic aortic valves: an analytical model.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Motamed, Pouyan K; Maftoon, Nima

    2015-03-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS), in which the opening of the aortic valve is narrowed, is the most common valvular heart disease. Cardiac catheterization is considered the reference standard for definitive evaluation of AS severity, based on instantaneous systolic value of transvalvular pressure gradient (TPG). However, using invasive cardiac catheterization might carry high risks knowing that undergoing multiple cardiac catheterizations for follow-up in patients with AS is common. The objective of this study was to suggest an analytical description of the AS that estimates TPG without a need for high risk invasive data collection. For this purpose, Navier-Stokes equation coupled with the elastic-deformation equation was solved analytically. The estimated TPG resulted from the suggested analytical description was validated against published in vivo and in vitro measurement data. Very good concordances were found between TPG obtained from the analytical formulation and in vivo (maximum root mean square error: 3.8 mmHg) and in vitro (maximum root mean square error: 9.4 mmHg). The analytical description can be integrated to non-invasive imaging modalities to estimate AS severity as an alternative to cardiac catheterization to help preventing its risks in patients with AS. PMID:25682932

  5. Solitons on Tori and Soliton Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speight, J. M.

    2014-11-01

    Necessary conditions for a soliton on a torus to be a soliton crystal, that is, a spatially periodic array of topological solitons in stable equilibrium, are derived. The stress tensor of the soliton must be L 2 orthogonal to , the space of parallel symmetric bilinear forms on TM, and, further, a certain symmetric bilinear form on , called the hessian, must be positive. It is shown that, for baby Skyrme models, the first condition actually implies the second. It is also shown that, for any choice of period lattice Λ, there is a baby Skyrme model which supports a soliton crystal of periodicity Λ. For the three-dimensional Skyrme model, it is shown that any soliton solution on a cubic lattice which satisfies a virial constraint and is equivariant with respect to (a subgroup of) the lattice symmetries automatically satisfies both tests. This verifies, in particular, that the celebrated Skyrme crystal of Castillejo et al., and Kugler and Shtrikman, passes both tests.

  6. The effects of adverse pressure gradients on momentum and thermal structures in transitional boundary layers. Part 2: Fluctuation quantities

    SciTech Connect

    Mislevy, S.P.; Wang, T.

    1996-10-01

    The effects of adverse pressure gradients on the thermal and momentum characteristics of a heated transitional boundary layer were investigated with free-stream turbulence ranging from 0.3 to 0.6 percent. Boundary layer measurements were conducted for two constant-K cases, K1 = {minus}0.51 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} and K2 = {minus}1.05 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. The fluctuation quantities, u{prime}, v{prime}, t{prime}, the Reynolds shear stress ({ovr uv}), and the Reynolds heat fluxes ({ovr vt} and {ovr ut}) were measured. In general, u{prime}/U{sub {infinity}}, v{prime}/U{sub {infinity}}, and {ovr vt} have higher values across the boundary layer for the adverse pressure-gradient cases than they do for the baseline case (K = 0). The development of v{prime} for the adverse pressure gradients was more actively involved than that of the baseline. In the early transition region, the Reynolds shear stress distribution for the K2 case showed a near-wall shear developed at Y{sup +} = 70. For the baseline case, however, the maximum turbulent shear in the transition region was generated at Y{sup +} = 70, and no near-wall high-shear region was seen. Stronger adverse pressure gradients appear to produce more uniform and higher t{prime} in the near-wall region (Y{sup +} < 20) in both transitional and turbulent boundary layers. The instantaneous velocity signals did not show any clear turbulent/nonturbulent demarcations in the transition region. Increasingly stronger adverse pressure gradients seemed to produce large nonturbulent unsteadiness (or instability waves) at a similar magnitude as the turbulent spots could not be identified visually or through conventional conditional-sampling schemes. In addition, the streamwise evolution of eddy viscosity, turbulent thermal diffusivity, and Pr{sub t} are also presented.

  7. Turbulence measurements in a compressible boundary layer subjected to a shock-wave-induced adverse pressure gradient.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, W. C.

    1973-01-01

    The rms intensities of fluctuating mass flux and total temperature and their correlation coefficients are given for the case of an adiabatic, Mach 4, axisymmetric shock-wave boundary-layer interaction. Data were obtained upstream, within, and downstream of the interaction by the use of constant temperature hot-wire anemometer. Turbulence spectra and quantitative behavior from oscilloscope traces are shown at selected locations. The measurements indicate that certain frequencies of the turbulence are increased as a result of the interaction and that the mass flux and total temperature fluctuations remain highly correlated over most of the boundary layer throughout the interaction. The present data are also transformed to rms intensities of fluctuating static temperature and velocity and compared with existing data obtained in adiabatic flows.

  8. Large amplitude ion-acoustic solitons in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, R. S.; Jain, S. L.; Mishra, M. K.

    2011-08-15

    Characteristics of ion-acoustic soliton in dusty plasma, including the dynamics of heavily charged massive dust grains, are investigated following the Sagdeev Potential formalism. Retaining fourth order nonlinearities of electric potential in the expansion of the Sagdeev Potential in the energy equation for a pseudo particle and integrating the resulting energy equation, large amplitude soliton solution is determined. Variation of amplitude (A), half width (W) at half maxima and the product P = AW{sup 2} of the Korteweg-deVries (KdV), dressed and large amplitude soliton as a function of wide range of dust concentration are numerically studied for recently observed parameters of dusty plasmas. We have also presented the region of existence of large amplitude ion-acoustic soliton in the dusty plasma by analyzing the structure of the pseudo potential. It is found that in the presence of positively charged dust grains, system supports only compressive solitons, on the other hand, in the presence of negatively charged dust grains, the system supports compressive solitons up to certain critical concentration of dust grains and above this critical concentration, the system can support rarefactive solitons also. The effects of dust concentration, charge, and mass of the dust grains, on the characteristics of KdV, dressed and large amplitude the soliton, i.e., amplitude (A), half width at half maxima (W), and product of amplitude (A) and half width at half maxima (P = AW{sup 2}), are discussed in detail.

  9. Ponderable soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The theory of Lee and Pang (1987), who obtained solutions for soliton stars composed of zero-temperature fermions and bosons, is applied here to quark soliton stars. Model soliton stars based on a simple physical model of the proton are computed, and the properties of the solitons are discussed, including the important problem of the existence of a limiting mass and thus the possible formation of black holes of primordial origin. It is shown that there is a definite mass limit for ponderable soliton stars, so that during cooling a soliton star might reach a stage beyond which no equilibrium configuration exists and the soliton star probably will collapse to become a black hole. The radiation of ponderable soliton stars may alter the short-wavelength character of the cosmic background radiation, and may be observed as highly redshifted objects at z of about 100,000.

  10. Topological Solitons in Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsa, Zohreh

    1979-01-01

    A broad definition of solitons and a discussion of their role in physics is given. Vortices and magnetic monopoles which are examples of topological solitons in two and three spatial dimensions are described in some detail. (BB)

  11. Anderson Localization of Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacha, Krzysztof; Müller, Cord A.; Delande, Dominique; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2009-11-01

    At low temperature, a quasi-one-dimensional ensemble of atoms with an attractive interaction forms a bright soliton. When exposed to a weak and smooth external potential, the shape of the soliton is hardly modified, but its center-of-mass motion is affected. We show that in a spatially correlated disordered potential, the quantum motion of a bright soliton displays Anderson localization. The localization length can be much larger than the soliton size and could be observed experimentally.

  12. Anderson Localization of Solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Sacha, Krzysztof; Zakrzewski, Jakub; Mueller, Cord A.; Delande, Dominique

    2009-11-20

    At low temperature, a quasi-one-dimensional ensemble of atoms with an attractive interaction forms a bright soliton. When exposed to a weak and smooth external potential, the shape of the soliton is hardly modified, but its center-of-mass motion is affected. We show that in a spatially correlated disordered potential, the quantum motion of a bright soliton displays Anderson localization. The localization length can be much larger than the soliton size and could be observed experimentally.

  13. Restoration of Liver Function and Portosystemic Pressure Gradient after TIPSS and Late TIPSS Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Maedler, U.; Hansmann, J.; Duex, M.; Noeldge, G.; Sauer, P.; Richter, G.M.

    2002-03-15

    TIPSS (transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt) may be indicated to control bleeding from esophageal and gastric varicose veins, to reduce ascites, and to treat patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome and veno-occlusive disease. Numerous measures to improve the safety and methodology of the procedure have helped to increase the technical and clinical success. Follow-up of TIPSS patients has revealed shunt stenosis to occur more often in patients with preserved liver function (Child A, Child B). In addition, the extent of liver cirrhosis is the main factor that determines prognosis in the long term. Little is known about the effects of TIPSS with respect to portosystemic hemodynamics. This report deals with a cirrhotic patient who stopped drinking 7 months prior to admission. He received TIPSS to control ascites and recurrent esophageal bleeding. Two years later remarkable hypertrophy of the left liver lobe and shunt occlusion was observed. The portosystemic pressure gradient dropped from 24 mmHg before TIPSS to 11 mmHg and remained stable after shunt occlusion. The Child's B cirrhosis prior to TIPSS turned into Child's A cirrhosis and remained stable during the follow-up period of 32 months. This indicates that liver function of TIPSS patients may recover due to hypertrophy of the remaining non-cirrhotic liver tissue. In addition the hepatic hemodynamics may return to normal. In conclusion, TIPSS cannot cure cirrhosis but its progress may be halted if the cause can be removed. This may result in a normal portosystemic gradient, leading consequently to shunt occlusion.

  14. Chronic Liver Disease: Noninvasive Subharmonic Aided Pressure Estimation of Hepatic Venous Pressure Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Eisenbrey, John R.; Dave, Jaydev K.; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G.; Merton, Daniel A.; Miller, Cynthia; Gonzalez, José M.; Machado, Priscilla; Park, Suhyun; Dianis, Scott; Chalek, Carl L.; Kim, Christopher E.; Baliff, Jeffrey P.; Thomenius, Kai E.; Brown, Daniel B.; Navarro, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare subharmonic aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) with pressure catheter–based measurements in human patients with chronic liver disease undergoing transjugular liver biopsy. Materials and Methods: This HIPAA-compliant study had U.S. Food and Drug Administration and institutional review board approval, and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Forty-five patients completed this study between December 2010 and December 2011. A clinical ultrasonography (US) scanner was modified to obtain SHAPE data. After transjugular liver biopsy with pressure measurements as part of the standard of care, 45 patients received an infusion of a microbubble US contrast agent and saline. During infusion, SHAPE data were collected from a portal and hepatic vein and were compared with invasive measurements. Correlations between data sets were determined by using the Pearson correlation coefficient, and statistical significance between groups was determined by using the Student t test. Results:- The 45 study patients included 27 men and 18 women (age range, 19–71 years; average age, 55.8 years). The SHAPE gradient between the portal and hepatic veins was in good overall agreement with the hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) (R = 0.82). Patients at increased risk for variceal hemorrhage (HVPG ≥ 12 mm Hg) had a significantly higher mean subharmonic gradient than patients with lower HVPGs (1.93 dB ± 0.61 [standard deviation] vs −1.47 dB ± 0.29, P < .001), with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 81%, indicating that SHAPE may be a useful tool for the diagnosis of clinically important portal hypertension. Conclusion: Preliminary results show SHAPE to be an accurate noninvasive technique for estimating portal hypertension. © RSNA, 2013 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.13121769/-/DC1 PMID:23525208

  15. Improvement in diastolic intraventricular pressure gradients in patients with HOCM after ethanol septal reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rovner, Aleksandr; Smith, Rebecca; Greenberg, Neil L.; Tuzcu, E. Murat; Smedira, Nicholas; Lever, Harry M.; Thomas, James D.; Garcia, Mario J.

    2003-01-01

    We sought to validate measurement of intraventricular pressure gradients (IVPG) and analyze their change in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) after ethanol septal reduction (ESR). Quantitative analysis of color M-mode Doppler (CMM) images may be used to estimate diastolic IVPG noninvasively. Noninvasive IVPG measurement was validated in 10 patients undergoing surgical myectomy. Echocardiograms were then analyzed in 19 patients at baseline and after ESR. Pulsed Doppler data through the mitral valve and pulmonary venous flow were obtained. CMM was used to obtain the flow propagation velocity (Vp) and to calculate IVPG off-line. Left atrial pressure was estimated with the use of previously validated Doppler equations. Data were compared before and after ESR. CMM-derived IVPG correlated well with invasive measurements obtained before and after surgical myectomy [r = 0.8, P < 0.01, Delta(CMM - invasive IVPG) = 0.09 +/- 0.45 mmHg]. ESR resulted in a decrease of resting LVOT systolic gradient from 62 +/- 10 to 29 +/- 5 mmHg (P < 0.001). There was a significant increase in the Vp and IVPG (from 48 +/- 5to 74 +/- 7 cm/s and from 1.5 +/- 0.2 to 2.6 +/- 0.3 mmHg, respectively, P < 0.001 for both). Estimated left atrial pressure decreased from 16.2 +/- 1.1 to 11.5 +/- 0.9 mmHg (P < 0.001). The increase in IVPG correlated with the reduction in the LVOT gradient (r = 0.6, P < 0.01). Reduction of LVOT obstruction after ESR is associated with an improvement in diastolic suction force. Noninvasive measurements of IVPG may be used as an indicator of diastolic function improvement in HOCM.

  16. Transpulmonary pressure gradient verifies pulmonary hypertension is initiated by increased arterial resistance in broilers.

    PubMed

    Lorenzoni, A G; Anthony, N B; Wideman, R F

    2008-01-01

    Previous hemodynamic evaluations demonstrated that pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) is higher in broilers that are susceptible to pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS, ascites) than in broilers that are resistant to PHS. We compared key pulmonary hemodynamic parameters in broilers from PHS-susceptible and PHS-resistant lines (selected for 12 generations under hypobaric hypoxia) and in broilers from a relaxed (control) line. In experiment 1 the PAP was measured in male broilers in which a flow probe positioned on one pulmonary artery permitted the determination of cardiac output and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). The PAP and relative PVR were higher in susceptible broilers than in relaxed and resistant broilers, whereas absolute and relative cardiac output did not differ between lines. In experiment 2 male and female broilers from the 3 lines were catheterized to measure pressures in the wing vein, right atrium, right ventricle, pulmonary artery, and pulmonary veins (WP, wedge pressure). The transpulmonary pressure gradient (TPG) was calculated as (PAP-WP), with PAP quantifying precapillary pressure and WP approximating postcapillary pulmonary venous pressure. When compared with resistant and relaxed broilers, PAP values in susceptible broilers were > or =10 mmHg higher, TPG values were > or =8 mmHg higher, and WP values were < or =2 mmHg higher, regardless of sex. The combined hemodynamic criteria (elevated PAP and PVR combined with a proportionally elevated TPG) demonstrate that susceptibility to PHS can be attributed primarily to pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with increased precapillary (arteriole) resistance rather than to pulmonary venous hypertension caused by elevated postcapillary (venous and left atrial) resistance. PMID:18079461

  17. Solitons in nonlinear optics

    SciTech Connect

    Maimistov, Andrei I

    2010-11-13

    The classic examples of optical phenomena resulting in the appearance of solitons are self-focusing, self-induced transparency, and parametric three-wave interaction. To date, the list of the fields of nonlinear optics and models where solitons play an important role has significantly expanded. Now long-lived or stable solitary waves are called solitons, including, for example, dissipative, gap, parametric, and topological solitons. This review considers nonlinear optics models giving rise to the appearance of solitons in a narrow sense: solitary waves corresponding to the solutions of completely integrable systems of equations basic for the models being discussed. (review)

  18. Perpendicular propagation of electromagnetic solitons in magnetized thermal pair plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verheest, Frank

    2016-02-01

    The properties of perpendicularly propagating large amplitude electromagnetic solitons are investigated in a thermal, magnetized pair plasma. To obtain a tractable description, these solitons are assumed to be charge neutral and have a linearly polarized magnetic field, and thus represent the nonlinear extension of part of the linear extraordinary mode. From a Sagdeev pseudopotential analysis it transpires that these solitons are compressive and characterized by a wave magnetic field parallel to the static field. The existence domain in compositional parameter space shows pressure-dependent maxima for the soliton velocities, densities and total magnetic field. Physically, an increase in pressure yields a decrease in the acceptable maxima. This is also illustrated on typical pseudopotential and soliton profiles.

  19. Experimental results for the transpired turbulent boundary layer in an adverse pressure gradient. [tubular and graphical data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, P. S.; Kays, W. M.; Moffat, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The fluid mechanics of transpired incompressible turbulent boundary layers under zero and adverse pressure gradient conditions is investigated using an open-ended wind tunnel with a porous floor in the test section and a secondary air system for supply and metering of the transpiration air. All velocity profiles and turbulence profiles are obtained by linearized constant-temperature hot-wire anemometry. The wall shear stress is determined by measuring the shear stress away from the wall and extrapolating to the wall by integrating the boundary layer equations for the shear-stress profile. Equilibrium boundary layers are obtained when the transpiration velocity is varied such that the blowing parameter and the Clauser pressure gradient parameter are held constant. The experimental results obtained are presented in tabular and graphical forms.

  20. An experimental investigation of a low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer subject to an adverse pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watmuff, J. H.

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of a low Re(sub theta) turbulent boundary layer in an adverse pressure gradient (APG) is being studied for comparison with direct numerical simulations by Spalart. A short region of favorable pressure gradient (FPG) is applied first to establish a self preserving layer with Re(sub theta) equals approx. 600, which is a suitable initial condition for simulations. The APG is then applied rapidly such that beta equals approx. 2 at Re(sub theta) equals approx. 1500. The streamwise extent of the measurements exceeds the current capabilities of direct simulation so that the results should also serve as a useful data base for Reynolds averaged boundary layer prediction methods and in the future for direct simulation schemes as computer technology evolves.

  1. Impact of edge current density and pressure gradient on the stability of DIII-D high performance discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Lao, L.L.; Ferron, J.R.; Strait, E.J.

    1997-06-01

    One of the major goals of advanced tokamak research is to develop plasma configurations with good confinement and improved stability at high {beta}. In DIII-D, various high performance configurations with H- and VH-mode edges have been produced. These include discharges with poloidal cross sections in the forms of dee and crecent shapes, single- and double-null divertors, and with various central magnetic shear profiles and current profile peakedness. All these discharges exhibit confinement in the outer plasma region which leads to a large edge pressure gradient and a large edge bootstrap current driven by this steep pressure gradient. These edge conditions often drive an instability near the edge region which can severely degrade the discharge performance. An understanding of this edge instability is essential to sustain an enhance discharge performance.

  2. Electrorheological effect and directional non-Newtonian behavior in a nematic capillary subjected to a pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Carlos I.; Corella-Madueño, A.; Reyes, J. Adrián

    2008-01-01

    We consider a capillary consisting of two coaxial cylinders whose core is filled with a nematic liquid crystal (LC) subjected to the simultaneous action of both a pressure gradient applied parallel to the axis of the cylinders and a radial low frequency electric field. We find the configuration of the director of the nematic, initially with an escaped-like configuration, for the flow aligning LC 4'-n -pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) by assuming hard anchoring hybrid boundary conditions. Also, we obtain the velocity profile parametrized by the electric field and the pressure gradient for nonslip boundary conditions. Finally, we calculate exactly the effective viscosity, the first normal stress difference, and the dragging forces on the cylinders. The results show an important electrorheological effect and a directional non-Newtonian response with regions of flow thinning and thickening.

  3. Observation of pressure gradient and related flow rate effect on the plasma parameters in plasma processing reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Kim, Aram; Chung, Chin-Wook; Moon, Se Youn

    2011-02-15

    In industrial plasma processes, flow rate has been known to a key to control plasma processing results and has been discussed with reactive radical density, gas residence time, and surface reaction. In this study, it was observed that the increase in the flow rate can also change plasma parameters (electron temperature and plasma density) and electron energy distribution function in plasma processing reactor. Based on the measurement of gas pressure between the discharge region and the pumping port region, the considerable differences in the gas pressure between the two regions were found with increasing flow rate. It was also observed that even in the discharge region, the pressure gradient occurs at the high gas flow rate. This result shows that increasing the flow rate results in the pressure gradient and causes the changes in the plasma parameters.

  4. An experimental investigation of a low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer subject to an adverse pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watmuff, J. H.

    1990-02-01

    The evolution of a low Re(sub theta) turbulent boundary layer in an adverse pressure gradient (APG) is being studied for comparison with direct numerical simulations by Spalart. A short region of favorable pressure gradient (FPG) is applied first to establish a self preserving layer with Re(sub theta) equals approx. 600, which is a suitable initial condition for simulations. The APG is then applied rapidly such that beta equals approx. 2 at Re(sub theta) equals approx. 1500. The streamwise extent of the measurements exceeds the current capabilities of direct simulation so that the results should also serve as a useful data base for Reynolds averaged boundary layer prediction methods and in the future for direct simulation schemes as computer technology evolves.

  5. Pressure Gradient Error of Spectral Element Dynamical Core associated with Topographic Forcing: Comparison with the Spherical Harmonics Dynamical Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun-Gyu; Cheong, Hyeong-Bin; Jeong, Han-Byeol; Kim, Won-Ho

    2015-04-01

    Response characteristics of the spectral element hydrostatic dynamical core on the cubed sphere to the global topographic forcing are investigated in terms of pressure gradient error, and it is compared with the spherical harmonics hydrostatic dynamical core. The vertical hybrid-pressure coordinate and finite difference method are introduced to both dynamical cores, and explicit and implicit hyper-diffusion schemes are applied to spectral element dynamical core and spherical harmonics dynamical core, respectively. The model atmosphere at initial time is set to the quiescent environment so that the term affecting on the time tendency of the momentum equation at the first time step is the pressure gradient term only which is influenced by the observed surface topography. During 6 days of time integration, the spurious flow is generated due to inaccurate numerical approximations of pressure gradient term for each dynamical core. High zonal wind speed which can be regarded as numerical error is occurred commonly in two dynamical cores around steep topography (e.g., the Tibetan Plateau, the Rocky Mountains, and the Andes Mountains), but the maximum zonal wind speed at day 6 of spectral element dynamical core is 8-9 times larger than that of spherical harmonics dynamical core. The vertically averaged kinetic energy spectrum at day 6 shows very different trend between two dynamical cores. By performing the experiments with the scale-separated topography, it turns out that these kinetic energy spectrum trends are mainly caused by the small-scale topography. A simple change of pressure gradient term into log-pressure form is found to significantly reduce numerical error (up to 63% of maximum wind speed in case of spectral element dynamical core) and noise-like small-scale phenomena.

  6. A wall-layer model for large-eddy simulations of turbulent flows with/out pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duprat, C.; Balarac, G.; Métais, O.; Congedo, P. M.; Brugière, O.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, modeling of the near-wall region in turbulent flows is addressed. A new wall-layer model is proposed with the goal to perform high-Reynolds number large-eddy simulations of wall bounded flows in the presence of a streamwise pressure gradient. The model applies both in the viscous sublayer and in the inertial region, without any parameter to switch from one region to the other. An analytical expression for the velocity field as a function of the distance from the wall is derived from the simplified thin-boundary equations and by using a turbulent eddy coefficient with a damping function. This damping function relies on a modified van Driest formula to define the mixing-length taking into account the presence of a streamwise pressure gradient. The model is first validated by a priori comparisons with direct numerical simulation data of various flows with and without streamwise pressure gradient and with eventual flow separation. Large-eddy simulations are then performed using the present wall model as wall boundary condition. A plane channel flow and the flow over a periodic arrangement of hills are successively considered. The present model predictions are compared with those obtained using the wall models previously proposed by Spalding, Trans. ASME, J. Appl. Mech 28, 243 (2008) and Manhart et al., Theor. Comput. Fluid Dyn. 22, 243 (2008). It is shown that the new wall model allows for a good prediction of the mean velocity profile both with and without streamwise pressure gradient. It is shown than, conversely to the previous models, the present model is able to predict flow separation even when a very coarse grid is used.

  7. Turbulence measurements in an adverse-pressure-gradient three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer along a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernholz, H. H.; Vagt, J.-D.

    1981-10-01

    Turbulence measurements, including the six components of the Reynolds-stress tensor, have been made along three generators of a circular cylinder with an elliptical nose cone. The pressure distribution was axisymmetric upstream and asymmetric downstream. The streamwise adverse pressure gradient led to almost zero skin friction in the direction of the limiting streamline, and the circumferential pressure gradient led to skew angles up to 30 deg in the vicinity of the wall. It is shown that the normal stresses and the shear stress component behave qualitatively much like those in a two-dimensional adverse pressure-gradient boundary layer. Mean velocity profiles obey the linear and logarithmic law of the wall known from two-dimensional boundary layers both along a line of symmetry and in the three-dimensional boundary layer. Finally, it has been found that the skew angle of the Reynolds shear stress vector leads the skew angle of the resultant velocity gradient, both having the opposite sign of the skew angle of the mean velocity vector, except close to the wall.

  8. Pressure Rate of Strain, Pressure Diffusion and Velocity Pressure Gradient Tensor Measurements in a Cavity Shear Layer Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Katz, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Pressure related turbulence statistics of a 2D open cavity shear layer flow was investigated experimentally in a water tunnel at a Reynolds number of 40,000. Time-resolved PIV sampled at 4500 fps and a field of view of 25 × 25 mm was used to simultaneously measure the instantaneous velocity, material acceleration and pressure distributions. The pressure was obtained by spatially integrating the measured material acceleration. Results based on 150,000 measurement samples enable direct estimates of components of the pressure-rate-of-strain, pressure diffusion and velocity-pressure-gradient tensors. The pressure and streamwise velocity correlation changes its sign from negative values far upstream from the downstream corner to positive values near the corner due to the strong adverse pressure gradient imposed by the corner. Moreover, once its sign changes, the pressure-velocity correlation preserves its positive value for the streamwise correlations, and negative value for the spanwise correlations, even after the shear layer propagates beyond the adverse pressure gradient region along both the vertical and horizontal corner walls. The pressure diffusion term is of the same order as the production rate. In the shear layer, the streamwise pressure-rate-of-strain term, R11, is mostly negative while the perpendicular term, R22, is positive but with a smaller magnitude, implying turbulent energy redistribution from streamwise to lateral directions. Sponsored by ONR and NSF.

  9. Assessment of coronary artery stenosis pressure gradient by quantitative coronary arteriography in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Atar, D; Ramanujam, P S; Saunamäki, K; Haunsø, S

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the study described here was to correlate coronary artery (CA) stenosis pressure gradients calculated by quantitative coronary arteriography (QCA) to invasively measured transstenotic pressure drops in patients with anginal symptoms and with known or suspected coronary artery disease. Furthermore, the known mathematical models are improved by introducing (1) pressure catheter-corrected minimal stenosis area, (2) modification of flow assumptions, and (3) stenosis exit angle. Included in the study were 45 patients with 61 stenoses. The visually estimated CA lesion severity in these non-complex stenoses was in the equivocal range of 40-70%. All measurements were performed after intracoronary administration of nifedipine and nitroglycerin. Stenosis dimensions were assessed from magnified cinefilms, using hand-held calipers. Highly significant overall correlation was found between measured and calculated pressure gradients with correction for the impact of the intracoronary catheter (P < 0.00001, r = 0.84). In particular, a substantial number of stenoses with haemodynamically-insignificant pressure gradients were identified by hydrodynamic calculations. In conclusion, the great majority of the coronary artery stenoses could be classified reliably by QCA as being haemodynamically insignificant or significant, respectively. PMID:8149707

  10. Preventing Damaging Pressure Gradients at the Walls of an Inflatable Space System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, John J.

    2000-01-01

    An inflatable structural system to deploy a space system such as a solar shield, an antenna or another similar instrument, requires a stiffening element after it is extended by the inflated gas pressure. The stiffening element has to be packaged in a folded configuration before the deployment. It must be relatively small, lightweight, non-damaging to the inflated system, and be able to become stiff in a short time. One stiffening method is to use a flexible material inserted in the deployable system, which, upon a temperature curing, can become stiff and is capable to support the entire structure. There are two conditions during the space operations when the inflated volume could be damaged: during the transonic region of the launch phase and when the curing of the rigidizing element occurs. In both cases, an excess of pressure within the volume containing the rigid element could burst the walls of the low-pressure gas inflated portion of the system. This paper investigates those two conditions and indicates the vents, which will prevent those damaging overpressures. Vent openings at the non-inflated volumes have been calculated for the conditions existing during the launch. Those vents allow the initially folded volume to exhaust the trapped atmospheric gas at approximately the same rate as the ambient pressure drops. That will prevent pressure gradients across the container walls which otherwise could be as high as 14.7 psi. The other condition occurring during the curing of the stiffening element has been investigated. This has required the testing of the element to obtain the gas generation during the curing and the transformation from a pliable material to a rigid one. The tested material is a composite graphite/epoxy weave. The outgassing of the uncured sample at 121C was carried with the Cahn Microbalance and with other outgassing facilities including the micro-CVCM ASTM E-595 facility. The tests provided the mass of gas evolved during the test. That data