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1

Preventing dengue/dengue haemorrhagic fever outbreaks in the National Capital Territory of Delhi--the role of entomological surveillance.  

PubMed

Outbreaks of Dengue/Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever have been occurring in the National Capital Territory (NCT) Delhi from time to time. A massive outbreak of Dengue/DHF causing considerable mortality occurred in 1996 in the NCT, Delhi. Since this outbreak regular entomological surveillance has been instituted, for timely preventive action against Dengue/DHF. The Central Cross Checking Organisation (CCO) of the National Malaria Eradication Programme cross-checks Aedes surveillance activities in Delhi. In this paper we present our experiences in entomological surveillance in relation Dengue, to share them with other workers in this field. PMID:10093427

Kaul, S M; Sharma, R S; Sharma, S N; Panigrahi, N; Phukan, P K; Lal, S

1998-09-01

2

Mediational Effects of Self-Efficacy Dimensions in the Relationship between Knowledge of Dengue and Dengue Preventive Behaviour with Respect to Control of Dengue Outbreaks: A Structural Equation Model of a Cross-Sectional Survey  

PubMed Central

Background Dengue fever is endemic in Malaysia, with frequent major outbreaks in urban areas. The major control strategy relies on health promotional campaigns aimed at encouraging people to reduce mosquito breeding sites close to people's homes. However, such campaigns have not always been 100% effective. The concept of self-efficacy is an area of increasing research interest in understanding how health promotion can be most effective. This paper reports on a study of the impact of self-efficacy on dengue knowledge and dengue preventive behaviour. Methods and Findings We recruited 280 adults from 27 post-outbreak villages in the state of Terengganu, east coast of Malaysia. Measures of health promotion and educational intervention activities and types of communication during outbreak, level of dengue knowledge, level and strength of self-efficacy and dengue preventive behaviour were obtained via face-to-face interviews and questionnaires. A structural equation model was tested and fitted the data well (?2?=?71.659, df?=?40, p?=?0.002, RMSEA?=?0.053, CFI?=?0.973, TLI?=?0.963). Mass media, local contact and direct information-giving sessions significantly predicted level of knowledge of dengue. Level and strength of self-efficacy fully mediated the relationship between knowledge of dengue and dengue preventive behaviours. Strength of self-efficacy acted as partial mediator in the relationship between knowledge of dengue and dengue preventive behaviours. Conclusions To control and prevent dengue outbreaks by behavioural measures, health promotion and educational interventions during outbreaks should now focus on those approaches that are most likely to increase the level and strength of self-efficacy.

Isa, Affendi; Loke, Yoon K.; Smith, Jane R.; Papageorgiou, Alexia; Hunter, Paul R.

2013-01-01

3

Lessons learned from previous dengue outbreaks  

PubMed Central

Dengue is an important tropical infection caused by an arbovirus dengue. As a mosquito borne infection, this disease is widely spread in several tropical endemic countries. Millions of world populations are at risk for this arboviral infection. Each year, thousands of dengue infections are reported and there are several death cases. Each year, the outbreaks of dengue emerge in several countries and this implies the global importance of this infection. Fighting with dengue outbreak is important in public health. In this specific chapter, the author discussed lessons learned from previous dengue outbreaks.

Wiwanitkit, Viroj

2014-01-01

4

Dengue Outbreak in Hadramout, Yemen, 2010: An Epidemiological Perspective  

PubMed Central

We analyzed surveillance data of a dengue outbreak (2010) reported to the Hadramout Health Office (Yemen) and retrospectively analyzed dengue-related epidemiological and entomological events reported in Hadramout from 2005 to 2009. A total of 630 immunoglobulin M (IgM) -confirmed dengue cases of 982 febrile cases was reported during the period from February to June of 2010; 12 cases died, giving case fatality a rate of 1.9%. Among febrile cases, the highest proportion of dengue cases (37.3%) was reported in the 15- to 24-year-old age group. The overall attack rate was 0.89/1,000. The average number of cases reported by month over the preceding 5-year period compared with the 2010 data is consistent with endemicity of dengue in the region and supports epidemic designation for the dengue activity in 2010. Recognition of endemic dengue transmission and potential for substantial dengue epidemics highlight the need for consistent laboratory-based surveillance that can support prevention and control activities accordingly.

Ghouth, Abdulla Salim Bin; Amarasinghe, Ananda; Letson, G. William

2012-01-01

5

Dengue outbreak in Hadramout, Yemen, 2010: an epidemiological perspective.  

PubMed

We analyzed surveillance data of a dengue outbreak (2010) reported to the Hadramout Health Office (Yemen) and retrospectively analyzed dengue-related epidemiological and entomological events reported in Hadramout from 2005 to 2009. A total of 630 immunoglobulin M (IgM) -confirmed dengue cases of 982 febrile cases was reported during the period from February to June of 2010; 12 cases died, giving case fatality a rate of 1.9%. Among febrile cases, the highest proportion of dengue cases (37.3%) was reported in the 15- to 24-year-old age group. The overall attack rate was 0.89/1,000. The average number of cases reported by month over the preceding 5-year period compared with the 2010 data is consistent with endemicity of dengue in the region and supports epidemic designation for the dengue activity in 2010. Recognition of endemic dengue transmission and potential for substantial dengue epidemics highlight the need for consistent laboratory-based surveillance that can support prevention and control activities accordingly. PMID:22665621

Bin Ghouth, Abdulla Salim; Amarasinghe, Ananda; Letson, G William

2012-06-01

6

Implications of Dengue Outbreaks for Blood Supply, Australia  

PubMed Central

Dengue outbreaks have increased in size and frequency in Australia, and transfusion-transmitted dengue poses a risk to transfusion safety. Using whole blood samples collected during the large 2008–2009 dengue epidemic, we estimated the risk for a dengue-infectious blood donation as ?1 in 7,146 (range 2,218–50,021).

Seed, Clive R.; Fryk, Jesse J.; Hyland, Catherine A.; Ritchie, Scott A.; Taylor, Carmel T.; Van Der Merwe, Kathryn L.; Flower, Robert L.P.; McBride, William J.H.

2013-01-01

7

Dengue Outbreak in Key West, Florida, USA, 2009  

PubMed Central

After 3 dengue cases were acquired in Key West, Florida, we conducted a serosurvey to determine the scope of the outbreak. Thirteen residents showed recent infection (infection rate 5%; 90% CI 2%–8%), demonstrating the reemergence of dengue in Florida. Increased awareness of dengue among health care providers is needed.

Radke, Elizabeth G.; Gregory, Christopher J.; Kintziger, Kristina W.; Sauber-Schatz, Erin K.; Hunsperger, Elizabeth A.; Gallagher, Glen R.; Barber, Jean M.; Biggerstaff, Brad J.; Stanek, Danielle R.; Tomashek, Kay M.

2012-01-01

8

Space-time analysis of the dengue spreading dynamics in the 2004 Tartagal outbreak, Northern Argentina.  

PubMed

The spreading dynamic of the 2004 dengue fever outbreak that occurred in Tartagal, Northwestern Argentina, was investigated. A total of 487 suspected dengue cases were recorded and geo-referenced. Maps of daily cases were generated for the 109 days of the outbreak. The epidemic affected the majority of the city within 11 days. The age-distribution of the cases was different from the population age-distribution. The spatio-temporal clustering of the cases was analyzed using Knox test concept. Results of the space and time geo-referencing of the cases showed outbreak spotlights and spreading patterns that could be related to entomologic and epidemiologic factors. An environmental risk prediction model was developed based on a synthetic multi-band image created from LandSat 5 TM satellite image. The potential and limitations of remote sensing data and spatial statistics as landscape epidemiology tools for a dengue surveillance strategy and prevention are discussed. PMID:17603989

Rotela, Camilo; Fouque, Florence; Lamfri, Mario; Sabatier, Phillipe; Introini, Virginia; Zaidenberg, Mario; Scavuzzo, Carlos

2007-07-01

9

[Dengue prevention: focus on information].  

PubMed

The first three months of 2002 witnessed a dengue epidemic in the State of Rio de Janeiro. At that time, health authorities encouraged community participation in the elimination of vector breeding sites. For this campaign, a great quantity of information about the disease was extensively publicized in order to guide the population's preventive action. This paper analyzed the three pamphlets most widely distributed at that time in Rio de Janeiro city considering that this information contributed to the construction of disease representation and its prevention. It was observed that even though this information was provided repeatedly it must be revised. PMID:15334270

Lenzi, Márcia de Freitas; Coura, Lea Camillo

2004-01-01

10

A deviation bar chart for detecting dengue outbreaks in Puerto Rico.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention deviation bar chart (Statistical Software for Public Health Surveillance) and laboratory-based surveillance data were evaluated for their utility in detecting dengue outbreaks in Puerto Rico. METHODS: A significant increase in dengue incidence was defined as an excess of suspected cases of more than 2 SDs beyond the mean for all 4-week periods from April through June (the period of lowest seasonal incidence), 1989 through 1993. An outbreak was defined as a cumulative annual rate of reported dengue greater than 3 per 1000 population. RESULTS: Retrospective application of the system to 1994 data showed agreement with previous analyses. In 1995 and 1996, 36.4% and 27.3%, respectively, of municipalities with a significant increase in reports for 2 or more consecutive weeks before the first week of September had an outbreak, compared with 9.0% (in 1995, P = .042) and 6.0% (in 1996, P = .054) of towns without a significant increase. The system showed sensitivity near 40%, specificity near 89%, and accuracy in classifying municipalities near 84%. CONCLUSIONS: This method provides a statistically based, visually striking, specific, and timely signal for dengue control efforts.

Rigau-Perez, J G; Millard, P S; Walker, D R; Deseda, C C; Casta-Velez, A

1999-01-01

11

Dengue  

MedlinePLUS

Dengue is an infection caused by a virus. You can get it if an infected mosquito bites you. Dengue does not spread from person to person. It ... the world. Outbreaks occur in the rainy season. Dengue is rare in the United States. Symptoms include ...

12

Dengue virus type 1 clade replacement in recurring homotypic outbreaks  

PubMed Central

Background Recurring dengue outbreaks occur in cyclical pattern in most endemic countries. The recurrences of dengue virus (DENV) infection predispose the population to increased risk of contracting the severe forms of dengue. Understanding the DENV evolutionary mechanism underlying the recurring dengue outbreaks has important implications for epidemic prediction and disease control. Results We used a set of viral envelope (E) gene to reconstruct the phylogeny of DENV-1 isolated between the periods of 1987–2011 in Malaysia. Phylogenetic analysis of DENV-1 E gene revealed that genotype I virus clade replacements were associated with the cyclical pattern of major DENV-1 outbreaks in Malaysia. A total of 9 non-conservative amino acid substitutions in the DENV-1 E gene consensus were identified; 4 in domain I, 3 in domain II and 2 in domain III. Selection pressure analyses did not reveal any positively selected codon site within the full length E gene sequences (1485 nt, 495 codons). A total of 183 (mean dN/dS = 0.0413) negatively selected sites were found within the Malaysian isolates; neither positive nor negative selection was noted for the remaining 312 codons. All the viruses were cross-neutralized by the respective patient sera suggesting no strong support for immunological advantage of any of the amino acid substitutions. Conclusion DENV-1 clade replacement is associated with recurrences of major DENV-1 outbreaks in Malaysia. Our findings are consistent with those of other studies that the DENV-1 clade replacement is a stochastic event independent of positive selection.

2013-01-01

13

Preventing Measles Outbreaks  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... spread airborne virus since 2002. But a new "Pediatrics" study, exploring a 2011 outbreak in Minnesota, suggests that the U.S. is not home free yet. The problem according to the researchers: parents who choose not to vaccinate their children, often out of fears that the vaccine may ...

14

Outbreak of dengue virus serotype-2 (DENV-2) of Cambodian origin in Manipur, India - Association with meteorological factors  

PubMed Central

Background & objectives: Dengue is a major health problem in many parts of India and its neighbouring countries. Dengue cases have not been reported from Manipur, a northeastern State of India till 2007. But, the sudden outbreak of fever with febrile illness during 2007 and 2008, suspected to be dengue/dengue haemorrhagic fever was investigated to detect the causative agent. Potential impact of climatic variables on dengue transmission has been documented and hence the association between climatic factors, entomological parameters and dengue cases was also analysed. Methods: Forty two and 16 blood samples were collected from patients suspected to have dengue infection in the year 2007 and 2008, respectively. Viral RNA was extracted from serum samples and subjected to multiplex one step RT-PCR assay. Dengue specific amplicons were sequenced and phylogenetic analysis was carried out. Multiyear trend analysis and ‘t’ test were performed for the comparison of different meteorological variables between the years 2000-2004 and 2005-2008. Results: The aetiological agent was found to be DENV-2 and the phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolate was similar to that of Cambodian isolate. There was a significant difference in minimum temperature (P<0.05), Relative humidity - morning hours (P<0.001), relative humanity - afternoon hours (P<0.01) and cumulative precipitation (P< 0.05) between the years 2000-2004 and 2005-2008. Interpretation & conclusions: The sudden outbreak of dengue fever in Manipur State occurred was possibly due to the increased temperature, relative humidity and decrease in cumulative precipitation. These climatic factors would have contributed to the Aedes mosquito abundance and increased virus transmission. Proper diseases surveillance system integrated with meteorological warning system and management of vector breeding sites will prevent such outbreaks in future.

Sankari, T.; Hoti, S.L.; Singh, Th Bhubonchandra; Shanmugavel, J.

2012-01-01

15

The 1996 outbreak of dengue hemorrhagic fever in Delhi, India.  

PubMed

A major outbreak of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) affected more than 10,000 people in Delhi and neighboring areas in 1996. The outbreak started in September, peaked in October to November and lasted till early December. The clinical and laboratory data of 515 adult patients admitted to Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi were reviewed. Fever (100%), myalgias and malaise (96%), abdominal pain (10.2%) and vomiting (8.7%) were the prominent presenting features. Hemorrhagic manifestations were seen in all patients- a positive tourniquet test (21.2%), scattered petechial rash (23.07%), confluent rash (2.7%), epistaxis (38.4%), gum bleeds (28.06%) and hematemesis (22.86%) being the major bleeding manifestations. Hepatomegaly was observed in 96% of the patients. Laboratory investigations revealed thrombocytopenia, hemoconcentration and leukopenia. Serological confirmation with a microcapture ELISA technic was done in 143/515 patients. The mortality rate was 6.6% and, multiple bleeding manifestations, severe thrombocytopenia, hypoproteinemia and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) were associated with a higher mortality. PMID:10437946

Anuradha, S; Singh, N P; Rizvi, S N; Agarwal, S K; Gur, R; Mathur, M D

1998-09-01

16

On the analysis of effectiveness in mass application of mosquito repellent for dengue disease prevention  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dengue disease has been known as one of dangerous vector-borne diseases and become serious threat in many tropical countries. With no vaccine and antiviral available until nowadays, and frequent appearance of extraordinary dengue outbreaks, many governments are forced to declare national problem for dengue. At this moment, the only method available to prevent dengue disease transmission is to combat the disease-carrying mosquitoes as well as to reduce the contact between human and mosquitoes. The fast growing dengue transmission in many countries in recent years indicates that the mosquito control programs are far from successful. The use of mosquito repellent is one possible instrument which could be used as an effective mass treatment to prevent the dengue outbreak during endemic period. Here in this paper a Susceptible-Infectious-Recovered (S-I-R) dengue transmission model with repellent mass treatment is being applied to portions of children and adult compartments. Analysis of the basic reproductive ratio (Ro) of the model is done. It is shown, with reasonable choices of portions of treated children and adults, in combination with reduction of mosquito population, the basic reproductive ratio can be significantly reduced and occurrence of endemic can be avoided. Numerical simulations are shown for various treatment scenarios.

Aldila, D.; Soewono, E.; Nuraini, N.

2012-05-01

17

Exploring the origin and potential for spread of the 2013 dengue outbreak in Luanda, Angola  

PubMed Central

Introduction Dengue in Africa is underreported. Simultaneous reports of travellers with dengue returning from Luanda, Angola, to six countries on four continents suggest that a major dengue outbreak is currently occurring in Angola, South West Africa. Methods To identify the origin of the imported dengue virus, we sequenced the virus from Angola and investigated the interconnectivity via air travel between dengue-endemic countries and Angola. Results and Conclusion Our analyses show that the Angola outbreak was most likely caused by an endemic virus strain that had been circulating in West Africa for many years. We also show that Portugal and South Africa are most likely at the highest risk of importation of dengue from Angola due to the large number of air passengers between Angola and these countries.

Sessions, October M.; Khan, Kamran; Hou, Yan'an; Meltzer, Eyal; Quam, Mikkel; Schwartz, Eli; Gubler, Duane J.; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

2013-01-01

18

An Insular Outbreak of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever. I. Epidemiologic Observations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Between 10 July and 23 October 1966 an epidemic of dengue hemorrhagic fever occurred on an island in the Gulf of Thailand. Fourteen cases of dengue-shock syndrome (with one death) and 20 of hemorrhagic-fever syndrome due to dengue occurred. An additional ...

P. E. Winter T. M. Yuill S. Udomaskdi D. Gould S. Nantapanich

1968-01-01

19

A data-driven epidemiological prediction method for dengue outbreaks using local and remote sensing data  

PubMed Central

Background Dengue is the most common arboviral disease of humans, with more than one third of the world’s population at risk. Accurate prediction of dengue outbreaks may lead to public health interventions that mitigate the effect of the disease. Predicting infectious disease outbreaks is a challenging task; truly predictive methods are still in their infancy. Methods We describe a novel prediction method utilizing Fuzzy Association Rule Mining to extract relationships between clinical, meteorological, climatic, and socio-political data from Peru. These relationships are in the form of rules. The best set of rules is automatically chosen and forms a classifier. That classifier is then used to predict future dengue incidence as either HIGH (outbreak) or LOW (no outbreak), where these values are defined as being above and below the mean previous dengue incidence plus two standard deviations, respectively. Results Our automated method built three different fuzzy association rule models. Using the first two weekly models, we predicted dengue incidence three and four weeks in advance, respectively. The third prediction encompassed a four-week period, specifically four to seven weeks from time of prediction. Using previously unused test data for the period 4–7 weeks from time of prediction yielded a positive predictive value of 0.686, a negative predictive value of 0.976, a sensitivity of 0.615, and a specificity of 0.982. Conclusions We have developed a novel approach for dengue outbreak prediction. The method is general, could be extended for use in any geographical region, and has the potential to be extended to other environmentally influenced infections. The variables used in our method are widely available for most, if not all countries, enhancing the generalizability of our method.

2012-01-01

20

Public Health Responses to a Dengue Outbreak in a Fragile State: A Case Study of Nepal  

PubMed Central

Objectives. The number of countries reporting dengue cases is increasing worldwide. Nepal saw its first dengue outbreak in 2010, with 96% of cases reported in three districts. There are numerous policy challenges to providing an effective public health response system in a fragile state. This paper evaluates the dengue case notification, surveillance, laboratory facilities, intersectoral collaboration, and how government and community services responded to the outbreak. Methods. Qualitative data were collected through 20 in-depth interviews, with key stakeholders, and two focus-group discussions, with seven participants. Results. Limitations of case recognition included weak diagnostic facilities and private hospitals not incorporated into the case reporting system. Research on vectors was weak, with no virological surveillance. Limitations of outbreak response included poor coordination and an inadequate budget. There was good community mobilization and emergency response but no routine vector control. Conclusions. A weak state has limited response capabilities. Disease surveillance and response plans need to be country-specific and consider state response capacity and the level of endemicity. Two feasible solutions for Nepal are (1) go upwards to regional collaboration for disease and vector surveillance, laboratory assistance, and staff training; (2) go downwards to expand upon community mobilisation, ensuring that vector control is anticipatory to outbreaks.

Griffiths, Karolina; Banjara, Megha Raj; O'Dempsey, T.; Munslow, B.; Kroeger, Axel

2013-01-01

21

E. Coli: Preventing Outbreaks at Camp.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One strain of E. coli is not usually found in foods, but has been related to consumption of undercooked ground beef. Symptoms are stomach cramps and diarrhea, and 2-7% of infections lead to hemolytic uremic syndrome, which is life threatening. Camps can prevent outbreaks by avoiding uncooked meat on overnight campouts and requiring appropriate…

McKinney, Mary D.

1996-01-01

22

Outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever caused by dengue virus type 3 in Al-Mukalla, Yemen  

PubMed Central

Background Investigations were conducted by the authors to explore an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) reported in 2010 from Al-Mukalla city, the capital of Hadramout in Yemen. Methods From 15–17 June 2010, the outbreak investigation period, specimens were obtained within 7?days after onset of illness of 18 acutely ill patients hospitalized with VHF and 15 household asymptomatic contacts of 6 acute cases. Additionally, 189 stored sera taken from acutely ill patients with suspected VHF hospitalized in the preceding 12?months were obtained from the Ministry of Health of Yemen. Thus, a total of 222 human specimens were collected; 207 specimens from acute cases and 15 specimens from contacts. All samples were tested with RT-PCR for dengue (DENV), Alkhumra (ALKV), Rift Valley Fever (RVFV), Yellow Fever (YFV), and Chikungunya (CHIKV) viruses. Samples were also tested for DENV IgM, IgG, and NS1-antigen. Medical records of patients were reviewed and demographic, clinical, and laboratory data was collected. Results Of 207 patients tested, 181 (87.4%) patients were confirmed to have acute dengue with positive dengue NS1-antigen (97 patients, 46.9%) and/or IgM (163 patients, 78.7%). Of the 181 patients with confirmed dengue, 100 (55.2%) patients were IgG-positive. DENV RNA was detected in 2 (1%) patients with acute symptoms; both samples were molecularly typed as DENV type 3. No other VHF viruses were detected. For the 15 contacts tested, RT-PCR tests for the five viruses were negative, one contact was dengue IgM positive, and another one was dengue IgG positive. Of the 181 confirmed dengue patients, 120 (66.3%) patients were males and the median age was 24?years. The most common manifestations included fever (100%), headache (94.5%), backache (93.4%), malaise (88.4%), arthralgia (85.1%), myalgia (82.3%), bone pain (77.9%), and leukopenia (76.2%). Two (1.1%) patients died. Conclusions DENV-3 was confirmed to be the cause of an outbreak of VHF in Al-Mukalla. It is important to use both IgM and NS1-antigen tests to confirm acute dengue particularly under the adverse field conditions, where proper storage and transportation of specimens are missing, which substantially reduce the sensitivity of the RT-PCR for detecting DENV RNA.

2013-01-01

23

Best Practices in Dengue Surveillance: A Report from the Asia-Pacific and Americas Dengue Prevention Boards  

PubMed Central

Background Dengue fever is a virus infection that is spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito and can cause severe disease especially in children. Dengue fever is a major problem in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. Methodology/Principal Findings We invited dengue experts from around the world to attend meetings to discuss dengue surveillance. We reviewed literature, heard detailed reports on surveillance programs, and shared expert opinions. Results Presentations by 22 countries were heard during the 2.5 day meetings. We describe the best methods of surveillance in general, the stakeholders in dengue surveillance, and the steps from mosquito bite to reporting of a dengue case to explore how best to carry out dengue surveillance. We also provide details and a comparison of the dengue surveillance programs by the presenting countries. Conclusions/Significance The experts provided recommendations for achieving the best possible data from dengue surveillance accepting the realities of the real world (e.g., limited funding and staff). Their recommendations included: (1) Every dengue endemic country should make reporting of dengue cases to the government mandatory; (2) electronic reporting systems should be developed and used; (3) at minimum dengue surveillance data should include incidence, hospitalization rates, deaths by age group; (4) additional studies should be completed to check the sensitivity of the system; (5) laboratories should share expertise and data; (6) tests that identify dengue virus should be used in patients with fever for four days or less and antibody tests should be used after day 4 to diagnose dengue; and (7) early detection and prediction of dengue outbreaks should be goals for national surveillance systems.

Beatty, Mark E.; Stone, Amy; Fitzsimons, David W.; Hanna, Jeffrey N.; Lam, Sai Kit; Vong, Sirenda; Guzman, Maria G.; Mendez-Galvan, Jorge F.; Halstead, Scott B.; Letson, G. William; Kuritsky, Joel; Mahoney, Richard; Margolis, Harold S.

2010-01-01

24

Clinical and Virological Descriptive Study in the 2011 Outbreak of Dengue in the Amazonas, Brazil  

PubMed Central

Background Dengue is a vector-borne disease in the tropical and subtropical region of the world and is transmitted by the mosquito Aedes aegypti. In the state of Amazonas, Brazil during the 2011 outbreak of dengue all the four Dengue virus (DENV) serotypes circulating simultaneously were observed. The aim of the study was to describe the clinical epidemiology of dengue in Manaus, the capital city of the state of the Amazonas, where all the four DENV serotypes were co-circulating simultaneously. Methodology Patients with acute febrile illness during the 2011 outbreak of dengue, enrolled at the Fundação de Medicina Tropical Dr. Heitor Viera Dourado (FMT-HVD), a referral centre for tropical and infectious diseases in Manaus, were invited to participate in a clinical and virological descriptive study. Sera from 677 patients were analyzed by RT-nested-PCRs for flaviviruses (DENV 1–4, Saint Louis encephalitis virus-SLEV, Bussuquara virus-BSQV and Ilheus virus-ILHV), alphavirus (Mayaro virus-MAYV) and orthobunyavirus (Oropouche virus-OROV). Principal Findings Only dengue viruses were detected in 260 patients (38.4%). Thirteen patients were co-infected with more than one DENV serotype and six (46.1%) of them had a more severe clinical presentation of the disease. Nucleotide sequencing showed that DENV-1 belonged to genotype V, DENV-2 to the Asian/American genotype, DENV-3 to genotype III and DENV-4 to genotype II. Conclusions Co-infection with more than one DENV serotype was observed. This finding should be warning signs to health authorities in situations of the large dispersal of serotypes that are occurring in the world.

Martins, Valquiria do Carmo Alves; Bastos, Michele de Souza; Ramasawmy, Rajendranath; de Figueiredo, Regina Pinto; Gimaque, Joao Bosco Lima; Braga, Wornei Silva Miranda; Nogueira, Mauricio Lacerda; Nozawa, Sergio; Naveca, Felipe Gomes; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes; Mourao, Maria Paula Gomes

2014-01-01

25

Dengue Virus Immunoglobulin M Detection in a Reference Laboratory Setting during the 2010 Dengue Virus Outbreak on Caribbean Islands ?  

PubMed Central

A large outbreak of dengue virus (DV) infections occurred on Caribbean islands during 2010, with cases peaking during the second half of the year. In conjunction with the outbreak, we observed an unprecedented spike in the number of sera submitted for DV antibody testing between June and December 2010, with a concomitant increase in the number of IgM-positive specimens, indicative of acute DV infection. Analysis of the place of residence of the IgM-positive patients identified from June to December of 2010 revealed that 58.1% were residents of Caribbean islands (Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands), whereas 40.6% were residents of the U.S. mainland or Hawaii. The U.S. residents represented 42 states plus the District of Columbia, but most (53%) were from just 3 states (California, Florida, and New York). In comparison to the Caribbean IgM-positive patient group, the U.S. IgM-positive patient group contained proportionately more adults 21 to 60 years old and fewer individuals <21 years old. These findings indicate that the 2010 Caribbean DV outbreak affected many U.S. residents (mostly adults, presumably travelers) from diverse geographic areas and emphasize the potential for a viremic DV-infected returning traveler to spark a local DV outbreak by introducing DV into a community with competent mosquito vectors.

Prince, Harry E.; Matud, Jose L.; Lieberman, Jay M.

2011-01-01

26

Dengue Prevention and 35 Years of Vector Control in Singapore  

PubMed Central

After a 15-year period of low incidence, dengue has reemerged in Singapore in the past decade. We identify potential causes of this resurgence. A combination of lowered herd immunity, virus transmission outside the home, an increase in the age of infection, and the adoption of a case-reactive approach to vector control contribute to the increased dengue incidence. Singapore's experience with dengue indicates that prevention efforts may not be sustainable. For renewed success, Singapore needs to return to a vector control program that is based on carefully collected entomologic and epidemiologic data. Singapore's taking on a leadership role in strengthening disease surveillance and control in Southeast Asia may also be useful in reducing virus importation.

Goh, Kee-Tai; Gubler, Duane J.

2006-01-01

27

CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Norovirus Outbreaks  

MedlinePLUS

... Environmental Assessment Information System, Norovirus Sentinel Testing and Tracking, and CaliciNet. Food service industry can: Adhere to ... Reporting System (NORS) CaliciNet Norovirus Sentinel Testing and Tracking (NoroSTAT) Foodborne Outbreaks Foodborne Outbreak Tracking and Reporting ...

28

Dengue and Severe Dengue  

MedlinePLUS

... an outbreak of dengue on Madeira islands of Portugal resulted in over 2000 cases and imported cases ... 10 other countries in Europe apart from mainland Portugal. In 2013, cases have occurred in Florida (United ...

29

Spatio-temporal dynamics of dengue 2009 outbreak in Córdoba City, Argentina.  

PubMed

During 2009 the biggest dengue epidemic to date occurred in Argentina, affecting almost half the country. We studied the spatio-temporal dynamics of the outbreak in the second most populated city of the country, Córdoba city. Confirmed cases and the results of an Aedes aegypti monitoring during the outbreak were geolocated. The imported cases began in January, and the autochthonous in March. Thirty-three percent of the 130 confirmed cases were imported, and occurred mainly at the center of the city. The autochthonous cases were more frequent in the outskirts, specially in the NE and SE. Aedes aegypti infestation showed no difference between neighborhoods with or without autochthonous cases, neither between neighborhoods with autochthonous vs. imported cases. The neighborhoods with imported cases presented higher population densities. The majority of autochthonous cases occurred at ages between 25 and 44 years old. Cases formed a spatio-temporal cluster of up to 20 days and 12km. According to a mathematical model that estimates the required number of days needed for transmission according to daily temperature, the number of cases begun to fall when more than 15.5 days were needed. This may be a coarse estimation of mean mosquito survival in the area, provided that the study area is close to the global distribution limit of the vector, and that cases prevalence was very low. PMID:24795212

Estallo, E L; Carbajo, A E; Grech, M G; Frías-Céspedes, M; López, L; Lanfri, M A; Ludueña-Almeida, F F; Almirón, W R

2014-08-01

30

Seroprevalence of Antibodies against Chikungunya, Dengue, and Rift Valley Fever Viruses after Febrile Illness Outbreak, Madagascar  

PubMed Central

In October 2009, two–3 months after an outbreak of a febrile disease with joint pain on the eastern coast of Madagascar, we assessed serologic markers for chikungunya virus (CHIKV), dengue virus (DENV), and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in 1,244 pregnant women at 6 locations. In 2 eastern coast towns, IgG seroprevalence against CHIKV was 45% and 23%; IgM seroprevalence was 28% and 5%. IgG seroprevalence against DENV was 17% and 11%. No anti-DENV IgM was detected. At 4 locations, 450–1,300 m high, IgG seroprevalence against CHIKV was 0%–3%, suggesting CHIKV had not spread to higher inland-altitudes. Four women had IgG against RVFV, probably antibodies from a 2008 epidemic. Most (78%) women from coastal locations with CHIKV-specific IgG reported joint pain and stiffness; 21% reported no symptoms. CHIKV infection was significantly associated with high bodyweight. The outbreak was an isolated CHIKV epidemic without relevant DENV co-transmission.

Girmann, Mirko; Randriamampionona, Njary; Bialonski, Alexandra; Maus, Deborah; Krefis, Anne Caroline; Njarasoa, Christine; Rajanalison, Jeanne Fleury; Ramandrisoa, Herly Daniel; Randriarison, Maurice Lucien; May, Jurgen; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Rakotozandrindrainy, Raphael

2012-01-01

31

The basic reproduction number R0 and effectiveness of reactive interventions during dengue epidemics: the 2002 dengue outbreak in Easter Island, Chile.  

PubMed

We use a stochastic simulation model to explore the effect of reactive intervention strategies during the 2002 dengue outbreak in the small population of Easter Island, Chile. We quantified the effect of interventions on the transmission dynamics and epidemic size as a function of the simulated control intensity levels and the timing of initiation of control interventions. Because no dengue outbreaks had been reported prior to 2002 in Easter Island, the 2002 epidemic provided a unique opportunity to estimate the basic reproduction number R0 during the initial epidemic phase, prior to the start of control interventions. We estimated R0 at 27.2 (95%CI: 14.8, 49.3). We found that the final epidemic size is highly sensitive to the timing of start of interventions. However, even when the control interventions start several weeks after the epidemic onset, reactive intervention efforts can have a significant impact on the final epidemic size. Our results indicate that the rapid implementation of control interventions can have a significant effect in reducing the epidemic size of dengue epidemics. PMID:24245625

Chowell, Gerardo; Fuentes, R; Olea, A; Aguilera, X; Nesse, H; Hyman, J M

2013-01-01

32

Unusual and rare manifestations of dengue during a dengue outbreak in a tertiary care hospital in South India.  

PubMed

Dengue is the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease in the world, and as a larger proportion of the population is being affected, more unusual manifestations are being reported. Very few studies have documented unusual manifestations of dengue in South India. This prospective study was undertaken from July 2011 to June 2013 to document rare manifestations of dengue fever in 175 hospitalized patients. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed by the detection of NS1Ag, dengue IgM, or IgG by ELISA and/or a RT-PCR and CDC real-time PCR for dengue virus (DENV) RNA. The daily profiles of the hematological and biochemical investigations were followed and recorded. Unusual and rare manifestations of dengue were documented for 115 patients (66 %). Hepatitis was observed in 70 % of the cases. Pleural effusion was seen in 11 %, acute renal failure in 10 %, neurological complications such as encephalitis in 7.4 %, myocarditis in 9 %, and bleeding gastric ulcers in 3.4 % of the cases. DENV serotype 2 was more prevalent in patients with unusual manifestations of dengue in our study. The WHO classification system does not include unusual and rare manifestations; hence, it is essential to be aware of these manifestations and closely monitor them for better clinical management and outcome of patients. PMID:24510171

Neeraja, M; Lakshmi, V; Teja, V D; Lavanya, Vanjari; Priyanka, E N; Subhada, K; Parida, M M; Dash, P K; Sharma, Sashi; Rao, P V L; Reddy, Gopal

2014-07-01

33

Vaccines for Dengue  

Cancer.gov

Among the arthropod-borne flaviviruses, the four dengue virus serotypes, dengue type 1 virus (DENV-1), dengue type 2 virus (DENV-2), dengue type 3 virus (DENV-3), and dengue type 4 virus (DENV-4) are most important in terms of human morbidity and geographic distribution. Dengue viruses cause dengue outbreaks and major epidemics in most tropical and subtropical areas where Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are abundant.

34

Dengue among United Nations mission in Haiti personnel, 1995: implications for preventive medicine.  

PubMed

The incidence of dengue infections has been increasing in the Caribbean, and cases have been identified among successive deployments of multinational peacekeepers to Haiti (1994-1997). In the absence of an effective vaccine or chemoprophylaxis to prevent dengue fever, vector-control operations and use of personal protection measures to prevent arthropod bites are the most effective means of limiting disease transmission. During our 5-month deployment as part of the United Nations Mission in Haiti, 79 cases of recent dengue fever were identified among 249 patients (32%) presenting with febrile illness to the 86th Combat Support Hospital. Further investigation revealed low unit readiness to perform standard vector-control activities and poor individual adherence to measures to prevent arthropod bites. Command enforcement of existing field preventive medicine doctrine is essential to prevent casualties caused by dengue, other arthropod-borne infections, and nuisance arthropod bites during military deployments. PMID:10226460

Gambel, J M; Drabick, J J; Swalko, M A; Henchal, E A; Rossi, C A; Martinez-Lopez, L

1999-04-01

35

Emergence of dengue virus 4 genotype II in Guangzhou, China, 2010: Survey and molecular epidemiology of one community outbreak  

PubMed Central

Background The re-emergence of dengue virus 4 (DENV-4) has become a public health concern in South America, Southeast Asia and South Asia. However, it has not been known to have caused a local outbreak in China for the past 20 years. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the epidemiology of one local community outbreak caused by DENV-4 in Guangzhou city, China, in 2010; and to determine the molecular characteristics of the genotype II virus involved. Case presentations During September and October of 2010, one imported case, a Guangzhou resident who travelled back from Thailand, resulted in 18 secondary autochthonous cases in Guangzhou City, with an incidence rate of 5.53 per 10,000 residents. In indigenous cases, 14 serum samples tested positive for IgM against DENV and 7 for IgG from a total of 15 submitted serum samples, accompanied by 5 DENV-4 isolates. With identical envelope gene nucleotide sequences, the two isolates (D10168-GZ from the imported index case and Guangzhou 10660 from the first isolate in the autochthonous cases) were grouped into DENV-4 genotype II after comparison to 32 previous DENV-4 isolates from GenBank that originated from different areas. Conclusions Based on epidemiological and phylogenetic analyses, the outbreak, which was absent for 20 years after the DENV-4 genotype I outbreak in 1990, was confirmed as DENV-4 genotype II and initially traced to the imported index case, a Guangzhou resident who travelled back from Thailand.

2012-01-01

36

Preventing dengue through mobile phones: Evidence from a field experiment in Peru.  

PubMed

Dengue is the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease in the world (WHO, 2009). During the last two decades, the dramatic rise in the number of dengue infections has been particularly evident in Latin American and the Caribbean countries. This paper examines the experimental evidence of the effectiveness of mobile phone technology in improving households' health preventive behavior in dengue-endemic areas. The main results suggest that repeated exposure to health information encourages households' uptake of preventive measures against dengue. As a result, the Breteau Index in treatment households, an objective measure of dengue risk transmission, is 0.10 standard deviations below the mean of the control group, which shows a reduction in the number of containers per household that test positive for dengue larvae. The estimates also show marginally significant effects of the intervention on self-reported dengue symptoms. Moreover, we use a multiple treatment framework that randomly assigns households to one of the four treatment groups in order to analyze the impacts of framing on health behavior. Different variants emphasized information on monetary and non-monetary benefits and costs. The main results show no statistical differences among treatment groups. PMID:24681813

Dammert, Ana C; Galdo, Jose C; Galdo, Virgilio

2014-05-01

37

[Dengue epidemic in New Caledonia (1989). Environmental factors and prevention].  

PubMed

An extensive dengue epidemic was reported in New Caledonia en 1989. Environmental factors (temperature and rainfalls) directly controlled the mosquitos population at the end of 1988. The introduction of a new dengue virus, transmitted by Aedes aegypti, was responsible for an epidemic that occurred in January-April 1989 and lasted until July 1989. The estimated number of cases was 25,000 and the attack rate was close to 120 per thousand inhabitants for a six month-period. The epidemic involved mainly the adult population in 84% of cases and 6-8% of patients was admitted in hospital with thrombopenia, leucopenia, minor haemorrhages in 2/3 of cases and 12 patients died with severe hemorrhagic disease or shock syndrome; initial serological results from suspected cases were positive against dengue by haemaglutination inhibition. Two dengue viruses were involved (dengue 1 and dengue 3) but dengue 3 was by far the most common. Ultra-low volume aerosols of diluted insecticide (decamethrine K'Othrine, Roussel) from road vehicles and aircraft was used from February to May to kill the adult mosquitoes (adulticiding). The efficacy dependent on the interaction of the insecticide and the flying mosquitoes is relative and debated but played probably a major role on the transmission, though the reduction of breeding sites was primarily uncovered. Since the epidemic, only sporadic cases were observed in 1991 and 1992. PMID:7819798

Laille, M; Huerre, M; Dubourdieu, H; Flye Sainte Marie, F

1993-01-01

38

An outbreak of type 2 dengue fever in the Seychelles, probably transmitted by Aedes albopictus (Skuse)  

PubMed Central

Between December 1976 and September 1977 the Seychelles group of islands in the Indian Ocean was struck by an extensive epidemic of dengue fever. The peak of the epidemic was in the last week of February. Type 2 dengue virus was isolated from patients and mosquitos. Aedes albopictus was the sole vector. The clinical picture was that of classical dengue. Haemorrhagic fever and the shock syndrome were not observed. Absenteeism from schools and offices, anamnestic questioning, and prevalence of antibodies in sera collected after the epidemic was over, indicated that approximately 75% of the population had been infected. Serological evidence was obtained of an epidemic of dengue in the islands more than 40 years earlier. This was confirmed by archival records.

Metselaar, D.; Grainger, C. R.; Oei, K. G.; Reynolds, D. G.; Pudney, M.; Leake, C. J.; Tukei, P. M.; D'Offay, R. M.; Simpson, D. I. H.

1980-01-01

39

Effect of community participation on household environment to mitigate dengue transmission in Thailand.  

PubMed

Due to the absence of dengue vaccination, vector control is the only measure to prevent dengue outbreaks. The key element of dengue prevention is to eliminate vector habitats. Clean household environment, preventive behaviors of household members and community participation in dengue prevention and control are key successful elements. This study aimed to investigate the associations between environmental factors, dengue knowledge, perception and preventive behaviors of household and collaboration of community members and household risk of dengue by using mixed methods. One dengue epidemic province was selected from each region of Thailand including Bangkok. Two districts, one from the highest and another from the lowest dengue incidence areas, were selected from those provinces. The household leaders, community members, and local authorities in highest dengue incidence areas were interviewed by using questionnaire and through group interviews. The environment of each selected household was observed. Of 4,561 households, 194 were reported having dengue case(s) in the past year and that outdoor solid waste disposal significantly influenced household risk of dengue (OR=1.62; 95% CI=1.16-2.29). In contrast, having gardening areas reduced dengue risk at household level by 32%. High level of community participation in dengue prevention and control in uninfected areas and the information from local authorities and community members reconfirmed that community participation was the key factor against dengue outbreaks. Sustainable process of encouraging community members to eliminate vector breeding sites such as outdoor solid waste disposal is likely to lead to an achievement in dengue prevention and control. PMID:24862055

Suwannapong, N; Tipayamongkholgul, M; Bhumiratana, A; Boonshuyar, C; Howteerakul, N; Poolthin, S

2014-03-01

40

Strengthening the perception-assessment tools for dengue prevention: a cross-sectional survey in a temperate region (Madeira, Portugal)  

PubMed Central

Background Community participation is mandatory in the prevention of Dengue outbreaks. Taking public views into account is crucial to guide more effective planning and quicker community participation in preventing campaigns. This study aims to assess community perceptions of Madeira population in order to explore their involvement in the A. aegypti’s control and reinforce health-educational planning. Due to the lack of accurate methodologies for measuring perception, a new tool to assess the community’s perceptions was built. Methods A cross-sectional survey was performed in the Island’s aegypti-infested area, exploring residents’ perceptions regarding most critical community behaviour: aegypti-source reduction and their domestic aegypti-breeding sites. A novel tool defining five essential topics which underlie the source reduction’s awareness and accession was built, herein called Essential-Perception (EP) analysis. Results Of 1276 individuals, 1182 completed the questionnaire (92?·?6%). EP-Score analysis revealed that community’s perceptions were scarce, inconsistent and possibly incorrect. Most of the population (99?·?6%) did not completely understood the five essential topics explored. An average of 54?·?2% of residents only partially understood each essential topic, revealing inconsistencies in their understanding. Each resident apparently believed in an average of four false assumptions/myths. Significant association (p<0.001) was found between both the EP-Score level and the domestic presence of breeding sites, supporting the validity of this EP-analysis. Aedes aegypti’s breeding sites, consisting of décor/leisure containers, presented an atypical pattern of infestation comparing with dengue prone regions. Conclusions The studied population was not prepared for being fully engaged in dengue prevention. Evidences suggest that EP-methodology was efficient and accurate in assessing the community perception and its compliance to practices. Moreover, it suggested a list of myths that could persist in the community. This is the first study reporting an aegypti-entomological pattern and community’s perception in a developed dengue-prone region. Tailored messages considering findings of this study are recommended to be used in future campaigns in order to more effectively impact the community perception and behaviour.

2014-01-01

41

Geo-visual Approach for Spatial Scan Statistics: An Analysis of Dengue Fever Outbreaks in Delhi  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are very few surveillance systems being used to detect disease outbreaks at present. In disease surveillance system, data related to cases and various risk factors are collected and then the collected data is transformed into meaningful information for effective disease control using statistical analysis tools. Disease outbreaks can be detected but for effective disease control, a visualization approach is

Raja Sengupta Shuchi Mala

2013-01-01

42

Natural attenuation of Dengue Virus Type-2 after a series of island outbreaks: a re-trospective phylogenetic study of events in the South Pacific three decades ago  

PubMed Central

Dengue is an expanding arboviral disease of variable severity characterized by the emergence of virus strains with greater fitness, epidemic potential and possibly virulence. To investigate the role of dengue virus (DENV) strain variation on epidemic activity we studied DENV-2 viruses from a series of South Pacific islands experiencing outbreaks of varying intensity and clinical severity. Initially appearing in 1971 in Tahiti and Fiji, the virus was responsible for subsequent epidemics in American Samoa, New Caledonia and Niue Island in 1972, reaching Tonga in 1973 where there was near-silent transmission for over a year. Based on whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis on 20 virus isolates, Tonga viruses were genetically unique, clustering in a single clade. Substitutions in the pre-membrane (prM) and nonstructural genes NS2A and NS4A correlated with the attenuation of the Tongan viruses and suggest that genetic change may play a significant role in dengue epidemic severity.

Steel, Argon; Gubler, Duane J.; Bennett, Shannon N.

2011-01-01

43

Risk factors for infection during a severe dengue outbreak in El Salvador in 2000.  

PubMed

In 2000, El Salvador experienced a large dengue-2 virus epidemic with many severe cases. A seroepidemiologic survey was conducted in 106 randomly selected households (501 residents) in an affected community (Las Pampitas). The frequency of recent infection, documented by the presence of IgM antibodies or high-titer IgG antibodies to dengue virus, was estimated to be 9.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 5.8-13.7), of which at least 44% were secondary infections. The number of containers positive for Aedes mosquito larvae or pupae per 100 premises (Breteau Index) was 62 and the frequency of positive premises (House Index) was 36%; 33% (35 of 106) of the informants reported having taken action against mosquito larval habitats and 82% (87 of 106) reported having taken actions against adult mosquitoes. Recent infection was associated with the presence in the home environment of mosquito infested discarded cans (odds ratio [OR] = 4.30, 95% CI = 2.54-7.28), infested discarded plastic containers (OR = 3.98, 95% CI = 1.05-15.05), and discarded tire casings (OR = 2.57, 95% CI = 1.09-6.04). The population attributable fractions associated with these factors were 4%, 13%, and 31%, respectively. Our data suggest that targeted community cleanup campaigns, particularly those directed at discarded tires and solid waste, are likely to have the greatest impact on reducing the risk of dengue infection. PMID:14740880

Hayes, John M; García-Rivera, Enid; Flores-Reyna, Roberto; Suárez-Rangel, Gloria; Rodríguez-Mata, Tito; Coto-Portillo, René; Baltrons-Orellana, Rafael; Mendoza-Rodríguez, Elmer; De Garay, Betry Fuentes; Jubis-Estrada, Juan; Hernández-Argueta, Rolando; Biggerstaff, Brad J; Rigau-Pérez, José G

2003-12-01

44

[Exploration study of knowledge and attitudes related to prevention and transmission of dengue in Puerto Rico in 2012].  

PubMed

We got one of the most significant epidemics of the history of Dengue in Puerto Rico despite all major educational efforts made. The objective is to determine how much knowledge the people have about the prevention and transmission of Dengue virus. We administered a questionnaire of fifteen questions to 140 people of different communities at the metropolitan area as well as in the East area of Puerto Rico during the months of September to November of 2012. 88% were adults, 100 were women and 40 men. The majority was from Caguas, Carolina, San Juan, and Bayamon. 60% were professionals. One hundred percent knew what Dengue is and 90% knows the mosquito. 77% of the participants know the actual epidemics, but the men got a 10% higher knowledge than women on the subject. Around 47% are not prepared to fight the Dengue virus, but they have great knowledge about the preventive measures and the clinical Management of Dengue Syndrome. 66% did not know that Puerto Rico has a Dengue Center from the CDC located at the Island. Only 17.5% of the participants knows that the Dengue Virus can be transmitted through transfusion of blood components. Our study met our objectives showing that we have good knowledge about Dengue, but there is poor knowledge about the transmission of Dengue Virus through transfusion of blood components. There is a big necessity to develop community strategies to eliminate this disease. We recommend repeating this study with more collaboration from other entities, more questions, and more participants. PMID:23882986

Rodríguez, Ian J Rivera; Rivera, Augusto A Puig; Morales-Borges, Raúl H

2013-01-01

45

A phylogenetic analysis using full-length viral genomes of South American dengue serotype 3 in consecutive Venezuelan outbreaks reveals novel NS5 mutation  

PubMed Central

Dengue virus currently causes 50-100 million infections annually. Comprehensive knowledge about the evolution of Dengue in response to selection pressure is currently unavailable, but would greatly enhance vaccine design efforts. In the current study, we sequenced 187 new dengue virus serotype 3(DENV-3) genotype III whole genomes isolated from Asia and the Americas. We analyzed them together with previously-sequenced isolates to gain a more detailed understanding of the evolutionary adaptations existing in this prevalent American serotype. In order to analyze the phylogenetic dynamics of DENV-3 during outbreak periods; we incorporated datasets of 48 and 11 sequences spanning two major outbreaks in Venezuela during 2001 and 2007-2008 respectively. Our phylogenetic analysis of newly sequenced viruses shows that subsets of genomes cluster primarily by geographic location, and secondarily by time of virus isolation. DENV-3 genotype III sequences from Asia are significantly divergent from those from the Americas due to their geographical separation and subsequent speciation. We measured amino acid variation for the E protein by calculating the Shannon entropy at each position between Asian and American genomes. We found a cluster of 7 amino acid substitutions having high variability within E protein domain III, which has previously been implicated in serotype-specific neutralization escape mutants. No novel mutations were found in the E protein of sequences isolated during either Venezuelan outbreak. Shannon entropy analysis of the NS5 polymerase mature protein revealed that a G374E mutation, in a region that contributes to interferon resistance in other flaviviruses by interfering with JAK-STAT signaling was present in both the Asian and American sequences from the 2007-2008 Venezuelan outbreak, but was absent in the sequences from the 2001 Venezuelan outbreak. In addition to E, several NS5 amino acid changes were unique to the 2007-2008 epidemic in Venezuela and may give additional insight into the adaptive response of DENV-3 at the population level.

Schmidt, DJ; Pickett, BE; Camacho, D; Comach, G; Xhaja, K; Lennon, NJ; Rizzolo, K; de Bosch, N; Becerra, A; Nogueira, ML; Mondini, A; da Silva, EV; Vasconcelos, PF; Munoz-Jordan, JL; Santiago, GA; Ocazionez, R; Gehrke, L; Lefkowitz, EJ; Birren, BW; Henn, MR; Bosch, I

2013-01-01

46

Organic Mania in Dengue  

PubMed Central

Dengue fever is considered to be one of the major health problems in south east Asia. In the recent past, epidemic outbreaks of Dengue have also been noticed in India. Initially, the neurological manifestations which were associated with Dengue received little attention, but now, there have been several reports of encephalitis and encephalopathy . However, nowhere in the literature has Dengue fever been mentioned as a cause of acute psychosis or mania. Here, we are reporting a 21-year-old male, a resident of Delhi, India who after the Dengue infection, developed an episode of classical mania.

Srivastava, Shruti; Bhatia, M.S.; Jhanjee, Anurag

2013-01-01

47

Dengue fever mimicking acute appendicitis: A case report?  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Dengue fever is an acute viral disease, which usually presents as a mild febrile illness. Patients with severe disease present with dengue haemorrhagic fever or dengue toxic shock syndrome. Rarely, it presents with abdominal symptoms mimicking acute appendicitis. We present a case of a male patient presenting with right iliac fossa pain and suspected acute appendicitis that was later diagnosed with dengue fever following a negative appendicectomy. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 13-year old male patient presented with fever, localized right-sided abdominal pain and vomiting. Abdominal ultrasound was not helpful and appendicectomy was performed due to worsening abdominal signs and an elevated temperature. A normal appendix with enlarged mesenteric nodes was found at surgery. Complete blood count showed thrombocytopenia with leucopenia. Dengue fever was now suspected and confirmed by IgM enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay against dengue virus. DISCUSSION This unusual presentation of dengue fever mimicking acute appendicitis should be suspected during viral outbreaks and in patients with atypical symptoms and cytopenias on blood evaluation in order to prevent unnecessary surgery. CONCLUSION This case highlights the occurrence of abdominal symptoms and complications that may accompany dengue fever. Early recognition of dengue fever mimicking acute appendicitis will avoid non-therapeutic operation and the diagnosis may be aided by blood investigations indicating a leucopenia, which is uncommon in patients with suppurative acute appendicitis.

Mcfarlane, M.E.C.; Plummer, J.M.; Leake, P.A.; Powell, L.; Chand, V.; Chung, S.; Tulloch, K.

2013-01-01

48

Forecast of Dengue Incidence Using Temperature and Rainfall  

PubMed Central

Introduction An accurate early warning system to predict impending epidemics enhances the effectiveness of preventive measures against dengue fever. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a forecasting model that could predict dengue cases and provide timely early warning in Singapore. Methodology and Principal Findings We developed a time series Poisson multivariate regression model using weekly mean temperature and cumulative rainfall over the period 2000–2010. Weather data were modeled using piecewise linear spline functions. We analyzed various lag times between dengue and weather variables to identify the optimal dengue forecasting period. Autoregression, seasonality and trend were considered in the model. We validated the model by forecasting dengue cases for week 1 of 2011 up to week 16 of 2012 using weather data alone. Model selection and validation were based on Akaike's Information Criterion, standardized Root Mean Square Error, and residuals diagnoses. A Receiver Operating Characteristics curve was used to analyze the sensitivity of the forecast of epidemics. The optimal period for dengue forecast was 16 weeks. Our model forecasted correctly with errors of 0.3 and 0.32 of the standard deviation of reported cases during the model training and validation periods, respectively. It was sensitive enough to distinguish between outbreak and non-outbreak to a 96% (CI?=?93–98%) in 2004–2010 and 98% (CI?=?95%–100%) in 2011. The model predicted the outbreak in 2011 accurately with less than 3% possibility of false alarm. Significance We have developed a weather-based dengue forecasting model that allows warning 16 weeks in advance of dengue epidemics with high sensitivity and specificity. We demonstrate that models using temperature and rainfall could be simple, precise, and low cost tools for dengue forecasting which could be used to enhance decision making on the timing, scale of vector control operations, and utilization of limited resources.

Hii, Yien Ling; Zhu, Huaiping; Ng, Nawi; Ng, Lee Ching; Rocklov, Joacim

2012-01-01

49

Dengue Fever Testing  

MedlinePLUS

... of this website will be limited. Search Help? Dengue Fever Testing Share this page: Was this page ... fever, can I get it again? 1. Can dengue fever be prevented? Currently, there is no immunization ...

50

Dengue Surveillance in Veterans Affairs Healthcare Facilities, 2007-2010  

PubMed Central

Background Although dengue is endemic in Puerto Rico (PR), 2007 and 2010 were recognized as epidemic years. In the continental United States (US), outside of the Texas-Mexico border, there had not been a dengue outbreak since 1946 until dengue re-emerged in Key West, Florida (FL), in 2009–2010. The objective of this study was to use electronic and manual surveillance systems to identify dengue cases in Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare facilities and then to clinically compare dengue cases in Veterans presenting for care in PR and in FL. Methodology Outpatient encounters from 1/2007–12/2010 and inpatient admissions (only available from 10/2009–12/2010) with dengue diagnostic codes at all VA facilities were identified using VA's Electronic Surveillance System for Early Notification of Community-based Epidemics (ESSENCE). Additional case sources included VA data from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention BioSense and VA infection preventionists. Case reviews were performed. Categorical data was compared using Mantel-Haenszel or Fisher Exact tests and continuous variables using t-tests. Dengue case residence was mapped. Findings Two hundred eighty-eight and 21 PR and FL dengue cases respectively were identified. Of 21 FL cases, 12 were exposed in Key West and 9 were imported. During epidemic years, FL cases had significantly increased dengue testing and intensive care admissions, but lower hospitalization rates and headache or eye pain symptoms compared to PR cases. There were no significant differences in clinical symptoms, laboratory abnormalities or outcomes between epidemic and non-epidemic year cases in FL and PR. Confirmed/probable cases were significantly more likely to be hospitalized and have thrombocytopenia or leukopenia compared to suspected cases. Conclusions Dengue re-introduction in the continental US warrants increased dengue surveillance and education in VA. Throughout VA, under-testing of suspected cases highlights the need to emphasize use of diagnostic testing to better understand the magnitude of dengue among Veterans.

Schirmer, Patricia L.; Lucero-Obusan, Cynthia A.; Benoit, Stephen R.; Santiago, Luis M.; Stanek, Danielle; Dey, Achintya; Martinez, Mirsonia; Oda, Gina; Holodniy, Mark

2013-01-01

51

Dengue viral infections  

PubMed Central

Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito borne diseases in the world. They may be asymptomatic or may give rise to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome. Annually, 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of DHF occur worldwide. Ninety percent of DHF subjects are children less than 15 years of age. At present, dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. No vaccine is available for preventing this disease. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate treatment are vital if disease related morbidity and mortality are to be limited. This review outlines aspects of the epidemiology of dengue infections, the dengue virus and its mosquito vector, clinical features and pathogenesis of dengue infections, and the management and control of these infections.

Malavige, G; Fernando, S; Fernando, D; Seneviratne, S

2004-01-01

52

Protect Yourself and Your Baby from Dengue  

MedlinePLUS

Avoid mosquito bites during pregnancy to prevent dengue in your newborn baby • Dengue is transmitted by the bite of infected Aedes aegypti mosquitoes • A pregnant woman infected with dengue virus may ...

53

Dengue Occurrence in the Population (Epidemiology)  

MedlinePLUS

... the United States Dengue Surveillance in the U.S. Epidemiology Dengue fever (DF) is caused by any of ... Notices Prevention If You Think You Have Dengue Epidemiology Continental U.S. Entomology/Ecology Mosquito Life-Cycle Mosquito ...

54

Dengue Virus and Japanese Encephalitis Virus Epidemiological Shifts in Nepal: A Case of Opposing Trends  

PubMed Central

We report on the changing epidemiology of two important flaviviruses in Nepal: Japanese encephalitis (JE) and dengue viruses. Morbidity and mortality in Nepal is in the thousands since JE was introduced in 1978. Nepal launched an extensive laboratory-based JE surveillance in 2004. Nepal experienced a remarkable reduction in disease burden after mass immunizations from 2005 to 2010, when 2,040 JE infections and 205 JE-related deaths were confirmed. With its emergence in 2006, dengue has become a significant challenge in the country, highlighted by a sudden outbreak in 2010 that resulted in 359 confirmed dengue infections. Currently, both viruses cocirculate in Nepal. Here, we document the remarkable expansion of dengue in Nepal, which urgently requires national surveillance to refine the burden and make recommendations regarding control and prevention programs. We believe that the use of existing JE surveillance network for integrated dengue surveillance may represent the most appropriate alternative.

Dumre, Shyam P.; Shakya, Geeta; Na-Bangchang, Kesara; Eursitthichai, Veerachai; Rudi Grams, Hans; Upreti, Senendra R.; Ghimire, Prakash; KC, Khagendra; Nisalak, Ananda; Gibbons, Robert V.; Fernandez, Stefan

2013-01-01

55

Laboratory Surveillance of Dengue in Argentina, 1995-2001  

PubMed Central

Local transmission of dengue fever virus in Argentina is increased by the presence of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and dengue outbreaks in neighboring countries. From 1995 to 2001, a laboratory-based active surveillance program detected 922 dengue cases. Indigenous transmission involving dengue-1 and -2 serotypes was confirmed only in subtropical areas in northern Argentina.

Paz, Maria Valeria; Rangeon, Griselda; Ranaivoarisoa, Marie Y.; Verzeri, Nora; Roginski, Sandra; Baroni, Pablo; Enria, Delia

2003-01-01

56

Spatio-Temporal Tracking and Phylodynamics of an Urban Dengue 3 Outbreak in S?o Paulo, Brazil  

PubMed Central

The dengue virus has a single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome of ?10.700 nucleotides with a single open reading frame that encodes three structural (C, prM, and E) and seven nonstructural (NS1, NS2A, NS2B, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, and NS5) proteins. It possesses four antigenically distinct serotypes (DENV 1–4). Many phylogenetic studies address particularities of the different serotypes using convenience samples that are not conducive to a spatio-temporal analysis in a single urban setting. We describe the pattern of spread of distinct lineages of DENV-3 circulating in São José do Rio Preto, Brazil, during 2006. Blood samples from patients presenting dengue-like symptoms were collected for DENV testing. We performed M-N-PCR using primers based on NS5 for virus detection and identification. The fragments were purified from PCR mixtures and sequenced. The positive dengue cases were geo-coded. To type the sequenced samples, 52 reference sequences were aligned. The dataset generated was used for iterative phylogenetic reconstruction with the maximum likelihood criterion. The best demographic model, the rate of growth, rate of evolutionary change, and Time to Most Recent Common Ancestor (TMRCA) were estimated. The basic reproductive rate during the epidemics was estimated. We obtained sequences from 82 patients among 174 blood samples. We were able to geo-code 46 sequences. The alignment generated a 399-nucleotide-long dataset with 134 taxa. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that all samples were of DENV-3 and related to strains circulating on the isle of Martinique in 2000–2001. Sixty DENV-3 from São José do Rio Preto formed a monophyletic group (lineage 1), closely related to the remaining 22 isolates (lineage 2). We assumed that these lineages appeared before 2006 in different occasions. By transforming the inferred exponential growth rates into the basic reproductive rate, we obtained values for lineage 1 of R0?=?1.53 and values for lineage 2 of R0?=?1.13. Under the exponential model, TMRCA of lineage 1 dated 1 year and lineage 2 dated 3.4 years before the last sampling. The possibility of inferring the spatio-temporal dynamics from genetic data has been generally little explored, and it may shed light on DENV circulation. The use of both geographic and temporally structured phylogenetic data provided a detailed view on the spread of at least two dengue viral strains in a populated urban area.

Mondini, Adriano; de Moraes Bronzoni, Roberta Vieira; Nunes, Silvia Helena Pereira; Chiaravalloti Neto, Francisco; Massad, Eduardo; Alonso, Wladimir J.; Lazzaro, Eduardo S. M.; Ferraz, Amena Alcantara; de Andrade Zanotto, Paolo Marinho; Nogueira, Mauricio Lacerda

2009-01-01

57

Reemergence of Dengue in Mauritius  

PubMed Central

Dengue reemerged in Mauritius in 2009 after an absence of >30 years, and >200 cases were confirmed serologically. Molecular studies showed that the outbreak was caused by dengue virus type 2. Phylogenetic analysis of the envelope gene identified 2 clades of the virus. No case of hemorrhagic fever was recorded.

Pursem, Vidula N.; Barkham, Timothy M.S.; Ng, Lee-Ching; Inoue, Masafumi; Manraj, Shyam S.

2010-01-01

58

Evaluation of Compliance in Control and Prevention Study of Vancomycin Resistant Enterococcus Outbreak  

PubMed Central

Objective. Vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) colonization and the spread decrease with compliance and isolation guidelines. For the isolation methods to succeed, compliance with the isolation guidelines needs to be overseen. In this study, VRE outbreak among the Pediatric Ward patients, the preventative efforts to control this outbreak, and the impact of scoring tables used in controlling this outbreak on the success are explained. Design. Rectal swab cultures were taken from patients who were admitted to the Ward between October and December 2010 due to diagnoses of VRE and urinary tract infection. Results. VRE were isolated in the rectal swab samples of 34 patients. VRE infection findings were clinically detected in two of the cases with VRE isolation. Two isolations of VRE were detected on cultures from patient room door handle surface and the telephone in the room for common use. Close contact isolation was achieved and barrier precautions were taken for all cases, as soon as the detections were made. A scoring system was developed to evaluate the feasibility of and the compliance with the precautions to be taken. Conclusions. With the method presented in this study, the outbreak at our hospital was under control within two months.

Kecik Bosnak, Vuslat; Namiduru, Mustafa; Karaoglan, Ilkay; Ozlem Mete, Ayse

2013-01-01

59

Salmonella enteritidis outbreak in a restaurant chain: the continuing challenges of prevention.  

PubMed

In 1990, a Salmonella enteritidis (SE) outbreak occurred in a restaurant chain in Pennsylvania. To determine its cause(s), we conducted a case-control study and a cohort study at one restaurant, and a survey of restaurants. Egg dishes were associated with illness (P = 0.03). Guests from one hotel eating at the restaurant had a diarrhoeal attack rate of 14%, 4.7-fold higher than among those not eating there (P = 0.04). There were no differences in egg handling between affected and unaffected restaurants. Eggs supplied to affected restaurants were medium grade AA eggs from a single farm, and were reportedly refrigerated during distribution. Human and hen SE isolates were phage type 8 and had similar plasmid profiles and antibiograms. We estimate the prevalence of infected eggs during the outbreak to be as high as 1 in 12. Typical restaurant egg-handling practices and refrigeration during distribution appear to be insufficient by themselves to prevent similar outbreaks. PMID:8432323

Vugia, D J; Mishu, B; Smith, M; Tavris, D R; Hickman-Brenner, F W; Tauxe, R V

1993-02-01

60

Failure of vaccination to prevent outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease.  

PubMed Central

Outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease persist in dairy cattle herds in Saudi Arabia despite revaccination at intervals of 4-6 months. Vaccine trials provide data on antibody responses following vaccination. Using this information we developed a mathematical model of the decay of protective antibodies with which we estimated the fraction of susceptible animals at a given time after vaccination. The model describes the data well, suggesting over 95% take with an antibody half-life of 43 days. Farm records provided data on the time course of five outbreaks. We applied a 'SLIR' epidemiological model to these data, fitting a single parameter representing disease transmission rate. The analysis provides estimates of the basic reproduction number R(0), which may exceed 70 in some cases. We conclude that the critical intervaccination interval which would provide herd immunity against FMDV is unrealistically short, especially for heterologous challenge. We suggest that it may not be possible to prevent foot-and-mouth disease outbreaks on these farms using currently available vaccines.

Woolhouse, M. E.; Haydon, D. T.; Pearson, A.; Kitching, R. P.

1996-01-01

61

The Incubation Periods of Dengue Viruses  

PubMed Central

Dengue viruses are major contributors to illness and death globally. Here we analyze the extrinsic and intrinsic incubation periods (EIP and IIP), in the mosquito and human, respectively. We identified 146 EIP observations from 8 studies and 204 IIP observations from 35 studies. These data were fitted with censored Bayesian time-to-event models. The best-fitting temperature-dependent EIP model estimated that 95% of EIPs are between 5 and 33 days at 25°C, and 2 and 15 days at 30°C, with means of 15 and 6.5 days, respectively. The mean IIP estimate was 5.9 days, with 95% expected between days 3 and 10. Differences between serotypes were not identified for either incubation period. These incubation period models should be useful in clinical diagnosis, outbreak investigation, prevention and control efforts, and mathematical modeling of dengue virus transmission.

Chan, Miranda; Johansson, Michael A.

2012-01-01

62

A spatiotemporal dengue fever early warning model accounting for nonlinear associations with meteorological factors: a Bayesian maximum entropy approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dengue fever has been identified as one of the most widespread vector-borne diseases in tropical and sub-tropical. In the last decade, dengue is an emerging infectious disease epidemic in Taiwan especially in the southern area where have annually high incidences. For the purpose of disease prevention and control, an early warning system is urgently needed. Previous studies have showed significant relationships between climate variables, in particular, rainfall and temperature, and the temporal epidemic patterns of dengue cases. However, the transmission of the dengue fever is a complex interactive process that mostly understated the composite space-time effects of dengue fever. This study proposes developing a one-week ahead warning system of dengue fever epidemics in the southern Taiwan that considered nonlinear associations between weekly dengue cases and meteorological factors across space and time. The early warning system based on an integration of distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM) and stochastic Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) analysis. The study identified the most significant meteorological measures including weekly minimum temperature and maximum 24-hour rainfall with continuous 15-week lagged time to dengue cases variation under condition of uncertainty. Subsequently, the combination of nonlinear lagged effects of climate variables and space-time dependence function is implemented via a Bayesian framework to predict dengue fever occurrences in the southern Taiwan during 2012. The result shows the early warning system is useful for providing potential outbreak spatio-temporal prediction of dengue fever distribution. In conclusion, the proposed approach can provide a practical disease control tool for environmental regulators seeking more effective strategies for dengue fever prevention.

Lee, Chieh-Han; Yu, Hwa-Lung; Chien, Lung-Chang

2014-05-01

63

[The historical evolution of dengue prevention and control programs in Brazil].  

PubMed

An epidemiological analysis of the forms and distribution of Dengue fever in Brazil and worldwide was carried out. The National Program of Dengue Control (NPDC) was evaluated based on the data available at 'Diagdengue' an official computerized information system allowing to follow-up the implantation and impact of the Program. A factorial analysis was performed by means of a set of indicators contributing to variability. The indicator scores were added and the cities demanding for prior attention of the NPCD were classified for the construction of an index, which is presented three-monthly for every state, with intervals distributed between 0 and 9. The implantation of the NCPD is irregular. Cities with bad implantation are predominating in the north and northeast of the country. In the second analysis, socio-economic variables of the selected cities were added. For the association tests these cities were classified into two groups: 'Bad' and 'Good/Very Good', based on the association of the index of building infestation informed in the FAD (Yellow Fever and Dengue) database and the constructed index. Associations were verified based on variance analysis, trend test and trend estimate. It was observed that cities with low rates of illiteracy, efficient garbage collection and high ratio of sanitary installations are correlated with a good classification of the city according to Diagdengue. PMID:19547796

Ferreira, Beatriz Jansen; Souza, Maria de Fátima Marinho; Soares Filho, Adauto Martins; Carvalho, André Anderson

2009-01-01

64

Flavonoid from Carica papaya inhibits NS2B-NS3 protease and prevents Dengue 2 viral assembly  

PubMed Central

Dengue virus belongs to the virus family Flaviviridae. Dengue hemorrhagic disease caused by dengue virus is a public health problem worldwide. The viral non structural 2B and 3 (NS2B-NS3) protease complex is crucial for virus replication and hence, it is considered to be a good anti-viral target. Leaf extracts from Carica papaya is generally prescribed for patients with dengue fever, but there are no scientific evidences for its anti-dengue activity; hence we intended to investigate the anti-viral activity of compounds present in the leaves of Carica papaya against dengue 2 virus (DENV-2). We analysed the anti-dengue activities of the extracts from Carica papaya by using bioinformatics tools. Interestingly, we find the flavonoid quercetin with highest binding energy against NS2B-NS3 protease which is evident by the formation of six hydrogen bonds with the amino acid residues at the binding site of the receptor. Our results suggest that the flavonoids from Carica papaya have significant anti-dengue activities. Abbreviations ADME - Absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion, BBB - Blood brain barrier, CYP - Cytochrome P450, DENV - – Dengue virus, DHF - Dengue hemorrhagic fever, DSS - Dengue shock syndrome, GCMS - – Gas chromatography- Mass spectrometry, MOLCAD - Molecular Computer Aided Design, NS - Non structural, PDB - Protein data bank, PMF - Potential Mean Force.

Senthilvel, Padmanaban; Lavanya, Pandian; Kumar, Kalavathi Murugan; Swetha, Rayapadi; Anitha, Parimelzaghan; Bag, Susmita; Sarveswari, Sundaramoorthy; Vijayakumar, Vijayaparthasarathi; Ramaiah, Sudha; Anbarasu, Anand

2013-01-01

65

DENGUE VIRAL INFECTIONS  

PubMed Central

Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Presently dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. It has been estimated that almost 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) occur worldwide. An increasing proportion of DHF is in children less than 15 years of age, especially in South East and South Asia. The unique structure of the dengue virus and the pathophysiologic responses of the host, different serotypes, and favorable conditions for vector breeding have led to the virulence and spread of the infections. The manifestations of dengue infections are protean from being asymptomatic to undifferentiated fever, severe dengue infections, and unusual complications. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate supportive treatment are often delayed resulting in unnecessarily high morbidity and mortality. Attempts are underway for the development of a vaccine for preventing the burden of this neglected disease. This review outlines the epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiologic mechanisms, management, and control of dengue infections.

Gurugama, Padmalal; Garg, Pankaj; Perera, Jennifer; Wijewickrama, Ananda; Seneviratne, Suranjith L

2010-01-01

66

Dengue fever in the Western Hemisphere.  

PubMed

Dengue virus, an arthropod-borne viral agent, causes two distinct diseases: classic dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). There are four dengue virus serotypes: DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, and DEN-4. Although infection with dengue stimulates immunologic response to a serotype, there is no cross-immunity conferred. Hence, a person can potentially be infected with each serotype during his or her lifetime. An infected female Aedes mosquito transmits the virus from person to person while feeding. The disease, now endemic in more than 100 countries in Africa, the Americas, the Eastern Mediterranean, Southeast Asia, and Western Pacific, is spreading to new areas and causing explosive outbreaks. Because of the major impact on lives and local economies epidemics produce, rapid detection of dengue infection has become an important public health research issue. Recently developed serological procedures to detect dengue infections have shown great potential for field use. PMID:12587656

Castleberry, Jason S; Mahon, Connie R

2003-01-01

67

Dengue/Severe Dengue Frequently Asked Questions  

MedlinePLUS

... ??????? Español RSS Feed Youtube Twitter Facebook Google + Dengue control Menu Dengue Control strategies Monitoring and evaluation Other arbo-viral diseases Research Information resources Dengue/Severe dengue frequently asked questions What is dengue ...

68

Molecular epidemiology of dengue type 2 virus in Venezuela: evidence for in situ virus evolution and recombination  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epidemic outbreaks of dengue fever (DF) were first recorded in Venezuela in 1978 and were followed by the emergence of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) outbreaks in 1989. To gain a better understanding of the nature of these epidemics, the complete envelope (E) gene sequence of 34 Venezuelan dengue type 2 (DEN-2) viruses, isolated between 1997 and 2000 was determined. Of

N. Y. Uzcategui; D. Camacho; G. Comach; R. Cuello de Uzcategui; E. C. Holmes; E. A. Gould

2001-01-01

69

[Risk perception and strategies for mass communication on dengue in the Americas].  

PubMed

Dengue is clearly a very serious public health problem. In the Americas the number of dengue cases has been increasing since the 1960s, and outbreaks of the disease have been occurring more frequently. Furthermore, the density of infestation with the disease vector, the Aedes aegypti mosquito, is high in the Americas. The general strategy for preventing and controlling dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever is based on promoting behavior changes that lead to incorporating the community in controlling the disease, particularly the vector. In order to achieve this, mass communication programs on dengue should have two primary aims: converting information into practice and encouraging the community to take over prevention and control measures. The new generation of programs should be designed based on the local sanitation structure (water distribution and waste disposal) as well as information on community organizations and the roles of different family members. Furthermore, the new programs should incorporate all the following ten components: epidemiological surveillance, intersectoral actions, community participation, managing the environment and basic services, patient care, case reporting, education, using insecticides and vector control, training, and preparing for emergencies. Communication should be aimed at modifying the behavior of individuals and the community by empowering them to carry out prevention and control measures. PMID:15030659

San Martín, José Luis; Prado, Mónica

2004-02-01

70

Prevention and management of avian influenza outbreaks: experiences from the United States of America.  

PubMed

The epidemiology and control of avian influenza (AI) are complex. The virus is transported in nature by the activities of wild birds and in commercial poultry by the activities of people. In general, all the outbreaks of AI in the United States of America (U.S.A.) have involved AI virus spread by the movement of poultry and manure and objects contaminated by poultry and manure, butthe specific cause of spread has been different for most outbreaks. The 1924 highly pathogenic AI (HPAI) outbreak was spread halfway across the U.S.A. by contaminated rail cars and poultry crates; the 1983 HPAI outbreak was spread by the movement of people between farms and transport of live and dead poultry, including depopulation efforts; whereas low pathogenicity AI (LPAI) outbreaks in different states were spread by people and equipment, partial flock removal, transport of spent hens and/or manure, and transport of dead birds for rendering. There is a dichotomy surrounding AI control methods in the USA. Large LPAI outbreaks have mainly affected turkeys in the western part of the country and have been controlled by vaccination and controlled marketing-strategies developed prior to the 1983 HPAI outbreak. By contrast, in the eastern part of the country, the AI control strategy has been modelled on the successful stamping-out programme that was used during the HPAI outbreak in 1983. The author presents a summary of the costs and control strategies in table form. PMID:19618639

Halvorson, D A

2009-04-01

71

Poliomyelitis outbreaks in Angola genetically linked to India: risk factors and implications for prevention of outbreaks due to wild poliovirus importations.  

PubMed

We conducted an investigation of two outbreaks of poliomyelitis in Angola during 2007-2008 due to wild poliovirus (WPV) genetically linked to India. A case-control study including 27 case-patients and 76 age- and neighborhood-matched control-subjects was conducted to assess risk factors associated with paralytic poliomyelitis, and epidemiologic links to India were explored through in-depth case-patient interviews. In multivariable analysis, case-patients were more likely than control-subjects to be undervaccinated with fewer than four routine doses of oral poliovirus vaccine (adjusted matched odds ratio [aMOR], 4.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-13.6) and have an adult household member who traveled outside the province of residence in the 2 months preceding onset of paralysis (aMOR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.2-8.6). No epidemiologic link with India was identified. These findings underscore the importance of routine immunization to prevent outbreaks following WPV importations and suggest a possible role of adults in sustaining WPV transmission. PMID:21440639

Kidd, Sarah; Goodson, James L; Aramburu, Javier; Morais, Alda; Gaye, Abou; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Buffington, Joanna; Gerber, Sue; Wassilak, Steven; Uzicanin, Amra

2011-05-12

72

Dengue fever  

MedlinePLUS

... northeastern Australia South and Central America Southeast Asia Sub-Saharan Africa Some parts of the Caribbean Dengue ... Tests that may be done to diagnose this condition include: Antibody titer for dengue virus types Complete ...

73

Waterborne Outbreaks of Giardiasis: Why They Happen, How to Prevent Them.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Giardiasis is transmitted by contaminated drinking water or food or contact with infected individuals through the fecal-oral route of exposure. Frequently reported are outbreaks in day-care centers and infections in campers and backpackers, travelers outs...

G. F. Craun

1988-01-01

74

Dengue disease status in Chennai (2006-2008): A retrospective analysis  

PubMed Central

Background & objectives: Dengue is one of the most important Arboviral diseases in man with outbreaks in Southeast Asia and India. We report a retrospective analysis of the dengue positivity in the referred samples for three years period (2006 to 2008) at the Department of Virology, King Institute of Preventive Medicine, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India. Methods: Serum samples from 1593 suspected cases (968 male and 625 female) were obtained. Of the 1593 cases screened, 1204 (75.5%) were paediatric cases and 389 (24.4%) adults. The samples were subjected to MAC ELISA and IgG ELISA. Results: Of the 968 patients, 686 (43.0%) were positive, of which 579 (84.0%) were in the paediatric age group (<14 yr) and 107 (15.5%) were adults. The IgM positivity being 356 (36.7%) in males and 330 (52.8%) in females. Of the 686 positives, 113 (16.47%) were positive for both IgM and IgG denoting secondary infection. There was a noticeable increased occurrence during the cooler months and during the monsoon and post-monsoon months. Interpretation & conclusions: The dengue IgM seropositivity among the suspected cases indicates active dengue virus activity. Increase in the probable secondary infections especially in a country like ours where multiple serotypes are prevalent raises concern over probable increase in the incidence of the more serious DHF/DSS. Studies need to be done to identify circulating serotypes of dengue virus to design preventive strategies.

Gunasekaran, P.; Kaveri, K.; Mohana, S.; Arunagiri, Kavita; Babu, B.V. Suresh; Priya, P. Padma; Kiruba, R.; Kumar, V. Senthil; Sheriff, A. Khaleefathullah

2011-01-01

75

Factors affecting prevention and control of viral gastroenteritis outbreaks in care homes.  

PubMed

We assess the effect of key care quality indicators on viral gastroenteritis outbreaks and control in care homes using mandatory inspection data collected by a non-departmental public body. Outbreak occurrence was associated with care home size but not with overall quality or individual environmental standards. Care home size, hygiene and infection control standard scores were inversely associated with attack rate in residents, whereas delayed reporting to the local public health agency was associated with higher attack rates. PMID:22926136

Vivancos, R; Trainor, E; Oyinloye, A; Keenan, A

2012-10-01

76

Policymakers' views on dengue fever/dengue haemorrhagic fever and the need for dengue vaccines in four southeast Asian countries.  

PubMed

A survey of policymakers and other influential professionals in four southeast Asian countries (Cambodia, Indonesia, Philippines and Vietnam) was conducted to determine policymakers' views on the public health importance of dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), the need for a vaccine and the determinants influencing its potential introduction. The survey, which involved face-to-face interviews with policymakers, health programme managers, researchers, opinion leaders and other key informants, revealed an almost uniformly high level of concern about dengue fever/DHF and a high perceived need for a dengue vaccine. Several characteristics of the disease contribute to this high sense of priority, including its geographic spread, occurrence in outbreaks, the recurrent risk of infection each dengue season, its severity and the difficulty in diagnosis and management, its urban predominance, its burden on hospitals, and its economic toll on governments and families. Research felt to be key to future decision-making regarding dengue vaccine introduction include: disease surveillance studies, in-country vaccine trials or pilot projects, and studies on the economic burden of dengue and the cost-effectiveness of dengue vaccines. The results suggest favourable conditions for public and private sector markets for dengue vaccines and the need for creative financing strategies to ensure their accessibility to poor children in dengue-endemic countries. PMID:14604579

DeRoeck, Denise; Deen, Jacqueline; Clemens, John D

2003-12-01

77

Typing of Dengue Viruses in Clinical Specimens and Mosquitoes by Single-Tube Multiplex Reverse Transcriptase PCR  

PubMed Central

In recent years, dengue viruses (serotypes 1 to 4) have spread throughout tropical regions worldwide. In many places, multiple dengue virus serotypes are circulating concurrently, which may increase the risk for the more severe form of the disease, dengue hemorrhagic fever. For the control and prevention of dengue fever, it is important to rapidly detect and type the virus in clinical samples and mosquitoes. Assays based on reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR (RT-PCR) amplification of dengue viral RNA can offer a rapid, sensitive, and specific approach to the typing of dengue viruses. We have reduced a two-step nested RT-PCR protocol to a single-tube reaction with sensitivity equivalent to that of the two-step protocol (1 to 50 PFU) in order to maximize simplicity and minimize the risk of sample cross-contamination. This assay was also optimized for use with a thermostable RT-polymerase. We designed a plasmid-based internal control that produces a uniquely sized product and can be used to control for both reverse transcription or amplification steps without the risk of generating false-positive results. This single-tube RT-PCR procedure was used to type dengue viruses during the 1995 and 1997-1998 outbreaks in Nicaragua. In addition, an extraction procedure that permits the sensitive detection of viral RNA in pools of up to 50 mosquitoes without PCR inhibition or RNA degradation was developed. This assay should serve as a practical tool for use in countries where dengue fever is endemic, in conjunction with classical methods for surveillance and epidemiology of dengue viruses.

Harris, Eva; Roberts, T. Guy; Smith, Leila; Selle, John; Kramer, Laura D.; Valle, Sonia; Sandoval, Erick; Balmaseda, Angel

1998-01-01

78

Analyzing the spatio-temporal relationship between dengue vector larval density and land-use using factor analysis and spatial ring mapping  

PubMed Central

Background Dengue, a mosquito-borne febrile viral disease, is found in tropical and sub-tropical regions and is now extending its range to temperate regions. The spread of the dengue viruses mainly depends on vector population (Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus), which is influenced by changing climatic conditions and various land-use/land-cover types. Spatial display of the relationship between dengue vector density and land-cover types is required to describe a near-future viral outbreak scenario. This study is aimed at exploring how land-cover types are linked to the behavior of dengue-transmitting mosquitoes. Methods Surveys were conducted in 92 villages of Phitsanulok Province Thailand. The sampling was conducted on three separate occasions in the months of March, May and July. Dengue indices, i.e. container index (C.I.), house index (H.I.) and Breteau index (B.I.) were used to map habitats conducible to dengue vector growth. Spatial epidemiological analysis using Bivariate Pearson’s correlation was conducted to evaluate the level of interdependence between larval density and land-use types. Factor analysis using principal component analysis (PCA) with varimax rotation was performed to ascertain the variance among land-use types. Furthermore, spatial ring method was used as to visualize spatially referenced, multivariate and temporal data in single information graphic. Results Results of dengue indices showed that the settlements around gasoline stations/workshops, in the vicinity of marsh/swamp and rice paddy appeared to be favorable habitat for dengue vector propagation at highly significant and positive correlation (p = 0.001) in the month of May. Settlements around the institutional areas were highly significant and positively correlated (p = 0.01) with H.I. in the month of March. Moreover, dengue indices in the month of March showed a significant and positive correlation (p <= 0.05) with deciduous forest. The H.I. of people living around horticulture land were significantly and positively correlated (p = 0.05) during the month of May, and perennial vegetation showed a highly significant and positive correlation (p = 0.001) in the month of March with C.I. and significant and positive correlation (p <= 0.05) with B.I., respectively. Conclusions The study concluded that gasoline stations/workshops, rice paddy, marsh/swamp and deciduous forests played highly significant role in dengue vector growth. Thus, the spatio-temporal relationships of dengue vector larval density and land-use types may help to predict favorable dengue habitat, and thereby enables public healthcare managers to take precautionary measures to prevent impending dengue outbreak.

2012-01-01

79

Gravitraps for Management of Dengue Clusters in Singapore  

PubMed Central

Although Singapore has an intensive dengue control program, dengue remains endemic with regular outbreaks. We report development and use of a novel adult oviposition trap, the Gravitrap, in managing dengue cluster areas. The Gravitrap is a simple, hay infusion-filled cylindrical trap with a sticky inner surface to serve as an oviposition site for gravid female Aedes mosquitoes. Wire gauze fitted above the water level minimizes the risk of it being an unwanted breeding habitat. The Gravitrap was deployed in 11 dengue cluster areas throughout Singapore. Aedes aegypti was the predominant mosquito caught in the trap and some (5.73%) were found to be positive for dengue virus.

Lee, Caleb; Vythilingam, Indra; Chong, Chee-Seng; Razak, Muhammad Aliff Abdul; Tan, Cheong-Huat; Liew, Christina; Pok, Kwoon-Yong; Ng, Lee-Ching

2013-01-01

80

Auditing the Management of Vaccine-Preventable Disease Outbreaks: The Need for a Tool  

PubMed Central

Public health activities, especially infectious disease control, depend on effective teamwork. We present the results of a pilot audit questionnaire aimed at assessing the quality of public health services in the management of VPD outbreaks. Audit questionnaire with three main areas indicators (structure, process and results) was developed. Guidelines were set and each indicator was assessed by three auditors. Differences in indicator scores according to median size of outbreaks were determined by ANOVA (significance at p?0.05). Of 154 outbreaks; eighteen indicators had a satisfactory mean score, indicator “updated guidelines” and “timely reporting” had a poor mean score (2.84±106 and 2.44±1.67, respectively). Statistically significant differences were found according to outbreak size, in the indicators “availability of guidelines/protocol updated less than 3 years ago” (p?=?0.03) and “days needed for outbreak control” (p?=?0.04). Improving availability of updated guidelines, enhancing timely reporting and adequate recording of control procedures taken is needed to allow for management assessment and improvement.

Torner, Nuria; Carnicer-Pont, Dolors; Castilla, Jesus; Cayla, Joan; Godoy, Pere; Dominguez, Angela

2011-01-01

81

WATERBORNE OUTBREAKS OF GIARDIASIS: WHY THEY HAPPEN, HOW TO PREVENT THEM  

EPA Science Inventory

Giardiasis is transmitted by contaminated drinking water or food or contact with infected individuals through the fecal-oral route of exposure. Frequently reported are outbreaks in day-care centers and infections in campers and backpackers, travelers outside the U.S., and homosex...

82

Fractional Derivatives in Dengue Epidemics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We introduce the use of fractional calculus, i.e., the use of integrals and derivatives of non-integer (arbitrary) order, in epidemiology. The proposed approach is illustrated with an outbreak of dengue disease, which is motivated by the first dengue epidemic ever recorded in the Cape Verde islands off the coast of west Africa, in 2009. Numerical simulations show that in some cases the fractional models fit better the reality when compared with the standard differential models. The classical results are obtained as particular cases by considering the order of the derivatives to take an integer value.

Pooseh, Shakoor; Rodrigues, Helena Sofia; Torres, Delfim F. M.

2011-09-01

83

Dengue virus type 3, South Pacific Islands, 2013.  

PubMed

After an 18-year absence, dengue virus serotype 3 reemerged in the South Pacific Islands in 2013. Outbreaks in western (Solomon Islands) and eastern (French Polynesia) regions were caused by different genotypes. This finding suggested that immunity against dengue virus serotype, rather than virus genotype, was the principal determinant of reemergence. PMID:24856252

Cao-Lormeau, Van-Mai; Roche, Claudine; Musso, Didier; Mallet, Henri-Pierre; Dalipanda, Tenneth; Dofai, Alfred; Nogareda, Francisco; Nilles, Eric J; Aaskov, John

2014-06-01

84

Dengue Virus Type 3, South Pacific Islands, 2013  

PubMed Central

After an 18-year absence, dengue virus serotype 3 reemerged in the South Pacific Islands in 2013. Outbreaks in western (Solomon Islands) and eastern (French Polynesia) regions were caused by different genotypes. This finding suggested that immunity against dengue virus serotype, rather than virus genotype, was the principal determinant of reemergence.

Roche, Claudine; Musso, Didier; Mallet, Henri-Pierre; Dalipanda, Tenneth; Dofai, Alfred; Nogareda, Francisco; Nilles, Eric J.; Aaskov, John

2014-01-01

85

An Epidemic of Dengue-1 in a Remote Village in Rural Laos  

PubMed Central

In the Lao PDR (Laos), urban dengue is an increasingly recognised public health problem. We describe a dengue-1 virus outbreak in a rural northwestern Lao forest village during the cool season of 2008. The isolated strain was genotypically “endemic” and not “sylvatic,” belonging to the genotype 1, Asia 3 clade. Phylogenetic analyses of 37 other dengue-1 sequences from diverse areas of Laos between 2007 and 2010 showed that the geographic distribution of some strains remained focal overtime while others were dispersed throughout the country. Evidence that dengue viruses have broad circulation in the region, crossing country borders, was also obtained. Whether the outbreak arose from dengue importation from an urban centre into a dengue-naïve community or crossed into the village from a forest cycle is unknown. More epidemiological and entomological investigations are required to understand dengue epidemiology and the importance of rural and forest dengue dynamics in Laos.

Dubot-Peres, Audrey; Vongphrachanh, Phengta; Denny, Justin; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Linthavong, Singharath; Sengkeopraseuth, Bounthanom; Khasing, Amphai; Xaythideth, Vimattha; Moore, Catrin E.; Vongsouvath, Manivanh; Castonguay-Vanier, Josee; Sibounheuang, Bountoy; Chanthongthip, Anisone; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Newton, Paul N.

2013-01-01

86

Autopsy findings in fatal dengue haemorrhagic fever - 06 Cases  

PubMed Central

Background During recent outbreak of dengue fever in Delhi, there has been a significant increase in dengue-associated admission in hospitals. To better understand the pathology of dengue haemorrhagic fever, we conducted autopsies of dengue infections deaths within our hospital. Method This was an autopsy study of dengue-associated deaths at a large tertiary care hospital. Results From Sep 2009 to Dec 2010, a total of 1032 patients with serological evidence of dengue infection were admitted to our hospital. There were twelve deaths and autopsies were conducted in six. Adult respiratory distress syndrome, bleeding diathesis, hypotension, hepatic failure and acute renal failure were the common causes of death despite early hospitalization, intravenous fluid, and blood-product support. Conclusion Dengue is associated with severe disease, and deaths do occur despite current supportive management. Early predictors of disease severity and better clinical interventions are needed.

Rathi, K.R.; Arora, M.M.; Sahai, K.; Tripathi, S.; Singh, S.P.; Raman, D.K.; Anand, K.B.

2012-01-01

87

Dengue fever.  

PubMed

Dengue fever is a notifiable infectious disease in England because of its geographic expansion and the increase in the number of epidemics. The article highlighted the importance of informing overseas travellers of the risk of acquiring dengue fever and advising them on personal protective measures. PMID:24003820

Skinner, Anita

88

Dengue/dengue haemorrhagic fever  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A World Health Organization page devoted to the control of dengue. Many excellent informative PDF files are available from this page dealing with vector control, as well as recognition of symptoms, and treatment of dengue haemorrhagic fever. Estimated numbers of at risk people are staggering. A powerful resource for teaching the importance of vector borne diseases.

0002-11-30

89

[Dengue fever in the Reunion Island and in South Western islands of the Indian Ocean].  

PubMed

South Western islands of the Indian Ocean are permanently threatened by dengue fever outbreaks. On the Reunion Island, two dengue outbreaks were biologically documented (1977-1978 and 2004). And since July 2004 there has been an inter-epidemic period for the island with sporadic cases and clusters. Between January 1, 2007 and October 5, 2009, the epidemiologic surveillance system detected five confirmed autochthonous cases, five confirmed imported cases (South-East Asia), and 71 probable cases. All the five autochthonous confirmed cases occurred in Saint-Louis during two consecutive clusters. In other South Western islands of the Indian Ocean, several dengue fever outbreaks have been reported. Importation of dengue virus from South-East Asia is a major risk for a new outbreak on the island. The introduction of a new serotype could lead to the emergence of new and severe clinical forms, including dengue hemorrhagic fever. PMID:21295427

D'Ortenzio, E; Balleydier, E; Baville, M; Filleul, L; Renault, P

2011-09-01

90

Dengue specific immunoglobulins M, A, and E in primary and secondary dengue 4 infected salvadorian children.  

PubMed

El Salvador is a Central American country that has been affected by several dengue outbreaks. This study investigated the levels of IgM, IgA, and IgE anti-dengue antibodies in serum samples from children in El Salvador, with a clinical and serological diagnosis of dengue infection during the dengue 4 outbreak in 2002-2003. Seventy one serum samples were tested by ELISA and cases were classified in three groups: 13 primary dengue fever (PDF), 21 secondary dengue fever (SDF), and 37 secondary dengue hemorrhagic fever (SDHF). Also, the specificity of anti-dengue IgM for the different serotypes was tested. No significant differences in the IgM response were found between PDF and SDF, but these were detected between PDF and SDHF (P?=?0.0053) and between SDF and SDHF (P?=?0.0003). The IgA and IgE values showed a statistically significant difference between primary and secondary groups. The highest positivity percentage of IgA was between 95% (SDF) and 100% (SDHF) towards day 7 of onset of fever. All secondary cases were positive for IgE antibodies. The specificity of IgM was determined for DENV-4 virus in primary and secondary DF groups. This is the first study on dengue cases in Salvadorian children related to the immune response of different immunoglobulins to the type of infection and the clinical picture. Further prospective studies are needed to define if the pattern of immunoglobulins can determine early dengue infection and/or severity. J. Med. Virol. 86:1576-1583, 2014. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24615872

Vazquez, Susana; Lozano, Celina; Perez, Ana Beatriz; Castellanos, Yinet; Ruiz, Didye; Calzada, Naifi; Guzmán, Maria Guadalupe

2014-09-01

91

Monoclonal Antibody-Mediated Enhancement of Dengue Virus Infection in vitro and in vivo and Strategies for Prevention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infection with dengue virus (DENV) or any other flavivirus induces cross-reactive, but weakly neutralizing or nonneutralizing, antibodies that recognize epitopes involving the fusion peptide in the envelope glycoprotein. Humanized mAb IgG 1A5, derived from a chimpanzee, shares properties of cross-reactive antibodies. mAb IgG 1A5 up-regulated DENV infection by a mechanism of antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) in a variety of Fc receptor-bearing

Ana P. Goncalvez; Ronald E. Engle; Marisa St. Claire; Robert H. Purcell; Ching-Juh Lai

2007-01-01

92

Strategies for preventing invasive plant outbreaks after prescribed fire in ponderosa pine forest  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Land managers use prescribed fire to return a vital process to fire-adapted ecosystems, restore forest structure from a state altered by long-term fire suppression, and reduce wildfire intensity. However, fire often produces favorable conditions for invasive plant species, particularly if it is intense enough to reveal bare mineral soil and open previously closed canopies. Understanding the environmental or fire characteristics that explain post-fire invasive plant abundance would aid managers in efficiently finding and quickly responding to fire-caused infestations. To that end, we used an information-theoretic model-selection approach to assess the relative importance of abiotic environmental characteristics (topoedaphic position, distance from roads), pre-and post-fire biotic environmental characteristics (forest structure, understory vegetation, fuel load), and prescribed fire severity (measured in four different ways) in explaining invasive plant cover in ponderosa pine forest in South Dakota’s Black Hills. Environmental characteristics (distance from roads and post-fire forest structure) alone provided the most explanation of variation (26%) in post-fire cover of Verbascum thapsus (common mullein), but a combination of surface fire severity and environmental characteristics (pre-fire forest structure and distance from roads) explained 36–39% of the variation in post-fire cover of Cirsium arvense (Canada thistle) and all invasives together. For four species and all invasives together, their pre-fire cover explained more variation (26–82%) in post-fire cover than environmental and fire characteristics did, suggesting one strategy for reducing post-fire invasive outbreaks may be to find and control invasives before the fire. Finding them may be difficult, however, since pre-fire environmental characteristics explained only 20% of variation in pre-fire total invasive cover, and less for individual species. Thus, moderating fire intensity or targeting areas of high severity for post-fire invasive control may be the most efficient means for reducing the chances of post-fire invasive plant outbreaks when conducting prescribed fires in this region.

Symstad, Amy J.; Newton, Wesley E.; Swanson, Daniel J.

2014-01-01

93

Economic Impact of Dengue Illness in the Americas  

PubMed Central

The growing burden of dengue in endemic countries and outbreaks in previously unaffected countries stress the need to assess the economic impact of this disease. This paper synthesizes existing studies to calculate the economic burden of dengue illness in the Americas from a societal perspective. Major data sources include national case reporting data from 2000 to 2007, prospective cost of illness studies, and analyses quantifying underreporting in national routine surveillance systems. Dengue illness in the Americas was estimated to cost $2.1 billion per year on average (in 2010 US dollars), with a range of $1–4 billion in sensitivity analyses and substantial year to year variation. The results highlight the substantial economic burden from dengue in the Americas. The burden for dengue exceeds that from other viral illnesses, such as human papillomavirus (HPV) or rotavirus. Because this study does not include some components (e.g., vector control), it may still underestimate total economic consequences of dengue.

Shepard, Donald S.; Coudeville, Laurent; Halasa, Yara A.; Zambrano, Betzana; Dayan, Gustavo H.

2011-01-01

94

Ongoing dengue epidemic - Angola, June 2013.  

PubMed

On April 1, 2013, the Public Health Directorate of Angola announced that six cases of dengue had been reported to the Ministry of Health of Angola (MHA). As of May 31, a total of 517 suspected dengue cases had been reported and tested for dengue with a rapid diagnostic test (RDT). A total of 313 (60.5%) specimens tested positive for dengue, including one from a patient who died. All suspected cases were reported from Luanda Province, except for two from Malanje Province. Confirmatory diagnostic testing of 49 specimens (43 RDT-positive and six RDT-negative) at the CDC Dengue Branch confirmed dengue virus (DENV) infection in 100% of the RDT-positive specimens and 50% of the RDT-negative specimens. Only DENV-1 was detected by molecular diagnostic testing. Phylogenetic analysis indicated this virus has been circulating in the region since at least 1968, strongly suggesting that dengue is endemic in Angola. Health-care professionals throughout Angola should be aware of the ongoing epidemic, the recommended practices for clinical management of dengue patients, and the need to report cases to MHA. Persons in Angola should seek medical care for acute febrile illness to reduce the risk for developing complications. Laboratory-confirmed dengue also has been reported from seven countries on four continents among persons who had recently traveled to Luanda, including 79 persons from Portugal. Angola is the third of four African countries to report a dengue outbreak in 2013. Persons returning from Africa with acute febrile illness should seek medical care, including testing for DENV infection, and suspected cases should be reported to public health authorities. PMID:23784016

2013-06-21

95

Foodborne Outbreaks Surveillance Data  

MedlinePLUS

... outbreak-associated infections due to Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157, or Campylobacter, Listeria, or Salmonella ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1600 Clifton Rd Atlanta, GA 30333 800-CDC- ...

96

[Dengue epidemic in Nicaragua, 1985].  

PubMed

In the second half of the year 1985, during the rainy season, an epidemic of Dengue Fever was recognized in Nicaragua. A total of 17,483 cases were reported by the health services. The highest morbidity and attack rates were reported between August and November of the same year. Regions II (Leon and Chinandega), III (Managua) and IV (Masaya, Granada, Carazo y Rivas) reported 89% of the cases; these regions are precisely the more densely populated in the country, located in the Pacific Coast. Leon and Chinandega were the more affected cities reporting 41% of the cases of the epidemic. Sixty seven percent of the cases were adults, 57% were female. The national attack rate was 55.4/10,000 inhab. An intensive campaign for the control of the vector was launched immediately after the epidemic was recognized and by the month of October 1985 morbidity decreased and an endemic situation was established. Seven fatal cases were reported in adults. They were considered as DHF/DSS cases by a multidisciplinary group of pathologists and clinicians, considering the criteria of WHO and the experience obtained during the cuban DHF/DSS epidemic, in 1981. The outbreak was considered as a Classical Dengue Fever epidemic with 7 fatalities. Dengue-1 and -2 were isolated from acute sera and Dengue-1 from one of the dead. PMID:1844963

Kouri, G; Valdéz, M; Arguello, L; Guzmán, M G; Valdés, L; Soler, M; Bravo, J

1991-01-01

97

Re-Emergence of Dengue Virus Type 3 in Canton, China, 2009-2010, Associated with Multiple Introductions through Different Geographical Routes  

PubMed Central

Background Endemic dengue virus type 3 (DENV-3) infections have not been reported in Canton, China, since 1980. In March 2009, DENV-3 was isolated for the second time, occurring about 30 years after the previous circulation. In August, 3 other cases emerged. One much larger outbreak occurred again in 2010. To address the origin and particularly to determine whether the outbreaks were caused by the same viral genotype, we investigated the epidemiological and molecular characteristics of the introduction, spread and genetic microevolution of DENV-3 involved. Methodology/Principal Findings Three imported cases (index-1,2,3) separately traveled back from Vietnam, India and Tanzania, resulted in 1, 3 and 60 secondary autochthonous cases, respectively. In autochthonous cases, 64.6% positive in IgM anti-DENV and 18.6% in IgG from a total of 48 submitted serum samples, accompanied by 7 DENV-3 isolates. With 99.8%, 99.7%, and 100% envelope gene nucleotidic identity, 09/GZ/1081 from index-1 and endemic strain (09/GZ/1483) belonged to genotype V; 09/GZ/10616 from index-2 and endemic strains (09/GZ/11144 and 09/GZ/11194) belonged to genotype III Clade-A; and 10/GZ/4898 from index-3 and all four 2010 endemic DENV-3 strains belonged to genotype III Clade-B, respectively. Conclusions/Significance Both epidemiological and phylogenetic analyses showed that the 2010 outbreak of dengue was not a reemergence of the 2009 strain. Introductions of different genotypes following more than one route were important contributory factors for the 2009–2010 dengue epidemics/outbreaks in Canton. These findings underscore the importance of early detection and case management of imported case in preventing large-scale dengue epidemics among indigenous peoples of Canton.

Di, Biao; Bai, Zhijun; He, Peng; Jing, Qinlong; Zheng, Xueli

2013-01-01

98

Pediatric measles vaccine expressing a dengue tetravalent antigen elicits neutralizing antibodies against all four dengue viruses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dengue disease is an increasing global health problem that threatens one-third of the world's population. To control this emerging arbovirus, an efficient preventive vaccine is still needed. Because four serotypes of dengue virus (DV) coexist and antibody-dependent enhanced infection may occur, most strategies developed so far rely on the administration of tetravalent formulations of four live attenuated or chimeric viruses.

Samantha Brandler; Claude Ruffie; Valérie Najburg; Marie-Pascale Frenkiel; Hughes Bedouelle; Philippe Desprès; Frédéric Tangy

2010-01-01

99

DengueTools: innovative tools and strategies for the surveillance and control of dengue.  

PubMed

Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne viral disease estimated to cause about 230 million infections worldwide every year, of which 25,000 are fatal. Global incidence has risen rapidly in recent decades with some 3.6 billion people, over half of the world's population, now at risk, mainly in urban centres of the tropics and subtropics. Demographic and societal changes, in particular urbanization, globalization, and increased international travel, are major contributors to the rise in incidence and geographic expansion of dengue infections. Major research gaps continue to hamper the control of dengue. The European Commission launched a call under the 7th Framework Programme with the title of 'Comprehensive control of Dengue fever under changing climatic conditions'. Fourteen partners from several countries in Europe, Asia, and South America formed a consortium named 'DengueTools' to respond to the call to achieve better diagnosis, surveillance, prevention, and predictive models and improve our understanding of the spread of dengue to previously uninfected regions (including Europe) in the context of globalization and climate change.The consortium comprises 12 work packages to address a set of research questions in three areas:Research area 1: Develop a comprehensive early warning and surveillance system that has predictive capability for epidemic dengue and benefits from novel tools for laboratory diagnosis and vector monitoring.Research area 2: Develop novel strategies to prevent dengue in children.Research area 3: Understand and predict the risk of global spread of dengue, in particular the risk of introduction and establishment in Europe, within the context of parameters of vectorial capacity, global mobility, and climate change.In this paper, we report on the rationale and specific study objectives of 'DengueTools'. DengueTools is funded under the Health theme of the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Community, Grant Agreement Number: 282589 Dengue Tools. PMID:22451836

Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Renhorn, Karl-Erik; Tissera, Hasitha; Abu Bakar, Sazaly; Alphey, Luke; Kittayapong, Pattamaporn; Lindsay, Steve; Logan, James; Hatz, Christoph; Reiter, Paul; Rocklöv, Joacim; Byass, Peter; Louis, Valérie R; Tozan, Yesim; Massad, Eduardo; Tenorio, Antonio; Lagneau, Christophe; L'Ambert, Grégory; Brooks, David; Wegerdt, Johannah; Gubler, Duane

2012-01-01

100

Epidemiology of dengue: past, present and future prospects  

PubMed Central

Dengue is currently regarded globally as the most important mosquito-borne viral disease. A history of symptoms compatible with dengue can be traced back to the Chin Dynasty of 265–420 AD. The virus and its vectors have now become widely distributed throughout tropical and subtropical regions of the world, particularly over the last half-century. Significant geographic expansion has been coupled with rapid increases in incident cases, epidemics, and hyperendemicity, leading to the more severe forms of dengue. Transmission of dengue is now present in every World Health Organization (WHO) region of the world and more than 125 countries are known to be dengue endemic. The true impact of dengue globally is difficult to ascertain due to factors such as inadequate disease surveillance, misdiagnosis, and low levels of reporting. Currently available data likely grossly underestimates the social, economic, and disease burden. Estimates of the global incidence of dengue infections per year have ranged between 50 million and 200 million; however, recent estimates using cartographic approaches suggest this number is closer to almost 400 million. The expansion of dengue is expected to increase due to factors such as the modern dynamics of climate change, globalization, travel, trade, socioeconomics, settlement and also viral evolution. No vaccine or specific antiviral therapy currently exists to address the growing threat of dengue. Prompt case detection and appropriate clinical management can reduce the mortality from severe dengue. Effective vector control is the mainstay of dengue prevention and control. Surveillance and improved reporting of dengue cases is also essential to gauge the true global situation as indicated in the objectives of the WHO Global Strategy for Dengue Prevention and Control, 2012–2020. More accurate data will inform the prioritization of research, health policy, and financial resources toward reducing this poorly controlled disease. The objective of this paper is to review historical and current epidemiology of dengue worldwide and, additionally, reflect on some potential reasons for expansion of dengue into the future.

Murray, Natasha Evelyn Anne; Quam, Mikkel B; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

2013-01-01

101

Monoclonal antibody-mediated enhancement of dengue virus infection in vitro and in vivo and strategies for prevention.  

PubMed

Infection with dengue virus (DENV) or any other flavivirus induces cross-reactive, but weakly neutralizing or nonneutralizing, antibodies that recognize epitopes involving the fusion peptide in the envelope glycoprotein. Humanized mAb IgG 1A5, derived from a chimpanzee, shares properties of cross-reactive antibodies. mAb IgG 1A5 up-regulated DENV infection by a mechanism of antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) in a variety of Fc receptor-bearing cells in vitro. A 10- to 1,000-fold increase of viral yield in K562 cells, dependent on the DENV serotype, was observed over a range of subneutralizing concentrations of IgG 1A5. A significant increase of DENV-4 viremia titers (up to 100-fold) was also demonstrated in juvenile rhesus monkeys immunized with passively transferred dilutions of IgG 1A5. These results, together with earlier findings of ADE of DENV-2 infection by a polyclonal serum, establish the primate model for analysis of ADE. Considering the abundance of these cross-reactive antibodies, our observations confirm that significant viral amplification could occur during DENV infections in humans with prior infection or with maternally transferred immunity, possibly leading to severe dengue. Strategies to eliminate ADE were explored by altering the antibody Fc structures responsible for binding to Fc receptors. IgG 1A5 variants, containing amino acid substitutions from the Fc region of IgG2 or IgG4 antibodies, reduced but did not eliminate DENV-4-enhancing activity in K562 cells. Importantly, a 9-aa deletion at the N terminus of the CH(2) domain in the Fc region abrogated the enhancing activity. PMID:17517625

Goncalvez, Ana P; Engle, Ronald E; St Claire, Marisa; Purcell, Robert H; Lai, Ching-Juh

2007-05-29

102

Updated Norovirus Outbreak Management and Disease Prevention Guidelines. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Vol. 60, No. 3, March 4, 2011.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Noroviruses are the most common cause of epidemic gastroenteritis, responsible for at least 50% of all gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide, and a major cause of foodborne illness. In the United States, approximately 21 million illnesses attributable to no...

A. J. Hall B. Lopman C. Yen G. W. Park J. Vinje N. Gregoricus U. Parashar

2011-01-01

103

Importance of Internet Surveillance in Public Health Emergency Control and Prevention: Evidence From a Digital Epidemiologic Study During Avian Influenza A H7N9 Outbreaks  

PubMed Central

Background Outbreaks of human infection with a new avian influenza A H7N9 virus occurred in China in the spring of 2013. Control and prevention of a new human infectious disease outbreak can be strongly affected by public reaction and social impact through the Internet and social media. Objective This study aimed to investigate the potential roles of Internet surveillance in control and prevention of the human H7N9 outbreaks. Methods Official data for the human H7N9 outbreaks were collected via the China National Health and Family Planning Committee website from March 31 to April 24, 2013. We obtained daily posted and forwarded number of blogs for the keyword “H7N9” from Sina microblog website and a daily Baidu Attention Index (BAI) from Baidu website, which reflected public attention to the outbreak. Rumors identified and confirmed by the authorities were collected from Baidu search engine. Results Both daily posted and forwarded number and BAI for keyword H7N9 increased quickly during the first 3 days of the outbreaks and remained at a high level for 5 days. The total daily posted and forwarded number for H7N9 on Sina microblog peaked at 850,000 on April 3, from zero blogs before March 31, increasing to 97,726 on April 1 and to 370,607 on April 2, and remaining above 500,000 from April 5-8 before declining to 208,524 on April 12. The total daily BAI showed a similar pattern of change to the total daily posted and forwarded number over time from March 31 to April 12. When the outbreak locations spread, especially into other areas of the same province/city and the capital, Beijing, daily posted and forwarded number and BAI increased again to a peak at 368,500 and 116,911, respectively. The median daily BAI during the studied 25 days was significantly higher among the 7 provinces/cities with reported human H7N9 cases than the 2 provinces without any cases (P<.001). So were the median daily posted and forwarded number and daily BAI in each province/city except Anhui province. We retrieved a total of 32 confirmed rumors spread across 19 provinces/cities in China. In all, 84% (27/32) of rumors were disseminated and transmitted by social media. Conclusions The first 3 days of an epidemic is a critical period for the authorities to take appropriate action through Internet surveillance to prevent and control the epidemic, including preparation of personnel, technology, and other resources; information release; collection of public opinion and reaction; and clarification, prevention, and control of rumors. Internet surveillance can be used as an efficient and economical tool to prevent and control public health emergencies, such as H7N9 outbreaks.

Zhu, Honghong; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Xinyi; Chen, Lei; Jiang, Zhenggang; Zheng, Dawei

2014-01-01

104

Dengue Fever (DF) in Pakistan  

PubMed Central

Dengue is a widespread mosquito-borne infection in human beings, which in recent years has become a major international public health concern. Symptomatic dengue virus infections can present with a wide range of clinical manifestations, from a mild febrile illness to a life-threatening shock syndrome. Both viral and host factors are thought to contribute to the manifestations of disease in each infected. It is important to understand its burden on health care, morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and suspicion of DF in primary care might reduce the complications if handled properly. We must understand the depth of the problem in terms of its transmission, clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and prevention.

2011-01-01

105

Quantifying the Emergence of Dengue in Hanoi, Vietnam: 1998-2009  

PubMed Central

Background An estimated 2.4 billion people live in areas at risk of dengue transmission, therefore the factors determining the establishment of endemic dengue in areas where transmission suitability is marginal is of considerable importance. Hanoi, Vietnam is such an area, and following a large dengue outbreak in 2009, we set out to determine if dengue is emerging in Hanoi. Methods and Principal Findings We undertook a temporal and spatial analysis of 25,983 dengue cases notified in Hanoi between 1998 and 2009. Age standardized incidence rates, standardized age of infection, and Standardized Morbidity Ratios (SMR) were calculated. A quasi-Poisson regression model was used to determine if dengue incidence was increasing over time. Wavelet analysis was used to explore the periodicity of dengue transmission and the association with climate variables. After excluding the two major outbreak years of 1998 and 2009 and correcting for changes in population age structure, we identified a significant annual increase in the incidence of dengue cases over the period 1999–2008 (incidence rate ratio ?=?1.38, 95% confidence interval ?=?1.20–1.58, p value ?=?0.002). The age of notified dengue cases in Hanoi is high, with a median age of 23 years (mean 26.3 years). After adjusting for changes in population age structure, there was no statistically significant change in the median or mean age of dengue cases over the period studied. Districts in the central, highly urban, area of Hanoi have the highest incidence of dengue (SMR>3). Conclusions Hanoi is a low dengue transmission setting where dengue incidence has been increasing year on year since 1999. This trend needs to be confirmed with serological surveys, followed by studies to determine the underlying drivers of this emergence. Such studies can provide insights into the biological, demographic, and environmental changes associated with vulnerability to the establishment of endemic dengue.

Cuong, Hoang Quoc; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Duong, Tran Nhu; Phong, Tran Vu; Cam, Nguyen Nhat; Farrar, Jeremy; Nam, Vu Sinh; Thai, Khoa T. D.; Horby, Peter

2011-01-01

106

Spatio-temporal diffusion pattern and hotspot detection of dengue in Chachoengsao province, Thailand.  

PubMed

In recent years, dengue has become a major international public health concern. In Thailand it is also an important concern as several dengue outbreaks were reported in last decade. This paper presents a GIS approach to analyze the spatial and temporal dynamics of dengue epidemics. The major objective of this study was to examine spatial diffusion patterns and hotspot identification for reported dengue cases. Geospatial diffusion pattern of the 2007 dengue outbreak was investigated. Map of daily cases was generated for the 153 days of the outbreak. Epidemiological data from Chachoengsao province, Thailand (reported dengue cases for the years 1999-2007) was used for this study. To analyze the dynamic space-time pattern of dengue outbreaks, all cases were positioned in space at a village level. After a general statistical analysis (by gender and age group), data was subsequently analyzed for temporal patterns and correlation with climatic data (especially rainfall), spatial patterns and cluster analysis, and spatio-temporal patterns of hotspots during epidemics. The results revealed spatial diffusion patterns during the years 1999-2007 representing spatially clustered patterns with significant differences by village. Villages on the urban fringe reported higher incidences. The space and time of the cases showed outbreak movement and spread patterns that could be related to entomologic and epidemiologic factors. The hotspots showed the spatial trend of dengue diffusion. This study presents useful information related to the dengue outbreak patterns in space and time and may help public health departments to plan strategies to control the spread of disease. The methodology is general for space-time analysis and can be applied for other infectious diseases as well. PMID:21318014

Jeefoo, Phaisarn; Tripathi, Nitin Kumar; Souris, Marc

2011-01-01

107

Dengue NS1 and prM antibodies increase the sensitivity of acute dengue diagnosis test and differentiate from Japanese encephalitis infection.  

PubMed

Accurate and early diagnosis of dengue infection is essential for dengue case management. In outbreak conditions, it is essential to include two different tests to diagnose dengue and the choice depends on the number of days after the onset of illness in which the sample is collected. During the laboratory diagnosis of dengue in late acute and convalescent phase by MAC-ELISA, it is necessary to rule out possible cross reactions of closely related flavivirus, such as Japanese encephalitis virus which is commonly co-circulating. In the present investigation, the usefulness of dengue virus NS1 and prM antibodies in diagnosing and differentiating dengue from Japanese encephalitis infection was assessed using samples collected during out-breaks. It was shown here that, detection of antibodies against dengue NS1 and prM proteins increases the sensitivity of dengue diagnosis until 15days. Moreover, detection of antibodies against both proteins was able to differentiate dengue from Japanese encephalitis infection. PMID:24732134

Gowri Sankar, S; Balaji, T; Venkatasubramani, K; Thenmozhi, V; Dhananjeyan, K J; Paramasivan, R; Tyagi, B K; John Vennison, S

2014-05-01

108

Sentinel surveillance system for early outbreak detection in Madagascar  

PubMed Central

Background Following the outbreak of chikungunya in the Indian Ocean, the Ministry of Health directed the necessary development of an early outbreak detection system. A disease surveillance team including the Institut Pasteur in Madagascar (IPM) was organized to establish a sentinel syndromic-based surveillance system. The system, which was set up in March 2007, transmits patient data on a daily basis from the various voluntary general practitioners throughout the six provinces of the country to the IPM. We describe the challenges and steps involved in developing a sentinel surveillance system and the well-timed information it provides for improving public health decision-making. Methods Surveillance was based on data collected from sentinel general practitioners (SGP). The SGPs report the sex, age, visit date and time, and symptoms of each new patient weekly, using forms addressed to the management team. However, the system is original in that SGPs also report data at least once a day, from Monday to Friday (number of fever cases, rapid test confirmed malaria, influenza, arboviral syndromes or diarrhoeal disease), by cellular telephone (encrypted message SMS). Information can also be validated by the management team, by mobile phone. This data transmission costs 120 ariary per day, less than US$1 per month. Results In 2008, the sentinel surveillance system included 13 health centers, and identified 5 outbreaks. Of the 218,849 visits to SGPs, 12.2% were related to fever syndromes. Of these 26,669 fever cases, 12.3% were related to Dengue-like fever, 11.1% to Influenza-like illness and 9.7% to malaria cases confirmed by a specific rapid diagnostic test. Conclusion The sentinel surveillance system represents the first nationwide real-time-like surveillance system ever established in Madagascar. Our findings should encourage other African countries to develop their own syndromic surveillance systems. Prompt detection of an outbreak of infectious disease may lead to control measures that limit its impact and help prevent future outbreaks.

2010-01-01

109

Insecticide Control in a Dengue Epidemics Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A model for the transmission of dengue disease is presented. It consists of eight mutually-exclusive compartments representing the human and vector dynamics. It also includes a control parameter (insecticide) in order to fight the mosquitoes. The main goal of this work is to investigate the best way to apply the control in order to effectively reduce the number of infected humans and mosquitoes. A case study, using data of the outbreak that occurred in 2009 in Cape Verde, is presented.

Rodrigues, Helena Sofia; Monteiro, M. Teresa T.; Torres, Delfim F. M.

2010-09-01

110

New CDC Data on Foodborne Disease Outbreaks  

MedlinePLUS

... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button CDC Features New CDC Data on Foodborne Disease Outbreaks Outbreaks provide ... is the first step towards prevention. Highlights of New Reports: CDC published two new reports for 2011 ...

111

Oviposition Site Selection by the Dengue Vector Aedes aegypti and Its Implications for Dengue Control  

PubMed Central

Background Because no dengue vaccine or antiviral therapy is commercially available, controlling the primary mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti, is currently the only means to prevent dengue outbreaks. Traditional models of Ae. aegypti assume that population dynamics are regulated by density-dependent larval competition for food and little affected by oviposition behavior. Due to direct impacts on offspring survival and development, however, mosquito choice in oviposition site can have important consequences for population regulation that should be taken into account when designing vector control programs. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined oviposition patterns by Ae. aegypti among 591 naturally occurring containers and a set of experimental containers in Iquitos, Peru. Using larval starvation bioassays as an indirect measure of container food content, we assessed whether females select containers with the most food for their offspring. Our data indicate that choice of egg-laying site is influenced by conspecific larvae and pupae, container fill method, container size, lid, and sun exposure. Although larval food positively influenced oviposition, our results did not support the hypothesis that females act primarily to maximize food for larvae. Females were most strongly attracted to sites containing immature conspecifics, even when potential competitors for their progeny were present in abundance. Conclusion/Significance Due to strong conspecific attraction, egg-laying behavior may contribute more to regulating Ae. aegypti populations than previously thought. If highly infested containers are targeted for removal or larvicide application, females that would have preferentially oviposited in those sites may instead distribute their eggs among other suitable, previously unoccupied containers. Strategies that kill mosquitoes late in their development (i.e., insect growth regulators that kill pupae rather than larvae) will enhance vector control by creating “egg sinks,” treated sites that exploit conspecific attraction of ovipositing females, but reduce emergence of adult mosquitoes via density-dependent larval competition and late acting insecticide.

Wong, Jacklyn; Stoddard, Steven T.; Astete, Helvio; Morrison, Amy C.; Scott, Thomas W.

2011-01-01

112

Flu Outbreaks Force Schools to Adjust Plans: Classes Canceled in Some Places to Prevent Spread of Influenza  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A flu outbreak at Madison Junior High School in Ohio prompted school officials to close the building for two days. At Webber Junior High School in Fort Collins, Colorado, where absenteeism recently hit 20 percent for two bad weeks, educators were forced to slow the pace of schoolwork so sick students did not fall behind. This article reports on…

Jacobson, Linda; Bowman, Darcia Harris

2004-01-01

113

Dengue infection in Dhaka City, Bangladesh.  

PubMed

Dengue fever (DF) and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) are now endemic in Bangladesh with outbreaks being reported quite frequently. This cross sectional study was done clinically suspected dengue patients were selected from different hospitals of Dhaka city, Bangladesh, from January 2008 to December 2008. The clinical features, risk factors and laboratory findings associated with dengue infection were investigated among 201 clinically suspected patients. Antibodies were detected in 137(68.2%) cases. Of these, 80(58.4%) were primary and 57(41.6%) as secondary dengue cases according to presence of dengue-specific IgM and/or IgG antibodies. Among primary cases, 70(87.5%) were DF and 10(12.5%) were DHF cases, in contrast to secondary cases, where 10(18.1%) were DF and 47(81.9%) were DHF cases. Majority (57.9%) of patients presented with Grade I and 42.1% had Grade II disease. Patients between 16-30 years were the most vulnerable age group (81.3% DF and 71.9% DHF patients). Males out-numbered females with 72.5% male vs. 27.5% female patients having DF and 68.4% male vs. 31.6% female patients having DHF. The monsoon period was the peak season for dengue infection. Headache and arthralgia were the most frequent symptoms in both DF and DHF, but vomiting was more common in DHF. The Tourniquet test was significantly positive among DHF than DF cases (p = 0.001). Platelet count was the only laboratory parameter that showed significantly higher values among DHF than DF cases (p = 0.001). PMID:24292312

Sharmin, R; Tabassum, S; Mamun, K Z; Nessa, A; Jahan, M

2013-10-01

114

First Isolation of Dengue Virus from the 2010 Epidemic in Nepal  

PubMed Central

Dengue is an emerging disease in Nepal and was first observed as an outbreak in nine lowland districts in 2006. In 2010, however, a large epidemic of dengue occurred with 4,529 suspected and 917 serologically-confirmed cases and five deaths reported in government hospitals in Nepal. The collection of demographic information was performed along with an entomological survey and clinical evaluation of the patients. A total of 280 serum samples were collected from suspected dengue patients. These samples were subjected to routine laboratory investigations and IgM-capture ELISA for dengue serological identification, and 160 acute serum samples were used for virus isolation, RT-PCR, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. The results showed that affected patients were predominately adults, and that 10% of the cases were classified as dengue haemorrhagic fever/ dengue shock syndrome. The genetic characterization of dengue viruses isolated from patients in four major outbreak areas of Nepal suggests that the DENV-1 strain was responsible for the 2010 epidemic. Entomological studies identified Aedes aegypti in all epidemic areas. All viruses belonged to a monophyletic single clade which is phylogenetically close to Indian viruses. The dengue epidemic started in the lowlands and expanded to the highland areas. To our knowledge, this is the first dengue isolation and genetic characterization reported from Nepal.

Pandey, Basu D.; Nabeshima, Takeshi; Pandey, Kishor; Rajendra, Saroj P.; Shah, Yogendra; Adhikari, Bal R.; Gupta, Govinda; Gautam, Ishan; Tun, Mya M. N.; Uchida, Reo; Shrestha, Mahendra; Kurane, Ichiro; Morita, Kouichi

2013-01-01

115

Analysis of Effects of Meteorological Factors on Dengue Incidence in Sri Lanka Using Time Series Data  

PubMed Central

In tropical and subtropical regions of eastern and South-eastern Asia, dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) outbreaks occur frequently. Previous studies indicate an association between meteorological variables and dengue incidence using time series analyses. The impacts of meteorological changes can affect dengue outbreak. However, difficulties in collecting detailed time series data in developing countries have led to common use of monthly data in most previous studies. In addition, time series analyses are often limited to one area because of the difficulty in collecting meteorological and dengue incidence data in multiple areas. To gain better understanding, we examined the effects of meteorological factors on dengue incidence in three geographically distinct areas (Ratnapura, Colombo, and Anuradhapura) of Sri Lanka by time series analysis of weekly data. The weekly average maximum temperature and total rainfall and the total number of dengue cases from 2005 to 2011 (7 years) were used as time series data in this study. Subsequently, time series analyses were performed on the basis of ordinary least squares regression analysis followed by the vector autoregressive model (VAR). In conclusion, weekly average maximum temperatures and the weekly total rainfall did not significantly affect dengue incidence in three geographically different areas of Sri Lanka. However, the weekly total rainfall slightly influenced dengue incidence in the cities of Colombo and Anuradhapura.

Goto, Kensuke; Kumarendran, Balachandran; Mettananda, Sachith; Gunasekara, Deepa; Fujii, Yoshito; Kaneko, Satoshi

2013-01-01

116

Analysis of effects of meteorological factors on dengue incidence in Sri Lanka using time series data.  

PubMed

In tropical and subtropical regions of eastern and South-eastern Asia, dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) outbreaks occur frequently. Previous studies indicate an association between meteorological variables and dengue incidence using time series analyses. The impacts of meteorological changes can affect dengue outbreak. However, difficulties in collecting detailed time series data in developing countries have led to common use of monthly data in most previous studies. In addition, time series analyses are often limited to one area because of the difficulty in collecting meteorological and dengue incidence data in multiple areas. To gain better understanding, we examined the effects of meteorological factors on dengue incidence in three geographically distinct areas (Ratnapura, Colombo, and Anuradhapura) of Sri Lanka by time series analysis of weekly data. The weekly average maximum temperature and total rainfall and the total number of dengue cases from 2005 to 2011 (7 years) were used as time series data in this study. Subsequently, time series analyses were performed on the basis of ordinary least squares regression analysis followed by the vector autoregressive model (VAR). In conclusion, weekly average maximum temperatures and the weekly total rainfall did not significantly affect dengue incidence in three geographically different areas of Sri Lanka. However, the weekly total rainfall slightly influenced dengue incidence in the cities of Colombo and Anuradhapura. PMID:23671694

Goto, Kensuke; Kumarendran, Balachandran; Mettananda, Sachith; Gunasekara, Deepa; Fujii, Yoshito; Kaneko, Satoshi

2013-01-01

117

Dengue fever: a resurgent risk for the international traveler.  

PubMed

The incidence of dengue fever, an acute febrile illness transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, is on the rise. High fever, severe headache, skin rash and a variety of constitutional symptoms are hallmarks of classic dengue fever. Dengue hemorrhagic fever, a severe manifestation associated with secondary infection, most often occurs in children. Treatment of classic dengue fever is supportive, whereas urgent rehydration therapy is often required in more severe forms. Community-based and personal strategies for avoiding the mosquito vector represent the best methods of prevention, although vaccine development programs are under way. PMID:1543101

Lange, W R; Beall, B; Denny, S C

1992-03-01

118

Fire fighting truck-based emergency mosquito biolarviciding to prevent outbreaks of malaria and arboviral disease in Kabul, Afghanistan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emergency control of disease vectors requires high efficacy, rapid reaction and safe use of biocides in order interrupt transmission\\u000a cycles without harming humans, non-target animals and the environment. In countries with complex emergencies, air-borne large-scale\\u000a vector control is often limited, or impossible, due to questionable security as well as military, safety, equipment, or logistical\\u000a constraints. While facing a potential outbreak

M. K. Faulde; J. J. Scharninghausen; M. Tisch

2008-01-01

119

Effective suppression of Dengue fever virus in mosquito cell cultures using retroviral transduction of hammerhead ribozymes targeting the viral genome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Outbreaks of Dengue impose a heavy economic burden on developing countries in terms of vector control and human morbidity. Effective vaccines against all four serotypes of Dengue are in development, but population replacement with transgenic vectors unable to transmit the virus might ultimately prove to be an effective approach to disease suppression, or even eradication. A key element of the

Pruksa Nawtaisong; James Keith; Tresa Fraser; Velmurugan Balaraman; Andrey Kolokoltsov; Robert A Davey; Stephen Higgs; Ahmed Mohammed; Yupha Rongsriyam; Narumon Komalamisra; Malcolm J Fraser Jr

2009-01-01

120

Dengue fever (image)  

MedlinePLUS

Dengue fever, or West Nile fever, is a mild viral illness transmitted by mosquitoes which causes fever, ... second exposure to the virus can result in Dengue hemorrhagic fever, a life-threatening illness.

121

Dengue Fever Treatment  

MedlinePLUS

... JavaScript on. Read more information on enabling JavaScript. Dengue Fever Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content ... Treatment There is no specific treatment for classic dengue fever, and most people recover within 2 weeks. ...

122

More reasons to dread rain on vacation? Dengue fever in 42 German and United Kingdom Madeira tourists during autumn 2012.  

PubMed

In October and November 2012 residents and tourists in the Autonomous Region of Madeira, Portugal, were affected by dengue fever. The outbreak waned during the unusually dry winter. Using a Monte Carlo test we investigated the hypothesis that rainy weather conveyed increased risk of dengue virus infection among tourists. Results confirmed the hypothesis. As it is unclear whether the outbreak is over, upkeep and emphasis on mosquito avoidance on rainy days may help residents and tourists reduce infection risk. PMID:23594519

Frank, C; Höhle, M; Stark, K; Lawrence, J

2013-01-01

123

Emergence of the Severe Syndrome and Mortality Associated with Dengue and Dengue-Like Illness: Historical Records (1890 to 1950) and Their Compatibility with Current Hypotheses on the Shift of Disease Manifestation  

PubMed Central

Summary: Outbreaks of the severe dengue syndrome, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), emerged beginning in the 1950s, marking a dramatic change in the dengue syndrome. While intense investigations in multiple directions have been conducted for many years to elucidate the intrinsic mechanisms conducive to the development of DHF, no consensus has yet emerged. Meanwhile, relatively little attention has been paid to the occurrence of severe dengue and death prior to the 1950s. This comprehensive review was designed to evaluate outbreak records in the early dengue history to better understand the epidemiologic background and other factors that existed before the emergence of DHF outbreaks. By applying a set of stringent criteria to remove unreliable data as much as possible and by interpreting the results conservatively, a short list of etiologically more reliable outbreaks with high mortality was obtained. The results show that severe dengue syndrome, clinically very much compatible with DHF, occurred far more frequently in multiple locations than it had been assumed before; that the magnitudes of mortality in several outbreaks were not negligible; and that the epidemiologic background features shared among these outbreaks in the early period were, with the exceptions of more limited demographic changes, generally similar to the post-1950 conditions.

Kuno, Goro

2009-01-01

124

Public health implications of dengue in personnel returning from East Timor.  

PubMed

In north Queensland the vector of dengue fever (Aedes aegypti) is present; hence any viraemic individual importing dengue has the potential to transmit the disease locally. In early 2000 approximately 2,000 personnel returned from East Timor to Townsville, north Queensland. Seven importations of dengue occurred and individual cases were viraemic for up to 6 days in Townsville. No subsequent local transmission occurred. There were 3 cases each of dengue type 2 and dengue type 3. One case could not be serotyped. A response, including mosquito control measures, was initiated in another 18 cases in which dengue fever was clinically suspected but which subsequently proved not to be dengue. The planning and processes undertaken to prevent local transmission of dengue in Townsville during an intense period are described. PMID:11225377

Hills, S; Piispanen, J; Foley, P; Smith, G; Humphreys, J; Simpson, J; McDonald, G

2000-12-01

125

Natural or deliberate outbreak in pakistan: how to prevent or detect and trace its origin: biosecurity, surveillance, forensics.  

PubMed

Over the last few decades biosecurity and biosafety have emerged as a prominent public health concern due to some high-profile accidents. Effective strategies to deal with the outbreak, whether deliberate or non-deliberate requires a multidisciplinary approach and coordinated decision-making by various state departments such as health, forensics, agriculture, environment, intelligence, law and enforcement, etc. In a dynamic global environment and the overwhelming asymmetric threats from the non-state actors, it is of utmost importance to understand the biosecurity issues and initiate a coordinated global effort to cope with biosecurity and biosafety breaches and develop an as effective response mechanism. An attractive choice for the terrorists, state enemies and non-state actors is the use of biological weapons. An unwanted incident may not only bring chaos to the people, but also can inflict severe economic damage industrially and locally as was in the notorious foot-and-mouth disease outbreak. Because of special geopolitical compulsion, Pakistan is one of the hot spots where special action needs to be taken. The current review focuses on the various approaches, technologies that can be used to alleviate the chances of biosafety and biosecurity incident and emphasizes the role of modern technology that can be used in this regard. PMID:24942803

Shinwari, Zabta Khan; Khalil, Ali Talha; Nasim, Anwar

2014-08-01

126

Vancomycin-resistant enterococcus outbreak in a pediatric intensive care unit: report of successful interventions for control and prevention  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study is to retrospectively report the results of interventions for controlling a vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE) outbreak in a tertiary-care pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) of a University Hospital. After identification of the outbreak, interventions were made at the following levels: patient care, microbiological surveillance, and medical and nursing staff training. Data were collected from computer-based databases and from the electronic prescription system. Vancomycin use progressively increased after March 2008, peaking in August 2009. Five cases of VRE infection were identified, with 3 deaths. After the interventions, we noted a significant reduction in vancomycin prescription and use (75% reduction), and the last case of VRE infection was identified 4 months later. The survivors remained colonized until hospital discharge. After interventions there was a transient increase in PICU length-of-stay and mortality. Since then, the use of vancomycin has remained relatively constant and strict, no other cases of VRE infection or colonization have been identified and length-of-stay and mortality returned to baseline. In conclusion, we showed that a bundle intervention aiming at a strict control of vancomycin use and full compliance with the Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee guidelines, along with contact precautions and hand-hygiene promotion, can be effective in reducing vancomycin use and the emergence and spread of vancomycin-resistant bacteria in a tertiary-care PICU.

Carmona, F.; Prado, S.I.; Silva, M.F.I.; Gaspar, G.G.; Bellissimo-Rodrigues, F.; Martinez, R.; Matsuno, A.K.; Carlotti, A.P.C.P.

2012-01-01

127

Agent-based modeling to simulate the dengue spread  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we introduce a novel method ABM in simulating the unique process for the dengue spread. Dengue is an acute infectious disease with a long history of over 200 years. Unlike the diseases that can be transmitted directly from person to person, dengue spreads through a must vector of mosquitoes. There is still no any special effective medicine and vaccine for dengue up till now. The best way to prevent dengue spread is to take precautions beforehand. Thus, it is crucial to detect and study the dynamic process of dengue spread that closely relates to human-environment interactions where Agent-Based Modeling (ABM) effectively works. The model attempts to simulate the dengue spread in a more realistic way in the bottom-up way, and to overcome the limitation of ABM, namely overlooking the influence of geographic and environmental factors. Considering the influence of environment, Aedes aegypti ecology and other epidemiological characteristics of dengue spread, ABM can be regarded as a useful way to simulate the whole process so as to disclose the essence of the evolution of dengue spread.

Deng, Chengbin; Tao, Haiyan; Ye, Zhiwei

2008-11-01

128

Latest developments and future directions in dengue vaccines  

PubMed Central

Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease which is currently an expanding global health problem. The disease is caused by four closely related viruses, the dengue virus. There are no specific dengue therapeutics and prevention is currently limited to vector control measures. Development of an effective tetravalent dengue vaccine would therefore represent a major advance in the control of the disease and is considered a high public health priority. While a licensed dengue vaccine is not yet available, the scope and intensity of dengue vaccine development has increased dramatically in the last decade. The uniqueness of the dengue viruses and the spectrum of disease resulting from infection have made dengue vaccine development difficult. Several vaccine candidates are currently being evaluated in clinical studies. The candidate currently at the most advanced clinical development stage, a live-attenuated tetravalent vaccine based on chimeric yellow fever dengue virus, has progressed to phase III efficacy studies. Several other live-attenuated vaccines, as well as subunit, DNA and purified inactivated vaccine candidates, are at earlier stages of clinical development. Additional technological approaches, such as virus-vectored and virus-like particle-based vaccines, are under evaluation in preclinical studies.

Thisyakorn, Chule

2014-01-01

129

[Lessons from the Greek dengue epidemic of 1927-1928].  

PubMed

Epidemics of dengue have occurred in Greece in 1881, 1889, 1895-1897 and 1910, but the outbreak which has affected this country in 1927-1928 has been of a peculiar severity and geographic extension. More than one million inhabitants were sick and about 1500 died. The outbreak extended to the whole Greek territory and evolved in two epidemics waves. The first one occurred during the second half of 1927, was not very extensive and relatively benign. The second wave, explosive, started on July 1928, reached its summit in August and then declined until November. During this second part of the outbreak severe clinical events were identified, such as hemorrhagic, neurological or renal disorders, along with infections during pregnancy. The mosquito Aedes aegypti was the alone vector of the disease and dengue type 1 virus was the main etiological agent both in 1927 and 1928. The eventual activity of the dengue type 2 virus and its possible role in the pathogenesis of severe clinical forms of dengue, during 1928, remains unclear. Relatively speaking, it is possible to parallel this "historical" outbreak with the recent epidemic episode which appeared in 2007 in the Ravenne's area in northern Italy. This outbreak was caused by the Chikungunya virus after its importation from southern India by an infected traveller. There were 249 autochthonous registered cases but no severity nor death was observed. The local vector was Aedes albopictus, an invasive mosquito of Asian origin which has progressively invaded a number of European countries including France. Thus, Europe is now at risk to the emergence of outbreaks caused by "exotic" viruses imported by travellers returning from other parts of the world. PMID:19718899

Chastel, Claude

2009-02-01

130

An outbreak of gastroenteritis in a holiday resort in Italy: epidemiological survey, implementation and application of preventive measures.  

PubMed

A major gastroenteritis outbreak was reported in a vacation resort in Central Italy in 2003. A total of 183 cases were identified. The case-control study identified a statistically significant correlation between the disease and sea bathing, use of sanitary facilities in bungalows and of common showers. Stool samples taken from people affected were found positive for Norovirus (68%, 13 of 19 samples), Rotavirus (38%, 1 of 14 samples) and Campylobacter (7%, 3 of 8 samples). Environmental investigations revealed serious faecal contamination of the groundwater and the presence of Norovirus in the seawater near the resort. The mixing of groundwater and seawater with the non-drinking water system - which was also found to be connected to the drinking water system - had a primary role in the onset and spread of infection within the village. The complete absence of any gastroenteritis epidemics among the site guests since 2006 demonstrates the effectiveness of the environmental corrective measures taken. PMID:20405445

Migliorati, Giacomo; Prencipe, Vincenza; Ripani, Alessandro; Di Francesco, Cristina; Casaccia, Claudia; Crudeli, Silvia; Ferri, Nicola; Giovannini, Armando; Marconi, Maria Maddalena; Marfoglia, Cristina; Melai, Valeria; Savini, Giovanni; Scortichini, Giampiero; Semprini, Primula; Ruggeri, Franco Maria

2008-01-01

131

Expanded dengue syndrome: subacute thyroiditis and intracerebral hemorrhage  

PubMed Central

Background Although most symptomatic dengue infections follow an uncomplicated course, complications and unusual manifestations are increasingly being reported due to rising disease burden. Expanded dengue syndrome is a new entity added into World Health Organization (WHO) classification system to incorporate this wide spectrum of unusual manifestations. We report a case of expanded dengue syndrome with subacute thyroiditis and intracerebral hemorrhage. This is the first case report of thyroiditis in dengue infection. Case presentation A 20?years old man presented with fever, myalgias, arthralgias, retro-orbital pain, vomiting and gum bleeding during a large dengue outbreak in Lahore, Pakistan. On 7th day of illness patient became afebrile, but he developed severe headaches, unconsciousness followed by altered behavior. On 9th day of illness patient developed painful neck swelling accompanied by fever, tremors, palpitations, hoarseness of voice and odynophagia. Examination revealed acutely swollen, tender thyroid gland along with features of hyperthyroidism. Laboratory evaluation revealed stable hematocrit, thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Patient had seroconverted for anti-dengue IgM antibodies on the 10th day of illness. A non-contrast Computed Tomogram (CT) of the brain showed right frontal lobe hematoma. Thyroid profile showed increased free T3 and T4 and low TSH. Technetium thyroid scan showed reduced tracer uptake. He was diagnosed as having subacute thyroiditis and treated with oral prednisolone and propranolol. Follow up CT brain showed resolving hematoma. Patient’s recovery was uneventful. Conclusion Subacute thyroiditis may develop during the course of dengue fever and should be included as a manifestation of expanded dengue syndrome. It should be suspected in patients with dengue fever who develop painful thyroid swelling and clinical features of hyperthyroidism.

2012-01-01

132

Foodborne disease outbreaks in Australia, 1995 to 2000  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health agencies are increasingly conducting systematic reviews of foodborne disease outbreak inves- tigations to develop strategies to prevent future outbreaks. We surveyed state and territory health departments to summarise the epidemiology of foodborne disease outbreaks in Australia from 1995 to 2000. From 1995 through 2000, 293 outbreaks were identifi ed, with 214 being of foodborne origin. One hundred and seventy-four

Craig B Dalton; Joy Gregory; Martyn D Kirk; Russell J Stafford; Rod Givney; Ed Kraa; David Gould

2004-01-01

133

An optimal control problem arising from a dengue disease transmission model.  

PubMed

An optimal control problem for a host-vector Dengue transmission model is discussed here. In the model, treatments with mosquito repellent are given to adults and children and those who undergo treatment are classified in treated compartments. With this classification, the model consists of 11 dynamic equations. The basic reproductive ratio that represents the epidemic indicator is obtained from the largest eigenvalue of the next generation matrix. The optimal control problem is designed with four control parameters, namely the treatment rates for children and adult compartments, and the drop-out rates from both compartments. The cost functional accounts for the total number of the infected persons, the cost of the treatment, and the cost related to reducing the drop-out rates. Numerical results for the optimal controls and the related dynamics are shown for the case of epidemic prevention and outbreak reduction strategies. PMID:23274179

Aldila, Dipo; Götz, Thomas; Soewono, Edy

2013-03-01

134

Dengue encephalitis-A rare manifestation of dengue fever  

PubMed Central

The clinical spectrum of dengue fever ranges from asymptomatic infection to dengue shock syndrome. Dengue is classically considered a non-neurotropic virus. Neurological complications are not commonly seen in dengue. The neurological manifestations seen in dengue are encephalitis, meningitis, encephalopathy, stroke and Guillain-Barré syndrome. Dengue encephalitis is a rare disease. We report an interesting case of dengue encephalitis from Southern India. A 49-year-old gentleman presented with fever, altered sensorium and seizures. Dengue NS-1 antigen test was reactive. Dengue IgM was also positive. CSF PCR was negative for herpes simplex 1 & 2. Dengue encephalitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of fever with altered sensorium, especially in countries like India where dengue is rampant.

Madi, Deepak; Achappa, Basavaprabhu; Ramapuram, John T; Chowta, Nityananda; Laxman, Mridula; Mahalingam, Soundarya

2014-01-01

135

Molecular Characterization and Phylogenetic Analysis of Dengue Viruses Imported into Taiwan during 2008-2010  

PubMed Central

We present our surveillance results on imported dengue cases in Taiwan during 2008–2010. A total of 734 imported dengue patients were identified. The travelers were arriving from 18 countries, including Southeast Asia, the Indian subcontinent, South Pacific islands, and Latin America. Gene sequences from 358 dengue virus (DENV) isolates were used to perform phylogenetic analyses, thus, providing an updated view of the geographic distribution and dynamic transmission of DENV strains circulating in these countries. Our results suggest that the DENV-1 genotype I and DENV-2 Cosmopolitan genotype comprise the predominant DENV strains circulating in Southeast Asian countries. The DENV-3 Genotype III strain was found to be newly emerging in several Southeast Asian countries, however, the Asian genotype 2 and the Asian/American genotype of DENV-2 strains appeared to be less prevalent in Southeast Asia. Furthermore, imported dengue viruses are representative of the overall patterns of serotype/genotype frequencies of dengue outbreaks that occurred in Taiwan.

Huang, Jyh-Hsiung; Su, Chien-Ling; Yang, Cheng-Fen; Liao, Tsai-Ling; Hsu, Tung-Chien; Chang, Shu-Fen; Lin, Chien-Chou; Shu, Pei-Yun

2012-01-01

136

[Dengue 1 epidemic in the Grand Comoro Island (Federal Islamic Republic of the Comores). March-May 1993].  

PubMed

An epidemic of dengue fever occurred in Grande Comore island from March to May 1993. Dengue 1 virus has been isolated. The epidemic did not affect the other islands of the archipelago. No compound clinical picture, in particular hemorrhagic, was reported. A random sampling survey conducted towards the end of April showed that 26% of the population aged 5 years old or more had IgM dengue antibodies. The epidemic concerned essentially individuals under 45 years of age. The number of inhabitants of Grande Comore affected by the outbreak can be estimated between 56,000 and 75,000. The results of the sero-epidemiological survey allowed to find the serological scar of two previous epidemics of dengue: the first one around 1948, which may correspond with dengue 1, the other one in 1984, probably with dengue 2. PMID:7840689

Boisier, P; Morvan, J M; Laventure, S; Charrier, N; Martin, E; Ouledi, A; Roux, J

1994-09-01

137

Complete nucleotide sequence analysis of a Dengue-1 virus isolated on Easter Island, Chile.  

PubMed

Dengue-1 viruses responsible for the dengue fever outbreak in Easter Island in 2002 were isolated from acute-phase sera of dengue fever patients. In order to analyze the complete genome sequence, we designed primers to amplify contiguous segments across the entire sequence of the viral genome. RT-PCR products obtained were cloned, and complete nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences were determined. This report constitutes the first complete genetic characterization of a DENV-1 isolate from Chile. Phylogenetic analysis shows that an Easter Island isolate is most closely related to Pacific DENV-1 genotype IV viruses. PMID:18815724

Cáceres, C; Yung, V; Araya, P; Tognarelli, J; Villagra, E; Vera, L; Fernández, J

2008-01-01

138

Dengue: a review of the laboratory tests a clinician must know to achieve a correct diagnosis.  

PubMed

Dengue is the most important disease caused by an arbovirus (1, 2, 3 and 4 serotypes) worldwide, especially in the tropical and sub-tropical regions. Its clinical manifestations range from asymptomatic infections to a severe disease characterized by hemorrhage and shock. The incidence of dengue virus activity in the Americas has substantially increased from 1980 to 1994. In Brazil, the increase in the incidence of dengue is especially linked to the dissemination of Aedes aegypti. Thus, a rapid and accurate dengue diagnosis is of paramount importance for effective control of dengue outbreaks [8]. Five serological tests have been used for the diagnosis of dengue infection: hemagglutination-inhibition (HI), complement fixation (CF), neutralization test (NT), immunoglobulin M (IgM) capture enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (MAC-ELISA) and indirect immunoglobulin G ELISA. The limitations of these techniques are the high cross-reactivity observed with these tests. Four methods of viral isolation have been routinely used for dengue viruses: intracerebral inoculation of newborn mice, inoculation on mammalian cell cultures, intrathoracic inoculation of adult mosquitoes, and inoculation on mosquito cell cultures. In recent years, several new diagnostic techniques have been developed and have proven very useful in dengue diagnosis, such as: nucleic and acid hybridization, RT-PCR. Currently, dengue diagnosis is based on serology, viral isolation and RNA detection. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) are still the most widely used technique for serological diagnosis, but they do not identify the dengue virus serotype responsible for the current infection, so molecular techniques may soon assume a very important role in dengue diagnosis. RT-PCR is definitely the most satisfactory test that can be used on these infections, since it has been shown to be able to detect dengue viruses up to the 10th day after the onset of the symptoms. PMID:15880229

De Paula, Sérgio Oliveira; Fonseca, Benedito Antônio Lopes da

2004-12-01

139

Review of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Fatal Cases Seen Among Adults: A Retrospective Study  

PubMed Central

Background Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease endemic in many countries in the tropics and sub-tropics. The disease affects mainly children, but in recent years it is becoming more of an adult disease. Malaysia experienced a large dengue outbreak in 2006 to 2007, involving mostly adults, with a high number of deaths. Methodology/Principal Findings We undertook a retrospective study to examine dengue death cases in our hospital from June 2006 to October 2007 with a view to determine if there have been changes in the presentation of severe to fatal dengue. Nine of ten fatal cases involved adult females with a median age of 32 years. All had secondary dengue infection. The mean duration of illness prior to hospitalization was 4.7 days and deaths occurred at an average of 2.4 days post-admission. Gastrointestinal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, intravascular leakages and bleeding occurred in the majority of cases. DSS complicated with severe bleeding, multi-organ failure and coagulopathy were the primary causes of deaths. Seven patients presented with thrombocytopenia and hypoalbuminemia, five of which had hemoconcentration and increased ALT and AST indicative of liver damage. Co-morbidities particularly diabetes mellitus was common in our cohort. Prominent unusual presentations included acute renal failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome, myocarditis with pericarditis, and hemorrhages over the brain and heart. Conclusions In our cohort, dengue fatalities are seen primarily in adult females with secondary dengue infection. The majority of the patients presented with common clinical and laboratory warning signs of severe dengue. Underlying co-morbidities may contribute to the rapid clinical deterioration in severe dengue. The uncommon presentations of dengue are likely a reflection of the changing demographics where adults are now more likely to contract dengue in dengue endemic regions.

Sam, Sing-Sin; Omar, Sharifah Faridah Syed; Teoh, Boon-Teong; Abd-Jamil, Juraina; AbuBakar, Sazaly

2013-01-01

140

The Role of Imported Cases and Favorable Meteorological Conditions in the Onset of Dengue Epidemics  

PubMed Central

Background Travelers who acquire dengue infection are often routes for virus transmission to other regions. Nevertheless, the interplay between infected travelers, climate, vectors, and indigenous dengue incidence remains unclear. The role of foreign-origin cases on local dengue epidemics thus has been largely neglected by research. This study investigated the effect of both imported dengue and local meteorological factors on the occurrence of indigenous dengue in Taiwan. Methods and Principal Findings Using logistic and Poisson regression models, we analyzed bi-weekly, laboratory-confirmed dengue cases at their onset dates of illness from 1998 to 2007 to identify correlations between indigenous dengue and imported dengue cases (in the context of local meteorological factors) across different time lags. Our results revealed that the occurrence of indigenous dengue was significantly correlated with temporally-lagged cases of imported dengue (2–14 weeks), higher temperatures (6–14 weeks), and lower relative humidity (6–20 weeks). In addition, imported and indigenous dengue cases had a significant quantitative relationship in the onset of local epidemics. However, this relationship became less significant once indigenous epidemics progressed past the initial stage. Conclusions These findings imply that imported dengue cases are able to initiate indigenous epidemics when appropriate weather conditions are present. Early detection and case management of imported cases through rapid diagnosis may avert large-scale epidemics of dengue/dengue hemorrhagic fever. The deployment of an early-warning surveillance system, with the capacity to integrate meteorological data, will be an invaluable tool for successful prevention and control of dengue, particularly in non-endemic countries.

Shang, Chuin-Shee; Wen, Tzai-Hung; Tsai, Kun-Hsien

2010-01-01

141

Virulence Markers of Dengue Viruses.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Illnesses in humans caused by the four serotypes of dengue virus vary from mild forms i. e. pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO) and dengue fever (DF) to severe forms i.e. dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). One of the factors that co...

J. L. Hardy S. C. Kliks

1990-01-01

142

Non-hemorrhagic dengue fever with rhabdomyolysis.  

PubMed

Acute kidney injury occurs in 33-50% of patients with rhabdomyolysis and infections remain one of the major contributing factors. The incidence of rhabdomyolysis in non-hemorrhagic dengue virus infection is quite low and may go unnoticed, especially if the presentation is not florid. We report a case of a young male patient, sero-positive for dengue, with no hemorrhagic manifestations or hypotension, who developed rhabdomyolysis complicated by renal failure. The patient eventually needed dialysis support and later recovered fully. Clinicians need to be aware of the occurrence of rhabdomyolysis even in patients without the hemorrhagic manifestations of dengue viral infection and should employ early preventive strategies in such cases. PMID:24231486

Jha, Ratan; Gude, Dilip; Chennamsetty, Sashidhar

2013-11-01

143

Utility of the tourniquet test and the white blood cell count to differentiate dengue among acute febrile illnesses in the emergency room.  

PubMed

Dengue often presents with non-specific clinical signs, and given the current paucity of accurate, rapid diagnostic laboratory tests, identifying easily obtainable bedside markers of dengue remains a priority. Previous studies in febrile Asian children have suggested that the combination of a positive tourniquet test (TT) and leucopenia can distinguish dengue from other febrile illnesses, but little data exists on the usefulness of these tests in adults or in the Americas. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of the TT and leucopenia (white blood cell count <5000/mm(3)) in identifying dengue as part of an acute febrile illness (AFI) surveillance study conducted in the Emergency Department of Saint Luke's Hospital in Ponce, Puerto Rico. From September to December 2009, 284 patients presenting to the ED with fever for 2-7 days and no identified source were enrolled. Participants were tested for influenza, dengue, leptospirosis and enteroviruses. Thirty-three (12%) patients were confirmed as having dengue; 2 had dengue co-infection with influenza and leptospirosis, respectively. An infectious etiology was determined for 141 others (136 influenza, 3 enterovirus, 2 urinary tract infections), and 110 patients had no infectious etiology identified. Fifty-two percent of laboratory-positive dengue cases had a positive TT versus 18% of patients without dengue (P<0.001), 87% of dengue cases compared to 28% of non-dengue cases had leucopenia (P<0.001). The presence of either a positive TT or leucopenia correctly identified 94% of dengue patients. The specificity and positive predictive values of these tests was significantly higher in the subset of patients without pandemic influenza A H1N1, suggesting improved discriminatory performance of these tests in the absence of concurrent dengue and influenza outbreaks. However, even during simultaneous AFI outbreaks, the absence of leucopenia combined with a negative tourniquet test may be useful to rule out dengue. PMID:22163057

Gregory, Christopher J; Lorenzi, Olga D; Colón, Lisandra; García, Arleene Sepúlveda; Santiago, Luis M; Rivera, Ramón Cruz; Bermúdez, Liv Jossette Cuyar; Báez, Fernando Ortiz; Aponte, Delanor Vázquez; Tomashek, Kay M; Gutierrez, Jorge; Alvarado, Luisa

2011-12-01

144

Utility of the Tourniquet Test and the White Blood Cell Count to Differentiate Dengue among Acute Febrile Illnesses in the Emergency Room  

PubMed Central

Dengue often presents with non-specific clinical signs, and given the current paucity of accurate, rapid diagnostic laboratory tests, identifying easily obtainable bedside markers of dengue remains a priority. Previous studies in febrile Asian children have suggested that the combination of a positive tourniquet test (TT) and leucopenia can distinguish dengue from other febrile illnesses, but little data exists on the usefulness of these tests in adults or in the Americas. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of the TT and leucopenia (white blood cell count <5000/mm3) in identifying dengue as part of an acute febrile illness (AFI) surveillance study conducted in the Emergency Department of Saint Luke's Hospital in Ponce, Puerto Rico. From September to December 2009, 284 patients presenting to the ED with fever for 2–7 days and no identified source were enrolled. Participants were tested for influenza, dengue, leptospirosis and enteroviruses. Thirty-three (12%) patients were confirmed as having dengue; 2 had dengue co-infection with influenza and leptospirosis, respectively. An infectious etiology was determined for 141 others (136 influenza, 3 enterovirus, 2 urinary tract infections), and 110 patients had no infectious etiology identified. Fifty-two percent of laboratory-positive dengue cases had a positive TT versus 18% of patients without dengue (P<0.001), 87% of dengue cases compared to 28% of non-dengue cases had leucopenia (P<0.001). The presence of either a positive TT or leucopenia correctly identified 94% of dengue patients. The specificity and positive predictive values of these tests was significantly higher in the subset of patients without pandemic influenza A H1N1, suggesting improved discriminatory performance of these tests in the absence of concurrent dengue and influenza outbreaks. However, even during simultaneous AFI outbreaks, the absence of leucopenia combined with a negative tourniquet test may be useful to rule out dengue.

Gregory, Christopher J.; Lorenzi, Olga D.; Colon, Lisandra; Sepulveda Garcia, Arleene; Santiago, Luis M.; Cruz Rivera, Ramon; Cuyar Bermudez, Liv Jossette; Ortiz Baez, Fernando; Vazquez Aponte, Delanor; Tomashek, Kay M.; Gutierrez, Jorge; Alvarado, Luisa

2011-01-01

145

Dengue Spatial and Temporal Patterns, French Guiana, 2001  

PubMed Central

To study a 2001 dengue fever outbreak in Iracoubo, French Guiana, we recorded the location of all patients’ homes and the date when symptoms were first observed. A geographic information system was used to integrate the patient-related information. The Knox test, a classic space-time analysis technique, was used to detect spatiotemporal clustering. Analysis of the relative-risk (RR) variations when space and time distances vary, highlighted the maximum space and time extent of a dengue transmission focus. The results show that heterogeneity in the RR variations in space and time corresponds to known entomologic and epidemiologic factors, such as the mosquito feeding cycle and host-seeking behavior. This finding demonstrates the relevance and potential of the use of GIS and spatial statistics for elaborating a dengue fever surveillance strategy.

Deparis, Xavier; Dussart, Philippe; Morvan, Jacques; Rabarison, Patrick; Remy, Franck; Polidori, Laurent; Gardon, Jacques

2004-01-01

146

[Haemorrhagic exanthema due to dengue virus induced by acetylsalicylic acid].  

PubMed

Dengue fever, a viral infectious disease characteristic of tropical climates, is considered to be a re-emergent pathology responsible for several serious outbreaks in the last decade. Some factors have been involved in the spread of the virus and its vectorial mosquito carrier: human alteration of the ecosystems, improvement and speed in the transit of goods and people and climate changes. As a reflection of this, an increase in imported cases is probable, especially in tourists coming from endemic areas, considering its short period of incubation (7-10 days). The recognition of personal antecedents of journeys, the main symptoms of the disease and the potential presence of complications (haemorrhagic dengue) should be included in the examination of fever of unknown origin or feverish exanthema. The case of a patient is presented whose clinical picture of classic dengue fever was worsened by self-treatment with acetylsalicylic acid. PMID:17224945

Valerio, L; de Balanzó, X; Jiménez, O; Pedro-Bolet, M L

2006-01-01

147

An update on the incidence of dengue gaining strength in Saudi Arabia and current control approaches for its vector mosquito  

PubMed Central

Background The cases of dengue reported earlier in the late 1990s from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) occurred in the cities of Jeddah and Makkah. Although the kingdom has ample financial resources to establish effective control measures for the dengue vector, numerous cases of dengue occur and fluctuate in numbers from year to year. This necessitates a serious review of the current vector control strategies being practiced in order to identify the existing shortcomings. This short report provides an update on epidemiology of dengue in KSA (specifically in cities of Jeddah and Makkah) with a critical look at the current vector control strategies. Findings In 2013, 4411 cases of dengue were reported, with 8 cases of mortality. This number of dengue incidence was four times higher compared to 2012. In 2013, the highest number of 1272 dengue cases was reported in May, while the lowest number (37) of cases was reported in September. Conclusions It is evident that the control strategies of the dengue vector presently employed are inadequate. There seems to be serious deficiencies in following proper scientific procedures during field application(s) of control materials against the vector as is evident by the increases in the number of dengue cases as well as frequent outbreaks of the vector mosquito populations. In this review, some specific suggestions are made to draw attention to the relevant KSA authorities of the possible reasons behind unsuccessful control results and as to how to improve the strategy of dengue vector control in the kingdom.

2014-01-01

148

Human Immune Response to Dengue Infections.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this contract was to analyze human immune responses to dengue virus infections. To understand the role of immune responses in recovery from dengue virus infection and in the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome...

F. A. Ennis

1991-01-01

149

Human Immune Response to Dengue Infections.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Work was begun to analyze human T cell responses to dengue antigens in vitro to elucidate the possible role of T lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Dengue antigens induce proliferative responses of perip...

F. A. Ennis

1988-01-01

150

Emergence of traveling waves in the spreading of dengue fever  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dengue fever is a multistrain mosquito-borne subtropical disease that exhibits complex oscillatory outbreaks. Epidemiological data from Thailand displays traveling waves of infection originating in Bangkok, the largest population center (Cummings et al., Nature 427: 344, 2004). We present a multistrain metapopulation model in which traveling wave like behavior results from migration coupling between heterogeneous regions. The region with the highest effective person-to-person contact rate leads the dynamics. A stochastic version of the model will also be presented.

Bianco, Simone; Faatz, Andrea; Cummings, Derek; Shaw, Leah

2010-03-01

151

Dengue fever triggering systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis: a case report  

PubMed Central

We report a rare case of dengue fever triggering systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis. The patient presented herself during a large outbreak of dengue fever in December 2012 in Maharashtra, India. The diagnosis of dengue fever was confirmed by the presence of NS-1 antigen during the first few days of febrile illness. Eight weeks later, kidney tissue biopsy studies revealed evidence of lupus nephritis on microscopic examination and immunofluorescence. The report interpreted it as focal proliferative glomerulonephritis and segmental sclerosis (Stage IIIC). The case was also found positive for perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence assay. An active and effective management of a case essentially calls for clear perception of differentiating dengue-induced lupus flare, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related nephropathy, and/or dengue-induced de-novo lupus disease. Dengue viremia may be the trigger for immune complex formation in patients who are predisposed to developing autoimmune diseases. The present case explains the importance of considering the diagnosis of dengue-related lupus nephritis as an atypical occurrence in appropriate situations, as in this case. It would not be improper to regard this escalating disease as an expanded feature of dengue.

Talib, SH; Bhattu, SR; Bhattu, R; Deshpande, SG; Dahiphale, DB

2013-01-01

152

Acute Pancreatitis Complicating Severe Dengue  

PubMed Central

Dengue is an arthropod borne viral infection endemic in tropical and subtropical continent. Severe dengue is life threatening. Various atypical presentations of dengue have been documented. But we present a rare and fatal complication of severe dengue in form of acute pancreatitis. A 27-year-old male had presented with severe dengue in decompensated shock and with pain in abdomen due to pancreatitis. The pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis in dengue is not clearly understood, but various mechanisms are postulated. The awareness and timely recognition of this complication is very important for proper management.

Jain, Vishakha; Gupta, OP; Rao, Tarun; Rao, Siddharth

2014-01-01

153

A climate-based spatiotemporal prediction for dengue fever epidemics: a case study in southern Taiwan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dengue Fever (DF) has been identified by the World Health organization (WHO) as one of the most serious vector-borne infectious diseases in tropical and sub-tropical areas. DF has been one of the most important epidemics in Taiwan which occur annually especially in southern Taiwan during summer and autumn. Most DF studies have focused mainly on temporal DF patterns and its close association with climatic covariates, whereas few studies have investigated the spatial DF patterns (spatial dependence and clustering) and composite space-time effects of the DF epidemics. The present study proposes a spatio-temporal DF prediction approach based on stochastic Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) analysis. Core and site-specific knowledge bases are considered, including climate and health datasets under conditions of uncertainty, space-time dependence functions, and a Poisson regression model of climatic variables contributing to DF occurrences in southern Taiwan during 2007, when the highest number of DF cases was recorded in the history of Taiwan epidemics (over 2000). The obtained results show that the DF outbreaks in the study area are highly influenced by climatic conditions. Furthermore, the analysis can provide the required "one-week-ahead" outbreak warnings based on spatio-temporal predictions of DF distributions. Therefore, the proposed analysis can provide the Taiwan Disease Control Agency with a valuable tool to timely identify, control, and even efficiently prevent DF spreading across space-time.

Yu, H.-L.; Yang, S.-J.; Lin, Y.-C.

2012-04-01

154

Impact of Dengue  

MedlinePLUS

... intervals, a reflection of the slow pace of transport and limited travel at that time. Today, dengue ... in used tyres which easily accumulate rainwater. Increased air travel and breakdown of vector control measures have ...

155

[Increase of entomological indices during the pre-epidemic period of dengue in Ben Tre, South Vietnam].  

PubMed

Dengue has emerged in Vietnam 50 years ago and since has become endemo-epidemic throughout the whole country. Each year, major epidemics of dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) hit South Vietnam during the rainy season, causing significant morbidity and mortality, especially among young children. The only preventive measure is vector control, but it is often implemented too late or indiscriminately. The aim of this study was to investigate, in the pre-epidemic stage, the existence of significant changes in vector indices, which will predict DF/DHF outbreaks. We conducted a descriptive transversal study, repeated once a month for four months (March to June) in the village of Locthuan (province Ben Tre) in the Mekong's delta. Adult mosquitoes were caught in 30 houses, and larvae were collected in water holding containers of 50 houses. The houses were randomly selected. Vector densities were calculated according to the indices recommended by WHO. Virological analysis was carried out on lots of female Aedes and larvae in order to determine viral infection rates. Catches of adult mosquitoes collected 496 specimens including 329 Aedes, 139 Culex and 28 Anopheles. Aedes aegypti was present in 63% of visited homes that is an average density of 1.8 mosquitoes per house. The increase in imaginal indices during the 4 months was not significant. The survey of breeding sites of Ae. aegypti identified 1292 water containers in which 71,569 larval specimens were collected. The values of house index, container index [CI] and Breteau index [BI] increased each month, the latter from 166 to 442. This increase was significant for CI and BI. Breeding sites were mostly intra-home, mainly consisting of large and small ceramic jars. Larval density of Ae. aegypti in the containers also increased significantly over the 4 months. It was correlated with the lack of cover and predators such as Mesocyclops spp., Micronecta spp. and larvivorous fishes. Cultivation of 15 pools of 10 adult females and 29 pools of larvae (ie 1088 specimens) of Ae. aegypti failed to isolate dengue virus. The high Stegomyia indices measured in this South Vietnamese village and their increase before the rainy season reflect a situation at high risk of epidemics but cannot predict the occurrence of an outbreak in the absence of virus isolation from mosquitoes. They justify conducting an integrated vector control throughout the year. PMID:21643648

Nguyen, T P Q; Luu, L L; Vu, T Q H; Buisson, Y

2011-10-01

156

Health economics of dengue: a systematic literature review and expert panel's assessment.  

PubMed

Dengue vaccines are currently in development and policymakers need appropriate economic studies to determine their potential financial and public health impact. We searched five databases (PubMed, EMBASE, LILAC, EconLit, and WHOLIS) to identify health economics studies of dengue. Forty-three manuscripts were identified that provided primary data: 32 report economic burden of dengue and nine are comparative economic analyses assessing various interventions. The remaining two were a willingness-to-pay study and a policymaker survey. An expert panel reviewed the existing dengue economic literature and recommended future research to fill information gaps. Although dengue is an important vector-borne disease, the economic literature is relatively sparse and results have often been conflicting because of use of inconsistent assumptions. Health economic research specific to dengue is urgently needed to ensure informed decision making on the various options for controlling and preventing this disease. PMID:21363989

Beatty, Mark E; Beutels, Philippe; Meltzer, Martin I; Shepard, Donald S; Hombach, Joachim; Hutubessy, Raymond; Dessis, Damien; Coudeville, Laurent; Dervaux, Benoit; Wichmann, Ole; Margolis, Harold S; Kuritsky, Joel N

2011-03-01

157

Health Economics of Dengue: A Systematic Literature Review and Expert Panel's Assessment  

PubMed Central

Dengue vaccines are currently in development and policymakers need appropriate economic studies to determine their potential financial and public health impact. We searched five databases (PubMed, EMBASE, LILAC, EconLit, and WHOLIS) to identify health economics studies of dengue. Forty-three manuscripts were identified that provided primary data: 32 report economic burden of dengue and nine are comparative economic analyses assessing various interventions. The remaining two were a willingness-to-pay study and a policymaker survey. An expert panel reviewed the existing dengue economic literature and recommended future research to fill information gaps. Although dengue is an important vector-borne disease, the economic literature is relatively sparse and results have often been conflicting because of use of inconsistent assumptions. Health economic research specific to dengue is urgently needed to ensure informed decision making on the various options for controlling and preventing this disease.

Beatty, Mark E.; Beutels, Philippe; Meltzer, Martin I.; Shepard, Donald S.; Hombach, Joachim; Hutubessy, Raymond; Dessis, Damien; Coudeville, Laurent; Dervaux, Benoit; Wichmann, Ole; Margolis, Harold S.; Kuritsky, Joel N.

2011-01-01

158

VARIACION ESPACIO-TEMPORAL DEL RIESGO DE TRANSMISION DE DENGUE EN LA CIUDAD DE BUENOS AIRES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spatio-temporal variability in the transmission of dengue in Buenos Aires City. Cases of den- gue detected in Buenos Aires City between 1999 and 2000 confirmed the possibility of epidemic outbreaks. The activity of its vector Aedes aegypi was monitored to study the spatial and temporal risk of den- gue transmission. Adult oviposition activity of Aedes aegypti showed an heterogeneous spatio-temporal

ANIBAL E. CARBAJO; SANDRA M. GOMEZ; SUSANA I. CURTO; NICOLAS J. SCHWEIGMANN; Academia Nacional de Medicina

2004-01-01

159

Dengue viruses - an overview  

PubMed Central

Dengue viruses (DENVs) cause the most common arthropod-borne viral disease in man with 50–100 million infections per year. Because of the lack of a vaccine and antiviral drugs, the sole measure of control is limiting the Aedes mosquito vectors. DENV infection can be asymptomatic or a self-limited, acute febrile disease ranging in severity. The classical form of dengue fever (DF) is characterized by high fever, headache, stomach ache, rash, myalgia, and arthralgia. Severe dengue, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) are accompanied by thrombocytopenia, vascular leakage, and hypotension. DSS, which can be fatal, is characterized by systemic shock. Despite intensive research, the underlying mechanisms causing severe dengue is still not well understood partly due to the lack of appropriate animal models of infection and disease. However, even though it is clear that both viral and host factors play important roles in the course of infection, a fundamental knowledge gap still remains to be filled regarding host cell tropism, crucial host immune response mechanisms, and viral markers for virulence.

Back, Anne Tuiskunen; Lundkvist, Ake

2013-01-01

160

Dengue vaccines for travelers.  

PubMed

Dengue is an arthropod-borne infection caused by a flavivirus and spread by the Aedes mosquitoes. Many of the countries where dengue is endemic are popular tourist destinations and the disease is an increasingly important problem encountered by international travelers. Personal protection against the day-feeding dengue vectors is problematic, indicating the urgent need for a dengue vaccine. This review discusses the challenges of vaccine development, current vaccine strategies and the prospects for the availability of a vaccine for travelers in the future. Cost-effectiveness studies will need to take into account many factors, including the attack rate of dengue in travelers, the proportion of travelers who will need hospitalization, the cost of altered travel itineraries, the cost of the vaccine, duration of travel, destination and season. To be licensed as a travelers' vaccine, vaccine trials must address safety, immunogenicity, duration of protection, schedules and boosters in adults (in particular in immunologically naive adults), trials that may differ from those conducted in endemic countries. Vaccine schedules with long intervals would be a major obstacle to the uptake of the vaccine by travelers. Enhanced reactogenicity or interference with immunization must be effectively excluded for travelers with prior or concurrent vaccination against other flaviviruses, such as yellow fever or Japanese encephalitis. Licensing dengue as a travelers' vaccine poses unique challenges beyond the development of a vaccine for the endemic population. PMID:18564012

Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Deen, Jacqueline L

2008-07-01

161

Outbreak Simulation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page provides a problem-based activity on risk assessment of environmental health issues. The activity asks students to "study and research emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, particularly through vector-borne, food-borne, and water-borne educational activities" and "understand that certain exposures in the environment cause various infectious diseases." The activity asks students to simulate a food borne salmonella outbreak, and carry out the resulting investigation. This resource is free to download. Users must first create a login with ATEEC's website to access the file.

2013-07-22

162

Assessing the Relationship between Vector Indices and Dengue Transmission: A Systematic Review of the Evidence  

PubMed Central

Background Despite doubts about methods used and the association between vector density and dengue transmission, routine sampling of mosquito vector populations is common in dengue-endemic countries worldwide. This study examined the evidence from published studies for the existence of any quantitative relationship between vector indices and dengue cases. Methodology/Principal Findings From a total of 1205 papers identified in database searches following Cochrane and PRISMA Group guidelines, 18 were included for review. Eligibility criteria included 3-month study duration and dengue case confirmation by WHO case definition and/or serology. A range of designs were seen, particularly in spatial sampling and analyses, and all but 3 were classed as weak study designs. Eleven of eighteen studies generated Stegomyia indices from combined larval and pupal data. Adult vector data were reported in only three studies. Of thirteen studies that investigated associations between vector indices and dengue cases, 4 reported positive correlations, 4 found no correlation and 5 reported ambiguous or inconclusive associations. Six out of 7 studies that measured Breteau Indices reported dengue transmission at levels below the currently accepted threshold of 5. Conclusions/Significance There was little evidence of quantifiable associations between vector indices and dengue transmission that could reliably be used for outbreak prediction. This review highlighted the need for standardized sampling protocols that adequately consider dengue spatial heterogeneity. Recommendations for more appropriately designed studies include: standardized study design to elucidate the relationship between vector abundance and dengue transmission; adult mosquito sampling should be routine; single values of Breteau or other indices are not reliable universal dengue transmission thresholds; better knowledge of vector ecology is required.

Bowman, Leigh R.; Runge-Ranzinger, Silvia; McCall, P. J.

2014-01-01

163

Emergence of dengue virus serotype 3 on Mayotte Island, Indian Ocean.  

PubMed

A serosurvey carried out in 2006 in Mayotte, a French overseas collectivity in the Indian Ocean, confirmed previous circulation of dengue virus (DENV) on the island, but since the set up of a laboratory-based surveillance of dengue-like illness in 2007, no case of DENV has been confirmed. In response to an outbreak of DENV-3 on Comoros Islands in March 2010 surveillance of dengue-like illness in Mayotte was enhanced. By September 15, 76 confirmed and 31 probable cases of DENV have been identified in Mayotte. In urban and periurban settings on the island, Aedes albopictus is the predominant Aedes species, but Ae. aegyptii remains the most common species in rural areas. Given the epidemic potential of dengue virus in Mayotte, adequate monitoring including early detection of cases, timely investigation and sustained mosquito control actions remain essential. PMID:22066303

Lernout, T; Giry, C; Binder, P; Zumbo, B; Durquety, E; Lajoinie, G; D'Ortenzio, E; Filleul, L

2011-06-01

164

Role of CC chemokine receptor 1 and two of its ligands in human dengue infection. Three approaches under the Cuban situation.  

PubMed

Any of the four dengue serotypes can cause a severe disease, partly due to systemic inflammation orchestrated by mediators like cytokines and chemokines. We addressed the role of CCR1 and its ligands CCL3/MIP-1? and CCL5/RANTES in dengue infection using three different approaches: an ex vivo model exploring memory immune response in subjects with a well characterized dengue immune background, an in vivo study in patients with primary or secondary dengue infection, and an approach in fatal dengue. CCR1 and CCL3/MIP-1? gene expression showed differences after homotypic and heterotypic challenge according to dengue immune background of subjects, in correspondence with previous observations in Cuban dengue outbreaks. CCL5/RANTES gene expression was higher after homotypic challenge. CCR1 and CCL3/MIP-1? gene expression was higher in patients with secondary infection during critical days of the dengue disease, while the increase in RANTES expression started earlier than the observed for CCR1 and CCL3/MIP-1?. CCR1 and CCL3/MIP-1? gene expression was as high in brain as in spleen tissue from necropsy. Our results confirm the strong influence of previous immunity in subsequent dengue infections, and confer a possible pathogenic role to CCR1 and CCL3/MIP-1? in dengue disease and a possible protective role for CCL5/RANTES, probably through CCR5 interaction. PMID:24157267

Sierra, Beatriz; Perez, Ana B; Garcia, Gissel; Aguirre, Eglys; Alvarez, Mayling; Gonzalez, Daniel; Guzman, Maria G

2014-01-01

165

Novel, Meso-Substituted Cationic Porphyrin Molecule for Photo-Mediated Larval Control of the Dengue Vector Aedes aegypti  

PubMed Central

Background Control of the mosquito vector population is the most effective strategy currently available for the prevention of dengue fever and the containment of outbreaks. Photo-activated oxidants may represent promising tools for developing effective, safe and ecofriendly novel larvicides. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of the synthetic meso-substituted porphyrin meso-tri(N-methylpyridyl), meso-mono(N-tetradecylpyridyl)porphine (C14) as a photoactivatable larvicide against the dengue vector Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti. Methodology The photophysical and photochemical properties of the C14 molecule were assessed spectrophotometrically. Photomediated larvicidal efficacy, route of intake and site of action were determined on Ae. aegypti larvae by laboratory bioassays and fluorescence microscopy. Using powdered food pellet for laboratory rodents (a common larval food used in the laboratory) as a carrier for C14, loading-release dynamics, larvicidal efficacy and residual activity of the C14-carrier complex were investigated. Main Findings The C14 molecule was found to exert a potent photosensitizing activity on Ae. aegypti larvae. At irradiation intervals of 12 h and 1 h, at a light intensity of 4.0 mW/cm2, which is 50–100 times lower than that of natural sunlight, LC50 values of 0.1 µM (0.15 mg/l) and 0.5 µM (0.77 mg/l) were obtained, respectively. The molecule was active after ingestion by the larvae and caused irreversible, lethal damage to the midgut and caecal epithelia. The amphiphilic nature of C14 allowed a formulate to be produced that not only was as active against the larvae as C14 in solution, but also possessed a residual activity of at least two weeks, in laboratory conditions. Conclusions The meso-substituted synthetic porphyrin C14, thanks to its photo-sensitizing properties represents an attractive candidate for the development of novel photolarvicides for dengue vector control.

Lucantoni, Leonardo; Magaraggia, Michela; Lupidi, Giulio; Ouedraogo, Robert Kossivi; Coppellotti, Olimpia; Esposito, Fulvio; Fabris, Clara; Jori, Giulio; Habluetzel, Annette

2011-01-01

166

Treatment of dengue fever  

PubMed Central

The endemic area for dengue fever extends over 60 countries, and approximately 2.5 billion people are at risk of infection. The incidence of dengue has multiplied many times over the last five decades at an alarming rate. In the endemic areas, waves of infection occur in epidemics, with thousands of individuals affected, creating a huge burden on the limited resources of a country’s health care system. While the illness passes off as a simple febrile episode in many, a few have a severe illness marked by hypovolemic shock and bleeding. Iatrogenic fluid overload in the management may further complicate the picture. In this severe form dengue can be fatal. Tackling the burden of dengue is impeded by several issues, including a lack of understanding about the exact pathophysiology of the infection, inability to successfully control the vector population, lack of specific therapy against the virus, and the technical difficulties in developing a vaccine. This review provides an overview on the epidemiology, natural history, management strategies, and future directions for research on dengue, including the potential for development of a vaccine.

Rajapakse, Senaka; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Rajapakse, Anoja

2012-01-01

167

Generating temporal model using climate variables for the prediction of dengue cases in Subang Jaya, Malaysia  

PubMed Central

Objective To develop a forecasting model for the incidence of dengue cases in Subang Jaya using time series analysis. Methods The model was performed using the Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) based on data collected from 2005 to 2010. The fitted model was then used to predict dengue incidence for the year 2010 by extrapolating dengue patterns using three different approaches (i.e. 52, 13 and 4 weeks ahead). Finally cross correlation between dengue incidence and climate variable was computed over a range of lags in order to identify significant variables to be included as external regressor. Results The result of this study revealed that the ARIMA (2,0,0) (0,0,1)52 model developed, closely described the trends of dengue incidence and confirmed the existence of dengue fever cases in Subang Jaya for the year 2005 to 2010. The prediction per period of 4 weeks ahead for ARIMA (2,0,0)(0,0,1)52 was found to be best fit and consistent with the observed dengue incidence based on the training data from 2005 to 2010 (Root Mean Square Error=0.61). The predictive power of ARIMA (2,0,0) (0,0,1)52 is enhanced by the inclusion of climate variables as external regressor to forecast the dengue cases for the year 2010. Conclusions The ARIMA model with weekly variation is a useful tool for disease control and prevention program as it is able to effectively predict the number of dengue cases in Malaysia.

Dom, Nazri Che; Hassan, A Abu; Latif, Z Abd; Ismail, Rodziah

2013-01-01

168

Anamnestic immune response to dengue and decreased severity of yellow Fever.  

PubMed

A protective immunity against yellow fever, from cross-reactive dengue antibodies, has been hypothesized as an explanation for the absence of yellow fever in Southern Asia where dengue immunity is almost universal. This study evaluates the association between protective immunity from cross-reactive dengue antibodies with yellow fever infection and severity of the disease. The study population consisted of military personnel of a jungle garrison and its detachments located in the Ecuadorian Amazonian rainforest. The cross-sectional study employed interviews as well as seroepidemiological methods. Humoral immune response to yellow fever, Mayaro, Venezuelan equine encephalitis, Oropouche, and dengue 2 infections was assessed by evaluating IgM and IgG specific antibodies. Log-linear regression analysis was used to evaluate age and presence of antibodies, against dengue type 2 virus, as predictors of yellow fever infection or severe disease. During the seroepidemiological survey, presence of dengue antibodies among yellow fever cases were observed in 77.3% cases from the coastal region, where dengue is endemic, 14.3% cases from the Amazon and 16.7 % cases from the Andean region. Dengue cross-reactive antibodies were not significantly associated with yellow fever infection but significantly associated with severity of the disease. The findings of this study suggest that previous exposure to dengue infection may have induced an anamnestic immune response that did not prevent yellow fever infection but greatly reduced the severity of the disease. PMID:20300401

Izurieta, Ricardo O; Macaluso, Maurizio; Watts, Douglas M; Tesh, Robert B; Guerra, Bolivar; Cruz, Ligia M; Galwankar, Sagar; Vermund, Sten H

2009-07-01

169

Use of Multiple Data Sources to Estimate the Economic Cost of Dengue Illness in Malaysia  

PubMed Central

Dengue represents a substantial burden in many tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. We estimated the economic burden of dengue illness in Malaysia. Information about economic burden is needed for setting health policy priorities, but accurate estimation is difficult because of incomplete data. We overcame this limitation by merging multiple data sources to refine our estimates, including an extensive literature review, discussion with experts, review of data from health and surveillance systems, and implementation of a Delphi process. Because Malaysia has a passive surveillance system, the number of dengue cases is under-reported. Using an adjusted estimate of total dengue cases, we estimated an economic burden of dengue illness of US$56 million (Malaysian Ringgit MYR196 million) per year, which is approximately US$2.03 (Malaysian Ringgit 7.14) per capita. The overall economic burden of dengue would be even higher if we included costs associated with dengue prevention and control, dengue surveillance, and long-term sequelae of dengue.

Shepard, Donald S.; Undurraga, Eduardo A.; Lees, Rosemary Susan; Halasa, Yara; Lum, Lucy Chai See; Ng, Chiu Wan

2012-01-01

170

A tetravalent dengue nanoparticle stimulates antibody production in mice  

PubMed Central

Background Dengue is a major public health problem worldwide, especially in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Infection with a single Dengue virus (DENV) serotype causes a mild, self-limiting febrile illness called dengue fever. However, a subset of patients experiencing secondary infection with a different serotype progresses to the severe form of the disease, dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines or antiviral drugs to prevent or treat dengue infections. Biodegradable nanoparticles coated with proteins represent a promising method for in vivo delivery of vaccines. Findings Here, we used a murine model to evaluate the IgG production after administration of inactivated DENV corresponding to all four serotypes adsorbed to bovine serum albumin nanoparticles. This formulation induced a production of anti-DENV IgG antibodies (p < 0.001). However, plaque reduction neutralization assays with the four DENV serotypes revealed that these antibodies have no neutralizing activity in the dilutions tested. Conclusions Our results show that while the nanoparticle system induces humoral responses against DENV, further investigation with different DENV antigens will be required to improve immunogenicity, epitope specicity, and functional activity to make this platform a viable option for DENV vaccines.

2012-01-01

171

Sulfated Polysaccharide, Curdlan Sulfate, Efficiently Prevents Entry/Fusion and Restricts Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Infection In Vitro: A Possible Candidate for Clinical Application  

PubMed Central

Curdlan sulfate (CRDS), a sulfated 1?3-?-D glucan, previously shown to be a potent HIV entry inhibitor, is characterized in this study as a potent inhibitor of the Dengue virus (DENV). CRDS was identified by in silico blind docking studies to exhibit binding potential to the envelope (E) protein of the DENV. CRDS was shown to inhibit the DENV replication very efficiently in different cells in vitro. Minimal effective concentration of CRDS was as low as 0.1 µg/mL in LLC-MK2 cells, and toxicity was observed only at concentrations over 10 mg/mL. CRDS can also inhibit DENV-1, 3, and 4 efficiently. CRDS did not inhibit the replication of DENV subgenomic replicon. Time of addition experiments demonstrated that the compound not only inhibited viral infection at the host cell binding step, but also at an early post-attachment step of entry (membrane fusion). The direct binding of CRDS to DENV was suggested by an evident reduction in the viral titers after interaction of the virus with CRDS following an ultrafiltration device separation, as well as after virus adsorption to an alkyl CRDS-coated membrane filter. The electron microscopic features also showed that CRDS interacted directly with the viral envelope, and caused changes to the viral surface. CRDS also potently inhibited DENV infection in DC-SIGN expressing cells as well as the antibody-dependent enhancement of DENV-2 infection. Based on these data, a probable binding model of CRDS to DENV E protein was constructed by a flexible receptor and ligand docking study. The binding site of CRDS was predicted to be at the interface between domains II and III of E protein dimer, which is unique to this compound, and is apparently different from the ?-OG binding site. Since CRDS has already been tested in humans without serious side effects, its clinical application can be considered.

Zhang, Li Feng; Chin, Wei Xin; Muschin, Tegshi; Heinig, Lars; Suzuki, Youichi; Nanjundappa, Haraprasad; Yoshinaka, Yoshiyuki; Ryo, Akihide; Nomura, Nobuo; Ooi, Eng Eong; Vasudevan, Subhash G.; Yoshida, Takashi; Yamamoto, Naoki

2013-01-01

172

Antigenic and Biological Classification of Dengue Viruses.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Dengue viruses are the cause of two distinct diseases, dengue fever (DF), a mild and self limited illness and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), a severe disease with an appreciable mortality rate. This investigation addressed itself to the hypothesis that t...

W. G. Downs S. B. Halstead J. Casals H. Shotwell

1970-01-01

173

Clinical Manifestations and Trend of Dengue Cases Admitted in a Tertiary Care Hospital, Udupi District, Karnataka  

PubMed Central

Background: India is one of the seven identified countries in the South-East Asia region regularly reporting dengue fever (DF)/dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) outbreaks and may soon transform into a major niche for dengue infection in the future with more and more new areas being struck by dengue epidemics Objective: To study the clinical manifestations, trend and outcome of all confirmed dengue cases admitted in a tertiary care hospital. Study Design: Record-based study conducted in a coastal district of Karnataka. Required data from all the laboratory confirmed cases from 2002 to 2008 were collected from Medical Records Department (MRD) and analyzed using SPSS 13.5 version. Results: Study included 466 patients. Majority were males, 301(64.6%) and in the and in the age group of 15-44 years, 267 (57.5%). Maximum number of cases were seen in 2007, 219 (47%) and in the month of September, 89 (19.1%). The most common presentation was fever 462 (99.1%), followed by myalgia 301 (64.6%), vomiting 222 (47.6%), headache 222 (47.6%) and abdominal pain 175 (37.6%). The most common hemorrhagic manifestation was petechiae 84 (67.2%). 391 (83.9%) cases presented with dengue fever, 41 (8.8%) dengue hemorrhagic fever, and 34 (7.3%) with dengue shock syndrome. Out of 66 (14.1%) patients who developed clinical complications, 22 (33.3%) had ARDS and 20 (30.3%) had pleural effusion. Deaths reported were 11(2.4%). Conclusion: Community awareness, early diagnosis and management and vector control measures need to be strengthened, during peri-monsoon period, in order to curb the increasing number of dengue cases.

Kumar, Ashwini; Rao, Chythra R; Pandit, Vinay; Shetty, Seema; Bammigatti, Chanaveerappa; Samarasinghe, Charmaine Minoli

2010-01-01

174

Using Google Dengue Trends to Estimate Climate Effects in Mexico  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate the association between Dengue Fever (DF) and climate in Mexico with real-time data from Google Dengue Trends (GDT) and climate data from NASA Earth observing systems. Introduction The incidence of dengue fever (DF) has increased 30 fold between 1960 and 2010 [1]. The literature suggests that temperature plays a major role in the life cycle of the mosquito vector and in turn, the timing of DF outbreaks [2]. We use real-time data from GDT and real-time temperature estimates from NASA Earth observing systems to examine the relationship between dengue and climate in 17 Mexican states from 2003–2011. For the majority of states, we predict that a warming climate will increase the number of days the minimum temperature is within the risk range for dengue. Methods The GDT estimates are derived from internet search queries and use similar methods as those developed for Google Flu Trends [3]. To validate GDT data, we ran a correlation between GDT and dengue data from the Mexican Secretariat of Health (2003–2010). To analyze the relationship between GDT and varying lags of temperature, we constructed a time series meta-analysis. The mean, max and min of temperature were tested at lags 0 –12 weeks using data from the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications. Finally, we built a binomial model to identify the minimum 5° C temperature range associated with a 50% or higher Dengue activity threshold as predicted by GDT. Results The time series plot of GDT data and the Mexican Secretariat of Health data (2003– 2010) (Figure 1) produced a correlation coefficient of 0.87. The time series meta-analysis results for 17 states showed an increase in minimum temperature at lag week 8 had the greatest odds of dengue incidence, 1.12 Odds Ratio (1.09–1.16, 95% Confidence Interval). The comparison of dengue activity above 50% in each state to the minimum temperature at lag week 8 showed 14/17 states had an association with warmest 5 degrees of the minimum temperature range. The state of Sonora was the only state to show an association between dengue and the coldest 5 degrees of the minimum temperature range. Conclusions Overall, the incidence data from the Mexican Secretariat of Health showed a close correlation with the GDT data. The meta-analysis indicates that an increase in the minimum temperature at lag week 8 is associated with an increased dengue risk. This is consistent with the Colon-Gonzales et al. Mexico study which also found a strong association with the 8 week lag of increasing minimum temperature [4]. The results from this binomial regression show, for the majority of states, the warmest 5 degree range for the minimum temperature had the greatest association with dengue activity 8 weeks later. Inevitably, several other factors contribute to dengue risk which we are unable to include in this model [5]. IPCC climate change predictions suggest a 4° C increase in Mexico. Under such scenario, we predict an increase in the number of days the minimum temperature falls within the range associated with DF risk.

Gluskin, Rebecca T.; Santillana, Mauricio; Brownstein, John S.

2013-01-01

175

Consultation on dengue vaccines: Progress in understanding protection, 26-28 June 2013, Rockville, Maryland.  

PubMed

There is an unmet need for a dengue vaccine to further prevent the spread of this disease and contain the growing pandemic. To this end several vaccine companies and academic groups are actively pursuing the development of a tetravalent vaccine to prevent dengue. In the last few years progress has been made in this area, including the first results of a vaccine efficacy trial and improved understanding of the immune responses to the infection. Despite this progress, development of dengue vaccines faces important challenges including the need for a vaccine that induces balanced immune responses against all dengue strains and an incomplete understanding of the mechanism(s) of protection against infection and disease. This is a summary of a Consultation on dengue vaccines held in June 26-28, 2013 by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (part of the US National Institutes of Health) and the Dengue Vaccine Initiative (part of the International Vaccine Institute). The primary goal of this consultation was to review the progress in dengue vaccine development, evaluate the known mechanism of protection of dengue vaccines and discuss avenues for future research. PMID:24768502

Cassetti, M Cristina; Halstead, Scott B

2014-05-30

176

Evaluation of Aedes Aegypti Presence and Abundance in Septic Tanks and Their Impacts on Dengue Transmission.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Aedes aegypti is the mosquito vector for dengue fever and has historically been considered to prefer 'clean' water for development. A 2006 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) demonstrated large numbers of adult Ae. aegypti mosqui...

R. L. Burke

2009-01-01

177

Identification of Chimpanzee Fab Fragments by Repertoire Cloning and Production of a Full-Length Humanized Immunoglobulin G1 Antibody That Is Highly Efficient for Neutralization of Dengue Type 4 Virus  

Microsoft Academic Search

A safe and effective dengue vaccine is still not available. Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies from humans or nonhuman primates represents an attractive alternative for the prevention of dengue virus infection. Fab monoclonal antibodies to dengue type 4 virus (DENV-4) were recovered by repertoire cloning of bone marrow mRNAs from an immune chimpanzee and analyzed for antigen binding specificity, VH

Ruhe Men; Tetsu Yamashiro; Ana P. Goncalvez; Claire Wernly; Darren J. Schofield; Suzanne U. Emerson; Robert H. Purcell; Ching-Juh Lai

2004-01-01

178

Dengue Serosurvey in Sint Eustatius  

PubMed Central

Four distinct serotypes of dengue viruses (DENV) are the cause of re-emerging dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). Dengue circulation in the Caribbean has gone from none or single serotype to multiple serotypes co-circulating with reports of continuing cycles of progressively more severe disease in the region. Few studies have investigated dengue on Sint Eustatius. Blood samples were collected to determine the prevalence of antibodies against dengue in the Sint Eustatius population. Greater than 90% of the serum samples (184 of 204) were positive for anti-flavivirus antibodies by enzyme linked immunosorbance assay (ELISA). Plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), specific for dengue viruses, showed that 171 of these 184 flavivirus antibody positive sera had a neutralization titer against one or more DENV serotypes. A majority of the sera (62%) had neutralizing antibody to all four dengue serotypes. Only 26 PRNT positive sera (15%) had monotypic dengue virus neutralizing antibody, most of which (20 of 26) were against DENV2. Evidence of infection with all four serotypes was observed across all age groups except in the youngest age group (10–19 years) which contained only DENV2 positive individuals. In a multiple logistic regression model, only the length of residence on the island was a predictor of a positive dengue PRNT50 result. To our knowledge this is the first dengue serosurveillance study conducted on Sint Eustatius since the 1970s. The lack of antibodies to the DEN1, 3, and 4 in the samples collected from participants under 20 years of age suggests that only DEN2 has circulated on island since the early 1990s. The high prevalence of antibodies against dengue (83.8%) and the observation that the length of time on the island was the strongest predictor of infection suggests dengue is endemic on Sint Eustatius and a public health concern that warrants further investigation.

Leslie, Teresa; Martin, Nicholas J.; Jack-Roosberg, Carol; Odongo, George; Beausoleil, Edwin; Tuck, Jennifer; Raviprakash, Kanakatte; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

2014-01-01

179

Animal models in dengue.  

PubMed

Validation of a mouse model of dengue virus (DENV) infection relies on verification of viremia and productive replication in mouse tissues following infection. Here, we describe a quantitative assay for determining viral RNA levels in mouse serum and tissues. For the purpose of confirming DENV replication, we outline a fluorescence immunohistochemistry (FIHC) protocol for staining a nonstructural protein of DENV. PMID:24696349

Plummer, Emily; Shresta, Sujan

2014-01-01

180

Airport sentinel surveillance and entry quarantine for dengue infections following a fever screening program in Taiwan  

PubMed Central

Background Dengue has not reached an endemic status in Taiwan; nevertheless, we have implemented a fever screening program at airports for the early detection of febrile passengers with a dengue infection. This study is intended to assess the performance of the airport screening procedures for dengue infection. Methods We analyzed data from the national surveillance system of the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control. We included the imported dengue cases reported by sentinel airports and clinics as well as the domestic cases from 2007–2010. Results Approximately 44.9% (95%CI: 35.73-54.13%) of the confirmed imported dengue cases with an apparent symptom (febrile) in the viremic stage were detected via the airport fever screening program, with an estimated positive predictive value of 2.36% (95% CI: 0.96- 3.75%) and a negative predictive value?>?99.99%. Fluctuations in the number of the symptomatic imported dengue cases identified in the airports (X) were associated with the total number of imported dengue cases (Y) based on a regression analysis of a biweekly surveillance (i.e., n?=?104, R2X:Y?=?0.61, P?dengue cases (X) with a 1–2?month lead time (t) was in parallel with that of the domestic dengue cases (Y) based on a consecutive 4-year surveillance (i.e., n?=?48, R2X(t-1):Y?=?0.22, R2X(t-2):Y?=?0.31, P?dengue at the airports examined in this study indicated some limitations of the fever screening program for the prevention of importation. The screening program could assist in the rapid triage for self-quarantine of some symptomatic dengue cases that were in the viremic stage at the borders and contribute to active sentinel surveillance; however, the blocking of viral transmission to susceptible populations (neighbors or family) from all of the viremic travelers, including those with or without symptoms, is critical to prevent dengue epidemics. Therefore, the reinforcement of mosquito bite prevention and household vector control in dengue-endemic or dengue-competent hotspots during an epidemic season is essential and highly recommended.

2012-01-01

181

Concurrent infection with dengue virus type-2 and DENV-3 in a patient from Ceará, Brazil.  

PubMed

Dengue outbreaks have occurred in several regions in Brazil and cocirculating dengue virus type 1 (DENV-1), DENV-2, and DENV-3 have been frequently observed. Dual infection by DENV-2 and DENV-3 was identified by type-specific indirect immunofluorescence assay and confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in a patient in Ceará with a mild disease. This is the first documented case of simultaneous infection with DENV-2 and DENV-3 in Brazil. Sequencing confirmed DENV-2 and DENV-3 (South-East/American) genotype III and (SriLanka/India), genotype III respectively. PMID:17293990

Araújo, Fernanda Montenegro de Carvalho; Nogueira, Rita Maria Ribeiro; de Araújo, Josélio Maria Galvão; Ramalho, Izabel Letícia Cavalcante; Roriz, Maria Lucia Feitosa de Sá; de Melo, Maria Elizabeth Lisboa; Coelho, Ivo Castelo Branco

2006-12-01

182

A case of dengue type 3 virus infection imported from Africa to Italy, October 2009.  

PubMed

In October 2009, a traveller returning from Africa to Italy was hospitalised with symptoms suggestive of a haemorrhagic fever of unknown origin. The patient was immediately placed in a special biocontainment unit until laboratory investigations confirmed the infection to be caused by a dengue serotype 3 virus. This case reasserts the importance of returning travellers as sentinels of unknown outbreaks occurring in other countries, and highlights how the initial symptoms of dengue fever resemble those of other haemorrhagic fevers, hence the importance of prompt isolation of patients until a final diagnosis is reached. PMID:20184855

Nisii, C; Carletti, F; Castilletti, C; Bordi, L; Meschi, S; Selleri, M; Chiappini, R; Travaglini, D; Antonini, M; Castorina, S; Lauria, F N; Narciso, P; Gentile, M; Martini, L; Di Perri, G; Audagnotto, S; Biselli, R; Lastilla, M; Di Caro, A; Capobianchi, M; Ippolito, G

2010-02-18

183

Regional Differences in the Growing Incidence of Dengue Fever in Vietnam Explained by Weather Variability  

PubMed Central

Dengue fever is a major health problem in Vietnam, but its incidence differs from province to province. To understand this at the local level, we assessed the effect of four weather components (humidity, rainfall, temperature and sunshine) on the number of dengue cases in nine provinces of Vietnam. Monthly data from 1999 to 2009 were analysed by time-series regression using negative binomial models. A test for heterogeneity was applied to assess the weather-dengue association in the provinces. Those associations were significantly heterogeneous (for temperature, humidity, and sunshine: P < 0.001 heterogeneity test; for rainfall: P = 0.018 heterogeneity test). This confirms that weather components strongly affect dengue transmission at a lag time of 0 to 3 months, with considerable variation in their influence among different areas in Vietnam. This finding may promote the strategic prevention of dengue disease by suggesting specific plans at the local level, rather than a nationally unified approach.

Vu, Ha Hai; Okumura, Junko; Hashizume, Masahiro; Tran, Duong Nhu; Yamamoto, Taro

2014-01-01

184

Regional differences in the growing incidence of dengue Fever in Vietnam explained by weather variability.  

PubMed

Dengue fever is a major health problem in Vietnam, but its incidence differs from province to province. To understand this at the local level, we assessed the effect of four weather components (humidity, rainfall, temperature and sunshine) on the number of dengue cases in nine provinces of Vietnam. Monthly data from 1999 to 2009 were analysed by time-series regression using negative binomial models. A test for heterogeneity was applied to assess the weather-dengue association in the provinces. Those associations were significantly heterogeneous (for temperature, humidity, and sunshine: P < 0.001 heterogeneity test; for rainfall: P = 0.018 heterogeneity test). This confirms that weather components strongly affect dengue transmission at a lag time of 0 to 3 months, with considerable variation in their influence among different areas in Vietnam. This finding may promote the strategic prevention of dengue disease by suggesting specific plans at the local level, rather than a nationally unified approach. PMID:24808744

Vu, Ha Hai; Okumura, Junko; Hashizume, Masahiro; Tran, Duong Nhu; Yamamoto, Taro

2014-03-01

185

Lessons from malaria control to help meet the rising challenge of dengue  

PubMed Central

Summary Achievements in malaria control could inform efforts to control the increasing global burden of dengue. Better methods for quantifying dengue endemicity—equivalent to parasite prevalence surveys and endemicity mapping used for malaria—would help target resources, monitor progress, and advocate for investment in dengue prevention. Success in controlling malaria has been attributed to widespread implementation of interventions with proven efficacy. An improved evidence base is needed for large-scale delivery of existing and novel interventions for vector control, alongside continued investment in dengue drug and vaccine development. Control of dengue is unlikely to be achieved without coordinated international financial and technical support for national programmes, which has proven effective in reducing the global burden of malaria.

Anders, Katherine L; Hay, Simon I

2012-01-01

186

Atypical manifestations of dengue Fever.  

PubMed

We reviewed case records of 40 in-patients (22 boys) with serologically confirmed dengue fever between 1st October and 30th November, 2013. Severe dengue was seen in 30, out of which 12 (30%) had compensated shock. Splenomegaly (6,15%) and encephalopathy (4,10%) were the commonest atypical features. Atypical manifestations of dengue fever were more common than that reported in the past. PMID:24986292

Pawaria, Arti; Mishra, Devendra; Juneja, Monica; Meena, Jagdish

2014-06-01

187

Epidemic dengue 2 in the city of Djibouti 1991-1992.  

PubMed

From October 1991 to February 1992, an outbreak of acute fever (in which thick blood films were negative for malaria) spread rapidly in the city of Djibouti, Djibouti Republic, affecting all age groups and both nationals and foreigners. The estimated number of cases was 12,000. The clinical features were consistent with a non-haemorrhagic dengue-like illness. Serum samples from 91 patients were analysed serologically for flavivirus infection (dengue 1-4, West Nile, yellow fever, Zika, Banzi, and Uganda-S), and virus isolation was attempted. Twelve strains of dengue 2 virus were isolated. Dengue infection was confirmed by a 4-fold or greater rise in immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibody in paired serum specimens, the presence of IgM antibody, or isolation of the virus. Overall, 46 of the suspected cases (51%) were confirmed virologically or had serological evidence of a recent flavivirus infection. Statistical analysis showed that the presence of a rash was the best predictor of flavivirus seropositivity. In November 1992, Aedes aegypti was widespread and abundant in several districts of Djibouti city. A serological study of serum samples collected from Djiboutian military personnel 5 months before the epidemic showed that only 15/177 (8.5%) had flavivirus antibodies. These findings, together with a negative serosurvey for dengue serotypes 1-4 and yellow fever virus performed in 1987, support the conclusion that dengue 2 virus has only recently been introduced to Djibouti. PMID:8758061

Rodier, G R; Gubler, D J; Cope, S E; Cropp, C B; Soliman, A K; Polycarpe, D; Abdourhaman, M A; Parra, J P; Maslin, J; Arthur, R R

1996-01-01

188

Silent transmission of virus during a Dengue epidemic, Nakhon Pathom Province, Thailand 2001.  

PubMed

In the year 2001 a large dengue fever (DF)/dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) outbreak occurred in Nakhon Pathom Province, Thailand. Three thousand one hundred twelve cases of DHF were reported, an attack rate of 393 per 100,000 population. The Nakhon Pathom Provincial Health Office immediately carried out a control action according to WHO recommendations. Active serological surveys and viral RNA isolation were carried out to detect silent transmission of dengue virus in 329 healthy volunteers in Nakhon Pathom Province subdistricts where the dengue epidemic had the highest rate of infection of 2.5 per 1000. Eight point eight percent of these volunteers had a serum sample positive for DF/DHF virus IgM antibody. The highest prevalence occurred in the 15 to 40 year old group. In two instances viral RNA was detected by PCR and dengue serotype 3 was subsequently identified. The data support the hypothesis of subclinical infection with dengue virus. This high frequency of virus circulation combined with a high population density, urbanization and increasing breeding sites for mosquitoes, needs to be taken into account in the evaluation of viral transmission during and after epidemics. This underlines the importance of community-based control in informing people of their involvement in virus transmission and the importance of personal protection. PMID:17333731

Poblap, Thaval; Nitatpattana, Narong; Chaimarin, Aree; Barbazan, Philippe; Chauvancy, Gilles; Yoksan, Sutee; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul

2006-09-01

189

Community and School-Based Health Education for Dengue Control in Rural Cambodia: A Process Evaluation  

PubMed Central

Dengue fever continues to be a major public health problem in Cambodia, with significant impact on children. Health education is a major means for prevention and control of the National Dengue Control Program (NDCP), and is delivered to communities and in schools. Drawing on data collected in 2003–2004 as part of an ethnographic study conducted in eastern Cambodia, we explore the approaches used in health education and their effectiveness to control dengue. Community health education is provided through health centre outreach activities and campaigns of the NDCP, but is not systematically evaluated, is under-funded and delivered irregularly; school-based education is restricted in terms of time and lacks follow-up in terms of practical activities for prevention and control. As a result, adherence is partial. We suggest the need for sustained routine education for dengue prevention and control, and the need for approaches to ensure the translation of knowledge into practice.

Khun, Sokrin; Manderson, Lenore

2007-01-01

190

House-to-house human movement drives dengue virus transmission  

PubMed Central

Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease of growing global health importance. Prevention efforts focus on mosquito control, with limited success. New insights into the spatiotemporal drivers of dengue dynamics are needed to design improved disease-prevention strategies. Given the restricted range of movement of the primary mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti, local human movements may be an important driver of dengue virus (DENV) amplification and spread. Using contact-site cluster investigations in a case-control design, we demonstrate that, at an individual level, risk for human infection is defined by visits to places where contact with infected mosquitoes is likely, independent of distance from the home. Our data indicate that house-to-house human movements underlie spatial patterns of DENV incidence, causing marked heterogeneity in transmission rates. At a collective level, transmission appears to be shaped by social connections because routine movements among the same places, such as the homes of family and friends, are often similar for the infected individual and their contacts. Thus, routine, house-to-house human movements do play a key role in spread of this vector-borne pathogen at fine spatial scales. This finding has important implications for dengue prevention, challenging the appropriateness of current approaches to vector control. We argue that reexamination of existing paradigms regarding the spatiotemporal dynamics of DENV and other vector-borne pathogens, especially the importance of human movement, will lead to improvements in disease prevention.

Stoddard, Steven T.; Forshey, Brett M.; Morrison, Amy C.; Paz-Soldan, Valerie A.; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M.; Astete, Helvio; Reiner, Robert C.; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Elder, John P.; Halsey, Eric S.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Kitron, Uriel; Scott, Thomas W.

2013-01-01

191

Kinetics of non-structural protein 1, IgM and IgG antibodies in dengue type 1 primary infection  

PubMed Central

Background Early and accurate diagnosis of dengue infection is essential for control of disease outbreaks. Recently, the dengue virus non-structural antigen 1 (NS1), a conserved and secreted glycoprotein, has been used as a marker for early diagnosis of dengue with convenience and cost-effectiveness. Serological tests of dengue IgM and IgG antibodies are still the most widely used for diagnosis of dengue. In order to assess combined diagnostic value of these tests, we study the kinetic profiles of circulating NS1, dengue IgM and IgG antibodies over the course of the disease by using an in-house dengue type 1 (DENV1) specific NS1 capture ELISA and the commercial Panbio Dengue IgM and IgG capture ELISAs. Results A panel of 313 acute-and early convalescent-phase serum specimens from 140 DENV1 primary infected patients during an outbreak of dengue in Guangzhou, China, in 2006 were studied. Dengue NS1 presented high levels in acute-phase serum samples. It was detectable as early as day 1 of illness, and up to 14 day after onset. The sensitivity of NS1 detection was ranged from 81.8% to 91.1% with samples taken during the first 7 days. Anti-dengue IgM antibody was detectable on the third day of onset with the positive rate of 42.9%, and rapidly increasing to 100% by day 8 of illness. Anti-dengue IgG antibody was detectable on the fifth day of onset with low level at the first week of onset, and slowly increasing to 100% by day 15 of illness. Combining the results of NS1 and IgM antibody detection allowed positive diagnosis in 96.9% -100% for samples taken after day 3 of onset. Conclusions Dengue NS1 detection might shorten the window period by first few days of illness. A combination of dengue NS1 antigen and IgM antibody testing facilitates enhanced diagnosis rates. The procedures should be suitable for developing countries where dengue is endemic.

2011-01-01

192

The AFHSC-Division of GEIS Operations Predictive Surveillance Program: a multidisciplinary approach for the early detection and response to disease outbreaks.  

PubMed

The Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, Division of Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System Operations (AFHSC-GEIS) initiated a coordinated, multidisciplinary program to link data sets and information derived from eco-climatic remote sensing activities, ecologic niche modeling, arthropod vector, animal disease-host/reservoir, and human disease surveillance for febrile illnesses, into a predictive surveillance program that generates advisories and alerts on emerging infectious disease outbreaks. The program's ultimate goal is pro-active public health practice through pre-event preparedness, prevention and control, and response decision-making and prioritization. This multidisciplinary program is rooted in over 10 years experience in predictive surveillance for Rift Valley fever outbreaks in Eastern Africa. The AFHSC-GEIS Rift Valley fever project is based on the identification and use of disease-emergence critical detection points as reliable signals for increased outbreak risk. The AFHSC-GEIS predictive surveillance program has formalized the Rift Valley fever project into a structured template for extending predictive surveillance capability to other Department of Defense (DoD)-priority vector- and water-borne, and zoonotic diseases and geographic areas. These include leishmaniasis, malaria, and Crimea-Congo and other viral hemorrhagic fevers in Central Asia and Africa, dengue fever in Asia and the Americas, Japanese encephalitis (JE) and chikungunya fever in Asia, and rickettsial and other tick-borne infections in the U.S., Africa and Asia. PMID:21388561

Witt, Clara J; Richards, Allen L; Masuoka, Penny M; Foley, Desmond H; Buczak, Anna L; Musila, Lillian A; Richardson, Jason H; Colacicco-Mayhugh, Michelle G; Rueda, Leopoldo M; Klein, Terry A; Anyamba, Assaf; Small, Jennifer; Pavlin, Julie A; Fukuda, Mark M; Gaydos, Joel; Russell, Kevin L; Wilkerson, Richard C; Gibbons, Robert V; Jarman, Richard G; Myint, Khin S; Pendergast, Brian; Lewis, Sheri; Pinzon, Jorge E; Collins, Kathrine; Smith, Matthew; Pak, Edwin; Tucker, Compton; Linthicum, Kenneth; Myers, Todd; Mansour, Moustafa; Earhart, Ken; Kim, Heung Chul; Jiang, Ju; Schnabel, Dave; Clark, Jeffrey W; Sang, Rosemary C; Kioko, Elizabeth; Abuom, David C; Grieco, John P; Richards, Erin E; Tobias, Steven; Kasper, Matthew R; Montgomery, Joel M; Florin, Dave; Chretien, Jean-Paul; Philip, Trudy L

2011-01-01

193

Human Immune Responses to Dengue Viruses.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from humans without antibodies to dengue 2 virus lysed dengue virus-infected Raji cells to a significantly greater degree than uninfected Raji cells. Addition of mouse anti-dengue antibody increased the lysis of dengue-i...

F. A. Ennis

1985-01-01

194

High Level of Awareness but Poor Practices Regarding Dengue Fever Control: A Cross-sectional Study from North India  

PubMed Central

Background: Delhi, the capital of India, has suffered many outbreaks of dengue in recent past and despite the obvious magnitude of problem, very scarce evidence exists that documents the knowledge, awareness and practices of the people regarding dengue. Aim: To assess the knowledge and practices related to control of dengue fever and to assess the differences in knowledge and practices based on sex and literacy. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among persons visiting a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi. A systematic sampling procedure was adopted and a pretested questionnaire was used. Results: A total of 215 individuals were interviewed. Majority of the respondents (96.3%) had heard about dengue. The important sources of information were television (54.9%) and newspaper/magazines (51.7%). Around 89% of the study participants considered dengue as “serious problem”. Nearly 86% participants were aware of the spread of dengue by mosquitoes while 73% were aware of one of the correct breeding sites of Aedes mosquito. Mosquito mats/liquidators were used by 61% of respondents, coils by 56% and repellant creams by 22%. Conclusion: The awareness regarding dengue and mosquito control measures was satisfactory to an extent. Programs should focus that this knowledge gets translated into practice.

Chinnakali, Palanivel; Gurnani, Nishant; Upadhyay, Ravi Prakash; Parmar, Komal; Suri, Tejas M; Yadav, Kapil

2012-01-01

195

Space-time analysis of hospitalized dengue patients in rural Thailand reveals important temporal intervals in the pattern of dengue virus transmission  

PubMed Central

Objective This study uses space-time analysis to determine the temporal intervals at which spatial clustering of dengue hospitalizations occurs. Methods Analysis of 262 people hospitalized and serologically confirmed with dengue virus infections in Kamphaeng Phet, Thailand was performed. The cases were observed between January 1, 2009 and May 6, 2011. Spatial coordinates of each patient’s home were captured using the Global Positioning System. A novel methodology based on the Knox test was used to determine the temporal intervals between cases at which spatial clustering occured. These intervals are indicative of the length of time between successive illnesses in the chain of dengue virus transmission. Results The strongest spatial clustering occurred at the 15–17 day interval. Therewas also significant spatial clustering over short time intervals (2–5 days). The highest excess risk was observed within 200m of a previous hospitalized case and significantly elevated risk persisted within this distance for as long as 32–34 days. Conclusions The analyses indicate that 15–17 days is the most likely serial interval between successive dengue illnesses. This novel methodology relies only on passively-detected, hospitalized case data with household locations and provides a useful tool for understanding region-specific and outbreak-specific dengue virus transmission dynamics.

Aldstadt, Jared; Yoon, In-Kyu; Tannitisupawong, Darunee; Jarman, Richard G.; Thomas, Stephen J.; Gibbons, Robert V.; Uppapong, Angkana; Iamsirithaworn, Sopon; Rothman, Alan L.; Scott, Thomas W.; Endy, Timothy

2014-01-01

196

Corticosteroids in the treatment of dengue shock syndrome  

PubMed Central

Dengue infection causes significant morbidity and mortality in over 100 countries worldwide, and its incidence is on the rise. The pathophysiological basis for the development of severe dengue, characterized by plasma leakage and the “shock syndrome” are poorly understood. No specific treatment or vaccine is available, and careful monitoring and judicious administration of fluids forms the mainstay of management at present. It is postulated that vascular endothelial dysfunction, induced by cytokine and chemical mediators, is an important mechanism of plasma leakage. Although corticosteroids are potent modulators of the immune system, their role in pharmacological doses in modulating the purported immunological effects that take place in severe dengue has been a subject of controversy. The key evidence related to the role of corticosteroids for various manifestations of dengue are reviewed here. In summary, there is currently no high-quality evidence supporting the beneficial effects of corticosteroids for treatment of shock, prevention of serious complications, or increasing platelet counts. Non-randomized trials of corticosteroids given as rescue medication for severe shock have shown possible benefit. Nonetheless, the evidence base is small, and good-quality trials are lacking. We reiterate the need for well-designed and adequately powered randomized controlled trials of corticosteroids for the treatment of dengue shock.

Rajapakse, Senaka; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Maduranga, Sachith; Rajapakse, Anoja Chamarie

2014-01-01

197

Rhabdomyolysis and Dengue Fever: A Case Report and Literature Review  

PubMed Central

The medical literature contains only a few reports of rhabdomyolysis occurring in patients with dengue fever. We report the case of a 25-year-old Jamaican man who was admitted to a private hospital four days after the onset of an acute febrile illness with fever, myalgia, and generalized weakness. Dengue fever was confirmed with a positive test for the dengue antigen, nonstructural protein 1. He remained well and was discharged on day 6 of his illness. On day 8, he started to pass red urine and was subsequently admitted to the University Hospital of the West Indies. On admission he was found to have myoglobinuria and an elevated creatine phosphokinase (CPK) of 325,600?U/L, leading to a diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis. Dengue IgM was positive. He was treated with aggressive hydration and had close monitoring of his urine output, creatinine, and CPK levels. His hospital course was uneventful without the development of acute renal failure and he was discharged after 14 days in hospital, with a CPK level of 2463?U/L. This case highlights that severe rhabdomyolysis may occur in patients with dengue fever and that early and aggressive treatment may prevent severe complications such as acute renal failure and death.

Sargeant, Tanya; Harris, Tricia; Wilks, Rohan; Barned, Sydney; Galloway-Blake, Karen; Ferguson, Trevor

2013-01-01

198

Dengue in pregnancy.  

PubMed

This was a retrospective study of patients with dengue infection in pregnancy from year 2000 till 2004. Data were analyzed by looking at the presentation, complications of patient and fetus, and pregnancy outcomes. There was a total of 16 cases with an increasing trend (0.12% in 2003 vs 0.25% in 2004). The mean age of patients was 30.19+/-6.85 years. Fifty percent of patients were multiparae and in their third trimester. The average gestation was 24.44 weeks with 7.5 days being the average duration of ward admission. Tourniquet test was positive in 62.5% of patients. Dengue serology IgM was positive in 50% whereas dengue serology IgG were positive in 68.8% of patients. There were three cases of maternal death. One patient presented as missed abortion. Preterm deliveries happened in 50.0% of the women. There were 4 premature babies, one in-utero fetal death, and two fetuses which suffered acute fetal distress. Three babies required intensive care. One unrelated fetal anomaly resulted in early neonatal death. PMID:17121293

Ismail, Nor Azlin Mohamed; Kampan, Nirmala; Mahdy, Zaleha Abdullah; Jamil, Muhammad Abdul; Razi, Zainul Rashid Mohd

2006-07-01

199

Dengue viral infections; pathogenesisand epidemiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dengue viral infections affect up to 100 million individuals per year. Dengue haemorrhagic fever is a clinical form of disease characterised by intravascular fluid loss. There has been a marked increase in the incidence of this form of the disease over the last few decades, associated with significant mortality, particularly in the paediatric population. A number of theories relating to

William J. H McBride; Helle Bielefeldt-Ohmann

2000-01-01

200

Hepatitis in Dengue Shock Syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dengue fever is the most frequent arbovirus disease in the world and the most important one in terms of morbidity and mortality. Atypical manifestations of dengue have become commonplace during the last few years, including hepatic damage, which manifests mainly by pain in the right hypochondrium and an increase in the levels of aminotransferases. We describe a case of acute

Luiz José de Souza; Helder Gonçalves Carneiro; João Tadeu Damian Souto Filho; Thiago Ferreira de Souza; Vitor Azevedo Côrtes; Carlos Gicovate Neto; Diogo Assed Bastos; Edno Wallace da Silva Siqueira

2002-01-01

201

Evaluation of the Dengue NS1 Ag Strip® for Detection of Dengue Virus Antigen in Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae)  

PubMed Central

Abstract Dengue fever is currently one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases that affect humans. With neither vaccines nor treatment available, prevention of the disease relies heavily on surveillance and control of mosquito vectors. In the present study, we have evaluated and showed the potential use of the Dengue NS1 Ag Strip® for the detection of dengue virus (DENV) in Aedes aegypti. Initial results showed that the sensitivity of the test kit in detecting DENV in wild-caught mosquitoes is comparable to that of real-time reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. The detection of naturally infected Ae. aegypti with the NS1 rapid test kit in our dengue cluster investigation further illustrates its potential use for surveillance of DENV in wild mosquito populations. The kit can easily be used in a simple field station, and minimal training is required. The results can be obtained in less than an hour. Employment of the kit in the field could help guide mosquito control operations in the prioritization of resources in controlling the transmission of DENV. In this study the potential of the kit for field surveillance of infected dengue vectors, which are epidemiologically important, has been demonstrated.

Tan, Cheong-Huat; Wong, Pei-Sze Jeslyn; Li, Mei-Zhi Irene; Vythilingam, Indra

2011-01-01

202

Tweeting Fever: Are Tweet Extracts a Valid Surrogate Data Source for Dengue Fever?  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine whether Twitter data contains information on dengue-like illness and whether the temporal trend of such data correlates with the incidence dengue or dengue-like illness as identified by city and national health authorities. Introduction Dengue fever is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the Republic of the Philippines (RP) and across the world. Early identification of geographic outbreaks can help target intervention campaigns and mitigate the severity of outbreaks. Electronic disease surveillance can improve early identification but, in most dengue endemic areas data pre-existing digital data are not available for such systems. Data must be collected and digitized specifically for electronic disease surveillance. Twitter, however, is heavily used in these areas; for example, the RP is among the top 20 producers of tweets in the world. If social media could be used as a surrogate data source for electronic disease surveillance, it would provide an inexpensive pre-digitized data source for resource-limited countries. This study investigates whether Twitter extracts can be used effectively as a surrogate data source to monitor changes in the temporal trend of dengue fever in Cebu City and the National Capitol Region surrounding Manila (NCR) in the RP. Methods We obtained two sources of ground truth incidence for dengue. The first was daily dengue fever incidence for Cebu City and the NCR taken from the Philippines Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response System (PIDSR). The second ground truth source was fever incidence from Cebu City for 2011. The Cebu City Health Office (CCHO) has monitored fever incidence as a surrogate for dengue fever since the 1980s. Tweets from Cebu City, and the NCR were collected prospectively thru Twitter’s public application program interface. The Cebu City fever ground truth data set was smoothed with a seven day moving average to facilitate comparison to the PIDSR and Twitter data. A vocabulary of words and phrases describing fever and dengue fever in the tweets collected were identified and used to mark relevant tweets. A subset of these ‘fever’ tweets that mentioned fever related to a medical situation were identified. The incidence and the temporal pattern of these medically-relevant tweets were compared with the incidence and pattern of fever and dengue fever in the two ground truth data sets. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to compare the correlation among the different data sets. Noted lag periods were adjusted by moving the data in time and re-computing the correlation coefficient. Results 26,023,103 tweets were collected from the two geographic regions: 10,303,366 from Cebu City and 15,719,767 tweets from the NCR. 8,814 (0.02%) Tweets contained the word fever and 4099 (0.01% of total) mentioned fever in a medically-relevant context, for example. “…I have a fever…” vs. “…football fever….” The medically-relevant tweets were compared with both ground truth data sets. The correlation between the Tweets and each of the incidence data sets is shown below. Conclusions Tweets containing medically-relevant fever references were correlated (p<0.0001) with both fever and dengue fever incidence in the ground truth data sets. The signal indicating fever in the medically-related tweets led the incidence data significantly: by 6 days for the Cebu City fever incidence; and by 12 days for the PIDSR dengue fever incidence. Temporal adjustment to account for observed lag periods increased the correlation coefficient by about one-third in both cases. This was a limited pilot study, but it suggests that Twitter extracts may provide a valid and timely surrogate data source to monitor dengue fever in this population. Further study of the correlation of Twitter and dengue in other areas, and of Twitter with other illnesses is warranted.

Coberly, Jacqueline S.; Fink, Clayton R.; Elbert, Eugene; Yoon, In-Kyu; Velasco, John M.; Tomayo, Agnes; Roque, V.; Ygano, S.; Macasoco, Durinda; Lewis, Sheri

2013-01-01

203

Influence of Urban Landscapes on Population Dynamics in a Short-Distance Migrant Mosquito: Evidence for the Dengue Vector Aedes aegypti  

PubMed Central

Background Dengue viruses are endemic across most tropical and subtropical regions. Because no proven vaccines are available, dengue prevention is primarily accomplished through controlling the mosquito vector Aedes aegypti. While dispersal distance is generally believed to be ?100 m, patterns of dispersion may vary in urban areas due to landscape features acting as barriers or corridors to dispersal. Anthropogenic features ultimately affect the flow of genes affecting vector competence and insecticide resistance. Therefore, a thorough understanding of what parameters impact dispersal is essential for efficient implementation of any mosquito population suppression program. Population replacement and genetic control strategies currently under consideration are also dependent upon a thorough understanding of mosquito dispersal in urban settings. Methodology and Principal Findings We examined the effect of a major highway on dispersal patterns over a 2 year period. A. aegypti larvae were collected on the east and west sides of Uriah Butler Highway (UBH) to examine any effect UBH may have on the observed population structure in the Charlieville neighborhood in Trinidad, West Indies. A panel of nine microsatellites, two SNPs and a 710 bp sequence of mtDNA cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) were used for the molecular analyses of the samples. Three CO1 haplotypes were identified, one of which was only found on the east side of the road in 2006 and 2007. AMOVA using mtCO1 and nuclear markers revealed significant differentiation between the east- and west-side collections. Conclusion and Significance Our results indicate that anthropogenic barriers to A. aegypti dispersal exist in urban environments and should be considered when implementing control programs during dengue outbreaks and population suppression or replacement programs.

Hemme, Ryan R.; Thomas, Clayton L.; Chadee, Dave D.; Severson, David W.

2010-01-01

204

The changing epidemiology of yellow fever and dengue, 1900 to 2003: full circle?  

PubMed

Yellow fever and dengue are old diseases, having caused major epidemics in centuries past. Both were effectively controlled in the mid 1900s, yellow fever in Francophone Africa by vaccination and yellow fever and dengue in the Americas by effective control of the principal urban vector of both viruses, Aedes aegypti. In the last 25 years of the 20th century, however, there was a resurgence of yellow fever in Africa, and of dengue worldwide. The factors responsible for this resurgence are discussed, as are current options for prevention and control. PMID:15225982

Gubler, D J

2004-09-01

205

[Paediatric features of Dengue and Chikungunya fevers].  

PubMed

Dengue (Df) and Chikungunya fever (Cf) arbovirosis are booming in the world, because of the plasticity of their pathogens, mutant RNA viruses making the acquisition of sustainable herd immunity and vaccination difficult in humans, and the plasticity of their vectors, the female mosquitoes of the genus Aedes (Stegomya), capable of adapting to different environments. This review summarizes the viral life cycle and epidemiology of these arboviruses, pathogenesis and pediatric aspects of their clinical forms and the basic principles of their treatment and prevention. PMID:19815395

Gérardin, P

2010-01-01

206

Control of Simultaneous Outbreaks of Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Extensively Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Infection in an Intensive Care Unit Using Interventions Promoted in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2012 Carbapenemase-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Toolkit.  

PubMed

Objective.?We describe the efficacy of enhanced infection control measures, including those recommended in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 2012 carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) toolkit, to control concurrent outbreaks of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) and extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (XDR-AB). Design.?Before-after intervention study. Setting.?Fifteen-bed surgical trauma intensive care unit (ICU). Methods.?We investigated the impact of enhanced infection control measures in response to clusters of CPE and XDR-AB infections in an ICU from April 2009 to March 2010. Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the presence of blaKPC and resistance plasmids in CRE. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was performed to assess XDR-AB clonality. Enhanced infection-control measures were implemented in response to ongoing transmission of CPE and a new outbreak of XDR-AB. Efficacy was evaluated by comparing the incidence rate (IR) of CPE and XDR-AB before and after the implementation of these measures. Results.?The IR of CPE for the 12 months before the implementation of enhanced measures was 7.77 cases per 1,000 patient-days, whereas the IR of XDR-AB for the 3 months before implementation was 6.79 cases per 1,000 patient-days. All examined CPE shared endemic blaKPC resistance plasmids, and 6 of the 7 XDR-AB isolates were clonal. Following institution of enhanced infection control measures, the CPE IR decreased to 1.22 cases per 1,000 patient-days (P = .001), and no more cases of XDR-AB were identified. Conclusions.?Use of infection control measures described in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 2012 CRE toolkit was associated with a reduction in the IR of CPE and an interruption in XDR-AB transmission. PMID:24915208

Enfield, Kyle B; Huq, Nujhat N; Gosseling, Megan F; Low, Darla J; Hazen, Kevin C; Toney, Denise M; Slitt, Gavin; Zapata, Heidi J; Cox, Heather L; Lewis, Jessica D; Kundzins, John R; Mathers, Amy J; Sifri, Costi D

2014-07-01

207

High Content Screening of a Kinase-Focused Library Reveals Compounds Broadly-Active against Dengue Viruses  

PubMed Central

Dengue virus is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that has a large impact in global health. It is considered as one of the medically important arboviruses, and developing a preventive or therapeutic solution remains a top priority in the medical and scientific community. Drug discovery programs for potential dengue antivirals have increased dramatically over the last decade, largely in part to the introduction of high-throughput assays. In this study, we have developed an image-based dengue high-throughput/high-content assay (HT/HCA) using an innovative computer vision approach to screen a kinase-focused library for anti-dengue compounds. Using this dengue HT/HCA, we identified a group of compounds with a 4-(1-aminoethyl)-N-methylthiazol-2-amine as a common core structure that inhibits dengue viral infection in a human liver-derived cell line (Huh-7.5 cells). Compounds CND1201, CND1203 and CND1243 exhibited strong antiviral activities against all four dengue serotypes. Plaque reduction and time-of-addition assays suggests that these compounds interfere with the late stage of viral infection cycle. These findings demonstrate that our image-based dengue HT/HCA is a reliable tool that can be used to screen various chemical libraries for potential dengue antiviral candidates.

Li, Xiaolan; Milan Bonotto, Rafaela; No, Joo Hwan; Kim, Keum Hyun; Baek, Sungmin; Kim, Hee Young; Windisch, Marc Peter; Pamplona Mosimann, Ana Luiza; de Borba, Luana; Liuzzi, Michel; Hansen, Michael Adsetts Edberg; Nunes Duarte dos Santos, Claudia; Freitas-Junior, Lucio Holanda

2013-01-01

208

Close Contact Precautions Could Prevent an Outbreak of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever: A Case Series Report from Southern Part of Tehran  

PubMed Central

Between the end of June and the middle of July 2011, an outbreak of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever occurred in southern part of Tehran, Iran. This study reports clinical, laboratory findings and outcome of six cases, who were all consanguine. Index case who was livestock-worker died with hemorrhagic manifestations; thereafter his pregnant wife, three brothers, mother-in-law and his pregnant sister-in-law were admitted and except for the latter, ribavirin was administered. The brother with close contact with body fluids and blood of index case, died with hemorrhage. Low platelet, high aminotransferases and elevated PT, PTT were detected in this case. Skin manifestations were present in five cases. Only in one case RT-PCR and IgM serology were reported as positive for CCHF virus by reference laboratory. In endemic areas, high index of suspicion should be kept in mind in successfully finding and treating cases in early phase of the disease.

Mardani, Masoud; Namazee, Najmeh

2013-01-01

209

Close contact precautions could prevent an outbreak of crimean-congo hemorrhagic Fever: a case series report from southern part of tehran.  

PubMed

Between the end of June and the middle of July 2011, an outbreak of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever occurred in southern part of Tehran, Iran. This study reports clinical, laboratory findings and outcome of six cases, who were all consanguine. Index case who was livestock-worker died with hemorrhagic manifestations; thereafter his pregnant wife, three brothers, mother-in-law and his pregnant sister-in-law were admitted and except for the latter, ribavirin was administered. The brother with close contact with body fluids and blood of index case, died with hemorrhage. Low platelet, high aminotransferases and elevated PT, PTT were detected in this case. Skin manifestations were present in five cases. Only in one case RT-PCR and IgM serology were reported as positive for CCHF virus by reference laboratory. In endemic areas, high index of suspicion should be kept in mind in successfully finding and treating cases in early phase of the disease. PMID:23930191

Mardani, Masoud; Namazee, Najmeh

2013-06-01

210

Surveillance of Dengue Fever Virus: A Review of Epidemiological Models and Early Warning Systems  

PubMed Central

Dengue fever affects over a 100 million people annually hence is one of the world's most important vector-borne diseases. The transmission area of this disease continues to expand due to many direct and indirect factors linked to urban sprawl, increased travel and global warming. Current preventative measures include mosquito control programs, yet due to the complex nature of the disease and the increased importation risk along with the lack of efficient prophylactic measures, successful disease control and elimination is not realistic in the foreseeable future. Epidemiological models attempt to predict future outbreaks using information on the risk factors of the disease. Through a systematic literature review, this paper aims at analyzing the different modeling methods and their outputs in terms of acting as an early warning system. We found that many previous studies have not sufficiently accounted for the spatio-temporal features of the disease in the modeling process. Yet with advances in technology, the ability to incorporate such information as well as the socio-environmental aspect allowed for its use as an early warning system, albeit limited geographically to a local scale.

Racloz, Vanessa; Ramsey, Rebecca; Tong, Shilu; Hu, Wenbiao

2012-01-01

211

Viral Genetics as a Basis of Dengue Pathogenesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dengue is the most widespread mosquito-borne human viral disease. The disease is now endemic in more than 100 countries in Africa, the Americas, the Eastern Mediterranean, South-East Asia and the Western Pacific regions. Dengue viruses cause dengue infection, which ranges from mild febrile illness (dengue fever, DF) to fatal haemorrhagic manifestation (dengue haemorrhagic fever, DHF) leading to shock syndrome (dengue

Suchita Chaudhry; Sathyamangalam Swaminathan; Navin Khanna

2006-01-01

212

Cholera outbreaks in Africa.  

PubMed

During the current seventh cholera pandemic, Africa bore the major brunt of global disease burden. More than 40 years after its resurgence in Africa in 1970, cholera remains a grave public health problem, characterized by large disease burden, frequent outbreaks, persistent endemicity, and high CFRs, particularly in the region of the central African Great Lakes which might act as reservoirs for cholera. There, cases occur year round with a rise in incidence during the rainy season. Elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa, cholera occurs mostly in outbreaks of varying size with a constant threat of widespread epidemics. Between 1970 and 2011, African countries reported 3,221,050 suspected cholera cases to the World Health Organization, representing 46 % of all cases reported globally. Excluding the Haitian epidemic, sub-Saharan Africa accounted for 86 % of reported cases and 99 % of deaths worldwide in 2011. The number of cholera cases is possibly much higher than what is reported to the WHO due to the variation in modalities, completeness, and case definition of national cholera data. One source on country specific incidence rates for Africa, adjusting for underreporting, estimates 1,341,080 cases and 160,930 deaths (52.6 % of 2,548,227 estimated cases and 79.6 % of 209,216 estimated deaths worldwide). Another estimates 1,411,453 cases and 53,632 deaths per year, respectively (50 % of 2,836,669 estimated cases and 58.6 % of 91,490 estimated deaths worldwide). Within Africa, half of all cases between 1970 and 2011 were notified from only seven countries: Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mozambique, Nigeria, Somalia, Tanzania, and South Africa. In contrast to a global trend of decreasing case fatality ratios (CFRs), CFRs have remained stable in Africa at approximately 2 %. Early propagation of cholera outbreaks depends largely on the extent of individual bacterial shedding, host and organism characteristics, the likelihood of people coming into contact with an infectious dose of Vibrio cholerae and on the virulence of the implicated strain. Cholera transmission can then be amplified by several factors including contamination of human water- or food sources; climate and extreme weather events; political and economic crises; high population density combined with poor quality informal housing and poor hygiene practices; spread beyond a local community through human travel and animals, e.g., water birds. At an individual level, cholera risk may increase with decreasing immunity and hypochlorhydria, such as that induced by Helicobacter pylori infection, which is endemic in much of Africa, and may increase individual susceptibility and cholera incidence. Since contaminated water is the main vehicle for the spread of cholera, the obvious long-term solution to eradicate the disease is the provision of safe water to all African populations. This requires considerable human and financial resources and time. In the short and medium term, vaccination may help to prevent and control the spread of cholera outbreaks. Regardless of the intervention, further understanding of cholera biology and epidemiology is essential to identify populations and areas at increased risk and thus ensure the most efficient use of scarce resources for the prevention and control of cholera. PMID:24827501

Mengel, Martin A; Delrieu, Isabelle; Heyerdahl, Leonard; Gessner, Bradford D

2014-01-01

213

Comparing dengue and chikungunya emergence and endemic transmission in A. aegypti and A. albopictus.  

PubMed

Chikungunya and dengue are re-emerging mosquito-borne infectious diseases that are of increasing concern as human travel and expanding mosquito ranges increase the risk of spread. We seek to understand the differences in transient and endemic behavior of chikungunya and dengue; risk of emergence for different virus-vector assemblages; and the role that virus evolution plays in disease dynamics and risk. To address these questions, we adapt a mathematical mosquito-borne disease model to chikungunya and dengue in Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. We derive analytical threshold conditions and important dimensionless parameters for virus transmission; perform sensitivity analysis on quantities of interest such as the basic reproduction number, endemic equilibrium, and first epidemic peak; and compute distributions for the quantities of interest across parameter ranges. We found that chikungunya and dengue exhibit different transient dynamics and long-term endemic levels. While the order of most sensitive parameters is preserved across vector-virus combinations, the magnitude of sensitivity is different across scenarios, indicating that risk of invasion or an outbreak can change with vector-virus assemblages. We found that the dengue - A. aegypti and new Rèunion strain of chikungunya - A. albopictus systems represent the highest risk across the range of parameters considered. These results inform future experimental and field research efforts and point toward effective mitigation strategies adapted to each disease. PMID:24801860

Manore, Carrie A; Hickmann, Kyle S; Xu, Sen; Wearing, Helen J; Hyman, James M

2014-09-01

214

Botulism outbreak associated with eating fermented food--Alaska, 2001.  

PubMed

On January 18, 2001, the Alaska Division of Public Health was informed by a local physician of a possible botulism outbreak in a southwest Alaska village. This report summarizes the findings of the outbreak investigation, which linked disease to eating fermented food, and describes a new botulism prevention program in Alaska. PMID:11785568

2001-08-17

215

Management of outbreaks in neonatal intensive care units.  

PubMed

Outbreaks in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) have disastrous consequences for neonates and raise enormous concerns in staff, altering usual practice patterns of the NICU. Our objective was to perform a systematic analysis for gaining insights into the control and prevention of NICUs outbreaks. Epidemiology, risk factors and outcomes are reviewed. PMID:24709461

Decembrino, Lidia; Maini, Antonella; Decembrino, Nunzia; Maggi, Ivana; Lacerenza, Serafina

2014-03-01

216

Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in adolescents and adults  

PubMed Central

Dengue fever (DF) is endemic in tropical and subtropical zones and the prevalence is increasing across South-east Asia, Africa, the Western Pacific and the Americas. In recent years, the spread of unplanned urbanisation, with associated substandard housing, overcrowding and deterioration in water, sewage and waste management systems, has created ideal conditions for increased transmission of the dengue virus in tropical urban centres. While dengue infection has traditionally been considered a paediatric disease, the age distribution of dengue has been rising and more cases have been observed in adolescents and adults. Furthermore, the development of tourism in the tropics has led to an increase in the number of tourists who become infected, most of whom are adults. Symptoms and risk factors for dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and severe dengue differ between children and adults, with co-morbidities and incidence in more elderly patients associated with greater risk of mortality. Treatment options for DF and DHF in adults, as for children, centre round fluid replacement (either orally or intravenously, depending on severity) and antipyretics. Further data are needed on the optimal treatment of adult patients.

Tantawichien, Terapong

2012-01-01

217

Fusion of protegrin-1 and plectasin to MAP30 shows significant inhibition activity against dengue virus replication.  

PubMed

Dengue virus (DENV) broadly disseminates in tropical and sub-tropical countries and there are no vaccine or anti-dengue drugs available. DENV outbreaks cause serious economic burden due to infection complications that requires special medical care and hospitalization. This study presents a new strategy for inexpensive production of anti-DENV peptide-fusion protein to prevent and/or treat DENV infection. Antiviral cationic peptides protegrin-1 (PG1) and plectasin (PLSN) were fused with MAP30 protein to produce recombinant antiviral peptide-fusion protein (PG1-MAP30-PLSN) as inclusion bodies in E. coli. High yield production of PG1-MAP30-PLSN protein was achieved by solubilization of inclusion bodies in alkaline buffer followed by the application of appropriate refolding techniques. Antiviral PG1-MAP30-PLSN protein considerably inhibited DENV protease (NS2B-NS3pro) with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) 0.5±0.1 ?M. The real-time proliferation assay (RTCA) and the end-point proliferation assay (MTT assay) showed that the maximal-nontoxic dose of the peptide-fusion protein against Vero cells is approximately 0.67±0.2 ?M. The cell-based assays showed considerable inhibition of the peptide-fusion protein against binding and proliferating stages of DENV2 into the target cells. The peptide-fusion protein protected DENV2-challeged mice with 100% of survival at the dose of 50 mg/kg. In conclusion, producing recombinant antiviral peptide-fusion protein by combining short antiviral peptide with a central protein owning similar activity could be useful to minimize the overall cost of short peptide production and take advantage of its synergistic antiviral activities. PMID:24722532

Rothan, Hussin A; Bahrani, Hirbod; Mohamed, Zulqarnain; Abd Rahman, Noorsaadah; Yusof, Rohana

2014-01-01

218

Fusion of Protegrin-1 and Plectasin to MAP30 Shows Significant Inhibition Activity against Dengue Virus Replication  

PubMed Central

Dengue virus (DENV) broadly disseminates in tropical and sub-tropical countries and there are no vaccine or anti-dengue drugs available. DENV outbreaks cause serious economic burden due to infection complications that requires special medical care and hospitalization. This study presents a new strategy for inexpensive production of anti-DENV peptide-fusion protein to prevent and/or treat DENV infection. Antiviral cationic peptides protegrin-1 (PG1) and plectasin (PLSN) were fused with MAP30 protein to produce recombinant antiviral peptide-fusion protein (PG1-MAP30-PLSN) as inclusion bodies in E. coli. High yield production of PG1-MAP30-PLSN protein was achieved by solubilization of inclusion bodies in alkaline buffer followed by the application of appropriate refolding techniques. Antiviral PG1-MAP30-PLSN protein considerably inhibited DENV protease (NS2B-NS3pro) with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) 0.5±0.1 ?M. The real-time proliferation assay (RTCA) and the end-point proliferation assay (MTT assay) showed that the maximal-nontoxic dose of the peptide-fusion protein against Vero cells is approximately 0.67±0.2 ?M. The cell-based assays showed considerable inhibition of the peptide-fusion protein against binding and proliferating stages of DENV2 into the target cells. The peptide-fusion protein protected DENV2-challeged mice with 100% of survival at the dose of 50 mg/kg. In conclusion, producing recombinant antiviral peptide-fusion protein by combining short antiviral peptide with a central protein owning similar activity could be useful to minimize the overall cost of short peptide production and take advantage of its synergistic antiviral activities.

Rothan, Hussin A.; Bahrani, Hirbod; Mohamed, Zulqarnain; Abd Rahman, Noorsaadah; Yusof, Rohana

2014-01-01

219

Knowledge, Attitude and Practice Regarding Dengue Fever among the Healthy Population of Highland and Lowland Communities in Central Nepal  

PubMed Central

Background Dengue fever (DF) is the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease in the world. In this decade it has expanded to new countries and from urban to rural areas. Nepal was regarded DF free until 2004. Since then dengue virus (DENV) has rapidly expanded its range even in mountain regions of Nepal, and major outbreaks occurred in 2006 and 2010. However, no data on the local knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of DF in Nepal exist although such information is required for prevention and control measures. Methods We conducted a community based cross-sectional survey in five districts of central Nepal between September 2011 and February 2012. We collected information on the socio-demographic characteristics of the participants and their knowledge, attitude and practice regarding DF using a structured questionnaire. We then statistically compared highland and lowland communities to identify possible causes of observed differences. Principal Findings Out of 589 individuals interviewed, 77% had heard of DF. Only 12% of the sample had good knowledge of DF. Those living in the lowlands were five times more likely to possess good knowledge than highlanders (P<0.001). Despite low knowledge levels, 83% of the people had good attitude and 37% reported good practice. We found a significantly positive correlation among knowledge, attitude and practice (P<0.001). Among the socio-demographic variables, the education level of the participants was an independent predictor of practice level (P<0.05), and education level and interaction between the sex and age group of the participants were independent predictors of attitude level (P<0.05). Conclusion Despite the rapid expansion of DENV in Nepal, the knowledge of people about DF was very low. Therefore, massive awareness programmes are urgently required to protect the health of people from DF and to limit its further spread in this country.

Dhimal, Meghnath; Aryal, Krishna Kumar; Dhimal, Mandira Lamichhane; Gautam, Ishan; Singh, Shanker Pratap; Bhusal, Chop Lal; Kuch, Ulrich

2014-01-01

220

Dot enzyme immunoassay: an alternative diagnostic aid for dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever.  

PubMed Central

A dot enzyme immunoassay (DEIA) for the detection of antibodies to dengue virus was tested for use as a tool in the presumptive diagnosis of dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever. Paired sera from the following groups of patients were tested using the DEIA and the haemagglutination inhibition (HI) test: those with primary dengue fever; those experiencing a second dengue infection; and febrile patients who did not have dengue. The data obtained show that the DEIA can be effectively used at a serum dilution of 1:1000 to confirm presumptive recent dengue in patients with a second dengue infection. However, demonstration of seroconversion proved necessary for patients with primary dengue. At a serum dilution of 1:1000 the DEIA has a specificity of 97.3%. The role of this simple and rapid test in improving the effectivity of programmes for the control of dengue virus infection is discussed.

Cardosa, M. J.; Tio, P. H.

1991-01-01

221

MUCOCUTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF DENGUE FEVER  

PubMed Central

Dengue viral infection is a cause of considerable morbidity and mortality and may be associated with a variety of mucocutaneous manifestations that may provide important early clues to the diagnosis of this condition. Cutaneous and mucosal findings like confluent erythema, morbilliform eruptions, and hemorrhagic lesions may figure prominently in the clinical features of dengue. The differential diagnoses include a large number of bacterial and viral exanthems as well as drug rash.

Thomas, Emy Abi; John, Mary; Kanish, Bimal

2010-01-01

222

Outbreaks of Enteric Disease Associated with Animal Contact: Not Just a Foodborne Problem Anymore  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the past 10 years, an increasing number of outbreaks of enteric disease associated with animals in public settings, such as fairs and petting zoos, have been reported. Fifty-five of these outbreaks that occurred in the United States during 1991- 2005 are reviewed in this article. Lessons learned from these outbreaks and recommendations for prevention are also discussed. Physicians should

Frederick J. Angulo; Nicole Steinmuller; Linda Demma; Jeff B. Bender; Millicent Eidson

2006-01-01

223

Chimpanzee Fab Fragments and a Derived Humanized Immunoglobulin G1 Antibody That Efficiently Cross-Neutralize Dengue Type 1 and Type 2 Viruses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies from humans or nonhuman primates represents an attractive alternative to vaccines for prevention of illness caused by dengue viruses (DENV) and other flaviviruses, including the West Nile virus. In a previous study, repertoire cloning to recover Fab fragments from bone marrow mRNA of chimpanzees infected with all four DENV serotypes (dengue virus serotype 1 (DENV-1)

Ana P. Goncalvez; Ruhe Men; Claire Wernly; Robert H. Purcell; Ching-Juh Lai

2004-01-01

224

An 11-year-old boy with Plasmodium falciparum malaria and dengue co-infection.  

PubMed

Malaria and dengue fever are major mosquito-borne public health problems in tropical countries. The authors report a malaria and dengue co-infection in an 11-year-old boy who presented with sustained fever for 10 days. The physical examination revealed a flushed face, injected conjunctivae and left submandibular lymphadenopathy. His peripheral blood smear showed few ring-form trophozoites of Plasmodium falciparum. His blood tests were positive for dengue NS-1 antigen and IgM antibody, and negative for IgG antibody. After the initiation of antimalarial treatment with artesunate and mefloquine, his clinical condition gradually improved. However, he still had low-grade fever that persisted for 6 days. Finally, he recovered well without fluid leakage, shock or severe bleeding. This case report emphasises that early recognition and concomitant treatment of malaria and dengue co-infection in endemic areas can improve clinical outcome and prevent serious complications. PMID:24692379

Issaranggoon Na Ayuthaya, Satja; Wangjirapan, Anchalee; Oberdorfer, Peninnah

2014-01-01

225

Fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever in Cuba, 1997  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: After more than 15 years without dengue activity, a dengue II epidemic was reported in Cuba in 1997. Three thousand and twelve serologically confirmed cases were reported, with 205 dengue hemorrhagic fever\\/dengue shock syndrome (DHF\\/DSS) cases and 12 fatalities. This report presents the clinical, serologic, and virologic findings in the 12 fatal DHF\\/DSS cases.Methods: Serum and necropsy samples were

Maria G. Guzmán; Mayling Alvarez; Rosmari Rodriguez; Delfina Rosario; Susana Vázquez; Luis Valdés; Maria V. Cabrera; Gustavo Kouri

1999-01-01

226

Determinants of lemming outbreaks  

PubMed Central

Population outbreaks in tundra rodents have intrigued scientists for a century as a result of their spectacular appearances and their general lessons in ecology. One outstanding question that has led to competing hypotheses is why sympatric lemmings and voles differ in regularity and shape of their outbreaks. Lemming outbreaks may be lost for decades while vole populations maintain regular population cycles. Moreover, when lemming populations eventually irrupt, they do so more steeply than the vole populations. Norwegian lemmings exhibited a large-scale outbreak synchronously with gray-sided voles in Finnmark, northern Fennoscandia, during 2006 to 2007 for the first time in two decades. Analyses of spatial variability of this outbreak across altitudinal gradients allowed us to identify determinants of the contrasting lemming and vole dynamics. The steeper lemming outbreak trajectories were caused by breeding and population growth during winter, when nonbreeding vole populations consistently declined. The differently shaped lemming and vole outbreaks appear to result from a particular demographic tactic of lemmings that evolved as an adaptation to the long and cold Arctic–Alpine winters. The lemming outbreak amplitude increased with altitude and vole density, indicating that lemming outbreaks are jointly facilitated by low temperatures and apparent mutualism with voles mediated by shared predators. High sensitivity to variation in climate and predation is likely to be the reasons why lemmings have more erratic population dynamics than sympatric voles. The combination of continued climatic warming and dampened vole cycles is expected to further decrease the frequency, amplitude, and geographic range of lemming outbreaks in tundra ecosystems.

Ims, Rolf A.; Yoccoz, Nigel G.; Killengreen, Siw T.

2011-01-01

227

Use of Saliva for Early Dengue Diagnosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThe necessity of a venous blood collection in all dengue diagnostic assays and the high cost of tests that are available for testing during the viraemic period hinder early detection of dengue cases and thus could delay cluster management. This study reports the utility of saliva in an assay that detects dengue virus (DENV)–specific immunoglobulin A (Ig A) early in

Grace Yap; Bijon Kumar Sil; Lee-Ching Ng

2011-01-01

228

Geographical Information Systems for Dengue Surveillance  

PubMed Central

This review provides details on the role of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in current dengue surveillance systems and focuses on the application of open access GIS technology to emphasize its importance in developing countries, where the dengue burden is greatest. It also advocates for increased international collaboration in transboundary disease surveillance to confront the emerging global challenge of dengue.

Duncombe, Jennifer; Clements, Archie; Hu, Wenbiao; Weinstein, Philip; Ritchie, Scott; Espino, Fe Esperanza

2012-01-01

229

Biosurveillance in outbreak investigations.  

PubMed

Following the terrorist attacks of September 11 and the anthrax attacks in 2001, public health entities implemented automated surveillance systems based on disease syndromes for early detection of bioterror events and to increase timeliness of responses. Despite widespread adoption, syndromic surveillance systems' ability to provide early notification of outbreaks is unproven, and there is little documentation on their role in outbreak response. We hypothesized that biosurveillance is used in practice to augment classical outbreak investigations, and we used case studies conducted in 2007-08 to determine (1) which steps in outbreak investigations were best served by biosurveillance, and (2) which steps presented the greatest opportunities for improvement. The systems used in the case studies varied in how they functioned, and there were examples in which syndromic systems had identified outbreaks before other methods. Biosurveillance was used successfully for all steps of outbreak investigations. Key advantages of syndromic systems were sensitivity, timeliness, and flexibility and as a source of data for situational awareness. Limitations of biosurveillance were a lack of specificity, reliance on chief complaint data, and a lack of formal training for users. Linking syndromic data to triage notes and medical chart data would substantially increase the value of biosurveillance in the conduct of outbreak investigations and reduce the burden on health department staff. PMID:23448272

Kaydos-Daniels, S Cornelia; Rojas Smith, Lucia; Farris, Tonya R

2013-03-01

230

Human Dendritic Cells as Targets of Dengue Virus Infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dengue virus infections are an emerging global threat. Severe dengue infection is manifested as dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome, both of which can be fatal complications. Factors predisposing to complicated disease and pathogenesis of severe infections are discussed. Using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and ELISA techniques, we studied the cellular targets of dengue virus infection, at both the

Mary Marovich; Geraldine Grouard-Vogel; Mark Louder; Michael Eller; Wellington Sun; Shuenn-Ju Wu; Ravithat Putvatana; Gerald Murphy; Boonrat Tassaneetrithep; Timothy Burgess; Deborah Birx; Curtis Hayes; Sarah Schlesinger-Frankel; John Mascola; M. Marovitch

2001-01-01

231

Long-Term and Seasonal Dynamics of Dengue in Iquitos, Peru  

PubMed Central

Introduction Long-term disease surveillance data provide a basis for studying drivers of pathogen transmission dynamics. Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease caused by four distinct, but related, viruses (DENV-1-4) that potentially affect over half the world's population. Dengue incidence varies seasonally and on longer time scales, presumably driven by the interaction of climate and host susceptibility. Precise understanding of dengue dynamics is constrained, however, by the relative paucity of laboratory-confirmed longitudinal data. Methods We studied 10 years (2000–2010) of laboratory-confirmed, clinic-based surveillance data collected in Iquitos, Peru. We characterized inter and intra-annual patterns of dengue dynamics on a weekly time scale using wavelet analysis. We explored the relationships of case counts to climatic variables with cross-correlation maps on annual and trimester bases. Findings Transmission was dominated by single serotypes, first DENV-3 (2001–2007) then DENV-4 (2008–2010). After 2003, incidence fluctuated inter-annually with outbreaks usually occurring between October and April. We detected a strong positive autocorrelation in case counts at a lag of ?70 weeks, indicating a shift in the timing of peak incidence year-to-year. All climatic variables showed modest seasonality and correlated weakly with the number of reported dengue cases across a range of time lags. Cases were reduced after citywide insecticide fumigation if conducted early in the transmission season. Conclusions Dengue case counts peaked seasonally despite limited intra-annual variation in climate conditions. Contrary to expectations for this mosquito-borne disease, no climatic variable considered exhibited a strong relationship with transmission. Vector control operations did, however, appear to have a significant impact on transmission some years. Our results indicate that a complicated interplay of factors underlie DENV transmission in contexts such as Iquitos.

Stoddard, Steven T.; Wearing, Helen J.; Reiner, Robert C.; Morrison, Amy C.; Astete, Helvio; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Alvarez, Carlos; Ramal-Asayag, Cesar; Sihuincha, Moises; Rocha, Claudio; Halsey, Eric S.; Scott, Thomas W.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Forshey, Brett M.

2014-01-01

232

Epidemiological and molecular features of dengue virus type-1 in New Caledonia, South Pacific, 2001-2013  

PubMed Central

Background The epidemiology of dengue in the South Pacific has been characterized by transmission of a single dominant serotype for 3–5 years, with subsequent replacement by another serotype. From 2001 to 2008 only DENV-1 was reported in the Pacific. In 2008, DENV-4 emerged and quickly displaced DENV-1 in the Pacific, except in New Caledonia (NC) where DENV-1 and DENV-4 co-circulated in 2008–2009. During 2012–2013, another DENV-1 outbreak occurred in NC, the third DENV-1 outbreak in a decade. Given that dengue is a serotype-specific immunizing infection, the recurrent outbreaks of a single serotype within a 10-year period was unexpected. Findings This study aimed to inform this phenomenon by examining the phylogenetic characteristics of the DENV-1 viruses in NC and other Pacific islands between 2001 and 2013. As a result, we have demonstrated that NC experienced introductions of viruses from both the Pacific (genotype IV) and South-east Asia (genotype I). Moreover, whereas genotype IV and I were co-circulating at the beginning of 2012, we observed that from the second half of 2012, i.e. during the major DENV-1 outbreak, all analyzed viruses were genotype I suggesting that a genotype switch occurred. Conclusions Repeated outbreaks of the same dengue serotype, as observed in NC, is uncommon in the Pacific islands. Why the earlier DENV-1 outbreaks did not induce sufficient herd immunity is unclear, and likely multifactorial, but the robust vector control program may have played a role by limiting transmission and thus maintaining a large susceptible pool in the population.

2014-01-01

233

Economic and Disease Burden of Dengue in Southeast Asia  

PubMed Central

Background Dengue poses a substantial economic and disease burden in Southeast Asia (SEA). Quantifying this burden is critical to set policy priorities and disease-control strategies. Methods and Findings We estimated the economic and disease burden of dengue in 12 countries in SEA: Bhutan, Brunei, Cambodia, East-Timor, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Viet Nam. We obtained reported cases from multiple sources—surveillance data, World Health Organization (WHO), and published studies—and adjusted for underreporting using expansion factors from previous literature. We obtained unit costs per episode through a systematic literature review, and completed missing data using linear regressions. We excluded costs such as prevention and vector control, and long-term sequelae of dengue. Over the decade of 2001–2010, we obtained an annual average of 2.9 million (m) dengue episodes and 5,906 deaths. The annual economic burden (with 95% certainty levels) was US$950m (US$610m–US$1,384m) or about US$1.65 (US$1.06–US$2.41) per capita. The annual number of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), based on the original 1994 definition, was 214,000 (120,000–299,000), which is equivalent to 372 (210–520) DALYs per million inhabitants. Conclusion Dengue poses a substantial economic and disease burden in SEA with a DALY burden per million inhabitants in the region. This burden is higher than that of 17 other conditions, including Japanese encephalitis, upper respiratory infections, and hepatitis B.

Shepard, Donald S.; Undurraga, Eduardo A.; Halasa, Yara A.

2013-01-01

234

Factors Predicting Severe Dengue in Patients with Dengue Fever  

PubMed Central

Introduction Dengue virus (DENV) affects over half the world’s population in 112 countries, and dengue fever (DF) is the second largest arthropod borne infectious global hazard after malaria with complications like Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS), accounting for significant morbidity and mortality world-over. Pakistan is significantly affected with DENV infection and to-date no study identifying risk factors associated with development of severe complications of DF has been done. Methods 997 confirmed cases of DF were collected from a tertiary care hospital in Lahore, Pakistan and their clinical and biochemical data were collected. Univariate, multivariate and logistics regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors associated with development of DHF and DSS. Results Bleeding OR 70.7 (CI 38.4–129.9), deranged liver function test OR 1.9 (CI 0.97–0.99), presence of urinary red blood cells OR 1.4 (95%CI 0.179–0.900) and presence of urinary protein OR 1.1 (95%CI 0.191–0.974) were related to development of DHF and DSS. Discussion Severe Dengue, like DHF and DSS can be predicted by the presence of clinical and biochemical factors like signs of bleeding, deranged liver function test, presence of urinary red blood cells and urinary protein; so that the patients at high risk for complication be identified early and started on treatment timely. Conclusion Predictors of severe dengue are identified in this study but further large scale multi-centered studies are needed for better interpretation.

Khan, Muhammad Imran Hasan; Anwar, Eram; Agha, Adnan; Hassanien, Noha Saleh Mohamed; Ullah, Ehsan; Syed, Imran Ali; Raja, Arsalan

2013-01-01

235

Cells in Dengue Virus Infection In Vivo  

PubMed Central

Dengue has been recognized as one of the most important vector-borne emerging infectious diseases globally. Though dengue normally causes a self-limiting infection, some patients may develop a life-threatening illness, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF)/dengue shock syndrome (DSS). The reason why DHF/DSS occurs in certain individuals is unclear. Studies in the endemic regions suggest that the preexisting antibodies are a risk factor for DHF/DSS. Viremia and thrombocytopenia are the key clinical features of dengue virus infection in patients. The amounts of virus circulating in patients are highly correlated with severe dengue disease, DHF/DSS. Also, the disturbance, mainly a transient depression, of hematological cells is a critical clinical finding in acute dengue patients. However, the cells responsible for the dengue viremia are unresolved in spite of the intensive efforts been made. Dengue virus appears to replicate and proliferate in many adapted cell lines, but these in vitro properties are extremely difficult to be reproduced in primary cells or in vivo. This paper summarizes reports on the permissive cells in vitro and in vivo and suggests a hematological cell lineage for dengue virus infection in vivo, with the hope that a new focus will shed light on further understanding of the complexities of dengue disease.

Noisakran, Sansanee; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Songprakhon, Pucharee; Hsiao, Hui-Mien; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Perng, Guey Chuen

2010-01-01

236

Dengue: a new challenge for neurology  

PubMed Central

Dengue infection is a leading cause of illness and death in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Forty percent of the world's population currently lives in these areas. The clinical picture resulting from dengue infection can range from relatively minor to catastrophic hemorrhagic fever. Recently, reports have increased of neurological manifestations. Neuropathogenesis seems to be related to direct nervous system viral invasion, autoimmune reaction, metabolic and hemorrhagic disturbance. Neurological manifestations include encephalitis, encephalopathy, meningitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, myelitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, polyneuropathy, mononeuropathy, and cerebromeningeal hemorrhage. The development of neurological symptoms in patients with positive Immunoglobulin M (IgM) dengue serology suggests a means of diagnosing the neurological complications associated with dengue. Viral antigens, specific IgM antibodies, and the intrathecal synthesis of dengue antibodies have been successfully detected in cerebrospinal fluid. However, despite diagnostic advancements, the treatment of neurological dengue is problematic. The launch of a dengue vaccine is expected to be beneficial.

Puccioni-Sohler, Marzia; Orsini, Marco; Soares, Cristiane N.

2012-01-01

237

Alfalfa Seed Decontamination in Salmonella Outbreak  

PubMed Central

Based on in vitro data, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends chemical disinfection of raw sprout seeds to reduce enteric pathogens contaminating the seed coats. However, little is known about the effectiveness of decontamination at preventing human disease. In 1999, an outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Mbandaka occurred in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and California. Based on epidemiologic and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis evidence from 87 confirmed cases, the outbreak was linked to contaminated alfalfa seeds grown in California’s Imperial Valley. Trace-back and trace-forward investigations identified a single lot of seeds used by five sprout growers during the outbreak period. Cases of salmonellosis were linked with two sprout growers who had not employed chemical disinfection; no cases were linked to three sprout growers who used disinfection. This natural experiment provides empiric evidence that chemical disinfection can reduce the human risk for disease posed by contaminated seed sprouts.

Gill, Christopher J.; Mohle-Boetani, Janet C.; Farrar, Jeff A.; Waller, Patti L.; Hahn, Christine G.; Cieslak, Paul R.

2003-01-01

238

High-Throughput Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Dengue Virus Type 2 Infected A549 Cells  

PubMed Central

Disease caused by dengue virus is a global health concern with up to 390 million individuals infected annually worldwide. There are no vaccines or antiviral compounds available to either prevent or treat dengue disease which may be fatal. To increase our understanding of the interaction of dengue virus with the host cell, we analyzed changes in the proteome of human A549 cells in response to dengue virus type 2 infection using stable isotope labelling in cell culture (SILAC) in combination with high-throughput mass spectrometry (MS). Mock and infected A549 cells were fractionated into nuclear and cytoplasmic extracts before analysis to identify proteins that redistribute between cellular compartments during infection and reduce the complexity of the analysis. We identified and quantified 3098 and 2115 proteins in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions respectively. Proteins that showed a significant alteration in amount during infection were examined using gene enrichment, pathway and network analysis tools. The analyses revealed that dengue virus infection modulated the amounts of proteins involved in the interferon and unfolded protein responses, lipid metabolism and the cell cycle. The SILAC-MS results were validated for a select number of proteins over a time course of infection by Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Our study demonstrates for the first time the power of SILAC-MS for identifying and quantifying novel changes in cellular protein amounts in response to dengue virus infection.

Chiu, Han-Chen; Hannemann, Holger; Heesom, Kate J.; Matthews, David A.; Davidson, Andrew D.

2014-01-01

239

High-throughput quantitative proteomic analysis of dengue virus type 2 infected A549 cells.  

PubMed

Disease caused by dengue virus is a global health concern with up to 390 million individuals infected annually worldwide. There are no vaccines or antiviral compounds available to either prevent or treat dengue disease which may be fatal. To increase our understanding of the interaction of dengue virus with the host cell, we analyzed changes in the proteome of human A549 cells in response to dengue virus type 2 infection using stable isotope labelling in cell culture (SILAC) in combination with high-throughput mass spectrometry (MS). Mock and infected A549 cells were fractionated into nuclear and cytoplasmic extracts before analysis to identify proteins that redistribute between cellular compartments during infection and reduce the complexity of the analysis. We identified and quantified 3098 and 2115 proteins in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions respectively. Proteins that showed a significant alteration in amount during infection were examined using gene enrichment, pathway and network analysis tools. The analyses revealed that dengue virus infection modulated the amounts of proteins involved in the interferon and unfolded protein responses, lipid metabolism and the cell cycle. The SILAC-MS results were validated for a select number of proteins over a time course of infection by Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Our study demonstrates for the first time the power of SILAC-MS for identifying and quantifying novel changes in cellular protein amounts in response to dengue virus infection. PMID:24671231

Chiu, Han-Chen; Hannemann, Holger; Heesom, Kate J; Matthews, David A; Davidson, Andrew D

2014-01-01

240

Spatio-temporal distribution of dengue fever under scenarios of climate change in the southern Taiwan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dengue fever has been recognized as the most important widespread vector-borne infectious disease in recent decades. Over 40% of the world's population is risk from dengue and about 50-100 million people are infected world wide annually. Previous studies have found that dengue fever is highly correlated with climate covariates. Thus, the potential effects of global climate change on dengue fever are crucial to epidemic concern, in particular, the transmission of the disease. This present study investigated the nonlinearity of time-delayed impact of climate on spatio-temporal variations of dengue fever in the southern Taiwan during 1998 to 2011. A distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM) is used to assess the nonlinear lagged effects of meteorology. The statistically significant meteorological factors are considered, including weekly minimum temperature and maximum 24-hour rainfall. The relative risk and the distribution of dengue fever then predict under various climate change scenarios. The result shows that the relative risk is similar for different scenarios. In addition, the impact of rainfall on the incidence risk is higher than temperature. Moreover, the incidence risk is associated to spatially population distribution. The results can be served as practical reference for environmental regulators for the epidemic prevention under climate change scenarios.

Lee, Chieh-Han; Yu, Hwa-Lung

2014-05-01

241

Building and analyzing an innovative community-centered dengue-ecosystem management intervention in Yogyakarta, Indonesia  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: Dengue is an important public health problem in Yogyakarta city, Indonesia. The aim of this study was to build an innovative community-centered dengue-ecosystem management intervention in the city and to assess the process and results. Methods: For describing the baseline situation, entomological surveys and household surveys were carried out in six randomly selected neighborhoods in Yogyakarta city, documents were analyzed and different stakeholders involved in dengue control and environmental management were interviewed. Then a community-centered dengue-ecosystem management intervention was built up in two of the neighborhoods (Demangan and Giwangan) whereas two neighborhoods served as controls with no intervention (Tahunan and Bener). Six months after the intervention follow up surveys (household interviews and entomological) were conducted as well as focus group discussions and key informant interviews. FIindings: The intervention results included: better community knowledge, attitude and practices in dengue prevention; increased household and community participation; improved partnership including a variety of stakeholders with prospects for sustainability; vector control efforts refocused on environmental and health issues; increased community ownership of dengue vector management including broader community development activities such as solid waste management and recycling. Conclusion: The community-centred approach needs a lot of effort at the beginning but has better prospects for sustainability than the vertical “top-down” approach.

Tana, Susilowati

2012-01-01

242

Outbreaks of campylobacteriosis in Australia, 2001 to 2006.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to examine the frequency of Campylobacter outbreaks in Australia and determine common transmission routes and vehicles. Summary and unit data on Campylobacter outbreaks that occurred between January 2001 and December 2006 were systematically collected and analyzed. Data from Campylobacter mandatory notifications for the same period were used for comparison. During the study period there were 33 Campylobacter outbreaks reported, affecting 457 persons. Of these, 147 (32%) had laboratory-confirmed infections, constituting 0.1% of notified Campylobacter cases. Campylobacter outbreaks most commonly occurred during the Australian Spring (September to November; n = 14, 45%), when notifications generally peaked. Transmission was predominantly foodborne or suspected foodborne (n = 27, 82%), commercial settings (n = 15, 55%) being most commonly involved. There were eight foodborne outbreaks (30%) attributed to food prepared or eaten at institutions; four (15%) at aged care facilities and three (11%) at school camps. A vehicle or suspected vehicle was determined for 16 (59%) foodborne outbreaks; poultry (chicken or duck) was associated with 11 (41%) of these, unpasteurized milk and salad were associated with two outbreaks each. Three potential waterborne outbreaks were detected, and one was due to person-to-person transmission. Campylobacter outbreaks were more commonly detected during this study period compared to a previous 6-year period (n = 9) when prospective recording of information was not undertaken. However, outbreak cases continue to constitute a very small proportion of notifications. Improved recognition through subtyping is required to enhance outbreak detection and investigation so as to aid policy formulation for prevention of infection. In addition to detection of chicken as a common source of outbreaks, these data highlight the importance of directing policy at commercial premises, aged care facilities, and school camps to reduce Campylobacter disease burden. PMID:19895264

Unicomb, Leanne E; Fullerton, Kathleen E; Kirk, Martyn D; Stafford, Russell J

2009-12-01

243

Forecasting fluctuating outbreaks in seasonally driven epidemics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seasonality is a driving force that has major impact on the spatio-temporal dynamics of natural systems and their populations. This is especially true for the transmission of common infectious diseases such as influenza, measles, chickenpox, and pertussis. Here we gain new insights into the nonlinear dynamics of recurrent diseases through the analysis of the classical seasonally forced SIR epidemic model. Despite many efforts over the last decades, it has been difficult to gain general analytical insights because of the complex synchronization effects that can evolve between the external forcing and the model's natural oscillations. The analysis advanced here attempts to make progress in this direction by focusing on the dynamics of ``skips'' where we identify and predict years in which the epidemic is absent rather than outbreak years. Skipping events are intrinsic to the forced SIR model when parameterised in the chaotic regime. In fact, it is difficult if not impossible to locate realistic chaotic parameter regimes in which outbreaks occur regularly each year. This contrasts with the well known Rossler oscillator whose outbreaks recur regularly but whose amplitude vary chaotically in time (Uniform Phase Chaotic Amplitude oscillations). The goal of the present study is to develop a ``language of skips'' that makes it possible to predict under what conditions the next outbreak is likely to occur, and how many ``skips'' might be expected after any given outbreak. We identify a new threshold effect and give clear analytical conditions that allow accurate predictions. Moreover, the time of occurrence (i.e., phase) of an outbreak proves to be a useful new parameter that carries important epidemiological information. In forced systems, seasonal changes can prevent late-initiating outbreaks (i.e., having high phase) from running to completion. These principles yield forecasting tools that should have relevance for the study of newly emerging and reemerging diseases.

Stone, Lewi

2009-03-01

244

Surveillance for Norovirus Outbreaks  

MedlinePLUS

... of gastroenteritis in U.S. Marines during Operation Iraqi Freedom and a common cause of outbreaks among British ... Lopman BA, Vinjé J, Parashar UD, Hall AJ. Impact of an emergent norovirus variant in 2009 on ...

245

Inhibition of Dengue Virus Entry and Multiplication into Monocytes Using RNA Interference  

PubMed Central

Background Dengue infection ranks as one of the most significant viral diseases of the globe. Currently, there is no specific vaccine or antiviral therapy for prevention or treatment. Monocytes/macrophages are the principal target cells for dengue virus and are responsible for disseminating the virus after its transmission. Dengue virus enters target cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis after the viral envelope protein E attaches to the cell surface receptor. This study aimed to investigate the effect of silencing the CD-14 associated molecule and clathrin-mediated endocytosis using siRNA on dengue virus entry into monocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings Gene expression analysis showed a significant down-regulation of the target genes (82.7%, 84.9 and 76.3% for CD-14 associated molecule, CLTC and DNM2 respectively) in transfected monocytes. The effect of silencing of target genes on dengue virus entry into monocytes was investigated by infecting silenced and non-silenced monocytes with DENV-2. Results showed a significant reduction of infected cells (85.2%), intracellular viral RNA load (73.0%), and extracellular viral RNA load (63.0%) in silenced monocytes as compared to non-silenced monocytes. Conclusions/Significance Silencing the cell surface receptor and clathrin mediated endocytosis using RNA interference resulted in inhibition of the dengue virus entry and subsequently multiplication of the virus in the monocytes. This might serve as a novel promising therapeutic target to attenuate dengue infection and thus reduce transmission as well as progression to severe dengue hemorrhagic fever.

Alhoot, Mohammed Abdelfatah; Wang, Seok Mui; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

2011-01-01

246

Community Knowledge, Health Beliefs, Practices and Experiences Related to Dengue Fever and Its Association with IgG Seropositivity  

PubMed Central

Background Demographic, economic and behavioural factors are central features underpinning the successful management and biological control of dengue. This study aimed to examine these factors and their association with the seroprevalence of this disease. Methodology We conducted a cross-sectional telephone survey of households in a 3 km radius of the schools where we had conducted serological tests on the student population in a previous study. Households were surveyed about their socio-demographics, knowledge, practices, and Health Belief Model (HBM) constructs. The results were then associated with the prevalence rate of dengue in the community, as marked by IgG seropositivity of the students who attended school there. Results A total of 1,400 complete responses were obtained. The community's IgG seropositivity was significantly positively associated with high household monthly income, high-rise residential building type, high surrounding vegetation density, rural locality, high perceived severity and susceptibility, perceived barriers to prevention, knowing that a neighbour has dengue, frequent fogging and a higher level of knowledge about dengue. In the multivariate analyses, three major correlates of the presence of IgG seropositivity in the community: (1) high-rise residential apartment house type or condominium buildings; (2) the main construct of the HBM, perceived severity and susceptibility; and (3) the additional constructs of the HBM, lack of preventive measures from the community level and having a neighbour with dengue as a cue to action. Weak correlations were found between self-practices to prevent dengue and the level of dengue seropositivity in the community, and between HBM constructs and knowledge (r?=?0.09). Conclusions The residential environment factor and the constructs of the HBM are useful and important elements in developing interventions to prevent and control dengue. The study also sheds light on the importance of the need for approaches that ensure the translation of knowledge into practice.

Wong, Li Ping; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Chinna, Karuthan

2014-01-01

247

Invasion and Maintenance of Dengue Virus Type 2 and Type 4 in the Americas†  

PubMed Central

Dengue virus type 4 (DENV-4) was first reported in the Americas in 1981, where it caused epidemics of dengue fever throughout the region. In the same year, the region's first epidemic of dengue hemorrhagic fever was reported, caused by an Asian strain of dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) that was distinct from the American subtype circulating previously. Despite the importance of these epidemics, little is known about the rates or determinants of viral spread among island and mainland populations or their directions of movement. We employed a Bayesian coalescent approach to investigate the transmission histories of DENV-2 and DENV-4 since their introduction in 1981 and a parsimony method to assess patterns of strain migration. For both viruses there was an initial invasion phase characterized by an exponential increase in the number of DENV lineages, after which levels of genetic diversity remained constant despite reported fluctuations in DENV-2 and DENV-4 activity. Strikingly, viral lineage numbers increased far more rapidly for DENV-4 than DENV-2, indicative of a more rapid rate of exponential population growth in DENV-4 or a higher rate of geographic dispersal, allowing this virus to move more effectively among localities. We propose that these contrasting dynamics may reflect underlying differences in patterns of host immunity. Despite continued gene flow along particular transmission routes, the overall extent of viral traffic was less than expected under panmixis. Hence, DENV in the Americas has a clear geographic structure that maintains viral diversity between outbreaks.

Carrington, Christine V. F.; Foster, Jerome E.; Pybus, Oliver G.; Bennett, Shannon N.; Holmes, Edward C.

2005-01-01

248

Aedes aegypti from temperate regions of South America are highly competent to transmit dengue virus  

PubMed Central

Background Aedes aegypti is extensively spread throughout South America where it has been responsible for large dengue epidemics during the last decades. Intriguingly, dengue transmission has not been reported in Uruguay and is essentially prevalent in subtropical northern Argentina which borders Uruguay. Methods We assessed vector competence for dengue virus (DENV) of Ae. aegypti populations collected in subtropical Argentina (Corrientes) as well as temperate Uruguay (Salto) and Argentina (Buenos Aires) in 2012 using experimental oral infections with DENV-2. Mosquitoes were incubated at 28°C and examined at 14 and 21 days p.i. to access viral dissemination and transmission. Batches of the Buenos Aires mosquitoes were also incubated at 15°C and 20°C. Results Although mosquitoes from temperate Uruguay and Argentina were competent to transmit DENV, those from subtropical Argentina were more susceptible, displaying the highest virus titters in the head and presenting the highest dissemination of infection and transmission efficiency rates when incubated at 28°C. Interestingly, infectious viral particles could be detected in saliva of mosquitoes from Buenos Aires exposed to 15°C and 20°C. Conclusions There is a potential risk of establishing DENV transmission in Uruguay and for the spread of dengue outbreaks to other parts of subtropical and temperate Argentina, notably during spring and summer periods.

2013-01-01

249

Epidemiology of foodborne disease outbreaks caused by Clostridium perfringens, United States, 1998-2010.  

PubMed

Clostridium perfringens is estimated to be the second most common bacterial cause of foodborne illness in the United States, causing one million illnesses each year. Local, state, and territorial health departments voluntarily report C. perfringens outbreaks to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System. Our analysis included outbreaks confirmed by laboratory evidence during 1998-2010. A food item was implicated if C. perfringens was isolated from food or based on epidemiologic evidence. Implicated foods were classified into one of 17 standard food commodities when possible. From 1998 to 2010, 289 confirmed outbreaks of C. perfringens illness were reported with 15,208 illnesses, 83 hospitalizations, and eight deaths. The number of outbreaks reported each year ranged from 16 to 31 with no apparent trend over time. The annual number of outbreak-associated illnesses ranged from 359 to 2,173, and the median outbreak size was 24 illnesses. Outbreaks occurred year round, with the largest number in November and December. Restaurants (43%) were the most common setting of food preparation. Other settings included catering facility (19%), private home (16%), prison or jail (11%), and other (10%). Among the 144 (50%) outbreaks attributed to a single food commodity, beef was the most common commodity (66 outbreaks, 46%), followed by poultry (43 outbreaks, 30%), and pork (23 outbreaks, 16%). Meat and poultry outbreaks accounted for 92% of outbreaks with an identified single food commodity. Outbreaks caused by C. perfringens occur regularly, are often large, and can cause substantial morbidity yet are preventable if contamination of raw meat and poultry products is prevented at the farm or slaughterhouse or, after contamination, if these products are properly handled and prepared, particularly in restaurants and catering facilities. PMID:23379281

Grass, Julian E; Gould, L Hannah; Mahon, Barbara E

2013-02-01

250

Seroepidemiology of Dengue Virus in Mayotte, Indian Ocean, 2006  

PubMed Central

Background Although Dengue virus (DENV) circulation had been documented in neighbouring South-western Indian Ocean Islands, its presence in Mayotte is poorly characterised. To address this issue, we aimed to assess the seroprevalence of dengue IgG antibodies (DENV-IgG Ab) among the population and to investigate potential associations with individual and household characteristics. Methods/Principal Findings In November–December 2006 we conducted a cross-sectional serologic survey in Mayotte among 1,154 inhabitants aged ?2 years by using a multistage cluster random sampling method. The overall prevalence of DENV-specific IgG antibodies (ELISA) was 22.73% (95% CI, 18.16–27.31). The age-specific seroprevalence increased with age (?2 for trend?=?11.86, P<0.0006), and was linked with previous known outbreaks in this region. In multivariate analysis, older age, being born in the Comoros and living in a household with a low socioeconomic index were positively associated with DENV IgG antibody positivity. Conclusions These findings document substantial prior exposure of the population of Mayotte to DENV and highlight the risk of severe illness due to the possibility of sequential DENV infections. Further investigations characterizing current DENV circulation patterns and associated serotypes are needed.

Sissoko, Daouda; Ezzedine, Khaled; Giry, Claude; Moendandze, Amrat; Lernout, Tinne; D'Ortenzio, Eric; Pettinelli, Francois; Malvy, Denis

2010-01-01

251

Evaluation of the WHO classification of dengue disease severity during an epidemic in 2011 in the state of Cear?, Brazil  

PubMed Central

In 2009, the World Health Organization (WHO) issued a new guideline that stratifies dengue-affected patients into severe (SD) and non-severe dengue (NSD) (with or without warning signs). To evaluate the new recommendations, we completed a retrospective cross-sectional study of the dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) cases reported during an outbreak in 2011 in northeastern Brazil. We investigated 84 suspected DHF patients, including 45 (53.6%) males and 39 (46.4%) females. The ages of the patients ranged from five-83 years and the median age was 29. According to the DHF/dengue shock syndrome classification, 53 (63.1%) patients were classified as having dengue fever and 31 (36.9%) as having DHF. According to the 2009 WHO classification, 32 (38.1%) patients were grouped as having NSD [4 (4.8%) without warning signs and 28 (33.3%) with warning signs] and 52 (61.9%) as having SD. A better performance of the revised classification in the detection of severe clinical manifestations allows for an improved detection of patients with SD and may reduce deaths. The revised classification will not only facilitate effective screening and patient management, but will also enable the collection of standardised surveillance data for future epidemiological and clinical studies.

Cavalcanti, Luciano Pamplona de Goes; Mota, Lia Alves Martins; Lustosa, Gustavo Porto; Fortes, Mayara Carvalho; Mota, Davi Alves Martins; Lima, Antonio Afonso Bezerra; Coelho, Ivo Castelo Branco; Mourao, Maria Paula Gomes

2013-01-01

252

Male-female differences in the number of reported incident dengue fever cases in six Asian countries  

PubMed Central

Introduction Demographic factors, such as age and sex, are associated with the likelihood of exposure to Aedes aegypti, the vector for dengue. However, dengue data disaggregated by both sex and age are not routinely reported or analysed by national surveillance systems. This study analysed the reported number of incident dengue cases by age and sex for six countries in Asia. Methods Data for the Lao People's Democratic Republic, the Philippines, Singapore and Sri Lanka were obtained from DengueNet; the number of male and female dengue cases was available for four age groups (< 1, 1–4, 5–14 and ? 15 years) over a cumulative period of six to 10 years. Data for Cambodia (2010) and Malaysia (1997–2008) were obtained from their respective ministries of health. Results An excess of males was found among reported dengue cases ? 15 years of age. This pattern was observed consistently over several years across six culturally and economically diverse countries. Discussion These data indicated the importance of reporting data stratified by both sex and age since collapsing the data over all ages would have masked some of the male–female differences. To target preventive measures appropriately, assessment of gender by age is important for dengue because biological or gender-related factors can change over the human lifespan and gender-related factors may differ across countries.

Anker, Martha

2011-01-01

253

Nation-wide, web-based, geographic information system for the integrated surveillance and control of dengue fever in Mexico.  

PubMed

Dengue fever incidence and its geographical distribution are increasing throughout the world. Quality and timely information is essential for its prevention and control. A web based, geographically enabled, dengue integral surveillance system (Dengue-GIS) was developed for the nation-wide collection, integration, analysis and reporting of geo-referenced epidemiologic, entomologic, and control interventions data. Consensus in the design and practical operation of the system was a key factor for its acceptance. Working with information systems already implemented as a starting point facilitated its acceptance by officials and operative personnel. Dengue-GIS provides the geographical detail needed to plan, asses and evaluate the impact of control activities. The system is beginning to be adopted as a knowledge base by vector control programs. It is used to generate evidence on impact and cost-effectiveness of control activities, promoting the use of information for decision making at all levels of the vector control program. Dengue-GIS has also been used as a hypothesis generator for the academic community. This GIS-based model system for dengue surveillance and the experience gathered during its development and implementation could be useful in other dengue endemic countries and extended to other infectious or chronic diseases. PMID:23936394

Hernández-Ávila, Juan Eugenio; Rodríguez, Mario-Henry; Santos-Luna, René; Sánchez-Castañeda, Veronica; Román-Pérez, Susana; Ríos-Salgado, Víctor Hugo; Salas-Sarmiento, Jesús Alberto

2013-01-01

254

Nation-Wide, Web-Based, Geographic Information System for the Integrated Surveillance and Control of Dengue Fever in Mexico  

PubMed Central

Dengue fever incidence and its geographical distribution are increasing throughout the world. Quality and timely information is essential for its prevention and control. A web based, geographically enabled, dengue integral surveillance system (Dengue-GIS) was developed for the nation-wide collection, integration, analysis and reporting of geo-referenced epidemiologic, entomologic, and control interventions data. Consensus in the design and practical operation of the system was a key factor for its acceptance. Working with information systems already implemented as a starting point facilitated its acceptance by officials and operative personnel. Dengue-GIS provides the geographical detail needed to plan, asses and evaluate the impact of control activities. The system is beginning to be adopted as a knowledge base by vector control programs. It is used to generate evidence on impact and cost-effectiveness of control activities, promoting the use of information for decision making at all levels of the vector control program. Dengue-GIS has also been used as a hypothesis generator for the academic community. This GIS-based model system for dengue surveillance and the experience gathered during its development and implementation could be useful in other dengue endemic countries and extended to other infectious or chronic diseases.

Hernandez-Avila, Juan Eugenio; Rodriguez, Mario-Henry; Santos-Luna, Rene; Sanchez-Castaneda, Veronica; Roman-Perez, Susana; Rios-Salgado, Victor Hugo; Salas-Sarmiento, Jesus Alberto

2013-01-01

255

Generation and characterization of potential dengue vaccine candidates based on domain III of the envelope protein and the capsid protein of the four serotypes of dengue virus.  

PubMed

Dengue is currently one of the most important arthropod-borne diseases, causing up to 25,000 deaths annually. There is currently no vaccine to prevent dengue virus infection, which needs a tetravalent vaccine approach. In this work, we describe the cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of envelope domain III-capsid chimeric proteins (DIIIC) of the four dengue serotypes as a tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate that is potentially able to generate humoral and cellular immunity. The recombinant proteins were purified to more than 85 % purity and were recognized by anti-dengue mouse and human sera. Mass spectrometry analysis verified the identity of the proteins and the correct formation of the intracatenary disulfide bond in the domain III region. The chimeric DIIIC proteins were also serotype-specific, and in the presence of oligonucleotides, they formed aggregates that were visible by electron microscopy. These results support the future use of DIIIC recombinant chimeric proteins in preclinical studies in mice for assessing their immunogenicity and efficacy. PMID:24420159

Suzarte, Edith; Marcos, Ernesto; Gil, Lázaro; Valdés, Iris; Lazo, Laura; Ramos, Yassel; Pérez, Yusleidi; Falcón, Viviana; Romero, Yaremis; Guzmán, María G; González, Sirenia; Kourí, Juan; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

2014-07-01

256

Safety Testing of Dengue-1 and Dengue-3 Seeds for Human Challenges, Unattenuated.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Dengue Virus Type 3 (non-attenuated) Strain: CH-53489, LOT No. 1 of April 1984 was satisfactorily safety-tested in accordance with the guidelines established by the FDA for live and inactivated vaccines. Keywords: Dengue-1; Dengue-3; Hepatitis A; Viral se...

L. Potash

1987-01-01

257

HAITI: ABSENCE OF DENGUE HEMORRHAGIC FEVER DESPITE HYPERENDEMIC DENGUE VIRUS TRANSMISSION  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1994-1996, 185 strains of dengue (DEN) virus types 1, 2, and 4 were recovered from febrile United States and other United Nations military personnel in Haiti. We wondered whether risk factors for dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) existed and, if so, were DHF cases occurring among Haitian children. Dengue transmission rates were studied in 210 school children (6-13 years old)

SCOTT B. HALSTEAD; THOMAS G. STREIT; JACK GUY LAFONTANT; RAVITHAT PUTVATANA; KEVIN RUSSELL; WELLINGTON SUN; NIRANJAN KANESA-THASAN; CURTIS G. HAYES; DOUGLAS M. WATTS

2001-01-01

258

An online spatio-temporal prediction model for dengue fever epidemic in Kaohsiung,Taiwan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dengue Fever (DF) is one of the most serious vector-borne infectious diseases in tropical and subtropical areas. DF epidemics occur in Taiwan annually especially during summer and fall seasons. Kaohsiung city has been one of the major DF hotspots in decades. The emergence and re-emergence of the DF epidemic is complex and can be influenced by various factors including space-time dynamics of human and vector populations and virus serotypes as well as the associated uncertainties. This study integrates a stochastic space-time "Susceptible-Infected-Recovered" model under Bayesian maximum entropy framework (BME-SIR) to perform real-time prediction of disease diffusion across space-time. The proposed model is applied for spatiotemporal prediction of the DF epidemic at Kaohsiung city during 2002 when the historical series of high DF cases was recorded. The online prediction by BME-SIR model updates the parameters of SIR model and infected cases across districts over time. Results show that the proposed model is rigorous to initial guess of unknown model parameters, i.e. transmission and recovery rates, which can depend upon the virus serotypes and various human interventions. This study shows that spatial diffusion can be well characterized by BME-SIR model, especially at the district surrounding the disease outbreak locations. The prediction performance at DF hotspots, i.e. Cianjhen and Sanmin, can be degraded due to the implementation of various disease control strategies during the epidemics. The proposed online disease prediction BME-SIR model can provide the governmental agency with a valuable reference to timely identify, control, and efficiently prevent DF spread across space-time.

Cheng, Ming-Hung; Yu, Hwa-Lung; Angulo, Jose; Christakos, George

2013-04-01

259

Evolution of Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA during outbreaks.  

PubMed

Investigation of Staphylococcus aureus outbreaks, and particularly those due to methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in hospitals, can identify infection reservoirs and prevent further colonization and infection. During outbreaks, S. aureus genomes develop single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), small genetic rearrangements, and/or acquire and lose mobile genetic elements (MGE) encoding resistance and virulence genes. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is the most powerful method for discriminating between related isolates and deciding which are involved in an outbreak. Isolates with only minor variations are detectable and can identify MRSA transmission routes and identify reservoirs. Some patients may carry 'clouds' of related isolates, and this has consequences for how we interpret the data from outbreak investigations. Different clones of MRSA are evolving at different rates, influencing their typability. S. aureus genome variation reveals the importance of antibiotic resistance in the long term evolution of successful hospital clones, contributing to strategies to prevent the spread of successful MRSA clones. PMID:23665384

Lindsay, Jodi A

2014-01-01

260

Dengue Human Infection Models Supporting Drug Development  

PubMed Central

Dengue is a arboviral infection that represents a major global health burden. There is an unmet need for effective dengue therapeutics to reduce symptoms, duration of illness and incidence of severe complications. Here, we consider the merits of a dengue human infection model (DHIM) for drug development. A DHIM could allow experimentally controlled studies of candidate therapeutics in preselected susceptible volunteers, potentially using smaller sample sizes than trials that recruited patients with dengue in an endemic country. In addition, the DHIM would assist the conduct of intensive pharmacokinetic and basic research investigations and aid in determining optimal drug dosage. Furthermore, a DHIM could help establish proof of concept that chemoprophylaxis against dengue is feasible. The key challenge in developing the DHIM for drug development is to ensure the model reliably replicates the typical clinical and laboratory features of naturally acquired, symptomatic dengue.

Whitehorn, James; Van, Vinh Chau Nguyen; Simmons, Cameron P.

2014-01-01

261

Dengue human infection models supporting drug development.  

PubMed

Dengue is a arboviral infection that represents a major global health burden. There is an unmet need for effective dengue therapeutics to reduce symptoms, duration of illness and incidence of severe complications. Here, we consider the merits of a dengue human infection model (DHIM) for drug development. A DHIM could allow experimentally controlled studies of candidate therapeutics in preselected susceptible volunteers, potentially using smaller sample sizes than trials that recruited patients with dengue in an endemic country. In addition, the DHIM would assist the conduct of intensive pharmacokinetic and basic research investigations and aid in determining optimal drug dosage. Furthermore, a DHIM could help establish proof of concept that chemoprophylaxis against dengue is feasible. The key challenge in developing the DHIM for drug development is to ensure the model reliably replicates the typical clinical and laboratory features of naturally acquired, symptomatic dengue. PMID:24872399

Whitehorn, James; Van, Vinh Chau Nguyen; Simmons, Cameron P

2014-06-15

262

Dengue human infection model performance parameters.  

PubMed

Dengue is a global health problem and of concern to travelers and deploying military personnel with development and licensure of an effective tetravalent dengue vaccine a public health priority. The dengue viruses (DENVs) are mosquito-borne flaviviruses transmitted by infected Aedes mosquitoes. Illness manifests across a clinical spectrum with severe disease characterized by intravascular volume depletion and hemorrhage. DENV illness results from a complex interaction of viral properties and host immune responses. Dengue vaccine development efforts are challenged by immunologic complexity, lack of an adequate animal model of disease, absence of an immune correlate of protection, and only partially informative immunogenicity assays. A dengue human infection model (DHIM) will be an essential tool in developing potential dengue vaccines or antivirals. The potential performance parameters needed for a DHIM to support vaccine or antiviral candidates are discussed. PMID:24872397

Endy, Timothy P

2014-06-15

263

Hemophagocytic Syndrome in Classic Dengue Fever  

PubMed Central

A 24-year-old previously healthy girl presented with persistent fever, headache, and jaundice. Rapid-test anti-dengue virus IgM antibody was positive but anti-dengue IgG was nonreactive, which is suggestive of primary dengue infection. There was clinical deterioration during empiric antibiotic and symptomatic therapy. Bone marrow examination demonstrated the presence of hemophagocytosis. Diagnosis of dengue fever with virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome was made according to the diagnostic criteria of the HLH 2004 protocol of the Histiocyte Society. The patient recovered with corticosteroid therapy. A review of literature revealed only a handful of case reports that showed the evidence that this syndrome is caused by dengue virus. Our patient is an interesting case of hemophagocytic syndrome associated with classic dengue fever and contributes an additional case to the existing literature on this topic. This case highlights the need for increased awareness even in infections not typically associated with hemophagocytic syndrome.

Ray, Sayantan; Kundu, Supratip; Saha, Manjari; Chakrabarti, Prantar

2011-01-01

264

BROTE NOSOCOMIAL DE QUERATOCONJUNTIVITIS EPIDÉMICA EN UNA UNIDAD DE CUIDADOS INTENSIVOS NEONATAL NOSOCOMIAL OUTBREAK OF EPIDEMIC KERATOCONJUNCTIVITIS IN A NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To describe an epidemic nosocomial outbreak of keratoconjunctivitis affecting at least 43 people in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Madrid, between May and October 2002, perform epide- miologic research and determine preventive measu- res to prevent new outbreaks. Methods: Description of the outbreak, clinical case definition, microbiologic and epidemiologic research through the use of questionnaires. Analysis of the

ASENCIO-DURÁN M; ROMERO-MARTÍN R; GARCÍA-MARTÍNEZ JR; PERALTA-CALVO JM; PÉREZ-BLANCO V; GARCÍA-CABALLERO J; MALO-MARTÍNEZ C

265

Planning for smallpox outbreaks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mathematical models of viral transmission and control are important tools for assessing the threat posed by deliberate release of the smallpox virus and the best means of containing an outbreak. Models must balance biological realism against limitations of knowledge, and uncertainties need to be accurately communicated to policy-makers. Smallpox poses the particular challenge that key biological, social and spatial factors affecting disease spread in contemporary populations must be elucidated largely from historical studies undertaken before disease eradication in 1979. We review the use of models in smallpox planning within the broader epidemiological context set by recent outbreaks of both novel and re-emerging pathogens.

Ferguson, Neil M.; Keeling, Matt J.; John Edmunds, W.; Gani, Raymond; Grenfell, Bryan T.; Anderson, Roy M.; Leach, Steve

2003-10-01

266

Dengue blood analysis by Raman spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work Raman spectra of normal and dengue infected serum and whole blood were analyzed. In normal whole blood and serum characteristic peaks were observed when excited at 442 and 532 nm. In dengue whole blood and serum all peaks found to be blue shifted with reduced Raman intensity. Dengue whole blood and serum shows two peaks at 1614 and 1750 cm-1 which are due to presence of Immunoglobulin antibodies IgG and IgM. Whole study provides a route of information for diagnosis of dengue viral infection.

Rehman, A.; Anwar, S.; Firdous, S.; Ahmed, M.; Rasheed, R.; Nawaz, M.

2012-06-01

267

STAT2 signaling and dengue virus infection  

PubMed Central

Dengue virus (DENV) is an important human pathogen whose byzantine relationship with the immune response is poorly understood. DENV causes dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome, diseases for which palliative care is the only treatment. DENV immunopathogenesis studies are complicated by the lack of an immunocompetent small-animal model, and this has hindered anti-DENV drug and vaccine development. This review describes strategies that DENV uses to evade the type I interferon response and focuses on how data gained from the study of DENV NS5-mediated STAT2 degradation may be used to create immunocompetent DENV mouse models and design anti-DENV therapeutics.

Morrison, Juliet; Garcia-Sastre, Adolfo

2014-01-01

268

Economic Cost of Dengue in Puerto Rico  

PubMed Central

Dengue, endemic in Puerto Rico, reached a record high in 2010. To inform policy makers, we derived annual economic cost. We assessed direct and indirect costs of hospitalized and ambulatory dengue illness in 2010 dollars through surveillance data and interviews with 100 laboratory-confirmed dengue patients treated in 2008–2010. We corrected for underreporting by using setting-specific expansion factors. Work absenteeism because of a dengue episode exceeded the absenteeism for an episode of influenza or acute otitis media. From 2002 to 2010, the aggregate annual cost of dengue illness averaged $38.7 million, of which 70% was for adults (age 15+ years). Hospitalized patients accounted for 63% of the cost of dengue illness, and fatal cases represented an additional 17%. Households funded 48% of dengue illness cost, the government funded 24%, insurance funded 22%, and employers funded 7%. Including dengue surveillance and vector control activities, the overall annual cost of dengue was $46.45 million ($12.47 per capita).

Halasa, Yara A.; Shepard, Donald S.; Zeng, Wu

2012-01-01

269

A study of hepatic dysfunction in dengue.  

PubMed

Dengue is a major international health concern that is prevalent in tropical and sub tropical countries. There are certain clinical features that are associated with Dengue in addition to the classical features. An analysis of 70 patients suffering from dengue showed liver dysfunction was present in all patients. Vomiting was an important symptom. SGOT levels were higher than SGPT levels. Hepatosplenomegaly and ascitis were also present in significant number of patients. One should be aware of these presentations when dealing with suspected cases of Dengue. PMID:24772748

Shukla, Vaibhav; Chandr, Ashok

2013-07-01

270

The Utility of a Board Game for Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Health Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to test the effectiveness of an educational board game for increasing knowledge, positive attitudes-beliefs, and self-efficacy for dengue prevention in a sample of Philippine school children and adolescents. Effective board games are more advantageous than lectures because they are adaptable, inexpensive and…

Lennon, Jeffrey L.; Coombs, David W.

2007-01-01

271

Molecular epidemiology of dengue viruses in southern China from 1978 to 2006  

PubMed Central

To investigate molecular epidemiology of dengue viruses (DENV) in southern China, a total of 14 dengue isolates were collected in southern China during each epidemic year between 1978 and 2006 and their full-length genome sequences were obtained by using RT-PCR method. The E gene sequences from additional 6 dengue fever patients in Guangzhou in 2006 were also obtained by using RT-PCR method. Combined with DENVs sequences published in GenBank, phylogenetic analysis and recombination analysis were performed. One hundred and twenty-five E gene sequences and 60 complete genome sequences published in the GenBank were also involved. Phylogenetic analysis showed that there was a wide genetic diversity of DENVs isolated in southern China. DENV-1 strains exist in almost all of the clades of genotype I and IV except the Asia 1 clade of genotype I; DENV-2 stains are grouped into four of the five genotypes except American genotype. DENV-4 strains are grouped into 2 genotypes (I and II). Phylogenetic analysis also showed that all DENV-4 isolates and two DENV-2 isolates were closely related to the prior isolates from neighboring Southeast Asia countries. The DENV-1 strain isolated during the 2006 epidemic is highly homologous to the strains isolated during the 2001 epidemic. Recombination analysis showed no inter-serotype recombination, but 22 intra-serotype recombination events were found across the 32 complete genomes of all Chinese isolates. The study suggested that dengue fever epidemic in Southern China over the past 30 years presented two important modes, 1) imported-cases-induced endemic prevalence; 2) endogenous epidemic outbreak with natural epidemic focus. Recombination may play an important role in dengue virus evolution and adaptation.

2011-01-01

272

Partial cross-enhancement in models for dengue epidemiology.  

PubMed

Four distinct serotypes of dengue virus co-circulate in many parts of the world. Antibodies to one serotype prevent infection with the homologous serotype, but may enhance infections with heterologous serotypes. Enhanced secondary infections have been implicated in the majority of severe cases, termed dengue hemorrhagic fever. Conventionally, mathematical models assume that all heterologous secondary infections are subject to enhanced susceptibility or transmissibility. However, empirical data show that only a minority of secondary infections lead to severe disease, which suggests that only a minority of secondary infections are subject to enhancement. We present a new modelling framework in which the population susceptible to secondary infection is split into a group prone to enhanced infection and a group with some degree of cross-protection. We use this framework to re-evaluate the role of enhanced infections in several well known dengue models that exhibit multi-annual epidemiological oscillations. We show that enhancement is unlikely to be driving such oscillations but may be modifying the effects of other drivers. PMID:24568780

Woodall, Hannah; Adams, Ben

2014-06-21

273

Rift Valley fever outbreak--Kenya, November 2006-January 2007.  

PubMed

In mid-December 2006, several unexplained fatalities associated with fever and generalized bleeding were reported to the Kenya Ministry of Health (KMOH) from Garissa District in North Eastern Province (NEP). By December 20, a total of 11 deaths had been reported. Of serum samples collected from the first 19 patients, Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus RNA or immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies against RVF virus were found in samples from 10 patients; all serum specimens were negative for yellow fever, Ebola, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and dengue viruses. The outbreak was confirmed by isolation of RVF virus from six of the specimens. Humans can be infected with RVF virus from bites of mosquitoes or other arthropod vectors that have fed on animals infected with RVF virus, or through contact with viremic animals, particularly livestock. Reports of livestock deaths and unexplained animal abortions in NEP provided further evidence of an RVF outbreak. On December 20, an investigation was launched by KMOH, the Kenya Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (FELTP), the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI), the Walter Reed Project of the U.S. Army Medical Research Unit, CDC-Kenya's Global Disease Detection Center, and other partners, including the World Health Organization (WHO) and Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF). This report describes the findings from that initial investigation and the control measures taken in response to the RVF outbreak, which spread to multiple additional provinces and districts, resulting in 404 cases with 118 deaths as of January 25, 2007. PMID:17268404

2007-02-01

274

A case presentation of a fatal dengue myocarditis showing evidence for dengue virus-induced lesion.  

PubMed

Dengue is a prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease in tropical and subtropical areas of the globe. Dengue clinical manifestations include asymptomatic infections; undifferentiated fever; dengue fever, which is characterized by fever, headache, retroorbital pain, myalgia, and arthralgia; and a severe form of the disease denominated dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome, characterized by haemoconcentration, thrombocytopenia, and bleeding tendency. However, atypical manifestations, such as liver, central nervous system, and cardiac involvement, have been increasingly reported. We report an atypical and rare presentation of dengue disease marked by a dramatic and fatal cardiogenic shock due to acute myocarditis. Histopathological analysis of heart tissue showed several multifocal areas of muscle necrosis and intense interstitial oedema associated with clusters of virus particles inside the cardiomyocytes and in the interstitial space, providing evidence of a possible direct action of dengue virus on myocardium. PMID:24222821

Miranda, Carlos Henrique; Borges, Marcos de Carvalho; Schmidt, André; Pazin-Filho, Antônio; Rossi, Marcos Antônio; Ramos, Simone Gusmão; Lopes da Fonseca, Benedito Antônio

2013-06-01

275

A waterborne tularemia outbreak  

Microsoft Academic Search

A waterborne tularemia outbreak is described. Forty nine cases were identified in Sansepolcro, a small Medioeval town in the province of Arezzo, Tuscany, Italy. All cases had laterocervical or sub-mandibular adenitis, and occurred within a period of three weeks during March and April 1982.

D. Greco; G. Allegrini; T. Tizzi; E. Ninu; A. Lamanna; S. Luzi

1987-01-01

276

Planning for smallpox outbreaks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mathematical models of viral transmission and control are important tools for assessing the threat posed by deliberate release of the smallpox virus and the best means of containing an outbreak. Models must balance biological realism against limitations of knowledge, and uncertainties need to be accurately communicated to policy-makers. Smallpox poses the particular challenge that key biological, social and spatial factors

Matt J. Keeling; W. John Edmunds; Raymond Gani; Bryan T. Grenfell; Roy M. Anderson; Steve Leach; Neil M. Ferguson

2003-01-01

277

Outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis infection, Thailand.  

PubMed

Norovirus is a leading cause of gastrointestinal illness worldwide. We investigated an outbreak of gastrointestinal illness in Pattaya, Thailand, among participants of a course. We asked participants and family members to complete a questionnaire asking about symptoms, meals eaten, and foods consumed during the course. We collected stool samples from persons reporting illness and analyzed specimens for several viruses and enteropathogenic bacteria. We defined a case as a person having one or more episodes of diarrhea, with onset between 30 August and 1 September 2010, in a participant or family member who attended the course. Of 56 people who attended, 95% completed the questionnaire: nine met the case definition (attack rate, 17%). Common symptoms included abdominal cramps, nausea, fatigue, headache, and vomiting. Food items with elevated risk ratios included: crispy fish maw, dried squid, and cashew nut salad [risk ratio (RR) 5.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7-37]; assorted salad bar with dressing (RR 3.0; 95% CI 0.9-11); and seafood kebab (RR 5.8; 95% CI 0.8-43). Among ill persons, four (44%) provided stool samples and two (50%) were positive for norovirus. Our data suggest a foodborne outbreak of norovirus. Increased use of norovirus diagnostics as well as measures to prevent transmission may help identify additional outbreaks and improve control measures to limit the spread of outbreaks. PMID:24050072

McCarthy, Katie S; Guntapong, Ratigorn; Thattiyaphong, Aree; Wangroongsarb, Piyada; Hall, Aron J; Olsen, Sonja J; Holtz, Timothy H

2013-05-01

278

Laboratory diagnosis of primary and secondary dengue infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Dengue fever is routinely detected in many laboratories using commercial tests for the specific detection of dengue IgM antibodies. Objectives: We have studied the sensitivity of IgM antibody detection in paired serum samples of 43 patients with either with primary dengue (PD) or secondary dengue (SD). Study design: Two consecutive samples were drawn from 23 Vietnamese and 20 German

Stefan Schilling; Diana Ludolfs; Le Van An; Herbert Schmitz

2004-01-01

279

Urban epidemic of dengue virus serotype 3 infection, Senegal, 2009.  

PubMed

An urban epidemic of dengue in Senegal during 2009 affected 196 persons and included 5 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever and 1 fatal case of dengue shock syndrome. Dengue virus serotype 3 was identified from all patients, and Aedes aegypti mosquitoes were identified as the primary vector of the virus. PMID:24572297

Faye, Ousmane; Ba, Yamar; Faye, Oumar; Talla, Cheikh; Diallo, Diawo; Chen, Rubing; Mondo, Mireille; Ba, Rouguiétou; Macondo, Edgard; Siby, Tidiane; Weaver, Scott C; Diallo, Mawlouth; Sall, Amadou Alpha

2014-03-01

280

Urban Epidemic of Dengue Virus Serotype 3 Infection, Senegal, 2009  

PubMed Central

An urban epidemic of dengue in Senegal during 2009 affected 196 persons and included 5 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever and 1 fatal case of dengue shock syndrome. Dengue virus serotype 3 was identified from all patients, and Aedes aegypti mosquitoes were identified as the primary vector of the virus.

Faye, Ousmane; Ba, Yamar; Faye, Oumar; Talla, Cheikh; Diallo, Diawo; Chen, Rubing; Mondo, Mireille; Ba, Rouguietou; Macondo, Edgard; Siby, Tidiane; Weaver, Scott C.; Diallo, Mawlouth

2014-01-01

281

Knowledge, attitude and practices related to dengue in rural and slum areas of Delhi after the dengue epidemic of 1996.  

PubMed

To assess the knowledge and attitudes about dengue and practice of prevention followed by the residents of a rural area and an urban resettlement colony of East Delhi, an interview based cross sectional KAP study was undertaken in Jan 97 to Feb 97, a few months after the dengue epidemic in rural area and urban areas of East Delhi. A pre-structured and pre-tested format containing the relevant questions was administered to the subjects. A total of 687 subjects (334 rural and 353 urban) were interviewed. Nearly four fifth (82.3%) of these were aware of Dengue. Audiovisual media was the most common source of information in both the areas. Knowledge about the disease was fair to good. Fever was the commonest symptom of the disease known to 92% urban and 83% rural respondents followed by symptoms of bleeding and headache. Mosquito was known to spread the disease to 71% rural and 89% urban respondents. More than two third respondents in urban and two fifth in rural areas had used some method of mosquito control or personal protection during the epidemic. PMID:9914677

Gupta, P; Kumar, P; Aggarwal, O P

1998-06-01

282

Thailand Momentum on Policy and Practice in Local Legislation on Dengue Vector Control  

PubMed Central

Over a past decade, an administrative decentralization model, adopted for local administration development in Thailand, is replacing the prior centralized (top-down) command system. The change offers challenges to local governmental agencies and other public health agencies at all the ministerial, regional, and provincial levels. A public health regulatory and legislative framework for dengue vector control by local governmental agencies is a national topic of interest because dengue control program has been integrated into healthcare services at the provincial level and also has been given priority in health plans of local governmental agencies. The enabling environments of local administrations are unique, so this critical review focuses on the authority of local governmental agencies responsible for disease prevention and control and on the functioning of local legislation with respect to dengue vector control and practices.

Bhumiratana, Adisak; Intarapuk, Apiradee; Chujun, Suriyo; Kaewwaen, Wuthichai; Sorosjinda-Nunthawarasilp, Prapa; Koyadun, Surachart

2014-01-01

283

Dengue, Urbanization and Globalization: The Unholy Trinity of the 21st Century  

PubMed Central

Dengue is the most important arboviral disease of humans with over half of the world’s population living in areas of risk. The frequency and magnitude of epidemic dengue have increased dramatically in the past 40 years as the viruses and the mosquito vectors have both expanded geographically in the tropical regions of the world. There are many factors that have contributed to this emergence of epidemic dengue, but only three have been the principal drivers: 1) urbanization, 2) globalization and 3) lack of effective mosquito control. The dengue viruses have fully adapted to a human-Aedes aegypti-human transmission cycle, in the large urban centers of the tropics, where crowded human populations live in intimate association with equally large mosquito populations. This setting provides the ideal home for maintenance of the viruses and the periodic generation of epidemic strains. These cities all have modern airports through which 10s of millions of passengers pass each year, providing the ideal mechanism for transportation of viruses to new cities, regions and continents where there is little or no effective mosquito control. The result is epidemic dengue. This paper discusses this unholy trinity of drivers, along with disease burden, prevention and control and prospects for the future.

Gubler, Duane J.

2011-01-01

284

Extensive haemorrhagic necrosis of liver is an unpredictable fatal complication in dengue infection: a postmortem study  

PubMed Central

Background Dengue infection carries a potential risk of death despite stringent management of plasma leak and haemorrhage. It appears that the extent of liver dysfunction determines the outcome. Methods We present a postmortem study of five patients, died of dengue shock syndrome who had markedly elevated liver enzymes and irreparable circulatory failure. Results All were females with a median age of 46 years (range 20–50 years). All had positive NS1 and IgM. Clinically, one patient developed severe degree of hepatic encephalopathy whilst three patients developed uncontrollable bleeding manifestations. Dengue virus was detected in three liver specimens by reverse transcription PCR. Histology of the liver revealed massive necrosis with haemorrhages in these patients with evidence of micro and macrovesicular steatosis with significant periportal inflammatory infiltrate. No significant ischaemic changes or necrosis was observed in the other organs. Conclusions Severe haemorrhagic necrosis of the liver was the cause of death in these patients probably due to direct viral infection. Predilection for severe liver disease remains unknown. Therefore, it is prudent to think beyond plasma leak as the main pathology of dengue infection and attempts should be made to develop other treatment modalities to prevent and manage unforeseen fatal complications of dengue infection.

2014-01-01

285

Dengue, Urbanization and Globalization: The Unholy Trinity of the 21(st) Century.  

PubMed

Dengue is the most important arboviral disease of humans with over half of the world's population living in areas of risk. The frequency and magnitude of epidemic dengue have increased dramatically in the past 40 years as the viruses and the mosquito vectors have both expanded geographically in the tropical regions of the world. There are many factors that have contributed to this emergence of epidemic dengue, but only three have been the principal drivers: 1) urbanization, 2) globalization and 3) lack of effective mosquito control. The dengue viruses have fully adapted to a human-Aedes aegypti-human transmission cycle, in the large urban centers of the tropics, where crowded human populations live in intimate association with equally large mosquito populations. This setting provides the ideal home for maintenance of the viruses and the periodic generation of epidemic strains. These cities all have modern airports through which 10s of millions of passengers pass each year, providing the ideal mechanism for transportation of viruses to new cities, regions and continents where there is little or no effective mosquito control. The result is epidemic dengue. This paper discusses this unholy trinity of drivers, along with disease burden, prevention and control and prospects for the future. PMID:22500131

Gubler, Duane J

2011-12-01

286

Dengue related maculopathy and foveolitis.  

PubMed

A 24 year-old Malay lady presented with high grade fever, myalgia, generalized rashes, severe headache and was positive for dengue serology test. Her lowest platelet count was 45 × 10(9) cells/L. She complained of sudden onset of painlessness, profound loss of vision bilaterally 7 days after the onset of fever. On examination, her right eye best corrected vision was 6/30 and left eye was 6/120. Her anterior segment examination was unremarkable. Funduscopy revealed there were multiple retinal haemorrhages found at posterior pole of both fundi and elevation at fovea area with subretinal fluid. Systemic examination revealed normal findings except for residual petechial rashes. She was managed conservatively. Her vision improved tremendously after 2 months. The retinal hemorrhages and foveal elevation showed sign of resolving. Ocular manifestations following dengue fever is rare. However, bilateral visual loss can occur if both fovea are involved. PMID:23570008

Juanarita, Jaafar; Azmi, Mohd Noor Raja; Azhany, Yaakub; Liza-Sharmini, Ahmad Tajudin

2012-09-01

287

Dengue related maculopathy and foveolitis  

PubMed Central

A 24 year-old Malay lady presented with high grade fever, myalgia, generalized rashes, severe headache and was positive for dengue serology test. Her lowest platelet count was 45 × 109 cells/L. She complained of sudden onset of painlessness, profound loss of vision bilaterally 7 days after the onset of fever. On examination, her right eye best corrected vision was 6/30 and left eye was 6/120. Her anterior segment examination was unremarkable. Funduscopy revealed there were multiple retinal haemorrhages found at posterior pole of both fundi and elevation at fovea area with subretinal fluid. Systemic examination revealed normal findings except for residual petechial rashes. She was managed conservatively. Her vision improved tremendously after 2 months. The retinal hemorrhages and foveal elevation showed sign of resolving. Ocular manifestations following dengue fever is rare. However, bilateral visual loss can occur if both fovea are involved.

Juanarita, Jaafar; Azmi, Mohd Noor Raja; Azhany, Yaakub; Liza-Sharmini, Ahmad Tajudin

2012-01-01

288

Mosquito age and dengue transmission  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This online portal features a research project funded by The Grand Challenges in Global Health Initiative to develop new strategies to control mosquitoes that transmit human disease. Specifically, the project is focused on a method to reduce dengue transmission using naturally occurring bacterial symbionts that reduce mosquito life span. The site includes a background of this work, participating research programs and researchers, project publications, current progress, news and events, and FAQs.

Initiative, The G.

289

A model of dengue fever  

PubMed Central

Background Dengue is a disease which is now endemic in more than 100 countries of Africa, America, Asia and the Western Pacific. It is transmitted to the man by mosquitoes (Aedes) and exists in two forms: Dengue Fever and Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever. The disease can be contracted by one of the four different viruses. Moreover, immunity is acquired only to the serotype contracted and a contact with a second serotype becomes more dangerous. Methods The present paper deals with a succession of two epidemics caused by two different viruses. The dynamics of the disease is studied by a compartmental model involving ordinary differential equations for the human and the mosquito populations. Results Stability of the equilibrium points is given and a simulation is carried out with different values of the parameters. The epidemic dynamics is discussed and illustration is given by figures for different values of the parameters. Conclusion The proposed model allows for better understanding of the disease dynamics. Environment and vaccination strategies are discussed especially in the case of the succession of two epidemics with two different viruses.

Derouich, M; Boutayeb, A; Twizell, EH

2003-01-01

290

Human Immune Responses to Dengue Viruses.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this contract was to analyze the immune responses to dengue infections. During the past few years we have focused on three immune responses; lysis of dengue virus-infected cells by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of non-immune don...

F. A. Ennis

1986-01-01

291

Dengue disease, basic reproduction number and control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dengue is one of the major international public health concerns. Although progress is underway, developing a vaccine against the disease is challenging. Thus, the main approach to fight the disease is vector control. A model for the transmission of dengue disease is presented. It consists of eight mutually exclusive compartments representing the human and vector dynamics. It also includes a

Helena Sofia Rodrigues; M. Teresa T. Monteiro; Delfim F. M. Torres; Alan Zinober

2011-01-01

292

Lung in Dengue: Computed Tomography Findings  

PubMed Central

Background Dengue is the most important mosquito-borne viral disease in the world. Dengue virus infection may be asymptomatic or lead to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever with or without warning signs, or severe dengue. Lower respiratory symptoms are unusual and lung-imaging data in patients with dengue are scarce. Methodology/Principal Findings To evaluate lung changes associated with dengue infection, we retrospectively analyzed 2,020 confirmed cases of dengue. Twenty-nine of these patients (11 females and 18 males aged 16–90 years) underwent chest computed tomography (CT), which yielded abnormal findings in 17 patients: 16 patients had pleural effusion (the sole finding in six patients) and 11 patients had pulmonary abnormalities. Lung parenchyma involvement ranged from subtle to moderate unilateral and bilateral abnormalities. The most common finding was ground-glass opacity in eight patients, followed by consolidation in six patients. Less common findings were airspace nodules (two patients), interlobular septal thickening (two patients), and peribronchovascular interstitial thickening (one patient). Lung histopathological findings in four fatal cases showed thickening of the alveolar septa, hemorrhage, and interstitial edema. Conclusions/Significance In this largest series involving the use of chest CT to evaluate lung involvement in patients with dengue, CT findings of lower respiratory tract involvement were uncommon. When abnormalities were present, pleural effusion was the most frequent finding and lung involvement was often mild or moderate and bilateral. Extensive lung abnormalities are infrequent even in severe disease and when present should lead physicians to consider other diagnostic possibilities.

Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Brum, Ana Livia Garcia; Paes, Marciano Viana; Povoa, Tiago Fajardo; Basilio-de-Oliveira, Carlos Alberto; Marchiori, Edson; Borghi, Danielle Provencano; Ramos, Grazielle Viana; Bozza, Fernando Augusto

2014-01-01

293

Atypical respiratory complications of dengue fever.  

PubMed

In last decade, dengue has emerged as one of the most important vector born disease. With increasing cases, uncommon presentations and complications are now commonly recognized. Here, we report two cases of rare pattern of respiratory involvement in dengue: acute respiratory distress syndrome and bronchiolitis with respiratory failure. PMID:23870477

Kumar, Naveen; Gadpayle, A K; Trisal, Deepshikha

2013-10-01

294

Monocyte-Plasmablast Crosstalk during Dengue.  

PubMed

Dengue virus infection induces a dramatic expansion of B cell plasmablasts. In this issue, Kwissa et al. (2014) begin with transcriptomic analysis and then integrate studies in human clinical samples, nonhuman primates, and coculture of primary human cells to identify a role for CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes in generating plasmablast responses during dengue virus infection. PMID:25011103

Green, Angela M; Harris, Eva

2014-07-01

295

Identification of Avibacterium paragallinarum serovar B-1 from severe infectious coryza outbreaks in Panama.  

PubMed

The isolation and identification of Avibacterium paragallinarum serovar B-1 from severe infectious coryza outbreaks in broiler breeders in Panama is reported for the first time. Infectious coryza was absent for over a decade in the breeder farms area. Disease outbreaks were characterized by an up to 45% drop in egg production and increased mortality. Use of a commercial trivalent bacterin and a strengthened biosecurity program prevented outbreaks in susceptible flocks in the farm. PMID:20945795

Calderón, E N; Thomas, K; Morales-Erasto, V; Salgado-Miranda, C; Soriano-Vargas, E

2010-09-01

296

Cardiovascular manifestations of the emerging dengue pandemic.  

PubMed

Dengue is one of the most important emerging viral diseases globally. The majority of symptomatic infections result in a relatively benign disease course. However, a small proportion of patients develop severe clinical manifestations, including bleeding, organ impairment, and endothelial dysfunction with increased capillary permeability causing hypovolaemic shock that can lead to cardiovascular collapse. Evidence is increasing that dengue can also cause myocardial impairment, arrhythmias and, occasionally, fulminant myocarditis. No antiviral agents or vaccines are licensed for dengue, and treatment remains supportive with judicious fluid replacement for patients with severe disease. Defining the role of cardiac dysfunction in the haemodynamic compromise of severe dengue has potentially important management implications. In this Review, we will outline the current understanding of the cardiovascular manifestations of dengue, including myocardial and vascular involvement, and conclude with a discussion of the available therapeutic options and potential future research directions. PMID:24710495

Yacoub, Sophie; Wertheim, Heiman; Simmons, Cameron P; Screaton, Gavin; Wills, Bridget

2014-06-01

297

Listeriosis Outbreaks and Associated Food Vehicles, United States, 1998-2008  

PubMed Central

Listeria monocytogenes, a bacterial foodborne pathogen, can cause meningitis, bacteremia, and complications during pregnancy. This report summarizes listeriosis outbreaks reported to the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during 1998–2008. The study period includes the advent of PulseNet (a national molecular subtyping network for outbreak detection) in 1998 and the Listeria Initiative (enhanced surveillance for outbreak investigation) in 2004. Twenty-four confirmed listeriosis outbreaks were reported during 1998–2008, resulting in 359 illnesses, 215 hospitalizations, and 38 deaths. Outbreaks earlier in the study period were generally larger and longer. Serotype 4b caused the largest number of outbreaks and outbreak-associated cases. Ready-to-eat meats caused more early outbreaks, and novel vehicles (i.e., sprouts, taco/nacho salad) were associated with outbreaks later in the study period. These changes may reflect the effect of PulseNet and the Listeria Initiative and regulatory initiatives designed to prevent contamination in ready-to-eat meat and poultry products.

Cartwright, Emily J.; Jackson, Kelly A.; Johnson, Shacara D.; Graves, Lewis M.; Mahon, Barbara E.

2013-01-01

298

Listeriosis outbreaks and associated food vehicles, United States, 1998-2008.  

PubMed

Listeria monocytogenes, a bacterial foodborne pathogen, can cause meningitis, bacteremia, and complications during pregnancy. This report summarizes listeriosis outbreaks reported to the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during 1998-2008. The study period includes the advent of PulseNet (a national molecular subtyping network for outbreak detection) in 1998 and the Listeria Initiative (enhanced surveillance for outbreak investigation) in 2004. Twenty-four confirmed listeriosis outbreaks were reported during 1998-2008, resulting in 359 illnesses, 215 hospitalizations, and 38 deaths. Outbreaks earlier in the study period were generally larger and longer. Serotype 4b caused the largest number of outbreaks and outbreak-associated cases. Ready-to-eat meats caused more early outbreaks, and novel vehicles (i.e., sprouts, taco/nacho salad) were associated with outbreaks later in the study period. These changes may reflect the effect of PulseNet and the Listeria Initiative and regulatory initiatives designed to prevent contamination in ready-to-eat meat and poultry products. PMID:23260661

Cartwright, Emily J; Jackson, Kelly A; Johnson, Shacara D; Graves, Lewis M; Silk, Benjamin J; Mahon, Barbara E

2013-01-01

299

Effectiveness and acceptance of total release insecticidal aerosol cans as a control measure in reducing dengue vectors.  

PubMed

The effectiveness of regular application of insecticidal fogging in reducing dengue is questionable, since delays occur between peak time of outbreak and insecticide administrations. Moreover, many residents do not accept indoor application because of concern about insecticide contamination of household items. The study described in this article was designed to evaluate the effectiveness and acceptance of insecticidal aerosol cans to reduce dengue vectors inside and outside of homes. Residents in Kaohsiung City of South Taiwan were provided with two formulations of aerosol cans (permethrin 3.75% weight/weight [w/w] and cypermethrin 1.716% w/w) and were requested to use these aerosol cans. Although the indoor ovitrap index of the permethrin group returned to the original level in week 3, the index of the cypermethrin group decreased 60% to 20%. The residents accepted the insecticidal aerosol cans but complained of unfavorable effects caused by traditional insecticidal fogging. Results indicate that the insecticidal aerosol cans may serve as a supplementary household control measure for dengue vectors during the time period between the peak of outbreak and the administration of government-organized insecticide fogging. PMID:24645416

Pai, Hsiu-Hua; Hsu, Err-Lieh

2014-01-01

300

Introducing the Outbreak Threshold in Epidemiology  

PubMed Central

When a pathogen is rare in a host population, there is a chance that it will die out because of stochastic effects instead of causing a major epidemic. Yet no criteria exist to determine when the pathogen increases to a risky level, from which it has a large chance of dying out, to when a major outbreak is almost certain. We introduce such an outbreak threshold (T0), and find that for large and homogeneous host populations, in which the pathogen has a reproductive ratio R0, on the order of 1/Log(R0) infected individuals are needed to prevent stochastic fade-out during the early stages of an epidemic. We also show how this threshold scales with higher heterogeneity and R0 in the host population. These results have implications for controlling emerging and re-emerging pathogens.

Hartfield, Matthew; Alizon, Samuel

2013-01-01

301

Spray application of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti strain AM65-52) against Aedes aegypti (L.) and Ae. albopictus Skuse populations and impact on dengue transmission in a dengue endemic residential site in Malaysia.  

PubMed

A one year study was conducted to evaluate the impact of spray application of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti), strain AM65-52 on vector populations and dengue transmission in a dengue endemic state in Malaysia. Residential sites with similar populations of Aedes aegypti (L.) and Aedes albopictus Skuse were studied. One site was treated with spray application of Bti into all outdoor target vector habitats, which consisted of natural and artificial containers. The other site was not treated. The impact of spray application was measured with an indoor and outdoor ovitrap index (OI) and epidemiologic data. Significant reductions in both Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, OI were observed both indoors and outdoors, in treated sites compared to untreated sites (p < 0.05). OI reduction was achieved over time in the treated area. The OI was suppressed to below 10%. This was maintained for 4 weeks into the post-treatment phase. The outdoor OI at the untreated site remained at more than 40% for 38 weeks during the evaluation period. One dengue case occurred at the Bti treatment site at the beginning of the treatment phase, but no further cases were detected during the remainder of the treatment phase. However, there was an ongoing dengue outbreak in the untreated area with 15 serologically confirmed cases during weeks 37-54. Intensive fogging operations with pyrethroids at the untreated (Bti) site had a positive impact on Ae. albopictus, but not on Ae. aegypti. PMID:23082582

Tan, A W A; Loke, S R; Benjamin, S; Lee, H L; Chooi, K H; Sofian-Azirun, M

2012-03-01

302

The epidemiology of published norovirus outbreaks: a review of risk factors associated with attack rate and genogroup.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine global epidemiological trends in human norovirus (NoV) outbreaks by transmission route and setting, and describe relationships between these characteristics, viral attack rates, and the occurrence of genogroup I (GI) or genogroup II (GII) strains in outbreaks. We analysed data from 902 reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction-confirmed, human NoV outbreaks abstracted from a systematic review of articles published from 1993 to 2011 and indexed under the terms 'norovirus' and 'outbreak'. Multivariate regression analyses demonstrated that foodservice and winter outbreaks were significantly associated with higher attack rates. Foodborne and waterborne outbreaks were associated with multiple strains (GI+GII). Waterborne outbreaks were significantly associated with GI strains, while healthcare-related and winter outbreaks were associated with GII strains. These results identify important trends for epidemic NoV detection, prevention, and control. PMID:22444943

Matthews, J E; Dickey, B W; Miller, R D; Felzer, J R; Dawson, B P; Lee, A S; Rocks, J J; Kiel, J; Montes, J S; Moe, C L; Eisenberg, J N S; Leon, J S

2012-07-01

303

The epidemiology of published norovirus outbreaks: a systematic review of risk factors associated with attack rate and genogroup  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY The purpose of this study was to examine global epidemiological trends in human norovirus (NoV) outbreaks by transmission route and setting, and describe relationships between these characteristics, viral attack rates, and the occurrence of genogroup I (GI) or genogroup II (GII) strains in outbreaks. We analysed data from 902 RT-PCR-confirmed, human NoV outbreaks extracted from a systematic review of articles published from 1993 to 2011 and indexed under the terms “norovirus” and “outbreak.” Multivariate regression analyses demonstrated that foodservice and winter outbreaks were significantly associated with higher attack rates. Food- and waterborne outbreaks were associated with multiple strains (GI+GII). Waterborne outbreaks were significantly associated with GI strains, while healthcare-related and winter outbreaks were associated with GII strains. These results identify important trends for epidemic NoV detection, prevention, and control.

Matthews, J. E.; Dickey, B. W.; Miller, R. D.; Felzer, J. R.; Dawson, B. P.; Lee, A. S.; Rocks, J. J.; Kiel, J.; Montes, J. S.; Moe, C. L.; Eisenberg, J. N. S.; Leon, J. S.

2012-01-01

304

Estimating the basic reproduction number for single-strain dengue fever epidemics  

PubMed Central

Background Dengue, an infectious tropical disease, has recently emerged as one of the most important mosquito-borne viral diseases in the world. We perform a retrospective analysis of the 2011 dengue fever epidemic in Pakistan in order to assess the transmissibility of the disease. We obtain estimates of the basic reproduction number R0 from epidemic data using different methodologies applied to different epidemic models in order to evaluate the robustness of our estimate. Results We first estimate model parameters by fitting a deterministic ODE vector-host model for the transmission dynamics of single-strain dengue to the epidemic data, using both a basic ordinary least squares (OLS) as well as a generalized least squares (GLS) scheme. Moreover, we perform the same analysis for a direct-transmission ODE model, thereby allowing us to compare our results across different models. In addition, we formulate a direct-transmission stochastic model for the transmission dynamics of dengue and obtain parameter estimates for the stochastic model using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. In each of the cases we have considered, the estimate for the basic reproduction number R0 is initially greater than unity leading to an epidemic outbreak. However, control measures implemented several weeks after the initial outbreak successfully reduce R0 to less than unity, thus resulting in disease elimination. Furthermore, it is observed that there is strong agreement in our estimates for the pre-control value of R0, both across different methodologies as well across different models. However, there are also significant differences between our estimates for the post-control value of the basic reproduction number across the two different models. Conclusion In conclusion, we have obtained robust estimates for the value of the basic reproduction number R0 associated with the 2011 dengue fever epidemic before the implementation of public health control measures. Furthermore, we have shown that there is close agreement between our estimates for the post-control value of R0 across the different methodologies. Nevertheless, there are also significant differences between the estimates for the post-control value of R0 across the two different models.

2014-01-01

305

Contributing factors in restaurant-associated foodborne disease outbreaks, FoodNet sites, 2006 and 2007.  

PubMed

An estimated 48 million cases of foodborne illness occur each year in the United States, resulting in approximately 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths. Over half of all foodborne disease outbreaks reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are associated with eating in restaurants or delicatessens. We reviewed data from restaurant-associated foodborne disease outbreaks to better understand the factors that contribute to these outbreaks. Data on restaurant-associated foodborne disease outbreaks reported by sites participating in the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) were analyzed to characterize contributing factors reported in foodborne disease outbreaks and the levels of evidence used to identify these factors. Of 457 foodborne disease outbreaks reported in 2006 and 2007 by FoodNet sites, 300 (66%) were restaurant associated, and of these 295 (98%) had at least one reported contributing factor. One to nine (with a median of two) contributing factors were reported per outbreak. Of the 257 outbreaks with a single etiology reported, contributing factors associated with food worker health and hygiene were reported for 165 outbreaks (64%), factors associated with food preparation practices within the establishment were reported for 88 outbreaks (34%), and factors associated with contamination introduced before reaching the restaurant were reported for 56 outbreaks (22%). The pronounced role of food workers in propagating outbreaks makes it clear that more work is needed to address prevention at the local level. Food workers should be instructed not to prepare food while ill to prevent the risk of transmitting pathogens. PMID:24215683

Gould, L Hannah; Rosenblum, Ida; Nicholas, David; Phan, Quyen; Jones, Timothy F

2013-11-01

306

Halting a pneumococcal pneumonia outbreak among United States Marine Corps trainees  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundStreptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia in all age groups. Identifying outbreaks of pneumococcal disease and key risk factors may lead to improvements in vaccination and prevention strategies for high-risk groups. A significant outbreak of S. pneumoniae pneumonia that occurred among Marine recruits is reported here.

Nancy F Crum; Mark R Wallace; Carla R Lamb; Ava Marie S Conlin; Dennis E Amundson; Patrick E Olson; Margaret A. K Ryan; Ted J Robinson; Gregory C Gray; Kenneth C Earhart

2003-01-01

307

Acute Gastroenteritis Surveillance through the National Outbreak Reporting System, United States  

PubMed Central

Implemented in 2009, the National Outbreak Reporting System provides surveillance for acute gastroenteritis outbreaks in the United States resulting from any transmission mode. Data from the first 2 years of surveillance highlight the predominant role of norovirus. The pathogen-specific transmission pathways and exposure settings identified can help inform prevention efforts.

Wikswo, Mary E.; Manikonda, Karunya; Roberts, Virginia A.; Yoder, Jonathan S.; Gould, L. Hannah

2013-01-01

308

Molecular characterization of dengue virus 1 from autochthonous dengue fever cases in Croatia.  

PubMed

In the summer of 2010, two autochthonous dengue fever cases were detected in Croatia. Here we report the retrospective detection of an additional case of dengue fever, representing the first sustained autochthonous transmission in Europe since 1928. In addition, we present the phylogenetic analyses based on two sequences from the Pelješac peninsula, southern Croatia. The sequences were identified as dengue virus genotype 1 and recovered from two out of the three Pelješac patients in whom infection occurred. PMID:23279586

Kurolt, I C; Betica-Radi?, L; Dakovi?-Rode, O; Franco, L; Zelená, H; Tenorio, A; Markoti?, A

2013-03-01

309

Aedes aegypti on Madeira Island (Portugal): genetic variation of a recently introduced dengue vector  

PubMed Central

The increasing population of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes on Madeira Island (Portugal) resulted in the first autochthonous dengue outbreak, which occurred in October 2012. Our study establishes the first genetic evaluation based on the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes [cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4)] and knockdown resistance ( kdr ) mutations exploring the colonisation history and the genetic diversity of this insular vector population. We included mosquito populations from Brazil and Venezuela in the analysis as putative geographic sources. The Ae. aegypti population from Madeira showed extremely low mtDNA genetic variability, with a single haplotype for COI and ND4. We also detected the presence of two important kdr mutations and the quasi-fixation of one of these mutations (F1534C). These results are consistent with a unique recent founder event that occurred on the island of Ae. aegypti mosquitoes that carry kdr mutations associated with insecticide resistance. Finally, we also report the presence of the F1534C kdr mutation in the Brazil and Venezuela populations. To our knowledge, this is the first time this mutation has been found in South American Ae. aegypti mosquitoes. Given the present risk of Ae. aegypti re-invading continental Europe from Madeira and the recent dengue outbreaks on the island, this information is important to plan surveillance and control measures.

Seixas, Goncalo; Salgueiro, Patricia; Silva, Ana Clara; Campos, Melina; Spenassatto, Carine; Reyes-Lugo, Matias; Novo, Maria Teresa; Ribolla, Paulo Eduardo Martins; Pinto, Joao Pedro Soares da Silva; Sousa, Carla Alexandra

2013-01-01

310

Epidemiology of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks caused by Noroviruses in Okayama, Japan.  

PubMed

Noroviruses (called formerly "Norwalk-like viruses") cause food-borne gastroenteritis outbreaks. These outbreaks were thought to be related to shellfish consumption, although non-shellfish related outbreaks also occurred frequently in Japan. To clarify the epidemiology of Norovirus outbreaks, 435 stool samples were collected from 60 acute non-bacterial gastroenteritis outbreaks occurring over 8 years in Okayama, Japan. Using reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), Noroviruses were detected in 257 cases (59.1% of all samples) from 46 outbreaks (77% of all outbreaks). The majority of the 46 Norovirus outbreaks (89%) occurred during November to March; notably one-third occurred in December. Restaurants, schools, and welfare institutions accounted for the major settings in 50%, 20%, and 15% of the Norovirus outbreaks, respectively. This was similar to other reports from Japan, but differed from those from the United Kingdom. The transmission routes were assigned in 27 of the Norovirus outbreaks. In 18 outbreaks the routes were related to human contact (7 from food handlers and 11 from person-to-person contact), whereas those related directly to shellfish occurred only in 9 outbreaks. These results suggest that transmission routes related to human contact are more important than recognized previously in the context of preventive medicine. Furthermore, all outbreaks in which some of the samples contained dual genogroups of Noroviruses were related to shellfish, suggesting that consumption of contaminated shellfish frequently results in mixed Norovirus infections in contrast to other transmission routes and that coexistence of genogroups is a useful marker for shellfish-related outbreaks. PMID:16121370

Hamano, Masako; Kuzuya, Mitsutaka; Fujii, Ritsushi; Ogura, Hajime; Yamada, Masao

2005-10-01

311

Dengue transmission model by means of viremic adult immuno-competent mouse  

PubMed Central

Background Dengue virus infection manifests in three distinct forms in humans: dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and dengue shock syndrome. Infection with the virus is a fatal disease; no vaccine is available and prevention depends on interruption of the chain of transmission. The study of dengue viral transmission by mosquitoes is hindered due to the lack of an affordable animal model. In general, immuno-competent mice are used as a simple and inexpensive animal model, but mice are not susceptible to dengue virus infection and therefore viremia will not occur following the inoculation of the virus in such mice. Here, we report a method for creating artificial viremia in immuno-competent mice, and further demonstrate the use of viremic mice to simultaneously infect a large number of Aedes aegypti. Methods We infected K562 cells with DENV-2 in the presence of an antibody against DENV-4. We then incubated the cells for 2 d before injecting the infected cells into C3H mice. After 5 h incubation, we allowed 100–150 female Aedes aegypti to feed on blood from the mice directly. We collected blood samples from the mice and from randomly selected Ae. aegypti at 2, 6, 12, and 24 h post-blood meal and screened the samples for DENV-2 genome as well as for virus concentration. Results Our procedure provided high virus concentrations in the mice for at least 7 h after viral inoculation. We found that 13 out of 14 randomly picked mosquitoes were infected with DENV-2. High concentrations of virus were detected in the mosquitoes until at least 12 h post-infection. Conclusions Using the viremic immuno-competent mouse, we show that mass infection of Ae. aegypti is achievable. Compared to other infection techniques using direct inoculation, membrane-feeding, or immuno-deficient/humanized mice, we are confident that this method will provide a simpler and more efficient infection technique.

2014-01-01

312

Bromeliad-inhabiting mosquitoes in an urban botanical garden of dengue endemic Rio de Janeiro. Are bromeliads productive habitats for the invasive vectors Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus?  

PubMed Central

Immatures of both Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus have been found in water-holding bromeliad axils in Brazil. Removal of these plants or their treatment with insecticides in public and private gardens have been undertaken during dengue outbreaks in Brazil despite uncertainty as to their importance as productive habitats for dengue vectors. From March 2005-February 2006, we sampled 120 randomly selected bromeliads belonging to 10 species in a public garden less than 200 m from houses in a dengue-endemic neighborhood in Rio de Janeiro. A total of 2,816 mosquito larvae and pupae was collected, with an average of 5.87 immatures per plant per collection. Culex (Microculex) pleuristriatus and Culex spp of the Ocellatus Group were the most abundant culicid species, found in all species of bromeliads; next in relative abundance were species of the genus Wyeomyia. Only two individuals of Ae. aegypti (0.07%) and five of Ae. albopictus (0.18%) were collected from bromeliads. By contrast, immatures of Ae. aegypti were found in manmade containers in nearly 5% of nearby houses. These results demonstrate that bromeliads are not important producers of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus and, hence, should not be a focus for dengue control. However, the results of this study of only one year in a single area may not represent outcomes in other urban localities where bromeliads, Ae. aegypti and dengue coincide in more disturbed habitats.

Mocellin, Marcio Goulart; Simoes, Taynana Cesar; do Nascimento, Teresa Fernandes Silva; Teixeira, Maria Lucia Franca; Lounibos, Leon Philip; de Oliveira, Ricardo Lourenco

2012-01-01

313

Dengue epidemics and human mobility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work we explore the effects of human mobility on the dispersion of a vector borne disease. We combine an already presented stochastic model for dengue with a simple representation of the daily motion of humans on a schematic city of 20×20 blocks with 100 inhabitants in each block. The pattern of motion of the individuals is described in terms of complex networks in which links connect different blocks and the link length distribution is in accordance with recent findings on human mobility. It is shown that human mobility can turn out to be the main driving force of the disease dispersal.

Barmak, D. H.; Dorso, C. O.; Otero, M.; Solari, H. G.

2011-07-01

314

Wild animal mortality monitoring and human Ebola outbreaks, Gabon and Republic of Congo, 2001-2003.  

PubMed

All human Ebola virus outbreaks during 2001-2003 in the forest zone between Gabon and Republic of Congo resulted from handling infected wild animal carcasses. After the first outbreak, we created an Animal Mortality Monitoring Network in collaboration with the Gabonese and Congolese Ministries of Forestry and Environment and wildlife organizations (Wildlife Conservation Society and Programme de Conservation et Utilisation Rationnelle des Ecosystemes Forestiers en Afrique Centrale) to predict and possibly prevent human Ebola outbreaks. Since August 2001, 98 wild animal carcasses have been recovered by the network, including 65 great apes. Analysis of 21 carcasses found that 10 gorillas, 3 chimpanzees, and 1 duiker tested positive for Ebola virus. Wild animal outbreaks began before each of the 5 human Ebola outbreaks. Twice we alerted the health authorities to an imminent risk for human outbreaks, weeks before they occurred. PMID:15752448

Rouquet, Pierre; Froment, Jean-Marc; Bermejo, Magdalena; Kilbourn, Annelisa; Karesh, William; Reed, Patricia; Kumulungui, Brice; Yaba, Philippe; Délicat, André; Rollin, Pierre E; Leroy, Eric M

2005-02-01

315

Clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever manifestations and their transfusion profile  

PubMed Central

Background: Dengue is an infectious disease with a recurring incidence, especially in developing countries. Despite recent economic growth, success in disease control has not been achieved, and dengue has evolved from cyclic epidemic outbreaks to a lack of seasonality. The lack of scientific basis for the proper management of cases with hemorrhagic manifestations, especially regarding transfusion procedures, might contribute to the high death rate in potentially avoidable cases. Objective: The aim of the study was to identify the clinical and laboratory manifestations in hemorrhagic dengue fever treated at the emergency services in Rio Branco, AC, Brazil, as well as to describe transfusion characteristics of patients and identify possible prognostic factors. Methods: A retrospective descriptive study was performed to analyze the distribution of relative frequencies of clinical and laboratory variables. The study was carried out in Rio Branco with confirmed dengue fever cases. Secondary data were obtained by Acre Epidemiological Surveillance teams of cases with bleeding or platelet counts under 100.0 × 109/L. The patients' clinical, laboratory and transfusion data were obtained from hospital records. Results: A total of 90,553 dengue cases were reported of which 7,447 had serologic confirmation; 267 cases had hemorrhagic manifestations and 193 patients were located. Nearly half of the patients had anemia and the mean of the lowest platelet count of these patients was 26.4 × 109/L. Platelet concentrate was transfused in 22.3% of cases with a mean of 7.5 IU/patient, fresh frozen plasma in 21.2% with a mean of 5.2 IU/patient and just 2.6% of patients received concentrated red blood cells with a mean of 3.2 IU/patient. Bleeding led to transfusions. Signs of plasma leakage and cardiopulmonary dysfunction were correlated to unfavorable outcomes. Conclusion: The pattern of clinical and laboratory criteria observed in this investigation does not differ from the literature. Transfusions were used as part of the treatment of dengue hemorrhagic fever manifestations. Some of the clinical manifestations may be related to unfavorable outcomes.

Fujimoto, Denys Eiti; Koifman, Sergio

2014-01-01

316

Feline dermatophytosis: Steps for investigation of a suspected shelter outbreak.  

PubMed

Practical relevance: Dermatophytosis (ringworm) is the most important infectious and contagious skin disease of cats in shelters. Its importance relates to the fact that it can affect all cats, but tends to affect those which would otherwise have good chances for adoption. Although many diseases in shelters fit this description, dermatophytosis is of particular significance because of associated public health concerns. Clinical challenges: Disease management in animal shelters is challenging because new animals are frequently entering the population, numerous animals are often housed together, and resources are almost always limited. Global relevance: Outbreaks of dermatophytosis occur worldwide and no animal shelter is completely shielded from possible introduction of the disease into the population. Audience: This article offers a flexible stepwise approach to dealing with a known or suspected outbreak of dermatophytosis in an animal shelter. It is based on the authors' experiences spanning more than a decade of responses and/or consultations. While primarily aimed at veterinarians involved in shelter medicine, the principles largely apply to other group-housing situations, such as catteries and breeding establishments. Aims: The goals in dealing with a potential dermatophytosis outbreak are to ascertain if the 'outbreak' is actually an outbreak, to develop a shelter-specific outbreak management plan and to implement a long-term plan to prevent recurrences. PMID:24794037

Newbury, Sandra; Moriello, Karen A

2014-05-01

317

The reappearance of dengue-3 and a subsequent dengue-4 and dengue-1 epidemic in Puerto Rico in 1998.  

PubMed

In January 1998, dengue-3 (DEN)-3 (group III genotype) was detected in Puerto Rico after an absence of 20 years. Public health officials intensified education efforts to promote community participation in dengue control. Virologic surveillance revealed an unexpected paradox: DEN-4 and DEN-1 produced a large epidemic overlaying the DEN-3 epidemic. In 1998 there were 17,000 reported cases of dengue (4.8/1,000 persons), and among all virus isolations (n = 960), DEN-4 (419, 43.6%), DEN-1 (337, 35.1%), and DEN-2 (143, 14.9%) were detected much more frequently than DEN-3 (61, 6%). Age group-specific attack rates were highest for persons 10-19 years old, followed by infants less than a year of age. Nineteen fatal cases (median = 37 years old, range = 8 months to 90 years) had a positive laboratory diagnosis of dengue. Among DEN-3 cases no fatalities were documented, 50 were hospitalized, and 10 of 48 (21%) fulfilled the criteria for dengue hemorrhagic fever (four had primary infections and six had secondary infections). During 1999, DEN-3 became the predominant serotype isolated (182 of 310 isolations, 59%). The reappearance of DEN-3 and its subsequent circulation from 1999 to 2001 produced no changes in dengue incidence that could have been detected in the absence of virologic surveillance. PMID:12452489

Rigau-Pérez, José G; Ayala-López, Aurimar; García-Rivera, Enid J; Hudson, Sharon M; Vorndam, Vance; Reiter, Paul; Cano, Marta P; Clark, Gary G

2002-10-01

318

[Lessons learned from tuberculosis outbreak cases].  

PubMed

Most TB outbreaks were caused by exposure of many people to tuberculosis bacilli due to delayed detection of initial cases who had long-lasting severe coughs and excretion of massive tuberculosis bacilli. They were also affected by several other factors, such as socio-environmental factors of the initial case; time and place of infection; and host factors of the infected persons such as immune status, infectivity, and/or pathogenicity of the bacilli. In this symposium, we learned the seriousness of infection and disease among immune-suppressed groups, special environmental factors with regard to the spread of infection, disease after treatment of latent tuberculosis infection, diagnostic specification of IGRA, and bacteriological features including genotyping of the bacilli. We reaffirmed that countermeasures for the case are important, but outbreaks can provide excellent opportunities to learn important information about infection, disease progression, etc. 1. Tuberculosis outbreak in a cancer ward: Katsuhiro KUWABARA (Division of Respiratory Diseases, National Hospital Organization Nishi-Niigata Chuo National Hospital) There was an outbreak of tuberculosis in a cancer ward of a highly specialized medical center. Outbreak cases included eight hospitalized patients and two medical staff members over a 1.5-year observation period after initial contact. Three immune-compromised patients including the index patent died of cancer and tuberculosis. Community hospitals and highly specialized medical centers, such as cancer centers, should carefully prepare a proper system to prevent nosocomial transmission of tuberculosis. 2. Sixty-one cases of TB exposures in hospital settings and contact investigations of the hospital staff, with special reference to the application of QFT: Hiroko Yoshikawa NIGORIKAWA (The Division of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo Metropolitan Health and Medical Treatment Corporation, Toshima Hospital; present: Division of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo Teishin Hospital), Toru MORI (Research Institute of Tuberculosis, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association) The index case was a patient who was admitted to a general hospital where she was treated with pulsed corticosteroid therapy and then put on a respirator. Soon after, she developed tuberculosis (TB) and died. Immediately after her death, the healthcare workers who had close contact with the index case were given the QuantiFERON TB Gold (QFT) test, which indicated that all staff except one were negative. However, a QFT test administered eight weeks later had a positive rate of 18.6%. Subsequently, a total of five workers, including a doctor, nurses, and radiology technicians, developed TB. The bacterial isolates from five of them exhibited an RFLP pattern identical to that of the index case. These secondary cases of TB included a case who had contact of less than 5 minutes, a case whose QFT was negative ("doubtful" in the Japanese criterion of the QFT), and a case who was QFT-positive but declined to be treated for latent TB infection (LTBI). No other workers nor hospitalized patients developed TB. The healthcare worker contacts were further examined with the QFT 6, 9 and 12 months after the contact. The QFT results revealed four additional positive reactors and four "doubtful" reactors who were indicated for LTBI treatment. Among them were seven subjects who turned positive six months after the contact. TB prevention in hospital settings and contact investigations were discussed with the hospital staff, with special reference to the application of QFT. 3. Summary and issues of concern relating to a tuberculosis outbreak in a prison: Mitsunobu HOMMA, Takefumi ITOH (Department of Respiratory Medicine, Akita City Hospital) We report a tuberculosis outbreak that occurred in a prison in the spring of 2011, resulting in 11 cases of active disease and 40 cases of infection. The primary cause of the outbreak is thought to be the delay in identifying the index case, where the screening result interpretation might have contributed to the delay. However, w

Kato, Seiya; Kuwabara, Katsuhiro

2014-02-01

319

Connecting Environmental Observations with Cholera Outbreaks in Bangladesh  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research has demonstrated that cholera epidemics in Bangladesh occur seasonally. This bimodal outbreak pattern closely follows times when large monsoon events are most frequent (spring and fall). While these patterns are presented in regional data, this knowledge alone cannot forecast the severity and location of cholera outbreaks until a monsoon event occurs, or an outbreak is reported. Therefore, there can only be reactive responses to cholera outbreaks. A heightened understanding of the link between environmental factors and outbreak occurrence will greatly enhance disease management capabilities. A predictive tool capable of giving an advanced warning of the environmental hazards that lead to location specific outbreaks allows for proactive and preventative responses, minimizing negative effects. A specific goal of this research was to relate latitude-longitude data with existing points associated with V. cholerae human case data collected from four cities in Bangladesh. Remotely sensed products were used to better understand the correlation between human outbreak occurrences, chlorophyll-a estimates, sea surface temperature (SST), and rainfall. Using MODIS, SeaWiFS, and TRMM satellite data, a gridded regional image was developed. Correlation analyses of the data were studied within the context of geographically diverse locations for the four cities of interest. Seasonal relationships were found between the cholera case data and all three of the chosen remotely sensed parameters. The strongest correlation found was between chlorophyll-a concentrations and reported human cases. The primary deliverable of this project was the production of an interactive Google Earth base map for use in a pilot design study that will lead to the development of applications to connect earth science products with water and health studies. The base map, with its inherent value of merging remotely sensed data with in situ observation points, can be used as a basis for constructing better models of disease outbreaks. This effort will build upon current research at University of Maryland, College Park, which focuses on the impacts of climate on both water and health.

Stack, D.; Sandborn, A.; Widmeyer, P. A.; Escobar, V. M.

2011-12-01

320

Disease Outbreaks Caused by Water.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a literature review of the disease outbreaks caused by drinking polluted water, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the waterborn outbreaks included are: (1) cholera; (2) gastroenteritis; (3) giardiasis; and (4) typhoid fever and salmonellosis. A list of 66 references is also presented. (HM)

Craun, Gunther F.

1978-01-01

321

INVESTIGATIONS OF WATERBORNE DISEASE OUTBREAKS  

EPA Science Inventory

From 1971-2000, there were about 751 waterborne disease outbreaks recognized and reported, with over 500,000 associated cases of illness. From 1989-1994, of 90 total outbreaks, 2% were associated with untreated surface water, 30% with untreated ground water, 42% with treatment de...

322

DENGUE-TYPE VIRUSES ISOLATED IN SINGAPORE.  

PubMed

A dengue-like illness with marked haemorrhagic manifestations appeared in Singapore in 1960. Its similarity in many respects to the haemorrhagic fevers of Thailand and the Philippines led to its being described as "Singapore haemorrhagic fever".This paper describes the isolation and identification of dengue-type viruses from patients in Singapore between 1960 and 1962. In addition to the conventional complement-fixation and neutralization tests, a new test, called the "sensitized erythrocyte agglutination test", was employed; this test method is described.Altogether 21 dengue-type viruses were isolated, including dengue types 1, 2 and 4. Chikungunya virus, prominent in the Thailand disease, was not detected.The author suggests that study of the epidemiology of haemorrhagic fevers in South-East Asia would cast further light on the transmission of arboviruses. PMID:14153412

LIM, K A; CHAN, Y C; PHOON, W O; HANAM, E

1964-01-01

323

Results from the First 12 Months of the National Surveillance of Healthcare Associated Outbreaks in Germany, 2011/2012  

PubMed Central

Background In August 2011, the German Protection against Infection Act was amended, mandating the reporting of healthcare associated infection (HAI) outbreak notifications by all healthcare workers in Germany via local public health authorities and federal states to the Robert Koch Institute (RKI). Objective To describe the reported HAI-outbreaks and the surveillance system’s structure and capabilities. Methods Information on each outbreak was collected using standard paper forms and notified to RKI. Notifications were screened daily and regularly analysed. Results Between November 2011 and November 2012, 1,326 paper forms notified 578 HAI-outbreaks, between 7 and 116 outbreaks per month. The main causative agent was norovirus (n?=?414/578; 72%). Among the 108 outbreaks caused by bacteria, the most frequent pathogens were Clostridium difficile (25%) Klebsiella spp. (19%) and Staphylococcus spp. (19%). Multidrug-resistant bacteria were responsible for 54/108 (50%) bacterial outbreaks. Hospitals were affected most frequently (485/578; 84%). Hospital outbreaks due to bacteria were mostly reported from intensive care units (ICUs) (45%), followed by internal medicine wards (16%). Conclusion The mandatory HAI-outbreak surveillance system describes common outbreaks. Pathogens with a particular high potential to cause large or severe outbreaks may be identified, enabling us to further focus research and preventive measures. Increasing the sensitivity and reliability of the data collection further will facilitate identification of outbreaks able to increase in size and severity, and guide specific control measures to interrupt their propagation.

Haller, Sebastian; Eckmanns, Tim; Benzler, Justus; Tolksdorf, Kristin; Claus, Hermann; Gilsdorf, Andreas; Sin, Muna Abu

2014-01-01

324

Probing functional polymorphisms in the dengue vector, Aedes aegypti  

PubMed Central

Background Dengue is the most prevalent arboviral disease world-wide and its primary vector is the mosquito Aedes aegypti. The current lack of commercially-available vaccines makes control of vector populations the only effective strategy to prevent dengue transmission. Aedes aegypti geographic populations exhibit great variability in insecticide resistance and susceptibility to dengue infection. The characterization of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as molecular markers to study quantitatively this variation is needed greatly because this species has a low abundance of microsatellite markers and limited known restriction fragments length polymorphisms (RFLPs) and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) markers. Results We used RNA-seq to characterize SNPs in three Ae. aegypti strains, including the Liverpool (LVP) strain, from which the current genome annotation is derived. We identified 131,764 unique genome locations with at least one alternative nucleotide to what is reported in the reference annotation. These comprised changes in both open-reading frames (ORFs) and untranslated regions (UTRs) of transcripts. An in depth-look at sequence variation in immunity genes revealed that those associated with autophagy, MD2-like receptors and Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins had more sequence variation in their 3’UTRs than mutations associated with non-synonymous changes. This supports the conclusion that these genes had maintained their functional specificity while being adapted to different regulatory domains. In contrast, a number of peroxidases, serpins and Clip-domain serine proteases exhibited conservation of putative UTR regulatory sequences while displaying diversification of the ORFs. Transcriptome evidence also was found for ~2500 novel transcriptional units (NTUs) not annotated in the reference genome. Conclusions The transcriptome-wide assessment of within and inter-strain polymorphisms in Ae. aegypti adds considerably to the number of molecular markers available for genetic studies in this mosquito. Additionally, data supporting NTU discovery emphasizes the need for continuous amendments of the reference genome annotation.

2013-01-01

325

Frequency and clinical manifestations of dengue in urban medellin, Colombia.  

PubMed

A dengue fever surveillance study was conducted at three medical facilities located in the low-income district of San Javier in Medellin, Colombia. During March 2008 to 2009, 781 patients with fever regardless of chief complaint were recruited for acute dengue virus infection testing. Of the 781 tested, 73 (9.3%) were positive for dengue infection. Serotypes DENV-2 (77%) and -3 (23%) were detected by PCR. One patient met the diagnostic criteria for dengue hemorrhagic fever. Only 3 out of 73 (4.1%) febrile subjects testing positive for dengue infection were diagnosed with dengue fever by the treating physician. This study confirms dengue virus as an important cause of acute febrile illness in Medellin, Colombia, but it is difficult to diagnose without dengue diagnostic testing. PMID:24987421

Restrepo, Berta Nelly; Beatty, Mark E; Goez, Yenny; Ramirez, Ruth E; Letson, G William; Diaz, Francisco J; Piedrahita, Leidy Diana; Osorio, Jorge E

2014-01-01

326

Frequency and Clinical Manifestations of Dengue in Urban Medellin, Colombia  

PubMed Central

A dengue fever surveillance study was conducted at three medical facilities located in the low-income district of San Javier in Medellin, Colombia. During March 2008 to 2009, 781 patients with fever regardless of chief complaint were recruited for acute dengue virus infection testing. Of the 781 tested, 73 (9.3%) were positive for dengue infection. Serotypes DENV-2 (77%) and -3 (23%) were detected by PCR. One patient met the diagnostic criteria for dengue hemorrhagic fever. Only 3 out of 73 (4.1%) febrile subjects testing positive for dengue infection were diagnosed with dengue fever by the treating physician. This study confirms dengue virus as an important cause of acute febrile illness in Medellin, Colombia, but it is difficult to diagnose without dengue diagnostic testing.

Restrepo, Berta Nelly; Beatty, Mark E.; Goez, Yenny; Ramirez, Ruth E.; Letson, G. William; Diaz, Francisco J.; Piedrahita, Leidy Diana; Osorio, Jorge E.

2014-01-01

327

Evasion of the human innate immune system by dengue virus  

PubMed Central

Dengue virus is a worldwide health problem, with billions of people at risk annually. Dengue virus causes a spectrum of diseases, namely dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome with the latter two being linked to death. Understanding how dengue is able to evade the immune system and cause enhanced severity of disease is the main topics of interest in the Fernandez-Sesma laboratory at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Using primary human immune cells, our group investigates the contribution of dengue virus-specific proteins to the evasion of innate immunity by this virus and the host factors that the virus interacts with in order to evade immune recognition and to establish infection in humans. Here, we review recent findings from our group as well as published data from other groups regarding immune modulation by dengue virus.

Pagni, Sarah; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

2014-01-01

328

Hypokalemic quadriparesis: An unusual manifestation of dengue fever  

PubMed Central

Dengue is the most important mosquito-borne, arboviral infection found in tropical and sub-tropical climates. Clinical presentation varies from a severe flu-like illness to a potentially lethal dengue hemorrhagic fever. Dengue has been regarded as a nonneurotropic virus. However, there are reports describing neurological involvements in dengue virus infection. The neurological involvement in dengue virus infection includes encephalitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, transverse myelitis, and Guillain-Barre syndrome. The neurological spectrum of dengue patients has been limited because of small number of case reports, paucity of imaging, and neurophysiologic studies. There are only a few isolated case reports and case series documenting acute pure motor quadriparesis in dengue fever. We report acute pure motor reversible quadriparesis due to hypokalemia. Clinicians in the endemic area should be aware of such association of acute pure motor reversible quadriparesis with dengue fever

Gutch, Manish; Agarwal, Avinash; Amar, Amrendra

2012-01-01

329

Outbreaks of gastrointestinal diseases on cruise ships: Lessons from three decades of progress  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dramatic improvements in sanitary engineering and, especially, operational procedures aboard cruise ships began in the mid-1970s\\u000a after several large outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Vessel Sanitation\\u000a Program, working with the cruise industry, conducts ship inspections, provides public access to ship sanitation scores, and\\u000a reports outbreak investigations. The significant increase in median ship sanitation

Dale N. Lawrence

2004-01-01

330

Human and entomological surveillance of West Nile fever, dengue and chikungunya in Veneto Region, Italy, 2010-2012  

PubMed Central

Background Since 2010 Veneto region (North-Eastern Italy) planned a special integrated surveillance of summer fevers to promptly identify cases of West Nile Fever (WNF), dengue (DENV) and chikungunya (CHIKV). The objectives of this study were (i) To increase the detection rate of imported CHIKV and DENV cases in travellers from endemic areas and promptly identify potential autochthonous cases.(ii) To detect autochthonous cases of WNF, besides those of West Nile Neuroinvasive Disease (WNND) that were already included in a national surveillance. Methods Human surveillance: a traveler who had returned within the previous 15 days from endemic countries, with fever >38°C, absence of leucocytosis (leukocyte count <10,000 ?L), and absence of other obvious causes of fever, after ruling out malaria, was considered a possible case of CHIKV or DENV. A possible autochthonous case of WNF was defined as a patient with fever >38°C for <7 days, no recent travel history and absence of other obvious causes of fever. Entomologic surveillance: for West Nile (WNV) it was carried out from May through November placing CDC-CO2 traps in five provinces of Veneto Region, while for DENV and CHIKV it was also performed around residences of viremic cases. Results Human surveillance: between 2010 and 2012, 234 patients with fever after travelling were screened, of which 27 (11,5%) were found infected (24 with DENV and 3 with CHIKV). No autochthonous case of DENV or CHIKV was detected. Autochthonous patients screened for WNF were 408, and 24 (5,9%) were confirmed cases. Entomologic surveillance: the WNV was found in 10, 2 and 11 pools of Culex pipiens from 2010 to 2012 respectively, in sites of Rovigo, Verona, Venezia and Treviso provinces). No infected Aedes albopictus with DENV or CHIKV was found. Conclusions Veneto is the only Italian region reporting WNV human cases every year since 2008. WNV is likely to cause sporadic cases and unforeseeable outbreaks for decades. Including WNF in surveillance provides additional information and possibly an early alert system. Timely detection of DENV and CHIKV should prompt vector control measures to prevent local outbreaks.

2014-01-01

331

Simulations to compare efficacies of tetravalent dengue vaccines and mosquito vector control.  

PubMed

SUMMARY Infection with dengue, the most prevalent mosquito-borne virus, manifests as dengue fever (DF) or the more fatal dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). DHF occurs mainly when an individual who has acquired antibodies to one serotype is inoculated with another serotype. It was reported that mosquito control may have increased the incidence of DF and DHF due to age-dependency in manifesting these illnesses or an immunological mechanism. Tetravalent dengue vaccine is currently being tested in clinical trials. However, seroconversions to all four serotypes were achieved only after three doses. Therefore, vaccines may predispose vaccinees to the risk of developing DHF in future infections. This study employed an individual-based computer simulation, to emulate mosquito control and vaccination, incorporating seroconversion rates reported from actual clinical trials. It was found that mosquito control alone would have increased incidence of DF and DHF in areas of high mosquito density. A vaccination programme with very high coverage, even with a vaccine of suboptimal seroconversion rates, attenuated possible surges in the incidence of DF and DHF which would have been caused by insufficient reduction in mosquito abundance. DHF cases attributable to vaccine-derived enhancement were fewer than DHF cases prevented by a vaccine with considerably high (although not perfect) seroconversion rates. These predictions may justify vaccination programmes, at least in areas of high mosquito abundance. In such areas, mosquito control programmes should be conducted only after the vaccination programme with a high coverage has been initiated. PMID:23925059

Thavara, U; Tawatsin, A; Nagao, Y

2014-06-01

332

A model for the spatial transmission of dengue with daily movement between villages and a city.  

PubMed

Dengue is a re-emergent vector-borne disease affecting large portions of the world's population living in the tropics and subtropics. The virus is transmitted through the bites of female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, and it is widely believed that these bites occur primarily in the daytime. The transmission of dengue is a complicated process, and one of the main sources of this complexity is due to the movement of people, e.g. between home and their places of work. Hence, the mechanics of disease progression may also differ between day and night. A discrete-time multi-patch dengue transmission model which takes into account the mobility of people as well as processes of infection, recovery, recruitment, mortality, and outbound and return movements is considered here. One patch (the city) is connected to all other patches (the villages) in a spoke-like network. We obtain here the basic reproductive ratio (?0) of the transmission model which represents a threshold for an epidemic to occur. Dynamical analysis for vector control, human treatment and vaccination, and different kinds of mobility are performed. It is shown that changes in human movement patterns can, in some situations, affect the ability of the disease to persist in a predictable manner. We conclude with biological implications for the prevention and control of dengue virus transmission. PMID:23475426

Nevai, Andrew L; Soewono, Edy

2014-06-01

333

Dengue human infection model: re-establishing a tool for understanding dengue immunology and advancing vaccine development.  

PubMed

Dengue is an emerging and re-emerging disease of the tropics and sub-tropics. Millions of infections occur annually exacting a significant social, financial, and health care resource toll. Widespread use of a safe and efficacious dengue vaccine in cooperation with strategic vector control is the best hope for reducing the global dengue burden. Despite over 100 y of research exploring dengue immunology, pathogenesis, animal models, and vaccine and drug development there is no licensed vaccine or dengue anti-viral. No correlate of protection or validated animal model of disease has been defined. Experimental human infection with partially attenuated dengue viruses are documented as early as 1902 and have facilitated research efforts resulting in seminal discoveries and observations. It is time to explore re-invigorating the dengue human infection model to support dengue vaccine development. PMID:23466948

Thomas, Stephen J

2013-07-01

334

Predicting Local Dengue Transmission in Guangzhou, China, through the Influence of Imported Cases, Mosquito Density and Climate Variability  

PubMed Central

Introduction Each year there are approximately 390 million dengue infections worldwide. Weather variables have a significant impact on the transmission of Dengue Fever (DF), a mosquito borne viral disease. DF in mainland China is characterized as an imported disease. Hence it is necessary to explore the roles of imported cases, mosquito density and climate variability in dengue transmission in China. The study was to identify the relationship between dengue occurrence and possible risk factors and to develop a predicting model for dengue’s control and prevention purpose. Methodology and Principal Findings Three traditional suburbs and one district with an international airport in Guangzhou city were selected as the study areas. Autocorrelation and cross-correlation analysis were used to perform univariate analysis to identify possible risk factors, with relevant lagged effects, associated with local dengue cases. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to extract principal components and PCA score was used to represent the original variables to reduce multi-collinearity. Combining the univariate analysis and prior knowledge, time-series Poisson regression analysis was conducted to quantify the relationship between weather variables, Breteau Index, imported DF cases and the local dengue transmission in Guangzhou, China. The goodness-of-fit of the constructed model was determined by pseudo-R2, Akaike information criterion (AIC) and residual test. There were a total of 707 notified local DF cases from March 2006 to December 2012, with a seasonal distribution from August to November. There were a total of 65 notified imported DF cases from 20 countries, with forty-six cases (70.8%) imported from Southeast Asia. The model showed that local DF cases were positively associated with mosquito density, imported cases, temperature, precipitation, vapour pressure and minimum relative humidity, whilst being negatively associated with air pressure, with different time lags. Conclusions Imported DF cases and mosquito density play a critical role in local DF transmission, together with weather variables. The establishment of an early warning system, using existing surveillance datasets will help to control and prevent dengue in Guangzhou, China.

Sang, Shaowei; Yin, Wenwu; Bi, Peng; Zhang, Honglong; Wang, Chenggang; Liu, Xiaobo; Chen, Bin; Yang, Weizhong; Liu, Qiyong

2014-01-01

335

Understanding of and possible strategies to avian influenza outbreak.  

PubMed

Swine flu and avian flu outbreaks have occurred in recent years in addition to seasonal flu. As mortality rate records are not available at the early stage of an outbreak, two parameters may be useful to assess the viral virulence : 1. the time required for the first domestic case in a newly involved region, and 2. the doubling time of new infected cases. Viral virulence is one of the most important factors in guiding short term and immediate responses. Although routine surveillance and repeated vaccination are useful efforts, some novel strategies that may be relevant to prevent and control the spread of influenza among human beings and domestic animals are discussed. PMID:24180306

Shen, Junkang; Zhang, Andy; Xu, Huifen; Sirois, Pierre; Zhang, Jia; Li, Kai; Xiao, Li

2014-10-01

336

Describing dengue epidemics: Insights from simple mechanistic models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a set of nested models to be applied to dengue fever epidemiology. We perform a qualitative study in order to show how much complexity we really need to add into epidemiological models to be able to describe the fluctuations observed in empirical dengue hemorrhagic fever incidence data offering a promising perspective on inference of parameter values from dengue case notifications.

Aguiar, Maíra; Stollenwerk, Nico; Kooi, Bob W.

2012-09-01

337

Regular paracetamol in severe dengue: a lethal combination?  

PubMed

An eight-month-old female infant with severe dengue disease, who was repeatedly given therapeutic paracetamol for severe dengue, developed fulminant liver failure with encephalopathy, gastrointestinal haemorrhage and severe coagulopathy. She responded to supportive measures and N-acetylcysteine infusion. This case highlights the potential danger of administering repeated therapeutic doses of paracetamol in childhood severe dengue disease with hepatitis. PMID:23462840

Gan, Chin Seng; Chong, Sze Yee; Lum, Lucy Chai See; Lee, Way Seah

2013-02-01

338

Stochastic dynamics of dengue epidemics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use a stochastic Markovian dynamics approach to describe the spreading of vector-transmitted diseases, such as dengue, and the threshold of the disease. The coexistence space is composed of two structures representing the human and mosquito populations. The human population follows a susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) type dynamics and the mosquito population follows a susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) type dynamics. The human infection is caused by infected mosquitoes and vice versa, so that the SIS and SIR dynamics are interconnected. We develop a truncation scheme to solve the evolution equations from which we get the threshold of the disease and the reproductive ratio. The threshold of the disease is also obtained by performing numerical simulations. We found that for certain values of the infection rates the spreading of the disease is impossible, for any death rate of infected mosquitoes.

de Souza, David R.; Tomé, Tânia; Pinho, Suani T. R.; Barreto, Florisneide R.; de Oliveira, Mário J.

2013-01-01

339

[Dengue vector density survey in Liuchiu, Pintung, Taiwan].  

PubMed

The first outbreak of dengue in Taiwan in 35 years was recorded in the summer of 1981 in Liuchiu, Pintung, a small offshore island of southern Taiwan. An investigation team visited the affected area during the period of 14-17 October 1981 and collected 8,641 mosquito larvae, of which 4,432 were Aedes aegypti and 4,182 were Ae. albopictus. The house index, container index and Breteau index were 44.2, 23.9 and 73.0 for Ae. aegypti and 41.3, 17.0 and 51.9 for Ae. albopictus, respectively. Both species of mosquitoes are peridomestic breeders, with larvae found in water-holding containers in or outside houses. Ae. albopictus is indigenous, but Ae. aegypti may be of recent introduction to the island. As the two species are closely related, the larvae of both species were found co-existent in only 2.3% of positive containers. This supports the hypothesis of the "competitive exclusion principle", i.e., competition is possibly occurring on this island. PMID:2880696

Lin, H M; Chen, C S; Hsu, C C; Chung, C L

1986-08-01

340

[Organizational decision making in health: the case of dengue].  

PubMed

Intelligent organizations (IO) represent a valuable tool to organize and guide dengue fever surveillance, prevention and control interventions. IO entail state of the art technology in managerial science to generate behavioral frameworks of organizational structures and policies. They present a systematic description of problems and construct computerized models to develop systemic thinking; they produce a shared vision and build progressive mental learning and advancement models. Also, IO promote team building and personal control skills. Scientific-technological advances have produced a wealth of information in medicine, with the corresponding growth of organizations and difficulty of responses because of sudden and incessant change. This new environment calls for the application of IO know-how. This article is oriented to prove the usefulness of the IO technology in the ordering and systematization of the reports about the medical sciences facts. Dengue was chosen to exemplify the use of IO technology as it represents an increasing health problem in America, as well as in Mexico; it is so complex that it can evolve to a more serious problem, besides it can be analyzed within a systemic method. PMID:8599151

Ortiz-Quesada, F; Méndez-Galván, J F; Ritchie-Dunham, J; Rosado-Muñoz, F J

1995-01-01

341

Causes of outbreaks associated with drinking water in the United States from 1971 to 2006.  

PubMed

Since 1971, the CDC, EPA, and Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) have maintained the collaborative national Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOSS) to document waterborne disease outbreaks (WBDOs) reported by local, state, and territorial health departments. WBDOs were recently reclassified to better characterize water system deficiencies and risk factors; data were analyzed for trends in outbreak occurrence, etiologies, and deficiencies during 1971 to 2006. A total of 833 WBDOs, 577,991 cases of illness, and 106 deaths were reported during 1971 to 2006. Trends of public health significance include (i) a decrease in the number of reported outbreaks over time and in the annual proportion of outbreaks reported in public water systems, (ii) an increase in the annual proportion of outbreaks reported in individual water systems and in the proportion of outbreaks associated with premise plumbing deficiencies in public water systems, (iii) no change in the annual proportion of outbreaks associated with distribution system deficiencies or the use of untreated and improperly treated groundwater in public water systems, and (iv) the increasing importance of Legionella since its inclusion in WBDOSS in 2001. Data from WBDOSS have helped inform public health and regulatory responses. Additional resources for waterborne disease surveillance and outbreak detection are essential to improve our ability to monitor, detect, and prevent waterborne disease in the United States. PMID:20610821

Craun, Gunther F; Brunkard, Joan M; Yoder, Jonathan S; Roberts, Virginia A; Carpenter, Joe; Wade, Tim; Calderon, Rebecca L; Roberts, Jacquelin M; Beach, Michael J; Roy, Sharon L

2010-07-01

342

Causes of Outbreaks Associated with Drinking Water in the United States from 1971 to 2006  

PubMed Central

Summary: Since 1971, the CDC, EPA, and Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) have maintained the collaborative national Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOSS) to document waterborne disease outbreaks (WBDOs) reported by local, state, and territorial health departments. WBDOs were recently reclassified to better characterize water system deficiencies and risk factors; data were analyzed for trends in outbreak occurrence, etiologies, and deficiencies during 1971 to 2006. A total of 833 WBDOs, 577,991 cases of illness, and 106 deaths were reported during 1971 to 2006. Trends of public health significance include (i) a decrease in the number of reported outbreaks over time and in the annual proportion of outbreaks reported in public water systems, (ii) an increase in the annual proportion of outbreaks reported in individual water systems and in the proportion of outbreaks associated with premise plumbing deficiencies in public water systems, (iii) no change in the annual proportion of outbreaks associated with distribution system deficiencies or the use of untreated and improperly treated groundwater in public water systems, and (iv) the increasing importance of Legionella since its inclusion in WBDOSS in 2001. Data from WBDOSS have helped inform public health and regulatory responses. Additional resources for waterborne disease surveillance and outbreak detection are essential to improve our ability to monitor, detect, and prevent waterborne disease in the United States.

Craun, Gunther F.; Brunkard, Joan M.; Yoder, Jonathan S.; Roberts, Virginia A.; Carpenter, Joe; Wade, Tim; Calderon, Rebecca L.; Roberts, Jacquelin M.; Beach, Michael J.; Roy, Sharon L.

2010-01-01

343

Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Growth in Human Monocytes as a Risk Factor for Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Serum specimens collected during a prospective study of dengue infections among schoolchildren in Bangkok were tested for their ability to enhance dengue 2(DEN-2) virus growth in human monocytes in vitro. Two groups of dengue-immune sera were compared: 32...

A. Nisalak D. S. Burke L. Wahl S. C. Kliks W. E. Brandt

1989-01-01

344

Pediatric Measles Vaccine Expressing a Dengue Antigen Induces Durable Serotype-specific Neutralizing Antibodies to Dengue Virus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dengue disease is an increasing global health problem that threatens one-third of the world's population. Despite decades of efforts, no licensed vaccine against dengue is available. With the aim to develop an affordable vaccine that could be used in young populations living in tropical areas, we evaluated a new strategy based on the expression of a minimal dengue antigen by

Samantha Brandler; Marianne Lucas-Hourani; Arnaud Moris; Marie-Pascale Frenkiel; Chantal Combredet; Michèle Février; Hugues Bedouelle; Olivier Schwartz; Philippe Desprès; Frédéric Tangy

2007-01-01

345

An information value based analysis of physical and climatic factors affecting dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever incidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Vector-borne diseases are the most dreaded worldwide health problems. Although many campaigns against it have been conducted, Dengue Fever (DF) and Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF) are still the major health problems of Thailand. The reported number of dengue incidences in 1998 for the Thailand was 129,954, of which Sukhothai province alone reported alarming number of 682. It was the

Kanchana Nakhapakorn; Nitin Kumar Tripathi

2005-01-01

346

Evaluation of dengue nonstructural protein 1 antigen strip for the rapid diagnosis of patients with dengue infection.  

PubMed

Two hundred twenty samples obtained from 104 patients with dengue infection (n = 89) and other febrile illnesses (n = 15) were assayed for dengue nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) antigen by enzyme immunoassay and by an immunochromatography (lateral flow) test strip. The sensitivity and the specificity of dengue NS1 antigen strip were 98.9% and 90.6%, respectively. PMID:19232857

Chaiyaratana, Wathanee; Chuansumrit, Ampaiwan; Pongthanapisith, Viroj; Tangnararatchakit, Kanchana; Lertwongrath, Sarapee; Yoksan, Sutee

2009-05-01

347

Profile of Hepatic Involvement by Dengue Virus in Dengue Infected Children  

PubMed Central

Background: The spectrum of liver dysfunction in children with dengue infection is wide and has been associated with disease severity. Aims: This study was undertaken to estimate the range of hepatic involvement in dengue infection in children. Materials and Methods: This study assessed the biochemical and clinical profile of hepatic involvement by dengue virus in 120 children with serologically positive dengue fever (DF), aged 2 months to 14 years. Results: All cases were grouped into DF without warning signs (Group 1), DF with warning signs (Group 2) and severe dengue (Group 3) according to revised World Health Organization 2009 criteria. The spectrum of hepatic manifestations included hepatomegaly (80.8%), hepatic tenderness (46.3%), jaundice (60%), raised aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT) and prolonged prothrombin time (41.7%) and reduced serum albumin (56%). Conclusions: Hepatic dysfunction was observed more in Groups 2 and 3. There was 84.4% and 93.75% ALT and AST elevation respectively in Group 2 and 94.5% and 95.9% ALT and AST elevation respectively in Group 3 and fulminant hepatic failure was observed in Group 3. Therefore in a child with fever, jaundice, hepatomegaly and altered liver function tests, the diagnosis of dengue infection should be strongly considered in areas where dengue infection is endemic.

Roy, Amrita; Sarkar, Debalina; Chakraborty, Sohini; Chaudhuri, Jasodhara; Ghosh, Pramit; Chakraborty, Swapna

2013-01-01

348

Dengue virus tetra-epitope peptide expressed in lettuce chloroplasts for potential use in dengue diagnosis.  

PubMed

Dengue virus causes about 100 million cases of dengue disease per year in the world. Laboratory diagnosis is done mainly by serological techniques, which in many cases use crude virus extracts that may cause cross-reactions to other flaviviruses. These undesirable cross-reactions can be reduced or eliminated by using recombinant proteins based on restricted epitopes. Aiming to decrease flaviviral cross-reactions and non-specific interactions in dengue serological assays, a plant expression system was chosen for recombinant antigen production as a reliable and inexpensive dengue diagnostic tool. In the present report, the lettuce plastid transformation system was applied to achieve efficient and stable tetra-epitope peptide antigen production, and its reactivity was evaluated. For this purpose, one putative epitope at positions 34 to 57 of E protein within the junction site of domains I and II of dengue virus (DENV) 1 to 4 serotypes linked by glycine linkers was expressed in lettuce chloroplasts. The potential immunoreactivity for the four DENV serotypes was evaluated using sera from patients of positive and negative dengue cases. Results indicated an overall sensitivity of 71.7% and specificity of 100%. No cross-reactions with the sera of yellow fever-positive or healthy individuals vaccinated against yellow fever were observed. This novel approach may provide an alternative system for the large-scale production of dengue recombinant antigens useful for serodiagnosis. PMID:23615743

Maldaner, Franciele Roberta; Aragão, Francisco José Lima; dos Santos, Flávia Barreto; Franco, Octavio Luiz; da Rocha Queiroz Lima, Monique; de Oliveira Resende, Renato; Vasques, Raquel Medeiros; Nagata, Tatsuya

2013-07-01

349

Measles (Rubeola) Cases and Outbreaks  

MedlinePLUS

... an increase in cases some years: 2014: The Philippines is experiencing a large, ongoing measles outbreak. Many ... been associated with cases brought in from the Philippines. For more information see the Measles in the ...

350

Severe Thrombotic Events Associated with Dengue Fever, Brazil  

PubMed Central

Dengue fever has been a major problem in hospital settings in Brazil for the past 15 years. The main concern has been the severe forms, i.e., dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Hemorrhagic events of different degrees have also been a major concern. We report five cases of large vein thrombotic events associated with the acute phase of dengue fever, including a previously non-reported case of mesenteric vein thrombosis. Complications such as these could have been overlooked in the diagnosis of dengue fever, given that the major concern is the hemorrhagic event.

da Costa, Paulo Sergio Goncalves; Ribeiro, Geyza Machado; Junior, Cleber Soares; da Costa Campos, Lenilton

2012-01-01

351

Waterborne gastroenteritis outbreak in Albania  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three different studies are reported concerning the environmental pollution caused by viruses in Albania. The first study describes an outbreak of gastroenteritis in the capital city, involving 2,722 children attending the Paediatric Unit of Tirana Hospital. The age group with the highest morbidity was 0-5 years, with 89.5%; no fatalities were recorded during the outbreak. Rotavirus was detected in 26\\/28

M. Divizia; R. Gabrieli; D. Donia; A. Macaluso; A. Bosch; S. Guix; G. Sánchez; C. Villena; R. M. Pintó; L. Palombi; E. Buonuomo; F. Cenko; L. Leno; D. Bebeci; S. Bino

352

[Anaplasmosis in a Swiss dairy farm: an epidemiological outbreak investigation].  

PubMed

In summer of 2002, a case of severe clinical bovine anaplasmosis caused great losses in a dairy farm of an animal trader in Grisons. This article outlines the general approach of an outbreak investigation considering the case of anaplasmosis as an example. The goals of such investigations are to identify and eliminate the source of a disease outbreak in order to avoid additional cases. In addition, recommendations should be developed for preventing or limiting the magnitude of similar outbreaks in the future. In the outbreak presented, the causative agents were probably brought into the dairy farm by animal trade. Due to the large herd size, a missing quarantine for new animals and the coinfection with several pathogens, this case led to a high number of fatalities. The investigations of this outbreak demonstrated the importance of an universal and consistent identification of individual animals for the reconstruction of their movements. The veterinary practitioner should be reminded to act cautiously when facing strange clinical cases and to also consider "exotic diseases" as a possible cause. PMID:15526601

Brülisauer, F; Thoma, R; Cagienard, A; Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Lutz, H; Meli, M L; Regula, G; Jörger, K; Perl, R; Dreher, U M; Braun, U; Stärk, K D C

2004-10-01

353

Dengue Vectors and their Spatial Distribution  

PubMed Central

The distribution of dengue vectors, Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, is affected by climatic factors. In addition, since their life cycles are well adapted to the human environment, environmental changes resulting from human activity such as urbanization exert a great impact on vector distribution. The different responses of Ae. aegypti and Ae albopictus to various environments result in a difference in spatial distribution along north-south and urban-rural gradients, and between the indoors and outdoors. In the north-south gradient, climate associated with survival is an important factor in spatial distribution. In the urban-rural gradient, different distribution reflects a difference in adult niches and is modified by geographic and human factors. The direct response of the two species to the environment around houses is related to different spatial distribution indoors and outdoors. Dengue viruses circulate mainly between human and vector mosquitoes, and the vector presence is a limiting factor of transmission. Therefore, spatial distribution of dengue vectors is a significant concern in the epidemiology of the disease. Current technologies such as GIS, satellite imagery and statistical models allow researchers to predict the spatial distribution of vectors in the changing environment. Although it is difficult to confirm the actual effect of environmental and climate changes on vector abundance and vector-borne diseases, environmental changes caused by humans and human behavioral changes due to climate change can be expected to exert an impact on dengue vectors. Longitudinal monitoring of dengue vectors and viruses is therefore necessary.

Higa, Yukiko

2011-01-01

354

Dengue: profile of hematological and biochemical dynamics  

PubMed Central

Aim The objective of this study was to correlate laboratory tests during the evolution of dengue fever, comparing frequencies between the different clinical forms in order to use test results to predict the severity of the disease. Methods This is an observational, descriptive and retrospective study of 154 patients with clinical and serological diagnoses of dengue fever who, in the period from January to May 2008, were admitted in a tertiary state hospital in the city of Fortaleza that is a referral center for infectious diseases. The patients were allocated to two groups according to age: under 15 years old (n = 66) and 15 years or older (n = 88). The tests analyzed were blood count, platelet count, and serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) concentrations. Results Thrombocytopenia and elevated transaminases were observed in patients with classic dengue fever. The main laboratory abnormalities found in dengue hemorrhagic fever were thrombocytopenia, hemoconcentration and elevated transaminases, similar to severe dengue with the exception of hemoconcentration. Most laboratory abnormalities started on the 3rd day but were more evident on the 5th day with restoration of values by the 11th day; this was more prominent in under 15-year-olds and with the more severe clinical forms. Conclusion These results are relevant in assessing the disease because they can be used as markers for more severe forms and can help by enabling the adaptation of the therapeutic conduct to the needs of individual patients.

Azin, Francisca Raimunda F. Guerreiro; Goncalves, Romelia Pinheiro; Pitombeira, Maria Helena da Silva; Lima, Danielle Malta; Branco, Ivo Castelo

2012-01-01

355

First Iranian Imported Case of Dengue  

PubMed Central

Dengue fever, a mosquito-borne flavivirus infection, is endemic in Southeast Asia. Currently, incidences have been increasing among adults. There have been no published reports of dengue fever from Iran. Widespread connection between different countries may predispose them for acquisition of infection. The patient was a 58-year-old Iranian woman with acute unexplained high-grade fever for 4 days, associated with skin rash, after returning from Southeast Asia. CBC showed WBC = 1600/mm3 and platelet count 99,000/mm3. The patient also had hematuria. ELISA immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies to dengue and serum RT-PCR for dengue virus was positive. The patient managed with conservative treatment and due to good general condition and improvement specific antiviral treatment was not started. She became afebrile at the 3rd day of hospitalization and discharged with good general condition on fourth day. She was afebrile after two weeks follow-up. Dengue fever has been increasing among adults. It should be suspected, when a patient presents with acute febrile illness and skin rashes returning from endemic region. Conservative treatment may be conducted in uncomplicated cases.

Mardani, Masoud; Abbasi, Farhad; Aghahasani, Morteza; Ghavam, Babak

2013-01-01

356

Fluid management for dengue in children  

PubMed Central

Dengue is a serious public health problem worldwide. Dengue shock syndrome (DSS), the severe form of dengue fever, can cause death within 12–24 hours if appropriate treatment is not promptly administered. For patients with DSS and the 30% of non-shocked dengue patients who require intravenous fluid therapy, a range of solutions is available for plasma volume support. Crystalloid solutions, such as normal 0·9% saline or Ringer’s lactate, are the ones most commonly used. In severe cases, colloid solutions may be administered for their greater osmotic effect, although they carry a greater risk of adverse events. This paper summarises the key clinical data, comparing fluid regimens in children with severe dengue, and concludes that the majority of patients with DSS can be treated successfully with isotonic crystalloid solutions. If a colloid is thought necessary, a medium-molecular-weight preparation that combines good initial plasma volume support with good intravascular persistence and an acceptable side-effect profile is optimal. Further research should aim to determine whether there are benefits to early treatment with colloids, and which colloid solution is most effective for resuscitation of DSS patients.

Hung, Nguyen Thanh

2012-01-01

357

[Food borne infectious outbreaks, Austria 2005].  

PubMed

In Austria, a total of 606 food borne outbreaks, affecting 1,910 people altogether (including 368 hospitalized patients and 1 fatal outcome) were documented in 2005. Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp. accounted for 99% of all reported outbreaks. Fortysix (8%) of the 606 outbreaks were acquired abroad. Bacteria caused all but one of the 560 domestically acquired food borne outbreaks: 427 (76%) were due to Salmonella spp., 128 (23%) due to Campylobacter spp. and two outbreaks each due to enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli and Yersinia enterocolitica. Norovirus caused an outbreak affecting 22 persons. The respective hospitalization rate for domestically acquired Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp. infections was 20% and 16%. Of those outbreaks where information as to the source was provided, eggs were implicated in 57%, meat products (especially poultry) in 30% and milk or dairy products (especially raw milk) in 4%. The ratio between family outbreaks and general outbreaks was 89% to 11%. For general outbreaks the following locations of exposure were given: commercial food suppliers (incl. restaurants, cafeterias) 34 x, family celebrations 14 x, nursery schools 4 x, festivities (e.g. fairs) 3 x, nursing homes twice and once a mixed outbreak involving commercial food suppliers plus homes (Austria-wide S. Enteritidis PT19 outbreak). In our opinion, the relatively high number of family outbreaks merely reflects the still insufficient quality of epidemiological outbreak investigation in Austria, i.e. lack of consolidating individual clusters into larger food borne outbreaks which exceed district or provincial borders. PMID:17427017

Much, Peter; Pichler, Juliane; Allerberger, Franz

2007-01-01

358

RNA Interference Mediated Inhibition of Dengue Virus Multiplication and Entry in HepG2 Cells  

PubMed Central

Background Dengue virus-host cell interaction initiates when the virus binds to the attachment receptors followed by endocytic internalization of the virus particle. Successful entry into the cell is necessary for infection initiation. Currently, there is no protective vaccine or antiviral treatment for dengue infection. Targeting the viral entry pathway has become an attractive therapeutic strategy to block infection. This study aimed to investigate the effect of silencing the GRP78 and clathrin-mediated endocytosis on dengue virus entry and multiplication into HepG2 cells. Methodology/Principal Findings HepG2 cells were transfected using specific siRNAs to silence the cellular surface receptor (GRP78) and clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway. Gene expression analysis showed a marked down-regulation of the targeted genes (87.2%, 90.3%, and 87.8% for GRP78, CLTC, and DNM2 respectively) in transfected HepG2 cells when measured by RT-qPCR. Intracellular and extracellular viral RNA loads were quantified by RT-qPCR to investigate the effect of silencing the attachment receptor and clathrin-mediated endocytosis on dengue virus entry. Silenced cells showed a significant reduction of intracellular (92.4%) and extracellular viral RNA load (71.4%) compared to non-silenced cells. Flow cytometry analysis showed a marked reduction of infected cells (89.7%) in silenced HepG2 cells compared to non-silenced cells. Furthermore, the ability to generate infectious virions using the plaque assay was reduced 1.07 log in silenced HepG2 cells. Conclusions/Significance Silencing the attachment receptor and clathrin-mediated endocytosis using siRNA could inhibit dengue virus entry and multiplication into HepG2 cells. This leads to reduction of infected cells as well as the viral load, which might function as a unique and promising therapeutic agent for attenuating dengue infection and prevent the development of dengue fever to the severe life-threatening DHF or DSS. Furthermore, a decrease of viremia in humans can result in the reduction of infected vectors and thus, halt of the transmission cycle.

Alhoot, Mohammed Abdelfatah; Wang, Seok Mui; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

2012-01-01

359

Fulminant dengue myocarditis masquerading as acute myocardial infarction.  

PubMed

Dengue fever is manifested by a sudden onset of fever (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fever), with severe headache, myalgias (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myalgia), arthralgias (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthralgia) and characteristic bright red petechia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petechia). The exact incidence and pathophysiological mechanism of dengue myocarditis remain obscure, but most of these cases are self-limiting. Fatal dengue myocarditis is a very rare complication of dengue fever. The non-specific symptoms and signs of dengue myocarditis make early diagnosis difficult. A 25-year-old Indian male, suffered from fulminant dengue myocarditis, presented to a our hospital with symptoms and electrocardiographic features mimicking acute myocardial infarction. Unfortunately, the patient succumbed before the dengue serology results were available. PMID:18701172

Lee, Chi-Hang; Teo, Clarence; Low, Adrian F

2009-08-21

360

Full Serotype- and Group-Specific NS1 Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Rapid Differential Diagnosis of Dengue Virus Infection ? †  

PubMed Central

Dengue virus (DENV), a member of the Flavivirus family, has four distinct serotypes (DENV serotype 1 [DENV1], DENV2, DENV3, and DENV4) that require differentiation for the effective prevention of morbid disease. Early and rapid differentiation between flaviviruses remains challenging. Full assays combining four individual, serotype-specific and one group-specific nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) based on monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against DENV NS1 were developed and validated. The sensitivities and specificities of the full NS1 ELISAs were evaluated with viral cultures and dengue acute-phase sera. Four serotype-specific NS1 ELISAs displayed high specificities for the detection and differentiation of appropriate serotypes. The group-specific NS1 ELISA was broadly reactive with the four dengue virus serotypes. None of the NS1 ELISAs displayed cross-reactivity with the other flaviviruses or samples from febrile patients with non-dengue virus infections. The full serotype- and group-specific MAb-based NS1 capture ELISAs may provide tools for the early detection and typing of dengue infection, which is preferable to reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) for the rapid differential diagnosis of dengue virus infection in the field.

Ding, Xixia; Hu, Dongmei; Chen, Yue; Di, Biao; Jin, Jing; Pan, Yuxian; Qiu, Liwen; Wang, Yadi; Wen, Kun; Wang, Ming; Che, Xiaoyan

2011-01-01

361

Preliminary evaluation on the efficiency of the kit Platelia Dengue NS1 Ag-ELISA to detect dengue virus in dried Aedes aegypti: a potential tool to improve dengue surveillance  

PubMed Central

Background Surveillance is a critical component of any dengue prevention and control programme. Herein, we investigate the efficiency of the commercial kit Platelia Dengue NS1 Ag-ELISA to detect dengue virus (DENV) antigens in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes infected under laboratory conditions. Methods Under insectary conditions, four to five day-old mosquitoes were orally challenged with DENV-2 titer of 3.6 x 105 PFU equivalent/ml, incubated for 14 days and then killed. At ten time-points following mosquito death (0, 6, 12, 24, 72, 96, 120, 144 and 168 h), i.e., during a one-week period, dried mosquitoes were comparatively tested for the detection of the NS1 antigen with other methods of detection, such as qRT-PCR and virus isolation in C6/36 cells. Results We first observed that the NS1 antigen was more effective in detecting DENV-2 in Ae. aegypti between 12 and 72 h after mosquito death when compared with qRT-PCR. A second round involved comparing the sensitivity of detection of the NS1 antigen and virus isolation in C6/36 cells. The NS1 antigen was also more effective than virus isolation, detecting DENV-2 at all time-points, i.e., up to 168 h after mosquito death. Meanwhile, virus isolation was successful up to 96 h after Ae. aegypti death, but the number of positive samples per time period presented a tendency to decline progressively over time. From the 43 samples positive by the virus isolation technique, 38 (88.4%) were also positive by the NS1 test. Conclusion Taken together, these results are the first to indicate that the NS1 antigen might be an interesting complementary tool to improve dengue surveillance through DENV detection in dried Ae. aegypti females.

2014-01-01

362

Dengue Infection and Miscarriage: A Prospective Case Control Study  

PubMed Central

Background Dengue is the most prevalent mosquito borne infection worldwide. Vertical transmissions after maternal dengue infection to the fetus and pregnancy losses in relation to dengue illness have been reported. The relationship of dengue to miscarriage is not known. Method We aimed to establish the relationship of recent dengue infection and miscarriage. Women who presented with miscarriage (up to 22 weeks gestation) to our hospital were approached to participate in the study. For each case of miscarriage, we recruited 3 controls with viable pregnancies at a similar gestation. A brief questionnaire on recent febrile illness and prior dengue infection was answered. Blood was drawn from participants, processed and the frozen serum was stored. Stored sera were thawed and then tested in batches with dengue specific IgM capture ELISA, dengue non-structural protein 1 (NS1) antigen and dengue specific IgG ELISA tests. Controls remained in the analysis if their pregnancies continued beyond 22 weeks gestation. Tests were run on 116 case and 341 control sera. One case (a misdiagnosed viable early pregnancy) plus 45 controls (39 lost to follow up and six subsequent late miscarriages) were excluded from analysis. Findings Dengue specific IgM or dengue NS1 antigen (indicating recent dengue infection) was positive in 6/115 (5·2%) cases and 5/296 (1·7%) controls RR 3·1 (95% CI 1·0–10) P?=?0·047. Maternal age, gestational age, parity and ethnicity were dissimilar between cases and controls. After adjustments for these factors, recent dengue infection remained significantly more frequently detected in cases than controls (AOR 4·2 95% CI 1·2–14 P?=?0·023). Interpretation Recent dengue infections were more frequently detected in women presenting with miscarriage than in controls whose pregnancies were viable. After adjustments for confounders, the positive association remained.

Tan, Peng Chiong; Soe, May Zaw; Si Lay, Khaing; Wang, Seok Mui; Sekaran, Shamala Devi; Omar, Siti Zawiah

2012-01-01

363

Raw grated beetroot linked to several outbreaks of sudden-onset gastrointestinal illness, Finland 2010.  

PubMed

In 2010, 7/44 (16%) reported foodborne outbreaks in Finland were linked with raw beetroot consumption. We reviewed data from the national outbreak registry in order to hypothesize the aetiology of illness and to prevent further outbreaks. In the seven outbreaks, 124 cases among 623 respondents were identified. Consumption of raw beetroot was strongly associated with gastrointestinal illness (relative risk 8?99, 95% confidence interval 6?06-13?35). The illness was characterized by sudden onset of gastrointestinal symptoms; the median incubation time was 40 min and duration of illness 5 h. No common foodborne pathogens or toxins were found in either clinical or beetroot samples, but all tested beetroot samples were of poor quality according to total bacterial counts. Beta-haemolytic Pseudomonas fluorescens was detected in several beetroot samples but its effect on human health is unknown. No outbreaks were reported after the Finnish Food Safety Authority Evira advised against serving raw beetroot in institutional canteens. PMID:23068603

Jacks, A; Toikkanen, S; Pihlajasaari, A; Johansson, T; Hakkinen, M; Hemminki, K; Hokkanen, P; Käpyaho, A; Kärnä, A; Valkola, K; Niskanen, T; Takkinen, J; Kuusi, M; Rimhanen-Finne, R

2013-08-01

364

[Epidemiological dynamics of Dengue on Easter Island].  

PubMed

Dengue is considered an emerging disease with an increasing prevalence especially in South America. In 2002, an epidemic of classic Dengue (DENV-1) occurred unexpectedly on Easter Island, where it had never been detected before. It reappeared in 2006-2007 and 2008, 2009 and 2011. The aim of this study was to estimate the most relevant parameters of the epidemiological dynamics of transmission of Dengue on Easter Island and to model the dynamics since 2002, comparing the predictions with the actual situation observed. Of the total cases, 52.27% were females and 47.73% men. The average age of infection was 31.38 ± 18.37 years, similar in men and women. We estimated the reproductive number R0 = 3.005 with an IC0,95 = [1.92, 4.61]. The inter-epidemic period reached an estimated T = 5.20 to 6.8 years. The case simulation showed recurrent epidemics with decreasing magnitude (damped oscillations), which is a known phenomenon in models of dengue and malaria. There was good qualitative fit to the epidemiological dynamics from 2002 onwards. It accurately predicted the rise in cases between 2006 and 2011. The predicted number of cases during the 2002 epidemic is greater than the confirmed cases and the predicted epidemic was faster than notified cases. Interepidemic period in the simulation was 6.72 years between 2002 and 2008 and 4.68 years between 2008 and 2013. From the theoretical perspective, the first epidemic had affected 94% of the population (approximately 3500 cases), but 639 were reported suggesting underreporting and a lot of sub-clinical cases occurred. Future epidemic of decreasing size are expected, although the main danger are epidemics of hemorrhagic dengue fever resulting from the introduction of different dengue virus serotypes. PMID:23096537

Canals, Mauricio; González, Christian; Canals, Andrea; Figueroa, Daniela

2012-08-01

365

Dengue Virus Entry as Target for Antiviral Therapy  

PubMed Central

Dengue virus (DENV) infections are expanding worldwide and, because of the lack of a vaccine, the search for antiviral products is imperative. Four serotypes of DENV are described and they all cause a similar disease outcome. It would be interesting to develop an antiviral product that can interact with all four serotypes, prevent host cell infection and subsequent immune activation. DENV entry is thus an interesting target for antiviral therapy. DENV enters the host cell through receptor-mediated endocytosis. Several cellular receptors have been proposed, and DC-SIGN, present on dendritic cells, is considered as the most important DENV receptor until now. Because DENV entry is a target for antiviral therapy, various classes of compounds have been investigated to inhibit this process. In this paper, an overview is given of all the putative DENV receptors, and the most promising DENV entry inhibitors are discussed.

Alen, Marijke M. F.; Schols, Dominique

2012-01-01

366

Using climate information to understand the spatio-temporal heterogeneity of a chikungunya outbreak in the presence of widespread asymptomatic infection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The emergence and persistence of human pathogens in the environment represents a constant threat to society, with global implications for human health, economies and ecosystems. Of particular concern are vector-borne diseases, such as dengue, malaria and chikungunya, which are increasing across their traditional ranges and continuing to infiltrate new regions. This unprecedented situation has been partly attributed to the increase in global temperatures in recent decades which has allowed non-native mosquito species to invade and successfully colonise previously inhospitable environments The spatio-temporal evolution of these diseases is determined by the interaction of the host and vector, which is strongly dependent on social structures and mobility patterns. In turn, vector populations are thought to be driven by external environmental variables, such as precipitation and temperature. Furthermore, the ability of asymptomatic individuals to successfully transmit the infection and evade control measures can undermine public health interventions. We employed a stochastic model, which explicitly included asymptomatic and undocumented laboratory confirmed cases, and applied it to a documented outbreak in Cambodia in 2012 (Trapeang Roka village, Kampong Speu Province). The resulting estimate of the reproduction number was considerably higher than values obtained for previous outbreaks and highlights the importance of asymptomatic transmission. Subsequently, we develop an agent-based model (ABM), in which each individual is explicitly represented and vector populations are linked to precipitation estimates in a tropical setting. The model is implemented on both scale-free and regular networks. The spatio-temporal transmission of chikungunya is analysed and the presence of asymptomatic silent spreaders within the population is investigated in the context of implementing travel restrictions during an outbreak. Preventing the movement of symptomatic individuals alone is found to be an insufficient mechanism to halt the spread of the disease, which can be readily carried to neighbouring nodes via sub-clinical individuals. Furthermore, the impact of topology structure versus precipitation levels is assessed and precipitation is found to be the dominant factor driving spatio-temporal transmission. Our results highlight the urgent need to establish adequate monitoring and mosquito control programs in vulnerable countries. These models can help to inform public health officials on both the impact and potential spatial expansion of vector-borne diseases through both urban and rural regions under the influence of dynamic climatic conditions. Given the climate sensitivity of vector-borne diseases, such as chikungunya, it is important to link the monitoring of meteorological conditions to public health surveillance and control.

Dommar, C. J.; Lowe, R.; Robinson, M.; Rodó, X.

2013-12-01

367

Climate-driven mathematical models to understand the spatio-temporal heterogeneity of a chikungunya outbreak in the presence of widespread asymptomatic infection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The emergence and persistence of human pathogens in the environment represents a constant threat to society, with global implications for human health, economies and ecosystems. Of particular concern are vector-borne diseases, such as dengue, malaria and chikungunya, which are increasing across their traditional ranges and continuing to infiltrate new regions. This unprecedented situation has been partly attributed to the increase in global temperatures in recent decades which has allowed non-native mosquito species to invade and successfully colonise previously inhospitable environments. The spatio-temporal evolution of these diseases is determined by the interaction of the host and vector, which is strongly dependent on social structures and mobility patterns. In turn, vector populations are thought to be driven by external environmental variables, such as precipitation and temperature. Furthermore, the ability of asymptomatic individuals to successfully transmit the infection and evade control measures can undermine public health interventions. We employed a stochastic model, which explicitly included asymptomatic and undocumented laboratory confirmed cases, and applied it to a documented outbreak in Cambodia in 2012 (Trapeang Roka village, Kampong Speu Province). The resulting estimate of the reproduction number was considerably higher than values obtained for previous outbreaks and highlights the importance of asymptomatic transmission. Subsequently, we develop an agent-based model (ABM), in which each individual is explicitly represented and vector populations are linked to precipitation estimates in a tropical setting. The model is implemented on both scale-free and regular networks. The spatio-temporal transmission of chikungunya is analysed and the presence of asymptomatic silent spreaders within the population is investigated in the context of implementing travel restrictions during an outbreak. Preventing the movement of symptomatic individuals alone is found to be an insufficient mechanism to halt the spread of the disease, which can be readily carried to neighbouring nodes via sub-clinical individuals. Furthermore, the impact of topology structure versus precipitation levels is assessed and precipitation is found to be the dominant factor driving spatio-temporal transmission. Our results highlight the urgent need to establish adequate monitoring and mosquito control programs in vulnerable countries. These models can help to inform public health officials on both the impact and potential spatial expansion of vector-borne diseases through both urban and rural regions under the influence of dynamic climatic conditions. Given the climate sensitivity of vector-borne diseases, such as chikungunya, it is important to link the monitoring of meteorological conditions to public health surveillance and control.

Dommar, Carlos J.; Robinson, Marguerite; Lowe, Rachel; Conan, Anne; Buchy, Philippe; Tarantola, Arnaud; Rodó, Xavier

2014-05-01

368

The Returning Traveller: Dengue Fever Report.  

PubMed

This report describes a 21-year-old male patient who presented to a UK hospital with mild symptoms of fever, malaise and arthralgia. He had just returned from Hoga Islands (Indonesia) where he had spent six weeks. While examination was unremarkable, his blood showed a significant rise in liver function tests and a steady drop in white cells as well as platelets. Dengue serology was later found to be positive for anti-Dengue IgG as well as IgM. With supportive treatment, this young gentleman recovered quickly and was discharged with a plan for follow-up in the clinic. PMID:21060696

Doolub, Gemina

2010-01-01

369

Current Status of Dengue\\/Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever in WHO South-East Asia Region  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dengue fever\\/dengue haemorrhagic fever (DF\\/DHF) is the most important emerging viral disease affecting nearly half of the world's population. It is estimated that there are between 50 to 100 million cases of DF and about 500 000 cases of DHF which require hospitalization every year. In the WHO South-East Asia Region, over the past 15 years, DF\\/DHF has become a

Chusak Prasittisuk; A. G. Andjaparidze; Vijay Kumar

370

El Niño Southern Oscillation and vegetation dynamics as predictors of dengue fever cases in Costa Rica  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) are growing health concerns throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. This study focuses on Costa Rica, which experienced over 100 000 cases of DF/DHF from 2003 to 2007. We utilized data on sea-surface temperature anomalies related to the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and two vegetation indices derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) from the Terra satellite to model the influence of climate and vegetation dynamics on DF/DHF cases in Costa Rica. Cross-correlations were calculated to evaluate both positive and negative lag effects on the relationships between independent variables and DF/DHF cases. The model, which utilizes a sinusoid and non-linear least squares to fit case data, was able to explain 83% of the variance in weekly DF/DHF cases when independent variables were shifted backwards in time. When the independent variables were shifted forward in time, consistently with a forecasting approach, the model explained 64% of the variance. Importantly, when five ENSO and two vegetation indices were included, the model reproduced a major DF/DHF epidemic of 2005. The unexplained variance in the model may be due to herd immunity and vector control measures, although information regarding these aspects of the disease system are generally lacking. Our analysis suggests that the model may be used to predict DF/DHF outbreaks as early as 40 weeks in advance and may also provide valuable information on the magnitude of future epidemics. In its current form it may be used to inform national vector control programs and policies regarding control measures; it is the first climate-based dengue model developed for this country and is potentially scalable to the broader region of Latin America and the Caribbean where dramatic increases in DF/DHF incidence and spread have been observed.

Fuller, D. O.; Troyo, A.; Beier, J. C.

2009-01-01

371

Serological characterization of dengue virus infections observed among dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome cases in upper Myanmar.  

PubMed

In Myanmar, dengue fever (DF)/dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among children. From Pyinmana Hospital in 2004 and Mandalay Children Hospital in 2006, 160 patients diagnosed clinically to have DHF/dengue shock syndrome (DSS) were examined for immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG levels. A focus reduction neutralization test was also used to determine primary or secondary dengue virus (DENV) infection. By using IgM-capture ELISA, 139 cases were confirmed as DENV infections. Of these IgM-positives, 94 samples were collected 7-24 days from the onset of illness, to which 13 (14%) and 81 (86%) were determined to be primary and secondary DENV infections, respectively. The 13 primary DENV infection cases were spread among the various severity groups (DHF grade I-IV and DSS) and represented age groups ranging from <1 year of age to 9 years of age. The patients in these primary infection cases showed a remarkably high IgM with a low IgG titer response compared with the secondary infection cases. No significant differences were observed in IgG titers with clinical severity. The data obtained in this study suggest that primary DENV infection cases exist certainly among DHF/DSS cases in Myanmar, and that additional mechanism(s) aside from the antibody-dependent enhancement mechanism could have influenced the clinical severity in DHF/DSS cases. PMID:23595687

Ngwe Tun, Mya Myat; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Inoue, Shingo; Kurosawa, Yae; Lwin, Yee Yee; Lin, Sanda; Aye, Kay Thi; Thet Khin, Pe; Myint, Tin; Htwe, Khin; Mapua, Cynthia A; Natividad, Filipinas F; Hirayama, Kenji; Morita, Kouichi

2013-07-01

372

A Comparative Study of Leptospirosis and Dengue in Thai Children  

PubMed Central

Background Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonosis that is often under-recognized in children and commonly confused with dengue in tropical settings. An enhanced ability to distinguish leptospirosis from dengue in children would guide clinicians and public health personnel in the appropriate use of limited healthcare resources. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a prospective, hospital-based, study of children with acute febrile illnesses and dengue in Thailand. Among the children without dengue, we identified those with leptospirosis using anti-leptospira IgM and microscopic agglutination titers in paired acute and convalescent blood samples. We then performed a case-control comparison of symptoms, signs, and clinical laboratory values between children with leptospirosis and dengue. In a semi-rural region of Thailand, leptospirosis accounted for 19% of the non-dengue acute febrile illnesses among children presenting during the rainy season. None of the children with leptospirosis were correctly diagnosed at the time of hospital discharge, and one third (33%) were erroneously diagnosed as dengue or scrub typhus. A predictive model to distinguish pediatric leptospirosis from dengue was generated using three variables: the absolute neutrophil count, plasma albumin, and aspartate aminotransferase levels in the first 72 hours of illness. Conclusions/Significance Unrecognized leptospirosis can be a significant cause of “dengue-like” febrile illness in children. Increased awareness of pediatric leptospirosis, and an enhanced ability to discriminate between leptospirosis and dengue early in illness, will help guide the appropriate use of healthcare resources in often resource-limited settings.

Libraty, Daniel H.; Myint, Khin S. A.; Murray, Clinton K.; Gibbons, Robert V.; Mammen, Mammen P.; Endy, Timothy P.; Li, Wenjun; Vaughn, David W.; Nisalak, Ananda; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Hospenthal, Duane R.; Green, Sharone; Rothman, Alan L.; Ennis, Francis A.

2007-01-01

373

Immunogenicity and safety of recombinant tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) in individuals aged 2-45 years  

PubMed Central

This was a multicenter, blinded, Phase II study (NCT00880893) conducted in Singapore. The primary objectives were to evaluate the safety of a tetravalent dengue vaccine (TDV) comprising four recombinant, live, attenuated viruses (CYD-TDV) and the dengue virus serotype-specific antibody responses before and 28 d after each vaccination. Participants were randomized 3:1 to receive three doses of CYD-TDV or a control vaccine at 0, 6 and 12 mo. Control vaccine was placebo for the first dose (all ages) and for subsequent doses, licensed hepatitis-A for children (aged 2–11 years) or influenza vaccine for adolescents (12–17 years) and adults (18–45 years). Between April and October 2009, 317 children, 187 adolescents and 696 adults were enrolled. In all age groups, reactogenicity was higher after the first injection of CYD-TDV than after placebo control. Reactogenicity after subsequent CYD-TDV doses was no higher than after the first dose, and tended to be lower or similar to that seen after active control vaccination. Seropositivity rates and geometric mean neutralizing antibody titers (GMTs; 1/dil) against all four dengue virus serotypes increased in all age groups after each of the three CYD-TDV doses. Post-dose 3, 66.5% of all participants were seropositive to all four serotypes, and 87.2% were seropositive to ? 3 serotypes; GMTs for all participants ranged from 43.0 against dengue virus serotype 1 to 100 against dengue virus serotype 4. GMTs were higher in children than in adolescents. These results support the continued development of CYD-TDV for the prevention of dengue disease.

Sin Leo, Yee; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Archuleta, Sophia; Shek, Lynette P.; Chong, Chia Yin; Nam Leong, Hoe; Yong Low, Chian; Oh, May-Lin Helen; Bouckenooghe, Alain; Wartel, T. Anh; Crevat, Denis

2012-01-01

374

Temporal genetic structure of major dengue vector Aedes aegypti from Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil.  

PubMed

In recent years, high levels of Aedes aegypti infestation and several dengue outbreaks with fatal outcome cases have been reported in Manaus, State of Amazonas, Brazil. This situation made it important to understand the genetic structure and gene flow patterns among the populations of this vector in Manaus, vital pieces of information for their management and development of new control strategies. In this study, we used nine microsatellite loci to examine the effect of seasonality on the genetic structure and gene flow patterns in Ae. aegypti populations from four urban neighborhoods of Manaus, collected during the two main rainy and dry seasons. All loci were polymorphic in the eight samples from the two seasons, with a total of 41 alleles. The genetic structure analyses of the samples from the rainy season revealed genetic homogeneity and extensive gene flow, a result consistent with the abundance of breeding sites for this vector. However, the samples from the dry season were significantly structured, due to a reduction of Ne in two (Praça 14 de Janeiro and Cidade Nova) of the four samples analyzed, and this was the primary factor influencing structure during the dry season. Genetic bottleneck analyses suggested that the Ae. aegypti populations from Manaus are being maintained continuously throughout the year, with seasonal reduction rather than severe bottleneck or extinction, corroborating previous reports. These findings are of extremely great importance for designing new dengue control strategies in Manaus. PMID:24631342

Mendonça, Barbara Alessandra Alves; de Sousa, Adna Cristina Barbosa; de Souza, Anete Pereira; Scarpassa, Vera Margarete

2014-06-01

375

Bromeliad-inhabiting mosquitoes in an urban botanical garden of dengue endemic Rio de Janeiro--are bromeliads productive habitats for the invasive vectors Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus?  

PubMed

Immatures of both Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus have been found in water-holding bromeliad axils in Brazil. Removal of these plants or their treatment with insecticides in public and private gardens have been undertaken during dengue outbreaks in Brazil despite uncertainty as to their importance as productive habitats for dengue vectors. From March 2005-February 2006, we sampled 120 randomly selected bromeliads belonging to 10 species in a public garden less than 200 m from houses in a dengue-endemic neighborhood in Rio de Janeiro. A total of 2,816 mosquito larvae and pupae was collected, with an average of 5.87 immatures per plant per collection. Culex (Microculex) pleuristriatus and Culex spp of the Ocellatus Group were the most abundant culicid species, found in all species of bromeliads; next in relative abundance were species of the genus Wyeomyia. Only two individuals of Ae. aegypti (0.07%) and five of Ae. albopictus(0.18%) were collected from bromeliads. By contrast, immatures of Ae. aegypti were found in manmade containers in nearly 5% of nearby houses. These results demonstrate that bromeliads are not important producers of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus and, hence, should not be a focus for dengue control. However, the results of this study of only one year in a single area may not represent outcomes in other urban localities where bromeliads, Ae. aegypti and dengue coincide in more disturbed habitats. PMID:20140379

Mocellin, Márcio Goulart; Simões, Taynãna César; Nascimento, Teresa Fernandes Silva do; Teixeira, Maria Lucia França; Lounibos, Leon Philip; Oliveira, Ricardo Lourenço de

2009-12-01

376

Household water treatment uptake during a public health response to a large typhoid fever outbreak in Harare, Zimbabwe.  

PubMed

Locally manufactured sodium hypochlorite (chlorine) solution has been sold in Zimbabwe since 2010. During October 1, 2011-April 30, 2012, 4,181 suspected and 52 confirmed cases of typhoid fever were identified in Harare. In response to this outbreak, chlorine tablets were distributed. To evaluate household water treatment uptake, we conducted a survey and water quality testing in 458 randomly selected households in two suburbs most affected by the outbreak. Although 75% of households were aware of chlorine solution and 85% received chlorine tablets, only 18% had reportedly treated stored water and had the recommended protective level of free chlorine residuals. Water treatment was more common among households that reported water treatment before the outbreak, and those that received free tablets during the outbreak (P < 0.01), but was not associated with chlorine solution awareness or use before the outbreak (P > 0.05). Outbreak response did not build on pre-existing prevention programs. PMID:24664784

Imanishi, Maho; Kweza, Patience F; Slayton, Rachel B; Urayai, Tanaka; Ziro, Odrie; Mushayi, Wellington; Francis-Chizororo, Monica; Kuonza, Lazarus R; Ayers, Tracy; Freeman, Molly M; Govore, Emmaculate; Duri, Clemence; Chonzi, Prosper; Mtapuri-Zinyowera, Sekesai; Manangazira, Portia; Kilmarx, Peter H; Mintz, Eric; Lantagne, Daniele

2014-05-01

377

A review of outbreaks of infectious disease in schools in England and Wales 1979-88.  

PubMed Central

In this review of 66 outbreaks of infectious disease in schools in England and Wales between 1979-88, 27 were reported from independent and 39 from maintained schools. Altogether, over 8000 children and nearly 500 adults were affected. Most of the outbreaks investigated were due to gastrointestinal infections which affected about 5000 children: respiratory infections affected a further 2000 children. Fifty-two children and seven adults were admitted to hospital and one child with measles died. Vaccination policies and use of immunoglobulin for control and prevention of outbreaks in schools have been discussed.

Joseph, C.; Noah, N.; White, J.; Hoskins, T.

1990-01-01

378

A point-source norovirus outbreak caused by exposure to fomites.  

PubMed

We investigated a norovirus outbreak (genotype GII.2) affecting 9 members of a soccer team. Illness was associated with touching a reusable grocery bag or consuming its packaged food contents (risk difference, 0.636; P < .01). By polymerase chain reaction, GII norovirus was recovered from the bag, which had been stored in a bathroom used before the outbreak by a person with norovirus-like illness. Airborne contamination of fomites can lead to subsequent point-source outbreaks. When feasible, we recommend dedicated bathrooms for sick persons and informing cleaning staff (professional or otherwise) about the need for adequate environmental sanitation of surfaces and fomites to prevent spread. PMID:22573873

Repp, Kimberly K; Keene, William E

2012-06-01

379

A Point-Source Norovirus Outbreak Caused by Exposure to Fomites  

PubMed Central

We investigated a norovirus outbreak (genotype GII.2) affecting 9 members of a soccer team. Illness was associated with touching a reusable grocery bag or consuming its packaged food contents (risk difference, 0.636; P < .01). By polymerase chain reaction, GII norovirus was recovered from the bag, which had been stored in a bathroom used before the outbreak by a person with norovirus-like illness. Airborne contamination of fomites can lead to subsequent point-source outbreaks. When feasible, we recommend dedicated bathrooms for sick persons and informing cleaning staff (professional or otherwise) about the need for adequate environmental sanitation of surfaces and fomites to prevent spread.

Repp, Kimberly K.; Keene, William E.

2012-01-01

380

Malaria outbreaks in China (1990-2013): a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background China has already achieved remarkable accomplishments in shrinking the malaria burden since the mid-20th Century. The country now plans to eliminate malaria by the year 2020. Looking at the dynamics of malaria outbreaks during the last decades might provide important information regarding the potential challenges of such an elimination strategy and might help to avoid mistakes of the past. Methods A systematic review of the published literature (English and Chinese) was conducted to identify malaria outbreaks during the period 1990 until 2013 in China. The main causes of outbreaks as described in these papers were categorized according to whether they were related to population migration, environmental factors, vector and host related factors, and operational problems of the health services. Results The review identified 36 malaria outbreaks over the 23-year study period, on which sufficient information was available. They mainly occurred in southern and central China involving 12 provinces/autonomous regions. More than half of all outbreaks (21/36, 58%) were attributed at least in part to population migration, with malaria importation to non- or low-endemic areas from high-endemic Chinese areas (13/15) or endemic countries (2/15) having been the most frequent reason (15/21, 71%). Other main causes were problems of the health services (15/36, 42%), in particular poor malaria case management (10/15, 67%), environmental factors (7/36, 19%), and vector and host related factors (5/36, 14%). Conclusions Beside a number of other challenges, addressing population movement causing malaria appears to be of particular importance to the national malaria programme. Strengthening of surveillance for malaria and early radical treatment of cases should thus be considered among the most important tools for preventing malaria outbreaks and for the final goal of malaria elimination in China.

2014-01-01

381

HHS/CDC Legal Response to SARS Outbreak  

PubMed Central

Before the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) legal authority to apprehend, detain, or conditionally release persons was limited to seven listed diseases, not including SARS, and could only be changed using a two-step process: 1) executive order of the President of the United States on recommendation by the Secretary, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and 2) amendment to CDC quarantine regulations (42 CFR Parts 70 and 71). In April 2003, in response to the SARS outbreak, the federal executive branch acted rapidly to add SARS to the list of quarantinable communicable diseases. At the same time, HHS amended the regulations to streamline the process of adding future emerging infectious diseases. Since the emergence of SARS, CDC has increased legal preparedness for future public health emergencies by establishing a multistate teleconference program for public health lawyers and a Web-based clearinghouse of legal documents.

Foster, Joseph A.; Shaw, Frederic E.; Cetron, Martin S.

2004-01-01

382

Heterosandwich immunoswab assay for dengue virus Ns1 antigen detection.  

PubMed

Dengue and the more severe dengue hemorrhagic fever have been a very critical public health problem globally. Millions of people especially in the tropical areas get infected with dengue. An efficient diagnostic is very important for early screening of dengue infection. In dengue-infected patients, the nonstructural protein NS1 is present on the surface of infected cells and secreted in plasma. The NS1 antigen is an important target for developing a quick diagnostic largely due to its long presence in the blood. We have developed a simple-to-use immunoswab-based diagnostic procedure employing monoclonal antibodies and the second-generation quadromas. The detection limit for NS1 has been established to be in the subnanogram range. The assay is very sensitive, has a visual end point, and also being extremely inexpensive. With this assay, screening time for a dengue-infected person would be very rapid. PMID:24211216

Ganguly, Advaita; Malabadi, Ravindra B; Loebenberg, Raimer; Suresh, Mavanur R; Sunwoo, Hoon H

2014-01-01

383

DISEASE OUTBREAKS CAUSED BY DRINKING WATER  

EPA Science Inventory

Thirty-two waterborne disease outbreaks were reported to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the Environmental Protection Agency in 1981. The outbreaks occurred in 17 states and involved 4430 cases. This was only 64% of the number of outbreaks that were reported in 1980 and...

384

Method of immunization against the 4 serotypes of dengue fever  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

The invention relates to a method for inducing protection against the 4 serotypes of dengue fever in a patient, comprising: (a) the administration of a monovalent vaccine comprising a vaccinal virus of a first serotype of dengue fever, and (b) the administration of a tetravalent vaccine comprising vaccinal viruses of the four serotypes of dengue fever, in which administration (b) is made between at least 30 days and not more than 12 months following the first administration (a).

2010-05-18

385

Germany tracks down source for dangerous E. coli outbreak  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Number of Rare E. Coli Cases in U.S. Rose Last Yearhttp://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/08/us/08food.htmlEconomic costs of E. Coli outbreakhttp://video.ca.msn.com/watch/video/economic-costs-of-e-coli-outbreak/16ifpbqesEU boosts E. Coli compensation offer for farmershttp://www.dw-world.de/dw/article/0,,15141284,00.htmlQ&A: E. Coli outbreakhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-13600144FightBac!http://www.fightbac.org/Today, Germany's head of their Center for Disease Control, Reinhard Burger said, "It's the bean sprouts." After 29 deaths, thousands taken ill, and produce bans that included Spanish cucumbers, tomatoes, and lettuce, it is believed that they have found the source of one of history's most dangerous outbreaks of E. Coli. Nine countries were affected by the outbreak, including Great Britain, Germany, Spain, Poland, and the United States. Russia recently placed a ban on all EU produce, thus adding an economic crisis to the medical crisis. In Germany, so many people were infected that hospitals struggled to cope, and because it was a new strain and extremely aggressive many health institutions were often offering conflicting advice. Thankfully, German officials seem to have located the source and the hope is that now the spread of this particular strain can be contained. Burger warns that the outbreak is "not yet over" as there "will be new cases coming up." However, with the source of this outbreak found, perhaps the EU, and the rest of the world, can focus on how to prevent these outbreaks in the future.The first link will take visitors to a news article on the recent announcement about bean sprouts from the New York Times. The second link will take visitors to another article from the New York Times which discusses the increasing number of rare E. Coli cases in the U.S. The third link will take visitors to a MSN video that examines the financial toll an E. Coli outbreak can take on produce farmers. The fourth link leads to an article from Deutsche Welle that discusses compensation the EU is offering farmers affected by the outbreak and subsequent produce bans. The fifth link is an informative Q&A from the BBC about E. Coli. The last link will lead visitors to the FightBac! website, a food safety initiative that educates consumers about reducing the risk of food borne illnesses.

Grinnell, Max

386

Ebola Outbreak Killed 5000 Gorillas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past decade, the Zaire strain of Ebola virus (ZEBOV) has repeatedly emerged in Gabon and Congo. Each human outbreak has been accompanied by reports of gorilla and chimpanzee carcasses in neighboring forests, but both the extent of ape mortality and the causal role of ZEBOV have been hotly debated. Here, we present data suggesting that in 2002 and

Magdalena Bermejo; José Domingo Rodríguez-Teijeiro; Germán Illera; Alex Barroso; Carles Vilà; Peter D. Walsh

2006-01-01

387