Sample records for prevent dengue outbreaks

  1. Mediational Effects of Self-Efficacy Dimensions in the Relationship between Knowledge of Dengue and Dengue Preventive Behaviour with Respect to Control of Dengue Outbreaks: A Structural Equation Model of a Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Isa, Affendi; Loke, Yoon K.; Smith, Jane R.; Papageorgiou, Alexia; Hunter, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Dengue fever is endemic in Malaysia, with frequent major outbreaks in urban areas. The major control strategy relies on health promotional campaigns aimed at encouraging people to reduce mosquito breeding sites close to people's homes. However, such campaigns have not always been 100% effective. The concept of self-efficacy is an area of increasing research interest in understanding how health promotion can be most effective. This paper reports on a study of the impact of self-efficacy on dengue knowledge and dengue preventive behaviour. Methods and Findings We recruited 280 adults from 27 post-outbreak villages in the state of Terengganu, east coast of Malaysia. Measures of health promotion and educational intervention activities and types of communication during outbreak, level of dengue knowledge, level and strength of self-efficacy and dengue preventive behaviour were obtained via face-to-face interviews and questionnaires. A structural equation model was tested and fitted the data well (?2?=?71.659, df?=?40, p?=?0.002, RMSEA?=?0.053, CFI?=?0.973, TLI?=?0.963). Mass media, local contact and direct information-giving sessions significantly predicted level of knowledge of dengue. Level and strength of self-efficacy fully mediated the relationship between knowledge of dengue and dengue preventive behaviours. Strength of self-efficacy acted as partial mediator in the relationship between knowledge of dengue and dengue preventive behaviours. Conclusions To control and prevent dengue outbreaks by behavioural measures, health promotion and educational interventions during outbreaks should now focus on those approaches that are most likely to increase the level and strength of self-efficacy. PMID:24086777

  2. Impact of a Dengue Outbreak Experience in the Preventive Perceptions of the Community from a Temperate Region: Madeira Island, Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Nazareth, Teresa; Sousa, Carla Alexandra; Porto, Graça; Gonçalves, Luzia; Seixas, Gonçalo; Antunes, Luís; Silva, Ana Clara; Teodósio, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    The ability to effectively modify behaviours is increasingly relevant to attain and maintain a good health status. Current behaviour-change models and theories present two main approaches for (healthier) decision-making: one analytical/logical, and one experiential/emotional/intuitive. Therefore, to achieve an integral and dynamic understanding of the public perceptions both approaches should be considered: community surveys should measure cognitive understanding of health-risk contexts, and also explore how past experiences affect this understanding. In 2011, community perceptions regarding domestic source reduction were assessed in Madeira Island. After Madeira’s first dengue outbreak (2012) a unique opportunity to compare perceptions before and after the outbreak-experience occurred. This was the aim of this study, which constituted the first report on the effect of an outbreak experience on community perceptions regarding a specific vector-borne disease. A cross-sectional survey was performed within female residents at the most aegypti-infested areas. Perceptions regarding domestic source reduction were assessed according to the Essential Perception (EP)-analysis tool. A matching process paired individuals from studies performed before and after the outbreak, ensuring homogeneity in six determinant variables. After the outbreak, there were more female residents who assimilated the concepts considered to be essential to understand the proposed behaviour. Nevertheless, no significant difference was observed in the number of female residents who achieved the defined ‘minimal understanding’’. Moreover, most of the population (95.5%) still believed at least in one of the identified myths. After the outbreak some myths disappeared and others appeared. The present study quantified and explored how the experience of an outbreak influenced the perception regarding a dengue-preventive behaviour. The outbreak experience surprisingly led to the appearance of new myths within the population, apart from the expected increase of relevant concepts’ assimilation. Monitoring public perceptions is therefore crucial to make preventing dengue campaigns updated and worthy. PMID:25767886

  3. Leptospirosis during Dengue Outbreak, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Breiman, Robert F.; Ari, Mary D.; Morey, Roger E.; Janan, Firdous Ara; Hayes, John Mosely; Hossain, M. Anowar; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Levett, Paul N.

    2005-01-01

    We collected acute-phase serum samples from febrile patients at 2 major hospitals in Dhaka, Bangladesh, during an outbreak of dengue fever in 2001. A total of 18% of dengue-negative patients tested positive for leptospirosis. The case-fatality rate among leptospirosis patients (5%) was higher than among dengue fever patients (1.2%). PMID:15890136

  4. Effects of a Five-Year Citywide Intervention Program To Control Aedes aegypti and Prevent Dengue Outbreaks in Northern Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Gürtler, Ricardo E.; Garelli, Fernando M.; Coto, Héctor D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Dengue has propagated widely through the Americas. Most countries have not been able to maintain permanent larval mosquito control programs, and the long-term effects of control actions have rarely been documented. Methodology The study design was based on a before-and-after citywide assessment of Aedes aegypti larval indices and the reported incidence of dengue in Clorinda, northeastern Argentina, over 2003–2007. Interventions were mainly based on focal treatment with larvicides of every mosquito developmental site every four months (14 cycles), combined with limited source reduction efforts and ultra-low-volume insecticide spraying during emergency operations. The program conducted 120,000 house searches for mosquito developmental sites and 37,000 larvicide applications. Principal Findings Random-effects regression models showed that Breteau indices declined significantly in nearly all focal cycles compared to pre-intervention indices clustered by neighborhood, after allowing for lagged effects of temperature and rainfall, baseline Breteau index, and surveillance coverage. Significant heterogeneity between neighborhoods was revealed. Larval indices seldom fell to 0 shortly after interventions at the same blocks. Large water-storage containers were the most abundant and likely to be infested. The reported incidence of dengue cases declined from 10.4 per 10,000 in 2000 (by DEN-1) to 0 from 2001 to 2006, and then rose to 4.5 cases per 10,000 in 2007 (by DEN-3). In neighboring Paraguay, the reported incidence of dengue in 2007 was 30.6 times higher than that in Clorinda. Conclusions Control interventions exerted significant impacts on larval indices but failed to keep them below target levels during every summer, achieved sustained community acceptance, most likely prevented new dengue outbreaks over 2003–2006, and limited to a large degree the 2007 outbreak. For further improvement, a shift is needed towards a multifaceted program with intensified coverage and source reduction efforts, lids or insecticide-treated covers to water-storage containers, and a broad social participation aiming at long-term sustainability. PMID:19399168

  5. Lessons learned from previous dengue outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is an important tropical infection caused by an arbovirus dengue. As a mosquito borne infection, this disease is widely spread in several tropical endemic countries. Millions of world populations are at risk for this arboviral infection. Each year, thousands of dengue infections are reported and there are several death cases. Each year, the outbreaks of dengue emerge in several countries and this implies the global importance of this infection. Fighting with dengue outbreak is important in public health. In this specific chapter, the author discussed lessons learned from previous dengue outbreaks.

  6. Dengue disease outbreak definitions are implicitly variable

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Oliver J.; Smith, David L.; Scott, Thomas W.; Hay, Simon I.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases rarely exhibit simple dynamics. Outbreaks (defined as excess cases beyond response capabilities) have the potential to cause a disproportionately high burden due to overwhelming health care systems. The recommendations of international policy guidelines and research agendas are based on a perceived standardised definition of an outbreak characterised by a prolonged, high-caseload, extra-seasonal surge. In this analysis we apply multiple candidate outbreak definitions to reported dengue case data from Brazil to test this assumption. The methods identify highly heterogeneous outbreak characteristics in terms of frequency, duration and case burden. All definitions identify outbreaks with characteristics that vary over time and space. Further, definitions differ in their timeliness of outbreak onset, and thus may be more or less suitable for early intervention. This raises concerns about the application of current outbreak guidelines for early warning/identification systems. It is clear that quantitatively defining the characteristics of an outbreak is an essential prerequisite for effective reactive response. More work is needed so that definitions of disease outbreaks can take into account the baseline capacities of treatment, surveillance and control. This is essential if outbreak guidelines are to be effective and generalisable across a range of epidemiologically different settings. PMID:25979287

  7. Dengue fever outbreak in Lahore.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Usman; Loya, Asif; Mehmood, Muhammad Tariq; Nazeer, Hammad; Sultan, Faisal

    2013-03-01

    Dengue fever has now affected all the major cities of country. About 41,354 patients underwent antibody screening for dengue fever from Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital, Lahore, during the epidemic period (October 1st 2010 to December 20th 2010). Out of them, 1294 (3.1%) patients were positive for IgM antibodies, and 124 (0.3%) for IgG antibodies. A total of 722 (1.7%) patients were borderline positive for IgM antibodies and 108 (0.26%) were borderline positive for IgG antibodies. Dengue fever has emerged as a global problem over the last 5 years. It has also hit Lahore badly especially after the floods in 2010. High index of suspicion should be there in case of related symptoms. PMID:23458054

  8. Factors associated with larval control practices in a dengue outbreak prone area.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Mariam; Selamat, Mohamad Ikhsan; Ismail, Zaliha

    2014-01-01

    In order to reduce the risk of dengue outbreak recurrence in a dengue outbreak prone area, the members of the community need to sustain certain behavior to prevent mosquito from breeding. Our study aims to identify the factors associated with larval control practices in this particular community. A cross-sectional study involves 322 respondents living in a dengue outbreak prone area who were interviewed using a pretested questionnaire. The level of knowledge about Aedes mosquitoes, dengue transmission, its symptoms, and personal preventive measures ranges from fair to good. The level of attitude towards preventive measures was high. However, reported level of personal larval control practices was low (33.2%). Our multiple logistic regression analysis showed that only those with a good level of attitude towards personal preventive measure and frequent attendance to health campaigns were significantly associated with the good larval control practices. We conclude that, in a dengue outbreak prone area, having a good attitude towards preventive measures and frequent participation in health campaigns are important factors to sustain practices on larval control. PMID:25309602

  9. Predicting outbreaks of dengue fever according to climate

    E-print Network

    N° 410 July 2012 Predicting outbreaks of dengue fever according to climate Scientific news Actualidad cientifica Actualité scientifique Mainly vectored by the mosquito Aedes aegypti, dengue fever, causing more or less severe symptoms such as fever, muscular pain, headaches, digestive disor- ders

  10. Detecting and responding to a dengue outbreak: evaluation of existing strategies in country outbreak response planning.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Julia; Kroeger, Axel; Runge-Ranzinger, Silvia; O'Dempsey, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Background. Dengue outbreaks are occurring with increasing frequency and intensity. Evidence-based epidemic preparedness and effective response are now a matter of urgency. Therefore, we have analysed national and municipal dengue outbreak response plans. Methods. Thirteen country plans from Asia, Latin America and Australia, and one international plan were obtained from the World Health Organization. The information was transferred to a data analysis matrix where information was extracted according to predefined and emerging themes and analysed for scope, inconsistencies, omissions, and usefulness. Findings. Outbreak response planning currently has a considerable number of flaws. Outbreak governance was weak with a lack of clarity of stakeholder roles. Late timing of responses due to poor surveillance, a lack of combining routine data with additional alerts, and lack of triggers for initiating the response weakened the functionality of plans. Frequently an outbreak was not defined, and early response mechanisms based on alert signals were neglected. There was a distinct lack of consideration of contextual influences which can affect how an outbreak detection and response is managed. Conclusion. A model contingency plan for dengue outbreak prediction, detection, and response may help national disease control authorities to develop their own more detailed and functional context specific plans. PMID:24222774

  11. Dengue virus type 1 clade replacement in recurring homotypic outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recurring dengue outbreaks occur in cyclical pattern in most endemic countries. The recurrences of dengue virus (DENV) infection predispose the population to increased risk of contracting the severe forms of dengue. Understanding the DENV evolutionary mechanism underlying the recurring dengue outbreaks has important implications for epidemic prediction and disease control. Results We used a set of viral envelope (E) gene to reconstruct the phylogeny of DENV-1 isolated between the periods of 1987–2011 in Malaysia. Phylogenetic analysis of DENV-1 E gene revealed that genotype I virus clade replacements were associated with the cyclical pattern of major DENV-1 outbreaks in Malaysia. A total of 9 non-conservative amino acid substitutions in the DENV-1 E gene consensus were identified; 4 in domain I, 3 in domain II and 2 in domain III. Selection pressure analyses did not reveal any positively selected codon site within the full length E gene sequences (1485 nt, 495 codons). A total of 183 (mean dN/dS = 0.0413) negatively selected sites were found within the Malaysian isolates; neither positive nor negative selection was noted for the remaining 312 codons. All the viruses were cross-neutralized by the respective patient sera suggesting no strong support for immunological advantage of any of the amino acid substitutions. Conclusion DENV-1 clade replacement is associated with recurrences of major DENV-1 outbreaks in Malaysia. Our findings are consistent with those of other studies that the DENV-1 clade replacement is a stochastic event independent of positive selection. PMID:24073945

  12. An outbreak of dengue fever in St. Croix (U. S. Virgin Islands), 2005.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the summer of 2005, an outbreak of dengue virus serotype-2 with cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) occurred in St. Croix, US Virgin Islands. The medical records of all dengue laboratory-positive patients either seen in the Emergency Department of or admitted to the Governor Juan F. Luis Hosp...

  13. The effects of climate variables on the outbreak of dengue in Queensland 2008-2009.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Tasnim; Bambrick, Hilary

    2013-07-01

    Outbreaks of dengue occur in Queensland, Australia nearly every summer. In 2008-2009, there was an unusually large, protracted outbreak of dengue, comprised of 1,200 cases. We investigated the weather variables and their contribution to the 2008-2009 dengue outbreak in Queensland. Case data were obtained from the Communicable Disease Branch of Queensland Health for 2000-2010 for the towns of Cairns and Townsville. Monthly weather data (rainfall, maximum temperature, minimum temperature) and Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) was obtained from the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM). We used a negative binomial model to test associations between these variables and dengue. Lagged models were also created for one, two and three months. Our models suggest all weather variables but not the SOI were associated with dengue in both Cairns and Townsville, without a lag (p<0.01). No significant lag was seen with the weather variables. Rainfall and temperature preceding the 2008-2009 outbreak were also not significantly different (p<0.01) from other years. Short-term (non-lagged) weather variables were associated with the number of dengue cases in Cairns and Townsville. No lag was seen and no association was seen between the SOI and the number of dengue cases, which suggests there may be limited potential to predict large dengue outbreaks using climate variability. The large outbreak in 2008-2009 may have been driven by other, non-weather factors in addition to the immediate weather effect. PMID:24050094

  14. Abundant Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti aegypti mosquitoes in the 2014 dengue outbreak area of Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Higa, Yukiko; Abílio, Ana Paula; Futami, Kyoko; Lázaro, Manuel Alberto Félix; Minakawa, Noboru; Gudo, Eduardo Samo

    2015-01-01

    In early 2014, dengue cases were reported from northern Mozambique, 30 years after the last outbreak. We identified potential dengue vector species in three northern towns, Pemba, Nampula and Nacala, and one southern town, Maputo, during the outbreak in April 2014. A major dengue vector species, Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti, was found in all these towns. The dominant vector subspecies in the northern towns was Aedes aegypti aegypti, while Ae. aegypti formosus was dominant in Maputo. Considering the high proportion of Ae. aegypti aegypti and its high vector competence, the findings from this study suggest that Ae. aegypti aegypti was responsible for the outbreak in northern Mozambique.

  15. On the analysis of effectiveness in mass application of mosquito repellent for dengue disease prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldila, D.; Soewono, E.; Nuraini, N.

    2012-05-01

    Dengue disease has been known as one of dangerous vector-borne diseases and become serious threat in many tropical countries. With no vaccine and antiviral available until nowadays, and frequent appearance of extraordinary dengue outbreaks, many governments are forced to declare national problem for dengue. At this moment, the only method available to prevent dengue disease transmission is to combat the disease-carrying mosquitoes as well as to reduce the contact between human and mosquitoes. The fast growing dengue transmission in many countries in recent years indicates that the mosquito control programs are far from successful. The use of mosquito repellent is one possible instrument which could be used as an effective mass treatment to prevent the dengue outbreak during endemic period. Here in this paper a Susceptible-Infectious-Recovered (S-I-R) dengue transmission model with repellent mass treatment is being applied to portions of children and adult compartments. Analysis of the basic reproductive ratio (Ro) of the model is done. It is shown, with reasonable choices of portions of treated children and adults, in combination with reduction of mosquito population, the basic reproductive ratio can be significantly reduced and occurrence of endemic can be avoided. Numerical simulations are shown for various treatment scenarios.

  16. Short Report: Dengue3 Outbreak in Paraguay: Investigations Using Capillary Blood Samples on Filter Paper

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Severine Matheus; Jean-Baptiste Meynard; Anne Lavergne; Romain Girod; David Moua; Bhety Labeau; Philippe Dussart; Vincent Lacoste; Xavier Deparis

    2008-01-01

    During a dengue-3 outbreak in Paraguay at the beginning of 2007, capillary blood samples absorbed onto filter papers were collected from 44 suspected cases. These samples were subjected to three molecular and serologic tests, and 31 of the 44 samples gave a positive result by at least one of the techniques used. Molecular analyses detected the dengue-3 serotype in 22

  17. Surveillance of Aedes albopictus Skuse breeding preference in selected dengue outbreak localities, peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Rozilawati, H; Tanaselvi, K; Nazni, W A; Mohd Masri, S; Zairi, J; Adanan, C R; Lee, H L

    2015-03-01

    Entomological surveillance was conducted in order to determine the abundance and to evaluate any changes of biological vectors or ecology, especially in the dengue outbreak areas. The abundance and breeding preference of Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti were conducted in selected dengue outbreak localities in three states of peninsular Malaysia namely Selangor, Federal Territory of Kuala Lumpur, and Penang Island using ovitraps and larval survey method. It was determined that Ae. albopictus was predominant in most of the localities and found to breed more outdoor than indoor. A wide range of breeding foci were recorded in this study. It was also determined that ovitrap method was more effective to detect the presence of Aedes mosquitoes when the larval survey was at low rate of infestation. The abundance of Ae. albopictus in dengue outbreak localities emphasis that the vector control programme should also target this species together with the primary dengue vector, Ae. aegypti. PMID:25801254

  18. A data-driven epidemiological prediction method for dengue outbreaks using local and remote sensing data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dengue is the most common arboviral disease of humans, with more than one third of the world’s population at risk. Accurate prediction of dengue outbreaks may lead to public health interventions that mitigate the effect of the disease. Predicting infectious disease outbreaks is a challenging task; truly predictive methods are still in their infancy. Methods We describe a novel prediction method utilizing Fuzzy Association Rule Mining to extract relationships between clinical, meteorological, climatic, and socio-political data from Peru. These relationships are in the form of rules. The best set of rules is automatically chosen and forms a classifier. That classifier is then used to predict future dengue incidence as either HIGH (outbreak) or LOW (no outbreak), where these values are defined as being above and below the mean previous dengue incidence plus two standard deviations, respectively. Results Our automated method built three different fuzzy association rule models. Using the first two weekly models, we predicted dengue incidence three and four weeks in advance, respectively. The third prediction encompassed a four-week period, specifically four to seven weeks from time of prediction. Using previously unused test data for the period 4–7 weeks from time of prediction yielded a positive predictive value of 0.686, a negative predictive value of 0.976, a sensitivity of 0.615, and a specificity of 0.982. Conclusions We have developed a novel approach for dengue outbreak prediction. The method is general, could be extended for use in any geographical region, and has the potential to be extended to other environmentally influenced infections. The variables used in our method are widely available for most, if not all countries, enhancing the generalizability of our method. PMID:23126401

  19. The 2012 Madeira Dengue Outbreak: Epidemiological Determinants and Future Epidemic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, José; Recker, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Dengue, a vector-borne viral disease of increasing global importance, is classically associated with tropical and sub-tropical regions around the world. Urbanisation, globalisation and climate trends, however, are facilitating the geographic spread of its mosquito vectors, thereby increasing the risk of the virus establishing itself in previously unaffected areas and causing large-scale epidemics. On 3 October 2012, two autochthonous dengue infections were reported within the Autonomous Region of Madeira, Portugal. During the following seven months, this first ‘European’ dengue outbreak caused more than 2000 local cases and 81 exported cases to mainland Europe. Here, using an ento-epidemiological mathematical framework, we estimate that the introduction of dengue to Madeira occurred around a month before the first official cases, during the period of maximum influx of airline travel, and that the naturally declining temperatures of autumn were the determining factor for the outbreak's demise in early December 2012. Using key estimates, together with local climate data, we further propose that there is little support for dengue endemicity on this island, but a high potential for future epidemic outbreaks when seeded between May and August—a period when detection of imported cases is crucial for Madeira's public health planning. PMID:25144749

  20. Ongoing outbreak of dengue serotype-3 in Solomon Islands, January to May 2013

    PubMed Central

    Joshua, Cynthia; Sio, Alison; Shortus, Matthew; Dalipanda, Tenneth; Durski, Kara; Musto, Jennie; Puiahi, Elliot; Dofai, Alfred; Aaskov, John; Cao-Lormeau, Van Mai; Musso, Didier; Dutta, Nick; Fleisch, Juliet; Nilles, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Methods Enhanced dengue surveillance was implemented in the capital, Honiara, and in the provinces. This included training health staff on dengue case definitions, data collection and reporting. Vector surveillance was also conducted. Results From 3 January to 15 May 2013, 5254 cases of suspected dengue were reported (101.8 per 10 000 population), including 401 hospitalizations and six deaths. The median age of cases was 20 years (range zero to 90), and 86% were reported from Honiara. Both Aedes aegyti and Aedes albopictus were identified in Honiara. Outbreak response measures included clinical training seminars, vector control activities, implementation of diagnostic and case management protocols and a public communication campaign. Discussion This was the first large dengue outbreak documented in Solomon Islands. Factors that may have contributed to this outbreak include a largely susceptible population, the presence of a highly efficient dengue vector in Honiara, a high-density human population with numerous breeding sites and favourable weather conditions for mosquito proliferation. Although the number of cases has plateaued since 1 April, continued enhanced nationwide surveillance and response activities are necessary. PMID:24319611

  1. Factors Affecting Dengue Prevention Practices: Nationwide Survey of the Malaysian Public

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Li Ping; Shakir, Sharina Mahavera Mohamad; Atefi, Narges; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2015-01-01

    Background Efforts to stamp dengue in many dengue endemic countries has met little success. There is a need to re-examine and understand how the public at large view the dengue prevention efforts. This study aimed to examine the demographic factors, theoretical constructs of the Health Belief Model and knowledge about dengue and how these influence the practice of dengue prevention. Methods A national telephone survey was carried out with 2,512 individuals of the Malaysian public aged 18–60 years. Results The majority (73%) of the Malaysian public had a total dengue prevention score of 51–100 (of a possible score of 1–100). Multivariate analysis suggests significant correlates of higher dengue prevention practices with demographic background, perception of susceptibility to dengue, perceived density of mosquitoes in the neighbourhood and knowledge about dengue. Households of lower income of which the majority (40.7%) were from the rural areas, were associated with the highest odds [OR = 1.33; 95%CI = 1.09–1.67; p = 0.004] of dengue prevention. Dengue prevention practices were also less likely to be undertaken in neighbourhoods where the responders perceived there is no and/or low density of mosquitoes. Dengue prevention practices are also less likely to be practiced by skilled workers [OR = 0.78; 95%CI = 0.63–0.95; p = 0.029] compared to those unemployed. Higher perceived susceptibility to dengue was associated with higher dengue prevention practices and participants with higher dengue knowledge were found to have a higher level of involvement in dengue prevention practices. Conclusion Results from the study suggest that in formulating approaches to contain dengue, strategies should be developed to cultivate dengue prevention practices among urban population and target areas with low density of mosquitoes where public perceived a less likely chance of getting dengue. Dengue prevention campaigns should focus on messages highlighting the risk of contracting dengue and education to increase knowledge about dengue. PMID:25836366

  2. E. Coli: Preventing Outbreaks at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Mary D.

    1996-01-01

    One strain of E. coli is not usually found in foods, but has been related to consumption of undercooked ground beef. Symptoms are stomach cramps and diarrhea, and 2-7% of infections lead to hemolytic uremic syndrome, which is life threatening. Camps can prevent outbreaks by avoiding uncooked meat on overnight campouts and requiring appropriate…

  3. Predicting Unprecedented Dengue Outbreak Using Imported Cases and Climatic Factors in Guangzhou, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Peng; Yang, Weizhong; Yang, Zhicong; Xu, Lei; Yang, Jun; Liu, Xiaobo; Jiang, Tong; Wu, Haixia; Chu, Cordia; Liu, Qiyong

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Dengue is endemic in more than 100 countries, mainly in tropical and subtropical regions, and the incidence has increased 30-fold in the past 50 years. The situation of dengue in China has become more and more severe, with an unprecedented dengue outbreak hitting south China in 2014. Building a dengue early warning system is therefore urgent and necessary for timely and effective response. Methodology and Principal Findings In the study we developed a time series Poisson multivariate regression model using imported dengue cases, local minimum temperature and accumulative precipitation to predict the dengue occurrence in four districts of Guangzhou, China. The time series data were decomposed into seasonal, trend and remainder components using a seasonal-trend decomposition procedure based on loess (STL). The time lag of climatic factors included in the model was chosen based on Spearman correlation analysis. Autocorrelation, seasonality and long-term trend were controlled in the model. A best model was selected and validated using Generalized Cross Validation (GCV) score and residual test. The data from March 2006 to December 2012 were used to develop the model while the data from January 2013 to September 2014 were employed to validate the model. Time series Poisson model showed that imported cases in the previous month, minimum temperature in the previous month and accumulative precipitation with three month lags could project the dengue outbreaks occurred in 2013 and 2014 after controlling the autocorrelation, seasonality and long-term trend. Conclusions Together with the sole transmission vector Aedes albopictus, imported cases, monthly minimum temperature and monthly accumulative precipitation may be used to develop a low-cost effective early warning system. PMID:26020627

  4. Lessons Learned during Dengue Outbreaks in the United States, 2001–2011

    PubMed Central

    Sell, Tara Kirk; Bouri, Nidhi; Franco, Crystal

    2012-01-01

    Since 2001, three autochthonous dengue fever outbreaks have occurred in the United States: in Hawaii (2001); Brownsville, Texas (2005); and southern Florida (2009–2011). We sought to characterize and describe the response to these outbreaks from the perspectives of public health and vector control officials. By conducting a medical literature review through PubMed and news media searches through Google, we identified persons involved in managing each outbreak; 26 persons then participated in qualitative, semistructured interviews. After analyzing the 3 outbreaks, we found the following prominent themes in the response efforts: timely detection of illness; communication of up-to-date, correct information; and development of a rapid response that engages the community. We therefore recommend that public health authorities involve the clinical and laboratory community promptly, provide accurate information, and engage the local community in vector control and case identification and reporting. PMID:22469195

  5. Dengue Outbreak in a Hilly State of Arunachal Pradesh in Northeast India

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Siraj A.; Dutta, Prafulla; Topno, Rashmee; Soni, Monika; Mahanta, Jagadish

    2014-01-01

    Dengue has been reported from plains as well as hilly regions of India including some parts of Northeast India. In July-August 2012, outbreak of fever with unknown origin (FUO) indicative of Dengue was reported in Pasighat, East Siang district of Arunachal Pradesh (AP) state. Serum samples (n = 164) collected from patients from Health Training and Research Centre General Hospital, Pasighat, were tested for NS1 antigen and IgM antibodies. NS1-positive samples were analyzed by RT-PCR assay and entomological surveys were carried out. The majority of suspected cases reported NS1 antigen positivity. Females and young adults were mostly affected. The majority of the amplified NS1-positive samples showed Dengue serotype 3 infection. Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus, known as semiurban breeding mosquitoes, was the only potential vector species identified from the affected areas of Pasighat which single handedly contributed to the outbreak. Thus, the present work identifies Dengue as an emerging arboviral infection in hilly state of AP along with a looming risk of its spread to neighbouring areas. PMID:24587732

  6. 2013 Dengue Outbreaks in Singapore and Malaysia Caused by Different Viral Strains

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Lee-Ching; Chem, Yu-kie; Koo, Carmen; Mudin, Rose Nani Binti; Amin, Faridah Mohd; Lee, Kim-Sung; Kheong, Chong Chee

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of 14,079 circulating dengue viruses in a cross-border surveillance program, UNITEDengue, revealed that the 2013 outbreaks in Singapore and Malaysia were associated with replacement of predominant serotype. While the predominant virus in Singapore switched from DENV2 to DENV1, DENV2 became predominant in neighboring Malaysia. Dominance of DENV2 was most evident on the southern states where higher fatality rates were observed. PMID:25846296

  7. 2013 dengue outbreaks in singapore and malaysia caused by different viral strains.

    PubMed

    Ng, Lee-Ching; Chem, Yu-Kie; Koo, Carmen; Mudin, Rose Nani Binti; Amin, Faridah Mohd; Lee, Kim-Sung; Kheong, Chong Chee

    2015-06-01

    Characterization of 14,079 circulating dengue viruses in a cross-border surveillance program, UNITEDengue, revealed that the 2013 outbreaks in Singapore and Malaysia were associated with replacement of predominant serotype. While the predominant virus in Singapore switched from DENV2 to DENV1, DENV2 became predominant in neighboring Malaysia. Dominance of DENV2 was most evident on the southern states where higher fatality rates were observed. PMID:25846296

  8. Intra- and interseasonal autoregressive prediction of dengue outbreaks using local weather and regional climate for a tropical environment in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Eastin, Matthew D; Delmelle, Eric; Casas, Irene; Wexler, Joshua; Self, Cameron

    2014-09-01

    Dengue fever transmission results from complex interactions between the virus, human hosts, and mosquito vectors-all of which are influenced by environmental factors. Predictive models of dengue incidence rate, based on local weather and regional climate parameters, could benefit disease mitigation efforts. Time series of epidemiological and meteorological data for the urban environment of Cali, Colombia are analyzed from January of 2000 to December of 2011. Significant dengue outbreaks generally occur during warm-dry periods with extreme daily temperatures confined between 18°C and 32°C--the optimal range for mosquito survival and viral transmission. Two environment-based, multivariate, autoregressive forecast models are developed that allow dengue outbreaks to be anticipated from 2 weeks to 6 months in advance. These models have the potential to enhance existing dengue early warning systems, ultimately supporting public health decisions on the timing and scale of vector control efforts. PMID:24957546

  9. Intra- and Interseasonal Autoregressive Prediction of Dengue Outbreaks Using Local Weather and Regional Climate for a Tropical Environment in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Eastin, Matthew D.; Delmelle, Eric; Casas, Irene; Wexler, Joshua; Self, Cameron

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever transmission results from complex interactions between the virus, human hosts, and mosquito vectors—all of which are influenced by environmental factors. Predictive models of dengue incidence rate, based on local weather and regional climate parameters, could benefit disease mitigation efforts. Time series of epidemiological and meteorological data for the urban environment of Cali, Colombia are analyzed from January of 2000 to December of 2011. Significant dengue outbreaks generally occur during warm-dry periods with extreme daily temperatures confined between 18°C and 32°C—the optimal range for mosquito survival and viral transmission. Two environment-based, multivariate, autoregressive forecast models are developed that allow dengue outbreaks to be anticipated from 2 weeks to 6 months in advance. These models have the potential to enhance existing dengue early warning systems, ultimately supporting public health decisions on the timing and scale of vector control efforts. PMID:24957546

  10. Sharing experiences: towards an evidence based model of dengue surveillance and outbreak response in Latin America and Asia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The increasing frequency and intensity of dengue outbreaks in endemic and non-endemic countries requires a rational, evidence based response. To this end, we aimed to collate the experiences of a number of affected countries, identify strengths and limitations in dengue surveillance, outbreak preparedness, detection and response and contribute towards the development of a model contingency plan adaptable to country needs. Methods The study was undertaken in five Latin American (Brazil, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Peru) and five in Asian countries (Indonesia, Malaysia, Maldives, Sri Lanka, Vietnam). A mixed-methods approach was used which included document analysis, key informant interviews, focus-group discussions, secondary data analysis and consensus building by an international dengue expert meeting organised by the World Health Organization, Special Program for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (WHO-TDR). Results Country information on dengue is based on compulsory notification and reporting (“passive surveillance”), with laboratory confirmation (in all participating Latin American countries and some Asian countries) or by using a clinical syndromic definition. Seven countries additionally had sentinel sites with active dengue reporting, some also had virological surveillance. Six had agreed a formal definition of a dengue outbreak separate to seasonal variation in case numbers. Countries collected data on a range of warning signs that may identify outbreaks early, but none had developed a systematic approach to identifying and responding to the early stages of an outbreak. Outbreak response plans varied in quality, particularly regarding the early response. The surge capacity of hospitals with recent dengue outbreaks varied; those that could mobilise additional staff, beds, laboratory support and resources coped best in comparison to those improvising a coping strategy during the outbreak. Hospital outbreak management plans were present in 9/22 participating hospitals in Latin-America and 8/20 participating hospitals in Asia. Conclusions Considerable variation between countries was observed with regard to surveillance, outbreak detection, and response. Through discussion at the expert meeting, suggestions were made for the development of a more standardised approach in the form of a model contingency plan, with agreed outbreak definitions and country-specific risk assessment schemes to initiate early response activities according to the outbreak phase. This would also allow greater cross-country sharing of ideas. PMID:23800243

  11. Bleeding outcome during a dengue outbreak in 2005 in the East-coast region of Peninsular Malaysia: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Fariz-Safhan, M N; Tee, H P; Abu Dzarr, G A; Sapari, S; Lee, Y Y

    2014-06-01

    During a dengue outbreak in 2005 in the East-coast region of Peninsular Malaysia, one of the worst hit areas in the country at that time, we undertook a prospective study. We aimed to describe the bleeding outcome and changes in the liver and hematologic profiles that were associated with major bleeding outcome during the outbreak. All suspected cases of dengue admitted into the only referral hospital in the region during the outbreak were screened for WHO 2002 criteria and serology. Liver function, hematologic profile and severity of bleeding outcome were carefully documented. The association between symptoms, liver and hematologic impairments with the type of dengue infection (classical vs. hemorrhagic) and bleeding outcome (major vs. non-major) was tested. Dengue fever was confirmed in 183 cases (12.5/100,000 population) and 144 cases were analysed. 59.7% were dengue hemorrhagic fever, 3.5% were dengue shock syndrome and there were 3 in-hospital deaths. Major bleeding outcome (gastrointestinal bleeding, intracranial bleeding or haemoptysis) was present in 14.6%. Elevated AST, ALT and bilirubin were associated with increasing severity of bleeding outcome (all P < 0.05). Platelet count and albumin level were inversely associated with increasing severity of bleeding outcome (both P < 0.001). With multivariable analysis, dengue hemorrhagic fever was more likely in the presence of abdominal pain (OR 1.1, 95% CI 0.02- 1.6) and elevated AST (OR 1.0, 95% CI 1.0-1.1) but the presence of pleural effusion (OR 5.8, 95% CI: 1.1-29.9) and elevated AST (OR 1.008, 95% CI: 1.005-1.01) predicted a severe bleeding outcome. As a conclusion, the common presence of a severe hemorrhagic form of dengue fever may explain the rising death toll in recent outbreaks and the worst impairment in liver and hematologic profiles was seen in major bleeding outcome. PMID:25134895

  12. Diagnosis of Chikungunya dominated co-infection with dengue during an outbreak in south India (2010 and 2012).

    PubMed

    Venkatasubramani, K; Paramasivan, R; Thenmozhi, V; Dhananjeyan, K J; Balaji, T; Leo, S Victor Jerald

    2015-07-01

    Following a report of dengue outbreak from January 2010 to 2012 in the Tirunelveli, Theni, Dharmapuri and Thiruvallur districts of Tamil Nadu state, India, an investigation was carried out. The study was to demonstrate the probable presence of Chikungunya viral antibodies in patients clinically suspected of dengue fever. Out of 331 samples analysed, dengue viral antibodies were observed in 14.8% (n?=?49) of patients, while 16.6% (n?=?55) were positive for Chikungunya viral specific IgM antibodies. In the four districts surveyed, patients found positive for Chikungunya were found to be higher than dengue. The clinician should consider Chikungunya in the differential diagnosis of dengue-like infection appearing in the community. PMID:25990548

  13. USE OF A GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR DEFINING SPATIAL RISK FOR DENGUE TRANSMISSION IN BANGLADESH: ROLE FOR AEDES ALBOPICTUS IN AN URBAN OUTBREAK

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MOHAMMAD ALI; YUKIKO WAGATSUMA; MICHAEL EMCH; ROBERT F. BREIMAN

    2003-01-01

    We used conventional and spatial analytical tools to characterize patterns of transmission during a com- munity-wide outbreak of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever in Dhaka, Bangladesh in 2000. A comprehensive household-level mosquito vector survey and interview was conducted to obtain data on mosquito species and breeding as well as illness consistent with dengue. Clusters of dengue illnesses and high-density

  14. Community capacity for sustainable community–based dengue prevention and control: domain, assessment tool and capacity building model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charuai Suwanbamrung

    2010-01-01

    In order to understand the community capacity for sustainable community-based dengue prevention and control, this paper proposes the approach of a previous study about meaning and domains of dengue prevention and control, an assessment tool and a community capacity building model for sustainable community-based dengue prevention and control in the Southern Thailand. A study of dengue community capacity domains was

  15. Underrecognition of Leptospirosis During a Dengue Fever Outbreak in Hawaii, 2001–2002

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Tania; Imrie, Allison; Katz, Alan R.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract During the 10-year period from 1997 through 2006, the reported mean annual incidence rate of leptospirosis in the state of Hawaii was 3.3/100,000 with a range of 22–60 infections reported each year. Because the clinical presentation is highly variable, however, leptospirosis illness is challenging to recognize and may be underdiagnosed. To assess whether the incidence may be substantially higher than reported figures indicate, we retrospectively studied the prevalence of anti-Leptospira IgM antibodies among specimens obtained over a 12-month period (May 2001 to April 2002) from patients presenting with febrile illness during a dengue fever outbreak in Hawaii. Of 1206 patients testing negative or indeterminate for dengue, 54 (4.5%; 95% confidence interval: 3.3%–5.7%) were positive for anti-Leptospira IgM antibodies using a commercially available dipstick enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The most common clinical symptoms reported by laboratory-positive leptospirosis patients were fever (92%), headache (88%), and myalgia (83%). Three clinical symptoms were significantly less common among persons laboratory positive for leptospirosis when compared with the 122 patients who had been diagnosed with dengue fever during the outbreak: rash (p < 0.0001), chills (p = 0.05), and petechiae (p = 0.0005). Laboratory-positive leptospirosis infections were identified in persons exposed on each of the 5 most populous islands and illness onsets spanned a 10-month period, reflecting an endemic pattern of disease. If added to the figures obtained via routine passive surveillance, the number of leptospirosis infections identified through this study would more than double the annual incidence rate for Hawaii during 2001. These findings indicate that many leptospiral infections in Hawaii go undiagnosed. Physicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for leptospirosis when assessing patients presenting with acute febrile illness among residents and visitors to Hawaii. PMID:18447625

  16. Epidemiology and vector efficiency during a dengue fever outbreak in Cixi, Zhejiang Province, China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianci; Lu, Liang; Fu, Guiming; Zhong, Shi; Ding, Gangqiang; Xu, Rong; Zhu, Guangfeng; Shi, Nanfeng; Fan, Feilong; Liu, Qiyong

    2009-06-01

    An emigrant worker returning from Southeast Asia triggered the outbreak of a DF epidemic in Zhejiang province, China, in October, 2004. Eighty-three cases, mainly young and middle-aged people between 20 and 50 (78.3%), were reported in the area of Cixi. There were no obvious occupational patterns. The majority of cases were female, with a sex ratio of 1:1.86 (m:f). The dengue virus (DENV) strains from the epidemic area were isolated and identified as DENV-1, which belongs to Asian strain 1. According to the epidemiological investigation, the incidence of DF had no relationship to temperature, humidity, or precipitation, and the Breteau index of larvae showed a clear relationship only with the House Index and Container Index. Recent dengue problems in the town have been associated with the complex social factors and hygienic conditions for endemic villagers and immigrant workers. Some hygienic measures should be taken by the local government to reduce the risk of mosquito-borne disease. These measures should aim to eliminate the breeding sites of the vector Aedes albopictus in indoor and outdoor containers filled with rainwater and thus reducing the risk of DF transmission. PMID:20836815

  17. Undesirable Consequences of Insecticide Resistance following Aedes aegypti Control Activities Due to a Dengue Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Maciel-de-Freitas, Rafael; Avendanho, Fernando Campos; Santos, Rosangela; Sylvestre, Gabriel; Araújo, Simone Costa; Lima, José Bento Pereira; Martins, Ademir Jesus; Coelho, Giovanini Evelim; Valle, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Background During a dengue outbreak with co-circulation of DENV-1 and -2 in the city of Boa Vista, one patient was diagnosed with DENV-4, a serotype supposed absent from Brazil for almost 30 years. The re-emergence of DENV-4 triggered the intensification of mechanical and chemical Aedes aegypti control activities in order to reduce vector density and avoid DENV-4 dissemination throughout the country. Methods/Principal Findings Vector control activities consisted of (a) source reduction, (b) application of diflubenzuron against larvae and (c) vehicle-mounted space spraying of 2% deltamethrin to eliminate adults. Control activity efficacy was monitored by comparing the infestation levels and the number of eggs collected in ovitraps before and after interventions, performed in 22 Boa Vista districts, covering an area of ?80% of the city and encompassing 56,837 dwellings. A total of 94,325 containers were eliminated or treated with diflubenzuron. The most frequently positive containers were small miscellaneous receptacles, which corresponded to 59% of all positive breeding sites. Insecticide resistance to deltamethrin was assessed before, during and after interventions by dose-response bioassays adopting WHO-based protocols. The intense use of the pyrethroid increased fourfold the resistance ratio of the local Ae. aegypti population only six months after the beginning of vector control. Curiously, this trend was also observed in the districts in which no deltamethrin was applied by the public health services. On the other hand, changes in the resistance ratio to the organophosphate temephos seemed less influenced by insecticide in Boa Vista. Conclusions Despite the intense effort, mosquito infestation levels were only slightly reduced. Besides, the median number of eggs in ovitraps remained unaltered after control activity intensification. The great and rapid increase in pyrethroid resistance levels of natural Ae. aegypti populations is discussed in the context of both public and domestic intensification of chemical control due to a dengue outbreak. PMID:24676277

  18. Dengue

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in the United States. Symptoms include a high fever, headaches, joint and muscle pain, vomiting, and a ... In some cases, dengue turns into dengue hemorrhagic fever, which causes bleeding from your nose, gums, or ...

  19. The basic reproduction number R0 and effectiveness of reactive interventions during dengue epidemics: the 2002 dengue outbreak in Easter Island, Chile.

    PubMed

    Chowell, Gerardo; Fuentes, R; Olea, A; Aguilera, X; Nesse, H; Hyman, J M

    2013-01-01

    We use a stochastic simulation model to explore the effect of reactive intervention strategies during the 2002 dengue outbreak in the small population of Easter Island, Chile. We quantified the effect of interventions on the transmission dynamics and epidemic size as a function of the simulated control intensity levels and the timing of initiation of control interventions. Because no dengue outbreaks had been reported prior to 2002 in Easter Island, the 2002 epidemic provided a unique opportunity to estimate the basic reproduction number R0 during the initial epidemic phase, prior to the start of control interventions. We estimated R0 at 27.2 (95%CI: 14.8, 49.3). We found that the final epidemic size is highly sensitive to the timing of start of interventions. However, even when the control interventions start several weeks after the epidemic onset, reactive intervention efforts can have a significant impact on the final epidemic size. Our results indicate that the rapid implementation of control interventions can have a significant effect in reducing the epidemic size of dengue epidemics. PMID:24245625

  20. Lineage II of Southeast Asian/American DENV-2 is associated with a severe dengue outbreak in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Williams, Maya; Mayer, Sandra V; Johnson, William L; Chen, Rubing; Volkova, Evgeniya; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Widen, Steven G; Wood, Thomas G; Suarez-Ognio, Luis; Long, Kanya C; Hanley, Kathryn A; Morrison, Amy C; Vasilakis, Nikos; Halsey, Eric S

    2014-09-01

    During 2010 and 2011, the Loreto region of Peru experienced a dengue outbreak of unprecedented magnitude and severity for the region. This outbreak coincided with the reappearance of dengue virus-2 (DENV-2) in Loreto after almost 8 years. Whole-genome sequence indicated that DENV-2 from the outbreak belonged to lineage II of the southeast Asian/American genotype and was most closely related to viruses circulating in Brazil during 2007 and 2008, whereas DENV-2 previously circulating in Loreto grouped with lineage I (DENV-2 strains circulating in South America since 1990). One amino acid substitution (NS5 A811V) in the 2010 and 2011 isolates resulted from positive selection. However, the 2010 and 2011 DENV-2 did not replicate to higher titers in monocyte-derived dendritic cells and did not infect or disseminate in a higher proportion of Aedes aegypti than DENV-2 isolates previously circulating in Loreto. These results suggest that factors other than enhanced viral replication played a role in the severity of this outbreak. PMID:25002298

  1. Vaccines for Dengue

    Cancer.gov

    Among the arthropod-borne flaviviruses, the four dengue virus serotypes, dengue type 1 virus (DENV-1), dengue type 2 virus (DENV-2), dengue type 3 virus (DENV-3), and dengue type 4 virus (DENV-4) are most important in terms of human morbidity and geographic distribution. Dengue viruses cause dengue outbreaks and major epidemics in most tropical and subtropical areas where Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are abundant.

  2. Immunization coverage required to prevent outbreaks of dog rabies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul G. Coleman; Christopher Dye

    1996-01-01

    WHO recommends that 70% of dogs in a population should be immunized to eliminate or prevent outbreaks of rabies. This critical percentage (pc) has been established empirically from observations on the relationship between vaccination coverage and rabies incidence in dog populations around the world. Here, by contrast, we estimate pc by using epidemic theory, together with data available from four

  3. Dengue: a continuing global threat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria G. Guzman; Scott B. Halstead; Harvey Artsob; Philippe Buchy; Jeremy Farrar; Duane J. Gubler; Elizabeth Hunsperger; Axel Kroeger; Harold S. Margolis; Eric Martínez; Michael B. Nathan; Jose Luis Pelegrino; Cameron Simmons; Sutee Yoksan; Rosanna W. Peeling

    Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever are important arthropod-borne viral diseases. Each year, there are ?50 million dengue infections and ?500,000 individuals are hospitalized with dengue haemorrhagic fever, mainly in Southeast Asia, the Pacific and the Americas. Illness is produced by any of the four dengue virus serotypes. A global strategy aimed at increasing the capacity for surveillance and outbreak

  4. Effect of community participation on household environment to mitigate dengue transmission in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Suwannapong, N; Tipayamongkholgul, M; Bhumiratana, A; Boonshuyar, C; Howteerakul, N; Poolthin, S

    2014-03-01

    Due to the absence of dengue vaccination, vector control is the only measure to prevent dengue outbreaks. The key element of dengue prevention is to eliminate vector habitats. Clean household environment, preventive behaviors of household members and community participation in dengue prevention and control are key successful elements. This study aimed to investigate the associations between environmental factors, dengue knowledge, perception and preventive behaviors of household and collaboration of community members and household risk of dengue by using mixed methods. One dengue epidemic province was selected from each region of Thailand including Bangkok. Two districts, one from the highest and another from the lowest dengue incidence areas, were selected from those provinces. The household leaders, community members, and local authorities in highest dengue incidence areas were interviewed by using questionnaire and through group interviews. The environment of each selected household was observed. Of 4,561 households, 194 were reported having dengue case(s) in the past year and that outdoor solid waste disposal significantly influenced household risk of dengue (OR=1.62; 95% CI=1.16-2.29). In contrast, having gardening areas reduced dengue risk at household level by 32%. High level of community participation in dengue prevention and control in uninfected areas and the information from local authorities and community members reconfirmed that community participation was the key factor against dengue outbreaks. Sustainable process of encouraging community members to eliminate vector breeding sites such as outdoor solid waste disposal is likely to lead to an achievement in dengue prevention and control. PMID:24862055

  5. Changes in prevention and outbreak management of Legionnaires disease in the Netherlands between two large outbreaks in 1999 and 2006.

    PubMed

    Sonder, G J; van den Hoek, J A; Bovée, L P; Aanhane, F E; Worp, J; Du Ry van Beest Holle, M; van Steenbergen, J E; den Boer, J W; Ijzerman, E P; Coutinho, R A

    2008-09-18

    We describe an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease in 2006 in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Comparisons with the outbreak that took place in 1999 are made to evaluate changes in legionella prevention and outbreak management. The 2006 outbreak was caused by a wet cooling tower. Thirty-one patients were reported. The outbreak was detected two days after the first patient was admitted to hospital, and the source was eliminated five days later. The 1999 outbreak was caused by a whirlpool at a flower show, and 188 patients were reported. This outbreak was detected 14 days after the first patient was admitted to hospital, and two days later the source was traced. Since 1999, the awareness of legionellosis among physicians, the availability of a urinary antigen tests and more efficient early warning and communication systems improved the efficiency of legionellosis outbreak management. For prevention, extensive legislation with clear responsibilities has been put in place. For wet cooling towers, however, legislation regarding responsibility and supervision of maintenance needs to be improved. PMID:18801319

  6. Dengue Fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dengue Fever” will be included in “Health Information for International Travel, 2007-2008” which will be published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever are viral diseases transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. The disease is found in tropical and s...

  7. Management of animal botulism outbreaks: from clinical suspicion to practical countermeasures to prevent or minimize outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Anniballi, Fabrizio; Fiore, Alfonsina; Löfström, Charlotta; Skarin, Hanna; Auricchio, Bruna; Woudstra, Cédric; Bano, Luca; Segerman, Bo; Koene, Miriam; Båverud, Viveca; Hansen, Trine; Fach, Patrick; Tevell Aberg, Annica; Hedeland, Mikael; Olsson Engvall, Eva; De Medici, Dario

    2013-09-01

    Botulism is a severe neuroparalytic disease that affects humans, all warm-blooded animals, and some fishes. The disease is caused by exposure to toxins produced by Clostridium botulinum and other botulinum toxin-producing clostridia. Botulism in animals represents a severe environmental and economic concern because of its high mortality rate. Moreover, meat or other products from affected animals entering the food chain may result in a public health problem. To this end, early diagnosis is crucial to define and apply appropriate veterinary public health measures. Clinical diagnosis is based on clinical findings eliminating other causes of neuromuscular disorders and on the absence of internal lesions observed during postmortem examination. Since clinical signs alone are often insufficient to make a definitive diagnosis, laboratory confirmation is required. Botulinum antitoxin administration and supportive therapies are used to treat sick animals. Once the diagnosis has been made, euthanasia is frequently advisable. Vaccine administration is subject to health authorities' permission, and it is restricted to a small number of animal species. Several measures can be adopted to prevent or minimize outbreaks. In this article we outline all phases of management of animal botulism outbreaks occurring in wet wild birds, poultry, cattle, horses, and fur farm animals. PMID:23971806

  8. Patterns of dengue virus IgM and IgG antibodies in suspected cases of dengue in Jamaica, 2003-2006.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michelle G; Vickers, Ivan E; Salas, Rose Alba; Smikle, Monica Fisher

    2009-01-01

    The patterns of dengue immunoglobulin (Ig) M and IgG antibodies in patients presenting with dengue-like illnesses during 2003-2006 were investigated using enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The seroprevalence of dengue antibodies, dengue IgM and dengue IgG antibodies were 59.4% (979/1647), 15.4% (254/1647) and 51.1% (841/1647), respectively. A statistically significantly increasing trend in the prevalence of dengue IgG antibodies with age was observed, ranging from 38.4% in patients aged less than 1 year to 90% in those 60 of years and over (p = 0.000; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.000-0.002). Conversely the seroprevalence of dengue IgM did not differ significantly with age and no seasonality in the number of cases was observed. The patterns of IgM and IgG antibodies found in the present study are consistent with those found in dengue endemic countries during inter-epidemic periods indicating that an increasing risk of a new dengue outbreak due to the accumulation of susceptible population. Preventive measures should be maintained to control the endemic spread and reduce the risk of outbreaks of dengue in Jamaica. The high seroprevalence rate of dengue IgG antibodies might have implications for the emergence of the more severe forms dengue infection in the Jamaican population. PMID:19478396

  9. Natural attenuation of dengue virus type-2 after a series of island outbreaks: a retrospective phylogenetic study of events in the South Pacific three decades ago.

    PubMed

    Steel, Argon; Gubler, Duane J; Bennett, Shannon N

    2010-09-30

    Dengue is an expanding arboviral disease of variable severity characterized by the emergence of virus strains with greater fitness, epidemic potential and possibly virulence. To investigate the role of dengue virus (DENV) strain variation on epidemic activity we studied DENV-2 viruses from a series of South Pacific islands experiencing outbreaks of varying intensity and clinical severity. Initially appearing in 1971 in Tahiti and Fiji, the virus was responsible for subsequent epidemics in American Samoa, New Caledonia and Niue Island in 1972, reaching Tonga in 1973 where there was near-silent transmission for over a year. Based on whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis on 20 virus isolates, Tonga viruses were genetically unique, clustering in a single clade. Substitutions in the pre-membrane (prM) and nonstructural genes NS2A and NS4A correlated with the attenuation of the Tongan viruses and suggest that genetic change may play a significant role in dengue epidemic severity. PMID:20663532

  10. 75 FR 34146 - Draft Guideline for the Prevention and Control of Norovirus Gastroenteritis Outbreaks in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ...for developing, implementing, and evaluating infection prevention and control programs for healthcare settings across the continuum of care. This guideline provides evidence-based recommendations for prevention and control of norovirus outbreaks in...

  11. Molecular identification of the first local dengue fever outbreak in Shenzhen city, China: a potential imported vertical transmission from Southeast Asia?

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Guo, G Z; Chen, J Q; Ma, H W; Liu, T; Huang, D N; Yao, C H; Zhang, R L; Xue, C F; Zhang, L

    2014-02-01

    A suspected dengue fever outbreak occurred in 2010 at a solitary construction site in Shenzhen city, China. To investigate this epidemic, we used serological, molecular biological, and bioinformatics techniques. Of nine serum samples from suspected patients, we detected seven positive for dengue virus (DENV) antibodies, eight for DENV-1 RNA, and three containing live viruses. The isolated virus, SZ1029 strain, was sequenced and confirmed as DENV-1, showing the highest E-gene homology to D1/Malaysia/36000/05 and SG(EHI)DED142808 strains recently reported in Southeast Asia. Further phylogenetic tree analysis confirmed their close relationship. At the epidemic site, we also detected 14 asymptomatic co-workers (out of 291) positive for DENV antibody, and DENV-1-positive mosquitoes. Thus, we concluded that DENV-1 caused the first local dengue fever outbreak in Shenzhen. Because no imported case was identified, the molecular fingerprints of the SZ1029 strain suggest this outbreak may be due to vertical transmission imported from Southeast Asia. PMID:23587429

  12. Prevention and control of meningococcal outbreaks: The emerging role of serogroup B meningococcal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Oviedo-Orta, Ernesto; Ahmed, Sohail; Rappuoli, Rino; Black, Steven

    2015-07-17

    Recently an investigational meningococcal B vaccine has been used in two college outbreaks in the US. This is the first time that a meningococcal B vaccine has been used for outbreak control in the US. However, strain specific vaccines for meningococcal B outbreaks have been developed in Norway, Cuba and to control a large prolonged outbreak in New Zealand. Although meningococcal disease is mostly endemic and baseline rates in the US have fallen over the past decade, outbreaks are not uncommon in the US and globally. In an outbreak, disease risk can rise 1000 fold or more and such outbreaks can last a decade or longer causing significant morbidity and mortality. Here we review the evolution of several serogroup B outbreaks, and, when applicable, the development and impact of meningococcal B vaccines to control these outbreaks. Prior to the availability of "broad spectrum" meningococcal B vaccines, vaccines developed to control meningococcal B outbreaks were strain specific. With the development of two newly licensed meningococcal B vaccines - a four component meningococcal B vaccine (Bexsero(®), Novartis) and the two component fHBP vaccine (Trumenba(®), Pfizer) that target a broad array of meningococcal B strains, there is now the potential to prevent outbreaks and as well as to shorten the delay between identification of an outbreak and availability of a vaccine. PMID:26093201

  13. Historical Compilation and Georeferencing of Dengue and Chikungunya outbreak data for Disease Modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The risk of vector-borne disease spread is increasing due to significant changes and variability in the global climate and increasing global travel and trade. Understanding the relationships between climate variability and disease outbreak patterns are critical to the design and construction of pred...

  14. Enteric outbreaks in long-term care facilities and recommendations for prevention: a review.

    PubMed

    Greig, J D; Lee, M B

    2009-02-01

    Outbreaks of enteric illness in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) were reviewed to identify preventative recommendations. Systematic review methodology identified outbreak reports of gastrointestinal illness in LTCFs either published or that occurred from January 1997 to June 2007. The inclusion criteria captured 75 outbreaks; 23 (31%) associated with bacterial agents and 52 (69%) with viral agents. Transmission was mainly foodborne (52%) for those of bacterial origin and person-to-person (71%) for viral outbreaks. Norovirus infection was associated with 58% of hospitalizations. Sixty deaths were reported, about half from Salmonella infections. Recommendations for foodborne outbreaks emphasized appropriate sourcing and preparation of eggs, staff training, and temperature control during food preparation. Recommendations from outbreaks transmitted person-to-person centred on controlling residents' movements, effective environmental cleaning and disinfection, cancelling social events and restricting visitors, excluding ill staff, encouraging effective hand hygiene, and preventing cross-contamination through gloving and gowning. In none of the 75 published outbreak reports were the suggested recommendations evaluated for effectiveness in controlling the outbreak. Applied research of this type could greatly help in the acceptance of prevention and control strategies. PMID:18474129

  15. The Dynamics, Causes and Possible Prevention of Hepatitis E Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Nannyonga, Betty; Sumpter, David J. T.; Mugisha, Joseph Y. T.; Luboobi, Livingstone S.

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly spreading infectious diseases are a serious risk to public health. The dynamics and the factors causing outbreaks of these diseases can be better understood using mathematical models, which are fit to data. Here we investigate the dynamics of a Hepatitis E outbreak in the Kitgum region of northern Uganda during 2007 to 2009. First, we use the data to determine that is approximately 2.25 for the outbreak. Secondly, we use a model to estimate that the critical level of latrine and bore hole coverages needed to eradicate the epidemic is at least and respectively. Lastly, we further investigate the relationship between the co-infection factor for malaria and Hepatitis E on the value of for Hepatitis E. Taken together, these results provide us with a better understanding of the dynamics and possible causes of Hepatitis E outbreaks. PMID:22911752

  16. [Dengue and chikungunya acquired during travel in the tropics].

    PubMed

    van Aart, Carola J C; Braks, Marieta A H; Hautvast, Jeannine L A; de Mast, Quirijn; Tostmann, Alma

    2015-01-01

    The global incidence of dengue and chikungunya has greatly increased over recent decades, partly due to the increase of geographic distribution of both vectors. These infections are endemic to the tropics and subtropics, however autochthonous transmission and outbreaks have been described in non-endemic areas. Currently, there is a large chikungunya outbreak in the western hemisphere which started in the Caribbean. Chikungunya had not previously been endemic to this region. Both arboviral infections are important causes of fever in Dutch travellers returning from tropical destinations. The clinical presentations of dengue and chikungunya overlap; both are characterised by high fever and arthralgia. Bleeding and plasma leakage are potentially life-threatening complications of dengue, while persistent arthralgia typifies chikungunya. The prevention of mosquito bites, by using protective clothing and insect repellents, is the only way to prevent infection. No vaccine is yet available. PMID:25784059

  17. Managing and preventing outbreaks of Gram-negative infections in UK neonatal units.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Mark; Bedford-Russell, Alison; Cooper, Tracey; Fry, Carole; Heath, Paul T; Kennea, Nigel; McCartney, Maureen; Patel, Bharat; Pollard, Tina; Sharland, Mike; Wilson, Peter

    2013-11-01

    De novo guidance on the management of Gram-negative bacteria outbreaks in UK neonatal units was developed in 2012 by a Department of Health, England Antimicrobial Resistance and Healthcare Associated Infection working group. The recommendations included activation of an organisational response and establishing a control team when an outbreak is suspected; screening for the specific organism only during an outbreak; undertaking multidisciplinary reviews of cleaning routines, hand hygiene and Gram-negative bacteria transmission risks; considering deep-cleaning; cohorting colonised and infected babies preferably but not necessarily in isolation cubicles; and considering reducing beds or closing a unit to new admissions as a way of improving spacing and staff:patient ratios until the outbreak is under control. The group advised establishing mechanisms to communicate effectively across the network; informing parents of the outbreak as early as possible, and providing prewritten 'infection outbreak' information sheets. For prevention of outbreaks, the group advised meeting national staffing and cot-spacing requirements; following a Water Action Plan; using infection reduction care bundles and benchmarking; and introducing breast milk early and limiting antibiotic use. PMID:23792354

  18. Dengue Surveillance in Veterans Affairs Healthcare Facilities, 2007–2010

    PubMed Central

    Schirmer, Patricia L.; Lucero-Obusan, Cynthia A.; Benoit, Stephen R.; Santiago, Luis M.; Stanek, Danielle; Dey, Achintya; Martinez, Mirsonia; Oda, Gina; Holodniy, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Background Although dengue is endemic in Puerto Rico (PR), 2007 and 2010 were recognized as epidemic years. In the continental United States (US), outside of the Texas-Mexico border, there had not been a dengue outbreak since 1946 until dengue re-emerged in Key West, Florida (FL), in 2009–2010. The objective of this study was to use electronic and manual surveillance systems to identify dengue cases in Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare facilities and then to clinically compare dengue cases in Veterans presenting for care in PR and in FL. Methodology Outpatient encounters from 1/2007–12/2010 and inpatient admissions (only available from 10/2009–12/2010) with dengue diagnostic codes at all VA facilities were identified using VA's Electronic Surveillance System for Early Notification of Community-based Epidemics (ESSENCE). Additional case sources included VA data from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention BioSense and VA infection preventionists. Case reviews were performed. Categorical data was compared using Mantel-Haenszel or Fisher Exact tests and continuous variables using t-tests. Dengue case residence was mapped. Findings Two hundred eighty-eight and 21 PR and FL dengue cases respectively were identified. Of 21 FL cases, 12 were exposed in Key West and 9 were imported. During epidemic years, FL cases had significantly increased dengue testing and intensive care admissions, but lower hospitalization rates and headache or eye pain symptoms compared to PR cases. There were no significant differences in clinical symptoms, laboratory abnormalities or outcomes between epidemic and non-epidemic year cases in FL and PR. Confirmed/probable cases were significantly more likely to be hospitalized and have thrombocytopenia or leukopenia compared to suspected cases. Conclusions Dengue re-introduction in the continental US warrants increased dengue surveillance and education in VA. Throughout VA, under-testing of suspected cases highlights the need to emphasize use of diagnostic testing to better understand the magnitude of dengue among Veterans. PMID:23516642

  19. Dengue: a continuing global threat

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Maria G.; Halstead, Scott B.; Artsob, Harvey; Buchy, Philippe; Farrar, Jeremy; Gubler, Duane J.; Hunsperger, Elizabeth; Kroeger, Axel; Margolis, Harold S.; Martínez, Eric; Nathan, Michael B.; Pelegrino, Jose Luis; Simmons, Cameron; Yoksan, Sutee; Peeling, Rosanna W.

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever are important arthropod-borne viral diseases. Each year, there are ~50 million dengue infections and ~500,000 individuals are hospitalized with dengue haemorrhagic fever, mainly in Southeast Asia, the Pacific and the Americas. Illness is produced by any of the four dengue virus serotypes. A global strategy aimed at increasing the capacity for surveillance and outbreak response, changing behaviours and reducing the disease burden using integrated vector management in conjunction with early and accurate diagnosis has been advocated. Antiviral drugs and vaccines that are currently under development could also make an important contribution to dengue control in the future. PMID:21079655

  20. Transmission-blocking antibodies against mosquito C-type lectins for dengue prevention.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Fuchun; Liu, Jianying; Xiao, Xiaoping; Zhang, Siyin; Qin, Chengfeng; Xiang, Ye; Wang, Penghua; Cheng, Gong

    2014-02-01

    C-type lectins are a family of proteins with carbohydrate-binding activity. Several C-type lectins in mammals or arthropods are employed as receptors or attachment factors to facilitate flavivirus invasion. We previously identified a C-type lectin in Aedes aegypti, designated as mosquito galactose specific C-type lectin-1 (mosGCTL-1), facilitating the attachment of West Nile virus (WNV) on the cell membrane. Here, we first identified that 9 A. aegypti mosGCTL genes were key susceptibility factors facilitating DENV-2 infection, of which mosGCTL-3 exhibited the most significant effect. We found that mosGCTL-3 was induced in mosquito tissues with DENV-2 infection, and that the protein interacted with DENV-2 surface envelop (E) protein and virions in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the other identified mosGCTLs interacted with the DENV-2 E protein, indicating that DENV may employ multiple mosGCTLs as ligands to promote the infection of vectors. The vectorial susceptibility factors that facilitate pathogen invasion may potentially be explored as a target to disrupt the acquisition of microbes from the vertebrate host. Indeed, membrane blood feeding of antisera against mosGCTLs dramatically reduced mosquito infective ratio. Hence, the immunization against mosGCTLs is a feasible approach for preventing dengue infection. Our study provides a future avenue for developing a transmission-blocking vaccine that interrupts the life cycle of dengue virus and reduces disease burden. PMID:24550728

  1. Dengue viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Malavige, G; Fernando, S; Fernando, D; Seneviratne, S

    2004-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito borne diseases in the world. They may be asymptomatic or may give rise to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome. Annually, 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of DHF occur worldwide. Ninety percent of DHF subjects are children less than 15 years of age. At present, dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. No vaccine is available for preventing this disease. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate treatment are vital if disease related morbidity and mortality are to be limited. This review outlines aspects of the epidemiology of dengue infections, the dengue virus and its mosquito vector, clinical features and pathogenesis of dengue infections, and the management and control of these infections. PMID:15466994

  2. Protect Yourself and Your Baby from Dengue

    MedlinePLUS

    Avoid mosquito bites during pregnancy to prevent dengue in your newborn baby • Dengue is transmitted by the bite of infected Aedes aegypti mosquitoes • A pregnant woman infected with dengue virus may ...

  3. Molecular epidemiology suggests Venezuela as the origin of the dengue outbreak in Madeira, Portugal in 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Franco, L; Pagan, I; Serre Del Cor, N; Schunk, M; Neumayr, A; Molero, F; Potente, A; Hatz, C; Wilder-Smith, A; Sánchez-Seco, M P; Tenorio, A

    2015-07-01

    An explosive epidemic occurred in Madeira Island (Portugal) from October 2012 to February 2013. Published data showed that dengue virus type 1 introduced from South America was the incriminated virus. We aim to determine the origin of the strain introduced to Madeira by travellers returning to Europe. Using phylogeographic analysis and complete envelope sequences we have demonstrated that the most probable origin of the strain is Venezuela. PMID:25843502

  4. Prevention of Dengue Fever: An Exploratory School-Community Intervention Involving Students Empowered as Change Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayawardene, Wasantha P.; Lohrmann, David K.; YoussefAgha, Ahmed H.; Nilwala, Dayani C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DF/DHF) are epidemic and endemic in tropical and subtropical countries including Sri Lanka. Numerous structural and community interventions have been shown to be effective in interrupting the life cycle of mosquitoes that transmit DF/DHF; however, these interventions are not always implemented…

  5. Mycophenolic Acid Inhibits Dengue Virus Infection by Preventing Replication of Viral RNA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael S. Diamond; Marcus Zachariah; Eva Harris

    2002-01-01

    Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne viral disease of global importance with no available antiviral therapy. We assessed the ability of mycophenolic acid (MPA), a drug currently used as an immunosuppressive agent, to inhibit dengue virus (DV) antigen expression, RNA replication, and virus production. Pharmacological concentrations of MPA effectively blocked DV infection, decreasing the percentage of infected cells by 99% and

  6. Laboratory Surveillance of Dengue in Argentina, 1995–2001

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Maria Valeria; Rangeon, Griselda; Ranaivoarisoa, Marie Y.; Verzeri, Nora; Roginski, Sandra; Baroni, Pablo; Enria, Delia

    2003-01-01

    Local transmission of dengue fever virus in Argentina is increased by the presence of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and dengue outbreaks in neighboring countries. From 1995 to 2001, a laboratory-based active surveillance program detected 922 dengue cases. Indigenous transmission involving dengue-1 and -2 serotypes was confirmed only in subtropical areas in northern Argentina. PMID:12781019

  7. Integrating participatory community mobilization processes to improve dengue prevention: an eco-bio-social scaling up of local success in Machala, Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell-Foster, Kendra; Ayala, Efraín Beltrán; Breilh, Jaime; Spiegel, Jerry; Wilches, Ana Arichabala; Leon, Tania Ordóñez; Delgado, Jefferson Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Background This project investigates the effectiveness and feasibility of scaling-up an eco-bio-social approach for implementing an integrated community-based approach for dengue prevention in comparison with existing insecticide-based and emerging biolarvicide-based programs in an endemic setting in Machala, Ecuador. Methods An integrated intervention strategy (IIS) for dengue prevention (an elementary school-based dengue education program, and clean patio and safe container program) was implemented in 10 intervention clusters from November 2012 to November 2013 using a randomized controlled cluster trial design (20 clusters: 10 intervention, 10 control; 100 households per cluster with 1986 total households). Current existing dengue prevention programs served as the control treatment in comparison clusters. Pupa per person index (PPI) is used as the main outcome measure. Particular attention was paid to social mobilization and empowerment with IIS. Results Overall, IIS was successful in reducing PPI levels in intervention communities versus control clusters, with intervention clusters in the six paired clusters that followed the study design experiencing a greater reduction of PPI compared to controls (2.2 OR, 95% CI: 1.2 to 4.7). Analysis of individual cases demonstrates that consideration for contexualizing programs and strategies to local neighborhoods can be very effective in reducing PPI for dengue transmission risk reduction. Conclusions In the rapidly evolving political climate for dengue control in Ecuador, integration of successful social mobilization and empowerment strategies with existing and emerging biolarvicide-based government dengue prevention and control programs is promising in reducing PPI and dengue transmission risk in southern coastal communities like Machala. However, more profound analysis of social determination of health is called for to assess sustainability prospects. PMID:25604763

  8. The Prevalence and Endemic Nature of Dengue Infections in Guangdong, South China: An Epidemiological, Serological, and Etiological Study from 2005–2011

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ru-ning; Lin, Jin-yan; Li, Lin-hui; Ke, Chang-wen; He, Jian-feng; Zhong, Hao-jie; Zhou, Hui-qiong; Peng, Zhi-qiang; Yang, Fen; Liang, Wen-jia

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Frequent outbreaks of dengue are considered to be associated with an increased risk for endemicity of the disease. The occurrence of a large number of indigenous dengue cases in consecutive years indicates the possibility of a changing dengue epidemic pattern in Guangdong, China. Methods To have a clear understanding of the current dengue epidemic, a retrospective study of epidemiological profile, serological response, and virological features of dengue infections from 2005–2011 was conducted. Case data were collected from the National Notifiable Infectious Diseases Reporting Network. Serum samples were collected and prepared for serological verification and etiological confirmation. Incidence, temporal and spatial distribution, and the clinical manifestation of dengue infections were analyzed. Pearson's Chi-Square test was used to compare incidences between different age groups. A seroprevalence survey was implemented in local healthy inhabitants to obtain the overall positive rate for the specific immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibody against dengue virus (DENV). Results The overall annual incidence rate was 1.87/100000. A significant difference was found in age-specific incidence (Pearson's Chi-Square value 498.008, P<0.001). Children under 5 years of age had the lowest incidence of 0.28/100000. The vast majority of cases presented with a mild manifestation typical to dengue fever. The overall seroprevalence of dengue IgG antibody in local populations was 2.43% (range 0.28%–5.42%). DENV-1 was the predominant serotype in circulation through the years, while all 4 serotypes were identified in indigenous patients from different outbreak localities since 2009. Conclusions A gradual change in the epidemic pattern of dengue infection has been observed in recent years in Guangdong. With the endemic nature of dengue infections, the transition from a monotypic to a multitypic circulation of dengue virus in the last several years will have an important bearing on the prevention and control of dengue in the province and in the neighboring districts. PMID:24465613

  9. Evidence based community mobilization for dengue prevention in Nicaragua and Mexico (Camino Verde, the Green Way): cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Nava-Aguilera, Elizabeth; Arosteguí, Jorge; Morales-Perez, Arcadio; Suazo-Laguna, Harold; Legorreta-Soberanis, José; Hernandez-Alvarez, Carlos; Fernandez-Salas, Ildefonso; Paredes-Solís, Sergio; Balmaseda, Angel; Cortés-Guzmán, Antonio Juan; Serrano de los Santos, René; Coloma, Josefina; Ledogar, Robert J; Harris, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test whether community mobilization adds effectiveness to conventional dengue control. Design Pragmatic open label parallel group cluster randomized controlled trial. Those assessing the outcomes and analyzing the data were blinded to group assignment. Centralized computerized randomization after the baseline study allocated half the sites to intervention, stratified by country, evidence of recent dengue virus infection in children aged 3-9, and vector indices. Setting Random sample of communities in Managua, capital of Nicaragua, and three coastal regions in Guerrero State in the south of Mexico. Participants Residents in a random sample of census enumeration areas across both countries: 75 intervention and 75 control clusters (about 140 households each) were randomized and analyzed (60 clusters in Nicaragua and 90 in Mexico), including 85?182 residents in 18?838 households. Interventions A community mobilization protocol began with community discussion of baseline results. Each intervention cluster adapted the basic intervention—chemical-free prevention of mosquito reproduction—to its own circumstances. All clusters continued the government run dengue control program. Main outcome measures Primary outcomes per protocol were self reported cases of dengue, serological evidence of recent dengue virus infection, and conventional entomological indices (house index: households with larvae or pupae/households examined; container index: containers with larvae or pupae/containers examined; Breteau index: containers with larvae or pupae/households examined; and pupae per person: pupae found/number of residents). Per protocol secondary analysis examined the effect of Camino Verde in the context of temephos use. Results With cluster as the unit of analysis, serological evidence from intervention sites showed a lower risk of infection with dengue virus in children (relative risk reduction 29.5%, 95% confidence interval 3.8% to 55.3%), fewer reports of dengue illness (24.7%, 1.8% to 51.2%), fewer houses with larvae or pupae among houses visited (house index) (44.1%, 13.6% to 74.7%), fewer containers with larvae or pupae among containers examined (container index) (36.7%, 24.5% to 44.8%), fewer containers with larvae or pupae among houses visited (Breteau index) (35.1%, 16.7% to 55.5%), and fewer pupae per person (51.7%, 36.2% to 76.1%). The numbers needed to treat were 30 (95% confidence interval 20 to 59) for a lower risk of infection in children, 71 (48 to 143) for fewer reports of dengue illness, 17 (14 to 20) for the house index, 37 (35 to 67) for the container index, 10 (6 to 29) for the Breteau index, and 12 (7 to 31) for fewer pupae per person. Secondary per protocol analysis showed no serological evidence of a protective effect of temephos. Conclusions Evidence based community mobilization can add effectiveness to dengue vector control. Each site implementing the intervention in its own way has the advantage of local customization and strong community engagement. Trial registration ISRCTN27581154 PMID:26156323

  10. Dengue fever in the Indian Subcontinent: an overview.

    PubMed

    Raheel, Ummar; Faheem, Muhammad; Riaz, Mohammad Nasir; Kanwal, Naghmana; Javed, Farakh; Zaidi, Najam us Sahar Sadaf; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2011-04-01

    The Indian Subcontinent has emerged as a scene of many mosquito-borne infectious diseases, including malaria and dengue fever. After the 1990s, the rate of malaria declined owing largely to preventive measures, but at the same time dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) were increasing in the region. Outbreaks were recorded in all countries of the Indian Subcontinent with India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka on the forefront and suffering from the largest number of cases and deaths. We discuss annual cases of DF/DHF in these four countries and possible factors involved in DF outbreaks. We also discuss prevalent serotypes in this region where data suggest the emergence of DEN2 and DEN3 as the most dominant and lethal serotypes. Climate is an important factor influencing DF outbreaks, and rainfall, temperature and humidity play a pivotal role in DF outbreaks. Finally the economic impact of DF/DHF cases is discussed showing that direct and indirect economic loss due to DF/DHF reaches millions of USD each year. PMID:21537064

  11. The re-emergence of dengue in China.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Eng Eong

    2015-01-01

    The number of reports in the literature on dengue outbreaks in various parts of south China is increasing. This trend is likely contributed to by multiple factors, chief among which is the increase in trade and human movement in and out of China from the Southeast Asian region where dengue is firmly endemic. However, a holistic picture of dengue in China and how the public health authorities are responding to this global health challenge has been missing. In a research article published in BMC Medicine, Lai et al. have now filled this gap in knowledge by analysing statutorily mandated national dengue surveillance data from 1990 till 2014. They also conducted time series analyses to identify key drivers of dengue transmission in south China as well as from south China to the other parts of this vast and populous country. Their findings, as well as the description of surveillance and disease control activities in China, highlight urgent steps that need to be taken if China wishes to prevent itself from becoming another country that experiences large and frequent cycles of epidemic dengue. PMID:25925732

  12. Is drought helping or killing dengue? Investigation of spatiotemporal relationship between dengue fever and drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chieh-Han; Yu, Hwa-Lung

    2015-04-01

    Dengue Fever is a vector-borne disease that is transmitted between human and mosquitos in tropical and sub-tropical regions. Previous studies have found significant relationship between the epidemic of dengue cases and climate variables, especially temperature and precipitation. Besides, the natural phenomena (e.g., drought) are considered that significantly drop the number of dengue cases by killing vector's breeding environment. However, in Kaohsiung City, Taiwan, there are evidences that the temporal pattern of dengue is correlated to drought events. Kaohsiung City experienced two main dengue outbreaks in 2002 and 2014 that both years were confirmed with serious drought. Especially in 2014, Kaohsiung City was suffered from extremely dengue outbreak in 2014 that reported the highest number of dengue cases in the history. This study constructs the spatiotemporal model of dengue incidences and index of drought events (Standardized Precipitation Index, SPI) based on the distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM). Other meteorological measures are also included in the analysis.

  13. The Incubation Periods of Dengue Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Miranda; Johansson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Dengue viruses are major contributors to illness and death globally. Here we analyze the extrinsic and intrinsic incubation periods (EIP and IIP), in the mosquito and human, respectively. We identified 146 EIP observations from 8 studies and 204 IIP observations from 35 studies. These data were fitted with censored Bayesian time-to-event models. The best-fitting temperature-dependent EIP model estimated that 95% of EIPs are between 5 and 33 days at 25°C, and 2 and 15 days at 30°C, with means of 15 and 6.5 days, respectively. The mean IIP estimate was 5.9 days, with 95% expected between days 3 and 10. Differences between serotypes were not identified for either incubation period. These incubation period models should be useful in clinical diagnosis, outbreak investigation, prevention and control efforts, and mathematical modeling of dengue virus transmission. PMID:23226436

  14. Improved dengue fever prevention through innovative intervention methods in the city of Salto, Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Basso, César; García da Rosa, Elsa; Romero, Sonnia; González, Cristina; Lairihoy, Rosario; Roche, Ingrid; Caffera, Ruben M.; da Rosa, Ricardo; Calfani, Marisel; Alfonso-Sierra, Eduardo; Petzold, Max; Kroeger, Axel; Sommerfeld, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Background Uruguay is located at the southern border of Aedes aegypti distribution on the South American sub-continent. The reported dengue cases in the country are all imported from surrounding countries. One of the cities at higher risk of local dengue transmission is Salto, a border city with heavy traffic from dengue endemic areas. Methods We completed an intervention study using a cluster randomized trial design in 20 randomly selected ‘clusters’ in Salto. The clusters were located in neighborhoods of differing geography and economic, cultural and social aspects. Results Entomological surveys were carried out to measure the impact of the intervention on vector densities. Through participatory processes of all stakeholders, an appropriate ecosystem management intervention was defined. Residents collected the abundant small water holding containers and the Ministry of Public Health and the Municipality of Salto were responsible for collecting and eliminating them. Additional vector breeding places were large water tanks; they were either altered so that they could not hold water any more or covered so that oviposition by mosquitoes could not take place. Conclusions The response from the community and national programme managers was encouraging. The intervention evidenced opportunities for cost savings and reducing dengue vector densities (although not to statistically significant levels). The observed low vector density limits the potential reduction due to the intervention. A larger sample size is needed to obtain a statistically significant difference. PMID:25604764

  15. A spatiotemporal dengue fever early warning model accounting for nonlinear associations with meteorological factors: a Bayesian maximum entropy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chieh-Han; Yu, Hwa-Lung; Chien, Lung-Chang

    2014-05-01

    Dengue fever has been identified as one of the most widespread vector-borne diseases in tropical and sub-tropical. In the last decade, dengue is an emerging infectious disease epidemic in Taiwan especially in the southern area where have annually high incidences. For the purpose of disease prevention and control, an early warning system is urgently needed. Previous studies have showed significant relationships between climate variables, in particular, rainfall and temperature, and the temporal epidemic patterns of dengue cases. However, the transmission of the dengue fever is a complex interactive process that mostly understated the composite space-time effects of dengue fever. This study proposes developing a one-week ahead warning system of dengue fever epidemics in the southern Taiwan that considered nonlinear associations between weekly dengue cases and meteorological factors across space and time. The early warning system based on an integration of distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM) and stochastic Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) analysis. The study identified the most significant meteorological measures including weekly minimum temperature and maximum 24-hour rainfall with continuous 15-week lagged time to dengue cases variation under condition of uncertainty. Subsequently, the combination of nonlinear lagged effects of climate variables and space-time dependence function is implemented via a Bayesian framework to predict dengue fever occurrences in the southern Taiwan during 2012. The result shows the early warning system is useful for providing potential outbreak spatio-temporal prediction of dengue fever distribution. In conclusion, the proposed approach can provide a practical disease control tool for environmental regulators seeking more effective strategies for dengue fever prevention.

  16. Quantifying the Spatial Dimension of Dengue Virus Epidemic Spread within a Tropical Urban Environment

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M.; Kitron, Uriel; Montgomery, Brian; Horne, Peter; Ritchie, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Dengue infection spread in naive populations occurs in an explosive and widespread fashion primarily due to the absence of population herd immunity, the population dynamics and dispersal of Ae. aegypti, and the movement of individuals within the urban space. Knowledge on the relative contribution of such factors to the spatial dimension of dengue virus spread has been limited. In the present study we analyzed the spatio-temporal pattern of a large dengue virus-2 (DENV-2) outbreak that affected the Australian city of Cairns (north Queensland) in 2003, quantified the relationship between dengue transmission and distance to the epidemic's index case (IC), evaluated the effects of indoor residual spraying (IRS) on the odds of dengue infection, and generated recommendations for city-wide dengue surveillance and control. Methods and Findings We retrospectively analyzed data from 383 DENV-2 confirmed cases and 1,163 IRS applications performed during the 25-week epidemic period. Spatial (local k-function, angular wavelets) and space-time (Knox test) analyses quantified the intensity and directionality of clustering of dengue cases, whereas a semi-parametric Bayesian space-time regression assessed the impact of IRS and spatial autocorrelation in the odds of weekly dengue infection. About 63% of the cases clustered up to 800 m around the IC's house. Most cases were distributed in the NW-SE axis as a consequence of the spatial arrangement of blocks within the city and, possibly, the prevailing winds. Space-time analysis showed that DENV-2 infection spread rapidly, generating 18 clusters (comprising 65% of all cases), and that these clusters varied in extent as a function of their distance to the IC's residence. IRS applications had a significant protective effect in the further occurrence of dengue cases, but only when they reached coverage of 60% or more of the neighboring premises of a house. Conclusion By applying sound statistical analysis to a very detailed dataset from one of the largest outbreaks that affected the city of Cairns in recent times, we not only described the spread of dengue virus with high detail but also quantified the spatio-temporal dimension of dengue virus transmission within this complex urban environment. In areas susceptible to non-periodic dengue epidemics, effective disease prevention and control would depend on the prompt response to introduced cases. We foresee that some of the results and recommendations derived from our study may also be applicable to other areas currently affected or potentially subject to dengue epidemics. PMID:21200419

  17. Innovative community-based ecosystem management for dengue and Chagas disease prevention in low and middle income countries in Latin America and the Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Finkelman, Jacobo

    2015-01-01

    In 2009, the WHO Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) and the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) launched a call for innovative community-based ecosystem management research projects for dengue and Chagas disease prevention in low and middle income countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. Eight research institutions were selected. The outputs of these projects led to a better understanding of the interaction between ecological, biological, social and economic (eco-bio-social) determinants of dengue and Chagas disease in Latin America and the Caribbean. Both diseases are considered highly relevant in the regional health agendas. PMID:25604758

  18. Anthracene-based Inhibitors of Dengue Virus NS2B-NS3 Protease†

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, Suzanne M.; Watowich, Stanley J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that has strained global healthcare systems throughout tropical and subtropical regions of the world. In addition to plaguing developing nations, it has re-emerged in several developed countries with recent outbreaks in the USA (CDC, 2010), Australia (Hanna et al., 2009), Taiwan (Kuan et al., 2010) and France (La Ruche et al., 2010). DENV infection can cause significant disease, including dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, dengue shock syndrome, and death. There are no approved vaccines or antiviral therapies to prevent or treat dengue-related illnesses. However, the viral NS2B-NS3 protease complex provides a strategic target for antiviral drug development since NS3 protease activity is required for virus replication. Recently, we reported two compounds with inhibitory activity against the DENV protease in vitro and antiviral activity against dengue 2 (DEN2V) in cell culture (Tomlinson et al., 2009a). Analogs of one of the lead compounds were purchased, tested in protease inhibition assays, and the data evaluated with detailed kinetic analyses. A structure activity relationship (SAR) identified key atomic determinants (i.e. functional groups) important for inhibitory activity. Four “second series” analogs were selected and tested to validate our SAR and structural models. Here, we report improvements to inhibitory activity ranging between ~2- and 60-fold, resulting in selective low micromolar dengue protease inhibitors. PMID:21185332

  19. Dengue Fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... help lower the chances of infection. About Dengue Fever Dengue (DEN-gee) fever is caused by four similar viruses spread by ... else, that person can be infected with dengue fever. The virus can't spread directly from person ...

  20. Describing the geographic spread of dengue disease by traveling waves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norberto Aníbal Maidana; Hyun Mo Yang

    2008-01-01

    Dengue is a human disease transmitted by the mosquito Aedes aegypti. For this reason geographical regions infested by this mosquito species are under the risk of dengue outbreaks. In this work, we propose a mathematical model to study the spatial dissemination of dengue using a system of partial differential reaction–diffusion equations. With respect to the human and mosquito populations, we

  1. [Classical dengue transmission dynamics involving mechanical control and prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Toro-Zapata, Hernán D; Restrepo, Leonardo D; Vergaño-Salazar, Juan G; Muñoz-Loaiza, Aníbal

    2010-12-01

    Dengue fever transmission dynamics were studied in an endemic region considering the use of preventative measures and mechanical control in reducing transmission of the disease. A system of ordinary differential equations was proposed, describing the dynamics and their evolution as determined by numerical simulation. Different mechanical control and prophylaxis strategies were compared to the situation without control. The basic reproduction number R? was determined R? to show that if R? > 1 there would be a risk of an epidemic and otherwise the disease would have low impact levels. The basic reproduction number helps determine the dynamics' future pattern and contrast the results so obtained with those obtained numerically. It was concluded that although prophylaxis and mechanical control alone provide effective results in controlling the disease, if both controls are combined then infection levels become significantly reduced. Around 60 % mechanical control and prevention levels are needed to provide suitable results in controlling dengue outbreaks. PMID:22030689

  2. Effectiveness analysis of fumigation strategy in dengue disease prevention program (Case study: Jakarta province, Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustine, D.; Mahatma, Y.; Aldila, D.

    2015-03-01

    Mathematical model of dengue disease with fumigation intervention for mosquito population will discussed in this article. Interaction between human and mosquitoes population will based on SIR-SI host-vector model. Side effect of fumigation where mosquito capable to developed a resistance to fumigation will be accommodated in to the model. Equilibrium points and basic reproductive ratio as the endemic criteria will be shown analytically. Some numerical results are shown to give a back up reasoning for analytical result. We conclude that resistance of mosquitoes to fumigation intervention play an important role in fumigation strategy.

  3. Dengue and Severe Dengue

    MedlinePLUS

    ... dengue is a potentially deadly complication due to plasma leaking, fluid accumulation, respiratory distress, severe bleeding, or ... removing artificial man-made habitats; covering, emptying and cleaning of domestic water storage containers on a weekly ...

  4. Clustering, climate and dengue transmission.

    PubMed

    Junxiong, Pang; Yee-Sin, Leo

    2015-06-01

    Dengue is currently the most rapidly spreading vector-borne disease, with an increasing burden over recent decades. Currently, neither a licensed vaccine nor an effective anti-viral therapy is available, and treatment largely remains supportive. Current vector control strategies to prevent and reduce dengue transmission are neither efficient nor sustainable as long-term interventions. Increased globalization and climate change have been reported to influence dengue transmission. In this article, we reviewed the non-climatic and climatic risk factors which facilitate dengue transmission. Sustainable and effective interventions to reduce the increasing threat from dengue would require the integration of these risk factors into current and future prevention strategies, including dengue vaccination, as well as the continuous support and commitment from the political and environmental stakeholders. PMID:25872683

  5. [Risk perception and strategies for mass communication on dengue in the Americas].

    PubMed

    San Martín, José Luis; Prado, Mónica

    2004-02-01

    Dengue is clearly a very serious public health problem. In the Americas the number of dengue cases has been increasing since the 1960s, and outbreaks of the disease have been occurring more frequently. Furthermore, the density of infestation with the disease vector, the Aedes aegypti mosquito, is high in the Americas. The general strategy for preventing and controlling dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever is based on promoting behavior changes that lead to incorporating the community in controlling the disease, particularly the vector. In order to achieve this, mass communication programs on dengue should have two primary aims: converting information into practice and encouraging the community to take over prevention and control measures. The new generation of programs should be designed based on the local sanitation structure (water distribution and waste disposal) as well as information on community organizations and the roles of different family members. Furthermore, the new programs should incorporate all the following ten components: epidemiological surveillance, intersectoral actions, community participation, managing the environment and basic services, patient care, case reporting, education, using insecticides and vector control, training, and preparing for emergencies. Communication should be aimed at modifying the behavior of individuals and the community by empowering them to carry out prevention and control measures. PMID:15030659

  6. Lessons raised by the major 2010 dengue epidemics in the French West Indies.

    PubMed

    Larrieu, S; Cassadou, S; Rosine, J; Chappert, J L; Blateau, A; Ledrans, M; Quénel, P

    2014-03-01

    Dengue fever has been endemo-epidemic in the whole Region of America. In 2010, Guadeloupe and Martinique experienced historical epidemics, with an estimated attack rate of 10% in two islands. When considering the temporal evolution of epidemiological indicators, an unusual increase in the number of dengue cases could be detected very early. Two main factors might have facilitated the settlement of a viral transmission despite the dry season: a low immunity of the population against the circulating serotype and particular climatic conditions, notably very high temperatures which could have improved both virus and vector efficiency. This unusual situation was considered as a warning sign, and indeed led to major outbreaks in both islands a few weeks later. This event underlines that follow-up of epidemiological indicators is necessary to detect the unusual situations as soon as possible. Furthermore, development of biological and modelling tools should be promoted, as well as integrated management strategies for dengue prevention and control. PMID:24315801

  7. The epidemiologic surveillance of dengue-fever in French Guiana: when achievements trigger higher goals.

    PubMed

    Flamand, Claude; Quenel, Philippe; Ardillon, Vanessa; Carvalho, Luisiane; Bringay, Sandra; Teisseire, Maguelonne

    2011-01-01

    The epidemiology of dengue fever in French Guiana is marked by a combination of permanent transmission of the virus in the whole country and the occurrence of regular epidemics. Since 2006, a multi data source surveillance system was implemented to monitor dengue fever patterns, to improve early detection of outbreaks and to allow a better provision of information to health authorities, in order to guide and evaluate prevention activities and control measures. This report illustrates the validity and the performances of the system. We describe the experience gained by such a surveillance system and outline remaining challenges. Future works will consist in the use of other data sources such as environmental factors in order to improve knowledge on virus transmission mechanisms and determine how to use them for outbreaks prediction. PMID:21893824

  8. Climate and Dengue Transmission: Evidence and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Comrie, Andrew C.; Ernst, Kacey

    2013-01-01

    Background: Climate influences dengue ecology by affecting vector dynamics, agent development, and mosquito/human interactions. Although these relationships are known, the impact climate change will have on transmission is unclear. Climate-driven statistical and process-based models are being used to refine our knowledge of these relationships and predict the effects of projected climate change on dengue fever occurrence, but results have been inconsistent. Objective: We sought to identify major climatic influences on dengue virus ecology and to evaluate the ability of climate-based dengue models to describe associations between climate and dengue, simulate outbreaks, and project the impacts of climate change. Methods: We reviewed the evidence for direct and indirect relationships between climate and dengue generated from laboratory studies, field studies, and statistical analyses of associations between vectors, dengue fever incidence, and climate conditions. We assessed the potential contribution of climate-driven, process-based dengue models and provide suggestions to improve their performance. Results and Discussion: Relationships between climate variables and factors that influence dengue transmission are complex. A climate variable may increase dengue transmission potential through one aspect of the system while simultaneously decreasing transmission potential through another. This complexity may at least partly explain inconsistencies in statistical associations between dengue and climate. Process-based models can account for the complex dynamics but often omit important aspects of dengue ecology, notably virus development and host–species interactions. Conclusion: Synthesizing and applying current knowledge of climatic effects on all aspects of dengue virus ecology will help direct future research and enable better projections of climate change effects on dengue incidence. Citation: Morin CW, Comrie AC, Ernst KC. 2013. Climate and dengue transmission: evidence and implications. Environ Health Perspect 121:1264–1272;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1306556 PMID:24058050

  9. 78 FR 43219 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Live Attenuated Dengue Tetravalent Vaccine Containing a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ...1970 only nine countries had experienced Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) epidemics, a number that had increased more than four-fold...means for prevention of dengue infection and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) by immunization with attenuated, immunogenic...

  10. 75 FR 6211 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Purified Inactivated Dengue Tetravalent Vaccine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-08

    ...1970 only nine countries had experienced Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) epidemics, a number that had increased more than four-fold...means for prevention of dengue infection and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) by immunization with attenuated, immunogenic...

  11. WATERBORNE OUTBREAKS OF GIARDIASIS: WHY THEY HAPPEN, HOW TO PREVENT THEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Giardiasis is transmitted by contaminated drinking water or food or contact with infected individuals through the fecal-oral route of exposure. Frequently reported are outbreaks in day-care centers and infections in campers and backpackers, travelers outside the U.S., and homosex...

  12. Analyzing the spatio-temporal relationship between dengue vector larval density and land-use using factor analysis and spatial ring mapping

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dengue, a mosquito-borne febrile viral disease, is found in tropical and sub-tropical regions and is now extending its range to temperate regions. The spread of the dengue viruses mainly depends on vector population (Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus), which is influenced by changing climatic conditions and various land-use/land-cover types. Spatial display of the relationship between dengue vector density and land-cover types is required to describe a near-future viral outbreak scenario. This study is aimed at exploring how land-cover types are linked to the behavior of dengue-transmitting mosquitoes. Methods Surveys were conducted in 92 villages of Phitsanulok Province Thailand. The sampling was conducted on three separate occasions in the months of March, May and July. Dengue indices, i.e. container index (C.I.), house index (H.I.) and Breteau index (B.I.) were used to map habitats conducible to dengue vector growth. Spatial epidemiological analysis using Bivariate Pearson’s correlation was conducted to evaluate the level of interdependence between larval density and land-use types. Factor analysis using principal component analysis (PCA) with varimax rotation was performed to ascertain the variance among land-use types. Furthermore, spatial ring method was used as to visualize spatially referenced, multivariate and temporal data in single information graphic. Results Results of dengue indices showed that the settlements around gasoline stations/workshops, in the vicinity of marsh/swamp and rice paddy appeared to be favorable habitat for dengue vector propagation at highly significant and positive correlation (p = 0.001) in the month of May. Settlements around the institutional areas were highly significant and positively correlated (p = 0.01) with H.I. in the month of March. Moreover, dengue indices in the month of March showed a significant and positive correlation (p <= 0.05) with deciduous forest. The H.I. of people living around horticulture land were significantly and positively correlated (p = 0.05) during the month of May, and perennial vegetation showed a highly significant and positive correlation (p = 0.001) in the month of March with C.I. and significant and positive correlation (p <= 0.05) with B.I., respectively. Conclusions The study concluded that gasoline stations/workshops, rice paddy, marsh/swamp and deciduous forests played highly significant role in dengue vector growth. Thus, the spatio-temporal relationships of dengue vector larval density and land-use types may help to predict favorable dengue habitat, and thereby enables public healthcare managers to take precautionary measures to prevent impending dengue outbreak. PMID:23043443

  13. [The 1991 dengue epidemic in Kaohsiung City].

    PubMed

    Harn, M R; Chiang, Y L; Tian, M J; Chang, Y H; Ko, Y C

    1993-03-01

    In Kaohsiung City, dengue fever subsided for two years after the 1987-1988 epidemic. The main reason that it recurred was due to late diagnoses of the dengue fever in patients because of mild or atypical clinical presentations. The first patient contracted dengue fever from Thailand in mid-May, 1991. The disease then spread among his co-workers. Dengue fever was not suspected until the 9th patient contracted it in early July 1991. Through chain transmission, the epidemic spread in the community and even to other parts of Taiwan. There were 113 confirmed dengue cases in Kaohsiung City, and a total of 175 cases on the whole island during the 1991 epidemic. The clinical manifestations were mainly fever, body pain, dizziness, general weakness, and a skin rash. No instances of severe bleeding, shock or dengue hemorrhagic fever were found. Seven dengue 1 and three dengue 3 viruses were isolated from the sera of patients. We found that the clinical severity of the 1991 dengue epidemic was milder, and the viral isolation rate was lower, compared with the 1987-1988 epidemic, although these two outbreaks of dengue fever were both mostly due to dengue type 1. Genetic variation in the dengue virus may be the explanation. Clinically, about 35% of the patients were missed or not reported, although they were finally demonstrated to be dengue fever patients during a patient survey in the epidemic area. For early detection, viral surveys should be performed in new epidemic regions in addition to fixed-spot surveillance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8103385

  14. Emergence of dengue virus type 4 (genotype I) in India.

    PubMed

    Dash, P K; Sharma, S; Srivastava, A; Santhosh, S R; Parida, M M; Neeraja, M; Subbalaxmi, M V S; Lakshmi, V; Rao, P V L

    2011-06-01

    Dengue is an emerging arboviral disease and currently poses the greatest arboviral threat to human health. In recent decades, there has been a substantial increase in dengue outbreaks in many parts of the world including India. We performed an in-depth investigation of a major dengue outbreak in Andhra Pradesh, southern India in 2007 by serology, virus isolation, RT-PCR and genotyping. The results revealed an unusual emergence of dengue virus type 4 (DENV-4) along with the prevailing DENV-3. Phylogenetic analysis based on complete envelope gene of 182 globally diverse DENV-4 isolates demonstrated the involvement of a unique clade of genotype I of DENV-4 in the outbreak. This study also demonstrated a clear shift in the dominant serotype from DENV-3 to DENV-4 in India. This is the first report regarding the molecular characterization of Indian isolates of DENV-4, which has the potential to be involved in future outbreaks. PMID:20670467

  15. [Perinatal dengue].

    PubMed

    Salgado, Doris Martha; Rodríguez, Jairo Antonio; Lozano, Liliana del Pilar; Zabaleta, Tatiana Esther

    2013-09-01

    Dengue is currently the most important viral disease transmitted by arthropods and which is hyperendemic in the Americas. An increase in the number of cases is related to dengue during pregnancy and the neonatal period. According to the gestational age in which infection occurs, there could be different manifestations in the fetus including abortion, malformations or neonatal dengue in newborns. This article presents a review regarding some cases reported worldwide, especially in the Americas, and some pathophysiologic issues related to perinatal dengue. PMID:24652245

  16. Dengue fever, Hawaii, 2001-2002.

    PubMed

    Effler, Paul V; Pang, Lorrin; Kitsutani, Paul; Vorndam, Vance; Nakata, Michele; Ayers, Tracy; Elm, Joe; Tom, Tammy; Reiter, Paul; Rigau-Perez, José G; Hayes, John M; Mills, Kristin; Napier, Mike; Clark, Gary G; Gubler, Duane J

    2005-05-01

    Autochthonous dengue infections were last reported in Hawaii in 1944. In September 2001, the Hawaii Department of Health was notified of an unusual febrile illness in a resident with no travel history; dengue fever was confirmed. During the investigation, 1,644 persons with locally acquired denguelike illness were evaluated, and 122 (7%) laboratory-positive dengue infections were identified; dengue virus serotype 1 was isolated from 15 patients. No cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever or shock syndrome were reported. In 3 instances autochthonous infections were linked to a person who reported denguelike illness after travel to French Polynesia. Phylogenetic analyses showed the Hawaiian isolates were closely associated with contemporaneous isolates from Tahiti. Aedes albopictus was present in all communities surveyed on Oahu, Maui, Molokai, and Kauai; no Ae. aegypti were found. This outbreak underscores the importance of maintaining surveillance and control of potential disease vectors even in the absence of an imminent disease threat. PMID:15890132

  17. Dengue Fever, Hawaii, 2001–2002

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Lorrin; Kitsutani, Paul; Vorndam, Vance; Nakata, Michele; Ayers, Tracy; Elm, Joe; Tom, Tammy; Reiter, Paul; Rigau-Perez, José G.; Hayes, John M.; Mills, Kristin; Napier, Mike; Clark, Gary G.; Gubler, Duane J.

    2005-01-01

    Autochthonous dengue infections were last reported in Hawaii in 1944. In September 2001, the Hawaii Department of Health was notified of an unusual febrile illness in a resident with no travel history; dengue fever was confirmed. During the investigation, 1,644 persons with locally acquired denguelike illness were evaluated, and 122 (7%) laboratory-positive dengue infections were identified; dengue virus serotype 1 was isolated from 15 patients. No cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever or shock syndrome were reported. In 3 instances autochthonous infections were linked to a person who reported denguelike illness after travel to French Polynesia. Phylogenetic analyses showed the Hawaiian isolates were closely associated with contemporaneous isolates from Tahiti. Aedes albopictus was present in all communities surveyed on Oahu, Maui, Molokai, and Kauai; no Ae. aegypti were found. This outbreak underscores the importance of maintaining surveillance and control of potential disease vectors even in the absence of an imminent disease threat. PMID:15890132

  18. Intervention measures, turning point, and reproduction number for dengue, Singapore, 2005.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ying-Hen; Ma, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The 2005 dengue outbreak in Singapore cumulated in > 14,000 cases and 27 reported dengue deaths. We fit the single-phase Richards model to weekly dengue notification numbers to detect the turning point for the outbreak, which enables us to study the impact of intervention measures relating to the turning point. The results indicate that turning point had most likely occurred in late August or early September, before large-scale intervention measures were implemented. The "initial" reproduction number for the outbreak is estimated to be ~1.89-2.23 (95% confidence interval: 1.15-3.00). One of the lessons learned from the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak is that multiple phases of outbreak were observed in some affected countries when efforts to intensify intervention or to sustain vigilance were compromised. Intensive and continuing efforts in the implementation of control measures are essential in reducing further dengue occurrences during any resurgence of dengue. PMID:19141842

  19. Quantifying the Emergence of Dengue in Hanoi, Vietnam: 1998–2009

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hoang Quoc Cuong; Nguyen Tran Hien; Tran Nhu Duong; Tran Vu Phong; Nguyen Nhat Cam; Jeremy Farrar; Vu Sinh Nam; Khoa T. D. Thai; Peter Horby

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundAn estimated 2.4 billion people live in areas at risk of dengue transmission, therefore the factors determining the establishment of endemic dengue in areas where transmission suitability is marginal is of considerable importance. Hanoi, Vietnam is such an area, and following a large dengue outbreak in 2009, we set out to determine if dengue is emerging in Hanoi.Methods and Principal

  20. Dengue Fever Testing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this website will be limited. Search Help? Dengue Fever Testing Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Dengue Fever Antibodies; Dengue Fever Virus Formal name: Dengue Antibodies ( ...

  1. Dengue/dengue haemorrhagic fever

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    0000-00-00

    A World Health Organization page devoted to the control of dengue. Many excellent informative PDF files are available from this page dealing with vector control, as well as recognition of symptoms, and treatment of dengue haemorrhagic fever. Estimated numbers of at risk people are staggering. A powerful resource for teaching the importance of vector borne diseases.

  2. Community-based dengue prevention programs in Puerto Rico: impact on knowledge, behavior, and residential mosquito infestation.

    PubMed

    Winch, Peter J; Leontsini, Elli; Rigau-Pérez, José G; Ruiz-Pérez, Mervin; Clark, Gary G; Gubler, Duane J

    2002-10-01

    Dengue is a major health burden in Puerto Rico. Televised public service announcements and posters, elementary and pre-school educational programs, and an exhibit at the Children's Museum in Old San Juan were evaluated separately using knowledge and practices surveys administered to children and their parents, surveys of house lots for larval container habitats, focus groups, and interviews with program organizers and participants. Exposure to the programs was associated with increased dengue-related knowledge, increased proportion of tires protected from rain, decreased proportion of water storage containers positive for mosquito larvae, and increased indoor use of aerosol insecticides. Exposure to the elementary school program was associated with slightly lower indices of residential mosquito infestation. The programs have resulted in high levels of awareness, some behavior change, and limited change in larval indices. Greater emphasis on the skills necessary for community members to keep containers free of mosquito larvae would increase program effectiveness. PMID:12452490

  3. Social justice, climate change, and dengue.

    PubMed

    Chang, Aileen Y; Fuller, Douglas O; Carrasquillo, Olveen; Beier, John C

    2014-01-01

    Climate change should be viewed fundamentally as an issue of global justice. Understanding the complex interplay of climatic and socioeconomic trends is imperative to protect human health and lessen the burden of diseases such as dengue fever. Dengue fever is rapidly expanding globally. Temperature, rainfall, and frequency of natural disasters, as well as non-climatic trends involving population growth and migration, urbanization, and international trade and travel, are expected to increase the prevalence of mosquito breeding sites, mosquito survival, the speed of mosquito reproduction, the speed of viral incubation, the distribution of dengue virus and its vectors, human migration patterns towards urban areas, and displacement after natural disasters. The burden of dengue disproportionately affects the poor due to increased environmental risk and decreased health care. Mobilization of social institutions is needed to improve the structural inequalities of poverty that predispose the poor to increased dengue fever infection and worse outcomes. This paper reviews the link between dengue and climatic factors as a starting point to developing a comprehensive understanding of how climate change affects dengue risk and how institutions can address the issues of social justice and dengue outbreaks that increasingly affect vulnerable urban populations. PMID:25474614

  4. Dengue Fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... email updates Order publications Featured Research One small RNA regulates mosquito development, growth, and reproduction. Read more ... the 20th century, many tropical regions of the world saw an increase in dengue cases. Epidemics also ...

  5. Dengue Virus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Greg Smith

    \\u000a Dengue Virus (DENV) diagnosis can be performed by isolation of DENV from blood or autopsy samples; demonstration of a four-fold\\u000a or greater rise in reciprocal IgG or IgM antibody titres to one or more DENV in paired serum samples (acute and convascent);\\u000a use of the newer rapid diagnostic test kit (also differentiates between primary and secondary dengue infections – these

  6. Confusion, knock-down and kill of Aedes aegypti using metofluthrin in domestic settings: a powerful tool to prevent dengue transmission?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dengue control methods are reliant upon control of the vector, primarily Aedes aegypti. Current adulticiding methods in North Queensland include treating premises with residual synthetic pyrethroid insecticides (interior residual spraying; IRS), a laborious, intrusive task. The vapor active synthetic pyrethroid metofluthrin might offer an efficient alternative as some studies indicate that it prevents biting and has strong knockdown effects. However, its expellant and/or irritant effects, longevity, residual activity and the speed with which biting behavior is disrupted have not yet been characterized. Methods We exposed cohorts of Cairns colony (F2-4) Ae. aegypti to rooms (17–24 m3) treated with 5% and 10% AI metofluthrin emanators. Using free-flying and caged populations we measured biting (human landing rate), expulsion through unscreened windows, knockdown and death over periods ranging between a few minutes and 24 hrs. Observations of the behavior of single female Ae. aegypti exposed to metofluthrin were also made. Results Female Ae. aegypti exposed to 5% or 10% metofluthrin formulations were almost entirely inhibited from biting. This was the result of rapid knockdown and mortality (80-90% in less than one hour) and to the behavioral impacts of exposure that, within minutes, caused female Ae. aegypti to become disoriented, stop landing on hosts, and seek resting sites. Exposed mosquitoes did not exhibit any increased propensity to exit treated rooms and the 10% AI resin remained fully active for at least 20 days. Conclusion The new, high-dose, resin formulations of metofluthrin act quickly to prevent biting and to knockdown and kill free-flying female Ae. aegypti in our experimental rooms. There was no evidence that metofluthrin induced escape from treated areas. Resin-based metofluthrin emanators show great potential as a replacement for labor intensive IRS for dengue vector control. PMID:24025232

  7. Dengue serotype surveillance among patients admitted for dengue in two major hospitals in Selangor, Malaysia, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Ab-Fatah, M; Subenthiran, S; Abdul-Rahman, P S A; Saat, Z; Thayan, R

    2015-03-01

    Dengue serotype surveillance is important as any changes in serotype distribution may result in an outbreak or increase in severe dengue cases. This study aimed to determine circulating dengue serotypes in two hospitals in Selangor. Serum samples were collected from patients admitted for dengue at these two major public hospitals i.e. Hospital Sungai Buloh (HSB) and Hospital Tunku Ampuan Rahimah (HTAR) between November 2010 and August 2011 and subjected to real-time RT-PCR using SYBR® Green. All four dengue serotypes were detected in samples from both hospitals. The predominating serotype was dengue 1 in samples from both hospitals (HSB, DENV-1; 25.53 % and HTAR, DENV-1; 32.1 %). PMID:25801270

  8. Importance of Internet Surveillance in Public Health Emergency Control and Prevention: Evidence From a Digital Epidemiologic Study During Avian Influenza A H7N9 Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Honghong; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Xinyi; Chen, Lei; Jiang, Zhenggang; Zheng, Dawei

    2014-01-01

    Background Outbreaks of human infection with a new avian influenza A H7N9 virus occurred in China in the spring of 2013. Control and prevention of a new human infectious disease outbreak can be strongly affected by public reaction and social impact through the Internet and social media. Objective This study aimed to investigate the potential roles of Internet surveillance in control and prevention of the human H7N9 outbreaks. Methods Official data for the human H7N9 outbreaks were collected via the China National Health and Family Planning Committee website from March 31 to April 24, 2013. We obtained daily posted and forwarded number of blogs for the keyword “H7N9” from Sina microblog website and a daily Baidu Attention Index (BAI) from Baidu website, which reflected public attention to the outbreak. Rumors identified and confirmed by the authorities were collected from Baidu search engine. Results Both daily posted and forwarded number and BAI for keyword H7N9 increased quickly during the first 3 days of the outbreaks and remained at a high level for 5 days. The total daily posted and forwarded number for H7N9 on Sina microblog peaked at 850,000 on April 3, from zero blogs before March 31, increasing to 97,726 on April 1 and to 370,607 on April 2, and remaining above 500,000 from April 5-8 before declining to 208,524 on April 12. The total daily BAI showed a similar pattern of change to the total daily posted and forwarded number over time from March 31 to April 12. When the outbreak locations spread, especially into other areas of the same province/city and the capital, Beijing, daily posted and forwarded number and BAI increased again to a peak at 368,500 and 116,911, respectively. The median daily BAI during the studied 25 days was significantly higher among the 7 provinces/cities with reported human H7N9 cases than the 2 provinces without any cases (P<.001). So were the median daily posted and forwarded number and daily BAI in each province/city except Anhui province. We retrieved a total of 32 confirmed rumors spread across 19 provinces/cities in China. In all, 84% (27/32) of rumors were disseminated and transmitted by social media. Conclusions The first 3 days of an epidemic is a critical period for the authorities to take appropriate action through Internet surveillance to prevent and control the epidemic, including preparation of personnel, technology, and other resources; information release; collection of public opinion and reaction; and clarification, prevention, and control of rumors. Internet surveillance can be used as an efficient and economical tool to prevent and control public health emergencies, such as H7N9 outbreaks. PMID:24440770

  9. Dengue hemorrhagic fever

    MedlinePLUS

    Hemorrhagic dengue; Dengue shock syndrome; Philippine hemorrhagic fever; Thai hemorrhagic fever; Singapore hemorrhagic fever ... Endy TP, Rothman AL, Barrett AD. Flaviviruses (Dengue, Yellow ... Encephalitis, West Nile Encephalitis, St. Louis Encephalitis, ...

  10. Role of cognitive parameters in dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jih-Jin; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Chen, Po-Chih; Liu, Li-Teh; Hsiao, Hui-Mien; Lo, Yu-Chih; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2013-01-01

    Dengue is becoming recognized as one of the most important vector-borne human diseases. It is predominant in tropical and subtropical zones but its geographical distribution is progressively expanding, making it an escalating global health problem of today. Dengue presents with spectrum of clinical manifestations, ranging from asymptomatic, undifferentiated mild fever, dengue fever (DF), to dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) with or without shock (DSS), a life-threatening illness characterized by plasma leakage due to increased vascular permeability. Currently, there are no antiviral modalities or vaccines available to treat and prevent dengue. Supportive care with close monitoring is the standard clinical practice. The mechanisms leading to DHF/DSS remains poorly understood. Multiple factors have been attributed to the pathological mechanism, but only a couple of these hypotheses are popular in scientific circles. The current discussion focuses on underappreciated factors, temperature, natural IgM, and endotoxin, which may be critical components playing roles in dengue pathogenesis. PMID:24305068

  11. Dengue vectors, human activity, and dengue virus transmission potential in the lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas, United States.

    PubMed

    Vitek, Christopher J; Gutierrez, Joann A; Dirrigl, Frank J

    2014-09-01

    Dengue virus is an emerging disease of concern in the Americas. Recent outbreaks in Florida highlight the potential for the virus to return to the United States. The Lower Rio Grande Valley region of Texas directly borders Mexico, and has experienced dengue transmission in the past concurrent with outbreaks in Mexico along the border region. We examined the potential for dengue virus transmission by examining the vectors in the region, as well as assessing human behavior. We further hypothesized that dengue vector abundance would influence human behavior. Two dengue vectors, Aedes aegypti (L.) and Aedes albopictus (Skuse), were found in the region in high abundance. More mosquitoes were collected in rural sites and sites with high vegetation. Of the two species, only Ae. albopictus showed any significant habitat preferences, being more common in rural site. While there was no correlation between human behavior and mosquito abundance, the results support a significant correlation between knowledge of mosquitoes and dengue virus and behavioral practices that might reduce risk of disease transmission. Dengue risk may be higher in certain regions of the Lower Rio Grande Valley based on socioeconomic conditions, specifically in economically poor regions such as the undeveloped colonias found in the region. Because of the proximity of this region to an area with endemic dengue, continued surveillance and risk assessment is suggested. PMID:25276932

  12. Predicting outcome from dengue.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Sophie; Wills, Bridget

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is emerging as one of the most abundant vector-borne disease globally. Although the majority of infections are asymptomatic or result in only a brief systemic viral illness, a small proportion of patients develop potentially fatal complications. These severe manifestations, including a unique plasma leakage syndrome, a coagulopathy sometimes accompanied by bleeding, and organ impairment, occur relatively late in the disease course, presenting a window of opportunity to identify the group of patients likely to progress to these complications. However, as yet, differentiating this group from the thousands of milder cases seen each day during outbreaks remains challenging, and simple and inexpensive strategies are urgently needed in order to improve case management and to facilitate appropriate use of limited resources. This review will cover the current understanding of the risk factors associated with poor outcome in dengue. We focus particularly on the clinical features of the disease and on conventional investigations that are usually accessible in mid-level healthcare facilities in endemic areas, and then discuss a variety of viral, immunological and vascular biomarkers that have the potential to improve risk prediction. We conclude with a description of several novel methods of assessing vascular function and intravascular volume status non-invasively. PMID:25259615

  13. Acute dengue virus 2 infection in Gabonese patients is associated with an early innate immune response, including strong interferon alpha production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pierre Becquart; Nadia Wauquier; Dieudonné Nkoghe; Angélique Ndjoyi-Mbiguino; Cindy Padilla; Marc Souris; Eric M Leroy

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dengue is now a leading cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the tropics. We conducted the first ex vivo study of dengue fever (DF) in African patients infected during the first Gabonese dengue virus 2 (DENV-2) outbreak in 2007, in order to investigate cytokine production, including the antiviral cytokine IFN-?, reported to be a potent inhibitor of DENV replication

  14. Epidemiology of dengue: past, present and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Natasha Evelyn Anne; Quam, Mikkel B; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2013-01-01

    Dengue is currently regarded globally as the most important mosquito-borne viral disease. A history of symptoms compatible with dengue can be traced back to the Chin Dynasty of 265–420 AD. The virus and its vectors have now become widely distributed throughout tropical and subtropical regions of the world, particularly over the last half-century. Significant geographic expansion has been coupled with rapid increases in incident cases, epidemics, and hyperendemicity, leading to the more severe forms of dengue. Transmission of dengue is now present in every World Health Organization (WHO) region of the world and more than 125 countries are known to be dengue endemic. The true impact of dengue globally is difficult to ascertain due to factors such as inadequate disease surveillance, misdiagnosis, and low levels of reporting. Currently available data likely grossly underestimates the social, economic, and disease burden. Estimates of the global incidence of dengue infections per year have ranged between 50 million and 200 million; however, recent estimates using cartographic approaches suggest this number is closer to almost 400 million. The expansion of dengue is expected to increase due to factors such as the modern dynamics of climate change, globalization, travel, trade, socioeconomics, settlement and also viral evolution. No vaccine or specific antiviral therapy currently exists to address the growing threat of dengue. Prompt case detection and appropriate clinical management can reduce the mortality from severe dengue. Effective vector control is the mainstay of dengue prevention and control. Surveillance and improved reporting of dengue cases is also essential to gauge the true global situation as indicated in the objectives of the WHO Global Strategy for Dengue Prevention and Control, 2012–2020. More accurate data will inform the prioritization of research, health policy, and financial resources toward reducing this poorly controlled disease. The objective of this paper is to review historical and current epidemiology of dengue worldwide and, additionally, reflect on some potential reasons for expansion of dengue into the future. PMID:23990732

  15. Comparative Susceptibility of Mosquito Populations in North Queensland, Australia to Oral Infection with Dengue Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yixin H.; Ng, Tat Siong; Frentiu, Francesca D.; Walker, Thomas; van den Hurk, Andrew F.; O'Neill, Scott L.; Beebe, Nigel W.; McGraw, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent arthropod-borne virus, with at least 40% of the world's population at risk of infection each year. In Australia, dengue is not endemic, but viremic travelers trigger outbreaks involving hundreds of cases. We compared the susceptibility of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes from two geographically isolated populations to two strains of dengue virus serotype 2. We found, interestingly, that mosquitoes from a city with no history of dengue were more susceptible to virus than mosquitoes from an outbreak-prone region, particularly with respect to one dengue strain. These findings suggest recent evolution of population-based differences in vector competence or different historical origins. Future genomic comparisons of these populations could reveal the genetic basis of vector competence and the relative role of selection and stochastic processes in shaping their differences. Lastly, we show the novel finding of a correlation between midgut dengue titer and titer in tissues colonized after dissemination. PMID:24420782

  16. Community beliefs and practices about dengue in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In spite of long-term endemicity and repeated government and private efforts, effective, sustained community participation for dengue prevention is still a challenge in Puerto Rico. This study explored differences found in interviews conducted in 2001 in attitudes toward dengue and its prevention by...

  17. Dengue/Severe Dengue Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Français ??????? Español RSS Feed Youtube Twitter Facebook Google + iTunes Play Store Dengue control Menu Dengue Control ... 8 9 Next page » Share Email Twitter Facebook Google Delicious LinkedIn More... Print Last update: 22 April ...

  18. Co-infections with Chikungunya Virus and Dengue Virus in Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Chahar, Harendra S.; Bharaj, Preeti; Dar, Lalit; Guleria, Randeep; Kabra, Sushil K.

    2009-01-01

    Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are common vectors for dengue virus and chikungunya virus. In areas where both viruses cocirculate, they can be transmitted together. During a dengue outbreak in Delhi in 2006, 17 of 69 serum samples were positive for chikungunya virus by reverse transcription–PCR; 6 samples were positive for both viruses. PMID:19624923

  19. Assessing the effects of temperature on dengue transmission.

    PubMed

    Yang, H M; Macoris, M L G; Galvani, K C; Andrighetti, M T M; Wanderley, D M V

    2009-08-01

    The incidence of dengue infection, a vector-borne disease transmitted by the mosquito Aedes aegypti, shows clear dependence on seasonal variation. Based on the quantification method that furnishes the size of the A. aegypti population in terms of the estimated entomological parameters for different temperatures, we assessed the risk of dengue outbreaks. The persistence and severity of epidemics can be assessed by the basic reproduction number R(0), which varies with temperature. The expression for R(0) obtained from 'true' and 'pseudo' mass action laws for dengue infection is discussed. PMID:19192323

  20. Describing the geographic spread of dengue disease by traveling waves.

    PubMed

    Maidana, Norberto Aníbal; Yang, Hyun Mo

    2008-09-01

    Dengue is a human disease transmitted by the mosquito Aedes aegypti. For this reason geographical regions infested by this mosquito species are under the risk of dengue outbreaks. In this work, we propose a mathematical model to study the spatial dissemination of dengue using a system of partial differential reaction-diffusion equations. With respect to the human and mosquito populations, we take into account their respective subclasses of infected and uninfected individuals. The dynamics of the mosquito population considers only two subpopulations: the winged form (mature female mosquitoes), and an aquatic population (comprising eggs, larvae and pupae). We disregard the long-distance movement by transportation facilities, for which reason the diffusion is considered restricted only to the winged form. The human population is considered homogeneously distributed in space, in order to describe localized dengue dissemination during a short period of epidemics. The cross-infection is modeled by the law of mass action. A threshold value as a function of the model's parameters is obtained, which determines the rate of dengue dissemination and the risk of dengue outbreaks. Assuming that an area was previously colonized by the mosquitoes, the rate of disease dissemination is determined as a function of the model's parameters. This rate of dissemination of dengue disease is determined by applying the traveling wave solutions to the corresponding system of partial differential equations. PMID:18590749

  1. The use of typing methods and infection prevention measures to control a bullous impetigo outbreak on a neonatal ward

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We describe an outbreak of Bullous Impetigo (BI), caused by a (methicillin susceptible, fusidic acid resistant) Staphylococcus aureus (SA) strain, spa-type t408, at the neonatal and gynaecology ward of the Jeroen Bosch hospital in the Netherlands, from March-November 2011. Methods We performed an outbreak investigation with revision of the hygienic protocols, MSSA colonization surveillance and environmental sampling for MSSA including detailed typing of SA isolates. Spa typing was performed to discriminate between the SA isolates. In addition, Raman-typing was performed on all t408 isolates. Results Nineteen cases of BI were confirmed by SA positive cultures. A cluster of nine neonates and three health care workers (HCW) with SA t408 was detected. These strains were MecA-, PVL-, Exfoliative Toxin (ET)A-, ETB+, ETAD-, fusidic acid-resistant and methicillin susceptible. Eight out of nine neonates and two out of three HCW t408 strains yielded a similar Raman type. Positive t408 HCW were treated and infection control procedures were reinforced. These measures stopped the outbreak. Conclusions We conclude that treatment of patients and HCW carrying a predominant SA t408, and re-implementing and emphasising hygienic measures were effective to control the outbreak of SA t408 among neonates. PMID:23168170

  2. Simultaneous infection with dengue 2 and 3 viruses in a Chinese patient return from Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Wenming, Peng; Man, Yu; Baochang, Fan; Yongqiang, Deng; Tao, Jiang; Hongyuan, Duan; Ede, Qin

    2005-03-01

    Dengue is an acute viral disease transmitted by the Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquito, which are present in most tropical urban areas of the world. There are four antigenically distinct serotypes, designated dengue-1 (DEN-1), dengue-2 (DEN-2), dengue-3 (DEN-3) and dengue-4 (DEN-4). Dengue outbreaks have occurred in several regions in Asia, involving four serotypes of dengue 1, 2, 3 and 4. In review of the few cases of dual infection documented in the literature, we report here a case of simultaneous infection with DEN-2 and DEN-3 in a Chinese patient return from Sri Lanka. The dual infection was identified by type-specific indirect immunofluorescence assay and confirmed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and sequence determination. This is the first documented case of simultaneous infection with serotype of DEN-2 and DEN-3 in China. PMID:15722024

  3. Identification of the prediction model for dengue incidence in Can Tho city, a Mekong Delta area in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Phung, Dung; Huang, Cunrui; Rutherford, Shannon; Chu, Cordia; Wang, Xiaoming; Nguyen, Minh; Nguyen, Nga Huy; Manh, Cuong Do

    2015-01-01

    The Mekong Delta is highly vulnerable to climate change and a dengue endemic area in Vietnam. This study aims to examine the association between climate factors and dengue incidence and to identify the best climate prediction model for dengue incidence in Can Tho city, the Mekong Delta area in Vietnam. We used three different regression models comprising: standard multiple regression model (SMR), seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average model (SARIMA), and Poisson distributed lag model (PDLM) to examine the association between climate factors and dengue incidence over the period 2003-2010. We validated the models by forecasting dengue cases for the period of January-December, 2011 using the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). Receiver operating characteristics curves were used to analyze the sensitivity of the forecast of a dengue outbreak. The results indicate that temperature and relative humidity are significantly associated with changes in dengue incidence consistently across the model methods used, but not cumulative rainfall. The Poisson distributed lag model (PDLM) performs the best prediction of dengue incidence for a 6, 9, and 12-month period and diagnosis of an outbreak however the SARIMA model performs a better prediction of dengue incidence for a 3-month period. The simple or standard multiple regression performed highly imprecise prediction of dengue incidence. We recommend a follow-up study to validate the model on a larger scale in the Mekong Delta region and to analyze the possibility of incorporating a climate-based dengue early warning method into the national dengue surveillance system. PMID:25447266

  4. Dengue on islands: a Bayesian approach to understanding the global ecology of dengue viruses

    PubMed Central

    Feldstein, Leora R.; Brownstein, John S.; Brady, Oliver J.; Hay, Simon I.; Johansson, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Transmission of dengue viruses (DENV), the most common arboviral pathogens globally, is influenced by many climatic and socioeconomic factors. However, the relative contributions of these factors on a global scale are unclear. Methods We randomly selected 94 islands stratified by socioeconomic and geographic characteristics. With a Bayesian model, we assessed factors contributing to the probability of islands having a history of any dengue outbreaks and of having frequent outbreaks. Results Minimum temperature was strongly associated with suitability for DENV transmission. Islands with a minimum monthly temperature of greater than 14.8°C (95% CI: 12.4–16.6°C) were predicted to be suitable for DENV transmission. Increased population size and precipitation were associated with increased outbreak frequency, but did not capture all of the variability. Predictions for 48 testing islands verified these findings. Conclusions This analysis clarified two key components of DENV ecology: minimum temperature was the most important determinant of suitability; and endemicity was more likely in areas with high precipitation and large, but not necessarily dense, populations. Wealth and connectivity, in contrast, had no discernable effects. This model adds to our knowledge of global determinants of dengue risk and provides a basis for understanding the ecology of dengue endemicity. PMID:25771261

  5. Spatio-temporal diffusion pattern and hotspot detection of dengue in Chachoengsao province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Jeefoo, Phaisarn; Tripathi, Nitin Kumar; Souris, Marc

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, dengue has become a major international public health concern. In Thailand it is also an important concern as several dengue outbreaks were reported in last decade. This paper presents a GIS approach to analyze the spatial and temporal dynamics of dengue epidemics. The major objective of this study was to examine spatial diffusion patterns and hotspot identification for reported dengue cases. Geospatial diffusion pattern of the 2007 dengue outbreak was investigated. Map of daily cases was generated for the 153 days of the outbreak. Epidemiological data from Chachoengsao province, Thailand (reported dengue cases for the years 1999-2007) was used for this study. To analyze the dynamic space-time pattern of dengue outbreaks, all cases were positioned in space at a village level. After a general statistical analysis (by gender and age group), data was subsequently analyzed for temporal patterns and correlation with climatic data (especially rainfall), spatial patterns and cluster analysis, and spatio-temporal patterns of hotspots during epidemics. The results revealed spatial diffusion patterns during the years 1999-2007 representing spatially clustered patterns with significant differences by village. Villages on the urban fringe reported higher incidences. The space and time of the cases showed outbreak movement and spread patterns that could be related to entomologic and epidemiologic factors. The hotspots showed the spatial trend of dengue diffusion. This study presents useful information related to the dengue outbreak patterns in space and time and may help public health departments to plan strategies to control the spread of disease. The methodology is general for space-time analysis and can be applied for other infectious diseases as well. PMID:21318014

  6. Spatio-Temporal Diffusion Pattern and Hotspot Detection of Dengue in Chachoengsao Province, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Jeefoo, Phaisarn; Tripathi, Nitin Kumar; Souris, Marc

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, dengue has become a major international public health concern. In Thailand it is also an important concern as several dengue outbreaks were reported in last decade. This paper presents a GIS approach to analyze the spatial and temporal dynamics of dengue epidemics. The major objective of this study was to examine spatial diffusion patterns and hotspot identification for reported dengue cases. Geospatial diffusion pattern of the 2007 dengue outbreak was investigated. Map of daily cases was generated for the 153 days of the outbreak. Epidemiological data from Chachoengsao province, Thailand (reported dengue cases for the years 1999–2007) was used for this study. To analyze the dynamic space-time pattern of dengue outbreaks, all cases were positioned in space at a village level. After a general statistical analysis (by gender and age group), data was subsequently analyzed for temporal patterns and correlation with climatic data (especially rainfall), spatial patterns and cluster analysis, and spatio-temporal patterns of hotspots during epidemics. The results revealed spatial diffusion patterns during the years 1999–2007 representing spatially clustered patterns with significant differences by village. Villages on the urban fringe reported higher incidences. The space and time of the cases showed outbreak movement and spread patterns that could be related to entomologic and epidemiologic factors. The hotspots showed the spatial trend of dengue diffusion. This study presents useful information related to the dengue outbreak patterns in space and time and may help public health departments to plan strategies to control the spread of disease. The methodology is general for space-time analysis and can be applied for other infectious diseases as well. PMID:21318014

  7. Quantifying the Emergence of Dengue in Hanoi, Vietnam: 1998–2009

    PubMed Central

    Cuong, Hoang Quoc; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Duong, Tran Nhu; Phong, Tran Vu; Cam, Nguyen Nhat; Farrar, Jeremy; Nam, Vu Sinh; Thai, Khoa T. D.; Horby, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background An estimated 2.4 billion people live in areas at risk of dengue transmission, therefore the factors determining the establishment of endemic dengue in areas where transmission suitability is marginal is of considerable importance. Hanoi, Vietnam is such an area, and following a large dengue outbreak in 2009, we set out to determine if dengue is emerging in Hanoi. Methods and Principal Findings We undertook a temporal and spatial analysis of 25,983 dengue cases notified in Hanoi between 1998 and 2009. Age standardized incidence rates, standardized age of infection, and Standardized Morbidity Ratios (SMR) were calculated. A quasi-Poisson regression model was used to determine if dengue incidence was increasing over time. Wavelet analysis was used to explore the periodicity of dengue transmission and the association with climate variables. After excluding the two major outbreak years of 1998 and 2009 and correcting for changes in population age structure, we identified a significant annual increase in the incidence of dengue cases over the period 1999–2008 (incidence rate ratio ?=?1.38, 95% confidence interval ?=?1.20–1.58, p value ?=?0.002). The age of notified dengue cases in Hanoi is high, with a median age of 23 years (mean 26.3 years). After adjusting for changes in population age structure, there was no statistically significant change in the median or mean age of dengue cases over the period studied. Districts in the central, highly urban, area of Hanoi have the highest incidence of dengue (SMR>3). Conclusions Hanoi is a low dengue transmission setting where dengue incidence has been increasing year on year since 1999. This trend needs to be confirmed with serological surveys, followed by studies to determine the underlying drivers of this emergence. Such studies can provide insights into the biological, demographic, and environmental changes associated with vulnerability to the establishment of endemic dengue. PMID:21980544

  8. Acute Febrile Illness Surveillance in a Tertiary Hospital Emergency Department: Comparison of Influenza and Dengue Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Olga D.; Gregory, Christopher J.; Santiago, Luis Manuel; Acosta, Héctor; Galarza, Ivonne E.; Hunsperger, Elizabeth; Muñoz, Jorge; Bui, Duy M.; Oberste, M. Steven; Peñaranda, Silvia; García-Gubern, Carlos; Tomashek, Kay M.

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, an increased proportion of suspected dengue cases reported to the surveillance system in Puerto Rico were laboratory negative. As a result, enhanced acute febrile illness (AFI) surveillance was initiated in a tertiary care hospital. Patients with fever of unknown origin for 2–7 days duration were tested for Leptospira, enteroviruses, influenza, and dengue virus. Among the 284 enrolled patients, 31 dengue, 136 influenza, and 3 enterovirus cases were confirmed. Nearly half (48%) of the confirmed dengue cases met clinical criteria for influenza. Dengue patients were more likely than influenza patients to have hemorrhage (81% versus 26%), rash (39% versus 9%), and a positive tourniquet test (52% versus 18%). Mean platelet and white blood cell count were lower among dengue patients. Clinical diagnosis can be particularly difficult when outbreaks of other AFI occur during dengue season. A complete blood count and tourniquet test may be useful to differentiate dengue from other AFIs. PMID:23382160

  9. [Dengue: a growing risk to travellers to tropical and sub-tropical regions].

    PubMed

    da Silva-Voorham, Júlia M; Tami, Adriana; Juliana, Amadu E; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A; Wilschut, Jan C; Smit, Jolanda M

    2009-01-01

    Dengue is currently the most common arboviral infection worldwide. Due to global climate change and other factors, the vector of the virus - the Aedes mosquito - has spread considerably over the past decades. Dengue is endemic in almost all tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world; meaning that approximately 40% of the world population is at risk of acquiring a dengue infection. The clinical features of dengue vary from a non-specific febrile illness (dengue fever) to at times fatal serious conditions such as dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Considering the limited possibilities of prevention it is anticipated that the incidence of dengue will increase in the future. It is expected that health-care providers in non-endemic regions will encounter dengue-infected patients with increasing frequency in their practices. PMID:20025792

  10. In the midst of a large measles outbreak, EDs take steps to bolster screening procedures, prevent potential transmissions.

    PubMed

    2015-04-01

    A large, multi-state outbreak of measles is prompting EDs around the country to bolster their screening procedures and provide education to staff, most of whom have never seen a measles case. Dozens of people in more than 17 states have been confirmed to have the disease, with most of these cases associated with an outbreak that began at an amusement park in southern California. Measles is extremely contagious, infecting nine out of 10 people exposed to the virus if they are susceptible to the disease. In cases in which a contagious disease is suspected, experts advise emergency providers to protect themselves before proceeding to the traditional vital signs. It's a concept referred to as "vital sign zero." Once a measles case is confirmed, experts say emergency staff should isolate the patient with protection such as an N-95 mask, and inform both the hospital's infection control department and public health authorities. PMID:25844431

  11. Fire fighting truck-based emergency mosquito biolarviciding to prevent outbreaks of malaria and arboviral disease in Kabul, Afghanistan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. K. Faulde; J. J. Scharninghausen; M. Tisch

    2008-01-01

    Emergency control of disease vectors requires high efficacy, rapid reaction and safe use of biocides in order interrupt transmission\\u000a cycles without harming humans, non-target animals and the environment. In countries with complex emergencies, air-borne large-scale\\u000a vector control is often limited, or impossible, due to questionable security as well as military, safety, equipment, or logistical\\u000a constraints. While facing a potential outbreak

  12. Acta Tropica 104 (2007) 17 Surveillance of dengue fever cases using a novel

    E-print Network

    Severson, David

    2007-01-01

    Acta Tropica 104 (2007) 1­7 Surveillance of dengue fever cases using a novel Aedes aegypti 100 suspected dengue fever (DF) cases in county St. Patrick, Trinidad, West Indies. From the 30 that this eradication program initially sup- pressed the vector populations and prevented the spread of dengue fever (DF

  13. Research Note A Summary of National Reports of Foodborne Outbreaks of Salmonella Heidelberg Infections in the United States: Clues for Disease Prevention

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PAUL CHITTICK; ALANA SULKA; ROBERT V. TAUXE; ALICIA M. FRY

    We analyzed national foodborne outbreak data from 1973 through 2001 to determine the proportion of Salmonella Hei- delberg outbreaks caused by specific foods. Among 6,633 outbreaks with known etiology, 184 (3%) were caused bySalmonella Heidelberg. A vehicle was identified in 101 outbreaks; at least 53 were poultry or egg-related. Three outbreaks were attributed to egg consumption, 17 to consumption of

  14. Predicting the dengue incidence in Singapore using univariate time series models.

    PubMed

    Dayama, Pankaj; Kameshwaran, S

    2013-01-01

    Dengue is endemic in Singapore with year-around transmission. Prediction of dengue incidence is important for effective use of limited resources for vector-control and contingency measures. In the work, we develop a set of time series models based on the observed weekly dengue incidence since 2000. The dengue incidence data of Singapore from 2000 - 2011 is used to develop and fit the predictive models. For testing and validation, we use the 2012 data at two levels: A) real versus predicted incidence and B) real versus predicted outbreak severity. The statistical measures of validation show that the models predict both the dengue incidence and the outbreak severity level with acceptable level of accuracy. PMID:24551338

  15. Spotlight on measles in Italy: why outbreaks of a vaccine-preventable infection continue in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Piccirilli, Giulia; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Chiereghin, Angela; Serra, Laura; Gabrielli, Liliana; Lanari, Marcello

    2015-03-01

    Measles is a serious infectious disease that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Remarkable progress has been made through measles vaccination in reducing the number of people dying from measles. In the last years, concerns about the safety of vaccines have led to decline in immunization coverage rates and new outbreaks of measles in many European countries, including Italy. We believe that it is important to reinforce the message that measles vaccine is safe and highly effective through appropriate information campaigns and public awareness. PMID:25612664

  16. Interaction of Mean Temperature and Daily Fluctuation Influences Dengue Incidence in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Sharmin, Sifat; Glass, Kathryn; Viennet, Elvina; Harley, David

    2015-01-01

    Local weather influences the transmission of the dengue virus. Most studies analyzing the relationship between dengue and climate are based on relatively coarse aggregate measures such as mean temperature. Here, we include both mean temperature and daily fluctuations in temperature in modelling dengue transmission in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. We used a negative binomial generalized linear model, adjusted for rainfall, anomalies in sea surface temperature (an index for El Niño-Southern Oscillation), population density, the number of dengue cases in the previous month, and the long term temporal trend in dengue incidence. In addition to the significant associations of mean temperature and temperature fluctuation with dengue incidence, we found interaction of mean and temperature fluctuation significantly influences disease transmission at a lag of one month. High mean temperature with low fluctuation increases dengue incidence one month later. Besides temperature, dengue incidence was also influenced by sea surface temperature anomalies in the current and previous month, presumably as a consequence of concomitant anomalies in the annual rainfall cycle. Population density exerted a significant positive influence on dengue incidence indicating increasing risk of dengue in over-populated Dhaka. Understanding these complex relationships between climate, population, and dengue incidence will help inform outbreak prediction and control. PMID:26161895

  17. Outbreaks where food workers have been implicated in the spread of foodborne disease. Part 8. Gloves as barriers to prevent contamination of food by workers.

    PubMed

    Todd, Ewen C D; Michaels, Barry S; Greig, Judy D; Smith, Debra; Bartleson, Charles A

    2010-09-01

    The role played by food workers and other individuals in the contamination of food has been identified as an important contributing factor leading to foodborne outbreaks. To prevent direct bare hand contact with food and food surfaces, many jurisdictions have made glove use compulsory for food production and preparation. When properly used, gloves can substantially reduce opportunities for food contamination. However, gloves have limitations and may become a source of contamination if they are punctured or improperly used. Experiments conducted in clinical and dental settings have revealed pinhole leaks in gloves. Although such loss of glove integrity can lead to contamination of foods and surfaces, in the food industry improper use of gloves is more likely than leakage to lead to food contamination and outbreaks. Wearing jewelry (e.g., rings) and artificial nails is discouraged because these items can puncture gloves and allow accumulation of microbial populations under them. Occlusion of the skin during long-term glove use in food operations creates the warm, moist conditions necessary for microbial proliferation and can increase pathogen transfer onto foods through leaks or exposed skin or during glove removal. The most important issue is that glove use can create a false sense of security, resulting in more high-risk behaviors that can lead to cross-contamination when employees are not adequately trained. PMID:20828485

  18. Global spread and persistence of dengue.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Jennifer L; Harris, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Dengue is a spectrum of disease caused by four serotypes of the most prevalent arthropod-borne virus affecting humans today, and its incidence has increased dramatically in the past 50 years. Due in part to population growth and uncontrolled urbanization in tropical and subtropical countries, breeding sites for the mosquitoes that transmit dengue virus have proliferated, and successful vector control has proven problematic. Dengue viruses have evolved rapidly as they have spread worldwide, and genotypes associated with increased virulence have expanded from South and Southeast Asia into the Pacific and the Americas. This review explores the human, mosquito, and viral factors that contribute to the global spread and persistence of dengue, as well as the interaction between the three spheres, in the context of ecological and climate changes. What is known, as well as gaps in knowledge, is emphasized in light of future prospects for control and prevention of this pandemic disease. PMID:18429680

  19. The dengue viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Henchal, E A; Putnak, J R

    1990-01-01

    Dengue, a major public health problem throughout subtropical and tropical regions, is an acute infectious disease characterized by biphasic fever, headache, pain in various parts of the body, prostration, rash, lymphadenopathy, and leukopenia. In more severe or complicated dengue, patients present with a severe febrile illness characterized by abnormalities of hemostasis and increased vascular permeability, which in some instances results in a hypovolemic shock. Four distinct serotypes of the dengue virus (dengue-1, dengue-2, dengue-3, and dengue-4) exist, with numerous virus strains found worldwide. Molecular cloning methods have led to a greater understanding of the structure of the RNA genome and definition of virus-specific structural and nonstructural proteins. Progress towards producing safe, effective dengue virus vaccines, a goal for over 45 years, has been made. Images PMID:2224837

  20. Dengue Fever Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... on. Read more information on enabling JavaScript. Dengue Fever Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area ... There is no specific treatment for classic dengue fever, and most people recover within 2 weeks. To ...

  1. Dengue fever (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Dengue fever, or West Nile fever, is a mild viral illness transmitted by mosquitoes which causes fever, ... second exposure to the virus can result in Dengue hemorrhagic fever, a life-threatening illness.

  2. Natural or deliberate outbreak in Pakistan: how to prevent or detect and trace its origin: biosecurity, surveillance, forensics.

    PubMed

    Shinwari, Zabta Khan; Khalil, Ali Talha; Nasim, Anwar

    2014-08-01

    Over the last few decades biosecurity and biosafety have emerged as a prominent public health concern due to some high-profile accidents. Effective strategies to deal with the outbreak, whether deliberate or non-deliberate requires a multidisciplinary approach and coordinated decision-making by various state departments such as health, forensics, agriculture, environment, intelligence, law and enforcement, etc. In a dynamic global environment and the overwhelming asymmetric threats from the non-state actors, it is of utmost importance to understand the biosecurity issues and initiate a coordinated global effort to cope with biosecurity and biosafety breaches and develop an as effective response mechanism. An attractive choice for the terrorists, state enemies and non-state actors is the use of biological weapons. An unwanted incident may not only bring chaos to the people, but also can inflict severe economic damage industrially and locally as was in the notorious foot-and-mouth disease outbreak. Because of special geopolitical compulsion, Pakistan is one of the hot spots where special action needs to be taken. The current review focuses on the various approaches, technologies that can be used to alleviate the chances of biosafety and biosecurity incident and emphasizes the role of modern technology that can be used in this regard. PMID:24942803

  3. TRANSMISSION OF EPIDEMIC DENGUE HEMORRHAGIC FEVER IN EASTERNMOST INDONESIA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    NONO C. SUKRI; KANTI LARAS; TONI WANDRA; SUKMAN DIDI; RIA P. LARASATI; JOSEF R. RACHDYATMAKA; STEVIE OSOK; PETRUS TJIA; JOHN M. SARAGIH; SRI HARTATI; ERLIN LISTYANINGSIH; KEVIN R. PORTER; CHARMAGNE G. BECKETT; INGERANI S. PRAWIRA; NARAIN PUNJABI; SRI A. SUPARMANTO; H. JAMES BEECHAM; MICHAEL J. BANGS; ANDREW L. CORWIN

    In April 2001, a second suspected outbreak of dengue hemorrhagic fever in the easternmost region of Indonesia was investigated in Merauke, a town located in the southeastern corner of Papua, by the Indonesian Ministry of Health and the U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit No. 2. Principal case criteria of hemorrhagic disease provided for a study enrollment of 15 clinically acute

  4. Dengue Fever versus Bioterrorism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dorji Harnod; Hang Chang; Tzong-Luen Wang

    2002-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fever has ever been used as a route of bioterrorism. The mode of transmission, clinical course, and mortality of these illnesses vary with the specific viruses. In Taiwan, dengue fever is the most encountered disease of hemorrhagic fever. In the viewpoint of bioterrorism, dengue is always excluded because it is not transmissible by small-particle aerosols, and primary dengue

  5. Emergence of the Severe Syndrome and Mortality Associated with Dengue and Dengue-Like Illness: Historical Records (1890 to 1950) and Their Compatibility with Current Hypotheses on the Shift of Disease Manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Kuno, Goro

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Outbreaks of the severe dengue syndrome, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), emerged beginning in the 1950s, marking a dramatic change in the dengue syndrome. While intense investigations in multiple directions have been conducted for many years to elucidate the intrinsic mechanisms conducive to the development of DHF, no consensus has yet emerged. Meanwhile, relatively little attention has been paid to the occurrence of severe dengue and death prior to the 1950s. This comprehensive review was designed to evaluate outbreak records in the early dengue history to better understand the epidemiologic background and other factors that existed before the emergence of DHF outbreaks. By applying a set of stringent criteria to remove unreliable data as much as possible and by interpreting the results conservatively, a short list of etiologically more reliable outbreaks with high mortality was obtained. The results show that severe dengue syndrome, clinically very much compatible with DHF, occurred far more frequently in multiple locations than it had been assumed before; that the magnitudes of mortality in several outbreaks were not negligible; and that the epidemiologic background features shared among these outbreaks in the early period were, with the exceptions of more limited demographic changes, generally similar to the post-1950 conditions. PMID:19366911

  6. Prediction of High Incidence of Dengue in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Buczak, Anna L.; Baugher, Benjamin; Babin, Steven M.; Ramac-Thomas, Liane C.; Guven, Erhan; Elbert, Yevgeniy; Koshute, Phillip T.; Velasco, John Mark S.; Roque, Vito G.; Tayag, Enrique A.; Yoon, In-Kyu; Lewis, Sheri H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Accurate prediction of dengue incidence levels weeks in advance of an outbreak may reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with this neglected disease. Therefore, models were developed to predict high and low dengue incidence in order to provide timely forewarnings in the Philippines. Methods Model inputs were chosen based on studies indicating variables that may impact dengue incidence. The method first uses Fuzzy Association Rule Mining techniques to extract association rules from these historical epidemiological, environmental, and socio-economic data, as well as climate data indicating future weather patterns. Selection criteria were used to choose a subset of these rules for a classifier, thereby generating a Prediction Model. The models predicted high or low incidence of dengue in a Philippines province four weeks in advance. The threshold between high and low was determined relative to historical incidence data. Principal Findings Model accuracy is described by Positive Predictive Value (PPV), Negative Predictive Value (NPV), Sensitivity, and Specificity computed on test data not previously used to develop the model. Selecting a model using the F0.5 measure, which gives PPV more importance than Sensitivity, gave these results: PPV?=?0.780, NPV?=?0.938, Sensitivity?=?0.547, Specificity?=?0.978. Using the F3 measure, which gives Sensitivity more importance than PPV, the selected model had PPV?=?0.778, NPV?=?0.948, Sensitivity?=?0.627, Specificity?=?0.974. The decision as to which model has greater utility depends on how the predictions will be used in a particular situation. Conclusions This method builds prediction models for future dengue incidence in the Philippines and is capable of being modified for use in different situations; for diseases other than dengue; and for regions beyond the Philippines. The Philippines dengue prediction models predicted high or low incidence of dengue four weeks in advance of an outbreak with high accuracy, as measured by PPV, NPV, Sensitivity, and Specificity. PMID:24722434

  7. Secondary dengue virus type 4 infections in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Buchy, Philippe; Vo, Van Luong; Bui, Khanh Toan; Trinh, Thi Xuan Mai; Glaziou, Philippe; Le, Thi Thu Ha; Le, Viet Lo; Bui, Trong Chien

    2005-01-01

    This study was designated to describe clinical and biological features of patients with a suspected diagnosis of dengue fever/dengue hemorrhagic fever during an outbreak in Central Vietnam. One hundred and twenty-five consecutive patients hospitalized at Khanh Hoa and Binh Thuan Provincial hospitals between November 2001 and January 2002 with a diagnosis of suspected dengue infection were included in the present study. Viruses were isolated in C6/36 and VERO E6 cell cultures or detected by RT-PCR. A hemagglutination-inhibition test (HI) was done on each paired sera using dengue antigens type 1-4, Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus antigen, Chickungunya virus antigen and Sindbis virus antigen. Anti-dengue and anti-JE virus IgM were measured by a capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MAC-ELISA). Anti-dengue and anti-JE virus IgG were measured by an ELISA test. Dengue viruses were isolated in cell culture and/or detected by RT-PCR in 20.8% of blood samples. DEN-4 and DEN-2 serotypes were found in 18.4% and 2.4% of the patients, respectively. A total of 86.4% of individuals had a diagnosis of acute dengue fever by using the HI test and/or dengue virus-specific IgM capture-ELISA and/or virus isolation and/or RT-PCR. The prevalence of primary and secondary acute dengue infection was 4% and 78.4%, respectively. Anti-dengue IgG ELISA test was positive in 88.8% of the patients. In 5 cases (4%), Japanese encephalitis virus infection was positive by serology but the cell culture was negative. No Chickungunya virus or Sindbis virus infection was detected by the HI test. In patients with acute dengue virus infection, the most common presenting symptom was headache, followed by conjunctivitis, petechial rash, muscle and joint pain, nausea and abdominal pain. Four percent of hospitalized patients were classified as dengue hemorrhagic fever. The clinical presentation and blood cell counts were similar between patients hospitalized with acute dengue fever and patients with other febrile illnesses. PMID:15906664

  8. Health Beliefs and Practices Related to Dengue Fever: A Focus Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Li Ping; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2013-01-01

    Background This qualitative study aimed to provide an in-depth understanding of the meaning of dengue fever (DF) amongst people living in a dengue endemic region, dengue prevention and treatment-seeking behaviours. The Health Belief Model was used as a framework to explore and understand dengue prevention behaviours. Methods A total of 14 focus group discussions were conducted with 84 Malaysian citizens of different socio-demographic backgrounds between 16th December, 2011 and 12th May, 2012. Results The study revealed that awareness about DF and prevention measures were high. The pathophysiology of dengue especially dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) were rarely known; as a result, it was seen as deadly by some but was also perceived as easily curable by others without a basis of understanding. Young adults and elderly participants had a low perception of susceptibility to DF. In general, the low perceived susceptibility emerged as two themes, namely a perceived natural ability to withstand infection and a low risk of being in contact with the dengue virus vector, Aedes spp. mosquitoes. The barriers to sustained self-prevention against dengue prevention that emerged in focus groups were: i) lack of self-efficacy, ii) lack of perceived benefit, iii) low perceived susceptibility, and iv) unsure perceived susceptibility. Low perceived benefit of continued dengue prevention practices was a result of lack of concerted action against dengue in their neighborhood. Traditional medical practices and home remedies were widely perceived and experienced as efficacious in treating DF. Conclusion Behavioural change towards attaining sustainability in dengue preventive practices may be enhanced by fostering comprehensive knowledge of dengue and a change in health beliefs. Wide use of unconventional therapy for DF warrants the need to enlighten the public to limit their reliance on unproven alternative treatments. PMID:23875045

  9. [Dengue fever in mainland France].

    PubMed

    Paty, M-C

    2014-11-01

    Dengue fever is the most widespread distributed vector borne viral disease. It is transmitted through the bites of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. With the expansion of Aedes albopictus and increasing travel exchange, it is no longer limited to the tropical zone and transmission has been documented in temperate areas. In mainland France, where Aedes albopictus has been present and disseminating since 2004, 2 episodes of autochthonous transmission occurred in 2010 and in 2013. Control measures against dengue and chikungunya, which shares the same vector, are implemented every year since 2006, in the areas where the vector is present. They aim at preventing or limiting local transmission of these diseases. They are based on epidemiological and entomological surveillance and vector control measures. The diagnosis of dengue, and chikungunya should be considered in case of suggestive symptoms in patients returning from an area of virus circulation. It should also be considered for patients living or having stayed in areas of mainland France where Aedes albopictus is present, during its activity period from May 1 to November 30. The prevention and control system, including vector control measures and the notification of cases to the local health authority should be known, as the risk of autochthonous transmission increases every year. PMID:25080833

  10. Dengue infections in travellers.

    PubMed

    Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2012-05-01

    Dengue has been designated a major international public health problem by the World Health Organization (WHO). It is endemic in most tropical and sub-tropical countries, which are also popular tourist destinations. Travellers are not only at significant risk of acquiring dengue but they also contribute to its spread to non-endemic regions. Furthermore, they may serve as sentinels to alert the international community to epidemics in dengue-endemic regions. GeoSentinel, a global surveillance network, monitors all travel-related illnesses and estimates that dengue accounts for 2% of all illness in travellers returning from dengue-endemic regions. In fact, in travellers returning from South-east Asia, dengue is now a more frequent cause of febrile illness than malaria. Dengue-infected travellers returning home to countries where the vector exists can place the local population at risk of further spread of the disease with subsequent autochthonous cycles of infection. The true incidence of dengue amongst travellers may be underestimated because of variability in reporting requirements in different countries and under-diagnosis owing to the non-specific clinical presentation of the disease. Risk factors for acquiring dengue include duration of stay, season of travel and epidemic activity at the destination. Any pre-travel advice on the risks of developing dengue infections should consider these factors. PMID:22668447

  11. Expanded dengue syndrome: subacute thyroiditis and intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although most symptomatic dengue infections follow an uncomplicated course, complications and unusual manifestations are increasingly being reported due to rising disease burden. Expanded dengue syndrome is a new entity added into World Health Organization (WHO) classification system to incorporate this wide spectrum of unusual manifestations. We report a case of expanded dengue syndrome with subacute thyroiditis and intracerebral hemorrhage. This is the first case report of thyroiditis in dengue infection. Case presentation A 20?years old man presented with fever, myalgias, arthralgias, retro-orbital pain, vomiting and gum bleeding during a large dengue outbreak in Lahore, Pakistan. On 7th day of illness patient became afebrile, but he developed severe headaches, unconsciousness followed by altered behavior. On 9th day of illness patient developed painful neck swelling accompanied by fever, tremors, palpitations, hoarseness of voice and odynophagia. Examination revealed acutely swollen, tender thyroid gland along with features of hyperthyroidism. Laboratory evaluation revealed stable hematocrit, thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Patient had seroconverted for anti-dengue IgM antibodies on the 10th day of illness. A non-contrast Computed Tomogram (CT) of the brain showed right frontal lobe hematoma. Thyroid profile showed increased free T3 and T4 and low TSH. Technetium thyroid scan showed reduced tracer uptake. He was diagnosed as having subacute thyroiditis and treated with oral prednisolone and propranolol. Follow up CT brain showed resolving hematoma. Patient’s recovery was uneventful. Conclusion Subacute thyroiditis may develop during the course of dengue fever and should be included as a manifestation of expanded dengue syndrome. It should be suspected in patients with dengue fever who develop painful thyroid swelling and clinical features of hyperthyroidism. PMID:23033818

  12. Is dengue a threat to the blood supply?

    PubMed Central

    Teo, D; Ng, L C; Lam, S

    2009-01-01

    Dengue is the most common arthropod-borne infection worldwide, affecting at least 50 million people every year and endemic in more than 100 countries. The dengue virus is a single-stranded RNA virus with four major serotypes. Infection with one serotype confers homotypic immunity but not heterologous immunity, and secondary infection with another serotype may lead to more severe disease. The major route of transmission occurs through the Aedes aegypti mosquito vector, but dengue has also been transmitted through blood transfusion and organ transplantation. Infection results in a spectrum of clinical illness ranging from asymptomatic infection, undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) to dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Dengue is spreading rapidly to new areas and with increasing frequency of major outbreaks. A trend has also been observed towards increasing age among infected patients. This will impact blood supply availability as more blood donors are deferred because of dengue infection or exposure to infection. The risk of transmission through transfusion of blood from asymptomatic viraemic donors will also increase. Although screening tests for dengue and effective pathogen reduction processes are now available for the blood supply, the value of implementing these costly measures needs to be carefully considered. Demand for platelets and fresh frozen plasma will rise with increasing number of DHF/DSS. Evidence-based guidelines for the clinical use of these blood components in the management of patients with DHF/DSS have not been well established, and inappropriate use will contribute to the challenges faced by blood services. PMID:19392949

  13. Morbidity Rate Prediction of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) Using the Support Vector Machine and the Aedes aegypti Infection Rate in Similar Climates and Geographical Areas

    PubMed Central

    Kesorn, Kraisak; Ongruk, Phatsavee; Chompoosri, Jakkrawarn; Phumee, Atchara; Thavara, Usavadee; Tawatsin, Apiwat; Siriyasatien, Padet

    2015-01-01

    Background In the past few decades, several researchers have proposed highly accurate prediction models that have typically relied on climate parameters. However, climate factors can be unreliable and can lower the effectiveness of prediction when they are applied in locations where climate factors do not differ significantly. The purpose of this study was to improve a dengue surveillance system in areas with similar climate by exploiting the infection rate in the Aedes aegypti mosquito and using the support vector machine (SVM) technique for forecasting the dengue morbidity rate. Methods and Findings Areas with high incidence of dengue outbreaks in central Thailand were studied. The proposed framework consisted of the following three major parts: 1) data integration, 2) model construction, and 3) model evaluation. We discovered that the Ae. aegypti female and larvae mosquito infection rates were significantly positively associated with the morbidity rate. Thus, the increasing infection rate of female mosquitoes and larvae led to a higher number of dengue cases, and the prediction performance increased when those predictors were integrated into a predictive model. In this research, we applied the SVM with the radial basis function (RBF) kernel to forecast the high morbidity rate and take precautions to prevent the development of pervasive dengue epidemics. The experimental results showed that the introduced parameters significantly increased the prediction accuracy to 88.37% when used on the test set data, and these parameters led to the highest performance compared to state-of-the-art forecasting models. Conclusions The infection rates of the Ae. aegypti female mosquitoes and larvae improved the morbidity rate forecasting efficiency better than the climate parameters used in classical frameworks. We demonstrated that the SVM-R-based model has high generalization performance and obtained the highest prediction performance compared to classical models as measured by the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and mean absolute error (MAE). PMID:25961289

  14. The pathogenesis of dengue.

    PubMed

    Whitehorn, Jamie; Simmons, Cameron P

    2011-09-23

    Dengue is an important cause of childhood and adult morbidity in Asian and Latin American countries and its geographic footprint is growing. The clinical manifestations of dengue are the expression of a constellation of host and viral factors, some acquired, others intrinsic to the individual. The virulence of the virus plus the flavivirus infection history, age, gender and genotype of the host all appear to help shape the severity of infection. Similarly, the characteristics of the innate and acquired host immune response subsequent to infection are also likely determinants of outcome. This review summarises recent developments in the understanding of dengue pathogenesis and their relevance to dengue vaccine development. PMID:21781999

  15. RNA secondary structures in the proximal 3?UTR of Indonesian Dengue 1 virus strains

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Penelope Koraka; Marisol M. Williams; Kis Djamiatun; Tatty E. Setiati; F. H. D van Batenburg; Koert J. Stittelaar; Albert D. M. E. Osterhaus; Byron E. E. Martina

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of DENV-1 viruses, isolated during the 2001–2002 outbreak in Indonesia were studied. The secondary structure of the 3?UTR of different DENV-1 strains derived from Indonesian patients was compared with the 3?UTR of previously described DENV-1 sequences. The complete 3?UTR of DENV-1 was sequenced from 13 patients suffering from the severe form of dengue virus infection (dengue hemorrhagic fever).

  16. MONITORING OF DENGUE VIRUSES IN FIELD-CAUGHTAEDES AEGYPTIAND AEDES ALBOPICTUSMOSQUITOES BY A TYPE-SPECIFIC POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION AND CYCLE SEQUENCING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    VINCENT T. K. CHOW; Y. C. CHAN; RITA YONG; K. M. LEE; L. K. LIM; Y. K. CHUNG; S. G. LAM-PHUA

    1998-01-01

    Virologic surveillance for dengue through the detection of the prevalent serotype(s) circulating in the human population during inter- and intra-epidemic periods constitutes a reliable sentinel system for dengue outbreaks. We have applied a rapid and sensitive, semi-nested, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay using nonstructural protein 3 gene primers for the type-specific-detection of dengue viruses in artificially infected and in

  17. Hyperferritinaemia in Dengue Virus Infected Patients Is Associated with Immune Activation and Coagulation Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Pannuti, Cláudio S.; Brouns, Rosalba M.; van den Berg, Riemsdijk W. A.; van den Ham, Henk-Jan; Martina, Byron E. E.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Netea, Mihai G.; Meijers, Joost C. M.; van Gorp, Eric C. M.; Kallas, Esper G.

    2014-01-01

    Background During a dengue outbreak on the Caribbean island Aruba, highly elevated levels of ferritin were detected in dengue virus infected patients. Ferritin is an acute-phase reactant and hyperferritinaemia is a hallmark of diseases caused by extensive immune activation, such as haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether hyperferritinaemia in dengue patients was associated with clinical markers of extensive immune activation and coagulation disturbances. Methodology/Principal Findings Levels of ferritin, standard laboratory markers, sIL-2R, IL-18 and coagulation and fibrinolytic markers were determined in samples from patients with uncomplicated dengue in Aruba. Levels of ferritin were significantly increased in dengue patients compared to patients with other febrile illnesses. Moreover, levels of ferritin associated significantly with the occurrence of viraemia. Hyperferritinaemia was also significantly associated with thrombocytopenia, elevated liver enzymes and coagulation disturbances. The results were validated in a cohort of dengue virus infected patients in Brazil. In this cohort levels of ferritin and cytokine profiles were determined. Increased levels of ferritin in dengue virus infected patients in Brazil were associated with disease severity and a pro-inflammatory cytokine profile. Conclusions/Significance Altogether, we provide evidence that ferritin can be used as a clinical marker to discriminate between dengue and other febrile illnesses. The occurrence of hyperferritinaemia in dengue virus infected patients is indicative for highly active disease resulting in immune activation and coagulation disturbances. Therefore, we recommend that patients with hyperferritinaemia are monitored carefully. PMID:25299654

  18. Assessing weather effects on dengue disease in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Yoon Ling; Burkart, Katrin; Leitão, Pedro J; Lakes, Tobia

    2013-12-01

    The number of dengue cases has been increasing on a global level in recent years, and particularly so in Malaysia, yet little is known about the effects of weather for identifying the short-term risk of dengue for the population. The aim of this paper is to estimate the weather effects on dengue disease accounting for non-linear temporal effects in Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya, Malaysia, from 2008 to 2010. We selected the weather parameters with a Poisson generalized additive model, and then assessed the effects of minimum temperature, bi-weekly accumulated rainfall and wind speed on dengue cases using a distributed non-linear lag model while adjusting for trend, day-of-week and week of the year. We found that the relative risk of dengue cases is positively associated with increased minimum temperature at a cumulative percentage change of 11.92% (95% CI: 4.41-32.19), from 25.4 °C to 26.5 °C, with the highest effect delayed by 51 days. Increasing bi-weekly accumulated rainfall had a positively strong effect on dengue cases at a cumulative percentage change of 21.45% (95% CI: 8.96, 51.37), from 215 mm to 302 mm, with the highest effect delayed by 26-28 days. The wind speed is negatively associated with dengue cases. The estimated lagged effects can be adapted in the dengue early warning system to assist in vector control and prevention plan. PMID:24287855

  19. Assessing Weather Effects on Dengue Disease in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Yoon Ling; Burkart, Katrin; Leitão, Pedro J.; Lakes, Tobia

    2013-01-01

    The number of dengue cases has been increasing on a global level in recent years, and particularly so in Malaysia, yet little is known about the effects of weather for identifying the short-term risk of dengue for the population. The aim of this paper is to estimate the weather effects on dengue disease accounting for non-linear temporal effects in Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya, Malaysia, from 2008 to 2010. We selected the weather parameters with a Poisson generalized additive model, and then assessed the effects of minimum temperature, bi-weekly accumulated rainfall and wind speed on dengue cases using a distributed non-linear lag model while adjusting for trend, day-of-week and week of the year. We found that the relative risk of dengue cases is positively associated with increased minimum temperature at a cumulative percentage change of 11.92% (95% CI: 4.41–32.19), from 25.4 °C to 26.5 °C, with the highest effect delayed by 51 days. Increasing bi-weekly accumulated rainfall had a positively strong effect on dengue cases at a cumulative percentage change of 21.45% (95% CI: 8.96, 51.37), from 215 mm to 302 mm, with the highest effect delayed by 26–28 days. The wind speed is negatively associated with dengue cases. The estimated lagged effects can be adapted in the dengue early warning system to assist in vector control and prevention plan. PMID:24287855

  20. Aedes larval population dynamics and risk for dengue epidemics in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Rohani, A; Suzilah, I; Malinda, M; Anuar, I; Mohd Mazlan, I; Salmah Maszaitun, M; Topek, O; Tanrang, Y; Ooi, S C; Rozilawati, H; Lee, H L

    2011-08-01

    Early detection of a dengue outbreak is an important first step towards implementing effective dengue interventions resulting in reduced mortality and morbidity. A dengue mathematical model would be useful for the prediction of an outbreak and evaluation of control measures. However, such a model must be carefully parameterized and validated with epidemiological, ecological and entomological data. A field study was conducted to collect and analyse various parameters to model dengue transmission and outbreak. Dengue prone areas in Kuala Lumpur, Pahang, Kedah and Johor were chosen for this study. Ovitraps were placed outdoor and used to determine the effects of meteorological parameters on vector breeding. Vector population in each area was monitored weekly for 87 weeks. Weather stations, consisting of a temperature and relative humidity data logger and an automated rain gauge, were installed at key locations in each study site. Correlation and Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ADL) model were used to study the relationship among the variables. Previous week rainfall plays a significant role in increasing the mosquito population, followed by maximum humidity and temperature. The secondary data of rainfall, temperature and humidity provided by the meteorological department showed an insignificant relationship with the mosquito population compared to the primary data recorded by the researchers. A well fit model was obtained for each locality to be used as a predictive model to foretell possible outbreak. PMID:22041742

  1. Distribution, seasonal variation & dengue transmission prediction in Sisaket, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Wongkoon, S.; Jaroensutasinee, M.; Jaroensutasinee, K.

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Environmental factors including weather variables may play a significant role in the transmission of dengue. This study investigated the effect of seasonal variation on the abundance of Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus larvae and explored the impact of weather variability on dengue transmission in Sisaket, Thailand. Methods: The monthly mosquito larval surveys were carried out in urban and rural areas in Sisaket, Thailand from January to December 2010. Data on monthly-reported cases of dengue fever over the period 2004-2010 were obtained from the Ministry of Public Health. Weather data over the same period were obtained from the Thai Meteorological Department. Chi-square test was used to find the differences relating to seasonal variability, areas of study, and mosquito species factors using entomological survey data. Time series Poisson regression analysis was performed using data on monthly weather variables and dengue cases. Results: There were more Ae. aegypti larvae per household than Ae. albopictus larvae in the winter and rainy seasons. More Aedes larvae per household were found in the rainy season than in the winter and summer seasons. Relative humidity at a lag of one month and rainy days in the current month were significant predictors of dengue incidence in Sisaket. Interpretation & conclusions: Increased rain during the current month and less humidity during the previous month might trigger a higher incidence of dengue epidemic in Sisaket. The present findings suggest that the dengue incidence corresponds with the number of Aedes larvae. The seasonal patterns of dengue outbreaks coincide with the rainy season. PMID:24135179

  2. Sentinel surveillance system for early outbreak detection in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Following the outbreak of chikungunya in the Indian Ocean, the Ministry of Health directed the necessary development of an early outbreak detection system. A disease surveillance team including the Institut Pasteur in Madagascar (IPM) was organized to establish a sentinel syndromic-based surveillance system. The system, which was set up in March 2007, transmits patient data on a daily basis from the various voluntary general practitioners throughout the six provinces of the country to the IPM. We describe the challenges and steps involved in developing a sentinel surveillance system and the well-timed information it provides for improving public health decision-making. Methods Surveillance was based on data collected from sentinel general practitioners (SGP). The SGPs report the sex, age, visit date and time, and symptoms of each new patient weekly, using forms addressed to the management team. However, the system is original in that SGPs also report data at least once a day, from Monday to Friday (number of fever cases, rapid test confirmed malaria, influenza, arboviral syndromes or diarrhoeal disease), by cellular telephone (encrypted message SMS). Information can also be validated by the management team, by mobile phone. This data transmission costs 120 ariary per day, less than US$1 per month. Results In 2008, the sentinel surveillance system included 13 health centers, and identified 5 outbreaks. Of the 218,849 visits to SGPs, 12.2% were related to fever syndromes. Of these 26,669 fever cases, 12.3% were related to Dengue-like fever, 11.1% to Influenza-like illness and 9.7% to malaria cases confirmed by a specific rapid diagnostic test. Conclusion The sentinel surveillance system represents the first nationwide real-time-like surveillance system ever established in Madagascar. Our findings should encourage other African countries to develop their own syndromic surveillance systems. Prompt detection of an outbreak of infectious disease may lead to control measures that limit its impact and help prevent future outbreaks. PMID:20092624

  3. Foodborne outbreaks of shigellosis in the USA, 1998-2008.

    PubMed

    Nygren, B L; Schilling, K A; Blanton, E M; Silk, B J; Cole, D J; Mintz, E D

    2013-02-01

    We examined reported outbreaks of foodborne shigellosis in the USA from 1998 to 2008 and summarized demographic and epidemiological characteristics of 120 confirmed outbreaks resulting in 6208 illnesses. Most reported foodborne shigellosis outbreaks (n = 70, 58%) and outbreak-associated illnesses (n = 3383, 54%) were restaurant-associated. The largest outbreaks were associated with commercially prepared foods distributed in multiple states and foods prepared in institutional settings. Foods commonly consumed raw were implicated in 29 (24%) outbreaks and infected food handlers in 28 (23%) outbreaks. Most outbreaks (n = 86, 72%) were caused by Shigella sonnei. Targeted efforts to reduce contamination during food handling at multiple points in the food processing and distribution system, including food preparation in restaurants and institutional settings, could prevent many foodborne disease outbreaks and outbreak-related illnesses including those due to Shigella. PMID:22361246

  4. Utility of the Tourniquet Test and the White Blood Cell Count to Differentiate Dengue among Acute Febrile Illnesses in the Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Christopher J.; Lorenzi, Olga D.; Colón, Lisandra; Sepúlveda García, Arleene; Santiago, Luis M.; Cruz Rivera, Ramón; Cuyar Bermúdez, Liv Jossette; Ortiz Báez, Fernando; Vázquez Aponte, Delanor; Tomashek, Kay M.; Gutierrez, Jorge; Alvarado, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    Dengue often presents with non-specific clinical signs, and given the current paucity of accurate, rapid diagnostic laboratory tests, identifying easily obtainable bedside markers of dengue remains a priority. Previous studies in febrile Asian children have suggested that the combination of a positive tourniquet test (TT) and leucopenia can distinguish dengue from other febrile illnesses, but little data exists on the usefulness of these tests in adults or in the Americas. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of the TT and leucopenia (white blood cell count <5000/mm3) in identifying dengue as part of an acute febrile illness (AFI) surveillance study conducted in the Emergency Department of Saint Luke's Hospital in Ponce, Puerto Rico. From September to December 2009, 284 patients presenting to the ED with fever for 2–7 days and no identified source were enrolled. Participants were tested for influenza, dengue, leptospirosis and enteroviruses. Thirty-three (12%) patients were confirmed as having dengue; 2 had dengue co-infection with influenza and leptospirosis, respectively. An infectious etiology was determined for 141 others (136 influenza, 3 enterovirus, 2 urinary tract infections), and 110 patients had no infectious etiology identified. Fifty-two percent of laboratory-positive dengue cases had a positive TT versus 18% of patients without dengue (P<0.001), 87% of dengue cases compared to 28% of non-dengue cases had leucopenia (P<0.001). The presence of either a positive TT or leucopenia correctly identified 94% of dengue patients. The specificity and positive predictive values of these tests was significantly higher in the subset of patients without pandemic influenza A H1N1, suggesting improved discriminatory performance of these tests in the absence of concurrent dengue and influenza outbreaks. However, even during simultaneous AFI outbreaks, the absence of leucopenia combined with a negative tourniquet test may be useful to rule out dengue. PMID:22163057

  5. Utility of the tourniquet test and the white blood cell count to differentiate dengue among acute febrile illnesses in the emergency room.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Christopher J; Lorenzi, Olga D; Colón, Lisandra; García, Arleene Sepúlveda; Santiago, Luis M; Rivera, Ramón Cruz; Bermúdez, Liv Jossette Cuyar; Báez, Fernando Ortiz; Aponte, Delanor Vázquez; Tomashek, Kay M; Gutierrez, Jorge; Alvarado, Luisa

    2011-12-01

    Dengue often presents with non-specific clinical signs, and given the current paucity of accurate, rapid diagnostic laboratory tests, identifying easily obtainable bedside markers of dengue remains a priority. Previous studies in febrile Asian children have suggested that the combination of a positive tourniquet test (TT) and leucopenia can distinguish dengue from other febrile illnesses, but little data exists on the usefulness of these tests in adults or in the Americas. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of the TT and leucopenia (white blood cell count <5000/mm(3)) in identifying dengue as part of an acute febrile illness (AFI) surveillance study conducted in the Emergency Department of Saint Luke's Hospital in Ponce, Puerto Rico. From September to December 2009, 284 patients presenting to the ED with fever for 2-7 days and no identified source were enrolled. Participants were tested for influenza, dengue, leptospirosis and enteroviruses. Thirty-three (12%) patients were confirmed as having dengue; 2 had dengue co-infection with influenza and leptospirosis, respectively. An infectious etiology was determined for 141 others (136 influenza, 3 enterovirus, 2 urinary tract infections), and 110 patients had no infectious etiology identified. Fifty-two percent of laboratory-positive dengue cases had a positive TT versus 18% of patients without dengue (P<0.001), 87% of dengue cases compared to 28% of non-dengue cases had leucopenia (P<0.001). The presence of either a positive TT or leucopenia correctly identified 94% of dengue patients. The specificity and positive predictive values of these tests was significantly higher in the subset of patients without pandemic influenza A H1N1, suggesting improved discriminatory performance of these tests in the absence of concurrent dengue and influenza outbreaks. However, even during simultaneous AFI outbreaks, the absence of leucopenia combined with a negative tourniquet test may be useful to rule out dengue. PMID:22163057

  6. An update on the incidence of dengue gaining strength in Saudi Arabia and current control approaches for its vector mosquito

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The cases of dengue reported earlier in the late 1990s from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) occurred in the cities of Jeddah and Makkah. Although the kingdom has ample financial resources to establish effective control measures for the dengue vector, numerous cases of dengue occur and fluctuate in numbers from year to year. This necessitates a serious review of the current vector control strategies being practiced in order to identify the existing shortcomings. This short report provides an update on epidemiology of dengue in KSA (specifically in cities of Jeddah and Makkah) with a critical look at the current vector control strategies. Findings In 2013, 4411 cases of dengue were reported, with 8 cases of mortality. This number of dengue incidence was four times higher compared to 2012. In 2013, the highest number of 1272 dengue cases was reported in May, while the lowest number (37) of cases was reported in September. Conclusions It is evident that the control strategies of the dengue vector presently employed are inadequate. There seems to be serious deficiencies in following proper scientific procedures during field application(s) of control materials against the vector as is evident by the increases in the number of dengue cases as well as frequent outbreaks of the vector mosquito populations. In this review, some specific suggestions are made to draw attention to the relevant KSA authorities of the possible reasons behind unsuccessful control results and as to how to improve the strategy of dengue vector control in the kingdom. PMID:24890567

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of dengue virus types 1 and 3 isolated in Jakarta, Indonesia in 1988.

    PubMed

    Sjatha, Fithriyah; Takizawa, Yamato; Yamanaka, Atsushi; Konishi, Eiji

    2012-12-01

    Dengue viruses are mosquito-borne viruses that cause dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever, both of which are globally important diseases. These viruses have evolved in a transmission cycle between human hosts and mosquito vectors in various tropical and subtropical environments. We previously isolated three strains of dengue type 1 virus (DENV1) and 14 strains of dengue type 3 virus (DENV3) during an outbreak of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever in Jakarta, Indonesia in 1988. Here, we compared the nucleotide sequences of the entire envelope protein-coding region among these strains. The isolates were 97.6-100% identical for DENV1 and 98.8-100% identical for DENV3. All DENV1 isolates were included in two different clades of genotype IV and all DENV3 isolates were included in a single clade of genotype I. For DENV1, three Yap Island strains isolated in 2004 were the only strains closely related to the present isolates; the recently circulated Indonesian strains were in different clades. Molecular clock analyses estimated that ancestors of the genotype IV strains of DENV1 have been indigenous in Indonesia since 1948. We predict that they diverged frequently around 1967 and that their offspring distributed to Southeast Asia, the Western Pacific, and Africa. For DENV3, the clade containing all the present isolates also contained strains isolated from other Indonesian regions and other countries including Malaysia, Singapore, China, and East Timor from 1985-2010. Molecular clock analyses estimated that the common ancestor of the genotype I strains of DENV3 emerged in Indonesia around 1967 and diverged frequently until 1980, and that their offspring distributed mainly in Southeast Asia. The first dengue outbreak in 1968 and subsequent outbreaks in Indonesia might have influenced the divergence and distribution of the DENV1 genotype IV strains and the DENV3 genotype I strains in many countries. PMID:22959957

  8. Reappearance of chikungunya, formerly called dengue, in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Halstead, Scott B

    2015-04-01

    After an absence of ?200 years, chikungunya returned to the American tropics in 2013. The virus is maintained in a complex African zoonotic cycle but escapes into an urban cycle at 40- to 50-year intervals, causing global pandemics. In 1823, classical chikungunya, a viral exanthem in humans, occurred on Zanzibar, and in 1827, it arrived in the Caribbean and spread to North and South America. In Zanzibar, the disease was known as kidenga pepo, Swahili for a sudden cramp-like seizure caused by an evil spirit; in Cuba, it was known as dengue, a Spanish homonym of denga. During the eighteenth century, dengue (present-day chikungunya) was distinguished from breakbone fever (present-day dengue), another febrile exanthem. In the twentieth century, experiments resulted in the recovery and naming of present-day dengue viruses. In 1952, chikungunya virus was recovered during an outbreak in Tanzania, but by then, the virus had lost its original name to present-day dengue viruses. PMID:25816211

  9. Reappearance of Chikungunya, Formerly Called Dengue, in the Americas

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    After an absence of ?200 years, chikungunya returned to the American tropics in 2013. The virus is maintained in a complex African zoonotic cycle but escapes into an urban cycle at 40- to 50-year intervals, causing global pandemics. In 1823, classical chikungunya, a viral exanthem in humans, occurred on Zanzibar, and in 1827, it arrived in the Caribbean and spread to North and South America. In Zanzibar, the disease was known as kidenga pepo, Swahili for a sudden cramp-like seizure caused by an evil spirit; in Cuba, it was known as dengue, a Spanish homonym of denga. During the eighteenth century, dengue (present-day chikungunya) was distinguished from breakbone fever (present-day dengue), another febrile exanthem. In the twentieth century, experiments resulted in the recovery and naming of present-day dengue viruses. In 1952, chikungunya virus was recovered during an outbreak in Tanzania, but by then, the virus had lost its original name to present-day dengue viruses. PMID:25816211

  10. A climate-based spatiotemporal prediction for dengue fever epidemics: a case study in southern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.-L.; Yang, S.-J.; Lin, Y.-C.

    2012-04-01

    Dengue Fever (DF) has been identified by the World Health organization (WHO) as one of the most serious vector-borne infectious diseases in tropical and sub-tropical areas. DF has been one of the most important epidemics in Taiwan which occur annually especially in southern Taiwan during summer and autumn. Most DF studies have focused mainly on temporal DF patterns and its close association with climatic covariates, whereas few studies have investigated the spatial DF patterns (spatial dependence and clustering) and composite space-time effects of the DF epidemics. The present study proposes a spatio-temporal DF prediction approach based on stochastic Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) analysis. Core and site-specific knowledge bases are considered, including climate and health datasets under conditions of uncertainty, space-time dependence functions, and a Poisson regression model of climatic variables contributing to DF occurrences in southern Taiwan during 2007, when the highest number of DF cases was recorded in the history of Taiwan epidemics (over 2000). The obtained results show that the DF outbreaks in the study area are highly influenced by climatic conditions. Furthermore, the analysis can provide the required "one-week-ahead" outbreak warnings based on spatio-temporal predictions of DF distributions. Therefore, the proposed analysis can provide the Taiwan Disease Control Agency with a valuable tool to timely identify, control, and even efficiently prevent DF spreading across space-time.

  11. Dengue infection in neotropical forest mammals.

    PubMed

    de Thoisy, Benoît; Lacoste, Vincent; Germain, Adeline; Muñoz-Jordán, Jorge; Colón, Candimar; Mauffrey, Jean-François; Delaval, Marguerite; Catzeflis, François; Kazanji, Mirdad; Matheus, Séverine; Dussart, Philippe; Morvan, Jacques; Setién, Alvaro Aguilar; Deparis, Xavier; Lavergne, Anne

    2009-04-01

    In South America, dengue is the arbovirus-transmitted disease with the highest incidence. Unlike other arboviruses, wild mammals have no confirmed role in the cycle of dengue in the neotropics, although serological studies have suggested a possible secondary amplification cycle involving mammals other than nonhuman primates. In French Guiana, where all four serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3, DENV-4) are present, the disease is endemic with outbreak events. To determine whether wild mammals can be infected by DENV, rodents, marsupials, and bats were captured over several periods, from 2001 to 2007, at two sites. The first location is a secondary forest surrounded by an urban area where dengue is endemic. The second location is a forest edge site where the disease has not yet emerged. A total of 10,000 trap-nights were performed and 616 mammals were captured. RNAs representing the four DENV serotypes were detected at both sites by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in the livers and/or sera of 92 mammals belonging to 14 out of 32 species distributed among all the orders investigated: Rodentia (33 positive/146 tested), Marsupialia (40/318), and Chiroptera (19/152). Sequence analyses of a portion of the capsid and premembrane junction revealed that mammal strains of DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3, and DENV-4 had only 92.6%, 89%, 95%, and 95.8% identity, respectively, with strains circulating in the human population during the same periods. Regarding DENV-2, strains related (99% identity) to those responsible for an epidemic event in humans in French Guiana concurrent to the capture sessions were also evidenced, suggesting that wild mammals in edge habitats can be infected by circulating human strains. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that neotropical wild mammals can be infected with dengue virus. The question of whether mammals maintain DENV in enzootic cycles and can play a role in its reemergence in human populations remains to be answered. PMID:18945183

  12. Impact of Dengue

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Français ??????? Español RSS Feed Youtube Twitter Facebook Google + iTunes Play Store Emergencies preparedness, response Menu Home ... of dengue and DHF. Share Email Twitter Facebook Google Delicious LinkedIn More... Print You are here: Global ...

  13. Outbreak of Nosocomial Listeriosis — Texas, 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Invasive listeriosis is a potentially fatal foodborne disease caused by Listeria monocytogenes. In February 2010, a listeriosis cluster was identified in Texas. We investigated to confirm the outbreak, identify the source, and prevent additional infections. Methods: All clinical isol...

  14. Dengue Virus Diagnostics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Evgeni Eltzov; Danit Atias; Levi Gheber; Robert S. Marks

    \\u000a Dengue fever (DF) is an emerging arborviral disease caused by infection with dengue virus (DENV) which has emerged as the\\u000a most important vector-borne viral disease in tropical areas and it continues to expand geographically. The four serotypes\\u000a of DENV that cause human disease are transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. Expansion in geographic distribution of both viruses\\u000a and mosquito vectors, has led

  15. International Dispersal of Dengue through Air Travel: Importation Risk for Europe

    PubMed Central

    Semenza, Jan C.; Sudre, Bertrand; Miniota, Jennifer; Rossi, Massimiliano; Hu, Wei; Kossowsky, David; Suk, Jonathan E.; Van Bortel, Wim; Khan, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    Background The worldwide distribution of dengue is expanding, in part due to globalized traffic and trade. Aedes albopictus is a competent vector for dengue viruses (DENV) and is now established in numerous regions of Europe. Viremic travellers arriving in Europe from dengue-affected areas of the world can become catalysts of local outbreaks in Europe. Local dengue transmission in Europe is extremely rare, and the last outbreak occurred in 1927–28 in Greece. However, autochthonous transmission was reported from France in September 2010, and from Croatia between August and October 2010. Methodology We compiled data on areas affected by dengue in 2010 from web resources and surveillance reports, and collected national dengue importation data. We developed a hierarchical regression model to quantify the relationship between the number of reported dengue cases imported into Europe and the volume of airline travellers arriving from dengue-affected areas internationally. Principal Findings In 2010, over 5.8 million airline travellers entered Europe from dengue-affected areas worldwide, of which 703,396 arrived at 36 airports situated in areas where Ae. albopictus has been recorded. The adjusted incidence rate ratio for imported dengue into European countries was 1.09 (95% CI: 1.01–1.17) for every increase of 10,000 travellers; in August, September, and October the rate ratios were 1.70 (95%CI: 1.23–2.35), 1.46 (95%CI: 1.02–2.10), and 1.35 (95%CI: 1.01–1.81), respectively. Two Italian cities where the vector is present received over 50% of all travellers from dengue-affected areas, yet with the continuing vector expansion more cities will be implicated in the future. In fact, 38% more travellers arrived in 2013 into those parts of Europe where Ae. albopictus has recently been introduced, compared to 2010. Conclusions The highest risk of dengue importation in 2010 was restricted to three months and can be ranked according to arriving traveller volume from dengue-affected areas into cities where the vector is present. The presence of the vector is a necessary, but not sufficient, prerequisite for DENV onward transmission, which depends on a number of additional factors. However, our empirical model can provide spatio-temporal elements to public health interventions. PMID:25474491

  16. Use of Insecticide-Treated House Screens to Reduce Infestations of Dengue Virus Vectors, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Manrique-Saide, Pablo; Che-Mendoza, Azael; Barrera-Perez, Mario; Guillermo-May, Guillermo; Herrera-Bojorquez, Josue; Dzul-Manzanilla, Felipe; Gutierrez-Castro, Cipriano; Lenhart, Audrey; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo; Sommerfeld, Johannes; McCall, Philip J.; Kroeger, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Dengue prevention efforts rely on control of virus vectors. We investigated use of insecticide-treated screens permanently affixed to windows and doors in Mexico and found that the screens significantly reduced infestations of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in treated houses. Our findings demonstrate the value of this method for dengue virus vector control. PMID:25625483

  17. Health Economics of Dengue: A Systematic Literature Review and Expert Panel's Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Mark E.; Beutels, Philippe; Meltzer, Martin I.; Shepard, Donald S.; Hombach, Joachim; Hutubessy, Raymond; Dessis, Damien; Coudeville, Laurent; Dervaux, Benoit; Wichmann, Ole; Margolis, Harold S.; Kuritsky, Joel N.

    2011-01-01

    Dengue vaccines are currently in development and policymakers need appropriate economic studies to determine their potential financial and public health impact. We searched five databases (PubMed, EMBASE, LILAC, EconLit, and WHOLIS) to identify health economics studies of dengue. Forty-three manuscripts were identified that provided primary data: 32 report economic burden of dengue and nine are comparative economic analyses assessing various interventions. The remaining two were a willingness-to-pay study and a policymaker survey. An expert panel reviewed the existing dengue economic literature and recommended future research to fill information gaps. Although dengue is an important vector-borne disease, the economic literature is relatively sparse and results have often been conflicting because of use of inconsistent assumptions. Health economic research specific to dengue is urgently needed to ensure informed decision making on the various options for controlling and preventing this disease. PMID:21363989

  18. Dengue Virus Tropism in Humanized Mice Recapitulates Human Dengue Fever

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Javier Mota; Rebeca Rico-Hesse

    2011-01-01

    Animal models of dengue virus disease have been very difficult to develop because of the virus' specificity for infection and replication in certain human cells. We developed a model of dengue fever in immunodeficient mice transplanted with human stem cells from umbilical cord blood. These mice show measurable signs of dengue disease as in humans (fever, viremia, erythema and thrombocytopenia),

  19. Aedes aegypti in Brazil: genetically differentiated populations with high susceptibility to dengue and yellow fever viruses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Lourenço-de-Oliveira; M Vazeille; A. M. B de Filippis; A. B Failloux

    2004-01-01

    Aedes aegypti was eliminated from Brazil in 1955, but re-infested the country in the 1970s. Dengue outbreaks have occurred since 1981 and became endemic in several cities in Brazil after 1986. Urban yellow fever has not occurred since 1942, and only jungle yellow fever cases have been reported. A population genetic analysis using isoenzyme variation combined with an evaluation of

  20. VARIACION ESPACIO-TEMPORAL DEL RIESGO DE TRANSMISION DE DENGUE EN LA CIUDAD DE BUENOS AIRES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ANIBAL E. CARBAJO; SANDRA M. GOMEZ; SUSANA I. CURTO; NICOLAS J. SCHWEIGMANN; Academia Nacional de Medicina

    2004-01-01

    Spatio-temporal variability in the transmission of dengue in Buenos Aires City. Cases of den- gue detected in Buenos Aires City between 1999 and 2000 confirmed the possibility of epidemic outbreaks. The activity of its vector Aedes aegypi was monitored to study the spatial and temporal risk of den- gue transmission. Adult oviposition activity of Aedes aegypti showed an heterogeneous spatio-temporal

  1. Characterization of the Temporal and Spatial Dynamics of the Dengue Epidemic in Northern Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anno, S.; Imaoka, K.; Tadono, T.; Igarashi, T.; Sivaganesh, S.; Kannathasan, S.; Kumaran, V.; Surendran, S.

    2014-11-01

    Dengue outbreaks are affected by biological, ecological, socio-economic and demographic factors that vary over time and space. These factors have been examined separately, with limited success, and still require clarification. The present study aimed to investigate the spatial and temporal relationships between these factors and dengue outbreaks in the northern region of Sri Lanka. Remote sensing (RS) data gathered from a plurality of satellites: TRMM TMI, Aqua AMSR-E, GCOM-W AMSR2, DMSP SSM/I, DMSP SSMIS, NOAA-19 AMSU, MetOp-A AMSU and GEO IR were used to develop an index comprising rainfall. Humidity (total precipitable water, or vertically integrated water vapor amount) and temperature (surface temperature) data were acquired from the JAXA Satellite Monitoring for Environmental Studies (JASMES) portal which were retrieved and processed from the Aqua/MODIS and Terra/MODIS data. RS data gathered by ALOS/AVNIR-2 were used to detect urbanization, and a digital land cover map was used to extract land cover information. Other data on relevant factors and dengue outbreaks were collected through institutions and extant databases. The analyzed RS data and databases were integrated into geographic information systems, enabling both spatial association analysis and spatial statistical analysis. Our findings show that the combination of ecological factors derived from RS data and socio-economic and demographic factors is suitable for predicting spatial and temporal patterns of dengue outbreaks.

  2. Disease Outbreak News

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for communicating with the public during an outbreak Communication for behavioural impact (COMBI) COMBI toolkit for behavioural and social communication in outbreak response Field workbook for COMBI planning ...

  3. Assessing the Relationship between Vector Indices and Dengue Transmission: A Systematic Review of the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Leigh R.; Runge-Ranzinger, Silvia; McCall, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite doubts about methods used and the association between vector density and dengue transmission, routine sampling of mosquito vector populations is common in dengue-endemic countries worldwide. This study examined the evidence from published studies for the existence of any quantitative relationship between vector indices and dengue cases. Methodology/Principal Findings From a total of 1205 papers identified in database searches following Cochrane and PRISMA Group guidelines, 18 were included for review. Eligibility criteria included 3-month study duration and dengue case confirmation by WHO case definition and/or serology. A range of designs were seen, particularly in spatial sampling and analyses, and all but 3 were classed as weak study designs. Eleven of eighteen studies generated Stegomyia indices from combined larval and pupal data. Adult vector data were reported in only three studies. Of thirteen studies that investigated associations between vector indices and dengue cases, 4 reported positive correlations, 4 found no correlation and 5 reported ambiguous or inconclusive associations. Six out of 7 studies that measured Breteau Indices reported dengue transmission at levels below the currently accepted threshold of 5. Conclusions/Significance There was little evidence of quantifiable associations between vector indices and dengue transmission that could reliably be used for outbreak prediction. This review highlighted the need for standardized sampling protocols that adequately consider dengue spatial heterogeneity. Recommendations for more appropriately designed studies include: standardized study design to elucidate the relationship between vector abundance and dengue transmission; adult mosquito sampling should be routine; single values of Breteau or other indices are not reliable universal dengue transmission thresholds; better knowledge of vector ecology is required. PMID:24810901

  4. Novel, Meso-Substituted Cationic Porphyrin Molecule for Photo-Mediated Larval Control of the Dengue Vector Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Lucantoni, Leonardo; Magaraggia, Michela; Lupidi, Giulio; Ouedraogo, Robert Kossivi; Coppellotti, Olimpia; Esposito, Fulvio; Fabris, Clara; Jori, Giulio; Habluetzel, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Background Control of the mosquito vector population is the most effective strategy currently available for the prevention of dengue fever and the containment of outbreaks. Photo-activated oxidants may represent promising tools for developing effective, safe and ecofriendly novel larvicides. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of the synthetic meso-substituted porphyrin meso-tri(N-methylpyridyl), meso-mono(N-tetradecylpyridyl)porphine (C14) as a photoactivatable larvicide against the dengue vector Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti. Methodology The photophysical and photochemical properties of the C14 molecule were assessed spectrophotometrically. Photomediated larvicidal efficacy, route of intake and site of action were determined on Ae. aegypti larvae by laboratory bioassays and fluorescence microscopy. Using powdered food pellet for laboratory rodents (a common larval food used in the laboratory) as a carrier for C14, loading-release dynamics, larvicidal efficacy and residual activity of the C14-carrier complex were investigated. Main Findings The C14 molecule was found to exert a potent photosensitizing activity on Ae. aegypti larvae. At irradiation intervals of 12 h and 1 h, at a light intensity of 4.0 mW/cm2, which is 50–100 times lower than that of natural sunlight, LC50 values of 0.1 µM (0.15 mg/l) and 0.5 µM (0.77 mg/l) were obtained, respectively. The molecule was active after ingestion by the larvae and caused irreversible, lethal damage to the midgut and caecal epithelia. The amphiphilic nature of C14 allowed a formulate to be produced that not only was as active against the larvae as C14 in solution, but also possessed a residual activity of at least two weeks, in laboratory conditions. Conclusions The meso-substituted synthetic porphyrin C14, thanks to its photo-sensitizing properties represents an attractive candidate for the development of novel photolarvicides for dengue vector control. PMID:22206031

  5. Prevalence and incidence of dengue virus and antibody placental transfer during late pregnancy in central Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Maternal dengue antibodies are considered to play a significant role in dengue pathogenesis among infants. Determining the transplacental specific antibody transfer is invaluable for establishing the optimal vaccination age among infants in endemic regions. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study among pairs of maternal and corresponding umbilical cord blood samples in public hospitals. The prevalence and incidence of dengue infection were determined in 505 pairs of pregnant women and neonates during a large outbreak (2009–2010) in central Brazil. The women were interviewed at late pregnancy to assess current or past symptoms of dengue. All parturients and their neonates were screened using Dengue IgG Indirect ELISA (Panbio) to assess previous dengue exposure. A semi-quantitative measurement of the IgG antibody expressed by the index ratio was calculated using optical density (OD) values according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The studied population of parturients and their offspring was also screened for recent dengue infection by the Dengue IgM-capture ELISA (Panbio). Those participants with history of fever and two or more symptoms of dengue at least 10 days before the delivery were also tested for the dengue NS1 antigen using the Dengue Early ELISA (Panbio) and RT-PCR. Results The mean maternal age was 25.8 (SD?=?6.4), and 83.6% of deliveries were between 37 and 41 weeks. Approximately half of the 505 women and neonates were IgG-seropositive, yielding 99.3% co-positive mother-child frequency of antibody transfer (Kappa?=?0.96). The incidence of dengue infection was 2.8% (95% CI 1.4–4.4%) among the women considering 14 IgM-positive results and one DENV2 detected by RT-PCR. The dengue NS1 antigen was undetectable in the matched pairs. Conclusion This study provides critical data on the prevalence of transplacental transferred maternal-infant anti-dengue antibodies and incidence of infection. The design of future vaccine trials should consider diverse regional epidemiological scenarios. PMID:23725365

  6. Detection of Chikungunya virus in Aedes aegypti during 2011 outbreak in Al Hodayda, Yemen.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Alia; Awash, Abdullah A; Esmail, Mohammed A; Al-Mohamadi, Hani A; Al-Salwai, Mostafa; Al-Jasari, Adel; Medhat, Iman; Morales-Betoulle, Maria E; Mnzava, Abraham

    2012-07-01

    In October 2010, the Ministry of Public Health and Population reported an outbreak of dengue-like acute febrile illness in Al Hodayda governorate. By January 2011, a total of 1542 cases had been recorded from 19 of the 26 districts in the governorate with 104 purportedly associated deaths. In response this event, in January 2011 entomological investigations aimed at identifying the primary vector and the epidemic associated etiological agent were carried out. Based on the reported cases and the progress of the outbreak in the governorate, mosquito collection was undertaken in two of the most recent outbreak areas; Al Khokha district (130km south of Al Hodayda) and Al Muneera district (100km north). Mosquito adults were collected from houses using BG-sentinel™ traps, aspiration of resting mosquitoes and knock-down spraying. Indoor and outdoor containers adjacent to the houses were inspected for larvae. Subsequently mosquito pools were analyzed by RT-PCR for detection of the four dengue virus serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3, DENV-4), and for Chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Aedes aegypti was the dominant mosquito species collected. Four pools represent 40% of the tested pools, all containing adult female Ae. aegypti, were positive for CHIKV. Three CHIKV isolates were obtained from the RNA positive mosquito pools and identified by rRT-PCR. This finding marks the first record of CHIKV isolated from Ae. aegypti in Yemen. The larval container and Breteau indices in the visited localities surveyed were estimated at 53.8 and 100, respectively. The emergence of this unprecedented CHIKV epidemic in Al Hodayda is adding up another arboviral burden to the already existing vector-borne diseases. Considering the governorate as one focal port in the Red Sea region, the spread of the disease to other areas in Yemen and in neighboring countries is anticipated. Public health education and simple measures to detect and prevent mosquito breeding in water storage containers could prevent and reduce the spread of mosquito-borne viruses like CHIKV and DENV in Yemen. PMID:22469818

  7. Leptospirosis Prevalence in Patients with Initial Diagnosis of Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Dircio Montes Sergio, A.; González Figueroa, E.; María Saadia, Verdalet Guzmán; Elizabeth, Soler Huerta; Beatriz, Rivas Sánchez; Altuzar Aguilar Víctor, M.; Navarrete Espinosa, J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence of leptospirosis in patients from Veracruz with initial diagnosis of dengue and its association with risk factors. Materials and Methods. Transversal study in patients who sought medical attention under the suspicion of dengue. Backgrounds were researched and blood samples were drawn to determine dengue (NS1, RT-PCR) and leptospirosis (IFI). Simple frequencies, central tendency and dispersion measures, and prevalence and trust intervals at 95% (IC95%) were obtained. Prevalence reasons (RP) and IC95% were obtained and a multivariate logistic model was applied, using SPSS?V15. Results. 171 patients were included, 56% women (32 ± 14 years) and 44% men (32 ± 17 years). 48% of the cases (IC95%?40.5–55.4) was positive to dengue, with a cut point of 1?:?80, seroprevalence for leptospirosis was of 6% (IC95%?2.7–10); 12% (IC95%?7–16.5) was positive to both pathologies and 34% was negative to both tests. Although the largest number of isolations corresponded to serotype 2, the four dengue virus serotypes were identified. In the bivariate analysis, overcrowding RP?=?1.33, (IC?=?0.46–3.5), bathing in rivers (RP?=?1.31, IC?=?0.13–7.4), and walking barefoot (RP?=?1.39, IC?=?0.58–3.3) were the variables associated with leptospirosis, although the relation was not statistically significant. Conclusions. Leptospirosis prevalence in subjects under suspicion of dengue fever is high, as well as the coincidence of both infections. The results show the coexistence of overlapped outbreaks of several diseases sharing the side of transmission. It is necessary the intentional search of other pathologies, such as influenza, rickettsiosis, and brucella, among others. PMID:22685476

  8. Use of Multiple Data Sources to Estimate the Economic Cost of Dengue Illness in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Donald S.; Undurraga, Eduardo A.; Lees, Rosemary Susan; Halasa, Yara; Lum, Lucy Chai See; Ng, Chiu Wan

    2012-01-01

    Dengue represents a substantial burden in many tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. We estimated the economic burden of dengue illness in Malaysia. Information about economic burden is needed for setting health policy priorities, but accurate estimation is difficult because of incomplete data. We overcame this limitation by merging multiple data sources to refine our estimates, including an extensive literature review, discussion with experts, review of data from health and surveillance systems, and implementation of a Delphi process. Because Malaysia has a passive surveillance system, the number of dengue cases is under-reported. Using an adjusted estimate of total dengue cases, we estimated an economic burden of dengue illness of US$56 million (Malaysian Ringgit MYR196 million) per year, which is approximately US$2.03 (Malaysian Ringgit 7.14) per capita. The overall economic burden of dengue would be even higher if we included costs associated with dengue prevention and control, dengue surveillance, and long-term sequelae of dengue. PMID:23033404

  9. Population Density, Water Supply, and the Risk of Dengue Fever in Vietnam: Cohort Study and Spatial Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Wolf-Peter; Suzuki, Motoi; Dinh Thiem, Vu; White, Richard G.; Tsuzuki, Ataru; Yoshida, Lay-Myint; Yanai, Hideki; Haque, Ubydul; Huu Tho, Le; Anh, Dang Duc; Ariyoshi, Koya

    2011-01-01

    Background Aedes aegypti, the major vector of dengue viruses, often breeds in water storage containers used by households without tap water supply, and occurs in high numbers even in dense urban areas. We analysed the interaction between human population density and lack of tap water as a cause of dengue fever outbreaks with the aim of identifying geographic areas at highest risk. Methods and Findings We conducted an individual-level cohort study in a population of 75,000 geo-referenced households in Vietnam over the course of two epidemics, on the basis of dengue hospital admissions (n?=?3,013). We applied space-time scan statistics and mathematical models to confirm the findings. We identified a surprisingly narrow range of critical human population densities between around 3,000 to 7,000 people/km2 prone to dengue outbreaks. In the study area, this population density was typical of villages and some peri-urban areas. Scan statistics showed that areas with a high population density or adequate water supply did not experience severe outbreaks. The risk of dengue was higher in rural than in urban areas, largely explained by lack of piped water supply, and in human population densities more often falling within the critical range. Mathematical modeling suggests that simple assumptions regarding area-level vector/host ratios may explain the occurrence of outbreaks. Conclusions Rural areas may contribute at least as much to the dissemination of dengue fever as cities. Improving water supply and vector control in areas with a human population density critical for dengue transmission could increase the efficiency of control efforts. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:21918642

  10. Optimization model of vaccination strategy for dengue transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widayani, H.; Kallista, M.; Nuraini, N.; Sari, M. Y.

    2014-02-01

    Dengue fever is emerging tropical and subtropical disease caused by dengue virus infection. The vaccination should be done as a prevention of epidemic in population. The host-vector model are modified with consider a vaccination factor to prevent the occurrence of epidemic dengue in a population. An optimal vaccination strategy using non-linear objective function was proposed. The genetic algorithm programming techniques are combined with fourth-order Runge-Kutta method to construct the optimal vaccination. In this paper, the appropriate vaccination strategy by using the optimal minimum cost function which can reduce the number of epidemic was analyzed. The numerical simulation for some specific cases of vaccination strategy is shown.

  11. Environmental data analysis and remote sensing for early detection of dengue and malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md Z.; Roytman, Leonid; Kadik, Abdelhamid; Rosy, Dilara A.

    2014-06-01

    Malaria and dengue fever are the two most common mosquito-transmitted diseases, leading to millions of serious illnesses and deaths each year. Because the mosquito vectors are sensitive to environmental conditions such as temperature, precipitation, and humidity, it is possible to map areas currently or imminently at high risk for disease outbreaks using satellite remote sensing. In this paper we propose the development of an operational geospatial system for malaria and dengue fever early warning; this can be done by bringing together geographic information system (GIS) tools, artificial neural networks (ANN) for efficient pattern recognition, the best available ground-based epidemiological and vector ecology data, and current satellite remote sensing capabilities. We use Vegetation Health Indices (VHI) derived from visible and infrared radiances measured by satellite-mounted Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR) and available weekly at 4-km resolution as one predictor of malaria and dengue fever risk in Bangladesh. As a study area, we focus on Bangladesh where malaria and dengue fever are serious public health threats. The technology developed will, however, be largely portable to other countries in the world and applicable to other disease threats. A malaria and dengue fever early warning system will be a boon to international public health, enabling resources to be focused where they will do the most good for stopping pandemics, and will be an invaluable decision support tool for national security assessment and potential troop deployment in regions susceptible to disease outbreaks.

  12. Dengue in the Americas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary E Wilson; Lin H Chen

    2002-01-01

    Dengue has been present in the Americas for centuries, but the current situation is dynamic, and is worsening. The main vector, Aedes aegypti, infests most countries. Vector control efforts have been largely inadequate. Population growth, especially in urban, low latitude areas, has resulted in a greater risk for contact with a competent vector. An increasing number of cities have reached

  13. Airport sentinel surveillance and entry quarantine for dengue infections following a fever screening program in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dengue has not reached an endemic status in Taiwan; nevertheless, we have implemented a fever screening program at airports for the early detection of febrile passengers with a dengue infection. This study is intended to assess the performance of the airport screening procedures for dengue infection. Methods We analyzed data from the national surveillance system of the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control. We included the imported dengue cases reported by sentinel airports and clinics as well as the domestic cases from 2007–2010. Results Approximately 44.9% (95%CI: 35.73-54.13%) of the confirmed imported dengue cases with an apparent symptom (febrile) in the viremic stage were detected via the airport fever screening program, with an estimated positive predictive value of 2.36% (95% CI: 0.96- 3.75%) and a negative predictive value?>?99.99%. Fluctuations in the number of the symptomatic imported dengue cases identified in the airports (X) were associated with the total number of imported dengue cases (Y) based on a regression analysis of a biweekly surveillance (i.e., n?=?104, R2X:Y?=?0.61, P?dengue cases (X) with a 1–2?month lead time (t) was in parallel with that of the domestic dengue cases (Y) based on a consecutive 4-year surveillance (i.e., n?=?48, R2X(t-1):Y?=?0.22, R2X(t-2):Y?=?0.31, P?dengue at the airports examined in this study indicated some limitations of the fever screening program for the prevention of importation. The screening program could assist in the rapid triage for self-quarantine of some symptomatic dengue cases that were in the viremic stage at the borders and contribute to active sentinel surveillance; however, the blocking of viral transmission to susceptible populations (neighbors or family) from all of the viremic travelers, including those with or without symptoms, is critical to prevent dengue epidemics. Therefore, the reinforcement of mosquito bite prevention and household vector control in dengue-endemic or dengue-competent hotspots during an epidemic season is essential and highly recommended. PMID:22867003

  14. Regional Differences in the Growing Incidence of Dengue Fever in Vietnam Explained by Weather Variability

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Ha Hai; Okumura, Junko; Hashizume, Masahiro; Tran, Duong Nhu; Yamamoto, Taro

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever is a major health problem in Vietnam, but its incidence differs from province to province. To understand this at the local level, we assessed the effect of four weather components (humidity, rainfall, temperature and sunshine) on the number of dengue cases in nine provinces of Vietnam. Monthly data from 1999 to 2009 were analysed by time-series regression using negative binomial models. A test for heterogeneity was applied to assess the weather-dengue association in the provinces. Those associations were significantly heterogeneous (for temperature, humidity, and sunshine: P < 0.001 heterogeneity test; for rainfall: P = 0.018 heterogeneity test). This confirms that weather components strongly affect dengue transmission at a lag time of 0 to 3 months, with considerable variation in their influence among different areas in Vietnam. This finding may promote the strategic prevention of dengue disease by suggesting specific plans at the local level, rather than a nationally unified approach. PMID:24808744

  15. The Complexity of a Dengue Vaccine: A Review of the Human Antibody Response

    PubMed Central

    Flipse, Jacky; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral disease worldwide. Yet, there are no vaccines or specific antivirals available to prevent or treat the disease. Several dengue vaccines are currently in clinical or preclinical stages. The most advanced vaccine is the chimeric tetravalent CYD-TDV vaccine of Sanofi Pasteur. This vaccine has recently cleared Phase III, and efficacy results have been published. Excellent tetravalent seroconversion was seen, yet the protective efficacy against infection was surprisingly low. Here, we will describe the complicating factors involved in the generation of a safe and efficacious dengue vaccine. Furthermore, we will discuss the human antibody responses during infection, including the epitopes targeted in humans. Also, we will discuss the current understanding of the assays used to evaluate antibody response. We hope this review will aid future dengue vaccine development as well as fundamental research related to the phenomenon of antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection. PMID:26065421

  16. Community and School-Based Health Education for Dengue Control in Rural Cambodia: A Process Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Khun, Sokrin; Manderson, Lenore

    2007-01-01

    Dengue fever continues to be a major public health problem in Cambodia, with significant impact on children. Health education is a major means for prevention and control of the National Dengue Control Program (NDCP), and is delivered to communities and in schools. Drawing on data collected in 2003–2004 as part of an ethnographic study conducted in eastern Cambodia, we explore the approaches used in health education and their effectiveness to control dengue. Community health education is provided through health centre outreach activities and campaigns of the NDCP, but is not systematically evaluated, is under-funded and delivered irregularly; school-based education is restricted in terms of time and lacks follow-up in terms of practical activities for prevention and control. As a result, adherence is partial. We suggest the need for sustained routine education for dengue prevention and control, and the need for approaches to ensure the translation of knowledge into practice. PMID:18160981

  17. Mumps Cases and Outbreaks

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Resources MMWR Articles Outbreak Articles Related Links World Health Organization Medline Plus Mumps Cases and Outbreaks Language: English ... occurred during 2006 and 2009-2010. Related Links World Health Organization Medline Plus Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats ...

  18. The AFHSC-Division of GEIS Operations Predictive Surveillance Program: a multidisciplinary approach for the early detection and response to disease outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, Division of Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System Operations (AFHSC-GEIS) initiated a coordinated, multidisciplinary program to link data sets and information derived from eco-climatic remote sensing activities, ecologic niche modeling, arthropod vector, animal disease-host/reservoir, and human disease surveillance for febrile illnesses, into a predictive surveillance program that generates advisories and alerts on emerging infectious disease outbreaks. The program’s ultimate goal is pro-active public health practice through pre-event preparedness, prevention and control, and response decision-making and prioritization. This multidisciplinary program is rooted in over 10 years experience in predictive surveillance for Rift Valley fever outbreaks in Eastern Africa. The AFHSC-GEIS Rift Valley fever project is based on the identification and use of disease-emergence critical detection points as reliable signals for increased outbreak risk. The AFHSC-GEIS predictive surveillance program has formalized the Rift Valley fever project into a structured template for extending predictive surveillance capability to other Department of Defense (DoD)-priority vector- and water-borne, and zoonotic diseases and geographic areas. These include leishmaniasis, malaria, and Crimea-Congo and other viral hemorrhagic fevers in Central Asia and Africa, dengue fever in Asia and the Americas, Japanese encephalitis (JE) and chikungunya fever in Asia, and rickettsial and other tick-borne infections in the U.S., Africa and Asia. PMID:21388561

  19. [Dengue virus infection in neotropical forest mammals: incidental hosts or potential reservoirs?].

    PubMed

    Lavergne, A; Lacoste, V; Germain, A; Matheus, S; Dussart, P; Deparis, X; de Thoisy, B

    2009-08-01

    The arboviral disease with the highest human incidence in South America is dengue fever. In French Guiana, where all four dengue serotypes, i.e., DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4, are present, the disease is endemic with epidemic outbreaks. Though previous serological studies have suggested a sylvatic cycle, involvement of wild mammals in the dengue cycle in the neotropics has never been confirmed. The purpose of this study was to search for the presence of DENV in wild animals captured at two different sites between 2001 and 2007. About 10,000 trap/nights were performed leading to the capture of 464 non-flying mammals (rodents and marsupials). In addition, mistnests placed in the same zone yielded 152 bats. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplification to detect infection by any of the four dengue serotypes demonstrated viral RNA in the livers and/or sera of 92 captured animals. Sequence analysis of amplification products revealed that the DENV-1, DENV-3 and DENV-4 serotypes were distinct from those circulating in humans at the same periods. Analysis for DENV-2 showed that some strains were divergent from concurrent human strains but that others were identical. The latter finding suggests that wild neotropical mammals living in periurban area can be infected by dengue virus strains circulating in humans. However, further investigation will be needed to determine if neotropical mammals are incidental hosts or potential reservoirs of dengue virus. PMID:19725384

  20. Modeling cholera outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Longini, Ira M.; Morris, J. Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical modeling can be a valuable tool for studying infectious disease outbreak dynamics and simulating the effects of possible interventions. Here, we describe approaches to modeling cholera outbreaks and how models have been applied to explore intervention strategies, particularly in Haiti. Mathematical models can play an important role in formulating and evaluating complex cholera outbreak response options. Major challenges to cholera modeling are insufficient data for calibrating models and the need to tailor models for different outbreak scenarios. PMID:23412687

  1. Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    NCI’s prevention research has a broad focus, from identifying environmental and lifestyle factors that influence cancer risk to studying the biology of how cancer develops and studying ways to disseminate prevention interventions.

  2. Dengue fever occurrence and vector detection by larval survey, ovitrap and MosquiTRAP: a space-time clusters analysis.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Diogo Portella Ornelas; Scherrer, Luciano Rios; Eiras, Álvaro Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The use of vector surveillance tools for preventing dengue disease requires fine assessment of risk, in order to improve vector control activities. Nevertheless, the thresholds between vector detection and dengue fever occurrence are currently not well established. In Belo Horizonte (Minas Gerais, Brazil), dengue has been endemic for several years. From January 2007 to June 2008, the dengue vector Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti was monitored by ovitrap, the sticky-trap MosquiTRAP™ and larval surveys in an study area in Belo Horizonte. Using a space-time scan for clusters detection implemented in SaTScan software, the vector presence recorded by the different monitoring methods was evaluated. Clusters of vectors and dengue fever were detected. It was verified that ovitrap and MosquiTRAP vector detection methods predicted dengue occurrence better than larval survey, both spatially and temporally. MosquiTRAP and ovitrap presented similar results of space-time intersections to dengue fever clusters. Nevertheless ovitrap clusters presented longer duration periods than MosquiTRAP ones, less acuratelly signalizing the dengue risk areas, since the detection of vector clusters during most of the study period was not necessarily correlated to dengue fever occurrence. It was verified that ovitrap clusters occurred more than 200 days (values ranged from 97.0±35.35 to 283.0±168.4 days) before dengue fever clusters, whereas MosquiTRAP clusters preceded dengue fever clusters by approximately 80 days (values ranged from 65.5±58.7 to 94.0±14. 3 days), the former showing to be more temporally precise. Thus, in the present cluster analysis study MosquiTRAP presented superior results for signaling dengue transmission risks both geographically and temporally. Since early detection is crucial for planning and deploying effective preventions, MosquiTRAP showed to be a reliable tool and this method provides groundwork for the development of even more precise tools. PMID:22848729

  3. Dengue Fever Occurrence and Vector Detection by Larval Survey, Ovitrap and MosquiTRAP: A Space-Time Clusters Analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Diogo Portella Ornelas; Scherrer, Luciano Rios; Eiras, Álvaro Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The use of vector surveillance tools for preventing dengue disease requires fine assessment of risk, in order to improve vector control activities. Nevertheless, the thresholds between vector detection and dengue fever occurrence are currently not well established. In Belo Horizonte (Minas Gerais, Brazil), dengue has been endemic for several years. From January 2007 to June 2008, the dengue vector Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti was monitored by ovitrap, the sticky-trap MosquiTRAP™ and larval surveys in an study area in Belo Horizonte. Using a space-time scan for clusters detection implemented in SaTScan software, the vector presence recorded by the different monitoring methods was evaluated. Clusters of vectors and dengue fever were detected. It was verified that ovitrap and MosquiTRAP vector detection methods predicted dengue occurrence better than larval survey, both spatially and temporally. MosquiTRAP and ovitrap presented similar results of space-time intersections to dengue fever clusters. Nevertheless ovitrap clusters presented longer duration periods than MosquiTRAP ones, less acuratelly signalizing the dengue risk areas, since the detection of vector clusters during most of the study period was not necessarily correlated to dengue fever occurrence. It was verified that ovitrap clusters occurred more than 200 days (values ranged from 97.0±35.35 to 283.0±168.4 days) before dengue fever clusters, whereas MosquiTRAP clusters preceded dengue fever clusters by approximately 80 days (values ranged from 65.5±58.7 to 94.0±14. 3 days), the former showing to be more temporally precise. Thus, in the present cluster analysis study MosquiTRAP presented superior results for signaling dengue transmission risks both geographically and temporally. Since early detection is crucial for planning and deploying effective preventions, MosquiTRAP showed to be a reliable tool and this method provides groundwork for the development of even more precise tools. PMID:22848729

  4. Overview of current situation of dengue and dengue vector control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dengue is the most important arbovirus of humans in the world. It is caused by one of four closely related virus serotypes whose primary vector is Aedes aegypti and secondarily by Ae. albopictus. A global dengue pandemic began in Southeast Asia after World War II and has intensified during the las...

  5. Dengue: update on epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mary Elizabeth; Chen, Lin H

    2015-01-01

    The epidemiology of dengue fever has undergone major shifts in recent decades. The global distribution has expanded to include more geographic areas. The intensity of transmission and the severity of infections have increased in areas where infection was already endemic. Multiple studies provide a clearer picture of the epidemiology and allow mapping of its distribution and change over time. Despite major efforts to control transmission, competent vectors now infest most tropical and subtropical regions; Aedes albopictus, also a competent vector, is able to survive in temperate areas, placing parts of Europe and North America at risk for local transmission. Many research teams in dengue-endemic areas are working to identify key local weather, vector, and other variables that would allow prediction of a likely epidemic early enough to permit interventions to avert it or blunt its impact. PMID:25475383

  6. Dengue eye disease.

    PubMed

    Ng, Aaron W; Teoh, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever, a viral disease epidemic in some parts of the world, is of considerable international concern, with a growing incidence owing to developing urbanization, tourism, and trade. Ocular manifestations of dengue fever are uncommon, but of great significance. Proposed mechanisms include direct viral infection as well as immunologic phenomena. Common manifestations include subconjunctival, vitreous, and retinal hemorrhages; posterior uveitis; optic neuritis; and maculopathies such as foveolitis, hemorrhage, and edema. Main symptoms include blurring of vision, scotomata, metamorphopsia, and floaters. Diagnostic and monitoring investigations described included optical coherence tomography, fundus fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography, visual field analysis, and electrophysiologic tests. Management is based on clinical presentation and includes active surveillance as well as various anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive therapies. There have been no prospective, randomized therapeutic trials, and it is unclear if the disease is self-limiting or if treatment is actually beneficial. Prognosis varies, ranging from full resolution to permanent vision loss despite intervention. PMID:25223497

  7. Rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury in dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Arvind; Singh, Varun Kumar; Nanda, Satyan

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare but potentially lethal complication of severe dengue fever. We present a case of 21-year-old man with fever, bodyache and black coloured and decreasing amount of urine. He was positive for NS1 (non-structural protein-1) antigen and IgM antibody for dengue. Platelet count was below 20×10(9)/L and kidney function test was deranged. Urine was positive for myoglobin. The patient was managed emergently on conservative lines and improved in 10?days. Rhabdomyolysis should always be kept in mind in a patient with severe dengue, as its early detection and prompt management can prevent further progression to acute renal failure. PMID:26174727

  8. Synchrony of Sylvatic Dengue Isolations: A Multi-Host, Multi-Vector SIR Model of Dengue Virus Transmission in Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Althouse, Benjamin M.; Lessler, Justin; Sall, Amadou A.; Diallo, Mawlouth; Hanley, Kathryn A.; Watts, Douglas M.; Weaver, Scott C.; Cummings, Derek A. T.

    2012-01-01

    Isolations of sylvatic dengue-2 virus from mosquitoes, humans and non-human primates in Senegal show synchronized multi-annual dynamics over the past 50 years. Host demography has been shown to directly affect the period between epidemics in other pathogen systems, therefore, one might expect unsynchronized multi-annual cycles occurring in hosts with dramatically different birth rates and life spans. However, in Senegal, we observe a single synchronized eight-year cycle across all vector species, suggesting synchronized dynamics in all vertebrate hosts. In the current study, we aim to explore two specific hypotheses: 1) primates with different demographics will experience outbreaks of dengue at different periodicities when observed as isolated systems, and that coupling of these subsystems through mosquito biting will act to synchronize incidence; and 2) the eight-year periodicity of isolations observed across multiple primate species is the result of long-term cycling in population immunity in the host populations. To test these hypotheses, we develop a multi-host, multi-vector Susceptible, Infected, Removed (SIR) model to explore the effects of coupling multiple host-vector systems of dengue virus transmission through cross-species biting rates. We find that under small amounts of coupling, incidence in the host species synchronize. Long-period multi-annual dynamics are observed only when prevalence in troughs reaches vanishingly small levels (), suggesting that these dynamics are inconsistent with sustained transmission in this setting, but are consistent with local dengue virus extinctions followed by reintroductions. Inclusion of a constant introduction of infectious individuals into the system causes the multi-annual periods to shrink, while the effects of coupling remain the same. Inclusion of a stochastic rate of introduction allows for multi-annual periods at a cost of reduced synchrony. Thus, we conclude that the eight-year period separating amplifications of dengue may be explained by cycling in immunity with stochastic introductions. PMID:23209867

  9. Assessing the epidemiological effect of wolbachia for dengue control.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, Louis; Ferguson, Neil M; Harris, Eva; Holmes, Edward C; McGraw, Elizabeth A; O'Neill, Scott L; Ooi, Eng E; Ritchie, Scott A; Ryan, Peter A; Scott, Thomas W; Simmons, Cameron P; Weaver, Scott C

    2015-07-01

    Dengue viruses cause more human morbidity and mortality than any other arthropod-borne virus. Dengue prevention relies mainly on vector control; however, the failure of traditional methods has promoted the development of novel entomological approaches. Although use of the intracellular bacterium wolbachia to control mosquito populations was proposed 50 years ago, only in the past decade has its use as a potential agent of dengue control gained substantial interest. Here, we review evidence that supports a practical approach for dengue reduction through field release of wolbachia-infected mosquitoes and discuss the additional studies that have to be done before the strategy can be validated and implemented. A crucial next step is to assess the efficacy of wolbachia in reducing dengue virus transmission. We argue that a cluster randomised trial is at this time premature because choice of wolbachia strain for release and deployment strategies are still being optimised. We therefore present a pragmatic approach to acquiring preliminary evidence of efficacy through various complementary methods including a prospective cohort study, a geographical cluster investigation, virus phylogenetic analysis, virus surveillance in mosquitoes, and vector competence assays. This multipronged approach could provide valuable intermediate evidence of efficacy to justify a future cluster randomised trial. PMID:26051887

  10. Is transfusion-transmitted dengue fever a potential public health threat?

    PubMed Central

    Pozzetto, Bruno; Memmi, Meriam; Garraud, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is an arboviruses due to single-stranded enveloped ribonucleic acid viruses, named dengue viruses (DENV), that include four serotypes and are mainly transmitted via the bite of mosquitoes of the genus Aedes (A. aegypti and A. albopictus). The distribution of the disease was historically limited to intertropical areas; however, during the last thirty years, the perimeter of the disease extended considerably and temperate areas are now at risk of outbreaks. The present global burden of dengue is considerable: 2.5 billion people over more than 100 countries are concerned; 50 to 100 million infections occur every year, with a number of fatal cases of approximately 20000. Although frequently asymptomatic or limited to a mild fever, dengue is responsible for severe cases mainly consecutive to the occurrence of hemorrhagic complications that can lead to shock and death, notably in children from poor-resource settings. The place of DENV as a transfusion-transmitted pathogen has been recognized only in 2008. At the present time, only five cases of transfusion-transmitted dengue, including one case of dengue hemorrhagic fever, have been formerly documented. This review provides a general overview of dengue, its viruses and their vectors. It replaces the disease in the context of other viral diseases transmitted by arthropods. It discusses the threat of dengue on the supply of blood products in endemic and non endemic areas. Finally, it describes the specific and non specific measures available for improving the security of blood products with regards to this emerging risk. Interestingly, in 2009, the American Association of Blood Banks placed DENV in the highest category of emerging infectious agents for their potential impact on transfusion recipient safety for the next years in North America. PMID:25964876

  11. Synthetic 1,4-pyran naphthoquinones are potent inhibitors of dengue virus replication.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Emmerson C B; Amorim, Raquel; da Silva, Fernando C; Rocha, David R; Papa, Michelle P; de Arruda, Luciana B; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; Ferreira, Vitor F; Tanuri, Amilcar; da Costa, Luciana J; Ferreira, Sabrina B

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus infection is a serious public health problem in endemic areas of the world where 2.5 billion people live. Clinical manifestations of the Dengue infection range from a mild fever to fatal cases of hemorrhagic fever. Although being the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral infection in the world, until now no strategies are available for effective prevention or control of Dengue infection. In this scenario, the development of compounds that specifically inhibit viral replication with minimal effects to the human hosts will have a substantial effect in minimizing the symptoms of the disease and help to prevent viral transmission in the affected population. The aim of this study was to screen compounds with potential activity against dengue virus from a library of synthetic naphthoquinones. Several 1,2- and 1,4-pyran naphthoquinones were synthesized by a three-component reaction of lawsone, aldehyde (formaldehyde or arylaldehydes) and different dienophiles adequately substituted. These compounds were tested for the ability to inhibit the ATPase activity of the viral NS3 enzyme in in vitro assays and the replication of dengue virus in cultured cells. We have identified two 1,4-pyran naphthoquinones, which inhibited dengue virus replication in mammal cells by 99.0% and three others that reduced the dengue virus ATPase activity of NS3 by two-fold in in vitro assays. PMID:24376541

  12. Synthetic 1,4-Pyran Naphthoquinones Are Potent Inhibitors of Dengue Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Emmerson C. B.; Amorim, Raquel; da Silva, Fernando C.; Rocha, David R.; Papa, Michelle P.; de Arruda, Luciana B.; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; Ferreira, Vitor F.; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus infection is a serious public health problem in endemic areas of the world where 2.5 billion people live. Clinical manifestations of the Dengue infection range from a mild fever to fatal cases of hemorrhagic fever. Although being the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral infection in the world, until now no strategies are available for effective prevention or control of Dengue infection. In this scenario, the development of compounds that specifically inhibit viral replication with minimal effects to the human hosts will have a substantial effect in minimizing the symptoms of the disease and help to prevent viral transmission in the affected population. The aim of this study was to screen compounds with potential activity against dengue virus from a library of synthetic naphthoquinones. Several 1,2- and 1,4-pyran naphthoquinones were synthesized by a three-component reaction of lawsone, aldehyde (formaldehyde or arylaldehydes) and different dienophiles adequately substituted. These compounds were tested for the ability to inhibit the ATPase activity of the viral NS3 enzyme in in vitro assays and the replication of dengue virus in cultured cells. We have identified two 1,4-pyran naphthoquinones, which inhibited dengue virus replication in mammal cells by 99.0% and three others that reduced the dengue virus ATPase activity of NS3 by two-fold in in vitro assays. PMID:24376541

  13. Influence of Urban Landscapes on Population Dynamics in a Short-Distance Migrant Mosquito: Evidence for the Dengue Vector Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Hemme, Ryan R.; Thomas, Clayton L.; Chadee, Dave D.; Severson, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Dengue viruses are endemic across most tropical and subtropical regions. Because no proven vaccines are available, dengue prevention is primarily accomplished through controlling the mosquito vector Aedes aegypti. While dispersal distance is generally believed to be ?100 m, patterns of dispersion may vary in urban areas due to landscape features acting as barriers or corridors to dispersal. Anthropogenic features ultimately affect the flow of genes affecting vector competence and insecticide resistance. Therefore, a thorough understanding of what parameters impact dispersal is essential for efficient implementation of any mosquito population suppression program. Population replacement and genetic control strategies currently under consideration are also dependent upon a thorough understanding of mosquito dispersal in urban settings. Methodology and Principal Findings We examined the effect of a major highway on dispersal patterns over a 2 year period. A. aegypti larvae were collected on the east and west sides of Uriah Butler Highway (UBH) to examine any effect UBH may have on the observed population structure in the Charlieville neighborhood in Trinidad, West Indies. A panel of nine microsatellites, two SNPs and a 710 bp sequence of mtDNA cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) were used for the molecular analyses of the samples. Three CO1 haplotypes were identified, one of which was only found on the east side of the road in 2006 and 2007. AMOVA using mtCO1 and nuclear markers revealed significant differentiation between the east- and west-side collections. Conclusion and Significance Our results indicate that anthropogenic barriers to A. aegypti dispersal exist in urban environments and should be considered when implementing control programs during dengue outbreaks and population suppression or replacement programs. PMID:20300516

  14. Anthrax Outbreaks in Bangladesh, 2009–2010

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Apurba; Khan, Salah Uddin; Hasnat, Mohammed Abul; Parveen, Shahana; Islam, M. Saiful; Mikolon, Andrea; Chakraborty, Ranjit Kumar; Ahmed, Be-Nazir; Ara, Khorsed; Haider, Najmul; Zaki, Sherif R.; Hoffmaster, Alex R.; Rahman, Mahmudur; Luby, Stephen P.; Hossain, M. Jahangir

    2012-01-01

    During August 2009–October 2010, a multidisciplinary team investigated 14 outbreaks of animal and human anthrax in Bangladesh to identify the etiology, pathway of transmission, and social, behavioral, and cultural factors that led to these outbreaks. The team identified 140 animal cases of anthrax and 273 human cases of cutaneous anthrax. Ninety one percent of persons in whom cutaneous anthrax developed had history of butchering sick animals, handling raw meat, contact with animal skin, or were present at slaughtering sites. Each year, Bacillus anthracis of identical genotypes were isolated from animal and human cases. Inadequate livestock vaccination coverage, lack of awareness of the risk of anthrax transmission from animal to humans, social norms and poverty contributed to these outbreaks. Addressing these challenges and adopting a joint animal and human health approach could contribute to detecting and preventing such outbreaks in the future. PMID:22492157

  15. ‘We do not do any activity until there is an outbreak’: barriers to disease prevention and health promotion at the community level in Kongwa District, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Nyamhanga, Tumaini; Frumence, Gasto; Mwangu, Mughwira; Hurtig, Anna-Karin

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about the barriers to disease prevention and health promotion at the community level – within a decentralized health system. Objective This paper, therefore, presents and discusses findings on barriers (and opportunities) for instituting disease prevention and health promotion activities. Design The study was conducted in Kongwa District, Tanzania, using an explorative case study approach. Data were collected through document reviews and in-depth interviews with key informants at district, ward, and village levels. A thematic approach was used in the analysis of the data. Results This study has identified several barriers, namely decision-makers at the national and district levels lack the necessary political will in prioritizing prevention and health promotion; the gravity of prevention and health promotion stated in the national health policy is not reflected in the district health plans; gross underfunding of community-level disease prevention and health promotion activities; and limited community participation. Conclusion In this era, when Tanzania is burdened with both communicable and non-communicable diseases, prevention and health promotion should be at the top of the health care agenda. Despite operating in a neoliberal climate, a stronger role of the state is called for. Accordingly, the government should prioritize higher health-protecting physical, social, and economic environments. This will require a national health promotion policy that will clearly chart out how multisectoral collaboration can be put into practice. PMID:25084832

  16. An online spatiotemporal prediction model for dengue fever epidemic in Kaohsiung (Taiwan).

    PubMed

    Yu, Hwa-Lung; Angulo, José M; Cheng, Ming-Hung; Wu, Jiaping; Christakos, George

    2014-05-01

    The emergence and re-emergence of disease epidemics is a complex question that may be influenced by diverse factors, including the space-time dynamics of human populations, environmental conditions, and associated uncertainties. This study proposes a stochastic framework to integrate space-time dynamics in the form of a Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) model, together with uncertain disease observations, into a Bayesian maximum entropy (BME) framework. The resulting model (BME-SIR) can be used to predict space-time disease spread. Specifically, it was applied to obtain a space-time prediction of the dengue fever (DF) epidemic that took place in Kaohsiung City (Taiwan) during 2002. In implementing the model, the SIR parameters were continually updated and information on new cases of infection was incorporated. The results obtained show that the proposed model is rigorous to user-specified initial values of unknown model parameters, that is, transmission and recovery rates. In general, this model provides a good characterization of the spatial diffusion of the DF epidemic, especially in the city districts proximal to the location of the outbreak. Prediction performance may be affected by various factors, such as virus serotypes and human intervention, which can change the space-time dynamics of disease diffusion. The proposed BME-SIR disease prediction model can provide government agencies with a valuable reference for the timely identification, control, and prevention of DF spread in space and time. PMID:24615833

  17. Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... LinkedIn Twitter Digg Delicious Reddit StubmleUpon Print About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... try to avoid secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  18. An adjuvanted, tetravalent dengue virus purified inactivated vaccine candidate induces long-lasting and protective antibody responses against dengue challenge in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Stefan; Thomas, Stephen J; De La Barrera, Rafael; Im-Erbsin, Rawiwan; Jarman, Richard G; Baras, Benoît; Toussaint, Jean-François; Mossman, Sally; Innis, Bruce L; Schmidt, Alexander; Malice, Marie-Pierre; Festraets, Pascale; Warter, Lucile; Putnak, J Robert; Eckels, Kenneth H

    2015-04-01

    The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a candidate tetravalent dengue virus purified inactivated vaccine (TDENV PIV) formulated with alum or an Adjuvant System (AS01, AS03 tested at three different dose levels, or AS04) was evaluated in a 0, 1-month vaccination schedule in rhesus macaques. One month after dose 2, all adjuvanted formulations elicited robust and persisting neutralizing antibody titers against all four dengue virus serotypes. Most of the formulations tested prevented viremia after challenge, with the dengue serotype 1 and 2 virus strains administered at 40 and 32 weeks post-dose 2, respectively. This study shows that inactivated dengue vaccines, when formulated with alum or an Adjuvant System, are candidates for further development. PMID:25646261

  19. An Adjuvanted, Tetravalent Dengue Virus Purified Inactivated Vaccine Candidate Induces Long-Lasting and Protective Antibody Responses Against Dengue Challenge in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Stefan; Thomas, Stephen J.; De La Barrera, Rafael; Im-erbsin, Rawiwan; Jarman, Richard G.; Baras, Benoît; Toussaint, Jean-François; Mossman, Sally; Innis, Bruce L.; Schmidt, Alexander; Malice, Marie-Pierre; Festraets, Pascale; Warter, Lucile; Putnak, J. Robert; Eckels, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a candidate tetravalent dengue virus purified inactivated vaccine (TDENV PIV) formulated with alum or an Adjuvant System (AS01, AS03 tested at three different dose levels, or AS04) was evaluated in a 0, 1-month vaccination schedule in rhesus macaques. One month after dose 2, all adjuvanted formulations elicited robust and persisting neutralizing antibody titers against all four dengue virus serotypes. Most of the formulations tested prevented viremia after challenge, with the dengue serotype 1 and 2 virus strains administered at 40 and 32 weeks post-dose 2, respectively. This study shows that inactivated dengue vaccines, when formulated with alum or an Adjuvant System, are candidates for further development. PMID:25646261

  20. 2nd International External Quality Control Assessment for the Molecular Diagnosis of Dengue Infections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cristina Domingo; Matthias Niedrig; Anette Teichmann; Marco Kaiser; Leonid Rumer; Richard G. Jarman; Oliver Donoso-Mantke

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundCurrently dengue viruses (DENV) pose an increasing threat to over 2.5 billion people in over 100 tropical and sub-tropical countries worldwide. International air travel is facilitating rapid global movement of DENV, increasing the risk of severe dengue epidemics by introducing different serotypes. Accurate diagnosis is critical for early initiation of preventive measures. Different reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) methods are available,

  1. [Possible introduction and autochthonous transmission of dengue virus in Spain].

    PubMed

    Santos-Sanz, Sara; Sierra-Moros, María José; Oliva-Iñiguez, Lourdes; Sanchez-Gómez, Amaya; Suarez-Rodriguez, Berta; Simón-Soria, Fernando; Amela-Heras, Carmen

    2014-10-01

    Dengue has become a major public health problem worldwide. Ae. albopictus, vector responsible for transmission, was first detected in Catalonia in 2004. Since then, it has established along Mediterranean coast. The aim of this paper is to describe the risk of importation and possible autochthonous transmission of dengue virus in Spain, qualitatively reviewing factors that could influence the emergence of dengue in our country, and the implications for public health. No autochthonous transmission has occurred in our country to date, but infected travelers coming from endemic countries are arriving to Spain constantly. The transmission of this disease could occur on the Mediterranean coast. Transmission would be more likely in the warmer months due to cultural habits and higher vector densities. While most of the population would be susceptible, given the characteristics of the disease, the impact on health's population would be low. The main public health strategy to reduce the risk of importation and possible dengue transmission should focus on primary prevention, to prevent interaction of the virus, vector and human. These three components must be addressed in a comprehensive and multisectoral plan of action, intensifying some activities in the areas of greatest risk. Coordination of public health from all sectors involved is essential for the proper functioning of this integrated response plan for vector-borne diseases. PMID:25327266

  2. Outbreaks of Enteric Disease Associated with Animal Contact: Not Just a Foodborne Problem Anymore

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frederick J. Angulo; Nicole Steinmuller; Linda Demma; Jeff B. Bender; Millicent Eidson

    2006-01-01

    In the past 10 years, an increasing number of outbreaks of enteric disease associated with animals in public settings, such as fairs and petting zoos, have been reported. Fifty-five of these outbreaks that occurred in the United States during 1991- 2005 are reviewed in this article. Lessons learned from these outbreaks and recommendations for prevention are also discussed. Physicians should

  3. Public Acceptance and Willingness-to-Pay for a Future Dengue Vaccine: A Community-Based Survey in Bandung, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Hadisoemarto, Panji Fortuna; Castro, Marcia C.

    2013-01-01

    Background All four serotypes of dengue virus are endemic in Indonesia, where the population at risk for infection exceeds 200 million people. Despite continuous control efforts that were initiated more than four decades ago, Indonesia still suffers from multi-annual cycles of dengue outbreak and dengue remains as a major public health problem. Dengue vaccines have been viewed as a promising solution for controlling dengue in Indonesia, but thus far its potential acceptability has not been assessed. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a household survey in the city of Bandung, Indonesia by administering a questionnaire to examine (i) acceptance of a hypothetical pediatric dengue vaccine; (ii) participant's willingness-to-pay (WTP) for the vaccine, had it not been provided for free; and (iii) whether people think vector control would be unnecessary if the vaccine was available. A proportional odds model and an interval regression model were employed to identify determinants of acceptance and WTP, respectively. We demonstrated that out of 500 heads of household being interviewed, 94.2% would agree to vaccinate their children with the vaccine. Of all participants, 94.6% were willing to pay for the vaccine with a median WTP of US$1.94. In addition, 7.2% stated that vector control would not be necessary had there been a dengue vaccination program. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that future dengue vaccines can have a very high uptake even when delivered through the private market. This, however, can be influenced by vaccine characteristics and price. In addition, reduction in community vector control efforts may be observed following vaccine introduction but its potential impact in the transmission of dengue and other vector-borne diseases requires further study. PMID:24069482

  4. First dengue haemorrhagic fever epidemic in the Americas, 1981: insights into the causative agent.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Roche, Rosmari; Hinojosa, Yoandri; Guzman, Maria G

    2014-12-01

    Historical records describe a disease in North America that clinically resembled dengue haemorrhagic fever during the latter part of the slave-trading period. However, the dengue epidemic that occurred in Cuba in 1981 was the first laboratory-confirmed and clinically diagnosed outbreak of dengue haemorrhagic fever in the Americas. At that time, the presumed source of the dengue type 2 strain isolated during this epidemic was considered controversial, partly because of the limited sequence data and partly because the origin of the virus appeared to be southern Asia. Here, we present a molecular characterisation at the whole-genome level of the original strains isolated at different time points during the epidemic. Phylogenetic trees constructed using Bayesian methods indicated that 1981 Cuban strains group within the Asian 2 genotype. In addition, the study revealed that viral evolution occurred during the epidemic - a fact that could be related to the increasing severity from month to month. Moreover, the Cuban strains exhibited particular amino acid substitutions that differentiate them from the New Guinea C prototype strain as well as from dengue type 2 strains isolated globally. PMID:25091743

  5. Climate, mosquito indices and the epidemiology of dengue fever in Trinidad (2002-2004).

    PubMed

    Chadee, D D; Shivnauth, B; Rawlins, S C; Chen, A A

    2007-01-01

    Between January 2002 and December 2004, a population-based study on the effects of climate and mosquito indices on the incidences of dengue fever (DF) and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) was conducted in Trinidad, West Indies. The incidence of DF was 5.05 cases/1000 population in 2002, largely as the result of a major outbreak, but declined to 0.49 case/1000 in 2004. The monthly Aedes aegypti (L.) Breteau indices (BI) did not decline over the 3-year study period, however, but increased from a mean of 29 in 2002 to one of 36 in 2004, with seasonal variations (BI of 30-46 and 20-34 were recorded in the wet and dry seasons, respectively). No significant correlations were observed between temperature and DF or DHF incidence but rainfall was found to be significantly correlated with DF incidence, with a clearly defined 'dengue season', between June and November, in two of the study years. The apparent decline in dengue transmission since 2002 appears to be largely attributable to the development of 'herd immunity' in the general population and not to the attempts at vector control. Since the introduction of new serotypes or the fading of the herd immunity could lead to an explosive epidemic of dengue in Trinidad, there is clearly a need for continued surveillance. PMID:17244411

  6. Post-dengue encephalopathy and Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Fong, Choong Yi; Hlaing, Chaw Su; Tay, Chee Geap; Ong, Lai Choo

    2014-10-01

    Parkinsonism as a neurologic manifestation of dengue infection is rare with only 1 reported case in an adult patient. We report a case of a 6-year-old child with self-limiting post-dengue encephalopathy and Parkinsonism. This is the first reported pediatric case of post-dengue Parkinsonism and expands the neurologic manifestations associated with dengue infection in children. Clinicians should consider the possibility of post-dengue Parkinsonism in children with a history of pyrexia from endemic areas of dengue. PMID:24776518

  7. Fusion of protegrin-1 and plectasin to MAP30 shows significant inhibition activity against dengue virus replication.

    PubMed

    Rothan, Hussin A; Bahrani, Hirbod; Mohamed, Zulqarnain; Abd Rahman, Noorsaadah; Yusof, Rohana

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) broadly disseminates in tropical and sub-tropical countries and there are no vaccine or anti-dengue drugs available. DENV outbreaks cause serious economic burden due to infection complications that requires special medical care and hospitalization. This study presents a new strategy for inexpensive production of anti-DENV peptide-fusion protein to prevent and/or treat DENV infection. Antiviral cationic peptides protegrin-1 (PG1) and plectasin (PLSN) were fused with MAP30 protein to produce recombinant antiviral peptide-fusion protein (PG1-MAP30-PLSN) as inclusion bodies in E. coli. High yield production of PG1-MAP30-PLSN protein was achieved by solubilization of inclusion bodies in alkaline buffer followed by the application of appropriate refolding techniques. Antiviral PG1-MAP30-PLSN protein considerably inhibited DENV protease (NS2B-NS3pro) with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) 0.5±0.1 ?M. The real-time proliferation assay (RTCA) and the end-point proliferation assay (MTT assay) showed that the maximal-nontoxic dose of the peptide-fusion protein against Vero cells is approximately 0.67±0.2 ?M. The cell-based assays showed considerable inhibition of the peptide-fusion protein against binding and proliferating stages of DENV2 into the target cells. The peptide-fusion protein protected DENV2-challeged mice with 100% of survival at the dose of 50 mg/kg. In conclusion, producing recombinant antiviral peptide-fusion protein by combining short antiviral peptide with a central protein owning similar activity could be useful to minimize the overall cost of short peptide production and take advantage of its synergistic antiviral activities. PMID:24722532

  8. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice Regarding Dengue Fever among the Healthy Population of Highland and Lowland Communities in Central Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Dhimal, Meghnath; Aryal, Krishna Kumar; Dhimal, Mandira Lamichhane; Gautam, Ishan; Singh, Shanker Pratap; Bhusal, Chop Lal; Kuch, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue fever (DF) is the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease in the world. In this decade it has expanded to new countries and from urban to rural areas. Nepal was regarded DF free until 2004. Since then dengue virus (DENV) has rapidly expanded its range even in mountain regions of Nepal, and major outbreaks occurred in 2006 and 2010. However, no data on the local knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of DF in Nepal exist although such information is required for prevention and control measures. Methods We conducted a community based cross-sectional survey in five districts of central Nepal between September 2011 and February 2012. We collected information on the socio-demographic characteristics of the participants and their knowledge, attitude and practice regarding DF using a structured questionnaire. We then statistically compared highland and lowland communities to identify possible causes of observed differences. Principal Findings Out of 589 individuals interviewed, 77% had heard of DF. Only 12% of the sample had good knowledge of DF. Those living in the lowlands were five times more likely to possess good knowledge than highlanders (P<0.001). Despite low knowledge levels, 83% of the people had good attitude and 37% reported good practice. We found a significantly positive correlation among knowledge, attitude and practice (P<0.001). Among the socio-demographic variables, the education level of the participants was an independent predictor of practice level (P<0.05), and education level and interaction between the sex and age group of the participants were independent predictors of attitude level (P<0.05). Conclusion Despite the rapid expansion of DENV in Nepal, the knowledge of people about DF was very low. Therefore, massive awareness programmes are urgently required to protect the health of people from DF and to limit its further spread in this country. PMID:25007284

  9. Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Tantawichien, Terapong

    2012-05-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is endemic in tropical and subtropical zones and the prevalence is increasing across South-east Asia, Africa, the Western Pacific and the Americas. In recent years, the spread of unplanned urbanisation, with associated substandard housing, overcrowding and deterioration in water, sewage and waste management systems, has created ideal conditions for increased transmission of the dengue virus in tropical urban centres. While dengue infection has traditionally been considered a paediatric disease, the age distribution of dengue has been rising and more cases have been observed in adolescents and adults. Furthermore, the development of tourism in the tropics has led to an increase in the number of tourists who become infected, most of whom are adults. Symptoms and risk factors for dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and severe dengue differ between children and adults, with co-morbidities and incidence in more elderly patients associated with greater risk of mortality. Treatment options for DF and DHF in adults, as for children, centre round fluid replacement (either orally or intravenously, depending on severity) and antipyretics. Further data are needed on the optimal treatment of adult patients. PMID:22668446

  10. Spatiotemporal causal modeling for the management of Dengue Fever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hwa-Lung; Huang, Tailin; Lee, Chieh-Han

    2015-04-01

    Increasing climatic extremes have caused growing concerns about the health effects and disease outbreaks. The association between climate variation and the occurrence of epidemic diseases play an important role on a country's public health systems. Part of the impacts are direct casualties associated with the increasing frequency and intensity of typhoons, the proliferation of disease vectors and the short-term increase of clinic visits on gastro-intestinal discomforts, diarrhea, dermatosis, or psychological trauma. Other impacts come indirectly from the influence of disasters on the ecological and socio-economic systems, including the changes of air/water quality, living environment and employment condition. Previous risk assessment studies on dengue fever focus mostly on climatic and non-climatic factors and their association with vectors' reproducing pattern. The public-health implication may appear simple. Considering the seasonal changes and regional differences, however, the causality of the impacts is full of uncertainties. Without further investigation, the underlying dengue fever risk dynamics may not be assessed accurately. The objective of this study is to develop an epistemic framework for assessing dynamic dengue fever risk across space and time. The proposed framework integrates cross-departmental data, including public-health databases, precipitation data over time and various socio-economic data. We explore public-health issues induced by typhoon through literature review and spatiotemporal analytic techniques on public health databases. From those data, we identify relevant variables and possible causal relationships, and their spatiotemporal patterns derived from our proposed spatiotemporal techniques. Eventually, we create a spatiotemporal causal network and a framework for modeling dynamic dengue fever risk.

  11. Variations in Modeled Dengue Transmission over Puerto Rico Using a Climate Driven Dynamic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, Cory; Monaghan, Andrew; Crosson, William; Quattrochi, Dale; Luvall, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne viral disease reemerging throughout much of the tropical Americas. Dengue virus transmission is explicitly influenced by climate and the environment through its primary vector, Aedes aegypti. Temperature regulates Ae. aegypti development, survival, and replication rates as well as the incubation period of the virus within the mosquito. Precipitation provides water for many of the preferred breeding habitats of the mosquito, including buckets, old tires, and other places water can collect. Because of variations in topography, ocean influences and atmospheric processes, temperature and rainfall patterns vary across Puerto Rico and so do dengue virus transmission rates. Using NASA's TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) satellite for precipitation input, ground-based observations for temperature input, and laboratory confirmed dengue cases reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for parameter calibration, we modeled dengue transmission at the county level across Puerto Rico from 2010-2013 using a dynamic dengue transmission model that includes interacting vector ecology and epidemiological components. Employing a Monte Carlo approach, we performed ensembles of several thousands of model simulations for each county in order to resolve the model uncertainty arising from using different combinations of parameter values that are not well known. The top 1% of model simulations that best reproduced the reported dengue case data were then analyzed to determine the most important parameters for dengue virus transmission in each county, as well as the relative influence of climate variability on transmission. These results can be used by public health workers to implement dengue control methods that are targeted for specific locations and climate conditions.

  12. [Emerging infectious diseases: the example of the Indian Ocean chikungunya outbreak (2005-2006)].

    PubMed

    Flahault, Antoine

    2007-01-01

    Factors known to trigger the emergence or re-emergence of infectious diseases include globalisation, population growth, migration, international trade, urbanisation, forest destruction, climate change, loss of biodiversity, poverty, famine and war. Epidemics not only lead to disastrous loss of human life but may also have catastrophic economic, political and social consequences. Outbreaks may rapidly jeopardize industry, trade or tourism in countries that are unprepared. Dengue is currently spreading throughout the tropics, while another arbovirus, chikungunya, infected 30 to 75% of the population in some parts of the Indian Ocean region between 2005 and 2006. Chikungunya is now spreading through India, where more than a million people have so far been infected. This viral disease can cause lasting disability, and the first deaths were recently reported in La Réunion and Mayotte. All countries are at risk from emerging or re-emerging diseases, but the consequences are far worse in poor countries. Microbial pathogens and wild mammals, birds and arthropods do not respect man-made borders. There is still time to act against this threat of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, through prevention, anticipation, monitoring and research. PMID:17645111

  13. Identification of Dengue Fever Cases in Houston, Texas, with Evidence of Autochthonous Transmission Between 2003 and 2005

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Liliana F.; Herrington, Emily; Kharat, Vineetkumar; Vasilakis, Nikolaos; Walker, Christopher; Turner, Cynthia; Khuwaja, Salma; Arafat, Raouf; Weaver, Scott C.; Martinez, Diana; Kilborn, Cindy; Bueno, Rudy; Reyna, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Houston, Texas, maintains an environment conducive to dengue virus (DENV) emergence; however, surveillance is passive and diagnostic testing is not readily available. To determine if DENV is present in the area, we tested 3768 clinical specimens (2138 cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] and 1630 serum) collected from patients with suspected mosquito-borne viral disease between 2003 and 2005. We identified 47 immunoglobulin M (IgM)-positive dengue cases, including two cases that were positive for viral RNA in serum for dengue serotype 2. The majority of cases did not report any history of travel outside the Houston area prior to symptom onset. The epidemic curve suggests an outbreak occurred in 2003 with continued low-level transmission in 2004 and 2005. Chart abstractions were completed for 42 of the 47 cases; 57% were diagnosed with meningitis and/or encephalitis, and 43% met the case definition for dengue fever. Two of the 47 cases were fatal, including one with illness compatible with dengue shock syndrome. Our results support local transmission of DENV during the study period. These findings heighten the need for dengue surveillance in the southern United States. PMID:24107180

  14. A review of dengue research in malaysia.

    PubMed

    Cheah, W K; Ng, K S; Marzilawati, A R; Lum, L C S

    2014-08-01

    Dengue infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Malaysia. To date, much research on dengue infection conducted in Malaysia have been published. One hundred and sixty six articles related to dengue in Malaysia were found from a search through a database dedicated to indexing all original data relevant to medicine published between the years 2000-2013. Ninety articles with clinical relevance and future research implications were selected and reviewed. These papers showed evidence of an exponential increase in the disease epidemic and a varying pattern of prevalent dengue serotypes at different times. The early febrile phase of dengue infection consist of an undifferentiated fever. Clinical suspicion and ability to identify patients at risk of severe dengue infection is important. Treatment of dengue infection involves judicious use of volume expander and supportive care. Potential future research areas are discussed to narrow our current knowledge gaps on dengue infection. PMID:25417953

  15. Hospital outbreak of Norwalk-like virus.

    PubMed

    Russo, P L; Spelman, D W; Harrington, G A; Jenney, A W; Gunesekere, I C; Wright, P J; Doultree, J C; Marshall, J A

    1997-08-01

    An outbreak of gastroenteritis caused by Norwalk-like virus occurred in two areas of the hospital: area 1, consisting of three adjacent and interconnected wards, with mostly elderly patients; and area 22, an acute ward in a separate building with elderly patients. In area 1, 40 patients and 20 staff were affected; in area 2, 18 patients and 14 staff were affected. Infection control measures were instituted in consultation with the government health authority. These measures did not appear to affect the course of the outbreak, but may have prevented spreads to the other wards. PMID:9324510

  16. Outbreak of Chikungunya Fever, Dakshina Kannada District, South India, 2008

    PubMed Central

    Manimunda, Sathya P.; Sugunan, Attayur P.; Rai, Subhodh K.; Vijayachari, Paluru; Shriram, Ananganallur N.; Sharma, Sameer; Muruganandam, Nagarajan; Chaitanya, Itta K.; Guruprasad, Dev R.; Sudeep, Anakkathil B.

    2010-01-01

    The outbreak of chikungunya fever that surfaced in India during late 2005 has affected more than 1.56 million people, spread to more than 17 states/union territories, and is still ongoing. Many of these areas are dengue- and leptospirosis-endemic settings. We carried out a cross-sectional survey in one such chikungunya-affected location in Dakshina Kannada District of Karnataka State to estimate the magnitude of the epidemic and the proportion of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infections that remained clinically inapparent. The seropositivity for CHIKV infection was 62.2%, and the attack rate of confirmed CHIK fever was 58.3%. The proportion of inapparent CHIKV infection was 6.3%. The increasing trend in the seropositivity and attack rate of CHIKV infection with age group was statistically significant. The present study is an indicator of the magnitude of the ongoing outbreak of CHIKV infection in India that started during 2005–2006. PMID:20889860

  17. Reviewing dengue: still a neglected tropical disease?

    PubMed

    Horstick, Olaf; Tozan, Yesim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2015-04-01

    Dengue is currently listed as a "neglected tropical disease" (NTD). But is dengue still an NTD or not? Classifying dengue as an NTD may carry advantages, but is it justified? This review considers the criteria for the definition of an NTD, the current diverse lists of NTDs by different stakeholders, and the commonalities and differences of dengue with other NTDs. We also review the current research gaps and research activities and the adequacy of funding for dengue research and development (R&D) (2003-2013). NTD definitions have been developed to a higher precision since the early 2000s, with the following main features: NTDs are characterised as a) poverty related, b) endemic to the tropics and subtropics, c) lacking public health attention, d) having poor research funding and shortcomings in R&D, e) usually associated with high morbidity but low mortality, and f) often having no specific treatment available. Dengue meets most of these criteria, but not all. Although dengue predominantly affects resource-limited countries, it does not necessarily only target the poor and marginalised in those countries. Dengue increasingly attracts public health attention, and in some affected countries it is now a high profile disease. Research funding for dengue has increased exponentially in the past two decades, in particular in the area of dengue vaccine development. However, despite advances in dengue research, dengue epidemics are increasing in frequency and magnitude, and dengue is expanding to new areas. Specific treatment and a highly effective vaccine remain elusive. Major research gaps exist in the area of integrated surveillance and vector control. Hence, although dengue differs from many of the NTDs, it still meets important criteria commonly used for NTDs. The current need for increased R&D spending, shared by dengue and other NTDs, is perhaps the key reason why dengue should continue to be considered an NTD. PMID:25928673

  18. Biosurveillance in outbreak investigations.

    PubMed

    Kaydos-Daniels, S Cornelia; Rojas Smith, Lucia; Farris, Tonya R

    2013-03-01

    Following the terrorist attacks of September 11 and the anthrax attacks in 2001, public health entities implemented automated surveillance systems based on disease syndromes for early detection of bioterror events and to increase timeliness of responses. Despite widespread adoption, syndromic surveillance systems' ability to provide early notification of outbreaks is unproven, and there is little documentation on their role in outbreak response. We hypothesized that biosurveillance is used in practice to augment classical outbreak investigations, and we used case studies conducted in 2007-08 to determine (1) which steps in outbreak investigations were best served by biosurveillance, and (2) which steps presented the greatest opportunities for improvement. The systems used in the case studies varied in how they functioned, and there were examples in which syndromic systems had identified outbreaks before other methods. Biosurveillance was used successfully for all steps of outbreak investigations. Key advantages of syndromic systems were sensitivity, timeliness, and flexibility and as a source of data for situational awareness. Limitations of biosurveillance were a lack of specificity, reliance on chief complaint data, and a lack of formal training for users. Linking syndromic data to triage notes and medical chart data would substantially increase the value of biosurveillance in the conduct of outbreak investigations and reduce the burden on health department staff. PMID:23448272

  19. Dengue in peri-urban Pak-Ngum district, Vientiane capital of Laos: a community survey on knowledge, attitudes and practices

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dengue remains an important cause of morbidity in Laos. Good knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) among the public regarding dengue prevention are required for the success of disease control. Very little is known about dengue KAP among the Lao general population. Methods This was a KAP household survey on dengue conducted in a peri-urban Pak-Ngum district of Vientiane capital, Laos. A two-stage cluster sampling method was used to select a sample of participants to represent the general community. Participants from 231 households were surveyed using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Results Although 97% of the participants heard of dengue, there was a lack of depth of knowledge on dengue: 33% of them did not know that malaria and dengue were different diseases, 32% incorrectly believed that Aedes mosquito transmits malaria, 36% could not correctly report that Aedes mosquitoes bite most frequently at sunrise and sunset; and?dengue was a severe yet preventable disease. Self reported prevention methods were quite high yet observation of the participants’ yards showed use of prevention methods to be only moderate. The majority (93%) of the interviewees did not believe that they had enough information on dengue. There was an association between good knowledge and better practices, but good knowledge was associated with worse attitudes. Conclusions There is a lack of depth of knowledge regarding dengue in Pak-Ngum community and observation methods revealed that more needs to be done by community members themselves to prevent the spread of Aedes mosquitoes. PMID:23641953

  20. Foodborne disease outbreaks in Australia, 1995 to 2000.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Craig B; Gregory, Joy; Kirk, Martyn D; Stafford, Russell J; Givney, Rod; Kraa, Ed; Gould, David

    2004-01-01

    Health agencies are increasingly conducting systematic reviews of foodborne disease outbreak investigations to develop strategies to prevent future outbreaks. We surveyed state and territory health departments to summarise the epidemiology of foodborne disease outbreaks in Australia from 1995 to 2000. From 1995 through 2000, 293 outbreaks were identified, with 214 being of foodborne origin. One hundred and seventy-four (81%) had a known aetiology, and accounted for 80 per cent (6,472/8,124) of illnesses. There were 20 deaths attributed to foodborne illness. Of the 214 outbreaks, bacterial disease was responsible for 61 per cent of outbreaks, 64 per cent of cases and 95 per cent of deaths. The most frequent aetiology of outbreaks was Salmonella in 75 (35%) outbreaks, Clostridium perfringens in 30 (14%), ciguatera toxin in 23 (11%), scombrotoxin in 7 (3%) and norovirus in 6 (3%). Salmonellosis was responsible for eight of the 20 (40%) deaths, as was Listeria monocytogenes. Restaurants and commercial caterers were associated with the highest number of outbreak reports and cases. Outbreaks in hospitals and aged care facilities were responsible for 35 per cent of deaths. The most frequently implicated vehicles in the 173 outbreaks with known vehicles were meats 64 (30%), fish 34 (16%), seafood 13 (6%), salad 12 (6%), sandwiches 11 (5%) and eggs 9 (4%). Chicken, the most frequently implicated meat, was associated with 27 (13%) outbreaks. This summary demonstrates the serious nature of foodborne disease and supports the move to risk-based food safety interventions focusing on mass catering and hospital and aged care facilities. PMID:15460958

  1. Economic and Disease Burden of Dengue in Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Donald S.; Undurraga, Eduardo A.; Halasa, Yara A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Dengue poses a substantial economic and disease burden in Southeast Asia (SEA). Quantifying this burden is critical to set policy priorities and disease-control strategies. Methods and Findings We estimated the economic and disease burden of dengue in 12 countries in SEA: Bhutan, Brunei, Cambodia, East-Timor, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Viet Nam. We obtained reported cases from multiple sources—surveillance data, World Health Organization (WHO), and published studies—and adjusted for underreporting using expansion factors from previous literature. We obtained unit costs per episode through a systematic literature review, and completed missing data using linear regressions. We excluded costs such as prevention and vector control, and long-term sequelae of dengue. Over the decade of 2001–2010, we obtained an annual average of 2.9 million (m) dengue episodes and 5,906 deaths. The annual economic burden (with 95% certainty levels) was US$950m (US$610m–US$1,384m) or about US$1.65 (US$1.06–US$2.41) per capita. The annual number of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), based on the original 1994 definition, was 214,000 (120,000–299,000), which is equivalent to 372 (210–520) DALYs per million inhabitants. Conclusion Dengue poses a substantial economic and disease burden in SEA with a DALY burden per million inhabitants in the region. This burden is higher than that of 17 other conditions, including Japanese encephalitis, upper respiratory infections, and hepatitis B. PMID:23437406

  2. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Dengue Epidemics, Southern Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Cuong, Hoang Quoc; Vu, Nguyen Thanh; Cazelles, Bernard; Boni, Maciej F.; Thai, Khoa T.D.; Rabaa, Maia A.; Quang, Luong Chan; Simmons, Cameron P.; Huu, Tran Ngoc

    2013-01-01

    An improved understanding of heterogeneities in dengue virus transmission might provide insights into biological and ecologic drivers and facilitate predictions of the magnitude, timing, and location of future dengue epidemics. To investigate dengue dynamics in urban Ho Chi Minh City and neighboring rural provinces in Vietnam, we analyzed a 10-year monthly time series of dengue surveillance data from southern Vietnam. The per capita incidence of dengue was lower in Ho Chi Minh City than in most rural provinces; annual epidemics occurred 1–3 months later in Ho Chi Minh City than elsewhere. The timing and the magnitude of annual epidemics were significantly more correlated in nearby districts than in remote districts, suggesting that local biological and ecologic drivers operate at a scale of 50–100 km. Dengue incidence during the dry season accounted for 63% of variability in epidemic magnitude. These findings can aid the targeting of vector-control interventions and the planning for dengue vaccine implementation. PMID:23735713

  3. Dengue illness: clinical features and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Kazunori; Saito, Mariko; Mapua, Cynthia A; Natividad, Filipinas F

    2007-06-01

    The incidence and geographical distribution of dengue has gradually increased during the past decade. This review is an update on dengue virus infections, based on our clinical and laboratory experiences in the Philippines and on other relevant literature. The differential diagnosis of this disease is discussed, especially for use by clinicians where dengue is not endemic. The complex pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia and increased vascular permeability in dengue illness is also discussed. Our recent data suggest that platelet-associated immunoglobulins involving anti-dengue virus activity play a pivotal role in the development of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), as well as thrombocytopenia in secondary dengue virus infections. Further elucidation is needed on the involvement of platelet-associated immunoglobulins on the molecular mechanisms of thrombocytopenia and the increased vascular permeability. PMID:17593497

  4. Spatio-temporal distribution of dengue fever under scenarios of climate change in the southern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chieh-Han; Yu, Hwa-Lung

    2014-05-01

    Dengue fever has been recognized as the most important widespread vector-borne infectious disease in recent decades. Over 40% of the world's population is risk from dengue and about 50-100 million people are infected world wide annually. Previous studies have found that dengue fever is highly correlated with climate covariates. Thus, the potential effects of global climate change on dengue fever are crucial to epidemic concern, in particular, the transmission of the disease. This present study investigated the nonlinearity of time-delayed impact of climate on spatio-temporal variations of dengue fever in the southern Taiwan during 1998 to 2011. A distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM) is used to assess the nonlinear lagged effects of meteorology. The statistically significant meteorological factors are considered, including weekly minimum temperature and maximum 24-hour rainfall. The relative risk and the distribution of dengue fever then predict under various climate change scenarios. The result shows that the relative risk is similar for different scenarios. In addition, the impact of rainfall on the incidence risk is higher than temperature. Moreover, the incidence risk is associated to spatially population distribution. The results can be served as practical reference for environmental regulators for the epidemic prevention under climate change scenarios.

  5. [Society, economy, inequities and dengue].

    PubMed

    Kouri, Gustavo; Pelegrino, José L; Munster, Blanca María; Guzmán, María G

    2007-01-01

    Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever in the Americas have been on the rise throughout the 1990s, with the highest number -over one million cases- reported in 2002. This paper analyzed the situation of dengue in the region and discussed the determining factors that account for the rise of the disease, making emphasis on socioeconomic factors, such as poverty, inequality, migrations and the lack of access to basic services, which are the most influential in perpetuating this disease in most countries. Considering that a safe and accessible vaccine is now unavailable, basic principles of vector control combined with political willingness, inter-sectoral involvement, active community participation and the tightening of health legislation were also examined as the only viable solution at present. PMID:23427454

  6. Weather as an effective predictor for occurrence of dengue fever in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei-Chih; Guo, How-Ran; Lung, Shih-Chun; Lin, Chuan-Yao; Su, Huey-Jen

    2007-07-01

    We evaluated the impacts of weather variability on the occurrence of dengue fever in a major metropolitan city, Kaohsiung, in southern Taiwan using time-series analysis. Autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models showed that the incidence of dengue fever was negatively associated with monthly temperature deviation (beta=-0.126, p=0.044), and a reverse association was also found with relative humidity (beta=-0.025, p=0.048). Both factors were observed to present their most prominent effects at a time lag of 2 months. Meanwhile, vector density record, a conventional approach often applied as a predictor for outbreak, did not appear to be a good one for diseases occurrence. Weather variability was identified as a meaningful and significant indicator for the increasing occurrence of dengue fever in this study, and it might be feasible to be adopted for predicting the influences of rising average temperature on the occurrence of infectious diseases of such kind at a city level. Further studies should take into account variations of socio-ecological changes and disease transmission patterns to better propose the increasing risk for infectious disease outbreak by applying the conveniently accumulated information of weather variability. PMID:17612499

  7. Community Knowledge, Health Beliefs, Practices and Experiences Related to Dengue Fever and Its Association with IgG Seropositivity

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Li Ping; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Chinna, Karuthan

    2014-01-01

    Background Demographic, economic and behavioural factors are central features underpinning the successful management and biological control of dengue. This study aimed to examine these factors and their association with the seroprevalence of this disease. Methodology We conducted a cross-sectional telephone survey of households in a 3 km radius of the schools where we had conducted serological tests on the student population in a previous study. Households were surveyed about their socio-demographics, knowledge, practices, and Health Belief Model (HBM) constructs. The results were then associated with the prevalence rate of dengue in the community, as marked by IgG seropositivity of the students who attended school there. Results A total of 1,400 complete responses were obtained. The community's IgG seropositivity was significantly positively associated with high household monthly income, high-rise residential building type, high surrounding vegetation density, rural locality, high perceived severity and susceptibility, perceived barriers to prevention, knowing that a neighbour has dengue, frequent fogging and a higher level of knowledge about dengue. In the multivariate analyses, three major correlates of the presence of IgG seropositivity in the community: (1) high-rise residential apartment house type or condominium buildings; (2) the main construct of the HBM, perceived severity and susceptibility; and (3) the additional constructs of the HBM, lack of preventive measures from the community level and having a neighbour with dengue as a cue to action. Weak correlations were found between self-practices to prevent dengue and the level of dengue seropositivity in the community, and between HBM constructs and knowledge (r?=?0.09). Conclusions The residential environment factor and the constructs of the HBM are useful and important elements in developing interventions to prevent and control dengue. The study also sheds light on the importance of the need for approaches that ensure the translation of knowledge into practice. PMID:24853259

  8. Impact of meteorological factors on the spatiotemporal patterns of dengue fever incidence.

    PubMed

    Chien, Lung-Chang; Yu, Hwa-Lung

    2014-12-01

    Dengue fever is one of the most widespread vector-borne diseases and has caused more than 50 million infections annually over the world. For the purposes of disease prevention and climate change health impact assessment, it is crucial to understand the weather-disease associations for dengue fever. This study investigated the nonlinear delayed impact of meteorological conditions on the spatiotemporal variations of dengue fever in southern Taiwan during 1998-2011. We present a novel integration of a distributed lag nonlinear model and Markov random fields to assess the nonlinear lagged effects of weather variables on temporal dynamics of dengue fever and to account for the geographical heterogeneity. This study identified the most significant meteorological measures to dengue fever variations, i.e., weekly minimum temperature, and the weekly maximum 24-hour rainfall, by obtaining the relative risk (RR) with respect to disease counts and a continuous 20-week lagged time. Results show that RR increased as minimum temperature increased, especially for the lagged period 5-18 weeks, and also suggest that the time to high disease risks can be decreased. Once the occurrence of maximum 24-hour rainfall is >50 mm, an associated increased RR lasted for up to 15 weeks. A temporary one-month decrease in the RR of dengue fever is noted following the extreme rain. In addition, the elevated incidence risk is identified in highly populated areas. Our results highlight the high nonlinearity of temporal lagged effects and magnitudes of temperature and rainfall on dengue fever epidemics. The results can be a practical reference for the early warning of dengue fever. PMID:25084561

  9. A Heterocyclic Molecule with Significant Activity Against Dengue Virus

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Vasu; Chi, Guochen; Shu, Qingning; Julander, Justin; Smee, Donald F.

    2009-01-01

    There are no specific approved drugs or vaccines for the treatment or prevention of infectious dengue virus and there are very few compounds known that inhibit the replication of this virus. This communication describes the concise synthesis of two uracil-based multifunctional compounds. One of these compounds (1) has strong activity against dengue virus. It also exhibits low activity against a few other RNA viruses, but is highly active against yellow fever virus, a related flavivirus. It is likely that the mechanism of action of the antiviral activity of this compound is through its inhibition of the enzyme, inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). Molecular modeling studies reveal that the compound can have specific hydrogen bonding interactions with a number of amino acids in the active site of IMPDH, a stacking interaction with the bound natural substrate, IMP, and the ability to interfere with the binding of NAD+ with IMPDH, prior to the hydration step. PMID:19185487

  10. Description of outbreaks of healthcare associated infections related to compounding pharmacies, 2000-2012

    PubMed Central

    Staes, Catherine; Jacobs, Jason; Mayer, Jeanmarie; Allen, Jill

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The 2012 multistate fungal meningitis outbreak caused by contaminated methylprednisolone suggests that contaminated compounded drugs can pose a public health threat. The problem has not been well described. Our objective was to systematically review the literature to describe: a) features of infectious outbreaks associated with exposure to contaminated drugs produced by compounding pharmacies, b) sterile compounding procedures that caused microbial contamination, and c) outbreak features relevant for detection and investigation. Methods We searched PubMed (reviewing 850 citations) and the CDC and FDA Web sites to identify infectious outbreaks associated with compounding pharmacies outside the hospital setting between January 2000 and November 2012. We extracted information from peer-reviewed literature, FDA and CDC documents, meeting abstracts, and congressional testimony. Results Between 2000 and prior to the 2012 fungal meningitis outbreak, 11 infectious outbreaks from contaminated compounded drugs were reported involving 207 case-patients with 17 deaths (8.2% case fatality rate). The 2012 meningitis outbreak increased totals almost 5-fold. Half the outbreaks involved case-patients in more than 1 state. Three outbreaks involved ophthalmic drugs: trypan blue and Brilliant Blue-G ophthalmic solutions used during surgery, and triamcinolone and bevacizumab for intravitreal injection. Remaining outbreaks involved corticosteroids (n=2), heparin flush solutions (n=2), cardioplegia, intravenous magnesium sulfate, total parenteral nutrition, and fentanyl. The outbreaks were caused by pathogens commonly associated with healthcare associated infections (n=6), common skin commensals (n=1), and organisms that rarely cause infection (n=5). Morbidity was substantial, including vision loss; mortality rates during earlier outbreaks were similar to the 2012 meningitis outbreak. A variety of problems with sterile procedures were found. No single source reported all outbreaks. Conclusion Sporadic but serious infectious outbreaks associated with contaminated drugs from compounding pharmacies occurred before the 2012 fungal meningitis outbreak. These outbreaks illustrate root causes that could be addressed with preventive policies and practices. PMID:23867487

  11. The Global Distribution of Yellow Fever and Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, D.J.; Wilson, A.J.; Hay, S.I.; Graham, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Yellow fever has been subjected to partial control for decades, but there are signs that case numbers are now increasing globally, with the risk of local epidemic outbreaks. Dengue case numbers have also increased dramatically during the past 40 years and different serotypes have invaded new geographical areas. Despite the temporal changes in these closely related diseases, and their enormous public health impact, few attempts have been made to collect a comprehensive dataset of their spatial and temporal distributions. For this review, records of the occurrence of both diseases during the 20th century have been collected together and are used to define their climatic limits using remotely sensed satellite data within a discriminant analytical model framework. The resulting risk maps for these two diseases identify their different environmental requirements, and throw some light on their potential for co-occurrence in Africa and South East Asia. PMID:16647971

  12. The effect of opinion clustering on disease outbreaks

    E-print Network

    Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    , is a potentially dangerous infection and a leading cause of vaccine- preventable childhood mortality (Measles large outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases such as measles despite the availability of highly effective vaccines. This phenomenon lacks an explanation in countries where vaccination rates are rising

  13. Imported Dengue Cases, Weather Variation and Autochthonous Dengue Incidence in Cairns, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaodong; Williams, Gail; Clements, Archie C. A.; Hu, Wenbiao

    2013-01-01

    Background Dengue fever (DF) outbreaks often arise from imported DF cases in Cairns, Australia. Few studies have incorporated imported DF cases in the estimation of the relationship between weather variability and incidence of autochthonous DF. The study aimed to examine the impact of weather variability on autochthonous DF infection after accounting for imported DF cases and then to explore the possibility of developing an empirical forecast system. Methodology/principal finds Data on weather variables, notified DF cases (including those acquired locally and overseas), and population size in Cairns were supplied by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, Queensland Health, and Australian Bureau of Statistics. A time-series negative-binomial hurdle model was used to assess the effects of imported DF cases and weather variability on autochthonous DF incidence. Our results showed that monthly autochthonous DF incidences were significantly associated with monthly imported DF cases (Relative Risk (RR):1.52; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01–2.28), monthly minimum temperature (oC) (RR: 2.28; 95% CI: 1.77–2.93), monthly relative humidity (%) (RR: 1.21; 95% CI: 1.06–1.37), monthly rainfall (mm) (RR: 0.50; 95% CI: 0.31–0.81) and monthly standard deviation of daily relative humidity (%) (RR: 1.27; 95% CI: 1.08–1.50). In the zero hurdle component, the occurrence of monthly autochthonous DF cases was significantly associated with monthly minimum temperature (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.64; 95% CI: 1.01–2.67). Conclusions/significance Our research suggested that incidences of monthly autochthonous DF were strongly positively associated with monthly imported DF cases, local minimum temperature and inter-month relative humidity variability in Cairns. Moreover, DF outbreak in Cairns was driven by imported DF cases only under favourable seasons and weather conditions in the study. PMID:24349148

  14. Outbreaks associated with cantaloupe, watermelon, and honeydew in the United States, 1973-2011.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kelly A; Bennett, Sarah D; Mahovic, Michael; Gould, L Hannah

    2014-12-01

    Fresh fruits and vegetables are an important part of a healthy diet. Melons have been associated with enteric infections. We reviewed outbreaks reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System during 1973-2011 in which the implicated food was a single melon type. We also reviewed published literature and records obtained from investigating agencies. During 1973-2011, 34 outbreaks caused by a single melon type were reported, resulting in 3602 illnesses, 322 hospitalizations, 46 deaths, and 3 fetal losses. Cantaloupes accounted for 19 outbreaks (56%), followed by watermelons (13, 38%) and honeydew (2, 6%). Melon-associated outbreaks increased from 0.5 outbreaks per year during 1973-1991 to 1.3 during 1992-2011. Salmonella was the most common etiology reported (19, 56%), followed by norovirus (5, 15%). Among 13 outbreaks with information available, melons imported from Mexico and Central America were implicated in 9 outbreaks (69%) and domestically grown melons were implicated in 4 outbreaks (31%). The point of contamination was known for 20 outbreaks; contamination occurred most commonly during growth, harvesting, processing, or packaging (13, 65%). Preventive measures focused on reducing bacterial contamination of melons both domestically and internationally could decrease the number and severity of melon-associated outbreaks. PMID:25407556

  15. An online spatio-temporal prediction model for dengue fever epidemic in Kaohsiung,Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ming-Hung; Yu, Hwa-Lung; Angulo, Jose; Christakos, George

    2013-04-01

    Dengue Fever (DF) is one of the most serious vector-borne infectious diseases in tropical and subtropical areas. DF epidemics occur in Taiwan annually especially during summer and fall seasons. Kaohsiung city has been one of the major DF hotspots in decades. The emergence and re-emergence of the DF epidemic is complex and can be influenced by various factors including space-time dynamics of human and vector populations and virus serotypes as well as the associated uncertainties. This study integrates a stochastic space-time "Susceptible-Infected-Recovered" model under Bayesian maximum entropy framework (BME-SIR) to perform real-time prediction of disease diffusion across space-time. The proposed model is applied for spatiotemporal prediction of the DF epidemic at Kaohsiung city during 2002 when the historical series of high DF cases was recorded. The online prediction by BME-SIR model updates the parameters of SIR model and infected cases across districts over time. Results show that the proposed model is rigorous to initial guess of unknown model parameters, i.e. transmission and recovery rates, which can depend upon the virus serotypes and various human interventions. This study shows that spatial diffusion can be well characterized by BME-SIR model, especially at the district surrounding the disease outbreak locations. The prediction performance at DF hotspots, i.e. Cianjhen and Sanmin, can be degraded due to the implementation of various disease control strategies during the epidemics. The proposed online disease prediction BME-SIR model can provide the governmental agency with a valuable reference to timely identify, control, and efficiently prevent DF spread across space-time.

  16. Age and Clinical Dengue Illness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph R. Egger; Paul G. Coleman

    engue fever has emerged as a serious international public health threat with almost half of the world's population at risk for infection (1). Although >50 million cases of dengue fever are estimated to occur each year (2), a large proportion of infections are asymptomatic (3).Why infection progresses to clinical disease in some persons, but not in others, is not clear.

  17. Tetravalent dengue DIIIC protein together with alum and ODN elicits a Th1 response and neutralizing antibodies in mice.

    PubMed

    Zuest, Roland; Valdes, Iris; Skibinski, David; Lin, Yufang; Toh, Ying Xiu; Chan, Katherine; Hermida, Lisset; Connolly, John; Guillen, Gerardo; Fink, Katja

    2015-03-17

    Dengue disease is a global challenge for healthcare systems particularly during outbreaks, and millions of dollars are spent every year for vector control. An efficient and safe vaccine that is cost-effective could resolve the burden that dengue virus imposes on affected countries. We describe here the immunogenicity of a tetravalent formulation of a recombinant fusion protein consisting of E domain III and the capsid protein of dengue serotypes 1-4 (Tetra DIIIC). E domain III is an epitope for efficient neutralizing antibodies while the capsid protein contains T cell epitopes. Besides combining B and T cell epitopes, Tetra DIIIC is highly immunogenic due to its aggregate form and a two-component adjuvant. Following previous studies assessing the monovalent DIIIC formulations, we addressed here the quality and breadth of the T cell- and antibody response of Tetra DIIIC in mice. Tetra DIIIC induced a Th1-type response against all four DENV serotypes and dengue-specific antibodies were predominantly IgG1 and IgG2a and neutralizing, while the induction of neutralizing antibodies was dependent on IFN signaling. Importantly, the Th1 and IgG1/IgG2a profile of the DIIIC vaccine approach is similar to an efficient natural anti-dengue response. PMID:25659270

  18. Evaluation of the WHO classification of dengue disease severity during an epidemic in 2011 in the state of Ceará, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Luciano Pamplona de Góes; Mota, Lia Alves Martins; Lustosa, Gustavo Porto; Fortes, Mayara Carvalho; Mota, Davi Alves Martins; Lima, Antônio Afonso Bezerra; Coelho, Ivo Castelo Branco; Mourão, Maria Paula Gomes

    2014-02-01

    In 2009, the World Health Organization (WHO) issued a new guideline that stratifies dengue-affected patients into severe (SD) and non-severe dengue (NSD) (with or without warning signs). To evaluate the new recommendations, we completed a retrospective cross-sectional study of the dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) cases reported during an outbreak in 2011 in northeastern Brazil. We investigated 84 suspected DHF patients, including 45 (53.6%) males and 39 (46.4%) females. The ages of the patients ranged from five-83 years and the median age was 29. According to the DHF/dengue shock syndrome classification, 53 (63.1%) patients were classified as having dengue fever and 31 (36.9%) as having DHF. According to the 2009 WHO classification, 32 (38.1%) patients were grouped as having NSD [4 (4.8%) without warning signs and 28 (33.3%) with warning signs] and 52 (61.9%) as having SD. A better performance of the revised classification in the detection of severe clinical manifestations allows for an improved detection of patients with SD and may reduce deaths. The revised classification will not only facilitate effective screening and patient management, but will also enable the collection of standardised surveillance data for future epidemiological and clinical studies. PMID:24626308

  19. Evaluation of dengue NS1 test kits for the diagnosis of dengue fever

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William John Hannan McBride

    2009-01-01

    Detection of the dengue NS1 antigen during the symptomatic phase of illness represents an important advance in the diagnosis of dengue fever. The sensitivity of 2 commercial kits was evaluated in a panel of 91 serum samples collected at defined intervals after onset of symptomatic dengue fever. The sensitivity of the Bio-Rad Platelia™ (Bio-Rad Laboratories, Marnes-La-Coquette, France) dengue NS1 assay

  20. Planning for smallpox outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Neil M.; Keeling, Matt J.; John Edmunds, W.; Gani, Raymond; Grenfell, Bryan T.; Anderson, Roy M.; Leach, Steve

    2003-10-01

    Mathematical models of viral transmission and control are important tools for assessing the threat posed by deliberate release of the smallpox virus and the best means of containing an outbreak. Models must balance biological realism against limitations of knowledge, and uncertainties need to be accurately communicated to policy-makers. Smallpox poses the particular challenge that key biological, social and spatial factors affecting disease spread in contemporary populations must be elucidated largely from historical studies undertaken before disease eradication in 1979. We review the use of models in smallpox planning within the broader epidemiological context set by recent outbreaks of both novel and re-emerging pathogens.

  1. Dengue Human Infection Models Supporting Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Whitehorn, James; Van, Vinh Chau Nguyen; Simmons, Cameron P.

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a arboviral infection that represents a major global health burden. There is an unmet need for effective dengue therapeutics to reduce symptoms, duration of illness and incidence of severe complications. Here, we consider the merits of a dengue human infection model (DHIM) for drug development. A DHIM could allow experimentally controlled studies of candidate therapeutics in preselected susceptible volunteers, potentially using smaller sample sizes than trials that recruited patients with dengue in an endemic country. In addition, the DHIM would assist the conduct of intensive pharmacokinetic and basic research investigations and aid in determining optimal drug dosage. Furthermore, a DHIM could help establish proof of concept that chemoprophylaxis against dengue is feasible. The key challenge in developing the DHIM for drug development is to ensure the model reliably replicates the typical clinical and laboratory features of naturally acquired, symptomatic dengue. PMID:24872399

  2. Dengue human infection models supporting drug development.

    PubMed

    Whitehorn, James; Van, Vinh Chau Nguyen; Simmons, Cameron P

    2014-06-15

    Dengue is a arboviral infection that represents a major global health burden. There is an unmet need for effective dengue therapeutics to reduce symptoms, duration of illness and incidence of severe complications. Here, we consider the merits of a dengue human infection model (DHIM) for drug development. A DHIM could allow experimentally controlled studies of candidate therapeutics in preselected susceptible volunteers, potentially using smaller sample sizes than trials that recruited patients with dengue in an endemic country. In addition, the DHIM would assist the conduct of intensive pharmacokinetic and basic research investigations and aid in determining optimal drug dosage. Furthermore, a DHIM could help establish proof of concept that chemoprophylaxis against dengue is feasible. The key challenge in developing the DHIM for drug development is to ensure the model reliably replicates the typical clinical and laboratory features of naturally acquired, symptomatic dengue. PMID:24872399

  3. Fatal Staphylococcal Infection following Classic Dengue Fever

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Stanley Almeida; Moreira, Daniel Ribeiro; Veloso, Juliana Marcia Ribeiro; Silva, Jenaine Oliveira; Barros, Vera Lucia Souza Reis; Nobre, Vandack

    2010-01-01

    Dengue represents an important public health issue in many tropical areas, leading to high morbidity and the employment of substantial health resources. Even though the number of fatalities related to dengue is unknown, several reports warn about the potential occurrence of severe infections and even death. The clinical spectrum of dengue is highly variable, ranging from a mild flu-like syndrome to severe disease, with shock and hemorrhage. The occurrence of bacterial superinfection, or coinfection, in patients with dengue has been noted by some authors, but the available information comes from anecdotic reports. In this study, we show the clinical and anatomopathological data of a patient infected with dengue, who subsequently died of acute multi-organic failure related to Staphylococcus aureus infection. The autopsy revealed a severe disseminated staphylococcal disease and confirmed dengue infection. PMID:20810838

  4. The Utility of a Board Game for Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennon, Jeffrey L.; Coombs, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to test the effectiveness of an educational board game for increasing knowledge, positive attitudes-beliefs, and self-efficacy for dengue prevention in a sample of Philippine school children and adolescents. Effective board games are more advantageous than lectures because they are adaptable, inexpensive and…

  5. An agent-based model driven by tropical rainfall to understand the spatio-temporal heterogeneity of a chikungunya outbreak.

    PubMed

    Dommar, Carlos J; Lowe, Rachel; Robinson, Marguerite; Rodó, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases, such as dengue, malaria and chikungunya, are increasing across their traditional ranges and continuing to infiltrate new, previously unaffected, regions. The spatio-temporal evolution of these diseases is determined by the interaction of the host and vector, which is strongly dependent on social structures and mobility patterns. We develop an agent-based model (ABM), in which each individual is explicitly represented and vector populations are linked to precipitation estimates in a tropical setting. The model is implemented on both scale-free and regular networks. The spatio-temporal transmission of chikungunya is analysed and the presence of asymptomatic silent spreaders within the population is investigated in the context of implementing travel restrictions during an outbreak. Preventing the movement of symptomatic individuals is found to be an insufficient mechanism to halt the spread of the disease, which can be readily carried to neighbouring nodes via sub-clinical individuals. Furthermore, the impact of topology structure vs. precipitation levels is assessed and precipitation is found to be the dominant factor driving spatio-temporal transmission. PMID:23958228

  6. Exploratory space-time analysis of dengue incidence in Trinidad: a retrospective study using travel hubs as dispersal points, 1998–2004

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue is an acute arboviral disease responsible for most of the illness and death in tropical and subtropical regions. Over the last 25 years there has been increase epidemic activity of the disease in the Caribbean, with the co-circulation of multiple serotypes. An understanding of the space and time dynamics of dengue could provide health agencies with important clues for reducing its impact. Methods Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF) cases observed for the period 1998–2004 were georeferenced using Geographic Information System software. Spatial clustering was calculated for individual years and for the entire study period using the Nearest Neighbor Index. Space and time interaction between DHF cases was determined using the Knox Test while the Nearest Neighbor Hierarchical method was used to extract DHF hot spots. All space and time distances calculated were validated using the Pearson r significance test. Results Results shows that (1) a decrease in mean distance between DHF cases correlates with activity leading up to an outbreak, (2) a decrease in temporal distance between DHF cases leads to increased geographic spread of the disease, with an outbreak occurrence about every 2 years, and (3) a general pattern in the movement of dengue incidents from more rural to urban settings leading up to an outbreak with hotspot areas associated with transportation hubs in Trinidad. Conclusion Considering only the spatial dimension of the disease, results suggest that DHF cases become more concentrated leading up to an outbreak. However, with the additional consideration of time, results suggest that when an outbreak occurs incidents occur more rapidly in time leading to a parallel increase in the rate of distribution of the disease across space. The results of this study can be used by public health officers to help visualize and understand the spatial and temporal patterns of dengue, and to prepare warnings for the public. Dengue space-time patterns and hotspot detection will provide useful information to support public health officers in their efforts to control and predict dengue spread over critical hotspots allowing better allocation of resources. PMID:25052242

  7. The global distribution and burden of dengue.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Samir; Gething, Peter W; Brady, Oliver J; Messina, Jane P; Farlow, Andrew W; Moyes, Catherine L; Drake, John M; Brownstein, John S; Hoen, Anne G; Sankoh, Osman; Myers, Monica F; George, Dylan B; Jaenisch, Thomas; Wint, G R William; Simmons, Cameron P; Scott, Thomas W; Farrar, Jeremy J; Hay, Simon I

    2013-04-25

    Dengue is a systemic viral infection transmitted between humans by Aedes mosquitoes. For some patients, dengue is a life-threatening illness. There are currently no licensed vaccines or specific therapeutics, and substantial vector control efforts have not stopped its rapid emergence and global spread. The contemporary worldwide distribution of the risk of dengue virus infection and its public health burden are poorly known. Here we undertake an exhaustive assembly of known records of dengue occurrence worldwide, and use a formal modelling framework to map the global distribution of dengue risk. We then pair the resulting risk map with detailed longitudinal information from dengue cohort studies and population surfaces to infer the public health burden of dengue in 2010. We predict dengue to be ubiquitous throughout the tropics, with local spatial variations in risk influenced strongly by rainfall, temperature and the degree of urbanization. Using cartographic approaches, we estimate there to be 390 million (95% credible interval 284-528) dengue infections per year, of which 96 million (67-136) manifest apparently (any level of disease severity). This infection total is more than three times the dengue burden estimate of the World Health Organization. Stratification of our estimates by country allows comparison with national dengue reporting, after taking into account the probability of an apparent infection being formally reported. The most notable differences are discussed. These new risk maps and infection estimates provide novel insights into the global, regional and national public health burden imposed by dengue. We anticipate that they will provide a starting point for a wider discussion about the global impact of this disease and will help to guide improvements in disease control strategies using vaccine, drug and vector control methods, and in their economic evaluation. PMID:23563266

  8. The global distribution and burden of dengue

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Samir; Gething, Peter W.; Brady, Oliver J.; Messina, Jane P.; Farlow, Andrew W.; Moyes, Catherine L.; Drake, John M.; Brownstein, John S.; Hoen, Anne G.; Sankoh, Osman; Myers, Monica F.; George, Dylan B.; Jaenisch, Thomas; Wint, G.R. William; Simmons, Cameron P.; Scott, Thomas W.; Farrar, Jeremy J.; Hay, Simon I.

    2013-01-01

    Dengue is a systemic viral infection transmitted between humans by Aedes mosquitoes1. For some patients dengue is a life-threatening illness2. There are currently no licensed vaccines or specific therapeutics, and substantial vector control efforts have not stopped its rapid emergence and global spread3. The contemporary worldwide distribution of the risk of dengue virus infection4 and its public health burden are poorly known2,5. Here we undertake an exhaustive assembly of known records of dengue occurrence worldwide, and use a formal modelling framework to map the global distribution of dengue risk. We then pair the resulting risk map with detailed longitudinal information from dengue cohort studies and population surfaces to infer the public health burden of dengue in 2010. We predict dengue to be ubiquitous throughout the tropics, with local spatial variations in risk influenced strongly by rainfall, temperature and the degree of urbanisation. Using cartographic approaches, we estimate there to be 390 million (95 percent credible interval 284-528) dengue infections per year, of which 96 million (67-136) manifest apparently (any level of clinical or sub-clinical severity). This infection total is more than three times the dengue burden estimate of the World Health Organization2. Stratification of our estimates by country allows comparison with national dengue reporting, after taking into account the probability of an apparent infection being formally reported. The most notable differences are discussed. These new risk maps and infection estimates provide novel insights into the global, regional and national public health burden imposed by dengue. We anticipate that they will provide a starting point for a wider discussion about the global impact of this disease and will help guide improvements in disease control strategies using vaccine, drug and vector control methods and in their economic evaluation. [285] PMID:23563266

  9. Planning for smallpox outbreaks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matt J. Keeling; W. John Edmunds; Raymond Gani; Bryan T. Grenfell; Roy M. Anderson; Steve Leach; Neil M. Ferguson

    2003-01-01

    Mathematical models of viral transmission and control are important tools for assessing the threat posed by deliberate release of the smallpox virus and the best means of containing an outbreak. Models must balance biological realism against limitations of knowledge, and uncertainties need to be accurately communicated to policy-makers. Smallpox poses the particular challenge that key biological, social and spatial factors

  10. Economic Cost of Dengue in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Halasa, Yara A.; Shepard, Donald S.; Zeng, Wu

    2012-01-01

    Dengue, endemic in Puerto Rico, reached a record high in 2010. To inform policy makers, we derived annual economic cost. We assessed direct and indirect costs of hospitalized and ambulatory dengue illness in 2010 dollars through surveillance data and interviews with 100 laboratory-confirmed dengue patients treated in 2008–2010. We corrected for underreporting by using setting-specific expansion factors. Work absenteeism because of a dengue episode exceeded the absenteeism for an episode of influenza or acute otitis media. From 2002 to 2010, the aggregate annual cost of dengue illness averaged $38.7 million, of which 70% was for adults (age 15+ years). Hospitalized patients accounted for 63% of the cost of dengue illness, and fatal cases represented an additional 17%. Households funded 48% of dengue illness cost, the government funded 24%, insurance funded 22%, and employers funded 7%. Including dengue surveillance and vector control activities, the overall annual cost of dengue was $46.45 million ($12.47 per capita). PMID:22556069

  11. Dengue blood analysis by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, A.; Anwar, S.; Firdous, S.; Ahmed, M.; Rasheed, R.; Nawaz, M.

    2012-06-01

    In this work Raman spectra of normal and dengue infected serum and whole blood were analyzed. In normal whole blood and serum characteristic peaks were observed when excited at 442 and 532 nm. In dengue whole blood and serum all peaks found to be blue shifted with reduced Raman intensity. Dengue whole blood and serum shows two peaks at 1614 and 1750 cm-1 which are due to presence of Immunoglobulin antibodies IgG and IgM. Whole study provides a route of information for diagnosis of dengue viral infection.

  12. Origin of the Dengue Fever Mosquito, Aedes aegypti, in California

    PubMed Central

    Gloria-Soria, Andrea; Brown, Julia E.; Kramer, Vicki; Hardstone Yoshimizu, Melissa; Powell, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever is among the most widespread vector-borne infectious diseases. The primary vector of dengue is the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Ae. aegypti is prevalent in the tropics and sub-tropics and is closely associated with human habitats outside its native range of Africa. While long established in the southeastern United States of America where dengue is re-emerging, breeding populations have never been reported from California until the summer of 2013. Using 12 highly variable microsatellite loci and a database of reference populations, we have determined that the likely source of the California introduction is the southeastern United States, ruling out introductions from abroad, from the geographically closer Arizona or northern Mexico populations, or an accidental release from a research laboratory. The power to identify the origin of new introductions of invasive vectors of human disease relies heavily on the availability of a panel of reference populations. Our work demonstrates the importance of generating extensive reference databases of genetically fingerprinted human-disease vector populations to aid public health efforts to prevent the introduction and spread of vector-borne diseases. PMID:25077804

  13. Characterization of retrovirus-based reporter viruses pseudotyped with the precursor membrane and envelope glycoproteins of four serotypes of dengue viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, H.-P.; Hsieh, S.-C. [Institute of Microbiology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, No 1 Sec1 Jen-Ai Rd, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); King, C.-C. [Institute of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, No 1 Sec1 Jen-Ai Rd, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Wang, W.-K. [Institute of Microbiology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, No 1 Sec1 Jen-Ai Rd, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, No 7 Chung-Shan S Rd, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: wwang60@yahoo.com

    2007-11-25

    In this study, we successfully established retrovirus-based reporter viruses pseudotyped with the precursor membrane and envelope (PrM/E) proteins of each of the four serotypes of dengue viruses, which caused the most important arboviral diseases in this century. Co-sedimentation of the dengue E protein and HIV-1 core proteins by sucrose gradient analysis of the pseudotype reporter virus of dengue virus type 2, D2(HIVluc), and detection of HIV-1 core proteins by immunoprecipitation with anti-E monoclonal antibody suggested that dengue viral proteins were incorporated into the pseudotype viral particles. The infectivity in target cells, as assessed by the luciferase activity, can be inhibited by the lysosomotropic agents, suggesting a pH-dependent mechanism of entry. Amino acid substitutions of the leucine at position 107, a critical residue at the fusion loop of E protein, with lysine resulted in severe impairment in infectivity, suggesting that entry of the pseudotype reporter virus is mediated through the fusogenic properties of E protein. With more and more dengue viral sequences available from different outbreaks worldwide, this sensitive and convenient tool has the potential to facilitate molecular characterization of the PrM/E proteins of dengue field isolates.

  14. Evolution and heterogeneity of multiple serotypes of Dengue virus in Pakistan, 2006–2011

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Even though dengue has been recognized as one of the major public health threats in Pakistan, the understanding of its molecular epidemiology is still limited. The genotypic diversity of Dengue virus (DENV) serotypes involved in dengue outbreaks since 2005 in Pakistan is not well studied. Here, we investigated the origin, diversity, genetic relationships and geographic distribution of DENV to understand virus evolution during the recent expansion of dengue in Pakistan. Methods The study included 200 sera obtained from dengue-suspected patients from 2006 to 2011. DENV infection was confirmed in 94 (47%) sera by a polymerase chain reaction assay. These included 36 (38.3%) DENV-2, 57 DENV-3 (60.6%) and 1 DENV-4 (1.1%) cases. Sequences of 13 whole genomes (6 DENV-2, 6 DENV-3 and 1 DENV-4) and 49 envelope genes (26 DENV-2, 22 DENV-3 and 1 DENV-4) were analysed to determine the origin, phylogeny, diversity and selection pressure during virus evolution. Results DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4 in Pakistan from 2006 to 2011 shared 98.5-99.6% nucleotide and 99.3-99.9% amino acid similarity with those circulated in the Indian subcontinent during the last decade. Nevertheless, Pakistan DENV-2 and DENV-3 strains formed distinct clades characterized by amino acid signatures of NS2A-I116T + NS5-K861R and NS3-K590R + NS5-S895L respectively. Each clade consisted of a heterogenous virus population that circulated in Southern (2006–2009) and Northern Pakistan (2011). Conclusions DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4 that circulated during 2006–2011 are likely to have first introduced via the southern route of Pakistan. Both DENV-2 and DENV-3 have undergone in-situ evolution to generate heterogenous populations, possibly driven by sustained local DENV transmission during 2006–2011 periods. While both DENV-2 and DENV-3 continued to circulate in Southern Pakistan until 2009, DENV-2 has spread in a Northern direction to establish in Punjab Province, which experienced a massive dengue outbreak in 2011. PMID:24007412

  15. West Nile virus and the 2012 outbreak: The Baylor University Medical Center experience

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Mariangeli; Gummelt, Kyle L.; Colbert, Gates; Ursales, Anna L.; Van Vrancken, Michael J.; Snipes, George J.; Guileyardo, Joseph M.; Columbus, Cristie

    2015-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) has been responsible for multiple outbreaks and has shown evolution in its clinical manifestation. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has provided diagnostic criteria in classifying the variety of WNV infection; however, application of these criteria can prove challenging during outbreaks, and understanding the array of presentations and patient population is clinically important. In this article, we present the challenges encountered during the 2012 outbreak at one institution. PMID:26130870

  16. Acute gastroenteritis outbreaks associated with ground-waterborne norovirus in South Korea during 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Cho, H G; Lee, S G; Kim, W H; Lee, J S; Park, P H; Cheon, D S; Jheong, W H; Jho, E H; Lee, J B; Paik, S Y

    2014-12-01

    Epidemiological and virological studies indicate that noroviruses-contaminated groundwater was the primary source of four acute gastroenteritis outbreaks in South Korea between 2008 and 2012. Furthermore, cabbage kimchi was first identified as the vehicle of transmission between groundwater and infected patients in an outbreak in 2011. The proper treatment of groundwater sources prior to use for drinking or in food preparation is necessary to prevent further outbreaks. PMID:24534556

  17. Comparison of Vector Competence of Aedes mediovittatus and Aedes aegypti for Dengue Virus: Implications for Dengue Control in the Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Poole-Smith, B. Katherine; Hemme, Ryan R.; Delorey, Mark; Felix, Gilberto; Gonzalez, Andrea L.; Amador, Manuel; Hunsperger, Elizabeth A.; Barrera, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Background Aedes mediovittatus mosquitoes are found throughout the Greater Antilles in the Caribbean and often share the same larval habitats with Ae. Aegypti, the primary vector for dengue virus (DENV). Implementation of vector control measures to control dengue that specifically target Ae. Aegypti may not control DENV transmission in Puerto Rico (PR). Even if Ae. Aegypti is eliminated or DENV refractory mosquitoes are released, DENV transmission may not cease when other competent mosquito species like Ae. Mediovittatus are present. To compare vector competence of Ae. Mediovittatus and Ae. Aegypti mosquitoes, we studied relative infection and transmission rates for all four DENV serotypes. Methods To compare the vector competence of Ae. Mediovittatus and Ae. Aegypti, mosquitoes were exposed to DENV 1–4 per os at viral titers of 5–6 logs plaque-forming unit (pfu) equivalents. At 14 days post infectious bloodmeal, viral RNA was extracted and tested by qRT-PCR to determine infection and transmission rates. Infection and transmission rates were analyzed with a generalized linear model assuming a binomial distribution. Results Ae. Aegypti had significantly higher DENV-4 infection and transmission rates than Ae. mediovittatus. Conclusions This study determined that Ae. Mediovittatus is a competent DENV vector. Therefore dengue prevention programs in PR and the Caribbean should consider both Ae. Mediovittatus and Ae. Aegypti mosquitoes in their vector control programs. PMID:25658951

  18. Listeriosis outbreaks and associated food vehicles, United States, 1998-2008.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Emily J; Jackson, Kelly A; Johnson, Shacara D; Graves, Lewis M; Silk, Benjamin J; Mahon, Barbara E

    2013-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a bacterial foodborne pathogen, can cause meningitis, bacteremia, and complications during pregnancy. This report summarizes listeriosis outbreaks reported to the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during 1998-2008. The study period includes the advent of PulseNet (a national molecular subtyping network for outbreak detection) in 1998 and the Listeria Initiative (enhanced surveillance for outbreak investigation) in 2004. Twenty-four confirmed listeriosis outbreaks were reported during 1998-2008, resulting in 359 illnesses, 215 hospitalizations, and 38 deaths. Outbreaks earlier in the study period were generally larger and longer. Serotype 4b caused the largest number of outbreaks and outbreak-associated cases. Ready-to-eat meats caused more early outbreaks, and novel vehicles (i.e., sprouts, taco/nacho salad) were associated with outbreaks later in the study period. These changes may reflect the effect of PulseNet and the Listeria Initiative and regulatory initiatives designed to prevent contamination in ready-to-eat meat and poultry products. PMID:23260661

  19. An adenosine nucleoside inhibitor of dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zheng; Chen, Yen-Liang; Schul, Wouter; Wang, Qing-Yin; Gu, Feng; Duraiswamy, Jeyaraj; Kondreddi, Ravinder Reddy; Niyomrattanakit, Pornwaratt; Lakshminarayana, Suresh B; Goh, Anne; Xu, Hao Ying; Liu, Wei; Liu, Boping; Lim, Joanne Y H; Ng, Chuan Young; Qing, Min; Lim, Chin Chin; Yip, Andy; Wang, Gang; Chan, Wai Ling; Tan, Hui Pen; Lin, Kai; Zhang, Bo; Zou, Gang; Bernard, Kristen A; Garrett, Christine; Beltz, Karen; Dong, Min; Weaver, Margaret; He, Handan; Pichota, Arkadius; Dartois, Veronique; Keller, Thomas H; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2009-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, is a major public health threat. The virus poses risk to 2.5 billion people worldwide and causes 50 to 100 million human infections each year. Neither a vaccine nor an antiviral therapy is currently available for prevention and treatment of DENV infection. Here, we report a previously undescribed adenosine analog, NITD008, that potently inhibits DENV both in vitro and in vivo. In addition to the 4 serotypes of DENV, NITD008 inhibits other flaviviruses, including West Nile virus, yellow fever virus, and Powassan virus. The compound also suppresses hepatitis C virus, but it does not inhibit nonflaviviruses, such as Western equine encephalitis virus and vesicular stomatitis virus. A triphosphate form of NITD008 directly inhibits the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity of DENV, indicating that the compound functions as a chain terminator during viral RNA synthesis. NITD008 has good in vivo pharmacokinetic properties and is biologically available through oral administration. Treatment of DENV-infected mice with NITD008 suppressed peak viremia, reduced cytokine elevation, and completely prevented the infected mice from death. No observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) was achieved when rats were orally dosed with NITD008 at 50 mg/kg daily for 1 week. However, NOAEL could not be accomplished when rats and dogs were dosed daily for 2 weeks. Nevertheless, our results have proved the concept that a nucleoside inhibitor could be developed for potential treatment of flavivirus infections. PMID:19918064

  20. Thailand momentum on policy and practice in local legislation on dengue vector control.

    PubMed

    Bhumiratana, Adisak; Intarapuk, Apiradee; Chujun, Suriyo; Kaewwaen, Wuthichai; Sorosjinda-Nunthawarasilp, Prapa; Koyadun, Surachart

    2014-01-01

    Over a past decade, an administrative decentralization model, adopted for local administration development in Thailand, is replacing the prior centralized (top-down) command system. The change offers challenges to local governmental agencies and other public health agencies at all the ministerial, regional, and provincial levels. A public health regulatory and legislative framework for dengue vector control by local governmental agencies is a national topic of interest because dengue control program has been integrated into healthcare services at the provincial level and also has been given priority in health plans of local governmental agencies. The enabling environments of local administrations are unique, so this critical review focuses on the authority of local governmental agencies responsible for disease prevention and control and on the functioning of local legislation with respect to dengue vector control and practices. PMID:24799896

  1. Thailand Momentum on Policy and Practice in Local Legislation on Dengue Vector Control

    PubMed Central

    Bhumiratana, Adisak; Intarapuk, Apiradee; Chujun, Suriyo; Kaewwaen, Wuthichai; Sorosjinda-Nunthawarasilp, Prapa; Koyadun, Surachart

    2014-01-01

    Over a past decade, an administrative decentralization model, adopted for local administration development in Thailand, is replacing the prior centralized (top-down) command system. The change offers challenges to local governmental agencies and other public health agencies at all the ministerial, regional, and provincial levels. A public health regulatory and legislative framework for dengue vector control by local governmental agencies is a national topic of interest because dengue control program has been integrated into healthcare services at the provincial level and also has been given priority in health plans of local governmental agencies. The enabling environments of local administrations are unique, so this critical review focuses on the authority of local governmental agencies responsible for disease prevention and control and on the functioning of local legislation with respect to dengue vector control and practices. PMID:24799896

  2. Early Clinical and Laboratory Indicators of Acute Dengue Illness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Kalayanarooj; S. Nimmannitya; S. Green; S. Suntayakorn; N. Kunentrasai; W. Viramitrachai; S. Kiatpolpoj; A. Nisalak

    1997-01-01

    A prospective observational study was conducted to identify early indicators of acute dengue virus infection. Children with fever for õ72 h without obvious cause were studied at hospitals in Bangkok and Kamphaeng Phet, Thailand, until resolution of fever. Of 172 evaluable subjects (91% of enrollees), 60 (35%) had dengue, including 32 with dengue fever (DF) and 28 with dengue hemorrhagic

  3. (Dengue Fever reported in Osceola County) OSCEOLA COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT

    E-print Network

    Watson, Craig A.

    (Dengue Fever reported in Osceola County) OSCEOLA COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT ISSUES PUBLIC HEALTH of two cases of dengue fever in Osceola County. Dengue is one of several mosquito-borne illnesses was not acquired locally. Symptoms of dengue fever vary according to the age of the patient. Infants and young

  4. Policy Platform Assessing the Potential of a Candidate Dengue Vaccine

    E-print Network

    Rohani, Pej

    -attenuated, tetravalent, chimeric yellow fever dengue vaccine-- commenced Phase II and Phase IIB clinical trials in 2009-sense RNA viruses (genus Flavivirus, family Flaviviridae) that are the etiological agents of dengue fever ranges from asymptomatic infection to life threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock

  5. Juice-associated outbreaks of human illness in the United States, 1995 through 2005.

    PubMed

    Vojdani, Jazmin D; Beuchat, Larry R; Tauxe, Robert V

    2008-02-01

    Outbreaks of illness associated with consumption of fruit juice have been a growing public health problem since the early 1990s. In response to epidemiologic investigations of outbreaks in which juice was implicated, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration implemented process control measures to regulate the production of fruit juice. The final juice regulation, which became effective in 2002, 2003, and 2004, depending on the size of the business, requires that juice operations comply with a hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP) plan. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) receives reports of food-associated outbreaks of illness. We reviewed fruit juice-associated outbreaks of illness reported to the CDC's Foodborne Outbreak Reporting System. From 1995 through 2005, 21 juice-associated outbreaks were reported to CDC; 10 implicated apple juice or cider, 8 were linked to orange juice, and 3 involved other types of fruit juice. These outbreaks caused 1,366 illnesses, with a median of 21 cases per outbreak (range, 2 to 398 cases). Among the 13 outbreaks of known etiology, 5 were caused by Salmonella, 5 by Escherichia coli O157:H7, 2 by Cryptosporidium, and one by Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O111 and Cryptosporidium. Fewer juice-associated outbreaks have been reported since the juice HACCP regulation was implemented. Some juice operations that are exempt from processing requirements or do not comply with the regulation continue to be implicated in outbreaks of illness. PMID:18326187

  6. A review of outbreaks of foodborne disease associated with passenger ships: evidence for risk management.

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Roisin M.; Cramer, Elaine H.; Mantha, Stacey; Nichols, Gordon; Bartram, Jamie K.; Farber, Jeffrey M.; Benembarek, Peter K.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Foodborne disease outbreaks on ships are of concern because of their potentially serious health consequences for passengers and crew and high costs to the industry. The authors conducted a review of outbreaks of foodborne diseases associated with passenger ships in the framework of a World Health Organization project on setting guidelines for ship sanitation. METHODS: The authors reviewed data on 50 outbreaks of foodborne disease associated with passenger ships. For each outbreak, data on pathogens/toxins, type of ship, factors contributing to outbreaks, mortality and morbidity, and food vehicles were collected. RESULTS: The findings of this review show that the majority of reported outbreaks were associated with cruise ships and that almost 10,000 people were affected. Salmonella spp were most frequently associated with outbreaks. Foodborne outbreaks due to enterotoxigenic E. coli spp, Shigella spp, noroviruses (formally called Norwalk-like viruses), Vibrio spp, Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium perfringens, Cyclospora sp, and Trichinella sp also occurred on ships. Factors associated with the outbreaks reviewed include inadequate temperature control, infected food handlers, contaminated raw ingredients, cross-contamination, inadequate heat treatment, and onshore excursions. Seafood was the most common food vehicle implicated in outbreaks. CONCLUSIONS: Many ship-associated outbreaks could have been prevented if measures had been taken to ensure adequate temperature control, avoidance of cross-contamination, reliable food sources, adequate heat treatment, and exclusion of infected food handlers from work. PMID:15219800

  7. Dengue, Urbanization and Globalization: The Unholy Trinity of the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Gubler, Duane J.

    2011-01-01

    Dengue is the most important arboviral disease of humans with over half of the world’s population living in areas of risk. The frequency and magnitude of epidemic dengue have increased dramatically in the past 40 years as the viruses and the mosquito vectors have both expanded geographically in the tropical regions of the world. There are many factors that have contributed to this emergence of epidemic dengue, but only three have been the principal drivers: 1) urbanization, 2) globalization and 3) lack of effective mosquito control. The dengue viruses have fully adapted to a human-Aedes aegypti-human transmission cycle, in the large urban centers of the tropics, where crowded human populations live in intimate association with equally large mosquito populations. This setting provides the ideal home for maintenance of the viruses and the periodic generation of epidemic strains. These cities all have modern airports through which 10s of millions of passengers pass each year, providing the ideal mechanism for transportation of viruses to new cities, regions and continents where there is little or no effective mosquito control. The result is epidemic dengue. This paper discusses this unholy trinity of drivers, along with disease burden, prevention and control and prospects for the future. PMID:22500131

  8. Transient 2nd Degree Av Block Mobitz Type II: A Rare Finding in Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Nigam, Ashwini Kumar; Agarwal, Ayush; Singh, Amit K; Yadav, Subhash

    2015-01-01

    Dengue has been a major problem as endemic occurs almost every year and causes a state of panic due to lack of proper diagnostic methods and facilities for proper management. Patients presenting with classical symptoms are easy to diagnose, however as a large number of cases occur every year, a number of cases diagnosed with dengue fever on occasion presents with atypical manifestations, which cause extensive evaluation of the patients, unnecessary referral to higher centre irrespective of the severity and therefore a rough idea of these manifestations must be present in the backdrop in order to prevent these problems. Involvement of cardiovascular system in dengue has been reported in previous studies, and they are usually benign and self-limited. The importance of study of conduction abnormalities is important as sometimes conduction blocks are the first sign of acute myocarditis in patients of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever in shock. We present here a case of 2nd Degree Mobitz Type II atrioventricular AV block in a case of Dengue Hemorrhagic fever reverting to the normal rhythm in recovery phase and no signs thereafter on follow up.

  9. Dengue virus requires the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 for replication and infection development.

    PubMed

    Marques, Rafael E; Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Del Sarto, Juliana L; Rocha, Rebeca F; Queiroz, Ana Luiza; Cisalpino, Daniel; Marques, Pedro E; Pacca, Carolina C; Fagundes, Caio T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Nogueira, Maurício L; Souza, Danielle G; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2015-08-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease that affects millions of people worldwide yearly. Currently, there is no vaccine or specific treatment available. Further investigation on dengue pathogenesis is required to better understand the disease and to identify potential therapeutic targets. The chemokine system has been implicated in dengue pathogenesis, although the specific role of chemokines and their receptors remains elusive. Here we describe the role of the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 in Dengue virus (DENV-2) infection. In vitro experiments showed that CCR5 is a host factor required for DENV-2 replication in human and mouse macrophages. DENV-2 infection induces the expression of CCR5 ligands. Incubation with an antagonist prevents CCR5 activation and reduces DENV-2 positive-stranded (+) RNA inside macrophages. Using an immunocompetent mouse model of DENV-2 infection we found that CCR5(-/-) mice were resistant to lethal infection, presenting at least 100-fold reduction of viral load in target organs and significant reduction in disease severity. This phenotype was reproduced in wild-type mice treated with CCR5-blocking compounds. Therefore, CCR5 is a host factor required for DENV-2 replication and disease development. Targeting CCR5 might represent a therapeutic strategy for dengue fever. These data bring new insights on the association between viral infections and the chemokine receptor CCR5. PMID:25939314

  10. [Is the fight against dengue complicated with the emergence of a new viral serotype?].

    PubMed

    Valero, Nereida; Quiroz, Yasmir

    2014-09-01

    Dengue is a viral acute febrile illness, currently considered one of the most important arbovirosis worldwide in terms of morbidity, mortality and economic impact. Various theories have been proposed to explain the pathogenesis of severe forms of dengue, involving among other factors, features related to the virus, such as the presence of more virulent strains and/or strains with increased replicative capacity. A crucial point at this time is the discovery of a new viral type, dengue 5, from nonhuman primates in Malaysia-Borneo, which could result in greater difficulties for control and vaccine production (currently in efficacy tests). Once the circulation of this viral type has been demonstrated in the human population, the high risk of infection will have extreme or controversial public health implications. Therefore, a worldwide program to combat dengue should include an urgent need to implement continuous vector elimination, community education and prevention and control of the disease. Only then, we will be aiming to reduce the morbidity and transmission risk of dengue, while new technological and effective alternatives come about. PMID:25272519

  11. Dengue and Malaria in Cayenne Hospital,

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Concurrent Dengue and Malaria in Cayenne Hospital, French Guiana Bernard Carme, Severine Matheus, Gerd Donutil, Olivia Raulin, Mathieu Nacher, and Jacques Morvan Dengue­malaria co-infection reports cases) and 393 had malaria (371 acute malaria); 17 had both. Diagnosis of 1 of these 2 infections should

  12. Dengue and Chikungunya Vector Control Pocket Guide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This technical guide consolidates information and procedures for surveillance and control of mosquitoes that transmit dengue and chikungunya viruses. The guide focuses on mosquitoes that transmit dengue but also makes reference to chikungunya and yellow fever because the pathogens that cause these ...

  13. Convergent antibody signatures in human dengue

    PubMed Central

    Parameswaran, Poornima; Liu, Yi; Roskin, Krishna M; Jackson, Katherine KL; Dixit, Vaishali P; Lee, Ji-Yeun; Artiles, Karen; Zompi, Simona; Vargas, Maria José; Simen, Birgitte B; Hanczaruk, Bozena; McGowan, Kim R; Tariq, Muhammad A; Pourmand, Nader; Koller, Daphne; Balmaseda, Angel; Boyd, Scott D; Harris, Eva; Fire, Andrew Z

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Dengue is the most prevalent mosquito-transmitted viral disease in humans, and the lack of early prognostics, vaccines and therapeutics contributes to immense disease burden. To identify patterns that could be used for sequence-based monitoring of the antibody response to dengue, we examined antibody heavy-chain gene rearrangements in longitudinal peripheral blood samples from 60 dengue patients. Comparing signatures between acute dengue, post-recovery and healthy samples, we find increased expansion of B cell clones in acute dengue patients, with higher overall clonality in secondary infection. Additionally, we observe consistent antibody sequence features in acute dengue in the major antigen-binding determinant Complementarity Determining Region-3 (CDR3), with specific CDR3 sequences highly enriched in acute samples compared to post-recovery, healthy or non-dengue samples. Dengue thus provides a striking example of a human viral infection where convergent immune signatures can be identified in multiple individuals. Such signatures could facilitate surveillance of immunological memory in communities. PMID:23768493

  14. Abiotic determinants to the spatial dynamics of dengue fever in Guangzhou.

    PubMed

    Li, Sen; Tao, Haiyan; Xu, Yong

    2013-05-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is a mosquito-borne disease that significantly endangers the well-being of people in most tropical Asia-Pacific areas. The transmission of DF is inherently a spatial process, requiring susceptible humans encountering infectious mosquito. The relationships between humans, mosquito and environment underpin the dynamics and patterns of the epidemic. In this article, the objective is to find out the key abiotic factors in the spatial dynamics of DF. An interdisciplinary study has been carried out by taking advantage of statistics, geographical information science, and remote sensing technologies. The case study is the DF outbreak in the Chinese city of Guangzhou throughout the year of 2002--the most serious DF outbreak in the recent decade. This study shows that the presence and abundance of DF cases can be associated with (a) socioeconomic factors relating to urbanization and (b) meteorological factors favoring mosquito survival. PMID:21852418

  15. Outbreak of Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Shigella sonnei Associated with Travel to Vietnam, Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Seok; Kim, Jae Joon; Kim, Soo Jin; Jeon, Se-Eun; Seo, Ki Yeon; Choi, Jun-Kil; Kim, Nan-Ok; Hong, Sahyun; Chung, Gyung Tae; Yoo, Cheon-Kwon; Kim, Young-Taek; Cheun, Hyeng Il; Bae, Geun-Ryang; Yeo, Yeong-Hee; Ha, Gang-Ja; Choi, Mi-Suk; Kang, Shin-Jung

    2015-01-01

    We investigated an October 2014 outbreak of illness caused by Shigella sonnei in a daycare center in the Republic of Korea (South Korea). The outbreak strain was resistant to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones and was traced to a child who had traveled to Vietnam. Improved hygiene and infection control practices are needed for prevention of shigellosis. PMID:26079171

  16. Outbreak of Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Shigella sonnei Associated with Travel to Vietnam, Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Seok; Kim, Jae Joon; Kim, Soo Jin; Jeon, Se-Eun; Seo, Ki Yeon; Choi, Jun-Kil; Kim, Nan-Ok; Hong, Sahyun; Chung, Gyung Tae; Yoo, Cheon-Kwon; Kim, Young-Taek; Cheun, Hyeng Il; Bae, Geun-Ryang; Yeo, Yeong-Hee; Ha, Gang-Ja; Choi, Mi-Suk; Kang, Shin-Jung; Kim, Junyoung

    2015-07-01

    We investigated an October 2014 outbreak of illness caused by Shigella sonnei in a daycare center in the Republic of Korea (South Korea). The outbreak strain was resistant to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones and was traced to a child who had traveled to Vietnam. Improved hygiene and infection control practices are needed for prevention of shigellosis. PMID:26079171

  17. ECONOMIC IMPACT OF DENGUE FEVER\\/DENGUE HEMORRHAGIC FEVER IN THAILAND AT THE FAMILY AND POPULATION LEVELS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DANIELLE V. CLARK; MAMMEN P. MAMMEN JR.; ANANDA NISALAK; VIRAT PUTHIMETHEE; TIMOTHY P. ENDY

    2005-01-01

    Dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever constitute a substantial health burden on the population in Thailand. In this study, the impact of symptomatic dengue virus infection on the families of patients hospitalized at the Kamphaeng Phet Provincial Hospital with laboratory-confirmed dengue in 2001 was assessed, and the disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost for fatal and non-fatal cases of dengue were

  18. A Sensitive and Selective Label-Free Electrochemical DNA Biosensor for the Detection of Specific Dengue Virus Serotype 3 Sequences.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Natália; Souza, Elaine; Ferreira, Danielly; Zanforlin, Deborah; Bezerra, Wessulla; Borba, Maria Amélia; Arruda, Mariana; Lopes, Kennya; Nascimento, Gustavo; Martins, Danyelly; Cordeiro, Marli; Lima-Filho, José

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever is the most prevalent vector-borne disease in the world, with nearly 100 million people infected every year. Early diagnosis and identification of the pathogen are crucial steps for the treatment and for prevention of the disease, mainly in areas where the co-circulation of different serotypes is common, increasing the outcome of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Due to the lack of fast and inexpensive methods available for the identification of dengue serotypes, herein we report the development of an electrochemical DNA biosensor for the detection of sequences of dengue virus serotype 3 (DENV-3). DENV-3 probe was designed using bioinformatics software and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used for electrochemical analysis. The results showed that a 22-m sequence was the best DNA probe for the identification of DENV-3. The optimum concentration of the DNA probe immobilized onto the electrode surface is 500 nM and a low detection limit of the system (3.09 nM). Moreover, this system allows selective detection of DENV-3 sequences in buffer and human serum solutions. Therefore, the application of DNA biosensors for diagnostics at the molecular level may contribute to future advances in the implementation of specific, effective and rapid detection methods for the diagnosis dengue viruses. PMID:26140346

  19. Assessing Disparities of Dengue Virus Transmission Risk across the US-Mexican Border Using a Climate Driven Vector-Epidemiological Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, Cory; Monaghan, Andrew; Quattrochi, Dale; Crosson, William; Hayden, Mary; Ernst, Kacey

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne viral disease reemerging throughout much of the tropical Americas. Dengue virus transmission is explicitly influenced by climate and the environment through its primary vector, Aedes aegypti. Temperature regulates Ae. aegypti development, survival, and replication rates as well as the incubation period of the virus within the mosquito. Precipitation provides water for many of the preferred breeding habitats of the mosquito, including buckets, old tires, and other places water can collect. Although transmission regularly occurs along the border region in Mexico, dengue virus transmission in bordering Arizona has not occurred. Using NASA's TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) satellite for precipitation input and Daymet for temperature and supplemental precipitation input, we modeled dengue transmission along a US-Mexico transect using a dynamic dengue transmission model that includes interacting vector ecology and epidemiological components. Model runs were performed for 5 cities in Sonora, Mexico and southern Arizona. Employing a Monte Carlo approach, we performed ensembles of several thousands of model simulations in order to resolve the model uncertainty arising from using different combinations of parameter values that are not well known. For cities with reported dengue case data, the top model simulations that best reproduced dengue case numbers were retained and their parameter values were extracted for comparison. These parameter values were used to run simulations in areas where dengue virus transmission does not occur or where dengue fever case data was unavailable. Additional model runs were performed to reveal how changes in climate or parameter values could alter transmission risk along the transect. The relative influence of climate variability and model parameters on dengue virus transmission is assessed to help public health workers prepare location specific infection prevention strategies.

  20. School Meal Programs: Few Outbreaks of Foodborne Illness Reported. Report to the Ranking Minority Member, Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry, U.S. Senate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Robert E.

    Twenty outbreaks of foodborne illness in schools were reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) during 1997; however, only 8 cases were associated with food served in the school meal programs. Preliminary findings identified nine outbreaks in 1998, affecting an estimated 1,609 individuals. CDC notes that such outbreaks are…

  1. Genome sequence analysis of dengue virus 1 isolated in Key West, Florida.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dongyoung; Richards, Stephanie L; Alto, Barry W; Bettinardi, David J; Smartt, Chelsea T

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is transmitted to humans through the bite of mosquitoes. In November 2010, a dengue outbreak was reported in Monroe County in southern Florida (FL), including greater than 20 confirmed human cases. The virus collected from the human cases was verified as DENV serotype 1 (DENV-1) and one isolate was provided for sequence analysis. RNA was extracted from the DENV-1 isolate and was used in reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to amplify PCR fragments to sequence. Nucleic acid primers were designed to generate overlapping PCR fragments that covered the entire genome. The DENV-1 isolate found in Key West (KW), FL was sequenced for whole genome characterization. Sequence assembly, Genbank searches, and recombination analyses were performed to verify the identity of the genome sequences and to determine percent similarity to known DENV-1 sequences. We show that the KW DENV-1 strain is 99% identical to Nicaraguan and Mexican DENV-1 strains. Phylogenetic and recombination analyses suggest that the DENV-1 isolated in KW originated from Nicaragua (NI) and the KW strain may circulate in KW. Also, recombination analysis results detected recombination events in the KW strain compared to DENV-1 strains from Puerto Rico. We evaluate the relative growth of KW strain of DENV-1 compared to other dengue viruses to determine whether the underlying genetics of the strain is associated with a replicative advantage, an important consideration since local transmission of DENV may result because domestic tourism can spread DENVs. PMID:24098658

  2. Surveillance for Waterborne Disease Outbreaks Associated with Drinking Water United States, 2007-2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    Problem/Condition: Since 1971, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists have maintained a collaborative Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOS...

  3. Estimating the basic reproduction number for single-strain dengue fever epidemics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue, an infectious tropical disease, has recently emerged as one of the most important mosquito-borne viral diseases in the world. We perform a retrospective analysis of the 2011 dengue fever epidemic in Pakistan in order to assess the transmissibility of the disease. We obtain estimates of the basic reproduction number R0 from epidemic data using different methodologies applied to different epidemic models in order to evaluate the robustness of our estimate. Results We first estimate model parameters by fitting a deterministic ODE vector-host model for the transmission dynamics of single-strain dengue to the epidemic data, using both a basic ordinary least squares (OLS) as well as a generalized least squares (GLS) scheme. Moreover, we perform the same analysis for a direct-transmission ODE model, thereby allowing us to compare our results across different models. In addition, we formulate a direct-transmission stochastic model for the transmission dynamics of dengue and obtain parameter estimates for the stochastic model using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. In each of the cases we have considered, the estimate for the basic reproduction number R0 is initially greater than unity leading to an epidemic outbreak. However, control measures implemented several weeks after the initial outbreak successfully reduce R0 to less than unity, thus resulting in disease elimination. Furthermore, it is observed that there is strong agreement in our estimates for the pre-control value of R0, both across different methodologies as well across different models. However, there are also significant differences between our estimates for the post-control value of the basic reproduction number across the two different models. Conclusion In conclusion, we have obtained robust estimates for the value of the basic reproduction number R0 associated with the 2011 dengue fever epidemic before the implementation of public health control measures. Furthermore, we have shown that there is close agreement between our estimates for the post-control value of R0 across the different methodologies. Nevertheless, there are also significant differences between the estimates for the post-control value of R0 across the two different models. PMID:24708869

  4. Scombroid poisoning. Report of an outbreak.

    PubMed

    Lerke, P A; Werner, S B; Taylor, S L; Guthertz, L S

    1978-11-01

    An outbreak of scombroid poisoning occurred in San Francisco in the fall of 1977. The vehicle was sashimi prepared from spoiled tuna fish. Prompt public health measures prevented further consumption of the implicated food. Laboratory studies showed the presence in the tuna of bacterial species capable of producing large amounts of histamine, a substance strongly implicated in scombroid poisoning. Chemical analysis showed that histamine is very unevenly distributed in the flesh of spoiling tuna, therefore accounting for the sometimes random occurrence of disease among people eating the same food at the same table. PMID:569397

  5. Dengue epidemics and human mobility.

    PubMed

    Barmak, D H; Dorso, C O; Otero, M; Solari, H G

    2011-07-01

    In this work we explore the effects of human mobility on the dispersion of a vector borne disease. We combine an already presented stochastic model for dengue with a simple representation of the daily motion of humans on a schematic city of 20 × 20 blocks with 100 inhabitants in each block. The pattern of motion of the individuals is described in terms of complex networks in which links connect different blocks and the link length distribution is in accordance with recent findings on human mobility. It is shown that human mobility can turn out to be the main driving force of the disease dispersal. PMID:21867207

  6. Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay for Rapid Diagnostics of Dengue Infection

    PubMed Central

    Abd El Wahed, Ahmed; Patel, Pranav; Faye, Oumar; Thaloengsok, Sasikanya; Heidenreich, Doris; Matangkasombut, Ponpan; Manopwisedjaroen, Khajohnpong; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Sall, Amadou A.; Hufert, Frank T.; Weidmann, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Background Over 2.5 billion people are exposed to the risk of contracting dengue fever (DF). Early diagnosis of DF helps to diminish its burden on public health. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase amplification assays (RT-PCR) are the standard method for molecular detection of the dengue virus (DENV). Real-time RT-PCR analysis is not suitable for on-site screening since mobile devices are large, expensive, and complex. In this study, two RT-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA) assays were developed to detect DENV1-4. Methodology/Principal Findings Using two quantitative RNA molecular standards, the analytical sensitivity of a RT-RPA targeting the 3´non-translated region of DENV1-4 was found to range from 14 (DENV4) to 241 (DENV1-3) RNA molecules detected. The assay was specific and did not cross detect other Flaviviruses. The RT-RPA assay was tested in a mobile laboratory combining magnetic-bead based total nucleic acid extraction and a portable detection device in Kedougou (Senegal) and in Bangkok (Thailand). In Kedougou, the RT-RPA was operated at an ambient temperature of 38°C with auxiliary electricity tapped from a motor vehicle and yielded a clinical sensitivity and specificity of 98% (n=31) and 100% (n=23), respectively. While in the field trial in Bangkok, the clinical sensitivity and specificity were 72% (n=90) and 100%(n=41), respectively. Conclusions/Significance During the first 5 days of infection, the developed DENV1-4 RT-RPA assays constitute a suitable accurate and rapid assay for DENV diagnosis. Moreover, the use of a portable fluorescence-reading device broadens its application potential to the point-of-care for outbreak investigations. PMID:26075598

  7. Consequences of the Expanding Global Distribution of Aedes albopictus for Dengue Virus Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Lambrechts, Louis; Scott, Thomas W.; Gubler, Duane J.

    2010-01-01

    The dramatic global expansion of Aedes albopictus in the last three decades has increased public health concern because it is a potential vector of numerous arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses), including the most prevalent arboviral pathogen of humans, dengue virus (DENV). Ae. aegypti is considered the primary DENV vector and has repeatedly been incriminated as a driving force in dengue's worldwide emergence. What remains unresolved is the extent to which Ae. albopictus contributes to DENV transmission and whether an improved understanding of its vector status would enhance dengue surveillance and prevention. To assess the relative public health importance of Ae. albopictus for dengue, we carried out two complementary analyses. We reviewed its role in past dengue epidemics and compared its DENV vector competence with that of Ae. aegypti. Observations from “natural experiments” indicate that, despite seemingly favorable conditions, places where Ae. albopictus predominates over Ae. aegypti have never experienced a typical explosive dengue epidemic with severe cases of the disease. Results from a meta-analysis of experimental laboratory studies reveal that although Ae. albopictus is overall more susceptible to DENV midgut infection, rates of virus dissemination from the midgut to other tissues are significantly lower in Ae. albopictus than in Ae. aegypti. For both indices of vector competence, a few generations of mosquito colonization appear to result in a relative increase of Ae. albopictus susceptibility, which may have been a confounding factor in the literature. Our results lead to the conclusion that Ae. albopictus plays a relatively minor role compared to Ae. aegypti in DENV transmission, at least in part due to differences in host preferences and reduced vector competence. Recent examples of rapid arboviral adaptation to alternative mosquito vectors, however, call for cautious extrapolation of our conclusion. Vector status is a dynamic process that in the future could change in epidemiologically important ways. PMID:20520794

  8. Acceptability of impregnated school uniforms for dengue control in Thailand: a mixed methods approach

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Natasha; Jansarikij, Suphachai; Olanratmanee, Phanthip; Maskhao, Pongsri; Souares, Aurélia; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Kittayapong, Pattamaporn; Louis, Valérie R.

    2014-01-01

    Background As current dengue control strategies have been shown to be largely ineffective in reducing dengue in school-aged children, novel approaches towards dengue control need to be studied. Insecticide-impregnated school uniforms represent an innovative approach with the theoretical potential to reduce dengue infections in school children. Objectives This study took place in the context of a randomised control trial (RCT) to test the effectiveness of permethrin-impregnated school uniforms (ISUs) for dengue prevention in Chachoengsao Province, Thailand. The objective was to assess the acceptability of ISUs among parents, teachers, and principals of school children involved in the trial. Methodology Quantitative and qualitative tools were used in a mixed methods approach. Class-clustered randomised samples of school children enrolled in the RCT were selected and their parents completed 321 self-administered questionnaires. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used to analyse the quantitative data. Focus group discussions and individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with parents, teachers, and principals. Qualitative data analysis involved content analysis with coding and thematic development. Results The knowledge and experience of dengue was substantial. The acceptability of ISUs was high. Parents (87.3%; 95% CI 82.9–90.8) would allow their child to wear an ISU and 59.9% (95% CI 53.7–65.9) of parents would incur additional costs for an ISU over a normal uniform. This was significantly associated with the total monthly income of a household and the educational level of the respondent. Parents (62.5%; 95% CI 56.6–68.1) indicated they would be willing to recommend ISUs to other parents. Conclusions Acceptability of the novel tool of ISUs was high as defined by the lack of concern along with the willingness to pay and recommend. Considering issues of effectiveness and scalability, assessing acceptability of ISUs over time is recommended. PMID:25183313

  9. Disease Outbreaks Caused by Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craun, Gunther F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the disease outbreaks caused by drinking polluted water, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the waterborn outbreaks included are: (1) cholera; (2) gastroenteritis; (3) giardiasis; and (4) typhoid fever and salmonellosis. A list of 66 references is also presented. (HM)

  10. Results from the First 12 Months of the National Surveillance of Healthcare Associated Outbreaks in Germany, 2011/2012

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Sebastian; Eckmanns, Tim; Benzler, Justus; Tolksdorf, Kristin; Claus, Hermann; Gilsdorf, Andreas; Sin, Muna Abu

    2014-01-01

    Background In August 2011, the German Protection against Infection Act was amended, mandating the reporting of healthcare associated infection (HAI) outbreak notifications by all healthcare workers in Germany via local public health authorities and federal states to the Robert Koch Institute (RKI). Objective To describe the reported HAI-outbreaks and the surveillance system’s structure and capabilities. Methods Information on each outbreak was collected using standard paper forms and notified to RKI. Notifications were screened daily and regularly analysed. Results Between November 2011 and November 2012, 1,326 paper forms notified 578 HAI-outbreaks, between 7 and 116 outbreaks per month. The main causative agent was norovirus (n?=?414/578; 72%). Among the 108 outbreaks caused by bacteria, the most frequent pathogens were Clostridium difficile (25%) Klebsiella spp. (19%) and Staphylococcus spp. (19%). Multidrug-resistant bacteria were responsible for 54/108 (50%) bacterial outbreaks. Hospitals were affected most frequently (485/578; 84%). Hospital outbreaks due to bacteria were mostly reported from intensive care units (ICUs) (45%), followed by internal medicine wards (16%). Conclusion The mandatory HAI-outbreak surveillance system describes common outbreaks. Pathogens with a particular high potential to cause large or severe outbreaks may be identified, enabling us to further focus research and preventive measures. Increasing the sensitivity and reliability of the data collection further will facilitate identification of outbreaks able to increase in size and severity, and guide specific control measures to interrupt their propagation. PMID:24875674

  11. Bromeliad-inhabiting mosquitoes in an urban botanical garden of dengue endemic Rio de Janeiro. Are bromeliads productive habitats for the invasive vectors Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus?

    PubMed Central

    Mocellin, Márcio Goulart; Simões, Taynãna César; do Nascimento, Teresa Fernandes Silva; Teixeira, Maria Lucia França; Lounibos, Leon Philip; de Oliveira, Ricardo Lourenço

    2012-01-01

    Immatures of both Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus have been found in water-holding bromeliad axils in Brazil. Removal of these plants or their treatment with insecticides in public and private gardens have been undertaken during dengue outbreaks in Brazil despite uncertainty as to their importance as productive habitats for dengue vectors. From March 2005-February 2006, we sampled 120 randomly selected bromeliads belonging to 10 species in a public garden less than 200 m from houses in a dengue-endemic neighborhood in Rio de Janeiro. A total of 2,816 mosquito larvae and pupae was collected, with an average of 5.87 immatures per plant per collection. Culex (Microculex) pleuristriatus and Culex spp of the Ocellatus Group were the most abundant culicid species, found in all species of bromeliads; next in relative abundance were species of the genus Wyeomyia. Only two individuals of Ae. aegypti (0.07%) and five of Ae. albopictus (0.18%) were collected from bromeliads. By contrast, immatures of Ae. aegypti were found in manmade containers in nearly 5% of nearby houses. These results demonstrate that bromeliads are not important producers of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus and, hence, should not be a focus for dengue control. However, the results of this study of only one year in a single area may not represent outcomes in other urban localities where bromeliads, Ae. aegypti and dengue coincide in more disturbed habitats. PMID:20140379

  12. Multicountry prospective clinical evaluation of two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and two rapid diagnostic tests for diagnosing dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Pal, Subhamoy; Dauner, Allison L; Valks, Andrea; Forshey, Brett M; Long, Kanya C; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Sierra, Gloria; Picos, Victor; Talmage, Sara; Morrison, Amy C; Halsey, Eric S; Comach, Guillermo; Yasuda, Chadwick; Loeffelholz, Michael; Jarman, Richard G; Fernandez, Stefan; An, Ung Sam; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Jasper, Louis E; Wu, Shuenn-Jue L

    2015-04-01

    We evaluated four dengue diagnostic devices from Alere, including the SD Bioline Dengue Duo (nonstructural [NS] 1 Ag and IgG/IgM), the Panbio Dengue Duo Cassette (IgM/IgG) rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs), and the Panbio dengue IgM and IgG capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in a prospective, controlled, multicenter study in Peru, Venezuela, Cambodia, and the United States, using samples from 1,021 febrile individuals. Archived, well-characterized samples from an additional 135 febrile individuals from Thailand were also used. Reference testing was performed on all samples using an algorithm involving virus isolation, in-house IgM and IgG capture ELISAs, and plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNT) to determine the infection status of the individual. The primary endpoints were the clinical sensitivities and specificities of these devices. The SD Bioline Dengue Duo had an overall sensitivity of 87.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 84.1 to 90.2%) and specificity of 86.8% (95% CI, 83.9 to 89.3%) during the first 14 days post-symptom onset (p.s.o.). The Panbio Dengue Duo Cassette demonstrated a sensitivity of 92.1% (87.8 to 95.2%) and specificity of 62.2% (54.5 to 69.5%) during days 4 to 14 p.s.o. The Panbio IgM capture ELISA had a sensitivity of 87.6% (82.7 to 91.4%) and specificity of 88.1% (82.2 to 92.6%) during days 4 to 14 p.s.o. Finally, the Panbio IgG capture ELISA had a sensitivity of 69.6% (62.1 to 76.4%) and a specificity of 88.4% (82.6 to 92.8%) during days 4 to 14 p.s.o. for identification of secondary dengue infections. This multicountry prospective study resulted in reliable real-world performance data that will facilitate data-driven laboratory test choices for managing patient care during dengue outbreaks. PMID:25588659

  13. Dengue and its effects on liver

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Jayanta; Sharma, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Dengue has emerged as an important arboviral disease with significant impact on the disease burden in population residing in tropical countries. Dengue is spread by the bite of Aedes mosquito. The virus seems to have some hepatotoxic effects. Affliction of liver in form of derangements in the liver function tests is common and may include mild elevations in serum bilirubin, elevated transaminases and derangements in serum albumin. Although asymptomatic in most cases, clinical manifestations like jaundice, and acute liver failure (ALF) may occasionally complicate the clinical picture. Indeed, dengue has been implicated as an important cause of ALF in endemic countries. The present review focuses on the hepatic manifestations and the pathogenesis of the liver injury in dengue. PMID:25685758

  14. Surveillance for outbreaks of gastroenteritis in elderly long-term care facilities in France, November 2010 to May 2012.

    PubMed

    Barret, A S; Jourdan-da Silva, N; Ambert-Balay, K; Delmas, G; Bone, A; Thiolet, J M; Vaillant, V

    2014-01-01

    This article describes outbreaks of gastroenteritis in elderly long-term care facilities (LTCF) in France from November 2010 to May 2012 reported through the surveillance system for gastroenteritis outbreaks in LTCF. A total of 1,072 outbreaks were reported, causing 26,551 episodes of illness and 60 deaths. The median attack rate (AR) among residents was 32%. Norovirus and person-to-person transmission were the most frequently reported aetiology and mode of transmission. Control measures were implemented in 1,054 (98%) outbreaks and for 928 outbreaks, the timing of such measures could be inferred. Of these, 799 (86%) had put control measures into effect within three days of the occurrence of the first case. Outbreaks of gastroenteritis in LTCF cause substantial morbidity and mortality among elderly people in France. LTCF are encouraged to develop infection prevention and control plans and to notify any gastroenteritis outbreak to health authorities to ensure rapid control. PMID:25080141

  15. Seropositivity of Dengue Antibodies during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed Ismail, Nor Azlin; Wan Abd Rahim, Wan Elly Rushima; Salleh, Sharifah Azura; Neoh, Hui-Min; Jamal, Rahman; Jamil, Muhammad Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Malaysia a dengue endemic country with dengue infections in pregnancy on the rise. The present study was aimed at determining dengue seroprevalence (IgG or IgM) during pregnancy and its neonatal transmission in dengue seropositive women. Methods. Maternal with paired cord blood samples were tested for dengue antibodies (IgG and IgM) using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Maternal age, parity, occupation, ethnic group, and gestational age were recorded. Data on neonatal Apgar score and admissions to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) were analyzed. Results. Out of 358 women recruited, about 128 (35.8%) patients were seropositive. Twelve patients (3.4%) had recent infections (IgM positive) and another 116 women (32.4%) were with past infections (IgG positive). All babies born to seropositive mothers had positive IgG paired cord blood; however, no IgM seropositivity was observed. All neonates had good Apgar scores and did not require NICU admission. Conclusion. In this study, 35.8% pregnant women were found to be dengue seropositive. However, transplacental transfer of IgG antibodies had no detrimental effect on the neonatal outcomes. PMID:25587564

  16. Metagenomic detection methods in biopreparedness outbreak scenarios.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar Erik; Hansen, Trine; Knutsson, Rickard; Löfström, Charlotta; Granberg, Fredrik; Berg, Mikael

    2013-09-01

    In the field of diagnostic microbiology, rapid molecular methods are critically important for detecting pathogens. With rapid and accurate detection, preventive measures can be put in place early, thereby preventing loss of life and further spread of a disease. From a preparedness perspective, early detection and response are important in order to minimize the consequences. During the past 2 decades, advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology have changed the playing field of molecular methods. Today, it is within reach to completely sequence the total microbiological content of a clinical sample, creating a metagenome, in a single week of laboratory work. As new technologies emerge, their dissemination and capacity building must be facilitated, and criteria for use, as well as guidelines on how to report results, must be established. This article focuses on the use of metagenomics, from sample collection to data analysis and to some extent NGS, for the detection of pathogens, the integration of the technique in outbreak response systems, and the risk-based evaluation of sample processing in routine diagnostics labs. The article covers recent advances in the field, current debate, gaps in research, and future directions. Examples of metagenomic detection, as well as possible applications of the methods, are described in various biopreparedness outbreak scenarios. PMID:23971800

  17. A review of outbreaks of waterborne disease associated with ships: evidence for risk management.

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Roisin M.; Bartram, Jamie K.; Cramer, Elaine H.; Mantha, Stacey; Nichols, Gordon; Suraj, Rohini; Todd, Ewen C. D.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The organization of water supply to and on ships differs considerably from that of water supply on land. Risks of contamination can arise from source water at the port or during loading, storage, or distribution on the ship. The purpose of this article is to review documented outbreaks of waterborne diseases associated with passenger, cargo, fishing, and naval ships to identify contributing factors so that similar outbreaks can be prevented in the future. METHODS: The authors reviewed 21 reported outbreaks of waterborne diseases associated with ships. For each outbreak, data on pathogens/toxins, type of ship, factors contributing to outbreaks, mortality and morbidity, and remedial action are presented. RESULTS: The findings of this review show that the majority of reported outbreaks were associated with passenger ships and that more than 6,400 people were affected. Waterborne outbreaks due to Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, noroviruses, Salmonella spp, Shigella sp, Cryptosporidium sp, and Giardia lamblia occurred on ships. Enterotoxigenic E. coli was the pathogen most frequently associated with outbreaks. One outbreak of chemical water poisoning also occurred on a ship. Risk factors included contaminated port water, inadequate treatment, improper loading techniques, poor design and maintenance of storage tanks, ingress of contamination during repair and maintenance, cross-connections, back siphonage, and insufficient residual disinfectant. CONCLUSIONS: Waterborne disease outbreaks on ships can be prevented. The factors contributing to outbreaks emphasize the need for hygienic handling of water along the supply chain from source to consumption. A comprehensive approach to water safety on ships is essential. This may be achieved by the adoption of Water Safety Plans that cover design, construction, operation, and routine inspection and maintenance. PMID:15219801

  18. Evasion of the human innate immune system by dengue virus

    PubMed Central

    Pagni, Sarah; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus is a worldwide health problem, with billions of people at risk annually. Dengue virus causes a spectrum of diseases, namely dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome with the latter two being linked to death. Understanding how dengue is able to evade the immune system and cause enhanced severity of disease is the main topics of interest in the Fernandez-Sesma laboratory at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Using primary human immune cells, our group investigates the contribution of dengue virus-specific proteins to the evasion of innate immunity by this virus and the host factors that the virus interacts with in order to evade immune recognition and to establish infection in humans. Here, we review recent findings from our group as well as published data from other groups regarding immune modulation by dengue virus. PMID:22569913

  19. Frequency and Clinical Manifestations of Dengue in Urban Medellin, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Berta Nelly; Beatty, Mark E.; Goez, Yenny; Ramirez, Ruth E.; Letson, G. William; Diaz, Francisco J.; Piedrahita, Leidy Diana; Osorio, Jorge E.

    2014-01-01

    A dengue fever surveillance study was conducted at three medical facilities located in the low-income district of San Javier in Medellin, Colombia. During March 2008 to 2009, 781 patients with fever regardless of chief complaint were recruited for acute dengue virus infection testing. Of the 781 tested, 73 (9.3%) were positive for dengue infection. Serotypes DENV-2 (77%) and -3 (23%) were detected by PCR. One patient met the diagnostic criteria for dengue hemorrhagic fever. Only 3 out of 73 (4.1%) febrile subjects testing positive for dengue infection were diagnosed with dengue fever by the treating physician. This study confirms dengue virus as an important cause of acute febrile illness in Medellin, Colombia, but it is difficult to diagnose without dengue diagnostic testing. PMID:24987421

  20. Country- and age-specific optimal allocation of dengue vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Mbah, Martial L. Ndeffo; Durham, David P.; Medlock, Jan; Galvani, Alison P.

    2013-01-01

    Several dengue vaccines are under development, and some are expected to become available imminently. Concomitant with the anticipated release of these vaccines, vaccine allocation strategies for dengue endemic countries in Southeast Asia and Latin America are currently under development. We developed a model of dengue transmission that incorporates the age-specific distributions of dengue burden corresponding to those in Thailand and Brazil, respectively, to determine vaccine allocations that minimize the incidence of dengue hemorrhagic fever, taking into account limited availability of vaccine doses in the initial phase of production. We showed that optimal vaccine allocation strategies vary significantly with the demographic burden of dengue hemorrhagic fever. Consequently, the strategy that is optimal for one country may be sub-optimal for another country. More specifically, we showed that, during the first years following introduction of a dengue vaccine, it is optimal to target children for dengue mass vaccination in Thailand, whereas young adults should be targeted in Brazil. PMID:24161462

  1. Transmission spectroscopy of dengue viral infection Transmission spectroscopy of dengue viral infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdous, S.; Ahmed, M.; Rehman, A.; Nawaz, M.; Anwar, S.; Murtaza, S.

    2012-04-01

    We presented the rapid diagnostic test for dengue infection based on light spectrum of human blood. The transmission spectra of dengue infected whole blood samples have been recorded in ultra violet to near infrared range (400 – 800 nm) of about 30 conformed infected patients and compared to normal blood samples. Transmission spectra of dengue infected blood illustrate a strong band from 400 – 600 nm with prominant peaks at 540 and 580 nm, where is in case of normal blood below 600 nm, total absorption has been observed. These prominent peaks from 400 – 600 nm are characteristics of cells damage and dangue virus antibodies immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) produced against dengue antigen. The presented diagnostic method is non invasive, cost effective, easy and fast screening technique for dengue infected patients.

  2. Outbreaks of Illness Associated with Recreational Water - United States, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Hlavsa, Michele C; Roberts, Virginia A; Kahler, Amy M; Hilborn, Elizabeth D; Mecher, Taryn R; Beach, Michael J; Wade, Timothy J; Yoder, Jonathan S

    2015-06-26

    Outbreaks of illness associated with recreational water use result from exposure to chemicals or infectious pathogens in recreational water venues that are treated (e.g., pools and hot tubs or spas) or untreated (e.g., lakes and oceans). For 2011-2012, the most recent years for which finalized data were available, public health officials from 32 states and Puerto Rico reported 90 recreational water-associated outbreaks to CDC's Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOSS) via the National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS). The 90 outbreaks resulted in at least 1,788 cases, 95 hospitalizations, and one death. Among 69 (77%) outbreaks associated with treated recreational water, 36 (52%) were caused by Cryptosporidium. Among 21 (23%) outbreaks associated with untreated recreational water, seven (33%) were caused by Escherichia coli (E. coli O157:H7 or E. coli O111). Guidance, such as the Model Aquatic Health Code (MAHC), for preventing and controlling recreational water-associated outbreaks can be optimized when informed by national outbreak and laboratory (e.g., molecular typing of Cryptosporidium) data. PMID:26110837

  3. Prophylactic Platelets in Dengue: Survey Responses Highlight Lack of an Evidence Base

    PubMed Central

    Whitehorn, James; Roche, Rosmari Rodriguez; Guzman, Maria G.; Martinez, Eric; Villamil Gomez, Wilmar; Nainggolan, Leonard; Laksono, Ida Safitri; Mishra, Ajay; Lum, Lucy; Faiz, Abul; Sall, Amadou; Dawurung, Joshua; Borges, Alvaro; Leo, Yee-Sin; Blumberg, Lucille; Bausch, Daniel G.; Kroeger, Axel; Horstick, Olaf; Thwaites, Guy; Wertheim, Heiman; Larsson, Mattias; Hien, Tran Tinh; Peeling, Rosanna; Wills, Bridget; Simmons, Cameron; Farrar, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is the most important arboviral infection of humans. Thrombocytopenia is frequently observed in the course of infection and haemorrhage may occur in severe disease. The degree of thrombocytopenia correlates with the severity of infection, and may contribute to the risk of haemorrhage. As a result of this prophylactic platelet transfusions are sometimes advocated for the prevention of haemorrhage. There is currently no evidence to support this practice, and platelet transfusions are costly and sometimes harmful. We conducted a global survey to assess the different approaches to the use of platelets in dengue. Respondents were all physicians involved with the treatment of patients with dengue. Respondents were asked that their answers reflected what they would do if they were the treating physician. We received responses from 306 physicians from 20 different countries. The heterogeneity of the responses highlights the variation in clinical practice and lack of an evidence base in this area and underscores the importance of prospective clinical trials to address this key question in the clinical management of patients with dengue. PMID:22745847

  4. Prophylactic platelets in dengue: survey responses highlight lack of an evidence base.

    PubMed

    Whitehorn, James; Rodriguez Roche, Rosmari; Guzman, Maria G; Martinez, Eric; Gomez, Wilmar Villamil; Nainggolan, Leonard; Laksono, Ida Safitri; Mishra, Ajay; Lum, Lucy; Faiz, Abul; Sall, Amadou; Dawurung, Joshua; Borges, Alvaro; Leo, Yee-Sin; Blumberg, Lucille; Bausch, Daniel G; Kroeger, Axel; Horstick, Olaf; Thwaites, Guy; Wertheim, Heiman; Larsson, Mattias; Hien, Tran Tinh; Peeling, Rosanna; Wills, Bridget; Simmons, Cameron; Farrar, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is the most important arboviral infection of humans. Thrombocytopenia is frequently observed in the course of infection and haemorrhage may occur in severe disease. The degree of thrombocytopenia correlates with the severity of infection, and may contribute to the risk of haemorrhage. As a result of this prophylactic platelet transfusions are sometimes advocated for the prevention of haemorrhage. There is currently no evidence to support this practice, and platelet transfusions are costly and sometimes harmful. We conducted a global survey to assess the different approaches to the use of platelets in dengue. Respondents were all physicians involved with the treatment of patients with dengue. Respondents were asked that their answers reflected what they would do if they were the treating physician. We received responses from 306 physicians from 20 different countries. The heterogeneity of the responses highlights the variation in clinical practice and lack of an evidence base in this area and underscores the importance of prospective clinical trials to address this key question in the clinical management of patients with dengue. PMID:22745847

  5. Molecular epidemiology and phylogenetic analysis of Dengue virus type-1 and 2 isolated in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Muhd Hasyim; Rahman, Md. Mostafizur; Hussin, Salasawati

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Detection of different serotypes of dengue virus and provide information on origin, distribution and genotype of the virus. Methods: Dengue virus serotypes identified as DEN-1 and DEN-2 were amplified and sequenced with E gene. The consensus sequences were aligned with references E gene sequences of globally available GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using Neighbor-joining and Kimura 2-parameter model to construct phylogenetic tree. Results: A total of 53 dengue virus isolates were positive, of which 38 (71.7%) were DENV-1 and 15 (28.3%) were DENV-2. Phylogenetic tree of DENV-1 and DENV-2 showed that the isolates were clustered in genotype I and cosmopolitan genotype, respectively considered the predominant genotypes in Southeast Asian countries. The molecular epidemiology genotype I DENV-1 and cosmopolitan genotype DENV-2 have been co-circulating in Klang Valley areas, Malaysia without shifting of genotype. Conclusion: The study reveals that DENV-1 and DENV-2 have been circulating in Malaysia. The isolates are clustered in genotype 1 and cosmopolitian genotype, respectively. The study results would help in planning for prevention and control of dengue virus in Malaysia.

  6. Disease mapping based on stochastic SIR-SI model for Dengue and Chikungunya in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samat, N. A.; Ma'arof, S. H. Mohd Imam

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes and demonstrates a method for relative risk estimation which is based on the stochastic SIR-SI vector-borne infectious disease transmission model specifically for Dengue and Chikungunya diseases in Malaysia. Firstly, the common compartmental model for vector-borne infectious disease transmission called the SIR-SI model (susceptible-infective-recovered for human populations; susceptible-infective for vector populations) is presented. This is followed by the explanations on the stochastic SIR-SI model which involve the Bayesian description. This stochastic model then is used in the relative risk formulation in order to obtain the posterior relative risk estimation. Then, this relative estimation model is demonstrated using Dengue and Chikungunya data of Malaysia. The viruses of these diseases are transmitted by the same type of female vector mosquito named Aedes Aegypti and Aedes Albopictus. Finally, the findings of the analysis of relative risk estimation for both Dengue and Chikungunya diseases are presented, compared and displayed in graphs and maps. The distribution from risk maps show the high and low risk area of Dengue and Chikungunya diseases occurrence. This map can be used as a tool for the prevention and control strategies for both diseases.

  7. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Dengue Risk with Temperature Change

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jingchun; Wei, Wanxia; Bai, Zhenggang; Fan, Chunling; Li, Shulan; Liu, Qiyong; Yang, Kehu

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is the most serious mosquito-borne viral disease in the world and is significantly affected by temperature. Although associations between DF and temperatures have been reported repeatedly, conclusions have been inconsistent. Six databases were searched up to 23 March 2014, without language and geographical restrictions. The articles that studied the correlations between temperatures and dengue were selected, and a random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals. Of 1589 identified articles, 137 were reviewed further, with 33 satisfying inclusion criteria. The closest associations were observed between mean temperature from the included studies (23.2–27.7 °C) and DF (OR 35.0% per 1 °C; 95% CI 18.3%–51.6%) positively. Additionally, minimum (18.1–24.2 °C) (29.5% per 1 °C; 20.9%–38.1%) and maximum temperature (28.0–34.5 °C) (28.9%; 10.3%–47.5%) were also associated with increased dengue transmission. The OR of DF incidence increased steeply from 22 °C to 29 °C, suggesting an inflexion of DF risk between these lower and upper limits of DF risk. This discovery is helpful for government decision-makers focused on preventing and controlling dengue in areas with temperatures within this range. PMID:25546270

  8. A model for the spatial transmission of dengue with daily movement between villages and a city.

    PubMed

    Nevai, Andrew L; Soewono, Edy

    2014-06-01

    Dengue is a re-emergent vector-borne disease affecting large portions of the world's population living in the tropics and subtropics. The virus is transmitted through the bites of female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, and it is widely believed that these bites occur primarily in the daytime. The transmission of dengue is a complicated process, and one of the main sources of this complexity is due to the movement of people, e.g. between home and their places of work. Hence, the mechanics of disease progression may also differ between day and night. A discrete-time multi-patch dengue transmission model which takes into account the mobility of people as well as processes of infection, recovery, recruitment, mortality, and outbound and return movements is considered here. One patch (the city) is connected to all other patches (the villages) in a spoke-like network. We obtain here the basic reproductive ratio (?0) of the transmission model which represents a threshold for an epidemic to occur. Dynamical analysis for vector control, human treatment and vaccination, and different kinds of mobility are performed. It is shown that changes in human movement patterns can, in some situations, affect the ability of the disease to persist in a predictable manner. We conclude with biological implications for the prevention and control of dengue virus transmission. PMID:23475426

  9. Determinants of Outbreak Detection Performance

    PubMed Central

    Jafarpour, Nastaran; Precup, Doina; Buckeridge, David

    2013-01-01

    Objective To predict the performance of outbreak detection algorithms under different circumstances which will guide the method selection and algorithm configuration in surveillance systems, to characterize the dependence of the performance of detection algorithms on the type and severity of outbreak, to develop quantitative evidence about determinants of detection performance. Introduction The choice of outbreak detection algorithm and its configuration can result in important variations in the performance of public health surveillance systems. Our work aims to characterize the performance of detectors based on outbreak types. We are using Bayesian networks (BN) to model the relationships between determinants of outbreak detection and the detection performance based on a significant study on simulated data. Methods The simulated surveillance data that we used was generated by Surveillance Lab of McGill University using Simulation Analysis Platform [1] considering surveillance in an urban area to detect waterborne outbreaks due to the failure of a water treatment plant. We focus on predicting the performance of the C-family of algorithms, because they are widely used, state-of-art outbreak detection algorithms [2]. We investigate the influence of algorithm characteristics and outbreak characteristics in determining outbreak detection performance. The C1, C2, and C3 are distinguished by the configuration of 2 parameters,the guardband and memory. Generally, gradually increasing outbreaks can bias the test statistic upward, so the detection algorithm will fail to flag the outbreak. To avoid this situation, the C2 and C3 use a 2-day gap, guardband, between the baseline interval and the test interval. The C3 includes 2 recent observations, called memory, in the computation of the test statistic. The W2 algorithm is a modified version of the C2 which takes weekly patterns of surveillance time series into account [3]. In the W2, the baseline data is stratified to 2 distinct baselines: one for weekdays, the other for weekends. The W3 includes 2 recent observations of each baseline while calculating the test statistic in the corresponding baseline. We ran the C1, C2, C3, W2, and W3 on 18k simulated time series and measured the sensitivity and specificity of detection. Then we created the training data set of 5400000 instances. Each instance was the result of performance evaluation of an outbreak detection algorithm with a specific setting of parameters. In order to investigate the determinants of detection performance and reveal their effects quantitatively, we used BN to predict the performance based on algorithm characteristics and outbreak characteristics. Results We developed 2 BN models in the Weka machine learning software [4] using 5-fold cross-validation. The first BN determines the effect of the guardband, memory, alerting threshold, and the weekly pattern indicator (0 for C-algorithms, 1 for W-algorithms) and outbreak characteristics (contamination level and duration) on the sensitivity of detection. The value of sensitivity was mapped to 4 classes: (0, 0.3], (0.3, 0.6], (0.6, 0.9], (0.9, 1]. The developed BN correctly classified 67.74% of instances. The misclassification error was 0.9407. The second BN for predicting the specificity of detection correctly classified 95.895% of instances in 10 classes and the misclassification error was 0.2975. Conclusions The contamination level and duration of outbreaks, alerting threshold, memory, guardband, and whether the weekly pattern was considered or not influence the sensitivity and specificity of outbreak detection and given the C-algorithm parameter settings, we can predict outbreak detection performance quantitatively. In future work, we plan to investigate other predictors of performance and study how these predictions can be used in algorithm and policy choices.

  10. Unusual Dengue Virus 3 Epidemic in Nicaragua, 2009

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gamaliel Gutierrez; Katherine Standish; Federico Narvaez; Maria Angeles Perez; Saira Saborio; Douglas Elizondo; Oscar Ortega; Andrea Nuñez; Guillermina Kuan; Angel Balmaseda; Eva Harris

    2011-01-01

    The four dengue virus serotypes (DENV1–4) cause the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral disease affecting humans worldwide. In 2009, Nicaragua experienced the largest dengue epidemic in over a decade, marked by unusual clinical presentation, as observed in two prospective studies of pediatric dengue in Managua. From August 2009–January 2010, 212 dengue cases were confirmed among 396 study participants at the National

  11. Estimating costs associated with a community outbreak of meningococcal disease in a colombian Caribbean city.

    PubMed

    Pinzón-Redondo, Hernando; Coronell-Rodriguez, Wilfrido; Díaz-Martinez, Inés; Guzmán-Corena, Angel; Constenla, Dagna; Alvis-Guzmán, Nelson

    2014-09-01

    Meningococcal disease is a serious and potentially life-threatening infection that is caused by the bacterium Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis), and it can cause meningitis, meningococcaemia outbreaks and epidemics. The disease is fatal in 9-12% of cases and with a death rate of up to 40% among patients with meningococcaemia. The objective of this study was to estimate the costs of a meningococcal outbreak that occurred in a Caribbean city of Colombia. We contacted experts involved in the outbreak and asked them specific questions about the diagnosis and treatment for meningococcal cases during the outbreak. Estimates of costs of the outbreak were also based on extensive review of medical records available during the outbreak. The costs associated with the outbreak were divided into the cost of the disease response phase and the cost of the disease surveillance phase. The costs associated with the outbreak control and surveillance were expressed in US$ (2011) as cost per 1,000 inhabitants. The average age of patients was 4.6 years (SD 3.5); 50% of the cases died; 50% of the cases were reported to have meningitis (3/6); 33% were diagnosed with meningococcaemia and myocarditis (2/6); 50% of the cases had bacteraemia (3/6); 66% of the cases had a culture specimen positive for Neisseria meningitidis; 5 of the 6 cases had RT-PCR positive for N. meningitidis. All N. meningitidis were serogroup B; 50 doses of ceftriaxone were administered as prophylaxis. Vaccine was not available at the time. The costs associated with control of the outbreak were estimated at US$ 0.8 per 1,000 inhabitants, disease surveillance at US$ 4.1 per 1,000 inhabitants, and healthcare costs at US$ 5.1 per 1,000 inhabitants. The costs associated with meningococcal outbreaks are substantial, and the outbreaks should be prevented. The mass chemoprophylaxis implemented helped control the outbreak. PMID:25395916

  12. Estimating Costs Associated with a Community Outbreak of Meningococcal Disease in a Colombian Caribbean City

    PubMed Central

    Pinzón-Redondo, Hernando; Coronell-Rodriguez, Wilfrido; Díaz-Martinez, Inés; Guzmán-Corena, Ángel; Constenla, Dagna

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Meningococcal disease is a serious and potentially life-threatening infection that is caused by the bacterium Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis), and it can cause meningitis, meningococcaemia outbreaks and epidemics. The disease is fatal in 9-12% of cases and with a death rate of up to 40% among patients with meningococcaemia. The objective of this study was to estimate the costs of a meningococcal outbreak that occurred in a Caribbean city of Colombia. We contacted experts involved in the outbreak and asked them specific questions about the diagnosis and treatment for meningococcal cases during the outbreak. Estimates of costs of the outbreak were also based on extensive review of medical records available during the outbreak. The costs associated with the outbreak were divided into the cost of the disease response phase and the cost of the disease surveillance phase. The costs associated with the outbreak control and surveillance were expressed in US$ (2011) as cost per 1,000 inhabitants. The average age of patients was 4.6 years (SD 3.5); 50% of the cases died; 50% of the cases were reported to have meningitis (3/6); 33% were diagnosed with meningococcaemia and myocarditis (2/6); 50% of the cases had bacteraemia (3/6); 66% of the cases had a culture specimen positive for Neisseria meningitidis; 5 of the 6 cases had RT-PCR positive for N. meningitidis. All N. meningitidis were serogroup B; 50 doses of ceftriaxone were administered as prophylaxis. Vaccine was not available at the time. The costs associated with control of the outbreak were estimated at US$ 0.8 per 1,000 inhabitants, disease surveillance at US$ 4.1 per 1,000 inhabitants, and healthcare costs at US$ 5.1 per 1,000 inhabitants. The costs associated with meningococcal outbreaks are substantial, and the outbreaks should be prevented. The mass chemoprophylaxis implemented helped control the outbreak. PMID:25395916

  13. Stochastic dynamics of dengue epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, David R.; Tomé, Tânia; Pinho, Suani T. R.; Barreto, Florisneide R.; de Oliveira, Mário J.

    2013-01-01

    We use a stochastic Markovian dynamics approach to describe the spreading of vector-transmitted diseases, such as dengue, and the threshold of the disease. The coexistence space is composed of two structures representing the human and mosquito populations. The human population follows a susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) type dynamics and the mosquito population follows a susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) type dynamics. The human infection is caused by infected mosquitoes and vice versa, so that the SIS and SIR dynamics are interconnected. We develop a truncation scheme to solve the evolution equations from which we get the threshold of the disease and the reproductive ratio. The threshold of the disease is also obtained by performing numerical simulations. We found that for certain values of the infection rates the spreading of the disease is impossible, for any death rate of infected mosquitoes.

  14. Predicting Local Dengue Transmission in Guangzhou, China, through the Influence of Imported Cases, Mosquito Density and Climate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Shaowei; Yin, Wenwu; Bi, Peng; Zhang, Honglong; Wang, Chenggang; Liu, Xiaobo; Chen, Bin; Yang, Weizhong; Liu, Qiyong

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Each year there are approximately 390 million dengue infections worldwide. Weather variables have a significant impact on the transmission of Dengue Fever (DF), a mosquito borne viral disease. DF in mainland China is characterized as an imported disease. Hence it is necessary to explore the roles of imported cases, mosquito density and climate variability in dengue transmission in China. The study was to identify the relationship between dengue occurrence and possible risk factors and to develop a predicting model for dengue’s control and prevention purpose. Methodology and Principal Findings Three traditional suburbs and one district with an international airport in Guangzhou city were selected as the study areas. Autocorrelation and cross-correlation analysis were used to perform univariate analysis to identify possible risk factors, with relevant lagged effects, associated with local dengue cases. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to extract principal components and PCA score was used to represent the original variables to reduce multi-collinearity. Combining the univariate analysis and prior knowledge, time-series Poisson regression analysis was conducted to quantify the relationship between weather variables, Breteau Index, imported DF cases and the local dengue transmission in Guangzhou, China. The goodness-of-fit of the constructed model was determined by pseudo-R2, Akaike information criterion (AIC) and residual test. There were a total of 707 notified local DF cases from March 2006 to December 2012, with a seasonal distribution from August to November. There were a total of 65 notified imported DF cases from 20 countries, with forty-six cases (70.8%) imported from Southeast Asia. The model showed that local DF cases were positively associated with mosquito density, imported cases, temperature, precipitation, vapour pressure and minimum relative humidity, whilst being negatively associated with air pressure, with different time lags. Conclusions Imported DF cases and mosquito density play a critical role in local DF transmission, together with weather variables. The establishment of an early warning system, using existing surveillance datasets will help to control and prevent dengue in Guangzhou, China. PMID:25019967

  15. Development of ASSURE® Dengue IgA Rapid Test for the Detection of Anti-dengue IgA from Dengue Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yun Ying; Sekaran, Shamala D; Wang, Seok Mui; Ahmed, Firoz; Hossain, Anowar; Sil, Bijon Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Background: Rapid and early dengue diagnosis is essential for patient management and early disease intervention. MP Diagnostics ASSURE® Dengue IgA Rapid Test (Dengue IgA RT) was developed for the rapid detection of anti-dengue IgA in patients’ biological samples. The performance of Dengue IgA RT was examined using multiple categories of well-characterized samples. Materials and Methods: Dengue IgA RT was designed and developed. Following characterization of samples by reference ELISAs, the performance of the kit was evaluated. Results: The overall sensitivity and specificity of Dengue IgA RT were 86.70% (n=233) and 86.05% (n=681) respectively; in which Dengue IgA RT detected 77.42% primary and 92.86% secondary cases; compared to 70.97% and 72.14% by IgM-Cap ELISA and 89.25% and 20% by Non-Structural Protein 1 (NS1) Ag ELISA respectively. Using 125 paired samples, Dengue IgA RT showed 84.80% sensitivity at acute phase and 99.20% sensitivity at convalescent phase; with 92% specificity at both phases. Dengue IgA RT also demonstrated a consistent performance (sensitivity: 85.53%, specificity: 80%) with 76 whole blood samples. In detecting all four serotypes of DENV (n=162), the performance of Dengue IgA RT was comparable with in-house IgM-Cap ELISA. Kinetics of anti-dengue IgA production was elucidated with 42.86% detection level as early as one-two days after fever onset, which increased to 83.33% between five and seven days after fever onset. Conclusion: Dengue IgA RT demonstrated a good performance and is applicable as one of the dengue early diagnostic tools at all levels of health care system. PMID:21887054

  16. Understanding Dengue Virus Capsid Protein Interaction with Key Biological Targets

    PubMed Central

    Faustino, André F.; Martins, Ivo C.; Carvalho, Filomena A.; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Santos, Nuno C.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes over 500,000 hospitalizations and 20,000 deaths worldwide every year. Dengue epidemics now reach temperate regions due to globalization of trade and travel and climate changes. Currently, there are no successful therapeutic or preventive approaches. We previously developed a peptide drug lead, pep14-23, that inhibits the biologically relevant interaction of DENV capsid (C) protein with lipid droplets (LDs). Surprisingly, pep14-23 also inhibits DENV C interaction with very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). We thus investigated the similarity between the proposed DENV C molecular targets in LDs and VLDL, respectively, the proteins perilipin 3 (PLIN3) and apolipoprotein E (APOE). APOE N-terminal and PLIN3 C-terminal regions are remarkably similar, namely APOE ?-helix 4 (APOE?4) and PLIN3 ?-helix 5 (PLIN3?5) sequences, which are also highly superimposable structurally. Interestingly, APOE ?-helical N-terminal sequence and structure superimposes with DENV C ?-helices ?1 and ?2. Moreover, the DENV C hydrophobic cleft can accommodate the structurally analogous APOE?4 and PLIN3?5 helical regions. Mirroring DENV C-LDs interaction (previously shown experimentally to require PLIN3), we experimentally demonstrated that DENV C-VLDL interaction requires APOE. Thus, the results fit well with previous data and suggest future drug development strategies targeting the above mentioned ?-helical structures. PMID:26161501

  17. Understanding Dengue Virus Capsid Protein Interaction with Key Biological Targets.

    PubMed

    Faustino, André F; Martins, Ivo C; Carvalho, Filomena A; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Santos, Nuno C

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes over 500,000 hospitalizations and 20,000 deaths worldwide every year. Dengue epidemics now reach temperate regions due to globalization of trade and travel and climate changes. Currently, there are no successful therapeutic or preventive approaches. We previously developed a peptide drug lead, pep14-23, that inhibits the biologically relevant interaction of DENV capsid (C) protein with lipid droplets (LDs). Surprisingly, pep14-23 also inhibits DENV C interaction with very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). We thus investigated the similarity between the proposed DENV C molecular targets in LDs and VLDL, respectively, the proteins perilipin 3 (PLIN3) and apolipoprotein E (APOE). APOE N-terminal and PLIN3 C-terminal regions are remarkably similar, namely APOE ?-helix 4 (APOE?4) and PLIN3 ?-helix 5 (PLIN3?5) sequences, which are also highly superimposable structurally. Interestingly, APOE ?-helical N-terminal sequence and structure superimposes with DENV C ?-helices ?1 and ?2. Moreover, the DENV C hydrophobic cleft can accommodate the structurally analogous APOE?4 and PLIN3?5 helical regions. Mirroring DENV C-LDs interaction (previously shown experimentally to require PLIN3), we experimentally demonstrated that DENV C-VLDL interaction requires APOE. Thus, the results fit well with previous data and suggest future drug development strategies targeting the above mentioned ?-helical structures. PMID:26161501

  18. Describing dengue epidemics: Insights from simple mechanistic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Maíra; Stollenwerk, Nico; Kooi, Bob W.

    2012-09-01

    We present a set of nested models to be applied to dengue fever epidemiology. We perform a qualitative study in order to show how much complexity we really need to add into epidemiological models to be able to describe the fluctuations observed in empirical dengue hemorrhagic fever incidence data offering a promising perspective on inference of parameter values from dengue case notifications.

  19. RESEARCH Open Access Detection of dengue group viruses by

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    virus or yellow fever virus. The same protocol was used on salivary glands of Ae. albopictus fed and Patrick Mavingui1* Abstract Background: Dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) represent://www.parasitesandvectors.com/content/5/1/243 #12;Background Dengue fever (DF) is the most common arthropod-borne human viral disease

  20. Mumps outbreak - New York, New Jersey, Quebec, 2009.

    PubMed

    2009-11-20

    Mumps is a vaccine-preventable viral infection characterized by fever and inflammation of the salivary glands and whose complications include orchitis, deafness, and meningo-encephalitis. In August 2009, CDC was notified of the onset of an outbreak of mumps in a summer camp in Sullivan County, New York. The outbreak has spread and gradually increased in size and is now the largest U.S. mumps outbreak since 2006, when the United States experienced a resurgence of mumps with 6,584 reported cases. On August 18, public health departments in Sullivan County, New York state, and CDC began an investigation into the mumps outbreak, later joined by departments in New York City and other locales. As of October 30, a total of 179 confirmed or probable cases had been identified from multiple locations in New York and New Jersey, and an additional 15 cases had been reported from Canada. The outbreak primarily has affected members of a tradition-observant religious community; median age of the patients is 14 years, and 83% are male. Three persons have been hospitalized. Although little transmission has occurred outside the Jewish community, mumps can spread rapidly in congregate settings such as colleges and schools; therefore, public health officials and clinicians should heighten surveillance for mumps and ensure that children and adults are appropriately vaccinated. PMID:19940833

  1. Host and viral features of human dengue cases shape the population of infected and infectious Aedes aegypti mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nguyet Minh; Thi Hue Kien, Duong; Tuan, Trung Vu; Quyen, Nguyen Than Ha; Tran, Chau N. B.; Vo Thi, Long; Thi, Dui Le; Nguyen, Hoa Lan; Farrar, Jeremy J.; Holmes, Edward C.; Rabaa, Maia A.; Bryant, Juliet E.; Nguyen, Truong Thanh; Nguyen, Huong Thi Cam; Nguyen, Lan Thi Hong; Pham, Mai Phuong; Nguyen, Hung The; Luong, Tai Thi Hue; Wills, Bridget; Nguyen, Chau Van Vinh; Wolbers, Marcel; Simmons, Cameron P.

    2013-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent arboviral disease of humans. The host and virus variables associated with dengue virus (DENV) transmission from symptomatic dengue cases (n = 208) to Aedes aegypti mosquitoes during 407 independent exposure events was defined. The 50% mosquito infectious dose for each of DENV-1–4 ranged from 6.29 to 7.52 log10 RNA copies/mL of plasma. Increasing day of illness, declining viremia, and rising antibody titers were independently associated with reduced risk of DENV transmission. High early DENV plasma viremia levels in patients were a marker of the duration of human infectiousness, and blood meals containing high concentrations of DENV were positively associated with the prevalence of infectious mosquitoes 14 d after blood feeding. Ambulatory dengue cases had lower viremia levels compared with hospitalized dengue cases but nonetheless at levels predicted to be infectious to mosquitoes. These data define serotype-specific viremia levels that vaccines or drugs must inhibit to prevent DENV transmission. PMID:23674683

  2. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF DENGUE AND DENGUE HEMORRHAGIC FEVER IN A COHORT OF ADULTS LIVING IN BANDUNG, WEST JAVA, INDONESIA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KEVIN R. PORTER; CHARMAGNE G. BECKETT; HERMAN KOSASIH; BACHTI ALISJAHBANA; SUSANA WIDJAJA; ERLIN LISTIYANINGSIH; NISA MA' ROEF; JAMES L. MCARDLE; IDA PARWATI; HADI JUSUF; DJOKO YUWONO; SUHARYONO WURYADI

    A prospective study of dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) was conducted in a cohort of adult volunteers from two textile factories located in West Java, Indonesia. Volunteers in the cohort were bled every three months and were actively followed for the occurrence of dengue (DEN) disease. The first two years of the study showed an incidence of

  3. 75 FR 58415 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Prevention, Prophylaxis, Cure, Amelioration, and/or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ...transmitted to humans by mosquitoes. The disease caused by CHIKV resembles infection by dengue virus, characterized by rash, high fever, and severe, sometimes persistent arthritis. The field of use may be limited to ``Prevention, prophylaxis, cure,...

  4. Large outbreak of Legionnaires' disease and Pontiac fever at a military base.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, J; Hampton, L M; Fleming-Dutra, K E; Marten, C; McClusky, C; Perry, C; Clemmons, N A; McCormic, Z; Peik, S; Mancuso, J; Brown, E; Kozak, N; Travis, T; Lucas, C; Fields, B; Hicks, L; Cersovsky, S B

    2014-11-01

    We investigated a mixed outbreak of Legionnaires' disease (LD) and Pontiac fever (PF) at a military base to identify the outbreak's environmental source as well as known legionellosis risk factors. Base workers with possible legionellosis were interviewed and, if consenting, underwent testing for legionellosis. A retrospective cohort study collected information on occupants of the buildings closest to the outbreak source. We identified 29 confirmed and probable LD and 38 PF cases. All cases were exposed to airborne pathogens from a cooling tower. Occupants of the building closest to the cooling tower were 6·9 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2·2-22·0] and 5·5 (95% CI 2·1-14·5) times more likely to develop LD and PF, respectively, than occupants of the next closest building. Thorough preventive measures and aggressive responses to outbreaks, including searching for PF cases in mixed legionellosis outbreaks, are essential for legionellosis control. PMID:25267405

  5. Epidemiology of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Outbreaks, United States, 1982–2002

    PubMed Central

    Sparling, Phyllis H.; Crowe, Collen; Griffin, Patricia M.; Swerdlow, David L.

    2005-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 causes 73,000 illnesses in the United States annually. We reviewed E. coli O157 outbreaks reported to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to better understand the epidemiology of E. coli O157. E. coli O157 outbreaks (?2 cases of E. coli O157 infection with a common epidemiologic exposure) reported to CDC from 1982 to 2002 were reviewed. In that period, 49 states reported 350 outbreaks, representing 8,598 cases, 1,493 (17%) hospitalizations, 354 (4%) hemolytic uremic syndrome cases, and 40 (0.5%) deaths. Transmission route for 183 (52%) was foodborne, 74 (21%) unknown, 50 (14%) person-to-person, 31 (9%) waterborne, 11 (3%) animal contact, and 1 (0.3%) laboratory-related. The food vehicle for 75 (41%) foodborne outbreaks was ground beef, and for 38 (21%) outbreaks, produce. PMID:15829201

  6. Dengue Vectors and their Spatial Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Higa, Yukiko

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of dengue vectors, Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, is affected by climatic factors. In addition, since their life cycles are well adapted to the human environment, environmental changes resulting from human activity such as urbanization exert a great impact on vector distribution. The different responses of Ae. aegypti and Ae albopictus to various environments result in a difference in spatial distribution along north-south and urban-rural gradients, and between the indoors and outdoors. In the north-south gradient, climate associated with survival is an important factor in spatial distribution. In the urban-rural gradient, different distribution reflects a difference in adult niches and is modified by geographic and human factors. The direct response of the two species to the environment around houses is related to different spatial distribution indoors and outdoors. Dengue viruses circulate mainly between human and vector mosquitoes, and the vector presence is a limiting factor of transmission. Therefore, spatial distribution of dengue vectors is a significant concern in the epidemiology of the disease. Current technologies such as GIS, satellite imagery and statistical models allow researchers to predict the spatial distribution of vectors in the changing environment. Although it is difficult to confirm the actual effect of environmental and climate changes on vector abundance and vector-borne diseases, environmental changes caused by humans and human behavioral changes due to climate change can be expected to exert an impact on dengue vectors. Longitudinal monitoring of dengue vectors and viruses is therefore necessary. PMID:22500133

  7. Autoimmune response in children with dengue. Case reports.

    PubMed

    Morel, Zoilo; Ramírez, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is an infectious disease caused by the dengue virus (DV), which can progress to dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. DV causes the production of auto-antibodies against human cells. A variety of factors have been associated with macrophage activation syndrome, including infections, drugs and autoimmune pathologies (systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis). We present three cases of patients that clinically developed an autoimmune response related to a DV infection. Our country currently has endemic cases of dengue, with hyperimmune responses. Therefore, the physician should consider this possibility in the presence of unusual conditions. PMID:24666813

  8. Developing a Vulnerability Mapping Methodology: Applying the Water-Associated Disease Index to Dengue in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Dickin, Sarah K.; Schuster-Wallace, Corinne J.; Elliott, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    The Water-associated Disease Index (WADI) was developed to identify and visualize vulnerability to different water-associated diseases by integrating a range of social and biophysical determinants in map format. In this study vulnerability is used to encompass conditions of exposure, susceptibility, and differential coping capacity to a water-associated health hazard. By assessing these conditions, the tool is designed to provide stakeholders with an integrated and long-term understanding of subnational vulnerabilities to water-associated disease and contribute to intervention strategies to reduce the burden of illness. The objective of this paper is to describe and validate the WADI tool by applying it to dengue. A systemic ecohealth framework that considers links between people, the environment and health was applied to identify secondary datasets, populating the index with components including climate conditions, land cover, education status and water use practices. Data were aggregated to create composite indicators of exposure and of susceptibility in a Geographic Information System (GIS). These indicators were weighted by their contribution to dengue vulnerability, and the output consisted of an overall index visualized in map format. The WADI was validated in this Malaysia case study, demonstrating a significant association with dengue rates at a sub-national level, and illustrating a range of factors that drive vulnerability to the disease within the country. The index output indicated high vulnerability to dengue in urban areas, especially in the capital Kuala Lumpur and surrounding region. However, in other regions, vulnerability to dengue varied throughout the year due to the influence of seasonal climate conditions, such as monsoon patterns. The WADI tool complements early warning models for water-associated disease by providing upstream information for planning prevention and control approaches, which increasingly require a comprehensive and geographically broad understanding of vulnerability for implementation. PMID:23667642

  9. Prevent the Spread of Norovirus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Outbreaks For Food Handlers: Norovirus and Working with Food Norovirus in Healthcare Settings , general information on norovirus and prevention in healthcare facilities Handwashing: Clean Hands Save Lives , hand- and water-related hygiene tips Six Tips to Help Prevent the Spread ...

  10. Universal Single-Probe RT-PCR Assay for Diagnosis of Dengue Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Alm, Erik; Lesko, Birgitta; Lindegren, Gunnel; Ahlm, Clas; Söderholm, Sandra; Falk, Kerstin I.; Lagerqvist, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease that has become more prevalent in the last few decades. Most patients are viremic when they present with symptoms, and early diagnosis of dengue is important in preventing severe clinical complications associated with this disease and also represents a key factor in differential diagnosis. Here, we designed and validated a hydrolysis-probe-based one-step real-time RT-PCR assay that targets the genomes of dengue virus serotypes 1–4. Methodology/Principal Findings The primers and probe used in our RT-PCR assay were designed to target the 3? untranslated region of all complete genome sequences of dengue virus available in GenBank (n?=?3,305). Performance of the assay was evaluated using in vitro transcribed RNA, laboratory-adapted virus strains, external control panels, and clinical specimens. The linear dynamic range was found to be 104–1011 GCE/mL, and the detection limit was between 6.0×102 and 1.1×103 GCE/mL depending on target sequence. The assay did not cross-react with human RNA, nor did it produce false-positive results for other human pathogenic flaviviruses or clinically important etiological agents of febrile illnesses. We used clinical serum samples obtained from returning travelers with dengue-compatible symptomatology (n?=?163) to evaluate the diagnostic relevance of our assay, and laboratory diagnosis performed by the RT-PCR assay had 100% positive agreement with diagnosis performed by NS1 antigen detection. In a retrospective evaluation including 60 archived serum samples collected from confirmed dengue cases 1–9 days after disease onset, the RT-PCR assay detected viral RNA up to 9 days after appearance of symptoms. Conclusions/Significance The validation of the RT-PCR assay presented here indicates that this technique can be a reliable diagnostic tool, and hence we suggest that it be introduced as the method of choice during the first 5 days of dengue symptoms. PMID:25522325

  11. Preliminary evaluation on the efficiency of the kit Platelia Dengue NS1 Ag-ELISA to detect dengue virus in dried Aedes aegypti: a potential tool to improve dengue surveillance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Surveillance is a critical component of any dengue prevention and control programme. Herein, we investigate the efficiency of the commercial kit Platelia Dengue NS1 Ag-ELISA to detect dengue virus (DENV) antigens in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes infected under laboratory conditions. Methods Under insectary conditions, four to five day-old mosquitoes were orally challenged with DENV-2 titer of 3.6 x 105 PFU equivalent/ml, incubated for 14 days and then killed. At ten time-points following mosquito death (0, 6, 12, 24, 72, 96, 120, 144 and 168 h), i.e., during a one-week period, dried mosquitoes were comparatively tested for the detection of the NS1 antigen with other methods of detection, such as qRT-PCR and virus isolation in C6/36 cells. Results We first observed that the NS1 antigen was more effective in detecting DENV-2 in Ae. aegypti between 12 and 72 h after mosquito death when compared with qRT-PCR. A second round involved comparing the sensitivity of detection of the NS1 antigen and virus isolation in C6/36 cells. The NS1 antigen was also more effective than virus isolation, detecting DENV-2 at all time-points, i.e., up to 168 h after mosquito death. Meanwhile, virus isolation was successful up to 96 h after Ae. aegypti death, but the number of positive samples per time period presented a tendency to decline progressively over time. From the 43 samples positive by the virus isolation technique, 38 (88.4%) were also positive by the NS1 test. Conclusion Taken together, these results are the first to indicate that the NS1 antigen might be an interesting complementary tool to improve dengue surveillance through DENV detection in dried Ae. aegypti females. PMID:24690324

  12. Clinical and oral implications of dengue Fever: a review.

    PubMed

    Roopashri, G; Vaishali, M R; David, Maria Priscilla; Baig, Muqeet; Navneetham, Anuradha; Venkataraghavan, Karthik

    2015-02-01

    Dengue is a viral infection with fatal potential complications. It is also called as break-bone fever. Worldwide dengue infection is the most common mosquito-borne viral disease. It is caused by vector Aedesa egypti and represents a major public health issue in more than 100 tropical countries. The word dengue is obtained from Swahili phrase Ka-dinga pepo meaning "cramplikeseizure." Dengue viral infections are characterized by abrupt febrile illness, but can also lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Hence, it requires an early and correct diagnosis. Gingival bleeding is the most common oral manifestation of dengue infection. Although oral lesions are uncommon in dengue infections and if manifested, may be mistaken for bleeding disorders. This review emphasizes the significance of oral lesions as it may be the early indicators of dengue hemorrhagic fever. PMID:25859113

  13. Using climate information to understand the spatio-temporal heterogeneity of a chikungunya outbreak in the presence of widespread asymptomatic infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dommar, C. J.; Lowe, R.; Robinson, M.; Rodó, X.

    2013-12-01

    The emergence and persistence of human pathogens in the environment represents a constant threat to society, with global implications for human health, economies and ecosystems. Of particular concern are vector-borne diseases, such as dengue, malaria and chikungunya, which are increasing across their traditional ranges and continuing to infiltrate new regions. This unprecedented situation has been partly attributed to the increase in global temperatures in recent decades which has allowed non-native mosquito species to invade and successfully colonise previously inhospitable environments The spatio-temporal evolution of these diseases is determined by the interaction of the host and vector, which is strongly dependent on social structures and mobility patterns. In turn, vector populations are thought to be driven by external environmental variables, such as precipitation and temperature. Furthermore, the ability of asymptomatic individuals to successfully transmit the infection and evade control measures can undermine public health interventions. We employed a stochastic model, which explicitly included asymptomatic and undocumented laboratory confirmed cases, and applied it to a documented outbreak in Cambodia in 2012 (Trapeang Roka village, Kampong Speu Province). The resulting estimate of the reproduction number was considerably higher than values obtained for previous outbreaks and highlights the importance of asymptomatic transmission. Subsequently, we develop an agent-based model (ABM), in which each individual is explicitly represented and vector populations are linked to precipitation estimates in a tropical setting. The model is implemented on both scale-free and regular networks. The spatio-temporal transmission of chikungunya is analysed and the presence of asymptomatic silent spreaders within the population is investigated in the context of implementing travel restrictions during an outbreak. Preventing the movement of symptomatic individuals alone is found to be an insufficient mechanism to halt the spread of the disease, which can be readily carried to neighbouring nodes via sub-clinical individuals. Furthermore, the impact of topology structure versus precipitation levels is assessed and precipitation is found to be the dominant factor driving spatio-temporal transmission. Our results highlight the urgent need to establish adequate monitoring and mosquito control programs in vulnerable countries. These models can help to inform public health officials on both the impact and potential spatial expansion of vector-borne diseases through both urban and rural regions under the influence of dynamic climatic conditions. Given the climate sensitivity of vector-borne diseases, such as chikungunya, it is important to link the monitoring of meteorological conditions to public health surveillance and control.

  14. Climate-driven mathematical models to understand the spatio-temporal heterogeneity of a chikungunya outbreak in the presence of widespread asymptomatic infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dommar, Carlos J.; Robinson, Marguerite; Lowe, Rachel; Conan, Anne; Buchy, Philippe; Tarantola, Arnaud; Rodó, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    The emergence and persistence of human pathogens in the environment represents a constant threat to society, with global implications for human health, economies and ecosystems. Of particular concern are vector-borne diseases, such as dengue, malaria and chikungunya, which are increasing across their traditional ranges and continuing to infiltrate new regions. This unprecedented situation has been partly attributed to the increase in global temperatures in recent decades which has allowed non-native mosquito species to invade and successfully colonise previously inhospitable environments. The spatio-temporal evolution of these diseases is determined by the interaction of the host and vector, which is strongly dependent on social structures and mobility patterns. In turn, vector populations are thought to be driven by external environmental variables, such as precipitation and temperature. Furthermore, the ability of asymptomatic individuals to successfully transmit the infection and evade control measures can undermine public health interventions. We employed a stochastic model, which explicitly included asymptomatic and undocumented laboratory confirmed cases, and applied it to a documented outbreak in Cambodia in 2012 (Trapeang Roka village, Kampong Speu Province). The resulting estimate of the reproduction number was considerably higher than values obtained for previous outbreaks and highlights the importance of asymptomatic transmission. Subsequently, we develop an agent-based model (ABM), in which each individual is explicitly represented and vector populations are linked to precipitation estimates in a tropical setting. The model is implemented on both scale-free and regular networks. The spatio-temporal transmission of chikungunya is analysed and the presence of asymptomatic silent spreaders within the population is investigated in the context of implementing travel restrictions during an outbreak. Preventing the movement of symptomatic individuals alone is found to be an insufficient mechanism to halt the spread of the disease, which can be readily carried to neighbouring nodes via sub-clinical individuals. Furthermore, the impact of topology structure versus precipitation levels is assessed and precipitation is found to be the dominant factor driving spatio-temporal transmission. Our results highlight the urgent need to establish adequate monitoring and mosquito control programs in vulnerable countries. These models can help to inform public health officials on both the impact and potential spatial expansion of vector-borne diseases through both urban and rural regions under the influence of dynamic climatic conditions. Given the climate sensitivity of vector-borne diseases, such as chikungunya, it is important to link the monitoring of meteorological conditions to public health surveillance and control.

  15. Study of the relationship between Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti egg and adult densities, dengue fever and climate in Mirassol, state of São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dibo, Margareth Regina; Chierotti, Ana Patricia; Ferrari, Mariana Silveira; Mendonça, Adriano Luis; Chiaravalloti Neto, Francisco

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between Aedes aegypti egg and adult density indices, dengue fever and climate in Mirassol, state of São Paulo, Brazil, between November 2004-November 2005. Weekly collections of adults and eggs were made using, respectively, manual aspirators and oviposition traps that produced four entomological indices (positivity and average of females and eggs). Weekly incidence coefficients were calculated based on dengue cases. Each week, the data obtained from entomological indices were related to each other, dengue, and climate variables. The first index to show an association with dengue transmission was the female average, followed by female positivity and egg average. Egg positivity did not show a relationship with risk for dengue, but was sensitive to identifying the presence of the vector, principally in dry seasons. The relationship between climatic factors, the vector and the disease found in this study can be widely employed in planning and undertaking dengue surveillance and control activities, but it is a tool that has not been considered by the authorities responsible for controlling the disease. In fact, this relationship permits the use of information about climate for early detection of epidemics and for establishing more effective prevention strategies than currently exist. PMID:18949325

  16. Mosquitos and You! Mosquito Control and Prevention

    E-print Network

    in the Mosquito Life Cycle. Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 4 Stage 3 Adult Pupa Larva Egg Raft 4 #12;Mosquito Search HIDDEN WORDS MALARIA LARVA EGGRAFT MOSQUITO AFRICA WESTNILE PUPA DENGUE 5 #12;Can you Mosquitos and You! Mosquito Control and Prevention Third, Fourth and Fifth Grades State

  17. [A possible fifth dengue virus serotype].

    PubMed

    da Silva Voorham, Júlia M

    2014-01-01

    Sylvatic dengue viruses are both evolutionarily and ecologically distinguishable from the human dengue virus (DENV). Sporadic episodes of sylvatic human infections in West Africa and Southeast Asia suggest that sylvatic DENV regularly come into contact with human beings. Following a study on the sylvatic transmission cycle in Malaysia in 2007, researchers announced that a new DENV serotype, DENV-5, had been discovered. Scientists are still sceptical about these new findings, and indicate that more data is necessary to determine whether this 'new' virus really is a different serotype or whether it is a variant of one of the four DENV serotypes already known. The good news is that this new variant has not yet established itself in the human transmission cycle. However, if it really is a new serotype this will have implications for the long-term control of dengue using vaccines currently under development. PMID:25227888

  18. Internet and Free Press Are Associated with Reduced Lags in Global Outbreak Reporting

    PubMed Central

    McAlarnen, Lindsey; Smith, Katherine; Brownstein, John S.; Jerde, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Background: Global outbreak detection and reporting have generally improved for a variety of infectious diseases and geographic regions in recent decades. Nevertheless, lags in outbreak reporting remain a threat to the global human health and economy. In the time between first occurrence of a novel disease incident and public notification of an outbreak, infected individuals have a greater possibility of traveling and spreading the pathogen to other nations. Shortening outbreak reporting lags has the potential to improve global health by preventing local outbreaks from escalating into global epidemics. Methods: Reporting lags between the first record and the first public report of an event were calculated for 318 outbreaks occurring 1996-2009. The influence of freedom of the press, Internet usage, per capita health expenditure, and cell phone subscriptions, on the timeliness of outbreak reporting was evaluated. Results: Freer presses and increasing Internet usage correlate with reduced time between the first record of an outbreak and the public report. Increasing Internet usage reduced the expected reporting lag from more than one month in nations without Internet users to one day in those where 75 of 100 people use the Internet. Conclusion: Advances in technology and the emergence of more open and free governments are associated with to improved global infectious disease surveillance. PMID:25642380

  19. Dengue Infection and Miscarriage: A Prospective Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Peng Chiong; Soe, May Zaw; Si Lay, Khaing; Wang, Seok Mui; Sekaran, Shamala Devi; Omar, Siti Zawiah

    2012-01-01

    Background Dengue is the most prevalent mosquito borne infection worldwide. Vertical transmissions after maternal dengue infection to the fetus and pregnancy losses in relation to dengue illness have been reported. The relationship of dengue to miscarriage is not known. Method We aimed to establish the relationship of recent dengue infection and miscarriage. Women who presented with miscarriage (up to 22 weeks gestation) to our hospital were approached to participate in the study. For each case of miscarriage, we recruited 3 controls with viable pregnancies at a similar gestation. A brief questionnaire on recent febrile illness and prior dengue infection was answered. Blood was drawn from participants, processed and the frozen serum was stored. Stored sera were thawed and then tested in batches with dengue specific IgM capture ELISA, dengue non-structural protein 1 (NS1) antigen and dengue specific IgG ELISA tests. Controls remained in the analysis if their pregnancies continued beyond 22 weeks gestation. Tests were run on 116 case and 341 control sera. One case (a misdiagnosed viable early pregnancy) plus 45 controls (39 lost to follow up and six subsequent late miscarriages) were excluded from analysis. Findings Dengue specific IgM or dengue NS1 antigen (indicating recent dengue infection) was positive in 6/115 (5·2%) cases and 5/296 (1·7%) controls RR 3·1 (95% CI 1·0–10) P?=?0·047. Maternal age, gestational age, parity and ethnicity were dissimilar between cases and controls. After adjustments for these factors, recent dengue infection remained significantly more frequently detected in cases than controls (AOR 4·2 95% CI 1·2–14 P?=?0·023). Interpretation Recent dengue infections were more frequently detected in women presenting with miscarriage than in controls whose pregnancies were viable. After adjustments for confounders, the positive association remained. PMID:22590658

  20. Pertussis outbreak in an Amish community--Kent County, Delaware, September 2004-February 2005.

    PubMed

    2006-08-01

    Vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks continue to occur among undervaccinated populations in the United States, including contained religious communities. The Amish practice separation from the world through group solidarity and caring for their own. Amish religious doctrine does not prohibit vaccination; however, coverage levels for routine childhood vaccination remain low in many Amish communities. This report describes an outbreak of pertussis in an Amish community in Kent County, Delaware, during September 2004-February 2005, that resulted in 345 cases and affected primarily preschool-aged children. The outbreak underscores the need to promote vaccination in Amish communities through culturally appropriate strategies, such as education and outreach to community leaders. PMID:16888610

  1. Exploring new thermal fog and ultra-low volume technologies to improve indoor control of the dengue vector, Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Harwood, James F; Farooq, Muhammad; Richardson, Alec G; Doud, Carl W; Putnam, John L; Szumlas, Daniel E; Richardson, Jason H

    2014-07-01

    Control of the mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti (L.), inside human habitations must be performed quickly and efficiently to reduce the risk of transmission during dengue outbreaks. As part of abroad study to assess the efficacy of dengue vector control tools for the U.S. Military, two pesticide delivery systems (ultra-low volume [ULV] and thermal fog) were evaluated for their ability to provide immediate control of Ae. aegypti mosquitoes with a contact insecticide inside simulated urban structures. An insect growth regulator was also applied to determine how well each sprayer delivered lethal doses of active ingredient to indoor water containers for pupal control. Mortality of caged Ae. aegypti, pesticide droplet size, and droplet deposition were recorded after applications. In addition, larval and pupal mortality was measured from treated water samples for 4 wk after the applications. The ULV and the thermal fogger performed equally well in delivering lethal doses of adulticide throughout the structures. The ULV resulted in greater larval mortality and adult emergence inhibition in the water containers for a longer period than the thermal fogger. Therefore, the ULV technology is expected to be a better tool for sustained vector suppression when combined with an effective insect growth regulator. However, during a dengue outbreak, either delivery system should provide an immediate knockdown of vector populations that may lower the risk of infection and allow other suppression strategies to be implemented. PMID:25118418

  2. [Epidemiological dynamics of Dengue on Easter Island].

    PubMed

    Canals, Mauricio; González, Christian; Canals, Andrea; Figueroa, Daniela

    2012-08-01

    Dengue is considered an emerging disease with an increasing prevalence especially in South America. In 2002, an epidemic of classic Dengue (DENV-1) occurred unexpectedly on Easter Island, where it had never been detected before. It reappeared in 2006-2007 and 2008, 2009 and 2011. The aim of this study was to estimate the most relevant parameters of the epidemiological dynamics of transmission of Dengue on Easter Island and to model the dynamics since 2002, comparing the predictions with the actual situation observed. Of the total cases, 52.27% were females and 47.73% men. The average age of infection was 31.38 ± 18.37 years, similar in men and women. We estimated the reproductive number R0 = 3.005 with an IC0,95 = [1.92, 4.61]. The inter-epidemic period reached an estimated T = 5.20 to 6.8 years. The case simulation showed recurrent epidemics with decreasing magnitude (damped oscillations), which is a known phenomenon in models of dengue and malaria. There was good qualitative fit to the epidemiological dynamics from 2002 onwards. It accurately predicted the rise in cases between 2006 and 2011. The predicted number of cases during the 2002 epidemic is greater than the confirmed cases and the predicted epidemic was faster than notified cases. Interepidemic period in the simulation was 6.72 years between 2002 and 2008 and 4.68 years between 2008 and 2013. From the theoretical perspective, the first epidemic had affected 94% of the population (approximately 3500 cases), but 639 were reported suggesting underreporting and a lot of sub-clinical cases occurred. Future epidemic of decreasing size are expected, although the main danger are epidemics of hemorrhagic dengue fever resulting from the introduction of different dengue virus serotypes. PMID:23096537

  3. Understanding dengue pathogenesis: implications for vaccine design.

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, John R.

    2005-01-01

    In the second half of the twentieth century dengue spread throughout the tropics, threatening the health of a third of the world's population. Dengue viruses cause 50-100 million cases of acute febrile disease every year, including more than 500,000 reported cases of the severe forms of the disease--dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Attempts to create conventional vaccines have been hampered by the lack of suitable experimental models, the need to provide protection against all four serotypes simultaneously and the possible involvement of virus-specific immune responses in severe disease. The current understanding of dengue pathogenesis is outlined in this review, with special emphasis on the role of the immune response. The suspected involvement of the immune system in increased disease severity and vascular damage has raised concerns about every vaccine design strategy proposed so far. Clearly more research is needed on understanding the correlates of protection and mechanisms of pathogenesis. There is, however, an urgent need to provide a solution to the escalating global public health problems caused by dengue infections. Better disease management, vector control and improved public health measures will help reduce the current disease burden, but a safe and effective vaccine is probably the only long-term solution. Although concerns have been raised about the possible safety and efficacy of both conventional and novel vaccine technologies, the situation is now so acute that it is not possible to wait for the perfect vaccine. Consequently the careful and thorough evaluation of several of the current candidate vaccines may be the best approach to halting the spread of disease. PMID:15868023

  4. Household Water Treatment Uptake during a Public Health Response to a Large Typhoid Fever Outbreak in Harare, Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Imanishi, Maho; Kweza, Patience F.; Slayton, Rachel B.; Urayai, Tanaka; Ziro, Odrie; Mushayi, Wellington; Francis-Chizororo, Monica; Kuonza, Lazarus R.; Ayers, Tracy; Freeman, Molly M.; Govore, Emmaculate; Duri, Clemence; Chonzi, Prosper; Mtapuri-Zinyowera, Sekesai; Manangazira, Portia; Kilmarx, Peter H.; Mintz, Eric; Lantagne, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    Locally manufactured sodium hypochlorite (chlorine) solution has been sold in Zimbabwe since 2010. During October 1, 2011–April 30, 2012, 4,181 suspected and 52 confirmed cases of typhoid fever were identified in Harare. In response to this outbreak, chlorine tablets were distributed. To evaluate household water treatment uptake, we conducted a survey and water quality testing in 458 randomly selected households in two suburbs most affected by the outbreak. Although 75% of households were aware of chlorine solution and 85% received chlorine tablets, only 18% had reportedly treated stored water and had the recommended protective level of free chlorine residuals. Water treatment was more common among households that reported water treatment before the outbreak, and those that received free tablets during the outbreak (P < 0.01), but was not associated with chlorine solution awareness or use before the outbreak (P > 0.05). Outbreak response did not build on pre-existing prevention programs. PMID:24664784

  5. Ebola virus outbreak, updates on current therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Elshabrawy, Hatem A; Erickson, Timothy B; Prabhakar, Bellur S

    2015-07-01

    Filoviruses are enveloped negative-sense single-stranded RNA viruses, which include Ebola and Marburg viruses, known to cause hemorrhagic fever in humans with a case fatality of up to 90%. There have been several Ebola virus outbreaks since the first outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo in 1976 of which, the recent 2013-2015 epidemic in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone is the largest in recorded history. Within a few months of the start of the outbreak in December 2013, thousands of infected cases were reported with a significant number of deaths. As of March 2015, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there have been nearly 25?000 suspected cases, with 15?000 confirmed by laboratory testing, and over 10?000 deaths. The large number of cases and the high mortality rate, combined with the lack of effective Food and Drug Administration-approved treatments, necessitate the development of potent and safe therapeutic measures to combat the current and future outbreaks. Since the beginning of the outbreak, there have been considerable efforts to develop and characterize protective measures including vaccines and antiviral small molecules, and some have proven effective in vitro and in animal models. Most recently, a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies has been shown to be highly effective in protecting non-human primates from Ebola virus infection. In this review, we will discuss what is known about the nature of the virus, phylogenetic classification, genomic organization and replication, disease transmission, and viral entry and highlight the current approaches and efforts, in the development of therapeutics, to control the outbreak. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25962887

  6. Estimating the risk of fire outbreaks in the natural environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniela Stojanova; Andrej Kobler; Peter Ogrinc; Bernard Ženko; Sašo Džeroski

    A constant and controlled level of emission of carbon and other gases into the atmosphere is a pre-condition for preventing\\u000a global warming and an essential issue for a sustainable world. Fires in the natural environment are phenomena that extensively\\u000a increase the level of greenhouse emissions and disturb the normal functioning of natural ecosystems. Therefore, estimating\\u000a the risk of fire outbreaks

  7. Cross-protective immunity can account for the alternating epidemic pattern of dengue virus serotypes circulating in Bangkok

    PubMed Central

    Adams, B.; Holmes, E. C.; Zhang, C.; Mammen, M. P.; Nimmannitya, S.; Kalayanarooj, S.; Boots, M.

    2006-01-01

    Dengue virus, the causative agent of dengue fever and its more serious manifestation dengue hemorrhagic fever, is widespread throughout tropical and subtropical regions. The virus exists as four distinct serotypes, all of which have cocirculated in Bangkok for several decades with epidemic outbreaks occurring every 8–10 years. We analyze time-series data of monthly infection incidence, revealing a distinctive pattern with epidemics of serotypes 1, 2, and 3 occurring at approximately the same time and an isolated epidemic of serotype 4 occurring in the intervening years. Phylogenetic analysis of virus samples collected over the same period shows that clade replacement events are linked to the epidemic cycle and indicates that there is an interserotypic immune reaction. Using an epidemic model with stochastic seasonal forcing showing 8- to 10-year epidemic oscillations, we demonstrate that moderate cross-protective immunity gives rise to persistent out-of-phase oscillations similar to those observed in the data, but that strong or weak cross-protection or cross-enhancement only produces in-phase patterns. This behavior suggests that the epidemic pattern observed in Bangkok is the result of cross-protective immunity and may be significantly altered by changes in the interserotypic immune reaction. PMID:16966609

  8. Serological characterization of dengue virus infections observed among dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome cases in upper Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Ngwe Tun, Mya Myat; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Inoue, Shingo; Kurosawa, Yae; Lwin, Yee Yee; Lin, Sanda; Aye, Kay Thi; Thet Khin, Pe; Myint, Tin; Htwe, Khin; Mapua, Cynthia A; Natividad, Filipinas F; Hirayama, Kenji; Morita, Kouichi

    2013-07-01

    In Myanmar, dengue fever (DF)/dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among children. From Pyinmana Hospital in 2004 and Mandalay Children Hospital in 2006, 160 patients diagnosed clinically to have DHF/dengue shock syndrome (DSS) were examined for immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG levels. A focus reduction neutralization test was also used to determine primary or secondary dengue virus (DENV) infection. By using IgM-capture ELISA, 139 cases were confirmed as DENV infections. Of these IgM-positives, 94 samples were collected 7-24 days from the onset of illness, to which 13 (14%) and 81 (86%) were determined to be primary and secondary DENV infections, respectively. The 13 primary DENV infection cases were spread among the various severity groups (DHF grade I-IV and DSS) and represented age groups ranging from <1 year of age to 9 years of age. The patients in these primary infection cases showed a remarkably high IgM with a low IgG titer response compared with the secondary infection cases. No significant differences were observed in IgG titers with clinical severity. The data obtained in this study suggest that primary DENV infection cases exist certainly among DHF/DSS cases in Myanmar, and that additional mechanism(s) aside from the antibody-dependent enhancement mechanism could have influenced the clinical severity in DHF/DSS cases. PMID:23595687

  9. El Niño Southern Oscillation and vegetation dynamics as predictors of dengue fever cases in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Troyo, A; Beier, J C

    2009-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) are growing health concerns throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. This study focuses on Costa Rica, which experienced over 100 000 cases of DF/DHF from 2003 to 2007. We utilized data on sea-surface temperature anomalies related to the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and two vegetation indices derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) from the Terra satellite to model the influence of climate and vegetation dynamics on DF/DHF cases in Costa Rica. Cross-correlations were calculated to evaluate both positive and negative lag effects on the relationships between independent variables and DF/DHF cases. The model, which utilizes a sinusoid and non-linear least squares to fit case data, was able to explain 83% of the variance in weekly DF/DHF cases when independent variables were shifted backwards in time. When the independent variables were shifted forward in time, consistently with a forecasting approach, the model explained 64% of the variance. Importantly, when five ENSO and two vegetation indices were included, the model reproduced a major DF/DHF epidemic of 2005. The unexplained variance in the model may be due to herd immunity and vector control measures, although information regarding these aspects of the disease system are generally lacking. Our analysis suggests that the model may be used to predict DF/DHF outbreaks as early as 40 weeks in advance and may also provide valuable information on the magnitude of future epidemics. In its current form it may be used to inform national vector control programs and policies regarding control measures; it is the first climate-based dengue model developed for this country and is potentially scalable to the broader region of Latin America and the Caribbean where dramatic increases in DF/DHF incidence and spread have been observed. PMID:19763186

  10. Identification of Carboxylesterase Genes Implicated in Temephos Resistance in the Dengue Vector Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Poupardin, Rodolphe; Srisukontarat, Wannaporn; Yunta, Cristina; Ranson, Hilary

    2014-01-01

    Background Thailand is currently experiencing one of its worst dengue outbreaks in decades. As in most countries where this disease is endemic, dengue control in Thailand is largely reliant on the use of insecticides targeting both immature and adult stages of the Aedes mosquito, with the organophosphate insecticide, temephos, being the insecticide of choice for attacking the mosquito larvae. Resistance to temephos was first detected in Aedes aegypti larvae in Thailand approximately 25 years ago but the mechanism responsible for this resistance has not been determined. Principal Findings Bioassays on Ae. aegypti larvae from Thailand detected temephos resistance ratios ranging from 3.5 fold in Chiang Mai to nearly 10 fold in Nakhon Sawan (NS) province. Synergist and biochemical assays suggested a role for increased carboxylesterase (CCE) activities in conferring temephos resistance in the NS population and microarray analysis revealed that the CCE gene, CCEae3a, was upregulated more than 60 fold in the NS population compared to the susceptible population. Upregulation of CCEae3a was shown to be partially due to gene duplication. Another CCE gene, CCEae6a, was also highly regulated in both comparisons. Sequencing and in silico structure prediction of CCEae3a showed that several amino acid polymorphisms in the NS population may also play a role in the increased resistance phenotype. Significance Carboxylesterases have previously been implicated in conferring temephos resistance in Ae aegypti but the specific member(s) of this family responsible for this phenotype have not been identified. The identification of a strong candidate is an important step in the development of new molecular diagnostic tools for management of temephos resistant populations and thus improved control of dengue. PMID:24651719

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of dengue-3 viruses prevalent in Guatemala during 1996–1998

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Usuku; L. Castillo; C. Sugimoto; Y. Noguchi; Y. Yogo; N. Kobayashi

    2001-01-01

    Summary.  ?Dengue is an acute viral disease transmitted by the Aedesaegypti mosquito which is present in most tropical urban areas of the world. There are four antigenically distinct serotypes, designated\\u000a dengue-1 (DEN-1), dengue-2 (DEN-2), dengue-3 (DEN-3) and dengue-4 virus (DEN-4). In this study, we determined the serotypes\\u000a of dengue viruses isolated in Guatemala in 1995–1998, and found that DEN-3 viruses appeared

  12. Host Gene Expression Profiling of Dengue Virus Infection in Cell Lines and Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joshua Fink; Feng Gu; Ling Ling; Thomas Tolfvenstam; Farzad Olfat; Keh Chuang Chin; Pauline Aw; Joshy George; Vladimir A. Kuznetsov; Mark Schreiber; Subhash G. Vasudevan; Martin L. Hibberd

    2007-01-01

    BackgroundDespite the seriousness of dengue-related disease, with an estimated 50–100 million cases of dengue fever and 250,000–500,000 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever\\/dengue shock syndrome each year, a clear understanding of dengue pathogenesis remains elusive. Because of the lack of a disease model in animals and the complex immune interaction in dengue infection, the study of host response and immunopathogenesis is

  13. A Comparative Study of Leptospirosis and Dengue in Thai Children

    PubMed Central

    Libraty, Daniel H.; Myint, Khin S. A.; Murray, Clinton K.; Gibbons, Robert V.; Mammen, Mammen P.; Endy, Timothy P.; Li, Wenjun; Vaughn, David W.; Nisalak, Ananda; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Hospenthal, Duane R.; Green, Sharone; Rothman, Alan L.; Ennis, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonosis that is often under-recognized in children and commonly confused with dengue in tropical settings. An enhanced ability to distinguish leptospirosis from dengue in children would guide clinicians and public health personnel in the appropriate use of limited healthcare resources. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a prospective, hospital-based, study of children with acute febrile illnesses and dengue in Thailand. Among the children without dengue, we identified those with leptospirosis using anti-leptospira IgM and microscopic agglutination titers in paired acute and convalescent blood samples. We then performed a case-control comparison of symptoms, signs, and clinical laboratory values between children with leptospirosis and dengue. In a semi-rural region of Thailand, leptospirosis accounted for 19% of the non-dengue acute febrile illnesses among children presenting during the rainy season. None of the children with leptospirosis were correctly diagnosed at the time of hospital discharge, and one third (33%) were erroneously diagnosed as dengue or scrub typhus. A predictive model to distinguish pediatric leptospirosis from dengue was generated using three variables: the absolute neutrophil count, plasma albumin, and aspartate aminotransferase levels in the first 72 hours of illness. Conclusions/Significance Unrecognized leptospirosis can be a significant cause of “dengue-like” febrile illness in children. Increased awareness of pediatric leptospirosis, and an enhanced ability to discriminate between leptospirosis and dengue early in illness, will help guide the appropriate use of healthcare resources in often resource-limited settings. PMID:18160980

  14. Molecular Epidemiology of Dengue Viruses Co-circulating in Upper Myanmar in 2006

    PubMed Central

    Thant, Kyaw Zin; Tun, Mya Myat Ngwe; Parquet, Maria del Carmen; Inoue, Shingo; Lwin, Yee Yee; Lin, Sanda; Aye, Kay Thi; Khin, Pe Thet; Myint, Tin; Htwe, Khin; Nabeshima, Takeshi; Morita, Kouichi

    2015-01-01

    To understand the molecular epidemiology of circulating dengue viruses (DENV) in Upper Myanmar, DENV isolation was attempted by inoculating the sera of a panel of 110 serum samples onto a C6/36 mosquito cell line. The samples were collected from dengue (DEN) patients admitted at Mandalay Children’s Hospital in 2006. Infected culture fluids were subjected to a RT-PCR to detect the DENV genome. Three DENV strains were isolated. This was the first DENV isolation performed either in Mandalay or in Upper Myanmar. One strain belonged to DENV serotype-3 (DENV-3), and two other strains belonged to DENV serotype-4 (DEN-4). The sequence data for the envelope gene of these strains were used in a phylogenetic comparison of DENV-3 and DENV-4 from various countries. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that this DENV-3 strain was clustered within genotype II, and the two DENV-4 strains were clustered within genotype I in each serotype. The Myanmar strains were closely related to strains from the neighboring countries of Thailand and Bangladesh. These results are important for elucidating the trends of recent and future DEN outbreaks in Myanmar. PMID:25859150

  15. Systematic environmental evaluations to identify food safety differences between outbreak and nonoutbreak restaurants.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Craig W; Smith, S Jay; Kirkland, Elizabeth; Radke, Vincent; Jones, Tim F; Selman, Carol A

    2006-11-01

    Restaurants are important settings for foodborne disease transmission. The Environmental Health Specialists Network (EHS-Net) was established to identify underlying factors contributing to disease outbreaks and to translate those findings into improved prevention efforts. From June 2002 through June 2003, EHS-Net conducted systematic environmental evaluations in 22 restaurants in which outbreaks had occurred and 347 restaurants in which outbreaks had not occurred. Norovirus was the most common foodborne disease agent identified, accounting for 42% of all confirmed foodborne outbreaks during the study period. Handling of food by an infected person or carrier (65%) and bare-hand contact with food (35%) were the most commonly identified contributing factors. Outbreak and nonoutbreak restaurants were similar with respect to many characteristics. The major difference was in the presence of a certified kitchen manager (CKM); 32% of outbreak restaurants had a CKM, but 71% of nonoutbreak restaurants had a CKM (odds ratio of 0.2; 95% confidence interval of 0.1 to 0.5). CKMs were associated with the absence of bare-hand contact with foods as a contributing factor, fewer norovirus outbreaks, and the absence of outbreaks associated with Clostridium perfringens. However, neither the presence of a CKM nor the presence of policies regarding employee health significantly affected the identification of an infected person or carrier as a contributing factor. These findings suggest a lack of effective monitoring of employee illness or a lack of commitment to enforcing policies regarding ill food workers. Food safety certification of kitchen managers appears to be an important outbreak prevention measure, and managing food worker illnesses should be emphasized during food safety training programs. PMID:17133814

  16. Germany tracks down source for dangerous E. coli outbreak

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Grinnell, Max

    Number of Rare E. Coli Cases in U.S. Rose Last Yearhttp://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/08/us/08food.htmlEconomic costs of E. Coli outbreakhttp://video.ca.msn.com/watch/video/economic-costs-of-e-coli-outbreak/16ifpbqesEU boosts E. Coli compensation offer for farmershttp://www.dw-world.de/dw/article/0,,15141284,00.htmlQ&A: E. Coli outbreakhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-13600144FightBac!http://www.fightbac.org/Today, Germany's head of their Center for Disease Control, Reinhard Burger said, "It's the bean sprouts." After 29 deaths, thousands taken ill, and produce bans that included Spanish cucumbers, tomatoes, and lettuce, it is believed that they have found the source of one of history's most dangerous outbreaks of E. Coli. Nine countries were affected by the outbreak, including Great Britain, Germany, Spain, Poland, and the United States. Russia recently placed a ban on all EU produce, thus adding an economic crisis to the medical crisis. In Germany, so many people were infected that hospitals struggled to cope, and because it was a new strain and extremely aggressive many health institutions were often offering conflicting advice. Thankfully, German officials seem to have located the source and the hope is that now the spread of this particular strain can be contained. Burger warns that the outbreak is "not yet over" as there "will be new cases coming up." However, with the source of this outbreak found, perhaps the EU, and the rest of the world, can focus on how to prevent these outbreaks in the future.The first link will take visitors to a news article on the recent announcement about bean sprouts from the New York Times. The second link will take visitors to another article from the New York Times which discusses the increasing number of rare E. Coli cases in the U.S. The third link will take visitors to a MSN video that examines the financial toll an E. Coli outbreak can take on produce farmers. The fourth link leads to an article from Deutsche Welle that discusses compensation the EU is offering farmers affected by the outbreak and subsequent produce bans. The fifth link is an informative Q&A from the BBC about E. Coli. The last link will lead visitors to the FightBac! website, a food safety initiative that educates consumers about reducing the risk of food borne illnesses.

  17. Plague outbreak in the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya.

    PubMed

    Tarantola, A; Mollet, T; Gueguen, J; Barboza, P; Bertherat, E

    2009-07-01

    Plague is circulating regularly in localised areas worldwide, causing sporadic cases outside Africa and remains endemic or causes limited outbreaks in some African countries. Furthermore, some notable outbreaks have been reported in Asia in the last 20 years. A limited outbreak with five cases has recently been notified by the health authorities of the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya. PMID:19573511

  18. Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis outbreak at a tertiary referral eye care clinic.

    PubMed

    Montessori, V; Scharf, S; Holland, S; Werker, D H; Roberts, F J; Bryce, E

    1998-08-01

    An outbreak of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) occurred at a tertiary referral eye care clinic between late September and mid-November 1995. Before the outbreak, instruments were cleaned with 70% isopropyl alcohol and handwashing between patients was not routine. Infection control measures were implemented when the outbreak was recognized in mid-October. Control measures included triaging suspected cases to a separate waiting area, cohorting cases to a specific examining room, endorsing the use of gloves and handwashing during examinations of patients, and cleaning instruments with a buffered bleach solution. Thirty-six cases were diagnosed before the infection control measures were taken, and 3 cases were seen after the control measures were taken. Also, numerous secondary cases occurred in the community. No additional cases were diagnosed from DEcember to February 25, 1996. Acquisition of the infection was linked to visits to 4 of 20 physicians in the eye clinic with 61% of cases associated with visits to 1 of those 4 physicians. The use of diagnostic lenses applied directly to the eye was associated with infection (odds ratio = 2.83, 95% confidence interval = 0.79 to 10.4), although this did not reach statistical significance. The use of tonometers, ophthalmic solutions, or laser therapy was not associated with infection, and all environmental cultures were negative. This outbreak emphasizes the need for implementation of routine infection control guidelines to prevent nosocomial transmission of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis and stresses the need for appropriate disinfection of instruments. PMID:9721392

  19. Is dengue severity related to nutritional status?

    PubMed

    Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Nimmannitya, Suchitra

    2005-03-01

    A retrospective review of dengue patients admitted to Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health (previously known as Children's Hospital) from 1995 to 1999 revealed 4,532 confirmed cases of dengue infection; 80.9% were dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and 19.1% were dengue fever cases (DF). Among the DHF patients; 30.6% had shock. The majority of them, 66.6%, had a normal nutritional status, while 9.3% were malnourished and 24.2% had obesity as classified by weight for age. Compared with control patients with other diagnoses (excluding HIV/AIDS patients), malnourished children had a lower risk of contracting dengue infection (odds ratio = 0.48, 95% Cl = 0.39-0.60, p = 0.000) while obese children had a greater risk of infection with dengue viruses (odds ratio = 1.96, 95% Cl = 1.55-2.5, p = 0.000). The clinical signs, symptoms and laboratory findings of dengue were almost the same among the 3 groups of malnourished, normal, and obese patients. The minor differences observed were that in obese children liver enlargement was found less often; maculopapular/convalescence rash and elevations of alanine aminotransferase were found more often. Malnourished patients had a higher risk of developing shock (37.8%) than normal (29.9%) and obese patients (30.2%) (p = 0.000). Obese patients had more unusual presentations: encephalopathy (1.3%) and associated infections (4.8%), than normal (0.5% and 2.7%) and malnourished patients (1.2% and 3.1%). Complications of fluid overload were found more in obese patients (6.5%) compared to normal (3.2%) and malnourished patients (2.1%) (p = 0.000). The case-fatality rates (CFR) in malnourished patients and obese patients were 0.5% and 0.4%, respectively, while in normal patients the CFR was 0.07%. Under and over nutrition DHF patients had either a greater risk of shock or unusual presentations and complications, which can lead to severe disease or complications and probably a higher CFR. PMID:15916044

  20. Canine brucellosis: Outbreaks and compliance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Bruce Hollett

    2006-01-01

    Canine infertility has many causes that must be considered during evaluation of abnormal reproductive function. An important infectious agent is Brucella canis. Classically deemed a major reason of abortion, this organism also produces infertility in stud dogs and poses a potential health hazard to dogs and humans. The State of Georgia has, out of necessity, instigated regulations to manage outbreaks

  1. IMPROVING WATERBORNE DISEASE OUTBREAK INVESTIGATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article summarizes the discussions and conclusions of a workshop held December 7-8, 1998, to consider the inherent limitations and weaknesses of waterborne outbreak investigations and make recommendations for their improvement. In recent years, an increased number of suspec...

  2. Ebola Outbreak Killed 5000 Gorillas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Magdalena Bermejo; José Domingo Rodríguez-Teijeiro; Germán Illera; Alex Barroso; Carles Vilà; Peter D. Walsh

    2006-01-01

    Over the past decade, the Zaire strain of Ebola virus (ZEBOV) has repeatedly emerged in Gabon and Congo. Each human outbreak has been accompanied by reports of gorilla and chimpanzee carcasses in neighboring forests, but both the extent of ape mortality and the causal role of ZEBOV have been hotly debated. Here, we present data suggesting that in 2002 and

  3. Outbreak Ethnography The Anthropologist's Toolkit

    E-print Network

    epidemiologist at Ebola seminar at Pasteur Institute, Paris 2004 The epidemiologist was asking the question during Ebola outbreaks are challenging and relatively unusual for most anthropologists; they challenged abilities to do the Ebola work, but we went into the field with a limited background on the history

  4. Climatic factors associated with epidemic dengue in Palembang, Indonesia: implications of short-term meteorological events on virus transmission.

    PubMed

    Bangs, Michael J; Larasati, Ria P; Corwin, Andrew L; Wuryadi, Suharyono

    2006-11-01

    An extensive outbreak of dengue fever and dengue hemorhagic fever occurred in the city of Palembang, South Sumatra, Indonesia from late 1997 through March/April 1998. All surveyed administrative areas (kelurahan) in Palembang were found to be 'permissive' for dengue virus transmission; and all areas that had Aedes (subgenus Stegomyia) larval mosquitoes in abundance experienced increased cases of DHF during the epidemic. The Aedes House Index (HI) for combined Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus was recorded every 3 months before, during, and after the epidemic. Ten surveyed sentinel sites (October-December 1997) immediately preceding the epidemic peak had a combined HI of 25% (range 10-50.8%). Entomological surveys during the peak epidemic period (January-April) showed a combined HI of 23.7% (range: 7.6-43.8%). Kelurahans with the highest numbers of reported dengue cases had an HI exceeding 25%; however, there was no discernable relationship between elevated HI and increased risk of DHF incidence. Despite the unusual climatic conditions during late 1997 created throughout the region by the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the house indices during both wet and dry months remained above 23% for the 4 quarterly (3-month) periods surveyed in the second half of 1997 and first half of 1998. Rainfall returned to near normal monthly levels shortly before the reported increase in human cases. However, mean ambient air temperatures continued above normal (+0.6 to 1.2 degrees C) and were sustained over the months leading up to and during the epidemic. Evidence suggests that an ENSO-driven increase in ambient temperature had a marked influence on increased virus transmission by the vector population. We explore the apparent associations of entomological and climatic effects that precipitated the epidemic before the influx of reported human cases. PMID:17333762

  5. Severe Dengue Epidemics in Sri Lanka, 2003–2006

    PubMed Central

    Kanakaratne, Nalaka; Wahala, Wahala M.P.B.; Messer, William B.; Tissera, Hasitha A.; Shahani, Aruna; Abeysinghe, Nihal; de Silva, Aravinda M.; Gunasekera, Maya

    2009-01-01

    Recent emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in the Indian subcontinent has been well documented in Sri Lanka. We compare recent (2003–2006) and past (1980–1997) dengue surveillance data for Sri Lanka. The 4 dengue virus (DENV) serotypes have been cocirculating in Sri Lanka for >30 years. Over this period, a new genotype of DENV-1 has replaced an old genotype. Moreover, new clades of DENV-3 genotype III viruses have replaced older clades. Emergence of new clades of DENV-3 in 1989 and 2000 coincided with abrupt increases in the number of reported dengue cases, implicating this serotype in severe epidemics. In 1980–1997, most reported dengue cases were in children. Recent epidemics have been characterized by many cases in children and adults. Changes in local transmission dynamics and genetic changes in DENV-3 are likely increasing emergence of severe dengue epidemics in Sri Lanka. PMID:19193262

  6. NATIONAL PROGRESS IN DENGUE VECTOR CONTROL IN VIETNAM: SURVEY FOR MESOCYCLOPS(COPEPODA), MICRONECTA(CORIXIDAE), AND FISH AS BIOLOGICAL CONTROL AGENTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    VU SINH NAM; NGUYEN THI YEN; MARIA HOLYNSKA; JANET W. REID; BRIAN H. KAY

    This paper describes the process of expanding a successful dengue control program in 3 provinces in northern Vietnam into a national one and demonstrates the presence of a rich, low-cost resource that could have similar applicability to other countries in the region. The cornerstone of the preventive strategy is larval control of Aedes aegypti (L.), the major vector, using predators

  7. The Effects of Weather and Climate Change on Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Colón-González, Felipe J.; Fezzi, Carlo; Lake, Iain R.; Hunter, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Background There is much uncertainty about the future impact of climate change on vector-borne diseases. Such uncertainty reflects the difficulties in modelling the complex interactions between disease, climatic and socioeconomic determinants. We used a comprehensive panel dataset from Mexico covering 23 years of province-specific dengue reports across nine climatic regions to estimate the impact of weather on dengue, accounting for the effects of non-climatic factors. Methods and Findings Using a Generalized Additive Model, we estimated statistically significant effects of weather and access to piped water on dengue. The effects of weather were highly nonlinear. Minimum temperature (Tmin) had almost no effect on dengue incidence below 5°C, but Tmin values above 18°C showed a rapidly increasing effect. Maximum temperature above 20°C also showed an increasing effect on dengue incidence with a peak around 32°C, after which the effect declined. There is also an increasing effect of precipitation as it rose to about 550 mm, beyond which such effect declines. Rising access to piped water was related to increasing dengue incidence. We used our model estimations to project the potential impact of climate change on dengue incidence under three emission scenarios by 2030, 2050, and 2080. An increase of up to 40% in dengue incidence by 2080 was estimated under climate change while holding the other driving factors constant. Conclusions Our results indicate that weather significantly influences dengue incidence in Mexico and that such relationships are highly nonlinear. These findings highlight the importance of using flexible model specifications when analysing weather–health interactions. Climate change may contribute to an increase in dengue incidence. Rising access to piped water may aggravate dengue incidence if it leads to increased domestic water storage. Climate change may therefore influence the success or failure of future efforts against dengue. PMID:24244765

  8. Influenza outbreak in a vaccinated population--USS Ardent, February 2014.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Theodore L; Brice, Gary T; Hayes, Sherry; Myers, Christopher A; McDowell, Jaqueline; White, Brenda; Garten, Rebecca; Johnston, Daniel

    2014-10-24

    On February 10, 2014, the USS Ardent, a U.S. Navy minesweeper, was moored in San Diego, California, while conducting training. Over the course of 3 days, 25 of 102 crew members sought medical care because of influenza-like illness (ILI). Nasal swab specimens were collected from each patient, and initial rapid influenza testing indicated 16 cases of influenza A. Ultimately, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing conducted by the Naval Health Research Center determined that 20 specimens were influenza A, of which 18 were subtype H3N2. Two specimens could not be subtyped. The HA gene sequence of an outbreak isolate was 99% identical to strains circulating during the 2013-14 influenza season and antigenically similar to the H3N2 component of the 2013-14 influenza vaccine. At the time of the outbreak, 99% of the crew had received influenza vaccine. Through the duration of the outbreak, the minesweeper squadron medical officer collaborated with Navy Environmental and Preventive Medicine Unit Five, higher-level Navy authorities, and County of San Diego Public Health Services to implement the outbreak response, which included disseminating outbreak information to surrounding Navy units, disinfecting the ship, sending home infected crew members, identifying family members at high risk, and providing antiviral medications and guidance. No crew member had onset of symptoms >6 days after the first crew member became ill. This outbreak highlights the risk for an H3N2 influenza outbreak among vaccinated and otherwise healthy young persons. PMID:25340911

  9. Listeriosis Outbreaks in British Columbia, Canada, Caused by Soft Ripened Cheese Contaminated from Environmental Sources

    PubMed Central

    Wilcott, Lynn; Naus, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Soft ripened cheese (SRC) caused over 130 foodborne illnesses in British Columbia (BC), Canada, during two separate listeriosis outbreaks. Multiple agencies investigated the events that lead to cheese contamination with Listeria monocytogenes (L.m.), an environmentally ubiquitous foodborne pathogen. In both outbreaks pasteurized milk and the pasteurization process were ruled out as sources of contamination. In outbreak A, environmental transmission of L.m. likely occurred from farm animals to personnel to culture solutions used during cheese production. In outbreak B, birds were identified as likely contaminating the dairy plant's water supply and cheese during the curd-washing step. Issues noted during outbreak A included the risks of operating a dairy plant in a farm environment, potential for transfer of L.m. from the farm environment to the plant via shared toilet facilities, failure to clean and sanitize culture spray bottles, and cross-contamination during cheese aging. L.m. contamination in outbreak B was traced to wild swallows defecating in the plant's open cistern water reservoir and a multibarrier failure in the water disinfection system. These outbreaks led to enhanced inspection and surveillance of cheese plants, test and release programs for all SRC manufactured in BC, improvements in plant design and prevention programs, and reduced listeriosis incidence. PMID:25918702

  10. Antiviral activity of lanatoside C against dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Yan Yi; Chen, Karen Caiyun; Chen, Huixin; Seng, Eng Khuan; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2014-11-01

    Dengue infection poses a serious threat globally due to its recent rapid spread and rise in incidence. Currently, there is no approved vaccine or effective antiviral drug for dengue virus infection. In response to the urgent need for the development of an effective antiviral for dengue virus, the US Drug Collection library was screened in this study to identify compounds with anti-dengue activities. Lanatoside C, an FDA approved cardiac glycoside was identified as a candidate anti-dengue compound. Our data revealed that lanatoside C has an IC50 of 0.19?M for dengue virus infection in HuH-7 cells. Dose-dependent reduction in dengue viral RNA and viral proteins synthesis were also observed upon treatment with increasing concentrations of lanatoside C. Time of addition study indicated that lanatoside C inhibits the early processes of the dengue virus replication cycle. Furthermore, lanatoside C can effectively inhibit all four serotypes of dengue virus, flavivirus Kunjin, alphavirus Chikungunya and Sindbis virus as well as the human enterovirus 71. These findings suggest that lanatoside C possesses broad spectrum antiviral activity against several groups of positive-sense RNA viruses. PMID:25251726

  11. Seir Model for Transmission of Dengue Fever in Selangor Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syafruddin, S.; Noorani, M. S. M.

    In this paper, we study a system of differential equations that models the population dynamics of SEIR vector transmission of dengue fever. The model studied breeding value based on the number of reported cases of dengue fever in Selangor because the state had the highest case in Malaysia. The model explains that maximum level of human infection rate of dengue fever achieved in a very short period. It is also revealed that there existed suitability result between theoretical and empirical calculation using the model. The result of SEIR model will hopefully provide an insight into the spread of dengue fever in Selangor Malaysia and basic form for modeling this area.

  12. Quantitation of dengue precipitating antibody by inhibition countercurrent immunoelectrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Churdboonchart, V; Bhamarapravati, N; Harisdangkul, V; Futrakul, P; Chiengsong, R

    1981-01-01

    The inhibition countercurrent immunoelectrophoresis test was employed to detect dengue virus antibody in patients' sera. Anti-dengue type 2 titers determined by inhibition countercurrent immunoelectrophoresis correlated well with hemagglutination inhibition titers. In secondary cases, more than fourfold increases in precipitating antibodies were observed. The control sera were negative except for sera from a few patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, which showed low titers. Simultaneous detection of dengue virus antigen and antibody in sera collected during the acute phase could confirm at least 90% of cases. This method is recommended as a routine technique to quantitate antibody in sera from suspected cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever. PMID:7240383

  13. Communitywide shigellosis: control of an outbreak and risk factors in child day-care centers.

    PubMed Central

    Mohle-Boetani, J C; Stapleton, M; Finger, R; Bean, N H; Poundstone, J; Blake, P A; Griffin, P M

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The study's objectives were to assess (1) control of a community outbreak of shigellosis through the promotion of handwashing, (2) risk factors in day-care centers, and (3) shigellosis attributable to attendance at a day-care center. METHODS. In 1991, an outbreak of Shigella sonnei infections occurred in Lexington-Fayette County, Ky; 14 licensed child day-care centers were involved. Communitywide promotion of hand washing was instituted along with diarrhea surveillance. A case-control study compared day-care centers that had confirmed cases of shigellosis with centers that had none. A family transmission study determined those cases attributable to attendance at day-care centers. RESULTS. The outbreak abated 3 weeks after the interventions' initiation. Day-care centers with outbreaks were more likely than those with no cases to have a food handler who changed diapers and to provide transportation for children from their homes to the center. These centers also had a higher toddler-to-toilet ratio than control centers (21 vs 12). In 58% of families with shigellosis, the first person with diarrhea during the outbreak was a child younger than 6 years; 92% of diarrheal illnesses among these children were attributable to day-care attendance. CONCLUSIONS. Community involvement in increasing hand washing most likely resulted in control of this shigellosis outbreak. Diarrhea prevention strategies in day-care centers could prevent substantial communitywide disease. PMID:7762715

  14. Screening of Dengue Virus Antiviral Activity of Marine Seaweeds by an In Situ Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Koishi, Andrea Cristine; Zanello, Paula Rodrigues; Bianco, Éverson Miguel; Bordignon, Juliano; Nunes Duarte dos Santos, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is a significant public health problem worldwide. Despite the important social and clinical impact, there is no vaccine or specific antiviral therapy for prevention and treatment of dengue virus (DENV) infection. Considering the above, drug discovery research for dengue is of utmost importance; in addition natural marine products provide diverse and novel chemical structures with potent biological activities that must be evaluated. In this study we propose a target-free approach for dengue drug discovery based on a novel, rapid, and economic in situ enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the screening of a panel of marine seaweed extracts. The in situ ELISA was standardized and validated for Huh7.5 cell line infected with all four serotypes of DENV, among them clinical isolates and a laboratory strain. Statistical analysis showed an average S/B of 7.2 and Z-factor of 0.62, demonstrating assay consistency and reliability. A panel of fifteen seaweed extracts was then screened at the maximum non-toxic dose previously determined by the MTT and Neutral Red cytotoxic assays. Eight seaweed extracts were able to reduce DENV infection of at least one serotype tested. Four extracts (Phaeophyta: Canistrocarpus cervicornis, Padina gymnospora; Rhodophyta: Palisada perforate; Chlorophyta: Caulerpa racemosa) were chosen for further evaluation, and time of addition studies point that they might act at an early stage of the viral infection cycle, such as binding or internalization. PMID:23227238

  15. Outbreak of wound botulism in injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, M; Alpers, K; Van Treeck, U; Frank, C; Rosenkoetter, N; Schaumann, R

    2009-11-01

    Between October and December 2005, 16 cases of wound botulism were notified to the health authorities of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. All patients were injecting drug users (IDU) and the epidemiological investigations suggested contaminated injection drugs as the most probable source of infection. Clostridium botulinum was cultivated from clinical samples of six patients and molecular typing revealed that the different isolates were clonally identical. Two samples of heroin, one of them provided by a patient, were examined but C. botulinum could not be isolated. This outbreak demonstrates that IDU are at risk for acquiring wound botulism by injecting contaminated drugs. A greater awareness of this disease is needed by physicians and a close cooperation between public health authorities, street workers, operators of sheltered injecting facilities, and medical centres focusing on IDU is essential to prevent and manage outbreaks in IDU in a timely manner. PMID:19351433

  16. Linking Oviposition Site Choice to Offspring Fitness in Aedes aegypti: Consequences for Targeted Larval Control of Dengue Vectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jacklyn Wong; Amy C. Morrison; Steven T. Stoddard; Helvio Astete; Yui Yin Chu; Imaan Baseer; Thomas W. Scott

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundCurrent Aedes aegypti larval control methods are often insufficient for preventing dengue epidemics. To improve control efficiency and cost-effectiveness, some advocate eliminating or treating only highly productive containers. The population-level outcome of this strategy, however, will depend on details of Ae. aegypti oviposition behavior.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsWe simultaneously monitored female oviposition and juvenile development in 80 experimental containers located across 20 houses

  17. Souvenirs: Investigating a Disease Outbreak

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Janet Yagoda Shagam (RhizoTech; Biology)

    0000-00-00

    Starting with a case study based on the outbreak of a pulmonary disease in Southwest US, the interactions between human behavior, exposure, and confusing clinical symptoms are highlighted. As we search for the cause, these complications reflect real life difficulty in making diagnoses. The real questions extend beyond what disease has been contracted to cascading effects on the society we live in. * weigh the personal risks of exposure to a potentially fatal virus

  18. First Reported Chikungunya Fever Outbreak in the Republic of Congo, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Pastorino, Boris; Nougairede, Antoine; Thirion, Laurence; Mombouli, Jean-Vivien; Dimi, Yannick; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Lepfoundzou, Amelia Dzia; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Background Chikungunya is an Aedes -borne disease characterised by febrile arthralgia and responsible for massive outbreaks. We present a prospective clinical cohort study and a retrospective serological study relating to a CHIK outbreak, in the Republic of Congo in 2011. Methodology and Findings We analysed 317 suspected cases, of which 308 (97.2%) lived in the city of Brazzaville (66.6% in the South area). Amongst them, 37 (11.7%) were CHIKV+ve patients (i.e., biologically confirmed by a real-time RT-PCR assay), of whom 36 (97.3%) had fever, 22 (66.7%) myalgia and 32 (86.5%) arthralgia. All tested negative for dengue. The distribution of incident cases within Brazzaville districts was compared with CHIKV seroprevalence before the outbreak (34.4% in 517 blood donors), providing evidence for previous circulation of CHIKV. We applied a CHIK clinical score to 126 patients recruited within the two first day of illness (including 28 CHIKV+ves (22.2%)) with sensitivity (78.6%) and specificity (72.4%) values comparing with those of the referent study in Reunion Island. The negative predictive value was high (92%), but the positive predictive value (45%) indicate poor potential contribution to medical practice to identify CHIKV+ve patients in low prevalence outbreaks. However, the score allowed a slightly more accurate follow-up of the evolution of the outbreak than the criterion "fever+arthralgia". The complete sequencing of a Congolase isolate (Brazza_MRS1) demonstrated belonging to the East/Central/South African lineage and was further used for producing a robust genome-scale CHIKV phylogenetic analysis. Conclusions/Significance We describe the first Chikungunya outbreak declared in the Republic of Congo. The seroprevalence study conducted amongst blood donors before outbreak provided evidence for previous CHIKV circulation. We suggest that a more systematic survey of the entomological situation and of arbovirus circulation is necessary in Central Africa for better understanding the environmental, microbiological and sociological determinants of emergence. PMID:25541718

  19. Inflammation of the external ear in acute chikungunya infection: Experience from the outbreak in Johor Bahru, Malaysia, 2008.

    PubMed

    Javelle, Emilie; Tiong, Tee Hua; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Savini, Hélène; Simon, Fabrice

    2014-04-01

    The re-emerging invalidating chikungunya disease has recently extended to temperate areas. Other alphaviruses can also present with febrile arthalgias. Dengue virus transmitted by the same species of mosquitoes may cocirculate, leading to dual infections and concurrent epidemics. Although these diseases share similar clinical features, their prognoses considerably differ. Prominent and prolonged articular disorders are more consistent with chikungunya virus, whereas haemorrhages make the gravity of dengue infection. Specific symptoms are required, especially when diagnostic tests are not available or performable at a large scale. Indeed, early clinical suspicion of a vector-borne disease is crucial to isolate the first cases in the course of an outbreak, and discrimination between arboviruses help to optimal management of patients. No specific chikungunya clinical sign has been yet reported. We highlight here the high prevalence (about 25%) of acute ear redness in infected people during the 2008 chikungunya outbreak in Jahor Bahru in Malaysia. Nine consenting patients are more precisely described. Ear chondritis could be sensitive diagnostic criterion of the acute stage of chikungunya, every physician - even in occidental non endemic areas - should be aware of. PMID:24556566

  20. Co-Circulation of Dengue Virus Type 3 Genotypes in Vientiane Capital, Lao PDR

    PubMed Central

    Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Bounmany, Phaitong; Vongpayloth, Khamsing; Buchy, Philippe; Duong, Veasna; Vanhlasy, Chansamone; Hospied, Jean-Marie; Thongsna, Manichanh; Choumlivong, Khamla; Vongkhamchanh, Phonesavanh; Oudavong, Bounleua; Brey, Paul T.; Grandadam, Marc

    2014-01-01

    During the 2012 epidemic of dengue in Vientiane capital, Lao PDR, a major serotype switch from dengue 1 to 3 was observed. A molecular epidemiology study demonstrated that dengue 3 remained the predominant serotype in 2013, but also revealed the co-circulation of two genotypes, supporting the hypothesis of multiple geographic origins of dengue 3 strains circulating in Vientiane capital. PMID:25551768

  1. Dramatic caspase-dependent apoptosis in antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection of human mast cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael G. Brown; Yan Y. Huang; Jean S. Marshall; Christine A. King; David W. Hoskin; Robert Anderson

    2008-01-01

    Severe forms of dengue virus disease, known as dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome, result from an aberrant immune response involving antibody-dependent enhance- ment of infection, thrombocytopenia, and a loss of vascular integrity, culminating in hemorrhage, shock, and in some cases, death. Several studies have indicated that dengue virus infection results in the induction of apoptosis of certain cells

  2. The economic impact of dengue hemorrhagic fever on family level in Southern Vietnam

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mette Lønstrup Harving; Ho Chi

    Dengue fever is a viral infection transmitted by mosquitoes (Aedes Aegypti). WHO estimates that 40% of the world's population live in areas endemic for dengue fever, and that there are approximately 50 million cases of dengue in- fection worldwide every year. This study aims to measure the economic consequences of dengue hemor- rhagic fever in Southern Vietnam on family level.

  3. Acute kidney injury in dengue virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Muhammad A.M.; Sarwar, Sarfaraz; Chaudry, Muhammad A.; Maqbool, Baila; Khalil, Zarghoona; Tan, Jackson; Yaqub, Sonia; Hussain, Syed A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Dengue is a growing public health problem in Pakistan and acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the least studied complications of dengue virus infection (DVI). The aim of this study was to determine the frequency, severity and predictors of AKI in patients with DVI and to study the impact of AKI on the length of hospital stay and mortality. Methods We retrospectively reviewed medical records of patients aged ?14 years hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of DVI at Aga Khan University Hospital Karachi between January 2008 and December 2010. Binary logistic regression models were constructed to identify factors associated with the development of AKI and to study the impact of AKI on hospital stays of more than 3 days. Results Out of 532 patients, AKI was present in 13.3% (71/532). Approximately two-thirds (64.8%) of these patients had mild AKI and a third (35.2%) had moderate to severe AKI. Independent predictors for AKI were male gender [odds ratio (OD) 4.43; 95% CI 1.92–10.23], presence of dengue hemorrhagic and dengue shock syndrome (DSS, OD 2.14; 95% CI 1.06–4.32), neurological involvement (OD 12.08; 95% CI 2.82–51.77) and prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT, OD 1.81; 95% CI 1.003–3.26). AKI was associated with a length of stay ?3 days when compared with those who did not have AKI (OD 2.98; 95% CI 1.66–5.34). Eight patients (11.3%) with AKI died whereas there were no mortalities in patients without AKI (P < 0.001). Only 5 patients (7%) had persistent kidney dysfunction at discharge. Conclusions AKI in DVI is associated with neurological involvement, prolongation of aPTT, greater length of hospital stay and increased mortality.

  4. Challenges in Dengue Fever in the Elderly: Atypical Presentation and Risk of Severe Dengue and Hospita-Acquired Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Emily K.; Leo, Yee-Sin; Wong, Joshua G. X.; Thein, Tun-Linn; Gan, Victor C.; Lee, Linda K.; Lye, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Background/methods To better understand dengue fever in the elderly, we compared clinical features, World Health Organization (WHO) dengue classification and outcomes between adult (<60) and elderly (?60) dengue patients. We explored the impact of co-morbidity and hospital-acquired infection (HAI) on clinical outcomes in the elderly. All patients managed at the Communicable Disease Centre, Singapore, between 2005 and 2008 with positive dengue polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or who fulfilled WHO 1997 or 2009 probable dengue criteria with positive dengue IgM were included. Results Of the 6989 cases, 295 (4.4%) were elderly. PCR was positive in 29%. The elderly suffered more severe disease with more dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) (29.2% vs. 21.4%) and severe dengue (SD) (20.3% vs. 14.6%) (p<0.05). Classic dengue symptoms were more common in the adult group. The elderly were less likely to fulfill WHO 1997 (93.6% vs. 96.4%) (p?=?0.014), but not WHO 2009 probable dengue (75.3% vs. 71.5%). Time to dengue diagnosis was similar. There was no significant difference in the frequency of warning signs between the two groups, but the elderly were more likely to have hepatomegaly (p?=?0.006) and malaise/lethargy (p?=?0.033) while the adults had significantly more mucosal bleeding (p<0.001). Intensive care admission occurred in 15 and death in three, with no age difference. Notably, the elderly stayed in hospital longer (median 5 vs. 4 days), and suffered more pneumonia (3.8% vs. 0.7%) and urinary infection (1.9% vs. 0.3%) (p?=?0.003). Predictors of excess length of stay were age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.37–2.88), critical illness (aOR 5.13, 95%CI 2.59–9.75), HAI (aOR 12.06, 95%CI 7.39–19.9), Charlson score (aOR 6.9, 95%CI 2.02–22.56) and severe dengue (DHF/dengue shock syndrome/SD) (aOR 2.24, 95%CI 1.83–2.74). Conclusion Elderly dengue patients present atypically and are at higher risk of DHF, SD and HAI. Aside from dengue severity, age, co-morbidity and HAI were associated with longer hospital stay. PMID:24699282

  5. Rare case of acute dengue encephalitis with correlated MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Rishi Philip; Basti, Ram Shenoy; Hegde, Pavan; Devdas, Jaidev M; Khan, Habeeb Ullah; Bukelo, Mario Joseph

    2014-12-01

    Dengue encephalitis is extremely rare, with most patients showing no significant abnormality on neuroimaging (CT/MRI). We report one of the very few documented cases of dengue encephalitis, with abnormal signal intensities on all major sequences on brain MRI. PMID:24767167

  6. Dengue epidemic in Belém, Pará, Brazil, 1996-97.

    PubMed Central

    Trravassos da Rosa, A. P.; Vasconcelos, P. F.; Travassos Da Rosa, E. S.; Rodrigues, S. G.; Mondet, B.; Cruz, A. C.; Sousa, M. R.; Travassos Da Rosa, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    We describe clinical and epidemiologic findings during the first epidemic of dengue fever in Belém, Pará State, Brazil, in 1996-97. Of 40,237 serum samples, 17,440 (43%) were positive for dengue by virus isolation or serologic testing. No hemorrhagic cases or deaths were reported. Mycobacterium tuberculosis PMID:10827121

  7. Climate influence on dengue epidemics in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Jury, Mark R

    2008-10-01

    The variability of the insect-borne disease dengue in Puerto Rico was studied in relation to climatic variables in the period 1979-2005. Annual and monthly reported dengue cases were compared with precipitation and temperature data. Results show that the incidence of dengue in Puerto Rico was relatively constant over time despite global warming, possibly due to the offsetting effects of declining rainfall, improving health care and little change in population. Seasonal fluctuations of dengue were driven by rainfall increases from May to November. Year-to-year variability in dengue cases was positively related to temperature, but only weakly associated with local rainfall and an index of El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Climatic conditions were mapped with respect to dengue cases and patterns in high and low years were compared. During epidemics, a low pressure system east of Florida draws warm humid air over the northwestern Caribbean. Long-term trends in past observed and future projected rainfall and temperatures were studied. Rainfall has declined slowly, but temperatures in the Caribbean are rising with the influence of global warming. Thus, dengue may increase in the future, and it will be necessary to anticipate dengue epidemics using climate forecasts, to reduce adverse health impacts. PMID:18821372

  8. Dengue in the United States of America: A Worsening Scenario?

    PubMed Central

    Rios, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Dengue is a febrile illness caused by any of the four dengue virus types (DENV-1 to -4, genus Flavivirus, family Flaviviridae) mainly transmitted by the mosquito Aedes aegypti. DENV can be transmitted by blood transfusion. Dengue has been historically present in the continental United States (US), in the state of Hawaii, and in the US insular territories in the Caribbean and the Pacific. During the second half of the 20th century, most of the cases reported in the US were imported cases brought to the country by travelers. Since 2009, cases of autochthonous dengue have been recognized in the state of Florida after 75 years of absence, followed by intensification of transmission in endemic places including the US territories of US Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico, which experienced a large dengue epidemic in 2010. The widespread distribution of dengue mosquito vectors, deficient mosquito control measures and increased frequency of DENV-infected visitors to the US coming from dengue-endemic locations or places experiencing epidemics appear to be jointly responsible for the emergence and reemergence of dengue in the US and its territories. PMID:23865061

  9. The GOOD-BYE TO DENGUE GAME: Debriefing Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennon, Jeffrey L.; Coombs, David W.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the use of postgame debriefing of a health educational board game activity on dengue fever in a Filipino student population. The debriefing used a series of specific open-ended questions, exploring students' feelings about the game and game-related questionnaires, students' perceptions of important information about dengue from…

  10. Performance of the tourniquet test for diagnosing dengue in Peru.

    PubMed

    Halsey, Eric S; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Forshey, Brett M; Rocha, Claudio; Bazan, Isabel; Stoddard, Steven T; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Casapia, Martin; Scott, Thomas W; Morrison, Amy C

    2013-07-01

    The tourniquet test (TT) is a physical examination maneuver often performed on patients suspected of having dengue. It has been incorporated into dengue diagnostic guidelines and is used in clinical studies. However, little is known about TT performance characteristics in different patient types or epidemiologic conditions. In the dengue-endemic city of Iquitos, Peru, we performed TTs and dengue laboratory assays on 13,548 persons with febrile disease, recruited through either active (n = 1,095) or passive (n = 12,453) surveillance. The sensitivity was 52% and 56%, the specificity was 58% and 68%, the positive predictive value was 45% and 55%, and the negative predictive value was 64% and 69% for persons enrolled in active and passive surveillance, respectively. We demonstrated that the TT was more sensitive identifying dengue disease in women and those of younger age and that sensitivity increased the later a person came to a medical clinic for care. PMID:23716410

  11. Performance of the Tourniquet Test for Diagnosing Dengue in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Halsey, Eric S.; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Forshey, Brett M.; Rocha, Claudio; Bazan, Isabel; Stoddard, Steven T.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Casapia, Martin; Scott, Thomas W.; Morrison, Amy C.

    2013-01-01

    The tourniquet test (TT) is a physical examination maneuver often performed on patients suspected of having dengue. It has been incorporated into dengue diagnostic guidelines and is used in clinical studies. However, little is known about TT performance characteristics in different patient types or epidemiologic conditions. In the dengue-endemic city of Iquitos, Peru, we performed TTs and dengue laboratory assays on 13,548 persons with febrile disease, recruited through either active (n = 1,095) or passive (n = 12,453) surveillance. The sensitivity was 52% and 56%, the specificity was 58% and 68%, the positive predictive value was 45% and 55%, and the negative predictive value was 64% and 69% for persons enrolled in active and passive surveillance, respectively. We demonstrated that the TT was more sensitive identifying dengue disease in women and those of younger age and that sensitivity increased the later a person came to a medical clinic for care. PMID:23716410

  12. Sequential Episodes of Dengue—Puerto Rico, 2005–2010

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Tyler M.; Hunsperger, Elizabeth; Muñoz-Jordán, Jorge L.; Margolis, Harold S.; Tomashek, Kay M.

    2014-01-01

    Of 53,633 suspected dengue cases reported to a passive dengue surveillance system in Puerto Rico during 2005–2010, 949 individuals were reported on more than one occasion and 21 had laboratory-confirmed dengue on two separate occasions. Median time between illness episodes was 2.9 years (range: 62 days–5.3 years). Seventeen (81%) individuals with sequential episodes of dengue were male, and seven (33%) were adults. All 21 individuals experienced one episode and seven (33%) individuals experienced both episodes during a large epidemic that occurred in 2010. These observations show that heterotypic dengue virus immunity that protects against illness may have considerable variability but typically does not last longer than 3 years. PMID:24891464

  13. Lack of association of dengue activity with haze.

    PubMed

    Wilder-Smith, A; Earnest, A; Tan, S B; Ooi, E E; Gubler, D J

    2010-07-01

    Dengue activity depends on fluctuations in Aedes populations which in turn are known to be influenced by climate factors including temperature, humidity and rainfall. It has been hypothesized that haze may reduce dengue transmission. Due to its geographical location Singapore suffers almost every year from hazes caused by wildfires from Indonesia. Such hazes have a significant impact on pollution indexes in Singapore. We set out to study the relationship of dengue activity and haze (measured as pollution standard index) in Singapore, using ARIMA models. We ran different univariate models, each encompassing a different lag period for the effects of haze and temperature (from lag 0 to lag 12 weeks). We analysed the data on a natural logarithmic scale to stabilize the variance and improve the estimation. No association between dengue activity and haze was found. Our findings do not lend support to the hypothesis that haze is associated with reduced dengue activity in Singapore. PMID:20370955

  14. Dengue Infection Increases the Locomotor Activity of Aedes aegypti Females

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Paula M.; Castro, Márcia G.; Lourenço-de-Oliveira, Ricardo; Sorgine, Marcos H. F.; Peixoto, Alexandre A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Aedes aegypti is the main vector of the virus causing Dengue fever, a disease that has increased dramatically in importance in recent decades, affecting many tropical and sub-tropical areas of the globe. It is known that viruses and other parasites can potentially alter vector behavior. We investigated whether infection with Dengue virus modifies the behavior of Aedes aegypti females with respect to their activity level. Methods/Principal Findings We carried out intrathoracic Dengue 2 virus (DENV-2) infections in Aedes aegypti females and recorded their locomotor activity behavior. We observed an increase of up to ?50% in the activity of infected mosquitoes compared to the uninfected controls. Conclusions Dengue infection alters mosquito locomotor activity behavior. We speculate that the higher levels of activity observed in infected Aedes aegypti females might involve the circadian clock. Further studies are needed to assess whether this behavioral change could have implications for the dynamics of Dengue virus transmission. PMID:21408119

  15. Modeling the impact on virus transmission of Wolbachia-mediated blocking of dengue virus infection of Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Neil M.; Kien, Duong Thi Hue; Clapham, Hannah; Aguas, Ricardo; Trung, Vu Tuan; Chau, Tran Nguyen Bich; Popovici, Jean; Ryan, Peter A.; O’Neill, Scott L.; McGraw, Elizabeth A.; Long, Vo Thi; Dui, Le Thi; Nguyen, Hoa L; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Wills, Bridget; Simmons, Cameron P.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is the most common arboviral infection of humans and a public health burden in over 100 countries. Aedes aegypti mosquitoes stably infected with strains of the intracellular bacterium Wolbachia are resistant to dengue virus (DENV) infection and are being tested in field trials. To mimic field conditions, we experimentally assessed the vector competence of A. aegypti carrying the Wolbachia strains wMel and wMelPop after challenge with viremic blood from dengue patients. We found that wMelPop conferred strong resistance to DENV infection of mosquito abdomen tissue and largely prevented disseminated infection. wMel conferred less resistance to infection of mosquito abdomen tissue, but importantly did reduce the prevalence of mosquitoes with infectious saliva. A mathematical model of DENV transmission incorporating the dynamics of viral infection within humans and mosquitoes was fitted to the data collected. Model predictions suggested that wMel would reduce the basic reproduction number, R0, of DENV transmission by 66–75%. Our results suggest that establishment of wMelPop-infected A. aegypti at high frequency in a dengue endemic setting would result in complete abatement of DENV transmission. Establishment of wMel-infected A. aegypti is also predicted to have a substantial effect on transmission that would be sufficient to eliminate dengue in low or moderate transmission settings, but may be insufficient to achieve complete control in settings where R0 is high. These findings develop a framework for selecting Wolbachia strains for field releases and for calculating their likely impact. PMID:25787763

  16. Modeling the impact on virus transmission of Wolbachia-mediated blocking of dengue virus infection of Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Neil M; Kien, Duong Thi Hue; Clapham, Hannah; Aguas, Ricardo; Trung, Vu Tuan; Chau, Tran Nguyen Bich; Popovici, Jean; Ryan, Peter A; O'Neill, Scott L; McGraw, Elizabeth A; Long, Vo Thi; Dui, Le Thi; Nguyen, Hoa L; Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh; Wills, Bridget; Simmons, Cameron P

    2015-03-18

    Dengue is the most common arboviral infection of humans and is a public health burden in more than 100 countries. Aedes aegypti mosquitoes stably infected with strains of the intracellular bacterium Wolbachia are resistant to dengue virus (DENV) infection and are being tested in field trials. To mimic field conditions, we experimentally assessed the vector competence of A. aegypti carrying the Wolbachia strains wMel and wMelPop after challenge with viremic blood from dengue patients. We found that wMelPop conferred strong resistance to DENV infection of mosquito abdomen tissue and largely prevented disseminated infection. wMel conferred less resistance to infection of mosquito abdomen tissue, but it did reduce the prevalence of mosquitoes with infectious saliva. A mathematical model of DENV transmission incorporating the dynamics of viral infection in humans and mosquitoes was fitted to the data collected. Model predictions suggested that wMel would reduce the basic reproduction number, R0, of DENV transmission by 66 to 75%. Our results suggest that establishment of wMelPop-infected A. aegypti at a high frequency in a dengue-endemic setting would result in the complete abatement of DENV transmission. Establishment of wMel-infected A. aegypti is also predicted to have a substantial effect on transmission that would be sufficient to eliminate dengue in low or moderate transmission settings but may be insufficient to achieve complete control in settings where R0 is high. These findings develop a framework for selecting Wolbachia strains for field releases and for calculating their likely impact. PMID:25787763

  17. Dengue Patients at the Children's Hospital, Bangkok: 1995-1999 Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Siripen Kalayanarooj; Vanya Chansiriwongs; Suchitra Nimmannitya

    A retrospective review was done of 5,332 patients who were admitted to the Children's Hospital (Inpatient Department-IPD) with the diagnosis of dengue fever (DF)\\/dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) between 1995-1999. During the same period, 17,908 dengue patients were seen at the Outpatient Department (OPD). The OPD:IPD ratio of dengue patients was about 3:1. Dengue viruses were identified in 2,398 cases (50.6%).

  18. NS 1 gene sequences from eight dengue-2 viruses and their evolutionary relationships with other dengue-2 viruses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Blok; A. J. Gibbs; S. M. McWilliam; U. T. Vitarana

    1991-01-01

    Summary The nucleotide sequences of the NS 1 genes from five Thai and three Sri Lankan dengue-2 viruses were determined by sequencing the viral RNA using synthetic oligonucleotide primers. The results were shown to be similar to four published dengue-2 NS 1 sequences and the classification of these genes was compared with the one obtained for the envelope genes of

  19. Evaluation of dengue fever reports during an epidemic, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Vega, Liliana; Pacheco, Oscar; de la Hoz-Restrepo, Fernando; Díaz-Quijano, Fredi Alexander

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the validity of dengue fever reports and how they relate to the definition of case and severity. METHODS Diagnostic test assessment was conducted using cross-sectional sampling from a universe of 13,873 patients treated during the fifth epidemiological period in health institutions from 11 Colombian departments in 2013. The test under analyses was the reporting to the National Public Health Surveillance System, and the reference standard was the review of histories identified by active institutional search. We reviewed all histories of patients diagnosed with dengue fever, as well as a random sample of patients with febrile syndromes. The specificity and sensitivity of reports were estimated for this purpose, considering the inverse of the probability of being selected for weighting. The concordance between reporting and the findings of the active institutional search was calculated using Kappa statistics. RESULTS We included 4,359 febrile patients, and 31.7% were classified as compatible with dengue fever (17 with severe dengue fever; 461 with dengue fever and warning signs; 904 with dengue fever and no warning signs). The global sensitivity of reports was 13.2% (95%CI 10.9;15.4) and specificity was 98.4% (95%CI 97.9;98.9). Sensitivity varied according to severity: 12.1% (95%CI 9.3;14.8) for patients presenting dengue fever with no warning signs; 14.5% (95%CI 10.6;18.4) for those presenting dengue fever with warning signs, and 40.0% (95%CI 9.6;70.4) for those with severe dengue fever. Concordance between reporting and the findings of the active institutional search resulted in a Kappa of 10.1%. CONCLUSIONS Low concordance was observed between reporting and the review of clinical histories, which was associated with the low reporting of dengue fever compatible cases, especially milder cases. PMID:26039392

  20. Evaluation of commercially available diagnostic tests for the detection of dengue virus NS1 antigen and anti-dengue virus IgM antibody.

    PubMed

    Hunsperger, Elizabeth A; Yoksan, Sutee; Buchy, Philippe; Nguyen, Vinh Chau; Sekaran, Shamala Devi; Enria, Delia A; Vazquez, Susana; Cartozian, Elizabeth; Pelegrino, Jose L; Artsob, Harvey; Guzman, Maria G; Olliaro, Piero; Zwang, Julien; Guillerm, Martine; Kliks, Susie; Halstead, Scott; Peeling, Rosanna W; Margolis, Harold S

    2014-10-01

    Commercially available diagnostic test kits for detection of dengue virus (DENV) non-structural protein 1 (NS1) and anti-DENV IgM were evaluated for their sensitivity and specificity and other performance characteristics by a diagnostic laboratory network developed by World Health Organization (WHO), the UNICEF/UNDP/World Bank/WHO Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) and the Pediatric Dengue Vaccine Initiative (PDVI). Each network laboratory contributed characterized serum specimens for the panels used in the evaluation. Microplate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and rapid diagnostic test (RDT formats) were represented by the kits. Each ELISA was evaluated by 2 laboratories and RDTs were evaluated by at least 3 laboratories. The reference tests for IgM anti-DENV were laboratory developed assays produced by the Armed Forces Research Institute for Medical Science (AFRIMS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the NS1 reference test was reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results were analyzed to determine sensitivity, specificity, inter-laboratory and inter-reader agreement, lot-to-lot variation and ease-of-use. NS1 ELISA sensitivity was 60-75% and specificity 71-80%; NS1 RDT sensitivity was 38-71% and specificity 76-80%; the IgM anti-DENV RDTs sensitivity was 30-96%, with a specificity of 86-92%, and IgM anti-DENV ELISA sensitivity was 96-98% and specificity 78-91%. NS1 tests were generally more sensitive in specimens from the acute phase of dengue and in primary DENV infection, whereas IgM anti-DENV tests were less sensitive in secondary DENV infections. The reproducibility of the NS1 RDTs ranged from 92-99% and the IgM anti-DENV RDTs from 88-94%. PMID:25330157

  1. Evaluation of Commercially Available Diagnostic Tests for the Detection of Dengue Virus NS1 Antigen and Anti-Dengue Virus IgM Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Hunsperger, Elizabeth A.; Yoksan, Sutee; Buchy, Philippe; Nguyen, Vinh Chau; Sekaran, Shamala Devi; Enria, Delia A.; Vazquez, Susana; Cartozian, Elizabeth; Pelegrino, Jose L.; Artsob, Harvey; Guzman, Maria G.; Olliaro, Piero; Zwang, Julien; Guillerm, Martine; Kliks, Susie; Halstead, Scott; Peeling, Rosanna W.; Margolis, Harold S.

    2014-01-01

    Commercially available diagnostic test kits for detection of dengue virus (DENV) non-structural protein 1 (NS1) and anti-DENV IgM were evaluated for their sensitivity and specificity and other performance characteristics by a diagnostic laboratory network developed by World Health Organization (WHO), the UNICEF/UNDP/World Bank/WHO Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) and the Pediatric Dengue Vaccine Initiative (PDVI). Each network laboratory contributed characterized serum specimens for the panels used in the evaluation. Microplate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and rapid diagnostic test (RDT formats) were represented by the kits. Each ELISA was evaluated by 2 laboratories and RDTs were evaluated by at least 3 laboratories. The reference tests for IgM anti-DENV were laboratory developed assays produced by the Armed Forces Research Institute for Medical Science (AFRIMS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the NS1 reference test was reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results were analyzed to determine sensitivity, specificity, inter-laboratory and inter-reader agreement, lot-to-lot variation and ease-of-use. NS1 ELISA sensitivity was 60–75% and specificity 71–80%; NS1 RDT sensitivity was 38–71% and specificity 76–80%; the IgM anti-DENV RDTs sensitivity was 30–96%, with a specificity of 86–92%, and IgM anti-DENV ELISA sensitivity was 96–98% and specificity 78–91%. NS1 tests were generally more sensitive in specimens from the acute phase of dengue and in primary DENV infection, whereas IgM anti-DENV tests were less sensitive in secondary DENV infections. The reproducibility of the NS1 RDTs ranged from 92-99% and the IgM anti-DENV RDTs from 88–94%. PMID:25330157

  2. Threat of dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever to Egypt from travelers.

    PubMed

    El-Bahnasawy, Mamdouh M; Khalil, Hazem H M; Morsy, Ayman T A; Morsy, Tosson A

    2011-08-01

    Dengue (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fevers (DHF) are present in urban and suburban areas in the Americas, South-East Asia, the Eastern Mediterranean and the Western Pacific, but dengue fever is present mainly in the rural areas of Africa. Several factors have combined to produce epidemiological conditions in developing countries in the tropics and subtropics that favour viral transmission by the main mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti as the rapid population growth, rural-urban migration, inadequate basic urban infrastructure (eg. the unreliable water supply leading householders to store water in containers close to homes) and the increase in volume of solid waste, such as discarded plastic containers and other abandoned items which provide larval habitats in urban areas. Geographical expansion of the mosquito has been aided by the international commercial trade particularly in used car-tyres which easily accumulate rainwater. Increased air travel and the breakdown of vector control measures have also contributed greatly to the global burden of dengue and DH fevers. The presence of Ae. aegypti and endemicity of DF and DHF in the neighbor- ing regional countries must be in mind of the Public Health Authorities. PMID:21980768

  3. Mycoplasma pneumoniae outbreak in a long-term care facility--Nebraska, 2014.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Deborah L; Harrington, Kari J; Kutty, Preeta K; Rayman, Rebecca J; Spindola, Dana; Diaz, Maureen H; Thurman, Kathleen A; Winchell, Jonas M; Safranek, Thomas J

    2015-03-27

    On June 20, 2014, a Nebraska long-term care facility notified the East Central District Health Department (ECDHD) and Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services (NDHHS) of an outbreak of respiratory illness characterized by cough and fever in 22 residents and resulting in four deaths during the preceding 2 weeks. To determine the etiologic agent, identify additional cases, and implement control measures, Nebraska and CDC investigators evaluated the facility's infection prevention measures and collected nasopharyngeal (NP) and oropharyngeal (OP) swabs or autopsy specimens from patients for real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing at CDC. The facility was closed to new admissions until 1 month after the last case, droplet precautions were implemented, ill residents were isolated, and group activities were canceled. During the outbreak, a total of 55 persons experienced illnesses that met the case definition; 12 were hospitalized, and seven died. PCR detected Mycoplasma pneumoniae DNA in 40% of specimens. M. pneumoniae should be considered a possible cause of respiratory illness outbreaks in long-term care facilities. Morbidity and mortality from respiratory disease outbreaks at long-term care facilities might be minimized if facilities monitor for respiratory disease clusters, report outbreaks promptly, prioritize diagnostic testing in outbreak situations, and implement timely and strict infection control measures to halt transmission. PMID:25811678

  4. Outbreak of Rickettsia typhi infection - Austin, Texas, 2008.

    PubMed

    2009-11-20

    Murine typhus is a fleaborne rickettsial disease caused by the organism Rickettsia typhi. Symptoms include fever, headache, chills, vomiting, nausea, myalgia, and rash. Although murine typhus is endemic in southern Texas, only two cases had been reported during the past 10 years from Austin, located in central Texas. On August 8, 2008, the Austin/Travis County Department of Health and Human Services (ATCDHHS) contacted the Texas Department of State Health Services (TDSHS) concerning a cluster of 14 illnesses with serologic findings indicative of murine typhus. On August 12, 2008, TDSHS initiated an investigation with assistance from CDC to characterize the magnitude of the outbreak and assess potential animal reservoirs and peridomestic factors that might have contributed to disease. This report summarizes the clinical and environmental findings of that investigation. Thirty-three confirmed cases involved illness comparable to that associated with previous outbreaks of murine typhus. Illness ranged from mild to severe, with 73% of patients requiring hospitalization. Delayed diagnosis and administration of no or inappropriate antibiotics might have contributed to illness severity. Environmental investigation suggested that opossums and domestic animals likely played a role in the maintenance and spread of R. typhi; however, their precise role in the outbreak has not been determined. These findings underscore the need to increase awareness of murine typhus and communicate appropriate treatment and prevention measures through the distribution of typhus alerts before and throughout the peak vector season of March-November. PMID:19940832

  5. Outbreak of Clostridium difficile Infections at an Outpatient Hemodialysis Facility-Michigan, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    See, Isaac; Bagchi, Suparna; Booth, Stephanie; Scholz, Daniel; Geller, Andrew I; Anderson, Lydia; Moulton-Meissner, Heather; Finks, Jennie L; Kelley, Karen; Gould, Carolyn V; Patel, Priti R

    2015-08-01

    Investigation of an outbreak of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) at a hemodialysis facility revealed evidence that limited intrafacility transmission occurred despite adherence to published infection control standards for dialysis clinics. Outpatient dialysis facilities should consider CDI prevention, including environmental disinfection for C. difficile, when formulating their infection control plans. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2015;36(8):972-974. PMID:25913501

  6. [A study on investigation of an outbreak of Paederus dermatitis in the city of Yantai].

    PubMed

    Li, S R

    1990-05-01

    This paper reports on an outbreak of paederus dermatitis occurring the Chinese Coaleconomy College at the suburbs of Yantai in September 1987. The incidence rate was 35.02 percent. The clinical characteristics of paederus dermatitis were described and the ecology of paederuses was studied. That provided scientific basis for prevention and treatment of this disease. PMID:2253522

  7. Outbreak-associated Vibrio cholerae Genotypes with Identical Pulsotypes, Malaysia, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Cindy Shuan Ju; Suhaili, Zarizal; Lim, King Ting; Khamaruddin, Muhamad Afif; Yahya, Fariha; Sajili, Mohd Hailmi; Yeo, Chew Chieng

    2012-01-01

    A cholera outbreak in Terengganu, Malaysia, in November 2009 was caused by 2 El Tor Vibrio cholerae variants resistant to typical antimicrobial drugs. Evidence of replacement of treatable V. cholerae infection in the region with antimicrobial-resistant strains calls for increased surveillance and prevention measures. PMID:22709679

  8. A Review of Gastrointestinal Outbreaks in Schools: Effective Infection Control Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Marilyn B.; Greig, Judy D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to review documented outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness in schools, published in the last 10 years, to identify etiology, mode of transmission, the number of children affected, morbidity and mortality patterns, and interventions for control and prevention. Methods: Searches of electronic databases,…

  9. A WATERBORNE SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM OUTBREAK IN GIDEON, MISSOURI: RESULTS FROM A FIELD INVESTIGATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A waterborne disease outbreak associated with Salmonella typhimurium was identified in Gideon, Missouri (population 1104), a town in southeastern Missouri (USA) in December, 1993. It was estimated by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that approximately 44% o...

  10. Apropos: ‘Preliminary evaluation on the efficiency of the kit Platelia Dengue NS1 Ag-ELISA to detect dengue virus in dried Aedes aegypti: a potential tool to improve dengue surveillance’

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Only simple, point-of-care, assay formats of the Platellia Dengue NS1 Ag-ELISA would be suitable to identify Dengue virus in?Aedes aegypti?mosquitoes in dengue-endemic areas lacking sophisticated laboratory infrastructure and trained laboratory personnel. PMID:24779373

  11. Comparison of real-time SYBR green dengue assay with real-time taqman RT-PCR dengue assay and the conventional nested PCR for diagnosis of primary and secondary dengue infection

    PubMed Central

    Paudel, Damodar; Jarman, Richard; Limkittikul, Kriengsak; Klungthong, Chonticha; Chamnanchanunt, Supat; Nisalak, Ananda; Gibbons, Robert; Chokejindachai, Watcharee

    2011-01-01

    Background: Dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever are caused by dengue virus. Dengue infection remains a burning problem of many countries. To diagnose acute dengue in the early phase we improve the low cost, rapid SYBR green real time assay and compared the sensitivity and specificity with real time Taqman® assay and conventional nested PCR assay. Aims: To develop low cost, rapid and reliable real time SYBR green diagnostic dengue assay and compare with Taqman real-time assay and conventional nested PCR (modified Lanciotti). Materials and Methods: Eight cultured virus strains were diluted in tenth dilution down to undetectable level by the PCR to optimize the primer, temperature (annealing, and extension and to detect the limit of detection of the assay. Hundred and ninety three ELISA and PCR proved dengue clinical samples were tested with real time SYBR® Green assay, real time Taqman® assay to compare the sensitivity and specificity. Results: Sensitivity and specificity of real time SYBR® green dengue assay (84% and 66%, respectively) was almost comparable to those (81% and 74%) of Taqman real time PCR dengue assay. Real time SYBR® green RT-PCR was equally sensitive in primary and secondary infection while real time Taqman was less sensitive in the secondary infection. Sensitivity of real time Taqman on DENV3 (87%) was equal to SYBR green real time PCR dengue assay. Conclusion: We developed low cost rapid diagnostic SYBR green dengue assay. Further study is needed to make duplex primer assay for the serotyping of dengue virus. PMID:22363089

  12. Evaluation of dengue virus strains for human challenge studies.

    PubMed

    Mammen, M P; Lyons, A; Innis, B L; Sun, W; McKinney, D; Chung, R C Y; Eckels, K H; Putnak, R; Kanesa-thasan, N; Scherer, J M; Statler, J; Asher, L V; Thomas, S J; Vaughn, D W

    2014-03-14

    Discordance between the measured levels of dengue virus neutralizing antibody and clinical outcomes in the first-ever efficacy study of a dengue tetravalent vaccine (Lancet, Nov 2012) suggests a need to re-evaluate the process of pre-screening dengue vaccine candidates to better predict clinical benefit prior to large-scale vaccine trials. In the absence of a reliable animal model and established correlates of protection for dengue, a human dengue virus challenge model may provide an approach to down-select vaccine candidates based on their ability to reduce risk of illness following dengue virus challenge. We report here the challenge of flavivirus-naïve adults with cell culture-passaged dengue viruses (DENV) in a controlled setting that resulted in uncomplicated dengue fever (DF). This sets the stage for proof-of-concept efficacy studies that allow the evaluation of dengue vaccine candidates in healthy adult volunteers using qualified DENV challenge strains well before they reach field efficacy trials involving children. Fifteen flavivirus-naïve adult volunteers received 1 of 7 DENV challenge strains (n=12) or placebo (n=3). Of the twelve volunteers who received challenge strains, five (two DENV-1 45AZ5 and three DENV-3 CH53489 cl24/28 recipients) developed DF, prospectively defined as ?2 typical symptoms, ?48h of sustained fever (>100.4°F) and concurrent viremia. Based on our study and historical data, we conclude that the DENV-1 and DENV-3 strains can be advanced as human challenge strains. Both of the DENV-2 strains and one DENV-4 strain failed to meet the protocol case definition of DF. The other two DENV-4 strains require additional testing as the illness approximated but did not satisfy the case definition of DF. Three volunteers exhibited effusions (1 pleural/ascites, 2 pericardial) and 1 volunteer exhibited features of dengue (rash, lymphadenopathy, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia), though in the absence of fever and symptoms. The occurrence of effusions in milder DENV infections counters the long-held belief that plasma leakage syndromes are restricted to dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndromes (DHF/DSS). Hence, the human dengue challenge model may be useful not only for predicting the efficacy of vaccine and therapeutic candidates in small adult cohorts, but also for contributing to our further understanding of the mechanisms behind protection and virulence. PMID:24468542

  13. Time-varying, serotype-specific force of infection of dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Robert C; Stoddard, Steven T; Forshey, Brett M; King, Aaron A; Ellis, Alicia M; Lloyd, Alun L; Long, Kanya C; Rocha, Claudio; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Astete, Helvio; Bazan, Isabel; Lenhart, Audrey; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M; Paz-Soldan, Valerie A; McCall, Philip J; Kitron, Uriel; Elder, John P; Halsey, Eric S; Morrison, Amy C; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Scott, Thomas W

    2014-07-01

    Infectious disease models play a key role in public health planning. These models rely on accurate estimates of key transmission parameters such as the force of infection (FoI), which is the per-capita risk of a susceptible person being infected. The FoI captures the fundamental dynamics of transmission and is crucial for gauging control efforts, such as identifying vaccination targets. Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne, multiserotype pathogen that currently infects ?390 million people a year. Existing estimates of the DENV FoI are inaccurate because they rely on the unrealistic assumption that risk is constant over time. Dengue models are thus unreliable for designing vaccine deployment strategies. Here, we present to our knowledge the first time-varying (daily), serotype-specific estimates of DENV FoIs using a spline-based fitting procedure designed to examine a 12-y, longitudinal DENV serological dataset from Iquitos, Peru (11,703 individuals, 38,416 samples, and 22,301 serotype-specific DENV infections from 1999 to 2010). The yearly DENV FoI varied markedly across time and serotypes (0-0.33), as did daily basic reproductive numbers (0.49-4.72). During specific time periods, the FoI fluctuations correlated across serotypes, indicating that different DENV serotypes shared common transmission drivers. The marked variation in transmission intensity that we detected indicates that intervention targets based on one-time estimates of the FoI could underestimate the level of effort needed to prevent disease. Our description of dengue virus transmission dynamics is unprecedented in detail, providing a basis for understanding the persistence of this rapidly emerging pathogen and improving disease prevention programs. PMID:24847073

  14. Assessing the environmental health relevance of cooling towers--a systematic review of legionellosis outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Walser, Sandra M; Gerstner, Doris G; Brenner, Bernhard; Höller, Christiane; Liebl, Bernhard; Herr, Caroline E W

    2014-03-01

    Bioaerosols from cooling towers are often suspected to cause community-acquired legionellosis outbreaks. Although Legionella infections can mostly be assigned to the emission sources, uncertainty exists about the release and distribution into the air, the occurrence of the respirable virulent form and the level of the infective concentration. Our study aimed to evaluate studies on legionellosis outbreaks attributed to cooling towers published within the last 11 years by means of a systematic review of the literature. 19 legionellosis outbreaks were identified affecting 12 countries. Recurring events were observed in Spain and Great Britain. In total, 1609 confirmed cases of legionellosis and a case-fatality rate of approximately 6% were reported. Duration of outbreaks was 65 days on average. For diagnosis the urinary antigen test was mainly used. Age, smoking, male sex and underlying diseases (diabetes, immunodeficiency) could be confirmed as risk factors. Smoking and underlying diseases were the most frequent risk factors associated with legionellosis in 11 and 10 of the 19 studies, respectively. The meteorological conditions varied strongly. Several studies reported a temporal association of outbreaks with inadequate maintenance of the cooling systems. A match of clinical and environmental isolates by serotyping and/or molecular subtyping could be confirmed in 84% of outbreaks. Legionella-contaminated cooling towers as environmental trigger, in particular in the neighbourhood of susceptible individuals, can cause severe health problems and even death. To prevent and control Legionella contamination of cooling towers, maintenance actions should focus on low-emission cleaning procedures of cooling towers combined with control measurements of water and air samples. Procedures allowing rapid detection and risk assessment in the case of outbreaks are essential for adequate public health measures. Systematic registration of cooling towers will facilitate the identification of the source of outbreaks and help to shorten their duration. PMID:24100053

  15. Outbreaks of unexplained neurologic illness - Muzaffarpur, India, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Aakash; Srikantiah, Padmini; Kumar, Anil; Bhushan, Gyan; Goel, Kapil; Kumar, Satish; Kumar, Tripurari; Mohankumar, Raju; Pandey, Rajesh; Pathan, Parvez; Tulsian, Yogita; Pappanna, Mohan; Pasi, Achhelal; Pradhan, Arghya; Singh, Pankaj; Somashekar, D; Velayudhan, Anoop; Yadav, Rajesh; Chhabra, Mala; Mittal, Veena; Khare, Shashi; Sejvar, James J; Dwivedi, Mayank; Laserson, Kayla; Earhart, Kenneth C; Sivaperumal, P; Kumar, A Ramesh; Chakrabarti, Amit; Thomas, Jerry; Schier, Joshua; Singh, Ram; Singh, Ravi Shankar; Dhariwal, A C; Chauhan, L S

    2015-01-30

    Outbreaks of an unexplained acute neurologic illness affecting young children and associated with high case-fatality rates have been reported in the Muzaffarpur district of Bihar state in India since 1995. The outbreaks generally peak in June and decline weeks later with the onset of monsoon rains. There have been multiple epidemiologic and laboratory investigations of this syndrome, leading to a wide spectrum of proposed causes for the illness, including infectious encephalitis and exposure to pesticides. An association between illness and litchi fruit has been postulated because Muzaffarpur is a litchi fruit-producing region. To better characterize clinical and epidemiologic features of the illness that might suggest its cause and how it can be prevented, the Indian National Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) and CDC investigated outbreaks in 2013 and 2014. Clinical and laboratory findings in 2013 suggested a noninflammatory encephalopathy, possibly caused by a toxin. A common laboratory finding was low blood glucose (<70 mg/dL) on admission, a finding associated with a poorer outcome; 44% of all cases were fatal. An ongoing 2014 investigation has found no evidence of any infectious etiology and supports the possibility that exposure to a toxin might be the cause. The outbreak period coincides with the month-long litchi harvesting season in Muzaffarpur. Although a specific etiology has not yet been determined, the 2014 investigation has identified the illness as a hypoglycemic encephalopathy and confirmed the importance of ongoing laboratory evaluation of environmental toxins to identify a potential causative agent, including markers for methylenecyclopropylglycine (MCPG), a compound found in litchi seeds known to cause hypoglycemia in animal studies. Current public health recommendations are focused on reducing mortality by urging affected families to seek prompt medical care, and ensuring rapid assessment and correction of hypoglycemia in ill children. PMID:25632950

  16. ORIGINAL PAPER Grasshopper outbreak challenges conservation status

    E-print Network

    Latchininsky, Alexandre

    ORIGINAL PAPER Grasshopper outbreak challenges conservation status of a small Hawaiian Island. Gray bird grasshopper Schistocerca nitens has occurred on the main Hawaiian Islands since 1964 and was first reported from Nihoa in 1977. In 2002­2004, there was an outbreak of this grasshopper

  17. Selection Tool for Foodborne Norovirus Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Kroneman, Annelies; van Duynhoven, Yvonne; Boshuizen, Hendriek; van Pelt, Wilfrid; Koopmans, Marion

    2009-01-01

    Detection of pathogens in the food chain is limited mainly to bacteria, and the globalization of the food industry enables international viral foodborne outbreaks to occur. Outbreaks from 2002 through 2006 recorded in a European norovirus surveillance database were investigated for virologic and epidemiologic indicators of food relatedness. The resulting validated multivariate logistic regression model comparing foodborne (n = 224) and person-to-person (n = 654) outbreaks was used to create a practical web-based tool that can be limited to epidemiologic parameters for nongenotyping countries. Non–genogroup-II.4 outbreaks, higher numbers of cases, and outbreaks in restaurants or households characterized (sensitivity = 0.80, specificity = 0.86) foodborne outbreaks and reduced the percentage of outbreaks requiring source-tracing to 31%. The selection tool enabled prospectively focused follow-up. Use of this tool is likely to improve data quality and strain typing in current surveillance systems, which is necessary for identification of potential international foodborne outbreaks. PMID:19116046

  18. WATERBORNE DISEASE OUTBREAKS, 1986-1988

    EPA Science Inventory

    From 1986 to 1988, 24 states and Puerto Rico reported 50 outbreaks of illness due to water that people intended to drink, affecting 25,846 persons. he protozoal parasite Giardia lamblia was the agent most commonly implicated in outbreaks, as it has been for the last 10 years; man...

  19. Service Assessment Super Tuesday Tornado Outbreak

    E-print Network

    Service Assessment Super Tuesday Tornado Outbreak of February 5-6, 2008 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE of the image represents a tornado which affected the southern suburbs of Memphis, including the Memphis Tornado Outbreak of February 5-6, 2008 March 2009 National Weather Service John L. Hayes Assistant

  20. 724 PHYTOPATHOLOGY Characterization of Phytophthora spp. Causing Outbreaks

    E-print Network

    Peever, Tobin

    724 PHYTOPATHOLOGY Etiology Characterization of Phytophthora spp. Causing Outbreaks of Citrus Brown. Characterization of Phytophthora spp. causing outbreaks of citrus brown rot in Florida. Phytopathology 88

  1. VEGF and its receptors in dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kalita, J; Chauhan, P S; Mani, V E; Bhoi, S K; Misra, U K

    2015-09-01

    Vascular permeability determines the severity of dengue virus infection. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its (receptor 1) R1 and (receptor 2) R2 receptors may provide insight about the neurological complications of dengue. We report VEGF and its R1 and R2 receptors level in dengue patients and correlate these with neurological complications. Consecutive patients with dengue were subjected to clinical and neurological evaluations. Their blood counts, serum chemistry, including liver and kidney function tests, serum creatine kinase (CK), and albumin were measured. VEGF, VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 were measured by ELISA in the patients and 16 matched controls. Twenty four patients with dengue were included whose ages ranged between 15 and 67 years, and nine of whom were females. Serum VEGF level was insignificantly lower in dengue patients whereas VEGFR1 was significantly higher (P?=?0.01) and VEGFR2 was significantly lower (P?=?0.005) compared to controls. VEGFR2 correlated with systolic blood pressure, coagulopathy, and serum CK levels. None of the other clinical and biochemical parameters correlated with VEGF and VEGFR1 levels. VEGFR1 and R2 normalized at 1 month. VEGFR2 correlates with the clinical severity of dengue and muscle dysfunction. J. Med. Virol. 87:1449-1455, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25970161

  2. Neural network diagnostic system for dengue patients risk classification.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Tarig; Taib, Mohd Nasir; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2012-04-01

    With the dramatic increase of the worldwide threat of dengue disease, it has been very crucial to correctly diagnose the dengue patients in order to decrease the disease severity. However, it has been a great challenge for the physicians to identify the level of risk in dengue patients due to overlapping of the medical classification criteria. Therefore, this study aims to construct a noninvasive diagnostic system to assist the physicians for classifying the risk in dengue patients. Systematic producers have been followed to develop the system. Firstly, the assessment of the significant predictors associated with the level of risk in dengue patients was carried out utilizing the statistical analyses technique. Secondly, Multilayer perceptron neural network models trained via Levenberg-Marquardt and Scaled Conjugate Gradient algorithms was employed for constructing the diagnostic system. Finally, precise tuning for the models' parameters was conducted in order to achieve the optimal performance. As a result, 9 noninvasive predictors were found to be significantly associated with the level of risk in dengue patients. By employing those predictors, 75% prediction accuracy has been achieved for classifying the risk in dengue patients using Scaled Conjugate Gradient algorithm while 70.7% prediction accuracy were achieved by using Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. PMID:20703665

  3. Potential anti-dengue medicinal plants: a review.

    PubMed

    Abd Kadir, Siti Latifah; Yaakob, Harisun; Mohamed Zulkifli, Razauden

    2013-10-01

    Dengue fever causes mortality and morbidity around the world, specifically in the Tropics and subtropic regions, which has been of major concern to governments and the World Health Organization (WHO). As a consequence, the search for new anti-dengue agents from medicinal plants has assumed more urgency than in the past. Medicinal plants have been used widely to treat a variety of vector ailments such as malaria. The demand for plant-based medicines is growing as they are generally considered to be safer, non-toxic and less harmful than synthetic drugs. This article reviews potential anti-dengue activities from plants distributed around the world. Sixty-nine studies from 1997 to 2012 describe 31 different species from 24 families that are known for their anti-dengue activities. About ten phytochemicals have been isolated from 11 species, among which are compounds with the potential for development of dengue treatment. Crude extracts and essential oils obtained from 31 species showed a broad activity against Flavivirus. Current studies show that natural products represent a rich potential source of new anti-dengue compounds. Further ethnobotanical surveys and laboratory investigations are needed established the potential of identified species in contributing to dengue control. PMID:23591999

  4. Inhibitory effect of doxycycline against dengue virus replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rothan, Hussin A; Mohamed, Zulqarnain; Paydar, Mohammadjavad; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd; Yusof, Rohana

    2014-04-01

    Doxycycline is an antibiotic derived from tetracycline that possesses antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities. Antiviral activity of doxycycline against dengue virus has been reported previously; however, its anti-dengue properties need further investigation. This study was conducted to determine the potential activity of doxycycline against dengue virus replication in vitro. Doxycycline inhibited the dengue virus serine protease (DENV2 NS2B-NS3pro) with an IC50 value of 52.3 ± 6.2 ?M at 37 °C (normal human temperature) and 26.7 ± 5.3 ?M at 40 °C (high fever temperature). The antiviral activity of doxycycline was first tested at different concentrations against DENV2 using a plaque-formation assay. The virus titter decreased significantly after applying doxycycline at levels lower than its 50 % cytotoxic concentration (CC50, 100 ?M), showing concentration-dependent inhibition with a 50 % effective concentration (EC50) of approximately 50 ?M. Doxycycline significantly inhibited viral entry and post-infection replication of the four dengue serotypes, with serotype-specific inhibition (high activity against DENV2 and DENV4 compared to DENV1 and DENV3). Collectively, these findings underline the need for further experimental and clinical studies on doxycycline, utilizing its anti-dengue and anti-inflammatory activities to attenuate the clinical symptoms of dengue virus infection. PMID:24142271

  5. Dengue virus-specific cross-reactive CD8+ human cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, J F; Kurane, I; Lai, C J; Bray, M; Falgout, B; Ennis, F A

    1989-12-01

    Stimulation with live dengue virus of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a dengue virus type 4-immune donor generated virus-specific, serotype-cross-reactive, CD8+, class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) capable of lysing dengue virus-infected cells and cells pulsed with dengue virus antigens of all four serotypes. These CTL lysed autologous fibroblasts infected with vaccinia virus-dengue virus recombinant viruses containing the E gene or several nonstructural dengue virus type 4 genes. These results demonstrate that both dengue virus structural and nonstructural proteins are targets for the cytotoxic T-cell-mediated immune response to dengue virus and suggest that serotype-cross-reactive CD8+ CTL may be important mediators of viral clearance and of virus-induced immunopathology during secondary dengue virus infections. PMID:2511337

  6. The influence of climate variables on dengue in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Edna; Coelho, Micheline; Oliver, Leuda; Massad, Eduardo

    2011-12-01

    In this work we correlated dengue cases with climatic variables for the city of Singapore. This was done through a Poisson Regression Model (PRM) that considers dengue cases as the dependent variable and the climatic variables (rainfall, maximum and minimum temperature and relative humidity) as independent variables. We also used Principal Components Analysis (PCA) to choose the variables that influence in the increase of the number of dengue cases in Singapore, where PC? (Principal component 1) is represented by temperature and rainfall and PC? (Principal component 2) is represented by relative humidity. We calculated the probability of occurrence of new cases of dengue and the relative risk of occurrence of dengue cases influenced by climatic variable. The months from July to September showed the highest probabilities of the occurrence of new cases of the disease throughout the year. This was based on an analysis of time series of maximum and minimum temperature. An interesting result was that for every 2-10°C of variation of the maximum temperature, there was an average increase of 22.2-184.6% in the number of dengue cases. For the minimum temperature, we observed that for the same variation, there was an average increase of 26.1-230.3% in the number of the dengue cases from April to August. The precipitation and the relative humidity, after analysis of correlation, were discarded in the use of Poisson Regression Model because they did not present good correlation with the dengue cases. Additionally, the relative risk of the occurrence of the cases of the disease under the influence of the variation of temperature was from 1.2-2.8 for maximum temperature and increased from 1.3-3.3 for minimum temperature. Therefore, the variable temperature (maximum and minimum) was the best predictor for the increased number of dengue cases in Singapore. PMID:21557124

  7. Cell Phone-Based System (Chaak) for Surveillance of Immatures of Dengue Virus Mosquito Vectors

    PubMed Central

    LOZANO–FUENTES, SAUL; WEDYAN, FADI; HERNANDEZ–GARCIA, EDGAR; SADHU, DEVADATTA; GHOSH, SUDIPTO; BIEMAN, JAMES M.; TEP-CHEL, DIANA; GARCÍA–REJÓN, JULIÁN E.; EISEN, LARS

    2014-01-01

    Capture of surveillance data on mobile devices and rapid transfer of such data from these devices into an electronic database or data management and decision support systems promote timely data analyses and public health response during disease outbreaks. Mobile data capture is used increasingly for malaria surveillance and holds great promise for surveillance of other neglected tropical diseases. We focused on mosquito-borne dengue, with the primary aims of: 1) developing and field-testing a cell phone-based system (called Chaak) for capture of data relating to the surveillance of the mosquito immature stages, and 2) assessing, in the dengue endemic setting of Mérida, México, the cost-effectiveness of this new technology versus paper-based data collection. Chaak includes a desktop component, where a manager selects premises to be surveyed for mosquito immatures, and a cell phone component, where the surveyor receives the assigned tasks and captures the data. Data collected on the cell phone can be transferred to a central database through different modes of transmission, including near-real time where data are transferred immediately (e.g., over the Internet) or by first storing data on the cell phone for future transmission. Spatial data are handled in a novel, semantically driven, geographic information system. Compared with a pen-and-paper-based method, use of Chaak improved the accuracy and increased the speed of data transcription into an electronic database. The cost-effectiveness of using the Chaak system will depend largely on the up-front cost of purchasing cell phones and the recurring cost of data transfer over a cellular network. PMID:23926788

  8. Phylogenetic history demonstrates two different lineages of dengue type 1 virus in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dengue Fever is one of the most important viral re-emergent diseases affecting about 50 million people around the world especially in tropical and sub-tropical countries. In Colombia, the virus was first detected in the earliest 70's when the disease became a major public health concern. Since then, all four serotypes of the virus have been reported. Although most of the huge outbreaks reported in this country have involved dengue virus serotype 1 (DENV-1), there are not studies about its origin, genetic diversity and distribution. Results We used 224 bp corresponding to the carboxyl terminus of envelope (E) gene from 74 Colombian isolates in order to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships and to estimate time divergences. Analyzed DENV-1 Colombian isolates belonged to the formerly defined genotype V. Only one virus isolate was clasified in the genotype I, likely representing a sole introduction that did not spread. The oldest strains were closely related to those detected for the first time in America in 1977 from the Caribbean and were detected for two years until their disappearance about six years later. Around 1987, a split up generated 2 lineages that have been evolving separately, although not major aminoacid changes in the analyzed region were found. Conclusion DENV-1 has been circulating since 1978 in Colombia. Yet, the phylogenetic relationships between strains isolated along the covered period of time suggests that viral strains detected in some years, although belonging to the same genotype V, have different recent origins corresponding to multiple re-introduction events of viral strains that were circulating in neighbor countries. Viral strains used in the present study did not form a monophyletic group, which is evidence of a polyphyletic origin. We report the rapid spread patterns and high evolution rate of the different DENV-1 lineages. PMID:20836894

  9. Factors influencing the seasonal abundance of Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti and the control strategy of dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever in Thanlyin Township, Yangon City, Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Oo, T T; Storch, V; Madon, M B; Becker, N

    2011-08-01

    From June 2006 to May 2007, mosquito surveys were conducted in Thanlyin Township, Yangon City, Myanmar, to determine factors influencing the abundance of Aedes aegypti (Stegomyia aegypti) during the rainy season. Both the biological and environmental factors were included in this study. Increase in the hatchability of egg, larval survival rate, the shortened larval life-span and increased pupation rates supplemented by rainfall (i.e. continuous flooding of the containers, stimulate the continuous hatching of eggs) were observed for correlation with the increase in population density of Ae. aegypti during the rainy season in the study area. Control strategy of Ae. aegypti to analyze the infestation in the community (study area) with larval Ae. aegypti, integrated management measures including health education, attitudes and practices regarding dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever, transmission of the disease and possible preventive measures, reduction of breeding sites and testing the efficacy of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (B.t.i.) with respect to the reduction level of Ae. aegypti larvae in breeding sources, were taken into consideration. PMID:22041749

  10. The exanthem of dengue fever: Clinical features of two US tourists traveling abroad

    PubMed Central

    Pincus, Laura B.; Grossman, Marc E.; Fox, Lindy P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue fever is the most common identifiable cause of acute febrile illness among travelers returning from South America, South Central Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Caribbean. Although the characteristic exanthem of dengue fever occurs in up to 50% of patients, few descriptions of it are found in the dermatology literature, and discussions of how to distinguish the dengue exanthem from other infectious disease entities are rare. Chikungunya fever is an emerging infectious disease now seen in returning US tourists and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of dengue fever in the appropriate patient. Objective The purpose of our study was to report two cases of dengue fever among returning US tourists, provide a review of dengue fever, offer an extensive differential diagnosis of dengue fever, and raise awareness among dermatologists of chikungunya fever. Methods This study includes clinical findings of two returning travelers, one who traveled to Mexico and the other to Thailand, complemented by a discussion of both dengue fever and its differential diagnosis. Limitations Limited to 2 case reports. Conclusion Dengue fever should be considered in the differential diagnosis of fever and rash in the returning traveler. Dermatologists should be aware of the distinctive exanthem of dengue fever. Recognition of the dengue fever rash permits a rapid and early diagnosis, which is critical, as dengue fever can progress to life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome. PMID:17959270

  11. Effects of Short-Course Oral Corticosteroid Therapy in Early Dengue Infection in Vietnamese Patients: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Dong T. H.; Ngoc, Tran V.; Tien, Nguyen T. H.; Kieu, Nguyen T. T.; Thuy, Truong T. T.; Thanh, Lai T. C.; Tam, Cao T.; Truong, Nguyen T.; Dung, Nguyen T.; Qui, Phan T.; Hien, Tran T.; Farrar, Jeremy J.; Simmons, Cameron P.; Wolbers, Marcel; Wills, Bridget A.

    2012-01-01

    Background.?Patients with dengue can experience a variety of serious complications including hypovolemic shock, thrombocytopenia, and bleeding. These problems occur as plasma viremia is resolving and are thought to be immunologically mediated. Early corticosteroid therapy may prevent the development of such complications but could also prolong viral clearance. Methods.?We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded trial of low-dose (0.5 mg/kg) or high-dose (2 mg/kg) oral prednisolone therapy for 3 days in Vietnamese patients aged 5–20 years admitted with dengue and fever for ?72 hours, aiming to assess potential harms from steroid use during the viremic phase. Intention-to-treat analysis was performed using linear trend tests with a range of clinical and virological endpoints specified in advance. In addition to recognized complications of dengue, we focused on the are under the curve for serial plasma viremia measurements and the number of days after enrollment to negative viremia and dengue nonstructural protein 1 status. Results.?Between August 2009 and January 2011, 225 participants were randomized to 1 of the 3 treatment arms. Baseline characteristics were similar across the groups. All patients recovered fully and adverse events were infrequent. Aside from a trend toward hyperglycemia in the steroid recipients, we found no association between treatment allocation and any of the predefined clinical, hematological, or virological endpoints. Conclusions.?Use of oral prednisolone during the early acute phase of dengue infection was not associated with prolongation of viremia or other adverse effects. Although not powered to assess efficacy, we found no reduction in the development of shock or other recognized complications of dengue virus infection in this study. Clinical Trials Registration.?ISRCTN39575233. PMID:22865871

  12. Upregulation of a novel eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) in dengue 2 virus-infected mosquito cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dengue virus, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, is the etiological agent of dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and dengue shock syndrome. It generally induces apoptosis in mammalian cells, but frequently results in persistent infection in mosquito cells. That mechanism remains to be explored. In turn, a genomic survey through subtractive hybridization (PCR-select cDNA subtraction) was conducted in order to find gene(s) that may play a role in interactions between the virus and its host cells. Results Through this technique, we identified a novel eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) which is upregulated in Aedes albopictus-derived C6/36 cells infected by the type 2 dengue (Den-2) virus. The full-length of the identified eIF5A gene consisted of 1498 bp of nucleotides with a 41.39% G+C content, and it possessed a higher similarity and shorter evolutionary distance with insects than with other organisms. Upregulation of eIF5A in response to Den-2 virus infection was validated at both the RNA and protein levels. This phenomenon was also observed by confocal microscopy. In addition, cell death obviously occurred when eIF5A activity was inhibited in C6/36 cells even when they were infected by the virus. However, viral multiplication was not obviously affected in infected C6/36 cells when eIF5A activity was reduced. Conclusions Taken together, we postulated that eIF5A plays a role in preventing mosquito cells from death in response to Den-2 viral infection, thus facilitating continued viral growth and potential persistent infection in mosquito cells. It would be worthwhile to further investigate how its downstream factors or cofactors contribute to this phenomenon of dengue infection. PMID:20819232

  13. Persistency of transovarial dengue virus in Aedes aegypti (Linn.).

    PubMed

    Rohani, A; Zamree, I; Joseph, R T; Lee, H L

    2008-09-01

    A study was conducted to examine the persistency of transovarial dengue virus type 2 (DEN-2) in a Selangor strain of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Two hundred 4-5 day old female mosquitoes were fed with blood containing dengue virus. The infected mosquitoes were reared to the 7th generation; each generation was screened for the virus using immunological staining methods. The virus was detectable until the 5th generation but absent in the 6th and the 7th generations. Therefore, dengue virus type 2 can be transmitted transovarially in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes until the fifth generation under laboratory conditions. PMID:19058573

  14. The Sublethal Effects of the Entomopathic Fungus Leptolegnia chapmanii on Some Biological Parameters of the Dengue Vector Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Pelizza, S.A.; Scorsetti, A.C.; Tranchida, M.C.

    2013-01-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) is the primary vector of dengue in the Americas. The use of chemical insecticides is recommended during outbreaks of dengue in order to reduce the number of adult mosquitoes; however, because Ae. aegypti is highly synanthropic, the use of insecticides in densely populated areas is a dangerous practice. Leptolegnia chapmanii Seymour (Straminipila: Peronosporomycetes) is an entomopathogenic microorganism that has demonstrated marked pathogenicity toward the larvae of a number of mosquito species, with little or no effect on non-target insects. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the sublethal effects of L. chapmanii on fecundity, number of gonotrophic cycles, fertility, and relationship between wing length and fecundity in Ae. aegypti females. Ae. aegypti females that survived infection with L. chapmanii laid fewer eggs, had a smaller number of gonotrophic cycles, had shorter wings, and were less fertile than controls. This is the first study on the sublethal effects experienced by specimens of Ae. aegypti that survived infection with zoospores of L. chapmanii. Although field studies should be carried out, the results obtained in this study are encouraging because the high and rapid larval mortality caused by L. chapmanii coupled with the reduction of reproductive capacity in Ae. aegypti females seem to cause a significant reduction in the number of adults in the mid and long term, thereby reducing the health risks associated with Ae. aegypti. PMID:23901823

  15. Effective suppression of Dengue fever virus in mosquito cell cultures using retroviral transduction of hammerhead ribozymes targeting the viral genome

    PubMed Central

    Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Keith, James; Fraser, Tresa; Balaraman, Velmurugan; Kolokoltsov, Andrey; Davey, Robert A; Higgs, Stephen; Mohammed, Ahmed; Rongsriyam, Yupha; Komalamisra, Narumon; Fraser, Malcolm J

    2009-01-01

    Outbreaks of Dengue impose a heavy economic burden on developing countries in terms of vector control and human morbidity. Effective vaccines against all four serotypes of Dengue are in development, but population replacement with transgenic vectors unable to transmit the virus might ultimately prove to be an effective approach to disease suppression, or even eradication. A key element of the refractory transgenic vector approach is the development of transgenes that effectively prohibit viral transmission. In this report we test the effectiveness of several hammerhead ribozymes for suppressing DENV in lentivirus-transduced mosquito cells in an attempt to mimic the transgenic use of these effector molecules in mosquitoes. A lentivirus vector that expresses these ribozymes as a fusion RNA molecule using an Ae. aegypti tRNAval promoter and terminating with a 60A tail insures optimal expression, localization, and activity of the hammerhead ribozyme against the DENV genome. Among the 14 hammerhead ribozymes we designed to attack the DENV-2 NGC genome, several appear to be relatively effective in reducing virus production from transduced cells by as much as 2 logs. Among the sequences targeted are 10 that are conserved among all DENV serotype 2 strains. Our results confirm that hammerhead ribozymes can be effective in suppressing DENV in a transgenic approach, and provide an alternative or supplementary approach to proposed siRNA strategies for DENV suppression in transgenic mosquitoes. PMID:19497123

  16. Biodiversity Can Help Prevent Malaria Outbreaks in Tropical Forests

    PubMed Central

    Laporta, Gabriel Zorello; de Prado, Paulo Inácio Knegt Lopez; Kraenkel, Roberto André; Coutinho, Renato Mendes; Sallum, Maria Anice Mureb

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax is a widely distributed, neglected parasite that can cause malaria and death in tropical areas. It is associated with an estimated 80–300 million cases of malaria worldwide. Brazilian tropical rain forests encompass host- and vector-rich communities, in which two hypothetical mechanisms could play a role in the dynamics of malaria transmission. The first mechanism is the dilution effect caused by presence of wild warm-blooded animals, which can act as dead-end hosts to Plasmodium parasites. The second is diffuse mosquito vector competition, in which vector and non-vector mosquito species compete for blood feeding upon a defensive host. Considering that the World Health Organization Malaria Eradication Research Agenda calls for novel strategies to eliminate malaria transmission locally, we used mathematical modeling to assess those two mechanisms in a pristine tropical rain forest, where the primary vector is present but malaria is absent. Methodology/Principal Findings The Ross–Macdonald model and a biodiversity-oriented model were parameterized using newly collected data and data from the literature. The basic reproduction number () estimated employing Ross–Macdonald model indicated that malaria cases occur in the study location. However, no malaria cases have been reported since 1980. In contrast, the biodiversity-oriented model corroborated the absence of malaria transmission. In addition, the diffuse competition mechanism was negatively correlated with the risk of malaria transmission, which suggests a protective effect provided by the forest ecosystem. There is a non-linear, unimodal correlation between the mechanism of dead-end transmission of parasites and the risk of malaria transmission, suggesting a protective effect only under certain circumstances (e.g., a high abundance of wild warm-blooded animals). Conclusions/Significance To achieve biological conservation and to eliminate Plasmodium parasites in human populations, the World Health Organization Malaria Eradication Research Agenda should take biodiversity issues into consideration. PMID:23556023

  17. Recent weather extremes and impacts on agricultural production and vector-borne disease outbreak patterns.

    PubMed

    Anyamba, Assaf; Small, Jennifer L; Britch, Seth C; Tucker, Compton J; Pak, Edwin W; Reynolds, Curt A; Crutchfield, James; Linthicum, Kenneth J

    2014-01-01

    We document significant worldwide weather anomalies that affected agriculture and vector-borne disease outbreaks during the 2010-2012 period. We utilized 2000-2012 vegetation index and land surface temperature data from NASA's satellite-based Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to map the magnitude and extent of these anomalies for diverse regions including the continental United States, Russia, East Africa, Southern Africa, and Australia. We demonstrate that shifts in temperature and/or precipitation have significant impacts on vegetation patterns with attendant consequences for agriculture and public health. Weather extremes resulted in excessive rainfall and flooding as well as severe drought, which caused ?10 to 80% variation in major agricultural commodity production (including wheat, corn, cotton, sorghum) and created exceptional conditions for extensive mosquito-borne disease outbreaks of dengue, Rift Valley fever, Murray Valley encephalitis, and West Nile virus disease. Analysis of MODIS data provided a standardized method for quantifying the extreme weather anomalies observed during this period. Assessments of land surface conditions from satellite-based systems such as MODIS can be a valuable tool in national, regional, and global weather impact determinations. PMID:24658301

  18. Recent Weather Extremes and Impacts on Agricultural Production and Vector-Borne Disease Outbreak Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anyamba, Assaf; Small, Jennifer L.; Britch, Seth C.; Tucker, Compton J.; Pak, Edwin W.; Reynolds, Curt A.; Crutchfield, James; Linthicum, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    We document significant worldwide weather anomalies that affected agriculture and vector-borne disease outbreaks during the 2010-2012 period. We utilized 2000-2012 vegetation index and land surface temperature data from NASA's satellite-based Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to map the magnitude and extent of these anomalies for diverse regions including the continental United States, Russia, East Africa, Southern Africa, and Australia. We demonstrate that shifts in temperature and/or precipitation have significant impacts on vegetation patterns with attendant consequences for agriculture and public health. Weather extremes resulted in excessive rainfall and flooding as well as severe drought, which caused,10 to 80% variation in major agricultural commodity production (including wheat, corn, cotton, sorghum) and created exceptional conditions for extensive mosquito-borne disease outbreaks of dengue, Rift Valley fever, Murray Valley encephalitis, and West Nile virus disease. Analysis of MODIS data provided a standardized method for quantifying the extreme weather anomalies observed during this period. Assessments of land surface conditions from satellite-based systems such as MODIS can be a valuable tool in national, regional, and global weather impact determinations.

  19. Vector competence of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) for dengue virus in the Florida Keys.

    PubMed

    Richards, Stephanie L; Anderson, Sheri L; Alto, Barry W

    2012-07-01

    In 2009-2011, Monroe County in southern Florida experienced locally acquired and traveler-imported focal dengue outbreaks. Aedes aegypti (L.) is the primary vector of dengue virus (DENV) worldwide, is prevalent in Monroe County, and is the suspected vector in Florida. Ae. albopictus (Skuse) is also known to be an important vector of DENV and this species is ubiquitous in Florida; however, it is not yet established in Monroe County. Florida Ae. aegypti (Key West and Stock Island geographic colonies) and Ae. albopictus (Vero Beach geographic colony) were fed blood containing 3.7 Log10 plaque-forming unit equivalents of DENV serotype 1 isolated from a patient involved in the Key West, FL, outbreak in 2010. Mosquitoes were maintained at extrinsic incubation temperatures of 28 or 30 degrees C for an incubation period of 14 d. Vector competence was assessed using rates of infection (percent with virus-positive bodies), dissemination (percent infected with virus-positive legs), and transmission (percent infected with virus-positive saliva). No significant differences were observed in rates of infection or dissemination between Ae. aegypti or Ae. albopictus at either extrinsic incubation temperature. Transmission was observed only at 28 degrees C in both Ae. aegypti (Key West) and Ae. albopictus. The assessment of local mosquito populations for their DENV vector competence is essential and will aid mosquito control operators interested in pinpointing specific vector populations for control. The extent to which vector competence is affected by seasonal changes in temperature is discussed and provides baseline risk assessment data to mosquito control agencies. PMID:22897056

  20. The West African Ebola outbreak: finishing the job, preparing for future.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Clare; Naeem Ahmad, Umar

    2015-08-01

    As the West African Ebola Outbreak moves towards the final stages, we must consider the importance of remaining work and take heed of lessons learned in preparation for future outbreaks. Several issues pertinent to preparedness must be considered, including the remaining animal reservoir and potential for sexual transmission. Testing must be accessible and contact tracing robust to trace the last patient. Improved infection control procedures alongside education and training require guaranteed supply chains and ongoing funding. Effort must be sustained to prevent an even greater catastrophe than the one inflicted on West Africa today. PMID:26160255

  1. An outbreak of measles in an undervaccinated community.

    PubMed

    Gahr, Pamala; DeVries, Aaron S; Wallace, Gregory; Miller, Claudia; Kenyon, Cynthia; Sweet, Kristin; Martin, Karen; White, Karen; Bagstad, Erica; Hooker, Carol; Krawczynski, Gretchen; Boxrud, David; Liu, Gongping; Stinchfield, Patricia; LeBlanc, Julie; Hickman, Cynthia; Bahta, Lynn; Barskey, Albert; Lynfield, Ruth

    2014-07-01

    Measles is readily spread to susceptible individuals, but is no longer endemic in the United States. In March 2011, measles was confirmed in a Minnesota child without travel abroad. This was the first identified case-patient of an outbreak. An investigation was initiated to determine the source, prevent transmission, and examine measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine coverage in the affected community. Investigation and response included case-patient follow-up, post-exposure prophylaxis, voluntary isolation and quarantine, and early MMR vaccine for non-immune shelter residents >6 months and <12 months of age. Vaccine coverage was assessed by using immunization information system records. Outreach to the affected community included education and support from public health, health care, and community and spiritual leaders. Twenty-one measles cases were identified. The median age was 12 months (range, 4 months to 51 years) and 14 (67%) were hospitalized (range of stay, 2-7 days). The source was a 30-month-old US-born child of Somali descent infected while visiting Kenya. Measles spread in several settings, and over 3000 individuals were exposed. Sixteen case-patients were unvaccinated; 9 of the 16 were age-eligible: 7 of the 9 had safety concerns and 6 were of Somali descent. MMR vaccine coverage among Somali children declined significantly from 2004 through 2010 starting at 91.1% in 2004 and reaching 54.0% in 2010 (?(2) for linear trend 553.79; P < .001). This was the largest measles outbreak in Minnesota in 20 years, and aggressive response likely prevented additional transmission. Measles outbreaks can occur if undervaccinated subpopulations exist. Misunderstandings about vaccine safety must be effectively addressed. PMID:24913790

  2. A novel dengue virus detection method that couples DNAzyme and gold nanoparticle approaches

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent epidemics of dengue viruses (DENV) coupled with new outbreaks on the horizon have renewed the demand for novel detection methods that have the ability to identify this viral pathogen prior to the manifestation of symptoms. The ability to detect DENV in a timely manner is essential for rapid recovery from disease symptoms. A modified lab-derived 10-23 DNAzyme tethered to gold nanoparticles provides a powerful tool for the detection of viruses, such as DENV. Results We examined the effectiveness of coupling DNAzyme (DDZ) activation to the salt-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) to detect dengue virus (DENV) progeny in mosquito cells. A DNAzyme was designed to recognize the 5’ cyclization sequence (5’ CS) that is conserved among all DENV, and conjugated to AuNPs. DDZ-AuNP has demonstrated the ability to detect the genomic RNA of our model dengue strain, DENV-2 NGC, isolated from infected Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells. These targeting events lead to the rapid aggregation of AuNPs, resulting in a red to clear color transition of the reaction mixes, and thus positive detection of the DENV RNA genome. The inclusion of SDS in the reaction mixture permitted the detection of DENV directly from cell culture supernatants without additional sample processing. Specificity assays demonstrated detection is DENV-specific, while sensitivity assays confirm detection at levels of 1?×?101 TCID50 units. These results demonstrate DDZ-AuNP effectively detects DENV genomes in a sequence specific manner and at concentrations that are practical for field use. Conclusions We have developed an effective detection assay using DNAzyme catalysis coupled with AuNP aggregation for the detection of DENV genomes in a sequence specific manner. Full development of our novel DDZ-AuNP detection method will provide a practical, rapid, and low cost alternative for the detection of DENV in mosquito cells and tissues, and possibly infected patient serum, in a matter of minutes with little to no specialized training required. PMID:23809208

  3. [The ocular fundus findings in dengue fever].

    PubMed

    Wen, K H; Sheu, M M; Chung, C B; Wang, H Z; Chen, C W

    1989-01-01

    From September to December of 1988, 24 cases of clinical diagnosed dengue fever accompanied by visual disturbances were studied. A detailed history and a detailed ocular examination including visual acuity, slit lamp examination, fundus examination through dilated pupil and fluorescein angiography were conducted. In some cases, Amsler grid, visual field, visual evoked potential and color vision test were also evaluated. The chief complaints of these 24 patients were blurred vision, central scotoma, floaters, photophobia and halo vision. The intervals between onset of fever and awareness of blurred vision were 2 to 15 days with an average of 7.26 days. The ocular fundus changes included macular hemorrhage, retinal hemorrhage, maculopathy, Roth's spot, diffuse retinal edema, peripapillary hemorrhage vitreous cells and blurring optic disc. The fluorescein angiographic findings included poor choroidal flushing, delayed disc filling, disc extravasation, block fluorescence, capillary obliteration, non filling of macular network, capillary leakage and window defect. Seventeen cases (30 eyes) were followed-up for 2 weeks to 3 months. Visual recovery was good in most of the cases. However, 2 cases (4 eyes) showed poor visual outcome. In this series studied, the principle ocular fundus change caused by dengue fever was macular hemorrhage. This may be due to the capillary changes near the macular area. But in some of the cases, the direct viral invasion and/or indirect changes of the optic nerve, the retinal pigment epithelium or photoreceptors should be considered. PMID:2733064

  4. Hot temperatures can force delayed mosquito outbreaks via sequential changes in Aedes aegypti demographic parameters in autocorrelated environments.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Luis Fernando; Scott, Thomas W; Morrison, Amy C; Takada, Takenori

    2014-01-01

    Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae) is a common pantropical urban mosquito, vector of dengue, Yellow Fever and chikungunya viruses. Studies have shown Ae. aegypti abundance to be associated with environmental fluctuations, revealing patterns such as the occurrence of delayed mosquito outbreaks, i.e., sudden extraordinary increases in mosquito abundance following transient extreme high temperatures. Here, we use a two-stage (larvae and adults) matrix model to propose a mechanism for environmental signal canalization into demographic parameters of Ae. aegypti that could explain delayed high temperature induced mosquito outbreaks. We performed model simulations using parameters estimated from a weekly time series from Thailand, assuming either independent or autocorrelated environments. For autocorrelated environments, we found that long delays in the association between the onset of "hot" environments and mosquito outbreaks (10 weeks, as observed in Thailand) can be generated when "hot" environments sequentially trigger a larval survival decrease and over-compensatory fecundity increase, which lasts for the whole "hot" period, in conjunction with a larval survival increase followed by a fecundity decrease when the environment returns to "normal". This result was not observed for independent environments. Finally, we discuss our results implications for prospective entomological research and vector management under changing environments. PMID:23537497

  5. Challenges in reducing dengue burden; diagnostics, control measures and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sai Kit

    2013-09-01

    Dengue is a major public health concern worldwide, with the number of infections increasing globally. The illness imposes the greatest economic and human burden on developing countries that have limited resources to deal with the scale of the problem. No cure for dengue exists; treatment is limited to rehydration therapy, and with vector control strategies proving to be relatively ineffective, a vaccine is an urgent priority. Despite the numerous challenges encountered in the development of a dengue vaccine, several vaccine candidates have shown promise in clinical development and it is believed that a vaccination program would be at least as cost-effective as current vector control programs. The lead candidate vaccine is a tetravalent, live attenuated, recombinant vaccine, which is currently in Phase III clinical trials. Vaccine introduction is a complex process that requires consideration and is discussed here. This review discusses the epidemiology, burden and pathogenesis of dengue, as well as the vaccine candidates currently in clinical development. PMID:24053394

  6. Mapping dengue fever transmission risk in the Aburrá Valley, Colombia

    E-print Network

    Arboleda, Sair; Jaramillo-O, Nicolas; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2009-12-02

    Dengue fever (DF) is endemic in Medellín, the second largest Colombian city, and surrounding municipalities. We used DF case and satellite environmental data to investigate conditions associated with suitable areas for DF occurrence in 2008 in three...

  7. Hot spot detection and spatio-temporal dynamics of dengue in Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naish, S.; Tong, S.

    2014-11-01

    Dengue has been a major public health concern in Australia since it re-emerged in Queensland in 1992-1993. This study explored spatio-temporal distribution and clustering of locally-acquired dengue cases in Queensland State, Australia and identified target areas for effective interventions. A computerised locally-acquired dengue case dataset was collected from Queensland Health for Queensland from 1993 to 2012. Descriptive spatial and temporal analyses were conducted using geographic information system tools and geostatistical techniques. Dengue hot spots were detected using SatScan method. Descriptive spatial analysis showed that a total of 2,398 locally-acquired dengue cases were recorded in central and northern regions of tropical Queensland. A seasonal pattern was observed with most of the cases occurring in autumn. Spatial and temporal variation of dengue cases was observed in the geographic areas affected by dengue over time. Tropical areas are potential high-risk areas for mosquito-borne diseases such as dengue. This study demonstrated that the locally-acquired dengue cases have exhibited a spatial and temporal variation over the past twenty years in tropical Queensland, Australia. There is a clear evidence for the existence of statistically significant clusters of dengue and these clusters varied over time. These findings enabled us to detect and target dengue clusters suggesting that the use of geospatial information can assist the health authority in planning dengue control activities and it would allow for better design and implementation of dengue management programs.

  8. A Framework for Categorization of the Economic Impacts of Outbreaks of Highly Contagious Livestock Diseases.

    PubMed

    Saatkamp, H W; Mourits, M C M; Howe, K S

    2014-11-01

    A framework for categorization of economic impacts of outbreaks of highly contagious livestock diseases (HCLD) is presented. This framework interprets veterinary measures to control HCLD outbreaks with reference to economic definitions of costs and benefits, and the implications for value losses both for different stakeholders affected and society as a whole. Four cost categories are identified, that is virus control-related direct costs (DC), spread prevention and zoning-related direct consequential costs (DCC), market and price disruption-related costs during (indirect consequential costs, ICC) and after the outbreak (aftermath costs, AC). The framework is used to review existing literature on cost estimation for different stakeholders. This review shows considerable differences between studies, making comparison of results difficult and susceptible to misunderstanding. It is concluded that the framework provides a logical basis for all future analyses of the economic impacts of HCLD. PMID:25382248

  9. An outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis at a swimming club--Vermont, 2004.

    PubMed

    2004-09-01

    John Snow's historic investigation of a severe epidemic of cholera traced the cause of infection to a common water source. Today, 150 years later, waterborne diseases remain a public health problem, and similar investigations are used to identify the source of infection. On February 3, 2004, the Vermont Department of Health (VDH) was notified of an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis among children whose only common exposure was attendance at a swimming club the previous weekend (January 31-February 1). This report summarizes the results of an investigation conducted by VDH and CDC, which determined the cause of the outbreak to be a combination of stool contamination, a blocked chlorine feed tube, and multiple lapses of pool-maintenance procedures. The findings underscore the importance of correct pool maintenance for rapid identification of water-quality problems to prevent outbreaks of swimming pool-associated illness. PMID:15343147

  10. Detection of Clostridium perfringens type C in pig herds following disease outbreak and subsequent vaccination.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, K; Wyder, M; Gobeli, S; Candi, A; Doherr, M G; Zehnder, B; Zimmermann, W; Posthaus, H

    2012-11-17

    Immunisation of sows using Clostridium perfringens type C toxoid vaccines is recommended to prevent necrotising enteritis (NE) on pig breeding farms. Absence of disease, however, oftentimes leads to the false assumption of pathogens being eradicated. The prevalence of C perfringens type C was determined by PCR in faecal samples of piglets and sows in three Swiss pig breeding farms two to four years after implementation of a vaccination programme following disease outbreaks. C perfringens type C could still be detected several years after an outbreak despite absence of NE. In-herd prevalence of the pathogens varied significantly between the farms and was also lower compared with a farm which experienced a recent outbreak. In conclusion, C perfringens type C can be detected on once-affected farms, even in the absence of NE for several years. PMID:23100304

  11. An Alert System for Informing Environmental Risk of Dengue Infections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ngai Sze Wong; Chi Yan Law; Man Kwan Lee; Shui Shan Lee; Hui Lin

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne infection the incidence of which varies with the environment and climate. Knowingly, the reported\\u000a incidence of dengue is an insensitive indicator of infection risk in a locality. The Ovitrap Index has been in use in many\\u000a countries. This index is a measurement of mosquito eggs in specified geographic locations which, in turn, reflects the distribution\\u000a of

  12. Dengue fever: new paradigms for a changing epidemiology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Debarati Guha-Sapir; Barbara Schimmer

    2005-01-01

    Dengue is the most important arthropod-borne viral disease of public health significance. Compared with nine reporting countries in the 1950s, today the geographic distribution includes more than 100 countries worldwide. Many of these had not reported dengue for 20 or more years and several have no known history of the disease. The World Health Organization estimates that more than 2.5

  13. Detection of dengue virus type 4 in Easter Island, Chile.

    PubMed

    Fernández, J; Vera, L; Tognarelli, J; Fasce, R; Araya, P; Villagra, E; Roos, O; Mora, J

    2011-10-01

    We report the detection of dengue virus type 4 (DENV-4) for the first time in Easter Island, Chile. The virus was detected in serum samples of two patients treated at the Hospital in Easter Island. The two samples were IgM positive, and the infection was confirmed by RT-PCR and genetic sequencing; viral isolation was possible with one of them. The Easter Island isolates were most closely related to genotype II of dengue type 4. PMID:21691853

  14. The Hidden Burden of Dengue and Chikungunya in Chennai, India

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Barraquer, Isabel; Solomon, Sunil S.; Kuganantham, Periaswamy; Srikrishnan, Aylur Kailasom; Vasudevan, Canjeevaram K.; Iqbal, Syed H.; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Solomon, Suniti; Mehta, Shruti H.; Cummings, Derek A. T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dengue and chikungunya are rapidly expanding viruses transmitted by mosquitoes of the genus Aedes. Few epidemiological studies have examined the extent of transmission of these infections in South India despite an increase in the number of reported cases, and a high suitability for transmission. Methods and findings We conducted a household-based seroprevalence survey among 1010 individuals aged 5-40 years living in fifty randomly selected spatial locations in Chennai, Tamil Nadu. Participants were asked to provide a venous blood sample and to complete a brief questionnaire with basic demographic and daily activity information. Previous exposure to dengue and chikungunya was determined using IgG indirect ELISA (Panbio) and IgG ELISA (Novatec), respectively. We used this data to estimate key transmission parameters (force of infection and basic reproductive number) and to explore factors associated with seropositivity. While only 1% of participants reported history of dengue and 20% of chikungunya, we found that 93% (95%CI 89-95%) of participants were seropositive to dengue virus, and 44% (95%CI 37-50%) to chikungunya. Age-specific seroprevalence was consistent with long-tem, endemic circulation of dengue and suggestive of epidemic chikungunya transmission. Seropositivity to dengue and chikungunya were significantly correlated, even after adjusting for individual and household factors. We estimate that 23% of the susceptible population gets infected by dengue each year, corresponding to approximately 228,000 infections. This transmission intensity is significantly higher than that estimated in known hyperendemic settings in Southeast Asia and the Americas. Conclusions These results provide unprecedented insight into the very high transmission potential of dengue and chikungunya in Chennai and underscore the need for enhanced surveillance and control methods. PMID:26181441

  15. Households as Foci for Dengue Transmission in Highly Urban Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Anders, Katherine L.; Nga, Le Hong; Thuy, Nguyen Thi Van; Ngoc, Tran Van; Tam, Cao Thi; Tai, Luong Thi Hue; Truong, Nguyen Thanh; Duyen, Huynh Thi Le; Trung, Vu Tuan; Kien, Duong Thi Hue; Wolbers, Marcel; Wills, Bridget; Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh; Tho, Nguyen Dac; Simmons, Cameron P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dengue control programs commonly employ reactive insecticide spraying around houses of reported cases, with the assumption that most dengue virus (DENV) transmission occurs in the home. Focal household transmission has been demonstrated in rural settings, but it is unclear whether this holds true in dense and mobile urban populations. We conducted a prospective study of dengue clustering around households in highly urban Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Methods We enrolled 71 index cases with suspected dengue (subsequently classified as 52 dengue cases and 19 non-dengue controls); each initiated the enrollment of a cluster of 25–35 household members and neighbors who were followed up over 14 days. Incident DENV infections in cluster participants were identified by RT-PCR, NS1-ELISA, and/or DENV-IgM/-IgG seroconversion, and recent infections by DENV-IgM positivity at baseline. Principal Findings/Conclusions There was no excess risk of DENV infection within dengue case clusters during the two-week follow-up, compared to control clusters, but the prevalence of recent DENV infection at baseline was two-fold higher in case clusters than controls (OR 2.3, 95%CI 1.0–5.1, p = 0.05). Prevalence of DENV infection in Aedes aegypti was similar in case and control houses, and low overall (1%). Our findings are broadly consistent with household clustering of dengue risk, but indicate that any clustering is at a short temporal scale rather than sustained chains of localized transmission. This suggests that reactive perifocal insecticide spraying may have a limited impact in this setting. PMID:25680106

  16. La propagación de la Fiebre del dengue

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Duane Gubler (University of Hawaiâ??i; )

    2008-11-30

    Dengue fever is a serious disease, which is transmitted from a certain type of mosquito. Dengue fever has reached pandemic status in most of the tropical countries. Urbanization, lack of mosquito control, and modern transportation accelerate the spread of the virus. Stored-water systems versus piped-water systems encourage mosquito breeding. More air travel to tropical areas increases the potential for the spread of the disease.

  17. Social sustainability of Mesocyclops biological control for dengue in South Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thanh Tam; Olsen, Anna; Viennet, Elvina; Sleigh, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Copepod Mesocyclops as biological control agents for dengue was previously proven to be effective and sustainable in the Northern and Central provinces of Vietnam. We aim to study social sustainability of Mesocyclops intervention in south Vietnam. Both quantitative and qualitative approaches were used. An entomological survey was carried out in 100 random households of Chanh An commune, Vinh Long Province. Aedes larval indices and Mesocyclops prevalence were compared with historical pre- and post-intervention values. In the same commune, using purposeful sampling, sixteen semi-structured interviews (1 villager leader, 1 local doctor, 10 villagers, 2 teachers, 2 entomology officials), and a focus group discussion (6 Mesocyclops program collaborators) explored water storage habits, beliefs about dengue prevention and behaviour related to Mesocyclops. Thematic analysis was conducted to interpret the qualitative findings. Aedes abundance increased after responsibility for Mesocyclops intervention moved from government to community in 2010, with post-transfer surges in Breteau Index, Container Index, and Larval Density Index. Larval increments coincided with decrease in Mesocyclops prevalence. Villagers had some knowledge of dengue but it was conflated with other mosquito borne diseases and understanding of Mesocyclops was incomplete. Program adoption among the villagers was limited. With reduced government support program collaborators reported limited capacity to conduct population monitoring, and instead targeted 'problem' households. Although the Mesocyclops program was highly sustainable in northern and central provinces of Vietnam, the intervention has not been consistently adopted by southern households in Chanh An commune. Limited education, household monitoring and government support are affecting sustainability. Findings were based on a small household sample visited over a short time period, so other evaluations are needed. However, our results suggest that government support for the Mesocyclops program is still required in this part of Vietnam. PMID:25312335

  18. [Infection prevention and control for foodborne infections].

    PubMed

    Mitsuda, Toshihiro

    2012-08-01

    Patients' care for foodborne infections is sometimes very critical, since these patients exerting high copy numbers of contagious pathogens. Recently, Norovirus infection became the most frequent pathogen for large outbreaks in the community and the hospital around the world. Norovirus is alcohol-resistant and highly contagious. For preventing outbreaks of foodborne infections, standard precaution(and contact precaution for diaper changing patients) is required by the CDC's isolation precaution guideline revised at 2007. We need to provide for infection prevention and control in the epidemic winter period not only in healthcare facilities but also for communities. PMID:22894082

  19. Dengue Virus Infection Perturbs Lipid Homeostasis in Infected Mosquito Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Rushika M.; Riley, Catherine; Isaac, Georgis; Hopf- Jannasch, Amber; Moore, Ronald J.; Weitz, Karl K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Metz, Thomas O.; Adamec, Jiri; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2012-03-22

    Dengue virus causes {approx}50-100 million infections per year and thus is considered one of the most aggressive arthropod-borne human pathogen worldwide. During its replication, dengue virus induces dramatic alterations in the intracellular membranes of infected cells. This phenomenon is observed both in human and vector-derived cells. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry of mosquito cells, we show that this membrane remodeling is directly linked to a unique lipid repertoire induced by dengue virus infection. Specifically, 15% of the metabolites detected were significantly different between DENV infected and uninfected cells while 85% of the metabolites detected were significantly different in isolated replication complex membranes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that intracellular lipid redistribution induced by the inhibition of fatty acid synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in lipid biosynthesis, is sufficient for cell survival but is inhibitory to dengue virus replication. Lipids that have the capacity to destabilize and change the curvature of membranes as well as lipids that change the permeability of membranes are enriched in dengue virus infected cells. Several sphingolipids and other bioactive signaling molecules that are involved in controlling membrane fusion, fission, and trafficking as well as molecules that influence cytoskeletal reorganization are also up regulated during dengue infection. These observations shed light on the emerging role of lipids in shaping the membrane and protein environments during viral infections and suggest membrane-organizing principles that may influence virus-induced intracellular membrane architecture.

  20. Meteorological factors and dengue fever transmission in South Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Lung-Chang; Lin, Yuan-Chien; Cheng, Ming-Hung; Yu, Hwa-Lung

    2013-04-01

    The variations in meteorological conditions induced by climate change causes the diffusion pattern of infectious disease and serious epidemic situation. The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of meteorological variables to the temporal variation of dengue fever epidemic in weekly basis in south Taiwan. Several extreme and average index of meteorological variables, i.e. temperature and humidity, were used for this analysis, including averaged, maximum and minimum temperature, and average rainfall, maximum 1-hr rainfall, and maximum 24-hr rainfall. This study applies the distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM) to reveal the significant meteorological variables and their temporal lag effects to the dengue fever epidemic by analyzing the dengue fever records from 1998-2011. Results show that the weekly minimum temperature (minT) and 1-hr maximum rainfall (maxR) are significantly important to the dengue fever spread. Among them, once minT is higher than 20°C, the relative risk of dengue fever of nine-fourteen week later will be significantly elevated. On the other hand, the incidences of maxR higher than 80mm can also increase the relative risk of dengue fever occurrences around nine-fourteen weeks afterwards.

  1. Analysis of the dengue disease model with two virus strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adi-Kusumo, F.; Aini, A. N.; Ridwan, M.

    2014-02-01

    Dengue fever (DF) and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) are the disease caused by the dengue virus which is transmitted to the human by infected female mosquitoes. The disease is endemic in more than 100 countries over the world. Dengue virus has four distinct serotypes which are closely related to each other antigenically. A person who infected by the dengue virus will never be infected again by the same serotype, but he looses immunity from the three other serotypes. Infection with one serotype does not provide cross-protective immunity against to others. Here we assume that there are two serotypes exist in the population. Someone who has recovered from one serotype become susceptible to the other serotype and can be reinfected. In this paper we analyze the model of dengue fever with two infections from the different serotype by linear analysis. Then we study the effect of vaccination to the model. In numerical simulation, we use Runge-Kutta order 4 to integrate the solution of the system.

  2. Economic Cost and Burden of Dengue in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Edillo, Frances E.; Halasa, Yara A.; Largo, Francisco M.; Erasmo, Jonathan Neil V.; Amoin, Naomi B.; Alera, Maria Theresa P.; Yoon, In-Kyu; Alcantara, Arturo C.; Shepard, Donald S.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue, the world's most important mosquito-borne viral disease, is endemic in the Philippines. During 2008–2012, the country's Department of Health reported an annual average of 117,065 dengue cases, placing the country fourth in dengue burden in southeast Asia. This study estimates the country's annual number of dengue episodes and their economic cost. Our comparison of cases between active and passive surveillance in Punta Princesa, Cebu City yielded an expansion factor of 7.2, close to the predicted value (7.0) based on the country's health system. We estimated an annual average of 842,867 clinically diagnosed dengue cases, with direct medical costs (in 2012 US dollars) of $345 million ($3.26 per capita). This is 54% higher than an earlier estimate without Philippines-specific costs. Ambulatory settings treated 35% of cases (representing 10% of direct costs), whereas inpatient hospitals served 65% of cases (representing 90% of direct costs). The economic burden of dengue in the Philippines is substantial. PMID:25510723

  3. Estimated Deaths and Illnesses Averted During Fungal Meningitis Outbreak Associated with Contaminated Steroid Injections, United States, 2012–2013

    PubMed Central

    Derado, Gordana; Wise, Matthew; Harris, Julie R.; Chiller, Tom; Meltzer, Martin I.; Park, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    During 2012–2013, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and partners responded to a multistate outbreak of fungal infections linked to methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) injections produced by a compounding pharmacy. We evaluated the effects of public health actions on the scope of this outbreak. A comparison of 60-day case-fatality rates and clinical characteristics of patients given a diagnosis on or before October 4, the date the outbreak was widely publicized, with those of patients given a diagnosis after October 4 showed that an estimated 3,150 MPA injections, 153 cases of meningitis or stroke, and 124 deaths were averted. Compared with diagnosis after October 4, diagnosis on or before October 4 was significantly associated with a higher 60-day case-fatality rate (28% vs. 5%; p<0.0001). Aggressive public health action resulted in a substantially reduced estimated number of persons affected by this outbreak and improved survival of affected patients. PMID:25989264

  4. Climatic warming disrupts recurrent Alpine insect outbreaks

    E-print Network

    Liebhold, Andrew

    in LBM outbreak pattern highlights how interacting species with differential response rates to climate change can result in dramatic ecological changes. traveling wave | tree rings | tri-trophic | Lepidoptera

  5. ENGINEERING ASPECTS OF WATERBORNE OUTBREAK INVESTIGATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The subject material in this manuscript covers the engineering aspects of waterborne outbreak investigation. Major areas included in this discussion are: evaluation of disinfection (concentration and contact time, pH and temperature, interference); evaluation of the water system ...

  6. Infection Control During Filoviral Hemorrhagic Fever Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Vanessa, N Raabe; Matthias, Borchert

    2012-01-01

    Breaking the human-to-human transmission cycle remains the cornerstone of infection control during filoviral (Ebola and Marburg) hemorrhagic fever outbreaks. This requires effective identification and isolation of cases, timely contact tracing and monitoring, proper usage of barrier personal protection gear by health workers, and safely conducted burials. Solely implementing these measures is insufficient for infection control; control efforts must be culturally sensitive and conducted in a transparent manner to promote the necessary trust between the community and infection control team in order to succeed. This article provides a review of the literature on infection control during filoviral hemorrhagic fever outbreaks focusing on outbreaks in a developing setting and lessons learned from previous outbreaks. The primary search database used to review the literature was PUBMED, the National Library of Medicine website. PMID:22529631

  7. Genetic Clues to the 2014 Ebola Outbreak

    MedlinePLUS

    ... outbreak in West Africa and the first to affect major cities. Ebola can spread from one person to another through direct contact with body fluids, such as blood or saliva. Infections can cause vomiting, diarrhea, kidney and liver ...

  8. Multistate outbreak of human Salmonella typhimurium infections associated with aquatic frogs - United States, 2009.

    PubMed

    2010-01-01

    During April-July 2009, the Utah Department of Health identified five cases of Salmonella Typhimurium infection with indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns, predominantly among children. In August, CDC began a multistate outbreak investigation to determine the source of the infections. This report summarizes the results of this ongoing investigation, which, as of December 30, had identified 85 S. Typhimurium human isolates with the outbreak strain from 31 states. In a multistate case-control study, exposure to frogs was found to be significantly associated with illness (63% of cases versus 3% of controls; matched odds ratio [mOR] = 24.4). Among 14 case-patients who knew the type of frog, all had exposure to an exclusively aquatic frog species, the African dwarf frog. Environmental samples from aquariums containing aquatic frogs in four homes of case-patients yielded S. Typhimurium isolates matching the outbreak strain. Preliminary traceback information has indicated these frogs likely came from the same breeder in California. Reptiles (e.g., turtles) and amphibians (e.g., frogs) have long been recognized as Salmonella carriers, and three multistate outbreaks of human Salmonella infections associated with turtle contact have occurred since 2006. However, this is the first reported multistate outbreak of Salmonella infections associated with amphibians. Educational materials aimed at preventing salmonellosis from contact with reptiles should be expanded to include amphibians, such as aquatic frogs. PMID:20057349

  9. An Investigation of a Major Outbreak of Rift Valley Fever in Kenya: 2006–2007

    PubMed Central

    Nguku, Patrick M.; Sharif, S. K.; Mutonga, David; Amwayi, Samuel; Omolo, Jared; Mohammed, Omar; Farnon, Eileen C.; Gould, L. Hannah; Lederman, Edith; Rao, Carol; Sang, Rosemary; Schnabel, David; Feikin, Daniel R.; Hightower, Allen; Njenga, M. Kariuki; Breiman, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    An outbreak of Rift Valley fever (RVF) occurred in Kenya during November 2006 through March 2007. We characterized the magnitude of the outbreak through disease surveillance and serosurveys, and investigated contributing factors to enhance strategies for forecasting to prevent or minimize the impact of future outbreaks. Of 700 suspected cases, 392 met probable or confirmed case definitions; demographic data were available for 340 (87%), including 90 (26.4%) deaths. Male cases were more likely to die than females, Case Fatality Rate Ratio 1.8 (95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.3–3.8). Serosurveys suggested an attack rate up to 13% of residents in heavily affected areas. Genetic sequencing showed high homology among viruses from this and earlier RVF outbreaks. Case areas were more likely than non-case areas to have soil types that retain surface moisture. The outbreak had a devastatingly high case-fatality rate for hospitalized patients. However, there were up to 180,000 infected mildly ill or asymptomatic people within highly affected areas. Soil type data may add specificity to climate-based forecasting models for RVF. PMID:20682900

  10. Outbreaks of Salmonella infections attributed to beef - United States, 1973-2011.

    PubMed

    Laufer, A S; Grass, J; Holt, K; Whichard, J M; Griffin, P M; Gould, L H

    2015-07-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella is estimated to be the most common bacterial cause of foodborne illness in the United States, causing an estimated one million domestically acquired foodborne illnesses annually. Recent, large outbreaks have highlighted the importance of ground beef as an important source of multidrug-resistant Salmonella. We analysed the epidemiology of salmonellosis outbreaks that were attributed to beef in the United States reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) from 1973 to 2011. During 1973-2011, of the 1965 outbreaks of Salmonella where a food vehicle was implicated, 96 were attributed to beef, accounting for 3684 illnesses. We observed a shift in the type of beef implicated in salmonellosis outbreaks, from roast to ground beef. Delicatessen-style roast beef cooked in commercial processing establishments was the predominant type during the 1970s and early 1980s; regulations on cooking and processing essentially eliminated this problem by 1987. Ground beef emerged as an important vehicle in the 2000s; it was implicated in 17 (45%) of the 38 beef-attributed outbreaks reported during 2002-2011. Although this emergence was likely due in part to increased participation in CDC's PulseNet, which was established in 1996, and proactive decisions by the United States Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service, stronger measures are needed to decrease contamination of ground beef with Salmonella. PMID:25427978

  11. The combined effects of pathogens and predators on insect outbreaks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Greg Dwyer; Jonathan Dushoff; Susan Harrell Yee

    2004-01-01

    The economic damage caused by episodic outbreaks of forest-defoliating insects has spurred much research, yet why such outbreaks occur remains unclear. Theoretical biologists argue that outbreaks are driven by specialist pathogens or parasitoids, because host-pathogen and host-parasitoid models show large-amplitude, long-period cycles resembling time series of outbreaks. Field biologists counter that outbreaks occur when generalist predators fail, because predation in

  12. Dengue Vaccines Regulatory Pathways: A Report on Two Meetings with Regulators of Developing Countries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Mahoney; Liliana Chocarro; Donald P. Francis; John Vose; Harold Margolis

    2011-01-01

    Richard Mahoney and colleagues summarize two recent meetings convened by the Pediatric Dengue Vaccine Initiative and the Developing Countries' Vaccine Regulators Network on regulatory issues that need to be addressed before licensing dengue vaccines.

  13. Nosocomial outbreak of cryptosporidiosis in AIDS patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P Ravn; J D Lundgren; P Kjaeldgaard; W Holten-Anderson; N Højlyng; J O Nielsen; J Gaub

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To describe a nosocomial outbreak of cryptosporidiosis during four months after June 1989. SETTING--A department of infectious diseases in Copenhagen, seeing about half the patients with AIDS in Denmark. SUBJECTS--73 HIV antibody negative subjects and 60 antibody positive subjects admitted as inpatients during the transmission period of the outbreak (20 June-14 August), of whom 18 (17 with AIDS, one with

  14. [Cyclospora cayetanensis outbreak in travelers to Cuba].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Olivencia, Germán; Herrero, Maria Dolores; Subirats, Mercedes; Rivas González, Pablo; Puente, Sabino

    2008-11-01

    Initially described in travelers, outbreaks of cyclosporiasis were soon linked to imported food products. An outbreak of cyclosporiasis in Spanish travelers is described. After identification of Cyclospora cayetanensis