Sample records for preventing dental decay

  1. Prevention and management of dental decay in the pre-school child

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sergio Uribe

    2006-01-01

    Scope and purposeThe guideline addresses effective strategies for preventing and managing dental decay in the preschool child. The nature of dental decay, its diagnosis and its epidemiology are reviewed. Methods for prevention and management of the disease at an individual and population level are reviewed and identification of children at increased risk of developing dental disease is discussed.MethodologyThe guideline was

  2. Fluorides and the prevention of dental decay: a statement from the Representative Board of the British Dental Association.

    PubMed

    Craig, G C

    2000-06-24

    Fluoride reduces the incidence of dental decay substantially. Fluoride benefits all age-groups, because of its topical effect. Water fluoridation needs to be targeted on high caries areas which are normally also areas of social and material deprivation. Thorough brushing twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste is also crucial to the improvement of oral health. PMID:11022379

  3. Patterns of preventive dental behavior.

    PubMed

    Swank, M E; Vernon, S W; Lairson, D R

    1986-01-01

    Preventive dental behavior was examined using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey of 1971-75 conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics. Most research to date has dealt with the use of all types of dental services, with relatively few studies focusing on utilization of dental services for preventive purposes or on preventive dental behavior. Economic theory on the demand for health services and the Andersen model of health services utilization were applied to examine predisposing, enabling, and need characteristics which may influence use of preventive dental health services and preventive dental behavior. The associations between each of three measures of preventive dental behavior and the three sets of characteristics from Andersen's model were analyzed using multiple regression analysis. The enabling factors (income and a regular source of care) were the most important determinants of use of preventive dental services. Need characteristics, measured by self-evaluated condition of teeth, were also significant determinants of use, while the predisposing variables were the least important of the three types. In contrast, for the home care measure, frequency of brushing, the predisposing variables were the most important, with gender and education ranking highest. Consideration of these results may be useful to health educators and to those who formulate policies affecting the distribution of preventive dental services and dental insurance coverage. PMID:3083472

  4. Weaker Dental Enamel Explains Dental Decay

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; Gibson, Carolyn W.; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is “weaker” while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution. PMID:25885796

  5. Dental Decay Among Texas School Children.

    E-print Network

    Whitacre, Jessie (Jessie Opal)

    1934-01-01

    . S. Department of Agriculture. $In cooperation with Texaa Extension Service. lmong 6701 school children of Texas, dental decay was fot in approximately 70 per cent of the white group, 65 per cent o the Mexican, and 45 per cent of the negro...: . - Problem of Dental Carie :e of Da ence of - . .. CONTE: NTS Pagc ta E Carious Teeth -__l---_---------------------------- ----------_-----_._----..----- t

  6. DENTAL PLAN 01-01-2012 The Dental Plan provides benefits for preventive, diagnostic, restorative, and orthodontic dental

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Peter D.

    1 DENTAL PLAN 01-01-2012 The Dental Plan provides benefits for preventive, diagnostic, restorative, and orthodontic dental services. Enrollment in the Dental Plan is optional. Please note that the Employer reserves the right to amend or terminate this Dental Plan at any time and for any reason. WHO IS ELIGIBLE

  7. The Importance of Tooth Decay Prevention in Children under Three

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milgrom, Peter; Huebner, Colleen; Chi, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Tooth decay and tooth loss was once the norm but public health interventions have led to major improvements for most people. Nevertheless, not all children have benefited. Dental disease in young children is unacceptably high. Tooth decay is preventable. Early childhood educators are often the first to notice the problem. Professional…

  8. Prevention of dental disease versus surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2014-01-01

    The members of the Minnesota legislature have debated methods by which access to dental care and treatment of dental disease can be improved at a cost lower than that of present delivery systems. This review sheds light on some significant aspects of what the dental profession has learned over the last century that has proven significantly beneficial to the overall health of the American populace. Recommendations are made in the use of cost-effective dental public health interventions that could be used to provide better access and improved dental health at lower cost. PMID:24839794

  9. Mucositis prevention by improved dental care in acute leukemia patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Milanko Djuric; Valeria Hillier-Kolarov; Aranka Belic; Ljiljana Jankovic

    2006-01-01

    Goals of work  The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of the intensive dental care protocol in preventing oral complications in acute leukemia patients.Patients and methods  Thirty-four patients hospitalized for induction remission therapy for acute leukemia were randomly assigned to one of two groups, whether to receive intensive dental care protocol or not. The intensive dental care group

  10. Reflections on a training course reorienting dental teams towards prevention.

    PubMed

    Watt, R G; D'Cruz, L; Rai, A; Jones, E

    2015-01-01

    Prevention is a core element of routine dental practice. However, members of the dental team often lack the required knowledge and skills to deliver effective evidence-based advice and support to patients. This paper describes the development and delivery of an innovative course designed to develop the preventive capacity of dental teams working in dental foundation training practices across London. The course contents were based upon national guidelines on evidence-based preventive care delivered in primary dental care settings (Delivering better oral health). An experienced team of trainers from diverse backgrounds successfully designed and delivered the courses and the initial feedback from participants indicate strong support for the approach developed. PMID:25571821

  11. Recommendations for using fluoride to prevent and control dental caries in the United States. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    PubMed

    2001-08-17

    Widespread use of fluoride has been a major factor in the decline in the prevalence and severity of dental caries (i.e., tooth decay) in the United States and other economically developed countries. When used appropriately, fluoride is both safe and effective in preventing and controlling dental caries. All U.S. residents are likely exposed to some degree to fluoride, which is available from multiple sources. Both health-care professionals and the public have sought guidance on selecting the best way to provide and receive fluoride. During the late 1990s, CDC convened a work group to develop recommendations for using fluoride to prevent and control dental caries in the United States. This report includes these recommendations, as well as a) critical analysis of the scientific evidence regarding the efficacy and effectiveness of fluoride modalities in preventing and controlling dental caries, b) ordinal grading of the quality of the evidence, and c) assessment of the strength of each recommendation. Because frequent exposure to small amounts of fluoride each day will best reduce the risk for dental caries in all age groups, the work group recommends that all persons drink water with an optimal fluoride concentration and brush their teeth twice daily with fluoride toothpaste. For persons at high risk for dental caries, additional fluoride measures might be needed. Measured use of fluoride modalities is particularly appropriate during the time of anterior tooth enamel development (i.e., age <6 years). The recommendations in this report guide dental and other health-care providers, public health officials, policy makers, and the public in the use of fluoride to achieve maximum protection against dental caries while using resources efficiently and reducing the likelihood of enamel fluorosis. The recommendations address public health and professional practice, self-care, consumer product industries and health agencies, and further research. Adoption of these recommendations could further reduce dental caries in the United States and save public and private resources. PMID:11521913

  12. Utilization of Preventive Dental Practices by Graduates of One U.S. Dental School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripa, Louis W.; Johnson, Robin M.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 113 graduates of the State University of New York at Stony Brook dental school now in general practice found a high rate of self-reported use of preventive practices (oral hygiene instruction, pit-and-fissure sealants, fluorides, and diet analysis) included in the dental school's curriculum. (MSE)

  13. Challenges of Iranian Adolescents for Preventing Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Fallahi, Arezoo; Ghofranipour, Fazlollah; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Malekafzali, Beheshteh; Hajizadeh, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oral health plays a vital role in people’s general health and well-being. With regard to the costly treatments of oral diseases, preventive programs need to be designed for dental caries based on children’s perspectives. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to describe and explore challenges for caring dental health based on children’s perspectives. Patients and Methods: A qualitative design with content analysis approach was applied to collect and analyze the perspectives of students about factors influencing oral and dental care. Eighteen Iranian students in 8 guidance schools were chosen through the purposive sampling. Semi-structured interviews were held for data gathering. In order to support the validity and rigor of the data, different criteria such as acceptability, confirmability, and transferability were utilized. Results: During data analysis, four main themes developed: “barriers to dental health,” “maintaining dental health,” “uncertainty in decision-making” and “supportive factors”. “Uncertainty in decision-making” and “barriers to dental health” were the main challenges for preventing dental caries among adolescents. Conclusions: “Certainty in decision-making” to maintain dental health depends on overcoming the barriers of dental health. Further research is needed to confirm the findings of this study. PMID:25593720

  14. Taekwondo coaches knowledge about prevention and management of dental trauma.

    PubMed

    Vidovi?, Dina; Gorseta, Kristina; Bursac, Danijel; Glavina, Domagoj; Skrinjari?, Tomislav

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess level of knowledge about prevention and dental trauma management among taekwondo coaches in Croatia. The questionnaire submitted to the taekwondo coaches contained 16 items about dental trauma prevention and management. The questionnaires were filled in by 131 taekwondo coaches; 28 females and 103 males. Descriptive statistics was used to describe and analyze the obtained data. The coaches were familiar with dental injuries in high percentage: 41 (31.3%) have observed dental injury and 36 (27.5%) have experienced a dental injury themselves. Eight of them had tooth avulsion, fourteen crown fracture, and eight had tooth luxation. About half of all interviewed coaches 68 (52.7%) were aware of the possibility of replanting avulsed teeth. Twenty six (19.8%) were familiar with the tooth rescue kit. Only 99 out of 131 coaches (75.6%) have used a mouthguard. The obtained results show low knowledge about possibilities for prevention of dental trauma. Insufficient use of mouthguards in this contact sport requires more attention of dentists and coaches education about dental trauma prevention. PMID:25145007

  15. Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Patients Undergoing Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Watters, William; Rethman, Michael P; Hanson, Nicholas Buck; Abt, Elliot; Anderson, Paul A; Carroll, Karen C; Futrell, Harry C; Garvin, Kevin; Glenn, Stephen O; Hellstein, John; Hewlett, Angela; Kolessar, David; Moucha, Calin; O'Donnell, Richard J; O'Toole, John E; Osmon, Douglas R; Evans, Richard Parker; Rinella, Anthony; Steinberg, Mark J; Goldberg, Michael; Ristic, Helen; Boyer, Kevin; Sluka, Patrick; Martin, William Robert; Cummins, Deborah S; Song, Sharon; Woznica, Anne; Gross, Leeaht

    2013-03-01

    The Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Patients Undergoing Dental Procedures evidence-based clinical practice guideline was codeveloped by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Dental Association. This guideline replaces the previous AAOS Information Statement, "Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Bacteremia in Patients With Joint Replacement," published in 2009. Based on the best current evidence and a systematic review of published studies, three recommendations have been created to guide clinical practice in the prevention of orthopaedic implant infections in patients undergoing dental procedures. The first recommendation is graded as Limited; this recommendation proposes that the practitioner consider changing the long-standing practice of routinely prescribing prophylactic antibiotic for patients with orthopaedic implants who undergo dental procedures. The second, graded as Inconclusive, addresses the use of oral topical antimicrobials in the prevention of periprosthetic joint infections. The third recommendation, a Consensus statement, addresses the maintenance of good oral hygiene. PMID:23457068

  16. The prevention of hepatitis B transmission in dental practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Larry I. Lutwick

    1982-01-01

    The prevention of the spread of hepatitis B is of utmost importance to the dental profession. The mechanisms of transmission of the virus between practitioner and patient are discussed and preventive options outlined. Despite conscientious history taking, not all virus carriers can be identified without laboratory screening of the entire population. Despite specific precautions high risk exposures to practitioners still

  17. Attitude Towards Preventive Dentistry Among Iranian Senior Dental Students

    PubMed Central

    Khami, MR.; Murtomaa, H.; Razeghi, S.; Virtanen, J. I.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate attitudes of Iranian senior dental students towards preventive dentistry in relation to their background factors and self-perceived competency in providing preventive care. Materials and Methods: In spring 2008, a questionnaire survey was conducted with all the senior dental students of seven randomly selected state dental schools in Iran. In addition to the respondents’ age and gender, the voluntary questionnaire assessed the students’ attitudes towards preventive dentistry by means of a seven-point semantic differential scale of nine qualities and their opposites, and their self-perceived competency in providing preventive care by five separate questions. To identify the underlying dimensions for attitude, a factor analysis with principle component method and varimax rotation was applied. Independent sample t-test served for statistical analysis. Of the 242 students receiving the questionnaire, 182 students (75%) responded. The mean age of the participants was 26 years and 42% of them were men. Results: Based on the factor analysis, which explained 60% of the total variance, two attitude dimensions were identified; the profession-related dimension and the health service-related dimension. Competency in giving preventive care in all the five specified areas was reported by 44% of the students with no significant gender differences. The mean for the dentist-related dimension was significantly higher among the students who reported competency in giving preventive care (P=0.005). Conclusion: There is room for improvement in senior dental students’ attitudes towards preventive dentistry. In order to create more positive attitudes for future dental professionals, there should be an early and sufficient exposure to preventive aspects of dentistry in the dental curricula. PMID:23323180

  18. [Efficiency of preventive dental care in school dentistry system].

    PubMed

    Avraamova, O G; Kolesnik, A G; Kulazhenko, T V; Zadapaeva, S V; Shevchenko, S S

    2014-01-01

    Ways of development of Russian school dentistry are defined and justified based on the analysis according to logistics, personnel, legal, financial and economic basis for the reorientation of the service for preventive direction, which should be a priority in the current conditions. The implemented model of school dental care based on team work of the dentist and dental hygienist proved to be highly efficient and may be recommended for wide introduction in practice. PMID:24990789

  19. Barriers to Seeking Preventive Dental Care by Kuwaiti Adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Khalaf F. Al-Shammari; Jassem M. Al-Ansari; Areej K. Al-Khabbaz; Sisko Honkala

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of preventive dental visits and to identify self-reported barriers for this practice among Kuwaiti adults. Materials and Methods: A self-administered, anonymous, structured questionnaire was distributed to a random sample of Kuwaiti nationals 18 years of age or older recruited from all six health districts of Kuwait. A total of

  20. Fluoride Programs in the School Setting: Preventive Dental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebich, Theodore, Jr.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Two types of school-based programs that increase students' use of fluoride for preventive dental health are described. In fluoride mouthrinse programs, teachers give their students a fluoride solution once a week in a paper cup. In areas where the level of fluoride in the water supply is insufficient, the flouride tablet program is used. (JN)

  1. Bluetooth technology for prevention of dental caries.

    PubMed

    Kolahi, Jafar; Fazilati, Mohamad

    2009-12-01

    Caries is caused when the pH at the tooth surface drops below 5.5. A miniaturized and autonomous pH monitoring nodes can be attached to the tooth surface, like a tooth jewel. This intelligent sensor includes three components: (a) digital micro pH meter, (b) power supply, (c) wireless communicating device. The micro pH meter facilitates long term tooth surface pH monitoring and providing real time feedback to the patients and dental experts. Power supply of this system will be microfabricated biocatalytic fuel cell (enzymatic micro-battery) using organic compounds (e.g. formate or glucose) as the fuel to generate electricity. When micro pH meter detects the pH lower than 5.5, wireless Bluetooth device sends a caution (e.g. "you are at risk of dental caries") to external monitoring equipment such as mobile phone or a hands-free heads. After reception of the caution, subjects should use routine brushing and flossing procedure or use a medicated chewing gum (e.g. chlorhexidine containing chewing gum) or rinse with a mouthwash. PMID:19570617

  2. What do the public and profession know about dental caries prevention in Korea?

    PubMed

    Johng-bai, K

    1998-08-01

    The availability of known preventive dental measures has no value, unless they are used appropriately by the public and by dental health care providers. Nevertheless, there is a wide gap between what is known about preventive procedures and dental public health measures in the preventive and public health dental world and what is known and used by the public and dental health care providers in Korea. The gap should be minimised to enable dental caries to be conquered. Firstly, an emphasis on the appropriate use of preventive procedures is needed in colleges of dentistry, dental hygienist training technical colleges and continuing educational courses. Simultaneously, there should be reform of the state run qualifying examinations for dentists and for dental hygienists in order to upgrade preventive and public health dentistry. Meanwhile, to promote personal dental health, introduce community preventive dental measures and maintain their use through self-help personal efforts and organised combined efforts, all dental health care providers have to educate the public. In addition, dental health care providers and the public should be regularly questioned on their knowledge, opinions and practices about community water fluoridation programmes, school-based fluoride mouthrinsing programmes and preventive procedures at an interval of several years, as a test to measure the achievements of dental educational and dental health education aims. PMID:9779124

  3. Periodic health examination, 1995 update: 2. Prevention of dental caries. The Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, D W; Ismail, A I

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To make recommendations, based on current evidence, for practising physicians and dentists on interventions for the prevention of dental caries in their patients. OPTIONS: Systemic fluoride administration, professionally administered fluoride, use of fluoride mouth rinses, fissure sealants, oral-hygiene practices, dietary practices, identification of groups at a high risk of dental caries, and early diagnosis and treatment. OUTCOMES: Reduced prevalence of dental caries and fluorosis, longer retention of teeth and lower treatment costs. EVIDENCE: Several MEDLINE searches were conducted for articles published from January 1980 to December 1992, including relevant review articles. VALUES: Relevant clinical findings were evaluated and categorized with the use of the evidence-based methods and values of the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination. Recommendations were developed for each method of caries prevention, with reduced incidence of dental caries and improved prevalence of caries-free teeth given high values. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: The potential benefits of these measures in the long-term are a lower incidence of tooth decay, longer retention of teeth and prevention of fluorosis. The cost saving can be considerable for patients and insurers; however, implementation of some recommendations will be difficult, since the traditional preventive practices of dentists and dental hygienists are not easily changed. RECOMMENDATIONS: There is good evidence that the following manoeuvres are effective in preventing dental caries: use of dentifrices containing fluoride, fluoridation of drinking water, fluoride supplements for patients in areas where there is a low level (0.3 ppm or less) of fluoride in the drinking water, professionally applied topical fluoride and the use of fluoride mouth rinses for patients with very active decay or at a high risk of dental caries and selective use of professionally applied fissure sealants on permanent molar teeth. There is poor evidence that the following manoeuvres are effective in preventing dental caries: professionally applied topical fluoride and the use of fluoride mouth rinses for patients with a low risk of caries, toothbrushing (without a dentifrice containing fluoride) and flossing, cleaning of teeth by a dentist or dental hygienist before topical application of fluoride or at a dental visit and dietary counselling for the general population. There is good evidence to recommend against the use of over-the-counter fluoride mouth rinses by the general population. VALIDATION: These guidelines are compatible with those of the US Preventive Services Task Force. SPONSOR: These guidelines were developed and endorsed by the task force, which is funded by Health Canada. Major funding was provided by the Faculty of Dentistry of the University of Toronto, Toronto and the Faculty of Dentistry of Dalhousie University, Halifax. PMID:7697577

  4. Perceived barriers to preventive dental care among Libyan dentists

    PubMed Central

    Arheiam, Arheiam; Masoud, Ibtisam; Bernabé, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Aim To explore the barriers to providing preventive dental care to patients, as perceived by Libyan dentists working in Benghazi. Settings and design A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey was conducted among dentists working in Benghazi, Libya. Materials and methods All dentists registered with the Dental Association of Benghazi and with 2 or more years of practice were invited to participate. The questionnaire collected information on participants’ demographic and professional characteristics as well as the patient-, practice- and dentist-related barriers to providing preventive dental care. Statistical analysis Scores for each type of barrier were compared by demographic and professional characteristics in bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results One hundred and seventy five dentists returned the questionnaires (response rate: 79%) and 166 had complete information on all the variables selected for analysis (75%). The majority were females (70%), aged between 23 and 34 years (85%), was working in the public health sector (43%), and had up to 5 years of service (46%). Patient-related barriers were scored the highest, followed by practice- and dentist-related barriers. Dentists with mixed practice reported lower scores on patient- and practice-related barriers than those in public or private practice. Conclusion Respondents were generally aware of the barriers to preventive dentistry and perceived the barriers as being more related to their patients than to their practices or themselves. However, these perceptions varied by practice sector. PMID:24767673

  5. STUDENT INSURANCE DENTAL BENEFIT 2012 2013 POLICY YEAR Preventative Dental (All enrollees): Two Annual Oral Evaluations; Two Adult/Child

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    STUDENT INSURANCE DENTAL BENEFIT 2012 ­ 2013 POLICY YEAR Preventative Dental (All enrollees): Two This provider will file the claim for you. 124 Strode Circle Student must present insurance card must present insurance card at the appointment. Clemson, SC 29631 Student must call the dentist office

  6. Obesity and Dental Decay: Inference on the Role of Dietary Sugar

    PubMed Central

    Goodson, J. Max; Tavares, Mary; Wang, Xiaoshan; Niederman, Richard; Cugini, Maryann; Hasturk, Hatice; Barake, Roula; Alsmadi, Osama; Al-Mutawa, Sabiha; Ariga, Jitendra; Soparkar, Pramod; Behbehani, Jawad; Behbehani, Kazem

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relationship of children’s obesity and dental decay. Methods We measured parameters related to obesity and dental decay in 8,275 4th and 5th grade Kuwaiti children (average age = 11.36 years) in a cross-sectional study. First to determine body weight, height, age for computation of BMI . Second, to determine numbers of teeth, numbers of fillings and numbers of untreated decayed teeth to determine extent and severity of dental disease. From these measurements, we computed measures of dental decay in children from four body weight categories; obese, overweight, normal healthy weight and underweight children. Results The percentage of children with decayed or filled teeth varied inversely with the body weight category. The percentage of decayed or filled teeth decreased from 15.61% (n=193) in underweight children, to 13.03% (n=4,094) in normal healthy weight children, to 9.73% (n=1,786) in overweight children to 7.87% (n=2,202) in obese children. Differences between all groups were statistically significant. Male children in this population had more dental decay than female children but the reduction of tooth decay as a function of BMI was greater in male children. Conclusions The finding of an inverse obesity-dental decay relationship contradicts the obesity-sugar and the obesity-dental decay relationship hypotheses. Sugar is well recognized as necessary and sufficient for dental decay. Sugar is also hypothesized to be a leading co-factor in obesity. If the later hypothesis is true, one would expect dental decay to increase with obesity. This was not found. The reasons for this inverse relationship are not currently clear. PMID:24130667

  7. Dental injuries in inline skating - level of information and prevention.

    PubMed

    Fasciglione, Daniele; Persic, Robert; Pohl, Yango; Filippi, Andreas

    2007-06-01

    Inline skating belongs like ice hockey, rugby, and boxing to sporting activities with high-risk of suffering tooth accidents. Because of high velocity and loss of balance, especially on uneven ground, the injury potential in inline skating is higher. The objective of this work was to conduct a comparative study between Switzerland and Germany. The questions focussed on the frequency of tooth accidents, their prevention by mouthguard and the level of information about emergency measures after dental trauma and the resulting consequences for athletes. Using a standardized questionnaire totally 612 individuals, 324 men and 288 women, in two countries belonging to three different divisions (fun, fitness and speed) were surveyed. Fifty-six (9.2%) of these 612 interviewees have already experienced a tooth injury while inline skating. More than half of all interviewed players (68.3%) were aware of the possibility of replanting avulsed teeth. Only 32.4% were familiar with the tooth rescue kit. Just 65.4% knew mouthguard and only 1.9% of those athletes (n = 12) wore a mouthguard while inline skating. The results show that the area of inline skating requires more information about preventing dental trauma through sports associations and dentists. PMID:17511835

  8. Hearings Before the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs of the United States Senate, Ninety-Third Congress, First Session. Nutrition Education--1973. Part 6--Phosphate Research and Dental Decay. Hearings Held Washington, D.C., April 16, 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs.

    These hearings before the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs of the United States Senate include testimony on the subject of research into the use of phosphates to prevent dental decay. The purpose of the hearing was to explore certain dental health questions raised during the committee's recent hearings on the Television Advertising of…

  9. Innovative interventions to promote positive dental health behaviors and prevent dental caries in preschool children: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dental caries (tooth decay) is highly prevalent and is largely attributable to unhealthy self-care behaviors (diet and oral hygiene). The conventional (health) education (CE), focusing on disseminating information and giving normative advice, often fails to achieve sustained behavioral changes. This study incorporates two innovative elements into CE: (i) motivational interviewing (MI), a client-centered counseling for changing behaviors, and (ii) an interactive caries risk assessment (RA) tool, which is devised to facilitate dental counseling and may enhance MI in several ways. Through a randomized, controlled, evaluator-blinded trial, three intervention schemes (CE, CE + MI, and CE + MI + RA) will be compared for their effectiveness in eliciting dentally healthy behaviors and preventing caries in preschool children. Methods/Design This study targets 3-year-old children who are at a critical stage for embedding health habits. Children with unfavorable dental behaviors (insufficient toothbrushing and/or frequent snacking) and their parents will be recruited from 12 participating kindergartens. Parent-child dyads (n = 690) will be randomly assigned into three groups. In the first group (CE), oral health information and advice will be delivered to parents through pamphlets. In the second group (CE + MI), in addition to the pamphlets, individual MI counseling with each parent will be performed by one of two trained dental hygienists. In the third group (CE + MI + RA), besides pamphlets and MI, interactive RA will be integrated into MI to motivate parents and facilitate their informed decision making and goal planning. At baseline and after 12 and 24 months, parents will complete a questionnaire and children will undergo a dental examination. The effectiveness of the intervention schemes will be compared over 12 and 24 months. The primary outcome will be caries increment in children and proportion of caries-free children. Secondary outcomes will be changes in parental efficacy for protecting children’s oral health and changes in children’s dental behaviors. Discussion Motivating and empowering parents to cultivate dentally healthy habits of young children presents both promises and challenges. With careful methodological considerations, this study is expected to provide scientific evidence for public health workers, dentists, and dental auxiliaries (nurses and hygienists) to choose appropriate interventions to advance children’s oral health. Trial registration HKCTR-1455 PMID:23782918

  10. Perceived competency towards preventive dentistry among dental graduates: the need for curriculum change

    PubMed Central

    Arheiam, Arheiam; Bankia, Ibtesam; Ingafou, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Background A previous study has shown that dental practitioners in Benghazi believed that the less prevention-oriented education system is one of the barriers to applying preventive dentistry. Objective To assess attitudes and perceived competence of the dental graduates in Benghazi towards prevention and early management of dental caries. Methods A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey was conducted among internship students attending the Department of Community and Preventive Dentistry in Faculty of Dentistry, Benghazi, Libya. The participants were asked to provide demographic information, to respond to statements about their attitudes towards preventive dentistry, and to answer questions regarding their perceived competence in applying preventive dentistry procedures. Results Data from 108 Libyan dental graduates were analysed for this study, of which 64% of them were females and 42.1% of them passed their final year with grade: acceptable. The most acknowledged aspects of preventive dentistry were being useful and essential to the community (95.4 and 90.8%, respectively). The percentage of participants expressing a proficiency in providing oral hygiene instructions was the highest (95.4%). There were differences between study subgroups in their perceived competence of preventive dental practices by gender and academic performance (p?0.05). Conclusion This study highlighted that the currently implemented undergraduate education programme in Benghazi dental school does not provide dentists with the required attitude and skills to fulfil their role in providing preventive-oriented health services. PMID:25556523

  11. Prevalence of dental caries in dentistry students.

    PubMed

    Pavleova, G; Vesela, S; Stanko, P

    2015-01-01

    The study evaluates dental caries prevalence in dentistry students. They represent a sample of individuals with good dental status, socio-economical level and access to dental care. The values of teeth number with decay and filling and values of surfaces of teeth with decay and filling indices in group with lower caries incidence give the information as to what could be achieved by systemic care and prevention of dental caries in whole population (Tab. 4. Ref. 25). PMID:25665473

  12. Children's Dental Health | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... strategies that can help prevent tooth decay. Dental Sealants Dental sealants are thin, plastic coatings painted on the chewing ... and Craniofacial Research and others have shown that sealants are safe and effective. But many people don' ...

  13. 76 FR 2383 - Proposed HHS Recommendation for Fluoride Concentration in Drinking Water for Prevention of Dental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ...for Fluoride Concentration in Drinking Water for Prevention of Dental Caries AGENCY...U.S. Public Health Service Drinking Water Standards related to recommendations for fluoride concentrations in drinking water. The U.S. Public Health Service...

  14. Tooth Decay

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cavity. Your dentist calls it tooth decay or dental caries. They're all names for a hole ... or abscess. To help prevent cavities Brush your teeth every day with a fluoride toothpaste Clean between ...

  15. Evaluation of Isfahan’s Dental Students’ Awareness about Preventive Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Nilchian, F.; Kazemi, Sh.; Abbasi, M.; Ghoreishian, F.; Kowkabi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Statement of Problem: The modern dentistry approach is moving toward preventive dentistry, an approach that has decreased the prevalence of caries within the past decades. Since some reports imply that dentists are not knowledgeable enough in this issue. Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the attitude and awareness of future dental graduates toward preventive dentistry regarding gender and educational characteristics. Materials and Method: This cross-sectional study was performed on one hundred and forty questionnaires which were distributed among dental students of Isfahan province, Azad university of Khorasgan, Iran. Data regarding the level of awareness of dental students about preventive dentistry were recorded and analyzed by using the mean and standard deviations on scores as appropriated. Results: Majority of dental students were aware about the role of sugar in caries process, while only a minority were aware about the role of fluoridated toothpaste and brushing method in caries prevention. Most of the students (82.1%) were among the group with medium level of awareness. Compared with their female counterparts, male students had more knowledge about fluoride efficacy and general hygiene role in caries process. Conclusion: Dental students of  the Isfahan State University and Azad University of Khorasgan had acceptable levels of awareness about the role of sugar and fluoridated water in caries process, but were not aware enough about the role of fluoridated toothpaste in preventing dental caries. PMID:24738083

  16. [Current and future prospects concerning the prevention of dental caries].

    PubMed

    Simonetti D'Arca, A; Marino, F; Rosica, L

    1989-01-01

    Caries is a disease which on the basis of numerous epidemiological data it should be possible to control. The preventive interventions which have proved to have the greatest effect on the diffusion of this disease are essentially: fluoroprophylaxis, oral hygiene, food hygiene and periodic dental examination. The common denominator, which has the greatest effect on success, is a good level of health education of the populations affected by the programme, with specific reference to the teeth. The importance of the diet as a possible element predisposing to caries is an ascertained fact by now, and in fact it is well known that the greatest cariogenic effect is achieved after eating foods containing large quantities of fermentable sugars at irregular intervals throughout the day, especially in the form of products of high density and viscosity. The proposal to replace sugar with substitutive sweeteners such as: xilitol, sorbitol, licasin, talin, palatinit and, more recently, aspartame does not completely solve the problem; and apart from this the clearcut reduction of caries achieved in different European and non-European countries does not appear to be directly connected with a drop in sugar consumption, while more and more importance is ascribed to individual food choices. Oral hygiene procedures aim not only at the cleaning of teeth but also, to some extent, controlling the bacterial plaque. For this reason these are sometimes included among anticaries interventions; however opinions differ in this regard, with a clear prevalence of negative views. The question changes radically if we combine with mechanical procedures alone the use of fluoride-based toothpastes, which are recognised, in combination with other interventions, as playing a fundamental role in the rapid decline of caries in industralised countries. Toothpaste is considered as an excellent vehicle for the topical application of fluoride since it comes into contact with the teeth is slight concentrations only (of about 20 p.p.m.) but at high frequency, the latter constituting a decisive factor for the success of prevention. Furthermore, especially in the case of small children, it acts not only topically but also at systemic level, since in fact part of the toothpaste is swallowed, with consequent passing of the fluoride into the circulation. Undoubtedly the most valid anticaries prophylaxis is fluoroprophylaxis which may be achieved following different methods. Fluoration of water is the most widespread form of administration of fluoride systemically and also the most appropriate since it supplies small but continuous doses of fluoride.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2483064

  17. The importance of preventive dental visits from a young age: systematic review and current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskar, Vaishnavi; McGraw, Kathleen A; Divaris, Kimon

    2014-01-01

    Background Dental caries, the most common childhood chronic disease, disproportionately affects vulnerable parts of the population and confers substantial impacts to children, families, and health systems. Because efforts directed toward oral health promotion and disease prevention are fundamentally superior to dental rehabilitation secondary to disease development, early preventive dental visits (EPDVs) are widely advocated by professional and academic stakeholders. The aim of this comprehensive review was to critically review and summarize available evidence regarding the effectiveness of EPDVs in improving children’s oral health outcomes. Materials and methods A systematic literature search of the PubMed and Embase electronic databases was undertaken to identify peer-reviewed publications investigating the effectiveness of EPDVs on oral health outcomes, including clinical, behavioral, and cost end points up to October 30, 2013. Outcomes of the identified studies were abstracted and summarized independently by two investigators. Results Four manuscripts met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. All studies were conducted in the US and employed a retrospective cohort study design using public insurance-claims data, whereas one study matched claims files with kindergarten state dental surveillance data. That study found no benefit of EPDVs in future clinically determined dental caries levels in kindergarten. The other three studies found mixed support for an association of EPDVs with subsequent more preventive and fewer nonpreventive visits and lower nonpreventive service-related expenditures. Selection bias and a problem-driven dental care-seeking pattern were frequently articulated themes in the reviewed studies. Conclusion The currently available evidence base supporting the effectiveness of EPDVs and the year 1 first dental visit recommendation is weak, and more research is warranted. The benefits of EPDVs before the age of 3 years are evident among children at high risk or with existing dental disease. However, EPDVs may be associated with reduced restorative dental care visits and related expenditures during the first years of life. PMID:24672258

  18. The Cost and Effectiveness of School-Based Preventive Dental Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Stephen P.; And Others

    The National Preventive Dentistry Demonstration Program assessed the cost and effectiveness of various types and combinations of school-based preventive dental care procedures. The program involved 20,052 first, second, and fifth graders from five fluoridated and five non-fluoridated communities. These children were examined at baseline and…

  19. Not All Cavities Are Treated Equal: Increasing Access to Preventive Dental Care in Texas

    E-print Network

    Andrews, Sarah; Barrett, Elizabeth; Beonigk, Rachel; Broughton, Whitney; Cifuentes-Soto, Mauricio; Hill, Jenny; Louder, Nathan; Nwanze, Chukwudebe; Wang, Yefeng (Caryl)

    2012-01-01

    N O T A L L C A V I T I E S A R E T R E A T E D E Q U A L INCREASING ACCESS TO PREVENTIVE DENTAL CARE IN TEXAS Final Report Jason Sabo Senior Vice President of Public Policy United Ways of Texas 1122 Colorado Street...’s Oral Health .............................................................................................................................. 1  Low?income Children Lack Dental Care Access ............................................................................... 2  Children...

  20. Dental Decay in Southern Illinois Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers: An Analysis of Clinical Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukes, Sherri M.; Simon, Bret

    2005-01-01

    Context: Migrant and seasonal farmworkers are a population at risk for oral health problems. Data on the oral health conditions of migrant and seasonal farmworkers' permanent teeth are particularly lacking. Purpose: To document the relative rates of treated and untreated dental decay in a sample of southern Illinois migrant and seasonal…

  1. Dental Decay in Southern Illinois Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers: An Analysis of Clinical Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukes, Sherri M.; Simon, Bret

    2005-01-01

    Context: Migrant and seasonal farmworkers are a population at risk for oral health problems. Data on the oral health conditions of migrant and seasonal farmworkers? permanent teeth are particularly lacking. Purpose: To document the relative rates of treated and untreated dental decay in a sample of southern Illinois migrant and seasonal…

  2. Dental sealants

    MedlinePLUS

    ... prevent cavities. Dental sealants are a thin resin coating that covers the grooves of molars. ... cost of dental sealants is usually priced per tooth. Many dental insurance plans cover the cost of ...

  3. Perceived Barriers Affecting Access to Preventive Dental Services: Application of DEMATEL Method

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Ravangard, Ramin; Asghari, Baratali

    2013-01-01

    Background Identifying perceived access barriers to preventive dental services is one of the basic steps to improve the public health. Objectives This study aimed to determine the perceived barriers affecting access to preventive dental services in one of Tehran dental clinics in 2012. Patients and Methods This research was a cross-sectional descriptive-analytical study conducted in one of Tehran dental clinics in 2012 using decision–making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL) method. The study sample included all patients (100 patients) who had referred to the endodontic treatment department from 26 - 31 May, 2012. The required data were collected using a questionnaire. Collected data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 and MATLAB 7.9.0 SPSSS 18.0, as well as, some descriptive and analytical tests including Mean, Standard Deviation (SD), and Independent T- Test. Results The five determinants of cost, inconvenience, fear, organization, and patient-dentist relationship were determined as barriers to access to dental services among which the cost and patient-dentist relationship were identified as the first and last priorities with the coordinates (1.4 and 1.4) and (1.25 and -0.65), respectively. Conclusions High cost of dental care has led to not referring patients to the clinic. Oral health costs are too high; however insurance organizations have no commitment to support such services. Policymakers, administrators, and insurance organizations have a major role in improving access to dental services. These decision-makers in making their policies can provide the required financial resources, shift the available resources towards preventive care and periodic checkups, and consider providing proper and sufficient places for dental care facilities. PMID:24578831

  4. Hair keratin mutations in tooth enamel increase dental decay risk

    PubMed Central

    Duverger, Olivier; Ohara, Takahiro; Shaffer, John R.; Donahue, Danielle; Zerfas, Patricia; Dullnig, Andrew; Crecelius, Christopher; Beniash, Elia; Marazita, Mary L.; Morasso, Maria I.

    2014-01-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body and has a unique combination of hardness and fracture toughness that protects teeth from dental caries, the most common chronic disease worldwide. In addition to a high mineral content, tooth enamel comprises organic material that is important for mechanical performance and influences the initiation and progression of caries; however, the protein composition of tooth enamel has not been fully characterized. Here, we determined that epithelial hair keratins, which are crucial for maintaining the integrity of the sheaths that support the hair shaft, are expressed in the enamel organ and are essential organic components of mature enamel. Using genetic and intraoral examination data from 386 children and 706 adults, we found that individuals harboring known hair disorder–associated polymorphisms in the gene encoding keratin 75 (KRT75), KRT75A161T and KRT75E337K, are prone to increased dental caries. Analysis of teeth from individuals carrying the KRT75A161T variant revealed an altered enamel structure and a marked reduction of enamel hardness, suggesting that a functional keratin network is required for the mechanical stability of tooth enamel. Taken together, our results identify a genetic locus that influences enamel structure and establish a connection between hair disorders and susceptibility to dental caries. PMID:25347471

  5. Metal Film Sputtering Technique to Coat Teeth for Preventing Dental Caries. A Preliminary Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toshio Sugita; Shigeo Ebisawa; Eiichi Nishikawa; Takanobu Morinushi; Shigeharu Hanashima

    1987-01-01

    Dental caries starts locally on a tooth surface; thus, the selective protection by metal films on pits and fissures is simple and effective. The method and apparatus for forming preventive coatings by sputtering are described wherein metal atoms originate in a Penning discharge space and are then guided through a duct in order to reach a tooth and then to

  6. Novel technologies for the prevention and treatment of dental caries: a patent survey

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fu; Wang, Dong

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field: Dental caries is one of the most common preventable childhood diseases; people are susceptible to this ailment throughout their lifetime. In the United States, 90% of late adolescents and young adults have dental caries, while 94% of all dentate adults had evidence of treated or untreated coronal caries. Dental caries is often not self-limiting and without proper care, caries can progress until the tooth is destroyed. Areas covered in this review: In this paper, the etiology of dental caries was briefly introduced. It was followed by a thorough review of patents and literatures on the recent development of various novel technologies for the prevention and treatment of dental caries. What the reader will gain: Recent advances in anti-plaque agents, including chemoprophylactic agents, antimicrobial peptides, vaccines, probiotics/replacement therapy and sugar substitutes, and remineralization agents including fluorides and casein phosphopeptides are analyzed. Take home massage: Both the discovery of new anti-caries agents and the development of dentotropic delivery systems will be the future focus of this research field. PMID:20230309

  7. Camellia sinensis (Tea): Implications and role in preventing dental decay

    PubMed Central

    Goenka, Puneet; Sarawgi, Aditi; Karun, Vinayak; Nigam, Anant G.; Dutta, Samir; Marwah, Nikhil

    2013-01-01

    Tea is one of the most commonly consumed beverages with bioactive compounds like polyphenols-flavonoids-catechins, which are thought to be responsible for the health benefits that have traditionally been attributed to the tea. These compounds have multi-dimensional effects such as antibacterial action, inhibitory action on the bacterial and salivary amylase and inhibition of acid production. This article outlines the possible role of these compounds coupled with the presence of high fluoride content in tea to exhibit an anticariogenic effect. PMID:24347923

  8. Role of estrogen related receptor beta (ESRRB) in DFN35B hearing impairment and dental decay

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Congenital forms of hearing impairment can be caused by mutations in the estrogen related receptor beta (ESRRB) gene. Our initial linkage studies suggested the ESRRB locus is linked to high caries experience in humans. Methods We tested for association between the ESRRB locus and dental caries in 1,731 subjects, if ESRRB was expressed in whole saliva, if ESRRB was associated with the microhardness of the dental enamel, and if ESRRB was expressed during enamel development of mice. Results Two families with recessive ESRRB mutations and DFNB35 hearing impairment showed more extensive dental destruction by caries. Expression levels of ESRRB in whole saliva samples showed differences depending on sex and dental caries experience. Conclusions The common etiology of dental caries and hearing impairment provides a venue to assist in the identification of individuals at risk to either condition and provides options for the development of new caries prevention strategies, if the associated ESRRB genetic variants are correlated with efficacy. PMID:25023176

  9. Factors That Drive Dentists towards or Away from Dental Caries Preventive Measures: Systematic Review and Metasummary

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Uhana Seifert Guimarăes; Terada, Raquel Sano Suga; Ubaldini, Adriana Lemos Mori; Fujimaki, Mitsue; Pascotto, Renata Corręa; Batilana, Adelia Portero; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Vissoci, Joăo Ricardo N.; Rodrigues, Clarissa G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dental caries is a serious public health concern. The high cost of dental treatment can be avoided by effective preventive measures, which are dependent on dentists’ adherence. This study aimed to evaluate the factors that drive dentists towards or away from dental caries preventive measures. Methods and Findings This systematic review was registered in PROSPERO (CRD42012002235). Several databases as well as the reference lists and citations of the included publications were searched according to PRISMA guidelines, yielding 18,276 titles and abstracts, which were assessed to determine study eligibility. Seven qualitative studies and 41 surveys (36,501 participants) remained after data extraction and interpretation. A total of 43 findings were abstracted from the reports and were grouped together into 6 categories that were judged to be topically similar: education and training, personal beliefs, work conditions, remuneration, gender, place of residence and patients. The main findings for adherence based on their calculated frequency effect sizes (ES) were teamwork (21%) and post-graduation (12%), while for non-adherence were biologicism (27%), and remuneration for preventive procedures (25%). Intensity ES were also calculated and demonstrated low prevalence of the findings. Quality assessment of the studies demonstrated that the methodological quality, particularly of surveys, varied widely among studies. Conclusions Despite the questionable quality of the included reports, the evidence that emerged seems to indicate that further education and training coupled with a fairer pay scheme would be a reasonable approach to change the balance in favor of the provision of dental caries preventive measures by dentists. The results of this review could be of value in the planning and decision making processes aimed at encouraging changes in professional dental practice that could result in the improvement of the oral health care provided to the population in general. PMID:25296335

  10. [Dental care in cross-cultural networks-- case management--approaches in group prevention].

    PubMed

    Robke, F J

    2000-01-01

    Oral epidemiology studies of previous years have shown an increasing difference in caries cases in respect of different social strata. Thus, frequency of caries cases is related to social status. High rates of caries prevalence are found especially among children from typical areas of welfare problems. Already, today every fifth child is born into a family of immigrants. In areas of typical social deprivation their share is about 40% and more. Since the previous educational campaigns for social fringe groups have hardly shown any positive effect on dental health, new strategies are necessary. In a community of Hanover with low socio-economic status and a generally high caries level, the treatment strategies of dental care for the young have centred on the case-management approaches of social welfare programmes since the early 90s. Beside the expanded basic preventive programme, which includes application of a fluoride varnish for children, social compensatory measures with intercultural networks are also being taken. This concept shows very clearly that the dental health of children living in areas of social disorganisation can be effectively improved by means of these strategies. For the future, dental care for these children requires more intercultural competence and more knowledge of social welfare work by adolescent dental care providers. PMID:11037670

  11. Dental student perception and assessment of their clinical knowledge in educating patients about preventive dentistry.

    PubMed

    Metz, M J; Miller, C J; Lin, W S; Abdel-Azim, T; Zandinejad, A; Crim, G A

    2015-05-01

    In today's dental school curricula, an increasing amount of time is dedicated to technological advances, and preventive dentistry topics may not be adequately addressed. Freshman (D1) students participated in a new Introduction to Preventive Dentistry course, which consisted of didactic lectures, active learning breakout sessions and case-based studies. The goal of this study was to determine if D1 dental students completing the course had a better knowledge and comfort level with basic preventive dentistry concepts and caries risk assessment than the upcoming graduating senior dental students. Following the completion of the course, D1 students were administered a survey that assessed their comfort level describing preventive dentistry topics to patients. This was immediately followed by an unannounced examination over the same topics. Senior (D4) students, who had not taken a formal course, reported statistically significant higher comfort levels than D1 students. However, the D4s scored significantly lower in all of the examination areas than the D1 students. Higher scores in D1s may have been due to recent exposure to the course material. However, the basic nature of the content-specific questions should be easily answered by novice practitioners educating their patients on oral disease prevention. As the current data shows lower content-specific scores of basic preventive dentistry knowledge amongst graduating D4 students, this may indicate a need for more guidance and education of students during the patient care. This study showed that implementation of a formalised course for D1 students can successfully ameliorate deficiencies in knowledge of preventive dentistry topics. PMID:25040313

  12. The Impact of the Public Insurance Expansions on Children’s Use of Preventive Dental Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chi-Chi Liao; Michael Lee Ganz; Hongyu Jiang; Theodore Chelmow

    2010-01-01

    To determine if children eligible for coverage by the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) and Medicaid Programs\\u000a were more likely to receive preventive dental visits after implementation of the SCHIP policy, retrospective cross-sectional\\u000a analysis was done from the 1996–2000 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys (MEPS) data. We linked the individual level data from\\u000a the MEPS to state-level information on program

  13. Survey on the occurrence of dental trauma and preventive strategies among Brazilian professional soccer players

    PubMed Central

    CORREA, Marcos Britto; SCHUCH, Helena Silveira; COLLARES, Kauę; TORRIANI, Dione Dias; HALLAL, Pedro Curi; DEMARCO, Flavio Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to verify the occurrence of dental injuries in professional Brazilian soccer players, the level of knowledge of the teams' medical departments about mouthguards, and the conducts adopted in cases of dental trauma during the match. Material and methods Closed questionnaires were sent to the physicians in charge of the medical departments of the 40 teams enrolled in the first and second divisions of the Brazilian professional soccer league in 2007. The data obtained were subjected to descriptive analysis to determine absolute and relative frequencies of answers for each one of the questions. Results Physicians from 38 (95%) of the 40 teams in the first and second divisions answered the questionnaires and 71.1% reported the occurrence of some type of dental injury during soccer practice, dental fractures (74.1%) and avulsions (59.3%) being the most prevalent ones. Regarding emergency conducts, approximately 50% answered that a successful replantation could be obtained in periods from 6 to 24 h after injury, and 27.8% were not able to answer this question. Regarding mouthguard use, 48.6% of the physicians did not know about mouthguards, and only 21.6% usually recommended their use by the soccer players. Among the physicians who do not recommend the use of mouthguards, 50% justified that it was not necessary. Almost 50% of the medical departments do not have a dentist as part of the health professional staff. Conclusions It was possible to conclude that dental injuries are common during professional soccer practice and that there is a lack of information in the medical departments related to the emergency conducts and prevention of dental trauma. PMID:21308287

  14. Enzyme replacement therapy prevents dental defects in a model of hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    McKee, M D; Nakano, Y; Masica, D L; Gray, J J; Lemire, I; Heft, R; Whyte, M P; Crine, P; Millán, J L

    2011-04-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) occurs from loss-of-function mutation in the tissue-non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNALP) gene, resulting in extracellular pyrophosphate accumulation that inhibits skeletal and dental mineralization. TNALP-null mice (Akp2(-/-)) phenocopy human infantile hypophosphatasia; they develop rickets at 1 week of age, and die before being weaned, having severe skeletal and dental hypomineralization and episodes of apnea and vitamin B(6)-responsive seizures. Delay and defects in dentin mineralization, together with a deficiency in acellular cementum, are characteristic. We report the prevention of these dental abnormalities in Akp2(-/-) mice receiving treatment from birth with daily injections of a mineral-targeting, human TNALP (sALP-FcD(10)). sALP-FcD(10) prevented hypomineralization of alveolar bone, dentin, and cementum as assessed by micro-computed tomography and histology. Osteopontin--a marker of acellular cementum--was immuno-localized along root surfaces, confirming that acellular cementum, typically missing or reduced in Akp2(-/-) mice, formed normally. Our findings provide insight concerning how acellular cementum is formed on tooth surfaces to effect periodontal ligament attachment to retain teeth in their osseous alveolar sockets. Furthermore, they provide evidence that this enzyme-replacement therapy, applied early in post-natal life--where the majority of tooth root development occurs, including acellular cementum formation--could prevent the accelerated tooth loss seen in individuals with HPP. PMID:21212313

  15. Decay prevention in waterlogged archaeological wood using gamma irradiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. B Pointing; E. B. G Jones; A. M Jones

    1998-01-01

    Gamma irradiation is evaluated as a novel decay prevention treatment for waterlogged archaeological wood. A dose of 15 kGy was found to be sufficient to inactivate a large number of wood biodeteriogens, including fungi, bacteria and invertebrates, at various stages of development. For timbers excavated from polluted sites, a dose of 25 kGy is suggested to inactivate human pathogens. The

  16. Knowledge of General Dentists and Senior Dental Students in Iran about Prevention of Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, Samaneh; Roshanaei, Ghodratollah

    2012-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is an infection of the endothelial surface of the heart and heart valves with serious, even fatal, complications and that often requires long-term and expensive treatment. Dental procedures may lead to IE in high-risk patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the knowledge of general dentists and dental students concerning the prevention of IE in Hamadan, Iran. In this cross-sectional study, the awareness of general dentists and dentistry students concerning the prevention of IE was evaluated during 2010. A questionnaire was prepared and administered to 58 final-year dental students and 96 general dental practitioners in Hamadan. A total of 154 persons completed the questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of some demographic questions and questions about awareness of IE in three sections. The gathered data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics, Pearson's chi-square test, Mann-Whitney test, and independent t-tests. The gathered data showed that dentistry students answered the questions about awareness of the prevention of IE more correctly than did general dentists. The overall knowledge of endocarditis prophylaxis among students and dentists was about 65% and 56%, respectively. The students' knowledge was better because 94.9% of the students had desired (acceptable) and relatively desired knowledge; this result for dentists, however, was 82.3%. In our study, the overall awareness level of the study population was moderate. Dentist and students believed that patients with prosthetic valves and previous IE were the most common cardiac disease cases that required prophylaxis. The most common prophylactic regimen was in accordance with the guidelines of the American Heart Association and was a single dose of 2 g amoxicillin 1 hour before treatment. The results indicated that gender had no effect on the level of knowledge; however, there was a statistically significant relationship between age and level of knowledge. PMID:22570810

  17. Protocol for Northern Ireland Caries Prevention in Practice Trial (NIC-PIP) trial: a randomised controlled trial to measure the effects and costs of a dental caries prevention regime for young children attending primary care dental services

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dental caries is a persistent public health problem with little change in the prevalence in young children over the last 20 years. Once a child contracts the disease it has a significant impact on their quality of life. There is good evidence from Cochrane reviews including trials that fluoride varnish and regular use of fluoride toothpaste can prevent caries. The Northern Ireland Caries Prevention in Practice Trial (NIC-PIP) trial will compare the costs and effects of a caries preventive package (fluoride varnish, toothpaste, toothbrush and standardised dental health education) with dental health education alone in young children. Methods/Design A randomised controlled trial on children initially aged 2 and 3 years old who are regular attenders at the primary dental care services in Northern Ireland. Children will be recruited and randomised in dental practices. Children will be randomised to the prevention package of both fluoride varnish (twice per year for three years), fluoride toothpaste (1,450 ppm F) (supplied twice per year), a toothbrush (supplied twice a year) or not; both test and control groups receive standardised dental health education delivered by the dentist twice per year. Randomisation will be conducted by the Belfast Trust Clinical Research Support Centre ([CRSC] a Clinical Trials Unit). 1200 participants will be recruited from approximately 40 dental practices. Children will be examined for caries by independent dental examiners at baseline and will be excluded if they have caries. The independent dental examiners will examine the children again at 3 years blinded to study group. The primary end-point is whether the child develops caries (cavitation into dentine) or not over the three years. One secondary outcome is the number of carious surfaces in the primary dentition in children who experience caries. Other secondary outcomes are episodes of pain, extraction of primary teeth, other adverse events and costs which will be obtained from parental questionnaires. Discussion This is a pragmatic trial conducted in general dental practice. It tests a composite caries prevention intervention, which represents an evidence based approach advocated by current guidance from the English Department of Health which is feasible to deliver to all low risk (caries free) children in general dental practice. The trial will provide valuable information to policy makers and clinicians on the costs and effects of caries prevention delivered to young children in general dental practice. Trial registration EudraCT No: 2009 - 010725 - 39 ISRCTN: ISRCTN36180119 Ethics Reference No: 09/H1008/93: PMID:21985746

  18. Decay

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Olivia Worland (Purdue University; Biological Sciences)

    2008-06-16

    Decay is the process of organic rotting. Decay can take many different forms, such as tooth decay. Many times, you can see the visible effects of decay. Some types of decay can be prevented or can be fought against; others are inevitable. Microbes are responsible for decay in fruits, vegetables, and other organisms and products.

  19. A holistic food labelling strategy for preventing obesity and dental caries.

    PubMed

    Cinar, A B; Murtomaa, H

    2009-05-01

    Obesity and dental caries in childhood are among the major public health concerns described as a global pandemic because of their global distribution and severe consequences. A consensus has developed as to a recently emerging and alarming common risk factor that leads to the double burden of dental caries and obesity; energy-dense foods (sugar-coated cereals, high-sugar yogurt, soft drinks) are becoming very popular among children because of their dense marketing, cheaper price, increased supply and variety. Implementation of health-promoting and -supporting marketing strategies for healthy food can be one initial cornerstone for successful application of the common risk factor approach in prevention of obesity and dental caries, as also suggested by World Health Organization. Labelling healthy food with a 'health-friendly' logo, illustrating that the teeth and the heart are both parts of the whole body (standing side by side supporting each other as close friends), both happy and protected because of consumption of healthy food for the whole body, can promote the foods that are friendly to health of the whole body, implementing the common risk factor approach under a single theme. Labelling healthy food as 'health-friendly' based on an international consensus will provide a clear and uniform picture of what is healthy to eat and result in an international integrated programme for prevention of obesity and caries. PMID:19207877

  20. Iatrogenic injury to the pulp in dental procedures: aspects of pathogenesis, management and preventive measures.

    PubMed

    Bergenholtz, G

    1991-04-01

    This review calls attention to the fact that iatrogenic ('dentistogenic') injury to the dental pulp is not an insignificant problem in clinical dentistry. On a short-term basis pulpal inflammatory lesions and hypersensitive teeth are frequently associated with procedures that involve removal of the dental hard tissue structures. Although the pulp is likely to recover, reparative processes induced by the insult may impair pulpal function on a long-term basis. In this paper current concepts regarding pathogenic mechanisms associated with injuries induced in the pulp by restorative and periodontal treatment procedures are reviewed. Aspects of the management of accidental pulp exposures are also described as well as measures to prevent or reduce iatrogenic injuries to the pulp. PMID:2032743

  1. Perception of tobacco use prevention and cessation among faculty members in Latin American and Caribbean dental schools.

    PubMed

    Tamí-Maury, Irene; Aigner, Carrie J; Hong, Judy; Strom, Sara; Chambers, Mark S; Gritz, Ellen R

    2014-12-01

    Rates of tobacco use are increasing in the regions of Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). Unfortunately, tobacco cessation education is not a standard component of the dental curriculum in LAC dental schools. The objective of this study was to identify the perceptions of LAC dental faculty members regarding the tobacco use prevention and cessation (TUPAC) competencies that should be addressed in the dental curricula. Dental deans and faculty completed a web-based questionnaire in Spanish, Portuguese, French, or English. The questionnaire contained 32 competencies grouped into the five A's (Ask, Advise, Assess, Assist, and Arrange) of tobacco cessation and six supplementary questions for identifying barriers to providing TUPAC education to dental students. Respondents indicated the degree to which they believed each competency should be incorporated into the dental curricula using a five-point Likert scale ("1"?=?strongly disagree to "5"?=?strongly agree). Responses were obtained from 390 faculty members (66 % South America, 18 % Mexico/Central America, 16 % the Caribbean). Of the respondents, 2, 12, and 83 % reported that smoking was allowed in clinical environments, other indoor environments, and outdoor environments of their dental schools, respectively. Mean importance ratings for each of the competencies were as follows: Ask (4.71), Advise (4.54), Assess (4.41), Assist (4.07), and Arrange (4.01). Overall, LAC dental educators agree that TUPAC training should be incorporated into the dental curricula. Assist and Arrange competencies were rated lower, relative to other competencies. Tobacco use among dental educators and high rates of on-campus smoking could potentially pose barriers to promoting cessation interventions in the LAC dental schools. PMID:24385339

  2. Brief oral health promotion intervention among parents of young children to reduce early childhood dental decay

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Severe untreated dental decay affects a child’s growth, body weight, quality of life as well as cognitive development, and the effects extend beyond the child to the family, the community and the health care system. Early health behavioural factors, including dietary practices and eating patterns, can play a major role in the initiation and development of oral diseases, particularly dental caries. The parent/caregiver, usually the mother, has a critical role in the adoption of protective health care behaviours and parental feeding practices strongly influence children’s eating behaviours. This study will test if an early oral health promotion intervention through the use of brief motivational interviewing (MI) and anticipatory guidance (AG) approaches can reduce the incidence of early childhood dental decay and obesity. Methods The study will be a randomised controlled study with parents and their new-born child/ren who are seen at 6–12 weeks of age by a child/community health nurse. Consenting parents will complete a questionnaire on oral health knowledge, behaviours, self-efficacy, oral health fatalism, parenting stress, prenatal and peri-natal health and socio-demographic factors at study commencement and at 12 and 36 months. Each child–parent pair will be allocated to an intervention or a standard care group, using a computer-generated random blocks. The standard group will be managed through the standard early oral health screening program; “lift the lip”. The intervention group will be provided with tailored oral health counselling by oral health consultants trained in MI and AG. Participating children will be examined at 24, and 36 months for the occurrence of dental decay and have their height and weight recorded. Dietary information obtained from a food frequency chart will be used to determine food and dietary patterns. Data analysis will use intention to treat and per protocol analysis and will use tests of independent proportions and means. Multivariate statistical tests will also be used to take account of socio-economic and demographic factors in addition to parental knowledge, behaviour, self-efficacy, and parent/child stress. Discussion The study will test the effects of an oral health promotion intervention to affect oral health and general health and have the potential to demonstrate the “common risk factor” approach to health promotion. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: http://ACTRN12611000997954 PMID:23509932

  3. Dental Sealants

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Statistics > Find Data by Topic > Dental Sealants Dental Sealants Main Content Dental sealants are thin plastic coatings that protect the chewing ... teeth from tooth decay. Overall, the prevalence of sealants in children’s and adolescent’s teeth has increased since ...

  4. Dental plaque, preventive care, and tooth brushing associated with dental caries in primary teeth in schoolchildren ages 6–9 years of Leon, Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    del Socorro Herrera, Miriam; Medina-Solis, Carlo Eduardo; Minaya-Sánchez, Mirna; Pontigo-Loyola, América Patricia; Villalobos-Rodelo, Juan José; Islas-Granillo, Horacio; de la Rosa-Santillana, Rubén; Maupomé, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    Background Our study aimed to evaluate the effect of various risk indicators for dental caries on primary teeth of Nicaraguan children (from Leon, Nicaragua) ages 6 to 9, using the negative binomial regression model. Material/Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out to collect clinical, demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioral data from 794 schoolchildren ages 6 to 9 years, randomly selected from 25 schools in the city of León, Nicaragua. Clinical examinations for dental caries (dmft index) were performed by 2 trained and standardized examiners. Socio-demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioral data were self-reported using questionnaires. Multivariate negative binomial regression (NBR) analysis was used. Results Mean age was 7.49±1.12 years. Boys accounted for 50.1% of the sample. Mean dmft was 3.54±3.13 and caries prevalence (dmft >0) was 77.6%. In the NBR multivariate model (p<0.05), for each year of age, the expected mean dmft decreased by 7.5%. Brushing teeth at least once a day and having received preventive dental care in the last year before data collection were associated with declines in the expected mean dmft by 19.5% and 69.6%, respectively. Presence of dental plaque increased the expected mean dmft by 395.5%. Conclusions The proportion of students with caries in this sample was high. We found associations between dental caries in the primary dentition and dental plaque, brushing teeth at least once a day, and having received preventive dental care. To improve oral health, school programs and/or age-appropriate interventions need to be developed based on the specific profile of caries experience and the associated risk indicators. PMID:24247119

  5. Effectiveness of sealed dental prophylaxis angles inoculated with Bacillus stearothermophilus in preventing leakage.

    PubMed

    Barnes, C M; Anderson, N A; Michalek, S M; Russell, C M

    1994-01-01

    It was the purpose of this in vitro investigation to evaluate the effectiveness of several brands of sealed, reusable prophylaxis angles to keep internal materials within the internal portions of the head of the prophylaxis angle, and not allowing contaminates to leak out. Three brands of sealed, reusable dental prophylaxis angles were autoclaved and then taken apart under a biocontainment flow hood. Testing conditions were designed to prevent a "worst case scenario" by inoculating dental prophylaxis angles with 10(6) of the heat resistant spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus and 20% bovine serum albumin to simulate the presence of human serum. The concentration of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores was verified before testing procedures were initiated. The internal portions of the sterile prophylaxis angles were inoculated with a 1:1 mixture of the Bacillus stearothermophilus spores and bovine serum albumin, at a concentration of 1.15 x 10(6) spores/inoculation. The prophylaxis angles were reassembled under sterile conditions, and a sterile rubber cup was inserted into each of the prophylaxis angles. The prophylaxis angles were attached to a sterile dental handpiece and then submerged in a 50 ml tube containing sterile trypticase soy broth and run at 3000 rpm for 30 seconds. The tube of medium was incubated for 7 days. No growth of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores could be cultured from one of the brands of prophylaxis angles at any time during the incubation period. The other two brands of prophylaxis angles did produce some leakage of the Bacillus stearothermophilus spores. PMID:7999287

  6. Harvesting and Curing of Garlic to Prevent Decay.

    E-print Network

    Altstatt, G. E. (George E.); Smith, H. P. (Harris Pearson); Byrom, Mills H. (Mills Herbert)

    1944-01-01

    / Av. Check Sulphur Cuprocide Cuprocide 54 Ceresan 270 Mercuric chloride Formaldehyde Semesan Malachite green Phemernite Samples of the garlic produced in the various seed-piece treatments were cured in the drier and on racks in the open...TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STAT103 A. B. CONNER, Director College Station, Texas BULLETIN NO. 651 JULY 1942 I 4ARVESTING AND CURING OF GARLIC TO PREVENT DECAY Ti. P. SMITH, G. E. ALTSTATT, M. H. BYROM Divisio~l of Agricultural Engineering...

  7. Addressing Tooth Decay in Head Start Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth decay is the most prevalent chronic disease of childhood. Oral health education and dental services are crucial to reducing the number of children afflicted with dental cavities. Due to limited access to preventative care, Head Start children are particularly vulnerable to tooth decay. This article outlines practical implications of a…

  8. Forensic Luminol Blood Test for Preventing Cross-contamination in Dentistry: An Evaluation of a Dental School Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Cadore, Peterson; Gallon, Andrea; Imanishi, Soraia Almeida Watanabe

    2014-01-01

    Background: More than 200 different diseases may be transmitted from exposure to blood in the dental setting. The aim of this study is to identify possible faults in the crosscontamination chain control in a dental school clinic searching for traces of blood in the clinical contact surfaces (CCS) through forensic luminol blood test. Methods: Traces of invisible blood where randomly searched in CCS of one dental school clinic. Results: Forty eight surfaces areas in the CCS were tested and the presence of invisible and remnant blood was identified in 28 (58.3%) items. Conclusions: We suggest that the luminol method is suitable for identifying contamination with invisible blood traces and this method may be a useful tool to prevent cross-contamination in the dental care setting. PMID:25400895

  9. A comparative study of the effect of probiotics on cariogenic biofilm model for preventing dental caries.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Young-Jae

    2014-08-01

    Dental caries is induced by oral biofilm containing Streptococcus mutans. Probiotic bacteria were mainly studied for effect on the gastrointestinal tract and have been known to promote human health. However, the information of probiotics for oral health has been lack yet. In this study, we investigated influence of various probiotics on oral bacteria or cariogenic biofilm and evaluated candidate probiotics for dental caries among them. The antimicrobial activity of the spent culture medium of probiotics for oral streptococci was performed. Probiotics were added during the biofilm formation with salivary bacteria including S. mutans. The oral biofilms were stained with a fluorescent dye and observed using the confocal laser scanning microscope. To count bacteria in the biofilm, the bacteria were plated on MSB and BHI agar plates after disrupting the biofilm and cultivated. Glucosyltransferases (gtfs) expression of S. mutans and integration of lactobacilli into the biofilm were evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Among probiotics, Lactobacillus species strongly inhibited growth of oral streptococci. Moreover, Lactobacillus species strongly inhibited formation of cariogenic biofilm model. The expression of gtfs was significantly reduced by Lactobacillus rhamnosus. The integration of L. rhamnosus into the biofilm model did not exhibit. However, L. acidophilus and L casei integrated into the biofilm model. These results suggest that L. rhamnosus may inhibit oral biofilm formation by decreasing glucan production of S. mutans and antibacterial activity and did not integrate into oral biofilm, which can be a candidate for caries prevention strategy. PMID:24919536

  10. The Outcome of a Preventive Dental Care Programme on the Prevalence of Localized Aggressive Periodontitis in Down's Syndrome Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigmond, Maora; Stabholz, A.; Shapira, J.; Bachrach, G.; Chaushu, G.; Becker, A.; Yefenof, E.; Merrick, J.; Chaushu, S.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Periodontal disease in Down's syndrome (DS) individuals develops earlier and is more rapid and extensive than in age-matched normal individuals. The present study evaluated a group of DS patients, who had been participating in a 10-year preventive dental programme, for the impact of the programme on their periodontal status. Methods:…

  11. A comparison of Medicaid reimbursement for non-definitive pediatric dental treatment in the emergency room versus periodic preventive care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erika S. Pettinato; Michael D. Webb; N. Sue

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: This study compared the expenditure by the state Medicaid program for episodic, nondefinitive care provided through the emergency room (ER) of a children's hospital with the cost to Medicaid of covering that same child with the recommended preventive service calculated on the fee schedule of the state dental Medicaid program. Methods: Records of patients discharged from the ER during

  12. Tackling stress management, addiction, and suicide prevention in a predoctoral dental curriculum.

    PubMed

    Brondani, Mario A; Ramanula, Dhorea; Pattanaporn, Komkhamn

    2014-09-01

    Health care professionals, particularly dentists, are subject to high levels of stress. Without proper stress management, problems related to mental health and addiction and, to a lesser extent, deliberate self-harm such as suicide may arise. There is a lack of information on teaching methodologies employed to discuss stress management and suicide prevention in dental education. The purpose of this article is to describe a University of British Columbia Faculty of Dentistry module designed to address stress management and suicide prevention, using students' personal reflections to illustrate the impact of the pedagogies used. The module enrolls more than 200 students per year and has sessions tailored to the discussion of stress management and suicide prevention. The pedagogies include standardized patients, invited guest lectures, in-class activities, video presentation, and self-reflections. More than 500 students' self-reflections collected over the past five years illustrate the seriousness of the issues discussed and the level of discomfort students experience when pondering such issues. The instructors hope to have increased students' awareness of the stressors in their profession. Further studies are needed to unravel the extent to which such pedagogy influences a balanced practice of dentistry. PMID:25179925

  13. Prevention of infective endocarditis: a review of the medical and dental literature.

    PubMed

    Barco, C T

    1991-08-01

    This paper is a review of what is presently known about the cause and prevention of infective endocarditis. Systemic antibiotics alone are not always enough for an effective prevention of infective endocarditis. Non-streptococcus bacteria frequently found in the periodontal pocket are now reported as causing infective endocarditis; these bacteria are not uniformly susceptible to the antibiotics recommended for prophylaxis. Animal studies indicate that periodontal disease does increase the incidence of infective endocarditis and that the number of microbes entering the blood stream may not be as important in the production of infective endocarditis as other qualities, such as the microbe's ability to adhere. Antibiotics may affect the ability of a microorganism to adhere to tissues of the heart, but this association is yet unclear and may vary with the antibiotic and species of bacteria. Reduction of inflammation of the periodontal tissues is of the utmost importance in the prevention of infective endocarditis; however, mouthrinses have a very limited effect in a periodontal pocket of more than 3 mm in depth and irrigation of a periodontal pocket may create a dangerous bacteremia. Nevertheless, in addition to systemic antibiotics, local antimicrobial agents followed by routine dental treatment and maintenance show promise as an effective means for the prevention of infective endocarditis. Future research in the prevention of infective endocarditis should include placement of antimicrobials in the periodontal pocket and systemic agents that reduce platelet adhesion. The suggestions presented in this review are only recommendations for further research and are not to be construed as a substitute for the current guidelines. PMID:1920019

  14. Alternatives to fluoride in the prevention and treatment of dental erosion.

    PubMed

    Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Magalhăes, Ana Carolina; Wiegand, Annette

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, different agents have been discussed as potential alternatives to fluoride in the prevention of dental erosion. These agents are intended to form acid-resistant layers on the surface, to induce repair of eroded lesions by mineral precipitation or to prevent the enzymatic degradation of demineralised collagen. The application of adhesives and/or fissure sealants is considered to be an effective alternative to fluoride, but requires professional application and, depending on the product used, a re-sealing of the surface every several months. Studies testing film-forming products, such as polymers, have suggested the potential effectiveness of some of these approaches, such as chitosan, although further studies are needed to confirm the effectiveness of this approach. Other studies have demonstrated that products designed to deliver calcium and/or phosphate have not been successful at providing a significant anti-erosive effect. In advanced erosive lesions, the demineralised collagenous dentine matrix can be degraded by host enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). As well as fluorides, epigallocatechin gallate and chlorhexidine have been identified as effective MMP inhibitors, with the potential to reduce the progression of dentine erosion. While fluoride compounds have been shown to have an anti-erosive potential, particularly those containing tin, alternative approaches that provide even greater protective capacity still need to be developed and proven to be effective. PMID:24993272

  15. Application of chimeric glucanase comprising mutanase and dextranase for prevention of dental biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Ryoko; Imai, Susumu; Murata, Takatoshi; Nomura, Yoshiaki; Okamoto, Masaaki; Tsumori, Hideaki; Kakuta, Erika; Hanada, Nobuhiro; Momoi, Yasuko

    2015-01-01

    Water-insoluble glucan (WIG) produced by mutans streptococci, an important cariogenic pathogen, plays an important role in the formation of dental biofilm and adhesion of biofilm to tooth surfaces. Glucanohydrolases, such as mutanase (?-1,3-glucanase) and dextranase (?-1,6-glucanase), are able to hydrolyze WIG. The purposes of this study were to construct bi-functional chimeric glucanase, composed of mutanase and dextranase, and to examine the effects of this chimeric glucanase on the formation and decomposition of biofilm. The mutanase gene from Paenibacillus humicus NA1123 and the dextranase gene from Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175 were cloned and ligated into a pE-SUMOstar Amp plasmid vector. The resultant his-tagged fusion chimeric glucanase was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and partially purified. The effects of chimeric glucanase on the formation and decomposition of biofilm formed on a glass surface by Streptococcus sobrinus 6715 glucosyltransferases were then examined. This biofilm was fractionated into firmly adherent, loosely adherent, and non-adherent WIG fractions. Amounts of WIG in each fraction were determined by a phenol-sulfuric acid method, and reducing sugars were quantified by the Somogyi-Nelson method. Chimeric glucanase reduced the formation of the total amount of WIG in a dose-dependent manner, and significant reductions of WIG in the adherent fraction were observed. Moreover, the chimeric glucanase was able to decompose biofilm, being 4.1 times more effective at glucan inhibition of biofilm formation than a mixture of dextranase and mutanase. These results suggest that the chimeric glucanase is useful for prevention of dental biofilm formation. PMID:25411090

  16. Effect of honey in preventing gingivitis and dental caries in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Atwa, AL-Dany A.; AbuShahba, Ramadan Y.; Mostafa, Marwa; Hashem, Mohamed I.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to investigate the following: (1) the effects of chewing honey on plaque formation in orthodontic patients, (2) the effect of chewing honey on dental plaque bacterial counts, (3) determine if honey possesses antibacterial effects on bacteria recovered from plaques. Methods Female orthodontic patients (n = 20, 12–18 years of age) participated in this randomized controlled study. The effects of honey were compared to treatment with either 10% sucrose or 10% sorbitol that served as positive and negative controls, respectively. The pH of plaque was measured using a digital pH meter prior to baseline and at 2, 5, 10, 20, and 30 min after chewing honey or rinsing with control solutions and the numbers of Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacilli, and Prophymonas gingivalis in respective plaques were determined. The antibacterial activity of honey was tested against commonly used antibiotics using the disk diffusion method. Results Significant differences in pH were observed in the honey and sucrose groups compared to the pH observed in the sorbitol group (p ? 0.001). The maximum pH drop occurred at 5 min in both the honey and sucrose groups; however the pH in the honey group rapidly recovered 10–20 min after exposure and did not drop below the critical decalcification pH of 5.5. On the other hand, the pH following sucrose exposure fell <5.5 and was associated with a 30 min recovery time. The pH observed for the sorbitol group did not change over time. Bacterial counts were significantly reduced in the honey group compared to the other treatment groups (p ? 0.001) and honey significantly inhibited the growth of all studied strains compared to inhibition observed with antibiotics (p ? 0.001). Conclusions Honey can be used as an alternative to traditional remedies for the prevention of dental caries and gingivitis following orthodontic treatment. PMID:25057231

  17. Effects of common dental materials used in preventive or operative dentistry on dentin permeability and remineralization.

    PubMed

    Sauro, Salvatore; Thompson, Ian; Watson, Timothy F

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dentin remineralization induced by bioactive substances contained in common dental materials used in preventive and operative dentistry. Several materials were applied on human dentin segments. Dentin permeability was quantified using a fluid filtration system working at 20 cm H(2)O. Micro-Raman, SEM-EDX, and microhardness calculation were used to evaluate changes in the mineralization of dentin. Dentin treated with the prophylactic materials showed different dentin permeability values, in particular subsequent to immersion in remineralizing solutions (RSS). The bioactive glass (Sylc) was the only substance able to reduce dentin permeability after immersion in remineralizing solution and to show hydroxyapatite precipitation as a sign of dentin remineralization. The reduction in dentin permeability obtained after the application of the other prophylactic materials used in this study was due to the presence of the remnant material in the dentinal tubules, with no remineralization effect after storage in remineralizing solution. In conclusion, the results indicated that bioactive glass prophy powder may induce immediate remineralization of dentin. PMID:21777102

  18. Community-oriented administration of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries: a summary of the current situation in Asia.

    PubMed

    Petersen, P E; Baez, R J; Lennon, M A

    2012-02-01

    Dental caries is the most prevalent chronic disease affecting human populations around the world. It is recognized that fluoride plays a significant role in dental caries reduction. Meanwhile, several low- and middle-income countries of Asia have not yet implemented systematic fluoride programs; contributing factors relate to misconceptions about the mechanisms of fluoride, low priority given to oral health in national health policy and strategic plans, and lack of interest among public health administrators. A workshop on the effective use of fluoride in Asia took place in Phang-Nga, Thailand, in 2011. A series of country presentations addressed some of the topics mentioned above; in addition, speakers from countries of the region provided examples of successful fluoride interventions and discussed program limitations, barriers encountered, and solutions, as well as possibilities for expanding coverage. Participants acknowledged that automatic fluoridation through water, salt, and milk is the most effective and equitable strategy for the prevention of dental caries. Concerns were expressed that government-subsidized community fluoride prevention programs may face privatization. In addition, the use of affordable fluoride-containing toothpastes should be encouraged. The workshop identified: strengths and weaknesses of ongoing community-based fluoride programs, as well as the interest of countries in a particular method; the requirement for World Health Organization (WHO) technical assistance on various aspects, including fluoridation process, feasibility studies, and implementation of effective epidemiological surveillance of the program; exchange of information; and the need for inter-country collaboration. It was acknowledged that program process and evaluation at the local and country levels need further dissemination. The meeting was co-sponsored by the World Health Organization, the International Association for Dental Research, and the World Dental Federation. PMID:22261256

  19. A Comparison of Selected Evidence Reviews and Recommendations on Interventions to Prevent Dental Caries, Oral and Pharyngeal Cancers, and Sports Related Craniofacial Injuries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara F. Gooch; Benedict I. Truman; Susan O. Griffin; William G. Kohn; Iddrisu Sulemana; Helen C. Gift; Alice M. Horowitz; Caswell A. Evans

    Medical Subject Headings (MeSH): cariostatic agents, community dentistry, community health planning, community health services, decision making, dental caries, evidence- based medicine, facial injuries, fluoridation, intervention studies, meta-analysis, mouth protectors, oral health, pharyngeal neoplasms, pit and fissure sealants, practice guidelines, preventive dentistry, preventive health services, public health dentistry, public health practice, review literature, tooth injuries

  20. Use of Preventive Dental Care Among Medicaid-Enrolled, School-Aged US Children in Immigrant and Nonimmigrant Families: Trends in Pennsylvania From 2005 Through 2010

    PubMed Central

    Chesnokova, Arina; Shults, Justine; Pinto, Andres; Rubin, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We describe trends in receipt of preventive dental care among Medicaid-enrolled children in Pennsylvania between 2005 and 2010, comparing the US children of immigrants with their co-ethnic peers in nonimmigrant families. Methods. We analyzed Pennsylvania Medicaid claims, birth records, and census data for children born in Pennsylvania and enrolled in Medicaid for 10 or more months during any of the calendar years assessed. Results. Receipt of preventive dental care was more likely among Latino children in immigrant families than among their peers in nonimmigrant families; also, it was more likely among White children in immigrant families than among their peers in nonimmigrant families. Rates of preventive dental care use among African American and Asian children in immigrant and nonimmigrant families were comparable. From 2005 to 2010, the percentage of Latino children in nonimmigrant families who received preventive dental care increased from 33% to 61%. Changes in other groups were significant but less dramatic. Conclusions. Receipt of preventive dental care has increased among Medicaid-enrolled children in Pennsylvania, with marked gains among Latino children. Within each racial/ethnic group, the children of immigrants were either more likely than or equally likely as children in nonimmigrant families to receive care. PMID:25322290

  1. Fluoride supplements in pregnancy, effectiveness in the prevention of dental caries in a group of children

    PubMed Central

    MATURO, P.; COSTACURTA, M.; PERUGIA, C.; DOCIMO, R.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY This clinical, retrospective study intends to evaluate whether the systemic administration of fluoride during pregnancy can reduce caries incidence in a group of paediatric patients, compared to a control group. 84 patients were selected out of a sample of 2000 children (3–15 years of age) and then divided in two groups: TEST Group: 34 patients (16M – 18F, mean age 9.23), whose mothers had taken fluoride during pregnancy; CONTROL Group: 50 patients (23M – 27F, mean age 9) whose mothers had not taken fluoride. Patients underwent a clinical and radiographic inspection to assess the dfs/DFS value as caries index (decayed or filled surfaces for deciduous or permanent teeth). Results: dfs/DFS value: TEST Group: 3.41, CONTROL group 2.49. The TEST group was further divided in individuals who were administered fluoride only during pregnancy (33%) with a dfs/DFS of 3.14 and individuals who were administered fluoride also after birth (67%) with a dfs/DFS of 3. Caries index (dfs/DFS) did not show any significant differences between the test and control groups. Fluoride administration during pregnancy and postpartum does not seem to have a significant impact on the reduction of caries incidence. More preventive strategies should be investigated to contrast the multifactorial etiology of children caries. PMID:23285398

  2. Disparities in children's oral health and access to dental care.

    PubMed

    Mouradian, W E; Wehr, E; Crall, J J

    Dental caries can be prevented by a combination of community, professional, and individual measures including water fluoridation, professionally applied topical fluorides and dental sealants, and use of fluoride toothpastes. Yet, tooth decay is the most common chronic disease of childhood. Dental care is the most prevalent unmet health need in US children with wide disparities existing in oral health and access to care. Only 1 in 5 children covered by Medicaid received preventive oral care for which they are eligible. Children from low income and minority families have poorer oral health outcomes, fewer dental visits, and fewer protective sealants. Water fluoridation is the most effective measure in preventing caries, but only 62% of water supplies are fluoridated, and lack of fluoridation may disproportionately affect poor and minority children. Childhood oral disease has significant medical and financial consequences that may not be appreciated because of the separation of medicine and dentistry. The infectious nature of dental caries, its early onset, and the potential of early interventions require an emphasis on preventive oral care in primary pediatric care to complement existing dental services. However, many pediatricians lack critical knowledge to promote oral health. We recommend financial incentives for prioritizing Medicaid Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment dental services; managed care accountability; integration of medical and dental professional training, clinical care, and research; and national leadership. JAMA. 2000;284:2625-2631. PMID:11086371

  3. Design and implementation of a dental caries prevention trial in remote Canadian Aboriginal communities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rosamund Harrison; Jacques Veronneau; Brian Leroux

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The goal of this cluster randomized trial is to test the effectiveness of a counseling approach, Motivational Interviewing, to control dental caries in young Aboriginal children. Motivational Interviewing, a client-centred, directive counseling style, has not yet been evaluated as an approach for promotion of behaviour change in indigenous communities in remote settings. METHODS\\/DESIGN: Aboriginal women were hired from the

  4. An examination of the advances in science and technology of prevention of tooth decay in young children since the Surgeon General's Report on Oral Health.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, Peter; Zero, Domenick T; Tanzer, Jason M

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses a number of areas related to how effectively science and technology have met Healthy People 2010 goals for tooth decay prevention. In every area mentioned, it appears that science and technology are falling short of these goals. Earlier assessments identified water fluoridation as one of the greatest public health accomplishments of the last century. Yet, failure to complete needed clinical and translational research has shortchanged the caries prevention agenda at a critical juncture. Science has firmly established the transmissible nature of tooth decay. However, there is evidence that tooth decay in young children is increasing, although progress has been made in other age groups. Studies of risk assessment have not been translated into improved practice. Antiseptics, chlorhexidine varnish, and polyvinylpyrrolidone iodine (PVI-I) may have value, but definitive trials are needed. Fluorides remain the most effective agents, but are not widely disseminated to the most needy. Fluoride varnish provides a relatively effective topical preventive for very young children, yet definitive trials have not been conducted. Silver diamine fluoride also has potential but requires study in the United States. Data support effectiveness and safety of xylitol, but adoption is not widespread. Dental sealants remain a mainstay of public policy, yet after decades of research, widespread use has not occurred. We conclude that research has established the public health burden of tooth decay, but insufficient research addresses the problems identified in the report Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General. Transfer of technology from studies to implementation is needed to prevent tooth decay among children. This should involve translational research and implementation of scientific and technological advances into practice. PMID:19837019

  5. Mucoadhesive electrospun chitosan-based nanofibre mats for dental caries prevention.

    PubMed

    Samprasit, Wipada; Kaomongkolgit, Ruchadaporn; Sukma, Monrudee; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2015-03-01

    The mucoadhesive electrospun nanofibre mats were developed using chitosan (CS) and thiolated chitosan (CS-SH) as mucoadhesive polymers. Garcinia mangostana (GM) extract was incorporated into nanofibre mats. The antibacterial activity in the single and combined agents was evaluated against dental caries pathogens. The morphology of mats was observed using SEM. The mats were evaluated for GM extract amount, mucoadhesion, in vitro release, antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity. The mucoadhesion and antibacterial activity were determined in healthy human volunteers. The prepared mats were in nanoscale with good physical and mucoadhesive properties. The CS-SH caused the higher mucoadhesion. All mats rapidly released active substances, which had the synergistic antibacterial activity. In addition, the reduction of bacteria and good mucoadhesion in the oral cavity occurred without cytotoxicity. The results suggest that mats have the potential to be mucoadhesive dosage forms to maintain oral hygiene by reducing the bacterial growth that causes the dental caries. PMID:25498719

  6. Status of occupational hazards and their prevention among dental professionals in Chandigarh, India: A comprehensive questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Abhishek; Gupta, Mohit; Upadhyaya, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Background: To assess the status of occupational hazards and their prevention among the practicing dentists in Chandigarh city, India. Materials and Methods: A closed-ended questionnaire was prepared to record demographic status, types of occupational hazards encountered, and status of measures used for their prevention. A total 113 out of 130 dentists completed the questionnaire and the response rate was 86.9%. Frequency tables were prepared and coefficient of correlation was computed to check correlation between different variables. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: The most common occupational hazard reported was injury from “sharps” (77%), out of which needle prick injury was the most frequent. Of the other occupational problems job related stress (43.3%), musculoskeletal problems (39.8%), and allergies (23.8%) from things used in dental clinics were most common. A reasonably high percentage of dentists were immunized against hepatitis-B virus (88.4%) and were following proper infection control measures and hospital waste disposal methods. Very few dentists were following the correct method of disposal of excess amalgam (11%) and measurement of radiation exposure (27.5%) within their clinic. Most of them (90.2%) were satisfied with their current working hours and job. Conclusion: Prevalence of occupational hazards among the studied group was high and certain preventive measures were not being followed properly. Therefore, there is a need to improve the knowledge of dentists regarding these hazards and their prevention. PMID:24130578

  7. Oral health disparity in older adults: dental decay and tooth loss.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Paula K; Kaufman, Laura B; Karpas, Steven L

    2014-10-01

    Progress has been made in reducing dental caries and edentulism in older adults, but disparities continue to exist related to race, ethnicity, socioeconomic level, and sex. Lack of training in treating medically complex patients, economic factors including absence of coverage for oral health services in Medicare and as a required service for adults in Medicaid, and attitudinal issues on the part of patients, caregivers, and providers contribute to barriers to care for older adults. In addition to the impact of oral health on overall health, oral health impacts quality of life and social and employment opportunities. PMID:25201540

  8. Near-infrared image-guided laser ablation of dental decay

    PubMed Central

    Tao, You-Chen; Fried, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Image-guided laser ablation systems are now feasible for dentistry with the recent development of nondestructive high-contrast imaging modalities such as near-IR (NIR) imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) that are capable of discriminating between sound and demineralized dental enamel at the early stages of development. Our objective is to demonstrate that images of demineralized tooth surfaces have sufficient contrast to be used to guide a CO2 laser for the selective removal of natural and artificial caries lesions. NIR imaging and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) operating at 1310-nm are used to acquire images of natural lesions on extracted human teeth and highly patterned artificial lesions produced on bovine enamel. NIR and PS-OCT images are analyzed and converted to binary maps designating the areas on the samples to be removed by a CO2 laser to selectively remove the lesions. Postablation NIR and PS-OCT images confirmed preferential removal of demineralized areas with minimal damage to sound enamel areas. These promising results suggest that NIR and PS-OCT imaging systems can be integrated with a CO2 laser ablation system for the selective removal of dental caries. PMID:19895146

  9. Sequential years of dental outreach to Jamaica. Gains toward improved caries status of children.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Charles D; Larsen, Michael D; Kim, Michelle; Yang, Esther; Brown, Noel; Cunningham, Ralph P

    2014-01-01

    In the years 2007 to 2011, faculty, pediatric dental residents and dental students lead by New York University College of Dentistry and Healthcare International Reachout, Inc., traveled to the Hoolebury School, Saint Ann Parish, Jamaica, where they provided treatment to 172 children. The service project focused on dental health promotion, education and prevention. Although not a randomized controlled trial, the statistical evidence from records of treatment received and the presence of decay strongly suggests the positive benefit of repeat dental visits and the placement of sealants on permanent molars in these children. PMID:25672077

  10. Optical coherence tomography guided dental drill

    DOEpatents

    DaSilva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Colston, Jr., Bill W. (Livermore, CA); James, Dale L. (Tracy, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A dental drill that has one or multiple single mode fibers that can be used to image in the vicinity of the drill tip. It is valuable to image below the surface being drilled to minimize damage to vital or normal tissue. Identifying the boundary between decayed and normal enamel (or dentine) would reduce the removal of viable tissue, and identifying the nerve before getting too close with the drill could prevent nerve damage. By surrounding a drill with several optical fibers that can be used by an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) to image several millimeters ahead of the ablation surface will lead to a new and improved dental treatment device.

  11. Preventing Tooth Decay: A Guide for Implementing Self-Applied Fluoride in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Dental Research (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This guidebook was developed to assist citizens in initiating programs to prevent tooth decay in young children through the use of fluoridation. It contains outlines for determining the needs of the school and community for fluoride in drinking water, and presents the various steps and activities that are necessary for developing and implementing…

  12. Effect of pretreatment with an Er:YAG laser and fluoride on the prevention of dental enamel erosion.

    PubMed

    dos Reis Derceli, Juliana; Faraoni-Romano, Juliana Jendiroba; Azevedo, Danielle Torres; Wang, Linda; Bataglion, César; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the Er:YAG laser and its association with fluoride (1.23% acidulate phosphate fluoride gel) on the prevention of enamel erosion. Sixty specimens were obtained from bovine enamel (4?×?4 mm), which were ground flat, polished, and randomly divided into five groups according to the preventive treatments: control-fluoride application; L--Er:YAG laser; L+F--laser + fluoride; F+L--fluoride + laser; L/F--laser/fluoride simultaneously. Half of the enamel surface was covered with nail varnish (control area), and the other half was pretreated with one of the preventive strategies to subsequently be submitted to erosive challenge. When the laser was applied, it was irradiated for 10 s with a focal length of 4 mm and 60 mJ/2 Hz. Fluoride gel was applied for 4 min. Each specimen was individually exposed to regular Coca-Cola® for 1 min, four times/day, for 5 days. Wear analysis was performed with a profilometer, and demineralization was assessed with an optical microscope. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test (wear)/Dunn test and ANOVA/Fisher's exact tests. The group L/F was similar to control group. The other groups showed higher wear, which did not present differences among them. In the demineralization assessment, the groups F+L and L/F showed lower demineralization in relation to the other groups. It can be concluded that none preventive method was able to inhibit dental wear. The treatments L/F and F+L showed lower enamel demineralization. PMID:24149579

  13. Preventing Dental Caries in Children from Birth Through Age Five Years

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medication What is the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force? The Task Force is an independent group of ... recommendation statement. To learn more, visit the Task Force Web site. USPSTF Recommendation Grades Grade Definition A ...

  14. Dental care resistance prevention and antibiotic prescribing modification—the cluster-randomised controlled DREAM trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial resistance development is one of the most urgent problems in healthcare worldwide. In Europe, dentistry accounts for a comparatively high amount of antibiotic prescriptions. In light of increasing levels of bacterial resistance, this development is alarming. So far, very few interventional studies have been performed, and further research is urgently needed. By means of a complex educational intervention, the DREAM trial aims at optimising antibiotic prescribing behaviour of general dentists in Germany. Method This is a cluster-randomised controlled trial, where each cluster consists of one dental practice and all of its patients in a defined period. Participants are general dentists practicing in the German region of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania. Randomisation takes place after baseline data collection (6 months) and will be stratified by the antibiotic prescribing rates of the participating dental practices. Dentists randomised into the intervention group will participate in a complex small group educational seminar that aims at: increasing knowledge on bacterial resistance, pharmacology, and prophylaxis of infectious endocarditis; increasing awareness of dentist-patient communication using video-taped vignettes of dentist-patient communication on antibiotic treatment; improving collaboration between general dentists, general practitioners, and practice-based cardiologists on the necessity of antibiotic prophylaxis; enhancing awareness of the dentists’ own prescribing habits by providing antibiotic prescribing feedback; and increasing patient knowledge on antibiotic treatment by providing patient-centred information material on antibiotic prophylaxis of endocarditis. The dentists randomised into the control group will not receive any educational programme and provide care as usual. Primary outcome is the overall antibiotic prescribing rate measured at T1 (period of six months after intervention). In a subgroup of adult patients affected by odontogenic infections, microbiological analyses for antibiotic resistance of oral streptococci are performed. Discussion Major aim of the study is to improve the process of decision making with regard to antibiotic prescribing. The approach is simple to implement and might be used rapidly in graduate and post-graduate medical education. We expect the results of this trial to have a major impact on antibiotic prescription strategies and practices in Germany. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN09576376 PMID:24559212

  15. Bioinspired amphiphilic phosphate block copolymers as non-fluoride materials to prevent dental erosion

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yanda; Wang, Tongxin; Mitchell, James W.; Zaidel, Lynette; Qiu, Jianhong; Kilpatrick-Liverman, LaTonya

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by the fact that certain natural proteins, e.g. casein phosphopeptide or amelogenin, are able to prevent tooth erosion (mineral loss) and to enhance tooth remineralization, a synthetic amphiphilic diblock copolymer, containing a hydrophilic methacryloyloxyethyl phosphate block (MOEP) and a hydrophobic methyl methacrylate block (MMA), was designed as a novel non-fluoride agent to prevent tooth erosion under acidic conditions. The structure of the polymer, synthesized by reversible addition-fragment transfer (RAFT) polymerization, was confirmed by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). While the hydrophilic PMOEP block within the amphiphilic block copolymer strongly binds to the enamel surface, the PMMA block forms a hydrophobic shell to prevent acid attack on tooth enamel, thus preventing/reducing acid erosion. The polymer treatment not only effectively decreased the mineral loss of hydroxyapatite (HAP) by 36–46% compared to the untreated control, but also protected the surface morphology of the enamel specimen following exposure to acid. Additionally, experimental results confirmed that low pH values and high polymer concentrations facilitate polymer binding. Thus, the preliminary data suggests that this new amphiphilic diblock copolymer has the potential to be used as a non-fluoride ingredient for mouth-rinse or toothpaste to prevent/reduce tooth erosion. PMID:25419457

  16. Xylitol, sweeteners, and dental caries.

    PubMed

    Ly, Kiet A; Milgrom, Peter; Rothen, Marilynn

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to provide an overview of xylitol and other polyol sweeteners and dental caries for clinicians and to discuss current applications for dental practice and potential community-based public health interventions. Xylitol, like other polyol sweeteners, is a naturally occurring sugar alcohol. Studies suggest polyols are noncariogenic. Furthermore, studies indicate that xylitol can decrease mutans streptococci levels in plaque and saliva and can reduce dental caries in young children, mothers, and in children via their mothers. Food products containing xylitol are now available and have the potential to be widely accessible to consumers to help control rampant decay. Determining whether products contain adequate xylitol amounts for practical use towards prevention is challenging, however, because xylitol content is not clearly labeled. Sufficient evidence exists to support the use of xylitol to reduce caries. Clinicians and dental associations should push for clear recommendations of efficacious dose and frequency of xylitol use and for clear labeling of xylitol content in products to help consumers choose appropriately. PMID:16708791

  17. Prevention. Part 1: smoking cessation advice within the general dental practice.

    PubMed

    Watt, R G; Daly, B; Kay, E J

    2003-06-28

    Smoking remains the largest single preventable cause of death and disability in the UK and costs the NHS 1.7 billion pound each year. More than 120,000 people die prematurely due to smoking related diseases. Worldwide smoking is the single most important public health problem. The detrimental effects of smoking and tobacco use on oral health are well recognised. Oral cancers and pre-cancers, periodontal diseases and poor wound healing are the most significant and serious effects of smoking on the mouth. In addition, staining of the teeth, soft tissue changes and halitosis are aesthetic and social impacts of smoking directly related to oral health. PMID:12830185

  18. Chemico-therapeutic approach to prevention of dental caries. [using stannous fluoride gel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, I. L.

    1975-01-01

    The program of chemical preventive dentistry is based primarily upon the development of a procedure for stabilizing stannous fluoride in solution by forcing it into glycerin. New topical fluoride treatment concentrates, fluoride containing gels and prophylaxis pastes, as well as a completely stable stannous fluoride dentifrice are made possible by the development of a rather complicated heat application method to force stannous fluoride into solution in glycerin. That the stannous fluoride is clinically effective in such a preparation is demonstrated briefly on orthodontic patients.

  19. IQuaD dental trial; improving the quality of dentistry: a multicentre randomised controlled trial comparing oral hygiene advice and periodontal instrumentation for the prevention and management of periodontal disease in dentate adults attending dental primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Periodontal disease is the most common oral disease affecting adults, and although it is largely preventable it remains the major cause of poor oral health worldwide. Accumulation of microbial dental plaque is the primary aetiological factor for both periodontal disease and caries. Effective self-care (tooth brushing and interdental aids) for plaque control and removal of risk factors such as calculus, which can only be removed by periodontal instrumentation (PI), are considered necessary to prevent and treat periodontal disease thereby maintaining periodontal health. Despite evidence of an association between sustained, good oral hygiene and a low incidence of periodontal disease and caries in adults there is a lack of strong and reliable evidence to inform clinicians of the relative effectiveness (if any) of different types of Oral Hygiene Advice (OHA). The evidence to inform clinicians of the effectiveness and optimal frequency of PI is also mixed. There is therefore an urgent need to assess the relative effectiveness of OHA and PI in a robust, sufficiently powered randomised controlled trial (RCT) in primary dental care. Methods/Design This is a 5 year multi-centre, randomised, open trial with blinded outcome evaluation based in dental primary care in Scotland and the North East of England. Practitioners will recruit 1860 adult patients, with periodontal health, gingivitis or moderate periodontitis (Basic Periodontal Examination Score 0–3). Dental practices will be cluster randomised to provide routine OHA or Personalised OHA. To test the effects of PI each individual patient participant will be randomised to one of three groups: no PI, 6 monthly PI (current practice), or 12 monthly PI. Baseline measures and outcome data (during a three year follow-up) will be assessed through clinical examination, patient questionnaires and NHS databases. The primary outcome measures at 3 year follow up are gingival inflammation/bleeding on probing at the gingival margin; oral hygiene self-efficacy and net benefits. Discussion IQuaD will provide evidence for the most clinically-effective and cost-effective approach to managing periodontal disease in dentate adults in Primary Care. This will support general dental practitioners and patients in treatment decision making. Trial registration Protocol ID: ISRCTN56465715 PMID:24160246

  20. Dental Assisting Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard dental assisting curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level dental assistants, and includes job skills in the technical areas of preventive dentistry; four-handed dentistry; chairside assisting with emphasis in diagnostics,…

  1. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disclaimer Print E-mail commonUtilitiesRightboxRadEditor commonRightboxRadEditor Connect: e-Newsletter RSS NIDCR Twitter NIDCR YouTube Widgets Share: Facebook Twitter Linked-In Google E-Mail Up to top This page last updated: May 28, 2014 Home Contact Us Viewers and Players Site Map FOIA Web ...

  2. Going, going, gone? Proactive control prevents the congruency sequence effect from rapid decay.

    PubMed

    Duthoo, W; Abrahamse, E L; Braem, S; Notebaert, W

    2014-07-01

    The congruency sequence effect, the finding of a reduced congruency effect following incongruent trials in conflict tasks, has received considerable attention in the research on cognitive control over the last two decades. This effect can reflect either the expectancy-guided, preparatory biasing of attention in anticipation of the upcoming stimulus (i.e. proactive control), or the phasic enhancement of the attentional set in response to conflict on the previous trial (i.e. reactive control). A recent study by Egner et al. in Front Psychol 1 (2010) set out to contrast these two alternatives, by exploring the congruency sequence effect across a wide range of inter-trial intervals. It was found that congruency sequence effects were subject to rapid decay over time. This decay fits well with the notion of reactive control, while at the same time speaking against the involvement of proactive regulation—which should also (and even mainly) be evident at longer intervals. In the present study, we first replicate the reduction of the congruency sequence effect with increasing inter-trial interval in a face-word Stroop task. In a second experiment, we show that congruency sequence effects are observed at longer intervals, too, when the proportion of trials with the longest inter-trial interval is increased. Our findings indicate that proactive control can prevent the congruency sequence effect from decaying rapidly. PMID:24077774

  3. The Level of Dental Anxiety and Dental Status in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dobros, Katarzyna; Hajto-Bryk, Justyna; Wnek, Anna; Zarzecka, Joanna; Rzepka, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present study aimed to assess potential correlation between dental anxiety and overall dental status in adult patients, in consideration of the frequency of dental appointments and individual dental hygiene practices. Materials and Methods: Individual dental anxiety levels were assessed with the aid of the Corah’s dental anxiety scale (DAS). The study embraced 112 patients of the University Dental Clinic, Kraków. Following clinical and X-ray exams, respectively, decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) index and dental treatment index (DTI) were computed for each study subject. Results: Mean DAS among the 112 subjects under study was 9.41 standard deviation (SD = 3.36). Mean DMFT value was 15.86 (SD = 7.00), whereas DTI value was 0.76 (SD = 0.27). The number of decayed teeth and an individual dental anxiety level were found to be correlated (r = 0.26). Higher dental anxiety correlated with lower DTI value (r = ?0.22) and lesser frequency of dental appointments (r = 0.22). Conclusions: Individual dental anxiety level appears to impact overall dental status, frequency of dental appointments and everyday oral health practices. Every conceivable effort should therefore be undertaken with a view to effectively diminishing dental anxiety levels in the patients. How to cite the article: Dobros K, Hajto-Bryk J, Wn?k A, Zarzecka J, Rzepka D. The level of dental anxiety and dental status in adult patients. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):11-4. PMID:25083026

  4. Review of Spaceflight Dental Emergencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Anil

    2012-01-01

    All exploration class missions--extending beyond earth's orbit--differ from existing orbital missions by being of longer duration and often not having a means of evacuation. If an exploration mission extends beyond a year, then there will be a greater lapse since the crewmembers last terrestrial dental exams, which routinely occur each year. This increased time since professional dental care could increase the chance of a dental emergency such as intractable pain, dental decay requiring a temporary filling, crown replacement, exposed pulp, abscess, tooth avulsion, or toothache. Additionally, any dental emergency will have to be treated in-flight with available resources and personnel who may not have extensive training in dental care. Thus, dental emergencies are an important risk to assess in preparation for exploration missions.

  5. Oral and dental health in Huntington‘s disease - an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Only a few case reports and case series dealing with oral and dental health care are available in literature until now. The aim of the present pilot study was to determine the status of dental health in comparison to matched controls and to heighten the neurologists’ and dentists’ awareness of the oral aspects of the disease. Methods 42 Huntington’s disease (HD) participants were scored according to the Unified Huntington’s Disease Rating Scale. The dental status was assessed by using the well established score for decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) and the dental plaque score (Silness-Loe plaque index). Results Compared to controls HD participants showed significantly more decayed teeth and more plaques in both plaque indices. A higher motor impairment and a lower functional status of the patients lead to a worsening in dental status. Conclusion Possible reasons for our findings are discussed. Apart from local oral complications general complications may also occur. Thus, as a consequence, we would encourage patients, caregivers, neurologists, and the dentists to ensure regular preventive dental examinations and dental treatments of individuals with Huntington’s disease even in the premanifest stage of this disease. PMID:24138900

  6. Before and After (Dental Restorations)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of her back teeth. She also reported a history of dental decay and disliked the dark areas near ... to life. Before This patient had a long history of grinding his teeth, which led to severe wear ...

  7. An evaluation of Droperidol for preventing nausea and vomiting after deep intravenous sedation for ambulatory dental surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Trapp, L. D.

    1989-01-01

    Four sets of 25 patients were given either 0, 0.25, 0.50, or 1.00 mg droperidol intravenously during deep intravenous sedation for dental surgery in a nonrandomly assigned, single-blind, prospective clinical trial. The control group experienced a 48% incidence of nausea or vomiting, while each of the experimental groups experienced a significantly lower incidence of nausea or vomiting (P = 0.0026). All nausea or vomiting occurred after the patients were discharged and appeared to be motion-related. PMID:2604056

  8. Prevention and nonsurgical management of dental caries over the life course for individuals with special health care needs.

    PubMed

    Chi, Donald L; Ettinger, Ronald L

    2014-07-01

    Traditional approaches to caries prevention and management are unlikely to result in successful outcomes for individuals with special health care needs. Intensive prevention-oriented and minimally invasive restorative approaches have the greatest potential to address oral health disparities affecting vulnerable populations. This paper introduces readers to oral health-related issues for patients with special health care needs across the life course and outlines clinical strategies to prevent and manage caries in high-risk patients. PMID:25076628

  9. Prevalence, Severity and Related Factors of Dental Caries in School Going Children of Vadodara City – An Epidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Niyanta; Sujan, SG; Joshi, Keyur; Parekh, Harshik; Dave, Bhavna

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Among dental diseases, dental caries is an important dental public health problem in India which is irreversible in nature, and is predominantly a disease of childhood. Till date no study has been carried out in Vadodara. As baseline data of caries is required to improve oral health of children, the present study was undertaken to determine the pattern of dental caries in school children of Vadodara city in the mixed dentition period considering age, sex and dietary patterns. Methods: An epidemiological cross sectional descriptive study was carried out among 1600 school children aged 6-12 years in Vadodara city. A closed ended questionnaire according to World Health Organisation 1997 methodology was used to collect the data. The children were examined for the presence of dental caries using decayed missing filled teeth/decayed missing filled surfaces and Decayed Missing Filled Teeth/Decayed Missing Filled Surfaces index. Related factors which predispose caries such as age, sex and dietary patterns were recorded. Results: The prevalence of dental caries was 69.12%. The mean dmft/dmfs and DMFT/DMFS were 3.00/4.79 and 0.45/0.56 respectively. The prevalence was higher in deciduous teeth than in permanent teeth. Positive association was found between dental caries and age, sex, frequency of sugar consumption in between meals. Conclusion: The study concludes that the prevalence and severity of dental caries in Vadodara city is high. So, in developing country like India, it is imperative to introduce primary prevention and increased restorative care for the purpose of both reducing the caries prevalence and maintaining those caries free children. How to cite this article: Joshi N, Sujan SG, Joshi K, Parekh H, Dave B. Prevalence, Severity and Related Factors of Dental Caries in School Going Children of Vadodara City – An Epidemiological Study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(4):40-48. PMID:24155618

  10. Application of Stem Cell Technology in Dental Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ruoxue; Lengner, Chistopher

    2013-01-01

    Significance In this review, we summarize the current literature regarding the isolation and characterization of dental tissue-derived stem cells and address the potential of these cell types for use in regenerative cell transplantation therapy. Recent Advances Looking forward, platforms for the delivery of stem cells via scaffolds and the use of growth factors and cytokines for enhancing dental stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are discussed. Critical Issues We aim to understand the developmental origins of dental tissues in an effort to elucidate the molecular pathways governing the genesis of somatic dental stem cells. The advantages and disadvantages of several dental stem cells are discussed, including the developmental stage and specific locations from which these cells can be purified. In particular, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth may act as a very practical and easily accessibly reservoir for autologous stem cells and hold the most value in stem cell therapy. Dental pulp stem cells and periodontal ligament stem cells should also be considered for their triple lineage differentiation ability and relative ease of isolation. Further, we address the potentials and limitations of induced pluripotent stem cells as a cell source in dental regenerative. Future Directions From an economical and a practical standpoint, dental stem cell therapy would be most easily applied in the prevention of periodontal ligament detachment and bone atrophy, as well as in the regeneration of dentin-pulp complex. In contrast, cell-based tooth replacement due to decay or other oral pathology seems, at the current time, an untenable approach. PMID:24527351

  11. A Position on School Dental Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Lois K.; Lucye, Helen

    1970-01-01

    Prevention is the pnly hope for controlling dental diseases. The school setting provides great potential for securing dental health practices which will result in better dental health for the children of today, and the adults of tomorrow. Presented at Joint Session of American School Health Association and American Public Health Association,…

  12. Dental exarticulation.

    PubMed

    Yadav, S; Sisodia, N; Jha, V; Yadav, M

    2015-01-01

    Tooth exarticulation or avulsion refers to the complete displacement of the tooth out of its socket. It is a complex injury, requiring immediate intervention for optimal results. Literature indicates that prolonged dry time and improper handling may be associated with increased risk of failure. Immediate replantation of the tooth allows for immediate restoration of esthetics and phonetics. This case report presents the management of an avulsed mature tooth in a young boy, with a two-year follow-up, which had been preserved in milk after around 15-20 minutes of injury and transplanted after two hours at a dental hospital. Timely modified endodontic therapy prevented subsequent inflammatory root resorption. PMID:25772931

  13. Saliva and dental erosion

    PubMed Central

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; HANNAS, Angélicas Reis; KATO, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods A search was undertaken on MEDLINE website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects. PMID:23138733

  14. Dental Fluorosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CDC.gov . Oral Health home School-Based Dental Sealant Programs Community Water Fluoridation Fluoridation Basics Benefits Guidelines ... Health Engineering & Operations Infection Control School-Based Dental Sealant Programs Community Water Fluoridation FAQs Community Water Fluoridation ...

  15. Dental Assistants

    MedlinePLUS

    ... entry-level dental assistant. Contact state boards of dentistry for specific requirements. <- Work Environment Pay -> Pay About ... and for a list of state boards of dentistry, visit Dental Assisting National Board, Inc. O*NET ...

  16. Anti-Streptococcal activity of Brazilian Amazon Rain Forest plant extracts presents potential for preventive strategies against dental caries

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Juliana Paola Corręa; de CASTILHO, Adriana Lígia; SARACENI, Cíntia Helena Couri; DÍAZ, Ingrit Elida Collantes; PACIĘNCIA, Mateus Luís Barradas; SUFFREDINI, Ivana Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    Caries is a global public health problem, whose control requires the introduction of low-cost treatments, such as strong prevention strategies, minimally invasive techniques and chemical prevention agents. Nature plays an important role as a source of new antibacterial substances that can be used in the prevention of caries, and Brazil is the richest country in terms of biodiversity. Objective In this study, the disk diffusion method (DDM) was used to screen over 2,000 Brazilian Amazon plant extracts against Streptococcus mutans. Material and Methods Seventeen active plant extracts were identified and fractionated. Extracts and their fractions, obtained by liquid-liquid partition, were tested in the DDM assay and in the microdilution broth assay (MBA) to determine their minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs). The extracts were also subjected to antioxidant analysis by thin layer chromatography. Results EB271, obtained from Casearia spruceana, showed significant activity against the bacterium in the DDM assay (20.67±0.52 mm), as did EB1129, obtained from Psychotria sp. (Rubiaceae) (15.04±2.29 mm). EB1493, obtained from Ipomoea alba, was the only extract to show strong activity against Streptococcus mutans (0.08 mg/mLprevention strategies to treat caries. PMID:24676578

  17. Prevalence of Dental Caries and Periodontal Disease in Mexican American Children Aged 5 to 17 Years: Results from Southwestern HHANES, 1982-83.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Amid L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Dental caries and periodontal disease in Mexican American children of the southwestern United States occur mainly in molars, lending strong support for the use of fissure sealants as a preventive procedure. This study also reports on the prevalence of fillings decay and gingivitis in this population. (VM)

  18. Melatonin promotes hepatic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells: clinical implications for the prevention of liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Ah; Noh, Kwantae; Jue, Seong-Suk; Lee, So-Youn; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin's effect on hepatic differentiation of stem cells remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the action of melatonin on hepatic differentiation as well as its related signaling pathways of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) and to examine the therapeutic effects of a combination of melatonin and hDPSC transplantation on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 )-induced liver fibrosis in mice. In vitro hepatic differentiation was assessed by periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and mRNA expression for hepatocyte markers. Liver fibrosis model was established by injecting 0.5 mL/kg CCl4 followed by treatment with melatonin (5 mg/kg, twice a week) and hDPSCs. In vivo therapeutic effects were evaluated by histopathology and by means of liver function tests including measurement of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), and ammonia levels. Melatonin promoted hepatic differentiation based on mRNA expression of differentiation markers and PAS-stained glycogen-laden cells. In addition, melatonin increased bone morphogenic protein (BMP)-2 expression and Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation, which was blocked by the BMP antagonist noggin. Furthermore, melatonin activated p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) in hDPSCs. Melatonin-induced hepatic differentiation was attenuated by inhibitors of BMP, p38, ERK, and NF-?B. Compared to treatment of CCl4 -injured mice with either melatonin or hDPSC transplantation alone, the combination of melatonin and hDPSC significantly suppressed liver fibrosis and restored ALT, AST, and ammonia levels. For the first time, this study demonstrates that melatonin promotes hepatic differentiation of hDPSCs by modulating the BMP, p38, ERK, and NF-?B pathway. Combined treatment of grafted hDPSCs and melatonin could be a viable approach for the treatment of liver cirrhosis. PMID:25431168

  19. Relationship between Duration of Fluoride Exposure in School-Based Fluoride Mouthrinsing and Effects on Prevention and Control of Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Komiyama, Eri; Kimoto, Kazunari; Arakawa, Hirohisa

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to assess the effects of school-based fluoride mouthrinsing (S-FMR: weekly using 0.2% NaF solution) in two groups of school children with different periods of exposure to S-FMR in elementary school. Subjects were the S-FMR group consisted of 599 children, participated for six years. The control group consisted of 282 children, participated for less than one year in the sixth year of elementary school. From the results of the present survey, the caries reduction rate of S-FMR in the permanent teeth was 36.6% for DMFT and 42.8% for DMFS, and person rates with DMF, DMFT, DMFS, and CO (questionable caries under observation) were inhibited in both boys and girls. Girls in the control group showed clearly higher values for all parameters of dental caries because of earlier teeth eruption; however, no gender differences were observed in the S-FMR group. As caries prevalence in the first molars accounted for about 85% regardless of participation to S-FMR, and first molar caries were more common in the mandible than in the maxilla, consideration should be given to preventive measures against pit-and-fissure-caries in addition to S-FMR. PMID:22548183

  20. School of Dental Medicine School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Dennett, Daniel

    findings, oral disease prevention, health promotion practices and knowledge of the public and the health issues Sample Curriculum "Dental Public Health is the science and art of preventing and controllingCombined DMD/MPH Program School of Dental Medicine & School of Medicine Contact Us: For more

  1. Hypnosis with a 31-year-old female with dental phobia requiring an emergency extraction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael A. Gow

    2006-01-01

    Presenting problem: Female, 31, attended emergency appointment at dental surgery with pain, dental phobia prevented extraction. Aim: Manage dental phobia using hypnosis integrated into anxiety management treat- ment plan to facilitate extraction. Methods: Pre-treatment questionnaire assessed dental anxiety, reasons for anxiety, and ascertained management options. Post-treatment questionnaire assessed changes in dental anxiety and attitudes. Anxiety management techniques: needle desensitization and

  2. Assessment of awareness amongst school teachers regarding prevention and emergency management of dentoalveolar traumatic injuries in school children in Pune City, before and 3 months after dental educational program.

    PubMed

    Karande, Namrata; Shah, Preetam; Bhatia, Mitali; Lakade, Laxmi; Bijle, Mohammed Nadeem Ahmed; Arora, Nitin; Bhalla, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Children have boundless energy, so, they are continuously engaged in some or the other physical activity. It is seen that when child reaches school age, accidents in the school environment in the form of falls, injuries due to contact sports, fights, abuse, etc. are very common and the main cause of traumatic dental injuries. Trauma may vary from minor enamel chipping or avulsion to extensive maxillofacial damage, more serious neck and brain injury, which may cause pain, disfigurement and mental agony, having immediate and long lasting effects. In such cases, a school teacher is in the right position to handle such an emergency and refer the child to the concerned dental surgeon or a pedodontist for further needful care. The main reason for delayed treatment of dental trauma is that people present at the site of injury are unaware of protocol of rapid and appropriate management leading to improper first aid treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the awareness of a group of school teachers from different schools about the prevention and emergency management of dental trauma in school children, by means of a questionnaire. Then educating them and reassessing their knowledge after a period of 3 months. Unfortunately, the public is unaware of the risks and does not have enough information about first aid emergency treatment or to avoid traumatic injuries. PMID:23404018

  3. Absorption and thermal study of dental enamel when irradiated with Nd:YAG laser with the aim of caries prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boari, H. G. D.; Ana, P. A.; Eduardo, C. P.; Powell, G. L.; Zezell, D. M.

    2009-07-01

    It is widely recognized that Nd:YAG can increase enamel resistance to demineralization; however, the safe parameters and conditions that enable the application of Nd:YAG laser irradiation in vivo are still unknown. The aim of this study was to determine a dye as a photoabsorber for Nd:YAG laser and to verify in vitro a safe condition of Nd:YAG irradiation for caries prevention. Fifty-eight human teeth were selected. In a first morphological study, four dyes (waterproof India ink., iron oxide, caries indicator and coal paste) were tested before Nd:YAG laser irradiation, under two different irradiation conditions: 60 mJ/pulse and 10 Hz (84.9 J/cm2); 80 mJ/pulse and 10 Hz (113.1 J/cm2). In a second study, the enamel surface and pulp chamber temperatures were evaluated during laser irradiations. All dyes produced enamel surface melting, with the exception of the caries indicator, and coal paste was the only dye that could be completely removed. All irradiation conditions produced temperature increases of up to 615.08°C on the enamel surface. Nd:YAG laser irradiation at 60 mJ/pulse, 10 Hz and 84.9 J/cm2 promoted no harmful temperature increase in the pulp chamber (ANOVA, p < 0.05). Among all dyes tested, the coal paste was an efficient photoabsorber for Nd:YAG irradiation, considered feasible for clinical practice. Nd:YAG laser at 84.9 J/cm2 can be indicated as a safe parameter for use in caries prevention.

  4. The Chemistry of Modern Dental Filling Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, John W.; Anstice, H. Mary

    1999-01-01

    Discusses materials used by dentists to restore teeth after decay has been removed. Shows how dental-material science is an interdisciplinary field in which chemistry plays a major part. Reviews the many developments polymer chemistry has contributed to the field of dental fillings. (CCM)

  5. The use of sub-ablative Er:YAG laser irradiation in prevention of dental caries during orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Brulat, Nathalie; Milia, Giulia; Rockl, Andrea; Rocca, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This « in-vitro » study had two specific aims: the first, to test using a universal testing machine whether sub-ablative Er:YAG laser irradiation prior to acid etching is effective in orthodontic bracket bonding and secondly using micro-hardness measurements and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observations to investigate the effectiveness of de-mineralization reduction in enamel treated with sub-ablative Er:YAG laser irradiation followed by fluoride varnish application. Materials and Methods: One hundred and eighty bovine permanent maxillary incisors were selected for shear bond strength testing and microhardness measurements. Sub-ablative Er:YAG laser irradiation was set at a power density of 2.5 J/cm2, a frequency of 7 Hz and air/water spray. Brackets were bonded with an auto-curing resin paste. The shear bond strength was measured comparing laser irradiated and non-irradiated enamel surface, followed by SEM observation of the bracket-resin-enamel interface. Microhardness measurements were made on enamel samples before treatment, after samples preparation, and after demineralization. Results: While the adhesion of orthodontic brackets to bovine enamel after sub-ablative Er:YAG laser irradiation and acid etching is comparable to that obtained after conventional acid etching, the effect of laser irradiation associated with topical application of fluoride varnish increases the microhardness of enamel. Conclusion: Sub-ablative Er:YAG laser irradiation before the acid etching doesn't reduce the shear bond whereas when associated with fluoride application it may play a role in caries prevention. Further studies will be necessary to establish the mechanism by which the protective laser activated fluoride effect is achieved. PMID:25368443

  6. Dental Hygienist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

  7. Dental Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This curriculum guide, developed for use in dental assistant education programs in Michigan, describes a task-based curriculum that can help a teacher to develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. It is based on task analysis and reflects the skills, knowledge, and attitudes that employers expect entry-level dental

  8. Dental Disease Prevalence among Methamphetamine and Poly-drug Users in an Urban Setting: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Carolyn; Krishnan, Sumathi; Hursh, Kevin; Yu, Michelle; Johnson, Paul; Page, Kimberly; Shiboski, Caroline H.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objectives Rampant tooth decay has been reported among methamphetamine users. We investigated the prevalence of dental disease and associated risk behaviors in methamphetamine users compared to heroin users. Methods This pilot project is a cross-sectional study of an on-going cohort of young adult injection-drug users (IDUs) in San Francisco. An oral health questionnaire was administered by a research-assistant, and two dentists performed clinical examinations to record the Decayed-Missing-Filled-Surfaces (DMFS) index, presence of residual roots, the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index, and salivary hypofunction. Results The prevalence of dental disease among 58 young adult IDUs was strikingly high compared to the U.S. general population, however, there was no difference in the level of dental disease between the methamphetamine and heroin users in this study. The mean DMFS and number of decayed surfaces exceeded 28 in both groups. Conclusions While no difference in dental disease between methamphetamine and heroin users was detected, we found a high prevalence of caries and caries-associated behaviors in this sample of young adult IDUs. Clinical Implications Given the high level of dental disease observed in this population of young adult IDUs, one next step may be to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of providing low-intensity preventative measures (e.g., distribution of chlorhexidine rinses, xylitol gum, application of fluoride varnishes) through outreach workers. PMID:22942146

  9. Establishing a Dental Health Program on a College Campus--What Mix of Prevention, Education, and Emergency Care Services is Necessary?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmer, John G.

    1973-01-01

    With a new dental health program the hard financial support should come from three main sources: a portion of the compulsory student health fee, fees for restorative Services rendered, plus budgetary funds from the particular college involved. (Author/CB)

  10. Dental phobia among Saudis.

    PubMed

    al-Khodair, I; al-Balawi, S; al-Khamis, H; Marks, I

    1996-01-01

    This study compares dental fear and phobias among patients attending: (1) primary care dental clinics, or (2) specialist dental clinics, or (3) nondental clinics. Of 853 patients, 539 from dental clinics and 314 from nondental clinics were interviewed in a structured interview. Patients from primary dental clinics and from specialist dental clinics did not differ. However, nondental clinic patients had more dental phobia and more avoidance of dental clinics. Dental clinic patients had more chronic dental problems than did nondental clinic attenders. Dental phobia was much more common among women, whose onset age was younger than in men, and the phobia interfered greatly with dental care. Dental phobics had fainted more often during dental treatment, had more chronic dental problems, more family history of dental phobia, and more blood and specific phobias. Most of the dental phobics reported dental trauma before the fear started. PMID:9160615

  11. Utilization of dental care: An Indian outlook.

    PubMed

    Gambhir, Ramandeep Singh; Brar, Prabhleen; Singh, Gurminder; Sofat, Anjali; Kakar, Heena

    2013-07-01

    Oral health has a significant impact on the quality of life, appearance, and self-esteem of the people. Preventive dental visits help in the early detection and treatment of oral diseases. Dental care utilization can be defined as the percentage of the population who access dental services over a specified period of time. There are reports that dental patients only visit the dentist when in pain and never bother to return for follow-up in most cases. To improve oral health outcomes an adequate knowledge of the way the individuals use health services and the factors predictive of this behavior is essential. The interest in developing models explaining the utilization of dental services has increased; issues like dental anxiety, price, income, the distance a person had to travel to get care, and preference for preservation of teeth are treated as barriers in regular dental care. Published materials which pertain to the use of dental services by Indian population have been reviewed and analyzed in depth in the present study. Dental surgeons and dental health workers have to play an adequate role in facilitating public enlightenment that people may appreciate the need for regular dental care and make adequate and proper use of the available dental care facilities. PMID:24082719

  12. Tooth decay

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    N/A N/A (None; )

    2005-05-21

    Teeth can decay and break or fall out of the gum line if they become damaged. One way in which they can be damaged is if dental plaque builds up on teeth. Plaque consists mostly of bacteria, and these bacteria cause cavities to be made in teeth if they are not removed on a regular basis.

  13. 38 CFR 17.169 - VA Dental Insurance Program for veterans and survivors and dependents of veterans (VADIP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...coverage for the following dental care and services: (i) Diagnostic...Preventive services. (A) Dental prophylaxis. (B) Topical...services. (A) Palliative (emergency) treatment of dental pain. (B) Therapeutic...

  14. 38 CFR 17.169 - VA Dental Insurance Program for veterans and survivors and dependents of veterans (VADIP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...coverage for the following dental care and services: (i) Diagnostic...Preventive services. (A) Dental prophylaxis. (B) Topical...services. (A) Palliative (emergency) treatment of dental pain. (B) Therapeutic...

  15. Managing the anxious and phobic dental patient.

    PubMed

    Slovin, M

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses dental anxiety and phobia. The author presents background information, including incidence and etiology. A discussion of evaluative techniques for assessing anxiety levels follows. Examination and treatment planning are considered in relation to this patient's special needs. The article stresses behavioral treatment modalities that eliminate the debilitating phobia. In closing, the author presents practical information regarding prevention of dental phobia and the merits of incorporating this type of patient into a dental practice. PMID:9297959

  16. Aetna Dental Plan Dental Benefits Summary

    E-print Network

    Gordon, Geoffrey J.

    and prevailing charge limits, as determined by Aetna. Emergency Dental Care If you need emergency dental care for the palliative treatment (pain relieving, stabilizing) of a dental emergency, you are covered 24 hours a day, 7Aetna Dental Plan Dental Benefits Summary Active PPO With PPOII Network Participating Non

  17. Summary Comparison of UNM Dental Plan Options Benefit Period July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2014 Benefits administered by Delta Dental of New Mexico

    E-print Network

    New Mexico, University of

    Summary Comparison of UNM Dental Plan Options ­ Benefit Period July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2014 Benefits administered by Delta Dental of New Mexico High Option Low Option Featuring Delta Dental Premier Featuring Delta Dental PPO The Plan Pays You Pay The Plan Pays You Pay Diagnostic and Preventive Services

  18. Summary Comparison of UNM Dental Plan Options Benefit Period July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2012 Benefits administered by Delta Dental of New Mexico

    E-print Network

    New Mexico, University of

    Summary Comparison of UNM Dental Plan Options ­ Benefit Period July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2012 Benefits administered by Delta Dental of New Mexico High Option Low Option Featuring Delta Dental Premier® Featuring Delta Dental PPOSM The Plan Pays You Pay The Plan Pays You Pay Diagnostic and Preventive Services

  19. Summary Comparison of UNM Dental Plan Options Benefit Period July 1, 2012 through June 30, 2013 Benefits administered by Delta Dental of New Mexico

    E-print Network

    New Mexico, University of

    Summary Comparison of UNM Dental Plan Options ­ Benefit Period July 1, 2012 through June 30, 2013 Benefits administered by Delta Dental of New Mexico High Option Low Option Featuring Delta Dental Premier® Featuring Delta Dental PPOSM The Plan Pays You Pay The Plan Pays You Pay Diagnostic and Preventive Services

  20. Dental disease and periprosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Young, Heather; Hirsh, Joel; Hammerberg, E Mark; Price, Connie S

    2014-01-15

    ? The number of patients with end-stage osteoarthritis is increasing, and treatment with hip and knee arthroplasty is expected to increase over the next several decades. ? Dental disease has long been anecdotally associated with increased periprosthetic joint infections, although case-control studies do not support this relationship. ? While most recent guidelines for the prevention of endocarditis have favored treatment of fewer patients, the most recent recommendations for prevention of periprosthetic joint infection have increased the number of patients who would receive antibiotics before a dental procedure. ? Antibiotics given before a dental procedure decrease the risk of bacteremia from the oral cavity, but this is of uncertain clinical importance. ? The number of patients who would require antibiotics before dental procedures to prevent one periprosthetic joint infection greatly outnumbers the number of patients who would experience an adverse event associated with antibiotics given before a dental procedure. PMID:24430417

  1. Diagnostic Levels in Dental Public Health Planning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amid Ismail

    2004-01-01

    This concept paper discusses the rationale for using different diagnostic criteria for dental caries in public health programs. The author contends that epidemiological data or needs assessment surveys should collect data to provide information on the epidemiology of different stages of the caries process in order to enable planners to design tailored programs to prevent dental caries. In a rapidly

  2. Planning an Education Program for Dental Hygienists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Harry W.; And Others

    Intended for adaptation to local situations, the handbook was prepared to assist interested groups to determine whether a dental hygiene educational program is needed and feasible, and to supply basic guidelines for planning. The introduction deals with dental hygiene in preventive dentistry and the historical development of educational programs.…

  3. A Longitudinal Evaluation of Fissure Sealants Applied in Dental Practices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. I. Ismail; P. Gagnon

    1995-01-01

    Sealants are highly effective in preventing dental caries in the pits and fissures of teeth when applied by trained operators in clinical trials and public health programs. The effectiveness of fissure sealants when applied in dental practices is still not known. The purpose of this longitudinal study was to evaluate the effectiveness of fissure sealants applied in dental practices in

  4. dentAl hygiene College of Rural and Community Development

    E-print Network

    Hartman, Chris

    dentAl hygiene College of Rural and Community Development Community and Technical College 907 The registered dental hygienist is a licensed oral health educator and clinical operator who uses preventive. The dental hygiene AAS degree is a three-year program with one year of prerequisite science and general

  5. The Emergency Dental Service at Southern Illinois University/Carbondale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cittadino, Dominic; Morgan, Frederic

    1980-01-01

    The main emphasis of Southern Illinois University's Student Emergency Dental Service is to treat patients with dental-related disorders of an emergency nature. Its other purpose is to help raise the level of dental knowledge among the student population so as to prevent the emergency situations from occurring. (Authors/CJ)

  6. First Aid for Sports-Related Dental Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castaldi, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    Sports-related dental injuries are common but first aid is usually performed by non-dental personnel. This article describes basic procedures to be followed in order to diagnose the type and severity of the injury and to determine whether emergency treatment is required. Prevention of dental injuries is addressed. (Author/MT)

  7. Medicaid: Extent of Dental Disease in Children Has Not Decreased, and Millions Are Estimated to Have Untreated Tooth Decay. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-08-1121

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosgrove, James C.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, concerns have been raised about the adequacy of dental care for low-income children. Attention to this subject became more acute due to the widely publicized case of Deamonte Driver, a 12-year-old boy who died as a result of an untreated infected tooth that led to a fatal brain infection. Deamonte had health coverage through…

  8. The Five-Year Effectiveness of the Texas First Dental Home Program

    E-print Network

    McFarland, Taylor BH

    2014-08-06

    This study examined the Texas Medicaid First Dental Home (FDH) program in rural and urban private pediatric dental practice settings and evaluated its five-year impact on caries severity, age of onset of decay, and treatment location. Comparisons...

  9. MedLinePlus: Dental Health

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Drawing on the very fine resources of the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health, this particular section of the MedLine Plus website provides a number of high-quality resources dealing with the area of dental health. Dental practitioners, students in the field, and the general web-browsing public will want to look at the content guide on the left-hand side of the homepage for starters. Here, they can quickly locate areas of specific interest, including prevention, nutrition, and specific conditions dealing with dental health. This guide to the siteâ??s dental health materials is complemented nicely by a â??Latest Newsâ?ť feature, which includes reports from a variety of dental health organizations and news wire services. Finally, visitors can also use their built-in â??Go Localâ?ť search engine feature to learn about services and providers for dental health in their particular geographic locale.

  10. Dental Caries Experience and Use of Dental Services among Brazilian Prisoners

    PubMed Central

    Leite Cavalcanti, Alessandro; Araujo Rodrigues, Iris Sant´Anna; de Melo Silveira, Ingrid Thays; Sarmento de Oliveira, Thaliny Batista; de Almeida Pinto, Magaly Suenya; Cabral Xavier, Alidianne Fabia; Dias de Castro, Ricardo; Nascimento Padilha, Wilton Wilney

    2014-01-01

    This ross-sectional study involving 127 male prisoners evaluates the use of dental services and dental caries among Brazilian inmates. Data were collected by interview and clinical examination. Sociodemographic and sentencing information as well as use of dental services, self-reported dental morbidity, self-perception, and oral health impacts were investigated. The mean DMFT index value was 19.72. Of the components, the decayed component showed the highest mean value (11.06 ± 5.37). Statistically significant association was found between DMFTs with values from 22 to 32 and oral health satisfaction (p = 0.002), difficulty speaking (p = 0.024), shame of talking (p = 0.004) and smiling (p < 0.001). Regarding the use of dental services, 80% had their last dental appointment less than one year ago, with most visits occurring in prison (80%), with restorative treatment (32%), followed by dental pain (26.4%), being the main reasons for such appointments. Most prisoners used dental services provided by the prison. Although restorative treatment has been the main reason for the use of dental services, “decayed” and “missing” components contributed to the high mean DMFT index. PMID:25429680

  11. Symposium on Dental Health Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Lawrence W., Ed.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    This document presents papers, critiques, and comments from a symposium which assessed the current status of preventive dental behavior. The field was divided into the following three major areas: (a) mass media programs, (b) school health programs, and (c) effect of the private practitioner. Each author was asked to review the literature, provide…

  12. Dental Surgery in Anticoagulated Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael J. Wahl

    1998-01-01

    ontinuous oral anticoagulant therapy has been used to decrease the risk of thrombo- embolism for more than half a century, prolonging the lives of thousands of patients. Many physicians recommend interrupting continuous anticoagulant therapy for den- tal surgery to prevent hemorrhage. In reviewing the available literature, there are no well-documented cases of serious bleeding problems from dental surgery in patients

  13. Dental Hygienists

    MedlinePLUS

    ... number of patients who have access to health insurance. People with new or expanded dental insurance coverage will be more likely to visit a ... in employment from 2012 to 2022. The average growth rate for all occupations is 11 ... of education that most workers need to enter this occupation.

  14. Minority Participation in a School-Based Randomized Clinical Trial of Tooth Decay Prevention in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Milgrom, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To describe the strategies--based on the social triad concept of a partnership of researchers, school personnel and community-- employed to recruit low-income, minority parent/caregivers of kindergarten children into a school-based tooth decay prevention trial in the United States. Methods The study site was an urban school district with five elementary schools. Recruitment was carried out once each year for three years. Recruitment involved strategies at the school district, school, classroom, and student-parent level. A coalition of researchers, school personnel and community individuals was established for communication and recruitment. Outreach workers from the community were hired to promote, recruit, and disseminate oral health information. Study promotion included both print materials (logos, flyers, pictorial story boards) and presentations at school and community events. Results The School District Superintendent and administrators approved the study, and all five school principals and kindergarten teachers participated. All children within the classrooms were eligible: the overall participation rate of was 86% (580/672). Community outreach workers actively facilitated the recruitment and participants were recruited at open house for parent-teacher meeting (37% of all participants), sending letters and consent forms home (31%), at a prearranged convenient time during drop off and pick up of the child at their respective schools (30%), curriculum nights and health fairs (2%). Conclusion Utilizing the social triad concept led to success in planning and carrying out the recruitment of predominantly minority school children with high participation rates. PMID:21986390

  15. Wig1 prevents cellular senescence by regulating p21 mRNA decay through control of RISC recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong Cho; Lee, Hyung Chul; Lee, Je-Jung; Choi, Chang-Min; Kim, Dong-Kwan; Lee, Jae Cheol; Ko, Young-Gyu; Lee, Jae-Seon

    2012-01-01

    Premature senescence, a key strategy used to suppress carcinogenesis, can be driven by p53/p21 proteins in response to various stresses. Here, we demonstrate that Wig1 plays a critical role in this process through regulation of p21 mRNA stability. Wig1 controls the association of Argonaute2 (Ago2), a central component of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), with target p21 mRNA via binding of the stem-loop structure near the microRNA (miRNA) target site. Depletion of Wig1 prohibited miRNA-mediated p21 mRNA decay and resulted in premature senescence. Wig1 plays an essential role in cell proliferation, as demonstrated in tumour xenografts in mice, and Wig1 and p21 mRNA levels are inversely correlated in human normal and cancer tissues. Together, our data indicate a novel role of Wig1 in RISC target accessibility, which is a key step in RNA-mediated gene silencing. In addition, these findings indicate that fine-tuning of p21 levels by Wig1 is essential for the prevention of cellular senescence. PMID:23085987

  16. Dental Training Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    This dental training films catalog is organized into two sections. Section I is a category listing of the films by number and title, indexed according to generalized headings; categories are as follow: anatomy, articulator systems, complete dentures, dental assisting, dental laboratory technology, dental materials, dental office emergencies,…

  17. From Public Mental Health to Community Oral Health: The Impact of Dental Anxiety and Fear on Dental Status

    PubMed Central

    Crego, Antonio; Carrillo-Díaz, María; Armfield, Jason M.; Romero, Martín

    2014-01-01

    Dental fear is a widely experienced problem. Through a “vicious cycle dynamic,” fear of dental treatment, lower use of dental services, and oral health diseases reinforce each other. Research on the antecedents of dental anxiety could help to break this cycle, providing useful knowledge to design effective community programs aimed at preventing dental fear and its oral health-related consequences. In this regard, frameworks that analyze the interplay between cognitive and psychosocial determinants of fear, such as the Cognitive Vulnerability Model, are promising. The onset of dental fear often occurs in childhood, so focusing on the child population could greatly contribute to understanding dental fear mechanisms and prevent this problem extending into adulthood. Not only can public mental health contribute to population health, but also community dentistry programs can help to prevent dental fear. Regular dental visits seem to act in a prophylactic way, with dental professionals playing an important role in the regulation of the patients’ anxiety-related responses. Both public mental health and community dentistry could therefore benefit from a multidisciplinary approach to dental fear and oral health. PMID:24616889

  18. Dental Anxiety and Phobia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... about going to the dentist. For those with dental phobia, however, the thought of a dental visit is ... a specific activity, object or situation. People with dental phobia often put off routine care for years or ...

  19. Prevalence of dental caries and periodontal disease in Mexican American children aged 5 to 17 years: results from southwestern HHANES, 1982-83. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, A L; Burt, B A; Brunelle, J A

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the estimated prevalence of dental caries and periodontal disease in 2,550 children, 5 through 17 years of age, who resided in five southwestern states of the United States and were examined in the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HHANES) of 1982-84 of the National Center for Health Statistics. Dental caries in the Mexican American children was predominantly a disease of occlusal surfaces of molars; few smooth surfaces of posterior and anterior teeth were affected by caries. This intra-oral distribution of dental caries strongly supports the use of fissure sealants as a preventive procedure. Filled tooth surfaces contributed about 66 per cent of the total DMFS (decayed, missing, filled surfaces) scores. The analysis also shows that about 50 per cent of the 17 year old Mexican Americans had five or more filled or decayed teeth. Mild gingivitis was prevalent (76.9 per cent) in the Mexican American children. PMID:3605476

  20. Application of hypno-dissociative strategies during dental treatment of patients with severe dental phobia.

    PubMed

    Meyerson, Joseph; Uziel, Nir

    2014-01-01

    Dental phobia is a well-known condition that may prevent patients from receiving adequate dental care. Dentists offer varied methods to help their patients overcome their phobic reactions and to enable them to proceed with needed dental treatment. These methods include diverse medical and behavioral interventions that are generally intended to regulate physiological, behavioral, cognitive, and emotional expressions of stress. Some patients with severe dental phobia together with actual or assumed traumatic background are only minimally responsive to these stress management procedures. The authors propose hypnotically induced dissociative strategies as a model of intervention for this category of dental phobic patients. The proposed model can help reduce or even suspend symptomatic behavior during dental treatment. PMID:24568324

  1. Dental Fear among Medical and Dental Undergraduates

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, H.; Razak, I. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht's Dental Fear Survey (DFS) questionnaire. Methods. Kleinknecht's DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates' of the University of Malaya. Results. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%). However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%). Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P = 0.004). “Heart beats faster” and “muscle being tensed” were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. “Drill” and “anesthetic needle” were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Conclusion. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services. PMID:25386615

  2. The sound of dental tissue ablation as a possible parameter for conservative dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles, Fábio Renato P.; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; Matos, Adriana Bona

    2007-02-01

    Studies in cariology have been struggling for the development of caries prevention techniques, precocious diagnoses of lesions, re-mineralization of incipient carious lesions and early restorative intervention with minimally invasive procedures. When removing caries, healthy dental structure is often removed inadvertently during its final phase, for being quite difficult to precise the limits between viable and decayed dental tissues clinically. With laser technologies, a subjective clinical hint, often used to indicate when tissue ablation should be stopped is that different sounds are perceptive whether in carious (bass) or in healthy (treble) dental structure; when sound produced by ablation turned treble it would mean that healthy tissue was reached. This study aims to classify those audio differences and to turn them into objective parameters for a conservative operative dentistry with minimally invasive tissue removal when using erbium lasers. Twenty freshly extracted human teeth were used (10 decayed and 10 sound teeth). Dentine was erbium laser irradiated under same parameters, distance and refrigeration and a mono directional microphone was set 10 cm far from the operative area in order to capture and record the ablation produced sounds when working either on carious or healthy dentine. Ten pulses per file were then analysed in a computer software (200 analyses). It was permitted to draw similarities among the patterns in each group (decayed and healthy teeth) as well as differences between decayed and healthy produced sounds. Audio analysis came out to be a technical reliable objective parameter to determine whether laser ablated dentine substrates are decayed or sound; therefore it can be proposed as a conservative parameter, avoiding unnecessary removal of healthy dentine and restricting it to carious one.

  3. Rx for caries prevention: time line for home care. A software aid for communication of patient instructions for management of dental caries.

    PubMed

    Newitter, D A; Meiers, J C; Kazemi, R B

    2002-01-01

    Treatment of a caries active patient requires the clinician to be knowledgeable in the restorative and risk management issues with which these patients often present. Modifications of risk factors that promote dental caries play an important part in the long-term restorative success in these patients. Patient compliance to recommendations addressing modifiable caries risk factors for maintenance of oral health is important to long-term caries risk management. Effective dentist-patient or hygienist-patient communication is a first step to encouraging a proactive role by the patient. Others have reported verbal communication accompanied by written communication to result in better compliance compared to verbal communication, alone (Tagliacozzo & Ima, 1970; MacDonald, MacDonald & Phoenix, 1977; Baker & others, 1991; Harvey & Plumridge, 1991; Vukmir & others, 1993; Makoul, Arntson & Schofield, 1995). Further evidence shows that medical patients who misunderstand their treatment plans and associated instructions usually exhibit poor compliance to following directions (Cargil, 1992; Counsell, Geddis & Smith, 1993; Vukmir & others, 1993; Makoul & others, 1995; Mayeaux & others, 1996). Computer-generated (printed) instructions were shown to significantly increase compliance to emergency room instructions when compared to verbal or verbal + hand-written instructions (Vukmir & others, 1993). Written instructions for use in management of dental caries have not been widely addressed in the literature (Fuller & Harding, 1991; Benn & others, 1997). This report presents a novel computer-generated, graphic approach to written communication that recognizes the patient's need to be reminded that home care consists of daily cyclic events. The objective of this approach is to promote communication with and comprehension by a wider population range than what might be affected by text-only instructions. The software for this method is pre-loaded with recommendations that can be modified by the dentist or hygienist and can be easily adapted as part of a comprehensive disease management program used in the office. PMID:11931140

  4. Wireless sensor networks evaluation for heritage monitoring; in the development of decay detecting techniques for a preventive conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inmaculada Martínez Garrido, María; Fort, Rafael

    2014-05-01

    Monitoring systems using sensor techniques are widely used in the field of cultural heritage. In recent decades, the use of monitoring techniques involving sensors has been evolving in a wide way, because of the increasing importance they have in the observation of decay phenomena in order to establish predictive strategies to promote a preventive conservation. Wireless sensor networks, formed by a group of sensors nodes or monitoring points which have wireless communication, allow us a great number of nonexistent advantages until now since they have an easier way of installation, maintenance and fault detection versus wired networks previously used, with the costs reduction and the increase of reliability in measurement systems that this fact entails. To assess the suitability of wireless sensor networks it is necessary to take into account many factors since heritage is a very demanding field. This paper evaluates the quality of communications in various deployments of heritage interest, both architectural and natural heritage, of a competitive wireless sensor networks platform which has been subjected to different conditions of range in demanding monitoring environments. To measure the communication quality, multiple parameters for the characterization of the received signal and the links were taken into account, such as the RSSI, which measures the power level of the received signal and the percentage of correctly received messages, among others. Additionally, it will be also of relevance to achieve a long-term and low energy monitoring, since measured parameters do not undergo significant variations in short periods of study, so that the evaluation includes energy and consumption aspects of wireless sensor networks systems, establishing a final assessment methodology for this type of technology applied to the heritage monitoring field. Furthermore some design software / hardware aspects are evaluated for an appropriate validation of the system from the point of view of the end user. Research funded by Geomateriales (S2009/MAT-16), projects CGL2010-19554 and CGL2011-27902. M.I. Martínez-Garrido has been supported by a PICATA predoctoral fellowship of the Moncloa Campus of International Excellence (UPM-UCM, CSIC).

  5. Delta Dental PPO Our national

    E-print Network

    Daly, Samantha

    Delta Dental PPO Our national Point-of-Service program University of Michigan Dental Plan Welcome! Delta Dental Plan of Michigan, Inc. is a nonprofit dental care corporation, doing business as Delta Dental of Michigan. Delta Dental of Michigan is the state's dental benefits specialist. Good oral health

  6. 75 FR 16511 - Pentron Clinical Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ...firm. The workers produce dental materials such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives...a shift in production of dental materials such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental...

  7. Clinically Determined and Self-Reported Dental Caries Status During and After Pregnancy Among Low-Income Hispanic Women

    PubMed Central

    Weintraub, Jane A.; Gansky, Stuart A.; Santo, William; Ramos-Gomez, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This analysis assessed, during and one-year after pregnancy: 1) the prevalence of and relationship between self-reported and clinically determined dental caries and oral health status, and whether self-reports are a potential proxy for professional determination; 2) factors associated with high levels of professionally determined or self-reported oral disease. Methods Data are from a randomized clinical trial of 301 pregnant, low-income Hispanic women at the California-Mexico border to compare two interventions to prevent early childhood caries. Interviews and dental examinations were conducted at enrollment (second trimester) and one-year post-partum (PP). Results During pregnancy and PP, 93% had untreated caries and most had gingival inflammation. Sensitivity and specificity of self-reported measures compared to dentists’ determinations were modest (ranging from 45–80% for sensitivity and 41–77% for specificity at both time points); positive predictive values for women reporting current tooth decay or fair/poor oral health were high (>94%), but negative predictive values were low (<23%). In a bivariate GEE model, factors associated with fair/poor self-reported oral health during and after pregnancy included self-reported dental symptoms (current tooth decay, bleeding gums without brushing), dental behaviors (not flossing) and number of decayed tooth surfaces. In a logistic regression model, the only significant factor PP associated with less extensive untreated disease was if women ever had their teeth cleaned professionally (OR=0.44). Conclusions There is a great need for dental treatment in this underserved population both during pregnancy and PP. Women may not be able to accurately recognize or act on their treatment needs. At baseline and PP, few demographic or behavioral factors were associated with either self-reported or clinically-determined oral disease (e.g., being less educated or acculturated and not flossing) in the bivariate analyses. Ever having a professional teeth cleaning significantly predicted less disease PP. PMID:23889689

  8. Dental utilization for adult Medicaid enrollees having intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD)

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Jane M.; Kuthy, Raymond A.; Momany, Elizabeth T.; Chi, Donald L.; Bacon, Robert A.; Lindgren, Scott D.; Askelson, Natoshia M.; Damiano, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine dental utilization and type of dental services for Medicaid enrolled adults identified as having intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Methods Using Iowa claims data, identified adults who met any of five IDD criteria for inclusion during calendar year 2005. Service utilization rates, including use of preventive dental, routine restorative, and complex restorative services, were determined. Results Approximately 60% of adults with IDD had at least one dental visit in 2005. Of adults with at least one dental visit, 83% received a preventive service, 31% a routine restorative service, and 16% a complex dental service. Those age 65 and older had fewer preventive dental services than other age groups. Conclusion In Iowa, dental utilization for adults 22-64 years of age with IDD was reasonably high (64%) in 2005, but individuals over age 65 had lower utilization (45%). PMID:21235610

  9. Dental education in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Jorge A.; Pulido, Jairo H. Ternera; Núńez, Jaime A. Castro; Bird, William F.; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    This article describes Colombia's development of formal dentistry, its dental school system, curriculum, and dental licensure, and current issues in oral health care. In 1969, there were only 4 dental schools in Colombia; at this writing there are 21. Five dental schools are public and the other 16 are private. Nearly all classes are conducted in Spanish. Undergraduate pre-dental coursework is not a prerequisite for dental school in Colombia. To obtain licensure, Colombian dental students must complete 5 years of study in dental school, earn a diploma, and work for the government for 1 year. There are approximately 41,400 dentists in Colombia, and the number is increasing quickly. However, the unemployment rate among dentists is very high, even though graduation from dental school is extremely difficult. Although the 1,100:1 ratio of citizens to dentists is considered satisfactory, access to dental care is limited due to the high rate of poverty. PMID:20339245

  10. The utilization of dental hygiene students in school-based dental sealant programs.

    PubMed

    Miller, Faith Y

    2005-01-01

    Early detection of childhood caries is important to childrens' overall health. Untreated childhood caries can lead to pain, as in abscesses from prolonged neglect; altered dietary intake; and delays in the development of the permanent teeth if the primary teeth are prematurely lost. In the summer of 2000, funds were provided to various oral health care provider organizations by the Illinois Department of Public Health, Division of Oral Health, to purchase portable equipment to deliver preventive services (i.e., exams, sealants, and oral hygiene education) to second-grade and sixth-grade children who qualified for Medicaid and/or free and reduced-cost lunch programs. The Dental Sealant Grant Program at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale was a unique program that utilized dental hygiene students as the primary human resource. Within the state, the Dental Sealant Grant Program was, at the time of this report, the only grantee sponsored by a stand-alone dental hygiene program (not affiliated with a dental school). Other positive aspects of the dental hygiene-sponsored sealant program were that the supervising dentist was the primary Medicaid provider and a member of the dental hygiene faculty; dental hygiene faculty participated actively as site coordinators and clinicians; and dental hygiene students were given the opportunity to volunteer for the program as a service-learning option. PMID:16297312

  11. Bienvenidos a Columbia Dental: En Columbia Dental estamos comprometidos en proveerle con cuidado dental de altura.

    E-print Network

    Grishok, Alla

    departamentos especializados, incluyendo Implantes Dentales. Su primera cita en Columbia Dental será con unBienvenidos a Columbia Dental: En Columbia Dental estamos comprometidos en proveerle con cuidado dental de altura. Columbia Dental le ofrece una amplia variedad de servicios dentales en todos nuestros

  12. Meth mouth severity in response to drug-use patterns and dental access in methamphetamine users.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ronni E; Morisky, Donald E; Silverstein, Steven J

    2013-06-01

    Meth mouth is the rapid development of tooth decay in methamphetamine users. Our study questioned whether drug-use patterns and dental care access are risk factors affecting the severity of meth mouth. Participants received dental examinations, and the number of decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) were counted and used to measure meth mouth severity. PMID:23875434

  13. Dental management of patients with epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Da?, Canan; Bezgin, Tu?ba; Özalp, Nurhan

    2014-09-01

    Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB) is a group of rare, genetic skin disorders characterized by fragility and blistering to minimal trauma. All oral surfaces may be involved, including the tongue, buccal mucosa, palate, floor of the mouth and gingiva. Common oral findings of the disease include microstomia, intraoral ulcerations and bullae formation, ankyloglossia, tongue atrophy, elimination of buccal and vestibular sulci, lingual depapillation and atrophy of the palatal folds. In these case reports; systemic findings, oral manifestations and preventive measures are described for 3 patients with EB, all of whom required extensive oral management. Early dental management and preventive care to minimize caries development and improve oral health is very important for patients with EB. Pediatric dentists play an especially important role in early intervention. In describing the dental management of three EB cases, this article stresses the importance of an aggressive dental preventive programme with strict oral hygiene instructions for patients and parents along with frequent professional cleaning and fluoride therapy. PMID:25284524

  14. Emerging technologies for diagnosis of dental caries: The road so far

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaechi, Bennett T.

    2009-05-01

    It is now universally recognized that the development of new technologies for early detection and quantitative monitoring of dental decay at an early stage of formation could provide health and economic benefits ranging from timely preventive interventions to reduction in the time required for clinical trials of anticaries agents. The use of technologies as adjunct to clinical visual examination for caries diagnosis will facilitate preventive care in dentistry to lower treatment cost as well as reduce the cost and time for testing potential anticaries agents. This article describes the various technologies available to aid the dental practitioners in detecting dental caries at the earliest stage of its formation, assessing the activities of the detected carious lesion, and quantitatively or qualitatively monitoring of the lesion over time. The need and the importance of these technologies were also discussed. The data discussed are primarily based on published scientific studies and reviews from case reports, clinical trials, and in vitro and in vivo studies. References have been traced manually by MEDLINE® or through manufacturer's websites. While some of the devices are fully developed and commercially available, others are still under development. The devices vary in their modes of action as well as their capability as caries diagnostic aids. It is clear that the differences in caries presentations and behavior in different anatomical sites make it unlikely that any one diagnostic modality will have adequate sensitivity and specificity of detection of carious lesions for all sites; a combination of diagnostic tools will help us diagnose lesions earlier and detect failing restorations sooner, all to avoid more costly, destructive dental procedures and truly take dentistry into the preventive rather than the reactive mode.

  15. 21 CFR 872.6390 - Dental floss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Dental floss is a string-like device made of cotton or other fibers intended to remove plaque and food particles from between the teeth to reduce tooth decay. The fibers of the device may be coated with wax for easier...

  16. 21 CFR 872.6390 - Dental floss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Dental floss is a string-like device made of cotton or other fibers intended to remove plaque and food particles from between the teeth to reduce tooth decay. The fibers of the device may be coated with wax for easier...

  17. Dental School Research Strategy 2014

    E-print Network

    Guo, Zaoyang

    Dental School Research Strategy 2014 www.glasgow.ac.uk/schools/dental/ #12;#12;Dental SchoolInternationalisationagendathroughthedevelopmentofglobal collaborationsandrecruitmentofoverseaspostgraduateresearchstudents. The Dental School research strategy and activity will be delivered by two subgroups: · Community

  18. Dental / Dental Hygiene Academic Community Outreach Product Request Form

    E-print Network

    Dennett, Daniel

    Dental / Dental Hygiene Academic Community Outreach Product Request Form Thank you involve dental and/or dental hygiene students providing oral health education. The projects must, additional names: Select One: Student Faculty Other: Select One: Dental School Dental Hygiene School Other

  19. The relationship of dental caries and dental fear in Malaysian adolescents: a latent variable approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To investigate the role of geography (place of residence) as a moderator in the relationship between dental caries disease and treatment experience and dental fear in 16-year-olds living in Malaysia. Methods A multi-stage-stratified sampling method was employed. Five hundred and three, 16-year-olds from 6 government secondary schools participated in this study. The questionnaire examined participants’ demographic profile and assessed their dental fear using the Dental Fear Survey (DFS). The clinical examination consisted of the DMFT as the outcome measure of dental caries disease and treatment experience by a single examiner (ICC?=?0.98). Structural equation modelling inspected the relationship between dental fear and dental caries disease and treatment experience. Results The mean DMFT was 2.76 (SD 3.25). The DT, MT and FT components were 0.64 (SD 1.25), 0.14 (SD 0.56) and 1.98 (SD 2.43) respectively. Rural compared with urban adolescents had significantly greater mean numbers of decayed and missing teeth. The mean DFS score was 40.8 (SD 12.4). Rural compared with urban adolescents had significantly higher mean scores for physical symptoms of dental fear. The correlation between dental fear (DFS) and dental caries disease and treatment experience (DMFT) was 0.29, p?dental caries disease and treatment experience. The strength of the relationship between dental fear and dental caries disease and treatment experience varied in accordance with place of residence. Conclusion In conclusion a relationship between dental fear and dental caries disease and treatment experience was shown to exist in 16-year-old adolescents living in Malaysia. This study showed that the rural–urban dichotomy acted as a moderator upon this relationship. PMID:24621226

  20. Mechanistic Aspects of the Interactions Between Fluoride and Dental Enamel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. ten Cate; J. D. B. Featherstone

    1991-01-01

    For many years after the discovery of its caries preventive effect, fluoride was thought to be primarily active by lowering the solubility of the apatitic mineral phase of the dental hard tissues. Recent findings have shed new light on the mechanisms by which fluoride inhibits or delays dental caries. Fluoride present in the oral fluids alters the rate of the

  1. 78 FR 45934 - The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Strategic Plan Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ...advancing oral health. To inform...advancing dental, oral, and craniofacial...on dental, oral, and craniofacial...leap in the care of dental, oral, and craniofacial...prevent, diagnose and manage...craniofacial diseases and disorders...the public health. (7)...

  2. dental materials 2 5 ( 2 0 0 9 ) 520525 available at www.sciencedirect.com

    E-print Network

    Ritchie, Robert

    dental materials 2 5 ( 2 0 0 9 ) 520­525 available at www.sciencedirect.com journal homepage: www. Manesh, R.O. Ritchieb , Daniel Frieda a Department of Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences strength of dentin. © 2008 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1

  3. Pit and fissure sealants in dental public health – application criteria and general policy in Finland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sari Kervanto-Seppälä; Ilpo Pietilä; Jukka H Meurman; Eero Kerosuo

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pit and fissure sealants (sealants) are widely used as a non-operative preventive method in public dental health in Finland. Most children under 19 years of age attend the community-organized dental health services free of charge. The aims of this study were to find out to what extent sealants were applied, what the attitudes of dental professionals towards sealant application

  4. Supporting dental registrants in difficulty.

    PubMed

    Pearce, M; Agius, S J; Macfarlane, J; Taylor, N

    2015-02-27

    Over the past few years there has been a significant increase in the number of dentists and dental care professionals (registrants) having conditions placed on their practice either by the General Dental Council or NHS area teams. There are a number of reasons for this including the fact that patients complain more often, colleagues are now expected to alert the authorities if poor practice is detected and the demographics of the dental profession in the UK are changing. Steps have already been taken to prevent dentists getting into difficulty, such as the development of requirements for continued professional development by the GDC and past initiatives at a local level set up to assist dentist in difficulty. The regional offices of Health Education England and equivalent organisations in Wales and Scotland assist registrants in difficulty in meeting these conditions. Little published research has been carried out into this important service which has had to develop rapidly over the past few years. There is a need to investigate the current service, the views of those dental professionals being assisted and those providing the support to inform the further development of the service. This paper provides an introduction to a planned series of research papers reporting on our investigation into the service provided by HEE teams. PMID:25720912

  5. A test of Berggren's model of dental fear and anxiety.

    PubMed

    De Jongh, A; Schutjes, M; Aartman, I H A

    2011-10-01

    Berggren's (1984) model of dental fear and anxiety predicts that dentally anxious individuals postpone treatment, leading to a deteriorating dental state and subsequently to fear of negative evaluations in relation to their oral condition. The present study aimed to test one of the core assumptions of this model, namely that deterioration of dental health status would mediate the effects of avoidance of dental care on self-reported fear of negative evaluation. Participants were 73 patients (mean age 38.5 yr) meeting the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders - 4th edn - Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) criteria of dental phobia. Variables in the theoretical model were operationalized with multiple measures. A series of Sobel tests indicated that mediation was present for the relationship between years of avoidance and fear of negative self-evaluation when dental health status was based on the assessment of dentists or patients' opinion of their own dental state, but not when dental health status was operationalized as decayed, missing or filled surfaces (DMFS). Although the findings are supportive of Berggren's model, other causal pathways that contribute to the perpetuation of anxiety and fear still need to be tested. The results suggest that individuals with high levels of dental anxiety would particularly benefit from interventions specifically designed to break their avoidance pattern. PMID:21896052

  6. 75 FR 33169 - Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ...Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation of Special Controls for Dental Amalgam, Mercury, and Amalgam Alloy; Technical Amendment...class II device, reclassified dental mercury from class I to class II, and...

  7. Dental Auxiliary Occupations. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, Richard D.

    As part of a dental auxiliaries project, a Dental Auxiliary National Technical Advisory Committee was established, and its major undertaking was to assist in the development of a functional inventory for each of the three dental auxiliary occupations (dental assisting, dental hygiene, and dental laboratory technology). The analysis consisted of…

  8. Simple Steps to Better Dental Health

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Simple Steps to Better Dental Health is a joint project of the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine and the health insurance company, Aetna. The site serves as "an independent consumer dental portal," offering loads of nicely presented Web pages on just about anything youâ??d ever want to know about dental health. The content falls into three main sections: Prevent Problems, Understanding Conditions, and Explore Treatments. The site is bursting with interactive tools and easy-to-understand diagrams, and also includes a section just for kids. From head and neck anatomy to cosmetic dentistry to your basic cavity, this Web site is a fantastically comprehensive resource that would be worth bookmarking for future reference.

  9. Dental Applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Weigl; Anton Kasenbacher; Kristian Werelius

    In dentistry the specific interactions between ultrashort laser pulses and enamel\\/dentin of a tooth [1] or ceramic restoration materials [2] are advantageous due to minimal collateral damage. The femtosecond laser beam can be used as a tool to remove either decayed enamel\\/dentin – also named caries – or as a tool to remove ceramic from a bulk until the shape of an all-ceramic restoration is left.

  10. Innovations in dental care delivery for the older adult.

    PubMed

    Bethel, Lynn Ann; Kim, Esther E; Seitz, Charles M; Swann, Brian J

    2014-10-01

    Access to and reducing disparities in oral health for older adults is a complex problem that requires innovative strategies. In addition to offering dental services in alternative settings, such as senior centers, places that are familiar to older adults, and where physical limitations can be better accommodated, alternatives to the traditional provider should be considered. Many states are changing laws and practice acts to allow dental hygienists to provide preventive services without the supervision of a dentist. Also, collaborations between dental and non-dental professionals can be a successful strategy for increasing access to oral health care for this high-risk population. PMID:25201546

  11. Accessibility to dental services 

    E-print Network

    Evenden, Craig Andrew

    2007-08-15

    Background: Access to dental care has become a key focus for Government officials in Scotland. Newton et al. (2004) note that the White Paper ‘Towards a healthier Scotland’ (The Scottish Office Department of Health, 1999), identifies dental health...

  12. Finding Dental Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings Loan Repayment Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – ...

  13. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    MedlinePLUS

    ... documents in the Related Resources section. Why is mercury used in dental amalgam? Approximately half of a ... about bioaccumulation, please see Related Resources. Is the mercury in dental amalgam the same as the mercury ...

  14. Dental Care in Scleroderma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... M. Leader, DMD of the Department of General Dentistry atTufts University School of Dental Medicine, for his ... M. Leader, DMD of the Department of General Dentistry atTufts University School of Dental Medicine, for his ...

  15. Dental Health in TSC

    MedlinePLUS

    ... may need sedation or extra behavioral care. Hospital dentistry is also an option if a patient cannot ... American Dental Association , the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry at and your state dental society are good ...

  16. Dental education in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Razak, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Bird, William F

    2007-12-01

    There was only one dental school in Malaysia until 1997 but five new schools have been established since 1998. This review provides information about dental education in Malaysia including; the history of dental education, the current dental school system and curriculum, and dental licensure. There are four public and two private dental schools in Malaysia. High school graduates are required to take the nationwide matriculation entrance examination or the Higher School Certificate (HSC) to apply for a dental degree programme. A five-year dental programme leads to the BDS or the DDS degree. National or state examinations are not required to practise dentistry. Currently, there are approximately 2,500 dentists, with a ratio of 1 dentist for every 10,000 people. PMID:18265775

  17. The Dental Plaque Microbiome in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Scott N.; Snesrud, Erik; Liu, Jia; Ong, Ana C.; Kilian, Mogens; Schork, Nicholas J.; Bretz, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Dental decay is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases worldwide. A variety of factors, including microbial, genetic, immunological, behavioral and environmental, interact to contribute to dental caries onset and development. Previous studies focused on the microbial basis for dental caries have identified species associated with both dental health and disease. The purpose of the current study was to improve our knowledge of the microbial species involved in dental caries and health by performing a comprehensive 16S rDNA profiling of the dental plaque microbiome of both caries-free and caries-active subjects. Analysis of over 50,000 nearly full-length 16S rDNA clones allowed the identification of 1,372 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the dental plaque microbiome. Approximately half of the OTUs were common to both caries-free and caries-active microbiomes and present at similar abundance. The majority of differences in OTU’s reflected very low abundance phylotypes. This survey allowed us to define the population structure of the dental plaque microbiome and to identify the microbial signatures associated with dental health and disease. The deep profiling of dental plaque allowed the identification of 87 phylotypes that are over-represented in either caries-free or caries-active subjects. Among these signatures, those associated with dental health outnumbered those associated with dental caries by nearly two-fold. A comparison of this data to other published studies indicate significant heterogeneity in study outcomes and suggest that novel approaches may be required to further define the signatures of dental caries onset and progression. PMID:23520516

  18. Gaps in Prevention and Treatment: Dental Care for Low-Income Children. New Federalism: National Survey of America's Families, Series B, No. B-15. Assessing the New Federalism: An Urban Institute Program To Assess Changing Social Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Genevieve M.; Ko, Grace; Ormond, Barbara A.

    Using estimates drawn from the 1997 National Survey of America's Families (NSAF), this brief examines variations in the receipt of dental care services and in unmet need for dental care across different subgroups of children aged 3 and over, both nationally and across 13 states. The NSAF is a household survey that provides information on more than…

  19. Dental Assisting Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiel, Sandra J.

    Compiled to introduce the dental assisting student to various techniques used in the dental office and to present theoretical information essential for the student's professional development, this laboratory guide consists of three units of instruction. The first unit is an introduction to dental assisting and contains five topics of study. The…

  20. Dental Materials BIOMATERIALS

    E-print Network

    Dental Materials BIOMATERIALS Our goal is to provide reference materials and clinically relevant measurement methods to facilitate a rational approach to dental materials design, thus enabling improvements in the clinical performance of dental materials. In particular, methods for determining long-term performance

  1. Dental Laboratory Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Air Force, Washington, DC.

    The Air Force dental laboratory technology manual is designed as a basic training text as well as a reference source for dental laboratory technicians, a specialty occupation concerned with the design, fabrication, and repair of dental prostheses. Numerous instructive diagrams and photographs are included throughout the manual. The comprehensive…

  2. DENTAL SCHOOL PLANNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GALAGAN, DONALD J.

    THIS DISCUSSION PRESENTS A COMPLETE PICTURE OF THE CURRENT STATE OF DENTAL EDUCATION WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR MEETING THE DEMANDS FOR DENTAL STAFF AND FACILITIES. THE AREAS INVESTIGATED ARE (1) OBJECTIVES IN DENTAL EDUCATION--COURSES, TEACHING MODES, INNOVATIONS IN CURRICULUM, COORDINATION OF BASIC AND CLINICAL INSTRUCTION, (2) FACILITY…

  3. Post-trial costs, clinical outcomes, and dental service utilization after a randomized clinical trial for caries control among Finnish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hietasalo, Pauliina; Seppä, Liisa; Niinimaa, Ahti; Kallio, Jouko; Lahti, Satu; Hausen, Hannu

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess post-trial treatment costs, clinical outcomes [decayed, missing or filled surfaces (DMFS) scores], and utilization of dental services among adolescents who had participated in a randomized clinical trial (RCT) in Pori, Finland, in 2001-2005. At baseline the children were 11-12 yr of age and had had at least one active initial caries lesion. The children in the experimental group (n = 250) had been exposed to multiple measures for caries control, while those in the control group (n = 247) had received standard dental care. During the post-trial period (2005-2008), all participants received the standard dental care offered in public dental clinics in Pori. In both groups the costs of treatment procedures and outcomes for the post-trial period were calculated for each adolescent. Information from patient records was available for 487 adolescents (former experimental n = 246, control n = 241). The mean total costs per adolescent were lower and the clinical outcome was better among the former experimental-group participants. The differences in mean costs between the groups were statistically significant for preventive and restorative procedures. The utilization of dental services was significantly more regular among the former experimental-group participants. PMID:20572860

  4. Association of dental and periodontal status with bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws. A retrospective case controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction To assess the association of oral hygiene, dental caries, and periodontal status with bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws. Material and methods A retrospective case-control study on 81 patients treated for neoplasms with bone metastases. Twenty-nine patients with bone necrosis and 52 controls treated with bisphosphonates were compared using the Oral Hygiene Index, Decay, Missing, Filled Teeth, Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs, and Residual Periodontal Bone. The null hypothesis stated that there was no difference in parameters of oral health between patients with and without bone necrosis. Differences of means of above-mentioned variables were compared between the groups with Student's t-test or Mann-Whitney rank sum test and ?2 test. Value of p ? 0.05 was considered significant. Results Poorer oral hygiene (OHIs 1.94 vs. 1.32; p = 0.065), more advanced dental caries (DMFT 26.85 vs. 22.87; p = 0.05), and more advanced periodontal disease (CPITN: = 0: 21.05% vs. 42.51%; = 1 13.16% vs. 7.29%; = 2: 0% vs. 15.38%; = 3: 65.79% vs. 28.34%; = 4: 0% vs. 6.48%, Residual periodontal bone 73.1% vs. 80.51%; p = 0,001) were characteristic of patients with bisphosphonate related jaw necrosis when compared with control group. An advanced dental caries or periodontal disease required surgical intervention which directly contributed to the development of the bone necrosis. Conclusions Dental and periodontal disease can lead to bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw. Oncologic patients treated with bisphosphonates should be offered preventive care to reduce dental plaque, calculus, dental caries, and periodontal disease. PMID:24701224

  5. Buonocore Memorial Lecture. Dental erosion.

    PubMed

    Lussi, Adrian; Hellwig, Elmar; Ganss, Carolina; Jaeggi, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    There is some evidence that dental erosion is steadily spreading. To diagnose erosion, dental professionals have to rely on clinical appearance, as there is no device available to detect it. Adequate preventive measures can only be initiated if the different risk factors and potential interactions between them are known. When substance loss, caused by erosive tooth wear, reaches a certain degree, oral rehabilitation becomes necessary. Prior to the most recent decade, the severely eroded dentition could only be rehabilitated by the provision of extensive crown and bridgework or removable dentures. As a result of the improvements in composite restorative materials and in adhesive techniques, it has become possible to rehabilitate eroded dentitions in a less invasive manner. PMID:19544813

  6. Pressures on the dental care system in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Wotman, S; Goldman, H

    1982-01-01

    A number of significant pressures are creating tensions in the dental profession and the dental care delivery system. These pressures may be categorized in five major areas: 1) regulation and deregulation pressures involve changes in the state dental practice acts, court decisions concerning antitrust and advertising, and the inclusion of consumers on State professional regulatory boards; 2) cost of services includes factors involving the out-of-pocket cost of dental care and the growth of dental insurance; 3) dentist-related factors include the increased number of dentists and the indebtedness of dental graduates; 4) the pressures of changes in the American populations include the decline in population growth and the increase in proportion of elderly people; 5) changes in the distribution of dental care are based on new epidemiologic data concerning dental caries and progress in the prevention of periodontal disease. Many of these pressures are inducing competition in the dental care system. It is clear that the dental care system is in the process of change as it responds to these complex pressures. PMID:7091458

  7. Global burden of dental condition among children in nine countries participating in an international oral health promotion programme, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Denis M; Llodra, Juan Carlos

    2014-10-01

    The Live.Learn.Laugh. phase 2 programme is a unique global partnership between FDI World Dental Federation and Unilever Oral Care which aims to provide measurable improvement of oral health on a global scale through encouraging twice-daily brushing with a fluoride toothpaste. It was based on international recommendations using the principles of health promotion within school for the implementation of preventive health strategies. This paper is an overview of the dental caries condition of children from 2012 to 2013 in nine countries included in four World Health Organisation (WHO) regions. A cross-sectional study was conducted in each country before the implementation of health-promotion measures focused on twice-daily toothbrushing with fluoride toothpaste. The sample was based on stratified sampling according to the WHO pathfinder recommendations. From a total of 7,949 children examined, there were 517 children (1-2 years of age), 1,667 preschool children (3-5 years of age) and 5,789 schoolchildren (6-13 years of age). The prevalence and severity of primary dental caries, early childhood caries and temporary dental caries were described using decayed, filled teeth (dft), permanent decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMFT) indices and the significant caries index (SCI). The major findings were a high prevalence of caries, identification of high-risk groups and inequality in the distribution of the severity of dental conditions. Aggregated data from this overview should provide justification for implementing an oral health programme. The main point is the need to retain and expand the community fluoridation programme as an effective preventive measure. At the individual level, the aggregated data identify the need for more targeted efforts to reach children early - especially among specific high-risk groups. PMID:25209648

  8. Dental considerations for cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Yasny, Jeffrey S; White, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Many patients requiring cardiac surgery possess poor oral health. The presence of decayed teeth, untreated dental abscesses, and periodontitis can all represent potentially potent causes of an odontogenic infection. Ultimately, such an infection can have catastrophic consequences if it occurs during or soon after certain cardiac procedures. Since an association exists between poor oral hygiene and various systemic diseases, many patients scheduled for cardiac procedures inherently possess poor oral hygiene and untreated dental infections. Inadequate patient education, financial constraints, and dental phobia all serve as barriers for patients receiving routine intraoral care. Consequently, patients may unknowingly present for cardiac surgery with undetected oral infections that can magnify the likelihood of an adverse outcome, leading to increased costs, morbidity, and possibly mortality. It is recommended to view oral health in the perspective of systemic health, specifically, recognizing the deleterious impact that an untreated odontogenic infection can have upon cardiac surgery. Therefore, considering scheduling constraints and the urgency of the operation, if time and resources permit, then it is suggested that patients who undergo elective cardiac surgery should be screened preoperatively to ensure that any oral infection is diagnosed and definitively treated. Such an investment can yield significant improvements in surgical outcome and overall patient health. PMID:18778297

  9. MONTHLY DENTAL RATES for Retirees

    E-print Network

    New Mexico, University of

    MONTHLY DENTAL RATES for Retirees Effective 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 UNDER 65 Dental Rates Delta Dental.00 $17.00 Family $40.00 $14.00 $35.00 $19.00 $29.00 $25.00 Delta Dental Premier (High Option) Annualized.00 $69.00 $59.00 OVER 65 Dental Rates Delta Dental PPO (Low Option) Delta Dental Premier (High Option

  10. Preventing Cavities, Gum Disease, Tooth Loss, and Oral Cancers at a Glance 2011

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Success Stories Expanding Access to Dental Sealants in Maine Dental sealants are thin plastic coatings applied to ... 60% of tooth decay for 5 years. In Maine, 61% of third-grade students who were screened ...

  11. Operations Handbook for Migrant Student Dental Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, William E.; Resendez, Ignacio V.

    Migrant Education and the Superintendent of Public Instruction in the state of Washington have brought several agencies together to provide low cost dental services to migrant children. The program, initiated in 1980 and serving 138 children that year, has focused on the provision of preventative and emergency services. Migrant Education has…

  12. Dental Erosion in Industry

    PubMed Central

    Cate, H. J. Ten Bruggen

    1968-01-01

    Five hundred and fifty-five acid workers were examined between March 1962 and October 1964. One hundred and seventy-six (31·7%) were affected by industrial dental erosion at the first examinations. In 33 cases (6·0%) the dentine was affected. During the period of the survey, 66 (20·4%) of 324 workers examined more than once showed evidence that erosion was progressing. The prevalence and incidence of erosion were highest among battery formation workers, lower among picklers, and least among other processes covered by the survey. The age of workers did not appear to influence their susceptibility to erosion. The habit of working with the lips slightly parted had little effect. Erosion superimposed upon attrition predisposed to more severe loss of tooth structure than either operating alone. Little inconvenience or functional disability was suffered by acid workers due to erosion. Twenty-seven (23·7%) of 114 erosions were considered to be disfiguring. Regular dental treatment was sought less by acid workers than by controls, and the oral hygiene of the latter was superior. There was no evidence to show any difference between caries experience among acid workers and controls. Calculus and periodontal disease were more prevalent among acid workers than among controls, but it was not possible to attribute this to the working environment. Black staining in iron picklers was considered to be due to the working environment. The use of closed acid containers or lip extraction on open acid vats prevented significant atmospheric contamination and diminished the prevalence of erosion. The use of wall fans and detergent foaming agents was helpful. Images PMID:5723349

  13. University of New Mexico Dental Plans Administered by Delta Dental

    E-print Network

    New Mexico, University of

    University of New Mexico Dental Plans Administered by Delta Dental Delta Dental Premier® Delta. · Plan contributions structured to make Delta Dental quality more affordable. · Over 180 dentists, and keeping, good oral health easy and affordable. HIGH OPTION The Plan features Delta Dental Premier

  14. BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY DENTAL SCHOOL UNIVERSITY OF

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    1 BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY DENTAL SCHOOL UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND Technical Standards for Admission and Matriculation The mission of the Dental School is "...to improve the quality of life dental, oral, and craniofacial health." To facilitate the achievement of its mission, the Dental School

  15. Seattle Pacific University Washington Dental Service, a Delta Dental Plan

    E-print Network

    Nelson, Tim

    Seattle Pacific University Washington Dental Service, a Delta Dental Plan Plan No. 00333 Effective your dental benefits plan, you may call: Washington Dental Service Customer Service (206) 522-2300 (800) 554-1907 Written inquiries may be sent to: Washington Dental Service Customer Service Department P

  16. Delta Dental of Michigan Dental Benefit Highlights for

    E-print Network

    Delta Dental of Michigan Dental Benefit Highlights for Michigan Technological University High Plan 10/29/2012 Delta Dental PPOSM (Point-of-Service) Coverage Effective January 1, 2013 Delta Dental PPO Dentist Delta Dental Premier® Dentist Non- participating Dentist Plan Pays Plan Pays Plan Pays* Diagnostic

  17. Evaluation of Dental Fear in Children during Dental Visit using Children's Fear Survey Schedule-Dental Subscale

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Manisha; Aradhya, Kiran; Konde, Sapna; Nagakishore, V

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fear of dental treatment in children has been recognized as a source of serious health problems and it may persist into adolescence, which may lead to a disruptive behavior, during dental treatment. In order to prevent this psychometric method namely the dental subscale of the children's fear survey schedule (CFSS-DS) is a well-known psychometric scale that was developed by Cuthbert and Melamed in 1982 for assessing dental fear in children. The present study was to evaluate dental fear in children during first dental visit using CFSS-DS between three different age group 4 and 6 years, 7 and 9 years, 10 and 14 years children to select fearful and nonfearful children from a larger reference population and to estimate the dental fear children. Total 600 children show CFSS-DS of 27.17 ± 5.3385, 307 were girls (51.17%) and they showed CFSS-DS of 27.50 ± 5.060 and 293 were boys (48.83%) and they show CFSS-DS 26.84 ± 5.617. This shows that there were no significant difference in fear between boys and girls. In 4 to 6 years show total CFSS-DS 28.78 ± 5.742, 7 to 9 years show that mean and standard deviation of CFSS-DS 27.81 ± 4.783, 10 to 14 years show that mean and standard deviation of CFSS-DS 25.93 ± 5.586. Fear scores were highest for ‘injections', ‘choking', ‘noise of dentist drilling', ‘dentist drilling which was not significant between boy's and girl's but item, ‘having somebody look at you’ showed that significant differences in fear scores between boys and girls in present study. The present study concluded that dental fear decreased as age increased. Total fear scores also exhibited no strong overall sex difference or age by sex interaction. d> Raj S, Agarwal M, Aradhya K, Konde S, Nagakishore V. Evaluation of Dental Fear in Children during Dental Visit using Children's Fear Survey Schedule-Dental Subscale. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(1):12-15. PMID:25206180

  18. Biocompatibility of Dental Amalgams

    PubMed Central

    Uçar, Yurdanur; Brantley, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this review paper is to review the literature regarding the toxicology of mercury from dental amalgam and evaluate current statements on dental amalgam. Materials and Methods. Two key-words “dental amalgam” and “toxicity” were used to search publications on dental amalgam biocompatibility published in peer-reviewed journals written in English. Manual search was also conducted. The most recent declarations and statements were evaluated using information available on the internet. Case reports were excluded from the study. Results. The literature show that mercury released from dental amalgam restorations does not contribute to systemic disease or systemic toxicological effects. No significant effects on the immune system have been demonstrated with the amounts of mercury released from dental amalgam restorations. Only very rarely have there been reported allergic reactions to mercury from amalgam restorations. No evidence supports a relationship between mercury released from dental amalgam and neurological diseases. Almost all of the declarations accessed by the internet stated by official organizations concluded that current data are not sufficient to relate various complaints and mercury release from dental amalgam. Conclusions. Available scientific data do not justify the discontinuation of amalgam use from dental practice or replacement with alternative restorative dental materials. PMID:22145006

  19. American Dental Education Association

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-01-01

    The American Dental Education Association (ADEA) has over 19,000 members, including students, faculty, staff, and administrators from across the United States and Canada. One of the Association's stated goals is to foster "interconnected community experiences that enable members to meet their individual goals while leveraging their collective strength." This website offers a great deal of interconnectivity, as those seeking to join the dental profession can learn about scholarship opportunities, accredited dentistry schools, and professional development. In the Dental Education Pathways area, visitors can read guides like "ADEA Official Guide to Dental Schools" and "ADEA Opportunities for Minorities in United States Dental Schools." Further along is the Policy and Advocacy area, where visitors can learn about the current shortages in dental healthcare professionals and the group's special interest in dental education outreach. The site is rounded out by the Publications area, which contains some members-only publications, along with the open-access YouTube For Dental Students area. These videos profile dental students by asking them to respond to questions such as "What made you decide to go into dentistry?" and "How was your path to dental school unique?"

  20. Past, present, and future trends in dental health and the dental system in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Cutress, T W; Hunter, P B

    1992-01-01

    The past dental health of the New Zealand population has been characterised by a very high level of tooth decay; this was initially managed by the extraction of a seemingly hopeless dentition, and the placement of dentures as the socially accepted norm. This period was followed by an intensive period of curative treatment that involved the large-scale treatment of caries and the restoration of teeth. The substantial decrease in decayed, missing and filled teeth since the 1960s is most probably associated with the widespread use of fluoride in water and toothpaste. The majority of children, adolescents, and young adults now have low caries experience; the benefits will be lifelong. The projected profile of the New Zealand population is an improvement in oral health as successive generations with low caries experience move into mature and older adulthood. They will require much less dental care, and their expectations are to retain most of their natural teeth for life. There will be a decreased demand for traditional forms of dental treatment. While the variety of dental needs will be maintained, even increased, the volume of need will inevitably decline, which will influence the dental provider workforce. PMID:1570121

  1. Silver Nanoparticles in Dental Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Corręa, Juliana Mattos; Mori, Matsuyoshi; Sanches, Heloísa Lajas; da Cruz, Adriana Dibo; Poiate, Isis Andréa Venturini Pola

    2015-01-01

    Silver has been used in medicine for centuries because of its antimicrobial properties. More recently, silver nanoparticles have been synthesized and incorporated into several biomaterials, since their small size provides great antimicrobial effect, at low filler level. Hence, these nanoparticles have been applied in dentistry, in order to prevent or reduce biofilm formation over dental materials surfaces. This review aims to discuss the current progress in this field, highlighting aspects regarding silver nanoparticles incorporation, such as antimicrobial potential, mechanical properties, cytotoxicity, and long-term effectiveness. We also emphasize the need for more studies to determine the optimal concentration of silver nanoparticle and its release over time. PMID:25667594

  2. Meeting Dental Health Needs Through Dental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Alvin L.

    1972-01-01

    Dental health needs of the country cannot be met through education of more dentists. Rather, we must educate auxiliaries to perform many of the intraoral procedures now regarded the sole responsibility of dentists. (SB)

  3. Dental x-ray image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Eyad; Fahmy, Gamal F.; Nassar, Diaa; Ammar, Hany

    2004-08-01

    Law enforcement agencies have been exploiting biometric identifiers for decades as key tools in forensic identification. With the evolution in information technology and the huge volume of cases that need to be investigated by forensic specialists, it has become important to automate forensic identification systems. While, ante mortem (AM) identification, that is identification prior to death, is usually possible through comparison of many biometric identifiers, postmortem (PM) identification, that is identification after death, is impossible using behavioral biometrics (e.g. speech, gait). Moreover, under severe circumstances, such as those encountered in mass disasters (e.g. airplane crashers) or if identification is being attempted more than a couple of weeks postmortem, under such circumstances, most physiological biometrics may not be employed for identification, because of the decay of soft tissues of the body to unidentifiable states. Therefore, a postmortem biometric identifier has to resist the early decay that affects body tissues. Because of their survivability and diversity, the best candidates for postmortem biometric identification are the dental features. In this paper we present an over view about an automated dental identification system for Missing and Unidentified Persons. This dental identification system can be used by both law enforcement and security agencies in both forensic and biometric identification. We will also present techniques for dental segmentation of X-ray images. These techniques address the problem of identifying each individual tooth and how the contours of each tooth are extracted.

  4. DentalCast

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    DentalCast is a network of Internet radio and video that brings the latest information about dental technology and clinical techniques to your computer or MP3 Player. DentalCast offers both Audio and Video episodes that can be accessed directly from your PC or users can subscribe to either or both audio and video via iTunes. Episodes available include: recognizing sleep apnea patients in your practice; Discussion of how a new dental product comes to the market; video of denture waxup techniques; and Dental Anxiety: An Integrative Approach to Treatment â?? to name only a few. These video and audio podcasts will be useful to those studying to be in the dental fields as well as for those teaching or practicing.

  5. Dental photostimulable phosphor radiography.

    PubMed

    Hildebolt, C F; Couture, R A; Whiting, B R

    2000-04-01

    Photostimulable phosphor radiography (PPR), a mature industry in medical imaging, became available in dentistry in 1994. At least three dental PPR systems have been made available commercially since that time. Although dental PPR offers a number of advantages over film-based methods, some aspects of dental PPR need improvement. Further research is needed to more fully compare and contrast this modality with film-based methods. PMID:10740769

  6. Dental radiology for children

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The benefit for the child from the judicious use of diagnostic dental radiography is improved dental health. The risk to the child from dental diagnostic radiation exposure appears to be extremely low. Despite the low risk, the dentist must minimize the child's exposure to ionizing radiation by using sound clinical judgment to determine what radiographs are necessary and to provide children with optimal protection from ionizing radiation.

  7. Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees

    MedlinePLUS

    Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees Dental health is an important part of people's overall health. States are required to provide dental ... to obtaining care. Dental Benefits for Children in Medicaid Medicaid covers dental services for all child enrollees ...

  8. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  9. Dental anomalies associated with genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Vozza, I; Barbato, E; De Muro, G; Quaranta, M

    2003-12-01

    The article reviews the association between dental anomalies and genetic diseases. Knowledge of these hereditary diseases will enable the dentist to make a more extensive analysis of the families in which such diseases occur, and above all to evaluate more precisely the dental aspects that such conditions favour. This will lead to better management of diseases linked to malocclusion, congenital absence of teeth and anomalous development of dental tissues. Hereditary diseases are caused either by a single mutant gene, inherited from 1 parent and acting as dominant gene, or from a pair of mutant genes, inherited from both parents and acting recessively. Autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive inherited diseases are described, together with hereditary sex-linked conditions and those of multi-factorial origin. The purpose is to review such diseases so that the dentist can make an early diagnosis in clinical practice, check the predisposition toward such diseases and put in place preventive measures. PMID:14765023

  10. Dental knowledge and attitudes among Arab schoolteachers in northern Israel.

    PubMed

    Sgan-Cohen, H D; Saadi, S; Weissman, A

    1999-10-01

    A representative random sample of 597 Arab school-teachers in northern Israel, was surveyed regarding sources and levels of knowledge and attitudes about dental caries prevention. Data were measured according to a self-administered questionnaire from a 91.4 per cent response rate. When ranking the effectiveness of different caries preventive measures teachers on average listed optimal water fluoridation as a lower priority compared to toothbrushing, dental visits, fluoride mouthrinses and eating fewer sweet products. Placing of fissure sealants was ranked as the second least effective caries preventive measure, with 39.6 per cent not knowing the effectiveness. Only 68.5 per cent of the school-teachers were aware of the anti-bacterial role of fluoride, and only a small minority knew of fluoride's potential in healing incipient caries. Teachers seemed less motivated to being involved in dental health school programmes which involved dedicating school time and their active involvement, such as fissure sealant programmes at school, supervision of brushing and flossing, and school mouthrinsing programmes. They revealed positive attitudes towards: informing parents about the importance of oral hygiene and teaching children about preventive dentistry. Teachers' main reported source of knowledge was the dental office. It is the responsibility of the dental profession to ensure that updated knowledge is correctly conveyed to schoolteachers, who are an important and potentially influential sector of dental health consumers and health education agents. PMID:10858763

  11. Culture and Dental Health among African Immigrant School-Aged Children in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obeng, Cecilia S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The paper examines African immigrant parents' views on dental decay and whether such views affect their decision to obtain dental insurance for their children. The paper also examines the cultural underpinnings of the immigrants' oral health care practices. Design/methodology/approach: The data for the study were collected in the states…

  12. Noninvasive control of dental caries in children with active initial lesions. A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hausen, H; Seppa, L; Poutanen, R; Niinimaa, A; Lahti, S; Kärkkäinen, S; Pietilä, I

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether DMFS increment can be decreased among children with active initial caries by oral hygiene and dietary counseling and by using noninvasive preventive measures. Except for mentally disabled and handicapped children attending special schools, all 11- to 12-year-olds in Pori, Finland, with at least one active initial caries lesion were invited to participate in the study and were then randomized into two groups. Children in the experimental group (n = 250) were offered an individually designed patient-centered preventive program aimed at identifying and eliminating factors that had led to the presence of active caries. The program included counseling sessions with emphasis on enhancing use of the children's own resources in everyday life. Toothbrushes, fluoride toothpaste and fluoride and xylitol lozenges were distributed to the children. They also received applications of fluoride/chlorhexidine varnish. The children in the control group (n = 247) received basic prevention offered as standard in the public dental clinics in Pori. For both groups, the average follow-up period was 3.4 years. A community level program of oral health promotion was run in Pori throughout this period. Mean DMFS increments for the experimental and control groups were 2.56 (95% CI 2.07, 3.05) and 4.60 (3.99, 5.21), respectively (p < 0.0001): prevented fraction 44.3% (30.2%, 56.4%). The results show that by using a regimen that includes multiple measures for preventing dental decay, caries increment can be significantly reduced among caries-active children living in an area where the overall level of caries experience is low. PMID:17713339

  13. [Cause of secondary caries and prevention].

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiping

    2014-04-01

    Secondary caries is a disease that occurs on the tooth after the filling has been used for a period of time. Secondary caries is also the main reason for the replacement of dental restorations. Regardless of the material used for fillings, secondary caries cannot be completely avoided. The proportion of secondary caries is very high after filling in permanent teeth or primary teeth. Secondary caries mainly occurs because of the formation of micro cracks after filling. When the micro crack width exceeds 50 microm, saliva will enter the micro cracks between the filling and tooth tissue. The cariogenic bacteria in the saliva will grow when the environment of micro cracks is appropriate, thereby producing secondary caries. The prevention of secondary caries includes micro crack control, fluoride use, teeth cleaning, tooth decay and gum disease treatment, and regular checkups. PMID:24881200

  14. Dental Charting. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Trudy Karlene; Apfel, Maura

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: dental anatomical terminology; tooth numbering systems;…

  15. Dental and related infections.

    PubMed

    Hodgdon, Alan

    2013-05-01

    Emergency physicians should be comfortable treating most dental and related infections. In this article, we outline recommended techniques to perform a dental examination, explore common pathologies, recommend pain and antibiotic management strategies and review common pitfalls. How to avoid overprescribing opioid analgesics is discussed in depth, along with recent studies to support this strategy. PMID:23601483

  16. Dental Laboratory Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units to the occupation of dental laboratory technician. The following skill areas…

  17. SCHOOL OF DENTAL HYGIENE Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene

    E-print Network

    Major, Arkady

    SCHOOL OF DENTAL HYGIENE Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Degree Completion Program Applicant are seeking admission to studies leading to the Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene, (BScDH) with a description of the selection procedures for the School of Dental Hygiene at the University of Manitoba

  18. Florida Dental Hygiene Association

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Florida Dental Hygiene Association's (FDHA) mission is to advance the art and science of dental hygiene by increasing awareness as well as ensuring access to quality oral health care, promoting the highest standards of dental hygiene education, licensure and practice while promoting the interests of dental hygiene. Available on the FDHA's website is their official publication Prophyways. This is a seasonal publication covering a wide range of information in the dental hygienist field, including changes to local organizations, such as the Board of Dentistry, to upcoming events in the State of Florida and nationally. Also available on the website is a calendar of events for the entire year as well as a directory of contact information for FDHA board members.

  19. Arresting rampant dental caries with silver diamine fluoride in a young teenager suffering from chronic oral graft versus host disease post-bone marrow transplantation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rampant caries is an advanced and severe dental disease that affects multiple teeth. This case describes the management of rampant caries in a young teenager suffering from chronic oral graft versus host disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Case presentation A 14-year-old Chinese boy suffering from ?–thalassemia major was referred to the dental clinic for the management of rampant dental caries. An oral examination revealed pale conjunctiva, bruising of lips, and depapillation of tongue indicating an underlying condition of anemia. The poor oral condition due to topical and systemic immunosuppressants was seriously aggravated, and rampant caries developed rapidly, affecting all newly erupted, permanent teeth. The teeth were hypersensitive and halitosis was apparent. Strategies for oral health education and diet modification were given to the patient. Xylitol chewing gum was used to stimulate saliva flow to promote remineralization of teeth. Silver diamine fluoride was topically applied to arrest rampant caries and to relieve pain from hypersensitivity. Carious teeth with pulpal involvement were endodontically treated. Stainless steel crowns were provided on molars to restore chewing function, and polycarbonate crowns were placed on premolars, upper canines and incisors. Conclusion This case report demonstrates success in treating a young teenager with severe rampant dental decay by contemporary caries control and preventive strategy. PMID:24383434

  20. Oral and Dental Considerations in Pediatric Leukemic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Padmini, Chiyadu; Bai, K. Yellamma

    2014-01-01

    Throughout the world, there have been drastic decline in mortality rate in pediatric leukemic population due to early diagnosis and improvements in oncology treatment. The pediatric dentist plays an important role in the prevention, stabilization, and treatment of oral and dental problems that can compromise the child's health and quality of life during, and follow up of the cancer treatment. This manuscript discusses recommendations and promotes dental care of the pediatric leukemic patients. PMID:24724033

  1. Sustained-Release Delivery Systems for Treatment of Dental Diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Friedman; Doron Steinberg

    1990-01-01

    Sustained-release delivery systems allow the effective targeting of drugs for treating dental and periodontal diseases. Since dental diseases are chronic, the therapeutic agents used should persist in the oral cavity for as long as possible. Implanting fluoride, chlorhexidine, and other antiseptic agents embedded into sustained-release polymeric matrices into the oral cavity prevents cariogenic plaque accumulation. Both fibers and slab-like sustained-delivery

  2. Michigan State University Graduate Assistant Dental Plan

    E-print Network

    Liu, Taosheng

    Michigan State University Graduate Assistant Dental Plan Keep your smile healthy with dental benefits from Delta Dental Delta Dental of Michigan, Inc. and Michigan State University are pleased to partner to bring you an affordable, quality dental plan--the MSU Student Dental Plan. Delta Dental

  3. Dental Institute Emergency Preparedness Action Sheets

    E-print Network

    Applebaum, David

    Dental Institute Emergency Preparedness Action Sheets Undergraduate dental students 1. The role for undergraduate dental students is limited. They cannot provide dental care unless supervised by a registered dental practitioner as directed by the General Dental Council within the context of a registered dental

  4. Pneumoconiosis among Cretan Dental Technicians

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marios E. Froudarakis; Argyro Voloudaki; Demosthenes Bouros; George Drakonakis; Kostas Hatzakis; Nikos M. Siafakas

    1999-01-01

    Pneumoconiosis among dental technicians has recently emerged as an area of research in interstitial lung disease. This study was carried out to estimate the prevalence of pneumoconiosis in Greek dental technicians on the island of Crete. Fifty-one of the 58 dental technicians of the Heraklion Dental Technicians’ Association completed an exposure history questionnaire and underwent a clinical examination, including chest

  5. DENTAL RESEARCH UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yan

    DENTAL RESEARCH Handbook UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE College of Dentistry #12;Page2 THE UNIVERSITY Associate Dean for Research DEPARMENT CONTACTS 6 CENTERS FOR DENTAL RESEARCH 7 DENTAL RESEARCH AT UTHSC 8, or Foundational Grants 27 o Dental Alumni Research Grants 31 SECTION II: STUDENTS IN RESEARCH 36 For Students

  6. Subscriber's Certificate Delta Dental PPO

    E-print Network

    Fraden, Seth

    Subscriber's Certificate Delta Dental PPO Delta Dental* certifies that you have the right. Your Delta Dental subscriber identification card will be mailed to you separately. It identifies you to a dentist as a Delta Dental subscriber who has the right to the benefits in your contract. You should

  7. Dental journals: yesterday and today.

    PubMed

    Woodmansey, Karl

    2012-10-01

    Today's dentists may subscribe to, or receive complimentarily, a number of periodical publications containing technical professional information. Dental journals are the prime example: providing timely, reliable and useful information. The development of dental journals is a component of the evolution of scientific communication. This article reviews the origins and evolution of dental journals, including the Texas Dental Journal. PMID:23311024

  8. Health Instruction Packages: Permanent Teeth, Dental Deposits, and Dental Instruments. Dientes Permanentes, Depositos Dentales y Instrumentos Dentales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Patricia; Germano, Catherine

    These five learning modules use text interspersed with illustrations and reinforcement exercises to instruct dental aide and dental hygiene students about jaw bones and gums, dental deposits, and dental instruments. The first four modules were prepared by Patricia Lind in both Spanish and English. "The Gum and Bone of Permanent Teeth" ("La Encia y…

  9. PEBB Dental Benefits Summary Preferred Option Plan

    E-print Network

    Oregon, University of

    . DIAGNOSTIC & PREVENTIVE 90% deductible waived 70%**1st year-80% Apr 1 & after 50% Fissure Sealants MAJOR 75% Restorative Dentistry (treatment of tooth decay with amalgam or composite) Oral Surgery (surgical

  10. Anxiety and depressive disorders and dental fear among adults in Finland.

    PubMed

    Pohjola, Vesa; Mattila, Aino K; Joukamaa, Matti; Lahti, Satu

    2011-02-01

    We studied the association between dental fear and anxiety or depressive disorders, as well as the comorbidity of dental fear with anxiety and depressive disorders, controlling for socio-demographic characteristics, dental attendance, and dental health. Nationally representative data on Finnish adults, ? 30 yr of age (n = 5,953), were gathered through interviews and clinical examination. Dental fear was measured using the question: 'How afraid are you of visiting a dentist?' Anxiety and/or depressive disorders were assessed using a standardized structured psychiatric interview according to criteria presented in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition) (DSM-IV).Those with depressive disorders, generalized anxiety disorder or social phobia more commonly reported high dental fear than did those without these disorders. When age, gender, education, dental attendance, and the number of decayed, missing, and restored teeth were considered, those with generalized anxiety disorder were more likely to have high dental fear than were participants with neither anxiety nor depressive disorders. The comorbidity of depressive and anxiety disorders also remained statistically significantly associated with dental fear; those with both depressive and anxiety disorders were more likely to have high dental fear than were those without these disorders. Our findings support the suggestion that some individuals may have a personality that is vulnerable to dental fear. PMID:21244512

  11. Methods of dental instrument processing, sterilization, and storage--a review.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Lisa P; Bebermeyer, Richard D; Dickinson, Sharon K

    2005-10-01

    A comprehensive instrument processing and sterilization program in the dental office is essential to ensure that the DHCP and the public are protected from disease transmission due to contaminated instruments/ devices. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other organizations have made recommendations to help dental personnel with this aspect of patient care. By following the CDC's latest guidelines, the DHCP can develop an optimal program of dental instrument processing, sterilization and storage. PMID:16350462

  12. Nova Scotia Dental Association: Healthy Teeth

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    What exact role does sugar play in the formation of cavities? Find the answer to this question and many more at Healthy Teeth, a comprehensive and lively oral health education website for 3rd-6th graders and created by the Nova Scotia Dental Association. The site contains sections on Cavities, Teeth and Gums, Prevention, and more. The sections are student-friendly with straightforward text and fun animated images. Additionally, the site offers hands-on classroom activities and experiments.

  13. Dental Status and Associated Factors in a Dentate Adult Population in Bulgaria: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Damyanov, Nikola D.; Witter, Dick J.; Bronkhorst, Ewald M.; Creugers, Nico H. J.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine variations in the dental status of a dentate adult population in terms of “decayed,” “missing,” and “filled” teeth in relation to several sociodemographic and behavioral factors. Quota sampling was used to draw 2531 subjects aged 20 years and over. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire and an oral examination. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to observe associations between “decayed,” “missing,” and “filled” teeth and the factors of interest. The mean numbers of “decayed,” “missing,” and “filled” teeth were 2.2, 6.7, and 4.9, respectively. Molar teeth were significantly more often “missing” than premolar and anterior teeth. Age, gender, education, and tooth brushing revealed most noticeable associations. Increasing age was associated with a lower chance of having “decayed” and “filled” teeth, but with a higher chance of having “missing” teeth. Females were more likely to have “missing” and “filled” teeth. Higher education was associated with a lower chance of having “missing” teeth. More frequent tooth brushing was associated with a lower chance of having “decayed” and “missing” teeth, but with a higher chance of having “filled” teeth. These risk indicators should be considered in prevention program planning if reduction of tooth loss is to be achieved. PMID:22654908

  14. Sociodental approach to the identification of dental treatment-need groups.

    PubMed

    Maizels, J; Maizels, A; Sheiham, A

    1993-12-01

    The aim of this study was to propose a method that could be used to distinguish significantly different dental treatment-need groups, to assist in planning more appropriate preventive dental health programmes than are now generally available. This involved the use of alternative new measures of dental status in conjunction with an indicator of people's potential, or "propensity" to adopt appropriate dental self-care measures. One important finding, based on a detailed questionnaire and dental examination of a sample population, is that substantial groups have relatively low or medium levels of dental status even though they possess relatively high propensity for self-care measures. A cross-classification of oral health status with the propensity indicator is used to define different treatment-need groups. Significant differences among these groups emerge in relation to various social indicators like age group, gender, region and dental history, and in relation to preventive dental health measures such as dental attendance and efficacy of teeth cleaning. The methodology proposed for identifying such different treatment-need groups could be valuable in devising effective community dental health strategies. PMID:8306610

  15. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants...SERVICES QUARANTINE, INSPECTION, LICENSING STANDARDS FOR THE ACCREDITATION OF...Appendix G to Part 75—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental...

  16. Hispanic Dental Association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ORGULLO Video Competition Read more March 25, 2015 - Scholarship Program Read more March 25, 2015 - Do You ... More EDUCATION Learn about our Patient Education and Scholarships. Hispanic Dental Association Foundation 2013 - 2014 Scholarship Program ...

  17. American Dental Hygienists' Association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... National Exam Student Advisor Resources Dental Hygiene Programs Scholarships and Grants Research Center Advocacy Practice Issues Direct ... Sidebar Homepage TOP NEWS View more IOH Increases Scholarship, Research Funding; Announces New RDH Market Research Study ...

  18. Dental Treatment Considerations

    MedlinePLUS

    ... can be precipitated by certain medications used in dentistry. The dental team should be cognizant of the ... problems. Drug interactions Many common drugs used in dentistry may have potential complications for MG patients by ...

  19. The prevalence of dental caries among adult population of different regions of Georgia.

    PubMed

    Tsitaisvili, L; Margvelashvili, M; Kalandadze, M; Margvelasvili, V

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and intensity of dental caries in adult population of Georgia according to their regional distribution. The survey was carried out by pathfinder survey, based on cluster- stratified method derived by WHO. 2370 adults including 1289 women and 1081 men distributed in 4 age groups: I - 20-34 years, II - 35-44, III - 45-64, IV - 65+ years, the residents of the city, town and village in 9 regions of Georgia and the capital Tbilisi were examined. The assessment of dental status and oral hygiene was based on WHO-'s recommendation. (WHO 1997 'Oral Health Assessment Form') Examination was done under good natural light using a mouth mirror and an explorer. Questionnaires comprised questions for revealing the following risk-factors: social status and family income, existence of common diseases, people's attitude towards oral hygiene (tooth brushing, using dental floss) accessibility and acceptability of dental service, sugar consumption rate, tobacco use, consumption of dairy products. The study revealed the high prevalence of dental caries in Georgia's adult population (96-100%) Caries intensity and severity was seen as the highest in Mtskheta- Mtianeti - 13.26±5.97, Guria - 12.79±8.92, Samtskhe-Javakheti - 12.62±8.44, Shida Qartli - 12.03±7.22 and Achara - 12.23±7.89 regions, relatively lower in Tbilisi - 11.64±7.8; Qvemo Qartli - 10.96±7.07; Imereti - 10.79±7.63 Samegrelo - 10.54±7.95 and in Kakheti - 9.86±7.02. By the mean number of caries decayed teeth Mckheta-Mtianeti - 4.26±3.51, Samckhe-Javakheti - 3.52±3.51 and Imereti - 3.05±3.1 were distinguished. The mean number of caries missing teeth was noted to be highest in Guria - 5.49±7.42, Samckhe-Javakheti - 5.31±6.97 and Achara - 5.32±6.73. Mckheta-Mtianeti - 2.62±3.05, Shida Qartli - 2.39±2.8 and Tbilisi - 2.28±2.09 were the leading regions by the mean number of filled teeth, the lowest value of filled teeth variable was seen in Imereti - 0.67±1.39. In summary behavioral factors (unsatisfactory oral hygiene and less acceptability of dental service due to low medical educational background) play substantial role in occurrence and prevalence of dental caries among adult population of Georgia in all regions, though the financial problem seems to be a considerable contributor in caries prevalence. Reliable statistical data obtained in the study allowed to conclude that in spite of small differences in prevalence in different regions of Georgia dental caries is very widespread throughout the country (96-100%). It represents a major problem in Georgia and needs serious attention and preventive measures to be carried out to enhance peoples' referral to dental service and improve medical educational background of the population. PMID:25214266

  20. Dental anxiety in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Morse, Zac; Takau, Aleva F

    2004-03-01

    Despite the technological advances in dentistry, anxiety about dental treatment and the fear of pain associated with dentistry remains globally widespread and is considered a major barrier to dental treatment. This can have detrimental consequences to people's oral health and pose a serious epidemiological challenge to oral health care professionals. Dental anxiety is well described in the Western world however there is little literature on the situation in the developing world. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the levels of dental anxiety in Fijians using Corah's DentalAnxiety Scale (DAS). 120 adults, aged 18-45 years were randomly selected from the capital city of Suva until there were 60 Indigenous and 60 IndoFijians, with 30 males and 30 females from each group responding to questions from Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale. The average DAS for all the participants was 8.8. The average DAS for IndoFijians was 9.8 and was significantly higher than for Indigenous Fijians ie 78. IndoFijians only reported less anxiety with increasing age as the Indigenous Fijians generally displayed low levels of anxiety. There was no significant difference in DAS between the genders. A considerable proportion of IndoFijians (28%) were anxious with 13% being highly anxious. Young IndoFijian adults are more likely to possess dental anxiety and should be managed appropriately which may include behavioural and/or pharmacological therapy. This may require referral to dental specialists or involve a multidisciplinary approach to the management of these people. PMID:18181437

  1. Portable Dental System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Portable dental system provides dental care in isolated communities. System includes a patient's chair and a dentist's stool, an X-ray machine and a power unit, all of which fold into compact packages. A large yellow "pumpkin" is a collapsible compressed air tank. Portable system has been used successfully in South America in out of the way communities with this back-packable system, and in American nursing homes. This product is no longer manufactured.

  2. SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE University of Pittsburgh

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE University of Pittsburgh Pitt Dental Medicine Alumni Update March 2012 Conservatory: Terry L. Buckenheimer (DMD `80) - Distinguished Alumnus Dental Medicine - Dr. Buckenheimer has leadership positions with the American Dental Association. Additionally, Dr. Buckenheimer has been actively

  3. 32 CFR 158.7 - Guidance for contractor medical and dental fitness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Under the terms and conditions...identified as no longer medically...Under the terms and conditions...medical and dental assessment within 12 months...preventive dental care (see paragraph...post-deployment health assessment in DMSS at the...employee's own risk due to the potential...ophthalmologic care in a field...

  4. 32 CFR 158.7 - Guidance for contractor medical and dental fitness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Under the terms and conditions...identified as no longer medically...Under the terms and conditions...medical and dental assessment within 12 months...preventive dental care (see paragraph...post-deployment health assessment in DMSS at the...employee's own risk due to the potential...ophthalmologic care in a field...

  5. 32 CFR 158.7 - Guidance for contractor medical and dental fitness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Under the terms and conditions...identified as no longer medically...Under the terms and conditions...medical and dental assessment within 12 months...preventive dental care (see paragraph...post-deployment health assessment in DMSS at the...employee's own risk due to the potential...ophthalmologic care in a field...

  6. Minimal Intervention Dentistry (MID) for managing dental caries – a review

    PubMed Central

    Frencken, Jo E.; Peters, Mathilde C.; Manton, David J.; Leal, Soraya C.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Eden, Ece

    2012-01-01

    This publication describes the history of Minimal Intervention Dentistry (MID) for managing dental caries and presents evidence for various carious lesion detection devices, for preventive measures, for restorative and non-restorative therapies as well as for repairing rather than replacing defective restorations. It is a follow-up to the FDI World Dental Federation publication on MID, of 2000. The dental profession currently is faced with an enormous task of how to manage the high burden of consequences of the caries process amongst the world population. If it is to manage carious lesion development and its progression, it should move away from the ‘surgical’ care approach and fully embrace the MID approach. The chance for MID to be successful is thought to be increased tremendously if dental caries is not considered an infectious but instead a behavioural disease with a bacterial component. Controlling the two main carious lesion development related behaviours, i.e. intake and frequency of fermentable sugars, to not more than five times daily and removing/disturbing dental plaque from all tooth surfaces using an effective fluoridated toothpaste twice daily, are the ingredients for reducing the burden of dental caries in many communities in the world. FDI’s policy of reducing the need for restorative therapy by placing an even greater emphasis on caries prevention than is currently done, is therefore, worth pursuing. PMID:23106836

  7. Awareness of emergency management of dental trauma

    PubMed Central

    Namdev, Ritu; Jindal, Ayushi; Bhargava, Smriti; Bakshi, Lokesh; Verma, Reena; Beniwal, Disha

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Traumatic dental injuries frequently occur in society and may occur at home. The ultimate prognosis of an avulsed tooth occurring in a child may depend on the parents’ knowledge of appropriate emergency measures. This study is aimed at evaluating the awareness level of a sample of Indian (Rohtak, Haryana) parents in the management of dental trauma. Materials and Methods: A total of 1500 parents were surveyed using a self-administered structured questionnaire. The questionnaire was divided into three parts. The tabulated data were statistically analyzed using the Chi-square test. Result: This study indicated a low level of knowledge regarding tooth avulsion and replantation procedures to be followed in emergency. The residing area and age of parent did not affect the knowledge and awareness of parents. Moreover, well-educated parents also had very little or no information about dental trauma first-aid. The lack of significance in correct answers between those with and without such experience indicated that past experience did not seem to have increase the knowledge of the correct emergency procedures. Very little or no information about tooth avulsion and replantation had been given to most of them. Conclusion: Dental injury prevention and management should be recognized as a major public health issue and adequate resources to be allocated for research in this area. Educational programs to improve the knowledge and awareness among the parents have to be implemented. PMID:25395768

  8. Summary of: Supporting dental registrants in difficulty.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, Paul

    2015-02-27

    Over the past few years there has been a significant increase in the number of dentists and dental care professionals (registrants) having conditions placed on their practice either by the General Dental Council or NHS area teams. There are a number of reasons for this including the fact that patients complain more often, colleagues are now expected to alert the authorities if poor practice is detected and the demographics of the dental profession in the UK are changing. Steps have already been taken to prevent dentists getting into difficulty, such as the development of requirements for continued professional development by the GDC and past initiatives at a local level set up to assist dentist in difficulty. The regional offices of Health Education England and equivalent organisations in Wales and Scotland assist registrants in difficulty in meeting these conditions. Little published research has been carried out into this important service which has had to develop rapidly over the past few years. There is a need to investigate the current service, the views of those dental professionals being assisted and those providing the support to inform the further development of the service. This paper provides an introduction to a planned series of research papers reporting on our investigation into the service provided by HEE teams. PMID:25720892

  9. Genetic factors affecting dental caries risk.

    PubMed

    Opal, S; Garg, S; Jain, J; Walia, I

    2015-03-01

    This article reviews the literature on genetic aspects of dental caries and provides a framework for the rapidly changing disease model of caries. The scope is genetic aspects of various dental factors affecting dental caries. The PubMed database was searched for articles with keywords 'caries', 'genetics', 'taste', 'diet' and 'twins'. This was followed by extensive handsearching using reference lists from relevant articles. The post-genomic era will present many opportunities for improvement in oral health care but will also present a multitude of challenges. We can conclude from the literature that genes have a role to play in dental caries; however, both environmental and genetic factors have been implicated in the aetiology of caries. Additional studies will have to be conducted to replicate the findings in a different population. Identification of genetic risk factors will help screen and identify susceptible patients to better understand the contribution of genes in caries aetiopathogenesis. Information derived from these diverse studies will provide new tools to target individuals and/or populations for a more efficient and effective implementation of newer preventive measures and diagnostic and novel therapeutic approaches in the management of this disease. PMID:25721273

  10. Influence of dental materials on dental MRI

    PubMed Central

    Tymofiyeva, O; Vaegler, S; Rottner, K; Boldt, J; Hopfgartner, AJ; Proff, PC; Richter, E-J; Jakob, PM

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the potential influence of standard dental materials on dental MRI (dMRI) by estimating the magnetic susceptibility with the help of the MRI-based geometric distortion method and to classify the materials from the standpoint of dMRI. Methods: A series of standard dental materials was studied on a 1.5?T MRI system using spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences and their magnetic susceptibility was estimated using the geometric method. Measurements on samples of dental materials were supported by in vivo examples obtained in dedicated dMRI procedures. Results: The tested materials showed a range of distortion degrees. The following materials were classified as fully compatible materials that can be present even in the tooth of interest: the resin-based sealer AH Plus® (Dentsply, Maillefer, Germany), glass ionomer cement, gutta-percha, zirconium dioxide and composites from one of the tested manufacturers. Interestingly, composites provided by the other manufacturer caused relatively strong distortions and were therefore classified as compatible I, along with amalgam, gold alloy, gold–ceramic crowns, titanium alloy and NiTi orthodontic wires. Materials, the magnetic susceptibility of which differed from that of water by more than 200?ppm, were classified as non-compatible materials that should not be present in the patient’s mouth for any dMRI applications. They included stainless steel orthodontic appliances and CoCr. Conclusions: A classification of the materials that complies with the standard grouping of materials according to their magnetic susceptibility was proposed and adopted for the purposes of dMRI. The proposed classification can serve as a guideline in future dMRI research. PMID:23610088

  11. Stress Response Pathways in Ameloblasts: Implications for Amelogenesis and Dental Fluorosis

    PubMed Central

    Sierant, Megan L.; Bartlett, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Human enamel development of the permanent teeth takes place during childhood and stresses encountered during this period can have lasting effects on the appearance and structural integrity of the enamel. One of the most common examples of this is the development of dental fluorosis after childhood exposure to excess fluoride, an elemental agent used to increase enamel hardness and prevent dental caries. Currently the molecular mechanism responsible for dental fluorosis remains unknown; however, recent work suggests dental fluorosis may be the result of activated stress response pathways in ameloblasts during the development of permanent teeth. Using fluorosis as an example, the role of stress response pathways during enamel maturation is discussed. PMID:23745169

  12. A Systematic Review of Dental Late Effects in Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gawade, Prasad L.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Kaste, Sue C.; Neglia, Joseph P.; Constine, Louis S.; Robison, Leslie L.; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2014-01-01

    Survivors of childhood cancer are at risk for dental late effects. This systematic review summarizes associations between treatment exposures and dental late effects among survivors of childhood cancer. We included investigations with at least 20 study participants conducted for 2 or more years after completion of childhood, adolescent, or young adult cancer therapy. This review suggests both independent and additive effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy on dental complications, and identifies vulnerable groups with specific host and treatment characteristics. This summary provides information that will assist clinicians to prevent, detect, and facilitate early intervention for dental late effects. PMID:24424790

  13. Dental Implantology in U.S. Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bavitz, J. Bruce

    1990-01-01

    The results of a survey of 44 dental schools corroborate the belief that dental implantology is gaining widespread acceptance in U.S. dental schools. Currently, predoctoral students have limited clinical participation. Most programs have taken the position that clinical techniques are best taught within the existing specialties at a graduate…

  14. Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

  15. Information for Students Interested in Dental Medicine Dental Careers

    E-print Network

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    officially beginning the process over a year prior to enrollment in dental school. Applicants should expect). The DAT is a computerized test and can be scheduled year-round. The test includes general biology, general themselves with the dental field before applying to dental school. In addition to being necessary to help

  16. Cigna Dental Care DHMO Insurance

    E-print Network

    Simaan, Nabil

    Cigna Dental Care DHMO Insurance Summary Plan Description #12;Vanderbilt University CIGNA DENTAL CARE INSURANCE EFFECTIVE DATE: January 1, 2013 CN015 3308928 This document printed in March, 2013 takes .............................................................................................................7 Employee Insurance

  17. Medical and Dental Patient Issues

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Join or Renew Members Only Medical and Dental Patient Issues The following FAQs have been developed by our topic editors for this category: Dental-Patient Issues Medical CT Reference Books and Articles on ...

  18. Dental Health: The Basic Facts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the dental visit Resources Academy of General Dentistry 211 East Chicago Avenue Suite 900 Chicago, Illinois ... state dental department of health National Foundation of Dentistry for the Handicapped 1800 15th Street Suite 100 ...

  19. Compliance with infection control practices in an university hospital dental clinic

    PubMed Central

    Mutters, Nico T.; Hägele, Ulrike; Hagenfeld, Daniel; Hellwig, Elmar; Frank, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Compliance with infection control practices is the key to quality care and excellence in dentistry. Infection control remains one of the most cost-beneficial interventions available. However, implementing control procedures requires full compliance of the whole dental team. The aim of our study was to measure the compliance in daily clinical practice. Methods: The compliance with infection control practices in dentistry by dental health care personnel (DHCP) in a German university dental clinic was observed during clinical work. In addition, a survey was conducted to assess the individual knowledge about infection control procedures. Contamination of the workplace during invasive dental procedures was tested, as well. Results: A total of 58 invasive dental treatments implying close contacts between HCWs and patients were scrutinized. All HCWs (100%) wore gloves during dental work, but in some cases (female dentists: 14.3%; dental assistants: 28.6%) gloves were neither changed nor hands were disinfected between different activities or patient contacts (female dentists: 68.6%; male dentists: 60.9%; dental assistants: 93%). Only 31.4% of female and 39.1% of male dentists carried out adequate hygienic hand disinfection after removing gloves. Male dentists wore significantly more often (100%) protective eyewear compared to 77.1% of female dentists (p<0.05). In addition, most of female dentists (62.9%) and dental assistants (80.7%) wore jewelry during dental procedures. Conclusion: Despite the knowledge of distinct hygiene procedures only a small percentage of dental staff performs hygiene practices according to recommended guidelines. Strict audit is clearly needed in the dental setting to ensure compliance with infection control guidelines to prevent transmission of pathogens. Our results provide insights for the development of a targeted education and training strategy to enhance compliance of dental staff especially of dental assistants with infection control procedures. PMID:25285262

  20. The dental education environment.

    PubMed

    Haden, N Karl; Andrieu, Sandra C; Chadwick, D Gregory; Chmar, Jacqueline E; Cole, James R; George, Mary C; Glickman, Gerald N; Glover, Joel F; Goldberg, Jerold S; Hendricson, William D; Meyerowitz, Cyril; Neumann, Laura; Pyle, Marsha; Tedesco, Lisa A; Valachovic, Richard W; Weaver, Richard G; Winder, Ronald L; Young, Stephen K; Kalkwarf, Kenneth L

    2006-12-01

    The second in a series of perspectives from the ADEA Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education (CCI), this article presents the CCI's view of the dental education environment necessary for effective change. The article states that the CCI's purpose is related to leading and building consensus in the dental community to foster a continuous process of innovative change in the education of general dentists. Principles proposed by CCI to shape the dental education environment are described; these are critical thinking, lifelong learning, humanistic environment, scientific discovery and integration of knowledge, evidence-based oral health care, assessment, faculty development, and the health care team. The article also describes influences external to the academic dental institutions that are important for change and argues that meaningful and long-lasting change must be systemic in nature. The CCI is ADEA's primary means to engage all stakeholders for the purpose of educating lifelong learners to provide evidence-based care to meet the needs of society. PMID:17170316

  1. Maintaining proper dental records.

    PubMed

    Leeuw, Wilhemina

    2014-01-01

    Referred to as Standard of Care, the legal duty of a dentist requires exercising the degree of skill and care that would be exhibited by other prudent dentists faced with the same patient-care situation. Primarily, the goal of keeping good dental records is to maintain continuity of care. Diligent and complete documentation and charting procedures are essential to fulfilling the Standard of Care. Secondly, because dental records are considered legal documents they help protect the interest of the dentist and/or the patient by establishing the details of the services rendered. Patients today are better educated and more assertive than ever before and dentists must be equipped to protect themselves against malpractice claims. Every record component must be handled as if it could be summoned to a court room and scrutinized by an attorney, judge or jury. Complete, accurate, objective and honest entries in a patient record are the only way to defend against any clinical and/or legal problems that might arise. Most medical and dental malpractice claims arise from an unfavorable interaction with the dentist and not from a poor treatment outcome. By implementing the suggestions mentioned in this course, dental health care professionals can minimize the legal risks associated with the delivery of dental care to promote greater understanding for patients of their rights and privileges to their complete record. PMID:24834675

  2. Evaluation of Dental Hand Instruments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Edwin Evans; Luigi F. Lucaccini; Joseph William Hazell; Robert J. Lucas

    1973-01-01

    A newly-developed, multiple-function dental syringe, designed to improve the efficiency of the dental team in performing restorative operations, was evaluated in mechanical tests, mock clinical trials, and field tests with live patients. Field tests indicated the new device to be superior to the conventional equipment configuration of separate instruments generally used by dental assistants in terms of the number of

  3. THE INDEMNITY DENTAL BENEFITS PLAN

    E-print Network

    Hutcheon, James M.

    THE INDEMNITY DENTAL BENEFITS PLAN THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA Plan Design ­ Originated regarding your indemnity dental benefits plan, please contact the appropriate resource(s) identified below Office Dental Claims Unit MetLife MyBenefits website (you must register on the site to access plan

  4. Dental Assistant Specialist. (AFSC 98150).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eling, David R.

    This four-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for dental assistant specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are an introduction to dental services (the mission and organization of medical/dental service, career ladder progressions, medical readiness/wartime training, and…

  5. Dental Laboratory Technology Program Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This guide contains 45 program standards for the dental laboratory technology program conducted in technical institutes in Georgia. The dental laboratory technology program, either diploma or associate degree, is designed to ensure that students gain basic competence in the job skills needed for an entry-level employee in dental laboratory…

  6. Dental Hygiene Realpolitik Affecting Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bader, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Current conditions in dental hygiene influencing professional education are discussed. Workplace/practice issues include dental hygiene care as a component of dental practice, content, effects, and quality of care, hygienist supply and demand, and job satisfaction. Professional issues include the knowledge base, definitions of practice, and…

  7. Relationship Between Dietary Patterns and Dental Health in Type I Diabetic Children Compared With Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Bassir, Leila; Amani, Reza; Khaneh Masjedi, Mashalla; Ahangarpor, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dietary habits are established in childhood and will persist until adulthood, being one of the human health pillars. Many diseases of humans have roots in the individuals’ diet, of which dental caries are one of the common infectious diseases. Diabetes Mellitus is also considered as the most common metabolic disorder in children. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the dietary patterns of children with type I Diabetes Mellitus with that of non-diabetic children, in relation to dental caries. Materials/Patients and Methods: In this study, 31 patients (13 boys and 18 girls, mean age of 11 ± 5.4 years) with type I Diabetes Mellitus referred to the Diabetes Mellitus Center and university hospitals were selected. Controls were 31 healthy students matched for age and sex. The study was based on the data obtained from the questionnaire containing information about dietary patterns and oral hygiene habits, social class and decayed/missing/filled teeth (DMFT) index. Dietary patterns were assessed using a food frequency questionnaire developed on the basis of caries preventing or inducing foods and then scored. Data were analyzed by using the t-test and McNamara’s test. Results: Diabetic children had less frequent cariogenic snacks than their controls. The mean diet scores for diabetic and healthy subjects were 7.65 ± 3.27 and 11.9 ± 2.03 (P < 0.05), respectively. There was no significant difference in DMFT between the diabetics and controls (3.71 ± 2.48 vs. 4.35 ± 2.74, respectively). There were also no differences in frequency of tooth brushing and use of mouth washes. However, more diabetics reported that they have never used dental floss compared to controls (42.2% vs. 71%, P < 0.05). Having cheese with bread as snack was more prevalent in diabetics (P < 0.05).There was a positive correlation between DMFT and dietary scores (r = 0.3, P < 0.05). Conclusions: Controls scored higher in their dietary habits and dental flossing but lower in tooth brushing and mouth washing. More diabetics tend to have snacks like cheese and bread, which is a caries-preventing habit. PMID:24719722

  8. American Dental Hygienists' Association

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    As the official website of the American Dental Hygienists' Association (ADHA), this site is a prime resource for dental health students and professionals. On the site, one can easily find industry news, content from professional journals, as well as information and offers for dental hygiene students. The ADHA site also provides Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) files for much of its content; most notably Single Topic Supplements under the Publications section. Students may find these supplements useful in supporting their curriculum-based studies while faculty will be interested in the value these documents may add to classroom discussions. The site also features continuing education opportunities, scholarship information and links to related sites over a cross section of government, library, and organizational resources.

  9. Dental amalgam: An update

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Ramesh; Wadhwani, Kulvinder Kaur; Tikku, Aseem Prakash; Chandra, Anil

    2010-01-01

    Dental amalgam has served as an excellent and versatile restorative material for many years, despite periods of controversy. The authors review its history, summarize the evidence with regard to its performance and offer predictions for the future of this material. The PubMed database was used initially; the reference list for dental amalgam featured 8641 articles and 13 publications dealing with recent advances in dental amalgam. A forward search was undertaken on selected articles and using some author names. For the present, amalgam should remain the material of choice for economic direct restoration of posterior teeth. When esthetic concerns are paramount, tooth-colored materials, placed meticulously, can provide an acceptable alternative. All alternative restorative materials and procedures, however, have certain limitations. PMID:21217947

  10. Drinks and dental health.

    PubMed

    Sorvari, R; Rytömaa, I

    1991-01-01

    The average daily requirement for water in man is 2-3 litres, of which more than half comes from drinks. Although the total consumption of various drinks is quite stable, the choices of beverages are slowly changing. In many Western countries e.g. the use of milk is declining while consumers drink greater amounts of soft drinks, including fruit juices and carbonated beverages. These changes may also affect dental health because of the potential risk of sugar and acid-containing drinks to cause dental caries and erosion. The effects of drinks in the human mouth are, however, strongly related to many individual factors and prediction of dental effects is therefore difficult. Anyway, there are risk patients who should be recognized, and risk products which should be noticed in product formulation. If attention is paid to such factors in the future harmful effects of drinks on teeth may be minimized. PMID:1775489

  11. Comparison of the dental education systems in Korea and Japan.

    PubMed

    Heo, Seok-Mo; Kim, K J; Kawamura, Makoto; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2004-04-01

    In recent years, international relationships in dentistry have grown stronger through journals, books, academies, seminars, researcher exchanges and so forth. Korea and Japan are neighbours in East Asia. However, no comparison of the dental education systems of the two countries has been published. Therefore, the authors have provided the present comparison to promote mutual understanding and to familiarise dentists around the world with dental education in these two countries. The number of dentists, life expectancy at birth, and number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) at age 12 years in Korea and Japan are summarised. PMID:15119795

  12. Reasons for use and non-use of dental services among people visiting a dental college hospital in India: A descriptive cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Devaraj, CG; Eswar, Pranati

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To find out the reasons for use and non-use of dental services among people visiting a dental college hospital in India. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out on 180 people, aged 15–65 years visiting the outpatient department of a dental college hospital in India. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data about the history of dental visits and reasons for use and non-use of dental services. Results: For a majority of the people (38.5%), time since the last dental visit was more than 2 years, and the main reason for visiting a dentist was dental pain (35.3%). Majority of the people had undergone extraction of teeth in their previous dental visit (44.3%). The major reason cited for not visiting a dentist was the presence of dental problem that was not severe enough to go to a dentist (43.1%). Conclusion: Majority of the people were “problem-oriented visitors” rather than “prevention oriented visitors.” PMID:23077423

  13. Performance of Dental Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Rekow, E.D.; Silva, N.R.F.A.; Coelho, P.G.; Zhang, Y.; Guess, P.; Thompson, V.P.

    2011-01-01

    The clinical success of modern dental ceramics depends on an array of factors, ranging from initial physical properties of the material itself, to the fabrication and clinical procedures that inevitably damage these brittle materials, and the oral environment. Understanding the influence of these factors on clinical performance has engaged the dental, ceramics, and engineering communities alike. The objective of this review is to first summarize clinical, experimental, and analytic results reported in the recent literature. Additionally, it seeks to address how this new information adds insight into predictive test procedures and reveals challenges for future improvements. PMID:21224408

  14. Dental education: a leadership challenge for dental educators and practitioners.

    PubMed

    Roth, Kathleen

    2007-08-01

    By all outward signs, the dental profession is prospering. However, signs of a looming crisis in dental education threaten the future effectiveness of the profession. Transforming dental education through the application of principles espoused by the ADEA Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education (CCI) is essential for securing the future of the profession. To meet the future oral health needs of the public, dental schools must retain their research mission and prepare students for evidence-based practice. To accomplish this, both the curricular content and the environment and approach to dental education must change. Besides the knowledge and abilities needed to care for a more diverse and aging population, future practitioners must possess tools needed to thrive in the world of small business and have the ethical foundation to conduct themselves as responsible professionals. Ensuring the future of the profession is a leadership challenge to be shared by both dental educators and practitioners. PMID:17687080

  15. Dental Care for a Child with Cleft Lip and Palate

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of this factsheet, click here How does cleft lip/palate affect the teeth? A cleft of the lip, gum (alveolus), and/or palate in the front ... future dental care? A child with a cleft lip/palate requires the same regular preventive and restorative ...

  16. Safety issues in dental x-ray technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Cooney; J. Rajan; G. Galvin; J. F. Malone

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation protocol for assessing the electrical, mechanical and radiological sfety aspects of intra-oral dental x-ray units in current use has been developed. No routine preventative maintenance or calibration is performed on any unit. Results indicate that over 50 % of the units are of old design and fall well below safety standards for equipment today.

  17. Aspirin Use and Post-operative Bleeding from Dental Extractions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. T. Brennan; M. A. Valerin; J. L. Noll; J. J. Napeńas; M. L. Kent; P. C. Fox; H. C. Sasser; P. B. Lockhart

    2008-01-01

    Aspirin is a common, chronically administered preventive treatment for cardiovascular disease, but is often discontinued prior to invasive dental procedures because of concern for bleeding complications. We hypothesized that aspirin does not cause increased bleeding following a single tooth extraction. Thirty-six healthy persons requiring a tooth extraction were randomized to receive 325 mg\\/day aspirin or placebo for 4 days. Cutaneous

  18. Changing dental images--from stone tablets to comic strips.

    PubMed

    Mandel, I D

    1989-06-01

    From deworming and tooth drawing to rehabilitation and prevention--the dentist's role has changed decidedly over the centuries. Dental images have changed as well. The perceptions of teeth and dentistry in myth and folklore, in art, literature, and popular cultural forms are varied, shifting, and reflective of both the growth of the profession and the fluxes and attitudinal changes in society. PMID:2738246

  19. Drugs that promote dental caries.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries result from erosion of tooth enamel or cementum by acidic substances produced by bacteria found in dental plaque. Caries can lead to pulp necrosis and tooth loss. Risk factors include certain dietary habits, poor oral hygiene, and dry mouth. Diabetes and Sjogren's syndrome can also promote dental caries. Psychotropic substances such as cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin and cannabis can promote dental caries. Many medicinal drugs facilitate the formation of dental caries, through various mechanisms; they include formulations with a high sugar content; drugs that cause dry mouth (especially antimuscarinics); drugs that lower the buccal pH (inhaled powders, etc.); and drugs that cause demineralisation (tetracyclines, etc.). In practice, patients (and parents) should be informed that some drugs can increase the risk of dental caries. They should be encouraged to adapt and reinforce dental hygiene, and advised to visit a dentist regularly. PMID:25802916

  20. Dental phobic patients' view of dental anxiety and experiences in dental care: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Kajsa H; Berggren, Ulf; Hallberg, Lillemor; Carlsson, Sven G

    2002-06-01

    Dental phobic patients' view of dental anxiety and experiences in dental care: a qualitative study The aim of this study was to explore and describe dental phobic patients' perceptions of their dental fear and experiences in dental care. The study sample consisted of 18 participants (12 women), with a mean age of 39.4 years, selected consecutively from patients applying for treatment at a specialized dental fear clinic in Göteborg, Sweden. Dental fear, assessed by the Dental Anxiety Scale, showed score levels well over established levels for severe dental fear. The method for sampling and analysis was inspired by the constant comparative method for Grounded Theory (GT). The thematized in-depth interviews took place outside the clinic and lasted for 1-1.5 h. All the interviews were conducted by the first author (KHA), audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Three higher-order categories were developed and labelled existential threat, vulnerability and unsupportive dentist. Existential threat was identified as the core category, describing the central meaning of the subjects' experiences in dental care. The core category included two dimensions, labelled threat of violation and threat of loss of autonomy and independence. The core category and the descriptive categories are integrated in a model framing the process of dental fear, as described by the informants. In conclusion, the onset of dental fear was commonly related to individual vulnerability and to traumatic dental care experiences, where perceived negative dentist behaviour played a significant role. The patient was caught in a 'vicious circle' that was difficult to break, and where fear and anxiety were maintained by negative expectations about treatment and about patient's own ability to cope in dental care situations. PMID:12000673

  1. Osteoradionecrosis prevention myths

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Michael J. E-mail: WahlMichaelJ@aol.com

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To critically analyze controversial osteoradionecrosis (ORN) prevention techniques, including preradiation extractions of healthy or restorable teeth and the use of prophylactic antibiotics or hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatments for preradiation and postradiation extractions. Methods: The author reviewed ORN studies found on PubMed and in other article references, including studies on overall ORN incidence and pre- and postradiation incidence, with and without prophylactic HBO or antibiotics. Results: Owing in part to more efficient radiation techniques, the incidence of ORN has been declining in radiation patients over the last 2 decades, but the prevention of ORN remains controversial. A review of the available literature does not support the preradiation extraction of restorable or healthy teeth. There is also insufficient evidence to support the use of prophylactic HBO treatments or prophylactic antibiotics before extractions or other oral surgical procedures in radiation patients. Conclusions: To prevent ORN, irradiated dental patients should maintain a high level of oral health. A preradiation referral for a dental evaluation and close collaboration by a multidisciplinary team can be invaluable for radiation patients. As with most other dental patients, restorable and healthy teeth should be retained in irradiated patients. The use of prophylactic HBO or antibiotics should be reconsidered for preradiation and postradiation extractions.

  2. FATIGUE OF DENTAL CERAMICS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. Data/sources The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Conclusions Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically-assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Clinical significance Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. PMID:24135295

  3. Dental plaque formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Burton Rosan; Richard J Lamont

    2000-01-01

    Dental plaque is a complex biofilm that accumulates on the hard tissues (teeth) in the oral cavity. Although over 500 bacterial species comprise plaque, colonization follows a regimented pattern with adhesion of initial colonizers to the enamel salivary pellicle followed by secondary colonization through interbacterial adhesion. A variety of adhesins and molecular interactions underlie these adhesive interactions and contribute to

  4. Dental Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yao-Sheng; Ho, Yi-Ching; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Chuang, Ching-Cheng; Tsai, Jui-che; Lin, Kun-Feng; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2013-01-01

    This review paper describes the applications of dental optical coherence tomography (OCT) in oral tissue images, caries, periodontal disease and oral cancer. The background of OCT, including basic theory, system setup, light sources, spatial resolution and system limitations, is provided. The comparisons between OCT and other clinical oral diagnostic methods are also discussed. PMID:23857261

  5. Undergraduate Dental Hygiene

    E-print Network

    Bristol, University of

    of oral disease. Specialising in the treatment and monitoring of periodontal (gum) health, they are responsible for developing patients' oral hygiene practices. Undertaking detailed clinical procedures that patients are educated and motivated to maintain their periodontal and oral health. Dental hygienists

  6. Skylab Dental Examination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Skylab 2 Commander Charles Conrad is seen undergoing a dental examination by the Medical Officer, Joseph Kerwin in the Skylab Medical Facility. In the absence of an examination chair, Conrad simply rotated his body to an upside down position to facilitate the procedure.

  7. The Dental Admissions Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myslinski, Norbert R.; Jeffrey, Robert I.

    1985-01-01

    A survey of Canadian and US dental school admissions offices concerning their use of the admissions interview revealed that use of the interview is increasing, interviewers are generally untrained, and schools use the interview to assess applicants' character, motivation, communication ability, knowledge, and intelligence. (MSE)

  8. Issues in financing dental care for the elderly.

    PubMed

    Jones, J A; Adelson, R; Niessen, L C; Gilbert, G H

    1990-01-01

    The elderly make up an increasingly larger segment of the patient population in dental practices. This article reviews recent epidemiologic, demographic, and health services research, and concludes that significant segments of the elderly are at high risk for oral disease and/or limited access to dental treatment, and consequently warrant classification as high-risk groups for policy considerations. It then proposes policy options to the dental community and public decision makers. Oral care can be viewed as having three components. Two basic components are the primary care component--which includes diagnostic, preventive restorative, and periodontal care--and the acute care component--i.e., the treatment of oral pain, trauma, and infection. The third, rehabilitative component, has to do with the restoration of oral function, including prosthodontics and cosmetic dentistry. Viewing dental care in this perspective may help link funding for dental primary care services with that for other primary health services, and link restoration of function and improvement of quality of life with similar health services, like hearing, vision, and social services. In addition, approaching dental care policy makers on several levels--i.e., federal, state, and local--will contribute to our ability as a profession, in the decades ahead, to meet the oral health needs of more elders: including the frail, those at high risk for oral disease, and those with limited access to care. PMID:2202826

  9. Total antioxidant capacity of saliva and dental caries

    PubMed Central

    Goodarzi, Mohammad T.; Hendi, Seyedeh S.; Kasraei, Shahin; Moghimbeigi, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Dental caries is one of the most common infectious diseases worldwide. Saliva has many functions in the oral cavity and is the first line defense against dental caries. Oxidative stress can affect initiation and progression of many inflammatory and infectious diseases such as dental caries. Thus the aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of saliva and dental caries. Study Design: 100 healthy high school students (50 female and 50 male) with age range of 15 -17 years were randomly selected, divided to four groups. Unstimulated whole saliva specimens were collected at the morning. TAC of saliva was evaluated by spectrophotometric assay. Statistical comparisons were performed using Student’s t-test, by SPSS 13. Results: The level of TAC was significantly higher in the saliva of caries active group relative to the caries free subjects. Statistical analysis for male and female groups showed a statistically significant reduction of TAC level in female group. Conclusion: TAC was higher in caries active group. Thus this result showed that total antioxidant capacity may influence in dental caries and activity can be measured by salivary factors and this may be helpful in preventive dentistry. Key words:Dental caries, saliva, total antioxidant capacity. PMID:23524431

  10. NOTICE TO NHS PATIENTS (February/ March 2014) The University of Cambridge Dental Practice, like all dental practices providing NHS dental

    E-print Network

    Talbot, James P.

    Dental Practice, like all dental practices providing NHS dental care, contracts with the Local Area Health Team (LAHT), previously the Primary Care Trust (PCT); to provide a fixed quantity of dental completed the allocation of dental treatment with just almost two months of the contract year to run

  11. Oral-dental concerns of the pediatric oncology patient

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, K.

    1989-01-01

    One of the main concerns of all disciplines in health care today is maintaining the patient's quality of life and comfort during cancer therapy. Oral complications resulting from radiation or chemotherapy can be expected in a large percentage of patients. Conducting a dental evaluation and performing treatment before therapy can help prevent or lessen potential complications. With preventive care and fewer infections, the patient will be able to communicate with friends and family, and optimum care and comfort can be provided.

  12. Social capital and dental pain in Brazilian northeast: a multilevel cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is limited evidence on possible associations between social determinants and dental pain. This study investigated the relationship of neighborhood and individual social capital with dental pain in adolescents, adults and the elderly. Methods A population-based multilevel study was conducted involving 624 subjects from 3 age groups: 15–19, 35–44 and 65–74 years. They were randomly selected from 30 census tracts in three cities in the State of Paraíba, Brazil. A two-stage cluster sampling was used considering census tracts and households as sampling units. The outcome of study was the presence of dental pain in the last 6 months. Information on dental pain, demographic, socio-economic, health-related behaviors, use of dental services, self-perceived oral health and social capital measures was collected through interviews. Participants underwent a clinical examination for assessment of dental caries. Neighborhood social capital was evaluated using aggregated measures of social trust, social control, empowerment, political efficacy and neighborhood safety. Individual social capital assessment included bonding and bridging social capital. Multilevel logistic regression was used to test the relationship of neighborhood and individual social capital with dental pain after sequential adjustment for covariates. Results Individuals living in neighborhoods with high social capital were 52% less likely to report dental pain than those living in neighborhoods with low social capital (OR?=?0.48, 95% CI?=?0.27-0.85). Bonding social capital (positive interaction) was independently associated with dental pain (OR?=?0.88, 95% CI?=?0.80-0.91). Last dental visit, self-perceived oral health and number of decayed teeth were also significantly associated with dental pain. Conclusions Our findings suggest that contextual and individual social capital are independently associated with dental pain. PMID:23289932

  13. Allied Dental Education: Past, Present, and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVore, Linda Rubinstein

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the status of the three allied dental disciplines (dental assisting, dental technology, and dental hygiene) gives a historical overview on allied dental programs, assesses their current status and enrollment trends, identifies critical issues affecting educational programs, and outlines a framework for innovation in recruitment and…

  14. Trends in Dentistry and Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valachovic, Richard W.; Weaver, Richard G.; Sinkford, Jeanne C.; Haden, N. Karl

    2001-01-01

    Compiled from many of the surveys that the American Dental Education Association routinely publishes, along with data from surveys conducted by the American Dental Association and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, presents statistical tables and descriptive text on trends among dental patients, among dental practitioners, and in dental

  15. Involving Parents in Their Children's Dental Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Donna

    1998-01-01

    Asserts that parent education is vital to good dental hygiene for the whole family. Discusses what Head Start staffers can do to ensure that children's dental needs are being met, particularly in assisting parents with taking responsibility for children's dental hygiene. Covers dental care tips for parents, questions and answers about dental

  16. Prevalence of Dental Fear and Anxiety amongst Patients in Selected Dental Clinics in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ofori, Marian A.; Adu-Ababio, F.; Nyako, E. A.; Ndanu, Tom A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To find out the prevalence of dental anxiety and fear amongst patients in various selected dental clinics in Accra, Ghana. Study design: Dental patients (n = 279) who had either been exposed to dental treatments or had no prior dental exposure, attending four selected dental clinics in Accra were randomly sampled. They were interviewed…

  17. Prevalence of dental caries among 12–14 year old children in Qatar

    PubMed Central

    Al-Darwish, Mohammed; El Ansari, Walid; Bener, Abdulbari

    2014-01-01

    Background To ensure the oral health of a population, clinicians must deliver appropriate dental services, and local communities need to have access to dental care facilities. However, establishment of this infrastructure must be based on reliable information regarding disease prevalence and severity in the target population. Objectives The aims of this study were to measure the incidence of dental caries in school children aged 12–14 throughout Qatar, including the influence of socio-demographic factors. Materials and methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in Qatar from October 2011 to March 2012. A total of 2113 children aged 12–14 were randomly selected from 16 schools located in different geographic areas. Three calibrated examiners using World Health Organization (WHO) criteria to diagnose dental caries performed the clinical examinations. Data analyses were subsequently conducted. Results The mean decayed, missing, and filled teeth index values were respectively 4.62 (±3.2), 4.79 (±3.5), and 5.5 (±3.7), for 12, 13, and 14 year-old subjects. Caries prevalence was 85%. The mandibular incisors and canines were least affected by dental caries, while maxillary and mandibular molars exhibited the highest incidence of dental caries. Dental caries were affected by socio-demographic factors; significant differences were detected between female and male children, where more female children showed dental caries than male children. In addition, children residing in semi-urban areas showed more dental caries than in urban areas. Conclusion Results indicated that dental caries prevalence among school children in Qatar has reached critical levels, and is influenced by socio-demographic factors. The mean decayed, missing, and filled teeth values obtained in this study were the second highest detected in the Eastern Mediterranean region. PMID:25057232

  18. Dental Procedures, Oral Practices, and Associated Anxiety: A Study on Late-teenagers

    PubMed Central

    Bhola, Rahul; Malhotra, Reema

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The study aims to determine the degree of anxiety pertaining to dental procedures and various oral hygiene practices among college teenagers. Methods Corah's Modified Dental Anxiety Scale was administered on a randomly chosen sample of 100 Indian college students (50 males and 50 females) of Delhi University, belonging to the age group of 17–20 years. Results Descriptive statistical computations revealed 12.14 years as the mean age of first dental visit, with moderately high levels of anxiety (60.75%) for various dental procedures among the Indian teenagers and 5% lying in the “phobic or extremely anxious” category. With merely 4.16% people going for regular consultations, general check-ups evoked 78.3% anxiety and having an injection or a tooth removed was perceived as the most threatening. The sample subgroup not using mouthwash and mouthspray, smokers, and alcohol drinkers with improper oral hygiene practices experienced much higher anxiety towards routine dental procedures. Conclusion The majority of the Indian youngsters had an evasive attitude of delaying dental treatment. The core problems lay in deficient health care knowledge, lack of patient-sensitive pedagogy to train dental professionals, inaccessibility of services, and a dismissive attitude towards medical help. The feelings of fear and anxiety prevalent among the Indian youth offer significant insights into causes and preventive measures for future research and practice. Methods of education and motivation could be developed to dissipate the anxiety amongst Indian teenagers that prevent routine dental visits and maintenance of adequate oral hygiene. PMID:25379373

  19. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  20. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  1. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  2. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...licensed prior to practicing. The existing State dental hygiene licensure processes meet the intent and purpose...status or graduation from an accredited or approved dental hygiene or dental assisting education program. 2. For...

  3. Microbial contamination of used dental handpieces.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gordon; Smith, Andrew

    2014-09-01

    Microbial contamination of used, unprocessed internal components of dental handpieces (HPs) was assessed. HPs were dismantled aseptically, immersed in phosphate-buffered saline, ultrasonicated, and cultured. A median of 200 CFU per turbine (n = 40), 400 CFU per spray channel (n = 40), and 1000 CFU per item of surgical gear (n = 20) was detected. Isolates included oral streptococci, Pseudomonas spp, and Staphylococcus aureus. Recovery of S aureus confirms the need for appropriate HP cleaning and sterilization after each patient to prevent cross-infection. PMID:25179340

  4. Dental-service Dental Radiation Safety and Protection: Program guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-27

    The primary purpose of the program guide for Dental Radiation Safety and Protection is to assist VA dental personnel in developing radiologic procedures that ensure maximum safety for their patients and themselves. In order to do this, the authors have included a summary of the biological hazards associated with exposure to x-radiation, provided information on patient exposure levels associated with dental X-ray units, and explained the methods for reducing patient and staff exposure to X-rays.

  5. Gender differences in practice patterns for diagnosis and treatment of dental caries: Findings from The Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Joseph L.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Rouisse, Kathleen M.; McClelland, Jocelyn; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives A number of articles have addressed gender differences in the productivity of dentists, but little is known about differences in practice patterns for caries management. This study compared the use of a comprehensive range of specific diagnostic methods, preventive agents, and restorative decision making for caries management between male and female dentists who were members of The Dental Practice-Based Research Network(DPBRN). Methods This study surveyed general dentists who were members of DPBRN and who practiced within the United States. The survey asked about dentist, practice, and patient characteristics, as well as prevention, assessment, and treatment of dental caries. Differences in years since dental school graduation, practice model, full/part-time status, and practice owner/employee were adjusted in the statistical models, before making conclusions about gender differences. Results Three hundred ninety-three male (84%) and seventy-three female (16%) dentists participated. Female dentists recommended at-home fluoride to a significantly larger proportion of their patients, whereas males had a preference for using in-office fluoride treatments with pediatric patients. Female dentists also choose to restore interproximal lesions at a significantly later stage of development, preferring to use preventive therapy more often at earlier stages of dental caries. There were few differences in diagnostic methods, time spent on or charges for restorative dentistry, and busyness of their practices. Conclusion DPBRN female dentists differ from their male counterparts in some aspects of the prevention, assessment, and treatment of dental caries, even with significant covariates taken into account. Practice patterns of female dentists suggest a greater caries preventive treatment philosophy. PMID:21454850

  6. Children’s Dental Health, School Performance and Psychosocial Well-Being

    PubMed Central

    Guarnizo-Herreńo, Carol Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of dental health on school performance and psychosocial well-being in a nationally representative sample of children in the US. Study design We analyzed data from the 2007 National Survey of Children’s Health for 40,752– 41,988 children. The effects of dental problems and maternal-rated dental health on school performance and psychosocial well-being outcomes were evaluated using regression models adjusting for demographic, socioeconomic, and health characteristics. Results Dental problems were significantly associated with reductions in school performance and psychosocial well-being. Children with dental problems were more likely to have problems at school (OR=1.52; 95% CI: 1.37–1.72) and to miss school (OR=1.42; 95% CI: 1.23–1.64) and were less likely to do all required homework (OR=0.76; 95% CI: 0.68–0.85). Dental problems were associated with shyness, unhappiness, feeling of worthlessness, and reduced friendliness. The effects of dental problems on unhappiness and feeling of worthlessness were largest for adolescents between 15 and 17 years. Conclusion Preventing and treating dental problems and improving dental health may benefit child academic achievement and cognitive and psychosocial development. PMID:22727866

  7. Open wide: looking into the safety culture of dental school clinics.

    PubMed

    Ramoni, Rachel; Walji, Muhammad F; Tavares, Anamaria; White, Joel; Tokede, Oluwabunmi; Vaderhobli, Ram; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2014-05-01

    Although dentists perform highly technical procedures in complex environments, patient safety has not received the same focus in dentistry as in medicine. Cultivating a robust patient safety culture is foundational to minimizing patient harm, but little is known about how dental teams view patient safety or the patient safety culture within their practice. As a step toward rectifying that omission, the goals of this study were to benchmark the patient safety culture in three U.S. dental schools, identifying areas for improvement. The extensively validated Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture (MOSOPS), developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, was administered to dental faculty, dental hygienists, dental students, and staff at the three schools. Forty-seven percent of the 328 invited individuals completed the survey. The "Teamwork" category received the highest marks and "Patient Care Tracking and Follow-Up" and "Leadership Support for Patient Safety" the lowest. Only 48 percent of the respondents rated systems and processes in place to prevent/catch patient problems as good/excellent. All patient safety dimensions received lower marks than in medical practices. These findings and the inherent risk associated with dental procedures lead to the conclusion that dentistry in general, and academic dental clinics in particular, stands to benefit from an increased focus on patient safety. This first published use of the MOSOPS in a dental clinic setting highlights both clinical and educational priorities for improving the safety of care in dental school clinics. PMID:24789834

  8. Dental patient preferences and choice in clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Fukai, Kakuhiro; Yoshino, Koichi; Ohyama, Atsushi; Takaesu, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    In economics, the concept of utility refers to the strength of customer preference. In health care assessment, the visual analogue scale (VAS), the standard gamble, and the time trade-off are used to measure health state utilities. These utility measurements play a key role in promoting shared decision-making in dental care. Individual preference, however, is complex and dynamic. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between patient preference and educational intervention in the field of dental health. The data were collected by distributing questionnaires to employees of two companies in Japan. Participants were aged 18-65 years and consisted of 111 males and 93 females (204 in total). One company (Group A) had a dental program of annual check-ups and health education in the workplace, while the other company (Group B) had no such program. Statistical analyses were performed with the t-test and Chi-square test. The questionnaire items were designed to determine: (1) oral health-related quality of life, (2) dental health state utilities (using VAS), and (3) time trade-off for regular dental check-ups. The percentage of respondents in both groups who were satisfied with chewing function, appearance of teeth, and social function ranged from 23.1 to 42.4%. There were no significant differences between groups A and B in the VAS of decayed, filled, and missing teeth. The VAS of gum bleeding was 42.8 in Group A and 51.3 in Group B (p<0.05). The percentage of persons having a regular dental check-up every three months was 34.1 and 31.3% in Groups A and B respectively. These results suggest that low preference results from lack of opportunity or utilization of dental care in the worksite. Ascertaining the factors involved in patient preference may have significant potential benefits in shared decision-making. PMID:22790334

  9. Importance of Dental Records in Forensic Dental Identification

    PubMed Central

    Waleed, Petro; Baba, Feras; Alsulami, Salem; Tarakji, Bassel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The patient’s record maintains all the diagnostic information with regards to patients and contains valuable information that can be beneficial to the dentist as well as legal authorities during forensic human identification. Aim: Objective of the study was to compare dental records with an ideal dental record form, as well as to compare between dental records of private clinics and academic hospitals and to assess the awareness and the knowledge of the dentists regarding the maintenance of their dental records accurate for medico-legal purposes. Material and Methods: A comparative cross-sectional study between records kept in private clinics and academic teaching hospitals in Khartoum locality. Results: Our results showed that Students are more likely to encounter accurate dental records more than dentists in private clinics. In conclusion Students are more aware regarding medicolegal purposes of maintenance of dental records. Accurate maintenance of dental records is more among dental students. Therefore, private clinics encounter dental records as financial documents.

  10. 2013 AAHA dental care guidelines for dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Holmstrom, Steven E; Bellows, Jan; Juriga, Stephen; Knutson, Kate; Niemiec, Brook A; Perrone, Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    Veterinary dentistry is constantly progressing. The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines for the practice of companion animal dentistry for the veterinary profession. Dental care is necessary to provide optimum health and optimize quality of life. Untreated diseases of the oral cavity are painful and can contribute to local and systemic diseases. This article includes guidelines for preventive oral health care, client communication, evaluation, dental cleaning, and treatment. In addition, materials and equipment necessary to perform a medically appropriate procedure are described. PMID:23443202

  11. Your Dental Visit: What to Expect

    MedlinePLUS

    ... professional dental cleaning is to remove the hard calculus (also called tartar) from above and just below ... home removes plaque. Only dental instruments can remove calculus. Some dental hygienists use ultrasonic instruments to blast ...

  12. 21 CFR 868.5820 - Dental protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental protector. 868.5820 Section 868.5820...DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5820 Dental protector. (a) Identification. A dental protector is a device intended to...

  13. 21 CFR 868.5820 - Dental protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental protector. 868.5820 Section 868.5820...DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5820 Dental protector. (a) Identification. A dental protector is a device intended to...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5820 - Dental protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental protector. 868.5820 Section 868.5820...DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5820 Dental protector. (a) Identification. A dental protector is a device intended to...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5820 - Dental protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental protector. 868.5820 Section 868.5820...DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5820 Dental protector. (a) Identification. A dental protector is a device intended to...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5820 - Dental protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental protector. 868.5820 Section 868.5820...DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5820 Dental protector. (a) Identification. A dental protector is a device intended to...

  17. Dental Hygiene Program 2014 Admission Application Instructions

    E-print Network

    Dental Hygiene Program 2014 Admission Application Instructions These instructions have been prepared for applicants to The Ohio State University Dental Hygiene Program. Please read these instructions carefully before completing the online application. Complete information about the dental hygiene program

  18. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental amalgamator is a device,...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental amalgamator is a device,...

  20. 42 CFR 483.55 - Dental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...obtaining routine and 24-hour emergency dental care. (a) Skilled nursing...of this part, routine and emergency dental services to meet the needs of...additional amount for routine and emergency dental services; (3) Must if...

  1. 42 CFR 483.55 - Dental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...obtaining routine and 24-hour emergency dental care. (a) Skilled nursing...of this part, routine and emergency dental services to meet the needs of...additional amount for routine and emergency dental services; (3) Must if...

  2. 42 CFR 483.55 - Dental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...obtaining routine and 24-hour emergency dental care. (a) Skilled nursing...of this part, routine and emergency dental services to meet the needs of...additional amount for routine and emergency dental services; (3) Must if...

  3. 42 CFR 483.55 - Dental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...obtaining routine and 24-hour emergency dental care. (a) Skilled nursing...of this part, routine and emergency dental services to meet the needs of...additional amount for routine and emergency dental services; (3) Must if...

  4. 42 CFR 483.55 - Dental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...obtaining routine and 24-hour emergency dental care. (a) Skilled nursing...of this part, routine and emergency dental services to meet the needs of...additional amount for routine and emergency dental services; (3) Must if...

  5. Medical Emergency Education in American Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Morris S.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    American dental schools were surveyed to determine the state of development of programs in medical emergencies in the dental curriculum. Results show that programs for teaching the diagnosis and management of medical emergencies are seriously underdeveloped in dental schools. (MLW)

  6. Dental caries prevalence, oral health knowledge and practice among indigenous Chepang school children of Nepal

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chepang communities are one of the most deprived ethnic communities in Nepal. According to the National Pathfinder Survey, dental caries is a highly prevalent childhood disease in Nepal. There is no data concerning the prevalence of caries along with knowledge, attitude and oral hygiene practices among Chepang schoolchildren. The objectives of this study were to 1) record the prevalence of dental caries 2) report experience of dental pain 3) evaluate knowledge, attitude and preventive practices on oral health of primary Chepang schoolchildren. Method A cross sectional epidemiological study was conducted in 5 government Primary schools of remote Chandibhanjyang Village Development Committee (VDC) in Chitwan district. Ethical approval was taken from the Institutional Review Board within the Research Department of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Tribhuvan University. Consent was obtained from parents for conducting clinical examination and administrating questionnaire. Permission was taken from the school principal in all schools. Data was collected using a pretested questionnaire on 131 schoolchildren aged 8-16-year- olds attending Grade 3–5. Clinical examination was conducted on 361 school children aged 5–16 –year-olds attending grade 1–5. Criteria set by the World Health Organization (1997) was used for caries diagnosis. The questionnaires, originally constructed in English and translated into Nepali were administered to the schoolchildren by the researchers. SPSS 11software was used for data analysis. Results Caries prevalence for 5–6 –year-old was above the goals recommended by WHO and Federation of Dentistry international (FDI) of less than 50% caries free children. Caries prevalence in 5-6-year-olds was 52% and 12-13-year-olds was 41%. The mean dmft/DMFT score of 5–6 –year-olds and 12 -13-year -olds was 1.59, 0.31 and 0.52, 0.84 respectively. The DMFT scores increased with age and the d/D component constituted almost the entire dmft/DMFT index. About 31% of 8-16-year-olds school children who participated in the survey reported having suffered from oral pain. Further, the need for treatment of decayed teeth was reported at 100%. About 76% children perceived teeth as an important component of general health and 75% reported it was required to eat. A total 93% children never visited a dentist or a health care service. Out of 56% children reporting cleaning their teeth daily, only 24% reported brushing their teeth twice daily. About 86% of the children reported using toothbrush and toothpaste to clean their teeth. Although 61% children reported to have received oral health education, 82% children did not know about fluoride and its benefit on dental health. About 50% children reported bacteria as the main cause of tooth decay and 23% as not brushing teeth for gingivitis. Frequency of sugar exposure was low; 75% of children reported eating sugar rich food once daily. Conclusions Caries prevalence of 5–6 –year- old Chepang school children is above the recommended target set by FDI/WHO. The study reported 31% schoolchildren aged 8-16-year old suffered oral pain and decayed component constituted almost the entire dmft/DMFT index. The brushing habit was reportedly low with only 24% of the children brushing twice daily. A nationwide scientifically proven, cost effective school based interventions is needed for prevention and control of caries in schoolchildren in Nepal. PMID:23672487

  7. A Kansas Policymaker's Guide to Registered Dental Practitioners: Inspired by Global Practices, a Homegrown Solution to Kansas' Oral Health Crisis

    E-print Network

    Appelhanz, Christie

    2013-05-31

    Mid-level dental providers provide preventive and restorative care in more than 50 countries around the world. Their quality of care and acceptance by the public has been well-documented as a safe and effective way to improve access to dental care...

  8. Who will pass the dental OSCE? Comparison of the Angoff and the borderline regression standard setting methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Schoonheim-Klein; A. Muijtjens; L. Habets; M. Manogue; C. van der Vleuten; U. van der Velden

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Aim of this study is to elucidate which standard setting method is optimal to prevent incompetent students to pass and competent students to fail a dental Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Material and methods: An OSCE with 14 test stations was used to assess the performance of 119 third year dental students in a training group practice. To establish

  9. Dental public health for the 21st century: implications for specialty education and practice.

    PubMed

    Shulman, J D; Niessen, L C; Kress, G C; DeSpain, B; Duffy, R

    1998-01-01

    A panel of public health practitioners sponsored by the Health Resources and Services Administration met December 6-8, 1994, to examine current roles and responsibilities for dental public health workers and to recommend changes in education and training to meet challenges posed by an evolving health care system. Overall, at least the same number, if not more, dental public health personnel will be needed in the future. While some new roles were identified, the panel felt that only small numbers of personnel will be needed to fill these new roles. Not all of these roles necessarily require a dental degree. The panel felt that a need exists for more academicians for dental schools, schools of public health, dental public health residencies, and dental hygiene programs; oral epidemiologists and health services researchers; health educators; and specialists in utilization review/outcomes assessment, dental informatics, nutrition, program evaluation, and prevention. To meet these personnel needs: (1) dental public health residency programs should be structured to meet the educational needs of working public health dentists with MPH degrees through on-the-job residency programs; (2) the standards for advanced specialty education programs in dental public health should be made sufficiently flexible to include dentists who have advanced education and the requisite core public health courses; (3) flexible MPH degree programs must be available because of the rising debt of dental students and the decreased numbers of graduating dentists; (4) loan repayment should be available for dentists who have pursued public health training and are working in state or local health departments; and (5) standards for advanced education in dental public health should be developed for dental hygienists. PMID:9661106

  10. Dental Assisting Education in California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Industrial Education.

    A survey of 22 dental assisting programs showed an average of 1,124 hours of instruction in dental assisting for 15 four-semester, 955 for three three-semester, and 1,042 for four two-semester programs. The average instructional hours for the four-semester programs were 48 in introduction to dental assisting, 179 in the life sciences, 221 in the…

  11. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872...DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a... Endosseous dental implant accessories are manually...of endosseous dental implants and abutments,...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872...DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a... Endosseous dental implant accessories are manually...of endosseous dental implants and abutments,...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872...DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a... Endosseous dental implant accessories are manually...of endosseous dental implants and abutments,...

  14. Cooling profile following prosthetic preparation of 1-piece dental implants.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Omer; Gabay, Eran; Machtei, Eli E

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of water irrigation on heat dissipation kinetics following abutment preparation of 1-piece dental implants. UNO 1-piece dental implants were mounted on Plexiglas apparatus clamping the implant at the collar. T-type thermocouple was attached to the first thread of the implant and recorded thermal changes at 100 millisecond intervals. Implants were prepared using highspeed dental turbine at 400,000 RPM with a coarse diamond bur. Once temperature reached 47 degrees C, abutment preparation was discontinued. Thirty implants were divided into 2 groups. Group A: Passive cooling without water irrigation. Group B: Cooling with turbine's water spray adjacent to the implant (30 mL/min). The following parameters were measured: T47 (time from peak temperature to 47 degrees C), T50%, T75% (time until the temperature amplitude decayed by 50% and 75%, respectively), dTemp50%/dt decay, and dTemp75%/dt decay (cooling rate measured at 50% and 75% of amplitude decay, respectively). Water spray irrigation significantly reduced T47 (1.37+/-0.29 seconds vs 19.97+/-3.06 seconds, P<0.0001), T50% (3.04+/-0.34 seconds vs 27.37+/-2.56 seconds, P<0.0001), and T75% (5.71+/-0.57 seconds vs 57.61+/-5.47 seconds, P<0.0001). Water spray irrigation also increased cooling capacity ninefold: dTemp50%/dt decay (4.14+/-0.61 degrees C/s vs 0.48+/-0.06 degrees C/s, P<0.0001), and dTemp50%/dt decay (1.70+/-0.29 degrees C/s vs 0.19+/-0.03 degrees C/s, P<0.0001). The continuous use of water spray adjacent to the abutment following the cessation of implant preparation might prove beneficial for rapid cooling of the implant. PMID:20521943

  15. The effect of xylitol on dental caries and oral flora

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Prathibha Anand; Nayak, Ullal Anand; Khandelwal, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries, the most chronic disease affecting mankind, has been in the limelight with regard to its prevention and treatment. Professional clinical management of caries has been very successful in cases of different severities of disease manifestations. However, tertiary management of this disease has been gaining attention, with numerous methods and agents emerging on a daily basis. Higher intake of nutritive sweeteners can result in higher energy intake and lower diet quality and thereby predispose an individual to conditions like obesity, cardiovascular disorders, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Non-nutritive sweeteners have gained popularity as they are sweeter and are required in substantially lesser quantities. Xylitol, a five-carbon sugar polyol, has been found to be promising in reducing dental caries disease and also reversing the process of early caries. This paper throws light on the role and effects of various forms of xylitol on dental caries and oral hygiene status of an individual. PMID:25422590

  16. [Alcopops: systemic and dental consequences].

    PubMed

    Michel, P-A; Loing, A; Maničre, M-C

    2010-12-01

    Alcopops are highly-sweetened premixed spirit-based drinks. Ready to drink and sold in small bottles, it contains between 3 and 5 % alcohol by volume, sugars, citric and malic acid with a pH around 3. Their success is attributed to the fact that spirits are more palatable and better tasting with a fruity flavour, similar to non alcoholic beverages. Especially aimed at female teenagers in search for the alcohol effect while disliking its strong taste, it has been sold in Europe for 15 years. So called "designer drinks" are often consumed during the weekend, binge-drinked with some friends. The frequent consumption has severe consequences on general health, which includes body overweight due to the amount of sugar, and alcohol-related consequences of utmost importance considering consumer's young age. Moreover, alcopops may introduce to the consumption of alcohol and induce addiction. Consequences on oral health may include dental erosion. Erosion is a premature loss of mineralized tissues (enamel and dentin), due to the contact with acids. The low pH of these drinks and the increased risk of vomiting because of an excessive alcohol intake could potentially lead to substantial damage to the teeth. The treatment depends on the erosion stage. The medical professionals should be aware of the possible implications relating to alcopops' consumption. Some preventive advices can be given to the teenagers and to their parents: reduce acids consumptions, do not brush the teeth immediately after an acid drink and regularly visit a dentist. PMID:20926267

  17. Delta Dental of Michigan Dental Benefit Highlights for

    E-print Network

    Dentist Delta Dental Premier® Dentist Non- participating Dentist Plan Pays Plan Pays Plan Pays* Diagnostic services from a Nonparticipating Dentist, the percentages in this column indicate the portion of Delta Dental's Nonparticipating Dentist Fee that will be paid for those services. This Nonparticipating Dentist

  18. [Atraumatic restorative treatment in relation to pain, discomfort and dental treatment anxiety].

    PubMed

    Frencken, J E F M; Flohil, K A; de Baat, C

    2014-01-01

    Dental treatment anxiety usually develops during childhood due to a bad experience and the dental drill as well as the injection needle are the most common causes. The Atraumatic Restorative Treatment provides the opportunity to provoke little or no dental treatment anxiety because only hand instruments are used and local anaesthesia is seldom required. Several scientific studies have indicated that the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment causes less pain, discomfort and anxiety by comparison with conventional treatments. Therefore, the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment is considered to be promising for the treatment of carious lesions in anxious children and adults, and potentially also for patients suffering from dental treatment phobia. Furthermore, the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment may be indicated as the primary treatment method in children to prevent dental treatment anxiety and treatment under general anaesthesia. These conclusions must still be confirmed with responsible scientific research. PMID:25174188

  19. Satisfaction with school dental service provided by mobile dental squads.

    PubMed

    Othman, Noormi; Razak, Ishak Abdul

    2010-10-01

    Feedback on satisfaction with dental care is vital for continuous improvement of the service delivery process and outcome. The objective of this study was to assess the satisfaction with school dental service (SDS) provided via mobile dental squads in Selangor, Malaysia, under 4 domains of satisfaction: patient-personnel interaction, technical competency, administrative efficiency, and clinic setup using self-administered questionnaires. Among the 607 participants who had received treatment, 62% were satisfied with the services provided. In terms of domains, technical competency achieved the highest satisfaction score, whereas clinic setup was ranked the lowest. As for items within the domains, the most acceptable was "dental operator did not ask personal things which were not dentally related," whereas privacy of treatment was the least acceptable. In conclusion, whereas children were generally satisfied with the SDS, this study indicates that there are still areas for further improvement. PMID:20462854

  20. Probiotics in the dental practice: a review.

    PubMed

    Laleman, Isabelle; Teughels, Wim

    2015-03-01

    During the last decade an increased interest in alternative, preventive, and therapeutic strategies in dentistry has arisen. Probiotics are living microorganisms which, if administered in sufficient amounts, provide a health benefit to the host. Their precise mechanisms of action have not been identified, but they are able to interfere with the imbalance occurring in biofilm-associated infections. In other fields of medicine, mainly in gastroenterology, their usefulness is already proven. Concerning oral threats, probiotic bacteria may reduce the numbers of pathogens associated with dental caries (mutans streptococci). Clinically, results are encouraging, but further research is needed to demonstrate apparent effects of certain probiotic strains on oral health as well as their desired concentration and vehicle. The use of probiotics in prevention and treatment of caries, periodontal diseases, halitosis, and other oral diseases needs to be further investigated. PMID:25485319

  1. Dental Laboratory Technology Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard dental laboratory technology curriculum for both diploma programs and associate degree programs in technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level workers in the dental laboratory technology field. The general information section contains the…

  2. Denitrification in human dental plaque

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank Schreiber; Peter Stief; Armin Gieseke; Ines M Heisterkamp; Willy Verstraete; Dirk de Beer; Paul Stoodley

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Microbial denitrification is not considered important in human-associated microbial communities. Accordingly, metabolic investigations of the microbial biofilm communities of human dental plaque have focused on aerobic respiration and acid fermentation of carbohydrates, even though it is known that the oral habitat is constantly exposed to nitrate (NO3-) concentrations in the millimolar range and that dental plaque houses bacteria that

  3. Dental Chairside Technique. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apfel, Maura; Weaver, Trudy Karlene

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: local anesthesia; dental office emergencies; oral hygiene;…

  4. Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    The handbook contains laws, rules, and regulations of the New York State Education Department that govern dentistry and dental hygiene practice in the state. It describes licensure requirements and includes complete application forms and instructions for obtaining license and first registration as a dentist and dental hygienist. Applicants are…

  5. Experience of dental caries and its effects on early dental occlusion: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Luzzi, Valeria; Fabbrizi, Miriam; Coloni, Camilla; Mastrantoni, Cristina; Mirra, Carla; Bossů, Maurizio; Vestri, Annarita; Polimeni, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    Summary Aim Describe the occurrence of dental caries in a sample of pre-school children and school children, aged 3 and 12, and study the possible association between caries and malocclusion. Methods We selected and analyzed the medical records of a sample of 588 patients who had their first dental examination at the Pediatric Dentistry Unit, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences of Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome. Results In the sample, 55.4% of the children had no decayed deciduous elements, while 44.6% had at least one decayed deciduous element. The prevalence of decayed permanent teeth was 10.2%, while 89.8% had no decayed permanent teeth. In the sample, 9.4% of the children showed advanced carious lesions, that needed tooth extraction and 6.6% needed a space maintainer for post-extractive interceptive treatment. In the sample, 26.7% of the examined patients had increased overjet, while 3.7% had decreased overjet and 25.4% of the sample had an increased overbite, 11, 2% had reduced over-bite values. A percentage over 10% of the sample had an anterior openbite in centric occlusion. The prevalence of posterior crossbite among entire samples was 19.8%. Conclusions Although the incidence of caries disease was high in the selected samples, the study did not show a statistically significant association between caries and clinical orthodontic abnormalities, except for the association between the midline deviation and the severe carious diseases, necessitating extraction. PMID:22238717

  6. Current trends in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants. PMID:24868501

  7. Psychometric measures of dental fear.

    PubMed

    Berggren, U; Carlsson, S G

    1984-10-01

    Four psychometric scales: Corah Dental Anxiety Scale (CDAS), a modified version of the Geer Fear Scale (GFS), the Health Locus of Control Scale (HLCS), and a Mood Adjective Check List (MACL), were studied with regard to their implications for dental fear. Swedish versions given to groups of fearful and non-fearful dental patients as well as non-patients showed satisfactory metric properties. Mean scores obtained were in most cases similar to those reported for original American versions, even though some indications of cultural differences were observed. The scales seem to reflect important aspects of dental fear, and they represent a valuable methodology in research on etiology and treatment of dental fear. PMID:6593151

  8. The American Dental Dream.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Nathan

    2014-09-25

    The American Dental Dream-the cultural desire for straight, white teeth-is difficult, if not impossible, for poor and working-class people to achieve. Using ethnographic fiction, autoethnography, poetry, and qualitative interviewing, I brush away the taken-for-granted assumptions about teeth. I explore the personal, relational, and structural consequences of this cultural desire, and show how social class writes itself on our bodies. I write these culture-centered teeth tales to show how one might cope with their teeth. PMID:25257392

  9. Eagles Direct Reimbursement Dental our dental plan is based on a calendar year. That means your

    E-print Network

    Pilyugin, Sergei S.

    Title Dental Eagles Direct Reimbursement Dental Y our dental plan is based on a calendar year. That means your benefits run from January 1 to December 31 each year. This dental plan pays by a dollar tier Dental Coverage Level: 16 Deductions* 24 Deductions* Employee Only $28.11 $18.74 Employee & Spouse

  10. The Prevalence of Dental Anxiety in Patients of a University Dental Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodmansey, Karl F.

    2005-01-01

    Dental anxiety remains a pervasive barrier to dental treatment for many individuals, including college-age patients. In this article, the author reviews dental anxiety and examines the usefulness of assessment instruments for identifying dental anxiety. Using 2 unique assessment instruments, he examines the prevalence of dental anxiety in his…

  11. UnitedHealthcare dental plan Voluntary Options PPO/covered dental services P4935

    E-print Network

    Bordenstein, Seth

    UnitedHealthcare dental plan Voluntary Options PPO/covered dental services P4935 NON of 16 years, limited to 1 per consecutive 60 months. General Services (incl. Emergency Treatment) 0% 0 dental plan provides that where two or more professionally acceptable dental treatments for a dental

  12. [Dentist's opinion about their dental education in Nijmegen, the Netherlands from 1990-1997].

    PubMed

    Verrijt, A H; van der Plaats, R E; Plasschaert, A J

    2000-01-01

    A questionnaire was sent to 328 dentists graduated from the University of Nijmegen in the period 1990-1998, to ask their opinion concerning the way they were prepared by dental education for their professional career. Comparison with similar data from Amsterdam Academic Centre for Dentistry has been carried out. The results show unanimity among graduates that they have been adequately prepared for the requirements in general dental practice as far as knowledge is concerned related to cariology, periodontology, crown and bridgework and dental radiology. They also have a positive assessment regarding other dental cognitive domains, except implantology. There is positive unanimity regarding their skills in various clinical areas. Shortcomings in dental education have been experienced in practice management and infection prevention, treatment of medically compromised patients, treatment of anxious patients and handicapped patients. Almost all responders have the opinion that they gained enough experience throughout their dental education to be competent to start their dental career independently. In general the Nijmegen graduates have a positive opinion concerning their dental education, although preparation for professional life could be strengthened in some specific areas. Comparison with ACTA-graduates shows that in both programmes the weakest areas are implantology and practice management. PMID:12621818

  13. Dental Curriculum Development in Developing Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phantumvanit, Prathip

    1996-01-01

    Since establishment of formal dental education in Southeast Asia, changes stemming from research and technology have led to dental curriculum changes. Development of the dental curriculum can be divided into three phases: disease oriented; health oriented; and community oriented. Evolution of these phases is traced in the dental curricula of Laos,…

  14. Delta Dental PPO Easy, Friendly, Accessible

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Delta Dental PPO SM ­ Easy, Friendly, Accessible We're pleased to be your partner in maintaining great oral health. The Delta Dental PPO* plan makes it easy for you to find a dentist, and easy about enrolling with Delta Dental: E HL_PPO_2col #73286 (rev. 5/13) · Save money with a Delta Dental PPO

  15. Delta Dental Program Highlights For Employees of

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    Delta Dental Program Highlights For Employees of The University of Oklahoma Basic Plan (PPO "Point-of-Service") This brochure provides a brief description of the most important features of your new Delta Dental dental benefits program. If you have more specific questions regarding your benefits, please contact Delta Dental

  16. January 2013 Delta Dental Program Highlights

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    January 2013 Delta Dental Program Highlights For Employees of The University of Oklahoma Basic Plan Delta Dental PPO - Point of Service This brochure provides a brief description of the most important features of your new Delta Dental dental benefits program. If you have more specific questions regarding

  17. The Dental Neglect Scale in adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Trilby Coolidge; Masahiro Heima; Elissa K Johnson; Philip Weinstein

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dental neglect has been found to be related to poor oral health, a tendency not to have had routine check-ups, and a longer period of time since the last dental appointment in samples of children and adults. The Dental Neglect Scale (DNS) has been found to be a valid measure of dental neglect in samples of children and adults,

  18. UK Dental Care Certificate of Coverage

    E-print Network

    Hayes, Jane E.

    UK Dental Care Certificate of Coverage July 2013 ­ June 2014 www.mc.uky.edu/Dentistry/patients/ukdental.html #12;UK Dental Care Plans Certificate of Coverage Employee Benefit Booklet This Certificate is issued and administered by UK Dental Care plans, for persons who have selected the UK Dental Care plan benefit structure

  19. Dental Informatics: An Emerging Biomedical Informatics Discipline

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Titus K. L. Schleyer

    2003-01-01

    Biomedical informatics is a maturing discipline. During the last forty years, it has developed into a research discipline of significant scale and scope. One of its subdisciplines, dental informatics, is beginning to emerge as its own entity. While there is a growing cadre of trained dental informaticians, dental faculty and administrators in general are not very familiar with dental informatics

  20. Sugar Industry Influence on the Scientific Agenda of the National Institute of Dental Research’s 1971 National Caries Program: A Historical Analysis of Internal Documents

    PubMed Central

    Kearns, Cristin E.; Glantz, Stanton A.; Schmidt, Laura A.

    2015-01-01

    Background In 1966, the National Institute of Dental Research (NIDR) began planning a targeted research program to identify interventions for widespread application to eradicate dental caries (tooth decay) within a decade. In 1971, the NIDR launched the National Caries Program (NCP). The objective of this paper is to explore the sugar industry’s interaction with the NIDR to alter the research priorities of the NIDR NCP. Methods and Findings We used internal cane and beet sugar industry documents from 1959 to 1971 to analyze industry actions related to setting research priorities for the NCP. The sugar industry could not deny the role of sucrose in dental caries given the scientific evidence. They therefore adopted a strategy to deflect attention to public health interventions that would reduce the harms of sugar consumption rather than restricting intake. Industry tactics included the following: funding research in collaboration with allied food industries on enzymes to break up dental plaque and a vaccine against tooth decay with questionable potential for widespread application, cultivation of relationships with the NIDR leadership, consulting of members on an NIDR expert panel, and submission of a report to the NIDR that became the foundation of the first request for proposals issued for the NCP. Seventy-eight percent of the sugar industry submission was incorporated into the NIDR’s call for research applications. Research that could have been harmful to sugar industry interests was omitted from priorities identified at the launch of the NCP. Limitations are that this analysis relies on one source of sugar industry documents and that we could not interview key actors. Conclusions The NCP was a missed opportunity to develop a scientific understanding of how to restrict sugar consumption to prevent tooth decay. A key factor was the alignment of research agendas between the NIDR and the sugar industry. This historical example illustrates how industry protects itself from potentially damaging research, which can inform policy makers today. Industry opposition to current policy proposals—including a World Health Organization guideline on sugars proposed in 2014 and changes to the nutrition facts panel on packaged food in the US proposed in 2014 by the US Food and Drug Administration—should be carefully scrutinized to ensure that industry interests do not supersede public health goals. PMID:25756179

  1. [Maintenance care for dental implant].

    PubMed

    Kamoi, K

    1989-10-01

    Dental implant has tried at the early stage in 19th century recovering an oral function and esthetics. Technological revolutions in biochemical and new materials have developed on the remarkable change in the dental implants, nowadays we call the three generation therapy for dental implantology. There are many kinds of methods and techniques in dental implants, however a lot of troublesome complication on the process of surgical phase, construction of prothodontics and prognosis of maintenance care. In the proceedings of this symposium, I would like to propose you how to manage the maintenance care for various kind of dental implants through the methodology and case presentations. Tendenay and future for dental implants The current outlook of dental implant has increasing supply and demand not only dentists but also patients. According to Japanese Welfare Ministry's report in 1987, average missing teeth over sixty years old generations are approximately 42% in accordance with NIDR (U.S.A.) research. They are missed on ten over teeth in full 28th teeth dentitions owing to dental caries and periodontal diseases. Generally speaking, latent implant patients are occupied on the same possibility of needs for dental implants both Japan and U.S.A. Management of maintenance care The patients hardly recognized the importance of plaque control for the maintenance care in the intraoral condition after implantation. Dentists and dental staffs must be instruct patients for importance of plaque removal and control, because they already had forgotten the habit of teeth cleaning, especially in the edenturous conditions. 1) Concept of establishment in oral hygiene. Motivation and instruction for patients include very important factors in dental implants as well as in periodontal diseases. Patients who could not achieve on good oral hygiene levels obtained no good results in the long term observations. To establish good oral hygiene are how to control supra plaque surrounding tissues with patient himself. Ultimate concept of implantology have supported common concordance with periodontal therapy. 2) Patients consent and co-operation the right of informed consent, agreement to treatment by the patient has been gaining increased importance to implantology. Even the patient has consent, they must co-operate the process of dental implant with co-therapist (Fig. 2). 3) The clinical examination of clinical parameters in dental implants. (1) Plaque Index (Silness & Loe 1964) and Plaque Control Record (0 Leary 1978) (Table 5). (2) Gingival inflammation (Fig. 3). Ordinarlly, Gingival Bleeding Index (GBI Ainamo & Bay 1975) and Papilla Bleeding Index (Saxer & Jühlemann 1975) are used. (3) The depth of peri-implant sulcus with the plastic probe. (NDU style) (Fig. 4).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2489287

  2. [Dental anatomy of dogs].

    PubMed

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate dog teeth anatomy as animal model for study of etiopathogenesis of caries disease and physiological tooth wear in human. After examining the dog's dental system, following conclusions were drawn: the dog has 42 permanent teeth, which are distributed over the dental arches not equally, and so the upper dentition consists of 20, and the lower of 22 teeth. The largest are considered upper fourth premolar and lower first molars, which are called discordant teeth. Between discordant teeth and fangs a dog has an open bite, which is limited to the top and bottom conical crown premolar teeth. Thus, in the closed position of the jaws, behind this occlusion is limited by discordant teeth, just in contact are smaller in size two molars. Only large dog's molars in a valid comparison can be likened to human molars, which allows us to use them in an analog comparison between them with further study of the morphological features ensure durability short-crown teeth and their predisposition to caries. PMID:25617107

  3. Cross-border dental care: 'dental tourism' and patient mobility.

    PubMed

    Turner, L

    2008-05-24

    Patient mobility is increasing. 'Dental tourism' is driven by numerous factors. These factors include the high cost of local care, delays in obtaining access to local dentists, competent care at many international clinics, inexpensive air travel, and the Internet's capacity to link 'customers' to 'sellers' of health-related services. Though dental tourism will benefit some patients, increased patient mobility comes with numerous risks. Lack of access to affordable and timely local care plays a significant role in prompting patients to cross borders and receive dental care outside their local communities. PMID:18500297

  4. Pain Management for Nerve Injury following Dental Implant Surgery at Tokyo Dental College Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Ken-ichi; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Kaneko, Yuzuru

    2012-01-01

    By allowing reconstruction of compromised occlusion, dental implants contribute to an improvement in quality of life (QOL) and diet. Injury to a nerve during such treatment, however, can result in a sudden decline in QOL. And once a nerve has been injured, the chances of a full recovery are slim unless the damage is only slight. If such damage causes neuropathic pain severe enough to prevent sleep, the patient's QOL will deteriorate dramatically. While damage to skin tissue or bone invariably heals over time, damage to nerves does not, indicating the need to avoid such injury while performing implant insertion, for example. This means not relying solely on X-ray images, which can be rather unclear, but also using computed tomography to allow preoperative planning and intraoperative execution to be performed as accurately as possible. Moreover, if sensory damage does occur it is essential to avoid breaking the bond of trust between dentist and patient by giving false assurances of recovery. In such cases, appropriate measures must be taken promptly. This paper describes pain management for nerve injury following dental implant surgery at the Orofacial Pain Center of Tokyo Dental College Suidoubashi Hospital. PMID:22899928

  5. Oral Health Literacy and Oral Health Status among Adults Attending Dental College Hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    Haridas, Reshmi; S, Supreetha; Ajagannanavar, Sunil Lingaraj; Tikare, Shreyas; Maliyil, Mathew J; Kalappa, Amrutha Ammanichanda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Low health literacy is one among many reasons why preventable diseases remain so common and why people often do not adopt healthy practices. It is important to detect patients with inadequate oral health literacy (OHL) and to improve the level of communication between the provider and the patient. This study was aimed to determine the relationship between OHL with selected socio-demographic variables and oral health status among adults in Virajpet, Karnataka, India. Materials and Methods: A convenience sample of 187 subjects from the out-patient department of Coorg-Institute of Dental Sciences Hospital administered the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Dentistry (REALD-30). The demographic variables and the oral health status were recorded for every participant using World Health Organization oral health survey proforma (1997). Data were analyzed using t-tests, analysis of variance, correlations and Kruskal–Wallis test. Results: The associations between REALD-30 scores and gender, age, and ethnicity were not statistically significant. Significant associations were found between REALD scores and the following oral-health related variables: Temperomandibular joint problems, prevalence of prosthetic need, CPI (Community Periodontal Index) and loss of attachment scores. REALD-30 scores were negatively correlated with DMFT (Decayed, Missing and Filled Teeth) scores and DAI (Dental Aesthetic Index) scores. Conclusion: OHL was not associated with sex, age, or ethnicity in this sample of the Virajpet population. OHL was associated with oral health status. Lower OHL was associated with poorer oral health status. OHL instruments can be considered to be included as screening tools to identifying individuals or groups with poor oral health outcomes. PMID:25628486

  6. [The association of Streptococcus mutans with human dental caries (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Chan, Y; Hsu, W H

    1981-06-01

    To investigate association of Streptococcus mutans with human dental caries, 323 adolescent students of Chung Shan Medical & Dental college were examined for decayed missing filled of tooth (DMFT) and then plaques were taken from their first and second upper molar's approximal surface using sterilized dental floss for S. mutans isolation. The result showed that among the 269 caries-active individuals 246 (94.98%) had detectable S. mutans, whereas among the 64 caries-free individuals only 23 (35.93%) were found positive, which showed significant association between plaque levels of S. mutans and dental caries (p less than 0.0001). Although the value is a little higher than that found in other literatures but has no statistically significant difference. PMID:7307648

  7. Lingual arch appliance fabrication in the dental office.

    PubMed

    Ferdianakis, K; Laskou, M; Spyrou, L

    1998-01-01

    Lingual arch is a mandibular fixed bilateral space maintaining appliance. It prevents the first permanent molar from drifting forward and preserves the available space, especially the leeway space in mixed dentition cases. The purpose of the present article is to present a simplified way of lingual arch appliance fabrication in the dental office, which will result in effective space maintenance and time savings for both the patient and the dentist. PMID:9796495

  8. Dental depth profilometry using simultaneous frequency-domain infrared photothermal radiometry and laser luminescence for the diagnosis of dental caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaides, Lena; Garcia, Jose A.; Mandelis, Andreas; Abrams, Stephen H.

    2001-04-01

    Frequency-domain IR photothermal radiometry is introduced as a dynamic dental diagnostic tool and its main features are compared with modulated laser luminescence for quantifying sound and carious enamel or dentin. Dental caries found in the fissures or grooves of teeth is very difficult to diagnose or quantify with the present clinical techniques. Visual examination and dental radiographs do not detect the presence of decay until there has been significant carious destruction of the tooth. A high-spatial-resolution dynamic experimental imaging set-up, which can provide simultaneous measurements of laser-induced frequency-domain IR photothermal radiometric and luminescence signals form defects in teeth, was developed. Following optical absorption of laser photons, the new set-up can monitor simultaneously and independently the non-radiative conversion, and the radiative de-excitation in turbid media such as hard dental tissue. This work is intended to show the complementarity between modulated luminescence and photothermal frequency scans in detecting carious lesions in teeth. A sound extracted molar with a dentin-enamel interface was introduced to examine the depth profilometric abilities of the method. Occlusal surfaces of teeth with potential areas of demineralization or carious destruction in the fissures were examined and compared to the signals produced by the sound enamel establishing the depth profilometric abilities of the method. The significance to clinical dentistry lies in the potential of this technique to detect and monitor early carious lesions in the pits and fissures of teeth.

  9. Assessment of tobacco dependence curricula in Italian dental hygiene schools.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, Giuseppe; Davis, Joan M; Licata, Maria E; Giuliana, Giovanna

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the level of tobacco dependence education offered by Italian dental hygiene programs. A fifty-question survey was mailed to the thirty-one active public and private dental hygiene programs in Italy during the 2008-09 academic year. The survey assessed faculty confidence in teaching tobacco treatment, which courses contained tobacco dependence content, the number of minutes spent on specific content areas, and the level of clinical competence that dental hygiene graduates should be able to demonstrate. Surveys were returned by sixteen programs for a response rate of 52 percent. Respondents indicated tobacco dependence education was included in clinic or clinic seminar (56 percent), periodontics (44 percent), oral pathology (31 percent), and prevention (19 percent). All programs reported including the effects of tobacco on general and oral diseases in courses. However, more in-depth topics received less curriculum time; these included tobacco treatment strategies (63 percent) and discussion of cessation medications (31 percent). Interestingly, 62 percent of the respondents indicated they expected dental hygiene graduates to demonstrate a tobacco treatment competency level of a moderate intervention or higher (counseling, discussion of medications, follow-up) rather than a brief intervention in which patients are advised to quit then referred to a quitline. The results of this study indicated that Italian dental hygiene students are not currently receiving adequate instruction in tobacco treatment techniques nor are they being adequately assessed. This unique overview of Italian dental hygiene tobacco dependence education provides a basis for further discussion towards a national competency-based curriculum. PMID:23929577

  10. TQM in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Harr, R

    2001-01-01

    Society now expects more from its doctors and dentists, and these increasing demands can be summed up in one relatively new term for the medical profession: "quality management" (QM). Doctors and dentists formerly took the view that their performance could be assessed solely on the basis of their technical skills, ethics and expertise, but are now confronted with a new social imperative, from outside the profession--quality management. The author, prize-winner of the European Quality Award 2000 describes his approach to introduce the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) Excellence Model in his dental practice. He shows that the EFQM model is well suited as a basis for a quality management system in healthcare. PMID:11436753

  11. Dental Arch Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Straightening teeth is an arduous process requiring months, often years, of applying corrective pressure by means of arch wires-better known as brace-which may have to be changed several times in the course of treatment. A new method has been developed by Dr. George Andreasen, orthodontist and dental scientist at the University of Iowa. The key is a new type of arch wire material, called Nitinol, with exceptional elasticity which helps reduce the required number of brace changes. An alloy of nickel and titanium, Nitinol was originally developed for aerospace applications by the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, now the Naval Surface Weapons Laboratory, White Oaks, Maryland. NASA subsequently conducted additional research on the properties of Nitinol and on procedures for processing the metal.

  12. A comparison of service profiles in alternative dental care delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Solanki, G C; Lalloo, R

    1999-07-01

    The financial crisis within the health care sector has resulted in the search by medical benefit funds of worker organisations for cost-effective alternatives to the private health care sector. This study compares the profile of services rendered to members of a union medical benefit fund by an 'in house' dental clinic and private dental practitioners. A total of 2,858 union clinic claims and 10,811 private practitioner accounts were selected. Each treatment code was categorised into either preventive, restorative, extraction or denture services. For the union clinic and private dental practitioners a total of 3,021 and 15,853 treatment codes respectively were included in the analysis. Significant differences were found in the profile of services rendered by the union clinic and private dental practitioners. The union clinic provided predominantly preventive and denture-related treatment compared with private practitioners who provided mainly preventive and extraction services. Members and their dependants are far more likely to have dentures made through the dental clinic (the odds of having dentures made at the clinic were 4.67 times the odds of having dentures made through private practitioners). On the other hand, members were more likely to receive all the other services (restorative, preventive and extractions) from private practitioners. However, the nature of the study design and the findings do not allow conclusions to be drawn regarding whether these differences were due to demand or supplier influences. PMID:10860042

  13. Infection Control in Dental Settings

    MedlinePLUS

    ... OSHA) USAF Dental Evaluation and Consultation Service  File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  14. Dental insurance! Are we ready?

    PubMed

    Toor, Ravi S S; Jindal, R

    2011-01-01

    Dental insurance is insurance designed to pay the costs associated with dental care. The Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) bill which was put forward in the winter session of the Lok Sabha (2008) focused on increasing the foreign investment share from the existing 26% to 49% in the insurance companies of India. This will allow the multibillion dollar international insurance companies to enter the Indian market and subsequently cover all aspects of insurance in India. Dental insurance will be an integral a part of this system. Dental insurance is a new concept in Southeast Asia as very few countries in Southeast Asia cover this aspect of insurance. It is important that the dentists in India should be acquainted with the different types of plans these companies are going to offer and about a new relationship which is going to emerge in the coming years between dentist, patient and the insurance company. PMID:21525693

  15. Dental abscess: A microbiological review

    PubMed Central

    Shweta; Prakash, S Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Dental abscess is a frequently occurring infectious process known to the health practice. The fate of the infection depends on the virulence of the bacteria, host resistance factors, and regional anatomy. Serious consequences arising from the spread of a dental abscess lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Acute dental abscess is polymicrobial, comprising of strict anaerobes, such as anaerobic cocci, Prevotella, Fusobacterium species, and facultative anaerobes, such as viridans group streptococci and the Streptococcus anginosus group. Numerous novel, uncultivable and fastidious organisms have been identified as potential pathogens with the use of non-culture techniques. The majority of localized dental abscesses respond to surgical treatment while the use of antimicrobials is limited to severe spreading infections. There is a need for good-quality clinical trials of sufficient size to identify the ideal treatment. The microbiology of the acute dentoalveolar abscess and its treatment in the light of improved culture and diagnostic methods are reviewed. PMID:24348613

  16. Dental Health Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Care Needs , WWAMI’s The Crisis in Rural Dentistry , and several other studies, rural residents have lower ... Connecticut. Kentucky The University of Kentucky College of Dentistry sponsors Dental Outreach Programs that manage four mobile ...

  17. DMO Dental -Texas Rice University

    E-print Network

    If you are an enrollee with Aetna Dental coverage, you don't need an ID card. When visiting a dentist a primary care dentist in Aetna's network. Otherwise, you could end up paying more. You can use our provider

  18. Oral Health Status and Behaviour of Mauritians Visiting Private Dental Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunsam, P. Pugo; Banka, S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to assess the oral health status and behaviour of a sample of the Mauritian population visiting private dental clinics. Design/methodology/approach: Oral health status was determined using the World Health Organization (Decayed, Missing, Filled Teeth (DMFT) index indicating the prevalence of caries, and factors associated…

  19. Genome technologies and personalized dental medicine.

    PubMed

    Eng, G; Chen, A; Vess, T; Ginsburg, G S

    2012-04-01

    The addition of genomic information to our understanding of oral disease is driving important changes in oral health care. It is anticipated that genome-derived information will promote a deeper understanding of disease etiology and permit earlier diagnosis, allowing for preventative measures prior to disease onset rather than treatment that attempts to repair the diseased state. Advances in genome technologies have fueled expectations for this proactive healthcare approach. Application of genomic testing is expanding and has already begun to find its way into the practice of clinical dentistry. To take full advantage of the information and technologies currently available, it is vital that dental care providers, consumers, and policymakers be aware of genomic approaches to understanding of oral diseases and the application of genomic testing to disease diagnosis and treatment. Ethical, legal, clinical, and educational initiatives are also required to responsibly incorporate genomic information into the practice of dentistry. This article provides an overview of the application of genomic technologies to oral health care and introduces issues that require consideration if we are to realize the full potential of genomics to enable the practice of personalized dental medicine. PMID:22129463

  20. Child Dental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    Healthy teeth are important to your child's overall health. From the time your child is born, there are things you can do to promote healthy teeth and prevent cavities. For babies, you should clean ...

  1. 38 CFR 17.163 - Posthospital outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. 17.163 Section 17.163...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.163 Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. The Chief, Dental...

  2. 38 CFR 17.163 - Posthospital outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. 17.163 Section 17.163...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.163 Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. The Chief, Dental...

  3. 38 CFR 17.163 - Posthospital outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. 17.163 Section 17.163...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.163 Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. The Chief, Dental...

  4. 38 CFR 17.163 - Posthospital outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. 17.163 Section 17.163...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.163 Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. The Chief, Dental...

  5. 38 CFR 17.163 - Posthospital outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. 17.163 Section 17.163...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.163 Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. The Chief, Dental...

  6. Degradation, Fatigue, and Failure of Resin Dental Composite Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.L. (UIC)

    2008-11-03

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle- or fiber-filler-containing indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on the effects of degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed-mode loading on flexure strength and fracture toughness. Several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading, and 3D tomography with multi-axial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and/or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection); after that time period, failure most often results from secondary decay.

  7. Degradation, fatigue and failure of resin dental composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, James L.

    2008-01-01

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle or fiber filler containing, indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed mode loading on the flexure strength and fracture toughness. Next several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading and then an examination of 3D tomography using multiaxial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection) and after that time period from secondary decay. PMID:18650540

  8. ORO-DENTAL PATTERN IN MENTALLY RETARDED

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Pradeep; Jha, Sanjeev; Tandon, Ragini; Sondhi, Deepak; Chandra, Mahesh; Trivedi, J.K.

    1990-01-01

    SUMMARY The study was carried out in 25 mentally retarded children and compared with equal number of normal children. They were subjected to detailed psychiatric evaluation and dental examination. The dental anomalies were corroborated with cephalometric analysis of lateral cephalograms. It was concluded that all mentally retarded children had some dental abnormality in them in form of dental malocclusion, wide inter dental spaces, absence of teeth etc. We suggest early dental management for such patients for reinforcing their neuromuscular coordination modifying the mastication power, swallowing, speech, stomatognathic function and above all their facial profile for better social acceptance. PMID:21927451

  9. Cerebrovascular Accident Under Anesthesia During Dental Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Mathew; Cuddy, Michael A.; Farr, Brad; Moore, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke, or cerebrovascular accident (CVA), is a medical emergency that may lead to permanent neurological damage, complications, and death. The rapid loss of brain function due to disruption of the blood supply to the brain is caused by blockage (thrombosis, arterial embolism) or hemorrhage. The incidence of CVA during anesthesia for noncardiac nonvascular surgery is as high as 1% depending on risk factors. Comprehensive preoperative assessment and good perioperative management may prevent a CVA. However, should an ischemic event occur, appropriate and rapid management is necessary to minimize the deleterious effects caused to the patient. This case report describes a patient who had an ischemic CVA while under general anesthesia for dental alveolar surgery and discusses the anesthesia management. PMID:24932981

  10. Effects of dental trauma on the pulp.

    PubMed

    Love, R M

    1997-05-01

    Infection of the root canal system following dental trauma induces pulp and periapical disease and prevents healing of previously healthy pulp. A clinical goal in treating trauma is the maintenance of pulp vitality, and clinicians should be aware of factors that influence pulp healing. The learning objective of this article is to review the factors and techniques that influence pulp vitality and examine the influence pulp has on the healing of adjacent tissues. The potential routes for bacterial infection of the root canal system are discussed, with the clinical crown as the primary portal of entry. Uncomplicated and complicated crown fractures, as well as the crown-root and root fractures, are reviewed. Complications in pulp healing include canal obliteration, disturbed root development, apexogenesis, apexification, and the various forms of resorption. PMID:9550069

  11. Comparative Effectiveness Study to Assess Two Examination Modalities Used to Detect Dental Caries in Preschool Urban Children

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: Dental caries affecting the primary dentition of U.S. children continues to be the most prevalent chronic childhood disease. Preventive screening for dental caries in toddlers by dental professionals is labor-intensive and costly. Studies are warranted to examine innovative screening modalities that reduce cost, are less labor-intensive, and have the potential to identify caries in high-risk children. Subjects and Methods: Two hundred ninety-one children were randomized into two groups: Group 1 received a traditional, visual tactile examination initially and follow up-examinations at 6 and 12 months, and Group 2 received a teledentistry examination initially and follow-up examinations at 6 and 12 months. The mean primary tooth decayed and filled surfaces (dfs) scores were calculated for all children at baseline and 6 and 12 months. Results: At baseline, the mean dfs score for children examined by means of teledentistry was 2.19, and for the children examined by means of the traditional method, the mean was 1.27; the means were not significantly different. At the 12-month examination, the mean dfs score for the children examined by means of teledentistry was 3.02, and for the children examined by means of the clinical method, the mean dfs was 1.70; the means were not significantly different. At 12 months the mean fillings score for the children examined by means of teledentistry was 1.43 and for the children examined by means of the clinical method was 0.51; the means were statistically significantly different (p<0.001). Conclusions: These results suggest that the teledentistry examinations were comparable to clinical examinations when screening for early childhood caries in preschool children. The data further showed that color printouts of teeth with cavities provided to parents of children who received teledentistry screenings promoted oral healthcare utilization, as children from the teledentistry study group received more dental care than children from the clinical study group. PMID:24053114

  12. Dental Camp Experience in Lifeline Express (LLE) Train among Rural Population of Central, India

    PubMed Central

    Dasar, Pralhad; N, Sandesh; Kumar, Sandeep; Chand, Binti Rani; Airen, Bhuvnesh; Jain, Deepika; Warekar, Shilpa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The lifeline express is the world’s first hospital train. To date, over 800,000 patients living in the remote rural interiors of India where medical facilities are scarce, have been treated. Objective: To evaluate the application and feasibility of providing screening, diagnosis, preventive dental treatment for rural population through mobile dental unit in lifeline express train from last three years in Madhya Pradesh, India. Materials and Methods: The study was retrospective and the data was extracted from six dental camps which have been conducted by Life line Express/ Impact India foundation in between 2011 to 2013 in rural and remote area of Madhya Pradesh. Results: Out of six dental camps 14,081 patients were registered and 6,526 received dental treatment. The type of dental treatment like extractions (3,441), scaling (2,119) and restoration (966) were performed. Conclusion: The study shows a mobile dental hospital like LLE can provide an excellent opportunity for rural populations regarding oral health care. PMID:25584322

  13. Usefulness of a psychometric questionnaire in exploring parental attitudes in children's dental care.

    PubMed

    Arnrup, K; Berggren, U; Broberg, A G

    2001-02-01

    In this methodological study we investigated the usefulness and reliability of a questionnaire designed to capture 4 aspects of parental dental attitudes: dental knowledge, child oral health behavior, perceived importance of dental related aims, and parental responsibility. The study was undertaken in a group of 140 parents of schoolchildren aged 8-12 years from four comprehensive schools in Sweden. Test-retest reliability, quantified by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) or by Cohen's kappa, varied from acceptable to excellent for different aspects of the questionnaire. The knowledge and responsibility-taking sections were also answered by a group of dental experts who showed a high level of internal agreement. Expert profiles, to which the parental assessments could be compared, were created. Exploration of the 4 aspects showed that this group of parents commonly had a multifocal view on the etiology and prevention of caries. Correlations between their knowledge assessments and the assessments made by the expert group varied from moderately negative to strongly positive. The parents revealed a high degree of dental-related motivation and responsibility, particularly according to oral health behaviors. In conclusion, the results indicate that this 4-part psychometric questionnaire might be a suitable instrument in investigations of priority and responsibility-taking as new aspects of parental dental attitudes, along with dental knowledge and child oral health behaviors. PMID:11318040

  14. Performance of Primary Dental Care Services: An Ecological Study in a Large Brazilian City

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Rita Sibele Souza; Mambrini, Juliana Vaz Melo; Oliveira, Ana Cristina Borges; Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarăes

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the association between area-level primary dental care performance and area-level demographics, dental treatment need, and health care service indicators. An ecological cross-sectional study was performed in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, in 2010. The 142 primary health care (PHC) units were grouped based on the following variables: access to individual dental treatment, frequency of dental emergencies, and frequency of individual preventive procedures. The independent variables analyzed were demographic variables, dental treatment need, and health care service indicators. The data were obtained from the information systems of the Brazilian Ministry of Health and the city of Belo Horizonte. We explored the associations between membership in a specific PHC cluster type and the independent variables using multinomial logistic regression with a significance level of 5%. Variables such as the high/very high vulnerability of population, rate of completed treatment, and rate of referrals of users to secondary care were independently associated with the clusters (P < 0.05). The performance of primary dental care services was associated with patient demographics, dental treatment need, and referrals. The results of this study have implications for the planning of public policies. PMID:24396294

  15. Performance of primary dental care services: an ecological study in a large Brazilian city.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Rita Sibele Souza; Mambrini, Juliana Vaz Melo; Oliveira, Ana Cristina Borges; Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarăes

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the association between area-level primary dental care performance and area-level demographics, dental treatment need, and health care service indicators. An ecological cross-sectional study was performed in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, in 2010. The 142 primary health care (PHC) units were grouped based on the following variables: access to individual dental treatment, frequency of dental emergencies, and frequency of individual preventive procedures. The independent variables analyzed were demographic variables, dental treatment need, and health care service indicators. The data were obtained from the information systems of the Brazilian Ministry of Health and the city of Belo Horizonte. We explored the associations between membership in a specific PHC cluster type and the independent variables using multinomial logistic regression with a significance level of 5%. Variables such as the high/very high vulnerability of population, rate of completed treatment, and rate of referrals of users to secondary care were independently associated with the clusters (P < 0.05). The performance of primary dental care services was associated with patient demographics, dental treatment need, and referrals. The results of this study have implications for the planning of public policies. PMID:24396294

  16. Reach the Unreached – A Systematic Review on Mobile Dental Units

    PubMed Central

    Kote, Sunder; Basavaraj, Patthi; Singla, Ashish; Pandita, Venisha; Malhi, Ravneet Kaur

    2014-01-01

    Provision of health care facilities and the extent of their utilization is one of the indices of human development. The services for the masses need to be designed with the basic objective of alleviating and preventing the vast amounts of diseases of the mass. This could be achieved by mobile dental units (MDUs). The present systemic review access the efficacy of MDUs for community settings. A review of literature was performed both electronically and manually using MeSH Terms- Mobile Dental Units/clinics. Eight articles, which fulfilled inclusion and exclusion criteria were selected for the review. MDUs help in overcoming the accessibility, affordability and sustainability barrier. They are able to reach more people than fixed-site clinics. Even in Government sector, mobile dental vans can help reach the underserved at an affordable cost.The present systematic review revealed that MDUs prove to be an effective adjunct to the oral health service providers like dental colleges and private practitioners. PMID:25302288

  17. [Adherence to oral hygiene and dental self-care].

    PubMed

    Poplinger, A

    2010-04-01

    Nearly every person will be in need of dental treatment in his lifetime, whether purely for health causes or alternately for esthetic issues. Yet the main reasons of seeking dental treatment are in fact Caries, Gingivitis and Periodontitis. In spite of the fact that these pathologies occur due to the accumulation of Plaque around the oral cavity and teeth, they are fairly easy to prevent. Using simple techniques such as oral rinsing, flossing and brushing of the teeth, are normally sufficient for obtaining good oral health. If this is actually the case, than how is it that we are witnessing a massive spread of dental problems? How come there are so many incidents of people suffering from dental problems if the preventative care is that easy to manage? The answer lies in the concept of Adherence, referring to the cooperation of an individual with the demands of his treatment regime and the dental staff. The idea of promoting health adherence aims mainly for using medication, attending the periodic inspections and examination, and making lifestyle changes such as preventive care illustrated above. This article exemplifies how one of the current trends in Medical Psychology discipline is to enhance adherence by establishing a secure therapeutic alliance which is based upon a positive relationship between the patient and his doctor, increasing patient's confidence and sense of self-efficacy, and recruiting family members and friends to the patient's process of change. A distinctive emphasis is put on expanding the patient's knowledge about his condition, and raising awareness to the linkage between his medical (to be more specific-dental) problem and its symptoms to the implications. The most modish and putative intervention nowadays is Patient Centered, where the guiding principles used are urging the patient to be responsible for implying the treatment regime, taking active participation, and make decisions regarding his current and future status. This article illustrates, through a comprehensive literature review of theories, models and researches, the contemporary methods for promoting adherence to oral hygiene, dental Self-Care and treatment. Using the combination of a survey from a select sample of specialists in the field of Dentistry, and the conclusions inferred from studies reviewed, I was able to determine how investment in the Bio-Psycho-Social approach would improve patient satisfaction from their doctors and outcomes of the treatment, shorten the duration of treatment, consume only little resources, improve dental health of patients and prevent repetitive visits to the dentists clinics. At the same time, despite the fact that dentistry practitioners acknowledge the importance of patient's adherence and take active measures such as talks, praises, guidance and providing information, most of them don't seem to comprehend interfusion of family members or friends as an integral part of the treatment. Moreover, their overall feeling is of incompetence when regarding dealing with un-adherent patients. Therefore, maybe there is room for providing dentists and staff with seminars, conventions etc. about the latest novelties on the subject. In conclusion, enhancing dental patient's adherence to health behavior is a domain mainly under the responsibility of the dentist, but also of his staff. As elaborated in the article, the measures for doing so are: 1. Information- the dentist should guide patients about the different methods for maintaining oral hygiene, explain how proper adherence benefits positive treatment outcome, and provide a broad and informative picture of the patient's specific problem. 2. Positive rapport - the need for establishing a good relationship between the doctor and his patients is crucial for attaining effective and satisfactory treatment outcomes. No doubt that this matter depends upon the personality and character of both the doctor and the patient, but using positive verbal reinforcements, symbolic incentives (such as free toothpaste samples), support throughout the treatment, sharing the rati

  18. An overview of dental radiology: a primer on dental radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Manny, E.F.; Carlson, K.C.; McClean, P.M.; Ra1hlin, J.A.; Segal, P.

    1980-11-07

    To provide medical and scientific background on certain selected technologies generally considered to be of particular significance, the National Center for Health Care Technology (NCHCT) has commissioned a series of overview papers. This is one of several projects entered into jointly by the Bureau of Radiological Health (BRH) and NCHCT relating to the use of radiation for health care. Dental radiation protection has been a long-time interest of BRH. Both past and on-going efforts to minimize population radiation exposure from electronic products have included specific action programs directed at minimizing unnecessary radiation exposure to the population from dental radiology. Current efforts in quality assurance and referral criteria are two aspects of NCHCT's own assessment of this technology which are described within the larger picture presented in this overview. The issues considered in this document go beyond the radiation exposure aspects of dental x-ray procedures. To be responsive to the informational needs of NCHCT, the assessment includes various other factors that influence the practice of dental radiology. It is hoped this analysis will serve as the basis for planning and conducting future programs to improve the practice of dental radiology.

  19. A review of the dental caries status of ethnic minority children in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shinan; Lo, Edward Chin Man; Liu, Juan; Chu, Chun Hung

    2015-02-01

    China has 55 ethnic minority groups comprised of 113 million persons, or 7.0% of total population. Dental caries is a major health problem for children in China, and national oral health surveys currently report dental caries based on geographical location rather than by ethnic group. This study reviews the literature on dental caries in ethnic minority children in China. Publications were retrieved in Chinese and English from five electronic databases; thirty-eight studies from 1983 to 2012 met inclusion criteria and described 25 ethnic minority groups. Primary dentition median caries prevalence and experience were higher (51% and dmft = 3.0, respectively) than permanent dentition caries prevalence and experience (39% and DMFT = 0.8). Median caries prevalence was highest (80%) for permanent dentition among aggregated ethnic minorities with population greater than 1 million. More work and research is needed to expand dental caries prevention and treatment measures for ethnic minority child populations in China. PMID:24057753

  20. Professional burnout: Its relevance and implications for the general dental community.

    PubMed

    Vered, Yuval; Zaken, Yonit; Ovadia-Gonen, Hilla; Mann, Jonathan; Zini, Avraham

    2014-01-01

    As very few studies regarding dentists' professional burnout have been published, we provide an updated review and recommendations with regards to the published dental literature of this phenomenon, which is relevant to the general dental community around the world. Professional burnout has been found to be prevalent among dentists and dental students. The challenge lies in early recognition and developing intervention programs specifically for the dental profession. Attention to realistic career expectation and the type of dentist one prefers to be, attention to practice management skills and the stressfulness of work, as well as longitudinal monitoring of newly qualified dentists on burnout development are recommended. Learning about professional burnout and its potentially serious consequences, as well as increasing knowledge about how to prevent and treat it are crucial. It is not only a caregiver problem, but also a public health problem. PMID:24392499

  1. Oral Health Disparities and Unmet Dental Needs among Preschool Children in Chelsea, MA: Exploring Mechanisms, Defining Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Isong, Inyang; Dantas, Laila; Gerard, Macda; Kuhlthau, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Background Significant disparities exist in children’s receipt of preventive dental care (PDC) in the United States. Many of the children at greatest risk of dental disease do not receive timely PDC; when they do receive dental care, it is often more for relief of dental pain. Chelsea is a low-income, diverse Massachusetts community with high rates of untreated childhood caries. There are various dental resources available in Chelsea, yet many children do not access dental care at levels equivalent to their needs. Objective Using Chelsea as a case-study, to explore factors contributing to forgone PDC (including the age 1 dental visit) in an in-depth way. Methods We used a qualitative study design that included semi-structured interviews with parents of preschool children residing in Chelsea, and Chelsea-based providers including pediatricians, dentists, a dental hygienist and early childhood care providers. We examined: a) parents’ dental attitudes and oral health cultural beliefs; b) parents’ and providers’ perspectives on facilitators and barriers to PDC, reasons for unmet needs, and proposed solutions to address the problem. We recorded, transcribed and independently coded all interviews. Using rigorous, iterative qualitative data analyses procedures, we identified emergent themes. Results Factors perceived to facilitate receipt of PDC included Head-Start oral health policies, strong pediatric primary care/dental linkages, community outreach and advertising, and parents’ own oral health experiences. Most parents and providers perceived there to be an adequate number of accessible dental services and resources in Chelsea, including for Medicaid enrollees. However, several barriers impeded children from receiving timely PDC, the most frequently cited being insurance related problems for children and adults. Other barriers included limited dental services for children <2 years, perceived poor quality of some dental practices, lack of emphasis on prevention-based dental care, poor care-coordination, and insufficient culturally-appropriate care. Important family-level barriers included parental oral health literacy, cultural factors, limited English proficiency and competing priorities. Several solutions were proposed to address identified barriers. Conclusion Even in a community with a considerable number of dental resources, various factors may preclude access to these services by preschool-aged children. Opportunities exist to address modifiable factors through strategic oral health policies, community outreach and improved care coordination between physicians, dentists and early childhood care providers. PMID:25614878

  2. A clinical evaluation of comprehensive dental treatment for children under general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Su, H L; Chen, P S

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the comprehensive dental treatment for children under general anesthesia. From 1989 to 1991, 57 children with mean age of 3 years 2 months were treated, followed up with a minimal of 1 year. This procedure allows the dentition to be restored in one visit. Further care including preventive options and behavior shaping was provided on a 3-6 months recall schedule. The reasons for general anesthesia are that these children were either unable to accept treatment because of handicaps, extreme fear or young age. Their mean number of decayed tooth was 15 (Standard Deviation, SD = 5) and nearly three quarters of the children were under 6 years old. The most frequent treatment procedures were the extraction of teeth, composite resin restoration and Ni-Cr crown restoration. The Ni-Cr crown (1.7% failure rate) was more successful than the amalgam and composite resin restoration (9.7% failure rate). Pedo-strip crown had the highest failure rate (22%) for anterior teeth restoration. Nineteen children needed retreatment with conventional behavior guide. Six children had new caries and required further treatment. Thirty eight children returned for regular recall during the minimal 1 year follow-up period. PMID:1295652

  3. Characteristics of Streptococcus mutans genotypes and dental caries in children

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Kyounga; Moser, Stephen A.; Wiener, Howard W.; Whiddon, Jennifer; Momeni, Stephanie S.; Ruby, John D.; Cutter, Gary R.; Childers, Noel K.

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal cohort study evaluated the diversity, commonality, and stability of Streptococcus mutans genotypes associated with dental caries history. Sixty-seven 5 and 6 yr-old children, considered being at high caries risk, had plaque collected from baseline through 36 months for S. mutans isolation and genotyping with repetitive extragenic palindromic-PCR (4,392 total isolates). Decayed, missing, filled surfaces (dmfs/DMFS) for each child were recorded at baseline. At baseline, 18 distinct genotypes were found among 911 S. mutans isolates from 67 children (diversity) and 13 genotypes were shared by at least 2 children (commonality). The number of genotypes per individual was positively associated with the proportion of decayed surfaces (p-ds) at baseline. Twenty-four of the 39 children who were available at follow-up visits maintained a predominant genotype for the follow-up periods (stability) and was negatively associated with p-ds. The observed diversity, commonality, and stability of S. mutans genotypes represent a pattern of dental caries epidemiology in this high caries risk community, which suggest fewer decayed surfaces are significantly associated with lower diversity and stability of S. mutans genotypes. PMID:23659236

  4. Mind Your Mouth: Preventing Gum Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... can simply cause swollen gums or give you bad breath. It can also ruin your smile or even make you lose your teeth. The good news is that gum disease can be prevented with daily dental care. The problem begins with bacteria. Our mouths are packed with these tiny microbes. ...

  5. 1274 Journal of Dental Education Volume 73, Number 11 Dental Students' Preparation and Study

    E-print Network

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    1274 Journal of Dental Education Volume 73, Number 11 Dental Students' Preparation and Study Habits for the National Board Dental Examination Part I Nathan Hawley, B.A.; Devin Johnson, D.M.D.; Keith was to assess dental students' study habits and level of preparation necessary to successfully prepare

  6. IN HONOR OF YOUR GRADUATION, The Dental Alumni Association and the Division of Continuing Dental Education

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    IN HONOR OF YOUR GRADUATION, The Dental Alumni Association and the Division of Continuing Dental Education extend to you free attendance for Continuing Education lectures on-campus at the School of Dental for a course. We wish you the very best as you begin your dental career. Sunday, May 18, 2014 Joseph C

  7. Building a Discriminative Dental Database for Dental Image Analysis , Dongqing Chen1

    E-print Network

    Louisville, University of

    1 Building a Discriminative Dental Database for Dental Image Analysis Aly Farag1 , Dongqing Chen1 of the proposed framework. E-mail: aly.farag@louisville.edu URL: www.cvip.louisville.edu Keywords: Dental Database, an unpleasant experience for the patient and may not provide all the details of the jaw. Dental radiography

  8. Access to dental care that is important to you! The Aetna Dental Indemnity Plan

    E-print Network

    Virginia Tech

    Access to dental care that is important to you! The Aetna Dental® Indemnity Plan Virginia Tech Aetna Dental® Indemnity insurance plan gives you the freedom to visit any licensed dentist-for-service dental insurance Members have the freedom to visit any licensed dentist Specialty and emergency care

  9. Experiences of Dental Care and Dental Anxiety in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Dahllöf, Göran; Bejerot, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Dental anxiety is associated with previous distressing dental experiences, such as lack of understanding of the dentist intentions, perceptions of uncontrollability and experiences of pain during dental treatment. People with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are impaired in building flexible predictions and expectations, which is very much needed during a dental visit. The aims of the study were to investigate if people with ASD have more negative dental experiences and a higher level of dental anxiety compared to a matched control group. Forty-seven adults with ASD and of normal intellectual performance, and 69 age- and sex-matched typically developing controls completed questionnaires on previous dental experiences and dental anxiety, the Dental Anxiety Scale, and the Dental Beliefs Survey. The ASD group experienced pain during dental treatments more often than the controls and 22% had repeatedly experienced being forced to dental treatment they were not prepared for, compared to 3% of the controls. A higher level of dental anxiety was reported by the ASD group. Dental treatment and methods for supporting the communication with patients with ASD need to be developed, in order to reduce the negative dental experiences and dental anxiety in people with ASD. PMID:25530879

  10. 42 CFR 410.24 - Limitations on services of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine. 410.24 Section 410.24 Public...of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine. Medicare Part B pays for services...by a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine within the scope of his or her...

  11. 42 CFR 410.24 - Limitations on services of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine. 410.24 Section 410.24 Public...of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine. Medicare Part B pays for services...by a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine within the scope of his or her...

  12. 42 CFR 410.24 - Limitations on services of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine. 410.24 Section 410.24 Public...of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine. Medicare Part B pays for services...by a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine within the scope of his or her...

  13. 42 CFR 410.24 - Limitations on services of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine. 410.24 Section 410.24 Public...of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine. Medicare Part B pays for services...by a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine within the scope of his or her...

  14. 42 CFR 410.24 - Limitations on services of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine. 410.24 Section 410.24 Public...of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine. Medicare Part B pays for services...by a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine within the scope of his or her...

  15. Impact of a risk management plan on Legionella contamination of dental unit water.

    PubMed

    Leoni, Erica; Dallolio, Laura; Stagni, Francesca; Sanna, Tiziana; D'Alessandro, Giovanni; Piana, Gabriela

    2015-03-01

    The study aimed to assess the prevalence of Legionella spp. in dental unit waterlines of a dental clinic and to verify whether the microbiological parameters used as indicators of water quality were correlated with Legionella contamination. A risk management plan was subsequently implemented in the dental health care setting, in order to verify whether the adopted disinfection protocols were effective in preventing Legionella colonization. The water delivered from syringes and turbines of 63 dental units operating in a dental clinic, was monitored for counts of the heterotrophic bacteria P. aeruginosa and Legionella spp. (22 °C and 37 °C). At baseline, output water from dental units continuously treated with disinfection products was more compliant with the recommended standards than untreated and periodically treated water. However, continuous disinfection was still not able to prevent contamination by Legionella and P. aeruginosa. Legionella was isolated from 36.4%, 24.3% and 53.3% of samples from untreated, periodically and continuously treated waterlines, respectively. The standard microbiological parameters used as indicators of water quality proved to be unreliable as predictors of the presence of Legionella, whose source was identified as the tap water used to supply the dental units. The adoption of control measures, including the use of deionized water in supplying the dental unit waterlines and the application of a combined protocol of continuous and periodic disinfection, with different active products for the different devices, resulted in good control of Legionella contamination. The efficacy of the measures adopted was mainly linked to the strict adherence to the planned protocols, which placed particular stress on staff training and ongoing environmental monitoring. PMID:25711357

  16. 38 CFR 52.170 - Dental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Standards § 52.170 Dental services. (a) Program management must, if necessary, assist the participant and family/caregiver— (1) In making appointments; and (2) By arranging for transportation to and from the dental services....

  17. 38 CFR 52.170 - Dental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Standards § 52.170 Dental services. (a) Program management must, if necessary, assist the participant and family/caregiver— (1) In making appointments; and (2) By arranging for transportation to and from the dental services....

  18. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol —(1) Identification. Zinc...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol —(1) Identification. Zinc...

  20. Ultrathinning Dental Porcelain for Transmitted Light Microscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Mackert; M. B. Butts; G. M. Beaudreau; C. W. Fairhurst; R. H. Beauchamp

    1985-01-01

    A technique for ultrathinning brittle materials, originally developed at Battelle Pacific Northwest Labs for examination of lunar materials, has been successfully adapted for the preparation of dental porcelain specimens. A commercial dental porcelain and \\

  1. Challenges and Opportunities for Effective Dental Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hieb, Barry R.

    1991-01-01

    Considered are aspects of effective dental automation, including integrating "islands of computing"; definition of a dental record; common nomenclature; an enabling architecture; capturing data at its source; computer-assisted software engineering; and system security. (DB)

  2. 38 CFR 51.170 - Dental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...with § 51.210(h) of this part, routine and emergency dental services to meet the needs of each resident; ...charge a resident an additional amount for routine and emergency dental services; and (c) A facility must, if...

  3. 38 CFR 51.170 - Dental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...with § 51.210(h) of this part, routine and emergency dental services to meet the needs of each resident; ...charge a resident an additional amount for routine and emergency dental services; and (c) A facility must, if...

  4. 38 CFR 51.170 - Dental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...with § 51.210(h) of this part, routine and emergency dental services to meet the needs of each resident; ...charge a resident an additional amount for routine and emergency dental services; and (c) A facility must, if...

  5. 38 CFR 51.170 - Dental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...with § 51.210(h) of this part, routine and emergency dental services to meet the needs of each resident; ...charge a resident an additional amount for routine and emergency dental services; and (c) A facility must, if...

  6. 38 CFR 51.170 - Dental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...with § 51.210(h) of this part, routine and emergency dental services to meet the needs of each resident; ...charge a resident an additional amount for routine and emergency dental services; and (c) A facility must, if...

  7. Curriculum Guidelines for Clinical Dental Hygiene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools curriculum guidelines for clinical dental hygiene include definitions, notes on the interrelationship of courses, an overview of course objectives, and suggested primary educational goals, prerequisites, core content, specific objectives, sequencing, faculty, and facilities. (MSE)

  8. Tobacco Cessation Counselling Practices and Attitude among the Dentist and the Dental Auxiliaries of Urban and Rural Areas of Modinagar, India

    PubMed Central

    Patthi, Basavaraj; Singh, Khushboo; Jain, Swati; Vashishtha, Vaibhav; Kundu, Hansa; Malhi, Ravneet; Pandita, Venisha

    2014-01-01

    Background: The increasing use of tobacco among youths warrants the need for dental health professionals to effectively provide tobacco cessation counselling (TCC) in the office and community settings. However, there have been concerns among the dental professionals regarding TCC in dental settings. Aims and Objectives: To assess the attitude of dental professionals including the dentist and dental hygienist towards the TCC and identify the possible barriers towards the implementation of these practices in the rural and urban areas of Modinagar district. Materials and Methods: The present questionnaire based survey was carried among the qualified dentist and dental hygienist from the urban and rural areas of the Modinagar district to attitudes in tobacco cessation, practices in tobacco cessation interventions and related barriers towards implementation. The survey data were analyzed using the SPSS 16 version software package. The descriptive statistics (frequency) was generated for the each question to assess their attitude and practice. Results: The response rate of the questionnaire among the dentist and dental hygienist was 100%. The attitude of the majority of dentist towards the tobacco cessation counselling was positive as compared to the dental hygienist. 69.2% of the dentist were of the view that the dental health professionals should provide TCC as compared to 54.2% among the hygienist. Regarding the practice, only 12.5% and 5.8% of the dentist and dental hygienist had ever used the nicotine replacement therapy in their dental practice. The lack of the knowledge and information regarding TCC was the only perceived barrier among the dentists (51.7%) and dental hygienist (68.3%). Conclusion: Dental professionals must expand their horizon and armamentarium to include TCC strategies inclusive of their regular preventive and therapeutic treatment modalities. Also, the dental institutions should include TCC into the curriculum, but it should not be just theoretical knowledge rather it must have a practical component. PMID:25386513

  9. Thalassemias and their dental implications.

    PubMed

    Cutando Soriano, Antonio; Gil Montoya, José Antonio; López-González Garrido, Juan de Dios

    2002-01-01

    Thalassemias constitute a form of anemia that pose clear problems in relation to dental treatment. Dental professionals must be aware of the treatment adaptations required in patients with severe forms of beta-thalassemia. Until medical research is able to afford a definitive solution to these diseases (thereby greatly simplifying the dental management of such patients), effort will continue to center on the improvement of available therapeutic modalities, with the aim of obtaining effective and inexpensive oral chelators and drugs that either individually or in combination allow increases in fetal hemoglobin levels. Undoubtedly, the use of such measures together with serial blood transfusions has made it possible for an ever increasing number of patients with beta-thalassemia to reach adult age, where the provision of integral rather than merely palliative dental treatment must be seriously considered. At present, the clinical orofacial manifestations caused by the erythroid mass expanding the facial bones - resulting in dental malocclusions and protrusions tend to be less intense as a result of early medical treatment. In the future, gene therapy may be expected to allow a normal facial appearance thanks to complete healing of the patient. PMID:11788807

  10. Aesthetic management of dental fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Vishal; Nayak, Ullal Anand; Nayak, Prathibha Anand; Ninawe, Nupur

    2013-01-01

    Significant numbers of patients visiting the paediatric dental clinics have aesthetically objectionable brown stains and desire treatment for them. Intrinsic tooth discolouration can be a significant aesthetic, and in some instances, functional, problem. Dental fluorosis, tetracycline staining, localised and chronological hypoplasia, and both amelogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta can all produce a cosmetically unsatisfactory dentition. The aetiology of intrinsic discolouration of enamel may sometimes be deduced from the patient's history, and one factor long associated with the problem has been a high level of fluoride intake. Optimal use of topical fluorides leads to a decrease in the caries prevalence but may show an increase in the prevalence of fluorosis staining because of metabolic alterations in the ameloblasts, causing a defective matrix formation and improper calcification. A 12-year-old male patient was screened at the dental clinic for routine dental care. He wanted us to remove and/or minimise the noticeable brown/yellow staining of his teeth. He requested the least invasive and most cost-effective treatment to change his smile. Various treatment modalities are present for the treatment of fluorosis stains. This report discusses the microabrasion technique in the patient having dental fluorosis. PMID:23704468

  11. Factors Involved In Dental Surgery Fires: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    VanCleave, Andrea M.; Jones, James E.; McGlothlin, James D.; Saxen, Mark A.; Sanders, Brian J.; Walker, LaQuia A.

    2014-01-01

    Surgical fires are well-characterized, readily preventable, potentially devastating operating room catastrophes that continue to occur from 20 to 100 times per year or, by one estimate, up to 600 times per year in US operating rooms, sometimes with fatal results. The most significant risk factors for surgical fires involve (a) the use of an ignition source, such as laser or electrocautery equipment, in or around an oxygen-enriched environment in the head, neck, and upper torso area and (b) the concurrent delivery of supplemental oxygen, especially via nasal cannula. Nonetheless, while these 2 conditions occur very commonly in dental surgery, especially in pediatric dental surgery where sedation and anesthesia are regularly indicated, there is a general absence of documented dental surgical fires in the literature. Barring the possibility of underreporting for fear of litigation, this may suggest that there is another mechanism or mechanisms present in dental or pediatric dental surgery that mitigates this worst-case risk of surgical fires. Some possible explanations for this include: greater fire safety awareness by dental practitioners, incidental ventilation of oxygen-enriched environments in patient oral cavities due to breathing, or suction used by dental practitioners during procedures. This review of the literature provides a background to suggest that the practice of using intraoral suction in conjunction with the use of supplemental oxygen during dental procedures may alter the conditions needed for the initiation of intraoral fires. To date, there appear to be no published studies describing the ability of intraoral suctioning devices to alter the ambient oxygen concentration in an intraoral environment. In vivo models that would allow examination of intraoral suction on the ambient oxygen concentration in a simulated intraoral environment may then provide a valuable foundation for evaluating the safety of current clinical dental surgical practices, particularly in regard to the treatment of children. PMID:24697822

  12. The Dental Cognitions Questionnaire in CBT for dental phobia in an adolescent with multiple phobias.

    PubMed

    Mansell, Warren; Morris, Kathleen

    2003-03-01

    A case of an adolescent boy with multiple phobias who was treated successfully for his dental phobia is described to illustrate the clinical utility of the Dental Cognitions Questionnaire (DCQ) in aiding effective cognitive-behavior therapy. The client showed drops in dental anxiety that coincided with the use of the DCQ in cognitive restructuring, and there was a close correlation between dental cognitions and degree of dental anxiety over the time-course of therapy and follow up. PMID:12763393

  13. A cluster randomised, controlled trial of the value of dental health educators in general dental practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D Gratrix; P J Holloway; Y M Wainwright-Stringer; S J Ward; H V Worthington; A S Blinkhorn

    2003-01-01

    Aim To test the effectiveness of dental health educators in general dental practice.Objective To evaluate the effectiveness and cost of primary care trusts seconding dental health educators free of charge to suitable general dental practices to provide dental health counselling to mothers of regularly attending pre-school children at risk to caries.Method Two-cell, parallel group, cluster randomised, controlled clinical trial of

  14. Developmental delays and dental caries in low-income preschoolers in the USA: a pilot cross-sectional study and preliminary explanatory model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anecdotal evidence suggests that low-income preschoolers with developmental delays are at increased risk for dental caries and poor oral health, but there are no published studies based on empirical data. The purpose of this pilot study was two-fold: to examine the relationship between developmental delays and dental caries in low-income preschoolers and to present a preliminary explanatory model on the determinants of caries for enrollees in Head Start, a U.S. school readiness program for low-income preschool-aged children. Methods Data were collected on preschoolers ages 3–5 years at two Head Start centers in Washington, USA (N?=?115). The predictor variable was developmental delay status (no/yes). The outcome variable was the prevalence of decayed, missing, and filled surfaces (dmfs) on primary teeth. We used multiple variable Poisson regression models to test the hypothesis that within a population of low-income preschoolers, those with developmental delays would have increased dmfs prevalence than those without developmental delays. Results Seventeen percent of preschoolers had a developmental delay and 51.3% of preschoolers had ?1 dmfs. Preschoolers with developmental delays had a dmfs prevalence ratio that was 1.26 times as high as preschoolers without developmental delays (95% CI: 1.01, 1.58; P dental home (P =?.01); low caregiver education (P prevention strategies within settings like Head Start classrooms that serve low-income preschool-aged children with additional targeted home- and community-based interventions for those with developmental delays. PMID:24119240

  15. A Cognitive Task Analysis for Dental Hygiene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Cheryl A.; Beemsterboer, Phyllis L.; Johnson, Lynn A.; Mislevy, Robert J.; Steinberg, Linda S.; Breyer, F. Jay

    2000-01-01

    As part of the development of a scoring algorithm for a simulation-based dental hygiene initial licensure examination, this effort conducted a task analysis of the dental hygiene domain. Broad classes of behaviors that distinguish along the dental hygiene expert-novice continuum were identified and applied to the design of nine paper-based cases…

  16. OPTING OUT OF THE DENTAL PLAN

    E-print Network

    Barthelat, Francois

    June 2013 OPTING OUT OF THE DENTAL PLAN Name: McGill ID #: Tel. Number: Email: I, the undersigned, wish to opt out of the McGill University ­ Dental Plan ("Plan") effective acknowledge that I may opt out of the Plan if: I am covered under another group group dental plan (eg. my

  17. 38 CFR 52.170 - Dental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dental services. 52.170 Section 52.170...STATE HOMES Standards § 52.170 Dental services. (a) Program management...arranging for transportation to and from the dental services. (b) Program...

  18. 38 CFR 52.170 - Dental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dental services. 52.170 Section 52.170...STATE HOMES Standards § 52.170 Dental services. (a) Program management...arranging for transportation to and from the dental services. (b) Program...

  19. Studienordnung fr den weiterbildenden Masterstudiengang ,,Clinical Dental

    E-print Network

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

    Studienordnung für den weiterbildenden Masterstudiengang ,,Clinical Dental CAD/CAM" an der Ernst Masterstudiengang ,,Clinical Dental CAD/CAM" als Satzung: Inhaltsverzeichnis § 1 Geltungsbereich § 2 Studium § 3 Clinical Dental CAD/CAM vom 3. Dezember 2009. * Mittl.bl. BM M-V S. 511 Soweit für Funktionsbezeichnungen

  20. 38 CFR 52.170 - Dental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dental services. 52.170 Section 52.170...STATE HOMES Standards § 52.170 Dental services. (a) Program management...arranging for transportation to and from the dental services. (b) Program...

  1. First-Aid Algorithms in Dental Avulsion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baginska, Joanna; Wilczynska-Borawska, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    Almost one fourth of traumatic dental injuries occur at schools or in their surroundings. Prevalence of tooth avulsion varies from 0.5% to 16% of all cases of dental trauma. Children with dental avulsion may seek help from school nurses so they should be able to provide first-aid treatment. However, many studies showed that the general level of…

  2. Diversity and Critical Forces in Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Paul B.

    1997-01-01

    Critical forces affecting dental education in general, and the connection between science and practice in particular include shifts in patterns of oral disease; changes in the backgrounds of students entering the dental profession; public skepticism and funding; the response of the dental community to several recent major reports; and managed…

  3. DENTAL REIMBURSEMENT PROGRAM (DPR) - HIV/AIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Dental Reimbursement Program (DPR) under Part F of the Ryan White CARE Act is intended to help accredited dental schools and post-doctoral dental education program cover their non-reimbursed costs of providing oral health care to individuals with HIV....

  4. Socioeconomic demand model for dental visits.

    PubMed

    Petersen, P E; Pedersen, K M

    1984-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop structural socioeconomic demand models for dental visits. The explanatory variables were chosen selectively from the various theories concerning health services utilization. The models were constructed on data from a sociodental survey carried out among workers and staff members at a Danish shipyard. A sample of 988 employees was drawn by stratified random sampling and 841 persons were interviewed regarding dental visits and attitudes towards teeth and dental health services. The structural equations were estimated by means of multiple regression analysis using the two-stage least-squares method. Dental visits were influenced by dental health status, expectations about value of dental care, income, and price of dental care. Dental health was affected by the number of dental visits and age. Residence in rural areas during childhood and age had a negative effect on dental care early in life while years of schooling had a positive effect. Years of schooling had also a positive effect on expectations about value of dental care. The present study has shown that it is possible to construct structural models for the demand for dental care. PMID:6597055

  5. Developing Teaching Expertise in Dental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, Lucinda J.

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study was designed to develop a baseline model of expertise in dental education utilizing the Dreyfus and Dreyfus continuum of skill acquisition. The goal was the development of a baseline model of expertise, which will contribute to the body of knowledge about dental faculty skill acquisition and may enable dental schools to…

  6. [Syncope in the dental environment].

    PubMed

    Findler, M; Elad, S; Garfunkel, A; Zusman, S P; Malamed, S F; Galili, D; Kaufman, E

    2002-01-01

    Syncope or Fainting is, by far, the most common emergency situation in the dental practice. Syncope is defined as an abrupt, transient, short term loss of consciousness and postural tone, followed by spontaneous and complete recovery. The pathophysiology of syncope consists of a sudden cessation or decrease in cerebral perfusion. Differential diagnosis of these medical conditions is of paramount importance in uncovering unrecognized systemic diseases. The dental team plays an important role in the process of establishing the correct diagnosis by its ability to recognize and document all the clinical symptoms and signs evident at the time of fainting. The dental surgeon is expected to be familiar with the various etiologies of syncope and should be able to differentiate between them. This article provides the essentials of the diagnostic procedure and an approach to the evaluation of the unconscious patient. PMID:11852447

  7. Nutritional Disorders of Children. Prevention, Screening, and Followup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fomon, Samuel J.

    Intended for child health care providers, the text contains information on improving preventive efforts in nutrition, particurlarly those focused on prevention of the major health problems which are nutrition related (obesity, atherosclerosis, dental caries, and anemia). Part I focuses on screening of individual children likely to be at risk of…

  8. Prevalence of dental caries among school children of Bharatpur city, India

    PubMed Central

    Ingle, Navin Anand; Dubey, Harsh Vardhan; Kaur, Navpreet; Gupta, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Background: Healthy teeth and oral tissues and the need for oral health care are important for any section of society. Dental caries is an infectious microbial disease of multifactorial origin in which diet, host, and microbial flora interacts over a period of time in such a way so as to encourage demineralization of the tooth enamel with resultant caries formation. Dental caries, the product of man's progress towards civilization, has a very high morbidity potential and thus, is coming into focus of the mankind. Aims and Objectives: To assess the prevalence of dental caries among 12-15 year old government and private school children of Bharatpur city. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study carried out on total 1400 school children, of which 700 school children were from government schools and 700 were from private schools. Simple random sampling methodology was used to select the sample. The subjects were examined for dental caries according to WHO 1997 assessment form. Significant Caries Index was also used to assess the prevalence of dental caries. Results: The prevalence of dental caries was found higher among government school children, that is, 53%, when compared to private school children, that is, 47% and this difference was found to be statistically significant. The mean decayed, missing, and filled teeth were found to be higher in government school children (7.61 ± 2.86) as compared to private school children (4.76 ± 2.42). Conclusion: Dental caries was found to be the major public health problems among both the government and private school children of Bharatpur city, which need immediate attention. Regular dental checkups and practice of routine oral hygiene procedures will enable them to lead a healthier life. PMID:24818096

  9. Cerebral palsy: a dental update.

    PubMed

    Sehrawat, Nidhi; Marwaha, Mohita; Bansal, Kalpana; Chopra, Radhika

    2014-05-01

    Special and medically compromised patients present a unique population that challenges the dentist's skill and knowledge. Providing oral care to people with cerebral palsy (CP) requires adaptation of the skills we use everyday. In fact, most people with mild or moderate forms of CP can be treated successfully in the general practice setting. This article is to review various dental considerations and management of a CP patient. How to cite this article: Sehrawat N, Marwaha M, Bansal K, Chopra R. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):109-118. PMID:25356010

  10. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Nidhi; Bansal, Kalpana; Chopra, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Special and medically compromised patients present a unique population that challenges the dentist’s skill and knowledge. Providing oral care to people with cerebral palsy (CP) requires adaptation of the skills we use everyday. In fact, most people with mild or moderate forms of CP can be treated successfully in the general practice setting. This article is to review various dental considerations and management of a CP patient. How to cite this article: Sehrawat N, Marwaha M, Bansal K, Chopra R. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):109-118. PMID:25356010

  11. Dental ceramics: a current review.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O

    2014-03-01

    Ceramics are used for many dental applications and are characterized in various ways, including by their hardness, brittleness, thermal and electrical insulation, and biocompatibility. The ceramics most commonly used in dentistry are oxides, particularly silicon dioxide (SiO2), or silica; aluminum oxide (Al2O3), or alumina; and zirconium dioxide (ZrO2), or zirconia. This article reviews the microstructure of current dental ceramic materials and how it relates to their mechanical properties, clinical techniques, and optical properties. Typical ceramics currently in use are described, and their clinically relevant properties such as strength, fracture, polishability, and wear are compared. Cementation methods are also discussed. PMID:24773195

  12. MR-byMIT-dental-1011 Dental Service

    E-print Network

    Polz, Martin

    Record) by MIT Medical Important information about releasing patient medical records MIT Medical and Massachusetts state law. You should be aware of these guidelines when requesting medical records. State and provide proof of legal authority to release the records. b. MIT Medical's Dental Service does not fax

  13. DENTAL HEALTH STATUS AND DENTAL HEALTH SERVICES FOR RURAL YOUTH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DONNELLY, CHARLES J.

    ALTHOUGH DENTAL PROBLEMS ARE COMMON IN BOTH RURAL AND URBAN AREAS, RURAL CHILDREN SEEM TO HAVE MORE DIFFICULTIES. THE REASONS FOR THIS APPEAR TO BE THAT THERE ARE FEWER DENTISTS PER CAPITA IN RURAL AREAS, AND THAT THE RURAL CHILD IS USUALLY EXPOSED TO A WATER SYSTEM LACKING FLUORIDATION, WHICH IS THE MOST EFFECTIVE WAY OF ADMINISTERING FLUORIDES.…

  14. Health maintenance facility: Dental equipment requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, John; Gosbee, John; Billica, Roger

    1991-01-01

    The objectives were to test the effectiveness of the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) dental suction/particle containment system, which controls fluids and debris generated during simulated dental treatment, in microgravity; to test the effectiveness of fiber optic intraoral lighting systems in microgravity, while simulating dental treatment; and to evaluate the operation and function of off-the-shelf dental handheld instruments, namely a portable dental hand drill and temporary filling material, in microgravity. A description of test procedures, including test set-up, flight equipment, and the data acquisition system, is given.

  15. Osseointegrated dental implants in growing children: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Mankani, Nivedita; Chowdhary, Ramesh; Patil, Brijesh A; Nagaraj, E; Madalli, Poornima

    2014-10-01

    Edentulism is usually associated with the aging patient. However, total or partial tooth loss also affects young individuals, mainly as a result of trauma, decay, anodontia, or congenital and acquired jaw defects involving the alveolar processes. For elderly patients, the use of oral implants has become an accepted treatment modality for edentulism, and most of today's knowledge regarding implants is based on such practice. There has been hesitation to perform implant therapy for growing children; hence, few children to date have been provided with implant-supported construction. Consequently, little is known about the outcome of the osseointegration procedure in young patients, and until now, only a limited number of case presentations have been reported. This article reviews the current literature to discuss the use of dental implants in growing patients and the influence of maxillary and mandibular skeletal and dental growth on the stability of those implants. The literature review was performed through Science Direct, Wileys Blackwell Synergy, PubMed, Google, Embase, Medknow publications, and Springer for references published from 1963 to 2011. It is recommended to wait for the completion of dental and skeletal growth, except for severe cases of ectodermal dysplasia. PMID:22214484

  16. Food insecurity and dental caries in schoolchildren: a cross-sectional survey in the western Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Frazăo, Paulo; Benicio, Maria H D; Narvai, Paulo C; Cardoso, Marly A

    2014-06-01

    We analyzed the association between food insecurity and dental caries in 7- to 9-yr-old schoolchildren. We performed a cross-sectional survey nested in a population-based cohort study of 203 schoolchildren. The participants lived in the urban area of a small town within the western Brazilian Amazon. Dental examinations were performed according to criteria recommended by the World Health Organization. The number of decayed deciduous and permanent teeth as a count variable was the outcome measure. Socio-economic status, food security, behavioral variables, and child nutritional status, measured by Z-score for body mass index (BMI), were investigated, and robust Poisson regression models were used. The results showed a mean (SD) of 3.63 (3.26) teeth affected by untreated caries. Approximately 80% of schoolchildren had at least one untreated decayed tooth, and nearly 60% lived in food-insecure households. Sex, household wealth index, mother's education level, and food-insecurity scores were associated with dental caries in the crude analysis. Dental caries was 1.5 times more likely to be associated with high food-insecurity scores after adjusting for socio-economic status and sex. A significant dose-response relationship was observed. In conclusion, food insecurity is highly associated with dental caries in 7- to 9-yr-old children and may be seen as a risk factor. These findings suggest that food-security policies could reduce dental caries. PMID:24754799

  17. Prevalence of dental caries among school-going children in Namakkal district: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Karunakaran, Ramachandran; Somasundaram, Sujatha; Gawthaman, Murugesan; Vinodh, Selvaraj; Manikandan, Sundaram; Gokulnathan, Subramanian

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of dental caries in primary teeth among 4-6 years old school going children in the Namakkal District. Materials and Methods: The study covered a total of 850 school going children in a total of 26 schools in the Namakkal district of Tamil Nadu. The age group selected for this study ranged from 4 to 6 years of age. Each child was examined in their respective schools by one of the four calibrated examiners and decay, missing and filled teeth (dmft) index was recorded along with demographic details. This study was done in September-October 2013 in a span of 1 month duration. Results: Of 850 children examined, 560 (65.88%) children had dental caries. Mean dmft score was 2.86. Prevalence of dental caries was higher in boys (69.6%) than in girls (61.5%). The untreated decay teeth accounted for 92.4%. Conclusion: The prevalence of dental caries among 4-6 years old children is high in the Namakkal district. The need for the creation of dental awareness among children and their primary caregivers is crucial and the need for developing immediate oral health promotion strategies including an increase in school dental health programs is recommended. PMID:25210362

  18. Health literacy, acculturation, and the use of preventive oral health care by Somali refugees living in massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Geltman, Paul L; Hunter Adams, Jo; Penrose, Katherine L; Cochran, Jennifer; Rybin, Denis; Doros, Gheorghe; Henshaw, Michelle; Paasche-Orlow, Michael

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the impact of English health literacy and spoken proficiency and acculturation on preventive dental care use among Somali refugees in Massachusetts. 439 adult Somalis in the US ?10 years were interviewed. English functional health literacy, dental word recognition, and spoken proficiency were measured using STOFHLA, REALD, and BEST Plus. Logistic regression tested associations of language measures with preventive dental care use. Without controlling for acculturation, participants with higher health literacy were 2.0 times more likely to have had preventive care (P = 0.02). Subjects with higher word recognition were 1.8 times as likely to have had preventive care (P = 0.04). Controlling for acculturation, these were no longer significant, and spoken proficiency was not associated with increased preventive care use. English health literacy and spoken proficiency were not associated with preventive dental care. Other factors, like acculturation, were more predictive of care use than language skills. PMID:23748902

  19. Special cluster issue on tribocorrosion of dental materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Mathew T.; Stack, Margaret M.

    2013-10-01

    Tribocorrosion affects all walks of life from oil and gas conversion to biomedical materials. Wear can interact with corrosion to enhance it or impede it; conversely, corrosion can enhance or impede wear. The understanding of the interactions between physical and chemical phenomena has been greatly assisted by electrochemical and microscopic techniques. In dentistry, it is well recognized that erosion due to dissolution (a term physicists use to denote wear) of enamel can result in tooth decay; however, the effects of the oral environment, i.e. pH levels, electrochemical potential and any interactions due to the forces involved in chewing are not well understood. This special cluster issue includes investigations on the fundamentals of wear-corrosion interactions involved in simulated oral environments, including candidate dental implant and veneer materials. The issue commences with a fundamental study of titanium implants and this is followed by an analysis of the behaviour of commonly used temporomandibular devices in a synovial fluid-like environment. The analysis of tribocorrosion mechanisms of Ti6Al4V biomedical alloys in artificial saliva with different pHs is addressed and is followed by a paper on fretting wear, on hydroxyapatite-titanium composites in simulated body fluid, supplemented with protein (bovine serum albumin). The effects of acid treatments on tooth enamel, and as a surface engineering technique for dental implants, are investigated in two further contributions. An analysis of the physiological parameters of intraoral wear is addressed; this is followed by a study of candidate dental materials in common beverages such as tea and coffee with varying acidity and viscosity and the use of wear maps to identify the safety zones for prediction of material degradation in such conditions. Hence, the special cluster issue consists of a range of tribocorrosion contributions involving many aspects of dental tribocorrosion, from analysis of physiological approaches and tissue engineering to studying of the effects of the environments encountered in clinical practice and management which lead to tooth decay. A wide range of analytical techniques and tribocorrosion experimental approaches is used to simulate, assess and model the synergistic interactions of wear and corrosion, many of them leading to new insights. We hope it will lead to increased awareness of tribocorrosion phenomena for researchers and dental clinicians alike and 'food for thought' for further studies in this field.

  20. Documento de consenso sobre la utilización de profilaxis antibiótica en cirugía y procedimientos dentales

    Microsoft Academic Search

    José Luis Gutiérrez; J. Vicente Bagán; Antonio Bascones; Rafael Llamas; Jaime Llena; Araceli Morales; Blas Noguerol; Paloma Planells; José Prieto; Jose Ignacio Salmerón

    2006-01-01

    The goal of antibiotic prophylaxis in Odontology is to prevent the onset of infections through the entranceway provided by the therapeutic action, therefore it is indicated providing there is a considerable risk of infection, either because of the charac- teristics of the operation itself or the patient's local or general condition. Nonetheless, clinical trials with antibiotics in dental pathologies have

  1. Childhood Obesity & Dental Disease: Common Causes, Common Solutions. Oral Health & Obesity Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children Now, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Too many California children suffer from high rates of preventable chronic conditions associated with childhood obesity and dental disease. The state is experiencing a crisis in both areas. Fortunately, common factors that contribute to both conditions--including the rates of breastfeeding, access to healthy food and the consumption of…

  2. Dental Hygiene Regulation and Access to Oral Healthcare: Assessing the Variation across the US States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tanya Wanchek

    2010-01-01

    AbstractRegulations in many US states prevent dental hygienists (DHs) from fulfilling their potential to improve oral healthcare. Wing et?al. found that stringent practice regulations lower DH wages and reduce access to care. We add licensure regulations to the analysis and estimate the simultaneous effect of licensure and practice restrictions on the DH labour market and access to care. The results

  3. Mechanistic Aspects oftheInteractions BetweenFluoride andDental Enamel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. tenCate; J. D. B. Featherstone

    Formany yearsafter thediscovery ofitscaries preventive effect, fluoride was thought tobe primarily active bylowering thesolubility oftheapatitic mineral phase ofthedental hardtissues. Recent findings haveshed new light on themechanisms bywhichfluoride inhibits ordelays dental caries. Fluoride present in theoralfluids alters therateofthenaturally occurring dissolution andreprecipitation processes atthetooth- oral fluid interface. Demineralization ofenamel isinhibited byconcentrations offluoride inthesub-ppm range. Likewise, remineralization ofincipient caries lesions (the earliest stage

  4. Synthesis and solubility of calcium fluoride\\/hydroxyfluorapatite nanocrystals for dental applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mahmoud Azami; Sasan Jalilifiroozinezhad; Masoud Mozafari; Mohammad Rabiee

    2011-01-01

    As the mineral phase of tooth enamel consists of apatite containing fluoride, the “CaF2-like” salts are of significant interest in dentistry for their roles as labile fluoride reservoirs in caries prevention. Fluoride ion is required for normal dental development because of its therapeutic ability of osteoporosis healing and stimulating osteoblast activity both in vitro and in vivo. In this research,

  5. [Anxiety and ++phobia in dental patients. Recent findings regarding the "fear of the dentist"].

    PubMed

    Lino, A; Rusconi, A C; Zisa, G

    1994-01-01

    The authors review the most recent literature on "dental phobia" which is responsible for discomfort and delays in prevention and treatment of odontoiatric disorders. Special attention is devoted to the multifactorial etiology and to diagnostic classification of these difficulties, as well as to the therapeutic possibilities available today. PMID:8168353

  6. Informatics Systems to Assess and Apply Clinical Research on Dental Restorative Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. J. Anusavice

    2003-01-01

    Dental biomaterials are used clinically for one or more of the following purposes: to restore function, to enhance esthetics, and to prevent or arrest demineralization of tooth structure. Studies of the clinical performance of restorations and prostheses made from these materials have generally focused on quality assessment and survival statistics. Data from these studies should provide probabilities of specific treatment

  7. Pulsed laser sintering of photo-active calcium phosphates for dental enamel restoration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Jha; E Elmadani; G. Jose; C. G. Leburn; C T A Brown; W Sibbett; M S Duggal; J Toumba

    2011-01-01

    to sensitivity of teeth is a common condition amongst large population worldwide. It is a lifestyle related condition, resulting from the progressive loss of mineral phase from enamel surface. Unlike bone, the dental enamel is a dead tissue and cannot regenerate itself and it must be restored for preventing exposure of softer dentinal tubules and nerves [1], which is the

  8. Addressing Disparities in Children's Oral Health: A Dental-Medical Partnership to Train Family Practice Residents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wendy E. Mouradian; Douglas C. Schaad; Sara Kim; Penelope J. Leggott; Peter S. Domoto; Russell Maier; Nancy G. Stevens; Mark Koday

    Providing oral health care to rural populations in the United States is a major challenge. Lack of community water fluoridation, dental workforce shortages, and geographical barriers all aggravate oral health and access problems in the largely rural Northwest. Children from low-income and minority families and children with special needs are at particular risk. Family- centered disease prevention strategies are needed

  9. Preventing Pneumoconiosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... email. » Register for ENews Home > Lung Disease > Pneumoconiosis, Coal Workers Pneumoconiosis Preventing Pneumoconiosis Can Pneumoconiosis be Prevented? ... way to prevent pneumoconiosis is by not inhaling coal dust. The Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) (part ...

  10. Factors for Increasing Adoption of E-Courses Among Dental and Dental Hygiene Faculty Members

    PubMed Central

    DeBate, Rita D.; Cragun, Deborah; Severson, Herbert H.; Shaw, Tracy; Christiansen, Steve; Koerber, Anne; Tomar, Scott; Brown, Kelli McCormack; Tedesco, Lisa A.; Hendricson, William

    2011-01-01

    The incorporation of web-based learning into the dental curriculum has been consistently recommended in the literature on reform in dental education. There has been growing support for web-based learning in dental and dental hygiene education as demonstrated by deans’ identifying this as a planned curricular innovation. The purpose of our study was to explore characteristics of e-courses that may serve to increase adoption among dental and dental hygiene faculty members. Eight ninety-minute focus groups (three dental; five dental hygiene) were conducted with dental (n=27) and dental hygiene (n=23) faculty members from six academic institutions. The resulting data were analyzed to identify two overarching themes and associated subthemes with regard to benefits and barriers influencing adoption of e-courses. A working conceptual framework, based on the Diffusion of Innovations, was developed from these themes to understand the characteristics that may influence the rate of adoption of e-courses among dental and dental hygiene faculty members. Analysis of the data revealed four main adoption barriers: 1) low perceived relative advantage to faculty members; 2) low compatibility with current curriculum; 3) high perceived time commitment; and 4) complexity of e-course development. This exploratory assessment identifies leverage points for facilitating the adoption and sustainability of e-courses in dental and dental hygiene education. PMID:21546592

  11. Usefulness of Forensic Dental Symbols© and Dental Encoder© database in forensic odontology.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Chicón, Jesús; Valenzuela, Aurora

    2012-01-01

    A new universal graphic dental system, Forensic Dental Symbols(©), has been created to provide precision in the construction of dental records, improve standardization, and increase efficiency in dental identification procedures. Two hundred and thirty-four different graphic symbols representing the most frequent clinical status for each tooth were designed. Symbols can be then converted to a typographic font and then are ready to use in any computer. For the appropriate use, manipulation, and storage of dental information generated by the Forensic Dental Symbols(©), Dental Encoder(©) database has been created. The database contains all the information required by INTERPOL Disaster Victim Identification (DVI)-dental-forms. To explore the possibilities that Dental Encoder(©) offers, an antemortem dental database from a Spanish population of 3920 military personnel had been constructed. Data generated by Dental Encoder(©) were classified into sex and age groups. The program can perform an automatic search of the database for cases that match a selected clinical status presented in a single tooth or a combination of situations for several teeth. Moreover, Dental Encoder(©) allows information to be printed on INTERPOL DVI-dental-forms, or the inclusion of any completed form into any document, technical report, or identification of dental report. PMID:22074597

  12. Orbital inflammation after dental procedures.

    PubMed

    Choe, Christina H; Eckstein, Lauren A; Vagefi, M Reza

    2012-01-01

    This study reports 3 cases of acute orbital inflammation that occurred within 3 weeks of various dental procedures and offers a possible mechanism as to their cause. The charts of 3 patients were retrospectively examined. Clinical notes, laboratory testing, and imaging studies were reviewed. The cases involved a 36-year old woman, a 61-year-old woman, and a 44-year-old woman who developed acute dacryoadenitis after tooth extraction in the former case and after routine dental cleaning in the latter 2. All cases were initially treated with an oral steroid taper over 6 to 8 weeks. The first 2 cases resolved promptly and have remained quiescent. The last individual had recurrent symptoms prompting lacrimal gland biopsy that demonstrated chronic, nongranulomatous inflammation without monoclonality. The patient subsequently responded to periorbital steroid injection only to have a recurrent bout of inflammation after repeat dental cleaning. Another periorbital steroid injection resulted in resolution of inflammation. The authors propose that a subset of acute orbital inflammation may represent an autoimmune response triggered by dental manipulation. These cases are suggestive of an atypical variant of noninfectious, microbe-induced inflammation. PMID:22391741

  13. Dental Office Procedures. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apfel, Maura; Weaver, Trudy Karlene

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains three units covering the following topics: ethics and jurisprudence; the appointment book; and…

  14. Dental Assistant. Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hefner, Dollie

    This curriculum is comprised of 31 instructional units divided into eight subject areas: orientation (6 units), anatomy and physiology (6 units), dental histology (1 unit), microbiology and bacteriology (2 units), pharmacology (2 units), chairside assistance (9 units), roentgenology (2 units), and practice administration (3 units). Each…

  15. Computer Education for Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffcoat, M. K.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A required computer course for preparing dental students to write computer programs, use software packages, and evaluate software for purchase is described. A post-course questionnaire survey of students revealed that the majority found the course helpful. A course outline is included. (Author/MLW)

  16. A case report of patient practising yoga leading to dental erosion.

    PubMed

    Meshramkar, Roseline; Patil, Sanjayagouda B; Patil, N P

    2007-06-01

    The article presents the case of a patient who was practising Yoga (Kunjal kriya) which led to dental erosion. Dental erosion can be due to extrinsic or intrinsic causes. The intrinsic causes include vomiting due to anorexia nervosa, regurgitation due to abnormality in gastro-intestinal tract or rumination. A 38-year-old male patient presented with a rare aetiology of dental erosion. He had practiced kunjal kriya one of the yogic exercises described in ancient India. In kunjal kriya the patient vomits on an empty stomach in order to clean his or her gastro-intestinal tract. The patient had practiced this form of exercise for over 12 years which had led to severe dental erosion. A proper case history should be evaluated for every patient so that they can be counselled for any factors that could be detrimental to dental health. Early diagnosis is paramount in recognising the aetiology of dental erosion so that detrimental effects on the dentition can be prevented. PMID:17695740

  17. Nuclear Decay

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Pratte

    This lesson provides an overview of basic atomic structure and the concept of radioactive decay. Topics include the particles that make up an atom, binding forces, and the concept of isotopes. There is also discussion of decay methods and half-life versus activity. The lesson includes an activity in which students use online applets to investigate the half-life and activity of selected isotopes and to examine possible decay chains for some others. They will also use a pair of dice to simulate the process of decay.

  18. On the reporting of dental health, time for dental care, and the treatment panorama.

    PubMed

    Swedberg, Y

    1999-01-01

    The thesis included five methodological studies and one caries epidemiological investigation, the general aim being to study how to measure and report dental health, time for dental care, treatment panorama, and dental care outcomes, within a Public Dental Service organization. The specific aims were to monitor dental clinic activities using a time study method, to apply time study results of a dental health-related patient group system for the 3-19 year age groups, and to compare time study results with corresponding results from computerized systems used for reporting dental care. Other specific aims were to compare longitudinal caries index data results between cohort and cross-sectional samples, to analyse caries index for extreme caries groups among adolescents leaving organized dental care, and--using time series methods--to analyse dental health development of the 15-19 year age groups. Results from the time studies portrayed the dental clinic as a working unit, showed that reported values can represent dental care only for intervention procedures, and indicated that clinic patterns were not adapted to the health situation of the patient groups. Longitudinal cohort attempts gave different values from those of the cross-sectional year classes, which should be the primary focus when presenting caries index mean values in dental health reviews. Caries-free groups from 15 to 19 years of age seem to be stable in their caries development in about 60%-80% of cases; while the 20% groups with the highest index values accounted for about 80% of all approximal lesions. In times of major economic adjustment, dental health for adolescents in Göteborg was an example of sustainable dental health development. A model system for monitoring, analysing, and reporting dental health and dental care outcomes within a dental care-giving organization calls for several conditions, for example, a dental health-related patient group system, and a rationale for the choice of dental team models. These areas could be gathered into a system where contemporary socio-economic factors and dental research results interact with performed dental care, and also with different methods for reporting and evaluating dental health, dental care costs, and the demand for dental care competence. PMID:10389234

  19. Severe dental caries as the first presenting clinical feature in primary Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Elham; Fallahi, Sasan; Alaeddini, Mojgan; Hasani Tabatabaei, Masoomeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Sjögren’s syndrome is an autoimmune syndrome involving the exocrine glands specially the salivary and lacrimal glands leading to xerostomia and xerophtalmia. This paper presents a case with primary Sjögren’s syndrome that severe dental caries were the first clinical manifestation. Case Presentation: A 42-year-old man was referred to the School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences due to unexplained severe dental decays. After systematic evaluation and consultation with the rheumatologist and the ophthalmologist, the diagnosis of primary Sjögren’s syndrome was suggested and confirmed by serologic and histopathologic study. Conclusion: Primary Sjögren’s syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with early severe dental caries. PMID:24009970

  20. What is the true incidence of dental pathology in the total joint arthroplasty population?

    PubMed

    Barrington, John W; Barrington, Thomas A

    2011-09-01

    One million total joint arthroplasties (TJAs) are performed annually in the United States. The incidence of oral disease has not been documented in this population. To understand the scope of disease, a descriptive longitudinal population-based study sought to define the true incidence of dental pathology in the TJA population. One hundred consecutive TJA patients from a dedicated arthroplasty practice were sent for dental clearance, including oral examination, cleaning, radiographs, and treatment of active decay. The incidence of pathology was documented. Of 10 patients, 23 (23%) were treated before being cleared for arthroplasty. Sixty-six procedures were performed--2.9 problems per patient. No patient developed TJA infection. Routine preoperative dental clearance revealed 23% incidence of pathology, and no patient developed TJA infection. PMID:21723698