Science.gov

Sample records for pressurized light water

  1. Light Water Reactor-Pressure Vessel Surveillance project computer system

    SciTech Connect

    Merriman, S.H.

    1980-10-01

    A dedicated process control computer has been implemented for regulating the metallurgical Pressure Vessel Wall Benchmark Facility (PSF) at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The purpose of the PSF is to provide reliable standards and methods by which to judge the radiation damage to reactor pressure vessel specimens. Benchmark data gathered from the PSF will be used to improve and standardize procedures for assessing the remaining safe operating lifetime of aging reactors. The computer system controls the pressure vessel specimen environment in the presence of gamma heating so that in-vessel conditions are simulated. Instrumented irradiation capsules, in which the specimens are housed, contain temperature sensors and electrical heaters. The computer system regulates the amount of power delivered to the electrical heaters based on the temperature distribution within the capsules. Time-temperature profiles are recorded along with reactor conditions for later correlation with specimen metallurgical changes.

  2. RELAP5-3D Code for Supercritical-Pressure Light-Water-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Riemke, Richard Allan; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Schultz, Richard Raphael

    2003-04-01

    The RELAP5-3D computer program has been improved for analysis of supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled reactors. Several code modifications were implemented to correct code execution failures. Changes were made to the steam table generation, steam table interpolation, metastable states, interfacial heat transfer coefficients, and transport properties (viscosity and thermal conductivity). The code modifications now allow the code to run slow transients above the critical pressure as well as blowdown transients (modified Edwards pipe and modified existing pressurized water reactor model) that pass near the critical point.

  3. Startup Thermal Considerations for Supercritical-Pressure Light Water-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsuka, Toru; Oka, Yoshiaki; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2001-06-15

    Supercritical-pressure light water-cooled reactors (SCRs) are innovative systems aimed at high efficiency and cost reduction. The once-through direct-cycle plant system is the leading system of fossil-fired power plants (FPPs). Estimates of the coolability and necessary sizes of the SCR startup systems, sequences, and required equipment for startup are investigated with reference to supercritical FPPs. There are two types of supercritical boilers. One is a constant pressure boiler, and the other is a variable pressure boiler.First, startup of the constant pressure boiler is examined. The reactor starts at a supercritical pressure. A startup bypass system consisting of a flash tank and pressure-reducing valves is required. Second, startup of the variable pressure boiler is investigated. The reactor starts at a subcritical pressure, and the pressure increases with the load. A steam-water separator and a drain tank are required for startup.The results of computer calculations show that with both constant pressure and variable pressure startup, the peak cladding temperature does not exceed the operating limit through startup, and both startup sequences are feasible. The sizes of the components required for the startup systems are assessed. To simplify the plant system and to reduce the component size, variable pressure startup with steam separators in the bypass line appears desirable.

  4. Conceptual design of a pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control

    SciTech Connect

    Rachamin, R.; Fridman, E.; Galperin, A.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the development of innovative pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control. The core layout is derived from a CANDU line of reactors in general, and advanced ACR-1000 design in particular. It should be stressed however, that while some of the ACR-1000 mechanical design features are adopted, the core design basics of the reactor proposed here are completely different. First, the inter fuel channels spacing, surrounded by the calandria tank, contains a low pressure gas instead of heavy water moderator. Second, the fuel channel design features an additional/external tube (designated as moderator tube) connected to a separate moderator management system. The moderator management system is design to vary the moderator tube content from 'dry' (gas) to 'flooded' (light water filled). The dynamic variation of the moderator is a unique and very important feature of the proposed design. The moderator variation allows an implementation of the 'breed and burn' mode of operation. The 'breed and burn' mode of operation is implemented by keeping the moderator tube empty ('dry' filled with gas) during the breed part of the fuel depletion and subsequently introducing the moderator by 'flooding' the moderator tube for the 'burn' part. This paper assesses the conceptual feasibility of the proposed concept from a neutronics point of view. (authors)

  5. Detection and characterization of flaws in segments of light water reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; McClung, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Studies have been conducted to determine flaw density in segments cut from light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels as part of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program. Segments from the Hope Creek Unit 2 vessil and the Pilgrim Unit 2 Vessel were purchased from salvage dealers. Hope Creek was a boiling water reactor (BWR) design and Pilgrim was a pressurized water reactor (PWR) design. Neither were ever placed in service. Objectives were to evaluate these LWR segments for flaws with ultrasonic and liquid penetrant techniques. Both objectives were successfully completed. One significant indication was detected in a Hope Creek seam weld by ultrasonic techniques and characterized by further analyses terminating with destructive correlation. This indication (with a through-wall dimension of approx.6 mm (approx.0.24 in.)) was detected in only 3 m (10 ft) of weldment and offers extremely limited data when compared to the extent of welding even in a single pressure vessel. However, the detection and confirmation of the flaw in the arbitrarily selected sections implies the Marshall report estimates (and others) are nonconservative for such small flaws. No significant indications were detected in the Pilgrim material by ultrasonic techniques. Unfortunately, the Pilgrim segments contained relatively little weldment; thus, we limited our ultrasonic examinations to the cladding and subcladding regions. Fluorescent liquid penetrant inspection of the cladding surfaces for both LWR segments detected no significant indications (i.e., for a total of approximately 6.8 m/sup 2/ (72 ft/sup 2/) of cladding surface).

  6. REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL ISSUES FOR THE LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K; Odette, George Robert

    2010-01-01

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Plan is a collaborative program between the U.S. Department of Energy and the private sector directed at extending the life of the present generation of nuclear power plants to enable operation to at least 80 years. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is one of the primary components requiring significant research to enable such long-term operation. There are significant issues that need to be addressed to reduce the uncertainties in regulatory application, such as, 1) high neutron fluence/long irradiation times, and flux effects, 2) material variability, 3) high-nickel materials, 4)specimen size effects and the fracture toughness master curve, etc. The first issue is the highest priority to obtain the data and mechanistic understanding to enable accurate, reliable embrittlement predictions at high fluences. This paper discusses the major issues associated with long-time operation of existing RPVs and the LWRSP plans to address those issues.

  7. Aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    Research is being conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to address aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants. The objectives of this work are to (1) identify the significant factors related to occurrence of corrosion, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containments and liners of concrete containments, and to make recommendations on use of risk models in regulatory decisions; (2) provide NRC reviewers a means of establishing current structural capacity margins for steel containments, and concrete containments as limited by liner integrity; and (3) provide recommendations, as appropriate, on information to be requested of licensees for guidance that could be utilized by NRC reviewers in assessing the seriousness of reported incidences of containment degradation. In meeting these objectives research is being conducted in two primary task areas - pressure boundary condition assessment and root-cause resolution practices, and reliability-based condition assessments. Under the first task area a degradation assessment methodology was developed for use in characterizing the in-service condition of metal and concrete containment pressure boundary components and quantifying the amount of damage that is present. An assessment of available destructive and nondestructive techniques for examining steel containments and liners is ongoing. Under the second task area quantitative structural reliability analysis methods are being developed for application to degraded metallic pressure boundaries to provide assurances that they will be able to withstand future extreme loads during the desired service period with a level of reliability that is sufficient for public safety. To date, mathematical models that describe time-dependent changes in steel due to aggressive environmental factors have been identified, and statistical data supporting their use in time-dependent reliability analysis have been summarized.

  8. Progress in understanding of direct containment heating phenomena in pressurized light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, T.; Tutu, N.K.

    1988-01-01

    Progress is described in development of a mechanistic understanding of direct containment heating phemonena arising during high-pressure melt ejection accidents in pressurized water reactor systems. The experimental data base is discussed which forms the basis for current assessments of containment pressure response using current lumped-parameter containment analysis methods. The deficiencies in available methods and supporting data base required to describe major phenomena occurring in the reactor cavity, intermediate subcompartments and containment dome are highlighted. Code calculation results presented in the literature are cited which demonstrate that the progress in understanding of DCH phenomena has also resulted in current predictions of containment pressure loadings which are significantly lower than are predicted by idealized, thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. Current methods are, nonetheless, still predicting containment-threatening loadings for large participating melt masses under high-pressure ejection conditions. Recommendations for future research are discussed. 36 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Pressurized lighting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phlieger, G. A.

    1973-01-01

    Safe lighting assembly has been constructed for hostile environments. Assembly is ventilated by inert gas to prolong life of lamps. Lighting assembly contains control box, number of lamps connected in parallel, several pilot lights, and ventilating circuit. Control box is provided with components for monitoring and controlling flow of ventilating gas through lamp assemblies.

  10. Boric acid corrosion of light water reactor pressure vessel head materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.-H.; Chopra, O. K.; Natesan, K.; Shack, W. J.; Cullen, Jr.; W. H.; Energy Technology; USNRC

    2005-01-01

    This work presents experimental data on electrochemical potential and corrosion rates for the materials found in the reactor pressure vessel head and control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles in boric acid solutions of varying concentrations at temperatures of 95-316 C. Tests were conducted in (a) high-temperature, high-pressure aqueous solutions with a range of boric acid concentrations, (b) high-temperature (150-316 C)H-B-Osolutions at ambient pressure, in wet and dry conditions, and (c) low-temperature (95 C) saturated, aqueous, boric acid solutions. These correspond to the following situations: (a) low leakage through the nozzle and nozzle/head annulus plugged, (b) low leakage through the nozzle and nozzle/head annulus open, and (c) significant cooling due to high leakage and nozzle/head annulus open. The results showed significant corrosion only for the low-alloy steel and no corrosion for Alloy 600 or 308 stainless steel cladding. Also, corrosion rates were significant in saturated boric acid solutions, and no material loss was observed in H-B-O solution in the absence of moisture. The results are compared with the existing corrosion/wastage data in the literature.

  11. Comparison of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes and low-pressure mercury-arc lamps for disinfection of water.

    PubMed

    Sholtes, Kari A; Lowe, Kincaid; Walters, Glenn W; Sobsey, Mark D; Linden, Karl G; Casanova, Lisa M

    2016-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) emitting at 260 nm were evaluated to determine the inactivation kinetics of bacteria, viruses, and spores compared to low-pressure (LP) UV irradiation. Test microbes were Escherichia coli B, a non-enveloped virus (MS-2), and a bacterial spore (Bacillus atrophaeus). For LP UV, 4-log10 reduction doses were: E. coli B, 6.5 mJ/cm(2); MS-2, 59.3 mJ/cm(2); and B. atrophaeus, 30.0 mJ/cm(2). For UV LEDs, the 4-log10 reduction doses were E. coli B, 6.2 mJ/cm(2); MS-2, 58 mJ/cm(2); and B. atrophaeus, 18.7 mJ/cm(2). Microbial inactivation kinetics of the two UV technologies were not significantly different for E. coli B and MS-2, but were different for B. atrophaeus spores. UV LEDs at 260 nm are at least as effective for inactivating microbes in water as conventional LP UV sources and should undergo further development in treatment systems to disinfect drinking water. PMID:26888599

  12. Comparison of Standard Light Water Reactor Cross-Section Libraries using the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Pressurized Water Reactor Standard Core Loading Benchmark Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzu Alpan, F.; Kulesza, Joel A.

    2016-02-01

    This paper compares contemporary and historical light water reactor shielding and pressure vessel dosimetry cross-section libraries for a pressurized water reactor calculational benchmark problem with a standard out-in core loading. The calculational benchmark problem was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory by the request of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and used the Oak Ridge National Laboratory two-dimensional discrete ordinates code DORT and the BUGLE-93 cross-section library for the calculations. In this paper, a Westinghouse three-dimensional discrete ordinates code with parallel processing, the RAPTOR-M3G code was used. A variety of cross section libraries were used with RAPTOR-M3G including the BUGLE-93, BUGLE-96, and BUGLE-B7 cross-section libraries developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the broad-group ALPAN-VII.0 cross-section library developed at Westinghouse. In comparing the calculation-to-calculation reaction rates using the BUGLE-93 cross-section library at the thermal shield, pressure vessel, and cavity capsules, for eleven dosimetry reaction rates, a maximum relative difference of 5% was observed, with the exception of 65Cu(n,2n) in the pressure vessel capsule that had a 90% relative difference with respect to the reference results. It is thought that the 65Cu(n,2n) reaction rate reported in the reference for the pressure vessel capsule is not correct. In considering the libraries developed after BUGLE-93, a maximum relative difference of 12% was observed in reaction rates, with respect to the reference results, for 237Np(n,f) in the cavity capsule using BUGLE-B7.

  13. Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Cyrus M; Nanstad, Randy K; Clayton, Dwight A; Matlack, Katie; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Light, Glenn

    2012-09-01

    The Department of Energy s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort which works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operations of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods which support these objectives. DOE funded Research and Development (R&D) on emerging NDE techniques to support commercial nuclear reactor sustainability is expected to begin next year. This summer, the MAaD Pathway invited subject matter experts to participate in a series of workshops which developed the basis for the research plan of these DOE R&D NDE activities. This document presents the results of one of these workshops which are the DOE LWRS NDE R&D Roadmap for Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV). These workshops made a substantial effort to coordinate the DOE NDE R&D with that already underway or planned by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) through their representation at these workshops.

  14. Water Pressure. Water in Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Carly Sporer

    The Water in Africa Project was realized over a 2-year period by a team of Peace Corps volunteers. As part of an expanded, detailed design, resources were collected from over 90 volunteers serving in African countries, photos and stories were prepared, and standards-based learning units were created for K-12 students. This unit, "Water Pressure,"…

  15. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Station Blackout caused by external flooding using the RISMC toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Mandelli, Diego; Smith, Curtis; Prescott, Steven; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua; Kinoshita, Robert

    2014-08-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated from these plants via power uprates. In order to evaluate the impacts of these two factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization project aims to provide insights to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions (e.g., probabilistic analysis and uncertainty quantification). This paper focuses on the impacts of power uprate on the safety margin of a boiling water reactor for a flooding induced station black-out event. Analysis is performed by using a combination of thermal-hydraulic codes and a stochastic analysis tool currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory, i.e. RAVEN. We employed both classical statistical tools, i.e. Monte-Carlo, and more advanced machine learning based algorithms to perform uncertainty quantification in order to quantify changes in system performance and limitations as a consequence of power uprate. Results obtained give a detailed investigation of the issues associated with a plant power uprate including the effects of station black-out accident scenarios. We were able to quantify how the timing of specific events was impacted by a higher nominal reactor core power. Such safety insights can provide useful information to the decision makers to perform risk informed margins management.

  16. Light water detritiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorchenko, O.A.; Aleksee, I.A.; Bondarenko, S.D.; Vasyanina, T.V.

    2015-03-15

    Hundreds of thousands of tons of tritiated light water have been accumulating from the enterprises of nuclear fuel cycles around the world. The Dual-Temperature Water-Hydrogen (DTWH) process looks like the only practical alternative to Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange (CECE). In DTWH power-consuming lower reflux device (electrolytic cell) is replaced by a so-called 'hot tower' (LPCE column operating at conditions which ensure relatively small value of elementary separation factor α(hot)). In the upper, cold tower, the tritium transfers from hydrogen to water while in the lower, hot tower - in the opposite direction - from water to hydrogen. The DTWH process is much more complicated compared to CECE; it must be thoroughly computed and strictly controlled by an automatic control system. The use of a simulation code for DTWH is absolutely important. The simulation code EVIO-5 deals with 3 flows inside a column (hydrogen gas, water vapour and liquid water) and 2 simultaneous isotope exchange sub-processes (counter-current phase exchange and co-current catalytic exchange). EVIO-5 takes into account the strong dependence of process performance on given conditions (temperature and pressure). It calculates steady-state isotope concentration profiles considering a full set of reversible exchange reactions between different isotope modifications of water and hydrogen (12 molecular species). So the code can be used for simulation of LPCE column operation for detritiation of hydrogen and water feed, which contains H and D not only at low concentrations but above 10 at.% also. EVIO-5 code is used to model a Tritium Removal Facility with a throughput capacity of about 400 m{sup 3}/day. Simulation results show that a huge amount of wet-proofed catalyst is required (about 6000 m{sup 3}), mainly (90%) in the first stage. One reason for these large expenses (apart from a big scale of the problem itself) is the relatively high tritium separation factor in the hot tower

  17. Water vapor pressure calculation.

    PubMed

    Hall, J R; Brouillard, R G

    1985-06-01

    Accurate calculation of water vapor pressure for systems saturated with water vapor can be performed using the Goff-Gratch equation. A form of the equation that can be adapted for computer programming and for use in electronic databases is provided. PMID:4008425

  18. Cavitation pressure in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, Eric; Balibar, Sébastien; Caupin, Frédéric

    2006-10-01

    We investigate the limiting mechanical tension (negative pressure) that liquid water can sustain before cavitation occurs. The temperature dependence of this quantity is of special interest for water, where it can be used as a probe of a postulated anomaly of its equation of state. After a brief review of previous experiments on cavitation, we describe our method which consists in focusing a high amplitude sound wave in the bulk liquid, away from any walls. We obtain highly reproducible results, allowing us to study in detail the statistics of cavitation, and to give an accurate definition of the cavitation threshold. Two independent pressure calibrations are performed. The cavitation pressure is found to increase monotonically from -26MPa at 0°C to -17MPa at 80°C . While these values lie among the most negative pressures reported in water, they are still far away from the cavitation pressure expected theoretically and reached in the experiment by Angell and his group [Zheng , Science 254, 829 (1991)] (around -120MPa at 40°C ). Possible reasons for this discrepancy are considered.

  19. Light water reactor program

    SciTech Connect

    Franks, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s Light Water Reactor Program is outlined. The scope of the program consists of: design certification of evolutionary plants; design, development, and design certification of simplified passive plants; first-of-a-kind engineering to achieve commercial standardization; plant lifetime improvement; and advanced reactor severe accident program. These program activities of the Office of Nuclear Energy are discussed.

  20. Low cost sonoluminescence experiment in pressurized water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, L.; Insabella, M.; Bilbao, L.

    2012-06-01

    We present a low cost design for demostration and mesurements of light emmision from a sonoluminescence experiment. Using presurized water introduced in an acrylic cylinder and one piezoelectric from an ultrasonic cleaner, we are able to generate cavitacion zones with emission of light. The use of argon to pressurize the water improves the emission an the light can be seen at naked eye in a softlit ambient.

  1. Progress in evaluation and improvement in nondestructive examination reliability for inservice inspection of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) and characterize fabrication flaws in reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, S.R.; Bowey, R.E.; Good, M.S.; Friley, J.R.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Taylor, T.T.; Heasler, P.G.; Andersen, E.S.; Diaz, A.A.; Greenwood, M.S.; Hockey, R.L.; Schuster, G.J.; Spanner, J.C.; Vo, T.V.

    1991-10-01

    This paper is a review of the work conducted under two programs. One (NDE Reliability Program) is a multi-year program addressing the reliability of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for the inservice inspection (ISI) of light water reactor components. This program examines the reliability of current NDE, the effectiveness of evolving technologies, and provides assessments and recommendations to ensure that the NDE is applied at the right time, in the right place with sufficient effectiveness that defects of importance to structural integrity will be reliably detected and accurately characterized. The second program (Characterizing Fabrication Flaws in Reactor Pressure Vessels) is assembling a data base to quantify the distribution of fabrication flaws that exist in US nuclear reactor pressure vessels with respect to density, size, type, and location. These programs will be discussed as two separate sections in this report. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Simulating nectarine tree transpiration and dynamic water storage from responses of leaf conductance to light and sap flow to stem water potential and vapor pressure deficit.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Indira; Naor, Amos; Gal, Yoni; Cohen, Shabtai

    2015-04-01

    For isohydric trees mid-day water uptake is stable and depends on soil water status, reflected in pre-dawn leaf water potential (Ψpd) and mid-day stem water potential (Ψmd), tree hydraulic conductance and a more-or-less constant leaf water potential (Ψl) for much of the day, maintained by the stomata. Stabilization of Ψl can be represented by a linear relationship between canopy resistance (Rc) and vapor pressure deficit (D), and the slope (BD) is proportional to the steady-state water uptake. By analyzing sap flow (SF), meteorological and Ψmd measurements during a series of wetting and drying (D/W) cycles in a nectarine orchard, we found that for the range of Ψmd relevant for irrigated orchards the slope of the relationship of Rc to D, BD is a linear function of Ψmd. Rc was simulated using the above relationships, and its changes in the morning and evening were simulated using a rectangular hyperbolic relationship between leaf conductance and photosynthetic irradiance, fitted to leaf-level measurements. The latter was integrated with one-leaf, two-leaf and integrative radiation models, and the latter gave the best results. Simulated Rc was used in the Penman-Monteith equation to simulate tree transpiration, which was validated by comparing with SF from a separate data set. The model gave accurate estimates of diurnal and daily total tree transpiration for the range of Ψmds used in regular and deficit irrigation. Diurnal changes in tree water content were determined from the difference between simulated transpiration and measured SF. Changes in water content caused a time lag of 90-105 min between transpiration and SF for Ψmd between -0.8 and -1.55 MPa, and water depletion reached 3 l h(-1) before noon. Estimated mean diurnal changes in water content were 5.5 l day(-1) tree(-1) at Ψmd of -0.9 MPa and increased to 12.5 l day(-1) tree(-1) at -1.45 MPa, equivalent to 6.5 and 16.5% of daily tree water use, respectively. Sixteen percent

  3. Experimental evidence for Abraham pressure of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; She, Weilong; Peng, Nan; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2015-05-01

    The question of how much momentum light carries in media has been debated for over a century. Two rivalling theories, one from 1908 by Hermann Minkowski and the other from 1909 by Max Abraham, predict the exact opposite when light enters an optical material: a pulling force in Minkowski's case and a pushing force in Abraham's. Most experimental tests have agreed with Minkowski's theory, but here we report the first quantitative experimental evidence for Abraham's pushing pressure of light. Our results matter in optofluidics and optomechanics, and wherever light exerts mechanical pressure.

  4. High-pressure water facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA Test Operations Group employees, from left, Todd Pearson, Tim Delcuze and Rodney Wilkinson maintain a water pump in Stennis Space Center's high-pressure water facility. The three were part of a group of employees who rode out Hurricane Katrina at the facility and helped protect NASA's rocket engine test complex.

  5. Water cooled static pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas T. (Inventor); Eves, John W. (Inventor); Reece, Garland D. (Inventor); Geissinger, Steve L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved static pressure probe containing a water cooling mechanism is disclosed. This probe has a hollow interior containing a central coolant tube and multiple individual pressure measurement tubes connected to holes placed on the exterior. Coolant from the central tube symmetrically immerses the interior of the probe, allowing it to sustain high temperature (in the region of 2500 F) supersonic jet flow indefinitely, while still recording accurate pressure data. The coolant exits the probe body by way of a reservoir attached to the aft of the probe. The pressure measurement tubes are joined to a single, larger manifold in the reservoir. This manifold is attached to a pressure transducer that records the average static pressure.

  6. Significant issues and changes for ANSI/ASME OM-1 1981, part 1, ASME OMc code-1994, and ASME OM Code-1995, Appendix I, inservice testing of pressure relief devices in light water reactor power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Seniuk, P.J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper identifies significant changes to the ANSI/ASME OM-1 1981, Part 1, and ASME Omc Code-1994 and ASME OM Code-1995, Appendix I, {open_quotes}Inservice Testing of Pressure Relief Devices in Light-Water Reactor Power Plants{close_quotes}. The paper describes changes to different Code editions and presents insights into the direction of the code committee and selected topics to be considered by the ASME O&M Working Group on pressure relief devices. These topics include scope issues, thermal relief valve issues, as-found and as-left set-pressure determinations, exclusions from testing, and cold setpoint bench testing. The purpose of this paper is to describe some significant issues being addressed by the O&M Working Group on Pressure Relief Devices (OM-1). The writer is currently the chair of OM-1 and the statements expressed herein represents his personal opinion.

  7. Light water reactor health physics.

    PubMed

    Prince, Robert J; Bradley, Scott E

    2004-11-01

    In this article an overview of the historical development of light water reactor health physics programs is presented. Operational health physics programs have developed and matured as experience in operating and maintaining light water reactors has been gained. Initial programs grew quickly in both size and complexity with the number and size of nuclear units under construction and in operation. Operational health physics programs evolved to face various challenges confronted by the nuclear industry, increasing the effectiveness of radiological safety measures. Industry improvements in radiological safety performance have resulted in significant decreases in annual collective exposures from a high value of 790 person-rem in 1980 to 117 person-rem per reactor in 2002. Though significant gains have been made, the continued viability of the nuclear power industry is confronted with an aging workforce, as well as the challenges posed by deregulation and the need to maintain operational excellence. PMID:15551785

  8. Light water reactor health physics.

    PubMed

    Prince, Robert J; Bradley, Scott E

    2005-06-01

    In this article an overview of the historical development of light water reactor health physics programs is presented. Operational health physics programs have developed and matured as experience in operating and maintaining light water reactors has been gained. Initial programs grew quickly in both size and complexity with the number and size of nuclear units under construction and in operation. Operational health physics programs evolved to face various challenges confronted by the nuclear industry, increasing the effectiveness of radiological safety measures. Industry improvements in radiological safety performance have resulted in significant decreases in annual collective exposures from a high value of 790 person-rem in 1980 to 117 person-rem per reactor in 2002. Though significant gains have been made, the continued viability of the nuclear power industry is confronted with an aging workforce, as well as the challenges posed by deregulation and the need to maintain operational excellence. PMID:15891460

  9. LIGHT WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1957-09-17

    A uranium fuel reactor designed to utilize light water as a moderator is described. The reactor core is in a tank at the bottom of a substantially cylindrical cross-section pit, the core being supported by an apertured grid member and comprised of hexagonal tubes each containing a pluralily of fuel rods held in a geometrical arrangement between end caps of the tubes. The end caps are apertured to permit passage of the coolant water through the tubes and the fuel elements are aluminum clad to prevent corrosion. The tubes are hexagonally arranged in the center of the tank providing an amulus between the core and tank wall which is filled with water to serve as a reflector. In use, the entire pit and tank are filled with water in which is circulated during operation by coming in at the bottom of the tank, passing upwardly through the grid member and fuel tubes and carried off near the top of the pit, thereby picking up the heat generated by the fuel elements during the fission thereof. With this particular design the light water coolant can also be used as the moderator when the uranium is enriched by fissionable isotope to an abundance of U/sup 235/ between 0.78% and 2%.

  10. Ultra-High-Pressure Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Martin; Redmer, Ronald; Mattsson, Thomas R.

    2008-03-01

    We present the first all-electron QMD simulations of water in the ultra-high-pressure regime up to conditions typical for the deep interior of Jupiter and Saturn. We calculate the equation of state and the Hugoniot curve and study the structural properties via pair correlation functions and self-diffusion coefficients. In the ultra-dense superionic phase, we find a continuous transition in the protonic structure. Water at conditions of Jupiter's core (i.e. 20000 K, 50 Mbar, 11 g/cm^3) forms a fluid dense plasma. Supported by the DFG within SFB 652. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. A particle assembly/constrained expansion (PACE) model for the formation and structure of porous metal oxide deposits on nuclear fuel rods in pressurized light water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Donald W.; Lu, Shijing; O'Brien, Christopher J.; Bucholz, Eric W.; Rak, Zsolt

    2015-02-01

    A new model is proposed for the structure and properties of porous metal oxide scales (aka Chalk River Unidentified Deposits (CRUD)) observed on the nuclear fuel rod cladding in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). The model is based on the thermodynamically-driven expansion of agglomerated octahedral nickel ferrite particles in response to pH and temperature changes in the CRUD. The model predicts that porous nickel ferrite with internal {1 1 1} surfaces is a thermodynamically stable structure under PWR conditions even when the free energy of formation of bulk nickel ferrite is positive. This explains the pervasive presence of nickel ferrite in CRUD, observed CRUD microstructures, why CRUD maintains its porosity, and variations in porosity within the CRUD observed experimentally. This model is a stark departure from decades of conventional wisdom and detailed theoretical analysis of CRUD chemistry, and defines new research directions for model validation, and for understanding and ultimately controlling CRUD formation.

  12. Light-Water Breeder Reactor

    DOEpatents

    Beaudoin, B. R.; Cohen, J. D.; Jones, D. H.; Marier, Jr, L. J.; Raab, H. F.

    1972-06-20

    Described is a light-water-moderated and -cooled nuclear breeder reactor of the seed-blanket type characterized by core modules comprising loosely packed blanket zones enriched with fissile fuel and axial zoning in the seed and blanket regions within each core module. Reactivity control over lifetime is achieved by axial displacement of movable seed zones without the use of poison rods in the embodiment illustrated. The seed is further characterized by a hydrogen-to-uranium-233 atom ratio in the range 10 to 200 and a uranium-233-to-thorium-232 atom ratio ranging from 0.012 to 0.200. The seed occupies from 10 to 35 percent of the core volume in the form of one or more individual islands or annuli. (NSA 26: 55130)

  13. Residual life assessment of major light water reactor components: Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, V.N.; MacDonald, P.E.; Amar, A.S.; Bakr, M.H.; Beaudoin, B.F.; Buescher, B.J.; Conley, D.A.; Drahos, F.R.; Gardner, J.B.; Garner, R.W.; Kirkwood, B.J.; Meyer, L.C.; Server, W.L.; Shah, V.N.; Siegel, E.A.; Sinha, U.P.; Ware, A.G. )

    1989-11-01

    This report presents an assessment of the aging (time-dependent degradation) of selected major light water reactor components and structures. The stressors, possible degradation sites and mechanisms, potential failure modes, and current inservice inspection requirements are discussed for eleven major light water reactor components: reactor coolant pumps, pressurized water reactor (PWR) pressurizers, PWR pressurizer surge and spray lines, PWR reactor coolant system charging and safety injection nozzles, PWR feedwater lines, PWR control rod drive mechanisms and reactor internals, boiling water reactor (BWR) containments, BWR feedwater and main steam lines, BWR control rod drive mechanisms and reactor internals, electrical cables and connections, and emergency diesel generators. Unresolved technical issues related to understanding and managing the aging of these major components are identified. 575 refs., 148 figs., 96 tabs.

  14. Effects of alloying elements on radiation hardening based on loop formation of electron-irradiated light water reactor pressure vessel model steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Takakuni; Hashimoto, N.; Ohnuki, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Odette, G. R.

    2011-10-01

    Electron irradiations using a high voltage electron microscope were conducted on several reactor pressure vessel model alloys in order to investigate the effects of alloying elements on the formation and development of defect clusters. In addition, the effects of alloying elements on yield stress change after irradiation were considered, comparing the mean size and number density of dislocation loops with the irradiation-induced hardening. High Cu alloys formed Cu and Mn-Ni-Si rich clusters, and these are important in determining the yield stress increase. High Ni alloys formed a high density of small dislocation loops and probably Mn-Ni-Si rich cluster, which have the effect of increasing the yield stress. High P enhanced radiation-induced segregation on grain boundary, helping prevent dislocation movement.

  15. Water-Based Pressure-Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Watkins, A. Neal; Oglesby, Donald M.; Ingram, JoAnne L.

    2006-01-01

    Water-based pressure-sensitive paints (PSPs) have been invented as alternatives to conventional organic-solvent-based pressure-sensitive paints, which are used primarily for indicating distributions of air pressure on wind-tunnel models. Typically, PSPs are sprayed onto aerodynamic models after they have been mounted in wind tunnels. When conventional organic-solvent-based PSPs are used, this practice creates a problem of removing toxic fumes from inside the wind tunnels. The use of water-based PSPs eliminates this problem. The waterbased PSPs offer high performance as pressure indicators, plus all the advantages of common water-based paints (low toxicity, low concentrations of volatile organic compounds, and easy cleanup by use of water).

  16. Water Delivery--It's All about Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2005-01-01

    There is a great deal of wisdom in the old saying "water seeks its level." In fact, the concept has bearing on a very practical side of human life as well, since the public water delivery system is based on it. In this article, the author discusses the concept behind water pressure and describes how the water systems work based on this concept.…

  17. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gruber, E.E.

    1996-07-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from April 1995 to December 1995. Topics that have been investigated include fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steel used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, EAC of Alloy 600 and 690, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic steels in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during different portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from several heats of Alloys 600 and 690 in simulated LWR environments. Effects of fluoride-ion contamination on susceptibility to intergranular cracking of high- and commercial- purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-tensile tests at 288 degrees Centigrade. Microchemical changes in the specimens were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements may contribute to IASCC of these materials.

  18. Bioluminescence-based imaging technique for pressure measurement in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yasunori; Tanaka, Yasufumi

    2011-07-01

    The dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula emits light in response to water motion. We developed a new imaging technique for measuring pressure using plankton that emits light in response to mechanical stimulation. The bioluminescence emitted by P. lunula was used to measure impact water pressure produced using weight-drop tests. The maximum mean luminescence intensity correlated with the maximum impact pressure that the cells receive when the circadian and diurnal biological rhythms are appropriately controlled. Thus, with appropriate calibration of experimentally determined parameters, the dynamic impact pressure can be estimated by measuring the cell-flash distribution. Statistical features of the evolution of flash intensity and the probability distribution during the impacting event, which are described by both biological and mechanical response parameters, are also discussed in this paper. The practical applicability of this bioluminescence imaging technique is examined through a water drop test. The maximum dynamic pressure, occurring at the impact of a water jet against a wall, was estimated from the flash intensity of the dinoflagellate.

  19. Water-Based Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglesby, Donald M.; Ingram, JoAnne L.; Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Watkins, A. Neal; Leighty, Bradley D.

    2004-01-01

    Preparation and performance of a water-based pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is described. A water emulsion of an oxygen permeable polymer and a platinum porphyrin type luminescent compound were dispersed in a water matrix to produce a PSP that performs well without the use of volatile, toxic solvents. The primary advantages of this PSP are reduced contamination of wind tunnels in which it is used, lower health risk to its users, and easier cleanup and disposal. This also represents a cost reduction by eliminating the need for elaborate ventilation and user protection during application. The water-based PSP described has all the characteristics associated with water-based paints (low toxicity, very low volatile organic chemicals, and easy water cleanup) but also has high performance as a global pressure sensor for PSP measurements in wind tunnels. The use of a water-based PSP virtually eliminates the toxic fumes associated with the application of PSPs to a model in wind tunnels.

  20. Radiation Damage Assessment in the Reactor Pressure Vessel of the Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaspoehler, Timothy; Petrovic, Bojan

    2016-02-01

    One of the major limiting factors to nuclear reactors lifetime is the radiation-induced material damage in the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). While older reactors were designed assuming a 40-year operating lifetime, new reactor designs are expected to have lifetimes up to 100 years. For safe operation, the integrity of the RPV must be ensured against significant material property changes. In this work, typical neutron damage indicators are calculated in the RPV of the I2S-LWR (Integral Inherently Safe LWR) Power Plant, including DPA (displacements per atom) and fast neutron fluence (>1 MeV and >0.1MeV). I2S-LWR is a PWR of integral design, which means that its wider downcomer provides additional shielding to the vessel. However, its higher core power density and longer lifetime may offset this advantage. In order to accurately represent the neutron environment for RPV damage assessment, a detailed model based on the preliminary design specifications of the I2S-LWR was developed to be used in the MAVRIC (Monaco with Automated Variance Reduction using Importance Calculations) sequence of the Scale6.1 code package. MAVRIC uses the CADIS (Consistent Adjoint-Driven Importance Sampling) methodology to bias a fixed-source MC (Monte Carlo) simulation. To establish the upper limit of a bounding envelope, a flat-source distribution was used. For the low limit, a center-peaked source was generated using the KENO-VI criticality sequence assuming uniform fresh fuel core. Results based on the preliminary I2S-LWR model show that DPA rates and fast fluence rates are conservatively 75% lower than in typical PWRs being operated currently in the US.

  1. Determining Atmospheric Pressure Using a Water Barometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohrengel, C. Frederick; Larson, Paul R.

    2012-12-01

    The atmosphere is an envelope of compressible gases that surrounds Earth. Because of its compressibility and nonuniform heating by the Sun, it is in constant motion. The atmosphere exerts pressure on Earth's surface, but that pressure is in constant flux. This experiment allows students to directly measure atmospheric pressure by measuring the mass of the water that is used as the fluid medium in the barometer. Simple calculations based upon the mass of water collected from the barometer yield the mass of the atmosphere per square unit of area at the site where the experiment is conducted.

  2. High Pressure CPT Signals using Intensity Modulated Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, Amber; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Miron, Eli; Romalis, Michael; Kuzma, Nicholas; Happer, William

    2004-05-01

    Coherent Population Trapping (CPT) is a promising technique for use in miniature atomic clocks, since it uses modulated light to detect clock resonances rather than microwaves. This method typically uses frequency-modulated light to probe cells with low buffer gas pressure, in which the ground-state hyperfine structure is clearly resolved. However, conventional frequency-modulated CPT fails at the higher pressures needed to inhibit wall collisions in miniature cells. We present theory and supporting experimental results of high-pressure CPT signals using intensity-modulated light. Circularly polarized light tuned to the Rb D1 line traps most of the atoms in the F=2, m_F=2, where the microwave ``end resonance"^2 is excited. We will show experimental data and briefly discuss linewidth broadening mechanisms. 2 Y.-Y. Jau, A. B. Post, N. N. Kuzma, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. (in press, 2004).

  3. Water solubility in pyrope at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookherjee, M.; Karato, S.-

    2006-12-01

    To address how much water is stored within the Earth's mantle, we need to understand the water solubility in the nominally anhydrous minerals. Much is known about olivine and pyroxene. Garnet is another important component, approaching 40% by volume in the transition zone. Only two studies on water solubility in pyrope at high-pressures exist which contradict each other. Lu and Keppler (1997) observed increase in water solubility in a natural pyrope up to 200 ppm wt of water, till 10 GPa. They concluded that the proton is located in the interstitial site. Withers et al. (1998) on the contrary, observed increasing water content in Mg-rich pyrope till 6 GPa, then sudden decrease of water, beyond detection, at 7 GPa. Based on infrared spectra, Withers et al. (1998), concluded hydrogarnet (Si^{4+} replaced by 4H+ to form O4H4) substitution in synthetic magnesium rich pyrope. They argued that at high pressure owing to larger volume, hydrogarnet substitution is unstable and water is expelled out of garnet. In transition zone conditions, however, majorite garnet seems to contain around 600-700 ppm wt of water (Bolfan-Casanova et al. 2000; Katayama et al. 2003). The cause for such discrepancy is not clear and whether garnet could store a significant amount of water at mantle condition is unconstrained. In order to understand the solubility mechanism of water in pyrope at high-pressure, we have conducted high- pressure experiments on naturally occurring single crystals of pyrope garnet (from Arizona, Aines and Rossman, 1984). To ascertain water-saturated conditions, we use olivine single-crystal as an internal standard. Preliminary results indicate that natural pyrope is capable of dissolving water at high-pressures, however, water preferentially enters olivine than in pyrope. We are undertaking systematic study to estimate the solubility of water in pyrope as a function of pressure. This will enable us to develop solubility models to understand the defect mechanisms

  4. Study on neutron scattering in light water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotta, Juan Pablo; Marquez Damian, Ignacio; Noguere, Gilles; Bernard, David

    2016-03-01

    It is presented a method to produce covariance matrices of the light water total cross section from thermal scattering laws of the JEFF-3.1.1 nuclear data library and CAB model. The generalized least square method was used to fit the LEAPR module parameters of the processing tool NJOY with light water experimental transmission measurements at 293.6K with CONRAD code. The marginalization technique was applied to account for systematic uncertainties.

  5. Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre Babka

    2002-10-31

    The Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR ) project was conducted under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The primary project objective was to develop the conceptual design for a safe and economic small, natural circulation light water reactor, to address the economic and safety attributes of the concept, and to demonstrate the technical feasibility by testing in an integral test facility.

  6. Water-Pressure Distribution on Seaplane Float

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, F L

    1929-01-01

    The investigation presented in this report was conducted for the purpose of determining the distribution and magnitude of water pressures likely to be experienced on seaplane hulls in service. It consisted of the development and construction of apparatus for recording water pressures lasting one one-hundredth second or longer and of flight tests to determine the water pressures on a UO-1 seaplane float under various conditions of taxiing, taking off, and landing. The apparatus developed was found to operate with satisfactory accuracy and is suitable for flight tests on other seaplanes. The tests on the UO-1 showed that maximum pressures of about 6.5 pounds per square inch occur at the step for the full width of the float bottom. Proceeding forward from the step the maximum pressures decrease in magnitude uniformly toward the bow, and the region of highest pressures narrows toward the keel. Immediately abaft the step the maximum pressures are very small, but increase in magnitude toward the stern and there once reached a value of about 5 pounds per square inch. (author)

  7. Light pressure of time-dependent fields in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zeidler, A.; Schnabl, H.; Mulser, P.

    1985-01-01

    An expression of the light pressure Pi is derived for the case of a nearly monochromatic electromagnetic wave with arbitrarily time-dependent amplitude. Thereby Pi is defined as the time-averaged force density exerted on a plasma by the wave. The resulting equations are valid for both transverse and longitudinal waves. The light pressure turns out to consist of two components: the well-known gradient-type term and a new nonstationary solenoidal term. This is true for warm as well as cold plasmas. The importance of the new term for the generation of static magnetic fields is shown, and a model in which shear forces may result is given. Formulas for the nonstationary light pressure developed previously are discussed.

  8. High pressure water jet cutting and stripping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, David T.; Babai, Majid K.

    1991-01-01

    High pressure water cutting techniques have a wide range of applications to the American space effort. Hydroblasting techniques are commonly used during the refurbishment of the reusable solid rocket motors. The process can be controlled to strip a thermal protective ablator without incurring any damage to the painted surface underneath by using a variation of possible parameters. Hydroblasting is a technique which is easily automated. Automation removes personnel from the hostile environment of the high pressure water. Computer controlled robots can perform the same task in a fraction of the time that would be required by manual operation.

  9. High pressure water jet mining machine

    DOEpatents

    Barker, Clark R.

    1981-05-05

    A high pressure water jet mining machine for the longwall mining of coal is described. The machine is generally in the shape of a plowshare and is advanced in the direction in which the coal is cut. The machine has mounted thereon a plurality of nozzle modules each containing a high pressure water jet nozzle disposed to oscillate in a particular plane. The nozzle modules are oriented to cut in vertical and horizontal planes on the leading edge of the machine and the coal so cut is cleaved off by the wedge-shaped body.

  10. Macroscopic view of light pressure on a continuous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkunov, M. V.; Kondratov, A. V.

    2013-07-01

    The ambiguity of the macroscopic description of light pressure on a continuous medium originates from the uncertainty of dividing the energy-momentum tensor of electromagnetically excited matter into a material and field parts or, equivalently, the total acting force into pressure and deformation terms. We show that, although there exists a continuum of formally correct formulations, one can adopt the appropriate form of the macroscopic field stress tensor that allows a unified description of pressure during elementary light-matter interactions, such as reflection, refraction, absorption, and nonlinear conversion. The derived simple expressions for the pressure force are compatible with the polariton momentum ℏk. The corresponding relation for the electromagnetic momentum density generalizes Rytov's definition for right-handed and left-handed frequency dispersive media.

  11. ASSESSING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF LOW PRESSURE ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT FOR INACTIVATING HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori were exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light from a low-pressure source to determine log inactivation versus applied fluence. Results indicate that H. pylori is readily inactivated at UV fluences typically used in water treatment r...

  12. Pressure-induced polyamorphism in salty water.

    PubMed

    Bove, L E; Klotz, S; Philippe, J; Saitta, A M

    2011-03-25

    We investigated the metastable phase diagram of an ionic salt aqueous solution, LiCl:6D₂O, at high pressure and low temperature by neutron diffraction measurements and computer simulations. We show that the presence of salt triggers a stepwise transformation, under annealing at high pressure, to a new very high-density amorphous form. The transition occurs abruptly at 120 K and 2 GPa, is reversible, and is characterized by a sizeable enthalpy release. Simulations suggest that the polyamorphic transition is linked to a local structural reorganization of water molecules around the Li ions. PMID:21517327

  13. Pressurized water reactor flow skirt apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kielb, John F.; Schwirian, Richard E.; Lee, Naugab E.; Forsyth, David R.

    2016-04-05

    A pressurized water reactor vessel having a flow skirt formed from a perforated cylinder structure supported in the lower reactor vessel head at the outlet of the downcomer annulus, that channels the coolant flow through flow holes in the wall of the cylinder structure. The flow skirt is supported at a plurality of circumferentially spaced locations on the lower reactor vessel head that are not equally spaced or vertically aligned with the core barrel attachment points, and the flow skirt employs a unique arrangement of hole patterns that assure a substantially balanced pressure and flow of the coolant over the entire underside of the lower core support plate.

  14. Light energy dissipation under water stress conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Stuhlfauth, T.; Scheuermann, R.; Fock, H.P. )

    1990-04-01

    Using {sup 14}CO{sub 2} gas exchange and metabolite analyses, stomatal as well as total internal CO{sub 2} uptake and evolution were estimated. Pulse modulated fluorescence was measured during induction and steady state of photosynthesis. Leaf water potential of Digitalis lanata EHRH. plants decreased to {minus}2.5 megapascals after withholding irrigation. By osmotic adjustment, leaves remained turgid and fully exposed to irradiance even at severe water stress. Due to the stress-induced reduction of stomatal conductance, the stomatal CO{sub 2} exchange was drastically reduced, whereas the total CO{sub 2} uptake and evolution were less affected. Stomatal closure induced an increase in the reassimilation of internally evolved CO{sub 2}. This CO{sub 2}-recycling consumes a significant amount of light energy in the form of ATP and reducing equivalents. As a consequence, the metabolic demand for light energy is only reduced by about 40%, whereas net photosynthesis is diminished by about 70% under severe stress conditions. By CO{sub 2} recycling, carbon flux, enzymatic substrate turnover and consumption of light energy were maintained at high levels, which enabled the plant to recover rapidly after rewatering. In stressed D. lanata plants a variable fluorescence quenching mechanism, termed coefficient of actinic light quenching, was observed. Besides water conservation, light energy dissipation is essential and involves regulated metabolic variations.

  15. Tritium issues in commercial pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.

    2008-07-15

    Tritium has become an important radionuclide in commercial Pressurized Water Reactors because of its mobility and tendency to concentrate in plant systems as tritiated water during the recycling of reactor coolant. Small quantities of tritium are released in routine regulated effluents as liquid water and as water vapor. Tritium has become a focus of attention at commercial nuclear power plants in recent years due to inadvertent, low-level, chronic releases arising from routine maintenance operations and from component failures. Tritium has been observed in groundwater in the vicinity of stations. The nuclear industry has undertaken strong proactive corrective measures to prevent recurrence, and continues to eliminate emission sources through its singular focus on public safety and environmental stewardship. This paper will discuss: production mechanisms for tritium, transport mechanisms from the reactor through plant, systems to the environment, examples of routine effluent releases, offsite doses, basic groundwater transport and geological issues, and recent nuclear industry environmental and legal ramifications. (authors)

  16. PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR CORE WITH PLUTONIUM BURNUP

    DOEpatents

    Puechl, K.H.

    1963-09-24

    A pressurized water reactor is described having a core containing Pu/sup 240/ in which the effective microscopic neutronabsorption cross section of Pu/sup 240/ in unconverted condition decreases as the time of operation of the reactor increases, in order to compensate for loss of reactivity resulting from fission product buildup during reactor operation. This means serves to improve the efficiency of the reactor operation by reducing power losses resulting from control rods and burnable poisons. (AEC)

  17. Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Chung, H.M.; Hicks, P.D.; Hins, A.G.; Park, J.Y.; Shack, W.J.

    1991-12-01

    Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in light water reactors (LWRs) are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. The degradation processes include intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of austenitic stainless steel (SS) piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs), and propagation of fatigue or SCC cracks (which initiate in sensitized SS cladding) into low-alloy ferritic steels in BWR pressure vessels. Similar cracking has also occurred in upper shell-to-transition cone girth welds in pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator vessels. Another concern is failure of reactor-core internal components after accumulation of relatively high fluence, which has occurred in both BWRs and PWRs. Research during the past year focused on (1) fatigue and SCC of ferritic steels used in piping and in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels, (2) role of chromate and sulfate in simulated BWR water in SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS, and (3) irradiation-assisted SCC in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes used in two operating BWRs. Failure after accumulation of relatively high fluence has been attributed to radiation-induced segregation (RIS) of elements such as Si, P, Ni, and Cr. This document provides a summary of research progress in these areas.

  18. Light pressure acceleration with frequency-tripled laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Shen, Baifei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, Xiaomei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Ji, Liangliang; Wang, Wenpeng; Zhao, Xueyan; Xu, Jiancai; Yu, Yahong; Yi, Longqing; Shi, Yin; Xu, Tongjun; Zhang, Lingang

    2014-08-15

    Light pressure acceleration of ions in the interaction of the frequency-tripled (3ω) laser pulse and foil target is studied, and a promising method to increase accelerated ion energy is shown. Results show that at a constant laser energy, much higher ion energy peak value is obtained for 3ω laser compared with that using the fundamental frequency laser. The effect of energy loss during frequency conversion on ion acceleration is considered, which may slightly decrease the acceleration effect.

  19. Assessing nitrogen pressures on European surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grizzetti, B.; Bouraoui, F.; de Marsily, G.

    2008-12-01

    The European environmental legislation on water, in particular the 2000 Water Framework Directive, requires the evaluation of nutrient pressures and the assessment of mitigation measures at the river basin scale. Models have been identified as tools that can contribute to fulfill these requirements. The objective of this research was the implementation of a modeling approach (Geospatial Regression Equation for European Nutrient losses (GREEN)) to assess the actual nitrogen pressures on surface water quality at medium and large basin scale (European scale) using readily available data. In particular the aim was to estimate diffuse nitrogen emissions into surface waters, contributions by different sources (point and diffuse) to the nitrate load in rivers, and nitrogen retention in river systems. A comprehensive database including nutrient sources and physical watershed characteristics was built at the European scale. The modeling partially or entirely covered some of the larger and more populated European river basins, including the Danube, Rhine, Elbe, Weser, and Ems in Germany, the Seine and Rhone in France, and the Meuse basin shared by France and Belgium. The model calibration was satisfactory for all basins. The source contribution to the in-stream nitrogen load, together with the diffuse nitrogen emissions and river nitrogen retention were estimated and were found to be in the range of values reported in the literature. Finally, the model results were extrapolated to estimate the diffuse nitrogen emission and source apportionment at the European scale.

  20. Review of light water reactor safety

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.S.

    1980-12-01

    A review of the present status of light water reactor (LWR) safety is presented. The review starts with a brief discussion of the outstanding accident scenarios concerning LWRs. Where possible the areas of present technological uncertainties are stressed. To provide a better perspective of reactor safety, it then reviews the probabilistic assessment of the outstanding LWR accidents considered in the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400) and discusses the potential impact of the present technological uncertainties on WASH-1400.

  1. High-pressure light scattering apparatus to study pressure-induced phase separation in polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yan; Kiran, Erdogan

    1998-03-01

    A new high-pressure time- and angle-resolved light scattering apparatus has been developed to study the kinetics of phase separation in polymer solutions and other fluid mixtures under pressure at near- and supercritical conditions. The system consists of a high-pressure polymer loading chamber, a solvent charge line, a variable-volume scattering cell (with a built-in movable piston connected to a pressure generator, and an expansion rod driven by an air-actuated diaphragm), and a recirculation pump which are all housed in a temperature-controlled oven. The system is operable at pressures up to 70 MPa, and temperatures up to 473 K. The scattering cell is a short path-length cell made of two flat sapphire windows that are separated by 250 μm. It is designed to permit measurements of transmitted and scattered light intensities over an angle range from 0° to 30°. A linear image sensor with 256 elements is used to monitor the time evolution of the scattered light intensities at different angles. With this sensor, the angle range from 2° to 13° is scanned at a sampling rate of 3.2 ms/scan. The pressure quenches are achieved by movement of the air-actuated movable expansion rod, or by the movement of the piston with the aid of the pressure generator to bring about either rapid (at rates approaching 2000 MPa/s) or slow pressure changes in the system. Quench depth is also adjustable, and very deep (70 MPa) or very shallow (as low as 0.1 MPa) pressure quenches are readily achievable. The temperature and the pressure of the solution in the scattering cell, and the transmitted and scattered light intensities at different angles are recorded in real time through a computerized data acquisition system before and during phase separation. The experimental system is especially suited to follow the kinetics of phase separation in polymer solutions and to assess the metastable and unstable regions where phase separation proceeds by the nucleation and growth, and the spinodal

  2. Design of Recycle Pressurized Water Reactor with Heavy Water Moderation

    SciTech Connect

    Hibi, Koki; Uchita, Masato

    2004-03-15

    This study presents the conceptual design of the recycle pressurized water reactor (RPWR), which is an innovative PWR fueled with mixed oxide, moderated by heavy water, and having breeding ratios around 1.1. Most of the systems of RPWR can employ those of PWRs. The RPWR has no boric acid systems and has a small tritium removal system. The construction and operation costs would be similar to those of current PWRs. Heavy water cost has decreased drastically with up-to-date producing methods. The reliability of the systems of the RPWR is high, and the research and development cost for RPWR is very low because the core design is fundamentally based on the current PWR technology.

  3. Installation of the Light-Water Breeder Reactor at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Massimino, R.J.; Williams, D.A.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes the refueling operations performed to install a Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core into the existing pressurized water reactor vessel at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. Detailed descriptions of the major installation operations (e.g., primary system preconditioning, fuel installation, pressure boundary seal welding) are included as appendices to this report; these operations are of technical interest to any reactor servicing operation, whether the reactor is a breeder or a conventional light water non-breeder core.

  4. Towards intrinsically safe light-water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hannerz, K

    1983-07-01

    Most of the present impediments to the rational use of the nuclear option have their roots in the reactor safety issue. The approach taken to satisfy the escalating safety concerns has resulted in excessively complex and expensive plant designs but has failed to create public confidence. This paper describes a new approach based on the principle of Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS). With the PIUS principle, ultimate safety is obtained by guaranteeing core integrity under all credible conditions. This is accomplished on the basis of the laws of gravity and thermohydraulics alone, interacting with the heat extraction process in an intact or damaged primary circuit, without recourse to engineered safety systems that may fail or dependence on error-prone human intervention. Application of the PIUS principle to the pressurized water reactor involves a substantial redesign of the reactor and primary system but builds on established PWR technology where long-term operation is needed for verification.

  5. Light water reactor lower head failure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L.

    1993-10-01

    This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response.

  6. Fabrication of light water reactor tritium targets

    SciTech Connect

    Pilger, J.P.

    1991-11-01

    The mission of the Fabrication Development Task of the Tritium Target Development Project is: to produce a documented technology basis, including specifications and procedures for target rod fabrication; to demonstrate that light water tritium targets can be manufactured at a rate consistent with tritium production requirements; and to develop quality control methods to evaluate target rod components and assemblies, and establish correlations between evaluated characteristics and target rod performance. Many of the target rod components: cladding tubes, end caps, plenum springs, etc., have similar counterparts in LWR fuel rods. High production rate manufacture and inspection of these components has been adequately demonstrated by nuclear fuel rod manufacturers. This summary describes the more non-conventional manufacturing processes and inspection techniques developed to fabricate target rod components whose manufacturability at required production rates had not been previously demonstrated.

  7. Commercial Light Water Reactor Tritium Extraction Facility

    SciTech Connect

    McHood, M D

    2000-10-12

    A geotechnical investigation program has been completed for the Commercial Light Water Reactor - Tritium Extraction Facility (CLWR-TEF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The program consisted of reviewing previous geotechnical and geologic data and reports, performing subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing, and geologic and engineering analyses. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the subsurface conditions for the CLWR-TEF in terms of subsurface stratigraphy and engineering properties for design and to perform selected engineering analyses. The objectives of the evaluation were to establish site-specific geologic conditions, obtain representative engineering properties of the subsurface and potential fill materials, evaluate the lateral and vertical extent of any soft zones encountered, and perform engineering analyses for slope stability, bearing capacity and settlement, and liquefaction potential. In addition, provide general recommendations for construction and earthwork.

  8. Use of submersible pressure transducers in water-resources investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman, Lawrence A.; Carpenter, Michael C.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Rousseau, Joseph P.; Unger, Randy; McLean, John S.

    2004-01-01

    Submersible pressure transducers, developed in the early 1960s, have made the collection of water-level and pressure data much more convenient than former methods. Submersible pressure transducers, when combined with electronic data recorders have made it possible to collect continuous or nearly continuous water-level or pressure data from wells, piezometers, soil-moisture tensiometers, and surface water gages. These more frequent measurements have led to an improved understanding of the hydraulic processes in streams, soils, and aquifers. This manual describes the operational theory behind submersible pressure transducers and provides information about their use in hydrologic investigations conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey.

  9. Determining Atmospheric Pressure Using a Water Barometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohrengel, C. Frederick, II; Larson, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    The atmosphere is an envelope of compressible gases that surrounds Earth. Because of its compressibility and nonuniform heating by the Sun, it is in constant motion. The atmosphere exerts pressure on Earth's surface, but that pressure is in constant flux. This experiment allows students to directly measure atmospheric pressure by measuring the…

  10. Overall evaluation light-weight composite pressure vessel with alloy liner by acoustic emission and Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun-qing; He, Xiao-dong; Wang, Rong-guo; Liu, Wen-bo

    2013-04-01

    Light-weight carbon fiber composite pressure vessel with inner thin-wall aluminum alloy liner has main problem of local buckling during manufacture and working process. The approach of acoustic emission and Bragg grating are adapted to monitoring the light-weight composite vessel under water pressure. Two channels of acoustic emission (AE) were bonded to front dome and cylinder to monitoring the performance of the vessel withstanding maximum 4.5MPa water pressure during loading, maintaining and unloading. Meantime six fiber Bragg sensors (FBG)were attached to front dome and cylinder of the outer surface by hoop and meridian direction respectively in order to monitor the vessel behavior. Analysis indicated Bragg sensors can evaluate outer surface behavior of the vessel with pressure. AE character parameters analysis illustrated the local buckling of inner thin-wall liner.

  11. Stress and Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Boiling Water Reactor and Pressurized Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Shengjun; Bass, Bennett Richard; Stevens, Gary; Kirk, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes stress analysis and fracture mechanics work performed to assess boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) nozzles located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Various RPV nozzle geometries were investigated: 1. BWR recirculation outlet nozzle; 2. BWR core spray nozzle3 3. PWR inlet nozzle; ; 4. PWR outlet nozzle; and 5. BWR partial penetration instrument nozzle. The above nozzle designs were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-license (EOL) to require evaluation as part of establishing the allowed limits on heatup, cooldown, and hydrotest (leak test) conditions. These nozzles analyzed represent one each of the nozzle types potentially requiring evaluation. The purpose of the analyses performed on these nozzle designs was as follows: To model and understand differences in pressure and thermal stress results using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) versus a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for all nozzle types. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated; To verify the accuracy of a selected linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solution for stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for both thermal and pressure loading for all nozzle types; To assess the significance of attached piping loads on the stresses in the nozzle corner region; and To assess the significance of applying pressure on the crack face with respect to the stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack.

  12. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Clark, R. W.; Gruber, E. E.; Shack, W. J.; Soppet, W. K.; Strain, R. V.

    2007-11-06

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from January to December 2002. Topics that have been investigated include: (a) environmental effects on fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs in BWRs, (c) evaluation of causes and mechanisms of irradiation-assisted cracking of austenitic SS in PWRs, and (d) cracking in Ni-alloys and welds. A critical review of the ASME Code fatigue design margins and an assessment of the conservation in the current choice of design margins are presented. The existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data have been evaluated to define the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on the fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic SSs. Experimental data are presented on the effects of surface roughness on fatigue crack initiation in these materials in air and LWR environments. Crack growth tests were performed in BWR environments on SSs irradiated to 0.9 and 2.0 x 10{sup 21} n x cm{sup -2}. The crack growth rates (CGRs) of the irradiated steels are a factor of {approx}5 higher than the disposition curve proposed in NUREG-0313 for thermally sensitized materials. The CGRs decreased by an order of magnitude in low-dissolved oxygen (DO) environments. Slow-strain-rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted in high-purity 289 C water on steels irradiated to {approx}3 dpa. The bulk S content correlated well with the susceptibility to intergranular SCC in 289 C water. The IASCC susceptibility of SSs that contain >0.003 wt. % S increased drastically. bend tests in inert environments at 23 C were conducted on broken pieces of SSRT specimens and on unirradiated specimens of the same materials after hydrogen charging. The results of the tests and a review of other data in the literature

  13. 22. Fire Protection Water Pump (low pressure), view to the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Fire Protection Water Pump (low pressure), view to the southwest. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  14. Issues concerned with future light-water-reactor designs

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, L.S.

    1982-03-01

    This article discusses some light-water-reactor (LWR) design issues that are based on operating experiences and the results of water-reactor safety research. The impacts of these issues on reactor safety are described, and new engineering concepts are identified to encourage further improvement in future light-water-reactor designs.

  15. Assessing the effectiveness of low-pressure ultraviolet light for inactivating Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) micro-organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: To assess low-pressure ultraviolet light (LP-UV) inactivation kinetics of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) strains in a water matrix using collimated beam apparatus. Methods and Results: Strains of M. avium (n = 3) and Mycobacterium intracellulare (n = 2) were exposed t...

  16. Silicon carbide composite for light water reactor fuel assembly applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yueh, Ken; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2014-05-01

    The feasibility of using SiCf-SiCm composites in light water reactor (LWR) fuel designs was evaluated. The evaluation was motivated by the desire to improve fuel performance under normal and accident conditions. The Fukushima accident once again highlighted the need for improved fuel materials that can maintain fuel integrity to higher temperatures for longer periods of time. The review identified many benefits as well as issues in using the material. Issues perceived as presenting the biggest challenges to the concept were identified to be flux gradient induced differential volumetric swelling, fragmentation and thermal shock resistance. The oxidation of silicon and its release into the coolant as silica has been identified as an issue because existing plant systems have limited ability for its removal. Detailed evaluation using available literature data and testing as part of this evaluation effort have eliminated most of the major concerns. The evaluation identified Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) channel, BWR fuel water tube, and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) guide tube as feasible applications for SiC composite. A program has been initiated to resolve some of the remaining issues and to generate physical property data to support the design of commercial fuel components.

  17. Pressurized water reactor fuel crud and corrosion modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshon, Jeff; Hussey, Dennis; Kendrick, Brian; McGurk, John; Secker, Jeff; Short, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Pressurized water reactors circulate high-temperature water that slowly corrodes Inconel and stainless steel system surfaces, and the nickel/iron based corrosion products deposit in regions of the fuel where sub-cooled nucleate boiling occurs. The deposited corrosion products, called `crud', can have an adverse impact on fuel performance. Boron can concentrate within the crud in the boiling regions of the fuel leading to a phenomenon known as axial offset anomaly (AOA). In rare cases, fuel clad integrity can be compromised because of crud-induced localized corrosion (CILC) of the zirconium-based alloy. Westinghouse and the Electric Power Research Institute have committed to understanding the crud transport process and develop a risk assessment software tool called boron-induced offset anomaly (BOA) to avoid AOA and CILC. This paper reviews the history of the BOA model development and new efforts to develop a micro-scale model called MAMBA for use in the Consortium for Advanced Light Water Reactor Simulation (CASL) program.

  18. The effect of pore water pressure on debris flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okura, Y.; Parker, G.; Marr, J. G.; Yu, B.; Ochiai, H.

    2003-12-01

    Pore-water likely plays an important role to reduce shear force in debris flow. In experiments, we observed pore-water pressure during flow to clarify the relationship between the flow speed and pore water pressure which would be affected by flow depth and particle size distribution. Soil materials were prepared with mixing materials of sand, silt and clay. Pore-water pressure on the flume bed, flow depth, velocity and run out distance was observed, and the following results were quantitatively obtained in this series of experiments. 1. A positive relation was observed between strain rate and pore-water pressure ratio in the flow. The strain rate and pressure ratio were dimensionless parameters of the ratios of surface velocity to flow depth and pore-water pressure head to flow depth, respectively. This relationship indicated that shear resistance decreased as the pressure potential leading to acceleration of flow velocity increased. 2. A positive relation was also observed between flow depth and pore-water pressure ratio. This indicated that the pore pressure diffusion became increasingly obstructed as the flow depth increased. 3. The pore-water pressure ratio tended to increase with the uniformity coefficient of debris flow materials. The reason for this might have been that smaller particles suspended in the flow increased pore-water pressure, and the wider range of particle distribution effectively prevented pore-water pressure diffusion. 4. There was an apparently negative correlation between the equivalent coefficient of frictions and the pressure ratios. Equivalent friction is apparent friction during flow. The most likely reason for this is that shear resistance would decrease and run out distance increase as the pressure ratio increased. These results indicated that the effect of pore water fluctuations should be one of the most important factors affecting the shear resistance in debris flows. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation

  19. Lattuce growth and water use in closed, low pressure environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, P.; Rygalov, V.; Wheeler, R.; Bucklin, R.; Schumacher, N.

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) cv. Waldmann's Green plants were grown in a clear, hemispherical enclosure at a reduced atmospheric pressure to study the potential for using low pressure greenhouses on planetary missions. The atmosphere was maintained at 25 kPa total pressure, with ˜20 kPa of N_2, ˜5 kPa of O_2, and between 0.1 and 0.2 kPa of CO_2, supplied by CO_2 injection and a feed-back control system. A closed water cycle was maintained inside the low pressure greenhouse by recycling condensed humidity back to the plants, and only adding external water to offset water vapor leakage and uptake in the plant tissue. All plants were grown in a granular, arcillite medium (calcined clay chips), with nutrients supplied by adding time-release fertilizer (Osmocote 20-20-20). Plants were harvested after 45 days, averaging 237 g fresh mass, and 23.7 g dry mass. No obvious adverse effects were noted on the plants, with the exception of some minor "tip-burn" injury to some leaves. Additional studies are planned to compare growth and water flux (evapotranspiration) rates at higher pressures. Preliminary results suggest that water fluxes should be lower at the higher pressures provided equal vapor pressure deficits can be maintained. The results suggest that vegetative crops such as lettuce should grow well at reduced pressures if adequate water, nutrients, and CO_2 are provided.

  20. 46 CFR 169.549 - Ring lifebuoys and water lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ring lifebuoys and water lights. 169.549 Section 169.549 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Lifesaving and Firefighting Equipment Additional Lifesaving Equipment § 169.549 Ring lifebuoys and water lights. (a)(1) The minimum number...

  1. 46 CFR 169.549 - Ring lifebuoys and water lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ring lifebuoys and water lights. 169.549 Section 169.549 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Lifesaving and Firefighting Equipment Additional Lifesaving Equipment § 169.549 Ring lifebuoys and water lights. (a)(1) The minimum number...

  2. 46 CFR 169.549 - Ring lifebuoys and water lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ring lifebuoys and water lights. 169.549 Section 169.549 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Lifesaving and Firefighting Equipment Additional Lifesaving Equipment § 169.549 Ring lifebuoys and water lights. (a)(1) The minimum number...

  3. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ronaldo Szilard; Hongbin Zhang; Doug Kothe; Paul Turinsky

    2011-10-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

  4. Evaluation of pressurized water cleaning systems for hardware refurbishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, Terry W.; Deweese, Charles D.; Hoppe, David T.; Vickers, John H.; Swenson, Gary J.; Hutchens, Dale E.

    1995-01-01

    Historically, refurbishment processes for RSRM motor cases and components have employed environmentally harmful materials. Specifically, vapor degreasing processes consume and emit large amounts of ozone depleting compounds. This program evaluates the use of pressurized water cleaning systems as a replacement for the vapor degreasing process. Tests have been conducted to determine if high pressure water washing, without any form of additive cleaner, is a viable candidate for replacing vapor degreasing processes. This paper discusses the findings thus far of Engineering Test Plan - 1168 (ETP-1168), 'Evaluation of Pressurized Water Cleaning Systems for Hardware Refurbishment.'

  5. High-pressure-induced water penetration into 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Nagae, Takayuki; Kawamura, Takashi; Chavas, Leonard M. G.; Niwa, Ken; Hasegawa, Masashi; Kato, Chiaki; Watanabe, Nobuhisa

    2012-03-01

    Structures of 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase were determined at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 650 MPa. Comparison of these structures gives a detailed picture of the swelling of a cavity at the dimer interface and the generation of a new cleft on the molecular surface, which are accompanied by water penetration. Hydrostatic pressure induces structural changes in proteins, including denaturation, the mechanism of which has been attributed to water penetration into the protein interior. In this study, structures of 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were determined at about 2 Å resolution under pressures ranging from 0.1 to 650 MPa using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Although most of the protein cavities are monotonically compressed as the pressure increases, the volume of one particular cavity at the dimer interface increases at pressures over 340 MPa. In parallel with this volume increase, water penetration into the cavity could be observed at pressures over 410 MPa. In addition, the generation of a new cleft on the molecular surface accompanied by water penetration could also be observed at pressures over 580 MPa. These water-penetration phenomena are considered to be initial steps in the pressure-denaturation process of IPMDH.

  6. The Switch from Low-Pressure Sodium to Light Emitting Diodes Does Not Affect Bat Activity at Street Lights

    PubMed Central

    Rowse, Elizabeth G.; Harris, Stephen; Jones, Gareth

    2016-01-01

    We used a before-after-control-impact paired design to examine the effects of a switch from low-pressure sodium (LPS) to light emitting diode (LED) street lights on bat activity at twelve sites across southern England. LED lights produce broad spectrum ‘white’ light compared to LPS street lights that emit narrow spectrum, orange light. These spectral differences could influence the abundance of insects at street lights and thereby the activity of the bats that prey on them. Most of the bats flying around the LPS lights were aerial-hawking species, and the species composition of bats remained the same after the switch-over to LED. We found that the switch-over from LPS to LED street lights did not affect the activity (number of bat passes), or the proportion of passes containing feeding buzzes, of those bat species typically found in close proximity to street lights in suburban environments in Britain. This is encouraging from a conservation perspective as many existing street lights are being, or have been, switched to LED before the ecological consequences have been assessed. However, lighting of all spectra studied to date generally has a negative impact on several slow-flying bat species, and LED lights are rarely frequented by these ‘light-intolerant’ bat species. PMID:27008274

  7. The Switch from Low-Pressure Sodium to Light Emitting Diodes Does Not Affect Bat Activity at Street Lights.

    PubMed

    Rowse, Elizabeth G; Harris, Stephen; Jones, Gareth

    2016-01-01

    We used a before-after-control-impact paired design to examine the effects of a switch from low-pressure sodium (LPS) to light emitting diode (LED) street lights on bat activity at twelve sites across southern England. LED lights produce broad spectrum 'white' light compared to LPS street lights that emit narrow spectrum, orange light. These spectral differences could influence the abundance of insects at street lights and thereby the activity of the bats that prey on them. Most of the bats flying around the LPS lights were aerial-hawking species, and the species composition of bats remained the same after the switch-over to LED. We found that the switch-over from LPS to LED street lights did not affect the activity (number of bat passes), or the proportion of passes containing feeding buzzes, of those bat species typically found in close proximity to street lights in suburban environments in Britain. This is encouraging from a conservation perspective as many existing street lights are being, or have been, switched to LED before the ecological consequences have been assessed. However, lighting of all spectra studied to date generally has a negative impact on several slow-flying bat species, and LED lights are rarely frequented by these 'light-intolerant' bat species. PMID:27008274

  8. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Kathryn A.

    2015-02-01

    Welcome to the 2014 Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Accomplishments Report, covering research and development highlights from 2014. The LWRS Program is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development program to inform and support the long-term operation of our nation’s commercial nuclear power plants. The research uses the unique facilities and capabilities at the Department of Energy national laboratories in collaboration with industry, academia, and international partners. Extending the operating lifetimes of current plants is essential to supporting our nation’s base load energy infrastructure, as well as reaching the Administration’s goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to 80% below 1990 levels by the year 2050. The purpose of the LWRS Program is to provide technical results for plant owners to make informed decisions on long-term operation and subsequent license renewal, reducing the uncertainty, and therefore the risk, associated with those decisions. In January 2013, 104 nuclear power plants operated in 31 states. However, since then, five plants have been shut down (several due to economic reasons), with additional shutdowns under consideration. The LWRS Program aims to minimize the number of plants that are shut down, with R&D that supports long-term operation both directly (via data that is needed for subsequent license renewal), as well indirectly (with models and technology that provide economic benefits). The LWRS Program continues to work closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to ensure that the body of information needed to support SLR decisions and actions is available in a timely manner. This report covers selected highlights from the three research pathways in the LWRS Program: Materials Aging and Degradation, Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization, and Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies, as well as a look-ahead at planned activities for 2015. If you

  9. Deep Water Cherenkov Light Scatter Meter

    SciTech Connect

    Pappalardo, L; Petta, C.; Russo, G.V.

    2000-12-31

    The relevant parameters for the site choice of an underwater neutrino's telescope are discussed. The in situ measurement of the scattering distribution of the cherenkov light requires a suitable experimental setup. Its main features are described here.

  10. Performance Evaluation of Pressure Transducers for Water Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.; Stegall, David E.; Treadway, Sean

    2012-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle is being designed for water landings. In order to benchmark the ability of engineering tools to predict water landing loads, test programs are underway for scale model and full-scale water impacts. These test programs are predicated on the reliable measurement of impact pressure histories. Tests have been performed with a variety of pressure transducers from various manufacturers. Both piezoelectric and piezoresistive devices have been tested. Effects such as thermal shock, pinching of the transducer head, and flushness of the transducer mounting have been studied. Data acquisition issues such as sampling rate and anti-aliasing filtering also have been studied. The response of pressure transducers have been compared side-by-side on an impulse test rig and on a 20-inch diameter hemisphere dropped into a pool of water. The results have identified a range of viable configurations for pressure measurement dependent on the objectives of the test program.

  11. Analysis of Environmental Effects on Leaf Temperature under Sunlight, High Pressure Sodium and Light Emitting Diodes

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jacob A.; Bugbee, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The use of LED technology is commonly assumed to result in significantly cooler leaf temperatures than high pressure sodium technology. To evaluate the magnitude of this effect, we measured radiation incident to and absorbed by a leaf under four radiation sources: clear sky sunlight in the field, sunlight in a glass greenhouse, and indoor plants under either high pressure sodium or light emitting diodes. We then applied a common mechanistic energy-balance model to compare leaf to air temperature difference among the radiation sources and environments. At equal photosynthetic photon flux, our results indicate that the effect of plant water status and leaf evaporative cooling is much larger than the effect of radiation source. If plants are not water stressed, leaves in all four radiation sources were typically within 2°C of air temperature. Under clear sky conditions, cool sky temperatures mean that leaves in the field are always cooler than greenhouse or indoor plants-when photosynthetic photon flux, stomatal conductance, wind speed, vapor pressure deficit, and leaf size are equivalent. As water stress increases and cooling via transpiration decreases, leaf temperatures can increase well above air temperature. In a near-worst case scenario of water stress and low wind, our model indicates that leaves would increase 6°, 8°, 10°, and 12°C above air temperature under field, LED, greenhouse, and HPS scenarios, respectively. Because LED fixtures emit much of their heat through convection rather than radiative cooling, they result in slightly cooler leaf temperatures than leaves in greenhouses and under HPS fixtures, but the effect of LED technology on leaf temperature is smaller than is often assumed. Quantifying the thermodynamic outputs of these lamps, and their physiological consequences, will allow both researchers and the horticulture industry to make informed decisions when employing these technologies. PMID:26448613

  12. Analysis of Environmental Effects on Leaf Temperature under Sunlight, High Pressure Sodium and Light Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jacob A; Bugbee, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The use of LED technology is commonly assumed to result in significantly cooler leaf temperatures than high pressure sodium technology. To evaluate the magnitude of this effect, we measured radiation incident to and absorbed by a leaf under four radiation sources: clear sky sunlight in the field, sunlight in a glass greenhouse, and indoor plants under either high pressure sodium or light emitting diodes. We then applied a common mechanistic energy-balance model to compare leaf to air temperature difference among the radiation sources and environments. At equal photosynthetic photon flux, our results indicate that the effect of plant water status and leaf evaporative cooling is much larger than the effect of radiation source. If plants are not water stressed, leaves in all four radiation sources were typically within 2°C of air temperature. Under clear sky conditions, cool sky temperatures mean that leaves in the field are always cooler than greenhouse or indoor plants-when photosynthetic photon flux, stomatal conductance, wind speed, vapor pressure deficit, and leaf size are equivalent. As water stress increases and cooling via transpiration decreases, leaf temperatures can increase well above air temperature. In a near-worst case scenario of water stress and low wind, our model indicates that leaves would increase 6°, 8°, 10°, and 12°C above air temperature under field, LED, greenhouse, and HPS scenarios, respectively. Because LED fixtures emit much of their heat through convection rather than radiative cooling, they result in slightly cooler leaf temperatures than leaves in greenhouses and under HPS fixtures, but the effect of LED technology on leaf temperature is smaller than is often assumed. Quantifying the thermodynamic outputs of these lamps, and their physiological consequences, will allow both researchers and the horticulture industry to make informed decisions when employing these technologies. PMID:26448613

  13. Applications of the compensating pressure theory of water transport.

    PubMed

    Canny, M

    1998-07-01

    Some predictions of the recently proposed theory of long-distance water transport in plants (the Compensating Pressure Theory) have been verified experimentally in sunflower leaves. The xylem sap cavitates early in the day under quite small water stress, and the compensating pressure P (applied as the tissue pressure of turgid cells) pushes water into embolized vessels, refilling them during active transpiration. The water potential, as measured by the pressure chamber or psychrometer, is not a measure of the pressure in the xylem, but (as predicted by the theory) a measure of the compensating pressure P. As transpiration increases, P is increased to provide more rapid embolism repair. In many leaf petioles this increase in P is achieved by the hydrolysis of starch in the starch sheath to soluble sugars. At night P falls as starch is reformed. A hypothesis is proposed to explain these observations by pressure-driven reverse osmosis of water from the ground parenchyma of the petiole. Similar processes occur in roots and are manifested as root pressure. The theory requires a pump to transfer water from the soil into the root xylem. A mechanism is proposed by which this pump may function, in which the endodermis acts as a one-way valve and a pressure-confining barrier. Rays and xylem parenchyma of wood act like the xylem parenchyma of petioles and roots to repair embolisms in trees. The postulated root pump permits a re-appraisal of the work done by evaporation during transpiration, leading to the proposal that in tall trees there is no hydrostatic gradient to be overcome in lifting water. Some published observations are re-interpreted in terms of the theory: doubt is cast on the validity of measurements of hydraulic conductance of wood; vulnerability curves are found not to measure the cavitation threshold of water in the xylem, but the osmotic pressure of the xylem parenchyma; if measures of xylem pressure and of hydraulic conductance are both suspect, the accepted

  14. High-pressure injection injury with river water.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, M I

    1978-06-01

    A case of high pressure injection and laceration of the calf with river water is reported, the first such case appearing in the literature. As with high pressure injection of grease, paint, paint thinner, mineral spirits, diesel oil, gasoline, and turpentine, this injury is a surgical emergency. All patients must be admitted for surgical debridement, irrigation, parenteral antibiotics, and observation. River water, contaminated by sewage and industrial wastes, has great irritative and infective potential. PMID:661048

  15. Transit time of mixed high pressure injection water and primary loop water in pressurized water reactor cold legs

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, B.H.; Oh, S.; Rothe, P.H.

    1984-03-01

    During an overcooling transient in a pressurized water reactor, cold water from the high pressure injection (HPI) mixes with the hot primary coolant in the cold leg. The transit time is a gauge for the assessment of the time and the velocity of the mixed flow that passes through the cold leg to the downcomer. Existing data from mixing tests at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)/CREARE and EPRI/SAI facilities are analyzed. By means of models for HPI jet entrainment as well as the propagation of a gravity current, dimensionless correlations have been developed for the transit time and cold water front velocity at stagnant loop flow conditions. Based on this transit time correlation for stagnant loop flow and the limiting condition for large loop flow, a general correlation has been developed to account for the loop flow effect on transit time. These correlations unify a wide range of data obtained from five geometrically different test sections with two fluids (pure water and saline solution). In addition to the geometric factors, the governing dimensionless parameters for the transit time are the HPI jet Froude number, the Froude number for the cold-leg channel, and the ratio of loop flow to HPI flow.

  16. Where Did the Water Go?: Boyle's Law and Pressurized Diaphragm Water Tanks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brimhall, James; Naga, Sundar

    2007-01-01

    Many homes use pressurized diaphragm tanks for storage of water pumped from an underground well. These tanks are very carefully constructed to have separate internal chambers for the storage of water and for the air that provides the pressure. One might expect that the amount of water available for use from, for example, a 50-gallon tank would be…

  17. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Aines, R D; Wolery, T J; Bourcier, W L; Wolfe, T; Haussmann, C

    2010-02-19

    Can we use the pressure associated with sequestration to make brine into fresh water? This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). Possible products are: Drinking water, Cooling water, and Extra aquifer space for CO{sub 2} storage. The conclusions are: (1) Many saline formation waters appear to be amenable to largely conventional RO treatment; (2) Thermodynamic modeling indicates that osmotic pressure is more limiting on water recovery than mineral scaling; (3) The use of thermodynamic modeling with Pitzer's equations (or Extended UNIQUAC) allows accurate estimation of osmotic pressure limits; (4) A general categorization of treatment feasibility is based on TDS has been proposed, in which brines with 10,000-85,000 mg/L are the most attractive targets; (5) Brines in this TDS range appear to be abundant (geographically and with depth) and could be targeted in planning future CCS operations (including site selection and choice of injection formation); and (6) The estimated cost of treating waters in the 10,000-85,000 mg/L TDS range is about half that for conventional seawater desalination, due to the anticipated pressure recovery.

  18. The initiation of boiling during pressure transients. [water boiling on metal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisman, J.; Bussell, G.; Jashnani, I. L.; Hsieh, T.

    1973-01-01

    The initiation of boiling of water on metal surfaces during pressure transients has been investigated. The data were obtained by a new technique in which light beam fluctuations and a pressure signal were simultaneously recorded on a dual beam oscilloscope. The results obtained agreed with those obtained using high speed photography. It was found that, for water temperatures between 90-150 C, the wall superheat required to initiate boiling during a rapid pressure transient was significantly higher than required when the pressure was slowly reduced. This result is explained by assuming that a finite time is necessary for vapor to fill the cavity at which the bubble originates. Experimental measurements of this time are in reasonably good agreement with calculations based on the proposed theory. The theory includes a new procedure for estimating the coefficient of vaporization.

  19. Water dynamics and retrogradation of ultrahigh pressurized wheat starch.

    PubMed

    Doona, Christopher J; Feeherry, Florence E; Baik, Moo-Yeol

    2006-09-01

    The water dynamics and retrogradation kinetics behavior of gelatinized wheat starch by either ultrahigh pressure (UHP) processing or heat are investigated. Wheat starch completely gelatinized in the condition of 90, 000 psi at 25 degrees C for 30 min (pressurized gel) or 100 degrees C for 30 min (heated gel). The physical properties of the wheat starches were characterized in terms of proton relaxation times (T2 times) measured using time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and evaluated using commercially available continuous distribution modeling software. Different T2 distributions in both micro- and millisecond ranges between pressurized and heated wheat starch gels suggest distinctively different water dynamics between pressurized and heated wheat starch gels. Smaller water self-diffusion coefficients were observed for pressurized wheat starch gels and are indicative of more restricted translational proton mobility than is observed with heated wheat starch gels. The physical characteristics associated with changes taking place during retrogradation were evaluated using melting curves obtained with differential scanning calorimetry. Less retrogradation was observed in pressurized wheat starch, and it may be related to a smaller quantity of freezable water in pressurized wheat starch. Starches comprise a major constituent of many foods proposed for commercial potential using UHP, and the present results furnish insight into the effect of UHP on starch gelatinization and the mechanism of retrogradation during storage. PMID:16939331

  20. Water-plasma-assisted synthesis of black titania spheres with efficient visible-light photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Panomsuwan, Gasidit; Watthanaphanit, Anyarat; Ishizaki, Takahiro; Saito, Nagahiro

    2015-06-01

    Black titania spheres (H-TiO2-x) were synthesized via a simple green method assisted by water plasma at a low temperature and atmospheric pressure. The in situ production of highly energetic hydroxyl and hydrogen species from water plasma are the prominent factors in the oxidation and hydrogenation reactions during the formation of H-TiO2-x, respectively. The visible-light photocatalytic activity toward the dye degradation of H-TiO2-x can be attributed to the synergistic effect of large-surface area, visible-light absorption and the existence of oxygen vacancies and Ti(3+) sites. PMID:25946395

  1. Pressure: the politechnics of water supply in Mumbai.

    PubMed

    Anand, Nikhil

    2011-01-01

    In Mumbai, most all residents are delivered their daily supply of water for a few hours every day, on a water supply schedule. Subject to a more precarious supply than the city's upper-class residents, the city's settlers have to consistently demand that their water come on “time” and with “pressure.” Taking pressure seriously as both a social and natural force, in this article I focus on the ways in which settlers mobilize the pressures of politics, pumps, and pipes to get water. I show how these practices not only allow settlers to live in the city, but also produce what I call hydraulic citizenship—a form of belonging to the city made by effective political and technical connections to the city's infrastructure. Yet, not all settlers are able to get water from the city water department. The outcomes of settlers' efforts to access water depend on a complex matrix of socionatural relations that settlers make with city engineers and their hydraulic infrastructure. I show how these arrangements describe and produce the cultural politics of water in Mumbai. By focusing on the ways in which residents in a predominantly Muslim settlement draw water despite the state's neglect, I conclude by pointing to the indeterminacy of water, and the ways in which its seepage and leakage make different kinds of politics and publics possible in the city. PMID:22171410

  2. Water cycles in closed ecological systems: effects of atmospheric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rygalov, Vadim Y.; Fowler, Philip A.; Metz, Joannah M.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Bucklin, Ray A.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    In bioregenerative life support systems that use plants to generate food and oxygen, the largest mass flux between the plants and their surrounding environment will be water. This water cycle is a consequence of the continuous change of state (evaporation-condensation) from liquid to gas through the process of transpiration and the need to transfer heat (cool) and dehumidify the plant growth chamber. Evapotranspiration rates for full plant canopies can range from 1 to 10 L m-2 d-1 (1 to 10 mm m-2 d-1), with the rates depending primarily on the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) between the leaves and the air inside the plant growth chamber. VPD in turn is dependent on the air temperature, leaf temperature, and current value of relative humidity (RH). Concepts for developing closed plant growth systems, such as greenhouses for Mars, have been discussed for many years and the feasibility of such systems will depend on the overall system costs and reliability. One approach for reducing system costs would be to reduce the operating pressure within the greenhouse to reduce structural mass and gas leakage. But managing plant growth environments at low pressures (e.g., controlling humidity and heat exchange) may be difficult, and the effects of low-pressure environments on plant growth and system water cycling need further study. We present experimental evidence to show that water saturation pressures in air under isothermal conditions are only slightly affected by total pressure, but the overall water flux from evaporating surfaces can increase as pressure decreases. Mathematical models describing these observations are presented, along with discussion of the importance for considering "water cycles" in closed bioregenerative life support systems.

  3. Water cycles in closed ecological systems: effects of atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Rygalov, Vadim Y; Fowler, Philip A; Metz, Joannah M; Wheeler, Raymond M; Bucklin, Ray A

    2002-01-01

    In bioregenerative life support systems that use plants to generate food and oxygen, the largest mass flux between the plants and their surrounding environment will be water. This water cycle is a consequence of the continuous change of state (evaporation-condensation) from liquid to gas through the process of transpiration and the need to transfer heat (cool) and dehumidify the plant growth chamber. Evapotranspiration rates for full plant canopies can range from ~1 to 10 L m-2 d-1 (~1 to 10 mm m-2 d-1), with the rates depending primarily on the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) between the leaves and the air inside the plant growth chamber. VPD in turn is dependent on the air temperature, leaf temperature, and current value of relative humidity (RH). Concepts for developing closed plant growth systems, such as greenhouses for Mars, have been discussed for many years and the feasibility of such systems will depend on the overall system costs and reliability. One approach for reducing system costs would be to reduce the operating pressure within the greenhouse to reduce structural mass and gas leakage. But managing plant growth environments at low pressures (e.g., controlling humidity and heat exchange) may be difficult, and the effects of low-pressure environments on plant growth and system water cycling need further study. We present experimental evidence to show that water saturation pressures in air under isothermal conditions are only slightly affected by total pressure, but the overall water flux from evaporating surfaces can increase as pressure decreases. Mathematical models describing these observations are presented, along with discussion of the importance for considering "water cycles" in closed bioregenerative life support systems. PMID:12481804

  4. Ultra-miniature fiber-optic pressure sensor using white light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totsu, Kentaro; Haga, Yoichi; Esashi, Masayoshi

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometric pressure sensor of 125 µm in diameter and a detection system for medical use. A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed at an optical fiber end. A deformation of the diaphragm of the Fabry-Perot cavity induced by pressure varies the cavity length. White light interferometry is used to avoid error and noise caused by bending of the optical fiber and fluctuation of the light source. The reflection light of the sensor cavity is detected by a commercial high-speed spectrometer. A pressure change has been detected by using the developed sensor system. Animal experiments using a goat have been carried out and dynamic pressure changes in the internal pressure of heart and aorta have been successfully monitored.

  5. 40 CFR 264.1058 - Standards: Pumps and valves in heavy liquid service, pressure relief devices in light liquid or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... liquid service, pressure relief devices in light liquid or heavy liquid service, and flanges and other... heavy liquid service, pressure relief devices in light liquid or heavy liquid service, and flanges and other connectors. (a) Pumps and valves in heavy liquid service, pressure relief devices in light...

  6. Polarization of light in shallow waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilerson, Alexander; Ibrahim, Amir; Stepinski, Jan; Ahmed, Samir

    2013-10-01

    Measurements of the upwelling polarized radiance in relatively shallow waters of varying depths and benthic conditions are compared to simulationsrevealing the depolarizing nature of the seafloor. Significant correlations between simulations and measurements are attained when the appropriate unpolarized, Lambertian bottoms are included in the radiative transfer model. The bottoms used in this study produce realistic upwelling radiance distributions as well as ranges of the degree of linear polarization (DoLP) that peak between 10 and 30%. This study specifically finds that polarization in upwelling radiance is best preserved at long wavelengths in clear waters and also at short wavelengths in phytoplankton- and CDOM-rich waters. These results can thus facilitate the detection of benthic materials as well as future studies of camouflage by benthic biota.The DoLPwas found to be highly sensitive to benthic reflectance, but the angle of polarization (AoLP), which quantifies the orientation of polarization, is independent of it. The AoLP could therefore be used to communicate and sense direction underwater.

  7. Design of virtual SCADA simulation system for pressurized water reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijaksono, Umar; Abdullah, Ade Gafar; Hakim, Dadang Lukman

    2016-02-01

    The Virtual SCADA system is a software-based Human-Machine Interface that can visualize the process of a plant. This paper described the results of the virtual SCADA system design that aims to recognize the principle of the Nuclear Power Plant type Pressurized Water Reactor. This simulation uses technical data of the Nuclear Power Plant Unit Olkiluoto 3 in Finland. This device was developed using Wonderware Intouch, which is equipped with manual books for each component, animation links, alarm systems, real time and historical trending, and security system. The results showed that in general this device can demonstrate clearly the principles of energy flow and energy conversion processes in Pressurized Water Reactors. This virtual SCADA simulation system can be used as instructional media to recognize the principle of Pressurized Water Reactor.

  8. Heat of freezing for supercooled water: measurements at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Will; Kostinski, Alexander; Szedlak, Anthony; Johnson, Alexandria

    2011-06-16

    Unlike reversible phase transitions, the amount of heat released upon freezing of a metastable supercooled liquid depends on the degree of supercooling. Although terrestrial supercooled water is ubiquitous and has implications for cloud dynamics and nucleation, measurements of its heat of freezing are scarce. We have performed calorimetric measurements of the heat released by freezing water at atmospheric pressure as a function of supercooling. Our measurements show that the heat of freezing can be considerably below one predicted from a reversible hydrostatic process. Our measurements also indicate that the state of the resulting ice is not fully specified by the final pressure and temperature; the ice is likely to be strained on a variety of scales, implying a higher vapor pressure. This would reduce the vapor gradient between supercooled water and ice in mixed phase atmospheric clouds. PMID:21087023

  9. Dynamics of Nano-Confined Water under Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Omar Diallo, Souleymane; Jazdzewska, Monika; Palmer, Jeremy; Mamontov, Eugene; Gubbins, Dr. K. E.; Sliwinska-Bartkowiak, M

    2013-01-01

    We report a study of the effects of pressure on the diffusivity of water molecules confined in single- wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with average mean pore diameter of 16 A. The measurements were carried out using high-resolution neutron scattering, over the temperature range 220 T 260 K, and at two pressure conditions: ambient and elevated pressure. The high pressure data were collected at constant volume on cooling, with P varying from 1.92 kbar at temperature T = 260 K to 1.85 kbar at T = 220 K. Analysis of the observed dynamic structure factor S(Q, E) reveals the presence of two relaxation processes, a faster diffusion component (FC) associated with the motion of caged or restricted molecules, and a slower component arising from the free water molecules diffusing within the SWNT matrix. While the temperature dependence of the slow relaxation time exhibits a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law and is non-Arrhenius in nature, the faster component follows an Arrhenius exponential law at both pressure conditions. The application of pressure remarkably slows down the overall molecular dynamics, in agreement with previous observations, but most notably affects the slow relaxation. The faster relaxation shows marginal or no change with pressure within the experimental conditions.

  10. Experience with non-fuel-bearing components in LWR (light-water reactor) fuel systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.J.; Berting, F.M.

    1990-12-01

    Many non-fuel-bearing components are so closely associated with the spent fuel assemblies that their integrity and behavior must be taken into consideration with the fuel assemblies, when handling spent fuel of planning waste management activities. Presented herein is some of the experience that has been gained over the past two decades from non-fuel-bearing components in light-water reactors (LWRs), both pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) and boiling-water reactors (BWRs). Among the most important of these components are the control rod systems, the absorber and burnable poison rods, and the fuel assembly channels. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Fracture analysis of axially cracked pressure tube of pressurized heavy water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, S.; Bhasin, V.; Mahajan, S.C.

    1997-04-01

    Three Dimensional (313) finite element elastic plastic fracture analysis was done for through wall axially cracked thin pressure tubes of 220 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor. The analysis was done for Zr-2 and Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes operating at 300{degrees}C and subjected to 9.5 Mpa internal pressure. Critical crack length was determined based on tearing instability concept. The analysis included the effect of crack face pressure due to the leaking fluid from tube. This effect was found to be significant for pressure tubes. The available formulae for calculating J (for axially cracked tubes) do not take into account the effect of crack face pressure. 3D finite element analysis also gives insight into variation of J across the thickness of pressure tube. It was observed that J is highest at the mid-surface of tube. The results have been presented in the form of across the thickness average J value and a peak factor on J. Peak factor on J is ratio of J at mid surface to average J value. Crack opening area for different cracked lengths was calculated from finite element results. The fracture assessment of pressure tubes was also done using Central Electricity Generating Board R-6 method. Ductile tearing was considered.

  12. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.; Maiya, P.S.; Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.E.

    1988-10-01

    Research during the past year focused on (1) stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austentitic stainless steels (SS), (2) fatigue of Type 316NG SS, and (3) SCC of ferritic steels used in reactor piping, pressure vessels, and steam generators. Stress corrosion cracking studies on austentitic SS explored the critical strains required for crack initiation, the effects of crevice conditions on SCC susceptibility, heat-to-heat variations in SCC susceptibility of Type 316NG and modified Type 347 SS, the effect of heat treatment on the susceptibility of Type 347 SS, threshold stress intensity values for crack growth in Type 316NG SS, and the effects of cuprous ion and several organic salts on the SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS. Crevice conditions were observed to strongly promote SCC. Significant heat-to-heat variations were observed in SCC susceptibility of Types 316NG and 347 SS. No correlation was found between SCC behavior and minor variations in chemical composition. A significant effect of heat treatment was observed in Type 347 SS. A heat that was extremely resistant to SCC after heat treatment at 650/degree/C for 24 h was susceptible to transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC) in the solution-annealed condition. Although there was no sensitization in either condition, the presence or absence of precipitates and differences in precipitate morphology appear to influence the SCC behavior. 20 refs., 20 figs., 11 tabs.

  13. Pressure loading of aluminum and quartz using spray deposited light-initiated high explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Benham, R. A.

    1980-02-01

    A series of experiments was conducted for the purpose of evaluating the impulsive pressure loading generated at a material surface by the detonation of light-initiated high explosive on that surface. The explosive was sprayed and then detonated directly on both carbon and quartz pressure transducers. The output was recorded to allow determination of the characteristics of the pressure loading, as well as to evaluate the variability of this loading.

  14. Disjoining pressure isotherms of water-in-bitumen emulsion films.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Shawn D; Czarnecki, Jan; Masliyah, Jacob

    2002-08-01

    In the oil sands industry, undesirable water-in-oil emulsions are often formed during the bitumen recovery process where water is used to liberate bitumen from sand grains. Nearly all of the water is removed except for a small percentage (approximately 1 to 2%), which remains in the solvent-diluted bitumen as micrometer-sized droplets. Knowledge of the colloidal forces that stabilized these water droplets would help to increase our understanding of how these emulsions are stabilized. In this study, the thin liquid film-pressure balance technique has been used to measure isotherms of disjoining pressure in water/toluene-diluted bitumen/water films at five different toluene-bitumen mass ratios. Even though a broad range of mass ratios was studied, only two isotherms are obtained, indicating a possible change in the molecular orientation of surfactant molecules at the bitumen/water interfaces. At low toluene-bitumen mass ratios, the film stability appears to be due to a strong, short-range steric repulsion created by a surfactant bilayer. Similar isotherms were obtained for water/toluene-diluted asphaltene/water films, indicating that the surface active material at the interface probably originated from the asphaltene fraction of the bitumen. However, unlike the bitumen films, films of toluene-diluted asphaltenes often formed very rigid interfaces similar to the "protective skin" described by other researcher. PMID:16290773

  15. Testing of the Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) Passive Safety Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, Jose N.; Groome, John; Woods, Brian G.; Young, Eric; Abel, Kent; Yao, You; Yeon Jong Yoo

    2006-07-01

    Experimental thermal hydraulic research has been conducted at Oregon State University for the purpose of assessing the performance of a new reactor design concept, the Multi-application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR). MASLWR is a pressurized light water reactor that uses natural circulation in both normal and transient operation. The purpose of the OSU MASLWR Test Facility is to assess the operation of the MASLWR under normal full pressure and full temperature conditions and to assess the passive safety systems under transient conditions. The data generated by the testing program will be used to assess computer code calculations and to provide a better understanding of the thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the design of the MASLWR NSSS. During this testing program, four tests were conducted at the OSU MASLWR Test Facility. These tests included one design basis accident and one beyond design basis accident. Plant start up, normal operation and shut down evolutions were also examined. (authors)

  16. Corrosion problems in light water nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, W.E.

    1984-06-01

    The corrosion problems encountered during the author's career are reviewed. Attention is given to the development of Zircaloys and attendant factors that affect corrosion; the caustic and chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steel steam generator tubing; the qualification of Inconel Alloy 600 for steam generator tubing and the subsequent corrosion problem of secondary side wastage, caustic SCC, pitting, intergranular attack, denting, and primary side SCC; and SCC in weld and furnace sensitized stainless steel piping and internals in boiling water reactor primary coolants. Also mentioned are corrosion of metallic uranium alloy fuels; corrosion of aluminum and niobium candidate fuel element claddings; crevice corrosion and seizing of stainless steel journal-sleeve combinations; SCC of precipitation hardened and martensitic stainless steels; low temperature SCC of welded austenitic stainless steels by chloride, fluoride, and sulfur oxy-anions; and corrosion problems experienced by condensers.

  17. Ultraviolet light may contribute to geographic and racial blood pressure differences.

    PubMed

    Rostand, S G

    1997-08-01

    Mean systolic and diastolic pressures and the prevalence of hypertension vary throughout the world. Published data suggest a linear rise in blood pressure at increasing distances from the equator. Similarly, blood pressure is higher in winter than summer. Blood pressure also is affected by variations in skin pigmentation. Altered calcium, vitamin D, and parathyroid hormone status is associated with hypertension and may vary with latitude and season. Since changes in UV light affect vitamin D and parathyroid hormone status and UV light intensity are influenced by seasonal change and latitude, these disparate observations suggest an association between blood pressure and ultraviolet light. This discussion presents the hypothesis that reduced epidermal vitamin D3 photosynthesis associated with high skin melanin content and/or decreased UV light intensity at distances from the equator, alone or when coupled with decreased dietary calcium and vitamin D, may be associated with reduced vitamin D stores and increased parathyroid hormone secretion. These changes may stimulate growth of vascular smooth muscle and enhance its contractility by affecting intracellular calcium, adrenergic responsiveness, and/or endothelial function. Thus, UV light intensity and efficiency of epidermal vitamin D3 photosynthesis may contribute to geographic and racial variability in blood pressure and the prevalence of hypertension. PMID:9260973

  18. Pressure-Induced Phase Transformation, Reversible Amorphization, and Anomalous Visible Light Response in Organolead Bromide Perovskite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yonggang; Lü, Xujie; Yang, Wenge; Wen, Ting; Yang, Liuxiang; Ren, Xiangting; Wang, Lin; Lin, Zheshuai; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-09-01

    Hydrostatic pressure, as an alternative of chemical pressure to tune the crystal structure and physical properties, is a significant technique for novel function material design and fundamental research. In this article, we report the phase stability and visible light response of the organolead bromide perovskite, CH3NH3PbBr3 (MAPbBr3), under hydrostatic pressure up to 34 GPa at room temperature. Two phase transformations below 2 GPa (from Pm3̅m to Im3̅, then to Pnma) and a reversible amorphization starting from about 2 GPa were observed, which could be attributed to the tilting of PbBr6 octahedra and destroying of long-range ordering of MA cations, respectively. The visible light response of MAPbBr3 to pressure was studied by in situ photoluminescence, electric resistance, photocurrent measurements and first-principle simulations. The anomalous band gap evolution during compression with red-shift followed by blue-shift is explained by the competition between compression effect and pressure-induced amorphization. Along with the amorphization process accomplished around 25 GPa, the resistance increased by 5 orders of magnitude while the system still maintains its semiconductor characteristics and considerable response to the visible light irradiation. Our results not only show that hydrostatic pressure may provide an applicable tool for the organohalide perovskites based photovoltaic device functioning as switcher or controller, but also shed light on the exploration of more amorphous organometal composites as potential light absorber. PMID:26284441

  19. Ultra-high pressure water jet: Baseline report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The ultra-high pressure waterjet technology was being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The ultra-high pressure waterjet technology acts as a cutting tool for the removal of surface substrates. The Husky{trademark} pump feeds water to a lance that directs the high pressure water at the surface to be removed. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure. These were dust and noise. The dust exposure was found to be minimal, which would be expected due to the wet environment inherent in the technology, but noise exposure was at a significant level. Further testing for noise is recommended because of the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, lockout/tagout, fall hazards, slipping hazards, hazards associated with the high pressure water, and hazards associated with air pressure systems.

  20. Interpretations of water pressure response during the 2011 Tohoku earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, H.; Ohmachi, T.; Inoue, S.

    2012-04-01

    Water pressure change have been recorded during the 2011 Tohoku earthquake (Mw9.0) by two ocean-bottom pressure gauges of the JAMSTEC cabled observatory off Hokkaido, and they have been interpreted in terms of the tsunami numerical simulation. The acquired data have demonstrated that two kinds of water waves involved in the tsunami generation process from the 2011 Tohoku earthquake; that is, one is water waves preceding the tsunami having relatively short period to the tsunami and the other is long period wave well known as tsunami. Their features are summarized in order as, 1. As for the tsunami, it was detected 20 min after the main shock by the water pressure gauges located approximately 400 km north from the earthquake epicenter. The first arrival tsunami had a maximum height of 0.6 m and its period of about 40 min. There is no significant difference except for the arrival time among two ocean-bottom pressure gauges. The tsunami had a gentle rise followed by a solitary wave with a height of about 3 m and duration of about 5min in the other similar ocean-bottom pressure gauges deployed near the tsunami source (e.g., Maeda et al., 2011), whereas such a solitary wave was not recorded by the JAMSTEC ocean-bottom pressure gauges. This feature might be attributed to the tectonic mechanism. Difference of the tsunami features between two observatories are attributed not only to the source distance but also the directivity of the tsunami energy, because the JAMSTEC cabled observatory was located parallel to the seismic fault strike direction. 2. The water waves preceding the tsunami were detected in an early stage of the water pressure change. Comparing water pressure together with the data of the ocean-bottom seismometers nearby, it has been revealed that this is associated with the forced oscillation response of water layer by ground motion acceleration, i.e., hydro-dynamic response. This kind of waves was seemingly attributed to a moderate-to-large ocean

  1. Dielectric constant of water at very high temperature and pressure

    PubMed Central

    Pitzer, Kenneth S.

    1983-01-01

    Pertinent statistical mechanical theory is combined with the available measurements of the dielectric constant of water at high temperature and pressure to predict that property at still higher temperature. The dielectric constant is needed in connection with studies of electrolytes such as NaCl/H2O at very high temperature. PMID:16593342

  2. Ultra-high pressure water jet: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The ultra-high pressure waterjet technology was being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The ultra-high pressure waterjet technology acts as a cutting tool for the removal of surface substrates. The Husky{trademark} pump feeds water to a lance that directs the high pressure water at the surface to be removed. The technologies being tested for concrete decontamination are targeted for alpha contamination. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  3. Dynamic response of berea sandstone shock-loaded under dry, wet and water-pressurized conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, T C; Hagelberg, C R; Hilt, M; Nellis, W J; Swift, R P

    1999-09-03

    A single-stage light-gas gun was used to perform shock-recovery experiments on Berea sandstone under dry, wet and hydrostatically water-pressurized conditions. The samples were impacted by flyer-plates to achieve stress levels in the range 1.3 to 9.8 GPa. The microstructure of the shocked samples was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser particle analysis and X-ray computed microtomography (XCMT). The dry samples show strongly fragmented and irregularly fractured quartz grains with a considerably reduced porosity, whereas the wet and water-pressurized specimens show less grain damage and less porosity reduction. During shock compression the water in the pores distributes the stresses and therefore the contact force between the grains is reduced. The interaction between the grains during the shock process was modeled by explicitly treating the grain-pore structure using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) and the Discrete Element Method (DEM).

  4. Pressure effect on water dynamics in tert-butyl alcohol/water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calandrini, Vania; Deriu, Antonio; Onori, Giuseppe; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Telling, Mark T. F.

    2006-09-01

    We report here a quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) investigation of the effect of pressure on the diffusivity properties of water in a dilute aqueous solution of hydrophobic molecules (tert-butyl alcohol, TBA). The experiment was performed at fixed TBA concentration (0.02 molar fraction) by varying pressure from 1 to 2000 bar at two different temperatures (268 and 278 K). The quasi-elastic line-shapes have been analysed in terms of a model based on the memory function formalism. Our data indicate that, on increasing pressure up to 2000 bar, the diffusion coefficient of water in the TBA/water mixture exhibits a relative increase larger than that of pure water under the same thermodynamic conditions. The extent of this effect increases with decreasing temperature. The observed behaviour is described in terms of pressure-induced distortions of the H-bonded random network of liquid water.

  5. Statistical physics and liquid water at negative pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. Eugene; Barbosa, M. C.; Mossa, S.; Netz, P. A.; Sciortino, F.; Starr, F. W.; Yamada, M.

    2002-11-01

    Angell and his collaborators have underscored the importance of studying water under all extremes of pressure-squeezing to high pressures and stretching to negative pressures. Here we review recent results of molecular dynamics simulations of two models of liquid water, the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) and the Mahoney-Jorgensen transferable intermolecular potential with five points (TIP5P), which is closer to real water than previously proposed classical pairwise additive potentials. In particular, we describe simulations of the TIP5P model for a wide range of deeply supercooled states, including both positive and negative pressures, which reveal (i) the existence of a non-monotonic “nose-shaped” temperature of maximum density (TMD) line and a non-reentrant spinodal, (ii) the presence of a low-temperature phase transition. The TMD that changes slope from negative to positive as P decreases and, notably, the point of crossover between the two behaviors is located at ambient pressure (temperature ≈ 4° C, and density ≈ 1 g/cm3). We also describe simulations of the dynamics of the SPC/E model, which reveal (iii) the dynamics at negative pressure shows a minimum in the diffusion constant D when the density is decreased at constant temperature, complementary to the known maximum of D at higher pressures, and (iv) the loci of minima of D relative to the spinodal shows that they are inside the thermodynamically metastable regions of the phase diagram. These dynamical results reflect the initial enhancement and subsequent breakdown of the tetrahedral structure and of the hydrogen bond network as the density decreases.

  6. Development test procedure High Pressure Water Jet System

    SciTech Connect

    Crystal, J.B.

    1995-06-05

    Development testing will be performed on the water jet cleaning fixture to determine the most effective arrangement of water jet nozzles to remove contamination from the surfaces of canisters and other debris. The following debris may be stained with dye to simulate surface contaminates: Mark O, Mark I, and Mark II Fuel Storage Canisters (both stainless steel and aluminum), pipe of various size, (steel, stainless, carbon steel and aluminum). Carbon steel and stainless steel plate, channel, angle, I-beam and other surfaces, specifically based on the Scientific Ecology Group (SEG) inventory and observations of debris within the basin. Test procedure for developmental testing of High Pressure Water Jet System.

  7. Stem Photosynthesis not Pressurized Ventilation is Responsible for Light-enhanced Oxygen Supply to Submerged Roots of Alder (Alnus glutinosa)

    PubMed Central

    ARMSTRONG, WILLIAM; ARMSTRONG, JEAN

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims Claims that submerged roots of alder and other wetland trees are aerated by pressurized gas flow generated in the stem by a light-induced thermo-osmosis have seemed inconsistent with root anatomy. Our aim was to seek a verification using physical root–stem models, stem segments with or without artificial roots, and rooted saplings. • Methods Radial O2 loss (ROL) from roots was monitored polarographically as the gas space system of the models, and stems were pressurized artificially. ROL and internal pressurization were also measured when stems were irradiated and the xylem stream was either CO2 enriched or not. Stem photosynthesis and respiration were measured polarographically. Stem and root anatomy were examined by light and fluorescence microscopy. • Key Results Pressurizing the models and stems to ≤10 kPa, values much higher than those reportedly generated by thermo-osmosis, created only a negligible density-induced increase in ROL, but ROL increased rapidly when ambient O2 concentrations were raised. Internal pressures rose by several kPa when shoots were exposed to high light flux and ROL increased substantially, but both were due to O2 accumulation from stem photosynthesis using internally sourced CO2. Increased stem pressures had little effect on O2 transport, which remained largely diffusive. Oxygen flux from stems in high light periods indicated a net C gain by stem photosynthesis. Chloroplasts were abundant in the secondary cortex and secondary phloem, and occurred throughout the secondary xylem rays and medulla of 3-year-old stems. Diurnal patterns of ROL, most marked when light reached submerged portions of the stem, were modified by minor variations in light flux and water level. Low root temperatures also helped improve root aeration. • Conclusions Pressurized gas flow to submerged roots does not occur to any significant degree in alder, but stem photosynthesis, using internally sourced CO2 from respiration and the

  8. Contribution of Water to Pressure and Cold Denaturation of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Valentino; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2015-09-01

    The mechanisms of cold and pressure denaturation of proteins are matter of debate and are commonly understood as due to water-mediated interactions. Here, we study several cases of proteins, with or without a unique native state, with or without hydrophilic residues, by means of a coarse-grain protein model in explicit solvent. We show, using Monte Carlo simulations, that taking into account how water at the protein interface changes its hydrogen bond properties and its density fluctuations is enough to predict protein stability regions with elliptic shapes in the temperature-pressure plane, consistent with previous theories. Our results clearly identify the different mechanisms with which water participates to denaturation and open the perspective to develop advanced computational design tools for protein engineering.

  9. Water under inner pressure: a dielectric spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Angulo-Sherman, Abril; Mercado-Uribe, Hilda

    2014-02-01

    Water is the most studied substance on Earth. However, it is not completely understood why its structural and dynamical properties give rise to some anomalous behaviors. Some of them emerge when experiments at low temperatures and/or high pressures are performed. Here we report dielectric measurements on cold water under macroscopically constrained conditions, i.e., water in a large container at constant volume that cannot freeze below the melting point. The inner pressure in these conditions shifts the α relaxation peak to similar frequencies as seen in ice Ih. At 267 K we observe a peculiar response possibly due to the Grotthuss mechanism. At 251 K (the triple point) ice III forms. PMID:25353481

  10. Soybean stem growth under high-pressure sodium with supplemental blue lighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Sager, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    To study high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps used for plant lighting because of their high energy conversion efficiencies, 'McCall' soybean plants were grown for 28 days in growth chambers utilizing HPS lamps, with/without supplemental light from blue phosphor fluorescent lamps. Total photosynthetic photon flux levels, including blue fluorescent, were maintained near 300 or 500 micromol/sq m s. Results indicate that employment of HPS or other blue-deficient sources for lighting at low to moderate photosynthetic photon flux levels may cause abnormal stem elongation, but this can be prevented by the addition of a small amount of supplemental blue light.

  11. LightForce: Photon Pressure Induced Collision Avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levit, C.; Smith, C.; Stupl, J.; Mason, J.; Marshall, M.

    2012-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using a medium-powered (5 kW) ground-based laser combined with a ground-based telescope to prevent collisions between debris objects in low-Earth orbit (LEO), for which there is no current, effective mitigation strategy. The scheme utilizes photon pressure alone as a means to perturb the orbit of a debris object. Applied over multiple engagements, this alters the debris orbit succinctly to reduce the risk of an upcoming conjunction. We employ standard assumptions for atmospheric conditions and the resulting beam propagation. Using case studies designed to represent the properties (e.g. area and mass) of the current debris population, we show that one could significantly reduce the risk of more than half of all debris-debris collisions using only one such laser/telescope facility. We speculate on whether this could mitigate the debris fragmentation rate such that it falls below the natural debris re-entry rate due to atmospheric drag, and thus whether continuous long-term operation could entirely mitigate the Kessler syndrome in LEO, without need for relatively expensive active debris removal.

  12. Solar radiation and water vapor pressure to forecast chickenpox epidemics.

    PubMed

    Hervás, D; Hervás-Masip, J; Nicolau, A; Reina, J; Hervás, J A

    2015-03-01

    The clear seasonality of varicella infections in temperate regions suggests the influence of meteorologic conditions. However, there are very few data on this association. The aim of this study was to determine the seasonal pattern of varicella infections on the Mediterranean island of Mallorca (Spain), and its association with meteorologic conditions and schooling. Data on the number of cases of varicella were obtained from the Network of Epidemiologic Surveillance, which is composed of primary care physicians who notify varicella cases on a compulsory basis. From 1995 to 2012, varicella cases were correlated to temperature, humidity, rainfall, water vapor pressure, atmospheric pressure, wind speed, and solar radiation using regression and time-series models. The influence of schooling was also analyzed. A total of 68,379 cases of varicella were notified during the study period. Cases occurred all year round, with a peak incidence in June. Varicella cases increased with the decrease in water vapor pressure and/or the increase of solar radiation, 3 and 4 weeks prior to reporting, respectively. An inverse association was also observed between varicella cases and school holidays. Using these variables, the best fitting autoregressive moving average with exogenous variables (ARMAX) model could predict 95 % of varicella cases. In conclusion, varicella in our region had a clear seasonality, which was mainly determined by solar radiation and water vapor pressure. PMID:25265908

  13. Generation-IV Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR)

    SciTech Connect

    Modro, S. Michael; Fisher, James; Weaver, Kevan; Babka, Pierre; Reyes, Jose; Groome, John

    2002-07-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Nexant Inc. and the Oregon State University (OSU) have developed a Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) concept. The MASLWR is a small, safe and economic natural circulation pressurized light water reactor. MASLWR reactor module consists of an integral reactor/steam generator located in a steel cylindrical containment. The entire module is to be entirely shop fabricated and transported to site on most railways or roads. Two or more modules are located in a reactor building, each being submersed in a common, below grade cavity filled with water. For the most severe postulated accident, the volume of water in the cavity provides a passive ultimate heat sink for 3 or more days allowing the restoration of lost normal active heat removal systems. MASLWR thermal power of a single module is 150 MWt, primary system pressure 10.5 MPa, steam pressure 1.52 MPa and the net electrical output is 35 - 50 MWe. (authors)

  14. Generation-IV Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR)

    SciTech Connect

    Modro, Slawomir Michael; Fisher, James Ebberly; Weaver, Kevan Dean; Babka, P.; Reyes, Johnny Paul; Groome, J.; Wilson, Gary Edward

    2002-04-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Nexant Inc. and the Oregon State University (OSU) have developed a Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) concept. The MASLWR is a small, safe and economic natural circulation pressurized light water reactor. MASLWR reactor module consists of an integral reactor/steam generator located in a steel cylindrical containment. The entire module is to be entirely shop fabricated and transported to site on most railways or roads. Two or more modules are located in a reactor building, each being submersed in a common, below grade cavity filled with water. For the most severe postulated accident, the volume of water in the cavity provides a passive ultimate heat sink for 3 or more days allowing the restoration of lost normal active heat removal systems. MASLWR thermal power of a single module is 150 MWt, primary system pressure 10.5 MPa, steam pressure1.52 MPa and the net electrical output is 35 - 50 MWe.

  15. Recent performance experience with US light water reactor self-actuating safety and relief valves

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, C.G.

    1996-12-01

    Over the past several years, there have been a number of operating reactor events involving performance of primary and secondary safety and relief valves in U.S. Light Water Reactors. There are several different types of safety and relief valves installed for overpressure protection of various safety systems throughout a typical nuclear power plant. The following discussion is limited to those valves in the reactor coolant systems (RCS) and main steam systems of pressurized water reactors (PWR) and in the RCS of boiling water reactors (BWR), all of which are self-actuating having a setpoint controlled by a spring-loaded disk acting against system fluid pressure. The following discussion relates some of the significant recent experience involving operating reactor events or various testing data. Some of the more unusual and interesting operating events or test data involving some of these designs are included, in addition to some involving a number of similar events and those which have generic applicability.

  16. Light-driven water oxidation for solar fuels

    PubMed Central

    Young, Karin J.; Martini, Lauren A.; Milot, Rebecca L.; III, Robert C. Snoeberger; Batista, Victor S.; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A.; Crabtree, Robert H.; Brudvig, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    Light-driven water oxidation is an essential step for conversion of sunlight into storable chemical fuels. Fujishima and Honda reported the first example of photoelectrochemical water oxidation in 1972. In their system, TiO2 was irradiated with ultraviolet light, producing oxygen at the anode and hydrogen at a platinum cathode. Inspired by this system, more recent work has focused on functionalizing nanoporous TiO2 or other semiconductor surfaces with molecular adsorbates, including chromophores and catalysts that absorb visible light and generate electricity (i.e., dye-sensitized solar cells) or trigger water oxidation at low overpotentials (i.e., photocatalytic cells). The physics involved in harnessing multiple photochemical events for multielectron reactions, as required in the four-electron water oxidation process, has been the subject of much experimental and computational study. In spite of significant advances with regard to individual components, the development of highly efficient photocatalytic cells for solar water splitting remains an outstanding challenge. This article reviews recent progress in the field with emphasis on water-oxidation photoanodes inspired by the design of functionalized thin film semiconductors of typical dye-sensitized solar cells. PMID:25364029

  17. Patterns and properties of polarized light in air and water

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Thomas W.; Marshall, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Natural sources of light are at best weakly polarized, but polarization of light is common in natural scenes in the atmosphere, on the surface of the Earth, and underwater. We review the current state of knowledge concerning how polarization and polarization patterns are formed in nature, emphasizing linearly polarized light. Scattering of sunlight or moonlight in the sky often forms a strongly polarized, stable and predictable pattern used by many animals for orientation and navigation throughout the day, at twilight, and on moonlit nights. By contrast, polarization of light in water, while visible in most directions of view, is generally much weaker. In air, the surfaces of natural objects often reflect partially polarized light, but such reflections are rarer underwater, and multiple-path scattering degrades such polarization within metres. Because polarization in both air and water is produced by scattering, visibility through such media can be enhanced using straightforward polarization-based methods of image recovery, and some living visual systems may use similar methods to improve vision in haze or underwater. Although circularly polarized light is rare in nature, it is produced by the surfaces of some animals, where it may be used in specialized systems of communication. PMID:21282165

  18. Light Effect on Water Viscosity: Implication for ATP Biosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Andrei P.; Haddad, Mike Kh.; Fecht, Hans-Jörg

    2015-07-01

    Previous work assumed that ATP synthase, the smallest known rotary motor in nature, operates at 100% efficiency. Calculations which arrive to this result assume that the water viscosity inside mitochondria is constant and corresponds to that of bulk water. In our opinion this assumption is not satisfactory for two reasons: (1) There is evidence that the water in mitochondria prevails to 100% as interfacial water. (2) Laboratory experiments which explore the properties of interfacial water suggest viscosities which exceed those of bulk water, specifically at hydrophilic interfaces. Here, we wish to suggest a physicochemical mechanism which assumes intramitochondrial water viscosity gradients and consistently explains two cellular responses: The decrease and increase in ATP synthesis in response to reactive oxygen species and non-destructive levels of near-infrared (NIR) laser light, respectively. The mechanism is derived from the results of a new experimental method, which combines the technique of nanoindentation with the modulation of interfacial water layers by laser irradiation. Results, including the elucidation of the principle of light-induced ATP production, are expected to have broad implications in all fields of medicine.

  19. Light Effect on Water Viscosity: Implication for ATP Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Andrei P.; Haddad, Mike Kh.; Fecht, Hans-Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Previous work assumed that ATP synthase, the smallest known rotary motor in nature, operates at 100% efficiency. Calculations which arrive to this result assume that the water viscosity inside mitochondria is constant and corresponds to that of bulk water. In our opinion this assumption is not satisfactory for two reasons: (1) There is evidence that the water in mitochondria prevails to 100% as interfacial water. (2) Laboratory experiments which explore the properties of interfacial water suggest viscosities which exceed those of bulk water, specifically at hydrophilic interfaces. Here, we wish to suggest a physicochemical mechanism which assumes intramitochondrial water viscosity gradients and consistently explains two cellular responses: The decrease and increase in ATP synthesis in response to reactive oxygen species and non-destructive levels of near-infrared (NIR) laser light, respectively. The mechanism is derived from the results of a new experimental method, which combines the technique of nanoindentation with the modulation of interfacial water layers by laser irradiation. Results, including the elucidation of the principle of light-induced ATP production, are expected to have broad implications in all fields of medicine. PMID:26154113

  20. Risk management and decision rules for light water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Griesmeyer, J. M.; Okrent, D.

    1981-01-01

    The process of developing and adopting safety objectives in quantitative terms can provide a basis for focusing societal decision making on the suitability of such objectives and upon questions of compliance with those objectives. A preliminary proposal for a light water reactor (LWR) risk management framework is presented as part of that process.

  1. 46 CFR 169.549 - Ring lifebuoys and water lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ring lifebuoys and water lights. 169.549 Section 169.549 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Lifesaving and Firefighting Equipment Additional Lifesaving Equipment § 169.549 Ring lifebuoys and...

  2. 46 CFR 169.549 - Ring lifebuoys and water lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ring lifebuoys and water lights. 169.549 Section 169.549 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Lifesaving and Firefighting Equipment Additional Lifesaving Equipment § 169.549 Ring lifebuoys and...

  3. Observation of strong radiation pressure forces from squeezed light on a mechanical oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Jeremy B.; Lecocq, Florent; Simmonds, Raymond W.; Aumentado, José; Teufel, John D.

    2016-07-01

    In quantum-enhanced sensing, non-classical states are used to improve the sensitivity of a measurement. Squeezed light, in particular, has proved a useful resource in enhanced mechanical displacement sensing, although the fundamental limit to this enhancement due to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle has not been encountered experimentally. Here we use a microwave cavity optomechanical system to observe the squeezing-dependent radiation pressure noise that necessarily accompanies any quantum enhancement of the measurement precision and ultimately limits the measurement noise performance. By increasing the measurement strength so that radiation pressure forces dominate the thermal motion of the mechanical oscillator, we exploit the optomechanical interaction to implement an efficient quantum nondemolition measurement of the squeezed light. Thus, our results show how the mechanical oscillator improves the measurement of non-classical light, just as non-classical light enhances the measurement of the motion.

  4. Theoretical aspects of light-element alloys under extremely high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ji

    In this Dissertation, we present theoretical studies on the geometric and electronic structure of light-element alloys under high pressure. The first three Chapters are concerned with specific compounds, namely, SiH 4, CaLi2 and BexLi1- x, and associated structural and electronic phenomena, arising in our computational studies. In the fourth Chapter, we attempt to develop a unified view of the relationship between the electronic and geometric structure of light-element alloys under pressure, by focusing on the states near the Fermi level in these metals.

  5. Pressure dependence of Kapitza resistance at gold/water and silicon/water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Pham, An; Barisik, Murat; Kim, BoHung

    2013-12-28

    We conducted non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to investigate Kapitza length at solid/liquid interfaces under the effects of bulk liquid pressures. Gold and silicon were utilized as hydrophilic and hydrophobic solid walls with different wetting surface behaviors, while the number of confined liquid water molecules was adjusted to obtain different pressures inside the channels. The interactions of solid/liquid couples were reparameterized accurately by measuring the water contact angle of solid substrates. In this paper, we present a thorough analysis of the structure, normal stress, and temperature distribution of liquid water to elucidate thermal energy transport across interfaces. Our results demonstrate excellent agreement between the pressures of liquid water in nano-channels and published thermodynamics data. The pressures measured as normal stress components were characterized using a long cut-off distance reinforced by a long-range van der Waals tail correction term. To clarify the effects of bulk liquid pressures on water structure at hydrophilic and hydrophobic solid surfaces, we defined solid/liquid interface spacing as the distance between the surface and the peak value of the first water density layer. Near the gold surface, we found that interface spacing and peak value of first water density layer were constant and did not depend on bulk liquid pressure; near the silicon surface, those values depended directly upon bulk liquid. Our results reveal that the pressure dependence of Kapitza length strongly depends on the wettability of the solid surface. In the case of the hydrophilic gold surface, Kapitza length was stable despite increasing bulk liquid pressure, while it varied significantly at the hydrophobic silicon surface. PMID:24387383

  6. Pressure dependence of Kapitza resistance at gold/water and silicon/water interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, An; Kim, BoHung; Barisik, Murat

    2013-12-28

    We conducted non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to investigate Kapitza length at solid/liquid interfaces under the effects of bulk liquid pressures. Gold and silicon were utilized as hydrophilic and hydrophobic solid walls with different wetting surface behaviors, while the number of confined liquid water molecules was adjusted to obtain different pressures inside the channels. The interactions of solid/liquid couples were reparameterized accurately by measuring the water contact angle of solid substrates. In this paper, we present a thorough analysis of the structure, normal stress, and temperature distribution of liquid water to elucidate thermal energy transport across interfaces. Our results demonstrate excellent agreement between the pressures of liquid water in nano-channels and published thermodynamics data. The pressures measured as normal stress components were characterized using a long cut-off distance reinforced by a long-range van der Waals tail correction term. To clarify the effects of bulk liquid pressures on water structure at hydrophilic and hydrophobic solid surfaces, we defined solid/liquid interface spacing as the distance between the surface and the peak value of the first water density layer. Near the gold surface, we found that interface spacing and peak value of first water density layer were constant and did not depend on bulk liquid pressure; near the silicon surface, those values depended directly upon bulk liquid. Our results reveal that the pressure dependence of Kapitza length strongly depends on the wettability of the solid surface. In the case of the hydrophilic gold surface, Kapitza length was stable despite increasing bulk liquid pressure, while it varied significantly at the hydrophobic silicon surface.

  7. Water vapor pressure should be addressed in Potomac study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, Walter G.

    In Bruce Doe's article, “A Potomac Perspective on the Growing Global Greenhouse” (Eos, January 5,1999), a statement is made in the next to last paragraph that “other climatic parameters such as precipitation can correlate better than temperature among the five sites.” It would be expected that precipitation, and in particular the partial pressure of water vapor, should correlate with the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect. It was pointed out by W. G. Egan and coworkers in 1991 that there is an inverse relationship between carbon dioxide and water vapor partial pressure, seen both in laboratory experiments and at all worldwide Global Monitoring for Climate Change monitoring stations. Specific examples were presented for Cold Bay, Alaska and Palmer Station, Antarctica monthly and annually

  8. Water-vapor pressure control in a volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The variation with time of the partial pressure of water in a volume that has openings to the outside environment and includes vapor sources was evaluated as a function of the purging flow and its vapor content. Experimental tests to estimate the diffusion of ambient humidity through openings and to validate calculated results were included. The purging flows required to produce and maintain a certain humidity in shipping containers, storage rooms, and clean rooms can be estimated with the relationship developed here. These purging flows are necessary to prevent the contamination, degradation, and other effects of water vapor on the systems inside these volumes.

  9. Pressure-induced transformations in computer simulations of glassy water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Janet; Starr, Francis W.; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2013-11-01

    Glassy water occurs in at least two broad categories: low-density amorphous (LDA) and high-density amorphous (HDA) solid water. We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to study the transformations of glassy water using the ST2 model. Specifically, we study the known (i) compression-induced LDA-to-HDA, (ii) decompression-induced HDA-to-LDA, and (iii) compression-induced hexagonal ice-to-HDA transformations. We study each transformation for a broad range of compression/decompression temperatures, enabling us to construct a "P-T phase diagram" for glassy water. The resulting phase diagram shows the same qualitative features reported from experiments. While many simulations have probed the liquid-state phase behavior, comparatively little work has examined the transitions of glassy water. We examine how the glass transformations relate to the (first-order) liquid-liquid phase transition previously reported for this model. Specifically, our results support the hypothesis that the liquid-liquid spinodal lines, between a low-density and high-density liquid, are extensions of the LDA-HDA transformation lines in the limit of slow compression. Extending decompression runs to negative pressures, we locate the sublimation lines for both LDA and hyperquenched glassy water (HGW), and find that HGW is relatively more stable to the vapor. Additionally, we observe spontaneous crystallization of HDA at high pressure to ice VII. Experiments have also seen crystallization of HDA, but to ice XII. Finally, we contrast the structure of LDA and HDA for the ST2 model with experiments. We find that while the radial distribution functions (RDFs) of LDA are similar to those observed in experiments, considerable differences exist between the HDA RDFs of ST2 water and experiment. The differences in HDA structure, as well as the formation of ice VII (a tetrahedral crystal), are a consequence of ST2 overemphasizing the tetrahedral character of water.

  10. Pressure-induced transformations in computer simulations of glassy water.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Janet; Starr, Francis W; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2013-11-14

    Glassy water occurs in at least two broad categories: low-density amorphous (LDA) and high-density amorphous (HDA) solid water. We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to study the transformations of glassy water using the ST2 model. Specifically, we study the known (i) compression-induced LDA-to-HDA, (ii) decompression-induced HDA-to-LDA, and (iii) compression-induced hexagonal ice-to-HDA transformations. We study each transformation for a broad range of compression/decompression temperatures, enabling us to construct a "P-T phase diagram" for glassy water. The resulting phase diagram shows the same qualitative features reported from experiments. While many simulations have probed the liquid-state phase behavior, comparatively little work has examined the transitions of glassy water. We examine how the glass transformations relate to the (first-order) liquid-liquid phase transition previously reported for this model. Specifically, our results support the hypothesis that the liquid-liquid spinodal lines, between a low-density and high-density liquid, are extensions of the LDA-HDA transformation lines in the limit of slow compression. Extending decompression runs to negative pressures, we locate the sublimation lines for both LDA and hyperquenched glassy water (HGW), and find that HGW is relatively more stable to the vapor. Additionally, we observe spontaneous crystallization of HDA at high pressure to ice VII. Experiments have also seen crystallization of HDA, but to ice XII. Finally, we contrast the structure of LDA and HDA for the ST2 model with experiments. We find that while the radial distribution functions (RDFs) of LDA are similar to those observed in experiments, considerable differences exist between the HDA RDFs of ST2 water and experiment. The differences in HDA structure, as well as the formation of ice VII (a tetrahedral crystal), are a consequence of ST2 overemphasizing the tetrahedral character of water. PMID:24320281

  11. TRAC-PF1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

    1984-02-01

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light water reactors. The TRAC-PF1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic experimental facilities. The code features either a one-dimensional or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals; a two-phase, two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field; flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment; optional reflood tracking capability for both bottom flood and falling-film quench fronts; and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. This report describes the thermal-hydraulic models and the numerical solution methods used in the code. Detailed programming and user information also are provided.

  12. Water in Olivine and its High-Pressure Polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S. M.; Jacobsen, S. D.; Bina, C. R.; Reichart, P.; Moser, M.; Dollinger, G.; Hauri, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    Theory and high-pressure experiments imply a significant water storage capacity of nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs), such as olivine, wadsleyite and ringwoodite, composing the Earth's upper mantle and transition zone to a depth of 660 km. The presence of water, dissolved as OH into such nominally anhydrous high-pressure silicates, notably influences phase relations, melting behavior, conductivity, elasticity, viscosity and rheology. The first direct evidence for hydration of the transition zone has recently been reported by Pearson et al. (2014) and Schmandt et al. (2014). Knowledge of absolute water contents in NAMs is essential for modeling the Earth's interior water cycle. To take advantage of IR spectroscopy as highly sensitive water quantification tool, mineral-specific absorption coefficients are required. Such calibration constants can be derived from hydrogen concentrations determined by independent techniques, such as secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), Raman spectroscopy or proton-proton(pp)-scattering. Broad beam pp-scattering has been performed on double-polished mm-sized mineral platelets (Thomas et al. 2008), but until recently analysis was not feasible for smaller samples synthetized in high-pressure apparati. Here we present first results from pp-scattering microscopy studies on μm-sized single crystals of hydrous olivine, wadsleyite and ringwoodite, which were synthesized at various pressure-temperature conditions in a multi-anvil press. The method allows us to quantify 3D distributions of atomic hydrogen in μm dimensions. These self-calibrating measurements were carried out at the nuclear microprobe SNAKE at the Munich tandem accelerator lab using a 25 MeV proton microbeam. We provide hydrogen depth-profiles, hydrogen maps and H2O concentrations. Pp-scattering data and results from independent Raman and SIMS analyses are in good agreement. Water contents for a set of high-pressure polymorphs with varying Fe-concentrations range from 0

  13. Excess pore water pressure due to ground surface erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellyn Smith, Stefan; Gagniere, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Erosional unloading is the process whereby surface rocks and soil are removed by external processes, resulting in changes to water pressure within the underlying aquifer. We consider a mathematical model of changes in excess pore water pressure as a result of erosional unloading. Neuzil and Pollock (1983) studied this process in the case where the water table initially coincides with the surface. In contrast, we analyze an ideal aquifer which is initially separated from the ground surface by an unsaturated zone. The model is solved using Laplace Transform methods in conjunction with a boost operator derived by King (1985). The boost operator is used to boost the solution (in the Laplace domain) to a frame of reference moving at constant velocity with respect to the original frame. We use our solution to analyze the evolution of the pressure during erosion of the aquifer itself for small and large erosion rates. We also examine the flux at the upper boundary as a function of time and present a quasi-steady approximation valid for very small erosion rates in the appendix.

  14. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring: Five Decades of More Light and Less Shadows

    PubMed Central

    Nobre, Fernando; Mion Junior, Décio

    2016-01-01

    Casual blood pressure measurements have been extensively questioned over the last five decades. A significant percentage of patients have different blood pressure readings when examined in the office or outside it. For this reason, a change in the paradigm of the best manner to assess blood pressure has been observed. The method that has been most widely used is the Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring - ABPM. The method allows recording blood pressure measures in 24 hours and evaluating various parameters such as mean BP, pressure loads, areas under the curve, variations between daytime and nighttime, pulse pressure variability etc. Blood pressure measurements obtained by ABPM are better correlated, for example, with the risks of hypertension. The main indications for ABPM are: suspected white coat hypertension and masked hypertension, evaluation of the efficacy of the antihypertensive therapy in 24 hours, and evaluation of symptoms. There is increasing evidence that the use of ABPM has contributed to the assessment of blood pressure behaviors, establishment of diagnoses, prognosis and the efficacy of antihypertensive therapy. There is no doubt that the study of 24-hour blood pressure behavior and its variations by ABPM has brought more light and less darkness to the field, which justifies the title of this review. PMID:27168473

  15. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring: Five Decades of More Light and Less Shadows.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Fernando; Mion Junior, Décio

    2016-06-01

    Casual blood pressure measurements have been extensively questioned over the last five decades. A significant percentage of patients have different blood pressure readings when examined in the office or outside it. For this reason, a change in the paradigm of the best manner to assess blood pressure has been observed. The method that has been most widely used is the Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring - ABPM. The method allows recording blood pressure measures in 24 hours and evaluating various parameters such as mean BP, pressure loads, areas under the curve, variations between daytime and nighttime, pulse pressure variability etc. Blood pressure measurements obtained by ABPM are better correlated, for example, with the risks of hypertension. The main indications for ABPM are: suspected white coat hypertension and masked hypertension, evaluation of the efficacy of the antihypertensive therapy in 24 hours, and evaluation of symptoms. There is increasing evidence that the use of ABPM has contributed to the assessment of blood pressure behaviors, establishment of diagnoses, prognosis and the efficacy of antihypertensive therapy. There is no doubt that the study of 24-hour blood pressure behavior and its variations by ABPM has brought more light and less darkness to the field, which justifies the title of this review. PMID:27168473

  16. Pressurized water nuclear reactor system with hot leg vortex mitigator

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, L.K.S.

    1990-09-18

    This patent describes an improvement in a pressurized water nuclear reactor system having a reactor pressure vessel, at least one steam generator, a hot leg conduit for charging of hot fluid from the reactor pressure vessel to the steam generator, and at least one cold leg conduit for return of cool fluid from the steam generator back to the reactor pressure vessel. The improvement comprises a residual heat removal device wherein: the hot leg has an inside diameter D{sub 1}; a first section of residual heat removal conduit is provided, having an inside diameter D{sub 2}, a first end for receipt of fluid from the hot leg, and a second end; a second section of residual heat removal conduit is provided connected to the reactor pressure vessel; a pump interconnects the second end of the first section of residual heat removal conduit with the second section of residual heat removal conduit; and a step nozzle of an inside diameter D{sub 3} and a length L interconnects the hot leg to the first end of the first section of residual heat removal conduit, with D{sub 3}/D{sub 1} {ge} 0.55, with D{sub 3}/D{sub 2}1.9 and L/D{sub 3} {ge} 1.44.

  17. Anomalies in bulk supercooled water at negative pressure.

    PubMed

    Pallares, Gaël; El Mekki Azouzi, Mouna; González, Miguel A; Aragones, Juan L; Abascal, José L F; Valeriani, Chantal; Caupin, Frédéric

    2014-06-01

    Water anomalies still defy explanation. In the supercooled liquid, many quantities, for example heat capacity and isothermal compressibility κT, show a large increase. The question arises if these quantities diverge, or if they go through a maximum. The answer is key to our understanding of water anomalies. However, it has remained elusive in experiments because crystallization always occurred before any extremum is reached. Here we report measurements of the sound velocity of water in a scarcely explored region of the phase diagram, where water is both supercooled and at negative pressure. We find several anomalies: maxima in the adiabatic compressibility and nonmonotonic density dependence of the sound velocity, in contrast with a standard extrapolation of the equation of state. This is reminiscent of the behavior of supercritical fluids. To support this interpretation, we have performed simulations with the 2005 revision of the transferable interaction potential with four points. Simulations and experiments are in near-quantitative agreement, suggesting the existence of a line of maxima in κT (LMκT). This LMκT could either be the thermodynamic consequence of the line of density maxima of water [Sastry S, Debenedetti PG, Sciortino F, Stanley HE (1996) Phys Rev E 53:6144-6154], or emanate from a critical point terminating a liquid-liquid transition [Sciortino F, Poole PH, Essmann U, Stanley HE (1997) Phys Rev E 55:727-737]. At positive pressure, the LMκT has escaped observation because it lies in the "no man's land" beyond the homogeneous crystallization line. We propose that the LMκT emerges from the no man's land at negative pressure. PMID:24843177

  18. Anomalies in bulk supercooled water at negative pressure

    PubMed Central

    Pallares, Gaël; El Mekki Azouzi, Mouna; González, Miguel A.; Aragones, Juan L.; Abascal, José L. F.; Valeriani, Chantal; Caupin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Water anomalies still defy explanation. In the supercooled liquid, many quantities, for example heat capacity and isothermal compressibility κT, show a large increase. The question arises if these quantities diverge, or if they go through a maximum. The answer is key to our understanding of water anomalies. However, it has remained elusive in experiments because crystallization always occurred before any extremum is reached. Here we report measurements of the sound velocity of water in a scarcely explored region of the phase diagram, where water is both supercooled and at negative pressure. We find several anomalies: maxima in the adiabatic compressibility and nonmonotonic density dependence of the sound velocity, in contrast with a standard extrapolation of the equation of state. This is reminiscent of the behavior of supercritical fluids. To support this interpretation, we have performed simulations with the 2005 revision of the transferable interaction potential with four points. Simulations and experiments are in near-quantitative agreement, suggesting the existence of a line of maxima in κT (LMκT). This LMκT could either be the thermodynamic consequence of the line of density maxima of water [Sastry S, Debenedetti PG, Sciortino F, Stanley HE (1996) Phys Rev E 53:6144–6154], or emanate from a critical point terminating a liquid–liquid transition [Sciortino F, Poole PH, Essmann U, Stanley HE (1997) Phys Rev E 55:727–737]. At positive pressure, the LMκT has escaped observation because it lies in the “no man’s land” beyond the homogeneous crystallization line. We propose that the LMκT emerges from the no man’s land at negative pressure. PMID:24843177

  19. In situ measurement of inelastic light scattering in natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chuanmin

    Variation in the shape of solar absorption (Fraunhofer) lines are used to study the inelastic scattering in natural waters. In addition, oxygen absorption lines near 689nm are used to study the solar stimulated chlorophyll fluorescence. The prototype Oceanic Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (OFLD) has been further developed and improved by using a well protected fiber optic - wire conductor cable and underwater electronic housing. A Monte-Carlo code and a simple code have been modified to simulate the Raman scattering, DOM fluorescence and chlorophyll fluorescence. A series of in situ measurements have been conducted in clear ocean waters in the Florida Straits, in the turbid waters of Florida Bay, and in the vicinity of a coral reef in the Dry Tortugas. By comparing the reduced data with the model simulation results, the Raman scattering coefficient, b r with an excitation wavelength at 488nm, has been verified to be 2.6 × 10-4m-1 (Marshall and Smith, 1990), as opposed to 14.4 × 10- 4m-1 (Slusher and Derr, 1975). The wavelength dependence of b r cannot be accurately determined from the data set as the reported values (λ m-4 to λ m- 5) have an insignificant effect in the natural underwater light field. Generally, in clear water, the percentage of inelastic scattered light in the total light field at /lambda < 510nm is negligible for the whole water column, and this percentage increases with depth at /lambda > 510nm. At low concentrations (a y(/lambda = 380nm) less than 0.1m-1), DOM fluorescence plays a small role in the inelastic light field. However, chlorophyll fluorescence is much stronger than Raman scattering at 685nm. In shallow waters where a sea bottom affects the ambient light field, inelastic light is negligible for the whole visible band. Since Raman scattering is now well characterized, the new OFLD can be used to measure the solar stimulated in situ fluorescence. As a result, the fluorescence signals of various bottom surfaces, from coral to

  20. Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Water Vapour by Pressure Modulation Radiometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, G. R.

    1987-09-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (SAMS) was a limb-sounding satellite experiment which used the technique of pressure modulation radiometry to measure the temperature and constituent distributions in the middle atmosphere. Two channels in the SAMS were devoted to the detection of water vapour, but the analysis of these data have produced unexpectedly high mixing ratios in the region of the stratopause. This thesis describes an attempt to resolve the discrepancy between theory and experiment by a laboratory investigation of the pressure modulation of water vapour. The central role of water vapour in the physics and chemistry of the middle atmosphere and previous attempts to measure its abundance are discussed. It is shown that the intercomparison of humidity sensing instruments has not produced a consensus and that the accuracy of the reported measurements is therefore in question. The SAMS water vapour channels are described and the need is shown for a laboratory transmission experiment. The pressure modulation technique is described in chapter 2 and a mathematical formulation is given. The constraints due to contaminant signals and harmonic contributions are considered and the use of the square wave chopping approximation in the interpretation of the measurements is discussed. In chapter 3, the spectroscopy of the H _2O rotation band is considered and it is shown that there are large uncertainties in most aspects of the problem due to the lack of spectroscopic measurements in this spectral region. In particular, the shapes of the collision broadened line wings under both self and foreign broadened conditions are poorly determined, a situation which is especially problematic for pressure modulation radiometry. The pressure modulation of water vapour is investigated in chapter 4 and it is shown by direct measurement of the pressure cycle that the linear model used by previous

  1. Where Did the Water Go? Boyle's Law and Pressurized Diaphragm Water Tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimhall, James; Naga, Sundar

    2007-03-01

    Many homes use pressurized diaphragm tanks for storage of water pumped from an underground well. These tanks are very carefully constructed to have separate internal chambers for the storage of water and for the air that provides the pressure. One might expect that the amount of water available for use from, for example, a 50-gallon tank would be close to 50 gallons. However, only a surprisingly small percentage of the total tank volume is available to provide water that can be drawn from the tank before the pump must cycle back on. Boyle's law ( PV is constant) provides mathematical insight into the workings of this type of tank, including predictions of the quantities of available water resulting from different initial conditions of the water tank system.

  2. Environmentally assisted cracking in Light Water Reactors: Semiannual report, April 1993--September 1993. Volume 17

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Karlsen, T.; Kassner, T.F.; Michaud, W.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Sanecki, J.E.; Shack, W.J.; Soppet, W.K.

    1994-06-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRS) during the six months from April 1993 to September 1993. EAC and fatigue of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in LWRs are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of low-alloy steel used in piping, steam generators, and reactor pressure vessels; (b) EAC of cast stainless steels (SSs); and (c) radiation-induced segregation and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence. Fatigue tests were conducted on medium-sulfur-content A106-Gr B piping and A533-Gr B pressure vessel steels in simulated PWR water and in air. Additional crack growth data were obtained on fracture-mechanics specimens of cast austenitic SSs in the as-received and thermally aged conditions in simulated boiling-water reactor (BWR) water at 289{degree}C. The data were compared with predictions based on crack growth correlations for wrought austenitic SS in oxygenated water developed at ANL and rates in air from Section 11 of the ASME Code. Microchemical and microstructural changes in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath from operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

  3. Apparatus for adapting a high-pressure light scattering cell to density measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abebe, M.; Schoen, P. E.

    1982-04-01

    A new experimental method is presented here by which the density of water, glycerol, HIW (a mixture of isopropyl ammonium nitrate, hydroxyl ammonium nitrate, and water), and solithane 113 was measured at 25 °C and pressure up to 410 MPa.

  4. PVDF water-shock pressure transducer with 200-ns response

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.E.; Hogeland, S.R.; Nelson, L.S.

    1992-12-01

    The design, calibration, and preliminary test results for an underwater shock gauge are presented. The active element is a 25-{mu}m thick polyvinylidene fluoride shock sensor providing rise times as short as 50 ns. Fast rise time is essential to accurate recording of shock pulses with durations of only a few microseconds. The piezoelectric polymer provides a self-generating pressure sensor requiring neither amplification nor additional active electronic circuitry. The gauge package is designed to minimize electromagnetic interference from the high-voltage fire set used to power the exploding bridge wire pressure source. The gauge package is constructed to withstand the initial water shock as well as subsequent reactions in the water that result in strong water motion and bubble generation. Thin-film diaphragm sensors are not sturdy enough to withstand this environment. Initial tests show that the gauge responds in 200 ns in water and that low-frequency response is sufficient to allow recording for at least 40 {mu}s after the initial shock arrival.

  5. The uptake and solubility of water in quartz at elevated pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerretsen, J.; Paterson, M. S.; McLaren, A. C.

    1989-02-01

    The uptake of water in quartz at 1.5 GPa total pressure, 1173 K and high water fugacity, over times up to 24 h, has been investigated using a newly developed assembly to prevent microcracking. It is found that the uptake is small, and below the detectability of the presently used technique of infrared spectroscopy and serial sectioning. This observation reflects either a low value for the diffusivity or the solubility or a combination of both, and is in agreement with the observations of Kronenberg et al. (1986) and Rovetta et al. (1986). It brings into question the interpretation of the early experiments on water weakening by Griggs and Blacic (1964) and the recent estimates of the solubility and diffusivity by Mackwell and Paterson (1985). Rults of a combined T.E.M., light-scattering and infrared-spectroscopy investigation of ‘wet’ synthetic quartz before and after heating at 0.1, 300 and 1500 MPa total pressure and 1173 K, strongly suggest that the water in ‘wet’ quartz is mainly in the form of H2O in inclusions, consistent with the solubility being low, possibly less than 100 H/106Si. From these observations, water-containing inclusions appear to play a major role in the plasticity of quartz, while any role of water in solid solution remains to be clarified.

  6. Effect of Pulsed Ultraviolet Light and High Hydrostatic Pressure on the Antigenicity of Almond Protein Extracts.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of pulsed ultraviolet light (PUV) and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on reducing the IgE binding to the almond extracts, was studied using SDS-PAGE, Western Blot, and ELISA probed with human plasma containing IgE antibodies to almond allergens, and a polyclonal antibody against almond ...

  7. Impulsive Stimulated Light Scattering at High Pressure - Precise Determination of Elastic Constants of Opaque Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Crowhurst, J C; Zaug, J M; Abramson, E H; Brown, J M; Ahre, D W

    2002-08-22

    Impulsive stimulated light scattering has been used to measure interfacial wave propagation speeds and elastic constants under conditions of high pressure. Data obtained from single-crystal Ge and Fe, and from polycrystalline Ta is presented. The method is complementary to other techniques for obtaining this type of information. There appears no fundamental reason why it cannot be extended to the 1 Mbar regime.

  8. Modeling the electrochemistry of the primary circuits of light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bertuch, A.; Macdonald, D.D.; Pang, J.; Kriksunov, L.; Arioka, K.

    1994-12-31

    To model the corrosion behaviors of the heat transport circuits of light water reactors, a mixed potential model (NTM) has been developed and applied to both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Using the data generated by the GE/UKEA-Harwell radiolysis model, electrochemical potentials (ECPs) have been calculated for the heat transport circuits of eight BWRs operating under hydrogen water chemistry (HWC). By modeling the corrosion behaviors of these reactors, the effectiveness of HWC at limiting IGSCC and IASCC can be determined. For simulating PWR primary circuits, a chemical-radiolysis model (developed by the authors) was used to generate input parameters for the MPM. Corrosion potentials of Type 304 and 316 SSs in PWR primary environments were calculated using the NTM and were found to be in good agreement with the corrosion potentials measured in the laboratory for simulated PWR primary environments.

  9. Assessment of light water reactor accident management programs and experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hammersley, R.J.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this report is to provide an assessment of the current light water reactor experience regarding accident management programs and associated technology developments. This assessment for light water reactor (LWR) designs is provided as a resource and reference for the development of accident management capabilities for the production reactors at the Savannah River Site. The specific objectives of this assessment are as follows: 1. Perform a review of the NRC, utility, and industry (NUMARC, EPRI) accident management programs and implementation experience. 2. Provide an assessment of the problems and opportunities in developing an accident management program in conjunction or following the Individual Plant Examination process. 3. Review current NRC, utility, and industry technological developments in the areas of computational tools, severe accident predictive tools, diagnostic aids, and severe accident training and simulation.

  10. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production

    SciTech Connect

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Weaver, Kevan Dean

    2002-01-01

    The use of supercritical temperature and pressure light water as the coolant in a direct-cycle nuclear reactor offers potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to 46%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type recirculation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If a tight fuel rod lattice is adopted, it is possible to significantly reduce the neutron moderation and attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions. In this project a supercritical water reactor concept with a simple, blanket-free, pancake-shaped core will be developed. This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain the hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity.

  11. Aging study of boiling water reactor high pressure injection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, D.A.; Edson, J.L.; Fineman, C.F.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of high pressure injection systems is to maintain an adequate coolant level in reactor pressure vessels, so that the fuel cladding temperature does not exceed 1,200{degrees}C (2,200{degrees}F), and to permit plant shutdown during a variety of design basis loss-of-coolant accidents. This report presents the results of a study on aging performed for high pressure injection systems of boiling water reactor plants in the United States. The purpose of the study was to identify and evaluate the effects of aging and the effectiveness of testing and maintenance in detecting and mitigating aging degradation. Guidelines from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program were used in performing the aging study. Review and analysis of the failures reported in databases such as Nuclear Power Experience, Licensee Event Reports, and the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, along with plant-specific maintenance records databases, are included in this report to provide the information required to identify aging stressors, failure modes, and failure causes. Several probabilistic risk assessments were reviewed to identify risk-significant components in high pressure injection systems. Testing, maintenance, specific safety issues, and codes and standards are also discussed.

  12. Water Pressure Effects on Strength and Deformability of Fractured Rocks Under Low Confining Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorian Bidgoli, Majid; Jing, Lanru

    2015-05-01

    The effect of groundwater on strength and deformation behavior of fractured crystalline rocks is one of the important issues for design, performance and safety assessments of surface and subsurface rock engineering problems. However, practical difficulties make the direct in situ and laboratory measurements of these properties of fractured rocks impossible at present, since effects of complex fracture system hidden inside the rock masses cannot be accurately estimated. Therefore, numerical modeling needs to be applied. The overall objective of this paper is to deepen our understanding on the validity of the effective stress concept, and to evaluate the effects of water pressure on strength and deformation parameters. The approach adopted uses discrete element methods to simulate the coupled stress-deformation-flow processes in a fractured rock mass with model dimensions at a representative elementary volume (REV) size and realistic representation of fracture system geometry. The obtained numerical results demonstrate that water pressure has significant influence on the strength, but with minor effects on elastic deformation parameters, compared with significant influence by the lateral confining pressure. Also, the classical effective stress concept to fractured rock can be quite different with that applied in soil mechanics. Therefore, one should be cautious when applying the classical effective stress concept to fractured rock media.

  13. ADDITIONAL STRESS AND FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSES OF PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL NOZZLES

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Matthew; Yin, Shengjun; Stevens, Gary; Sommerville, Daniel; Palm, Nathan; Heinecke, Carol

    2012-01-01

    In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP

  14. Research of a Supercritical Pressure Water Cooled Reactor in Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Yoon-Yeong; Joo, Hyung-Kook; Jang, Jinsung; Jeong, Yong-Hwan; Song, Jin-ho; Yoon, Han-Young; Yoo, Jung-Yul

    2004-07-01

    In this paper the activities on the supercritical pressure water-cooled reactor (SCWR) in Korea are briefly introduced. Four projects on a SCWR are being conducted in Korea. Three of them are supported by the I-NERI program while one is by KAERI. Two of the I-NERI-supported projects concern suitable materials for supercritical pressure and temperature, and radiation environment. The other I-NERI-supported project surveys numerically and experimentally the proper turbulence modeling for the numerical calculation of heat transfer phenomena at a supercritical condition. Heat transfer at a supercritical condition is being studied at KAERI experimentally using carbon dioxide as a coolant. The test loop is to be completed by the end of 2004. (authors)

  15. Pressurized water nuclear reactor system with hot leg vortex mitigator

    DOEpatents

    Lau, Louis K. S.

    1990-01-01

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor system includes a vortex mitigator in the form of a cylindrical conduit between the hot leg conduit and a first section of residual heat removal conduit, which conduit leads to a pump and a second section of residual heat removal conduit leading back to the reactor pressure vessel. The cylindrical conduit is of such a size that where the hot leg has an inner diameter D.sub.1, the first section has an inner diameter D.sub.2, and the cylindrical conduit or step nozzle has a length L and an inner diameter of D.sub.3 ; D.sub.3 /D.sub.1 is at least 0.55, D.sub.2 is at least 1.9, and L/D.sub.3 is at least 1.44, whereby cavitation of the pump by a vortex formed in the hot leg is prevented.

  16. Laboratory evaluation of the pressure water level data logger manufactured by Infinities USA, Inc.: results of pressure and temperature tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carnley, Mark V.

    2015-01-01

    The Pressure Water Level Data Logger manufactured by Infinities USA, Inc., was evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility for conformance with the manufacturer’s stated accuracy specifications for measuring pressure throughout the device’s operating temperature range and with the USGS accuracy requirements for water-level measurements. The Pressure Water Level Data Logger (Infinities Logger) is a submersible, sealed, water-level sensing device with an operating pressure range of 0 to 11.5 feet of water over a temperature range of −18 to 49 degrees Celsius. For the pressure range tested, the manufacturer’s accuracy specification of 0.1 percent of full scale pressure equals an accuracy of ±0.138 inch of water. Three Infinities Loggers were evaluated, and the testing procedures followed and results obtained are described in this report. On the basis of the test results, the device is poorly compensated for temperature. For the three Infinities Loggers, the mean pressure differences varied from –4.04 to 5.32 inches of water and were not within the manufacturer’s accuracy specification for pressure measurements made within the temperature-compensated range. The device did not meet the manufacturer’s stated accuracy specifications for pressure within its temperature-compensated operating range of –18 to 49 degrees Celsius or the USGS accuracy requirements of no more than 0.12 inch of water (0.01 foot of water) or 0.10 percent of reading, whichever is larger. The USGS accuracy requirements are routinely examined and reported when instruments are evaluated at the Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility. The estimated combined measurement uncertainty for the pressure cycling test was ±0.139 inch of water, and for temperature, the cycling test was ±0.127 inch of water for the three Infinities Loggers.

  17. Advanced fuels for plutonium management in pressurized water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, A.; Dufour, Ph; Golfier, H.; Grouiller, J. P.; Guillet, J. L.; Poinot, Ch; Youinou, G.; Zaetta, A.

    2003-06-01

    Several fuel concepts are under investigation at CEA with the aim of manage plutonium inventories in pressurized water reactors. This options range from the use of mature technologies like MOX adapted in the case of MOX-EUS (enriched uranium support) and COmbustible Recyclage A ILot (CORAIL) assemblies to more innovative technologies using IMF like DUPLEX and advanced plutonium assembly (APA). The plutonium burning performances reported to the electrical production go from 7 to 60 kg (TW h) -1. More detailed analysis covering economic, sustainability, reliability and safety aspects and their integration in the whole fuel cycle would allow identifying the best candidate.

  18. Self-Propagating Frontal Polymerization in Water at Ambient Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olten, Nesrin; Kraigsley, Alison; Ronney, Paul D.

    2003-01-01

    Advances in polymer chemistry have led to the development of monomers and initiation agents that enable propagating free-radical polymerization fronts to exist. These fronts are driven by the exothermicity of the polymerization reaction and the transport of heat from the polymerized product to the reactant monomer/solvent/initiator solution. The thermal energy transported to the reactant solution causes the initiator to decompose, yielding free radicals, which start the free radical polymerization process as discussed in recent reviews. The use of polymerization processes based on propagating fronts has numerous applications. Perhaps the most important of these is that it enables rapid curing of polymers without external heating since the polymerization process itself provides the high temperatures necessary to initiate and sustain polymerization. This process also enables more uniform curing of arbitrarily thick samples since it does not rely on heat transfer from an external source, which will necessarily cause the temperature history of the sample to vary with distance from the surface according to a diffusion-like process. Frontal polymerization also enables filling and sealing of structures having cavities of arbitrary shape without having to externally heat the structure. Water at atmospheric pressure is most convenient solvent to employ and the most important for practical applications (because of the cost and environmental issues associated with DMSO and other solvents). Nevertheless, to our knowledge, steady, self-propagating polymerization fronts have not been reported in water at atmospheric pressure. Currently, polymerization fronts require a high boiling point solvent (either water at high pressures or an alternative solvent such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (boiling point 189 C at atmospheric pressure.) Early work on frontal polymerization, employed pressures up to 5000 atm in order to avoid boiling of the monomer/solvent/initiator solution. High

  19. Soil Water Thermodynamic to Unify Water Retention Curve by Pressure Plates and Tensiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braudeau, Erik; Hovhannissian, Gaghik; Assi, Amjad; Mohtar, Rabi

    2014-10-01

    The pressure plate method is a standard method for measuring the pF curves, also called soil water retention curves, in a large soil moisture range from saturation to a dry state corresponding to a tension pressure of near 1500 kPa. However, the pressure plate can only provide discrete water retention curves represented by a dozen measured points. In contrast, the measurement of the soil water retention curves by tensiometer is direct and continuous, but limited to the range of the tensiometer reading: from saturation to near 70-80 kPa. The two methods stem from two very different concepts of measurement and the compatibility of both methods has never been demonstrated. The recently established thermodynamic formulation of the pedostructure water retention curve, will allow the compatibility of the two curves to be studied, both theoretically and experimentally. This constitutes the object of the present article. We found that the pressure plate method provides accurate measurement points of the pedostructure water retention curve h(W), conceptually the same as that accurately measured by the tensiometer. However, contrarily to what is usually thought, h is not equal to the applied air pressure on the sample, but rather, is proportional to its logarithm, in agreement with the thermodynamic theory developed in the article. The pF curve and soil water retention curve, as well as their methods of measurement are unified in a same physical theory. It is the theory of the soil medium organization (pedostructure) and its interaction with water. We show also how the hydrostructural parameters of the theoretical curve equation can be estimated from any measured curve, whatever the method of measurement. An application example using published pF curves is given.

  20. Variation in pupil diameter in North American Gartersnakes (Thamnophis) is regulated by immersion in water, not by light intensity.

    PubMed

    Fontenot, Clifford L

    2008-07-01

    A variable pupil generally regulates the amount of incoming light available for image formation on the retina. However, some of the semi-aquatic snakes (North American Gartersnakes, Thamnophis) that forage in relatively low light conditions reduce the pupil aperture in response to submergence underwater at the expense incoming light. Given that these snakes have all-cone retinas, reduction of incoming light because of pupillary constriction upon immersion seems counterintuitive. To test the effect of light and water on pupil aperture, three species of North American Gartersnakes (T. atratus, T. hammondii, and T. sirtalis) were exposed to nine light intensities in air and water. There was no effect of light on relative pupil aperture for any species. However, all three species showed a significant reduction in pupil aperture upon submergence underwater. The lack of a light response is surprising, and may be related to the method of accommodation in snakes. Snakes lack a ciliary muscle, and move the lens by constricting the pupil, which increases pressure in the posterior chamber and pushes the lens forward. Upon submergence, the snakes may be attempting to overcome the change in refractive index and defocus imposed by the water, by constricting the pupil. Thus, having the iris muscle involved in accommodation may preclude it from much of a light regulating function. PMID:18514250

  1. High Pressure Water Stripping Using Multi-Orifice Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, David T.

    1998-01-01

    The use of multi-orifice rotary nozzles not only increases the speed and stripping effectiveness of high pressure water blasting systems, but also greatly increases the complexity of selecting and optimizing the operating parameters. The rotational speed of the nozzle must be coupled with the transverse velocity of the nozzle as it passes across the surface of the substrate being stripped. The radial and angular positions of each orifice must be included in the analysis of the nozzle configuration. Since orifices at the outer edge of the nozzle head move at a faster rate than the orifice located near the center, the energy impact force of the water stream from the outer orifice is spread over a larger area than the water streams from the inner orifice. Utilizing a larger diameter orifice in the outer radial positions increases the energy impact to compensate for its wider force distribution. The total flow rate from the combination of orifices must be monitored and kept below the pump capacity while choosing an orifice to insert in each position. The energy distribution from the orifice pattern is further complicated since the rotary path of all orifices in the nozzle head pass through the center section, contributing to the stripping in this area while only the outer most orifice contributes to the stripping in the shell area at the extreme outside edge of the nozzle. From t he outer most shell to the center section, more orifices contribute to the stripping in each progressively reduced diameter shell. With all these parameters to configure and each parameter change affecting the others, a computer model was developed to track and coordinate these parameters. The computer simulation responds by graphically indicating the cumulative affect from each parameter selected. The results from the proper choices in parameters is a well designed, highly efficient stripping system. A poorly chosen set of parameters will cause the nozzle to strip aggressively in some areas

  2. Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Modro, S.M.; Fisher, J.E.; Weaver, K.D.; Reyes, J.N.; Groome, J.T.; Babka, P.; Carlson, T.M.

    2003-12-01

    The Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) project was conducted under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The primary project objectives were to develop the conceptual design for a safe and economic small, natural circulation light water reactor, to address the economic and safety attributes of the concept, and to demonstrate the technical feasibility by testing in an integral test facility. This report presents the results of the project. After an initial exploratory and evolutionary process, as documented in the October 2000 report, the project focused on developing a modular reactor design that consists of a self-contained assembly with a reactor vessel, steam generators, and containment. These modular units would be manufactured at a single centralized facility, transported by rail, road, and/or ship, and installed as a series of self-contained units. This approach also allows for staged construction of an NPP and ''pull and replace'' refueling and maintenance during each five-year refueling cycle. Development of the baseline design concept has been sufficiently completed to determine that it complies with the safety requirements and criteria, and satisfies the major goals already noted. The more significant features of the baseline single-unit design concept include: (1) Thermal Power--150 MWt; (2) Net Electrical Output--35 MWe; (3) Steam Generator Type--Vertical, helical tubes; (4) Fuel UO{sub 2}, 8% enriched; (5) Refueling Intervals--5 years; (6) Life-Cycle--60 years. The economic performance was assessed by designing a power plant with an electric generation capacity in the range of current and advanced evolutionary systems. This approach allows for direct comparison of economic performance and forms a basis for further evaluation, economic and technical, of the proposed design and for the design evolution towards a more cost competitive concept. Applications such as

  3. Fast atrazine photodegradation in water by pulsed light technology.

    PubMed

    Baranda, Ana Beatriz; Barranco, Alejandro; de Marañón, Iñigo Martínez

    2012-03-01

    Pulsed light technology consists of a successive repetition of short duration (325μs) and high power flashes emitted by xenon lamps. These flashlamps radiate a broadband emission light (approx. 200-1000 nm) with a considerable amount of light in the short-wave UV spectrum. In the present work, this technology was tested as a new tool for the degradation of the herbicide atrazine in water. To evaluate the presence and evolution with time of this herbicide, as well as the formation of derivatives, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (electrospray ionization) ion trap operating in positive mode was used. The degradation process followed first-order kinetics. Fluences about 1.8-2.3 J/cm(2) induced 50% reduction of atrazine concentration independently of its initial concentration in the range 1-1000 μg/L. Remaining concentrations of atrazine, below the current legal limit for pesticides, were achieved in a short period of time. While atrazine was degraded, no chlorinated photoproducts were formed and ten dehalogenated derivatives were detected. The molecular structures for some of these derivatives could be suggested, being hydroxyatrazine the main photoproduct identified. The different formation profiles of photoproducts suggested that the degradation pathway may include several successive and competitive steps, with subsequent degradation processes taking part from the already formed degradation products. According to the degradation efficiency, the short treatment time and the lack of chloroderivatives, this new technology could be considered as an alternative for water treatment. PMID:22153354

  4. Does fragility depend on pressure? A dynamic light scattering study of a fragile glass-former

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluch, Marian; Gapinski, Jacek; Patkowski, Adam; Fischer, Erhard W.

    2001-05-01

    Relaxation times of the α-process in the fragile glass-forming liquid diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (EPON 828) were measured in a broad pressure (1-1500 bar) and temperature (264-293 K) ranges by means of the depolarized dynamic light scattering—photon correlation spectroscopy. Based on this experimental data the fragility of the supercooled liquid was calculated in two ways: as a steepness index m of the "Angell plot" and as the DT-parameter from the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann Law, and was studied as a function of pressure. It was found, that while the steepness index depends on pressure, the DT parameter is pressure independent. The pressure dependence of the glass transition temperature Tg in EPON 828 was found to be nonlinear. Additionally, we established a relationship between the steepness index mT, the activation volume ΔV#, and the coefficient ∂Tg/∂Pg. In this pressure dependent study we found that also for EPON 828 the nonexponentiality of the correlation function of the α-process correlates well with the non-Arrhenius behavior (steepness index) of the relaxation times. An equation of state describing the temperature and pressure dependence of the structural relaxation time was proposed and verified using experimental data.

  5. Estimation of fatigue strain-life curves for austenitic stainless steels in light water reactor environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Smith, J. L.

    1998-02-12

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code design fatigue curves for structural materials do not explicitly address the effects of reactor coolant environments on fatigue life. Recent test data indicate a significant decrease in fatigue lives of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) in light water reactor (LWR) environments. Unlike those of carbon and low-alloy steels, environmental effects on fatigue lives of SSs are more pronounced in low-dissolved-oxygen (low-DO) water than in high-DO water, This paper summarizes available fatigue strain vs. life data on the effects of various material and loading variables such as steel type, DO level, strain range, and strain rate on the fatigue lives of wrought and cast austenitic SSs. Statistical models for estimating the fatigue lives of these steels in LWR environments have been updated with a larger data base. The significance of the effect of environment on the current Code design curve has been evaluated.

  6. Intra-Abdominal Pressure Correlates with Extracellular Water Content

    PubMed Central

    Dąbrowski, Wojciech; Kotlinska-Hasiec, Edyta; Jaroszynski, Andrzej; Zadora, Przemyslaw; Pilat, Jacek; Rzecki, Ziemowit; Zaluska, Wojciech; Schneditz, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background Secondary increase in intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) may result from extra-abdominal pathology, such as massive fluid resuscitation, capillary leak or sepsis. All these conditions increase the extravascular water content. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between IAP and body water volume. Material and Methods Adult patients treated for sepsis or septic shock with acute kidney injury (AKI) and patients undergoing elective pharyngolaryngeal or orthopedic surgery were enrolled. IAP was measured in the urinary bladder. Total body water (TBW), extracellular water content (ECW) and volume excess (VE) were measured by whole body bioimpedance. Among critically ill patients, all parameters were analyzed over three consecutive days, and parameters were evaluated perioperatively in surgical patients. Results One hundred twenty patients were studied. Taken together, the correlations between IAP and VE, TBW, and ECW were measured at 408 time points. In all participants, IAP strongly correlated with ECW and VE. In critically ill patients, IAP correlated with ECW and VE. In surgical patients, IAP correlated with ECW and TBW. IAP strongly correlated with ECW and VE in the mixed population. IAP also correlated with VE in critically ill patients. ROC curve analysis showed that ECW and VE might be discriminative parameters of risk for increased IAP. Conclusion IAP strongly correlates with ECW. PMID:25849102

  7. Breakdown and dc discharge in low-pressure water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivoš, J.; Škoro, N.; Marić, D.; Malović, G.; Petrović, Z. Lj

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we report studies of basic properties of breakdown, low-current Townsend discharge and high-current discharge regimes in water vapour. Paschen curves and the corresponding distributions of emission intensities at low current were recorded in the range of pd (pressure x electrode gap) from 0.1 to 10 Torrcm covering the region of Paschen minimum. From the experimental profiles we obtained effective ionization coefficient of water vapour for the E/N range 650 Td-7 kTd and fitted the results by using the extended Townsend analytical formula. Using the obtained ionization coefficient, we calculated the effective yield of secondary electrons from the copper cathode. Results of the measurements of Volt-Ampere characteristics in water vapour were presented together with the images of the axial structure of the discharge in a wide range of discharge currents for two pd values. Recorded profiles showed development of the spatial structure of the discharge in different operating regimes. We were able to identify conditions where processes induced by heavy particles, probably fast hydrogen atoms, are dominant in inducing emission from the discharge. Finally, standard scaling laws were tested for low current and glow discharges in water vapour.

  8. Acceptance test procedure for High Pressure Water Jet System

    SciTech Connect

    Crystal, J.B.

    1995-05-30

    The overall objective of the acceptance test is to demonstrate a combined system. This includes associated tools and equipment necessary to perform cleaning in the 105 K East Basin (KE) for achieving optimum reduction in the level of contamination/dose rate on canisters prior to removal from the KE Basin and subsequent packaging for disposal. Acceptance tests shall include necessary hardware to achieve acceptance of the cleaning phase of canisters. This acceptance test procedure will define the acceptance testing criteria of the high pressure water jet cleaning fixture. The focus of this procedure will be to provide guidelines and instructions to control, evaluate and document the acceptance testing for cleaning effectiveness and method(s) of removing the contaminated surface layer from the canister presently identified in KE Basin. Additionally, the desired result of the acceptance test will be to deliver to K Basins a thoroughly tested and proven system for underwater decontamination and dose reduction. This report discusses the acceptance test procedure for the High Pressure Water Jet.

  9. High Pressure Water Stripping Using Multi-Orifice Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, David

    1999-01-01

    The use of multi-orifice rotary nozzles greatly increases the speed and stripping effectiveness of high pressure water blasting systems, but also greatly increases the complexity of selecting and optimizing the operating parameters. The rotational speed of the nozzle must be coupled with its transverse velocity as it passes across the surface of the substrate being stripped. The radial and angular positions of each orifice must be included in the analysis of the nozzle configuration. Orifices at the outer edge of the nozzle head move at a faster rate than the orifices located near the center. The energy transmitted to the surface from the impact force of the water stream from an outer orifice is therefore spread over a larger area than energy from an inner orifice. Utilizing a larger diameter orifice in the outer radial positions increases the total energy transmitted from the outer orifice to compensate for the wider distribution of energy. The total flow rate from the combination of all orifices must be monitored and should be kept below the pump capacity while choosing orifice to insert in each position. The energy distribution from the orifice pattern is further complicated since the rotary path of all the orifices in the nozzle head pass through the center section. All orifices contribute to the stripping in the center of the path while only the outer most orifice contributes to the stripping at the edge of the nozzle. Additional orifices contribute to the stripping from the outer edge toward the center section. With all these parameters to configure and each parameter change affecting the others, a computer model was developed to track and coordinate these parameters. The computer simulation graphically indicates the cumulative affect from each parameter selected. The result from the proper choices in parameters is a well designed, highly efficient stripping system. A poorly chosen set of parameters will cause the nozzle to strip aggressively in some areas

  10. Water splitting on semiconductor catalysts under visible-light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Navarro Yerga, Rufino M; Alvarez Galván, M Consuelo; del Valle, F; Villoria de la Mano, José A; Fierro, José L G

    2009-01-01

    Sustainable hydrogen production is a key target for the development of alternative, future energy systems that will provide a clean and affordable energy supply. The Sun is a source of silent and precious energy that is distributed fairly all over the Earth daily. However, its tremendous potential as a clean, safe, and economical energy source cannot be exploited unless the energy is accumulated or converted into more useful forms. The conversion of solar energy into hydrogen via the water-splitting process, assisted by photo-semiconductor catalysts, is one of the most promising technologies for the future because large quantities of hydrogen can potentially be generated in a clean and sustainable manner. This Minireview provides an overview of the principles, approaches, and research progress on solar hydrogen production via the water-splitting reaction on photo-semiconductor catalysts. It presents a survey of the advances made over the last decades in the development of catalysts for photochemical water splitting under visible-light irradiation. The Minireview also analyzes the energy requirements and main factors that determine the activity of photocatalysts in the conversion of water into hydrogen and oxygen using sunlight. Remarkable progress has been made since the pioneering work by Fujishima and Honda in 1972, but he development of photocatalysts with improved efficiencies for hydrogen production from water using solar energy still faces major challenges. Research strategies and approaches adopted in the search for active and efficient photocatalysts, for example through new materials and synthesis methods, are presented and analyzed. PMID:19536754

  11. Navigation by light polarization in clear and turbid waters

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Amit; Sabbah, Shai; Erlick, Carynelisa; Shashar, Nadav

    2011-01-01

    Certain terrestrial animals use sky polarization for navigation. Certain aquatic species have also been shown to orient according to a polarization stimulus, but the correlation between underwater polarization and Sun position and hence the ability to use underwater polarization as a compass for navigation is still under debate. To examine this issue, we use theoretical equations for per cent polarization and electric vector (e-vector) orientation that account for the position of the Sun, refraction at the air–water interface and Rayleigh single scattering. The polarization patterns predicted by these theoretical equations are compared with measurements conducted in clear and semi-turbid coastal sea waters at 2 m and 5 m depth over sea floors of 6 m and 28 m depth. We find that the per cent polarization is correlated with the Sun's elevation only in clear waters. We furthermore find that the maximum value of the e-vector orientation angle equals the angle of refraction only in clear waters, in the horizontal viewing direction, over the deeper sea floor. We conclude that navigation by use of underwater polarization is possible under restricted conditions, i.e. in clear waters, primarily near the horizontal viewing direction, and in locations where the sea floor has limited effects on the light's polarization. PMID:21282170

  12. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production, 3rd Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2002-06-01

    The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed.

  13. Microbially Enhanced Oil Recovery by Sequential Injection of Light Hydrocarbon and Nitrate in Low- And High-Pressure Bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Gassara, Fatma; Suri, Navreet; Stanislav, Paul; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2015-10-20

    Microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) often involves injection of aqueous molasses and nitrate to stimulate resident or introduced bacteria. Use of light oil components like toluene, as electron donor for nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB), offers advantages but at 1-2 mM toluene is limiting in many heavy oils. Because addition of toluene to the oil increased reduction of nitrate by NRB, we propose an MEOR technology, in which water amended with light hydrocarbon below the solubility limit (5.6 mM for toluene) is injected to improve the nitrate reduction capacity of the oil along the water flow path, followed by injection of nitrate, other nutrients (e.g., phosphate) and a consortium of NRB, if necessary. Hydrocarbon- and nitrate-mediated MEOR was tested in low- and high-pressure, water-wet sandpack bioreactors with 0.5 pore volumes of residual oil in place (ROIP). Compared to control bioreactors, those with 11-12 mM of toluene in the oil (gained by direct addition or by aqueous injection) and 80 mM of nitrate in the aqueous phase produced 16.5 ± 4.4% of additional ROIP (N = 10). Because toluene is a cheap commodity chemical, HN-MEOR has the potential to be a cost-effective method for additional oil production even in the current low oil price environment. PMID:26406569

  14. Effects of Drought, Pest Pressure and Light Availability on Seedling Establishment and Growth: Their Role for Distribution of Tree Species across a Tropical Rainfall Gradient.

    PubMed

    Gaviria, Julian; Engelbrecht, Bettina M J

    2015-01-01

    Tree species distributions associated with rainfall are among the most prominent patterns in tropical forests. Understanding the mechanisms shaping these patterns is important to project impacts of global climate change on tree distributions and diversity in the tropics. Beside direct effects of water availability, additional factors co-varying with rainfall have been hypothesized to play an important role, including pest pressure and light availability. While low water availability is expected to exclude drought-intolerant wet forest species from drier forests (physiological tolerance hypothesis), high pest pressure or low light availability are hypothesized to exclude dry forest species from wetter forests (pest pressure gradient and light availability hypothesis, respectively). To test these hypotheses at the seed-to-seedling transition, the potentially most critical stage for species discrimination, we conducted a reciprocal transplant experiment combined with a pest exclosure treatment at a wet and a dry forest site in Panama with seeds of 26 species with contrasting origin. Establishment success after one year did not reflect species distribution patterns. However, in the wet forest, wet origin species had a home advantage over dry forest species through higher growth rates. At the same time, drought limited survival of wet origin species in the dry forest, supporting the physiological tolerance hypothesis. Together these processes sort species over longer time frames, and exclude species outside their respective home range. Although we found pronounced effects of pests and some effects of light availability on the seedlings, they did not corroborate the pest pressure nor light availability hypotheses at the seed-to-seedling transition. Our results underline that changes in water availability due to climate change will have direct consequences on tree regeneration and distributions along tropical rainfall gradients, while indirect effects of light and pests

  15. Effects of Drought, Pest Pressure and Light Availability on Seedling Establishment and Growth: Their Role for Distribution of Tree Species across a Tropical Rainfall Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Gaviria, Julian; Engelbrecht, Bettina M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Tree species distributions associated with rainfall are among the most prominent patterns in tropical forests. Understanding the mechanisms shaping these patterns is important to project impacts of global climate change on tree distributions and diversity in the tropics. Beside direct effects of water availability, additional factors co-varying with rainfall have been hypothesized to play an important role, including pest pressure and light availability. While low water availability is expected to exclude drought-intolerant wet forest species from drier forests (physiological tolerance hypothesis), high pest pressure or low light availability are hypothesized to exclude dry forest species from wetter forests (pest pressure gradient and light availability hypothesis, respectively). To test these hypotheses at the seed-to-seedling transition, the potentially most critical stage for species discrimination, we conducted a reciprocal transplant experiment combined with a pest exclosure treatment at a wet and a dry forest site in Panama with seeds of 26 species with contrasting origin. Establishment success after one year did not reflect species distribution patterns. However, in the wet forest, wet origin species had a home advantage over dry forest species through higher growth rates. At the same time, drought limited survival of wet origin species in the dry forest, supporting the physiological tolerance hypothesis. Together these processes sort species over longer time frames, and exclude species outside their respective home range. Although we found pronounced effects of pests and some effects of light availability on the seedlings, they did not corroborate the pest pressure nor light availability hypotheses at the seed-to-seedling transition. Our results underline that changes in water availability due to climate change will have direct consequences on tree regeneration and distributions along tropical rainfall gradients, while indirect effects of light and pests

  16. A simple method for locating the fresh water-salt water interface using pressure data.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kue-Young; Chon, Chul-Min; Park, Ki-Hwa

    2007-01-01

    Salt water intrusion is a key issue in dealing with exploitation, restoration, and management of fresh ground water in coastal aquifers. Constant monitoring of the fresh water-salt water interface is necessary for proper management of ground water resources. This study presents a simple method to estimate the depth of the fresh water-salt water interface in coastal aquifers using two sets of pressure data obtained from the fresh and saline zones within a single borehole. This method uses the density difference between fresh water and saline water and can practically be used at coastal aquifers that have a relatively sharp fresh water-salt water interface with a thin transition zone. The proposed method was applied to data collected from a coastal aquifer on Jeju Island, Korea, to estimate the variations in the depth of the interface. The interface varied with daily tidal fluctuations and heavy rainfall in the rainy season. The estimated depth of the interface showed a good agreement with the measured electrical conductivity profile. PMID:17973750

  17. Temperature/pressure and water vapor sounding with microwave spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhleman, D. O.; Janssen, M. A.; Clancy, R. T.; Gulkis, S.; Mccleese, D. J.; Zurek, R.; Haberle, R. M.; Frerking, M.

    1992-01-01

    Two intense microwave spectra lines exist in the martian atmosphere that allow unique sounding capabilities: water vapor at 183 GHz and the (2-1) rotational line of CO at 230 GHz. Microwave spectra line sounding is a well-developed technique for the Earth's atmosphere for sounding from above from spacecraft and airplanes, and from below from fixed surface sites. Two simple instruments for temperature sounding on Mars (the CO line) and water vapor measurements are described. The surface sounder proposed for the MESUR sites is designed to study the boundary layer water vapor distribution and the temperature/pressure profiles with vertical resolution of 0.25 km up to 1 km with reduced resolution above approaching a scale height. The water channel will be sensitive to a few tenths of a micrometer of water and the temperature profile will be retrieved to an accuracy between 1 and 2 K. The latter is routinely done on the Earth using oxygen lines near 60 GHz. The measurements are done with a single-channel heterodyne receiver looking into a 10-cm mirror that is canned through a range of elevation angles plus a target load. The frequency of the receiver is sweep across the water and CO lines generating the two spectra at about 1-hr intervals throughout the mission. The mass and power for the proposed instrument are 2 kg and 5-8 W continuously. The measurements are completely immune to the atmospheric dust and ice particle loads. It was felt that these measurements are the ultimate ones to properly study the martian boundary layer from the surface to a few kilometers. Sounding from above requires an orbiting spacecraft with multichannel microwave spectrometers such as the instrument proposed for MO by a subset of the authors, a putative MESUR orbiter, and a proposed Discovery mission called MOES. Such an instrument can be built with less than 10 kg and use less than 15 W. The obvious advantage of this approach is that the entire atmosphere can be sounded for temperature and

  18. Pressure dependence of the deuterium isotope effect in the photolysis of formaldehyde by ultraviolet light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E. J. K.; Andersen, V. F.; Skov, H.; Johnson, M. S.

    2010-04-01

    The pressure dependence of the relative photolysis rate of HCHO vs. HCDO has been investigated for the first time, using a photochemical reactor at the University of Copenhagen. The dissociation of HCHO vs. HCDO using a UVA lamp was measured at total bath gas pressures of 50, 200, 400, 600 and 1030 mbar. The products of formaldehyde photodissociation are either H2 + CO (molecular channel) or HCO + H (radical channel), and a photolysis lamp was chosen to emit light at wavelengths that greatly favor the molecular channel. The isotope effect in the dissociation, kHCHO/kHCDO, was found to depend strongly on pressure, varying from 1.1 + 0.15/-0.1 at 50 mbar to 1.75±0.10 at 1030 mbar. The results can be corrected for radical channel contribution to yield the kinetic isotope effect for the molecular channel; i.e. the KIE in the production of molecular hydrogen. This is done and the results at 1030 mbar are discussed in relation to previous studies at ambient pressure. In the atmosphere the relative importance of the two product channels changes with altitude as a result of changes in pressure and actinic flux. The study demonstrates that the δD of photochemical hydrogen produced from formaldehyde will increase substantially as pressure decreases.

  19. Environmentally assisted cracking in Light Water Reactors. Volume 16: Semiannual report, October 1992--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.; Ruther, W.E.; Kassner, T.F.; Michaud, W.F.; Park, J.Y.; Sanecki, J.E.; Shack, W.J.

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) during the six months from October 1992 to March 1993. Fatigue and EAC of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in LWRs are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. Topics that have been investigated include (1) fatigue of low-alloy steel used in piping, steam generators, and reactor pressure vessels. (2) EAC of cast stainless steels (SSs), (3) radiation-induced segregation and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence, and (4) EAC of low-alloy steels. Fatigue tests were conducted on medium-sulfur-content A106-Gr B piping and A533-Gr B pressure vessel steels in simulated PWR water and in air. Additional crack growth data were obtained on fracture-mechanics specimens of cast austenitic SSs in the as-received and thermally aged conditions and chromium-nickel-plated A533-Gr B steel in simulated boiling-water reactor (BWR) water at 289{degrees}C. The data were compared with predictions based on crack growth correlations for ferritic steels in oxygenated water and correlations for wrought austenitic SS in oxygenated water developed at ANL and rates in air from Section XI of the ASME Code. Microchemical and microstructural changes in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath from operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

  20. Method of burning lightly loaded coal-water slurries

    DOEpatents

    Krishna, C.R.

    1984-07-27

    In a preferred arrangement of the method of the invention, a lightly loaded coal-water slurry, containing in the range of approximately 40% to 52% + 2% by weight coal, is atomized to strip water from coal particles in the mixture. Primary combustor air is forced around the atomized spray in a combustion chamber of a combustor to swirl the air in a helical path through the combustion chamber. A flame is established within the combustion chamber to ignite the stripped coal particles, and flame temperature regulating means are provided for maintaining the flame temperature within a desired predetermined range of temperatures that is effective to produce dry, essentially slag-free ash from the combustion process.

  1. Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor - Rev. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Gail Lynn; Mc Cardell, Richard Keith; Illum, Douglas Brent

    2002-09-01

    The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was developed by Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to demonstrate the potential of a water-cooled, thorium oxide fuel cycle breeder reactor. The LWBR core operated from 1977-82 without major incident. The fuel and fuel components suffered minimal damage during operation, and the reactor testing was deemed successful. Extensive destructive and nondestructive postirradiation examinations confirmed that the fuel was in good condition with minimal amounts of cladding deformities and fuel pellet cracks. Fuel was placed in wet storage upon arrival at the Expended Core Facility, then dried and sent to the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center for underground dry storage. It is likely that the fuel remains in good condition at its current underground dry storage location at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Reports show no indication of damage to the core associated with shipping, loading, or storage.

  2. Quantum optomechanical correlations induced by radiation pressure between light and mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briant, T.; Verlot, P.; Tavernarakis, A.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Heidmann, A.

    2009-02-01

    Radiation pressure exerted by light in interferometric measurements is responsible for displacements of mirrors which appear as an additional back-action noise and limit the sensitivity of the measurement. We experimentally study these effects by monitoring in a very high-finesse optical cavity the displacements of a mirror with a sensitivity at the 10-20m/√Hz level. This unique sensitivity is a step towards the first observation of the fundamental quantum effects of radiation pressure and the resulting standard quantum limit in interferometric measurements. Our experiment may become a powerful facility to test quantum noise reduction schemes, and we already have demonstrated radiation-pressure induced correlations between two optical beams sent into the same moving mirror cavity. Our scheme can be extended down to the quantum level and has applications both in high-sensitivity measurements and in quantum optics.

  3. The nuclear reactor strategy between fast breeder reactors and advanced pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Seifritz, W.

    1983-11-01

    A nuclear reactor strategy between fast breeder reactors (FBRs) and advanced pressurized water reactors (APWRs) is being studied. The principal idea of this strategy is that the discharged plutonium from light water reactors (LWRs) provides the inventories of the FBRs and the high-converter APWRs, whereby the LWRs are installed according to the derivative of a logistical S curve. Special emphasis is given to the dynamics of reaching an asymptotic symbiosis between FBRs and APWRs. The main conclusion is that if a symbiotic APWR-FBR family with an asymptotic total power level in the terawatt range is to exist in about half a century from now, we need a large number of FBRs already in an early phase.

  4. Accident Performance of Light Water Reactor Cladding Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Andrew T.

    2012-07-24

    During a loss of coolant accident as experienced at Fukushima, inadequate cooling of the reactor core forces component temperatures ever higher where they must withstand aggressive chemical environments. Conventional zirconium cladding alloys will readily oxidize in the presence of water vapor at elevated temperatures, rapidly degrading and likely failing. A cladding breach removes the critical barrier between actinides and fission products and the coolant, greatly increasing the probability of the release of radioactivity in the event of a containment failure. These factors have driven renewed international interest in both study and improvement of the materials used in commercial light water reactors. Characterization of a candidate cladding alloy or oxidation mitigation technique requires understanding of both the oxidation kinetics and hydrogen production as a function of temperature and atmosphere conditions. Researchers in the MST division supported by the DOE-NE Fuel Cycle Research and Development program are working to evaluate and quantify these parameters across a wide range of proposed cladding materials. The primary instrument employed is a simultaneous thermal analyzer (STA) equipped with a specialized water vapor furnace capable of maintaining temperatures above 1200 C in a range of atmospheres and water vapor contents. The STA utilizes thermogravimetric analysis and a coupled mass spectrometer to measure in situ oxidation and hydrogen production of candidate materials. This capability is unprecedented in study of materials under consideration for reactor cladding use, and is currently being expanded to investigate proposed coating techniques as well as the effect of coating defects on corrosion resistance.

  5. CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothe, Douglas B.

    2010-11-01

    Like the fusion community, the nuclear engineering community is embarking on a new computational effort to create integrated, multiphysics simulations. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), one of 3 newly-funded DOE Energy Innovation Hubs, brings together an exceptionally capable team that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated the Virtual Reactor (VR), will: 1) Enable the use of leadership-class computing for engineering design and analysis to improve reactor capabilities, 2) Promote an enhanced scientific basis and understanding by replacing empirically based design and analysis tools with predictive capabilities, 3) Develop a highly integrated multiphysics environment for engineering analysis through increased fidelity methods, and 4) Incorporate UQ as a basis for developing priorities and supporting, application of the VR tools for predictive simulation. In this presentation, we present the plans for CASL and comment on the similarity and differences with the proposed Fusion Simulation Project (FSP).

  6. Multi-Applications Small Light Water Reactor - NERI Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    S. Michale Modro; James E. Fisher; Kevan D. Weaver; Jose N. Reyes, Jr.; John T. Groome; Pierre Babka; Thomas M. Carlson

    2003-12-01

    The Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) project was conducted under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The primary project objectives were to develop the conceptual design for a safe and economic small, natural circulation light water reactor, to address the economic and safety attributes of the concept, and to demonstrate the technical feasibility by testing in an integral test facility. This report presents the results of the project. After an initial exploratory and evolutionary process, as documented in the October 2000 report, the project focused on developing a modular reactor design that consists of a self-contained assembly with a reactor vessel, steam generators, and containment. These modular units would be manufactured at a single centralized facility, transported by rail, road, and/or ship, and installed as a series of self-contained units. This approach also allows for staged construction of an NPP and ''pull and replace'' refueling and maintenance during each five-year refueling cycle.

  7. Issues affecting advanced passive light-water reactor safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beelman, R.J.; Fletcher, C.D.; Modro, S.M.

    1992-08-01

    Next generation commercial reactor designs emphasize enhanced safety through improved safety system reliability and performance by means of system simplification and reliance on immutable natural forces for system operation. Simulating the performance of these safety systems will be central to analytical safety evaluation of advanced passive reactor designs. Yet the characteristically small driving forces of these safety systems pose challenging computational problems to current thermal-hydraulic systems analysis codes. Additionally, the safety systems generally interact closely with one another, requiring accurate, integrated simulation of the nuclear steam supply system, engineered safeguards and containment. Furthermore, numerical safety analysis of these advanced passive reactor designs wig necessitate simulation of long-duration, slowly-developing transients compared with current reactor designs. The composite effects of small computational inaccuracies on induced system interactions and perturbations over long periods may well lead to predicted results which are significantly different than would otherwise be expected or might actually occur. Comparisons between the engineered safety features of competing US advanced light water reactor designs and analogous present day reactor designs are examined relative to the adequacy of existing thermal-hydraulic safety codes in predicting the mechanisms of passive safety. Areas where existing codes might require modification, extension or assessment relative to passive safety designs are identified. Conclusions concerning the applicability of these codes to advanced passive light water reactor safety analysis are presented.

  8. Issues affecting advanced passive light-water reactor safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beelman, R.J.; Fletcher, C.D.; Modro, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Next generation commercial reactor designs emphasize enhanced safety through improved safety system reliability and performance by means of system simplification and reliance on immutable natural forces for system operation. Simulating the performance of these safety systems will be central to analytical safety evaluation of advanced passive reactor designs. Yet the characteristically small driving forces of these safety systems pose challenging computational problems to current thermal-hydraulic systems analysis codes. Additionally, the safety systems generally interact closely with one another, requiring accurate, integrated simulation of the nuclear steam supply system, engineered safeguards and containment. Furthermore, numerical safety analysis of these advanced passive reactor designs wig necessitate simulation of long-duration, slowly-developing transients compared with current reactor designs. The composite effects of small computational inaccuracies on induced system interactions and perturbations over long periods may well lead to predicted results which are significantly different than would otherwise be expected or might actually occur. Comparisons between the engineered safety features of competing US advanced light water reactor designs and analogous present day reactor designs are examined relative to the adequacy of existing thermal-hydraulic safety codes in predicting the mechanisms of passive safety. Areas where existing codes might require modification, extension or assessment relative to passive safety designs are identified. Conclusions concerning the applicability of these codes to advanced passive light water reactor safety analysis are presented.

  9. Mechanical design of a light water breeder reactor

    DOEpatents

    Fauth, Jr., William L.; Jones, Daniel S.; Kolsun, George J.; Erbes, John G.; Brennan, John J.; Weissburg, James A.; Sharbaugh, John E.

    1976-01-01

    In a light water reactor system using the thorium-232 -- uranium-233 fuel system in a seed-blanket modular core configuration having the modules arranged in a symmetrical array surrounded by a reflector blanket region, the seed regions are disposed for a longitudinal movement between the fixed or stationary blanket region which surrounds each seed region. Control of the reactor is obtained by moving the inner seed region thus changing the geometry of the reactor, and thereby changing the leakage of neutrons from the relatively small seed region into the blanket region. The mechanical design of the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core includes means for axially positioning of movable fuel assemblies to achieve the neutron economy required of a breeder reactor, a structure necessary to adequately support the fuel modules without imposing penalties on the breeding capability, a structure necessary to support fuel rods in a closely packed array and a structure necessary to direct and control the flow of coolant to regions in the core in accordance with the heat transfer requirements.

  10. Anticipatory control of xenon in a pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Impink, A.J. Jr.

    1987-02-10

    A method is described for automatically dampening xenon-135 spatial transients in the core of a pressurized water reactor having control rods which regulate reactor power level, comprising the steps of: measuring the neutron flu in the reactor core at a plurality of axially spaced locations on a real-time, on-line basis; repetitively generating from the neutron flux measurements, on a point-by-point basis, signals representative of the current axial distribution of xenon-135, and signals representative of the current rate of change of the axial distribution of xenon-135; generating from the xenon-135 distribution signals and the rate of change of xenon distribution signals, control signals for reducing the xenon transients; and positioning the control rods as a function of the control signals to dampen the xenon-135 spatial transients.

  11. Upper internals arrangement for a pressurized water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Norman R; Altman, David A; Yu, Ching; Rex, James A; Forsyth, David R

    2013-07-09

    In a pressurized water reactor with all of the in-core instrumentation gaining access to the core through the reactor head, each fuel assembly in which the instrumentation is introduced is aligned with an upper internals instrumentation guide-way. In the elevations above the upper internals upper support assembly, the instrumentation is protected and aligned by upper mounted instrumentation columns that are part of the instrumentation guide-way and extend from the upper support assembly towards the reactor head in hue with a corresponding head penetration. The upper mounted instrumentation columns are supported laterally at one end by an upper guide tube and at the other end by the upper support plate.

  12. Missiles caused by severe pressurized-water reactor accidients

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, R.

    1995-07-01

    For future pressurized-water reactors, which should be designed against core-meltdown accidents, missiles generated inside the containment present a severe problem for its integrity. The masses and geometries of the missiles, as well as their velocities, may vary to a great extent. Therefore a reliable proof of the containment integrity is very difficult. In this article the potential sources of missiles are discussed, and the conclusion was reached that the generation of heavy missiles must be prevented. Steam explosions must not damage the reactor vessel head. Thus fragments of the head cannot become missiles that endanger the containment shell. Furthermore, during a melt-through failure of the reactor vessel under high pressure, the resulting forces must not catapult the whole vessel against the containment shell. Only missiles caused by hydrogen explosions may be tolerable, but shielding structures that protect the containment shell may be required. Further investigations are necessary. Finally, measures are described showing that the generation of heavy missiles can indeed be prevented. Investigations are currently being carried out that will confirm the strength of the reactor vessel head. In addition, a device for retaining the fragments of a failing reactor vessel is discussed.

  13. Pressure effects on water vapour lines: beyond the Voigt profile.

    PubMed

    Ngo, N H; Tran, H; Gamache, R R; Hartmann, J M

    2012-06-13

    A short overview of recent results on the effects of pressure (collisions) regarding the shape of isolated infrared lines of water vapour is presented. The first part of this study considers the basic collisional quantities, which are the pressure-broadening and -shifting coefficients, central parameters of the Lorentzian (and Voigt) profile and thus of any sophisticated line-shape model. Through comparisons of measured values with semi-classical calculations, the influences of the molecular states (both rotational and vibrational) involved and of the temperature are analysed. This shows the relatively unusual behaviour of H(2)O broadening, with evidence of a significant vibrational dependence and the fact that the broadening coefficient (in cm(-1) atm(-1)) of some lines increases with temperature. In the second part of this study, line shapes beyond the Voigt model are considered, thus now taking 'velocity effects' into account. These include both the influence of collisionally induced velocity changes that lead to the so-called Dicke narrowing and the influence of the dependence of collisional parameters on the speed of the radiating molecule. Experimental evidence of deviations from the Voigt shape is presented and analysed. The interest of classical molecular dynamics simulations, to model velocity changes, together with semi-classical calculations of the speed-dependent collisional parameters for line-shape predictions from 'first principles', are discussed. PMID:22547229

  14. Water solubility in rhyolitic silicate melts at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Amy; Russell, Kelly; Nichols, Alexander; Porritt, Lucy; Friedlander, Elizabeth

    2014-05-01

    High temperature (900-1100 °C) experiments have been conducted to measure the solubility of water in a rhyolitic melt at atmospheric pressure (1 atm) and to quantify the magnitude of retrograde solubility at low pressure. Individual cores (1 cm x 1 cm) of crystal- and bubble-free rhyolitic obsidian from Hrafntinnugryggur, Krafla (Iceland) were held in a furnace at 900-1100 °C for 0.25 to 20 hours. During this time, the uniform bubble-free cores vesiculate to produce variably swollen bubble-rich run products. The volume change in each core reflects the volume of bubbles produced in each experiment and depends on the experimental temperature and the time held at that temperature. The run product volumes for isothermal experiments (e.g., 950 °C) increase non-linearly with increasing time (e.g., 0.18 cm3 at 1.5 h, 0.96 cm3 at 12.5 h) until reaching a maximum value, after which the volume does not change appreciably. We take this plateau in the isothermal volume:time curve as coinciding with the 1 atm. solubility limit for the rhyolite at this temperature. With increasing temperature, the slope and final horizontal plateaus of the volume:time curves increase such that samples from the higher temperature suites vesiculate more, as well as more rapidly (e.g., 0.85 cm3 after 0.5 hours, 1.78 cm3 after 1 hour at 1100 °C). The variations in the maximum volume of bubbles produced for each temperature constrain the retrograde solubility of water in the melt at 1 atm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses of the residual water content of the glass in the starting material and in the most vesiculated sample from each temperature suite shows a decrease in the water content of the glass from an initial 0.114 wt% (σ 0.013) to 0.098 wt% (σ 0.010), 0.087 wt% (σ 0.009), 0.093 wt% (σ 0.008), 0.090 wt% (σ 0.006) and 0.108 wt% (σ 0.010) for 900 °C, 950 °C, 1000 °C, 1050 °C and 1100 °C respectively. This change in the solubility of water at different

  15. The influence of water on the Peierls stress of olivine at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, S.; Suzuki, A. M.; Xu, L.; Kohlstedt, D. L.; Dixon, N. A.; Durham, W. B.

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the influence of water on the low-temperature plasticity of olivine under lithospheric conditions, we carried out a series of creep experiments on polycrystalline olivine at high pressures (~6 GPa), relatively low temperatures (873 ≤ T ≤ 1173 K), and hydrous conditions using a deformation-DIA. Samples were fabricated from fine powdered San Carlos olivine under hydrous conditions. In the experiments, a sample column composed of a sample and alumina pistons was assembled with a talc sleeve and graphite resistance heater into a 6.2-mm edge length cubic pressure medium. Experiments were carried out at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In a run, differential stress and sample displacement were monitored in-situ using synchrotron x-ray diffraction and radiography, respectively. The low-temperature plasticity of olivine under hydrous conditions is constrained by our data with a Peierls stress of 4.2 ± 0.3 GPa. This value is much lower than those reported the Peierls stress for olivine under anhydrous conditions (~ 6 - 15 GPa, Evans and Goetze, 1979; Raterron et al., 2004; Mei at al., 2010), indicating a significant influence of water on the low-temperature plasticity of olivine. The low-temperature flow behavior of olivine under hydrous conditions quantified in this study provides a necessary constraint for modeling the dynamic activities occurring within lithospheric mantle especially for those regions with the presence of water such as beneath a mid-ocean ridge and along a subducting slab.

  16. Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Illum, D.B.; Olson, G.L.; McCardell, R.K.

    1999-01-01

    The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was a small water cooled, U-233/Th-232 cycle breeder reactor developed by the Pittsburgh Naval Reactors to improve utilization of the nation's nuclear fuel resources in light water reactors. The LWBR was operated at Shippingport Atomic Power Station (APS), which was a Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly Atomic Energy Commission)-owned reactor plant. Shippingport APS was the first large-scale, central-station nuclear power plant in the United States and the first plant of such size in the world operated solely to produce electric power. The Shippingport LWBR was operated successfully from 1977 to 1982 at the APS. During the five years of operation, the LWBR generated more than 29,000 effective full power hours (EFPH) of energy. After final shutdown, the 39 core modules of the LWBR were shipped to the Expended Core Facility (ECF) at Naval Reactors Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). At ECF, 12 of the 39 modules were dismantled and about 1000 of more than 17,000 rods were removed from the modules of proof-of-breeding and fuel performance testing. Some of the removed rods were kept at ECF, some were sent to Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in Idaho and some to ANL-East in Chicago for a variety of physical, chemical and radiological examinations. All rods and rod sections remaining after the experiments were shipped back to ECF, where modules and loose rods were repackaged in liners for dry storage. In a series of shipments, the liners were transported from ECF to Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The 47 liners containing the fully-rodded and partially-derodded core modules, the loose rods, and the rod scraps, are now stored in underground dry wells at CPP-749.

  17. Evaluation of pressures in European river basins reported under the Water Framework Directive: potentials for collaborative improvement of assessments in transnational water management.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistocchi, A.; Aloe, A.; Bizzi, S.; Buoraoui, F.; Burek, P.; de Roo, A.; Grizzetti, B.; Liquete, C.; Pastori, M.; Salas, F.; Stips, A. K.; van de Bund, W.; Weissteiner, C.; Bidoglio, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Water Framework Directive 60/2000/EC requires European Union member states to ensure good status of water bodies. To this end, it requires to identify relevant pressures (e.g. diffuse pollution) on waters, to address them through appropriate measures (e.g. enforce good agricultural practices), and to report both pressures and measures to the European Commission (EC). In spite of existing assessment guidance, member states report about pressures in a rather heterogeneous way. This has stimulated the EC to undertake a comparison between the pressures reported by the member states with those depicted by Europe-wide model-based indicators. This alone has required turning model results to communicable maps to be used in a decision making context with minimal risk of interpretive distortion. The comparison suggests that the identification of relevant pressures at the continental scale is not always the same as at the national and regional scale, causing difficulties in the prioritization of investments and doubts about the effectiveness of envisaged measures. A simple rank-based classification has been used to map the level of agreement between pressures reported by the member states and the corresponding European indicators, highlighting regions where a more detailed insight is required in order to come to a shared judgment on pressures hampering the achievement of good water body status. Reported pressures may suffer from incompleteness and semantic uncertainty, while European indicators suffer from model uncertainties and errors. A discussion of differences between European indicators and river basin assessments in the light of agreed-upon reporting and model limitations may help to collaboratively improve the assessment from both sides, and consequently to design more effectively the measures to be implemented at the respective levels. We present and discuss the case study, highlighting how the approach may be useful in contexts of transnational water management.

  18. Behavior of stainless steels in pressurized water reactor primary circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Féron, D.; Herms, E.; Tanguy, B.

    2012-08-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in primary circuits of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Operating experience with the various grades of stainless steels over several decades of years has generally been excellent. Nevertheless, stress corrosion failures have been reported in few cases. Two main factors contributing to SCC susceptibility enhancement are investigated in this study: cold work and irradiation. Irradiation is involved in the stress corrosion cracking and corrosion of in-core reactor components in PWR environment. Irradiated assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a complex and multi-physics phenomenon for which a predictive modeling able to describe initiation and/or propagation is not yet achieved. Experimentally, development of initiation smart tests and of in situ instrumentation, also in nuclear reactors, is an important axis in order to gain a better understanding of IASCC kinetics. A strong susceptibility for SCC of heavily cold worked austenitic stainless steels is evidenced in hydrogenated primary water typical of PWRs. It is shown that for a given cold-working procedure, SCC susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels materials increases with increasing cold-work. Results have shown also strong influences of the cold work on the oxide layer composition and of the maximum stress on the time to fracture.

  19. Simulations of dissociation constants in low pressure supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halstead, S. J.; An, P.; Zhang, S.

    2014-09-01

    This article reports molecular dynamics simulations of the dissociation of hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide in water from ambient to supercritical temperatures at a fixed pressure of 250 atm. Corrosion of reaction vessels is known to be a serious problem of supercritical water, and acid/base dissociation can be a significant contributing factor to this. The SPC/e model was used in conjunction with solute models determined from density functional calculations and OPLSAA Lennard-Jones parameters. Radial distribution functions were calculated, and these show a significant increase in solute-solvent ordering upon forming the product ions at all temperatures. For both dissociations, rapidly decreasing entropy of reaction was found to be the controlling thermodynamic factor, and this is thought to arise due to the ions produced from dissociation maintaining a relatively high density and ordered solvation shell compared to the reactants. The change in entropy of reaction reaches a minimum at the critical temperature. The values of pKa and pKb were calculated and both increased with temperature, in qualitative agreement with other work, until a maximum value at 748 K, after which there was a slight decrease.

  20. Shippingport operations with the Light Water Breeder Reactor core. (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Budd, W.A.

    1986-03-01

    This report describes the operation of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station during the LWBR (Light Water Breeder Reactor) Core lifetime. It also summarizes the plant-oriented operations during the period preceding LWBR startup, which include the defueling of The Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 (PWR-2) and the installation of the LWBR Core, and the operations associated with the defueling of LWBR. The intent of this report is to examine LWBR experience in retrospect and present pertinent and significant aspects of LWBR operations that relate primarily to the nuclear portion of the Station. The nonnuclear portion of the Station is discussed only as it relates to overall plant operation or to unusual problems which result from the use of conventional equipment in radioactive environments. 30 refs., 69 figs., 27 tabs.

  1. Retrofittable Modifications to Pressurized Water Reactors for Improved Resource Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    This report summarizes work performed for the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency under BOA AC9NX707 (Task Order 80-02), as part of the Agency's continuing program on improved fuel utilization in light water reactors. The objective of the study was to investigate improvements in fuel management and design of water reactors (PWRs) that could potentially increase the utilization of natural uranium resources in a once-through fuel cycle (i.e., without using spent fuel reprocessing and recycle). For the present study, potential improvements were limited to retrofittable concepts, i.e., those which could be modifications to the reactor system or balance of plant. The potential improvements considered were not necessarily restricted to those which might be economical under current uranium ore prices or to those which might be acceptable to the nuclear industry at the present time. A six-month fuel cycle, for example, although technically possible, would be neither economical nor accept able to the industry at the present time. Although all potential improvements are not necessarily compatible with each other, the target objective was to seek a composite system of compatible improvements that, if possible, could increase uranium resource utilization by 30% or more. Economic factors, risks involved in the introduction, and potential licensing concerns are also addressed in the report.

  2. LIGHT PRESSURE: Theoretical study of the light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle of an arbitrary size in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzatov, D. V.; Gaida, L. S.; Afanas'ev, Anatolii A.

    2008-12-01

    The light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves is studied in detail for different particle radii and angles of incidence of waves.

  3. Retrieval of water optical properties using polarization of light underwater: case I and II waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilerson, Alexander; Ibrahim, Amir; Foster, Robert; Carrizo, Carlos; El-Habashi, Ahmed; Ahmed, Samir

    2014-10-01

    The relationship between the degree of linear polarization (DoLP) and attenuation-to-absorption coefficients ratio (c/a) of the water from which the scattering coefficient is readily computed (b = c-a) for two main types of oceanic waters (Case I and II) was investigated using the vector radiative transfer simulation. It is found the for Case I waters that only the green channels of the spectrum can be used to retrieve the scattering coefficient of the water whereas blue and red channels are dominated by the pure water effects of either Rayleigh scattering or high water absorption showing no variability between DoLP and c/a. On the other hand, Case II waters showed a strong relationship between DoLP and c/a for all wavelength of light under study (440, 550, 665 nm). Those relationships have been parameterized for all possible viewing geometries (sensor zenith and azimuth relative to the Sun's principle plane) and for varying Sun zenith angles. That relationship has been tested and validated against a dataset of in-situ measurements using a custom developed underwater polarimeter that measures the DoLP and an in-water package of instruments (WetLabs ac-s) that measure the absorption and the attenuation coefficients. Another polarimeter fixed on a platform in Long Island Sound at the LISCO station measures the DoLP of the light above water while a moored instrument package (WQM and C-star) that measures in-water optical properties have been used for a time serious validation.

  4. Piston slap induced pressure fluctuation in the water coolant passage of an internal combustion engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Kazuhide; Wang, Xiaoyu; Saeki, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Liner cavitation is caused by water pressure fluctuation in the water coolant passage (WCP). When the negative pressure falls below the saturated vapor pressure, the impulsive pressure following the implosion of cavitation bubbles causes cavitation erosion of the wet cylinder liner surface. The present work establishes a numerical model for structural-acoustic coupling between the crankcase and the acoustic field in the WCP considering their dynamic characteristics. The coupling effect is evaluated through mutual interaction terms that are calculated from the mode shapes of the acoustic field and of the crankcase vibration on the boundary. Water pressure fluctuations in the WCP under the action of piston slap forces are predicted and the contributions of the uncoupled mode shapes of the crankcase and the acoustic field to the pressure waveform are analyzed. The influence of sound speed variations on the water pressure response is discussed, as well as the pressure on the thrust sides of the four cylinders.

  5. Development test report for the high pressure water jet system nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Takasumi, D.S.

    1995-09-28

    The high pressure water jet nozzle tests were conducted to identify optimum water pressure, water flow rate, nozzle orifice size and fixture configuration needed to effectively decontaminate empty fuel storage canisters in KE-Basin. This report gives the tests results and recommendations from the these tests.

  6. Light-water breeder reactor (LWBR Development Program)

    DOEpatents

    Beaudoin, B.R.; Cohen, J.D.; Jones, D.H.; Marier, L.J. Jr.; Raab, H.F.

    1972-06-20

    Described is a light-water-moderated and -cooled nuclear breeder reactor of the seed-blanket type characterized by core modules comprising loosely packed blanket zones enriched with fissile fuel and axial zoning in the seed and blanket regions within each core module. Reactivity control over lifetime is achieved by axial displacement of movable seed zones without the use of poison rods in the embodiment illustrated. The seed is further characterized by a hydrogen-to-uranium-233 atom ratio in the range 10 to 200 and a uranium-233-to-thorium-232 atom ratio ranging from 0.012 to 0.200. The seed occupies from 10 to 35 percent of the core volume in the form of one or more individual islands or annuli. (NSA 26: 55130)

  7. Waste disposal from the light water reactor fuel cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costello, J. M.; Hardy, C. J.

    1981-05-01

    Alternaive nuclear fuel cycles for support of light water reactors are described and wastes containing naturally occurring or artificially produced radioactivity reviewed. General principles and objectives in radioactive waste management are outlined, and methods for their practical application to fuel cycle wastes discussed. Management of wastes from upgrading processes of uranium hexafluoride manufacture and uranium manufacture and enrichment, and, to a lesser extent, nuclear power reactor wastes are discussed. Some estimates of radiological dose commitments and health effects from nuclear power and fuel cycle wastes were made for US conditions. These indicate that the major part of the radiological dose arises from uranium mining and milling, operation of nuclear reactors, and spent fuel reprocessing. However, the total dose from the fuel cycle is estimated to be only a small fraction of that from natural background radiation.

  8. Commercial Light Water Reactor Tritium Extraction Facility Geotechnical Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M R

    2000-01-11

    A geotechnical investigation program has been completed for the Circulating Light Water Reactor - Tritium Extraction Facility (CLWR-TEF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The program consisted of reviewing previous geotechnical and geologic data and reports, performing subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing and geologic and engineering analyses. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the subsurface conditions for the CLWR-TEF in terms of subsurface stratigraphy and engineering properties for design and to perform selected engineering analyses. The objectives of the evaluation were to establish site-specific geologic conditions, obtain representative engineering properties of the subsurface and potential fill materials, evaluate the lateral and vertical extent of any soft zones encountered, and perform engineering analyses for slope stability, bearing capacity and settlement, and liquefaction potential. In addition, provide general recommendations for construction and earthwork.

  9. Extrasolar Storms: Pressure-dependent Changes in Light-curve Phase in Brown Dwarfs from Simultaneous HST and Spitzer Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Apai, Dániel; Marley, Mark S.; Karalidi, Theodora; Flateau, Davin; Showman, Adam P.; Metchev, Stanimir; Buenzli, Esther; Radigan, Jacqueline; Artigau, Étienne; Lowrance, Patrick J.; Burgasser, Adam J.

    2016-07-01

    We present Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera Ch1 and Ch2 monitoring of six brown dwarfs during eight different epochs over the course of 20 months. For four brown dwarfs, we also obtained simulataneous Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/WFC3 G141 grism spectra during two epochs and derived light curves in five narrowband filters. Probing different pressure levels in the atmospheres, the multiwavelength light curves of our six targets all exhibit variations, and the shape of the light curves evolves over the timescale of a rotation period, ranging from 1.4 to 13 hr. We compare the shapes of the light curves and estimate the phase shifts between the light curves observed at different wavelengths by comparing the phase of the primary Fourier components. We use state-of-the-art atmosphere models to determine the flux contribution of different pressure layers to the observed flux in each filter. We find that the light curves that probe higher pressures are similar and in phase, but are offset and often different from the light curves that probe lower pressures. The phase differences between the two groups of light curves suggest that the modulations seen at lower and higher pressures may be introduced by different cloud layers.

  10. Environmentally assisted cracking of light-water reactor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1996-02-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of lightwater reactor (LWR) materials has affected nuclear reactors from the very introduction of the technology. Corrosion problems have afflicted steam generators from the very introduction of pressurized water reactor (PWR) technology. Shippingport, the first commercial PWR operated in the United States, developed leaking cracks in two Type 304 stainless steel (SS) steam generator tubes as early as 1957, after only 150 h of operation. Stress corrosion cracks were observed in the heat-affected zones of welds in austenitic SS piping and associated components in boiling-water reactors (BRWs) as early as 1965. The degradation of steam generator tubing in PWRs and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic SS piping in BWRs have been the most visible and most expensive examples of EAC in LWRs, and the repair and replacement of steam generators and recirculation piping has cost hundreds of millions of dollars. However, other problems associated with the effects of the environment on reactor structures and components am important concerns in operating plants and for extended reactor lifetimes. Cast duplex austenitic-ferritic SSs are used extensively in the nuclear industry to fabricate pump casings and valve bodies for LWRs and primary coolant piping in many PWRs. Embrittlement of the ferrite phase in cast duplex SS may occur after 10 to 20 years at reactor operating temperatures, which could influence the mechanical response and integrity of pressure boundary components during high strain-rate loading (e.g., seismic events). The problem is of most concern in PWRs where slightly higher temperatures are typical and cast SS piping is widely used.

  11. Benthic effects on the polarization of light in shallow waters.

    PubMed

    Gilerson, Alexander A; Stepinski, Jan; Ibrahim, Amir I; You, Yu; Sullivan, James M; Twardowski, Michael S; Dierssen, Heidi M; Russell, Brandon; Cummings, Molly E; Brady, Parrish; Ahmed, Samir A; Kattawar, George W

    2013-12-20

    Measurements of the upwelling polarized radiance in relatively shallow waters of varying depths and benthic conditions are compared to simulations, revealing the depolarizing nature of the seafloor. The simulations, executed with the software package RayXP, are solutions to the vector radiative transfer equation, which depends on the incident light field and three types of parameters: inherent optical properties, the scattering matrix, and the benthic reflectance. These were measured directly or calculated from measurements with additional assumptions. Specifically, the Lambertian model used to simulate benthic reflectances is something of a simplification of reality, but the bottoms used in this study are found to be crucial for accurate simulations of polarization. Comparisons of simulations with and without bottom contributions show that only the former corroborate measurements of the Stokes components and the degree of linear polarization (DoLP) collected by the polarimeter developed at the City College of New York. Because this polarimeter is multiangular and hyperspectral, errors can be computed point-wise over a large range of scattering angles and wavelengths. Trends also become apparent. DoLP is highly sensitive to the benthic reflectance and to the incident wavelength, peaking in the red band, but the angle of linear polarization is almost spectrally constant and independent of the bottom. These results can thus facilitate the detection of benthic materials as well as future studies of camouflage by benthic biota; to hide underwater successfully, animals must reflect light just as depolarized as that reflected by benthic materials. PMID:24513934

  12. Effects of the operating pressure on the performance of water electrolysis cells at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, Y.; Yasudo, M.; Hine, F.

    1988-12-01

    The influence of pressure on the performance and the thermal behavior of an alkaline water electrolyzer operated at elevated temperatures was studied. The pressure dependence of cell voltage was not significant. On the other hand, the effects of pressure on the thermal behavior were great depending on the operating conditions mainly caused by the suppression of water vaporization. The optimum conditions of the operating temperature and pressure are also discussed from an economic point of view.

  13. Materials Inventory Database for the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kazi Ahmed; Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton

    2013-08-01

    Scientific research involves the purchasing, processing, characterization, and fabrication of many sample materials. The history of such materials can become complicated over their lifetime – materials might be cut into pieces or moved to various storage locations, for example. A database with built-in functions to track these kinds of processes facilitates well-organized research. The Material Inventory Database Accounting System (MIDAS) is an easy-to-use tracking and reference system for such items. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS), which seeks to advance the long-term reliability and productivity of existing nuclear reactors in the United States through multiple research pathways, proposed MIDAS as an efficient way to organize and track all items used in its research. The database software ensures traceability of all items used in research using built-in functions which can emulate actions on tracked items – fabrication, processing, splitting, and more – by performing operations on the data. MIDAS can recover and display the complete history of any item as a simple report. To ensure the database functions suitably for the organization of research, it was developed alongside a specific experiment to test accident tolerant nuclear fuel cladding under the LWRS Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels Pathway. MIDAS kept track of materials used in this experiment from receipt at the laboratory through all processes, test conduct and, ultimately, post-test analysis. By the end of this process, the database proved to be right tool for this program. The database software will help LWRS more efficiently conduct research experiments, from simple characterization tests to in-reactor experiments. Furthermore, MIDAS is a universal tool that any other research team could use to organize their material inventory.

  14. Intrinsic climate dependency of ecosystem light and water-use-efficiencies across Australian biomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hao; Li, Longhui; Eamus, Derek; Cleverly, James; Huete, Alfredo; Beringer, Jason; Yu, Qiang; van Gorsel, Eva; Hutley, Lindsay

    2014-10-01

    The sensitivity of ecosystem gross primary production (GPP) to availability of water and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) differs among biomes. Here we investigated variations of ecosystem light-use-efficiency (eLUE: GPP/PAR) and water-use-efficiency (eWUE: GPP/evapotranspiration) among seven Australian eddy covariance sites with differing annual precipitation, species composition and temperature. Changes to both eLUE and eWUE were primarily correlated with atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (VPD) at multiple temporal scales across biomes, with minor additional correlations observed with soil moisture and temperature. The effects of leaf area index on eLUE and eWUE were also relatively weak compared to VPD, indicating an intrinsic dependency of eLUE and eWUE on climate. Additionally, eLUE and eWUE were statistically different for biomes between summer and winter, except eWUE for savannas and the grassland. These findings will improve our understanding of how light- and water-use traits in Australian ecosystems may respond to climate change.

  15. White light emission from silicon oxycarbide films prepared by using atmospheric pressure microplasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Yi; Shirai, Hajime

    2009-02-15

    An atmospheric pressure microplasma jet was employed as a deposition tool to fabricate silicon oxycarbide films from tetraethoxysilane-argon (Ar) mixture gas at room temperature. Resultant films exhibit intense visible emission under a 325 nm excitation which appears white to naked eyes in the range from {approx}1.75 to {approx}3.5 eV at room temperature. The origin of photoluminescence is attributed to the electron-hole pair recombination through neutral oxygen vacancies (NOVs) in the film. The density of NOV defects was found in the range from 3.48x10{sup 15} to 2.23x10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}. The photoluminescence quantum efficiencies were estimated to be 1.48%-4.15%. Present experiment results demonstrate that the silicon oxycarbide films prepared by using atmospheric pressure microplasma jet would be a competitive candidate for the development of white light emission devices.

  16. High pressure stability of protein complexes studied by static and dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, Ronald; Kulozik, Ulrich

    2011-03-01

    The high pressure dissociation of hemocyanin prepared from the lobster Homarus americanus and casein micelles from cow milk were observed by in situ light scattering. The hemocyanin dodecamer dissociated via a hexamer into monomers in a two-step three-species reaction. The influence of ligands and the effector l-lactate on the dissociation behavior was investigated. While no effect by carbon monoxide after exchanging the ligand oxygen was observed, the addition of the effector l-lactate led to a decrease in the pressure stability. Due to a trimer intermediate which was found to be stabilized by l-lactate, the dissociation reaction in the presence of the effector was analyzed by a three-step four-species reaction. In the case of casein micelles, a two-step dissociation mechanism was found. The stabilizing interactions of casein micelles were identified and separated.

  17. Laser Heating of Solid Matter by Light-Pressure-Driven Shocks at Ultrarelativistic Intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Akli, K.U.; Hansen, S.B.; Kemp, A.J.; Freeman, R.R.; Beg, F.N.; Clark, D.C.; Chen, S.D.; Hey, D.; Hatchett, S.P.; Highbarger, K.; Giraldez, E.; Green, J.S.; Gregori, G.; Lancaster, K.L.; Ma, T.; MacKinnon, A.J.; Norreys, P.; Patel, N.; Pasley, J.; Shearer, C.; Stephens, R.B.; Stoeckl, C.; Storm, M.; Theobald, W.; Van Woerkom, L.D.; Weber, R.; Key, M.H.

    2008-04-29

    The heating of solid targets irradiated by 5 x 10^20 W cm^-2, 0.8 ps, 1.05 um wavelength laser light is studied by x-ray spectroscopy of the K-shell emission from thin layers of Ni, Mo, and V. A surface layer is heated to ~5 keV with an axial temperature gradient of 0.6 um scale length. Images of Ni Ly sub-alpha show the hot region has <25 um diameter. These data are consistent with collisional particle-in-cell simulations using preformed plasma density profiles from hydrodynamic modeling which show that the >100 Gbar light pressure compresses the preformed plasma and dries a shock into the solid, heating a thin layer.

  18. Radiation-Pressure Acceleration of Ion Beams from Nanofoil Targets: The Leaky Light-Sail Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, B.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Dromey, B.; Geissler, M.; Karmakar, A.; Gibbon, P.

    2010-10-08

    A new ion radiation-pressure acceleration regime, the 'leaky light sail', is proposed which uses sub-skin-depth nanometer foils irradiated by circularly polarized laser pulses. In the regime, the foil is partially transparent, continuously leaking electrons out along with the transmitted laser field. This feature can be exploited by a multispecies nanofoil configuration to stabilize the acceleration of the light ion component, supplementing the latter with an excess of electrons leaked from those associated with the heavy ions to avoid Coulomb explosion. It is shown by 2D particle-in-cell simulations that a monoenergetic proton beam with energy 18 MeV is produced by circularly polarized lasers at intensities of just 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. 100 MeV proton beams are obtained by increasing the intensities to 2x10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}.

  19. Laser heating of solid matter by light pressure-driven shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Akli, K; Hansen, S B; Kemp, A J; Freeman, R R; Beg, F N; Clark, D; Chen, S; Hey, D; Highbarger, K; Giraldez, E; Green, J; Gregori, G; Lancaster, K; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A J; Norreys, P A; Patel, N; Patel, P; Shearer, C; Stephens, R B; Stoeckl, C; Storm, M; Theobald, W; Van Woerkom, L; Weber, R; Key, M H

    2007-05-04

    Heating by irradiation of a solid surface in vacuum with 5 x 10{sup 20} W cm{sup -2}, 0.8 ps, 1.05 {micro}m wavelength laser light is studied by x-ray spectroscopy of the K-shell emission from thin layers of Ni, Mo and V. A surface layer is heated to {approx} 5 keV with an axial temperature gradient of 0.6 {micro}m scale length. Images of Ni Ly{sub {alpha}} show the hot region has a {approx} 25 {micro}m diameter, much smaller than {approx} 70 {micro}m region of K{sub {alpha}} emission. 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations suggest that the surface heating is due to a light pressure driven shock.

  20. [Temporal behavior of light emission of dielectric barrier discharges in air at atmospheric pressure].

    PubMed

    Yin, Zeng-qian; Dong, Li-fang; Han, Li; Li, Xue-chen; Chai, Zhi-fang

    2002-12-01

    The experimental setup of dielectric barrier discharge was designed which is propitious to optical measurement. Temporal behavior of light emission of dielectric barrier discharges (filamentary model) in air at atmospheric pressure was measured by using optical method. Temporal behavior of dielectric barrier discharges was obtained. The experimental results show that the discharge burst in each half cycle of applied voltage consists of a series of discharge pulses, the duration of each discharge pulse is about 30-50 ns, and the interval of the neighboring discharge pulses is about a few hundred ns. The result is of great importance to the application of dielectric barrier discharges. PMID:12914154

  1. Studying intracellular transport using high-pressure freezing and Correlative Light Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Edward; Mantell, Judith; Carter, Debbie; Tilly, Gini; Verkade, Paul

    2009-10-01

    Correlative Light Electron Microscopy (CLEM) aims at combining the best of light and electron microscopy in one experiment. Light microscopy (LM) is especially suited for providing a general overview with data from lots of different cells and by using live cell imaging it can show the history or sequence of events between or inside cells. Electron microscopy (EM) on the other hand can provide a much higher resolution image of a particular event and provide additional spatial information, the so-called reference space. CLEM thus has certain strengths over the application of both LM and EM techniques separately. But combining both modalities however generally also means making compromises in one or both of the techniques. Most often the preservation of ultrastructure for the electron microscopy part is sacrificed. Ideally samples should be visualized in its most native state both in the light microscope as well as the electron microscope. For electron microscopy this currently means that the sample will have to be cryo-fixed instead of the standard chemical fixation. In this paper we will discuss the rationale for using cryofixation for CLEM experiments. In particular we will highlight a CLEM technique using high-pressure freezing in combination with live cell imaging. In addition we examine some of the EM analysis tools that may be useful in combination with CLEM techniques. PMID:19660566

  2. Simulations of radiation pressure experiments narrow down the energy and momentum of light in matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethune-Waddell, Max; Chau, Kenneth J.

    2015-12-01

    Consensus on a single electrodynamic theory has yet to be reached. Discord was seeded over a century ago when Abraham and Minkowski proposed different forms of electromagnetic momentum density and has since expanded in scope with the gradual introduction of other forms of momentum and force densities. Although degenerate sets of electrodynamic postulates can be fashioned to comply with global energy and momentum conservation, hope remains to isolate a single theory based on detailed comparison between force density predictions and radiation pressure experiments. This comparison is two-fold challenging because there are just a handful of quantitative radiation pressure measurements over the past century and the solutions developed from different postulates, which consist of approximate expressions and inferential deductions, are scattered throughout the literature. For these reasons, it is appropriate to conduct a consolidated and comprehensive re-analysis of past experiments under the assumption that the momentum and energy of light in matter are degenerate. We create a combined electrodynamic/fluid dynamic simulation testbed that uses five historically significant sets of electrodynamic postulates, including those by Abraham and Minkowski, to model radiation pressure under diverse configurations with minimal assumptions. This leads to new interpretations of landmark investigations of light momentum, including the Balazs thought experiment, the Jones-Richards and Jones-Leslie measurements of radiation pressure on submerged mirrors, observations of laser-deformed fluid surfaces, and experiments on optical trapping and tractor beaming of dielectric particles. We discuss the merits and demerits of each set of postulates when compared to available experimental evidence and fundamental conservation laws. Of the five sets of postulates, the Abraham and Einstein-Laub postulates provide the greatest consistency with observations and the most physically plausible

  3. Simulations of radiation pressure experiments narrow down the energy and momentum of light in matter.

    PubMed

    Bethune-Waddell, Max; Chau, Kenneth J

    2015-12-01

    Consensus on a single electrodynamic theory has yet to be reached. Discord was seeded over a century ago when Abraham and Minkowski proposed different forms of electromagnetic momentum density and has since expanded in scope with the gradual introduction of other forms of momentum and force densities. Although degenerate sets of electrodynamic postulates can be fashioned to comply with global energy and momentum conservation, hope remains to isolate a single theory based on detailed comparison between force density predictions and radiation pressure experiments. This comparison is two-fold challenging because there are just a handful of quantitative radiation pressure measurements over the past century and the solutions developed from different postulates, which consist of approximate expressions and inferential deductions, are scattered throughout the literature. For these reasons, it is appropriate to conduct a consolidated and comprehensive re-analysis of past experiments under the assumption that the momentum and energy of light in matter are degenerate. We create a combined electrodynamic/fluid dynamic simulation testbed that uses five historically significant sets of electrodynamic postulates, including those by Abraham and Minkowski, to model radiation pressure under diverse configurations with minimal assumptions. This leads to new interpretations of landmark investigations of light momentum, including the Balazs thought experiment, the Jones-Richards and Jones-Leslie measurements of radiation pressure on submerged mirrors, observations of laser-deformed fluid surfaces, and experiments on optical trapping and tractor beaming of dielectric particles. We discuss the merits and demerits of each set of postulates when compared to available experimental evidence and fundamental conservation laws. Of the five sets of postulates, the Abraham and Einstein-Laub postulates provide the greatest consistency with observations and the most physically plausible

  4. A case of quinsy following high-pressure water jet injury.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, C; Oosthuizen, J C; O'Dwyer, T

    2014-06-01

    High-pressure water injuries of the oropharynx are uncommon but can cause significant injury and airway compromise when they occur. A small number of cases of high-pressure water injury of the oropharynx have been presented in the literature, detailing a range of effects and outcomes. We describe the first reported case of high-pressure water injury of the oropharynx associated with peritonsillar abscess (quinsy) requiring surgical drainage. PMID:24988835

  5. Amplitude- versus frequency-modulated pumping light for coherent population trapping resonances at high buffer-gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, A. B.; Jau, Y.-Y.; Kuzma, N. N.; Happer, W.

    2005-09-01

    Coherent population trapping (CPT) signals can be optimized with amplitude-modulated pumping light. As shown theoretically and experimentally in this paper, the optimum wave forms produce strong CPT signals at both low buffer-gas pressures, where the hyperfine structure (HFS) splitting of the optical absorption lines is well resolved, and also at high buffer-gas pressures, where the HFS is no longer optically resolved due to pressure broadening. On the other hand, CPT resonances from frequency-modulated waves are severely degraded for these high-pressure conditions. High buffer-gas pressures may offer advantages for miniature frequency standards and magnetometers, including suppression of diffusion losses in miniature cells, suppression of light shifts, and less stringent requirements for frequency stability of the pumping light sources.

  6. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors. Semiannual report July 1996--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gavenda, D.J.

    1997-10-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors from July 1996 to December 1996. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of carbon, low-alloy, and austenitic stainless steels (SSs) used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS, (c) EAC of Alloy 600, and (d) characterization of residual stresses in welds of boiling water reactor (BWR) core shrouds by numerical models. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic and austenitic SSs in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during various portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Slow-strain-rate-tensile tests were conducted in simulated BWR water at 288 C on SS specimens irradiated to a low fluence in the Halden reactor and the results were compared with similar data from a control-blade sheath and neutron-absorber tubes irradiated in BWRs to the same fluence level. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from a low-carbon content heat of Alloy 600 in high-purity oxygenated water at 289 C. Residual stresses and stress intensity factors were calculated for BWR core shroud welds.

  7. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors. Semiannual progress report, January 1996--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gruber, E.E.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors from January 1996 to June 1996. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of carbon, low-alloy, and austenitic stainless steels (SSs) used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS, and (c) EAC of Alloys 600 and 690. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic and austenitic SSs in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during various portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Slow-strain-rate-tensile tests were conducted in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water at 288{degrees}C on SS specimens irradiated to a low fluence in the Halden reactor and the results were compared with similar data from a control-blade sheath and neutron-absorber tubes irradiated in BWRs to the same fluence level. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from several heats of Alloys 600 and 690 in air and high-purity, low-DO water. 83 refs., 60 figs., 14 tabs.

  8. Pressurized-water reactor internals aging degradation study. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Luk, K.H.

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of a Phase I study on the effects of aging degradations on pr internals. Primary stressers for internals an generated by the primary coolant flow in the they include unsteady hydrodynamic forces and pump-generated pressure pulsations. Other stressors are applied loads, manufacturing processes, impurities in the coolant and exposures to fast neutron fluxes. A survey of reported aging-related failure information indicates that fatigue, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and mechanical wear are the three major aging-related degradation mechanisms for PWR internals. Significant reported failures include thermal shield flow-induced vibration problems, SCC in guide tube support pins and core support structure bolts, fatigue-induced core baffle water-jet impingement problems and excess wear in flux thimbles. Many of the reported problems have been resolved by accepted engineering practices. Uncertainties remain in the assessment of long-term neutron irradiation effects and environmental factors in high-cycle fatigue failures. Reactor internals are examined by visual inspections and the technique is access limited. Improved inspection methods, especially one with an early failure detection capability, can enhance the safety and efficiency of reactor operations.

  9. High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2006-01-31

    The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

  10. Global analysis of bundle behavior in pressurized water reactor specific CORA experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hering, W. ); Minato, Kazuo; Nagase, Fumihisa )

    1993-04-01

    At Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, out-of-pile bundle experiments are performed in the CORA facility to investigate the behavior of light water reactor fuel elements during severe fuel damage accidents. To analyze the phenomena observed during the tests, such as claddin failure, oxidation, and deformation, as well as their influence on the post test bundle state, four pressurized water reactor specific tests are selected: CORA-2, CORA-3, CORA-5, and CORA-12. From each of these tests, a detailed global analysis using all the measured temperatures, pressures, and fluid compositions as well as videoscope information has been performed. To describe the post test bundle state quantitatively, axial profiles of the bundle cross-section area, the damage state of the rods, the average cladding oxidation, and the damage to the pellets are measured. The effects of CORA-specific components on the bundle melt progression and the measured axial profiles are identified and assessed. Most of the observations during the tests as well as the post test bundle state can be explained by the established common sequence of phenomena. For a better understanding of the melt progression, some physical phenomena, such as the energy release associated with the double-sided oxidation of the cladding, the melt release, or the melt relocation, must be analyzed in detail.

  11. Characterization of 14C in Swedish light water reactors.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Asa; Aronsson, Per-Olof; Lundgren, Klas; Stenström, Kristina

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents the results of a 4-y investigation of 14C in different waste streams of both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Due to the potential impact of 14C on human health, minimizing waste and releases from the nuclear power industry is of considerable interest. The experimental data and conclusions may be implemented to select appropriate waste management strategies and practices at reactor units and disposal facilities. Organic and inorganic 14C in spent ion exchange resins, process water systems, ejector off-gas and replaced steam generator tubes were analyzed using a recently developed extraction method. Separate analysis of the chemical species is of importance in order to model and predict the fate of 14C within process systems as well as in dose calculations for disposal facilities. By combining the results of this investigation with newly calculated production rates, mass balance assessments were made of the 14C originating from production in the coolant. Of the 14C formed in the coolant of BWRs, 0.6-0.8% was found to be accumulated in the ion exchange resins (core-specific production rate in the coolant of a 2,500 MWth BWR calculated to be 580 GBq GW(e)(-1) y(-1)). The corresponding value for PWRs was 6-10% (production rate in a 2,775 MWth PWR calculated to be 350 GBq GW(e)(-1) y(-1)). The 14C released with liquid discharges was found to be insignificant, constituting less than 0.5% of the production in the coolant. The stack releases, routinely measured at the power plants, were found to correspond to 60-155% of the calculated coolant production, with large variations between the BWR units. PMID:18617793

  12. Multi-anvil High Pressure Facility at National Synchrotron Light Source: Then, Now, and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Weidner, D. J.; Vaughan, M. T.; Chen, J.; Li, B.; Liebermann, R. C.

    2007-12-01

    Multi-anvil high pressure facility (Beamline X17B2) at National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) was the first of its kind established in the United States with the support from NSF through the Center for High Pressure Research (CHiPR, 1990 - 2002). During this period, the facility provided a fertile ground for steep growth of research on earth materials at simultaneously high pressures and temperatures. Main areas of study included the thermoelastic and structural properties of minerals, phase equilibria, rheology, acoustic velocities, kinetics of phase transformations, and physical properties of melts. The rheological and acoustic measurements at high pressures in conjunction with synchrotron were first developed at this facility, and both techniques are being adapted today by other laboratories around the world. Last five years has witnessed great increases in efficiency and productivity of this facility, a beneficiary of the construction of a permanent hutch and time-sharing mechanism made possible by NSLS, and the establishment of the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES). While other above- mentioned areas of research continued to grow, the rheological studies of minerals experienced fast expansion through the use of two new high pressure deformation apparatus, the Deformation DIA (D-DIA) and the Rotational Drickamer apparatus (RDA, led by S. Karato from Yale Univ.) Experiments are currently being performed on various mantle minerals to derive their rheological properties. Performance of the facility will receive another boost through the addition of a monochromatic side station jointly supported by DoD, COMPRES and NSLS, and construction of the station is well underway. With continued operation of COMPRES in next five years, we will see several significant additions to the large- volume facility at NSLS: a new system for precise measurements of stress at high pressure; a 2000-ton press; D- TCup apparatus for deformation

  13. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Martinez, N; Michoud, G; Cario, A; Ollivier, J; Franzetti, B; Jebbar, M; Oger, P; Peters, J

    2016-01-01

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure. PMID:27595789

  14. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, N.; Michoud, G.; Cario, A.; Ollivier, J.; Franzetti, B.; Jebbar, M.; Oger, P.; Peters, J.

    2016-01-01

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure. PMID:27595789

  15. Progress in Piezo-Phototronic-Effect-Enhanced Light-Emitting Diodes and Pressure Imaging.

    PubMed

    Pan, Caofeng; Chen, Mengxiao; Yu, Ruomeng; Yang, Qing; Hu, Youfan; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-02-01

    Wurtzite materials exhibit both semiconductor and piezoelectric properties under strains due to the non-central symmetric crystal structures. The three-way coupling of semiconductor properties, piezoelectric polarization and optical excitation in ZnO, GaN, CdS and other piezoelectric semiconductors leads to the emerging field of piezo-phototronics. This effect can efficiently manipulate the emission intensity of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by utilizing the piezo-polarization charges created at the junction upon straining to modulate the energy band diagrams and the optoelectronic processes, such as generation, separation, recombination and/or transport of charge carriers. Starting from fundamental physics principles, recent progress in piezo-phototronic-effect-enhanced LEDs is reviewed; following their development from single-nanowire pressure-sensitive devices to high-resolution array matrices for pressure-distribution mapping applications. The piezo-phototronic effect provides a promising method to enhance the light emission of LEDs based on piezoelectric semiconductors through applying static strains, and may find perspective applications in various optoelectronic devices and integrated systems. PMID:26676842

  16. Forced-convection Heat Transfer to Water at High Pressures and Temperatures in the Nonboiling Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, S J; Henderson, R W

    1951-01-01

    Forced-convection heat-transfer data have been obtained for water flowing in an electrically heated tube of circular cross section at water pressures of 200 and 2000 pounds per square inch, and temperatures in the nonboiling region, for water velocities ranging between 5 and 25 feet per second. The results indicate that conventional correlations can be used to predict heat-transfer coefficients for water at pressures up to 2000 pounds per square inch and temperatures in the nonboiling region.

  17. Measurements of the speed of light in water using Foucault's technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brody, Jed; Griffin, Laura; Segre, Phil

    2010-06-01

    We describe how to modify an existing speed-of-light apparatus to measure the speed of light in water. We derive the necessary formulas to account for refraction and light's passage through both water and air. We obtain (3.00±0.09)×108 m/s for the speed of light in air and (2.1±0.1)×108 m/s for the speed of the light in water. Both results are within 7% of established values.

  18. Impact of Light Salt Substitution for Regular Salt on Blood Pressure of Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Carolina Lôbo de Almeida; Sousa, Ana Luiza Lima; Chinem, Brunella Mendonça; Rodrigues, Rafaela Bernardes; Jardim, Thiago Souza Veiga; Carneiro, Sérgio Baiocchi; de Souza, Weimar Kunz Sebba Barroso; Jardim, Paulo César Brandão Veiga

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies have shown sodium restriction to have a beneficial effect on blood pressure (BP) of hypertensive patients. Objective To evaluate the impact of light salt substitution for regular salt on BP of hypertensive patients. Methods Uncontrolled hypertensive patients of both sexes, 20 to 65 years-old, on stable doses of antihypertensive drugs were randomized into Intervention Group (IG - receiving light salt) and Control Group (CG - receiving regular salt). Systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) were analyzed by using casual BP measurements and Home Blood Pressure Monitoring (HBPM), and sodium and potassium excretion was assessed on 24-hour urine samples. The patients received 3 g of salt for daily consumption for 4 weeks. Results The study evaluated 35 patients (65.7% women), 19 allocated to the IG and 16 to the CG. The mean age was 55.5 ± 7.4 years. Most participants had completed the Brazilian middle school (up to the 8th grade; n = 28; 80.0%), had a family income of up to US$ 600 (n = 17; 48.6%) and practiced regular physical activity (n = 19; 54.3%). Two patients (5.7%) were smokers and 40.0% consumed alcohol regularly (n = 14). The IG showed a significant reduction in both SBP and DBP on the casual measurements and HBPM (p < 0.05) and in sodium excretion (p = 0.016). The CG showed a significant reduction only in casual SBP (p = 0.032). Conclusions The light salt substitution for regular salt significantly reduced BP of hypertensive patients. PMID:25409877

  19. Universal Long-Range Nanometric Bending of Water by Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Gopal; Singh, Kamal P.

    2015-10-01

    Resolving mechanical effects of light on fluids has fundamental importance with wide applications. Most experiments to date on optofluidic interface deformation exploited radiation forces exerted by normally incident lasers. However, the intriguing effects of photon momentum for any configuration, including the unique total internal reflection regime, where an evanescent wave leaks above the interface, remain largely unexplored. A major difficulty in resolving nanomechanical effects has been the lack of a sensitive detection technique. Here, we devise a simple setup whereby a probe laser produces high-contrast Newton-ring-like fringes from a sessile water drop. The mechanical action of the photon momentum of a pump beam modulates the fringes, thus allowing us to perform a direct noninvasive measurement of a nanometric bulge with sub-5-nm precision. Remarkably, a <10 nm difference in the height of the bulge due to different laser polarizations and nonlinear enhancement in the bulge near total internal reflection is isolated. In addition, the nanometric bulge is shown to extend far longer, 100 times beyond the pump spot. Our high precision data validate the century-old Minkowski theory for a general angle and offer potential for novel optofluidic devices and noncontact nanomanipulation strategies.

  20. Universal Long-Range Nanometric Bending of Water by Light.

    PubMed

    Verma, Gopal; Singh, Kamal P

    2015-10-01

    Resolving mechanical effects of light on fluids has fundamental importance with wide applications. Most experiments to date on optofluidic interface deformation exploited radiation forces exerted by normally incident lasers. However, the intriguing effects of photon momentum for any configuration, including the unique total internal reflection regime, where an evanescent wave leaks above the interface, remain largely unexplored. A major difficulty in resolving nanomechanical effects has been the lack of a sensitive detection technique. Here, we devise a simple setup whereby a probe laser produces high-contrast Newton-ring-like fringes from a sessile water drop. The mechanical action of the photon momentum of a pump beam modulates the fringes, thus allowing us to perform a direct noninvasive measurement of a nanometric bulge with sub-5-nm precision. Remarkably, a <10  nm difference in the height of the bulge due to different laser polarizations and nonlinear enhancement in the bulge near total internal reflection is isolated. In addition, the nanometric bulge is shown to extend far longer, 100 times beyond the pump spot. Our high precision data validate the century-old Minkowski theory for a general angle and offer potential for novel optofluidic devices and noncontact nanomanipulation strategies. PMID:26551814

  1. Impact of inflow transport approximation on light water reactor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sooyoung; Smith, Kord; Lee, Hyun Chul; Lee, Deokjung

    2015-10-01

    The impact of the inflow transport approximation on light water reactor analysis is investigated, and it is verified that the inflow transport approximation significantly improves the accuracy of the transport and transport/diffusion solutions. A methodology for an inflow transport approximation is implemented in order to generate an accurate transport cross section. The inflow transport approximation is compared to the conventional methods, which are the consistent-PN and the outflow transport approximations. The three transport approximations are implemented in the lattice physics code STREAM, and verification is performed for various verification problems in order to investigate their effects and accuracy. From the verification, it is noted that the consistent-PN and the outflow transport approximations cause significant error in calculating the eigenvalue and the power distribution. The inflow transport approximation shows very accurate and precise results for the verification problems. The inflow transport approximation shows significant improvements not only for the high leakage problem but also for practical large core problem analyses.

  2. Seismic margin assessment of evolutionary light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, S.A.; Bagchi, G.

    1996-12-01

    The objectives of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff`s review of the evolutionary light water reactors (ELWR) probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) are drawn from 10 CFR Part 52, the Commission`s Severe Reactor Accident Policy Statement regarding future designs and existing plants, the Commission`s Safety Goal Policy Statement, The Commission approved positions concerning the analyses of external and events contained in SECY-93-087, and NRC interest in the use of PRA to help improve future reactor designs. In general, these objectives have been achieved by the ELWR PRAs and the NRC staff`s review. The staff`s applicable regulation for the analysis of external events for the ELWR PRAs is as follows. The probabilistic risk assessment required by 10 CFR 52.47(a)(1)(v) must include an assessment of internal and external events. For external events, simplified probabilistic methods and margins methods may be used to assess the capacity of the standard design to withstand the effects of events such as fires and earthquakes. Traditional probabilistic techniques should be used to evaluate internal floods. For earthquakes, a seismic margin analysis must consider the effects of earthquakes with accelerations approximately one and two-thirds the acceleration of the safe-shutdown earthquake (SSE).

  3. Technologies for Upgrading Light Water Reactor Outlet Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel S. Wendt; Piyush Sabharwall; Vivek Utgikar

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear energy could potentially be utilized in hybrid energy systems to produce synthetic fuels and feedstocks from indigenous carbon sources such as coal and biomass. First generation nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) technology will most likely be based on conventional light water reactors (LWRs). However, these LWRs provide thermal energy at temperatures of approximately 300°C, while the desired temperatures for many chemical processes are much higher. In order to realize the benefits of nuclear hybrid energy systems with the current LWR reactor fleets, selection and development of a complimentary temperature upgrading technology is necessary. This paper provides an initial assessment of technologies that may be well suited toward LWR outlet temperature upgrading for powering elevated temperature industrial and chemical processes during periods of off-peak power demand. Chemical heat transformers (CHTs) are a technology with the potential to meet LWR temperature upgrading requirements for NHESs. CHTs utilize chemical heat of reaction to change the temperature at which selected heat sources supply or consume thermal energy. CHTs could directly utilize LWR heat output without intermediate mechanical or electrical power conversion operations and the associated thermodynamic losses. CHT thermal characteristics are determined by selection of the chemical working pair and operating conditions. This paper discusses the chemical working pairs applicable to LWR outlet temperature upgrading and the CHT operating conditions required for providing process heat in NHES applications.

  4. Constitutive Cylindrospermopsin Pool Size in Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii under Different Light and CO2 Partial Pressure Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pierangelini, Mattia; Sinha, Rati; Burford, Michele A.; Neilan, Brett A.

    2015-01-01

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) and 7-deoxy-cylindrospermopsin (dCYN) are potent hepatotoxic alkaloids produced by numerous species of cyanobacteria, including the freshwater Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii. C. raciborskii is an invasive cyanobacterium, and the study of how environmental parameters drive CYN production has received significant interest from water managers and health authorities. Light and CO2 affect cell growth and physiology in photoautotrophs, and these are potential regulators of cyanotoxin biosynthesis. In this study, we investigated how light and CO2 affect CYN and dCYN pool size as well as the expression of the key genes, cyrA and cyrK, involved in CYN biosynthesis in a toxic C. raciborskii strain. For cells growing at different light intensities (10 and 100 μmol photons m−2 s−1), we observed that the rate of CYN pool size production (μCYN) was coupled to the cell division rate (μc) during batch culture. This indicated that CYN pool size under our experimental conditions is constant and cell quotas of CYN (QCYN) and dCYN (QdCYN) are fixed. Moreover, a lack of correlation between expression of cyrA and total CYN cell quotas (QCYNs) suggests that the CYN biosynthesis is regulated posttranscriptionally. Under elevated CO2 (1,300 ppm), we observed minor effects on QCYN and no effects on expression of cyrA and cyrK. We conclude that the CYN pool size is constitutive and not affected by light and CO2 conditions. Thus, C. raciborskii bloom toxicity is determined by the absolute abundance of C. raciborskii cells within the water column and the relative abundance of toxic and nontoxic strains. PMID:25724956

  5. Constitutive cylindrospermopsin pool size in Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii under different light and CO2 partial pressure conditions.

    PubMed

    Pierangelini, Mattia; Sinha, Rati; Willis, Anusuya; Burford, Michele A; Orr, Philip T; Beardall, John; Neilan, Brett A

    2015-05-01

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) and 7-deoxy-cylindrospermopsin (dCYN) are potent hepatotoxic alkaloids produced by numerous species of cyanobacteria, including the freshwater Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii. C. raciborskii is an invasive cyanobacterium, and the study of how environmental parameters drive CYN production has received significant interest from water managers and health authorities. Light and CO2 affect cell growth and physiology in photoautotrophs, and these are potential regulators of cyanotoxin biosynthesis. In this study, we investigated how light and CO2 affect CYN and dCYN pool size as well as the expression of the key genes, cyrA and cyrK, involved in CYN biosynthesis in a toxic C. raciborskii strain. For cells growing at different light intensities (10 and 100 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)), we observed that the rate of CYN pool size production (μCYN) was coupled to the cell division rate (μc) during batch culture. This indicated that CYN pool size under our experimental conditions is constant and cell quotas of CYN (QCYN) and dCYN (QdCYN) are fixed. Moreover, a lack of correlation between expression of cyrA and total CYN cell quotas (QCYNs) suggests that the CYN biosynthesis is regulated posttranscriptionally. Under elevated CO2 (1,300 ppm), we observed minor effects on QCYN and no effects on expression of cyrA and cyrK. We conclude that the CYN pool size is constitutive and not affected by light and CO2 conditions. Thus, C. raciborskii bloom toxicity is determined by the absolute abundance of C. raciborskii cells within the water column and the relative abundance of toxic and nontoxic strains. PMID:25724956

  6. Effect of water pressure on absorbency of hydroentangled greige cotton nonwoven fabrics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A studied has been conducted to determine the effect of water pressure in a commercial-grade Fleissner MiniJet hydroentanglement system on the absorbency of greige (non-bleached) cotton lint-based nonwoven fabric. The study has shown that a water pressure of 125 Bar or higher on only two high-pressu...

  7. 78 FR 56752 - Interim Staff Guidance Specific Environmental Guidance for Integral Pressurized Water Reactors...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... COMMISSION Interim Staff Guidance Specific Environmental Guidance for Integral Pressurized Water Reactors... and operate integral pressurized water reactors (iPWR). This guidance applies to environmental reviews... purchase copies of public documents at the NRC's PDR, Room O1-F21, One White Flint North, 11555...

  8. Study and application of a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Huaizhong; Li, Gensheng; Huang, Zhongwei; Li, Jingbin; Zhang, Yi

    2015-12-01

    As the exploration and development of oil and gas focus more and more on deeper formation, hydraulic issues such as high-pressure water jet rock breaking, wellbore multiphase flow law, cuttings carrying efficiency, and hydraulic fracturing technique during the drilling and completion process have become the key points. To accomplish related researches, a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system was designed. The following novel researches are carried out: study of high-pressure water jet characteristics under confining pressure, wellbore multiphase flow regime, hydraulic pressure properties of down hole tools during jet fracturing and pulsed cavitation jet drilling, and deflector's friction in radial jet drilling. The validity and feasibility of the experimental results provided by the system with various test modules have proved its importance in the research of the high-pressure water jet and well completion technology.

  9. Study and application of a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huaizhong; Li, Gensheng; Huang, Zhongwei; Li, Jingbin; Zhang, Yi

    2015-12-01

    As the exploration and development of oil and gas focus more and more on deeper formation, hydraulic issues such as high-pressure water jet rock breaking, wellbore multiphase flow law, cuttings carrying efficiency, and hydraulic fracturing technique during the drilling and completion process have become the key points. To accomplish related researches, a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system was designed. The following novel researches are carried out: study of high-pressure water jet characteristics under confining pressure, wellbore multiphase flow regime, hydraulic pressure properties of down hole tools during jet fracturing and pulsed cavitation jet drilling, and deflector's friction in radial jet drilling. The validity and feasibility of the experimental results provided by the system with various test modules have proved its importance in the research of the high-pressure water jet and well completion technology. PMID:26724077

  10. Pressure and flow, temperature and heat, and properties of water. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The three sections in this volume cover pressure and flow (units of measurement, properties of substances, mass, volume, density, pressure, units of pressure, how pressure is measured, what causes flow, how flow is measured), temperature and heat (forms of energy, potential and kinetic energy, internal and P-V energy, temperature, work and heat in power plants, energy equivalence), and properties of water (what is water; ice - the solid phase of H/sub 2/O; water - the liquid phase of H/sub 2/O; steam - the gas phase of H/sub 2/O; change of phase of H/sub 2/O; specific heat of water; effect of pressure; density of water; important properties of steam).

  11. Periodic seepage face formation and water pressure distribution along a vertical boundary of an aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jazayeri Shoushtari, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Nielsen, Peter; Cartwright, Nick; Perrochet, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Detailed measurements of the piezometric head from sand flume experiments of an idealised coastal aquifer forced by a simple harmonic boundary condition across a vertical boundary are presented. The measurements focus on the pore pressures very close to the interface (x = 0.01m) and throw light on the details of the boundary condition, particularly with respect to meniscus suction and seepage face formation during the falling tide. Between the low and the mean water level, the response is consistent with meniscus suction free models in terms of both the vertical mean head and oscillation amplitude profiles and is consistent with the observation that this area of the interface was generally within the seepage face. Above the mean water level, the influence of meniscus formation is significant with the mean pressure head being less than that predicted by capillary free theory and oscillation amplitudes decaying faster than predicted by suction free models. The reduced hydraulic conductivity in this area due to partial drainage of pores on the falling tide also causes a delay in the response to the rising tide. The combined influence of seepage face formation, meniscus suction and reduced hydraulic conductivity generate higher harmonics with amplitudes of up to 26% of the local main harmonic. To model the influence of seepage face formation and meniscus suction a numerical solution of the Richards' equation was developed and evaluated against the data. The model-data comparison shows a good agreement with the behaviour high above the water table sensitive to the choice of moisture retention parameters.

  12. Comparison of actinide production in traveling wave and pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, A.G.; Smith, T.A.; Deinert, M.R.

    2013-07-01

    The geopolitical problems associated with civilian nuclear energy production arise in part from the accumulation of transuranics in spent nuclear fuel. A traveling wave reactor is a type of breed-burn reactor that could, if feasible, reduce the overall production of transuranics. In one possible configuration, a cylinder of natural or depleted uranium would be subjected to a fast neutron flux at one end. The neutrons would transmute the uranium, producing plutonium and higher actinides. Under the right conditions, the reactor could become critical, at which point a self-stabilizing fission wave would form and propagate down the length of the reactor cylinder. The neutrons from the fission wave would burn the fissile nuclides and transmute uranium ahead of the wave to produce additional fuel. Fission waves in uranium are driven largely by the production and fission of {sup 239}Pu. Simulations have shown that the fuel burnup can reach values greater than 400 MWd/kgIHM, before fission products poison the reaction. In this work we compare the production of plutonium and minor actinides produced in a fission wave to that of a UOX fueled light water reactor, both on an energy normalized basis. The nuclide concentrations in the spent traveling wave reactor fuel are computed using a one-group diffusion model and are verified using Monte Carlo simulations. In the case of the pressurized water reactor, a multi-group collision probability model is used to generate the nuclide quantities. We find that the traveling wave reactor produces about 0.187 g/MWd/kgIHM of transuranics compared to 0.413 g/MWd/kgIHM for a pressurized water reactor running fuel enriched to 4.95 % and burned to 50 MWd/kgIHM. (authors)

  13. Partial Defect Verification of the Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Fuel Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Y S; Sitaraman, S

    2010-02-05

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has the responsibility to carry out independent inspections of all nuclear material and facilities subject to safeguards agreements in order to verify compliance with non-proliferation commitments. New technologies have been continuously explored by the IAEA and Member States to improve the verification measures to account for declared inventory of nuclear material and detect clandestine diversion and production of nuclear materials. Even with these efforts, a technical safeguards challenge has remained for decades for the case of developing a method in identifying possible diversion of nuclear fuel pins from the Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel assemblies. We had embarked on this challenging task and successfully developed a novel methodology in detecting partial removal of fuel from pressurized water reactor spent fuel assemblies. The methodology uses multiple tiny neutron and gamma detectors in the form of a cluster and a high precision driving system to obtain underwater radiation measurements inside a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) spent fuel assembly without any movement of the fuel. The data obtained in such a manner can provide spatial distribution of neutron and gamma flux within a spent fuel assembly. The combined information of gamma and neutron signature is used to produce base signatures and they are principally dependent on the geometry of the detector locations, and exhibit little sensitivity to initial enrichment, burn-up or cooling time. A small variation in the fuel bundle such as a few missing pins changes the shape of the signature to enable detection. This resulted in a breakthrough method which can be used to detect pin diversion without relying on the nuclear power plant operator's declared operation data. Presented are the results of various Monte Carlo simulation studies and experiments from actual commercial PWR spent fuel assemblies.

  14. Combined non-adaptive light and smell stimuli lowered blood pressure, reduced heart rate and reduced negative affect.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shan; Jacob, Tim J C

    2016-03-15

    Bright light therapy has been shown to have a positive impact on seasonal affective disorder (SAD), depression and anxiety. Smell has also has been shown to have effects on mood, stress, anxiety and depression. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the combination of light and smell in a non-adaptive cycle. Human subjects were given smell (lemon, lavender or peppermint) and light stimuli in a triangular wave (60scycle) for 15min. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored before and after each session for 5 consecutive days and a Profile of Mood States (POMS) test was administered before and after the sensory stimulation on days 1, 3 and 5. The light-smell stimulus lowered blood pressure, both systolic and diastolic, and reduced heart rate for all odours compared to control. Of the two sensory stimuli, the odour stimulus contributed most to this effect. The different aromas in the light-smell combinations could be distinguished by their different effects on the mood factors with lemon inducing the greatest mood changes in Dejection-Depression, Anger-Hostility, Tension-Anxiety. In conclusion, combined light and smell stimulation was effective in lowering blood pressure, reducing heart rate and improving mood. The combination was more effective than either smell or light stimuli alone, suggesting that a light-smell combination would be a more robust and efficacious alternative treatment for depression, anxiety and stress. PMID:26780148

  15. Measured basal water pressure variability of the western Greenland Ice Sheet: Implications for hydraulic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Patrick J.; Harper, Joel T.; Humphrey, Neil F.; Meierbachtol, Toby W.

    2016-06-01

    The gradient of the hydraulic potential field at the ice-bedrock interface beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) dictates the routing and energetics of subglacial water, thereby influencing drainage system characteristics and sliding dynamics. In the ablation zone of the GrIS, variable water pressure due to an active subglacial drainage system and basal topography with high relief potentially interact to drive unknown spatial patterns and temporal changes in the hydraulic potential field. Here we present a suite of water pressure measurements collected in 13 boreholes along a 46 km transect on the western GrIS to investigate the role of spatial and temporal basal water pressure adjustments in hydraulic potential gradient dynamics. All borehole sites show pressures with similar seasonality, having relatively steady and high values during winter, variable and irregular behavior during spring and fall, and diurnal cycles that can persist for multiple weeks during the peak melt season. Despite much higher variability during the melt season, the median pressure of the summer period is nearly the same as the median pressure of the winter period. However, time variability of water pressure due to basal drainage processes can force changes in the magnitude and orientation of the hydraulic potential field over diurnal periods. We find that the basal water pressure across the transect generally mimics the ice thickness field but with superimposed large pressure gradients that develop at shorter scales within the basal drainage system. This leads to a complex hydraulic potential field across regions of similar ice thickness.

  16. Water cooled breeder program summary report (LWBR (Light Water Breeder Reactor) development program)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-10-01

    The purpose of the Department of Energy Water Cooled Breeder Program was to demonstrate pratical breeding in a uranium-233/thorium fueled core while producing electrical energy in a commercial water reactor generating station. A demonstration Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was successfully operated for more than 29,000 effective full power hours in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The reactor operated with an availability factor of 76% and had a gross electrical output of 2,128,943,470 kilowatt hours. Following operation, the expended core was examined and no evidence of any fuel element defects was found. Nondestructive assay of 524 fuel rods determined that 1.39 percent more fissile fuel was present at the end of core life than at the beginning, proving that breeding had occurred. This demonstrates the existence of a vast source of electrical energy using plentiful domestic thorium potentially capable of supplying the entire national need for many centuries. To build on the successful design and operation of the Shippingport Breeder Core and to provide the technology to implement this concept, several reactor designs of large breeders and prebreeders were developed for commercial-sized plants of 900--1000 Mw(e) net. This report summarizes the Water Cooled Breeder Program from its inception in 1965 to its completion in 1987. Four hundred thirty-six technical reports are referenced which document the work conducted as part of this program. This work demonstrated that the Light Water Breeder Reactor is a viable alternative as a PWR replacement in the next generation of nuclear reactors. This transition would only require a minimum of change in design and fabrication of the reactor and operation of the plant.

  17. Evaluation of anticipatory signal to steam generator pressure control program for 700 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pahari, S.; Hajela, S.; Rammohan, H. P.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G.

    2012-07-01

    700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR) is horizontal channel type reactor with partial boiling at channel outlet. Due to boiling, it has a large volume of vapor present in the primary loops. It has two primary loops connected with the help of pressurizer surge line. The pressurizer has a large capacity and is partly filled by liquid and partly by vapor. Large vapor volume improves compressibility of the system. During turbine trip or load rejection, pressure builds up in Steam Generator (SG). This leads to pressurization of Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS). To control pressurization of SG and PHTS, around 70% of the steam generated in SG is dumped into the condenser by opening Condenser Steam Dump Valves (CSDVs) and rest of the steam is released to the atmosphere by opening Atmospheric Steam Discharge Valves (ASDVs) immediately after sensing the event. This is accomplished by adding anticipatory signal to the output of SG pressure controller. Anticipatory signal is proportional to the thermal power of reactor and the proportionality constant is set so that SG pressure controller's output jacks up to ASDV opening range when operating at 100% FP. To simulate this behavior for 700 MWe IPHWR, Primary and secondary heat transport system is modeled. SG pressure control and other process control program have also been modeled to capture overall plant dynamics. Analysis has been carried out with 3-D neutron kinetics coupled thermal hydraulic computer code ATMIKA.T to evaluate the effect of the anticipatory signal on PHT pressure and over all plant dynamics during turbine trip in 700 MWe IPHWR. This paper brings out the results of the analysis with and without considering anticipatory signal in SG pressure control program during turbine trip. (authors)

  18. A GASFLOW analysis of a steam explosion accident in a typical light-water reactor confinement building

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, J.R.; Wilson, T.L.; Spore, J.W.; Lam, K.L.; Rao, D.V.

    1994-09-01

    Steam over-pressurization resulting from ex-vessel steam explosion (fuel-coolant interaction) may pose a serious challenge to the integrity of a typical light-water reactor confinement building. If the steam generation rate exceeds the removal capacity of the Airborne Activity Confinement System, confinement over pressurization occurs. Thus, there is a large potential for an uncontrolled and unfiltered release of fission products from the confinement atmosphere to the environment at the time of the steam explosion. The GASFLOW computer code was used to analyze the effects of a hypothetical steam explosion and the transport of steam and hydrogen throughout a typical light-water reactor confinement building. The effects of rapid pressurization and the resulting forces on the internal structures and the heat exchanger service bay hatch covers were calculated. Pressurization of the ventilation system and the potential damage to the ventilation fans and high-efficiency particulate air filters were assessed. Because of buoyancy forces and the calculated confinement velocity field, the hydrogen diffuses and mixes in the confinement atmosphere but tends to be transported to its upper region.

  19. Measurements of Capillary Pressure-Saturation Relationships for Silica Sands Using Light Transmission Visualization and a Rapid Pseudo Static Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurement of water saturation in porous media is essential for many types of studies including subsurface water flow, subsurface colloids transport and contaminant remediation to name a few. Water saturation (S) in porous media is dependent on the capillary pressure (Pc) which,...

  20. Light obscuration measurements of highly viscous solutions: sample pressurization overcomes underestimation of subvisible particle counts.

    PubMed

    Weinbuch, Daniel; Jiskoot, Wim; Hawe, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    Light obscuration (LO) is the current standard technique for subvisible particle analysis in the quality control of parenterally administered drugs, including therapeutic proteins. Some of those, however, exhibit high viscosities due to high protein concentrations, which can lead to false results by LO measurements. In this study, we show that elevated sample viscosities, from about 9 cP, lead to an underestimation of subvisible particle concentrations, which is easily overlooked when considering reported data alone. We evaluated a solution to this problem, which is the application of sample pressurization during analysis. The results show that this is an elegant way to restore the reliability of LO analysis of highly viscous products without the necessity of additional sample preparation. PMID:24934297

  1. Rod-bundle transient-film boiling of high-pressure water in the liquid-deficient regime. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.G.; Mullins, C.B.; Yoder, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    Results are reported from a recent experiment investigating dispersed flow film boiling of high pressure water in upflow through a rod bundle. The data, obtained under mildly transient conditions, are used to assess correlations currently used to predict heat transfer in these circumstances. In light of the scarcity of similar data, the data should prove useful in the development and assessment of new heat transfer models. The experiment was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility, a highly instrumented, non-nuclear, pressurized-water loop containing 64, 3.66-m (12-ft) long rods (of which 60 are electrically heated). The rods are arranged in a square array typical of 17 x 17 fuel rod assemblies in late generation PWRs. Data were collected over typical reactor blowdown parameter ranges.

  2. Improving CRDCS through digital technology for pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Liddle, P.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes increased Control Rod Drive Control System (CRDCS) reliability through the use of digital technology. A CRDCS is a non-safety plant system used to control rod motion into and out of the reactor core, which in turn controls the reactivity in the core. The CRDCS also provides the operator with information on the status of the control rods and the components within the system. The Digital CRDCS (DCRDCS) is an upgrade for the Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) pressurized water reactor control rod drive control system. The existing CRDCS was designed using relays, various electromechanical devices, and discrete solid-state components. The DCRDCS provides higher reliability, simplified maintenance, and streamlined system configuration through the use of Triple Modular Redundant (TMR) Controllers that implement the logic and control functions, as well as other design enhancements. A particularly important feature of the DCRDCS is the system's redundancy. With this configuration, no single failure of any DCRDCS component can cause an uncontrolled reaction. Such uncontrolled reactions might include withdrawal of the control rods, causing unwanted, or preventing, reactor trip, the loss of either or both the Absolute Position Indication (API) or Relative Position Indication (RPI), or inhibited rod movement. The DCRDCS is made up of two primary sections: the System Logic Equipment (SLE) and the Motor Control Equipment (MCE). The SLE is the primary component of the system. Signals transmitted to this equipment are processed by its logic, producing output signals that control the rod positions and provide system status information. The MCE receives command signals from the SLE to energize the Control Rod Drive Mechanism motors, producing the actual control rod motions. The DCRDCS is designed as a direct, state-of-the-art replacement for the existing CRDCS. Functionally, the DCRDCS will fulfill, and in some areas, exceed the functionality of the existing

  3. Properly synchronized measurements of droplet sizes for high-pressure intermittent coal-water slurry fuel sprays

    SciTech Connect

    Kihm, K.D.; Terracina, D.P.; Payne, S.E.; Caton, J.A.

    1993-12-31

    Experiments were completed to study intermittent coal-water slurry (CWS) fuel sprays injected from an electronically-controlled accumulator injector system. A new synchronization technique was developed using the light extinction signal as a triggering source for the data taking initiation with a laser diffraction particle analyzing (LDPA) technique. This technique allowed measurement of SMDs near the spray tip where the light extinction was low and the data were free from the multiscattering bias. Coal-water slurry fuel with 50% coal loading in mass containing 5 {mu}m mass median diameter coal particulates was considered. A correlation of the SMD with the injection conditions was determined which should show a satisfactory agreement with the measured SMD data. The spray SMD showed an increase with the distance of the axial measurement location and with the ambient gas density, and showed a decrease with increasing injection pressure.

  4. Monte Carlo simulations of the pressure dependence of the water-acid gas interfacial tensions.

    PubMed

    Biscay, F; Ghoufi, A; Lachet, V; Malfreyt, P

    2009-10-29

    We report two-phase Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the binary water-acid gas mixtures at high temperature and high pressure. Simulations are performed in the Np(N)AT ensemble in order to reproduce the pressure dependence of the interfacial tensions of the water-CO(2) and water-H(2)S mixtures. The interfacial tension of the binary water-CO(2) mixture is determined from 5 to 45 MPa along the isotherm T = 383 K. Water-H(2)S interfacial tensions are computed along one supercritical isotherm (T = 393 K) in a pressure range of 1-15 MPa. The temperature and pressure conditions investigated here by the MC simulations are typical of the geological storage conditions of these acid gases. The coexisting densities and the compositions of the water-rich and acid-gas-rich phases are compared with experiments and with data calculated from Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo (GEMC) simulations. PMID:19803493

  5. Pressure suppression containment system for boiling water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gluntz, D.M.; Nesbitt, L.B.

    1997-01-21

    A system is disclosed for suppressing the pressure inside the containment of a BWR following a postulated accident. A piping subsystem is provided which features a main process pipe that communicates the wetwell airspace to a connection point downstream of the guard charcoal bed in an offgas system and upstream of the main bank of delay charcoal beds which give extensive holdup to offgases. The main process pipe is fitted with both inboard and outboard containment isolation valves. Also incorporated in the main process pipe is a low-differential-pressure rupture disk which prevents any gas outflow in this piping whatsoever until or unless rupture occurs by virtue of pressure inside this main process pipe on the wetwell airspace side of the disk exceeding the design opening (rupture) pressure differential. The charcoal holds up the radioactive species in the noncondensable gas from the wetwell plenum by adsorption, allowing time for radioactive decay before the gas is vented to the environs. 3 figs.

  6. Pressure suppression containment system for boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Nesbitt, Loyd B.

    1997-01-01

    A system for suppressing the pressure inside the containment of a BWR following a postulated accident. A piping subsystem is provided which features a main process pipe that communicates the wetwell airspace to a connection point downstream of the guard charcoal bed in an offgas system and upstream of the main bank of delay charcoal beds which give extensive holdup to offgases. The main process pipe is fitted with both inboard and outboard containment isolation valves. Also incorporated in the main process pipe is a low-differential-pressure rupture disk which prevents any gas outflow in this piping whatsoever until or unless rupture occurs by virtue of pressure inside this main process pipe on the wetwell airspace side of the disk exceeding the design opening (rupture) pressure differential. The charcoal holds up the radioactive species in the noncondensable gas from the wetwell plenum by adsorption, allowing time for radioactive decay before the gas is vented to the environs.

  7. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    George Griffith; Robert Youngblood; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Cathy Barnard; Kathryn McCarthy

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline - even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration's energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program's plans.

  8. Revised accident source terms for light-water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Soffer, L.

    1995-02-01

    This paper presents revised accident source terms for light-water reactors incorporating the severe accident research insights gained in this area over the last 15 years. Current LWR reactor accident source terms used for licensing date from 1962 and are contained in Regulatory Guides 1.3 and 1.4. These specify that 100% of the core inventory of noble gases and 25% of the iodine fission products are assumed to be instantaneously available for release from the containment. The chemical form of the iodine fission products is also assumed to be predominantly elemental iodine. These assumptions have strongly affected present nuclear air cleaning requirements by emphasizing rapid actuation of spray systems and filtration systems optimized to retain elemental iodine. A proposed revision of reactor accident source terms and some im implications for nuclear air cleaning requirements was presented at the 22nd DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference. A draft report was issued by the NRC for comment in July 1992. Extensive comments were received, with the most significant comments involving (a) release fractions for both volatile and non-volatile species in the early in-vessel release phase, (b) gap release fractions of the noble gases, iodine and cesium, and (c) the timing and duration for the release phases. The final source term report is expected to be issued in late 1994. Although the revised source terms are intended primarily for future plants, current nuclear power plants may request use of revised accident source term insights as well in licensing. This paper emphasizes additional information obtained since the 22nd Conference, including studies on fission product removal mechanisms, results obtained from improved severe accident code calculations and resolution of major comments, and their impact upon the revised accident source terms. Revised accident source terms for both BWRS and PWRS are presented.

  9. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kathryn McCarthy; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Curtis Smith; Cathy Barnard

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

  10. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Kathryn A.; Busby, Jeremy; Hallbert, Bruce; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Smith, Curtis; Barnard, Cathy

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

  11. A numerical model for areal migration of water and light hydrocarbon in unconfined aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaluarachchi, J. J.; Parker, J. C.; Lenhard, R. J.

    A finite element model has been developed to simulate simultaneous flow of water and light hydrocarbon in an areal flow region of an unconfined aquifer for analyses of hydrocarbon spreading from subsurface leaks or spills and for use in design of free product recovery systems. Vertically integrated governing equations for water and oil flow are employed which assume local vertical equilibrium and negligible gas pressure gradients. Multiple water and free product recovery wells are handled as internal type-I boundary conditions by stipulating air-oil table elevation and free product height with corrections to convert grid averaged nodal heads to actual well bore fluid levels. An automatic updating scheme for well bore correction factors is introduced which ensures consistency of well flux calculations with the global mass balance. Areal model predictions are compared with two dimensional vertical cartesian and radial simulations with multiphase seepage faces for hypothetical trench and well free product recovery systems, respectively. The results indicate that the assumption of vertical equilibrium and lack of explicit treatment of seepage faces in the areal model produce minor loss in accuracy while conferring major reductions in computational effort. Simulations of various spill spreading and free product recovery scenarios with multiple pumping wells are investigated to demonstrate the model capabilities.

  12. The use of non-contact structured light scanning in burns pressure splint construction.

    PubMed

    Pilley, M J; Hitchens, C; Rose, G; Alexander, S; Wimpenny, D I

    2011-11-01

    This paper describes the use of a non-contact structured light scanning technique, computer aided design (CAD) and additive manufacturing (AM) to produce a burns pressure therapy splint, also known as mask or conformer. Masks such as this are used in the treatment of hypertrophic scars resulting from burns injuries. The case study described here is of a nine year old girl with significant hypertrophic scars to her face, especially her nasal bridge. Non-contact structured light scanning was used to capture accurate data of the patients face. This data was then post processed and used to produce a model of the patients face using the three dimensional printing processes from Z Corporation. The plaster model formed was then used to generate a former on which a polyethylene tetrephthalate glycol (PETG) mask was vacuum formed. The results illustrate the benefits and effectiveness in terms of accuracy of adopting an integrated surface scanning, CAD and AM approach for easier intervention and treatment. PMID:21835549

  13. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors annual report January - December 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandreanu, B.; Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Gruber, E. E.; Shack, W. J.; Soppet, W. K.

    2007-08-31

    This report summarizes work performed from January to December 2005 by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors (LWRs). Existing statistical models for estimating the fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels (SSs) as a function of material, loading, and environmental conditions were updated. Also, the ASME Code fatigue adjustment factors of 2 on stress and 20 on life were critically reviewed to assess the possible conservatism in the current choice of the margins. An approach, based on an environmental fatigue correction factor, for incorporating the effects of LWR environments into ASME Section III fatigue evaluations is discussed. The susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels and their welds to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is being evaluated as a function of the fluence level, water chemistry, material chemistry, and fabrication history. For this task, crack growth rate (CGR) tests and slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests are being conducted on various austenitic SSs irradiated in the Halden boiling water reactor. The SSRT tests are currently focused on investigating the effects of the grain boundary engineering process on the IASCC of the austenitic SSs. The CGR tests were conducted on Type 316 SSs irradiated to 0.45-3.0 dpa, and on sensitized Type 304 SS and SS weld heat-affected-zone material irradiated to 2.16 dpa. The CGR tests on materials irradiated to 2.16 dpa were followed by a fracture toughness test in a water environment. The effects of material composition, irradiation, and water chemistry on growth rates are discussed. The susceptibility of austenitic SS core internals to IASCC and void swelling is also being evaluated for pressurized water reactors. Both SSRT tests and microstructural examinations are being conducted on specimens irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor in Russia to doses up to 20 dpa. Crack growth rate data

  14. 76 FR 18753 - City of Springfield, Illinois, City Water, Light and Power; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission City of Springfield, Illinois, City Water, Light and Power; Notice of Filing Take notice that on March 24, 2011, The City of Springfield, Illinois, City Water, Light and...

  15. Technology Implementation Plan. Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Commercial Light Water Reactor Application

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Terrani, Kurt A.; Powers, Jeffrey J.; Worrall, Andrew; Robb, Kevin R.; Snead, Mary A.

    2015-04-01

    This report is an overview of the implementation plan for ORNL's fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) light water reactor fuel. The fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel consists of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particles embedded inside a fully dense SiC matrix and is intended for utilization in commercial light water reactor application.

  16. Estimation of diffuse attenuation of ultraviolet light in optically shallow Florida Keys waters from MODIS measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diffuse attenuation of solar light (Kd, m−1) determines the percentage of light penetrating the water column and available for benthic organisms. Therefore, Kd can be used as an index of water quality for coastal ecosystems that are dependent on photosynthesis, such as the coral ...

  17. Light Reflection from Water Surfaces Perturbed by Falling Rain Droplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molesini, Giuseppe; Vannoni, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    An account of peculiar light patterns produced by reflection in a pool under falling rain droplets was recently reported by Molesini and Vannoni (2008 Eur. J. Phys. 29 403-11). The mathematical approach, however, only covered the case of a symmetrical location of a light source and the observer's eyes with respect to the vertical of the falling…

  18. Simulation and experiment research on the proportional pressure control of water-assisted injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hua; Chen, Yinglong; Zhang, Zengmeng; Yang, Huayong

    2012-05-01

    Water-assisted injection molding (WAIM), a newly developed fluid-assisted injection molding technology has drawn more and more attentions for the energy saving, short cooling circle time and high quality of products. Existing research for the process of WAIM has shown that the pressure control of the injecting water is mostly important for the WAIM. However, the proportional pressure control for the WAIM system is quite complex due to the existence of nonlinearities in the water hydraulic system. In order to achieve better pressure control performance of the injecting water to meet the requirements of the WAIM, the proportional pressure control of the WAIM system is investigated both numerically and experimentally. A newly designed water hydraulic system for WAIM is first modeled in AMEsim environment, the load characteristics and the nonlinearities of water hydraulic system are both considered, then the main factors affecting the injecting pressure and load flow rate are extensively studied. Meanwhile, an open-loop model-based compensation control strategy is employed to regulate the water injection pressure and a feedback proportional integrator controller is further adopted to achieve better control performance. In order to verify the AMEsim simulation results WAIM experiment for particular Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) parts is implemented and the measured experimental data including injecting pressure and flow rate results are compared with the simulation. The good coincidence between experiment and simulation shows that the AMEsim model is accurate, and the tracking performance of the load pressure indicates that the proposed control strategy is effective for the proportional pressure control of the nonlinear WAIM system. The proposed proportional pressure control strategy and the conclusions drawn from simulation and experiment contribute to the application of water hydraulic proportional control and WAIM technology.

  19. Fatal Penetrating Injuries Sustained by High-pressure Water Jet Unit.

    PubMed

    Radojevic, Nemanja; Radnic, Bojana; Curovic, Ivana

    2015-11-01

    The high-pressure water jet unit is a generator of frequent burst of water jets. The water jet reaches very high speeds and is able to cause wounds similar to those of high-velocity projectiles. In the presented case, unusual fatal injuries sustained by water jet are presented. Operating with the unit, an untrained worker accidentally activated a high-pressure water jet unit, and the extremely high pressure of water liberated the jet unit from his hand and whirled it around him. A jet stream of water ran across his body and caused fatal penetrating injuries in the femoral region. The edges of the wound were mainly sharp with contusion rings on the skin beyond the edges. Exploring the inside of the canals during the autopsy, the left femoral artery and vein were found to be completely transected. The resemblance to a firearm entry wound and the severity of the internal injury make it a noteworthy entity. PMID:26250721

  20. High static pressure alters water-pool properties in reversed micelles formed by aerosol OT (sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate): A high pressure ESR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueishi, Yoshimi; Yoshioka, Daisuke; Negi, Mieko; Kotake, Yashige

    2005-11-01

    ESR spectra of Fremy's salt in sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) reversed micelles were recorded at high pressures in order to monitor dynamic properties of water molecules inside water pools. Rotational correlation times of Fremy's salt in large AOT water pools slightly decreased with increasing pressure, conversely those in small water pools increased with pressure: Δ V‡ for the rotational motion = -1.05 and 9.19 cm 3 mol -1 at ω0 = 20 and 2, respectively. These results demonstrate that most water molecules in small water pools are bound to AOT head groups and show very different physical properties from bulk water.

  1. 40 CFR 60.482-8 - Standards: Pumps and valves in heavy liquid service, pressure relief devices in light liquid or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... liquid service, pressure relief devices in light liquid or heavy liquid service, and connectors. 60.482-8... Standards: Pumps and valves in heavy liquid service, pressure relief devices in light liquid or heavy liquid... any other detection method at pumps and valves in heavy liquid service, pressure relief devices...

  2. 40 CFR 60.482-8 - Standards: Pumps and valves in heavy liquid service, pressure relief devices in light liquid or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... liquid service, pressure relief devices in light liquid or heavy liquid service, and connectors. 60.482-8... Standards: Pumps and valves in heavy liquid service, pressure relief devices in light liquid or heavy liquid... any other detection method at pumps and valves in heavy liquid service, pressure relief devices...

  3. 40 CFR 60.482-8 - Standards: Pumps and valves in heavy liquid service, pressure relief devices in light liquid or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... liquid service, pressure relief devices in light liquid or heavy liquid service, and connectors. 60.482-8... Standards: Pumps and valves in heavy liquid service, pressure relief devices in light liquid or heavy liquid... any other detection method at pumps and valves in heavy liquid service, pressure relief devices...

  4. 40 CFR 60.482-8 - Standards: Pumps and valves in heavy liquid service, pressure relief devices in light liquid or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... liquid service, pressure relief devices in light liquid or heavy liquid service, and connectors. 60.482-8... Standards: Pumps and valves in heavy liquid service, pressure relief devices in light liquid or heavy liquid... any other detection method at pumps and valves in heavy liquid service, pressure relief devices...

  5. 40 CFR 60.482-8 - Standards: Pumps and valves in heavy liquid service, pressure relief devices in light liquid or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... liquid service, pressure relief devices in light liquid or heavy liquid service, and connectors. 60.482-8... Standards: Pumps and valves in heavy liquid service, pressure relief devices in light liquid or heavy liquid... any other detection method at pumps and valves in heavy liquid service, pressure relief devices...

  6. In-Situ Safeguards Verification of Low Burn-up Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Fuel Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Y S; Sitaraman, S; Park, I; Kim, J; Ahn, G

    2008-04-16

    A novel in-situ gross defect verification method for light water reactor spent fuel assemblies was developed and investigated by a Monte Carlo study. This particular method is particularly effective for old pressurized water reactor spent fuel assemblies that have natural uranium in their upper fuel zones. Currently there is no method or instrument that does verification of this type of spent fuel assemblies without moving the spent fuel assemblies from their storage positions. The proposed method uses a tiny neutron detector and a detector guiding system to collect neutron signals inside PWR spent fuel assemblies through guide tubes present in PWR assemblies. The data obtained in such a manner are used for gross defect verification of spent fuel assemblies. The method uses 'calibration curves' which show the expected neutron counts inside one of the guide tubes of spent fuel assemblies as a function of fuel burn-up. By examining the measured data in the 'calibration curves', the consistency of the operator's declaration is verified.

  7. Negative pressures and spallation in water drops subjected to nanosecond shock waves

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stan, Claudiu A.; Willmott, Philip R.; Stone, Howard A.; Koglin, Jason E.; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Gumerlock, Karl L.; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G.; et al

    2016-05-16

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below –100 MPamore » were reached in the drops. As a result, we model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures.« less

  8. Negative Pressures and Spallation in Water Drops Subjected to Nanosecond Shock Waves.

    PubMed

    Stan, Claudiu A; Willmott, Philip R; Stone, Howard A; Koglin, Jason E; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L; Robinson, Joseph S; Gumerlock, Karl L; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G; Boutet, Sébastien; Guillet, Serge A H; Curtis, Robin H; Vetter, Sharon L; Loos, Henrik; Turner, James L; Decker, Franz-Josef

    2016-06-01

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below -100 MPa were reached in the drops. We model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures. PMID:27182751

  9. Ultra-high pressure water jet: Baseline report; Summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The Husky{trademark} is an ultra high pressure waterjet cutting tool system. The pump is mounted on a steel tube frame which includes slots for transport by a forklift. The Husky{trademark} features an automatic shutdown for several conditions such as low oil pressure and high oil temperature. Placement of the Husky{trademark} must allow for a three foot clearance on all sides for operation and service access. At maximum continuous operation, the output volume is 7.2 gallons per minute with an output pressure of 40,000 psi. A diesel engine provides power for the system. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  10. Light shield and cooling apparatus. [high intensity ultraviolet lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, T. G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A light shield and cooling apparatus was developed for a high intensity ultraviolet lamp including water and high pressure air for cooling and additional apparatus for shielding the light and suppressing the high pressure air noise.

  11. Response of the water status of soybean to changes in soil water potentials controlled by the water pressure in microporous tubes.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, S L; Henninger, D L

    1997-12-01

    Water transport through a microporous tube-soil-plant system was investigated by measuring the response of soil and plant water status to step change reductions in the water pressure within the tubes. Soybeans were germinated and grown in a porous ceramic 'soil' at a porous tube water pressure of -0.5 kpa for 28 d. During this time, the soil matric potential was nearly in equilibrium with tube water pressure. Water pressure in the porous tubes was then reduced to either -1.0, -1.5 or -2.0 kPa. Sap flow rates, leaf conductance and soil, root and leaf water potentials were measured before and after this change. A reduction in porous tube water pressure from -0.5 to -1.0 or -1.5 kPa did not result in any significant change in soil or plant water status. A reduction in porous tube water pressure to -2.0 kPa resulted in significant reductions in sap flow, leaf conductance, and soil, root and leaf water potentials. Hydraulic conductance, calculated as the transpiration rate/delta psi between two points in the water transport pathway, was used to analyse water transport through the tube-soil-plant continuum. At porous tube water pressures of -0.5 to-1.5 kPa soil moisture was readily available and hydraulic conductance of the plant limited water transport. At -2.0 kPa, hydraulic conductance of the bulk soil was the dominant factor in water movement. PMID:11541524

  12. Response of the water status of soybean to changes in soil water potentials controlled by the water pressure in microporous tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, S. L.; Henninger, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    Water transport through a microporous tube-soil-plant system was investigated by measuring the response of soil and plant water status to step change reductions in the water pressure within the tubes. Soybeans were germinated and grown in a porous ceramic 'soil' at a porous tube water pressure of -0.5 kpa for 28 d. During this time, the soil matric potential was nearly in equilibrium with tube water pressure. Water pressure in the porous tubes was then reduced to either -1.0, -1.5 or -2.0 kPa. Sap flow rates, leaf conductance and soil, root and leaf water potentials were measured before and after this change. A reduction in porous tube water pressure from -0.5 to -1.0 or -1.5 kPa did not result in any significant change in soil or plant water status. A reduction in porous tube water pressure to -2.0 kPa resulted in significant reductions in sap flow, leaf conductance, and soil, root and leaf water potentials. Hydraulic conductance, calculated as the transpiration rate/delta psi between two points in the water transport pathway, was used to analyse water transport through the tube-soil-plant continuum. At porous tube water pressures of -0.5 to-1.5 kPa soil moisture was readily available and hydraulic conductance of the plant limited water transport. At -2.0 kPa, hydraulic conductance of the bulk soil was the dominant factor in water movement.

  13. The effects of urbanization on water vapour pressure in a semi-arid climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çiçek, I.; Türkoğlu, N.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluates data from Aksaray, a medium sized urban city, and Cihanbeyli, a small town in Turkey, in order to show the effects of urbanization on water vapour pressure. Data taken at 07:00, 14:00 and 21:00 h and daily means were analyzed to identify the daily changes in water vapour pressure and temperatures. In Aksaray, positive urban heat island values were observed in all months except during afternoon hours. At all observation times during winter, weak water vapour pressure differences were recorded. During summer, on the other hand, positive water vapour differences were seen during afternoon and evening hours. A more humid city at afternoon hours is not typical of other mid-latitude countries. This is thought to be mainly related to the semi-arid climatic conditions in the area. Water vapour differences were seen to have a decreasing trend except during afternoon hours. As for temperature differences, an increase was seen during morning and evening hours, while a decrease was seen during afternoon hours and in daily means. A new trend was observed to start after the 1980s in both sets of data, which coincides with rapid population growth in Aksaray. Negative correlations were seen between water vapour pressure and temperature differences. No increase in water vapour pressure due to urbanization was observed in Aksaray. The decreasing evapotranspiration and the urban geometry appear to be the most influential factors in determining the water vapour pressure in Aksaray.

  14. Qualification Requirements of Guided Ultrasonic Waves for Inspection of Piping in Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2013-08-01

    Guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) are being increasingly used for both NDT and monitoring of piping. GUW offers advantages over many conventional NDE technologies due to the ability to inspect large volumes of piping components without significant removal of thermal insulation or protective layers. In addition, regions rendered inaccessible to more conventional NDE technologies may be more accessible using GUW techniques. For these reasons, utilities are increasingly considering the use of GUWs for performing the inspection of piping components in nuclear power plants. GUW is a rapidly evolving technology and its usage for inspection of nuclear power plant components requires refinement and qualification to ensure it is able to achieve consistent and acceptable levels of performance. This paper will discuss potential requirements for qualification of GUW techniques for the inspection of piping components in light water reactors (LWRs). The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has adopted ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code requirements in Sections V, III, and XI for nondestructive examination methods, fabrication inspections, and pre-service and in-service inspections. A Section V working group has been formed to place the methodology of GUW into the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code but no requirements for technique, equipment, or personnel exist in the Code at this time.

  15. Interfacial tension of hydrocarbon + water/brine systems under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, B.Y.; Yang, J.T.; Guo, T.M.

    1996-05-01

    The interfacial tension of hydrocarbon + water/brine systems is one of the basic physical properties required for performing process calculations in petroleum, natural gas, and petrochemical industries. Interfacial tensions of 10 normal alkane + water/brine and hydrocarbon mixture + water/brine systems were measured by using a pendent drop instrument. The temperature and pressure ranges of measurements are (25 to 80) C and (1 to 300) bar, respectively. The effects of temperature, pressure, and salt content have been studied. It was found that the interfacial tension is sensitive to temperature and salt concentration but weakly dependent on pressure and salt species.

  16. Sustained Recycle in Light Water and Sodium-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Michael A. Pope; Gilles J. Youinou

    2010-11-01

    From a physics standpoint, it is feasible to sustain recycle of used fuel in either thermal or fast reactors. This paper examines multi-recycle potential performance by considering three recycling approaches and calculating several fuel cycle parameters, including heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; radiotoxicity of waste; and uranium utilization. The first recycle approach is homogeneous mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies in a light water reactor (LWR). The transuranic portion of the MOX was varied among Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. (All-TRU means all isotopes through Cf-252.) The Pu case was allowed to go to 10% Pu in fresh fuel, but when the minor actinides were included, the transuranic enrichment was kept below 8% to satisfy the expected void reactivity constraint. The uranium portion of the MOX was enriched uranium. That enrichment was increased (to as much as 6.5%) to keep the fuel critical for a typical LWR irradiation. The second approach uses heterogeneous inert matrix fuel (IMF) assemblies in an LWR - a mix of IMF and traditional UOX pins. The uranium-free IMF fuel pins were Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. The UOX pins were limited to 4.95% U-235 enrichment. The number of IMF pins was set so that the amount of TRU in discharged fuel from recycle N (from both IMF and UOX pins) was made into the new IMF pins for recycle N+1. Up to 60 of the 264 pins in a fuel assembly were IMF. The assembly-average TRU content was 1-6%. The third approach uses fast reactor oxide fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor with transuranic conversion ratio of 0.50 and 1.00. The transuranic conversion ratio is the production of transuranics divided by destruction of transuranics. The FR at CR=0.50 is similar to the CR for the MOX case. The fast reactor cases had a transuranic content of 33-38%, higher than IMF or MOX.

  17. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Digital Architecture Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Kenneth; Oxstrand, Johanna

    2015-03-01

    The Digital Architecture effort is a part of the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The LWRS program is performed in close collaboration with industry research and development (R&D) programs that provides the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants (NPPs). One of the primary missions of the LWRS program is to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. Therefore, a major objective of the LWRS program is the development of a seamless digital environment for plant operations and support by integrating information from plant systems with plant processes for nuclear workers through an array of interconnected technologies. In order to get the most benefits of the advanced technology suggested by the different research activities in the LWRS program, the nuclear utilities need a digital architecture in place to support the technology. A digital architecture can be defined as a collection of information technology (IT) capabilities needed to support and integrate a wide-spectrum of real-time digital capabilities for nuclear power plant performance improvements. It is not hard to imagine that many processes within the plant can be largely improved from both a system and human performance perspective by utilizing a plant wide (or near plant wide) wireless network. For example, a plant wide wireless network allows for real time plant status information to easily be accessed in the control room, field workers’ computer-based procedures can be updated based on the real time plant status, and status on ongoing procedures can be incorporated into smart schedules in the outage command center to allow for more accurate planning of critical tasks. The goal

  18. Low-pressure water-cooled inductively coupled plasma torch

    DOEpatents

    Seliskar, Carl J.; Warner, David K.

    1988-12-27

    An inductively coupled plasma torch is provided which comprises an inner tube, including a sample injection port to which the sample to be tested is supplied and comprising an enlarged central portion in which the plasma flame is confined; an outer tube surrounding the inner tube and containing water therein for cooling the inner tube, the outer tube including a water inlet port to which water is supplied and a water outlet port spaced from the water inlet port and from which water is removed after flowing through the outer tube; and an r.f. induction coil for inducing the plasma in the gas passing into the tube through the sample injection port. The sample injection port comprises a capillary tube including a reduced diameter orifice, projecting into the lower end of the inner tube. The water inlet is located at the lower end of the outer tube and the r.f. heating coil is disposed around the outer tube above and adjacent to the water inlet.

  19. Low-pressure water-cooled inductively coupled plasma torch

    DOEpatents

    Seliskar, C.J.; Warner, D.K.

    1984-02-16

    An inductively coupled plasma torch is provided which comprises an inner tube, including a sample injection port to which the sample to be tested is supplied and comprising an enlarged central portion in which the plasma flame is confined; an outer tube surrounding the inner tube and containing water therein for cooling the inner tube, the outer tube including a water inlet port to which water is supplied and a water outlet port spaced from the water inlet port and from which water is removed after flowing through the outer tube; and an rf induction coil for inducing the plasma in the gas passing into the tube through the sample injection port. The sample injection port comprises a capillary tube including a reduced diameter orifice, projecting into the lower end of the inner tube. The water inlet is located at the lower end of the outer tube and the rf heating coil is disposed around the outer tube above and adjacent to the water inlet.

  20. Water loss control using pressure management: life-cycle energy and air emission effects.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jennifer R; Horvath, Arpad; Sturm, Reinhard

    2013-10-01

    Pressure management is one cost-effective and efficient strategy for controlling water distribution losses. This paper evaluates the life-cycle energy use and emissions for pressure management zones in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Halifax, Nova Scotia. It compares water savings using fixed-outlet and flow-modulated pressure control to performance without pressure control, considering the embedded electricity and chemical consumption in the lost water, manufacture of pipe and fittings to repair breaks caused by excess pressure, and pressure management. The resulting energy and emissions savings are significant. The Philadelphia and Halifax utilities both avoid approximately 130 million liters in water losses annually using flow-modulated pressure management. The conserved energy was 780 GJ and 1900 GJ while avoided greenhouse gas emissions were 50 Mg and 170 Mg a year by Philadelphia and Halifax, respectively. The life-cycle financial and environmental performance of pressure management systems compares favorably to the traditional demand management strategy of installing low-flow toilets. The energy savings may also translate to cost-effective greenhouse gas emission reductions depending on the energy mix used, an important advantage in areas where water and energy are constrained and/or expensive and greenhouse gas emissions are regulated as in California, for example. PMID:23869434

  1. Vegetative Propagule Pressure and Water Depth Affect Biomass and Evenness of Submerged Macrophyte Communities

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Li; Wang, Yong-Yang; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Pu; Zhang, Ming-Xiang; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2015-01-01

    Vegetative propagule pressure may affect the establishment and structure of aquatic plant communities that are commonly dominated by plants capable of clonal growth. We experimentally constructed aquatic communities consisting of four submerged macrophytes (Hydrilla verticillata, Ceratophyllum demersum, Elodea nuttallii and Myriophyllum spicatum) with three levels of vegetative propagule pressure (4, 8 and 16 shoot fragments for communities in each pot) and two levels of water depth (30 cm and 70 cm). Increasing vegetative propagule pressure and decreasing water level significantly increased the growth of the submerged macrophyte communities, suggesting that propagule pressure and water depth should be considered when utilizing vegetative propagules to re-establish submerged macrophyte communities in degraded aquatic ecosystems. However, increasing vegetative propagule pressure and decreasing water level significantly decreased evenness of the submerged macrophyte communities because they markedly increased the dominance of H. verticillata and E. nuttallii, but had little impact on that of C. demersum and M. spicatum. Thus, effects of vegetative propagule pressure and water depth are species-specific and increasing vegetative propagule pressure under lower water level can facilitate the establishment success of submerged macrophyte communities. PMID:26560705

  2. Visible Light Responsive Catalyst for Air Water Purification Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    Investigate and develop viable approaches to render the normally UV-activated TIO2 catalyst visible light responsive (VLR) and achieve high and sustaining catalytic activity under the visible region of the solar spectrum.

  3. The influence of the pressure and temperature on the light emission of the ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantas, N. O.; Couto dos Santos, M. A.; Cunha, F.; Macêdo, M. A.

    2007-09-01

    A new route for the preparation of zinc oxide powder is described along with its characterization. A proteic sol was prepared dissolving zinc nitrate in filtered coconut water. After calcination at 1000 °C, the powder was compressed to 1.3×10 8 Pa and ZnO pellets were obtained. The emission spectra were recorded under UV excitation at 325 and 400 nm. The powder showed no spectroscopic response, whereas one peak around 396 nm was observed for the pressed powder (pellet with no heat treatment). The pellets were then annealed for 24 h at 500, 800 and 1000 °C. In the first case, bands at 396 and 440 nm and a structure of narrow peaks around 480 nm (oxygen vacancies) were observed. Increasing the annealing temperature led to a decrease in the intensity of the emissions at 440 and 480 nm. We propose that the high pressure induces a red-shift in the UV region of the ZnO nanopowder emission peaks to 396 nm. This is an indication that the ZnO nanopowder treated under pressure and sintering temperature exhibits the spectroscopic behavior characteristic of the ZnO single crystal. The disappearance of the 440 and 480 nm lines indicate the reduction of oxygen vacancies. The atomic force micrographs suggest a coalescence thermal point.

  4. Development and Validation of a Pressurization System Model for a Crossfeed Subscale Water Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Han; Mazurkivich, Pete

    2006-01-01

    A pressurization system model was developed for a crossfeed subscale water test article using the EASY5 modeling software. The model consisted of an integrated tank pressurization and pressurization line model. The tank model was developed using the general purpose library, while the line model was assembled from the gas dynamic library. The pressurization system model was correlated to water test data obtained from nine test runs conducted on the crossfeed subscale test article. The model was first correlated to a representative test run and frozen. The correlated model was then used to predict the tank pressures and compared with the test data for eight other runs. The model prediction showed excellent agreement with the test data, allowing it to be used in a later study to analyze the pressurization system performance of a full-scale bimese vehicle with cryogenic propellants.

  5. Lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  6. DESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATION OF 3-CYCLE LWR (LIGHT WATER REACTOR) FUEL RODS FROM TURKEY POINT UNIT 3 FOR THE CLIMAX - SPENT FUEL TEST

    SciTech Connect

    ATKIN SD

    1981-06-01

    The destructive examination results of five light water reactor rods from the Turkey Point Unit 3 reactor are presented. The examinations included fission gas collection and analyses, burnup and hydrogen analyses, and a metallographic evaluation of the fuel, cladding, oxide, and hydrides. The rods exhibited a low fission gas release with all other results appearing representative for pressurized water reator fuel rods with similar burnups (28 GWd/MTU) and operating histories.

  7. Crack initiation in smooth fatigue specimens of austenitic stainless steel in light water reactor environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Smith, J. L.

    1999-04-08

    The fatigue design curves for structural materials specified in Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code are based on tests of smooth polished specimens at room temperature in air. The effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves; however, recent test data illustrate the detrimental effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of austenitic stainless steels (SSs). Certain loading and environmental conditions have led to test specimen fatigue lives that are significantly shorter than those obtained in air. Results of fatigue tests that examine the influence of reactor environments on crack initiation and crack growth of austenitic SSs are presented. Block loading was used to mark the fracture surface to determine crack length as a function of fatigue cycles in water environments, Crack lengths were measured by scanning electron microscopy. The mechanism for decreased fatigue life in LWR environments is discussed, and crack growth rates in the smooth fatigue specimens are compared with existing data from studies of crack growth rates.

  8. Storage of LWR (light-water-reactor) spent fuel in air

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, L.E.; Charlot, L.A.; Coleman, J.E. ); Knoll, R.W. )

    1989-12-01

    An experimental program is being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine the oxidation response of light-water-reactor (LWR) spent fuels under conditions appropriate to fuel storage in air. The program is designed to investigate several independent variables that might affect the oxidation behavior of spent fuel. Included are temperature (135 to 230{degree}C), fuel burnup (to about 34 MWd/kgM), reactor type (pressurized and boiling water reactors), moisture level in the air, and the presence of a high gamma field. In continuing tests with declad spent fuel and nonirradiated UO{sub 2} specimens, oxidation rates were monitored by weight-gain measurements and the microstructures of subsamples taken during the weighing intervals were characterized by several analytical methods. The oxidation behavior indicated by weight gain and time to form powder will be reported in Volume III of this series. The characterization results obtained from x-ray diffractometry, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Auger electron spectrometry of oxidized fuel samples are presented in this report. 28 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Computational Neutronics Methods and Transmutation Performance Analyses for Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    M. Asgari; B. Forget; S. Piet; R. Ferrer; S. Bays

    2007-03-01

    The urgency for addressing repository impacts has grown in the past few years as a result of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) accumulation from commercial nuclear power plants. One obvious path that has been explored by many is to eliminate the transuranic (TRU) inventory from the SNF thus reducing the need for additional long term repository storage sites. One strategy for achieving this is to burn the separated TRU elements in the currently operating U.S. Light Water Reactor (LWR) fleet. Many studies have explored the viability of this strategy by loading a percentage of LWR cores with TRU in the form of either Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels or Inert Matrix Fuels (IMF). A task was undertaken at INL to establish specific technical capabilities to perform neutronics analyses in order to further assess several key issues related to the viability of thermal recycling. The initial computational study reported here is focused on direct thermal recycling of IMF fuels in a heterogeneous Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) bundle design containing Plutonium, Neptunium, Americium, and Curium (IMF-PuNpAmCm) in a multi-pass strategy using legacy 5 year cooled LWR SNF. In addition to this initial high-priority analysis, three other alternate analyses with different TRU vectors in IMF pins were performed. These analyses provide comparison of direct thermal recycling of PuNpAmCm, PuNpAm, PuNp, and Pu.

  10. The Oxidation Rate of SiC in High Pressure Water Vapor Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Robinson, R. Craig

    1999-01-01

    CVD SiC and sintered alpha-SiC samples were exposed at 1316 C in a high pressure burner rig at total pressures of 5.7, 15, and 25 atm for times up to 100h. Variations in sample emittance for the first nine hours of exposure were used to determine the thickness of the silica scale as a function of time. After accounting for volatility of silica in water vapor, the parabolic rate constants for Sic in water vapor pressures of 0.7, 1.8 and 3.1 atm were determined. The dependence of the parabolic rate constant on the water vapor pressure yielded a power law exponent of one. Silica growth on Sic is therefore limited by transport of molecular water vapor through the silica scale.

  11. Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems

    DOEpatents

    McDermott, D.J.; Schrader, K.J.; Schulz, T.L.

    1994-05-03

    The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

  12. Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems

    DOEpatents

    McDermott, Daniel J.; Schrader, Kenneth J.; Schulz, Terry L.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

  13. A better energy allocation of absorbed light in photosystem II and less photooxidative damage contribute to acclimation of Arabidopsis thaliana young leaves to water deficit.

    PubMed

    Sperdouli, Ilektra; Moustakas, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Water deficit stress promotes excitation pressure and photooxidative damage due to an imbalance between light capture and energy use. Young leaves (YL) of Arabidopsis thaliana plants acclimate better to the onset of water deficit (OnsWD) than do mature leaves (ML). To obtain a better understanding of this differential response, we evaluated whether YL and ML of A. thaliana exposed to the OnsWD, mild water deficit (MiWD) and moderate water deficit (MoWD), show differences in their photosynthetic performance, and whether photosynthetic acclimation correlates with leaf developmental stage. Water deficit (WD) resulted in greater photooxidative damage in ML compared to YL, but the latter could not be protected under the OnsWD or MiWD, but only under MoWD. YL of A. thaliana with signs of photosynthetic acclimation under MoWD retained higher maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm) and decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. YL under MoWD, show a reduced excitation pressure and a better balance between light capture and photochemical energy use, which contributed to their photoprotection, but only under low light intensity (LL, 130μmolphotonsm(-2)s(-1)) and not under high light (HL, 1200μmolphotonsm(-2)s(-1)). In conclusion, leaf developmental stage was correlated with photo-oxidative damage and a differential allocation of absorbed light energy in photosystem II (PSII) of Arabidopsis leaves under WD. PMID:24709149

  14. A Boussinesq-scaled, pressure-Poisson water wave model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, Aaron S.; Zhang, Yao; Kennedy, Andrew B.; Westerink, Joannes J.; Panda, Nishant; Dawson, Clint

    2015-02-01

    Through the use of Boussinesq scaling we develop and test a model for resolving non-hydrostatic pressure profiles in nonlinear wave systems over varying bathymetry. A Green-Nagdhi type polynomial expansion is used to resolve the pressure profile along the vertical axis, this is then inserted into the pressure-Poisson equation, retaining terms up to a prescribed order and solved using a weighted residual approach. The model shows rapid convergence properties with increasing order of polynomial expansion which can be greatly improved through the application of asymptotic rearrangement. Models of Boussinesq scaling of the fully nonlinear O (μ2) and weakly nonlinear O (μN) are presented, the analytical and numerical properties of O (μ2) and O (μ4) models are discussed. Optimal basis functions in the Green-Nagdhi expansion are determined through manipulation of the free-parameters which arise due to the Boussinesq scaling. The optimal O (μ2) model has dispersion accuracy equivalent to a Padé [2,2] approximation with one extra free-parameter. The optimal O (μ4) model obtains dispersion accuracy equivalent to a Padé [4,4] approximation with two free-parameters which can be used to optimize shoaling or nonlinear properties. In comparison to experimental results the O (μ4) model shows excellent agreement to experimental data.

  15. Design and analysis of a nuclear reactor core for innovative small light water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, Alexey I.

    In order to address the energy needs of developing countries and remote communities, Oregon State University has proposed the Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) design. In order to achieve five years of operation without refueling, use of 8% enriched fuel is necessary. This dissertation is focused on core design issues related with increased fuel enrichment (8.0%) and specific MASLWR operational conditions (such as lower operational pressure and temperature, and increased leakage due to small core). Neutron physics calculations are performed with the commercial nuclear industry tools CASMO-4 and SIMULATE-3, developed by Studsvik Scandpower Inc. The first set of results are generated from infinite lattice level calculations with CASMO-4, and focus on evaluation of the principal differences between standard PWR fuel and MASLWR fuel. Chapter 4-1 covers aspects of fuel isotopic composition changes with burnup, evaluation of kinetic parameters and reactivity coefficients. Chapter 4-2 discusses gadolinium self-shielding and shadowing effects, and subsequent impacts on power generation peaking and Reactor Control System shadowing. The second aspect of the research is dedicated to core design issues, such as reflector design (chapter 4-3), burnable absorber distribution and programmed fuel burnup and fuel use strategy (chapter 4-4). This section also includes discussion of the parameters important for safety and evaluation of Reactor Control System options for the proposed core design. An evaluation of the sensitivity of the proposed design to uncertainty in calculated parameters is presented in chapter 4-5. The results presented in this dissertation cover a new area of reactor design and operational parameters, and may be applicable to other small and large pressurized water reactor designs.

  16. Exploration of Impinging Water Spray Heat Transfer at System Pressures Near the Triple Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golliher, Eric L.; Yao, Shi-Chune

    2013-01-01

    The heat transfer of a water spray impinging upon a surface in a very low pressure environment is of interest to cooling of space vehicles during launch and re-entry, and to industrial processes where flash evaporation occurs. At very low pressure, the process occurs near the triple point of water, and there exists a transient multiphase transport problem of ice, water and water vapor. At the impingement location, there are three heat transfer mechanisms: evaporation, freezing and sublimation. A preliminary heat transfer model was developed to explore the interaction of these mechanisms at the surface and within the spray.

  17. Nuclear Engineering Computer Modules, Thermal-Hydraulics, TH-1: Pressurized Water Reactors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reihman, Thomas C.

    This learning module is concerned with the temperature field, the heat transfer rates, and the coolant pressure drop in typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies. As in all of the modules of this series, emphasis is placed on developing the theory and demonstrating its use with a simplified model. The heart of the module is the PWR…

  18. Refraction index of shock compressed water in the megabar pressure range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batani, D.; Jakubowska, K.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Cavazzoni, C.; Danson, C.; Hall, T.; Kimpel, M.; Neely, D.; Pasley, J.; Rabec Le Gloahec, M.; Telaro, B.

    2015-11-01

    We compressed water to megabar pressures by laser-driven shock waves and evidenced transparent, opaque and reflecting phases as pressure increases. The refraction index of water in the first two states was measured using a VISAR system. At high compression a sharp increase of the real and imaginary part of the refraction index is observed. Experiments were performed at the LULI and RAL laboratories.

  19. Does temperature affect the accuracy of vented pressure transducer in fine-scale water level measurement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Higgins, C. W.

    2015-03-01

    Submersible pressure transducers have been utilized for collecting water level data since the early 1960s. Together with a digital data logger, it is a convenient way to record water level fluctuations for long-term monitoring. Despite the wide use of pressure transducers for water level monitoring, little has been reported regarding their accuracy and performance under field conditions. The effects of temperature fluctuations on the output of vented pressure transducers were considered in this study. The pressure transducers were tested under both laboratory and field conditions. The results of this study indicate that temperature fluctuation has a strong effect on the transducer output. Rapid changes in temperature introduce noise and fluctuations in the water level readings under a constant hydraulic head while the absolute temperature is also related to sensor errors. The former is attributed to venting and the latter is attributed to temperature compensation effects in the strain gauges. Individual pressure transducers responded differently to the thermal fluctuations in the same testing environment. In the field of surface hydrology, especially when monitoring fine-scale water level fluctuations, ignoring or failing to compensate for the temperature effect can introduce considerable error into pressure transducer readings. It is recommended that a performance test for the pressure transducer is conducted before field deployment.

  20. Does temperature affect the accuracy of vented pressure transducer in fine-scale water level measurement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Higgins, C. W.

    2014-09-01

    Submersible pressure transducers have been utilized for collecting water level data since early 1960s. Together with a digital datalogger, it is a convenient way to record water level fluctuations for long-term monitoring. Despite the widely use of pressure transducers for water level monitoring, little has been reported for their accuracy and performance under field conditions. The effect of temperature fluctuations on the output of vented pressure transducers were discussed in this study. The pressure transducer was tested under both laboratory and field conditions. The results of this study indicate that temperature fluctuation has a strong effect on the transducer output. Rapid changes in temperature introduce noise and fluctuations in the water level readings under a constant hydraulic head while the absolute temperature is also related to sensor errors. The former is attributed to venting and the latter is attributed to temperature compensation effect in the strain gauges. Individual pressure transducers responded differently to the thermal fluctuations in the same testing environment. In the field of surface hydrology, especially when monitoring fine-scale water level fluctuations, ignoring or failing to compensate for the temperature effect can introduce considerable error into pressure transducer readings. It is recommended that a performance test for the pressure transducer is conducted before field deployment.

  1. Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60,???

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, Jeremy T; Nanstad, Randy K; Stoller, Roger E; Feng, Zhili; Naus, Dan J

    2008-04-01

    Nuclear reactors present a very harsh environment for components service. Components within a reactor core must tolerate high temperature water, stress, vibration, and an intense neutron field. Degradation of materials in this environment can lead to reduced performance, and in some cases, sudden failure. A recent EPRI-led study interviewed 47 US nuclear utility executives to gauge perspectives on long-term operation of nuclear reactors. Nearly 90% indicated that extensions of reactor lifetimes to beyond 60 years were likely. When polled on the most challenging issues facing further life extension, two-thirds cited plant reliability as the key issue with materials aging and cable/piping as the top concerns for plant reliability. Materials degradation within a nuclear power plant is very complex. There are many different types of materials within the reactor itself: over 25 different metal alloys can be found with can be found within the primary and secondary systems, not to mention the concrete containment vessel, instrumentation and control, and other support facilities. When this diverse set of materials is placed in the complex and harsh environment coupled with load, degradation over an extended life is indeed quite complicated. To address this issue, the USNRC has developed a Progressive Materials Degradation Approach (NUREG/CR-6923). This approach is intended to develop a foundation for appropriate actions to keep materials degradation from adversely impacting component integrity and safety and identify materials and locations where degradation can reasonably be expected in the future. Clearly, materials degradation will impact reactor reliability, availability, and potentially, safe operation. Routine surveillance and component replacement can mitigate these factors, although failures still occur. With reactor life extensions to 60 years or beyond or power uprates, many components must tolerate the reactor environment for even longer times. This may increase

  2. Removal of fluorescence and ultraviolet absorbance of dissolved organic matter in reclaimed water by solar light.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qianyuan; Li, Chao; Wang, Wenlong; He, Tao; Hu, Hongying; Du, Ye; Wang, Ting

    2016-05-01

    Storing reclaimed water in lakes is a widely used method of accommodating changes in the consumption of reclaimed water during wastewater reclamation and reuse. Solar light serves as an important function in degrading pollutants during storage, and its effect on dissolved organic matter (DOM) was investigated in this study. Solar light significantly decreased the UV254 absorbance and fluorescence (FLU) intensity of reclaimed water. However, its effect on the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) value of reclaimed water was very limited. The decrease in the UV254 absorbance intensity and FLU excitation-emission matrix regional integration volume (FLU volume) of reclaimed water during solar light irradiation was fit with pseudo-first order reaction kinetics. The decrease of UV254 absorbance was much slower than that of the FLU volume. Ultraviolet light in solar light had a key role in decreasing the UV254 absorbance and FLU intensity during solar light irradiation. The light fluence-based removal kinetic constants of the UV254 and FLU intensity were independent of light intensity. The peaks of the UV254 absorbance and FLU intensity with an apparent molecular weight (AMW) of 100Da to 2000Da decreased after solar irradiation, whereas the DOC value of the major peaks did not significantly change. PMID:27155416

  3. Light-Initiated Transformation of C60 Clusters in Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although Buckminster fullerene (C60) has an extremely low water solubility (~8 ng/L), the formation of stable clusters (aqu/nC60) not only greatly increases the mass of C60 dispersed in water, but also alters its physicochemical properties. This research focused on investigating ...

  4. High pressure water electrolysis for space station EMU recharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, Nick; Puskar, Michael; Moulthrop, Lawrence; Zagaja, John

    1988-01-01

    A high pressure oxygen recharge system (HPORS), is being developed for application on board the Space Station. This electrolytic system can provide oxygen at up to 6000 psia without a mechanical compressor. The Hamilton standard HPORS based on a solid polymer electrolyte system is an extension of the much larger and succesful 3000 psia system of the U.S. Navy. Cell modules have been successfully tested under conditions beyond which spacecraft may encounter during launch. The control system with double redundancy and mechanical backups for all electronically controlled components is designed to ensure a safe shutdown.

  5. Marination effects on water states and water-holding capacity of broiler pectoralis major muscle with different color lightness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A total of four experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of marination on water states and water-holding capacity (WHC) of broiler pectoralis (p.) major muscle selected based on raw muscle color lightness. Boneless, skinless p. major were collected at 6-8 h postmortem from deboning li...

  6. Marination effects on water states and water-holding capacity of broiler pectoralis major muscle with different color lightness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of marination on water states and water-holding capacity (WHC) of broiler pectoralis (p.) major muscle. Boneless, skinless p. major were collected 6-8 h postmortem from deboning lines at a commercial processing plant, and separated into light, ...

  7. Environmentally assisted cracking in light-water reactors: Semi-annual report, January--June 1997. Volume 24

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gruber, E.E.

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors from January 1997 to June 1997. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of carbon, low-alloy, and austenitic stainless steels (SSs) used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Types 304 and 304L SS, and (c) EAC of Alloys 600 and 690. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic and austenitic SSs in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during various portions of a tensile-loading cycle is equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Slow-strain-rate-tensile tests were conducted in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water at 288 C on SS specimens irradiated to a low fluence in the Halden reactor and the results were compared with similar data from a control-blade sheath and neutron-absorber tubes irradiated in BWRs to the same fluence level. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from several heats of Alloys 600 and 690 in low-DO, simulated pressurized water reactor environments.

  8. Numerical Analysis including Pressure Drop in Oscillating Water Column Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    das Neves Gomes, Mateus; Domingues dos Santos, Elizaldo; Isoldi, Liércio André; Rocha, Luiz Alberto Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    The wave energy conversion into electricity has been increasingly studied in the last years. There are several proposed converters. Among them, the oscillatingwater column (OWC) device has been widespread evaluated in literature. In this context, the main goal of this work was to perform a comparison between two kinds of physical constraints in the chimney of the OWC device, aiming to represent numerically the pressure drop imposed by the turbine on the air flow inside the OWC. To do so, the conservation equations of mass,momentumand one equation for the transport of volumetric fraction were solved with the finite volume method (FVM). To tackle thewater-air interaction, the multiphase model volume of fluid (VOF)was used. Initially, an asymmetric constraint inserted in chimney duct was reproduced and investigated. Subsequently, a second strategywas proposed,where a symmetric physical constraint with an elliptical shapewas analyzed. Itwas thus possible to establish a strategy to reproduce the pressure drop in OWC devices caused by the presence of the turbine, as well as to generate its characteristic curve.

  9. Revisiting the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock Studies of an Aging Pressurized Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bryson, J.W.; Dickson, T.L.; Malik, S.N.M.; Simonen, F.A.

    1999-08-01

    The Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) studies were a series of studies performed in the early-mid 1980s as part of an NRC-organized comprehensive research project to confirm the technical bases for the pressurized thermal shock (PTS) rule, and to aid in the development of guidance for licensee plant-specific analyses. The research project consisted of PTS pilot analyses for three PWRs: Oconee Unit 1, designed by Babcock and Wilcox; Calvert Cliffs Unit 1, designed by Combustion Engineering; and H.B. Robinson Unit 2, designed by Westinghouse. The primary objectives of the IPTS studies were (1) to provide for each of the three plants an estimate of the probability of a crack propagating through the wall of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) due to PTS; (2) to determine the dominant overcooling sequences, plant features, and operator actions and the uncertainty in the plant risk due to PTS; and (3) to evaluate the effectiveness of potential corrective actions. The NRC is currently evaluating the possibility of revising current PTS regulatory guidance. Technical bases must be developed to support any revisions. In the years since the results of IPTS studies were published, the fracture mechanics model, the embrittlement database, embrittlement correlation, inputs for flaw distributions, and the probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) computer code have been refined. An ongoing effort is underway to determine the impact of these fracture-technology refinements on the conditional probabilities of vessel failure calculated in the IPTS Studies. This paper discusses the results of these analyses performed for one of these plants.

  10. High-pressure-induced water penetration into 3-­isopropylmalate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Nagae, Takayuki; Kawamura, Takashi; Chavas, Leonard M. G.; Niwa, Ken; Hasegawa, Masashi; Kato, Chiaki; Watanabe, Nobuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Hydrostatic pressure induces structural changes in proteins, including denaturation, the mechanism of which has been attributed to water penetration into the protein interior. In this study, structures of 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were determined at about 2 Å resolution under pressures ranging from 0.1 to 650 MPa using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Although most of the protein cavities are monotonically compressed as the pressure increases, the volume of one particular cavity at the dimer interface increases at pressures over 340 MPa. In parallel with this volume increase, water penetration into the cavity could be observed at pressures over 410 MPa. In addition, the generation of a new cleft on the molecular surface accompanied by water penetration could also be observed at pressures over 580 MPa. These water-penetration phenomena are considered to be initial steps in the pressure-denaturation process of IPMDH. PMID:22349232

  11. Growth and physiological responses of tree seedlings to experimental manipulation of light and water

    SciTech Connect

    Huston, M.A.; Holmgren, M.

    1995-06-01

    Seedlings of two tree species with similar tolerance to soil water and nutrient levels, but contrasting tolerance to shade (Acer saccharum and Liriodendron tulipifera) were grown in shade houses under 5 light levels (27%, 17%, 12%, 5%, and 1%) and three soil water regimes (5-9%, 11-15%, and >20%). Soil, light, and water conditions were representative of those in the Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment, where the same species are being monitored under field conditions. Treatments were maintained from mid-June through October, when all plants were harvested for determination of biomass allocation patterns. The only mortality occurred among the tulip poplars, but there was a significant interaction effect of the treatments on leaf area, total biomass, and allocation patterns. Highest growth rates in both species occurred at 17% light in the highest water treatment, with the 27% treatment showing reduced growth, perhaps due to photoinhibition. Gas exchange measurements indicated that the light compensation point increased under dry conditions.

  12. PREDICTIVE MODELING OF LIGHT-INDUCED MORTALITY OF ENTEROCOCCI FAECALIS IN RECREATIONAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    One approach to predictive modeling of biological contamination of recreational waters involves the application of process-based approaches that consider microbial sources, hydrodynamic transport, and microbial fate. This presentation focuses on one important fate process, light-...

  13. Low internal pressure in femtoliter water capillary bridges reduces evaporation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kun; Hwang, In Gyu; Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Lim, Jun; Kim, Joon Heon; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-03-01

    Capillary bridges are usually formed by a small liquid volume in a confined space between two solid surfaces. They can have a lower internal pressure than the surrounding pressure for volumes of the order of femtoliters. Femtoliter capillary bridges with relatively rapid evaporation rates are difficult to explore experimentally. To understand in detail the evaporation of femtoliter capillary bridges, we present a feasible experimental method to directly visualize how water bridges evaporate between a microsphere and a flat substrate in still air using transmission X-ray microscopy. Precise measurements of evaporation rates for water bridges show that lower water pressure than surrounding pressure can significantly decrease evaporation through the suppression of vapor diffusion. This finding provides insight into the evaporation of ultrasmall capillary bridges.

  14. Water Mediated Interactions and the Protein Folding Phase Diagram in the Temperature-Pressure Plane.

    PubMed

    Sirovetz, Brian J; Schafer, Nicholas P; Wolynes, Peter G

    2015-08-27

    The temperature-pressure behavior of two proteins, ubiquitin and λ-repressor, is explored using a realistically coarse-grained physicochemical model, the associative memory, water mediated, structure and energy model (AWSEM). The phase diagram across the temperature-pressure plane is obtained by perturbing the water mediated interactions in the Hamiltonian systematically. The phase diagrams calculated with direct simulations along with an extended bridge sampling estimator show the main features found experimentally, including both cold- and pressure-denaturation. The denatured ensembles in different parts of the phase diagram are characterized and found to be structurally distinct. The protein energy landscape is found to be funneled throughout the phase diagram, but modest changes in the entropy and free energy of the water are found to drive both cold and pressure induced denaturation. PMID:26102155

  15. Low internal pressure in femtoliter water capillary bridges reduces evaporation rates

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kun; Hwang, In Gyu; Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Lim, Jun; Kim, Joon Heon; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-01-01

    Capillary bridges are usually formed by a small liquid volume in a confined space between two solid surfaces. They can have a lower internal pressure than the surrounding pressure for volumes of the order of femtoliters. Femtoliter capillary bridges with relatively rapid evaporation rates are difficult to explore experimentally. To understand in detail the evaporation of femtoliter capillary bridges, we present a feasible experimental method to directly visualize how water bridges evaporate between a microsphere and a flat substrate in still air using transmission X-ray microscopy. Precise measurements of evaporation rates for water bridges show that lower water pressure than surrounding pressure can significantly decrease evaporation through the suppression of vapor diffusion. This finding provides insight into the evaporation of ultrasmall capillary bridges. PMID:26928329

  16. Low internal pressure in femtoliter water capillary bridges reduces evaporation rates.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kun; Hwang, In Gyu; Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Lim, Jun; Kim, Joon Heon; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-01-01

    Capillary bridges are usually formed by a small liquid volume in a confined space between two solid surfaces. They can have a lower internal pressure than the surrounding pressure for volumes of the order of femtoliters. Femtoliter capillary bridges with relatively rapid evaporation rates are difficult to explore experimentally. To understand in detail the evaporation of femtoliter capillary bridges, we present a feasible experimental method to directly visualize how water bridges evaporate between a microsphere and a flat substrate in still air using transmission X-ray microscopy. Precise measurements of evaporation rates for water bridges show that lower water pressure than surrounding pressure can significantly decrease evaporation through the suppression of vapor diffusion. This finding provides insight into the evaporation of ultrasmall capillary bridges. PMID:26928329

  17. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production Progress Report for Year 1, Quarter 2 (January - March 2002)

    SciTech Connect

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Weaver, Kevan Dean

    2002-03-01

    The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed.

  18. Production of water mist from electrolyte surface in contact with atmospheric-pressure dc helium glow plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, K.; Ishigame, H.; Nishiyama, S.

    2015-09-01

    Plasma-liquid interaction is a new subject which has been opened by developments of atmospheric-pressure plasma sources. In this work, we adopted laser Mie scattering to examine an atmospheric-pressure dc helium glow plasma in contact with NaCl solution. The plasma was produced by applying a dc voltage between a stainless-steel gas nozzle and the electrolyte via a register of 100 k Ω. The gap distance between the electrolyte surface and the electrode was 4 mm. Helium as a working gas was fed from the nozzle toward the electrolyte surface. The discharge space was illuminated using a cw laser beam at a wavelength of 457 nm, and the scattered laser light was captured using a high-speed camera with an image intensifier via an interference filter at the laser wavelength. The scattered laser light told us the existence of particulates or water mists in the discharge space. The water mists were produced from the electrolyte surface explosively as well as randomly. The trajectories of the mists were basically parabolic. We sometimes observed the expansion of the mist size in the gas phase. The expansion was followed by the disappearance of the mist. This may be due to the evaporation of the mist, and is considered to be the production mechanism of Na in the gas phase.

  19. Verification of the LWRARC code for light-water-reactor afterheat rate calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, B.D.

    1998-02-01

    This report describes verification studies carried out on the LWRARC (Light-Water-Reactor Afterheat Rate Calculations) computer code. The LWRARC code is proposed for automating the implementation of procedures specified in Draft Revision 1 of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 3.54, {open_quotes}Spent-Fuel Heat Generation in an Independent Spent-Fuel Storage Installation,{close_quotes} which gives guidelines on the calculation of decay heat for spent nuclear fuel. Draft Regulatory Guide 3.54 allows one to estimate decay-heat values by means of a table lookup procedure with interpolation performed between table-entry values. The tabulated values of the relevant parameters span ranges that are appropriate for spent fuel from a boiling-water reactor (BWR) or a pressurized-water reactor (PWR), as the case may be, and decay-heat rates are obtained for spent fuel whose properties are within those parameter limits. In some instances, where these limits are either exceeded or where they approach critical regions, adjustments are invoked following table lookup. The LWRARC computer code is intended to replicate the manual process just described. In the code, the table lookup is done by entering a database and carrying out interpolations. The code then determines if adjustments apply, and, if this is the case, adjustment factors are calculated separately. The manual procedures in the Draft Regulatory Guide have been validated (i.e., they produce results that are good estimates of reality). The work reported in this document verifies that the LWRARC code replicates the manual procedures of the Draft Regulatory Guide, and that the code, taken together with the Draft Regulatory Guide, can support both verification and validation processes.

  20. 77 FR 62270 - Proposed Revision Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... COMMISSION Proposed Revision Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors AGENCY... Treatment of Non-Safety Systems (RTNSS) for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors.'' The current SRP does not contain guidance on the proposed RTNSS for Passive Advance Light Water Reactors. DATES:...

  1. Data quality assurance in pressure transducer-based automatic water level monitoring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Submersible pressure transducers integrated with data loggers have become relatively common water-level measuring devices used in flow or well water elevation measurements. However, drift, linearity, hysteresis and other problems can lead to erroneous data. Researchers at the USDA-ARS in Watkinsvill...

  2. A review of light-scattering techniques for the study of colloids in natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rees, T.F.

    1987-01-01

    In order to understand the movement of colloidal materials in natural waters, we first need to have a means of quantifying their physical characteristics. This paper reviews three techniques which utilize light-scattering phenomena to measure the translational diffusion coefficient, the rotational diffusion coefficient, and the electrophoretic mobility of colloids suspended in water. Primary emphasis is to provide sufficient theoretical detail so that hydrologists can evaluate the utility of photon correlation spectrometry, electrophoretic light scattering, and electric birefringence analysis. ?? 1987.

  3. Abiotic control of underwater light in a drinking water reservoir: Photon budget analysis and implications for water quality monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shohei; Laurion, Isabelle; Markager, Stiig; Vincent, Warwick F.

    2015-08-01

    In optically complex inland waters, the underwater attenuation of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) is controlled by a variable combination of absorption and scattering components of the lake or river water. Here we applied a photon budget approach to identify the main optical components affecting PAR attenuation in Lake St. Charles, a drinking water reservoir for Québec City, Canada. This analysis showed the dominant role of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) absorption (average of 44% of total absorption during the sampling period), but with large changes over depth in the absolute and relative contribution of the individual absorption components (water, nonalgal particulates, phytoplankton and CDOM) to PAR attenuation. This pronounced vertical variation occurred because of the large spectral changes in the light field with depth, and it strongly affected the average in situ diffuse absorption coefficients in the water column. For example, the diffuse absorption coefficient for pure-water in the ambient light field was 10-fold higher than the value previously measured in the blue open ocean and erroneously applied to lakes and coastal waters. Photon absorption budget calculations for a range of limnological conditions confirmed that phytoplankton had little direct influence on underwater light, even at chlorophyll a values above those observed during harmful algal blooms in the lake. These results imply that traditional measures of water quality such as Secchi depth and radiometric transparency do not provide a meaningful estimate of the biological state of the water column in CDOM-colored lakes and reservoirs.

  4. Temporal and Spatial Pore Water Pressure Distribution Surrounding a Vertical Landfill Leachate Recirculation Well

    PubMed Central

    Kadambala, Ravi; Townsend, Timothy G.; Jain, Pradeep; Singh, Karamjit

    2011-01-01

    Addition of liquids into landfilled waste can result in an increase in pore water pressure, and this in turn may increase concerns with respect to geotechnical stability of the landfilled waste mass. While the impact of vertical well leachate recirculation on landfill pore water pressures has been mathematically modeled, measurements of these systems in operating landfills have not been reported. Pressure readings from vibrating wire piezometers placed in the waste surrounding a liquids addition well at a full-scale operating landfill in Florida were recorded over a 2-year period. Prior to the addition of liquids, measured pore pressures were found to increase with landfill depth, an indication of gas pressure increase and decreasing waste permeability with depth. When liquid addition commenced, piezometers located closer to either the leachate injection well or the landfill surface responded more rapidly to leachate addition relative to those far from the well and those at deeper locations. After liquid addition stopped, measured pore pressures did not immediately drop, but slowly decreased with time. Despite the large pressures present at the bottom of the liquid addition well, much smaller pressures were measured in the surrounding waste. The spatial variation of the pressures recorded in this study suggests that waste permeability is anisotropic and decreases with depth. PMID:21655145

  5. Temporal and spatial pore water pressure distribution surrounding a vertical landfill leachate recirculation well.

    PubMed

    Kadambala, Ravi; Townsend, Timothy G; Jain, Pradeep; Singh, Karamjit

    2011-05-01

    Addition of liquids into landfilled waste can result in an increase in pore water pressure, and this in turn may increase concerns with respect to geotechnical stability of the landfilled waste mass. While the impact of vertical well leachate recirculation on landfill pore water pressures has been mathematically modeled, measurements of these systems in operating landfills have not been reported. Pressure readings from vibrating wire piezometers placed in the waste surrounding a liquids addition well at a full-scale operating landfill in Florida were recorded over a 2-year period. Prior to the addition of liquids, measured pore pressures were found to increase with landfill depth, an indication of gas pressure increase and decreasing waste permeability with depth. When liquid addition commenced, piezometers located closer to either the leachate injection well or the landfill surface responded more rapidly to leachate addition relative to those far from the well and those at deeper locations. After liquid addition stopped, measured pore pressures did not immediately drop, but slowly decreased with time. Despite the large pressures present at the bottom of the liquid addition well, much smaller pressures were measured in the surrounding waste. The spatial variation of the pressures recorded in this study suggests that waste permeability is anisotropic and decreases with depth. PMID:21655145

  6. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors - annual report, January-December 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Clark, R. W.; Gruber, E. E; Hiller, R. W.; Shack, W. J.; Soppet, W. K.; Strain, R. V.; Energy Technology

    2003-06-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from January to December 2001. Topics that have been investigated include (a) environmental effects on fatigue S-N behavior of austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs, and (c) EAC of Alloy 600. The effects of key material and loading variables, such as strain amplitude, strain rate, temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO) level in water, and material heat treatment, on the fatigue lives of wrought and cast austenitic SSs in air and LWR environments have been evaluated. The mechanism of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic SSs in LWR environments has also been examined. The results indicate that the presence of a surface oxide film or difference in the characteristics of the oxide film has no effect on fatigue crack initiation in austenitic SSs in LWR environments. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests and post-test fractographic analyses were conducted on several model SS alloys irradiated to {approx}2 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx}3 dpa) in He at 289 C in the Halden reactor. The results were used to determine the influence of alloying and impurity elements on the susceptibility of these steels to IASCC. Corrosion fatigue tests were conducted on nonirradiated austenitic SSs in high-purity water at 289 C to establish the test procedure and conditions that will be used for the tests on irradiated materials. A comprehensive irradiation experiment was initiated to obtain many tensile and disk specimens irradiated under simulated pressurized water reactor conditions at {approx}325 C to 5, 10, 20, and 40 dpa. Crack growth tests were completed on 30% cold-worked Alloy 600 in high-purity water under various environmental and loading conditions. The results are compared with data obtained earlier on several heats of Alloy 600

  7. Aquatic vision and the modulation transfer properties of unlighted and diffusely lighted natural waters.

    PubMed

    Jagger, W S; Muntz, W R

    1993-09-01

    The modulation transfer function (MTF) of well-mixed unlighted and diffusely lighted samples of clear natural waters for path lengths up to 4 m was measured. The measuring conditions simulated the situation for horizontal aquatic vision. In unlighted water, the MTF decreased relatively slowly with increasing path length and spatial frequency up to 150 c/deg. We interpret this as the result of low-angle forward scattering of light from the target. For diffusely lighted water, the MTF fell much more rapidly with path length, but was nearly independent of spatial frequency. Here, scattering of ambient light into the light path contributes an additional veiling glare or path radiance, which is independent of spatial frequency but degrades the MTF strongly with increasing path length. These scattering processes are independent of wavelength in the visible spectrum. The modulation transfer properties of these waters do not preclude high aquatic visual acuity. However, the useful range of high acuity vision in diffusely lighted water is much less than for unlighted water. This places special requirements upon the design of high-acuity aquatic eyes. PMID:8266631

  8. Ammonia-water mixtures at high pressures - Melting curves of ammonia dihydrate and ammonia monohydrate and a revised high-pressure phase diagram for the water-rich region. [in primordial solar system ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boone, S.; Nicol, M. F.

    1991-01-01

    The phase relations of some mixtures of ammonia and water are investigated to create a phase diagram in pressure-temperature-composition space relevant to the geophysical study of bodies in the outer solar system. The mixtures of NH3(x)H2O(1-x), where x is greater than 0.30 but less than 0.51, are examined at pressures and temperatures ranging from 0-6.5 GPa and 125-400 K, respectively. The ruby luminescence technique monitors the pressure and a diamond-anvil cell compresses the samples, and the phases are identified by means of normal- and polarized-light optical microscopy. The melting curve for NH3H2O(2) is described by the equation T = 176 + 60P - 8.5P squared for the ranges of 0.06-1.4 GPa and 179-243 K. The equation for NH3H2O is T = 194 + 37P - P squared, which represents a minor correction of a previous description by Johnson et al. (1985). Observed phase transitions are consistent with the high-pressure stability limit of NH3H2O(2), and the transition boundary is found to be linear.

  9. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Is high-pressure water the cradle of life?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2003-06-01

    Several theories have been proposed for the synthesis of prebiotic molecules. This letter shows that the structure of supercritical water, or high-pressure water, could trigger prebiotic synthesis and the origin of life deep in the oceans, in hydrothermal vent systems. Dimer geometries of high-pressure water may have a point of symmetry and a zero dipole moment. Consequently, simple apolar molecules found in submarine hydrothermal vent systems will dissolve in the apolar environment provided by the apolar form of the water dimer. Apolar water could be the medium which helps precursor molecules to concentrate and react more efficiently. The formation of prebiotic molecules could thus be linked to the structure of the water inside chimney nanochannels and cavities where hydrothermal piezochemistry and shock wave chemistry could occur.

  10. Water permeability of nanoporous graphene at realistic pressures for reverse osmosis desalination

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen-Tanugi, David; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2014-08-21

    Nanoporous graphene (NPG) shows tremendous promise as an ultra-permeable membrane for water desalination thanks to its atomic thickness and precise sieving properties. However, a significant gap exists in the literature between the ideal conditions assumed for NPG desalination and the physical environment inherent to reverse osmosis (RO) systems. In particular, the water permeability of NPG has been calculated previously based on very high pressures (1000–2000 bars). Does NPG maintain its ultrahigh water permeability under real-world RO pressures (<100 bars)? Here, we answer this question by drawing results from molecular dynamics simulations. Our results indicate that NPG maintains its ultrahigh permeability even at low pressures, allowing a permeate water flux of 6.0 l/h-bar per pore, or equivalently 1041 ± 20 l/m{sup 2}-h-bar assuming a nanopore density of 1.7 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2}.

  11. Water permeability of nanoporous graphene at realistic pressures for reverse osmosis desalination.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Tanugi, David; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2014-08-21

    Nanoporous graphene (NPG) shows tremendous promise as an ultra-permeable membrane for water desalination thanks to its atomic thickness and precise sieving properties. However, a significant gap exists in the literature between the ideal conditions assumed for NPG desalination and the physical environment inherent to reverse osmosis (RO) systems. In particular, the water permeability of NPG has been calculated previously based on very high pressures (1000-2000 bars). Does NPG maintain its ultrahigh water permeability under real-world RO pressures (<100 bars)? Here, we answer this question by drawing results from molecular dynamics simulations. Our results indicate that NPG maintains its ultrahigh permeability even at low pressures, allowing a permeate water flux of 6.1 × 10−15 l/h bar per pore [Corrected], or equivalently 1041 ± 20 l/m(2)-h-bar assuming a nanopore density of 1.7 × 10(13) cm(-2). PMID:25149803

  12. Temperature and water vapor pressure effects on the friction coefficient of hydrogenated diamondlike carbon films.

    SciTech Connect

    Dickrell, P. L.; Sawyer, W. G.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Erdemir, A.; Energy Technology; Univ. of Florida

    2009-07-01

    Microtribological measurements of a hydrogenated diamondlike carbon film in controlled gaseous environments show that water vapor plays a significant role in the friction coefficient. These experiments reveal an initial high friction transient behavior that does not reoccur even after extended periods of exposure to low partial pressures of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}. Experiments varying both water vapor pressure and sample temperature show trends of a decreasing friction coefficient as a function of both the decreasing water vapor pressure and the increasing substrate temperature. Theses trends are examined with regard to first order gas-surface interactions. Model fits give activation energies on the order of 40 kJ/mol, which is consistent with water vapor desorption.

  13. X-Ray Shines Light on Water Mystery

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Anders

    2010-11-17

    Water is the key compound for our existence on this planet and it is involved in many important physical, chemical, biological and geological processes. Although water is the most common molecular substance it is also most unusual with many anomalies in its thermodynamic properties such as compressibility, density variation and heat capacity. The question of the structure of the hydrogen bonding network in water has been discussed intensively for over 100 years and has not yet been resolved. This talk will describe recent x-ray spectroscopy and scattering measurements showing that the liquid can be described as fluctuations between two types of local hydrogen bonded structures driven by in commensurate requirements for minimizing enthalpy and maximizing entropy.

  14. Th/U-233 multi-recycle in pressurized water reactors : feasibility study of multiple homogeneous and heterogeneous assembly designs.

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, D.; Taiwo, T. A.; Kim, T. K.; Mohamed, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-10-01

    The use of thorium in current or advanced light water reactors (LWRs) has been of interest in recent years. These interests have been associated with the need to increase nuclear fuel resources and the perceived non-proliferation advantages of the utilization of thorium in the fuel cycle. Various options have been considered for the use of thorium in the LWR fuel cycle. The possibility for thorium utilization in a multi-recycle system has also been considered in past literature, primarily because of the potential for near breeders with Th/U-233 in the thermal energy range. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential of Th/U-233 fuel multi-recycle in current LWRs, focusing on pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Approaches for sustainable multi-recycle without the need for external fissile material makeup have been investigated. The intent is to obtain a design that allows existing PWRs to be used with minimal modifications.

  15. Oxidation of SnO to SnO{sub 2} thin films in boiling water at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Nose, K. Suzuki, A. Y.; Oda, N.; Kamiko, M.; Mitsuda, Y.

    2014-03-03

    We demonstrated that SnO is oxidized to SnO{sub 2} in boiling water. (001)-oriented SnO thin films were pulsed-laser deposited onto a glass substrate. The Sn valence number changed from (II) to (IV) by keeping SnO films in boiling water at atmospheric pressure for 5 h. Optical transparency of the obtained SnO{sub 2} films was greater than 95% in the visible light range. The SnO{sub 2} films possessed an amorphous structure, and exhibited dielectric properties. Atomic force microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed granular structures and the existence of –OH groups, which may account for the diffusion of oxidants within the film.

  16. Pressurized heavy water reactor fuel behaviour in power ramp conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, S.; Uţă, O.; Pârvan, M.; Ohâi, D.

    2009-03-01

    In order to check and improve the quality of the Romanian CANDU fuel, an assembly of six CANDU fuel rods has been subjected to a power ramping test in the 14 MW TRIGA reactor at INR. After testing, the fuel rods have been examined in the hot cells using post-irradiation examination (PIE) techniques such as: visual inspection and photography, eddy current testing, profilometry, gamma scanning, fission gas release and analysis, metallography, ceramography, burn-up determination by mass spectrometry, mechanical testing. This paper describes the PIE results from one out of the six fuel rods. The PIE results concerning the integrity, dimensional changes, oxidation, hydriding and mechanical properties of the sheath, the fission-products activity distribution in the fuel column, the pressure, volume and composition of the fission gas, the burn-up, the isotopic composition and structural changes of the fuel enabled the characterization of the behaviour of the Romanian CANDU fuel in power ramping conditions performed in the TRIGA materials testing reactor.

  17. Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 4. Plutonium dispositioning in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sterbentz, J.W.; Olsen, C.S.; Sinha, U.P.

    1993-06-01

    This study is in response to a request by the Reactor Panel Subcommittee of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control (CISAC) to evaluate the feasibility of using plutonium fuels (without uranium) for disposal in existing conventional or advanced light water reactor (LWR) designs and in low temperature/pressure LWR designs that might be developed for plutonium disposal. Three plutonium-based fuel forms (oxides, aluminum metallics, and carbides) are evaluated for neutronic performance, fabrication technology, and material and compatibility issues. For the carbides, only the fabrication technologies are addressed. Viable plutonium oxide fuels for conventional or advanced LWRs include plutonium-zirconium-calcium oxide (PuO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}-CaO) with the addition of thorium oxide (ThO{sub 2}) or a burnable poison such as erbium oxide (Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}) or europium oxide (Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to achieve acceptable neutronic performance. Thorium will breed fissile uranium that may be unacceptable from a proliferation standpoint. Fabrication of uranium and mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuels is well established; however, fabrication of plutonium-based oxide fuels will require further development. Viable aluminum-plutonium metallic fuels for a low temperature/pressure LWR include plutonium aluminide in an aluminum matrix (PuAl{sub 4}-Al) with the addition of a burnable poison such as erbium (Er) or europium (Eu). Fabrication of low-enriched plutonium in aluminum-plutonium metallic fuel rods was initially established 30 years ago and will require development to recapture and adapt the technology to meet current environmental and safety regulations. Fabrication of high-enriched uranium plate fuel by the picture-frame process is a well established process, but the use of plutonium would require the process to be upgraded in the United States to conform with current regulations and minimize the waste streams.

  18. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors. Semiannual report, July 1998-December 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Gruber, E. E.; Kassner, T. F.; Ruther, W. E.; Shack, W. J.; Smith, J. L.; Soppet, W. K.; Strain; R. V.

    1999-10-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors from July 1998 to December 1998. Topics that have been investigated include (a) environmental effects on fatigue S-N behavior of primary pressure boundary materials, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels (SSs), and (c) EAC of Alloys 600 and 690. Fatigue tests have been conducted to determine the crack initiation and crack growth characteristics of austenitic SSs in LWR environments. Procedures are presented for incorporating the effects of reactor coolant environments on the fatigue life of pressure vessel and piping steels. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests and posttest fractographic analyses were conducted on several model SS alloys irradiated to {approx}0.3 and 0.9 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} (E > 1 MeV) in helium at 289 C in the Halden reactor. The results have been used to determine the influence of alloying and impurity elements on the susceptibility of these steels to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking. Fracture toughness J-R curve tests were also conducted on two heats of Type 304 SS that were irradiated to {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} in the Halden reactor. Crack-growth-rate tests have been conducted on compact-tension specimens of Alloys 600 and 690 under constant load to evaluate the resistance of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking in LWR environments.

  19. Point-of-use water disinfection using ultraviolet and visible light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Lui, Gough Yumu; Roser, David; Corkish, Richard; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Stuetz, Richard

    2016-05-15

    Improvements in point-of-use (POU) drinking water disinfection technologies for remote and regional communities are urgently needed. Conceptually, UV-C light-emitting diodes (LEDs) overcome many drawbacks of low-pressure mercury tube based UV devices, and UV-A or visible light LEDs also show potential. To realistically evaluate the promise of LED disinfection, our study assessed the performance of a model 1.3 L reactor, similar in size to solar disinfection bottles. In all, 12 different commercial or semi-commercial LED arrays (270-740 nm) were compared for their ability to inactivate Escherichia coli K12 ATCC W3110 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 19433 over 6h. Five log10 and greater reductions were consistently achieved using the 270, 365, 385 and 405 nm arrays. The output of the 310 nm array was insufficient for useful disinfection while 430 and 455 nm performance was marginal (≈ 4.2 and 2.3-log10s E. coli and E. faecalis over the 6h). No significant disinfection was observed with the 525, 590, 623, 660 and 740 nm arrays. Delays in log-phase inactivation of E. coli were observed, particularly with UV-A wavelengths. The radiation doses required for >3-log10 reduction of E. coli and E. faecalis differed by 10 fold at 270 nm but only 1.5-2.5 fold at 365-455 nm. Action spectra, consistent with the literature, were observed with both indicators. The design process revealed cost and technical constraints pertaining to LED electrical efficiency, availability and lifetime. We concluded that POU LED disinfection using existing LED technology is already technically possible. UV-C LEDs offer speed and energy demand advantages, while UV-A/violet units are safer. Both approaches still require further costing and engineering development. Our study provides data needed for such work. PMID:26967007

  20. PACTEL experiments for the investigation of passive safety injection systems of advanced light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tuunanen, J.; Munther, R.; Vihavainen, J.

    1996-07-01

    An important aspect of Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) decay heat removal concerns the plant response under Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions. In ALWRs, e.g. Westinghouse AP600, pump driven Emergency Core Cooling Systems (ECCS) are replaced by passive safety injection systems, which are gravity driven. It is therefore important that in such accidents, the ALWR coolant system pressure can be controlled to allow gravity fed injection to take place. The safety issue here is whether undesirable system responses could occur in any circumstances. Additionally, it is necessary to prove that the plant always depressurizes sufficiently for the ECCS to operate efficiently. Two experimental series have been carried out with the PACTEL integral test facility on the simulation of passive safety injection systems of ALWRs in accidental conditions. The safety system investigated was a passive core make-up tank (CMT), which was connected to the downcomer of the test facility. This paper starts with a short description of the PACTEL test facility and a summary of the results of the passive safety injection tests on PACTEL. Also included is a summary of the results of the computer simulations of the tests. The second part of the paper consists of a description of the planned third passive safety injection test series and the results of the pre-test simulations of the planned tests.

  1. The use of pneumatically generated water pressure signals for aquifer characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fort, M.; Roberts, R.; Chace, D.

    2013-12-01

    The use of pneumatically generated pressure signals for aquifer characterization Hydraulic tests are the most reliable method of obtaining estimates of hydrologic properties, such as conductivity, that are essential for flow and transport modeling. The use of a sinusoidal signal for hydraulic testing is well established, with Streltsova (1988), Rasmussen (2003) and others having developed analytic solutions. Sinusoidal tests provide a unique easily distinguished signal that reduces ambiguity during analysis and we show that a sinusoidal pressure signal propagates farther into the formation than a standard slug-test signal. If a sinusoidal test is combined with a slug and/or a constant rate test, it can further reduce uncertainty in the estimated parameter values. We demonstrate how pneumatic pressure can be used to generate all three of these signals. By positioning pressure transducers both below the water level and in the head space above the water, we can monitor the total pressure acting on the formation and the changes in water level. From the changes in water level, it is possible to calculate the flow rate in and out of the well, assuming that the well diameter and water density are known. Using gas flow controllers with a Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) system we are able to precisely control the pressures in the well. The use of pneumatic pressure has the advantage that it requires less equipment (no pumps) and produces no water. We also show how the numerical well test analysis program nSIGHTS can be used to analyze all three types of tests simultaneously and to assess the relative contribution of each type of test to the parameter estimation. nSIGHTS was recently released as open source by Sandia National Laboratories and is available for free.

  2. Pressure probe study of the water relations of Phycomyces blakesleeanus sporangiophores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.; Ortega, J. K.; Shropshire, W. Jr

    1987-01-01

    The physical characteristics which govern the water relations of the giant-celled sporangiophore of Phycomyces blakesleeanus were measured with the pressure probe technique and with nanoliter osmometry. These properties are important because they govern water uptake associated with cell growth and because they may influence expansion of the sporangiophore wall. Turgor pressure ranged from 1.1 to 6.6 bars (mean = 4.1 bars), and was the same for stage I and stage IV sporangiophores. Sporangiophore osmotic pressure averaged 11.5 bars. From the difference between cell osmotic pressure and turgor pressure, the average water potential of the sporangiophore was calculated to be about -7.4 bars. When sporangiophores were submerged under water, turgor remained nearly constant. We propose that the low cell turgor pressure is due to solutes in the cell wall solution, i.e., between the cuticle and the plasma membrane. Membrane hydraulic conductivity averaged 4.6 x 10(-6) cm s-1 bar-1, and was significantly greater in stage I sporangiophores than in stage IV sporangiophores. Contrary to previous reports, the sporangiophore is separated from the supporting mycelium by septa which prevent bulk volume flow between the two regions. The presence of a wall compartment between the cuticle and the plasma membrane results in anomalous osmosis during pressure clamp measurements. This behavior arises because of changes in solute concentration as water moves into or out of the wall compartment surrounding the sporangiophore. Theoretical analysis shows how the equations governing transient water flow are altered by the characteristics of the cell wall compartment.

  3. Pressure probe study of the water relations of Phycomyces blakesleeanus sporangiophores.

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, D J; Ortega, J K; Shropshire, W

    1987-01-01

    The physical characteristics which govern the water relations of the giant-celled sporangiophore of Phycomyces blakesleeanus were measured with the pressure probe technique and with nanoliter osmometry. These properties are important because they govern water uptake associated with cell growth and because they may influence expansion of the sporangiophore wall. Turgor pressure ranged from 1.1 to 6.6 bars (mean = 4.1 bars), and was the same for stage I and stage IV sporangiophores. Sporangiophore osmotic pressure averaged 11.5 bars. From the difference between cell osmotic pressure and turgor pressure, the average water potential of the sporangiophore was calculated to be about -7.4 bars. When sporangiophores were submerged under water, turgor remained nearly constant. We propose that the low cell turgor pressure is due to solutes in the cell wall solution, i.e., between the cuticle and the plasma membrane. Membrane hydraulic conductivity averaged 4.6 x 10(-6) cm s-1 bar-1, and was significantly greater in stage I sporangiophores than in stage IV sporangiophores. Contrary to previous reports, the sporangiophore is separated from the supporting mycelium by septa which prevent bulk volume flow between the two regions. The presence of a wall compartment between the cuticle and the plasma membrane results in anomalous osmosis during pressure clamp measurements. This behavior arises because of changes in solute concentration as water moves into or out of the wall compartment surrounding the sporangiophore. Theoretical analysis shows how the equations governing transient water flow are altered by the characteristics of the cell wall compartment. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:11536570

  4. Characterizing Scitillation and Cherenkov Light Yield in Water-Based Liquid Scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, B. J.; Caravaca, J.; Descamps, F. B.; Orebi Gann, G. D.

    2016-03-01

    The recent development of Water-based Liquid Scintillator (WbLS) has made it possible to produce scintillating materials with highly tunable light yields and excellent optical clarity. This allows for a straightforward combination of the directional properties of Cherenkov light with the greater energy resolution afforded by the typically brighter scintillation light, which lends itself well to a broad program of neutrino physics. Here we explore the light yields and optical properties of WbLS materials in development for Theia (formerly ASDC) as measured in our benchtop Theia R&D at Berkeley Lab and extrapolate to larger detectors.

  5. Hydrogen embrittlement of duplex stainless steel and maraging steel in sea water: Effect of pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Pohjanne, P.; Festy, D.

    1994-12-31

    Hydrogen embrittlement behavior of cast super duplex stainless steel and cast maraging steel was examined as a function of electrode potential and hydrostatic pressure, i.e, the water depth, in synthetic sea water using fracture mechanics bolt-loaded wedge-opening (WOL) specimens. The experimental variables investigated included: (1) Electrode potential: free corrosion potential and cathodic protection; (2) Hydrostatic pressure: ambient and 10 MPa corresponding depth of 1,000 meters. The duplex stainless-,steel was not susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement with initial stress intensity values of 30 MPa{radical}m < K{sub i} < 45 MPa{radical}m at ambient pressure. However, at pressure of 10 MPa slight crack growth was observed at open circuit potential and the crack growth was enhanced by the cathodic protection. The maraging steel was susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement in all tests, with all examined initial stress intensity values, K{sub i} < 36 MPa{radical}m. At the open circuit potential the crack growth rate was almost independent of the pressure. Cathodic protection enhanced crack growth and lowered the threshold stress intensity value at ambient as well as at 10 MPa pressure and the crack growth rate increased clearly as pressure increased from 0.1 MPa to 10 MPa. According to these experimental results the combined effect of cathodic protection and hydrostatic pressure must be taken into consideration when designing new offshore structures and equipment especially for deep sea application.

  6. Development of Extended Period Pressure-Dependent Demand Water Distribution Models

    SciTech Connect

    Judi, David R.; Mcpherson, Timothy N.

    2015-03-20

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has used modeling and simulation of water distribution systems for N-1 contingency analyses to assess criticality of water system assets. Critical components considered in these analyses include pumps, tanks, and supply sources, in addition to critical pipes or aqueducts. A contingency represents the complete removal of the asset from system operation. For each contingency, an extended period simulation (EPS) is run using EPANET. An EPS simulates water system behavior over a time period, typically at least 24 hours. It assesses the ability of a system to respond and recover from asset disruption through distributed storage in tanks throughout the system. Contingencies of concern are identified as those in which some portion of the water system has unmet delivery requirements. A delivery requirement is defined as an aggregation of water demands within a service area, similar to an electric power demand. The metric used to identify areas of unmet delivery requirement in these studies is a pressure threshold of 15 pounds per square inch (psi). This pressure threshold is used because it is below the required pressure for fire protection. Any location in the model with pressure that drops below this threshold at any time during an EPS is considered to have unmet service requirements and is used to determine cascading consequences. The outage area for a contingency is the aggregation of all service areas with a pressure below the threshold at any time during the EPS.

  7. [Effects of light on submerged macrophytes in eutrophic water: research progress].

    PubMed

    Li-Sha, Zou; Ze-Yu, Nie; Xiao-Yan, Yao; Ji-Yan, Shi

    2013-07-01

    The restoration of submerged macrophytes is the key to remediate eutrophic water and maintain the health of aquatic ecosystem, while light is the main limiting factor. This paper summarized the factors affecting the light extinction in water and the mechanisms of light intensity affecting the physiology of submerged macrophytes, with the focuses on the metabolic mechanisms of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus, the responses of antioxidant enzyme system, and the feedbacks of pigment composition and concentration in the common submerged macrophytes under low light stress. Several engineering techniques applied in the ecological restoration of submerged macrophytes were presented, and the framework of the restoration of submerged macrophytes in eutrophic water was proposed. Some problems in current research and several suggestions on future research were addressed, which could help the related research and engineering practices. PMID:24175542

  8. On phenomenon of light radiation from miniature balls immersed in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torchigin, V. P.; Torchigin, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    A phenomenon of light radiation from miniature silicon balls produced at arc discharge and immersed in water is described. Video film showing shining balls in a vessel with water is presented. An explanation of this phenomenon is considered. Similarities and differences of this phenomenon with a phenomenon of ball lightning are analyzed.

  9. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of molecular hydrogen dissolved in water at pressures up to 200 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Borysow, Jacek Rosso, Leonardo del; Celli, Milva; Ulivi, Lorenzo; Moraldi, Massimo

    2014-04-28

    We have measured the Raman Q-branch of hydrogen in a solution with water at a temperature of about 280 K and at pressures from 20 to 200 MPa. From a least-mean-square fitting analysis of the broad Raman Q-branch, we isolated the contributions from the four lowest individual roto-vibrational lines. The vibrational lines were narrower than the pure rotational Raman lines of hydrogen dissolved in water measured previously, but significantly larger than in the gas. The separations between these lines were found to be significantly smaller than in gaseous hydrogen and their widths were slightly increasing with pressure. The lines were narrowing with increasing rotational quantum number. The Raman frequencies of all roto-vibrational lines were approaching the values of gas phase hydrogen with increasing pressure. Additionally, from the comparison of the integrated intensity signal of Q-branch of hydrogen to the integrated Raman signal of the water bending mode, we have obtained the concentration of hydrogen in a solution with water along the 280 K isotherm. Hydrogen solubility increases slowly with pressure, and no deviation from a smooth behaviour was observed, even reaching thermodynamic conditions very close to the transition to the stable hydrogen hydrate. The analysis of the relative hydrogen concentration in solution on the basis of a simple thermodynamic model has allowed us to obtain the molar volume for the hydrogen gas/water solution. Interestingly, the volume relative to one hydrogen molecule in solution does not decrease with pressure and, at high pressure, is larger than the volume pertinent to one molecule of water. This is in favour of the theory of hydrophobic solvation, for which a larger and more stable structure of the water molecules is expected around a solute molecule.

  10. Role of transient water pressure in quarrying: A subglacial experiment using acoustic emissions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, D.; Hooyer, T.S.; Iverson, N.R.; Thomason, J.F.; Jackson, M.

    2006-01-01

    Probably the most important mechanism of glacial erosion is quarrying: the growth and coalescence of cracks in subglacial bedrock and dislodgement of resultant rock fragments. Although evidence indicates that erosion rates depend on sliding speed, rates of crack growth in bedrock may be enhanced by changing stresses on the bed caused by fluctuating basal water pressure in zones of ice-bed separation. To study quarrying in real time, a granite step, 12 cm high with a crack in its stoss surface, was installed at the bed of Engabreen, Norway. Acoustic emission sensors monitored crack growth events in the step as ice slid over it. Vertical stresses, water pressure, and cavity height in the lee of the step were also measured. Water was pumped to the lee of the step several times over 8 days. Pumping initially caused opening of a leeward cavity, which then closed after pumping was stopped and water pressure decreased. During cavity closure, acoustic emissions emanating mostly from the vicinity of the base of the crack in the step increased dramatically. With repeated pump tests this crack grew with time until the step's lee surface was quarried. Our experiments indicate that fluctuating water pressure caused stress thresholds required for crack growth to be exceeded. Natural basal water pressure fluctuations should also concentrate stresses on rock steps, increasing rates of crack growth. Stress changes on the bed due to water pressure fluctuations will increase in magnitude and duration with cavity size, which may help explain the effect of sliding speed on erosion rates. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Depletion optimization of lumped burnable poisons in pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kodah, Z.H.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques were developed to construct a set of basic poison depletion curves which deplete in a monotonical manner. These curves were combined to match a required optimized depletion profile by utilizing either linear or non-linear programming methods. Three computer codes, LEOPARD, XSDRN, and EXTERMINATOR-2 were used in the analyses. A depletion routine was developed and incorporated into the XSDRN code to allow the depletion of fuel, fission products, and burnable poisons. The Three Mile Island Unit-1 reactor core was used in this work as a typical PWR core. Two fundamental burnable poison rod designs were studied. They are a solid cylindrical poison rod and an annular cylindrical poison rod with water filling the central region.These two designs have either a uniform mixture of burnable poisons or lumped spheroids of burnable poisons in the poison region. Boron and gadolinium are the two burnable poisons which were investigated in this project. Thermal self-shielding factor calculations for solid and annular poison rods were conducted. Also expressions for overall thermal self-shielding factors for one or more than one size group of poison spheroids inside solid and annular poison rods were derived and studied. Poison spheroids deplete at a slower rate than the poison mixture because each spheroid exhibits some self-shielding effects of its own. The larger the spheroid, the higher the self-shielding effects due to the increase in poison concentration.

  12. Mechanical effects of light on material media: radiation pressure and the linear and angular momenta of photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2014-09-01

    Electromagnetic waves carry energy as well as linear and angular momenta. Interactions between light and material media typically involve the exchange of all three entities. In all such interactions energy and momentum (both linear and angular) are conserved. Johannes Kepler seems to have been the first person to notice that the pressure of sunlight is responsible for the tails of the comets pointing away from the Sun. Modern applications of radiation pressure and photon momentum include solar sails, optical tweezers for optical trapping and micro-manipulation, and optically-driven micro-motors and actuators. This paper briefly describes certain fundamental aspects underlying the mechanical properties of light, and examines several interesting phenomena involving the linear and angular momenta of photons.

  13. Elasticity of water-saturated rocks as a function of temperature and pressure.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeuchi, S.; Simmons, G.

    1973-01-01

    Compressional and shear wave velocities of water-saturated rocks were measured as a function of both pressure and temperature near the melting point of ice to confining pressure of 2 kb. The pore pressure was kept at about 1 bar before the water froze. The presence of a liquid phase (rather than ice) in microcracks of about 0.3% porosity affected the compressional wave velocity by about 5% and the shear wave velocity by about 10%. The calculated effective bulk modulus of the rocks changes rapidly over a narrow range of temperature near the melting point of ice, but the effective shear modulus changes gradually over a wider range of temperature. This phenomenon, termed elastic anomaly, is attributed to the existence of liquid on the boundary between rock and ice due to local stresses and anomalous melting of ice under pressure.

  14. An Investigation of the Use of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Transuranic Waste Recycling in Pressurized Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, Cole A; Godfrey, Andrew T; Terrani, Kurt A; Gehin, Jess C; Powers, Jeffrey J; Maldonado, G Ivan

    2014-01-01

    An investigation of the utilization of TRistructural- ISOtropic (TRISO)-coated fuel particles for the burning of plutonium/neptunium (Pu/Np) isotopes in typical Westinghouse four-loop pressurized water reactors is presented. Though numerous studies have evaluated the burning of transuranic isotopes in light water reactors (LWRs), this work differentiates itself by employing Pu/Np-loaded TRISO particles embedded within a silicon carbide (SiC) matrix and formed into pellets, constituting the fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) fuel concept that can be loaded into standard LWR fuel element cladding. This approach provides the capability of Pu/Np burning and, by virtue of the multibarrier TRISO particle design and SiC matrix properties, will allow for greater burnup of Pu/Np material, plus improved fuel reliability and thermal performance. In this study, a variety of heterogeneous assembly layouts, which utilize a mix of FCM rods and typical UO2 rods, and core loading patterns were analyzed to demonstrate the neutronic feasibility of Pu/Np-loaded TRISO fuel. The assembly and core designs herein reported are not fully optimized and require fine-tuning to flatten power peaks; however, the progress achieved thus far strongly supports the conclusion that with further rod/assembly/core loading and placement optimization, Pu/Np-loaded TRISO fuel and core designs that are capable of balancing Pu/Np production and destruction can be designed within the standard constraints for thermal and reactivity performance in pressurized water reactors.

  15. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of pressure-driven water transport through modified CNT membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luying; Dumont, Randall S.; Dickson, James M.

    2013-03-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are presented to investigate the effect of water-membrane interactions on the transport properties of pressure-driven water flow passing through carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes. The CNT membrane is modified with different physical properties to alter the van der Waals interactions or the electrostatic interactions between water molecules and the CNT membranes. The unmodified and modified CNT membranes are models of simplified nanofiltration (NF) membranes at operating conditions consistent with real NF systems. All NEMD simulations are run with constant pressure difference (8.0 MPa) temperature (300 K), constant pore size (0.643 nm radius for CNT (12, 12)), and membrane thickness (6.0 nm). The water flow rate, density, and velocity (in flow direction) distributions are obtained by analyzing the NEMD simulation results to compare transport through the modified and unmodified CNT membranes. The pressure-driven water flow through CNT membranes is from 11 to 21 times faster than predicted by the Navier-Stokes equations. For water passing through the modified membrane with stronger van der Waals or electrostatic interactions, the fast flow is reduced giving lower flow rates and velocities. These investigations show the effect of water-CNT membrane interactions on water transport under NF operating conditions. This work can help provide and improve the understanding of how these membrane characteristics affect membrane performance for real NF processes.

  16. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Annual Report FY09

    SciTech Connect

    Wolery, T; Aines, R; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W; Wolfe, T; Haussman, C

    2009-11-25

    This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine is reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction, such that the volume of fresh water extracted balances the volume of CO{sub 2} injected into the formation. This process provides additional CO{sub 2} storage capacity in the aquifer, reduces operational risks (cap-rock fracturing, contamination of neighboring fresh water aquifers, and seismicity) by relieving overpressure in the formation, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. This multi-faceted project combines elements of geochemistry, reservoir engineering, and water treatment engineering. The range of saline formation waters is being identified and analyzed. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the storage aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. Water treatment costs are being evaluated by comparing the necessary process facilities to those in common use for seawater RO. There are presently limited brine composition data available for actual CCS sites by the site operators including in the U.S. the seven regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (CSPs). To work around this, we are building a 'catalog' of compositions representative of 'produced' waters (waters produced in the course of seeking or producing oil and gas), to which we are adding data from actual CCS sites as they become available. Produced waters comprise the most common examples of saline

  17. Visualization by light transmission of oil and water contents in transient two-phase flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnault, Christophe J. G.; Throop, James A.; DiCarlo, David A.; Rimmer, Alon; Steenhuis, Tammo S.; Parlange, J.-Yves

    1998-06-01

    The difficulty of determining transient fluid contents in a soil-oil-water system is hampering an understanding of the system's flow characteristics. In this paper, we describe a light transmission method (LTM) which can rapidly obtain oil and water contents throughout a large two-dimensional flow field of silica sand. By appropriately coloring the water with 0.005% FD&C blue #1, the hue of the transmitted light is found to be directly related to the water content within the porous media. The hue provides a high resolution measurement of the water and oil contents in transient flow fields (such as unstable flow). Evaluation of the reliability of LTM was assessed by checking the mass balance for a known water injection and its utility in visualizing a whole flow field was exemplified for unstable fingered flow by comparing fluid contents to those obtained with synchrotron X-ray radiation.

  18. Sedentary Behavior and Light Physical Activity Are Associated with Brachial and Central Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gerage, Aline M.; Benedetti, Tania R. B.; Farah, Breno Q.; Santana, Fábio da S.; Ohara, David; Andersen, Lars B.; Ritti-Dias, Raphael M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Physical activity is recommended as a part of a comprehensive lifestyle approach in the treatment of hypertension, but there is a lack of data about the relationship between different intensities of physical activity and cardiovascular parameters in hypertensive patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between the time spent in physical activities of different intensities and blood pressure levels, arterial stiffness and autonomic modulation in hypertensive patients. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 87 hypertensive patients (57.5 ± 9.9 years of age) had their physical activity assessed over a 7 day period using an accelerometer and the time spent in sedentary activities, light physical activities, moderate physical activities and moderate-to-vigorous physical activities was obtained. The primary outcomes were brachial and central blood pressure. Arterial stiffness parameters (augmentation index and pulse wave velocity) and cardiac autonomic modulation (sympathetic and parasympathetic modulation in the heart) were also obtained as secondary outcomes. Results Sedentary activities and light physical activities were positively and inversely associated, respectively, with brachial systolic (r = 0.56; P < 0.01), central systolic (r = 0.51; P < 0.05), brachial diastolic (r = 0.45; P < 0.01) and central diastolic (r = 0.42; P < 0.05) blood pressures, after adjustment for sex, age, trunk fat, number of antihypertensive drugs, accelerometer wear time and moderate-to-vigorous physical activities. Arterial stiffness parameters and cardiac autonomic modulation were not associated with the time spent in sedentary activities and in light physical activities (P > 0.05). Conclusion Lower time spent in sedentary activities and higher time spent in light physical activities are associated with lower blood pressure, without affecting arterial stiffness and cardiac autonomic modulation in hypertensive patients. PMID:26717310

  19. Ultra-high pressure water jetting for coating removal and surface preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Spencer T.

    1995-01-01

    This paper shall examine the basics of water technology with particular attention paid to systems currently in use and some select new applications. By providing an overview of commercially available water jet systems in the context of recent case histories, potential users may evaluate the process for future applications. With the on going introduction of regulations prohibiting the use of chemical paint strippers, manual scrapping and dry abrasive media blasting, the need for an environmentally compliant coating removal process has been mandated. Water jet cleaning has been a traditional part of many industrial processed for year, although it has only been in the last few years that reliable pumping equipment capable of ultra-high pressure operation have become available. With the advent of water jet pumping equipment capable of sustaining pressures in excess of 36,000 psi. there has been shift away from lower pressure, high water volume systems. One of the major factors in driving industry to seek higher pressures is the ability to offer higher productivity rates while lowering the quantity of water used and subsequently reprocessed. Among benefits of the trend toward higher pressure/lower volume systems is the corresponding reduction in water jet reaction forces making hand held water jetting practical and safe. Other unique applications made possible by these new generation pumping systems include the use of alternative fluids including liquid ammonia for specialized and hazardous material removal applications. A review of the equipment used and the required modifications will be presented along with the conclusions reached reached during this test program.

  20. Partial molar volume of L-Valine in water under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawamura, Seiji

    2013-06-01

    Partial molar volume of L-valine in water was estimated up to 400 MPa from pressure coefficient of the solubility of the solute and molar volume of solid valine. The former was measured in a previous paper and the latter was measured in this article using a piston-cylinder typed cell. The partial molar volume increased with pressure and a maximum was observed around 250 MPa. It was compared with other amino acids.

  1. The refractive index and electronic gap of water and ice increase with increasing pressure

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ding; Wan, Quan; Galli, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    Determining the electronic and dielectric properties of water at high pressure and temperature is an essential prerequisite to understand the physical and chemical properties of aqueous environments under supercritical conditions, for example, in the Earth interior. However, optical measurements of compressed ice and water remain challenging, and it has been common practice to assume that their band gap is inversely correlated with the measured refractive index, consistent with observations reported for hundreds of materials. Here we report ab initio molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations showing that both the refractive index and the electronic gap of water and ice increase with increasing pressure, at least up to 30 GPa. Subtle electronic effects, related to the nature of interband transitions and band edge localization under pressure, are responsible for this apparently anomalous behaviour. PMID:24861665

  2. Evaluation of water cooled supersonic temperature and pressure probes for application to 1366 K flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas; Seiner, John M.

    1990-01-01

    Water cooled supersonic probes are developed to investigate total pressure, static pressure, and total temperature in high-temperature jet plumes and thereby determine the mean flow properties. Two probe concepts, designed for operation at up to 1366 K in a Mach 2 flow, are tested on a water cooled nozzle. The two probe designs - the unsymmetric four-tube cooling configuration and the symmetric annular cooling design - take measurements at 755, 1089, and 1366 K of the three parameters. The cooled total and static pressure readings are found to agree with previous test results with uncooled configurations. The total-temperature probe, however, is affected by the introduction of water coolant, and effect which is explained by the increased heat transfer across the thermocouple-bead surface. Further investigation of the effect of coolant on the temperature probe is proposed to mitigate the effect and calculate more accurate temperatures in jet plumes.

  3. Pressurized water extraction of isoflavones by experimental design from soybean flour and Soybean Protein Isolate.

    PubMed

    Moras, Benjamin; Rey, Stéphane; Vilarem, Gérard; Pontalier, Pierre-Yves

    2017-01-01

    A Doehlert experimental design was conducted and surface response methodology was used to determine the effect of temperature, contact time and solid liquid ratio on isoflavone extraction from soybean flour or Soybean Protein Isolate in pressurized water system. The optimal conditions conducted gave an extraction yield of 85% from soybean flour. For Soybean Protein Isolate compared to soybean flour, the isoflavone extraction yield is 61%. This difference could be explained by higher aglycon content, while aglycon appears to be the least extracted isoflavone by pressurized water. The solid liquid ratio in the ASE cell was the overriding factor in obtaining high yields with both soybean products, while temperature has less influence. A high temperature causes conversion of the malonyls-glucosides and glucosides isoflavone derivatives into glucosides or aglycons forms. pressurized water extraction showed a high solubilization of protein material up to 95% of inserted Soybean Protein Isolate. PMID:27507441

  4. The implosion of cylindrical shell structures in a high-pressure water environment

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, C. M.; Wilkerling, J.; Duncan, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    The implosion of cylindrical shell structures in a high-pressure water environment is studied experimentally. The shell structures are made from thin-walled aluminium and brass tubes with circular cross sections and internal clearance-fit aluminium end caps. The structures are filled with air at atmospheric pressure. The implosions are created in a high-pressure tank with a nominal internal diameter of 1.77 m by raising the ambient water pressure slowly to a value, Pc, just above the elastic stability limit of each shell structure. The implosion events are photographed with a high-speed digital movie camera, and the pressure waves are measured simultaneously with an array of underwater blast sensors. For the models with larger values of length-to-diameter ratio, L/D0, the tubes flatten during implosion with a two-lobe (mode 2) cross-sectional shape. In these cases, it is found that the pressure wave records scale primarily with Pc and the time scale (where Ri is the internal radius of the tube and ρ is the density of water), whereas the details of the structural design produce only secondary effects. In cases with smaller values of L/D0, the models implode with higher-mode cross-sectional shapes. Pressure signals are compared for various mode-number implosions of models with the same available energy, PcV , where V is the internal air-filled volume of the model. It is found that the pressure records scale well temporally with the time scale , but that the shape and amplitudes of the pressure records are strongly affected by the mode number. PMID:24353473

  5. The implosion of cylindrical shell structures in a high-pressure water environment.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, C M; Wilkerling, J; Duncan, J H

    2013-12-01

    The implosion of cylindrical shell structures in a high-pressure water environment is studied experimentally. The shell structures are made from thin-walled aluminium and brass tubes with circular cross sections and internal clearance-fit aluminium end caps. The structures are filled with air at atmospheric pressure. The implosions are created in a high-pressure tank with a nominal internal diameter of 1.77 m by raising the ambient water pressure slowly to a value, P c, just above the elastic stability limit of each shell structure. The implosion events are photographed with a high-speed digital movie camera, and the pressure waves are measured simultaneously with an array of underwater blast sensors. For the models with larger values of length-to-diameter ratio, L/D 0, the tubes flatten during implosion with a two-lobe (mode 2) cross-sectional shape. In these cases, it is found that the pressure wave records scale primarily with P c and the time scale [Formula: see text] (where R i is the internal radius of the tube and ρ is the density of water), whereas the details of the structural design produce only secondary effects. In cases with smaller values of L/D 0, the models implode with higher-mode cross-sectional shapes. Pressure signals are compared for various mode-number implosions of models with the same available energy, P c V , where V is the internal air-filled volume of the model. It is found that the pressure records scale well temporally with the time scale [Formula: see text], but that the shape and amplitudes of the pressure records are strongly affected by the mode number. PMID:24353473

  6. Temperature effect on low permeability porous media filled with water at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa Mattos, Heraldo S.; dos Reis, João Laredo; Puente Angulo, Jesús Alfonso; Martins-Costa, Maria Laura

    2015-09-01

    This article analyses the influence of small temperature variations in a rigid porous medium with ultra-low permeability, in which the natural pores are filled with water at high pressure. The basic idea is to verify the possibility of inducing the process of hydraulic fracturing of such kind of water wells with a small increase of temperature. It is shown, both theoretically and experimentally that, at high pressures and temperatures, hydraulic fracture may be induced by very small temperature variations. Due to the compressibility and depending on the fluid temperature and pressure, a small increase of temperature in a pore may cause a pressure surge that may eventually lead the solid matrix to failure. Hydrostatic experiments performed in a slightly deformable system filled with water with an initial internal pressure at temperatures around 353.15 K have shown that small temperature variations can strongly affect pressure. An equation of state is proposed to explain this phenomenon and theoretical predictions are in good agreement with experimental results also presented in this paper.

  7. Total dissolved gas, barometric pressure, and water temperature data, lower Columbia River, Oregon and Washington, 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, Dwight Q.; Harrison, Howard E.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1996-01-01

    Increased levels of total dissolved gas pressure can cause gas-bubble trauma in fish downstream from dams on the Columbia River. In cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Geological Survey collected data on total dissolved gas pressure, barometric pressure, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen pressure at 11 stations on the lower Columbia River from the John Day forebay (river mile 215.6) to Wauna Mill (river mile 41.9) from March to September 1996. Methods of data collection, review, and processing are described in this report. Summaries of daily minimum, maximum, and mean hourly values are presented for total dissolved gas pressure, barometric pressure, and water temperature. Hourly values for these parameters are presented graphically. Dissolved oxygen data are not presented in this report because the quality-control data show that the data have poor precision and high bias. Suggested changes to monitoring procedures for future studies include (1) improved calibration procedures for total dissolved gas and dissolved oxygen to better define accuracy at elevated levels of supersaturation and (2) equipping dissolved oxygen sensors with stirrers because river velocities at the shoreline monitoring stations probably cannot maintain an adequate flow of water across the membrane surface of the dissolved oxygen sensor.

  8. Pressure-assisted fabrication of organic light emitting diodes with MoO{sub 3} hole-injection layer materials

    SciTech Connect

    Du, J.; Anye, V. C.; Vodah, E. O.; Tong, T.; Zebaze Kana, M. G.; Soboyejo, W. O.

    2014-06-21

    In this study, pressures of ∼5 to ∼8 MPa were applied to organic light emitting diodes containing either evaporated molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) or spin-coated poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrene sulphonate) (PEDOT:PSS) hole-injection layers (HILs). The threshold voltages for both devices were reduced by about half, after the application of pressure. Furthermore, in an effort to understand the effects of pressure treatment, finite element simulations were used to study the evolution of surface contact between the HIL and emissive layer (EML) under pressure. The blister area due to interfacial impurities was also calculated. This was shown to reduce by about half, when the applied pressures were between ∼5 and 8 MPa. The finite element simulations used Young's modulus measurements of MoO{sub 3} that were measured using the nanoindentation technique. They also incorporated measurements of the adhesion energy between the HIL and EML (measured by force microscopy during atomic force microscopy). Within a fracture mechanics framework, the implications of the results are then discussed for the pressure-assisted fabrication of robust organic electronic devices.

  9. Role of 5f electrons in the structural stability of light actinide (Th-U) mononitrides under pressure.

    PubMed

    Modak, P; Verma, Ashok K

    2016-03-16

    Pressure induced structural sequences and their mechanism for light actinide (Th-U) mononitrides were studied as a function of 5f-electron number using first-principles total energy and electronic structure calculations. Zero pressure lattice constants, bulk module and C11 elastic module vary systematically with 5f-electron number implying its direct role on crystal binding. There is a critical 5f-electron number below which the system makes B1-B2 and above it B1-R3[combining macron]m-B2 structural sequence under pressure. Also, the B1-B2 transition pressure increases with increasing 5f-electron number whereas an opposite trend is obtained for the B1-R3[combining macron]m transition pressure. The ascending of N p anti-bonding states through the Fermi level at high pressure is responsible for the structural instability of the system. Above the critical 5f-electron number in the system a narrow 5f-band occurs very close to the Fermi level which allows the system to lower its symmetry via band Jahn-Teller type lattice distortion and the system undergoes a B1-R3[combining macron]m phase transition. However, below the critical 5f-electron number this mechanism is not favorable due to a lack of sufficient 5f-state occupancy and thus the system undergoes a B1-B2 phase transition like other ionic solids. PMID:26953085

  10. The effects of pulse pressure from seismic water gun technology on Northern Pike

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gross, Jackson A.; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Wilmoth, Siri K.; Wagner, Tristany L.; Shields, Patrick A; Fox, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of sound pressure pulses generated from a water gun for controlling invasive Northern Pike Esox lucius. Pulse pressures from two sizes of water guns were evaluated for their effects on individual fish placed at a predetermined random distance. Fish mortality from a 5,620.8-cm3 water gun (peak pressure source level = 252 dB referenced to 1 μP at 1 m) was assessed every 24 h for 168 h, and damage (intact, hematoma, or rupture) to the gas bladder, kidney, and liver was recorded. The experiment was replicated with a 1,966.4-cm3 water gun (peak pressure source level = 244 dB referenced to 1 μP at 1 m), but fish were euthanized immediately. The peak sound pressure level (SPLpeak), peak-to-peak sound pressure level (SPLp-p), and frequency spectrums were recorded, and the cumulative sound exposure level (SELcum) was subsequently calculated. The SPLpeak, SPLp-p, and SELcum were correlated, and values varied significantly by treatment group for both guns. Mortality increased and organ damage was greater with decreasing distance to the water gun. Mortality (31%) by 168 h was only observed for Northern Pike exhibiting the highest degree of organ damage. Mortality at 72 h and 168 h postexposure was associated with increasing SELcum above 195 dB. The minimum SELcum calculated for gas bladder rupture was 199 dB recorded at 9 m from the 5,620.8-cm3 water gun and 194 dB recorded at 6 m from the 1,966.4-cm3water gun. Among Northern Pike that were exposed to the large water gun, 100% of fish exposed at 3 and 6 m had ruptured gas bladders, and 86% exposed at 9 m had ruptured gas bladders. Among fish that were exposed to pulse pressures from the smaller water gun, 78% exhibited gas bladder rupture. Results from these initial controlled experiments underscore the potential of water guns as a tool for controlling Northern Pike.

  11. Prediction of pore-water pressure response to rainfall using support vector regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babangida, Nuraddeen Muhammad; Mustafa, Muhammad Raza Ul; Yusuf, Khamaruzaman Wan; Isa, Mohamed Hasnain

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinear complex behavior of pore-water pressure responses to rainfall was modelled using support vector regression (SVR). Pore-water pressure can rise to disturbing levels that may result in slope failure during or after rainfall. Traditionally, monitoring slope pore-water pressure responses to rainfall is tedious and expensive, in that the slope must be instrumented with necessary monitors. Data on rainfall and corresponding responses of pore-water pressure were collected from such a monitoring program at a slope site in Malaysia and used to develop SVR models to predict pore-water pressure fluctuations. Three models, based on their different input configurations, were developed. SVR optimum meta-parameters were obtained using k-fold cross validation and a grid search. Model type 3 was adjudged the best among the models and was used to predict three other points on the slope. For each point, lag intervals of 30 min, 1 h and 2 h were used to make the predictions. The SVR model predictions were compared with predictions made by an artificial neural network model; overall, the SVR model showed slightly better results. Uncertainty quantification analysis was also performed for further model assessment. The uncertainty components were found to be low and tolerable, with d-factor of 0.14 and 74 % of observed data falling within the 95 % confidence bound. The study demonstrated that the SVR model is effective in providing an accurate and quick means of obtaining pore-water pressure response, which may be vital in systems where response information is urgently needed.

  12. Elimination of disinfection byproduct formation potential in reclaimed water during solar light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Qian-Yuan, Wu; Chao, Li; Ye, Du; Wen-Long, Wang; Huang, Huang; Hong-Ying, Hu

    2016-05-15

    Ecological storage of reclaimed water in ponds and lakes is widely applied in water reuse. During reclaimed water storage, solar light can degrade pollutants and improve water quality. This study investigated the effects of solar light irradiation on the disinfection byproduct formation potential in reclaimed water, including haloacetonitriles (HANs), trichloronitromethane (TCNM), trihalomethanes (THMs), haloketones (HKs) and chloral hydrate (CH). Natural solar light significantly decreased the formation potential of HANs, TCNM, and HKs in reclaimed water, but had a limited effect on the formation potential of THMs and CH. Ultraviolet (UV) light in solar radiation played a dominant role in the decrease of the formation potential of HANs, TCNM and HKs. Among the disinfection byproducts, the removal kinetic constant of dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) with irradiation dose was much larger than those for dichloropropanone (1,1-DCP), trichloropropanone (1,1,1-TCP) and TCNM. During solar irradiation, fluorescence spectra intensities of reclaimed water also decreased significantly. The removal of tyrosine (Tyr)-like and tryptophan (Trp)-like protein fluorescence spectra intensity volumes was correlated to the decrease in DCAN formation potential. Solar irradiation was demonstrated to degrade Trp, Tyr and their DCAN formation potential. The photolysis products of Trp after solar irradiation were detected as kynurenine and tryptamine, which had chloroform, CH and DCAN formation potential lower than those of Trp. PMID:27010786

  13. Computational investigations of the thermodynamic properties of size-selected water and Ar-water clusters: high-pressure transitions.

    PubMed

    Vítek, Aleš; Arismendi-Arrieta, D J; Rodríguez-Cantano, R; Prosmiti, R; Villarreal, P; Kalus, R; Delgado-Barrio, G

    2015-04-14

    Classical parallel-tempering Monte Carlo simulations in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble were carried out for the (H2O)20 and Ar(H2O)20 clusters, over a wide range of temperatures (30-1000 K) and pressures (3 kPa-10 GPa) in order to study their thermodynamic properties and structural changes. The TIP4P/ice water model is employed for the water-water interactions, while both semiempirical and ab initio-based potentials are used to model the interaction between the rare-gas atoms and the water molecules. Temperature-pressure phase diagrams for these cluster systems were constructed by employing a two-dimensional multiple-histogram method. Structural changes were detected by analyzing the heat capacity landscape and the Pearson correlation coefficient profile for the interaction energy and volume. Those at high pressure correspond to solid-to-solid transitions and are found to be related to clathrate-like cages around the Ar atom. It is also shown that the formation and thermodynamic stability of such structures are determined by the intermolecular interaction between the rare-gas atoms and the host water molecules. PMID:25745673

  14. Impact of Pilot Light Modeling on the Predicted Annual Performance of Residential Gas Water Heaters: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, J.; Burch, J.

    2013-08-01

    Modeling residential water heaters with dynamic simulation models can provide accurate estimates of their annual energy consumption, if the units? characteristics and use conditions are known. Most gas storage water heaters (GSWHs) include a standing pilot light. It is generally assumed that the pilot light energy will help make up standby losses and have no impact on the predicted annual energy consumption. However, that is not always the case. The gas input rate and conversion efficiency of a pilot light for a GSWH were determined from laboratory data. The data were used in simulations of a typical GSWH with and without a pilot light, for two cases: 1) the GSWH is used alone; and 2) the GSWH is the second tank in a solar water heating (SWH) system. The sensitivity of wasted pilot light energy to annual hot water use, climate, and installation location was examined. The GSWH used alone in unconditioned space in a hot climate had a slight increase in energy consumption. The GSWH with a pilot light used as a backup to an SWH used up to 80% more auxiliary energy than one without in hot, sunny locations, from increased tank losses.

  15. The representativeness of pore water samples collected from the unsaturated zone using pressure-vacuum lysimeters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, C.A.; Healy, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Studies have indicated that the chemistry of water samples may be altered by the collection technique, creating concern about the representativeness of the pore water samples obtained. A study using soil water pressure-vacuum lysimeters in outwash sand and glacial till deposits demonstrates that for non-dilute-solution samples the effect of pH of sampling with lysimeters is minimal, and that measured major cation and anion concentrations are representative of the natural pore water; trace-metal concentrations can be significantly altered by collection procedures at low concentrations. -from Authors

  16. Tuning Light Emission of a Pressure-Sensitive Silicon/ZnO Nanowires Heterostructure Matrix through Piezo-phototronic Effects.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengxiao; Pan, Caofeng; Zhang, Taiping; Li, Xiaoyi; Liang, Renrong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-06-28

    Based on white light emission at silicon (Si)/ZnO hetrerojunction, a pressure-sensitive Si/ZnO nanowires heterostructure matrix light emitting diode (LED) array is developed. The light emission intensity of a single heterostructure LED is tuned by external strain: when the applied stress keeps increasing, the emission intensity first increases and then decreases with a maximum value at a compressive strain of 0.15-0.2%. This result is attributed to the piezo-phototronic effect, which can efficiently modulate the LED emission intensity by utilizing the strain-induced piezo-polarization charges. It could tune the energy band diagrams at the junction area and regulate the optoelectronic processes such as charge carriers generation, separation, recombination, and transport. This study achieves tuning silicon based devices through piezo-phototronic effect. PMID:27276167

  17. Weight change of various light-cured restorative materials after water immersion.

    PubMed

    Iwami, Y; Yamamoto, H; Sato, W; Kawai, K; Torii, M; Ebisu, S

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated weight changes of various light-cured glass-ionomer cements and other restorative materials during water immersion and compared findings with those of conventional glass-ionomer cement and light-cured resin composites. Three light-cured glass-ionomer cements, two polyacid-modified composite resins, one conventional glass-ionomer cement, and one light-cured composite resin were evaluated in this study. The weight changes of these specimens after water immersion were measured using an electronic analytical balance and adjusted according to water solubility measured at the same time weight change was measured. The results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Scheffé's F test at P < 0.05. The weight change of Photac-Fil Aplicap was the largest, and there were significant differences among the materials (P < 0.05). Weight change after 6 weeks' water immersion was noted in the following order: Fuji Ionomer Type II LC, Vitremer, Fuji Ionomer Type II, VariGlass VLC, Geristore V, and Clearfil AP-X. It is suggested that the amount of water sorption of light-cured glass-ionomer cements is greater than that of polyacid-modified composite resins. PMID:9656924

  18. Durable Suit Bladder with Improved Water Permeability for Pressure and Environment Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Kuznetz, Larry; Orndoff, Evelyne; Tang, Henry; Aitchison, Lindsay; Ross, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Water vapor permeability is shown to be useful in rejecting heat and managing moisture accumulation in launch-and-entry pressure suits. Currently this is accomplished through a porous Gortex layer in the Advanced Crew and Escape Suit (ACES) and in the baseline design of the Constellation Suit System Element (CSSE) Suit 1. Non-porous dense monolithic membranes (DMM) that are available offer potential improvements for water vapor permeability with reduced gas leak. Accordingly, three different pressure bladder materials were investigated for water vapor permeability and oxygen leak: ElasthaneTM 80A (thermoplastic polyether urethane) provided from stock polymer material and two custom thermoplastic polyether urethanes. Water vapor, carbon dioxide and oxygen permeability of the DMM's was measured in a 0.13 mm thick stand-alone layer, a 0.08 mm and 0.05 mm thick layer each bonded to two different nylon and polyester woven reinforcing materials. Additional water vapor permeability and mechanical compression measurements were made with the reinforced 0.05 mm thick layers, further bonded with a polyester wicking and overlaid with moistened polyester fleece thermal underwear .This simulated the pressure from a supine crew person. The 0.05 mm thick nylon reinforced sample with polyester wicking layer was further mechanically tested for wear and abrasion. Concepts for incorporating these materials in launch/entry and Extravehicular Activity pressure suits are presented.

  19. COMSORS: A light water reactor chemical core catcher

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Kenton, M.A.

    1997-02-24

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate lightwater reactor (LWR) core-melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass made of lead oxide (PbO) and boron oxide (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is placed under the reactor vessel. If molten core debris is released onto the glass, the following sequence happens: (1) the glass absorbs decay heat as its temperature increases and the glass softens; (2) the core debris dissolves into the molten glass; (3) molten glass convective currents create a homogeneous high-level waste (HLW) glass; (4) the molten glass spreads into a wider pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or transfer to water on top of the molten glass; and (5) the glass solidifies as increased surface cooling area and decreasing radioactive decay heat generation allows heat removal to exceed heat generation.

  20. Simulated solar light irradiation of mesotrione in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Ter Halle, Alexandra; Richard, Claire

    2006-06-15

    Photolysis is expected to be a major degradation process for pollutants in surface waters. We report here the first photodegradation study on mesotrione, a new triketone herbicide for use in maize. In a first step, we investigated the direct photolysis of mesotrione at 365 nm from a kinetic and analytical point of view. Mesotrione sensitizes its own oxidation through singlet oxygen formation and sensitizes the oxidation of H-donors through electron or H-atom transfer. In a second step, irradiation experiments were performed under conditions prevalent in the aqueous environment. Mesotrione in submicromolar concentrations was exposed to simulated sunlight, in addition to Suwannee River natural organic matter and/or nitrates. Suwannee River natural organic matter sensitizes the oxidation of mesotrione through the intermediacy of singlet oxygen, and the rate of mesotrione transformation is significantly enhanced for Suwannee River natural organic matter concentrations equal to or above 10 mg/L. Nitrates played a negligible role in SRNOM solutions. PMID:16830551

  1. Evaluation of Tritium Content and Release from Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Sharon M.; Chattin, Marc Rhea; Giaquinto, Joseph; Jubin, Robert Thomas

    2015-09-01

    It is expected that tritium pretreatment will be required in future reprocessing plants to prevent the release of tritium to the environment (except for long-cooled fuels). To design and operate future reprocessing plants in a safe and environmentally compliant manner, the amount and form of tritium in the used nuclear fuel (UNF) must be understood and quantified. Tritium in light water reactor (LWR) fuel is dispersed between the fuel matrix and the fuel cladding, and some tritium may be in the plenum, probably as tritium labelled water (THO) or T2O. In a standard processing flowsheet, tritium management would be accomplished by treatment of liquid streams within the plant. Pretreating the fuel prior to dissolution to release the tritium into a single off-gas stream could simplify tritium management, so the removal of tritium in the liquid streams throughout the plant may not be required. The fraction of tritium remaining in the cladding may be reduced as a result of tritium pretreatment. Since Zircaloy® cladding makes up roughly 25% by mass of UNF in the United States, processes are being considered to reduce the volume of reprocessing waste for Zircaloy® clad fuel by recovering the zirconium from the cladding for reuse. These recycle processes could release the tritium in the cladding. For Zircaloy-clad fuels from light water reactors, the tritium produced from ternary fission and other sources is expected to be divided between the fuel, where it is generated, and the cladding. It has been previously documented that a fraction of the tritium produced in uranium oxide fuel from LWRs can migrate and become trapped in the cladding. Estimates of the percentage of tritium in the cladding typically range from 0–96%. There is relatively limited data on how the tritium content of the cladding varies with burnup and fuel history (temperature, power, etc.) and how pretreatment impacts its release. To gain a better understanding of how tritium in cladding

  2. Thermal behavior of water confined in micro porous of clay mineral at additional pressure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Y.; Takemura, T.; Fujimori, H.; Nagoe, A.; Sugimoto, T.

    2014-12-01

    Water is the most familiar substance. However water has specific properties that has a crystal structure of a dozen and density of that is maximum at 277.15 K. Therefore it understands various natural phenomena to study physical properties of water. Oodo et al study physical properties of water confined in silica gel [1]. They indicate that melting point of water confined in silica gel decrease with decreasing pore size of silica gel. Also in case that pore size is less than 2 nm, water confined in silica gel is unfreezing water at low temperature. It is considered that effect of pore size prevent crystal growth of water. Therefore we are interested in water confined in clay minerals. Clay minerals have a number of water conditions. Also it is thought that water confined in clay minerals show different physical behavior to exist the domain where change with various effect. Therefore we studied a thermal properties and phase behavior of absorption water in clay minerals. In addition, we analyzed the changes in the thermal behavior of absorption water due to the effect of earth pressure that was an environmental factor in the ground. [1] Oodo & Fujimori, J. Non-Cryst. Solids, 357 (2011) 683.

  3. Red spruce gas exchange in response to light, temperature, CO sub 2 and water stress

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, L.; Seiler, J. )

    1991-05-01

    The objective of this research was to examine the gas exchange responses of native red spruce seedlings to light, temperature and CO{sub 2} in combination with water stress to determine how red spruce physiologically responds to water stress. Gas exchange responses were examined under well-watered conditions and at an average leaf water potential of {minus}1.6 MPa. Net photosynthesis (Pnet) and leaf conductance (gl) were on average 35% and 53% lower, respectively, during water stress. The nature of the response of Pnet and gl to temperature and CO{sub 2} was similar to the well-watered response. Pnet was lower with water stress at high irradiances only. Water use efficiency was greater during water stress at 15C but not at 25 and 35C. No change in osmotic potential during water stress was observed. The response of red spruce physiology to varying light, temperature and CO{sub 2} does not appear to be greatly modified by water stress.

  4. Aquaporin-1 facilitates pressure-driven water flow across the aortic endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tieuvi; Toussaint, Jimmy; Xue, Yan; Raval, Chirag; Cancel, Limary; Russell, Stewart; Shou, Yixin; Sedes, Omer; Sun, Yu; Yakobov, Roman; Tarbell, John M.; Jan, Kung-ming

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-1, a ubiquitous water channel membrane protein, is a major contributor to cell membrane osmotic water permeability. Arteries are the physiological system where hydrostatic dominates osmotic pressure differences. In the present study, we show that the walls of large conduit arteries constitute the first example where hydrostatic pressure drives aquaporin-1-mediated transcellular/transendothelial flow. We studied cultured aortic endothelial cell monolayers and excised whole aortas of male Sprague-Dawley rats with intact and inhibited aquaporin-1 activity and with normal and knocked down aquaporin-1 expression. We subjected these systems to transmural hydrostatic pressure differences at zero osmotic pressure differences. Impaired aquaporin-1 endothelia consistently showed reduced engineering flow metrics (transendothelial water flux and hydraulic conductivity). In vitro experiments with tracers that only cross the endothelium paracellularly showed that changes in junctional transport cannot explain these reductions. Percent reductions in whole aortic wall hydraulic conductivity with either chemical blocking or knockdown of aquaporin-1 differed at low and high transmural pressures. This observation highlights how aquaporin-1 expression likely directly influences aortic wall mechanics by changing the critical transmural pressure at which its sparse subendothelial intima compresses. Such compression increases transwall flow resistance. Our endothelial and historic erythrocyte membrane aquaporin density estimates were consistent. In conclusion, aquaporin-1 significantly contributes to hydrostatic pressure-driven water transport across aortic endothelial monolayers, both in culture and in whole rat aortas. This transport, and parallel junctional flow, can dilute solutes that entered the wall paracellularly or through endothelial monolayer disruptions. Lower atherogenic precursor solute concentrations may slow their intimal entrainment kinetics. PMID:25659484

  5. Aquaporin-1 facilitates pressure-driven water flow across the aortic endothelium.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tieuvi; Toussaint, Jimmy; Xue, Yan; Raval, Chirag; Cancel, Limary; Russell, Stewart; Shou, Yixin; Sedes, Omer; Sun, Yu; Yakobov, Roman; Tarbell, John M; Jan, Kung-ming; Rumschitzki, David S

    2015-05-01

    Aquaporin-1, a ubiquitous water channel membrane protein, is a major contributor to cell membrane osmotic water permeability. Arteries are the physiological system where hydrostatic dominates osmotic pressure differences. In the present study, we show that the walls of large conduit arteries constitute the first example where hydrostatic pressure drives aquaporin-1-mediated transcellular/transendothelial flow. We studied cultured aortic endothelial cell monolayers and excised whole aortas of male Sprague-Dawley rats with intact and inhibited aquaporin-1 activity and with normal and knocked down aquaporin-1 expression. We subjected these systems to transmural hydrostatic pressure differences at zero osmotic pressure differences. Impaired aquaporin-1 endothelia consistently showed reduced engineering flow metrics (transendothelial water flux and hydraulic conductivity). In vitro experiments with tracers that only cross the endothelium paracellularly showed that changes in junctional transport cannot explain these reductions. Percent reductions in whole aortic wall hydraulic conductivity with either chemical blocking or knockdown of aquaporin-1 differed at low and high transmural pressures. This observation highlights how aquaporin-1 expression likely directly influences aortic wall mechanics by changing the critical transmural pressure at which its sparse subendothelial intima compresses. Such compression increases transwall flow resistance. Our endothelial and historic erythrocyte membrane aquaporin density estimates were consistent. In conclusion, aquaporin-1 significantly contributes to hydrostatic pressure-driven water transport across aortic endothelial monolayers, both in culture and in whole rat aortas. This transport, and parallel junctional flow, can dilute solutes that entered the wall paracellularly or through endothelial monolayer disruptions. Lower atherogenic precursor solute concentrations may slow their intimal entrainment kinetics. PMID:25659484

  6. Temperature and pressure dependence of methane correlations and osmotic second virial coefficients in water.

    PubMed

    Ashbaugh, Henry S; Weiss, Katie; Williams, Steven M; Meng, Bin; Surampudi, Lalitanand N

    2015-05-21

    We report methane's osmotic virial coefficient over the temperatures 275 to 370 K and pressures from 1 bar up to 5000 bar evaluated using molecular simulations of a united-atom description of methane in TIP4P/2005 water. In the first half of this work, we describe an approach for calculating the water-mediated contribution to the methane-methane potential-of-mean force over all separations down to complete overlap. The enthalpic, entropic, heat capacity, volumetric, compressibility, and thermal expansivity contributions to the water-mediated interaction free energy are subsequently extracted from these simulations by fitting to a thermodynamic expansion over all the simulated state points. In the second half of this work, methane's correlation functions are used to evaluate its osmotic second virial coefficient in the temperature-pressure plane. The virial coefficients evaluated from the McMillan-Mayer correlation function integral are shown to be in excellent agreement with those determined from the concentration dependence of methane's excess chemical potential, providing an independent thermodynamic consistency check on the accuracy of the procedures used here. At atmospheric pressure the osmotic virial coefficient decreases with increasing temperature, indicative of increasing hydrophobic interactions. At low temperature, the virial coefficient decreases with increasing pressure while at high temperature the virial coefficient increases with increasing pressure, reflecting the underlying hyperbolic dependence of the virial coefficient on temperature and pressure. The transition between a decreasing to increasing pressure response of the osmotic virial coefficient is shown to follow the response of the methane-methane contact peak to changes in pressure as a function of temperature, though a universal correlation is not observed. PMID:25932722

  7. Prediction of light aircraft interior sound pressure level using the room equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, M.; Bernhard, R.

    1984-01-01

    The room equation is investigated for predicting interior sound level. The method makes use of an acoustic power balance, by equating net power flow into the cabin volume to power dissipated within the cabin using the room equation. The sound power level transmitted through the panels was calculated by multiplying the measured space averaged transmitted intensity for each panel by its surface area. The sound pressure level was obtained by summing the mean square sound pressures radiated from each panel. The data obtained supported the room equation model in predicting the cabin interior sound pressure level.

  8. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON LASER PLASMAS: Laser plasma at low air pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vas'kovskiĭ, Yu M.; Moiseev, V. N.; Rovinskiĭ, R. E.; Tsenina, I. S.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic and optical characteristics of the laser plasma produced during the application of a CO2 laser pulse to a target have been studied as a function of the ambient air pressure. The changes in the surface roughness of the sample after bombardment were studied as a function of the air pressure. It is concluded from the results that a transition from an air plasma to an erosion plasma occurs at a residual air pressure on the order of 1 torr. The experiment data support the existing picture of the process by which a plasma is produced near the surface of a target in air by laser pulses.

  9. Research on the water hammer protection of the long distance water supply project with the combined action of the air vessel and over-pressure relief valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D. D.; Jiang, J.; Zhao, Z.; Yi, W. S.; Lan, G.

    2013-12-01

    We take a concrete pumping station as an example in this paper. Through the calculation of water hammer protection with a specific pumping station water supply project, and the analysis of the principle, mathematical models and boundary conditions of air vessel and over-pressure relief valve we show that the air vessel can protect the water conveyance system and reduce the transient pressure damage due to various causes. Over-pressure relief valve can effectively reduce the water hammer because the water column re-bridge suddenly stops the pump and prevents pipeline burst. The paper indicates that the combination set of air vessel and over-pressure relief valve can greatly reduce the quantity of the air valve and can eliminate the water hammer phenomenon in the pipeline system due to the vaporization and water column separation and re-bridge. The conclusion could provide a reference for the water hammer protection of long-distance water supply system.

  10. Light-Regulated Molecular Trafficking in a Synthetic Water-Soluble Host.

    PubMed

    Del Barrio, Jesús; Ryan, Seán T J; Jambrina, Pablo G; Rosta, Edina; Scherman, Oren A

    2016-05-11

    Cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8])-mediated complexation of a dicationic azobenzene in water allows for the light-controlled encapsulation of a variety of second guest compounds, including amino acids, dyes, and fragrance molecules. Such controlled guest sequestration inside the cavity of CB[8] enables the regulation of the thermally induced phase transition of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-which is not photosensitive-thus demonstrating the robustness and relevancy of the light-regulated CB[8] complexation. PMID:26876686

  11. Median Nerve Injury Due to High-Pressure Water Jet Injection: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Emre, Ufuk; Unal, Aysun

    2009-08-01

    High-pressure injuries that occur accidentally are potentially destructive injuries that often affect the nondominant hands of young men. A variety of products such as paint, gasoline, grease, fuel oil, cement, thinner and solvents have been reported as destructive agents. High-pressure water jet injection injuries to soft tissues have rarely been reported. In this study, we present the first case of median nerve injury due to high-pressure water jet injection by a water spray gun. PMID:26815059

  12. Analysis of the light-water flooding of the HFBR thimble tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Carew, J.F.; Aronson, A.L.; Cokinos, D.M.; Prince, A.; Todosow, M.; Tichler, P.R.; Cheng, L.Y.; Karol, R.C. )

    1991-01-01

    The fuel elements surrounding the central vertical thimble tubes in the Brookhaven National Laboratory High-Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) are highly undermoderated, and light-water flooding of these irradiation thimbles results in a positive core reactivity insertion. The light-water contamination of the D{sub 2}O thimble tube coolant is the result of a postulated double-ended guillotine break of a U tube in the experimental facilities heat exchanger during the HFBR light-water flooding (LWF) event. While this event has a low probability (1.3 x 10{sup {minus}4}/yr), the HFBR protection system must ensure adequate thermal margin during the power transient. This paper summarizes the analysis of the HFBR thimble-tube LWF event.

  13. Negative Pressures and the First Water Siphon Taller than 10.33 Meters

    PubMed Central

    Vera, Francisco; Rivera, Rodrigo; Romero-Maltrana, Diego; Villanueva, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    A siphon is a device that is used to drain a container, with water rising inside a hose in the form of an inverted U and then going down towards a discharge point placed below the initial water level. The siphon is the first of a number of inventions of the ancients documented about 2.000 years ago by Hero of Alexandria in his treatise Pneumatics, and although the explanation given by Hero was essentially correct, there is nowadays a controversy about the underlying mechanism that explains the working of this device. Discussions concerning the physics of a siphon usually refer to concepts like absolute negative pressures, the strength of liquid’s cohesion and the possibility of a siphon working in vacuum or in the presence of bubbles. Torricelli understood the working principle of the barometer and the impossibility of pumping water out of wells deeper than 10.33 m. Following Torricelli’s ideas it would also not be possible to build a siphon that drives pure water to ascend higher than 10.33 m. In this work, we report the first siphon that drives water (with surfactant) to ascend higher than the Torricellian limit. Motivated by the rising of sap in trees, we built a 15.4 m siphon that shows that absolute negative pressures are not prohibited, that cohesion plays an important role in transmitting forces through a fluid, and that surfactants can help to the transport of water in a metastable regime of negative pressures. PMID:27054847

  14. Negative Pressures and the First Water Siphon Taller than 10.33 Meters.

    PubMed

    Vera, Francisco; Rivera, Rodrigo; Romero-Maltrana, Diego; Villanueva, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    A siphon is a device that is used to drain a container, with water rising inside a hose in the form of an inverted U and then going down towards a discharge point placed below the initial water level. The siphon is the first of a number of inventions of the ancients documented about 2.000 years ago by Hero of Alexandria in his treatise Pneumatics, and although the explanation given by Hero was essentially correct, there is nowadays a controversy about the underlying mechanism that explains the working of this device. Discussions concerning the physics of a siphon usually refer to concepts like absolute negative pressures, the strength of liquid's cohesion and the possibility of a siphon working in vacuum or in the presence of bubbles. Torricelli understood the working principle of the barometer and the impossibility of pumping water out of wells deeper than 10.33 m. Following Torricelli's ideas it would also not be possible to build a siphon that drives pure water to ascend higher than 10.33 m. In this work, we report the first siphon that drives water (with surfactant) to ascend higher than the Torricellian limit. Motivated by the rising of sap in trees, we built a 15.4 m siphon that shows that absolute negative pressures are not prohibited, that cohesion plays an important role in transmitting forces through a fluid, and that surfactants can help to the transport of water in a metastable regime of negative pressures. PMID:27054847

  15. Remote sensing of pressure inside deformable microchannels using light scattering in Scotch tape.

    PubMed

    Kim, KyungDuk; Yu, HyeonSeung; Koh, Joonyoung; Shin, Jung H; Lee, Wonhee; Park, YongKeun

    2016-04-15

    We present a simple but effective method to measure the pressure inside a deformable microchannel using laser scattering in a translucent Scotch tape. Our idea exploits the fact that the speckle pattern generated by a turbid layer is sensitive to the changes in the optical wavefront of an impinging beam. A change in the internal pressure of a channel deforms the elastic channel, which can be detected by measuring the speckle patterns of a coherent laser beam that has passed through the channel and the Scotch tape. We demonstrate that with a proper calibration, internal pressure can be remotely sensed with the resolution of 0.1 kPa within a pressure range of 0-3 kPa after calibration. PMID:27082358

  16. Water cycle and its management for plant habitats at reduced pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rygalov, Vadim Y.; Fowler, Philip A.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Bucklin, Ray A.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and mathematical models were developed for describing and testing temperature and humidity parameters for plant production in bioregenerative life support systems. A factor was included for analyzing systems operating at low (10-101.3 kPa) pressure to reduce gas leakage and structural mass (e.g., inflatable greenhouses for space application). The expected close relationship between temperature and relative humidity was observed, along with the importance of heat exchanger coil temperature and air circulation rate. The presence of plants in closed habitats results in increased water flux through the system. Changes in pressure affect gas diffusion rates and surface boundary layers, and change convective transfer capabilities and water evaporation rates. A consistent observation from studies with plants at reduced pressures is increased evapotranspiration rates, even at constant vapor pressure deficits. This suggests that plant water status is a critical factor for managing low-pressure production systems. The approach suggested should help space mission planners design artificial environments in closed habitats.

  17. Stray light effects in above-water remote-sensing reflectance from hyperspectral radiometers.

    PubMed

    Talone, Marco; Zibordi, Giuseppe; Ansko, Ilmar; Banks, Andrew Clive; Kuusk, Joel

    2016-05-20

    Stray light perturbations are unwanted distortions of the measured spectrum due to the nonideal performance of optical radiometers. Because of this, stray light characterization and correction is essential when accurate radiometric measurements are a necessity. In agreement with such a need, this study focused on stray light correction of hyperspectral radiometers widely applied for above-water measurements to determine the remote-sensing reflectance (RRS). Stray light of sample radiometers was experimentally characterized and a correction algorithm was developed and applied to field measurements performed in the Mediterranean Sea. Results indicate that mean stray light corrections are appreciable, with values generally varying from -1% to +1% in the 400-700 nm spectral region for downward irradiance and sky radiance, and from -1% to +4% for total radiance from the sea. Mean corrections for data products such as RRS exhibit values that depend on water type varying between -0.5% and +1% in the blue-green spectral region, with peaks up to 9% in the red in eutrophic waters. The possibility of using one common stray light correction matrix for the analyzed class of radiometers was also investigated. Results centered on RRS support such a feasibility at the expense of an increment of the uncertainty typically well below 0.5% in the blue-green and up to 1% in the red, assuming sensors are based on spectrographs from the same production batch. PMID:27411122

  18. Propagation of modulated light in water: implications for imaging and communications systems.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Linda; Laux, Alan; Cochenour, Brandon

    2009-05-10

    Until recently, little has been done to study the effect of higher modulation frequencies (>100 MHz) or short (<2 ns) pulse durations on forward-scattered light in ocean water. This forward-scattered light limits image resolution and may ultimately limit the bandwidth of a point-to-point optical communications link. The purpose of this work is to study the propagation of modulated light fields at frequencies up to 1 GHz. Results from laboratory tank experiments and their impact on future underwater optical imaging and communications systems are discussed. PMID:19424378

  19. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production, Progress Report for Work Through September 2003, 2nd Annual/8th Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Philip E. MacDonald

    2003-09-01

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the six reactor technologies selected for research and development under the Generation-IV program. SCWRs are promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency (i.e., about 45% vs. about 33% efficiency for current Light Water Reactors, LWRs) and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs are basically LWRs operating at higher pressure and temperatures with a direct once-through cycle. Operation above the critical pressure eliminates coolant boiling, so the coolant remains single-phase throughout the system. Thus the need for recirculation and jet pumps, a pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators and dryers is eliminated. The main mission of the SCWR is generation of low-cost electricity. It is built upon two proven technologies, LWRs, which are the most commonly deployed power generating reactors in the world, and supercritical fossil-fired boilers, a large number of which is also in use around the world.

  20. Progressive and cmuulative fabric effects of multiple hydroentangling impacts at different water pressures on greige cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A practical study was conducted to determine the effects of the hydroentangling jet strip’s orifice size and the hydroentangling water pressure on the energy expended and the properties of the resulting nonwoven fabrics produced on a commercial-grade hydro-entanglement (HE) system, using greige cott...

  1. Pore-water pressures associated with clogging of soil pipes: Numerical analysis of laboratory experiments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clogging of soil pipes due to excessive internal erosion has been hypothesized to cause extreme erosion events such as landslides, debris flows, and gullies, but confirmation of this phenomenon has been lacking. Laboratory and field measurements have failed to measure pore water pressures within pip...

  2. EFFECTIVENESS OF A HIGH-PRESSURE, WATER FOGGING SYSTEM IN CONTROLLING DUST EMISSIONS AT GRAIN RECEIVING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grain dust at the receiving area is a fire hazard, a health concern, and a sanitation problem and should be controlled. The effectiveness of a high-pressure, water-fog system in controlling grain dust emissions was evaluated with corn and wheat while spouting 2.1 m3 (60 bu) of grain into a test c...

  3. Hydrolysis of Tifton 85 bermudagrass in a pressurized batch hot water reactor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Ethanol production from grass is desirable due to the large amount of biomass it produces. However, a pretreatment is necessary before fermentation to increase ethanol yield. Tifton 85 bermudagrass was treated with a newly designed pressurized batch hot water reactor. Multiple temperatur...

  4. VAPOR PRESSURE AND MELTING BEHAVIOR OF SULFURIC ACID-WATER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An experimental apparatus was designed and constructed to use high vacuum and mass spectrometric techniques to determine total and partial vapor pressures above bulk liquid samples in the temperature range between -65C and 25C. Observations on the sulfuric acid-water system revea...

  5. DRINKING WATER SODIUM AND BLOOD PRESSURE IN CHILDREN: A SECOND LOOK

    EPA Science Inventory

    A previous study by the current authors demonstrated a statistically significant and clinically important elevation of 3-5 mmHg in mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure in high school sophomores in a community with 108 mg/L of sodium in the water supply when compared to thei...

  6. SEPARATION OF HAZARDOUS ORGANICS BY LOW PRESSURE MEMBRANES: TREATMENT OF SOIL-WASH RINSE WATER LEACHATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil washing is a promising technology for treating contaminated soils. n the present work, low-pressure, thin-film composite membranes were evaluated to treat he soil-wash leachates so that the treated water could be recycled back to the soil washing step. Experiments were done ...

  7. Identifying the effects on fish of changes in water pressure during turbine passage

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, James M.; Abernathy, C. Scott; Dauble, Dennis D.

    2003-09-01

    This article discusses experiments conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to determine how water pressure and dissolved gas levels associated with hydroelectric facilities may affect the survival of fish. The results of the experiments are discussed as well as how these results can be applied to turbine designs and plant operation.

  8. Water confinement in hydrophobic nanopores. Pressure-induced wetting and drying.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Sergei; Vlassiouk, Ivan; Takmakov, Pavel; Rios, Fabian

    2010-09-28

    Wetting and drying of hydrophobic pores with diameters lower than 0.2 μm by aqueous solutions at different hydrostatic pressures is investigated by measuring the ionic conductance variation through the nanopores. The critical pressure for water intrusion into the nanopores increases with lowering the pore diameter and the surface tension of the hydrophobic modification, in agreement with the Laplace equation. Nevertheless, restoring the pressure to the atmospheric one does not result in spontaneous pore dewetting unless bubbles are left inside the pores. Such bubbles can appear at the regions of narrowing cross section and/or varying quality of the hydrophobic modification and thus can be engineered to control water expulsion. PMID:20690599

  9. Advanced Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors Utility Requirements Document Small Modular Reactors Inclusion Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Loflin, Leonard; McRimmon, Beth

    2014-12-18

    This report summarizes a project by EPRI to include requirements for small modular light water reactors (smLWR) into the EPRI Utility Requirements Document (URD) for Advanced Light Water Reactors. The project was jointly funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The report covers the scope and content of the URD, the process used to revise the URD to include smLWR requirements, a summary of the major changes to the URD to include smLWR, and how to use the URD as revised to achieve value on new plant projects.

  10. Semihydrogenated BN Sheet: A Promising Visible-light Driven Photocatalyst for Water Splitting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xingxing; Zhao, Jin; Yang, Jinlong

    2013-01-01

    Based on first principles calculations, we predict semihydrogenated graphitic BN (sh-BN) sheet is a potential metal-free visible-light driven photocatalyst for water splitting. The ground state of sh-BN is a strip-like antiferromagnetic semiconductor with a band gap suitable for visible-light absorption. The redox potentials of water splitting are all located inside the band gap and the probability densities of valence and conduction bands are distributed apart spatially leading to a well-separation of photogenerated electrons and holes. PMID:23681171

  11. Practical Combinations of Light-Water Reactors and Fast-Reactors for Future Actinide Transmutation

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Emory D; Renier, John-Paul

    2007-01-01

    Multicycle partitioning-transmutation (P-T) studies continue to show that use of existing light-water reactors (LWRs) and new advanced light-water reactors (ALWRs) can effectively transmute transuranic (TRU) actinides, enabling initiation of full actinide recycle much earlier than waiting for the development and deployment of sufficient fast reactor (FR) capacity. The combination of initial P-T cycles using LWRs/ALWRs in parallel with economic improvements to FR usage for electricity production, and a follow-on transition period in which FRs are deployed, is a practical approach to near-term closure of the nuclear fuel cycle with full actinide recycle.

  12. Flow-induced vibration for light-water reactors. Progress report, April 1978-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Schardt, J. F.

    1980-03-01

    Flow-Induced vibration for Light Water Reactors (FIV for LWRs) is a four-year program designed to improve the FIV performance of light water reactors through the development of design criteria, analytical models for predicting behavior of components, general scaling laws to improve the accuracy of reduced-scale tests, and the identification of high FIV risk areas. The program commenced December 1, 1976, but was suspended on September 30, 1978, due to a shift in Department of Energy (DOE) priorities away from LWR productivity/availability. It was reinitiated as of August 1, 1979. This progress report summarizes the accomplishments achieved during the period from April 1978 to December 1979.

  13. Water balance in irrigation districts. Uncertainty in on-demand pressurized networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Calvo, Raúl; Rodríguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Juana, Luis; Laguna, Francisco Vicente

    2015-04-01

    In on-demand pressurized irrigation distribution networks, applied water volume is usually controlled opening a valve during a calculated time interval, and assuming constant flow rate. In general, pressure regulating devices for controlling the discharged flow rate by irrigation units are needed due to the variability of pressure conditions. A pressure regulating valve PRV is the commonly used pressure regulating device in a hydrant, which, also, executes the open and close function. A hydrant feeds several irrigation units, requiring a wide range in flow rate. In addition, some flow meters are also available, one as a component of the hydrant and the rest are placed downstream. Every land owner has one flow meter for each group of field plots downstream the hydrant. Ideal PRV performance would maintain a constant downstream pressure. However, the true performance depends on both upstream pressure and the discharged flow rate. Theoretical flow rates values have been introduced into a PRV behavioral model, validated in laboratory, coupled with an on-demand irrigation district waterworks, composed by a distribution network and a multi-pump station. Variations on flow rate are simulated by taking into account the consequences of variations on climate conditions and also decisions in irrigation operation, such us duration and frequency application. The model comprises continuity, dynamic and energy equations of the components of both the PRV and the water distribution network. In this work the estimation of water balance terms during the irrigation events in an irrigation campaign has been simulated. The effect of demand concentration peaks has been estimated.

  14. The effect of drinking water salinity on blood pressure in young adults of coastal Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Talukder, Mohammad Radwanur Rahman; Rutherford, Shannon; Phung, Dung; Islam, Mohammad Zahirul; Chu, Cordia

    2016-07-01

    More than 35 million people in coastal Bangladesh are vulnerable to increasing freshwater salinization. This will continue to affect more people and to a greater extent as climate change projections are realised in this area in the future. However the evidence for health effects of consuming high salinity water is limited. This research examined the association between drinking water salinity and blood pressure in young adults in coastal Bangladesh. We conducted a cross-sectional study during May-June 2014 in a rural coastal sub-district of Bangladesh. Data on blood pressure (BP) and salinity of potable water sources was collected from 253 participants aged 19-25 years. A linear regression method was used to examine the association between water salinity exposure categories and systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) level. Sixty five percent of the study population were exposed to highly saline drinking water above the Bangladesh standard (600 mg/L and above). Multivariable linear regression analyses identified that compared to the low water salinity exposure category (<600 mg/L), those in the high water salinity category (>600 mg/L), had statistically significantly higher SBP (B 3.46, 95% CI 0.75, 6.17; p = 0.01) and DBP (B 2.77, 95% CI 0.31, 5.24; p = 0.03). Our research shows that elevated salinity in drinking water is associated with higher BP in young coastal populations. Blood pressure is an important risk factor of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Given the extent of salinization of freshwater in many low-lying countries including in Bangladesh, and the likely exacerbation related to climate change-induced sea level rise, implementation of preventative strategies through dietary interventions along with promotion of low saline drinking water must be a priority in these settings. PMID:27089422

  15. Toxic pressure of herbicides on microalgae in Dutch estuarine and coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booij, Petra; Sjollema, Sascha B.; van der Geest, Harm G.; Leonards, Pim E. G.; Lamoree, Marja H.; de Voogt, W. Pim; Admiraal, Wim; Laane, Remi W. P. M.; Vethaak, A. Dick

    2015-08-01

    For several decades now, there has been an increase in the sources and types of chemicals in estuarine and coastal waters as a consequence of anthropogenic activities. This has led to considerable concern about the effects of these chemicals on the marine food chain. The fact is that estuarine and coastal waters are the most productive ecosystems with high primary production by microalgae. The toxic pressure of specific phytotoxic chemicals now poses a major threat to these ecosystems. In a previous study, six herbicides (atrazine, diuron, irgarol, isoproturon, terbutryn and terbutylazine) were identified as the main contaminants affecting photosynthesis in marine microalgae. The purpose of this study is to investigate the toxic pressure of these herbicides in the Dutch estuarine and coastal waters in relation to the effective photosystem II efficiency (ΦPSII) in microalgae. Temporal and spatial variations in the concentrations of these herbicides were analyzed based on monitoring data. Additionally, a field study was carried out in which chemical analysis of water was performed and also a toxicity assessment using the Pulse Amplitude Modulation (PAM) fluorometry assay that measures ΦPSII. The toxic pressure on ΦPSII in microalgae has decreased with 55-82% from 2003 to 2012, with the Western Scheldt estuary showing the highest toxic pressure. By combining toxicity data from the PAM assay with chemical analysis of herbicide concentrations, we have identified diuron and terbutylazine as the main contributors to the toxic pressure on microalgae. Although direct effects are not expected, the toxic pressure is close to the 10% effect level in the PAM assay. A compliance check with the current environmental legislation of the European Union revealed that the quality standards are not sufficient to protect marine microalgae.

  16. Transient pool boiling heat transfer due to increasing heat inputs in subcooled water at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, K.; Shiotsu, M.; Sakurai, A.

    1995-09-01

    Understanding of transient boiling phenomenon caused by increasing heat inputs in subcooled water at high pressures is necessary to predict correctly a severe accident due to a power burst in a water-cooled nuclear reactor. Transient maximum heat fluxes, q{sub max}, on a 1.2 mm diameter horizontal cylinder in a pool of saturated and subcooled water for exponential heat inputs, q{sub o}e{sup t/T}, with periods, {tau}, ranging from about 2 ms to 20 s at pressures from atmospheric up to 2063 kPa for water subcoolings from 0 to about 80 K were measured to obtain the extended data base to investigate the effect of high subcoolings on steady-state and transient maximum heat fluxes, q{sub max}. Two main mechanisms of q{sub max} exist depending on the exponential periods at low subcoolings. One is due to the time lag of the hydrodynamic instability which starts at steady-state maximum heat flux on fully developed nucleate boiling (FDNB), and the other is due to the heterogenous spontaneous nucleations (HSN) in flooded cavities which coexist with vapor bubbles growing up from active cavities. The shortest period corresponding to the maximum q{sub max} for long period range belonging to the former mechanism becomes longer and the q{sub max}mechanism for long period range shifts to that due the HSN on FDNB with the increase of subcooling and pressure. The longest period corresponding to the minimum q{sub max} for the short period range belonging to the latter mechanism becomes shorter with the increase in saturated pressure. On the contrary, the longest period becomes longer with the increase in subcooling at high pressures. Correlations for steady-state and transient maximum heat fluxes were presented for a wide range of pressure and subcooling.

  17. Passive containment cooling system with drywell pressure regulation for boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Hill, P.R.

    1994-12-27

    A boiling water reactor is described having a regulating valve for placing the wetwell in flow communication with an intake duct of the passive containment cooling system. This subsystem can be adjusted to maintain the drywell pressure at (or slightly below or above) wetwell pressure after the initial reactor blowdown transient is over. This addition to the PCCS design has the benefit of eliminating or minimizing steam leakage from the drywell to the wetwell in the longer-term post-LOCA time period and also minimizes the temperature difference between drywell and wetwell. This in turn reduces the rate of long-term pressure buildup of the containment, thereby extending the time to reach the design pressure limit. 4 figures.

  18. Passive containment cooling system with drywell pressure regulation for boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Hill, Paul R.

    1994-01-01

    A boiling water reactor having a regulating valve for placing the wetwell in flow communication with an intake duct of the passive containment cooling system. This subsystem can be adjusted to maintain the drywell pressure at (or slightly below or above) wetwell pressure after the initial reactor blowdown transient is over. This addition to the PCCS design has the benefit of eliminating or minimizing steam leakage from the drywell to the wetwell in the longer-term post-LOCA time period and also minimizes the temperature difference between drywell and wetwell. This in turn reduces the rate of long-term pressure buildup of the containment, thereby extending the time to reach the design pressure limit.

  19. Spectral intensity of the N2 emission in argon low-pressure arc discharges for lighting purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, R.; Fantz, U.

    2012-04-01

    Nitrogen is discussed as an alternative to hazardous mercury in lamps for general lighting. Molecular nitrogen bands emit in both the near-UV (the second positive system C3Πu → B3Πg) and the visible spectral range (the first positive system B3Πg → A3Σ+u), which reduces conversion losses. To analyse the potential of nitrogen, low-pressure arc discharges in an argon background were characterized by means of optical emission spectroscopy. The spectral intensity of the molecular nitrogen emission rises with increasing nitrogen content in the discharge and shows a maximum around 4 mbar of absolute pressure. With regard to the application as a light source, radiation efficiencies were determined, which are around 5% at maximum. In order to identify the main population processes a collisional radiative model for the nitrogen-argon system was established which reveals the high relevance of heavy-particle collisions due to a pressure of a few mbar. The decisive excitation reactions for the state N2 C3Πu are the well-known processes of energy pooling between metastable nitrogen molecules and energy transfer from metastable argon atoms. For the state N2 B3Πg the main population channels are collision-induced crossings within the nitrogen states, where the collision partner can be either a nitrogen molecule or an argon atom, and the quenching collisions with argon.

  20. Effects of control system failures on transients and accidents at a 3-loop Westinghouse pressurized water reactor. Volume 2. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Bruske, S.J.; Davis, C.B.; Ogden, D.M.; Ransom, C.B.; Stitt, B.D.; Stromberg, H.M.; Waterman, M.E.

    1985-10-01

    Safety Implications of Control Systems (A-47) was approved as an Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in December of 1980. USI A-47 is concerned with the potential for transients or accidents being made more severe than previously analyzed as a result of control system failures. This report describes the work performed on the effects of control system failures on transients and accidents at a Westinghouse 3-loop pressurized water reactor. In this volume, the appendices contain detailed information consisting of the FMEA (failure mode and analysis) results, an in-depth description of the computer model, the deterministic computer analyses, and responses to comments made by Carolina Power and Light Company and Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

  1. Development of a nuclear technique for monitoring water levels in pressurized vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.; Mall, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique for monitoring water levels in pressurized stainless steel cylinders was developed. It is based on differences in attenuation coefficients of water and air for Cs137 (662 keV) gamma rays. Experimentally observed gamma ray counting rates with and without water in model reservoir cylinder were compared with corresponding calculated values for two different gamma ray detection theshold energies. Calculated values include the effects of multiple scattering and attendant gamma ray energy reductions. The agreement between the measured and calculated values is reasonably good. Computer programs for calculating angular and spectral distributions of scattered radition in various media are included.

  2. Water Flow Testing and Unsteady Pressure Analysis of a Two-Bladed Liquid Oxidizer Pump Inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, Jordan B.; Mulder, Andrew; Zoladz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The unsteady fluid dynamic performance of a cavitating two-bladed oxidizer turbopump inducer was characterized through sub-scale water flow testing. While testing a novel inlet duct design that included a cavitation suppression groove, unusual high-frequency pressure oscillations were observed. With potential implications for inducer blade loads, these high-frequency components were analyzed extensively in order to understand their origins and impacts to blade loading. Water flow testing provides a technique to determine pump performance without the costs and hazards associated with handling cryogenic propellants. Water has a similar density and Reynolds number to liquid oxygen. In a 70%-scale water flow test, the inducer-only pump performance was evaluated. Over a range of flow rates, the pump inlet pressure was gradually reduced, causing the flow to cavitate near the pump inducer. A nominal, smooth inducer inlet was tested, followed by an inlet duct with a circumferential groove designed to suppress cavitation. A subsequent 52%-scale water flow test in another facility evaluated the combined inducer-impeller pump performance. With the nominal inlet design, the inducer showed traditional cavitation and surge characteristics. Significant bearing loads were created by large side loads on the inducer during synchronous cavitation. The grooved inlet successfully mitigated these loads by greatly reducing synchronous cavitation, however high-frequency pressure oscillations were observed over a range of frequencies. Analytical signal processing techniques showed these oscillations to be created by a rotating, multi-celled train of pressure pulses, and subsequent CFD analysis suggested that such pulses could be created by the interaction of rotating inducer blades with fluid trapped in a cavitation suppression groove. Despite their relatively low amplitude, these high-frequency pressure oscillations posed a design concern due to their sensitivity to flow conditions and

  3. HOW TO LIGHT IT UP: SIMULATING RAM-PRESSURE STRIPPED X-RAY BRIGHT TAILS

    SciTech Connect

    Tonnesen, Stephanie; Bryan, Greg L.; Chen, Rena

    2011-04-20

    Some tails of ram-pressure stripped galaxies are detected in H I, some in H{alpha}, and some in X-ray (but never in all three so far). We use numerical simulations to probe the conditions for the production of X-ray bright tails, demonstrating that the primary requirement is a high-pressure intracluster medium (ICM). This is because the stripped tail is mostly in pressure equilibrium with the ICM, but mixing leaves it with densities and temperatures intermediate between the cold gas in the disk and the hot ICM. Given a high enough ICM pressure, this mixed gas lies in the X-ray bright region of the phase diagram. We compare the simulations to observations of the ram-pressure stripped tail of ESO 137-001, showing excellent agreement in the total measured X-ray and H{alpha} emission and non-flaring morphology of the tail, and consistent H I measurements. Using these comparisons, we constrain the level of mixing and efficiency of heat conduction in the ICM.

  4. Improving the oxidation resistance of 316L stainless steel in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water by electropolishing treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guangdong; Lu, Zhanpeng; Ru, Xiangkun; Chen, Junjie; Xiao, Qian; Tian, Yongwu

    2015-12-01

    The oxidation behavior of 316L stainless steel specimens after emery paper grounding, mechanical polishing, and electropolishing were investigated in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water at 310 °C for 120 and 500 h. Electropolishing afforded improved oxidation resistance especially during the early immersion stages. Duplex oxide films comprising a coarse Fe-rich outer layer and a fine Cr-rich inner layer formed on all specimens after 500 h of immersion. Only a compact layer was observed on the electropolished specimen after 120 h of immersion. The enrichment of chromium in the electropolished layer contributed to the passivity and protectiveness of the specimen.

  5. Modeling the behavior of a light-water production reactor target rod

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwood, D.J.

    1992-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been conducting a series of in-reactor experiments in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to determine the amount of tritium released by permeation from a target rod under neutron irradiation. The model discussed in this report was developed from first principles to model the behavior of the first target rod irradiated in the ATR. The model can be used to determine predictive relationships for the amount of tritium that permeates through the target rod cladding during irradiation. The model consists of terms and equations for tritium production, gettering, partial pressure, and permeation, all of which are described in this report. The model addressed only the condition of steady state and features only a single adjustable parameter. The target rod design for producing tritium in a light-water reactor was tested first in the WC-1 in-reactor experiment. During irradiation, tritium is generated in the target rod within the ceramic lithium target material. The target rod has been engineered to limit the release of tritium to the reactor coolant during normal operations. The engineered features are a nickel-plated Zircaloy-4 getter and a barrier coating on the cladding surfaces. The ceramic target is wrapped with the getter material and the resulting ``pencils`` are inserted into the barrier coated cladding. These features of the rod are described in the report, along with the release of tritium from the ceramic target. The steady-state model could be useful for the design procedure of target rod components.

  6. Modeling the behavior of a light-water production reactor target rod

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwood, D.J.

    1992-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been conducting a series of in-reactor experiments in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to determine the amount of tritium released by permeation from a target rod under neutron irradiation. The model discussed in this report was developed from first principles to model the behavior of the first target rod irradiated in the ATR. The model can be used to determine predictive relationships for the amount of tritium that permeates through the target rod cladding during irradiation. The model consists of terms and equations for tritium production, gettering, partial pressure, and permeation, all of which are described in this report. The model addressed only the condition of steady state and features only a single adjustable parameter. The target rod design for producing tritium in a light-water reactor was tested first in the WC-1 in-reactor experiment. During irradiation, tritium is generated in the target rod within the ceramic lithium target material. The target rod has been engineered to limit the release of tritium to the reactor coolant during normal operations. The engineered features are a nickel-plated Zircaloy-4 getter and a barrier coating on the cladding surfaces. The ceramic target is wrapped with the getter material and the resulting pencils'' are inserted into the barrier coated cladding. These features of the rod are described in the report, along with the release of tritium from the ceramic target. The steady-state model could be useful for the design procedure of target rod components.

  7. X-ray scattering intensities of water at extreme pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, N; Fried, L E

    2007-01-03

    We have calculated the coherent x-ray scattering intensity of several phases of water at 1500 and 2000 K under high pressure, using ab initio Density Functional Theory (DFT). Our calculations span the molecular liquid, ice VII, and superionic solid phases, including the recently predicted symmetrically hydrogen bonded region of the superionic phase. We show that wide angle x-ray scattering intensity could be used to determine phase boundaries between these high pressure phases, and we compare the results for ice VII and superionic water. We compute simulated spectra and provide new atomic scattering form factors for water at extreme conditions, which take into account frequently neglected changes in ionic charge and electron delocalization. We show that our modifed atomic form factors allow for a nearly exact comaprison to the total x-ray scattering intensities calculated from DFT. Finally, we analyze the effect our new form factors have on determination of the oxygen-oxygen radial distribution function.

  8. Hypersonic velocity measurement using Brillouin scattering technique. Application to water under high pressure and temperature.

    PubMed

    Decremps, Frederic; Datchi, Frederic; Polian, Alain

    2006-12-22

    This paper presents recent improvement on sound velocity measurements under extreme conditions, illustrated by the hypersonic sound velocity measurements of water up to 723 K and 9 GPa using Brillouin scattering technique. Because water at high pressure and high temperature is chemically very aggressive, these experiments have been carried out using a specific experimental set-up. The present data should be useful to better constrain the water equation of state at high density. This new development brings high-quality elastic data in a large pressure/temperature domain, which may afterwards benefit the understanding of many other fields as nonlinear acoustics, underwater sound, or physical acoustics from a more general point of view. PMID:16797640

  9. Effect of supplementation of water-soluble vitamins on oxidative stress and blood pressure in prehypertensives.

    PubMed

    Talikoti, Prashanth; Bobby, Zachariah; Hamide, Abdoul

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of water-soluble vitamins on oxidative stress and blood pressure in prehypertensives. Sixty prehypertensives were recruited and randomized into 2 groups of 30 each. One group received water-soluble vitamins and the other placebo for 4 months. Further increase in blood pressure was not observed in the vitamin group which increased significantly in the placebo group at the end of 4 months. Malonedialdehyde and protein carbonylation were reduced during the course of treatment with vitamins whereas in the placebo group there was an increase in the level of malondialdehyde. In conclusion, supplementation of water-soluble vitamins in prehypertension reduces oxidative stress and its progression to hypertension. PMID:25588130

  10. Low pressure R.F. plasma reactions in light hydrocarbons. Ethylene and acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canepa, Pietro; Castello, Gianrico; Nicchia, Mario; Munari, Stelio

    The results obtained in the plasmolysis of ethylene and acetylene in an inductively coupled radiofrequency glow discharge are reported. A static system at a constant initial pressure of 0.5 torr and input power of 50 W was used; the gaseous and polymeric products were evaluated and compared with previous data on ethane plasmolysis and other available literature data. The decomposition products of ethylene were similar to those obtained during the plasmolysis of ethane, with a different distribution and a smaller initial increase of the total pressure. The total pressure of acetylene quickly decreased to near zero value at small specific energy, due to rapid polymerization. No gaseous products were detected, except hydrogen and traces of diacetylene.

  11. Weak interactions between water and clathrate-forming gases at low pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Thurmer, Konrad; Yuan, Chunqing; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Kay, Bruce D.; Smith, R. Scott

    2015-11-01

    Using scanning probe microscopy and temperature programed desorption we examined the interaction between water and two common clathrate-forming gases, methane and isobutane, at low temperature and low pressure. Water co-deposited with up to 10-1 mbar methane or 10-5 mbar isobutane at 140 K onto a Pt(111) substrate yielded pure crystalline ice, i.e., the exposure to up to ~107 gas molecules for each deposited water molecule did not have any detectable effect on the growing films. Exposing metastable, less than 2 molecular layers thick, water films to 10-5 mbar methane does not alter their morphology, suggesting that the presence of the Pt(111) surface is not a strong driver for hydrate formation. This weak water-gas interaction at low pressures is supported by our thermal desorption measurements from amorphous solid water and crystalline ice where 1 ML of methane desorbs near ~43 K and isobutane desorbs near ~100 K. Similar desorption temperatures were observed for desorption from amorphous solid water.

  12. Effect of nanoscale confinement on freezing of modified water at room temperature and ambient pressure.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sanket; Kamath, Ganesh; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the phase behavior of confined water is central to fields as diverse as heterogeneous catalysis, corrosion, nanofluidics, and to emerging energy technologies. Altering the state points (temperature, pressure, etc.) or introduction of a foreign surface can result in the phase transformation of water. At room temperature, ice nucleation is a very rare event and extremely high pressures in the GPa-TPa range are required to freeze water. Here, we perform computer experiments to artificially alter the balance between electrostatic and dispersion interactions between water molecules, and demonstrate nucleation and growth of ice at room temperature in a nanoconfined environment. Local perturbations in dispersive and electrostatic interactions near the surface are shown to provide the seed for nucleation (nucleation sites), which lead to room temperature liquid-solid phase transition of confined water. Crystallization of water occurs over several tens of nanometers and is shown to be independent of the nature of the substrate (hydrophilic oxide vs. hydrophobic graphene and crystalline oxide vs. amorphous diamond-like carbon). Our results lead us to hypothesize that the freezing transition of confined water can be controlled by tuning the relative dispersive and electrostatic interaction. PMID:24715572

  13. Weak interactions between water and clathrate-forming gases at low pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thürmer, Konrad; Yuan, Chunqing; Kimmel, Greg A.; Kay, Bruce D.; Scott Smith, R.

    2015-11-01

    Using scanning probe microscopy and temperature programed desorption we examined the interaction between water and two common clathrate-forming gases, methane and isobutane, at low temperature and low pressure. Water co-deposited with up to 10- 1 mbar methane or 10- 5 mbar isobutane at 140 K onto a Pt(111) substrate yielded pure crystalline ice, i.e., the exposure to up to ~ 107 gas molecules for each deposited water molecule did not have any detectable effect on the growing films. Exposing metastable, less than 2 molecular layers thick, water films to 10- 5 mbar methane does not alter their morphology, suggesting that the presence of the Pt(111) surface is not a strong driver for hydrate formation. This weak water-gas interaction at low pressures is supported by our thermal desorption measurements from amorphous solid water and crystalline ice where 1 ML of methane desorbs near ~ 43 K and isobutane desorbs near ~ 100 K. Similar desorption temperatures were observed for desorption from amorphous solid water.

  14. Comparison of Standard Light Water Reactor Cross-Section Libraries using the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Boiling Water Reactor Benchmark Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulesza, Joel A.; Arzu Alpan, F.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes a comparison of contemporary and historical light water reactor shielding and pressure vessel dosimetry cross-section libraries for a boiling water reactor calculational benchmark problem. The calculational benchmark problem was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory by the request of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The benchmark problem was originally evaluated by Brookhaven National Laboratory using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory discrete ordinates code DORT and the BUGLE-93 cross-section library. In this paper, the Westinghouse RAPTOR-M3G three-dimensional discrete ordinates code was used. A variety of cross-section libraries were used with RAPTOR-M3G including the BUGLE93, BUGLE-96, and BUGLE-B7 cross-section libraries developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and ALPAN-VII.0 developed at Westinghouse. In comparing the calculated fast reaction rates using the four aforementioned cross-section libraries in the pressure vessel capsule, for six dosimetry reaction rates, a maximum relative difference of 8% was observed. As such, it is concluded that the results calculated by RAPTOR-M3G are consistent with the benchmark and further that the different vintage BUGLE cross-section libraries investigated are largely self-consistent.

  15. Pressures and Impacts On Water Quality: Case Study of Guadiana River Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, F.; Quadrado, F.

    According to Article 5 and Annex II of the Water Framework Directive (WFD) is required that Member States identify significant anthropogenic pressures on river basins and also assess the potential impact of these pressures on the water bodies. The following areas have to be identified: point and diffuse sources pollution, the wa- ter abstraction, the water flow regulation, the morphological alterations and land use patterns. This work intends to describe and analyse the application of an integrated methodology for studying the importance of pressures and impacts on water quality. The methodology integrates loads calculation and mathematical models with Geo- graphical Information Systems (GIS). First step is to identify and characterise, point and diffuse sources of pollution, then estimate loads associate to that sources. Using GIS tools it is possible mapping the most problematic zones inside of the basin, con- cerning pressures to water resources. GIS model will be applied in order to estimate loads from diffuse pollution, using watershed characteristics, namely land use and to- pography. The obtained results together with loads from point sources pollution, will be integrated in a water quality model to evaluate the impacts of this pressures on the basin. For a correct basin management, it is necessary to minimise this impacts, with action plans and monitoring programmes, to improve water quality and achieve the environmental objectives. The case study is the Guadiana river, an international basin with a total area of 66 860 km2, having it is headwaters in Spain with a basin of 55 260 km2. The national area has 11 600 km2 and a big dam is being building, Alqueva, cre- ating a reservoir basin with 250 km2 and a storage capacity of 4 150 hm3. Guadiana river has an important role in the south of Portugal, a region with drought problems. Although the poor water quality that reaches the border, the Portuguese basin also has some important pollution sources. These can

  16. Identification and characterization of passive safety system and inherent safety feature building blocks for advanced light-water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is investigating passive and inherent safety options for Advanced Light-Water Reactors (ALWRs). A major activity in 1989 includes identification and characterization of passive safety system and inherent safety feature building blocks, both existing and proposed, for ALWRs. Preliminary results of this work are reported herein. This activity is part of a larger effort by the US Department of Energy, reactor vendors, utilities, and others in the United States to develop improved LWRs. The Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) program and the Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (APWR) program have as goals improved, commercially available LWRs in the early 1990s. The Advanced Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ASBWR) program and the AP-600 program are developing more advanced reactors with increased use of passive safety systems. It is planned that these reactors will become commercially available in the mid 1990s. The ORNL program is an exploratory research program for LWRs beyond the year 2000. Desired long-term goals for such reactors include: (1) use of only passive and inherent safety, (2) foolproof against operator errors, (3) malevolence resistance against internal sabotage and external assault and (4) walkaway safety. The acronym ''PRIME'' (Passive safety, Resilient operation, Inherent safety, Malevolence resistance, and Extended (walkaway) safety) is used to summarize these desired characteristics. Existing passive and inherent safety options are discussed in this document.

  17. High-pressure photodissociation of water as a tool for hydrogen synthesis and fundamental chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Ceppatelli, Matteo; Bini, Roberto; Schettino, Vincenzo

    2009-01-01

    High-pressure methods have been demonstrated to be efficient in providing new routes for the synthesis of materials of technological interest. In several molecular compounds, the drastic pressure conditions required for spontaneous transformations have been lowered to the kilobar range by photoactivation of the reactions. At these pressures, the syntheses are accessible to large-volume applications and are of interest to bioscience, space, and environmental chemistry. Here, we show that the short-lived hydroxyl radicals, produced in the photodissociation of water molecules by near-UV radiation at room temperature and pressures of a few tenths of a gigapascal (GPa), can be successfully used to trigger chemical reactions in mixtures of water with carbon monoxide or nitrogen. The detection of molecular hydrogen among the reaction products is of particular relevance. Besides the implications in fundamental chemistry, the mild pressure and irradiation conditions, the efficiency of the process, and the nature of the reactant and product molecules suggest applications in synthesis. PMID:19581572

  18. Time resolved emission studies of aluminum and water high pressure reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.A.; Russell, T.P.

    1996-07-01

    The detonation of underwater explosives is a complex problem involving a temporally dependent heterogeneous reaction regime of oxidizer reactions and high pressure metal combustion. For simplicity, underwater explosions may be described as a two stage reaction process. First, the oxidizing material detonates to produce species under extreme conditions of temperature (up to 5,000 K) and pressure (up to 10 GPa). The chemical energy produced from this reaction is transferred to the bulk water as three forms of work: (1) shock, (2) heat, and (3) initial bubble formation. Second, the species produced by the oxidizer detonation form a high pressure and high temperature reactive fluid that surrounds the solid particles. The solid particles are primarily consumed while the pressure is decreasing from 10 GPa to 0.1 GPa at a reaction temperature in excess of 3,200 K. The secondary reaction of the solid particles produces a lower energy shock and a pressure response that reinforces the initial energy delivered to the bulk water medium. The ability to tailor this late energy release between shock and bubble formation is dependent on the reaction time and chemistry of the solid particle under extreme conditions. The authors present a series of single-shot time resolved emission experiments that probe the reaction of aluminum particles under extreme conditions. The temporal behavior of the observed species is used to gain insight into the chemical reaction mechanism that leads to the formation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} during underwater detonations.

  19. The magnesium sulfate-water system at pressures to 4 kilobars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogenboom, D. L.; Kargel, Jeffrey S.; Ganasan, J. P.; Lewis, J. S.

    1991-01-01

    Hydrated magnesium sulfate constitutes up to 1/6 of the mass of carbonaceous chondrites, and probably is important in many icy asteroids and satellites. It occurs naturally in meteorites mostly as epsomite. MgSO4, considered anhydrously, comprises nearly 3/4 of the highly soluble fraction of C1 chondrites. Thus, MgSO4 is probably an important solute in cryovolcanic brines erupted on certain icy objects in the outer solar system. While the physiochemical properties of the water-magnesium sulfate system are well known at low pressures, planetological applications of these data are hindered by a dearth of useful published data at elevated pressures. Accordingly, solid-liquid phase equilibria was recently explored in this chemical system at pressures extending to about 4 kilobars. The water magnesium sulfate system in the region of the eutectic exhibits qualitatively constant behavior between pressures of 1 atm and 2 kbar. The eutectic melting curve closely follows that for water ice, with a freezing point depression of about 4 K at 1 atm decreasing to around 3.3 K at 2 kbars. The eutectic shifts from 17 pct. MgSO4 at 1 atm to about 15.3 pct at 2 kbars. Above 2 kbars, the eutectic melting curve again tends to follow ice.

  20. Dissociation of the light-harvesting membrane protein complex I from Rhodobacter sphaeroides under high hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puusepp, Marit; Kangur, Liina; Freiberg, Arvi

    2015-04-01

    The light-harvesting complex 1 (LH1) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is an excellent model system for investigating the stability of oligomeric membrane proteins under high hydrostatic pressure. The currently investigated LH1 forms a 16-meric ring structure of B825 subunits. B825 is a heterodimer of transmembrane α- and β-polypeptide chains, which non-covalently binds two bacteriochlorophyll a molecules. These pigment molecules were used as intrinsic spectroscopic sensors to follow the dissociation reaction. Our results demonstrate that the LH1 dissociates into B825 subunits through an intermediary tetrameric unit B845. The dissociation mechanism depends on pressure. At ∼200-500 MPa the dissociation corresponds to a pseudo-first-order reaction, characterised by the apparent reaction rate at atmospheric pressure k0 = 3.10-5 s-1, activation volume ΔV‡ = -4 mL/mol, and free energy of activation ΔG‡ = 26 kJ/mol. Below 200 MPa and above 500 MPa, the reaction is more complex, including further dissociation of B825 into monomers B777. This paper was presented at the LIIth European High Pressure Research Group (EHPRG 52) Meeting in Lyon (France), 7-12 September 2014.

  1. Effect of Stand-Off Distance on Impact Pressure of High Speed Water Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sittiwong, Wuttichai; Seehanam, Wirapan; Pianthong, Kulachate; Matthujak, Anirut

    2010-06-01

    High speed liquid jets may be applied to jet cutting, drilling and cleaning. Recently, in the automotive industries, the spray injection pressure becomes higher and higher to enhance the fuel mixing for the improved combustion efficiency. However, the ultra high injection pressure may cause the damage to the nozzle and also the combustion chamber. In the medical application, the high speed liquid injection might be applied for the drug delivery through the skin where the needle is not required anymore. From the above mentioned application, the investigation on the impact pressure of the high speed liquid jet relative to the stand-off distant is significant. The high speed liquid jets are generated by the projectile impact driven method. The high speed projectile is launched by the horizontal single stage powder gun. The experimental study focuses on the stand-off between 1.5 cm to 6.0 cm, while the nozzle contains approximately 1.5cm3 of water in its cavity. The nozzle conical angles are 30° and 60° with the orifice diameter of 0.7 mm. The jet velocities are measured by laser beam interruptions method. The target material is the Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) which the impact pressure is measured by using a piezoelectric Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) film. From the experiments, the maximum water jet velocity of 2290 m/s can be obtained from the 30° conical angle nozzle. The maximum impact pressures of nozzle conical angle of 30° and 60° are 3.4 GPa and 2.6 GPa respectively, at stand-off distance 3 cm. However, at the stand-off distance more than 3 cm, the impact pressure significantly decreases, because of aerodynamic drag, jets core break-up, and atomization of the water.

  2. Inland Waters Night Lighting Configurations: A Navigation Rules Course for Coast Guard Auxiliarists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Gregory Peter

    A project developed a training program to teach boaters to recognize and interpret properly the lights of other vessels in nighttime or other reduced visibility conditions in the inland waters of the United States. The project followed the Instructional Systems Design model in the development of the course. The target population were members of…

  3. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Constellation Pilot Project FY11 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    R. Johansen

    2011-09-01

    Summary report for Fiscal Year 2011 activities associated with the Constellation Pilot Project. The project is a joint effor between Constellation Nuclear Energy Group (CENG), EPRI, and the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The project utilizes two CENG reactor stations: R.E. Ginna and Nine Point Unit 1. Included in the report are activities associate with reactor internals and concrete containments.

  4. GENERIC, COMPONENT FAILURE DATA BASE FOR LIGHT WATER AND LIQUID SODIUM REACTOR PRAs

    SciTech Connect

    S. A. Eide; S. V. Chmielewski; T. D. Swantz

    1990-02-01

    A comprehensive generic component failure data base has been developed for light water and liquid sodium reactor probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) . The Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) and the Centralized Reliability Data Organization (CREDO) data bases were used to generate component failure rates . Using this approach, most of the failure rates are based on actual plant data rather than existing estimates .

  5. Grouping of light water reactors for evaluation of decay heat removal capability

    SciTech Connect

    Karol, R.; Fresco, A.; Perkins, K.R.

    1984-06-01

    This grouping report provides a compilation of decay heat removal systems (DHRS) data for operating commercial light water reactors. The reactors have been divided into 12 groups based on similarity of the DHRS and related systems as part of the NRC Task Action Plan on Shutdown Decay Heat Removal Requirements.

  6. Time-resolved refractive index and absorption mapping of light-plasma filaments in water.

    PubMed

    Minardi, Stefano; Gopal, Amrutha; Tatarakis, Michael; Couairon, Arnaud; Tamosauskas, Gintaras; Piskarskas, Rimtautas; Dubietis, Audrius; Di Trapani, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    By means of a quantitative shadowgraphic method, we performed a space-time characterization of the refractive index variation and transient absorption induced by a light-plasma filament generated by a 120 fs laser pulse in water. The formation and evolution of the plasma channel in the proximity of the nonlinear focus were observed with a 23 fs time resolution. PMID:18157267

  7. BENTHIC AND WATER COLUMN PROCESSES IN A SUBTROPICAL ESTUARY: EFFECTS OF LIGHT ON OXYGEN FLUXES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Murrell, M.C., J.D. Hagy, J.G. Campbell and J.M. Caffrey. In press. Benthic and Water Column Processes in a Subtropical Estuary: Effects of Light on Oxygen Fluxes (Abstract). To be presented at the ASLO 2004 Summer Meeting: The Changing Landscapes of Oceans and Freshwater, 13-18 ...

  8. In-Reactor Oxidation of Zircaloy-4 Under Low Water Vapor Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Clayton, Kevin; Longhurst, Glen

    2015-01-01

    Complementary in- and ex-reactor oxidation tests have been performed to evaluate the oxidation and hydrogen absorption performance of Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) under relatively low partial pressures (300 and 1000 Pa) of water vapor at specified test temperatures (330° and 370°C). Data from these tests will be used to support fabrication of components intended for isotope-producing targets and provide information regarding the temperature and pressure dependence of oxidation and hydrogen absorption of Zr-4 over the specified range of test conditions. Comparisons between in- and ex- reactor test results were performed to evaluate the influence of irradiation.

  9. In-reactor oxidation of zircaloy-4 under low water vapor pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Clayton, Kevin K.; Longhurst, Glen R.

    2015-01-01

    Complementary in- and ex-reactor oxidation tests have been performed to evaluate the oxidation and hydrogen absorption performance of Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) under relatively low partial pressures (300 and 1000 Pa) of water vapor at specified test temperatures (330 and 370 ºC). Data from these tests will be used to support the fabrication of components intended for isotope-producing targets and provide information regarding the temperature and pressure dependence of oxidation and hydrogen absorption of Zr- 4 over the specified range of test conditions. Comparisons between in- and ex-reactor test results were performed to evaluate the influence of irradiation.

  10. Protective structures on the surface of zirconium components of light water reactor cores: Formation, testing, and prototype equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begrambekov, L. B.; Gordeev, A. A.; Evsin, A. E.; Ivanova, S. V.; Kaplevsky, A. S.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.

    2015-12-01

    The results of tests of plasma treatment of zirconium and deposition of protective yttrium coatings used as the methods of protection of zirconium components of light water reactor cores against hydrogenation are detailed. The amount of hydrogen in the treated sample exposed to superheated steam for 2500 h at temperature T = 400°C and pressure p = 1 atm was five times lower than the corresponding value for the untreated one. The amount of hydrogen in the sample coated with yttrium remained almost unchanged in 4000 h of exposure. A plasma method for rapid testing for hydrogen resistance is proposed. The hydrogenation rate provided by this method is 700 times higher than that in tests with superheated steam. The results of preliminary experiments confirm the possibility of constructing a unit for batch processing of the surfaces of fuel rod claddings.

  11. Protective structures on the surface of zirconium components of light water reactor cores: Formation, testing, and prototype equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Begrambekov, L. B.; Gordeev, A. A.; Evsin, A. E. Ivanova, S. V.; Kaplevsky, A. S.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.

    2015-12-15

    The results of tests of plasma treatment of zirconium and deposition of protective yttrium coatings used as the methods of protection of zirconium components of light water reactor cores against hydrogenation are detailed. The amount of hydrogen in the treated sample exposed to superheated steam for 2500 h at temperature T = 400°C and pressure p = 1 atm was five times lower than the corresponding value for the untreated one. The amount of hydrogen in the sample coated with yttrium remained almost unchanged in 4000 h of exposure. A plasma method for rapid testing for hydrogen resistance is proposed. The hydrogenation rate provided by this method is 700 times higher than that in tests with superheated steam. The results of preliminary experiments confirm the possibility of constructing a unit for batch processing of the surfaces of fuel rod claddings.

  12. Variation of Pressure with Depth of Water: Working with High-Tech and Low-Cost Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornek, Funda; Zziwa, Byansi Jude; Taganahan, Teresita D.

    2013-01-01

    When you dive underwater, you feel the pressure on your ears and, as you dive deeper, more pressure is felt. This article presents an activity that teachers might find useful for demonstrating the relationship between water depth and pressure. (Contains 5 figures and 1 table.)

  13. Tissue fusion bursting pressure and the role of tissue water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cezo, James; Kramer, Eric; Taylor, Kenneth; Ferguson, Virginia; Rentschler, Mark

    2013-02-01

    Tissue fusion is a complex, poorly understood process which bonds collagenous tissues together using heat and pressure. The goal of this study is to elucidate the role of hydration in bond efficacy. Hydration of porcine splenic arteries (n=30) was varied by pre-fusion treatments: 24-48 hour immersion in isotonic, hypotonic, or hypertonic baths. Treated arteries were fused in several locations using Conmed's Altrus thermal fusion device and the bursting pressure was then measured for each fused segment. Artery sections were then weighed before and after lyophilization, to quantify water content. Histology (HE, EVG staining) enabled visualization of the bonding interface. Bursting pressure was significantly greater (p=4.17 E-ll) for the hypotonic group (607.6 +/- 83.2mmHg), while no significant difference existed between the isotonic (332.6 +/- 44.7mmHg) and hypertonic (348.7 +/- 44.0mmHg) treatment groups. Total water content varied (p=8.80 E-24) from low water content in the hypertonic samples (72.5% weight +/- 0.9), to high water content in the hypotonic samples (83.1% weight +/- 1.9), while the isotonic samples contained 78.8% weight +/- 1.1. Strength differences between the treated vessels imply that bound water driven from the tissue during fusion may reveal available collagen crosslinking sites to facilitate bond formation during the fusion process. Thus when the tissue contains greater bound water volumes, more crosslinking sites may become available during fusion, leading to a stronger bond. This study provides an important step towards understanding the chemistry underlying tissue fusion and the mechanics of tissue fusion as a function of bound water within the tissue.

  14. Porous graphene-based membranes for water purification from metal ions at low differential pressures.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaewoo; Bazylewski, Paul; Fanchini, Giovanni

    2016-05-14

    A new generation of membranes for water purification based on weakly oxidized and nanoporous few-layer graphene is here introduced. These membranes dramatically decrease the high energy requirements of water purification by reverse osmosis. They combine the advantages of porous and non-oxidized single-layer graphene, offering energy-efficient water filtration at relatively low differential pressures, and highly oxidized graphene oxide, exhibiting high performance in terms of impurity adsorption. In the reported fabrication process, leaks between juxtaposed few-layer graphene flakes are sealed by thermally annealed colloidal silica, in a treatment that precedes the opening of (sub)nanometre-size pores in graphene. This process, explored for the first time in this work, results in nanoporous graphene flakes that are water-tight at the edges without occluding the (sub)nanopores. With this method, removal of impurities from water occurs through a combination of size-based pore rejection and pore-edge adsorption. Thinness of graphene flakes allows these membranes to achieve water purification from metal ions in concentrations of few parts-per-million at differential pressures as low as 30 kPa, outperforming existing graphene or graphene oxide purification systems with comparable flow rates. PMID:27098780

  15. Weak interactions between water and clathrate-forming gases at low pressures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Thürmer, Konrad; Yuan, Chunqing; Kimmel, Greg A.; Kay, Bruce D.; Smith, R. Scott

    2015-07-17

    Using scanning probe microscopy and temperature programed desorption we examined the interaction between water and two common clathrate-forming gases, methane and isobutane, at low temperature and low pressure. Water co-deposited with up to 10–1 mbar methane or 10–5 mbar isobutane at 140 K onto a Pt(111) substrate yielded pure crystalline ice, i.e., the exposure to up to ~ 107 gas molecules for each deposited water molecule did not have any detectable effect on the growing films. Exposing metastable, less than 2 molecular layers thick, water films to 10–5 mbar methane does not alter their morphology, suggesting that the presence ofmore » the Pt(111) surface is not a strong driver for hydrate formation. This weak water–gas interaction at low pressures is supported by our thermal desorption measurements from amorphous solid water and crystalline ice where 1 ML of methane desorbs near ~ 43 K and isobutane desorbs near ~ 100 K. As a result, similar desorption temperatures were observed for desorption from amorphous solid water.« less

  16. Water solubility measurements in supercritical fluids and high-pressure liquids using near-infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, K.; Bowman, L.E.; Fulton, J.L.

    1995-07-15

    A small amount of water added to a supercritical fluid can greatly increase the solubility of polar species in nonpolar fluids. These modified supercritical solutions significantly expand the use of the fluids in separations and reactions. In order to successfully utilize these systems, information on the miscibility or solubility of water in the fluid is required. Often solubility data are not available for water in a supercritical fluid under a given set of temperature and pressure conditions, and a costly set of equipment must be assembled in order to make these measurements. A relatively fast and inexpensive technique to measure water solubilities using a simple long path length optical cell in an FT-IR spectrometer is described. This technique is also applicable to common and newly developed refrigerants where water solubilities are often unknown at temperatures much above ambient. In this paper, water solubility data in carbon dioxide and two types of refrigerants (chlorodifluoromethane, R22; 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane, R134a) are presented for temperatures from approximately 40 to 110{degree}C and pressures from approximately 10 to 344.8 bar. 26 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Porous graphene-based membranes for water purification from metal ions at low differential pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaewoo; Bazylewski, Paul; Fanchini, Giovanni

    2016-05-01

    A new generation of membranes for water purification based on weakly oxidized and nanoporous few-layer graphene is here introduced. These membranes dramatically decrease the high energy requirements of water purification by reverse osmosis. They combine the advantages of porous and non-oxidized single-layer graphene, offering energy-efficient water filtration at relatively low differential pressures, and highly oxidized graphene oxide, exhibiting high performance in terms of impurity adsorption. In the reported fabrication process, leaks between juxtaposed few-layer graphene flakes are sealed by thermally annealed colloidal silica, in a treatment that precedes the opening of (sub)nanometre-size pores in graphene. This process, explored for the first time in this work, results in nanoporous graphene flakes that are water-tight at the edges without occluding the (sub)nanopores. With this method, removal of impurities from water occurs through a combination of size-based pore rejection and pore-edge adsorption. Thinness of graphene flakes allows these membranes to achieve water purification from metal ions in concentrations of few parts-per-million at differential pressures as low as 30 kPa, outperforming existing graphene or graphene oxide purification systems with comparable flow rates.

  18. Weak interactions between water and clathrate-forming gases at low pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Thürmer, Konrad; Yuan, Chunqing; Kimmel, Greg A.; Kay, Bruce D.; Smith, R. Scott

    2015-07-17

    Using scanning probe microscopy and temperature programed desorption we examined the interaction between water and two common clathrate-forming gases, methane and isobutane, at low temperature and low pressure. Water co-deposited with up to 10–1 mbar methane or 10–5 mbar isobutane at 140 K onto a Pt(111) substrate yielded pure crystalline ice, i.e., the exposure to up to ~ 107 gas molecules for each deposited water molecule did not have any detectable effect on the growing films. Exposing metastable, less than 2 molecular layers thick, water films to 10–5 mbar methane does not alter their morphology, suggesting that the presence of the Pt(111) surface is not a strong driver for hydrate formation. This weak water–gas interaction at low pressures is supported by our thermal desorption measurements from amorphous solid water and crystalline ice where 1 ML of methane desorbs near ~ 43 K and isobutane desorbs near ~ 100 K. As a result, similar desorption temperatures were observed for desorption from amorphous solid water.

  19. Pressure Broadening of Several Terahertz Transitions of Water from 20K to 200K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Michael J.; Drouin, Brian J.; Pearson, John C.

    2009-06-01

    The pressure broadening of the 0_{00} to 1_{11}, 1_{11} to 2_{02}, 3_{03} to 3_{12}, 2_{21} to 3_{12} and 3_{12} to 3_{21} transitions of water by hydrogen and helium has been investigated using the collisional cooling technique. This technique has allowed the broadening to be examined over the temperature range of 20K to 200K, far below the freezing point of water. The results of the investigation show a general trend of two distinct regions of broadening for each rotational line. Above 50K, the temperature dependence of the broadening follows the expected power law behavior. Below 50K, the broadening decreases very rapidly with temperature. This behavior is similar to that observed in a recent study of the pressure broadening of the 556 GHz line of water completed in our lab. However, this behavior is in sharp contrast to that predicted by previous theoretical calculations. We will present the results of our current investigation. This will include a discussion comparing the current study with the results of the previous experimental and theoretical work. The pressure broadening is a window into the collisional excitation and the implications of our results for the interpretation of water spectra in the interstellar medium will be discussed.

  20. Water Dynamics in Shewanella oneidensis at Ambient and High Pressure using Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Foglia, Fabrizia; Hazael, Rachael; Simeoni, Giovanna G.; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Moulin, Martine; Haertlein, Michael; Trevor Forsyth, V.; Seydel, Tilo; Daniel, Isabelle; Meersman, Filip; McMillan, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) is an ideal technique for studying water transport and relaxation dynamics at pico- to nanosecond timescales and at length scales relevant to cellular dimensions. Studies of high pressure dynamic effects in live organisms are needed to understand Earth’s deep biosphere and biotechnology applications. Here we applied QENS to study water transport in Shewanella oneidensis at ambient (0.1 MPa) and high (200 MPa) pressure using H/D isotopic contrast experiments for normal and perdeuterated bacteria and buffer solutions to distinguish intracellular and transmembrane processes. The results indicate that intracellular water dynamics are comparable with bulk diffusion rates in aqueous fluids at ambient conditions but a significant reduction occurs in high pressure mobility. We interpret this as due to enhanced interactions with macromolecules in the nanoconfined environment. Overall diffusion rates across the cell envelope also occur at similar rates but unexpected narrowing of the QENS signal appears between momentum transfer values Q = 0.7–1.1 Å−1 corresponding to real space dimensions of 6–9 Å. The relaxation time increase can be explained by correlated dynamics of molecules passing through Aquaporin water transport complexes located within the inner or outer membrane structures. PMID:26738409