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1

Preventive Dental Health Association  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

Text Version... 3/08 Petitioned the California OSHA Board for a supplemental standard for ... 1988 Greater New York Dental Meeting OSHA Right to Know Law ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/advisorycommittees/committeesmeetingmaterials

2

THE DEMAND FOR PREVENTIVE AND RESTORATIVE DENTAL SERVICES.  

PubMed

Chronic tooth decay is the most common chronic condition in the United States among children ages 5-17 and also affects a large percentage of adults. Oral health conditions are preventable, but less than half of the US population uses dental services annually. We seek to examine the extent to which limited dental coverage and high out-of-pocket costs reduce dental service use by the nonelderly privately insured and uninsured. Using data from the 2001-2006 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and an American Dental Association survey of dental procedure prices, we jointly estimate the probability of using preventive and both basic and major restorative services through a correlated random effects specification that controls for endogeneity. We found that dental coverage increased the probability of preventive care use by 19% and the use of restorative services 11% to 16%. Both conditional and unconditional on dental coverage, the use of dental services was not sensitive to out-of-pocket costs. We conclude that dental coverage is an important determinant of preventive dental service use, but other nonprice factors related to consumer preferences, especially education, are equal if not stronger determinants. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23349123

Meyerhoefer, Chad D; Zuvekas, Samuel H; Manski, Richard

2013-01-24

3

Dental decay rates among children of migrant workers in Yakima, WA.  

PubMed Central

The literature documents a significant decline in the prevalence of dental caries among children. Unfortunately, dental decay rates of children of migrant workers remain high. This study collected data from 885 migrant children in central Washington. This community is in the west coast migrant stream. The area is served by a health center funded through the community and migrant health center program. There is an active dental program provided through the health center. The children were found to have a high rate of dental decay. However, there was a high rate of treatment of this decay and a rate of sealants (a preventive measure) nearly three times the rate in the general population. Although dental decay remains a serious problem in the migrant community, the migrant health centers appear to be making a positive impact on the dental health of the children.

Koday, M; Rosenstein, D I; Lopez, G M

1990-01-01

4

The Importance of Tooth Decay Prevention in Children under Three  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Tooth decay and tooth loss was once the norm but public health interventions have led to major improvements for most people. Nevertheless, not all children have benefited. Dental disease in young children is unacceptably high. Tooth decay is preventable. Early childhood educators are often the first to notice the problem. Professional…

Milgrom, Peter; Huebner, Colleen; Chi, Donald

2010-01-01

5

Preventive dental care for children and adolescents.  

PubMed

Preventive dental care for children and adolescents requires a good understanding of the dental caries process and the particular relationships that exist throughout childhood and young adulthood. Only when these relationships are understood can they be used to diagnose dental caries risk and apply appropriate preventive therapies and restorative care that is effective. The need to diagnose risk when applying preventive care is as important for individual patients as it is for population groups. At the individual level, the aim is to aid the development of a healthy functioning dentition for life. This applies in the population group level but the cost benefits also become important in justifying the funding to carry out preventive practices. Risk can be determined by general factors including the socioeconomic status, access to optimally fluoridated drinking water and age. Specific factors include the microbiology of the dental plaque, dietary practices, oral hygiene practices, individual fluoride use and previous dental caries history. Once the risk has been diagnosed and the related factors identified, the best preventive approach can be selected. This may include oral hygiene, dietary change, fluoride recommendations, restorative care using fluoride releasing materials or antibacterial mouthwashes. The dentist may play several roles in preventive dental care. The first is as the giver of advice and care for the individual child patient; the second is as an advocate to help the child get the care by getting the consent and support of the parents; and the third may be to lobby for the appropriate funding to obtain this care in publicly funded programs. PMID:11458617

Drummond, B K

2001-03-01

6

Insuring preventive dental care: are sealants included?  

PubMed Central

Lack of third-party reimbursement for pit and fissure sealants has been cited as a barrier preventing increased adoption rates. The extent to which commercial insurance companies and Blue Cross/Blue Shield Associations provide reimbursement for dental sealants is examined with data from a telephone survey. Results indicate that the majority of such third-party payers did not provide reimbursement for sealants.

Glasrud, P H

1985-01-01

7

Prevention and Control of Decay in Homes.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This manual is intended to provide architects, builders, inspectors, and pest control operators with a comprehensive reference on means of reducing or preventing damage to homes caused by the activities of wood - inhabiting fungi, particularly decay fungi...

A. F. Verrall T. L. Amburgey

1978-01-01

8

Compliance in Dental Health Education and Prevention - Executive Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Preventive programs based on self-care routines are important in dentistry because of their potential for reducing the need for dental treatment and the total cost of dental care. Dentistry is one of the few areas in health care in which prevention is kno...

M. K. Nikias N. S. Budner

1981-01-01

9

Personal viewEnding the misery of child dental decay  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dental caries in children's teeth has drastically declined in the last 30 years. We should be proud of this achievement but there is much still to do. One of the greatest stumbling blocks to further progress is, I believe, the current payment system for NHS children's dentistry which has failed to promote effective prevention amongst the most caries prone. To

D Reekie

1999-01-01

10

Preventive Dental Care and Unmet Dental Needs Among Low-Income Children  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We examined the ways in which levels of preventive dental care and unmet dental needs varied among subgroups of low-income children. Methods. Data were drawn from the 2002 National Survey of America’s Families. We conducted bivariate and multivariate analyses, including logistic regression analyses, to assess relationships between socioeconomic, demographic, and health factors and receipt of preventive dental care and unmet dental needs. Results. More than half of low-income children without health insurance had no preventive dental care visits. Levels of unmet dental needs among low-income children who had private health insurance coverage but no dental benefits were similar to those among uninsured children. Children of parents whose mental health was rated as poor were twice as likely to have unmet dental needs as other children. Conclusions. Additional progress toward improving the dental health of low-income children depends on identifying and responding to factors limiting both the demand for and the supply of dental services. In particular, it appears that expanding access to dental benefits is key to improving the oral health of this population.

Kenney, Genevieve M.; McFeeters, Joshua R.; Yee, Justin Y.

2005-01-01

11

A dental public health approach based on computational mathematics: Monte Carlo simulation of childhood dental decay.  

PubMed

This study developed a Monte Carlo simulation approach to examining the prevalence and incidence of dental decay using Australian children as a test environment. Monte Carlo simulation has been used for a half a century in particle physics (and elsewhere); put simply, it is the probability for various population-level outcomes seeded randomly to drive the production of individual level data. A total of five runs of the simulation model for all 275,000 12-year-olds in Australia were completed based on 2005-2006 data. Measured on average decayed/missing/filled teeth (DMFT) and DMFT of highest 10% of sample (Sic10) the runs did not differ from each other by more than 2% and the outcome was within 5% of the reported sampled population data. The simulations rested on the population probabilities that are known to be strongly linked to dental decay, namely, socio-economic status and Indigenous heritage. Testing the simulated population found DMFT of all cases where DMFT<>0 was 2.3 (n = 128,609) and DMFT for Indigenous cases only was 1.9 (n = 13,749). In the simulation population the Sic25 was 3.3 (n = 68,750). Monte Carlo simulations were created in particle physics as a computational mathematical approach to unknown individual-level effects by resting a simulation on known population-level probabilities. In this study a Monte Carlo simulation approach to childhood dental decay was built, tested and validated. PMID:23410020

Tennant, Marc; Kruger, Estie

2013-01-07

12

Recommendations for using fluoride to prevent and control dental caries in the United States. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  

PubMed

Widespread use of fluoride has been a major factor in the decline in the prevalence and severity of dental caries (i.e., tooth decay) in the United States and other economically developed countries. When used appropriately, fluoride is both safe and effective in preventing and controlling dental caries. All U.S. residents are likely exposed to some degree to fluoride, which is available from multiple sources. Both health-care professionals and the public have sought guidance on selecting the best way to provide and receive fluoride. During the late 1990s, CDC convened a work group to develop recommendations for using fluoride to prevent and control dental caries in the United States. This report includes these recommendations, as well as a) critical analysis of the scientific evidence regarding the efficacy and effectiveness of fluoride modalities in preventing and controlling dental caries, b) ordinal grading of the quality of the evidence, and c) assessment of the strength of each recommendation. Because frequent exposure to small amounts of fluoride each day will best reduce the risk for dental caries in all age groups, the work group recommends that all persons drink water with an optimal fluoride concentration and brush their teeth twice daily with fluoride toothpaste. For persons at high risk for dental caries, additional fluoride measures might be needed. Measured use of fluoride modalities is particularly appropriate during the time of anterior tooth enamel development (i.e., age <6 years). The recommendations in this report guide dental and other health-care providers, public health officials, policy makers, and the public in the use of fluoride to achieve maximum protection against dental caries while using resources efficiently and reducing the likelihood of enamel fluorosis. The recommendations address public health and professional practice, self-care, consumer product industries and health agencies, and further research. Adoption of these recommendations could further reduce dental caries in the United States and save public and private resources. PMID:11521913

2001-08-17

13

Mucositis prevention by improved dental care in acute leukemia patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Goals of work  The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of the intensive dental care protocol in preventing oral complications in acute leukemia patients.Patients and methods  Thirty-four patients hospitalized for induction remission therapy for acute leukemia were randomly assigned to one of two groups, whether to receive intensive dental care protocol or not. The intensive dental care group

Milanko Djuric; Valeria Hillier-Kolarov; Aranka Belic; Ljiljana Jankovic

2006-01-01

14

Utilization of Preventive Dental Practices by Graduates of One U.S. Dental School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A survey of 113 graduates of the State University of New York at Stony Brook dental school now in general practice found a high rate of self-reported use of preventive practices (oral hygiene instruction, pit-and-fissure sealants, fluorides, and diet analysis) included in the dental school's curriculum. (MSE)|

Ripa, Louis W.; Johnson, Robin M.

1991-01-01

15

National supervised toothbrushing program and dental decay in Scotland.  

PubMed

We aimed to assess the association between the roll-out of the national nursery toothbrushing program and a reduction in dental decay in five-year-old children in a Scotland-wide population study. The intervention was supervised toothbrushing in nurseries and distribution of fluoride toothpaste and toothbrushes for home use, measured as the percentage of nurseries participating in each health service administrative board area. The endpoint was mean d(3)mft in 99,071 five-year-old children, covering 7% to 25% of the relevant population (in various years), who participated in multiple cross-sectional dental epidemiology surveys in 1987 to 2009. The slope of the uptake in toothbrushing was correlated with the slope in the reduction of d(3)mft. The mean d(3)mft in Years -2 to 0 (relative to that in start-up Year 0) was 3.06, reducing to 2.07 in Years 10 to 12 (difference = -0.99; 95% CI -1.08, -0.90; p < 0.001). The uptake of toothbrushing correlated with the decline in d(3)mft (correlation = -0.64; -0.86, -0.16; p = 0.011). The result improved when one outlying Health Board was excluded (correlation = -0.90; -0.97, -0.70; p < 0.0001). An improvement in the dental health of five-year-olds was detected and is associated with the uptake of nursery toothbrushing. PMID:23264611

Macpherson, L M D; Anopa, Y; Conway, D I; McMahon, A D

2012-12-21

16

Obesity and Dental Decay: Inference on the Role of Dietary Sugar  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate the relationship of children’s obesity and dental decay. Methods We measured parameters related to obesity and dental decay in 8,275 4th and 5th grade Kuwaiti children (average age = 11.36 years) in a cross-sectional study. First to determine body weight, height, age for computation of BMI . Second, to determine numbers of teeth, numbers of fillings and numbers of untreated decayed teeth to determine extent and severity of dental disease. From these measurements, we computed measures of dental decay in children from four body weight categories; obese, overweight, normal healthy weight and underweight children. Results The percentage of children with decayed or filled teeth varied inversely with the body weight category. The percentage of decayed or filled teeth decreased from 15.61% (n=193) in underweight children, to 13.03% (n=4,094) in normal healthy weight children, to 9.73% (n=1,786) in overweight children to 7.87% (n=2,202) in obese children. Differences between all groups were statistically significant. Male children in this population had more dental decay than female children but the reduction of tooth decay as a function of BMI was greater in male children. Conclusions The finding of an inverse obesity-dental decay relationship contradicts the obesity-sugar and the obesity-dental decay relationship hypotheses. Sugar is well recognized as necessary and sufficient for dental decay. Sugar is also hypothesized to be a leading co-factor in obesity. If the later hypothesis is true, one would expect dental decay to increase with obesity. This was not found. The reasons for this inverse relationship are not currently clear.

Goodson, J. Max; Tavares, Mary; Wang, Xiaoshan; Niederman, Richard; Cugini, Maryann; Hasturk, Hatice; Barake, Roula; Alsmadi, Osama; Al-Mutawa, Sabiha; Ariga, Jitendra; Soparkar, Pramod; Behbehani, Jawad; Behbehani, Kazem

2013-01-01

17

Prevention of orthopaedic implant infection in patients undergoing dental procedures.  

PubMed

The Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Patients Undergoing Dental Procedures evidence-based clinical practice guideline was codeveloped by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Dental Association. This guideline replaces the previous AAOS Information Statement, "Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Bacteremia in Patients With Joint Replacement," published in 2009. Based on the best current evidence and a systematic review of published studies, three recommendations have been created to guide clinical practice in the prevention of orthopaedic implant infections in patients undergoing dental procedures. The first recommendation is graded as Limited; this recommendation proposes that the practitioner consider changing the long-standing practice of routinely prescribing prophylactic antibiotic for patients with orthopaedic implants who undergo dental procedures. The second, graded as Inconclusive, addresses the use of oral topical antimicrobials in the prevention of periprosthetic joint infections. The third recommendation, a Consensus statement, addresses the maintenance of good oral hygiene. PMID:23457068

Watters, William; Rethman, Michael P; Hanson, Nicholas Buck; Abt, Elliot; Anderson, Paul A; Carroll, Karen C; Futrell, Harry C; Garvin, Kevin; Glenn, Stephen O; Hellstein, John; Hewlett, Angela; Kolessar, David; Moucha, Calin; O'Donnell, Richard J; O'Toole, John E; Osmon, Douglas R; Evans, Richard Parker; Rinella, Anthony; Steinberg, Mark J; Goldberg, Michael; Ristic, Helen; Boyer, Kevin; Sluka, Patrick; Martin, William Robert; Cummins, Deborah S; Song, Sharon; Woznica, Anne; Gross, Leeaht

2013-03-01

18

Dental Amalgam  

MedlinePLUS

... Amalgam Fillings Alternatives to Dental Amalgam Related Resources - Dental Amalgam Dental amalgam is a dental filling material that is used ... decay results in a loss of tooth structure. Dental amalgam is one type of dental filling material used ...

19

Association of Streptococcus mutans with Human Dental Decay  

PubMed Central

The association of Streptococcus mutans with human dental decay was investigated by using several types of samples: (i) paraffin-stimulated saliva samples taken from children with from 0 to 15 decayed teeth; (ii) pooled occlusal and approximal plaque taken from children with no decayed or filled teeth, or from children with rampant caries of 10 or more teeth; (iii) plaque removed from single occlusal fissures that were either carious or noncarious. The results showed a significant association between plaque levels of S. mutans and caries. The strongest association, P < 0.0001, was found when plaque was removed from single occlusal fissures. Seventy-one percent of the carious fissures had S. mutans accounting for more than 10% of the viable flora, whereas 70% of the fissures that were caries free had no detectable S. mutans. Sixty-five percent of the pooled plaque samples from the children with rampant caries had S. mutans accounting for more than 10% of the viable flora, whereas 40% of the pooled samples from children that were caries free had no detectable S. mutans. Saliva samples tended to have low levels of S. mutans and were equivocal in demonstrating a relationship between S. mutans and caries.

Loesche, W. J.; Rowan, J.; Straffon, L. H.; Loos, P. J.

1975-01-01

20

Attitude Towards Preventive Dentistry Among Iranian Senior Dental Students  

PubMed Central

Objective: To investigate attitudes of Iranian senior dental students towards preventive dentistry in relation to their background factors and self-perceived competency in providing preventive care. Materials and Methods: In spring 2008, a questionnaire survey was conducted with all the senior dental students of seven randomly selected state dental schools in Iran. In addition to the respondents’ age and gender, the voluntary questionnaire assessed the students’ attitudes towards preventive dentistry by means of a seven-point semantic differential scale of nine qualities and their opposites, and their self-perceived competency in providing preventive care by five separate questions. To identify the underlying dimensions for attitude, a factor analysis with principle component method and varimax rotation was applied. Independent sample t-test served for statistical analysis. Of the 242 students receiving the questionnaire, 182 students (75%) responded. The mean age of the participants was 26 years and 42% of them were men. Results: Based on the factor analysis, which explained 60% of the total variance, two attitude dimensions were identified; the profession-related dimension and the health service-related dimension. Competency in giving preventive care in all the five specified areas was reported by 44% of the students with no significant gender differences. The mean for the dentist-related dimension was significantly higher among the students who reported competency in giving preventive care (P=0.005). Conclusion: There is room for improvement in senior dental students’ attitudes towards preventive dentistry. In order to create more positive attitudes for future dental professionals, there should be an early and sufficient exposure to preventive aspects of dentistry in the dental curricula.

Khami, MR.; Murtomaa, H.; Razeghi, S.; Virtanen, J. I.

2012-01-01

21

Effect of Early Preventive Dental Visits on Subsequent Dental Treatment and Expenditures  

PubMed Central

Objective Professional organizations recommend a preventive dental visit by one year of age. This study compared dental treatment and expenditures for Medicaid children who have a preventive visit before age 18-months to those who have a visit at age 18-42 months. Methods This retrospective cohort study used reimbursement claims for 19,888 children enrolled in North Carolina Medicaid (1999-2006). We compared the number of dental treatment procedures at age 43-72 months for children who had a visit by age 18-months to children who had a visit at age 18-24, 25-30, 31-36 and 37-42 months using a zero inflated negative binomial model. The likelihood and amount of expenditures at age 43-72 months were compared by group using a logit and ordinary least squares regression. Results Children who had a primary or secondary preventive visit by age 18-months had no difference in subsequent dental outcomes compared to children in older age categories. Among children with existing disease, those who had a tertiary preventive visit by age 18-months had lower rates of subsequent treatment (18-24 months IDR: 1.19, 95% CI: 1.03-1.38; 25-30 months IDR: 1.21, 95% CI: 1.06 – 1.39; 37-42 months IDR: 1.39, 95% CI: 1.22 – 1.59) and lower treatment expenditures compared to children in older age categories. Conclusions In this sample of preventive dental users in Medicaid, we found that children at highest risk of dental disease benefited from a visit before age 18-months, but most children could delay their first visit until age 3-years without an effect on subsequent dental outcomes.

Beil, Heather; Rozier, R. Gary; Preisser, John S.; Stearns, Sally; Lee, Jessica Y.

2012-01-01

22

Preventive dental care among New York City children, 2009.  

PubMed

This study aims to describe the prevalence of preventive dental care among New York City (NYC) children, including disparities by race/ethnicity or poverty and to identify health care utilization factors associated with these outcomes. Data were obtained from the 2009 NYC Child Community Health Survey. Descriptive statistics were calculated for preventive dental visits in the past 12 months among children aged 2-12 years (n = 2,435) and receipt of sealants among children aged 6-12 years (n = 1,416). Multivariable logistic regression was used to compute adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs). One in four (23.3 %) NYC children aged 2-12 years, including 57.3 % of 2-3-year olds, had no preventive dental visit in the past 12 months. Lack of preventive visits was more prevalent among Asian/Pacific Islander children compared with non-Hispanic white children (aPR 1.42 [95 % CI 1.07-1.89]), and among children living in poorer households compared with wealthier households (aPR 1.47 [95 % CI 1.13-1.92]). Two-thirds (64.5 %) of children aged 6-12 years never had sealants. Compared with non-Hispanic white children, Asian/Pacific Islander (aPR 1.26 [95 % CI 1.01-1.56]), non-Hispanic black (aPR 1.24 [95 % CI 1.06-1.46]), and Hispanic (aPR 1.21 [95 % CI 1.04-1.41]) children were more likely not to have sealants, as were children without a personal health care provider compared with children with a provider (aPR 1.33 [95 % CI 1.14-1.56]). Disparities in preventive dental care exist by race/ethnicity, poverty, and health care utilization. Personal health care providers may improve children's oral health by linking them to preventive dental care and promoting sealant application. PMID:23468320

Norton, Jennifer M; Jasek, John P; Kaye, Katherine

2013-08-01

23

Fluoride Programs in the School Setting: Preventive Dental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Two types of school-based programs that increase students' use of fluoride for preventive dental health are described. In fluoride mouthrinse programs, teachers give their students a fluoride solution once a week in a paper cup. In areas where the level of fluoride in the water supply is insufficient, the flouride tablet program is used. (JN)|

Rebich, Theodore, Jr.; And Others

1982-01-01

24

Tobacco Prevention and Control in Dental Practice: The Future  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tobacco use adversely affects oral health and dental care. Globally, the health consequences of tobacco use are worsening, particularly those caused by cigarette smoking. Concerned government and nongovernmental organizations are attempting to contain the transnational tobacco companies' promotion of tobacco use and its disregard for the serious health consequences. Dependence prevents most tobacco users from easily breaking free from their

Robert E. Mecklenburg

2001-01-01

25

School-Based Preventive Dental Care: A Different View.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Takes issue with the preceding article on the National Preventive Dentistry Demonstration Program. Argues that while the program's report has made a useful contribution to public health planning, its results are not valid as a reference for cost or effectiveness data for school-based dental health programs. (KH)|

Rebich, Theodore, Jr.

1985-01-01

26

[Tobacco use prevention and cessation in the dental practice].  

PubMed

This is the fourth part of a series of publications from the Swiss task force named "Smoking--intervention in the private dental office" on the topic "tobacco use and dental medicine". It presents the implementation of tobacco use prevention and cessation in the dental practice. Next to the optimal performance of plaque control, tobacco use cessation has become the most important measure for the treatment of periodontal diseases. In contrast to general medicine practice, the dental practice team is seeing its patients regularly and is therefore capable of helping their patients quit tobacco use. Tobacco dependence consists of both a physical and a psychological dependence. Therefore, the combination of pharmacotherapy with behavior change counseling is recommended. The use of brief Motivational Interviewing (BMI) for tobacco use short interventions in the dental practice appears to be suitable. Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is the treatment of choice for the dental practice team because both Varenicline and Bupropion SR have to be prescribed by physicians. PMID:17425242

Ramseier, Christoph A; Bornstein, Michael M; Saxer, Ulrich P; Klingler, Karl; Walter, Clemens

2007-01-01

27

Tooth Decay  

MedlinePLUS

... cavity. Your dentist calls it tooth decay or dental caries. They're all names for a hole ... or abscess. To help prevent cavities Brush your teeth every day with a fluoride toothpaste Clean between ...

28

Hearings Before the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs of the United States Senate, Ninety-Third Congress, First Session. Nutrition Education--1973. Part 6--Phosphate Research and Dental Decay. Hearings Held Washington, D.C., April 16, 1973.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|These hearings before the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs of the United States Senate include testimony on the subject of research into the use of phosphates to prevent dental decay. The purpose of the hearing was to explore certain dental health questions raised during the committee's recent hearings on the Television Advertising…

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs.

29

Hearings Before the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs of the United States Senate, Ninety-Third Congress, First Session. Nutrition Education--1973. Part 6--Phosphate Research and Dental Decay. Hearings Held Washington, D.C., April 16, 1973.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These hearings before the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs of the United States Senate include testimony on the subject of research into the use of phosphates to prevent dental decay. The purpose of the hearing was to explore certain dental health questions raised during the committee's recent hearings on the Television Advertising of…

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs.

30

Familial hypophosphatemic vitamin D-resistant rickets--prevention of spontaneous dental abscesses on primary teeth: a case report.  

PubMed

Familial hypophosphatemic vitamin D-resistant rickets is a hereditary disease generally transmitted as an X-linked dominant trait and characterized by distinctive general clinical signs. Dental features include spontaneous dental abscesses that occur in the absence of a history of trauma or dental decay. The challenge for the dentist is to prevent and treat these lesions. This report describes the case of a young hypophosphatemic boy with abscesses. In this case, the application of fluid resin composites with a self-etching primer bonding system to all primary teeth prevented abscess formation for more than 1 year and thus avoided endodontic treatment or extraction. This constitutes a new approach to the prevention of spontaneous abscesses on primary teeth in children with familial hypophosphatemic rickets. PMID:19201216

Douyere, Diane; Joseph, Clara; Gaucher, Céline; Chaussain, Catherine; Courson, Frederic

2009-02-06

31

Periodic health examination, 1995 update: 2. Prevention of dental caries. The Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To make recommendations, based on current evidence, for practising physicians and dentists on interventions for the prevention of dental caries in their patients. OPTIONS: Systemic fluoride administration, professionally administered fluoride, use of fluoride mouth rinses, fissure sealants, oral-hygiene practices, dietary practices, identification of groups at a high risk of dental caries, and early diagnosis and treatment. OUTCOMES: Reduced prevalence of dental caries and fluorosis, longer retention of teeth and lower treatment costs. EVIDENCE: Several MEDLINE searches were conducted for articles published from January 1980 to December 1992, including relevant review articles. VALUES: Relevant clinical findings were evaluated and categorized with the use of the evidence-based methods and values of the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination. Recommendations were developed for each method of caries prevention, with reduced incidence of dental caries and improved prevalence of caries-free teeth given high values. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: The potential benefits of these measures in the long-term are a lower incidence of tooth decay, longer retention of teeth and prevention of fluorosis. The cost saving can be considerable for patients and insurers; however, implementation of some recommendations will be difficult, since the traditional preventive practices of dentists and dental hygienists are not easily changed. RECOMMENDATIONS: There is good evidence that the following manoeuvres are effective in preventing dental caries: use of dentifrices containing fluoride, fluoridation of drinking water, fluoride supplements for patients in areas where there is a low level (0.3 ppm or less) of fluoride in the drinking water, professionally applied topical fluoride and the use of fluoride mouth rinses for patients with very active decay or at a high risk of dental caries and selective use of professionally applied fissure sealants on permanent molar teeth. There is poor evidence that the following manoeuvres are effective in preventing dental caries: professionally applied topical fluoride and the use of fluoride mouth rinses for patients with a low risk of caries, toothbrushing (without a dentifrice containing fluoride) and flossing, cleaning of teeth by a dentist or dental hygienist before topical application of fluoride or at a dental visit and dietary counselling for the general population. There is good evidence to recommend against the use of over-the-counter fluoride mouth rinses by the general population. VALIDATION: These guidelines are compatible with those of the US Preventive Services Task Force. SPONSOR: These guidelines were developed and endorsed by the task force, which is funded by Health Canada. Major funding was provided by the Faculty of Dentistry of the University of Toronto, Toronto and the Faculty of Dentistry of Dalhousie University, Halifax.

Lewis, D W; Ismail, A I

1995-01-01

32

Evidence-based review of prevention of dental injuries.  

PubMed

Despite efforts in reducing the number of dental traumas, most current studies indicate that the incidence of dental trauma remains unchanged and is at a relatively high level for children and young adults. When reviewing the literature on prevention, it is clear that until now the main focus has been on making and promoting mouthguards. The majority of the published studies on mouthguards have focused on materials used and how those behave and protect in vitro. The few epidemiologic studies that have been published on the possible protectiveness of the mouthguards in vivo are mostly of low level of evidence, and even those studies do not all agree on how much they actually protect the dentition. To compound the problem is the fact that the proportional ratio of dental trauma in organized sports is low compared with injuries that occur during children's play or leisure activities. It could be argued that the best strategic measure for preventing dental and oral injuries is education on both how to avoid them and what to do if an injury occurs. The demand of evidence-based dentistry and medicine calls for large prospective studies with randomized intervention to investigate the actual protection of mouthguards and faceguards. In addition, more emphasis should be placed on which is the best and most constructive way to educate youngsters and teenagers on how to avoid traumatic injuries to their teeth by using contemporary means like the Internet and apps. PMID:23635988

Sigurdsson, Asgeir

33

Evidence-based review of prevention of dental injuries.  

PubMed

Despite efforts in reducing the number of dental traumas, most current studies indicate that the incidence of dental trauma remains unchanged and is at a relatively high level for children and young adults. When reviewing the literature on prevention, it is clear that until now the main focus has been on making and promoting mouthguards. The majority of the published studies on mouthguards have focused on materials used and how those behave and protect in vitro. The few epidemiologic studies that have been published on the possible protectiveness of the mouthguards in vivo are mostly of low level of evidence, and even those studies do not all agree on how much they actually protect the dentition. To compound the problem is the fact that the proportional ratio of dental trauma in organized sports is low compared with injuries that occur during children's play or leisure activities. It could be argued that the best strategic measure for preventing dental and oral injuries is education on both how to avoid them and what to do if an injury occurs. The demand of evidence-based dentistry and medicine calls for large prospective studies with randomized intervention to investigate the actual protection of mouthguards and faceguards. In addition, more emphasis should be placed on which is the best and most constructive way to educate youngsters and teenagers on how to avoid traumatic injuries to their teeth by using contemporary means like the Internet and apps. PMID:23439051

Sigurdsson, Asgeir

2013-03-01

34

Dental sealants. ADA Council on Access, Prevention and Interprofessional Relations; ADA Council on Scientific Affairs.  

PubMed

Dental sealants have proved to be highly effective in preventing pit and fissure dental caries. This report describes the ADA's stance on sealants and efforts to educate dentists and patients about the benefits of sealants. PMID:9103802

1997-04-01

35

Gels containing MMP inhibitors prevent dental erosion in situ.  

PubMed

Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibition has been shown to reduce dentin caries progression, but its role in dental erosion has not yet been assessed. This study tested the hypothesis that gels containing MMP inhibitors (epigallocatechin gallate-EGCG and chlorhexidine) can prevent dental erosion. Volunteers (n = 10) wore palatal devices containing bovine dentin blocks (n = 10/group) treated for 1 min with EGCG at 10 (EGCG10) or 400 microM (EGCG400), chlorhexidine at 0.012%, F at 1.23% (NaF), and no vehicle (placebo). Erosion was performed with Coca-Cola (5 min) 4X/day during 5 days. The wear, assessed by profilometry (mean +/- SD, microm), was significantly reduced by the gels containing MMP inhibitors (0.05 +/- 0.02(a), 0.04 +/- 0.02(a), and 0.05 +/- 0.02(a) for EGCG10, EGCG400, and chlorhexidine, respectively) when compared with NaF (0.79 +/- 0.35(b)) and placebo gels (1.77 +/- 0.35(b)) (Friedman and Dunn's tests, p < 0.01). The use of gels delivering MMP inhibitors was shown to prevent erosion and opens a new perspective for protection against dental erosion. PMID:20200409

Kato, M T; Leite, A L; Hannas, A R; Buzalaf, M A R

2010-03-03

36

Imaging of occlusal dental caries (decay) with near-IR light at 1310-nm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dental enamel manifests high transparency in the near-IR. Previous work demonstrated that near-IR light at 1310-nm is ideally suited for the transillumination of interproximal dental caries (dental decay in between teeth) [1]. However, most new dental decay occurs in the pits and fissures of the occlusal (biting) surfaces of posterior teeth. These caries lesions cannot be detected by x-rays during the early stages of decay due to the overlapping topography of the crown of the tooth. In this study, a near- IR imaging system operating at 1310-nm was used to acquire occlusal images by launching the near-IR light into the buccal surface of the tooth just above the gingival margin (gum-line). The near-IR light diffuses through the highly scattering dentin providing uniform back illumination of the enamel of the crowns allowing imaging of the occlusal surfaces. The near-IR images show high contrast between sound and demineralized areas. Demineralization (decay) can be easily differentiated from stains, pigmentation, and hypomineralization (fluorosis). Moreover, the high transparency of the enamel enables imaging at greater depth for the detection of subsurface decay hidden under the enamel. These early images suggest that the near-IR offers significant advantages over conventional visual, tactile and radiographic caries detection methods.

Bühler, Christopher M.; Ngaotheppitak, Patara; Fried, Daniel

2005-01-01

37

Preventing baby bottle tooth decay in American Indian and Alaska native communities: a model for planning.  

PubMed Central

Baby bottle tooth decay (BBTD) is a preventable dental disease which surveys have shown affects more than 50 percent of Native American children. An experimental program to prevent BBTD was implemented in 12 Native American communities. The project represented a cooperative effort by three Department of Health and Human Service agencies: Administration for Children, Youth, and Families, Head Start Bureau; Indian Health Service, Dental Program; and Centers for Disease Control, Dental Disease Prevention Activity. Intervention strategies included the training of parent volunteers, health professionals, and the tribal employees who counseled caretakers of young children and made group presentations. There was also a media campaign in each community that ran for a 3-year period. Numerous educational materials were developed including training manuals, counseling booklets, tippee cups, posters, and bumper stickers. The BBTD project's planners encouraged tailoring the education materials and strategies to fit each community. Preliminary results documented statistically significant decreases in the prevalence of BBTD at the pilot sites. This multidisciplinary, comprehensive intervention offers a model for organizing members of minority communities to prevent health problems. Images p634-a p635-a p635-b

Bruerd, B; Kinney, M B; Bothwell, E

1989-01-01

38

Dental Decay in Southern Illinois Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers: An Analysis of Clinical Data  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Context: Migrant and seasonal farmworkers are a population at risk for oral health problems. Data on the oral health conditions of migrant and seasonal farmworkers? permanent teeth are particularly lacking. Purpose: To document the relative rates of treated and untreated dental decay in a sample of southern Illinois migrant and seasonal…

Lukes, Sherri M.; Simon, Bret

2005-01-01

39

Dental Decay in Southern Illinois Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers: An Analysis of Clinical Data  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Context: Migrant and seasonal farmworkers are a population at risk for oral health problems. Data on the oral health conditions of migrant and seasonal farmworkers' permanent teeth are particularly lacking. Purpose: To document the relative rates of treated and untreated dental decay in a sample of southern Illinois migrant and seasonal…

Lukes, Sherri M.; Simon, Bret

2005-01-01

40

Developing an Acceptability Assessment of Preventive Dental Treatments  

PubMed Central

Objectives Early childhood caries (ECC) is very prevalent among young Hispanic children. ECC is amenable to a variety of preventive procedures, yet many Hispanic families underutilize dental services. Acceptability research may assist in health care planning and resource allocation by identifying patient preferences among efficacious treatments with the goal of improving their utilization. The purposes of this study were (a) to develop a culturally competent acceptability assessment instrument, directed toward the caregivers of young Hispanic children, for five preventive dental treatments for ECC and (b) to test the instrument's reliability and validity. Methods An instrument of five standard treatments known to prevent ECC was developed, translated, reviewed by focus groups, and pilot tested, then tested for reliability. The instrument included illustrated cards, brief video clips, and samples of the treatments and was culturally appropriate for low-income Hispanic caregivers. In addition to determining the acceptability of the five treatments individually, the treatments were also presented as paired comparisons. Results Focus groups and debriefing interviews following the pilot tests established that the instrument has good face validity. The illustrated cards, product samples, and video demonstrations of the five treatments resulted in an instrument possessing good content validity. The instrument has good to excellent test–retest reliability, with identical time 1–time 2 responses for each of the five treatments 92 percent of the time (range 87 to 97 percent), and the same treatment of the paired comparisons preferred 75 percent of the time (range 61 to 90 percent). Conclusions The acceptability instrument described is reliable and valid and may be useful in program planning efforts to identify and increase the utilization of preferred ECC preventive treatments for target populations.

Hyde, Susan; Gansky, Stuart A.; Gonzalez-Vargas, Maria J.; Husting, Sheila R.; Cheng, Nancy F.; Millstein, Susan G.; Adams, Sally H.

2012-01-01

41

Reductions in dental decay in 3-year old children in Greater Glasgow and Clyde: repeated population inspection studies over four years  

PubMed Central

Background Dental decay remains one of the world's most prevalent diseases in childhood. It is unfortunate that the proportion of children suffering from oral disease is so high, given that dental decay is almost entirely preventable. The objective of this study was to examine dental inspection data from three-year old children to assess the extent to which the dental health in Greater Glasgow and Clyde had improved during the initial years of the Childsmile intervention programme. Methods Dental inspections of three-year old children in Greater Glasgow and Clyde were undertaken in the academic years of 2006/7 and 2007/8 (the baseline years), and again in 2008/9 and 2009/10 (after the intervention had begun). A standardised protocol suitable for the age group was used. The number of decayed, missing and filled teeth was calculated (ie d3mft). If d3mft was > 0 then a child was said to have 'obvious decay experience' into the dentine. Additional results examined the effect of socioeconomic status using the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD). Results We inspected 10022 children (19% of the population). The weighted percentage of children with decay experience was 26% in 2006/7, 25% (2007/8), reducing to 18% (2007/8) and 17% (2009/10). When compared to the first baseline year of 2006/7, the OR was 0.91 for 2007/8 (0.79-1.06, p = 0.221), 0.63 for 2008/9 (0.55-0.72, p < 0.001), and 0.50 for 2009/10 (0.43-0.58, p < 0.001). The weighted mean d3mft was 1.1 in 2006/7, 1.0 in 2007/8 (p = 0.869), 0.6 in 2008/9 (p < 0.001) and 0.4 in 2009/10 (p < 0.001). Reductions in decay were seen in all socioeconomic groups. Conclusions This study demonstrates that it is possible to impact upon the prevalence and morbidity of dental decay across the socioeconomic spectrum in a population. The dental health of young children in the Greater Glasgow and Clyde area has improved in recent years.

2011-01-01

42

Innovative interventions to promote positive dental health behaviors and prevent dental caries in preschool children: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Dental caries (tooth decay) is highly prevalent and is largely attributable to unhealthy self-care behaviors (diet and oral hygiene). The conventional (health) education (CE), focusing on disseminating information and giving normative advice, often fails to achieve sustained behavioral changes. This study incorporates two innovative elements into CE: (i) motivational interviewing (MI), a client-centered counseling for changing behaviors, and (ii) an interactive caries risk assessment (RA) tool, which is devised to facilitate dental counseling and may enhance MI in several ways. Through a randomized, controlled, evaluator-blinded trial, three intervention schemes (CE, CE + MI, and CE + MI + RA) will be compared for their effectiveness in eliciting dentally healthy behaviors and preventing caries in preschool children. Methods/Design This study targets 3-year-old children who are at a critical stage for embedding health habits. Children with unfavorable dental behaviors (insufficient toothbrushing and/or frequent snacking) and their parents will be recruited from 12 participating kindergartens. Parent-child dyads (n = 690) will be randomly assigned into three groups. In the first group (CE), oral health information and advice will be delivered to parents through pamphlets. In the second group (CE + MI), in addition to the pamphlets, individual MI counseling with each parent will be performed by one of two trained dental hygienists. In the third group (CE + MI + RA), besides pamphlets and MI, interactive RA will be integrated into MI to motivate parents and facilitate their informed decision making and goal planning. At baseline and after 12 and 24 months, parents will complete a questionnaire and children will undergo a dental examination. The effectiveness of the intervention schemes will be compared over 12 and 24 months. The primary outcome will be caries increment in children and proportion of caries-free children. Secondary outcomes will be changes in parental efficacy for protecting children’s oral health and changes in children’s dental behaviors. Discussion Motivating and empowering parents to cultivate dentally healthy habits of young children presents both promises and challenges. With careful methodological considerations, this study is expected to provide scientific evidence for public health workers, dentists, and dental auxiliaries (nurses and hygienists) to choose appropriate interventions to advance children’s oral health. Trial registration HKCTR-1455

2013-01-01

43

Determinants of preventive oral health behaviour among senior dental students in Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background To study the association between oral health behaviour of senior dental students in Nigeria and their gender, age, knowledge of preventive care, and attitudes towards preventive dentistry. Methods Questionnaires were administered to 179 senior dental students in the six dental schools in Nigeria. The questionnaire obtained information on age, gender, oral self-care, knowledge of preventive dental care and attitudes towards preventive dentistry. Attending a dental clinic for check-up by a dentist or a classmate within the last year was defined as preventive care use. Students who performed oral self-care and attended dental clinic for check-ups were noted to have complied with recommended oral self-care. Chi-square test and binary logistic regression models were used for statistical analyses. Results More male respondents agreed that the use of fluoride toothpaste was more important than the tooth brushing technique for caries prevention (P < 0.001). While the use of dental floss was very low (7.3%), more females were more likely to report using dental floss (p=0.03). Older students were also more likely to comply with recommended oral self-care (p<0.001). In binary regression models, respondents who were younger (p=0.04) and those with higher knowledge of preventive dental care (p=0.008) were more likely to consume sugary snacks less than once a day. Conclusion Gender differences in the awareness of the superiority of using fluoridated toothpaste over brushing in caries prevention; and in the use of dental floss were observed. While older students were more likely to comply with recommended oral self-care measures, younger students with good knowledge of preventive dental care were more likely to consume sugary snacks less than once a day.

2013-01-01

44

Factors associated with reduced compliance of children to dental preventive measures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to record self-reported factors for non-compliance to ‘dental home’ preventive measures among pediatric\\u000a patients, and to clarify whether number or frequency of recall appointments increases their long-term compliance to dental\\u000a home. Children attending recall appointments in a pediatric dental clinic were interviewed regarding their compliance as well\\u000a as factors for non-compliance with the previously

Malka Ashkenazi; Mervat Bidoosi; Liran Levin

45

Baden-Powell on teeth: a centenary perspective of a pioneer of preventive dental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the era when dental care, particularly preventive dental health, did not enjoy a high public profile, Lieut-General (later Lord) Robert Baden-Powell (1857–1941) was an influential advocate for the care of the teeth. He was a pioneer in a targeted outreach to youth, specifically boys and young men, emphasising the importance of dental health as an essential part of total

J. Pearn

2008-01-01

46

The influences on preventive care provided to children who frequently attend the UK General Dental Service  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives To identify the relationship between the preventive and restorative care provided to children who frequently attend the General Dental Service in the UK after taking into account socio-economic status, gender and dental caries experience.Setting General dental practices in the North West of England.Subjects and materials The study design involved a retrospective investigation of case notes of 677 children who

K M Milsom; D King; A S Blinkhorn; M Tickle

2003-01-01

47

An Evaluation of the School-Based Dental Disease Prevention Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report analyzes the effect of the California Dental Disease Prevention Program (DDPP). The program includes education about dental health and nutrition, daily toothbrushing and flossing, and weekly application of a fluoride mouthrinse. The DDPP serves approximately 350,000 elementary school children. The implementation of the DDPP is…

California State Legislature, Sacramento. Office of the Legislative Analyst.

48

Does the Presense of Water Fluoridation Alter the Use of Dental Preventive Services on United States Air Force Bases.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A plethora of preventive measures exists in the dental profession's armamentarium to minimize the incidence of dental caries. Although water fluoridation has been the most effective community measure available over the past fifty years, other individual m...

I. G. Bober-Moken

1999-01-01

49

A Dietary Procedure for Preventing Dental Caries in Young Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Significant improvement in the dental caries status of children in the United States has been seen in recent decades. The percentage of children who are free from dental caries, however, rapidly decreases with age. By the time young people enter colleges or universities, only a few are caries free. Colleges and universities are places where the young are simultaneously, and

Kauko K. Mäkinen

1993-01-01

50

Children's tooth decay in a public health program to encourage low-income pregnant women to utilize dental care  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: A community-based public health program to provide a dental home for women covered by the Oregon Health Plan (Medicaid) in Klamath County, Oregon USA was instituted with the long-term goal to promote preventive oral care for both mothers and their new infants provided by dental managed care companies. METHODS: As part of the evaluation of the program, children in

Peter Milgrom; Marilynn Sutherland; R Mike Shirtcliff; Sharity Ludwig; Darlene Smolen

2010-01-01

51

Addressing Tooth Decay in Head Start Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Tooth decay is the most prevalent chronic disease of childhood. Oral health education and dental services are crucial to reducing the number of children afflicted with dental cavities. Due to limited access to preventative care, Head Start children are particularly vulnerable to tooth decay. This article outlines practical implications of a…

Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

2012-01-01

52

Providing Preventive Dental Care in the Community Using the Team Approach: A Comparison of Five Training Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Five dental schools were given grants to design and implement a training program for dental students in planning and delivering preventive dental services. These programs are described and compared, and it is concluded that all were generally successful and worthy of continuation. (JSR)

Balzer, Jay A.; And Others

1980-01-01

53

The Cost and Effectiveness of School-Based Preventive Dental Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Preventive Dentistry Demonstration Program assessed the cost and effectiveness of various types and combinations of school-based preventive dental care procedures. The program involved 20,052 first, second, and fifth graders from five fluoridated and five non-fluoridated communities. These children were examined at baseline and…

Klein, Stephen P.; And Others

54

The Cost and Effectiveness of School-Based Preventive Dental Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The cost and effectiveness of various types and combinations of school-based preventive dental care procedures were assessed in the National Preventive Dentistry Demonstration Program, a four-year study involving more than 20,000 students, from ten schools nationwide. Communal water fluoridation was reaffirmed as the most cost-effective means of…

Klein, Stephen P.; And Others

1985-01-01

55

The Cost and Effectiveness of School-Based Preventive Dental Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The National Preventive Dentistry Demonstration Program assessed the cost and effectiveness of various types and combinations of school-based preventive dental care procedures. The program involved 20,052 first, second, and fifth graders from five fluoridated and five non-fluoridated communities. These children were examined at baseline and…

Klein, Stephen P.; And Others

56

The Cost and Effectiveness of School-Based Preventive Dental Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The cost and effectiveness of various types and combinations of school-based preventive dental care procedures were assessed in the National Preventive Dentistry Demonstration Program, a four-year study involving more than 20,000 students, from ten schools nationwide. Communal water fluoridation was reaffirmed as the most cost-effective means of…

Klein, Stephen P.; And Others

1985-01-01

57

Disparities in Children's Oral Health and Access to Dental Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dental caries can be prevented by a combination of community, profes- sional, and individual measures including water fluoridation, professionally applied topical fluorides and dental sealants, and use of fluoride tooth- pastes. Yet, tooth decay is the most common chronic disease of childhood. Dental care is the most prevalent unmet health need in US children with wide disparities existing in oral

Wendy E. Mouradian; Elizabeth Wehr; James J. Crall

2000-01-01

58

Factors associated with reduced compliance of children to dental preventive measures.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to record self-reported factors for non-compliance to 'dental home' preventive measures among pediatric patients, and to clarify whether number or frequency of recall appointments increases their long-term compliance to dental home. Children attending recall appointments in a pediatric dental clinic were interviewed regarding their compliance as well as factors for non-compliance with the previously recommended preventive measures. Files of 651 children were analyzed. A significant positive correlation was found between compliance with regular teeth brushing twice a day (p < 0.0001), using correct fluoride concentration toothpaste (p < 0.0001), drinking water between meals (p < 0.0001), using Elmex gel (p < 0.0001), flossing (p < 0.002) and number of recall appointments. The most common factor for non-compliance to 'dental home' was 'I forgot'. Not flossing was commonly justified by performance difficulty while non-compliance to Elmex gel or to mouth rinses was attributed mainly to 'bad taste'. Additional common reasons were 'it was finished', 'my parents did not purchase', 'I did not find it at home', 'I did not know I need to'. Frequency and number of recall appointments might improve compliance with dental preventive measures. Referring to the specific factors of personal non-compliance may increase compliance. PMID:21698350

Ashkenazi, Malka; Bidoosi, Mervat; Levin, Liran

2011-06-23

59

Novel technologies for the prevention and treatment of dental caries: a patent survey  

PubMed Central

Importance of the field: Dental caries is one of the most common preventable childhood diseases; people are susceptible to this ailment throughout their lifetime. In the United States, 90% of late adolescents and young adults have dental caries, while 94% of all dentate adults had evidence of treated or untreated coronal caries. Dental caries is often not self-limiting and without proper care, caries can progress until the tooth is destroyed. Areas covered in this review: In this paper, the etiology of dental caries was briefly introduced. It was followed by a thorough review of patents and literatures on the recent development of various novel technologies for the prevention and treatment of dental caries. What the reader will gain: Recent advances in anti-plaque agents, including chemoprophylactic agents, antimicrobial peptides, vaccines, probiotics/replacement therapy and sugar substitutes, and remineralization agents including fluorides and casein phosphopeptides are analyzed. Take home massage: Both the discovery of new anti-caries agents and the development of dentotropic delivery systems will be the future focus of this research field.

Chen, Fu; Wang, Dong

2010-01-01

60

Oral fluoride reservoirs and the prevention of dental caries.  

PubMed

Current models for increasing the anti-caries effects of fluoride (F) agents emphasize the importance of maintaining a cariostatic concentration of F in oral fluids. The concentration of F in oral fluids is maintained by the release of this ion from bioavailable reservoirs on the teeth, oral mucosa and - most importantly, because of its association with the caries process - dental plaque. Oral F reservoirs appear to be of two types: (1) mineral reservoirs, in particular calcium fluoride or phosphate-contaminated 'calcium-fluoride-like' deposits; (2) biological reservoirs, in particular (with regard to dental plaque) F held to bacteria or bacterial fragments via calcium-fluoride bonds. The fact that all these reservoirs are mediated by calcium implies that their formation is limited by the low concentration of calcium in oral fluids. By using novel procedures which overcome this limitation, the formation of these F reservoirs after topical F application can be greatly increased. Although these increases are associated with substantive increases in salivary and plaque fluid F, and hence a potential increase in cariostatic effect, it is unclear if such changes are related to the increases in the amount of these reservoirs, or changes in the types of F deposits formed. New techniques have been developed for identifying and quantifying these deposits which should prove useful in developing agents that enhance formation of oral F reservoirs with optimum F release characteristics. Such research offers the prospect of decreasing the F content of topical agents while simultaneously increasing their cariostatic effect. PMID:21701197

Vogel, Gerald Lee

2011-06-23

61

Readability of pediatric health materials for preventive dental care  

PubMed Central

Background This study examined the content and general readability of pediatric oral health education materials for parents of young children. Methods Twenty-seven pediatric oral health pamphlets or brochures from commercial, government, industry, and private nonprofit sources were analyzed for general readability ("usability") according to several parameters: readability, (Flesch-Kincaid grade level, Flesch Reading Ease, and SMOG grade level); thoroughness, (inclusion of topics important to young childrens' oral health); textual framework (frequency of complex phrases, use of pictures, diagrams, and bulleted text within materials); and terminology (frequency of difficult words and dental jargon). Results Readability of the written texts ranged from 2nd to 9th grade. The average Flesch-Kincaid grade level for government publications was equivalent to a grade 4 reading level (4.73, range, 2.4 – 6.6); F-K grade levels for commercial publications averaged 8.1 (range, 6.9 – 8.9); and industry published materials read at an average Flesch-Kincaid grade level of 7.4 (range, 4.7 – 9.3). SMOG readability analysis, based on a count of polysyllabic words, consistently rated materials 2 to 3 grade levels higher than did the Flesch-Kincaid analysis. Government sources were significantly lower compared to commercial and industry sources for Flesch-Kincaid grade level and SMOG readability analysis. Content analysis found materials from commercial and industry sources more complex than government-sponsored publications, whereas commercial sources were more thorough in coverage of pediatric oral health topics. Different materials frequently contained conflicting information. Conclusion Pediatric oral health care materials are readily available, yet their quality and readability vary widely. In general, government publications are more readable than their commercial and industry counterparts. The criteria for usability and results of the analyses presented in this article can be used by consumers of dental educational materials to ensure that their choices are well-suited to their specific patient population.

Hendrickson, Rachel L; Huebner, Colleen E; Riedy, Christine A

2006-01-01

62

Dentists' practice patterns regarding caries prevention: results from a dental practice-based research network  

PubMed Central

Objective The purposes of this study were to (1) quantify dentists' practice patterns regarding caries prevention and (2) test the hypothesis that certain dentists' characteristics are associated with these practice patterns. Design The study used a cross-sectional study design consisting of a questionnaire survey. Participants The study queried dentists who worked in outpatient dental practices who were affiliated with the Dental Practice-Based Research Network Japan, which seeks to engage dentists in investigating research questions and sharing experiences and expertise (n=282). Measurement Dentists were asked about their practice patterns regarding caries preventive dentistry. Background data on patients, practice and dentist were also collected. Results 38% of dentists (n=72) provided individualised caries prevention to more than 50% of their patients. Overall, 10% of the time in daily practice was spent on caries preventive dentistry. Dentists who provided individualised caries prevention to more than 50% of their patients spent significantly more time on preventive care and less time on removable prosthetics treatment, compared to dentists who did not provide individualised caries prevention. Additionally, they provided oral hygiene instruction, patient education, fluoride recommendations, intraoral photographs taken and diet counselling to their patients significantly more often than dentists who did not provide individualised caries prevention. Multiple logistic regression analysis suggested that the percentage of patients interested in caries prevention and the percentage of patients who received hygiene instruction, were both associated with the percentage of patients who receive individualised caries prevention. Conclusions We identified substantial variation in dentists' practice patterns regarding preventive dentistry. Individualised caries prevention was significantly related to provision of other preventive services and to having a higher percentage of patients interested in caries prevention, but not to the dentist's belief about the effectiveness of caries risk assessment. (Clinicaltrials.gov registration number NCT01?680?848).

Yokoyama, Yoko; Kakudate, Naoki; Sumida, Futoshi; Matsumoto, Yuki; Gilbert, Gregg H; Gordan, Valeria V

2013-01-01

63

The impact of the public insurance expansions on children's use of preventive dental care.  

PubMed

To determine if children eligible for coverage by the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) and Medicaid Programs were more likely to receive preventive dental visits after implementation of the SCHIP policy, retrospective cross-sectional analysis was done from the 1996-2000 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys (MEPS) data. We linked the individual level data from the MEPS to state-level information on program eligibility. Using logistic regression models that adjust for the complex survey design, the association between SCHIP implementation and receipt of preventive dental care was examined for children aged 3-18 with family incomes < or =200% of the Federal Poverty Line (FPL). Children who were eligible for SCHIP/Medicaid coverage in their respective states were more likely to have received preventive care three years after SCHIP implementation than children with similar eligibility profiles prior to SCHIP implementation. SCHIP has successfully increased the proportion of eligible children receiving preventive dental care among children in families with incomes less than or equal to 200% FPL. Our findings indicate, however, that SCHIP needed time to mature before detecting significant effects on national level. PMID:19067137

Liao, Chi-Chi; Ganz, Michael Lee; Jiang, Hongyu; Chelmow, Theodore

2008-12-09

64

Development of a preventive dental care programme for children and adolescents in the county of Jönköping 1973-1979.  

PubMed

Dental research the last two decades has created a basis for understanding the etiology, prevention and treatment of dental diseases. As a consequence, particular interest has been focused on the effect of prophylactic measures, efficiently organized and carried out, for various groups of individuals. However, it has proved difficult to organize systematic integrated preventive dental care for large parts of the population. The present paper describes in detail the development of integrated preventive dental care for children and adolescents in the County of Jönköping. Sweden, from 1973 to 1979. Based on the circumstances that existed before 1973 as regards e.g. personnel and the nature and content of the prophylactic measures, a description is made of the aims, methods, target groups, organization, financing and evaluation of a preventive dental care organization gradually developed for the age groups 0-16 years in the whole county (308,000 inhabitants; 4,000 individuals in each age-group). Important practical information as to the performance of the organization is given as well as examples of both basic preventive dental care programmes and supplementary programmes intended for individuals exhibiting a high prevalence of caries and gingivitis. As an effect of the programme instituted of remarkable improvement in dental health among children and adolescents has been achieved. PMID:6948420

Hugoson, A; Koch, G

1981-01-01

65

The Impact of the Public Insurance Expansions on Children’s Use of Preventive Dental Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine if children eligible for coverage by the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) and Medicaid Programs\\u000a were more likely to receive preventive dental visits after implementation of the SCHIP policy, retrospective cross-sectional\\u000a analysis was done from the 1996–2000 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys (MEPS) data. We linked the individual level data from\\u000a the MEPS to state-level information on program

Chi-Chi Liao; Michael Lee Ganz; Hongyu Jiang; Theodore Chelmow

2010-01-01

66

Untreated severe dental decay: a neglected determinant of low Body Mass Index in 12-year-old Filipino children  

PubMed Central

Background Dental decay is the most common childhood disease worldwide and most of the decay remains untreated. In the Philippines caries levels are among the highest in the South East Asian region. Elementary school children suffer from high prevalence of stunting and underweight. The present study aimed to investigate the association between untreated dental decay and Body Mass Index (BMI) among 12-year-old Filipino children. Methods Data collection was part of the National Oral Health Survey, a representative cross-sectional study of 1951 11-13-year-old school children using a modified, stratified cluster sampling design based on population classifications of the Philippine National Statistics Office. Caries was scored according to WHO criteria (1997) and odontogenic infections using the PUFA index. Anthropometric measures were performed by trained nurses. Some socio-economic determinants were included as potential confounding factors. Results The overall prevalence of caries (DMFT + dmft > 0) was 82.3% (95%CI; 80.6%-84.0%). The overall prevalence of odontogenic infections due to caries (PUFA + pufa > 0) was 55.7% (95% CI; 53.5%-57.9%) The BMI of 27.1% (95%CI; 25.1%-29.1%) of children was below normal, 1% (95%CI; 0.5%-1.4%) had a BMI above normal. The regression coefficient between BMI and caries was highly significant (p < 0.001). Children with odontogenic infections (PUFA + pufa > 0) as compared to those without odontogenic infections had an increased risk of a below normal BMI (OR: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.19-1.80). Conclusions This is the first-ever representative survey showing a significant association between caries and BMI and particularly between odontogenic infections and below normal BMI. An expanded model of hypothesised associations is presented that includes progressed forms of dental decay as a significant, yet largely neglected determinant of poor child development.

2011-01-01

67

Protocol for Northern Ireland Caries Prevention in Practice Trial (NIC-PIP) trial: a randomised controlled trial to measure the effects and costs of a dental caries prevention regime for young children attending primary care dental services  

PubMed Central

Background Dental caries is a persistent public health problem with little change in the prevalence in young children over the last 20 years. Once a child contracts the disease it has a significant impact on their quality of life. There is good evidence from Cochrane reviews including trials that fluoride varnish and regular use of fluoride toothpaste can prevent caries. The Northern Ireland Caries Prevention in Practice Trial (NIC-PIP) trial will compare the costs and effects of a caries preventive package (fluoride varnish, toothpaste, toothbrush and standardised dental health education) with dental health education alone in young children. Methods/Design A randomised controlled trial on children initially aged 2 and 3 years old who are regular attenders at the primary dental care services in Northern Ireland. Children will be recruited and randomised in dental practices. Children will be randomised to the prevention package of both fluoride varnish (twice per year for three years), fluoride toothpaste (1,450 ppm F) (supplied twice per year), a toothbrush (supplied twice a year) or not; both test and control groups receive standardised dental health education delivered by the dentist twice per year. Randomisation will be conducted by the Belfast Trust Clinical Research Support Centre ([CRSC] a Clinical Trials Unit). 1200 participants will be recruited from approximately 40 dental practices. Children will be examined for caries by independent dental examiners at baseline and will be excluded if they have caries. The independent dental examiners will examine the children again at 3 years blinded to study group. The primary end-point is whether the child develops caries (cavitation into dentine) or not over the three years. One secondary outcome is the number of carious surfaces in the primary dentition in children who experience caries. Other secondary outcomes are episodes of pain, extraction of primary teeth, other adverse events and costs which will be obtained from parental questionnaires. Discussion This is a pragmatic trial conducted in general dental practice. It tests a composite caries prevention intervention, which represents an evidence based approach advocated by current guidance from the English Department of Health which is feasible to deliver to all low risk (caries free) children in general dental practice. The trial will provide valuable information to policy makers and clinicians on the costs and effects of caries prevention delivered to young children in general dental practice. Trial registration EudraCT No: 2009 - 010725 - 39 ISRCTN: ISRCTN36180119 Ethics Reference No: 09/H1008/93:

2011-01-01

68

A holistic food labelling strategy for preventing obesity and dental caries.  

PubMed

Obesity and dental caries in childhood are among the major public health concerns described as a global pandemic because of their global distribution and severe consequences. A consensus has developed as to a recently emerging and alarming common risk factor that leads to the double burden of dental caries and obesity; energy-dense foods (sugar-coated cereals, high-sugar yogurt, soft drinks) are becoming very popular among children because of their dense marketing, cheaper price, increased supply and variety. Implementation of health-promoting and -supporting marketing strategies for healthy food can be one initial cornerstone for successful application of the common risk factor approach in prevention of obesity and dental caries, as also suggested by World Health Organization. Labelling healthy food with a 'health-friendly' logo, illustrating that the teeth and the heart are both parts of the whole body (standing side by side supporting each other as close friends), both happy and protected because of consumption of healthy food for the whole body, can promote the foods that are friendly to health of the whole body, implementing the common risk factor approach under a single theme. Labelling healthy food as 'health-friendly' based on an international consensus will provide a clear and uniform picture of what is healthy to eat and result in an international integrated programme for prevention of obesity and caries. PMID:19207877

Cinar, A B; Murtomaa, H

2009-01-16

69

Roles of parents in preventing dental caries in the primary dentition among preschool children in Thailand.  

PubMed

This study aimed to identify important roles of parents in preventing caries in primary dentition among preschool children in Thailand. A total of 664 preschool children aged 3 to 4 years and their parents were sampled from representative provinces of the 5 regions of Thailand. Dental examination to assess dental caries in preschool children was conducted. Questionnaires investigating roles of parents in caring for their children's teeth were used to interview parents. Preschool children were more likely to have at least 1 carious tooth if parents did not always clean their teeth every time they bathed them, did not always examine the cleanliness of children's teeth regularly, and always allowed children to consume snacks more than 3 times a day. Thai parents must be motivated to consistently spend the time required to take care of the primary dentition of their children by regular cleaning and controlling the snacking behavior of children. PMID:19574270

Narksawat, Kulaya; Boonthum, Angsana; Tonmukayakul, Utsana

2009-07-02

70

Morbidity and Mortality Weekley Report, Vol. 48, No. 41, October 22, 1999. Fluoridation of Drinking Water to Prevent Dental Caries.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Fluoridation - Continued Fluoridation of community drinking water is a major factor responsible for the decline in dental caries (tooth decay) during the second half of the 20th century. The history of water fluoridation is a classic example of clinical o...

1999-01-01

71

First aid for dental trauma caused by sports activities: state of knowledge, treatment and prevention.  

PubMed

In view of the widespread lack of knowledge of first aid procedures in cases of dental trauma, this article describes the current state of knowledge and highlights the need for education of those likely to witness or be victims of dental trauma while practising sports. Dental and oral injuries, the commonest type of orofacial injuries, are often sustained by athletes playing contact sports; indeed, they represent the most frequent type of sporting injury. Studies of a large group of children and adults have shown that as many as 31% of all orofacial injuries are caused by sporting activities. Furthermore, current literature on the subject emphasizes that awareness of appropriate triage procedures following dental trauma is unsatisfactory. Delay in treatment is the single most influential factor affecting prognosis. What should we know and, more importantly, what should we do? Immediate replantation of an avulsed tooth is the best treatment option at the site of the accident. If replantation is impossible, milk is the preferred transport medium for the avulsed tooth. There is a general low level of awareness about the need for prompt triage of traumatic dental injuries sustained in sports, despite their relative frequency. When a cohort of Swiss basketball players was interviewed, only half were aware that an avulsed tooth could be replanted. Cheap, commercially available tooth storage devices containing an isotonic transport medium (so-called 'Save-a-Tooth boxes'), can maintain the viability of an avulsed tooth for up to 72 hours, prior to replantation. More readily available storage media such as milk, sterile saline or even saliva may be used, but knowledge of this information is rare among sports participants. For example, just 6.6% of the Swiss basketball players interviewed were aware of the 'Tooth Rescue box' products. Sporting organizations seem to offer very little information about sports-related risks or preventive strategies for orodental trauma. Having an attending dentist at sports events - amateur or professional - is clearly a luxury that is neither practical nor affordable. The solution must lie in extending the knowledge of management of orodental trauma beyond the dental profession. Educational posters, when displayed prominently in sports clubs, gym halls and dressing rooms of swimming pools, are a clear, accessible and low cost method of presenting the appropriate procedures to follow after orodental injury. When the potentially avoidable financial burden and discomfort of protracted restorative or cosmetic dentistry are taken into account, rarely can such significant morbidity be so easily prevented. PMID:20433209

Emerich, Katarzyna; Kaczmarek, Jan

2010-05-01

72

Design of the Prevention of Adult Caries Study (PACS): A randomized clinical trial assessing the effect of a chlorhexidine dental coating for the prevention of adult caries  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Dental caries is one of the primary causes of tooth loss among adults. It is estimated to affect a majority of Americans aged 55 and older, with a disproportionately higher burden in disadvantaged populations. Although a number of treatments are currently in use for caries prevention in adults, evidence for their efficacy and effectiveness is limited. METHODS\\/DESIGN: The Prevention

William M Vollmer; Athena S Papas; James D Bader; Gerardo Maupomé; Christina M Gullion; Jack F Hollis; John J Snyder; Jeffrey L Fellows; Reesa L Laws; B Alexander White

2010-01-01

73

Preferences for caries prevention agents in adult patients: findings from The Dental Practice-Based Research Network  

PubMed Central

Objectives To identify factors that are significantly associated with dentists’ use of specific caries preventive agents in adult patients, and whether dentists who use one preventive agent are also more likely to use certain others. Methods Data were collected from 564 practitioners in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network, a multi-region consortium of participating practices and dental organizations. Results In-office topical fluoride was the method most frequently used. Regarding at-home preventive agents, there was little difference in preference between non-prescription fluoride, prescription fluoride, or chlorhexidine rinse. Dentists who most frequently used caries prevention were also those who regularly perform caries risk assessment and individualize caries prevention at the patient level. Higher percentages of patients with dental insurance were significantly associated with more use of in-office prevention modalities. Female dentists and dentists with more-recent training were more likely to recommend preventive agents that are applied by the patient. Dentists who reported more-conservative decisions in clinical treatment scenarios were also more likely to use caries preventive agents. Groups of dentist who shared a common preference for certain preventive agents were identified. One group used preventive agents selectively, whereas the other groups predominately used either in-office or at-home fluorides. Conclusions Caries prevention is commonly used with adult patients. However, these results suggest that only a subset of dentists base preventive treatments on caries risk at the individual patient level.

Riley, Joseph L.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Rindal, D. Brad; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Ajmo, Craig T.; Amundson, Craig; Anderson, Gerald A.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

2010-01-01

74

Dental stain prevention by abrasive toothpastes: A new in vitro test and its correlation with clinical observations  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new in vitro test based on the removal of a model film from polished hydroxyapatite discs has been developed to predict more precisely the stain prevention properties of toothpastes in vivo. It is argued that dental stain prevention, as opposed to removal, is the predominant function provided by abrasive pastes suitable for unrestricted home use. It is necessary, therefore,

P. L. DAWSON; J. E. WALSH; T. MORRISON

75

[Aspiration and ingestion of dental instruments--diagnosis, treatment and prevention].  

PubMed

Aspiration and ingestion of foreign bodies of dental origin during treatment may cause a gastrointestinal and airway obstruction or perforation, and may constitute a life threatening situation. Ingestion occurs more often than aspiration and usually does not cause any clinical signs or symptoms. Most often it will spontaneously rejected from the gastrointestinal tract by peristaltic movement without any coimplication. However aspiration always requires treatment since foreign bodies there may cause inflammatory reaction and even severe obstruction and death. This article describes one case of aspiration and 3 cases of ingestion of dental instruments and materials. We discuss the diagnostic procedure: evidence of clinical signs and plain radiography, CT and the use of contrast material in case of radiolucent foreign bodies. The modern technique of endoscopy is successfully performed for diagnosis and treatment of foreign bodies in case of aspiration with minimal complications. We suggest a step by step protocol of treatment at the dental clinic in the case of ingestion/aspiration of foreign body and discuss several prevention techniques. PMID:17091624

Emodi, O; Imad, A E; Blanc, O; Aizenbud, D

2006-07-01

76

Triclosan-Loaded Tooth-Binding Micelles for Prevention and Treatment of Dental Biofilm  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  To develop tooth-binding micelle formulations of triclosan for the prevention and treatment of dental caries.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Alendronate (ALN) was conjugated to the chain termini of different Pluronic copolymers to confer tooth-binding ability to\\u000a the micelles. Using 3 different formulation methods, Pluronics and ALN-modified Pluronics were used to prepare triclosan-loaded\\u000a tooth-binding micelles. The formulation parameters were optimized for triclosan solubility, particle size,

Fu Chen; Kelly C. Rice; Xin-Ming Liu; Richard A. Reinhardt; Kenneth W. Bayles; Dong Wang

2010-01-01

77

Xylitol pediatric topical oral syrup to prevent dental caries: a double blind, randomized clinical trial of efficacy  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of a xylitol pediatric topical oral syrup to reduce the incidence of dental caries of very young children. Design Randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial. Setting Communities in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Participants 108 children aged 9 to 15 months were screened and 100 were enrolled. Intervention Children were randomized and parents administered topical oral xylitol syrup two times (Xyl-2X, two xylitol 4.00 g/dose + one sorbitol dose) or three times (Xyl-3X, three xylitol 2.67 g/dose) per day (total 8 g) or control (one xylitol 2.67 g/dose + two sorbitol dose). Outcome Measures The outcome end-point of the study was the number of decayed primary teeth. Results Ninety-four of 100 children (mean±SD age, 15.0±2.7 months at randomization) with at least one follow-up exam were included in the intent-to-treat analysis. The mean±SD follow-up period was 10.5±2.2 months. Nearly 52% of children in the control condition had tooth decay compared to 40.6% among Xyl-3X and 24.2% among Xyl-2X conditions. The mean±SD number of decayed teeth was 1.9±2.4 for control, 1.0±1.4 for Xyl-3X, and 0.6±1.1 for Xyl-2X condition. Compared to controls, there was significantly fewer decayed teeth in the Xyl-2X (relative risk [RR], 0.30; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.13, 0.66; P=.003) and Xyl-3X (RR, 0.50; 95% CI 0.26, 0.96; P=0.037) conditions. There was no statistical difference between the two xylitol treatment conditions (P=0.22). Conclusion Oral xylitol syrup administered topically two or three times each day at a total dose of 8 g was effective in preventing Early Childhood Caries.

Milgrom, Peter; Ly, Kiet A.; Tut, Ohnmar K.; Mancl, Lloyd; Roberts, Marilyn C.; Briand, Kennar; Gancio, Mary Jane

2009-01-01

78

Falling towards forgetfulness: synaptic decay prevents spontaneous recovery of memory.  

PubMed

Long after a new language has been learned and forgotten, relearning a few words seems to trigger the recall of other words. This "free-lunch learning" (FLL) effect has been demonstrated both in humans and in neural network models. Specifically, previous work proved that linear networks that learn a set of associations, then partially forget them all, and finally relearn some of the associations, show improved performance on the remaining (i.e., nonrelearned) associations. Here, we prove that relearning forgotten associations decreases performance on nonrelearned associations; an effect we call negative free-lunch learning. The difference between free-lunch learning and the negative free-lunch learning presented here is due to the particular method used to induce forgetting. Specifically, if forgetting is induced by isotropic drifting of weight vectors (i.e., by adding isotropic noise), then free-lunch learning is observed. However, as proved here, if forgetting is induced by weight values that simply decay or fall towards zero, then negative free-lunch learning is observed. From a biological perspective, and assuming that nervous systems are analogous to the networks used here, this suggests that evolution may have selected physiological mechanisms that involve forgetting using a form of synaptic drift rather than synaptic decay, because synaptic drift, but not synaptic decay, yields free-lunch learning. PMID:18725945

Stone, James V; Jupp, Peter E

2008-08-22

79

The Relationship between Habitual Clove Cigarette Smoking and a Specific Pattern of Dental Decay in Male Bus Drivers in Jakarta, Indonesia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study has been conducted to establish the relationship between habitual smoking of clove cigarettes and a specific type of dental decay. A retrospective cohort study of 1,160 bus drivers in Jakarta who smoked clove cigarettes and non–smokers showed that a specific type of decay occurs in terms of form, location and pathology. The prevalence was 55.8%. The type of

F. Soetiarto

1999-01-01

80

Caregiver Acceptability and Preferences for Preventive Dental Treatments for Young African American Children  

PubMed Central

Our prior research focused on parental treatment acceptability (TA) and preferences (TP) for preventive dental treatments for young Hispanic children. We adapted the interview for administration to parents of young African American children. Objective In a sample of African American parents, determine parental TA and TP for 5 dental treatments to prevent early childhood caries. Methods Interviewed 48 parents/caregivers of African American children attending Head Start, assessing TA and TP for 3 treatments for children: toothbrushing with fluoride toothpaste (TB), fluoride varnish (FV), and xylitol in food (XF); and 2 treatments for mothers: xylitol gum (XG) and chlorhexidine (CHX) rinse. The interview included verbal information, illustrated treatment cards, photos/video clips, and samples. Parents provided TA of each treatment (1–5 scale), TP between each of 10 pairs of the 5 treatments, and open-ended reasons for their preferences. TP were summed (0–4) to create overall preference. Results All treatments were acceptable (means 4.4–4.9). TB was more acceptable than FV and XF (p<0.05). Summed TP revealed a strong preference for TB (mean 3.1) above other treatments (all p<0.01). Primary reasons for preferring TB were: promotes healthy habits; child-focused; and effectiveness. Conclusions All treatments were acceptable, however, parents/guardians strongly preferred TB. Parents’ emphasis on healthy habits and child-focused treatment supports efforts for oral health education programs in early childhood settings. Some parents expressed concerns about FV, XF, and CHX. Results may be useful in planning prevention programs for young children in African American communities.

Adams, Sally H.; Rowe, Corie R.; Gansky, Stuart A.; Cheng, Nancy F.; Barker, Judith C.; Hyde, Susan

2013-01-01

81

Triclosan-loaded Tooth-binding Micelles for Prevention and Treatment of Dental Biofilm  

PubMed Central

The purpose of the present study was to develop tooth-binding micelle formulations and evaluate their ability to both inhibit initial biofilm formation as well as decrease the viability of preformed biofilm using an in vitro dental biofilm model. Alendronate (ALN, a bisphosphonate) was covalently attached to the ends of different Pluronic copolymers to confer tooth-binding ability to the micelles, and triclosan was used as a model drug. Based on different micelle preparation methods, Pluronic copolymers and ALN-terminated Pluronic copolymers were used to prepare triclosan-loaded tooth-binding micelles. The formulation was optimized for triclosan solubility, particle size, hydroxyapatite (HA) binding capacity and kinetics, and in vitro drug release behavior. In vitro biofilm treatment studies demonstrated that the triclosan-loaded tooth-binding micelles were able to inhibit initial biofilm growth of Streptococcus mutans UA159 by 6-log CFU/HA disc compared to the untreated control. These tooth-binding micelles were also capable of reducing the viability of preformed biofilm by 4-log CFU/HA disc compared to untreated control biofilm. In summary, triclosan-loaded tooth-binding micelles have been successfully developed and optimized in this study. These micelles demonstrated promising anti-biofilm capabilities that have the potential for use in the future treatment and prevention of dental diseases.

Chen, Fu; Rice, Kelly C.; Liu, Xin-Ming; Reinhardt, Richard A.; Bayles, Kenneth W.; Wang, Dong

2010-01-01

82

Design of the Prevention of Adult Caries Study (PACS): A randomized clinical trial assessing the effect of a chlorhexidine dental coating for the prevention of adult caries  

PubMed Central

Background Dental caries is one of the primary causes of tooth loss among adults. It is estimated to affect a majority of Americans aged 55 and older, with a disproportionately higher burden in disadvantaged populations. Although a number of treatments are currently in use for caries prevention in adults, evidence for their efficacy and effectiveness is limited. Methods/Design The Prevention of Adult Caries Study (PACS) is a multicenter, placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized clinical trial of the efficacy of a chlorhexidine (10% w/v) dental coating in preventing adult caries. Participants (n = 983) were recruited from four different dental delivery systems serving four diverse communities, including one American Indian population, and were randomized to receive either chlorhexidine or a placebo treatment. The primary outcome is the net caries increment (including non-cavitated lesions) from baseline to 13 months of follow-up. A cost-effectiveness analysis also will be considered. Discussion This new dental treatment, if efficacious and approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), would become a new in-office, anti-microbial agent for the prevention of adult caries in the United States. Trial Registration Number NCT00357877

2010-01-01

83

The Outcome of a Preventive Dental Care Programme on the Prevalence of Localized Aggressive Periodontitis in Down's Syndrome Individuals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Periodontal disease in Down's syndrome (DS) individuals develops earlier and is more rapid and extensive than in age-matched normal individuals. The present study evaluated a group of DS patients, who had been participating in a 10-year preventive dental programme, for the impact of the programme on their periodontal status. Methods:…

Zigmond, Maora; Stabholz, A.; Shapira, J.; Bachrach, G.; Chaushu, G.; Becker, A.; Yefenof, E.; Merrick, J.; Chaushu, S.

2006-01-01

84

Systematic Review of Controlled Trials on the Effectiveness of Fluoride Gels for the Prevention of Dental Caries in Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fluoride gels have been widely used since the 1970s. The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness and safety of fluoride gels in the prevention of dental caries in children and to examine factors potentially modifying their effectiveness. Relevant randomized or quasi-randomized trials were identified without language restrictions by searching multiple databases, reference lists of articles, and journals

Valeria C. C. Marinho; Julian P. T. Higgins; Stuart Logan; Aubrey Sheiham

85

Dental erosion and severe tooth decay related to soft drinks: a case report and literature review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soft drinks have many potential health problems. The inherent acids and sugars have both acidogenic and cariogenic potential,\\u000a resulting in dental caries and potential enamel erosion. In this report we present a 25-year-old man complaining with the\\u000a severe worn-out of the front teeth during the past 3 years. He had a history of drinking cola for more than 7 years

Ran Cheng; Hui Yang; Mei-ying Shao; Tao Hu; Xue-dong Zhou

2009-01-01

86

Prevention of infective endocarditis: a review of the medical and dental literature.  

PubMed

This paper is a review of what is presently known about the cause and prevention of infective endocarditis. Systemic antibiotics alone are not always enough for an effective prevention of infective endocarditis. Non-streptococcus bacteria frequently found in the periodontal pocket are now reported as causing infective endocarditis; these bacteria are not uniformly susceptible to the antibiotics recommended for prophylaxis. Animal studies indicate that periodontal disease does increase the incidence of infective endocarditis and that the number of microbes entering the blood stream may not be as important in the production of infective endocarditis as other qualities, such as the microbe's ability to adhere. Antibiotics may affect the ability of a microorganism to adhere to tissues of the heart, but this association is yet unclear and may vary with the antibiotic and species of bacteria. Reduction of inflammation of the periodontal tissues is of the utmost importance in the prevention of infective endocarditis; however, mouthrinses have a very limited effect in a periodontal pocket of more than 3 mm in depth and irrigation of a periodontal pocket may create a dangerous bacteremia. Nevertheless, in addition to systemic antibiotics, local antimicrobial agents followed by routine dental treatment and maintenance show promise as an effective means for the prevention of infective endocarditis. Future research in the prevention of infective endocarditis should include placement of antimicrobials in the periodontal pocket and systemic agents that reduce platelet adhesion. The suggestions presented in this review are only recommendations for further research and are not to be construed as a substitute for the current guidelines. PMID:1920019

Barco, C T

1991-08-01

87

Education of tobacco use prevention and cessation for dental professionals - a paradigm shift  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of tobacco continues to be a substantial risk factor in the development and progression of oral cancer, periodontitis, implant failure and poor wound healing. Dental and dental hygiene education providers have made great advances towards the incorporation of tobacco education into their curricula in recent years. Unfortunately, however, both medical and dental education research has consistently reported schools

Joan M Davis; Christoph A Ramseier; Nikos Mattheos; M. Schoonheim-Klein; Sharon Compton; Nadia Al-Hazmi; A. Polychronopoulou; J. Suvan; Doriana Forna; Nicki Radley

2010-01-01

88

Preventing Tooth Decay: A Guide for Implementing Self-Applied Fluoride in Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guidebook was developed to assist citizens in initiating programs to prevent tooth decay in young children through the use of fluoridation. It contains outlines for determining the needs of the school and community for fluoride in drinking water, and presents the various steps and activities that are necessary for developing and implementing…

National Inst. of Dental Research (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

89

Preventing Tooth Decay: A Guide for Implementing Self-Applied Fluoride in Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This guidebook was developed to assist citizens in initiating programs to prevent tooth decay in young children through the use of fluoridation. It contains outlines for determining the needs of the school and community for fluoride in drinking water, and presents the various steps and activities that are necessary for developing and implementing…

National Inst. of Dental Research (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

90

Near-infrared image-guided laser ablation of dental decay  

PubMed Central

Image-guided laser ablation systems are now feasible for dentistry with the recent development of nondestructive high-contrast imaging modalities such as near-IR (NIR) imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) that are capable of discriminating between sound and demineralized dental enamel at the early stages of development. Our objective is to demonstrate that images of demineralized tooth surfaces have sufficient contrast to be used to guide a CO2 laser for the selective removal of natural and artificial caries lesions. NIR imaging and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) operating at 1310-nm are used to acquire images of natural lesions on extracted human teeth and highly patterned artificial lesions produced on bovine enamel. NIR and PS-OCT images are analyzed and converted to binary maps designating the areas on the samples to be removed by a CO2 laser to selectively remove the lesions. Postablation NIR and PS-OCT images confirmed preferential removal of demineralized areas with minimal damage to sound enamel areas. These promising results suggest that NIR and PS-OCT imaging systems can be integrated with a CO2 laser ablation system for the selective removal of dental caries.

Tao, You-Chen; Fried, Daniel

2009-01-01

91

Access to Dental Care for Children in Rhode Island. Rhode Island Kids Count Issue Brief.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Dental disease restricts activities in school, work, and home, and often significantly diminishes the quality of life for many children and adults, especially those who are low income or uninsured. Noting that dental caries (tooth decay) is the most common preventable chronic childhood disease, this Kids Count issue brief considers the extent to…

Katz, Linda; Fontes, Janice; Ross, Maureen; Lawrence, Robin; Andrews, John; Kernan, Sharon; Leddy, Tricia; O'Bara, Joan; Young, John

92

Economic evaluation of preventive dental programs: what can they tell us?  

PubMed

The role of public health program planners is to determine the effectiveness of public health programs, what recommendations should be made, what future initiatives should be taken, and what policies should be developed. At a basic level, to choose between competing alternatives, two characteristics of an intervention must be considered; these are its outcome and its cost. Based on cost and outcome, planners must select the option that offers the most advantages. Economic evaluation is commonly adopted by decision makers in the health sector to investigate the effectiveness of public health programs and to help plan future initiatives. Economic evaluation assists decision makers who must weigh the information it provides in the context of many and often competing options. In this way, an economic evaluation is an aid to decision making rather than the decision itself. Economic evaluation is becoming essential for informed decision making, with potential implications for public health policy and practice and for clinical practice too. While economic evaluations are commonly used in decision-making processes about health programs, few examples exist in the oral health literature. In the case of preventive oral health programs, economic analysis is often difficult, largely because it makes demands on epidemiological and demographic data that are hard to meet. This study will address the concepts and tools required to conduct economic evaluations of prevention programs. The emphasis will be on oral health and preventive dental programs, although the concepts presented could be useful for other public health programs by practitioners and managers with the aim of producing effective and efficient oral health programs. PMID:22998315

Morgan, Mike; Mariño, Rodrigo; Wright, Clive; Bailey, Denise; Hopcraft, Matthew

2012-10-01

93

Tetraparesis following dental extraction: case report and discussion of preventive measures for cervical spinal hyperextension injury.  

PubMed

This concerns a patient with compression myelopathy following passive hyperextension of the cervical spine during a dental procedure. Although he had been asymptomatic prior to the procedure, subsequent cervical spinal imaging revealed advanced spondylosis and spinal stenosis. Spinal stenosis is often asymptomatic for a long time. However, when radiculomyelopathy occurs after minor trauma to the head or neck, the patient is often found to have spinal stenosis. Specifically, hyperextension of a cervical spine with spondylotic changes can lead to compression myelopathy. Acquired spinal stenosis correlates positively with aging. As the size of the elderly population continues to increase the prevalence of cervical spondylotic radiculo-myelopathy will likely increase as well. Since appropriate precautions against potential neurologic damage can be undertaken, we suggest radiographic screening for pre-existing spinal stenosis prior to a procedure requiring hyperextension of the neck. Preventive measures for individuals with asymptomatic spondylotic changes and education of all health-care professionals to avoid abrupt or prolonged hyperextension of the cervical spine is emphasized. PMID:9360224

Whiteson, J H; Panaro, N; Ahn, J H; Firooznia, H

1997-10-01

94

Community-oriented administration of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries: a summary of the current situation in Asia.  

PubMed

Dental caries is the most prevalent chronic disease affecting human populations around the world. It is recognized that fluoride plays a significant role in dental caries reduction. Meanwhile, several low- and middle-income countries of Asia have not yet implemented systematic fluoride programs; contributing factors relate to misconceptions about the mechanisms of fluoride, low priority given to oral health in national health policy and strategic plans, and lack of interest among public health administrators. A workshop on the effective use of fluoride in Asia took place in Phang-Nga, Thailand, in 2011. A series of country presentations addressed some of the topics mentioned above; in addition, speakers from countries of the region provided examples of successful fluoride interventions and discussed program limitations, barriers encountered, and solutions, as well as possibilities for expanding coverage. Participants acknowledged that automatic fluoridation through water, salt, and milk is the most effective and equitable strategy for the prevention of dental caries. Concerns were expressed that government-subsidized community fluoride prevention programs may face privatization. In addition, the use of affordable fluoride-containing toothpastes should be encouraged. The workshop identified: strengths and weaknesses of ongoing community-based fluoride programs, as well as the interest of countries in a particular method; the requirement for World Health Organization (WHO) technical assistance on various aspects, including fluoridation process, feasibility studies, and implementation of effective epidemiological surveillance of the program; exchange of information; and the need for inter-country collaboration. It was acknowledged that program process and evaluation at the local and country levels need further dissemination. The meeting was co-sponsored by the World Health Organization, the International Association for Dental Research, and the World Dental Federation. PMID:22261256

Petersen, P E; Baez, R J; Lennon, M A

2012-02-01

95

Salt fl uoridation - an alternative in automatic prevention of dental caries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite great improvements in terms of reduced prevalence and amount of dental caries in populations worldwide, problems still persist particularly among the underprivileged groups of both developed and developing countries. Research and practical experience gained in several countries have demonstrated however, that dental caries can be pre- vented effectively through establishment of fl uoride programmes. Water fl uoridation, salt fl

T. M. Marthaler

96

Children's acceptance of milk with xylitol or sorbitol for dental caries prevention  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Xylitol, a polyol sugar, has been shown to reduce dental caries when mixed with food or chewing gum. This study examines the taste acceptability of xylitol in milk as a first step toward measuring the effectiveness of xylitol in milk for the reduction of dental caries in a public health program. METHODS: Three different types of milk (Ultra High

Jorge L Castillo; Peter Milgrom; Susan E Coldwell; Ramon Castillo; Rocio Lazo

2005-01-01

97

Hepatitis B and dental personnel: transmission to patients and prevention issues.  

PubMed

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is considered an occupational risk for dental professionals. The Centers for Disease Control have participated in eight investigations regarding dental professionals who were suspected of transmitting HBV infection to their patients. This article summarizes the findings of the investigations, the postulated mechanism of transmission of HBV, control measures suggested, and follow-up of the dental practice for those dentists who were chronic carriers of hepatitis B surface antigen. The approach by the centers for managing dental professionals who are HBsAg positive and those dental professionals who are HBsAg positive and implicated as transmitting HBV infection to patients are outlined. If HBV transmission cannot be interrupted, by suggested measures, then more restrictive measures should be decided on by state or local health officials, or both. These could include removal of the practitioner's license. HBV-infected dental personnel can transmit HBV infection to their patients. The measures suggested for the HBV carrier are designed to allow the dental practitioner to continue practice, but, at the same time, give maximum protection to the patient. PMID:6572677

Ahtone, J; Goodman, R A

1983-02-01

98

Comprehensive Dental Health Plan for Lane County, Oregon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A description of dental manpower, dental facilities, preventive dental health programs, and dental care financing provides background information for a comprehensive dental care plan for Lane County, Oregon. In 1965 it was found that approximately 75 perc...

1974-01-01

99

Tooth Decay  

MedlinePLUS

... forward in dental care, reportedly popularized by returning soldiers from World War II. The NIH completed the ... it was a few generations ago. Millions of American children now have little or no decay, and ...

100

Fluoride supplements in pregnancy, effectiveness in the prevention of dental caries in a group of children  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY This clinical, retrospective study intends to evaluate whether the systemic administration of fluoride during pregnancy can reduce caries incidence in a group of paediatric patients, compared to a control group. 84 patients were selected out of a sample of 2000 children (3–15 years of age) and then divided in two groups: TEST Group: 34 patients (16M – 18F, mean age 9.23), whose mothers had taken fluoride during pregnancy; CONTROL Group: 50 patients (23M – 27F, mean age 9) whose mothers had not taken fluoride. Patients underwent a clinical and radiographic inspection to assess the dfs/DFS value as caries index (decayed or filled surfaces for deciduous or permanent teeth). Results: dfs/DFS value: TEST Group: 3.41, CONTROL group 2.49. The TEST group was further divided in individuals who were administered fluoride only during pregnancy (33%) with a dfs/DFS of 3.14 and individuals who were administered fluoride also after birth (67%) with a dfs/DFS of 3. Caries index (dfs/DFS) did not show any significant differences between the test and control groups. Fluoride administration during pregnancy and postpartum does not seem to have a significant impact on the reduction of caries incidence. More preventive strategies should be investigated to contrast the multifactorial etiology of children caries.

MATURO, P.; COSTACURTA, M.; PERUGIA, C.; DOCIMO, R.

2011-01-01

101

An evaluation of a pilot study of a web-based educational initiative for educating and training undergraduate dental students in infection prevention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective Evaluate the views of undergraduate dental students on a pilot web-based e-learning programme to establish its merit in providing education in infection prevention and control. The initiative was commissioned by NHS Education for Scotland as an educational resource for healthcare workers.Design, sample and setting This was a retrospective analysis of questionnaire data from the first cohort of dental students

A. J. Smith; D. E. A. Lockhart

2009-01-01

102

The prevention of dental caries by BLIS-mediated inhibition of mutans streptococci.  

PubMed

Many of the strategies that have been formulated to decrease the incidence of dental caries have focused upon attempting to reduce either the numbers or the acidogenic activities in dental plaque of the mutans streptococci. In recent years there has been a growing interest in a new method of caries control which depends upon exploiting the ability of certain bacteria to produce antibiotics called bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLIS) with killing activity for mutans streptococci. The approaches under investigation include either the regular oral administration of the purified BLIS or the genetic modification of existing plaque bacteria such that they produce the antimutans BLIS in situ. PMID:1956623

James, S M; Tagg, J R

1991-07-01

103

Dental occlusion and postural control in adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied the influence of a dental occlusion perturbation on postural control. The tests were performed in three dental occlusion conditions: (Rest Position: no dental contact, Maximal Intercuspal Occlusion: maximal dental contact, and Thwarted Laterality Occlusion: simulation of a dental malocclusion) and four postural conditions: static (stable platform) and dynamic (unstable platform), with eyes open and eyes closed. A decay

Corinne Tardieu; Michel Dumitrescu; Anne Giraudeau; Jean-Luc Blanc; François Cheynet; Liliane Borel

2009-01-01

104

Recruiting College Students as Patients via a Pre-paid Preventive Dental Health Plan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The New York University College of Dentistry provides oral health care services for a low annual fee. The program meets its objective of providing additional operative procedures to fulfill dental students' educational requirements and accommodates students' oral health care needs at reasonable cost. Some members patronize the clinic after…

Klinghofer, Ilsa Peta; Marchese, Ann Marie

1990-01-01

105

Design and implementation of a dental caries prevention trial in remote Canadian Aboriginal communities  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The goal of this cluster randomized trial is to test the effectiveness of a counseling approach, Motivational Interviewing, to control dental caries in young Aboriginal children. Motivational Interviewing, a client-centred, directive counseling style, has not yet been evaluated as an approach for promotion of behaviour change in indigenous communities in remote settings. METHODS\\/DESIGN: Aboriginal women were hired from the

Rosamund Harrison; Jacques Veronneau; Brian Leroux

2010-01-01

106

Dental erosion as oral disease. Insights in etiological factors and pathomechanisms, and current strategies for prevention and therapy.  

PubMed

Dental erosion is induced by the exposure to acids, and together with physical impacts, contributes to the wear and tear of the dentition throughout a lifetime. It is a multifactorial condition, and so far several etiological and protecting factors have been identified. Based on a thorough diagnosis and identification of the acid sources, current preventive and therapeutic strategies focus on causal strategies bringing the acid exposure to a safe level, and/or strengthening the tooth surface against demineralization. There is increasing knowledge about the erosion inhibiting potential of fluorides particularly of compounds with polyvalent metal cations. The paper critically reviews the current literature providing a brief overview on what is known about diagnosis, prevalence, etiology and risk factors with the main focus on preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:23409626

Ganss, Carolina; Lussi, Adrian; Schlueter, Nadine

2012-12-01

107

Acupuncture versus ondansetron in the prevention of postoperative vomiting. A study of children undergoing dental surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary This study compares the anti-emetic effect of acupuncture with that of ondansetron and a placebo. Ninety children undergoing dental treatment under general anaesthesia were randomly allocated to one of the three equal groups, to receive acupuncture needle insertion, intravenous ondansetron 0.15 mg.kg 21 or a placebo. Parental satisfaction scores and the incidence of emetic episodes were recorded. A significant

M. Somri; S. J. Vaida; E. Sabo; G. Yassain; I. Gankin; L. A. Gaitini

2001-01-01

108

Glycemic control with insulin prevents progression of dental caries and caries-related periodontitis in diabetic WBN/KobSlc rats.  

PubMed

We have previously reported that dental caries progress in spontaneously and chemically induced diabetic rodent models. The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between hyperglycemia and dental caries by evaluating the preventive effect of glycemic control with insulin on the progression of the lesions in diabetic rats. Male WBN/KobSlc rats aged 15 weeks were divided into groups of spontaneously diabetic rats (intact group), spontaneously diabetic rats with insulin treatment (INS group), alloxan-induced prolonged diabetic rats (AL group), and alloxan-induced prolonged diabetic rats with insulin treatment (AL + INS group). The animals were killed at 90 weeks of age, and their oral tissue was examined. Dental caries and periodontitis were frequently detected in the intact group, and the lesions were enhanced in the AL group (in which there was an increased duration of diabetes). Meanwhile, glycemic control with insulin reduced the incidence and severity of dental caries and periodontitis in the INS group, and the effects became more pronounced in the AL + INS group. In conclusion, glycemic control by insulin prevented the progression of dental caries and caries-related periodontitis in the diabetic rats. PMID:23076036

Nakahara, Yutaka; Sano, Tomoya; Kodama, Yasushi; Ozaki, Kiyokazu; Matsuura, Tetsuro

2012-10-17

109

Oral and dental management of the cancer patient: prevention and treatment of complications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aggressive cancer therapy places patients at greater risk for oral complications and treatment-related consequences. Unfortunately, prevention and\\/or treatment of such oral sequelae has become an often overlooked priority of the treatment team. We describe a philosophy of management of the cancer patient that specifically emphasizes the prevention and treatment of oral complications associated with cancer therapy. These concepts and principles

Mark S. Chambers; Béla B. Toth; Jack W. Martin; Terence J. Fleming; James C. Lemon

1995-01-01

110

Infection Control in Air Force Dental Clinics.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document prescribes responsibilities and methods of sterilizing or disinfecting dental items in Air Force dental facilities to prevent or reduce the chance of cross-infection of patients and staff. The importance of preparing dental items for sterili...

B. A. Matis A. G. Christen J. M. Young W. R. Sellers

1980-01-01

111

Children's acceptance of milk with xylitol or sorbitol for dental caries prevention  

PubMed Central

Background Xylitol, a polyol sugar, has been shown to reduce dental caries when mixed with food or chewing gum. This study examines the taste acceptability of xylitol in milk as a first step toward measuring the effectiveness of xylitol in milk for the reduction of dental caries in a public health program. Methods Three different types of milk (Ultra High Temperature (UHT), powder and evaporated) were tested for acceptability by 75 Peruvian children (25 per milk group, ages 4 to 7 years). Each group evaluated xylitol and sorbitol in one type of milk. In the first phase, each child was presented with a tray of four plastic cups containing 50 ml of milk with 0.021 g/ml xylitol, 0.042 g/ml xylitol, 0.042 g/ml sorbitol or no sugar. Each child was asked to taste the samples in a self-selected order. After tasting each sample, the child placed the milk cup in front of one of three cartoon faces (smile, frown or neutral) representing the child's response to the taste of each sample. In the second phase, the child was asked to rank order the milk samples within each category (smile, frown or neutral). Ranks within categories were then combined to obtain a rank ordering for all the test samples. Results The ranking from best to worst for the samples across categories (UHT, powder, evaporated) was xylitol (0.0.042 g/ml), sorbitol (0.042 g/ml), xylitol (0.021 g/ml) and milk alone (Friedman's ANOVA). Xylitol and sorbitol were preferred over milk alone, and xylitol (0.042 g/ml) was preferred to sorbitol (0.042 g/ml)(p < .05 sign test). Conclusion Milk sweetened with xylitol is well accepted by Peruvian children ages 4–7 years.

Castillo, Jorge L; Milgrom, Peter; Coldwell, Susan E; Castillo, Ramon; Lazo, Rocio

2005-01-01

112

A critical review: an overview of genetic influence on dental caries.  

PubMed

Dental decay is a complex, chronic disease and one of the most common illnesses in dentistry today. Several dental decay risk factors have been identified during the last years; however, these variables alone may not entirely explain the disease development. Genetic research applied to dental decay began in the 1930s with experimental reports in animals and human observational research. Only recently, have some studies begun to search for genetic polymorphisms in humans and apply linkage analysis. However, due to the complex characteristics of the disease, the strong influence from several biological and environmental factors, and the small number of genetic studies related to dental caries, the genetic basis still requires further study. Therefore, the aim of this review is to provide a brief description of the current methodology for genetic analysis of complex traits, followed by a comprehensive evaluation of the literature related to genetic susceptibility/resistance to dental decay and a discussion of different aspects of the applied methodology. Advances towards the elucidation of the dental decay genetic basis may contribute to the understanding of the disease etiopathogenesis and to the identification of high risk groups, thus providing potential targets for effective screening, prevention and treatment. PMID:20846151

Werneck, R I; Mira, M T; Trevilatto, P C

2010-10-01

113

Dental caries in an Early Cretaceous ichthyosaur  

Microsoft Academic Search

A single anterior dentary tooth, recovered with a near complete juvenile ichthyosaur skull from the Early Cretaceous (upper Albian) Hughenden-Richmond region of northern Queensland, has revealed the presence of a potential dental caries (tooth decay) infection. Dental caries is a disease affecting hard dental structures including the cementum and results in cavitation. The implications of dental caries development on tooth

Benjamin P. Kear

2001-01-01

114

Comparing Dental and Pharmacy Students' Perceptions on Public Health and Preventive Health Care Course  

PubMed Central

Objectives: A Public health course has an important role in the undergraduate education of pharmacy and dentistry in terms of emphasizing preventive care. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the views of pharmacy and dentistry students on a public health course and preventive health care. Methods: 173 students enrolled at Ege University, Faculties of Pharmacy and Dentistry completed a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis and replied to 18 Likert type question to determine their perceptions on a public health course and preventive health care. The comments of the students were reviewed and categorized into key themes. Results: SWOT analysis and the results of quantitative Likert type questions supported each other. According to the quantitative results, there was no significant difference between the scores of students from both schools in terms of their statements about the public health course and preventive care. Both groups of students mentioned the contribution of the public health course to their professions in the future. They also appreciated the importance of preventive care in the health services.

Mandiracioglu, Aliye; Dogan, Fethi

2012-01-01

115

[The suitability of orthodontical groups of indications (OGI) for preventive dental examinations of the public health service].  

PubMed

In the context of the dental preventive medical examinations of the public health service, the orthodontical data-gathering in children's day-care centre and schools, in contrast to the diagnoses of caries disease, was made was based so far on a non-uniform methodology. In order to provide in future, also in the orthodontical sector, data material that is usable for comparative national and local health reporting, a uniform methodology should form the basis for the data acquisition. The present study makes a contribution to this objective. A goal of the work was to test two different collection instruments for their suitability as objective tools in the context of the preventive dental medical examinations. The occurrence and the severity level of dentofacial anomalies as well as the orthodontic treatment status of Thuringian school children of defined age groups (9 to 11 years old, 12 to 13 years old) were recorded and the orthodontic treatment need was determined. In the younger age group valid the orthodontical groups of indications (OGI) were found for the first time in Germany; in the older group we tested the already long established Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI) and equipment application recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). The work was a component of the task spectrum of the WHO Collaboration Centre "Prevention of Oral disease" of the Health Centre for Preventive Dentistry at the Centre for Tooth, Mouth and Jaw Dentistry of the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena in Thuringia. As investigation region, a rural area ("Landkreis Eichsfeld") of Thuringia was choosen. The study was arranged into a sociological and a clinical-epidemiological part. Altogether 1845 pupils were recruited from national schools. The questionnaire was based on the WHO-initiated "International Collaborative Study of Oral Health Outcomes" (ICS II study). The investigations took place in the context of the preventive medical examinations of the public health service. The results were based on the answers and findings of 691 probants of the group of the 9-11 years old (AG 1) and 774 probants of the group of the 12-13 years old (AG 2). The sociological results of both age groups reflected social restrictions regarding the presence of dentofacial anomalies in an order of magnitude of 20% in the AG 1 and 7.3% in the AG 2. In the AG 1 11.4% confirmed an orthodontical treatment and 47.9% of the probants examined indicated a desire for treatment. On the other hand, the proportion of orthodontically treated in AG 2 amounted to 31.1% and 37.8% expressed a desire for treatment. Dentofacial anomalies determined with the help of the OGI in the AG 1 as the most frequent were in the form of a distal bite (sagittal stage/group of D) with 55.5% of the examined pupils being documented. However here severity development stages 1 and 2 outweighed. Proportionally followed: confining (group E) with 21% and the vertical stage/deep bite (group T) with 7.8%. All other groups were represented by only small proportions, craniofacial anomalies (group A) were not diagnosed. Anomalies with severity development 1 and 2 were determined in 64.1% of the examined children. In the AG 2 examined with the DAI, the anomalies of space conditions with 58% exceeded anomalies of occlusion conditions with 38.9% and anomalies of dentition with 9.8%. An urgent orthodontical treatment need was determined in the AG 1 with 35.9% of the probants (severity development 3 to 5) and in the AG 2 with 16.8% (DAI values over 32). In the AG 2 too, over 60% DAI values from 13 to 25 were determined, 26% exhibited DAI values between 26 and 31. During the statistic evaluation the "Statistical Package found for Social Sciences (SPSS)" version 11.51 S with a significant level of 5% was used. Derived from the results of our analysis, the recommendation can be made that the methodology of the Orthodontical Groups of Indications for the employment is to be regarded as a possibility with dental preventive medical examinations in the public health service

Gottstein, I; Borutta, A

2007-10-01

116

Prevention. Part 1: Smoking cessation advice within the general dental practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Smoking remains the largest single preventable cause of death and disability in the UK and costs the NHS £1.7 billion each year. More than 120,000 people die prematurely due to smoking related diseases. Worldwide smoking is the single most important public health problem. The detrimental effects of smoking and tobacco use on oral health are well recognised. Oral cancers and

B Daly; R G Watt

2003-01-01

117

Impact of the "Guidelines for infection prevention in dentistry" (2006) by the Commission of Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention at the Robert Koch-Institute (KRINKO) on hygiene management in dental practices - analysis of a survey from 2009  

PubMed Central

Aim: To assess trends in hygiene management in dental practices in comparison to an earlier survey in 2002/2003 and to point out key aspects for future efforts. Method: The infection prevention management of all dental practices in Greifswald (n=35) was determined by a questionnaire in a personal interview in 2008/2009. Results: 26% of the dentists did not use sufficient personal protective equipment during the general examination of the patient. In conservative and prosthetic dentistry, 15% still did not use adequate measures and 9% did not even in surgical interventions. Vaccination coverage was clearly too low, as only 35% of dentists were vaccinated against influenza and coverage with other vaccinations was also quite low. 11% of the dentists did not perform a documented anamnesis and in 29% of the dental practices no appointment system for risk patients existed. There were significant deficiencies in the reprocessing of medical devices and in the equipment needed for reprocessing. The opportunity to participate in further training in this field was rejected by 23% of the dentists. In 10 dental practices, the colony count in the dental unit water-conducting system was five times higher than the limit. A contamination with P. aeruginosa was discovered in 4 practices. All units were renovated. Discussion: Overall, both the hygiene management and hygiene equipment in the practices have improved considerably compared to the previous survey in 2002/2003. This demonstrates the positive effect of the KRINKO guidelines from 2006. However, the survey again showed relevant deficiences in the hygiene management of dental practices, which agrees with a Germany-wide online survey from 2009. Conclusion: While the study revealed persistent deficiencies in hygiene management, especially in reprocessing, it confirms that the KRINKO guidelines for dental practices from 2006 led to significant improvements in hygiene management. Doubts about the impact of the guidelines are not backed by evidence.

Hubner, Nils-Olaf; Handrup, Stephan; Meyer, Georg; Kramer, Axel

2012-01-01

118

The distribution of burden of dental caries in schoolchildren: a critique of the high-risk caries prevention strategy for populations  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The 'high-risk approach' is a commonly adopted strategy recommended for the prevention of dental caries in populations. The scientific basis for the strategy has been questioned. The objective of this study is to assess the contribution that children identified at 'high-risk' made towards the total of new caries lesions over a 4-year period, by analysing the distribution of new

Paul A Batchelor; Aubrey Sheiham

2006-01-01

119

Community-oriented Administration of Fluoride for the Prevention of Dental Caries: A Summary of the Current Situation in Asia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dental caries is the most prevalent chronic disease affecting human populations around the world. It is recognized that fluoride plays a significant role in dental caries reduction. Meanwhile, several low- and middle-income countries of Asia have not yet implemented systematic fluoride programs; contributing factors relate to misconceptions about the mechanisms of fluoride, low priority given to oral health in national

P. E. Petersen; R. J. Baez; M. A. Lennon

2012-01-01

120

Referrals for dental care during pregnancy.  

PubMed

Oral health is essential to overall health in the prenatal period. Pregnancy is not a time to delay dental care. Several studies have shown an association between periodontal disease and poor pregnancy outcomes including preterm birth. Interventions to provide periodontal treatment to pregnant women yield inconsistent results regarding preterm birth but have established the safety of periodontal therapy during pregnancy. Postpartum women in poor dental health readily transmit the tooth decay pathogen Streptococcus mutans from their saliva to their infants, resulting in increased risk of early childhood caries. Preventive services and treatment for acute problems should be recommended, fears allayed, and women referred. Dental radiographs may be performed safely with the use of appropriate shielding. Nonemergent interventions are best provided between 14 and 20 weeks' gestation for comfort and optimal fetal safety. Most gravid women do not seek dental care. Increased interprofessional communication to encourage dentists to treat pregnant women will reduce the number of women without care. In states where it is available, Medicaid coverage of dental services for pregnant women is typically allowed during pregnancy and for 2 months postpartum. Women's health providers should understand the importance of protecting oral health during pregnancy and educate their patients accordingly. PMID:21429074

Kloetzel, Megan K; Huebner, Colleen E; Milgrom, Peter

2011-02-28

121

Dental Implants  

MedlinePLUS

Dental Implants Did you know that dental implants are frequently the best treatment option for replacing missing teeth? ... implants can last a lifetime. Anatomy of a Dental Implant A dental implant designed to replace a single ...

122

Dental Assisting Program Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This program guide contains the standard dental assisting curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level dental assistants, and includes job skills in the technical areas of preventive dentistry; four-handed dentistry; chairside assisting with emphasis in diagnostics,…

Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

123

Dental Assisting Program Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This program guide contains the standard dental assisting curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level dental assistants, and includes job skills in the technical areas of preventive dentistry; four-handed dentistry; chairside assisting with emphasis in diagnostics,…

Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

124

Dentists' use of caries risk assessment and individualized caries prevention for their adult patients: findings from The Dental Practice-Based Research Network  

PubMed Central

Objectives Few studies have examined dentists' subjective ratings of importance of caries risk factors or tested whether dentists use this information in treatment planning. This study tested several hypotheses related to caries risk assessment and individualized caries prevention. Methods Data were collected as part of a questionnaire entitled “Assessment of Caries Diagnosis and Caries Treatment”, completed by 547 practitioners who belong to The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN), a consortium of participating practices and dental organizations. Results Sixty-nine percent of DPBRN dentists perform caries risk assessment on their patients. Recently-graduated dentists, dentists with busier practices, and those who believe a dentist can predict future caries were the most likely to use caries risk assessment. The association between caries risk assessment and individualized prevention was weaker than expected (r=.21). Dentists who perform caries risk assessment provide individualized caries prevention to 57% of their patients, compared to 42% for dentists who do not perform caries risk assessment. Based on their responses to radiographic and clinical scenarios in the questionnaire, dentists who use caries risk assessment appear to use this information in restorative decisions. Conclusion A substantial percentage of DPBRN dentists do not perform caries risk assessment, and there is not a strong linkage between its use and use of individualized preventive regimens for adult patients. More progress in implementation of current scientific evidence in this area is warranted.

Riley, Joseph L.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Ajmo, Craig T.; Bockman, Hildegunn; Jackson, Marlon B.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

2011-01-01

125

The article has been accredited by Health Authority - Abu Dhabi as having educational content and is acceptable for up to 2 (Category 1) credit hours. Credit may be claimed for one year from the date of subscription (20 CME hours per year). Approaches for Prevention & Control of Dental Erosion  

Microsoft Academic Search

In light of increasing reports of the incidence and prevalence of dental erosion, it is now nec- essary that dental practitioners are familiar with the etiological and predisposing factors of dental erosion, as well as the possible ways of its prevention and control. It may be easier to gain pa- tients' compliance with the advice of administering a remineralizing agent

Bennett T. Amaechi

126

Dental Problems and Irradiation of the O.R.L. Sphere: A New Attitude. Preliminary Results on 488 Cases.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

High-energy radiotherapy has greatly improved the percentage of cures in cancers of the ORL sphere, but it is debatable whether the same progress has been made in the prevention of its sequels and complications. Post-radiotherapeutic dental decay, the res...

C. R. Paget

1975-01-01

127

Prevalence, Severity and Related Factors of Dental Caries in School Going Children of Vadodara City - An Epidemiological Study  

PubMed Central

Objective: Among dental diseases, dental caries is an important dental public health problem in India which is irreversible in nature, and is predominantly a disease of childhood. Till date no study has been carried out in Vadodara. As baseline data of caries is required to improve oral health of children, the present study was undertaken to determine the pattern of dental caries in school children of Vadodara city in the mixed dentition period considering age, sex and dietary patterns. Methods: An epidemiological cross sectional descriptive study was carried out among 1600 school children aged 6-12 years in Vadodara city. A closed ended questionnaire according to World Health Organisation 1997 methodology was used to collect the data. The children were examined for the presence of dental caries using decayed missing filled teeth/decayed missing filled surfaces and Decayed Missing Filled Teeth/Decayed Missing Filled Surfaces index. Related factors which predispose caries such as age, sex and dietary patterns were recorded. Results: The prevalence of dental caries was 69.12%. The mean dmft/dmfs and DMFT/DMFS were 3.00/4.79 and 0.45/0.56 respectively. The prevalence was higher in deciduous teeth than in permanent teeth. Positive association was found between dental caries and age, sex, frequency of sugar consumption in between meals. Conclusion: The study concludes that the prevalence and severity of dental caries in Vadodara city is high. So, in developing country like India, it is imperative to introduce primary prevention and increased restorative care for the purpose of both reducing the caries prevalence and maintaining those caries free children. How to cite this article: Joshi N, Sujan SG, Joshi K, Parekh H, Dave B. Prevalence, Severity and Related Factors of Dental Caries in School Going Children of Vadodara City – An Epidemiological Study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(4):40-48.

Joshi, Niyanta; Sujan, SG; Joshi, Keyur; Parekh, Harshik; Dave, Bhavna

2013-01-01

128

Nationwide survey of fifth-year dental students' perceptions about tobacco prevention, control, and curriculum in India.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to assess the tobacco cessation knowledge, attitudes, practices, and perceived barriers of dental interns (students in their last year of the five-year dental curriculum) in India as well as to assess the adequacy of training in tobacco use cessation (TUC) counselling. This was a cross-sectional questionnaire study conducted with 1,521 interns at fiftyone dental colleges of India selected by multistage random sampling. The survey instrument was a fifty-nine-item, self-structured, and self-administered questionnaire. Fifteen questions were about knowledge and attitudes, with twenty-two about practices, fifteen about barriers, and seven about curriculum adequacy; demographic data were also collected. The response rate was 99.7 percent. The results showed that 38.8 percent had knowledge, 30.8 percent had positive attitudes, 19.2 percent practiced TUC, 43 percent experienced barriers, and 85.2 percent agreed on receiving extensive curriculum on tobacco cessation. Only 1 percent were aware of the 5As, the 5Rs protocol, and the motivational interviewing technique of TUC. These respondents' knowledge, attitudes, and practices were below normative level, and they took a superficial approach to TUC. The perceived barriers were very high and included curriculum inadequacy. The results of this study help show there is an urgent need to revise the tobacco curriculum in dental schools in India to make students more confident to practice this aspect of dentistry independently. PMID:24098044

Balappanavar, Aswini Y; Sardana, Varun; Gupta, Puneet

2013-10-01

129

Effective use of fluorides for the prevention of dental caries in the 21st century: the WHO approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite great improvements in the oral health of populations across the world, problems still persist particularly among poor and disadvantaged groups in both developed and developing countries. According to the World Oral Health Report 2003, dental caries remains a major public health problem in most industrialized countries, affecting 60-90% of schoolchildren and the vast majority of adults. Although it appears

Poul Erik

2004-01-01

130

Improving children's dental health.  

PubMed

Surveys show that tooth decay in young children is becoming concentrated in more deprived sectors of the population. Only by targeting families with young children in underprivileged areas will dental health be improved further. An analysis of dental health promotion advice has shown that simple, direct advice to "brush teeth twice a day with fluoride toothpaste" is just as effective as complicated health promoting activities. Questions about the development of the teeth and oral structures are common among new parents but they rarely turn to the dental team for answers. Nurses, health visitors and midwives are very much in the front line because of their work with young families. Dental health advice for families with young children, delivered by community health professionals including health visitors and midwives, may be the key to tackling inequalities in oral health in young children. PMID:12449062

Ottley, Carol

2002-01-01

131

Asthma and dental erosion.  

PubMed

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory condition of the airway, characterised by the presence of airflow obstruction which is variable over short periods of time, or is reversible with treatment. Medication comprises of bronchodilators, corticosteroids and anticholinergic drugs. Most asthma drugs are inhaled using various forms of inhalers or nebulizers. Inhaled drugs must be used regularly. The effects of these drugs on the dentition such as tooth decay and erosion have been a subject of debate among dental practitioners. Asthmatic medications can place the patient at risk of dental erosion by reducing salivary protection against extrinsic or intrinsic acids. Asthmatic individuals are one of the higher risk groups suffering from dental erosion. Therefore patients with bronchial asthma should receive special prophylactic attention. This article presents a case of an asthmatic with dental manifestations and reviews the possible causes and management of the same. PMID:20071821

Manuel, S T; Kundabala, M; Shetty, N; Parolia, A

132

A phase II clinical trial of a dental health education program delivered by aboriginal health workers to prevent early childhood caries  

PubMed Central

Background Early Childhood Caries (ECC) is a widespread problem in Australian Aboriginal communities causing severe pain and sepsis. In addition dental services are difficult to access for many Aboriginal children and trying to obtain care can be stressful for the parents. The control of dental caries has been identified as a key indictor in the reduction of Indigenous disadvantage. Thus, there is a need for new approaches to prevent ECC, which reflect the cultural norms of Aboriginal communities. Methods/Design This is a Phase II single arm trial designed to gather information on the effectiveness of a dental health education program for Aboriginal children aged 6?months, followed over 2?years. The program will deliver advice from Aboriginal Health Workers on tooth brushing, diet and the use of fluoride toothpaste to Aboriginal families. Six waves of data collection will be conducted to enable estimates of change in parental knowledge and their views on the acceptability of the program. The Aboriginal Health Workers will also be interviewed to record their views on the acceptability and program feasibility. Clinical data on the child participants will be recorded when they are 30?months old and compared with a reference population of similar children when the study began. Latent variable modeling will be used to interpret the intervention effects on disease outcome. Discussion The research project will identify barriers to the implementation of a family centered Aboriginal oral health strategy, as well as the development of evidence to assist in the planning of a Phase III cluster randomized study. Trial registration ACTRN12612000712808

2012-01-01

133

Perceptions of Dental Fluorosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mild dental fluorosis has long been accepted as a side-effect of water fluoridation and, more recently, has been recognized as a consequence of the use of other fluoride-based caries-preventive strategies. Traditionally, dental health professionals have not seen this as being of public health importance, but members of the public have not been asked their opinion. The purpose of the present

P. J. Riordan

1993-01-01

134

Present state of dental health knowledge, attitudes/behaviour and perceived oral health of Japanese employees.  

PubMed

The aim of this survey was to assess the present state of dental health knowledge, attitudes/behaviour and perceived oral health of Japanese employees. A 60-item questionnaire was used in a dental health project in the work place. The subjects comprised 77,845 employees, 76 per cent of whom reported delaying a dental visit until they had toothache, with about 60 per cent delaying even when they discovered a decayed tooth. The majority did not regard decayed teeth as a disease and only a minority reported regular dental visits. About three quarters reported bleeding gums on brushing, although more than half had never been taught professionally how to clean their teeth and less than 5 per cent flossed daily. More than half believed that false teeth were inevitable in old age, and that their teeth were getting worse despite daily brushing. About 70 per cent of the employees thought that it was impossible to prevent gum disease with toothbrushing alone, and nearly half believed a toothpaste with fluoride was effective in preventing periodontal disease. Reorientation of oral health care in Japan, therefore, is urgently needed and dental services have to be provided for the implementation of systematic oral health promotion for employees in the workplace. PMID:10858751

Kawamura, M; Iwamoto, Y

1999-06-01

135

Effect of 5 years of dental studies on the oral health of Tunisian dental  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study is a follow-up of one made in 1998-99 on first-year dental students in Monastir. Now in their fifth year, we assessed the effect of dental studies on students' oral health practices and dental health. Of the 155 students in the first study, 140 were still enrolled. Periodontal troubles, maloc- - clusion and dental decay affected 84.3%, 80.0% and

F. Maatouk; W. Maatouk; H. Ghedira; S. Ben Mimoun

2006-01-01

136

Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Prevents AU-Rich-Element-Mediated mRNA Decay  

PubMed Central

During lytic Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection, host gene expression is severely restricted by a process of global mRNA degradation known as host shutoff, which rededicates translational machinery to the expression of viral proteins. A subset of host mRNAs is spared from shutoff, and a number of these contain cis-acting AU-rich elements (AREs) in their 3? untranslated regions. AREs are found in labile mRNAs encoding cytokines, growth factors, and proto-oncogenes. Activation of the p38/MK2 signal transduction pathway reverses constitutive decay of ARE-mRNAs, resulting in increased protein production. The viral G-protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR) is thought to play an important role in promoting the secretion of angiogenic molecules from KSHV-infected cells during lytic replication, but to date it has not been clear how vGPCR circumvents host shutoff. Here, we demonstrate that vGPCR activates the p38/MK2 pathway and stabilizes ARE-mRNAs, augmenting the levels of their protein products. Using MK2-deficient cells, we demonstrate that MK2 is essential for maximal vGPCR-mediated ARE-mRNA stabilization. ARE-mRNAs are normally delivered to cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein granules known as processing bodies (PBs) for translational silencing and decay. We demonstrate that PB formation is prevented during KSHV lytic replication or in response to vGPCR-mediated activation of RhoA subfamily GTPases. Together, these data show for the first time that vGPCR impacts gene expression at the posttranscriptional level, coordinating an attack on the host mRNA degradation machinery. By suppressing ARE-mRNA turnover, vGPCR may facilitate escape of certain target mRNAs from host shutoff and allow secretion of angiogenic factors from lytically infected cells.

Corcoran, Jennifer A.; Khaperskyy, Denys A.; Johnston, Benjamin P.; King, Christine A.; Cyr, David P.; Olsthoorn, Alisha V.

2012-01-01

137

Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus G-protein-coupled receptor prevents AU-rich-element-mediated mRNA decay.  

PubMed

During lytic Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection, host gene expression is severely restricted by a process of global mRNA degradation known as host shutoff, which rededicates translational machinery to the expression of viral proteins. A subset of host mRNAs is spared from shutoff, and a number of these contain cis-acting AU-rich elements (AREs) in their 3' untranslated regions. AREs are found in labile mRNAs encoding cytokines, growth factors, and proto-oncogenes. Activation of the p38/MK2 signal transduction pathway reverses constitutive decay of ARE-mRNAs, resulting in increased protein production. The viral G-protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR) is thought to play an important role in promoting the secretion of angiogenic molecules from KSHV-infected cells during lytic replication, but to date it has not been clear how vGPCR circumvents host shutoff. Here, we demonstrate that vGPCR activates the p38/MK2 pathway and stabilizes ARE-mRNAs, augmenting the levels of their protein products. Using MK2-deficient cells, we demonstrate that MK2 is essential for maximal vGPCR-mediated ARE-mRNA stabilization. ARE-mRNAs are normally delivered to cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein granules known as processing bodies (PBs) for translational silencing and decay. We demonstrate that PB formation is prevented during KSHV lytic replication or in response to vGPCR-mediated activation of RhoA subfamily GTPases. Together, these data show for the first time that vGPCR impacts gene expression at the posttranscriptional level, coordinating an attack on the host mRNA degradation machinery. By suppressing ARE-mRNA turnover, vGPCR may facilitate escape of certain target mRNAs from host shutoff and allow secretion of angiogenic factors from lytically infected cells. PMID:22696654

Corcoran, Jennifer A; Khaperskyy, Denys A; Johnston, Benjamin P; King, Christine A; Cyr, David P; Olsthoorn, Alisha V; McCormick, Craig

2012-06-13

138

Study of the Efficacy of Toothpaste Containing Casein Phosphopeptide in the Prevention of Dental Caries: a Randomized Controlled Trial in 12- to 15YearOld High Caries Risk Children in Bangalore, India  

Microsoft Academic Search

Casein phosphopeptide (CPP) has the potential to be added to mouth rinses, gels, toothpastes, chewing gums and confectioneries. Until now CPP has been studied in vitro, in situ and in animals, but clinical trials are lacking. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of CPP-containing toothpaste in preventing dental caries in schoolchildren. The study was conducted among 150 schoolchildren

S. K. Rao; G. S. Bhat; S. Aradhya; A. Devi; M. Bhat

2009-01-01

139

Dental caries in South Pacific populations: a review.  

PubMed

Dental caries (tooth decay) was uncommon in Pacific Island communities before European trading and migration expanded into the Region. The etiology of this oral microbial disease is a consequence of changed diets, food preparation and lifestyle. In particular, the easy availability of a high level of frequent dietary supplementation with refined sucrose (sugar) and carbohydrates is the key factor in the etiology of tooth decay. While tooth decay initially developed as a health problem in the more accessible Pacific islands over a century ago, it has spread increasingly as trading, travel and cash economies have developed to include even the more geographically remote communities. In this review selected epidemiological data are presented to show the magnitude, variation and secular changes in the prevalence of tooth decay in different communities. Tooth decay in conjunction with the historically endemic adult gum diseases poses a major public health problem in terms of pain, premature loss of teeth and the need for oral rehabilitation. Implementation and monitoring of caries control programs is a priority need in most communities. It is impractical to consider a return to indigenous diets and lifestyles as a strategy for caries prevention. Instead promotion of proven modern community preventive programmes, notably appropriate use of fluorides, 'fissure sealants' together with control of excessive consumption of diets rich in refined sugar is required if a significant increase in the levels of tooth decay is to be avoided. PMID:16276946

Cutress, T W

2003-03-01

140

Medicaid: Extent of Dental Disease in Children Has Not Decreased, and Millions Are Estimated to Have Untreated Tooth Decay. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-08-1121  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In recent years, concerns have been raised about the adequacy of dental care for low-income children. Attention to this subject became more acute due to the widely publicized case of Deamonte Driver, a 12-year-old boy who died as a result of an untreated infected tooth that led to a fatal brain infection. Deamonte had health coverage through…

Cosgrove, James C.

2008-01-01

141

Dental disease in children with chronic illness  

PubMed Central

We focus on the role of the general paediatrician in promoting the importance of good dental health for all children and in particular those children "at risk". We present preventive measures, evidence based where available, that may improve dental care and promote the role of paediatric dental services in the multidisciplinary management of chronic disease.

Foster, H; Fitzgerald, J

2005-01-01

142

Children's Dental Health | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine  

MedlinePLUS

... it has a dental sealant program. Community Water Fluoridation Nearly all naturally occurring water sources contain fluoride— ... decay and even reverses early decay. Community water fluoridation adjusts the amount of fluoride in an area's ...

143

Dental care demand among children with dental insurance.  

PubMed Central

As the number of families with dental insurance and expenditures for dental care has increased over the past two decades, so has interest in determining cost-sharing effects on dental demand among insureds. Using a representative sample of Pennsylvania Blue Shield children insureds during 1980, we estimate cost-sharing effects on dental demand for basic (diagnostic, preventive, restorative, endodontic, and extraction services) and orthodontic care. Results indicate that cost-sharing has little influence on the probability of using any dental services and basic expenditures. However, the probability of using orthodontic services decreases 2.1 percent when the proportion of orthodontic expenditures paid by the parent increases 10 percent. By reducing the cost of care, cost-sharing reduces social class differences in dental demand common in unisured populations, likely producing public oral health benefits.

Grembowski, D; Conrad, D A; Milgrom, P

1987-01-01

144

Electrophoretic deposition applied to ceramic dental crowns and bridges  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) was used as shaping technique for ceramic dental crowns and dental three-unit and four-unit bridges in the high loaded molar region. Because of esthetical aspects and their biocompatibility ceramics are the material of choice for dental applications. Allergic reactions or toxic tissue damages can be prevented largely by application of ceramic dental products. Zirconia in its tetragonal

T. Moritz; W. Eiselt; K. Moritz

2006-01-01

145

Dietary acids – a risk to dental health?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acids have the potential to dissolve or erode teeth. Dental erosion and dental decay are two very different processes. This review aims to explain what is erosion and how it is caused. Potentially erosive dietary acids in drinks and foods tested under laboratory conditions have resulted in eroded teeth, but epidemiological data on the degree of risk have been more

Alexander Milosevic

2004-01-01

146

Dental caries and dental health behavior of patients with primary Sjögren syndrome.  

PubMed

This comprehensive study was carried out to describe and analyze the oral health status, perceived oral health problems, patients' costs, and oral health behavior in a group of patients with primary Sjögren syndrome (PSS). In particular, the objective of this report was to assess whether Sjögren syndrome patients had more dental caries experience than a control group. Data were collected by means of interviews and clinical oral examinations. The study comprised 53 patients with PSS and a control group of 53 persons matched by age. Among the younger patients the number of decayed, missing, or filled teeth (DMFT) was 22.3, compared with 18.8 among controls (P< 0.05). In parallel, the DMFT in the old-age PSS patients was 26.2, against a DMFT of 22.1 for controls (P< 0.001). On average, the young patients had seven teeth missing, whereas two missing teeth were found among controls (P < 0.01). PSS patients had more frequent dental visits--every 3-4 months (40%)--than controls (19%). In parallel, 78% of the PSS patients brushed their teeth more than twice daily, compared with 28% of the control group. The PSS patient group reported having had more teeth extracted, more trouble with their teeth during lifetime, and higher expenses for dental treatment than controls. In spite of the more regular oral health care practices than the general population, PSS patients had experienced more dental caries and more radical dental treatment. It is suggested that the National Health Insurance should give emphasis to preventive care to patients with PSS. PMID:11501878

Christensen, L B; Petersen, P E; Thorn, J J; Schiødt, M

2001-06-01

147

Association between self-rated oral appearance and the need for dental prostheses among elderly Brazilians.  

PubMed

We investigated the association between poor self-rated oral appearance and the need for dental prostheses among elderly Brazilians. National data from an epidemiological survey on oral health in Brazil conducted from 2002 to 2003 by the Ministry of Health (SB, Brazil) with a multistage random sample of 4,839 individuals aged 65-74 years in 250 towns were analyzed. The dependent variable was self-rated oral appearance, dichotomized into "poor" (poor/very poor) and "good" (fair/good/very good). The main independent variable was the need for an upper or lower dental prosthesis. Other variables included sociodemographic characteristics, approach to dental care, oral health conditions, and self-reported oral disadvantage. Data were analyzed using the chi-square test and Poisson regression models at a 95% significance level. The prevalence of poor self-rated oral appearance was 20.6% and was higher in the elderly who needed a partial or complete upper or lower prosthesis, independent of other variables. This prevalence was associated with age, the use of dental services, access to information about oral disease prevention, number of decayed teeth, self-perception of the need for treatment, dental pain, chewing ability, and the perception that oral health affects relationships with other people. The elderly who needed dental prostheses had a higher prevalence of poor self-rated oral appearance than those who did not need any. PMID:23657484

Vilela, Emília Araújo; Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima; Barreto, Sandhi Maria; Vargas, Andréa Maria Duarte; Ferreira, Raquel Conceição

148

Relationship between Duration of Fluoride Exposure in School-Based Fluoride Mouthrinsing and Effects on Prevention and Control of Dental Caries  

PubMed Central

The objective of this paper was to assess the effects of school-based fluoride mouthrinsing (S-FMR: weekly using 0.2% NaF solution) in two groups of school children with different periods of exposure to S-FMR in elementary school. Subjects were the S-FMR group consisted of 599 children, participated for six years. The control group consisted of 282 children, participated for less than one year in the sixth year of elementary school. From the results of the present survey, the caries reduction rate of S-FMR in the permanent teeth was 36.6% for DMFT and 42.8% for DMFS, and person rates with DMF, DMFT, DMFS, and CO (questionable caries under observation) were inhibited in both boys and girls. Girls in the control group showed clearly higher values for all parameters of dental caries because of earlier teeth eruption; however, no gender differences were observed in the S-FMR group. As caries prevalence in the first molars accounted for about 85% regardless of participation to S-FMR, and first molar caries were more common in the mandible than in the maxilla, consideration should be given to preventive measures against pit-and-fissure-caries in addition to S-FMR.

Komiyama, Eri; Kimoto, Kazunari; Arakawa, Hirohisa

2012-01-01

149

Hypnosis with a 31-year-old female with dental phobia requiring an emergency extraction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Presenting problem: Female, 31, attended emergency appointment at dental surgery with pain, dental phobia prevented extraction. Aim: Manage dental phobia using hypnosis integrated into anxiety management treat- ment plan to facilitate extraction. Methods: Pre-treatment questionnaire assessed dental anxiety, reasons for anxiety, and ascertained management options. Post-treatment questionnaire assessed changes in dental anxiety and attitudes. Anxiety management techniques: needle desensitization and

Michael A. Gow

2006-01-01

150

Dental manpower development in the Pacific: case study in the Republic of the Marshall Islands.  

PubMed

This case study reports the ongoing progress and results of a manpower development program to expand indigenous dental personnel at four levels in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. The program was designed to: 1) increase the number of Marshallese students who successfully complete dentistry training; 2) recruit and train a group of Marshallese high school graduates in dental assisting for service in new preventive outreach programs within the community; 3) enhance the dental training of health assistants providing primary medical care to outer islands away from the main population centers of Majuro and Ebeye; and 4) provide in-service training on tooth decay prevention for Head Start teachers. The program resulted in the training of one Marshallese dentist and two Marshallese dental therapist, 16 primary care health aides who received oral health training for work in the outer island dispensaries, and 200 Head Start and kindergarten teachers who completed in-service training in oral health. Additional expertise was shared with other United States Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI) to enhance the dental workforce throughout the Pacific. PMID:19772166

Tut, Ohnmar K; Langidrik, Justina R; Milgrom, Peter M

2007-03-01

151

Assessment of awareness amongst school teachers regarding prevention and emergency management of dentoalveolar traumatic injuries in school children in Pune City, before and 3 months after dental educational program.  

PubMed

Children have boundless energy, so, they are continuously engaged in some or the other physical activity. It is seen that when child reaches school age, accidents in the school environment in the form of falls, injuries due to contact sports, fights, abuse, etc. are very common and the main cause of traumatic dental injuries. Trauma may vary from minor enamel chipping or avulsion to extensive maxillofacial damage, more serious neck and brain injury, which may cause pain, disfigurement and mental agony, having immediate and long lasting effects. In such cases, a school teacher is in the right position to handle such an emergency and refer the child to the concerned dental surgeon or a pedodontist for further needful care. The main reason for delayed treatment of dental trauma is that people present at the site of injury are unaware of protocol of rapid and appropriate management leading to improper first aid treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the awareness of a group of school teachers from different schools about the prevention and emergency management of dental trauma in school children, by means of a questionnaire. Then educating them and reassessing their knowledge after a period of 3 months. Unfortunately, the public is unaware of the risks and does not have enough information about first aid emergency treatment or to avoid traumatic injuries. PMID:23404018

Karande, Namrata; Shah, Preetam; Bhatia, Mitali; Lakade, Laxmi; Bijle, Mohammed Nadeem Ahmed; Arora, Nitin; Bhalla, Monika

2012-11-01

152

An Automated Dental Recall and Information System  

PubMed Central

A preventive dentistry program for fleet and shore based naval units assigned to Hawaii is monitored by a computerized dental recall system. The data base contains information concerning the identity, location, dental classification, required treatment and/or examination, and location of each individual's record. There are approximately 25,000 individual records in the data base. Utilizing this data, several functions concerning the management of dental treatment are accomplished. These include the dental recall of each individual, the dental status of each unit, the efficiency of each clinic, and most important, the identity of personnel who do not respond to treatment calls.

Caron, J.V.; Wilkie, N.D.; Loizeaux, A.D.

1981-01-01

153

Dental Emergencies  

PubMed Central

Patients with dental emergencies sometimes present to their physician. This article outlines the role of the physician in the management of dental patients who have suffered traumatic injuries, postoperative hemorrhage, pain, and infection. It deals with those difficulties for which the physician may easily prescribe treatment and outlines the treatment that would be undertaken by a dentist who receives such a patient on referral.

Symington, J.M.

1988-01-01

154

Dental Hygienist.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

155

Dental Hygienist.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

156

Methodological considerations concerning the development of oral dental erosion indexes: literature survey, validity and reliability  

PubMed Central

Within the context of preventing non-communicable diseases, the World Health Report (2002) and the WHO Global Oral Health Program (2003) put forward a new strategy of disease prevention and health promotion. Greater emphasis is placed on developing global policies in oral health promotion and oral disease prevention. The Decayed, Missing, Filled Teeth (DMFT) index does not meet new challenges in the field of oral health. Dental erosion seems to be a growing problem, and in some countries, an increase in erosion of teeth is associated with an increase in the consumption of beverages containing acids. Therefore, within a revision of the WHO Oral Health Surveys Basic Methods, new oral disease patterns, e.g. dental erosion, have to be taken into account. Within the last 20 years, many studies on dental erosion have been carried out and published. There has been a rapid growth in the number of indexes quantifying dental erosion process in different age groups. However, these indexes are not comparable. This article discusses quality criteria which an index intended for assessing tooth erosion should possess.

Kutschmann, Marcus; Bardehle, Doris

2008-01-01

157

Utilization of dental care: An Indian outlook  

PubMed Central

Oral health has a significant impact on the quality of life, appearance, and self-esteem of the people. Preventive dental visits help in the early detection and treatment of oral diseases. Dental care utilization can be defined as the percentage of the population who access dental services over a specified period of time. There are reports that dental patients only visit the dentist when in pain and never bother to return for follow-up in most cases. To improve oral health outcomes an adequate knowledge of the way the individuals use health services and the factors predictive of this behavior is essential. The interest in developing models explaining the utilization of dental services has increased; issues like dental anxiety, price, income, the distance a person had to travel to get care, and preference for preservation of teeth are treated as barriers in regular dental care. Published materials which pertain to the use of dental services by Indian population have been reviewed and analyzed in depth in the present study. Dental surgeons and dental health workers have to play an adequate role in facilitating public enlightenment that people may appreciate the need for regular dental care and make adequate and proper use of the available dental care facilities.

Gambhir, Ramandeep Singh; Brar, Prabhleen; Singh, Gurminder; Sofat, Anjali; Kakar, Heena

2013-01-01

158

Oral disease in children with Down syndrome: causes and prevention.  

PubMed

While healthcare professionals may be familiar with the social and medical management of Down syndrome, dental issues have traditionally been somewhat neglected and are important causes of morbidity. The aims of this review are two-fold. Firstly, to draw attention to the environmental and host factors associated with periodontal disease and dental caries (tooth decay) in children with Down syndrome. Secondly, to highlight key yet largely modifiable risk factors in the causation and progression of these chronic oral conditions, many of which also apply to other children with learning disabilities. The review focuses on the role of community and school-based healthcare professionals in promoting good oral health using evidence-based preventative strategies, and in encouraging early, regular contact with dental services. PMID:20222361

Shore, Sarah; Lightfoot, Tracy; Ansell, Pat

2010-02-01

159

Dental habits, knowledge, and attitudes of young drug addicts.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to obtain information about a group of young drug addicts' dental habits, knowledge, and attitudes. Semistructured interviews with open-ended questions based on well-defined hypotheses were obtained with 20 intravenous drug addicts attending a Danish addiction clinic. All the interviews were taped and typed out verbatim. The analysis of the interviews was primarily carried out qualitatively. Almost all the addicts had been enrolled in the Public Child Dental Care system and the majority vividly remembered this as an unpleasant experience. None of the addicts attended a dentist regularly after having finished school, when the drug abuse usually started. Only a need for acute relief could generally motivate the addicts to visit a dentist, and in the few instances they were questioned about any drug abuse or viral hepatitis infection they usually concealed this. They evidenced very limited knowledge concerning the causes and prevention of dental decay and periodontal disease, and the high prevalence of dental caries was often believed to be caused solely or partly by the ascorbic acid or citric acid that is mixed and injected together with the drugs. A distinct behaviour with a neglected oral hygiene and an excessive intake of candy, soft drinks, and other food with a high sugar content was common. The dietary habits were related to the injection of the drugs in a ritual manner. The drug addicts only realized how deplorable their dental health had become during periods of abstinence, and then they were often embarrassed or ashamed of their esthetic appearance, although this was not perceived to have a negative influence on attempts at resocialization.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3992214

Scheutz, F

1985-01-01

160

Economics of Dental Licensing.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Although a full cost-benefit study is not attempted, regression analysis is employed to examine correlations between dental licensing in the United States, and quality of dental health and dental care, concluding that dental licensing seems to be associat...

A. Nolan

1977-01-01

161

Infant dental care (image)  

MedlinePLUS

... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma can result ...

162

[Updates on Rickets and Osteomalacia. Dental diseases in rickets].  

PubMed

Rickets is characterized by mineralization defect in bone and cartilage. X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH) is the most common form of inherited rickets. Mineralization defect is observed in dentin as well as in bone and cartilage in XLH. The dominant feature is the occurrence of infectious periradicular abscesses on deciduous and permanent teeth, not associated with trauma or decay. Dental care including the maintenance of good oral hygiene and periodical examinations should be performed. A preventive sealing of occlusal surfaces can be considered. Endodontic treatment or extraction are carried out in the presence of periradicular abscesses. Further studies are necessary for elucidating mechanisms of dentin mineralization defect and the occurrence of periradicular abscesses and for developing preventive and curative measures in XLH. PMID:24076649

Kubota, Takuo

2013-10-01

163

The Emergency Dental Service at Southern Illinois University/Carbondale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The main emphasis of Southern Illinois University's Student Emergency Dental Service is to treat patients with dental-related disorders of an emergency nature. Its other purpose is to help raise the level of dental knowledge among the student population so as to prevent the emergency situations from occurring. (Authors/CJ)

Cittadino, Dominic; Morgan, Frederic

1980-01-01

164

A Longitudinal Evaluation of Fissure Sealants Applied in Dental Practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sealants are highly effective in preventing dental caries in the pits and fissures of teeth when applied by trained operators in clinical trials and public health programs. The effectiveness of fissure sealants when applied in dental practices is still not known. The purpose of this longitudinal study was to evaluate the effectiveness of fissure sealants applied in dental practices in

A. I. Ismail; P. Gagnon

1995-01-01

165

[Dental caries among children in institutions for orphans].  

PubMed

Epidemiological studies show that the level of dental care for children-orphans in institutions inadequate. Dominated by untreated and remote carious permanent teeth. If the traditional dental treatment difficult to implement need to develop special programs for the prevention of dental caries. PMID:22332381

Dmitrova, A G; Kulakov, A A; Gorbatova, L N

2011-01-01

166

Motivational strategies in dental hygiene care.  

PubMed

The process of educating and motivating patients presents interesting challenges to dental hygienists in clinical practice today. The recent technological advances in preventive and restorative dentistry, coupled with a high level of consumer interest in prevention of dental disease, have resulted in a unique opportunity for patients to attain high levels of oral health throughout their lifetimes. These challenges can also mean an expanded and more interesting role for dental hygienists that incorporates theories of motivation and change in conjunction with oral hygiene instruction as an integral component of dental hygiene care. Disease prevention and oral health promotion remain the essential components of dental hygiene treatment with patients. It is through the examination and application of existing theories in the behavioral and social sciences that dental hygiene care can be improved and revitalized. Both patients and dental hygienists benefit from activities that reexamine and analyze basic assumptions in oral hygiene instruction and motivation. It is a welcome and positive trend that preventive health care and motivation are important areas of concern to dental hygienists in clinical practice today. PMID:1820073

Gluch-Scranton, J

1991-07-01

167

Fluoride in dental erosion.  

PubMed

Dental erosion develops through chronic exposure to extrinsic/intrinsic acids with a low pH. Enamel erosion is characterized by a centripetal dissolution leaving a small demineralized zone behind. In contrast, erosive demineralization in dentin is more complex as the acid-induced mineral dissolution leads to the exposure of collagenous organic matrix, which hampers ion diffusion and, thus, reduces further progression of the lesion. Topical fluoridation inducing the formation of a protective layer on dental hard tissue, which is composed of CaF(2) (in case of conventional fluorides like amine fluoride or sodium fluoride) or of metal-rich surface precipitates (in case of titanium tetrafluoride or tin-containing fluoride products), appears to be most effective on enamel. In dentin, the preventive effect of fluorides is highly dependent on the presence of the organic matrix. In situ studies have shown a higher protective potential of fluoride in enamel compared to dentin, probably as the organic matrix is affected by enzymatical and chemical degradation as well as by abrasive influences in the clinical situation. There is convincing evidence that fluoride, in general, can strengthen teeth against erosive acid damage, and high-concentration fluoride agents and/or frequent applications are considered potentially effective approaches in preventing dental erosion. The use of tin-containing fluoride products might provide the best approach for effective prevention of dental erosion. Further properly designed in situ or clinical studies are recommended in order to better understand the relative differences in performance of the various fluoride agents and formulations. PMID:21701198

Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Wiegand, Annette; Rios, Daniela; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Lussi, Adrian

2011-06-23

168

The sound of dental tissue ablation as a possible parameter for conservative dentistry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Studies in cariology have been struggling for the development of caries prevention techniques, precocious diagnoses of lesions, re-mineralization of incipient carious lesions and early restorative intervention with minimally invasive procedures. When removing caries, healthy dental structure is often removed inadvertently during its final phase, for being quite difficult to precise the limits between viable and decayed dental tissues clinically. With laser technologies, a subjective clinical hint, often used to indicate when tissue ablation should be stopped is that different sounds are perceptive whether in carious (bass) or in healthy (treble) dental structure; when sound produced by ablation turned treble it would mean that healthy tissue was reached. This study aims to classify those audio differences and to turn them into objective parameters for a conservative operative dentistry with minimally invasive tissue removal when using erbium lasers. Twenty freshly extracted human teeth were used (10 decayed and 10 sound teeth). Dentine was erbium laser irradiated under same parameters, distance and refrigeration and a mono directional microphone was set 10 cm far from the operative area in order to capture and record the ablation produced sounds when working either on carious or healthy dentine. Ten pulses per file were then analysed in a computer software (200 analyses). It was permitted to draw similarities among the patterns in each group (decayed and healthy teeth) as well as differences between decayed and healthy produced sounds. Audio analysis came out to be a technical reliable objective parameter to determine whether laser ablated dentine substrates are decayed or sound; therefore it can be proposed as a conservative parameter, avoiding unnecessary removal of healthy dentine and restricting it to carious one.

Robles, Fábio Renato P.; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; Matos, Adriana Bona

2007-02-01

169

MedLinePlus: Dental Health  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Drawing on the very fine resources of the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health, this particular section of the MedLine Plus website provides a number of high-quality resources dealing with the area of dental health. Dental practitioners, students in the field, and the general web-browsing public will want to look at the content guide on the left-hand side of the homepage for starters. Here, they can quickly locate areas of specific interest, including prevention, nutrition, and specific conditions dealing with dental health. This guide to the siteÂs dental health materials is complemented nicely by a ÂLatest News feature, which includes reports from a variety of dental health organizations and news wire services. Finally, visitors can also use their built-in ÂGo Local search engine feature to learn about services and providers for dental health in their particular geographic locale.

170

A systematic review of literature on socioeconomic disparities in the prevalence of dental caries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dental caries, also known as tooth decay, are a disease of the oral cavity that affects the tooth structure and leads to the occurrence of cavities in teeth. Dental caries are one of the leading chronic diseases in the population and are very common in childhood. If not treated appropriately, dental caries have debilitating effect on the oral and general

Arati Bhosale

2010-01-01

171

Feasibility and validation of virtual autopsy for dental identification using the Interpol dental codes.  

PubMed

Virtual autopsy is a medical imaging technique, using full body computed tomography (CT), allowing for a noninvasive and permanent observation of all body parts. For dental identification clinically and radiologically observed ante-mortem (AM) and post-mortem (PM) oral identifiers are compared. The study aimed to verify if a PM dental charting can be performed on virtual reconstructions of full-body CT's using the Interpol dental codes. A sample of 103 PM full-body CT's was collected from the forensic autopsy files of the Department of Forensic Medicine University Hospitals, KU Leuven, Belgium. For validation purposes, 3 of these bodies underwent a complete dental autopsy, a dental radiological and a full-body CT examination. The bodies were scanned in a Siemens Definition Flash CT Scanner (Siemens Medical Solutions, Germany). The images were examined on 8- and 12-bit screen resolution as three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions and as axial, coronal and sagittal slices. InSpace(®) (Siemens Medical Solutions, Germany) software was used for 3D reconstruction. The dental identifiers were charted on pink PM Interpol forms (F1, F2), using the related dental codes. Optimal dental charting was obtained by combining observations on 3D reconstructions and CT slices. It was not feasible to differentiate between different kinds of dental restoration materials. The 12-bit resolution enabled to collect more detailed evidences, mainly related to positions within a tooth. Oral identifiers, not implemented in the Interpol dental coding were observed. Amongst these, the observed (3D) morphological features of dental and maxillofacial structures are important identifiers. The latter can become particularly more relevant towards the future, not only because of the inherent spatial features, yet also because of the increasing preventive dental treatment, and the decreasing application of dental restorations. In conclusion, PM full-body CT examinations need to be implemented in the PM dental charting protocols and the Interpol dental codes should be adapted accordingly. PMID:23622469

Franco, Ademir; Thevissen, Patrick; Coudyzer, Walter; Develter, Wim; Van de Voorde, Wim; Oyen, Raymond; Vandermeulen, Dirk; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Willems, Guy

2012-10-10

172

Meth mouth severity in response to drug-use patterns and dental access in methamphetamine users.  

PubMed

Meth mouth is the rapid development of tooth decay in methamphetamine users. Our study questioned whether drug-use patterns and dental care access are risk factors affecting the severity of meth mouth. Participants received dental examinations, and the number of decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) were counted and used to measure meth mouth severity. PMID:23875434

Brown, Ronni E; Morisky, Donald E; Silverstein, Steven J

2013-06-01

173

Can coffee prevent caries?  

PubMed Central

Aim: To determine the anti-carious effect of coffee in humans. Coffee represents one of the most consumed products by the population. Materials and Methods: A random sample of 1000 individuals, of both sexes, who consumed only coffee as a beverage and who visited the Out-Patient Department of KLE Society's Institute of Dental Sciences, with a dental complaint and no history of any major illness, were considered as subjects. The patients' histories with regard to the coffee intake, such as, period of consumption, frequency of consumption, whether taken with milk or wihout milk, with sugar or without sugar, and the brand make, was noted. History of the type of diet, consumption of sweets, periodicity of brushing, and whether they had undergone fluoride applications were also noted. A thousand patients who consumed beverages other than coffee were taken as the control. Results: The results showed that coffee most consumed was roasted coffee, and the frequency on an average was about three cups per day, for an average period of 35 years. The Decayed/Missing/Filled Surface (DMFS) scores varied from 2.9, in subjects who drank black coffee, to 5.5 in subjects who consumed coffee together with sweeteners and creaming agents. The DMFS score was 3.4 in subjects who consumed coffee together with milk but no sugar. The DMFS score of the control subjects was 4, indicating that coffee if consumed alone had anticaries action, but in the presence of additives the antibacterial and anticaries action was totally minimized. Conclusion: Thus coffee can help in prevention of dental caries if consumed without additives.

Anila Namboodiripad, PC; Kori, Sumathi

2009-01-01

174

Dental Surgery in Anticoagulated Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

ontinuous oral anticoagulant therapy has been used to decrease the risk of thrombo- embolism for more than half a century, prolonging the lives of thousands of patients. Many physicians recommend interrupting continuous anticoagulant therapy for den- tal surgery to prevent hemorrhage. In reviewing the available literature, there are no well-documented cases of serious bleeding problems from dental surgery in patients

Michael J. Wahl

1998-01-01

175

Dental occlusion and postural control in adults.  

PubMed

We studied the influence of a dental occlusion perturbation on postural control. The tests were performed in three dental occlusion conditions: (Rest Position: no dental contact, Maximal Intercuspal Occlusion: maximal dental contact, and Thwarted Laterality Occlusion: simulation of a dental malocclusion) and four postural conditions: static (stable platform) and dynamic (unstable platform), with eyes open and eyes closed. A decay of postural control was noted between the Rest Position and Thwarted Laterality Occlusion conditions with regard to average speed and power indexes in dynamic conditions and with eyes closed. However, the head position and stabilization were not different from those in the other experimental conditions, which means that the same functional goal was reached with an increase in the total energetic cost. This work shows that dental occlusion differently affects postural control, depending on the static or dynamic conditions. Indeed, dental occlusion impaired postural control only in dynamic postural conditions and in absence of visual cues. The sensory information linked to the dental occlusion comes into effect only during difficult postural tasks and its importance grows as the other sensory cues become scarce. PMID:19070652

Tardieu, Corinne; Dumitrescu, Michel; Giraudeau, Anne; Blanc, Jean-Luc; Cheynet, François; Borel, Liliane

2008-12-06

176

Population-Based Primary Care and Dental Education: A New Role for Dental Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses dental schools' role in meeting oral-health needs of populations that lack access to care, and describes a Columbia University (New York) program providing dental-health services in Central Harlem. The program provides screening and prevention for school children, improves access to care for the entire population, and creates…

Formicola, Allan J.; McIntosh, James; Marshall, Stephen; Albert, David; Mitchell-Lewis, Dennis; Zabos, Georgina P.; Garfield, Richard

1999-01-01

177

Population-Based Primary Care and Dental Education: A New Role for Dental Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discusses dental schools' role in meeting oral-health needs of populations that lack access to care, and describes a Columbia University (New York) program providing dental-health services in Central Harlem. The program provides screening and prevention for school children, improves access to care for the entire population, and creates…

Formicola, Allan J.; McIntosh, James; Marshall, Stephen; Albert, David; Mitchell-Lewis, Dennis; Zabos, Georgina P.; Garfield, Richard

1999-01-01

178

Effects of fluoridated drinking water on dental caries in Australian adults.  

PubMed

Systematic reviews produce conflicting conclusions regarding dental caries-preventive effects of water fluoridation in adults. The authors investigated the relationship using data from the nationally representative 2004-2006 Australian National Survey of Adult Oral Health. Effects were compared between the pre-fluoridation cohort born before 1960 (n = 2,270) and the cohort born between 1960 and 1990 (n = 1,509), when widespread implementation of fluoridation increased population coverage from < 1% to 67%. Residential history questionnaires determined the percentage of each person's lifetime exposed to fluoridated water. Examiners recorded decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMF-Teeth) and decayed and filled tooth surfaces (DF-Surfaces). Socio-demographic and preventive dental behaviors were included in multivariable least-squares regression models adjusted for potential confounding. In fully adjusted models, > 75% of lifetime exposure to fluoridation relative to < 25% of lifetime exposure was associated with 11% and 10% fewer DMF-Teeth in the pre-1960 (p < .0001) and 1960-1990 cohorts (p = .018), respectively. Corresponding reductions in DF-Surfaces were 30% (p < .001) and 21% (p < .001). Findings for intermediate fluoridation exposure suggested a dose-response relationship. Results were consistent in sensitivity analyses accounting for missing data. In this nationally representative sample of Australian adults, caries-preventive effects of water fluoridation were at least as great in adults born before widespread implementation of fluoridation as after widespread implementation of fluoridation. PMID:23456704

Slade, G D; Sanders, A E; Do, L; Roberts-Thomson, K; Spencer, A J

2013-03-01

179

Dental Training Films.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This dental training films catalog is organized into two sections. Section I is a category listing of the films by number and title, indexed according to generalized headings; categories are as follow: anatomy, articulator systems, complete dentures, dental assisting, dental laboratory technology, dental materials, dental office emergencies,…

Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, DC.

180

Dentist - Dental Hygienist Team.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The expanded use of dental hygienists and dental assistants is proposed to meet increased dental health care needs. Studies indicate that dental auxiliaries can be trained to perform selected simple procedures that do not require a dental degree. It has a...

H. L. Applewhite

1970-01-01

181

NF-?B Activation in Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells by TNF and LPS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Post-natal human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) represent a unique precursor population in the dental pulp, which has multipotential and can regenerate a dentin\\/pulp-like structure. Because the dental pulp is frequently infected by oral bacteria due to dental decay, in this study, we examined whether lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) activated the immunologic transcription factor nuclear factor kappa

J. Chang; C. Zhang; N. Tani-Ishii; S. Shi; C.-Y. Wang

2005-01-01

182

The influence of dental caries on body growth in prepubertal children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dental decay and dental treatment are suggested to be related to body growth in children. The aim of this study was first\\u000a to assess the relation between dental caries and body proportions cross-sectionally in a Suriname caries child population\\u000a and secondly to investigate whether dental treatment had a significant influence on body growth of these children in a randomised\\u000a controlled

Martine C. M. van Gemert-Schriks; Evert W. van Amerongen; Irene H. A. Aartman; Johanna M. B. Wennink; Jacob M. ten Cate; Johnannes J. de Soet

2011-01-01

183

Rotary dental polishing apparatus  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

A rotary dental polishing apparatus which utilizes a rotatably cylindrical cartridge for containing polishing paste therein. One end of the cartridge is provided with a polishing cup, the cavity of which is in communication with the interior of the cartridge to receive paste therefrom. The cartridge also comprises a wiper conveyer mechanism which is in communication with the outer end of the cartridge at the end opposite the cup and is prevented from rotating which results in the conveyer mechanism continuously urging the paste out of the cartridge into the cup. The cartridge may be configured to rotate at a right angle to the drive source.

Warden; Fuller (Tulsa, OK); Lewis; Eugene W. (Tulsa, OK)

1981-05-12

184

Dental training and changes in oral health attitudes and behaviors in Istanbul dental students.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to examine the changes that occur in the oral health attitudes and behaviors of dental students in Istanbul, Turkey, during their dental education. The Turkish version of the Hiroshima University-Dental Behavioral Inventory (HU-DBI) was distributed among 757 dental students at the Dental Faculty, Istanbul University. The response rate was 72 percent. Chi-square and logistic regression models were used for statistical analysis. The mean HU-DBI score of the clinical students was significantly higher than that of the preclinical students. Preclinical students significantly more often believed that it was impossible to prevent gum disease with toothbrushing alone and worried about the color of their teeth and bad breath. Most of them brushed their teeth with strong strokes, thought the condition of their teeth was getting worse despite daily toothbrushing, and would seek dental care only when symptoms arise. Clinical students more often used disclosing solutions to see how clean their teeth were and complained of bleeding gums. The variation in favorable oral health attitudes/behaviors appeared to reflect the students' educational training experience. The findings of this study highlight the relatively poor oral health behaviors of Turkish dental students, which should be improved by means of comprehensive programs that aim to promote their own dental hygiene practices and preventive oral health knowledge from the start of dental training. PMID:20837744

Peker, Kadriye; Uysal, Omer; Bermek, Gülçin

2010-09-01

185

Reviews of evidence on interventions to prevent dental caries, oral and pharyngeal cancers, and sports-related craniofacial injuries 1 1 The names and affiliations of the Task Force members are listed at the beginning of this supplement, and at www.thecommunityguide.org  

Microsoft Academic Search

Overview: This report presents the results of systematic reviews of effectiveness, applicability, other positive and negative effects, economic evaluations, and barriers to use of selected population-based interventions intended to prevent or control dental caries, oral and pharyngeal cancers, and sports-related craniofacial injuries. The related systematic reviews are linked by a common conceptual approach. These reviews form the basis of recommendations

Benedict I. Truman; Barbara F. Gooch; Iddrisu Sulemana; Helen C. Gift; Alice M. Horowitz; Caswell A. Evans; Susan O. Griffin; Vilma G. Carande-Kulis

2002-01-01

186

Systematic dental management in head and neck irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Preservation of teeth has been possible in 528 head and neck patients treated with irradiation at Centre Georges Leclerc, University of Dijon, by careful adherence to precise dental care. Careful initial dental evaluation with appropriate x rays, restoration of oral hygiene, atraumatic extraction technique where indicated, and institution of a program of topical fluoridation has resulted in an overall incidence of less than 3% post-irradiation dental decay and 2% osteoradionecrosis. In a small group of 22 patient who required extraction post-irradiation, precise, strict technique resulted in successful extraction in all but one patient who subsequently developed osteonecrosis. Soft-based dental prostheses were well tolerated in nearly 90% of patients. Adherence to the described principles of dental care will virtually eliminate post-irradiation decay and osteoradionecrosis.

Horiot, J.C. (Centre Georges Leclerc, Dijon, France); Bone, M.C.; Ibrahim, E.

1981-08-01

187

Dental caries and oral health practices among 12 year old children in Nairobi West and Mathira West Districts, Kenya  

PubMed Central

Background Dental caries is a common disease in children which causes pain with resultant effect on various physiological and social functions. The main objective of the study was to determine the association between dental caries and oral health knowledge and practice among children in Nairobi West and Mathira West Districts. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 639 children aged 12 years attending public primary schools in Nairobi West and Mathira West districts between August 2009-February 2010. A questionnaire was used to determine the level of knowledge and practices employed. Oral screening was performed using World Health Organisation (WHO) recommended methods. Dental caries was measured using the Decayed, Missing, Filled Teeth (DMFT) index. Results Nairobi West District had significantly higher caries prevalence of 37.5% than Mathira West District (24.0%). The DMFT in Nairobi West District was 0.76±1.2, while in Mathira West District it was 0.36±0.7. On multivariate analysis high consumption of soda was found to be a significant risk factor for dental caries in Nairobi West District(Odds Ratio (OR) = 3.0). In Mathira West District having an illiterate mother was a significant risk factor for dental caries (OR = 4.3). Conclusion Countrywide intensive oral health promotion should be carried out especially in urban areas, to reduce the higher prevalence of dental caries. The school health policy should be used to promote oral health by provision of oral health instructions and highlighting harmful dietary practices. Preventive practices such as regular dental checkups should be advocated and promoted in schools.

Gathecha, Gladwell; Makokha, Anselimo; Wanzala, Peter; Omolo, Jared; Smith, Perry

2012-01-01

188

Medical Services: Preventive Dentistry.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This regulation provides guidance for the development and conduct of preventive dentistry programs for all authorized beneficiaries of the U.S. Army Dental Care System. It describes the Oral Health Fitness Program for active duty soldiers and other progra...

1989-01-01

189

The Effects of Finger Rest Positions on Hand Muscle Load and Pinch Force in Simulated Dental Hygiene Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the techniques taught in dental and dental hygiene programs is to use finger rests to stabilize the instrument while performing dental scaling or other types of dental work. It is believed that finger rests may also reduce muscle stress and prevent injury due to muscle fatigue. In this study the effects of three different finger rest positions on

Hui Dong; Alan Barr; Peter Loomer; David Rempel

190

Dental anthropologyDental transfigurements in Borneo  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dental transfigurement, formerly termed dental mutilation, has been practised by many societies worldwide. This article gives many of the forms that have been attributed to the indigenes of the island of Borneo. The method has been performed by review of anthropological books, sparse dental references, Borneo research literature, and popular writing.'......ride rough-shod over my teeth; I have been sawed, hacked,

A Jones

2001-01-01

191

Emerging technologies for diagnosis of dental caries: The road so far  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is now universally recognized that the development of new technologies for early detection and quantitative monitoring of dental decay at an early stage of formation could provide health and economic benefits ranging from timely preventive interventions to reduction in the time required for clinical trials of anticaries agents. The use of technologies as adjunct to clinical visual examination for caries diagnosis will facilitate preventive care in dentistry to lower treatment cost as well as reduce the cost and time for testing potential anticaries agents. This article describes the various technologies available to aid the dental practitioners in detecting dental caries at the earliest stage of its formation, assessing the activities of the detected carious lesion, and quantitatively or qualitatively monitoring of the lesion over time. The need and the importance of these technologies were also discussed. The data discussed are primarily based on published scientific studies and reviews from case reports, clinical trials, and in vitro and in vivo studies. References have been traced manually by MEDLINE® or through manufacturer's websites. While some of the devices are fully developed and commercially available, others are still under development. The devices vary in their modes of action as well as their capability as caries diagnostic aids. It is clear that the differences in caries presentations and behavior in different anatomical sites make it unlikely that any one diagnostic modality will have adequate sensitivity and specificity of detection of carious lesions for all sites; a combination of diagnostic tools will help us diagnose lesions earlier and detect failing restorations sooner, all to avoid more costly, destructive dental procedures and truly take dentistry into the preventive rather than the reactive mode.

Amaechi, Bennett T.

2009-05-01

192

The FiCTION dental trial protocol - filling children's teeth: indicated or not?  

PubMed Central

Background There is a lack of evidence for effective management of dental caries (decay) in children’s primary (baby) teeth and an apparent failure of conventional dental restorations (fillings) to prevent dental pain and infection for UK children in Primary Care. UK dental schools’ teaching has been based on British Society of Paediatric Dentistry guidance which recommends that caries in primary teeth should be removed and a restoration placed. However, the evidence base for this is limited in volume and quality, and comes from studies conducted in either secondary care or specialist practices. Restorations provided in specialist environments can be effective but the generalisability of this evidence to Primary Care has been questioned. The FiCTION trial addresses the Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Programme’s commissioning brief and research question “What is the clinical and cost effectiveness of restoration caries in primary teeth, compared to no treatment?” It compares conventional restorations with an intermediate treatment strategy based on the biological (sealing-in) management of caries and with no restorations. Methods/Design This is a Primary Care-based multi-centre, three-arm, parallel group, patient-randomised controlled trial. Practitioners are recruiting 1461 children, (3–7 years) with at least one primary molar tooth where caries extends into dentine. Children are randomized and treated according to one of three treatment approaches; conventional caries management with best practice prevention, biological management of caries with best practice prevention or best practice prevention alone. Baseline measures and outcome data (at review/treatment during three year follow-up) are assessed through direct reporting, clinical examination including blinded radiograph assessment, and child/parent questionnaires. The primary outcome measure is the incidence of either pain or infection related to dental caries. Secondary outcomes are; incidence of caries in primary and permanent teeth, patient quality of life, cost-effectiveness, acceptability of treatment strategies to patients and parents and their experiences, and dentists’ preferences. Discussion FiCTION will provide evidence for the most clinically-effective and cost-effective approach to managing caries in children’s primary teeth in Primary Care. This will support general dental practitioners in treatment decision making for child patients to minimize pain and infection in primary teeth. The trial is currently recruiting patients. Trial registration Protocol ID: NCTU: ISRCTN77044005

2013-01-01

193

Reimbursing Dentists for Smoking Cessation Treatment: Views From Dental Insurers  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Screening and delivery of evidence-based interventions by dentists is an effective way to reduce tobacco use. However, dental visits remain an underutilized opportunity for the treatment of tobacco dependence. This is, in part, because the current reimbursement structure does not support expansion of dental providers’ role in this arena. The purpose of this study was to interview dental insurers to assess attitudes toward tobacco use treatment in dental practice, pros and cons of offering dental provider reimbursement, and barriers to instituting a tobacco use treatment-related payment policy for dental providers. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 dental insurance company executives. Participants were identified using a targeted sampling method and represented viewpoints from a significant share of companies within the dental insurance industry. Results: All insurers believed that screening and intervention for tobacco use was an appropriate part of routine care during a dental visit. Several indicated a need for more evidence of clinical and cost-effectiveness before reimbursement for these services could be actualized. Lack of purchaser demand, questionable returns on investment, and segregation of the medical and dental insurance markets were cited as additional barriers to coverage. Conclusions: Dissemination of findings on efficacy and additional research on financial returns could help to promote uptake of coverage by insurers. Wider issues of integration between dental and medical care and payment systems must be addressed in order to expand opportunities for preventive services in dental care settings.

Wright, Shana; McNeely, Jennifer; Rotrosen, John; Winitzer, Rebecca F.; Pollack, Harold; Abel, Stephen; Metsch, Lisa

2012-01-01

194

Dental care of the pediatric cancer patient.  

PubMed

Although the rate for childhood cancer has remained relatively stable for the past 2 decades, there have been drastic declines in mortality due to early diagnosis and improvements in therapy. Now over 75% of children diagnosed with cancer survive more than 5 years. The pediatric dental professional plays an important role in the prevention, stabilization, and treatment of oral and dental problems that can compromise the child's health and quality of life before, during, and after the cancer treatment. This manuscript discusses recommendations for the dental care of the pediatric oncology patient. PMID:15080359

da Fonseca, Marcio A

195

Child Indicators: Dental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Reviews measures of dental health in children and the evidence on child dental health. Although children's dental health has improved over the past two decades, many poor children do not receive necessary dental health services, and reasons for this failure are summarized. (SLD)|

Lewit, Eugene M.; Kerrebrock, Nancy

1998-01-01

196

Child Indicators: Dental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews measures of dental health in children and the evidence on child dental health. Although children's dental health has improved over the past two decades, many poor children do not receive necessary dental health services, and reasons for this failure are summarized. (SLD)

Lewit, Eugene M.; Kerrebrock, Nancy

1998-01-01

197

Dental findings in diabetic adults.  

PubMed

The dental status of dentate diabetic adults (n = 299) and its associations with diabetes-related factors was explored in Tehran, Iran. Presence of diabetes-related complications made no difference in mean values of DMFT, but was associated with a higher number of decayed and missing teeth, and fewer filled teeth. Higher level of HbA1c was associated with higher DMFT for men, but not for women. In conclusion, the results suggest a possible association between the level of metabolic control of diabetes mellitus and cumulative caries experience. PMID:18042985

Bakhshandeh, S; Murtomaa, H; Vehkalahti, M M; Mofid, R; Suomalainen, K

2007-11-27

198

A Dental Education Perspective on Dental Health Policy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Two issues related to dental health policy are examined: the contribution of dental education to the process by which dental health policy is established, and the nature of dental education's response to established policies. (MLW)|

Morris, Alvin L.

1985-01-01

199

Powdered milk micellar casein prevents oral colonization by Streptococcus sobrinus and dental caries in rats: a basis for the caries-protective effect of dairy products.  

PubMed

Three animal studies were performed to investigate the influence of the macromolecular structure of milk casein on caries incidence and the possible ecological changes of the oral microbiota by such casein fractions. Towards this end, rats were infected with mixed bacterial suspensions of Streptococcus sobrinus OMZ 176 and Actinomyces viscosus Ny1. Various milk protein fractions were incorporated into carefully balanced powdered cariogenic diets to constitute the sole major protein component. Diets containing micellar casein had a pronounced and highly significant effect on almost all clinical and microbiological parameters examined. Both the formation of advanced dentinal fissure (B) and smooth surface (E) caries lesions was inhibited by diets containing micellar casein; this caries-inhibiting effect appeared to be due mainly to modifications within the plaque microbiota. The proportion of S. sobrinus in the oral cavity of rats was reduced (73-80%) by micellar casein-containing preparations, whereas the A. viscosus population was increased. Both these microbiological parameters were always negatively correlated. This appears to be the first example of a food component other than dietary sugars, selectively modifying the composition of the dental plaque microbiota of rats in such a way as to reduce its pathogenic potential. It also demonstrates the importance of establishing a molecular basis for the role of food components, which prove to be beneficial to oral health. PMID:10529530

Guggenheim, B; Schmid, R; Aeschlimann, J M; Berrocal, R; Neeser, J R

200

Dental hyponatraemia.  

PubMed

A 14-year-old girl developed dental pain and was treated for acute infected pulpitis of her right upper lateral incisor with drilling and filling. The pain continued and was helped by analgesia, sucking ice cubes and drinking cold water. Forty-eight hours later, she became confused and disoriented. She started to vomit and complained of headache. Investigations revealed hyponatraemia with normal serum potassium levels and initially normal urinary sodium excretion. Over the next 24 hours, she passed 5.45 L of urine and her serum sodium rose from 125 to 143 mmol/L. Self-induced water intoxication has been described during drinking games and initiation ceremonies, but this would appear to an unusual cause. Conservative management proved successful in allowing this girl to recover without sequelae. PMID:21873727

Simpson, R M

2011-08-01

201

Dental caries among urban schoolchildren in Madagascar.  

PubMed

An epidemiological survey of prevalence and severity of dental caries was carried out in an urban population of children in Madagascar. The study population comprised 1257 children in the age groups 4-5 yr to 14-15 yr equally distributed by sex. The children were examined according to the recording system for the Danish Child Dental Services. The caries experience in the primary dentition as well as in the permanent dentition was high. For example, among 6-yr-olds a mean number of 11.8 defs and 5.2 deft was observed and 82% of the children were affected by caries in primary teeth. In particular, primary molars in the mandibular and incisors in the maxilla were affected and approximal caries was frequent. Among 12-yr-olds mean DMFS was 4.0 and DMFT 2.4 and 75% of the children had caries in permanent teeth. In permanent teeth caries was located predominantly to mandibular molars and occlusal surfaces. In both dentitions almost all decay was untreated, indicating lack of dental treatment available due to the shortage of dental manpower. The establishment of a child dental service system is a matter of urgency. Dental health education and primary health care should be organized. PMID:3163963

Petersen, P E; Steengaard, M

1988-06-01

202

A Modern Pioneer in Preventive Dentistry--Sumter S. Arnim, DDS, PhD: Teacher, Researcher, and National Dental Consultant--An Interview.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the life story of Dr. Sumter S. Arnim, DDS, PhD, of Brownsville, Texas, as told in detail to interviewer A. G. Christen. Dr. Arnim, a National Consultant in Preventive Dentistry to the USAF Surgeon General (1968-1972), is a noted author, lecturer,...

A. G. Christen

1979-01-01

203

Influence of private practice employment of dental therapists in Saskatchewan on the future supply of dental therapists in Canada.  

PubMed

The profession of dental therapy has long been held up as a model for reducing access to care barriers in high-risk, underserved populations worldwide. Dental therapists practice in many countries delivering preventive and basic restorative care to children and adults. In North America, dental therapy education and practice date back to 1972 with the establishment of training programs at the National School of Dental Therapy in Fort Smith, Northwest Territories, and the Wascana Institute of Applied Arts and Science in Regina, Saskatchewan, as a means of reducing access to care barriers in Canada's northern territories and to implement the Saskatchewan Health Dental Plan, respectively. At present, dental therapy in North America has reached a crossroads: in the United States, the profession is cautiously being explored as a solution for improving access to care in at-risk populations. In 2011, Canada's sole training program, the National School of Dental Therapy in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, closed when the federal government eliminated its funding. This article examines the impact of private practice employment of dental therapists in Saskatchewan on the supply of dental therapist human resources for health in Canada's three northern territories (Northwest Territories, Nunavut, and Yukon), its role in the closure of the National School of Dental Therapy in 2011, and ramifications for the future of dental therapy in Canada. PMID:22855596

Uswak, Gerry; Keller-Kurysh, Emory

2012-08-01

204

Strand I - Physical Health; Dental Health for Grades K-3. Special Edition for Evaluation and Discussion.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This is a curriculum guide for teaching dental health material to early elementary grade students. This outline emphasizes the prevention and treatment of dental diseases, and is designed to provide the knowledge and develop the habits necessary for a lifetime of good dental health. A list of seven pupil objectives is presented to develop good…

New York State Education Dept., Albany. Curriculum Development Center.

205

Strand I - Physical Health; Dental Health for Grades K-3. Special Edition for Evaluation and Discussion.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is a curriculum guide for teaching dental health material to early elementary grade students. This outline emphasizes the prevention and treatment of dental diseases, and is designed to provide the knowledge and develop the habits necessary for a lifetime of good dental health. A list of seven pupil objectives is presented to develop good…

New York State Education Dept., Albany. Curriculum Development Center.

206

The effectiveness of electronic dental anesthesia in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compared the effectiveness of traditional local anesthesia with a Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation unit that controls pain via electronic dental anesthesia for restorative dental procedures in 6- to 12-year-old children. The sample included 27 children who had two antimere teeth that required restorations of similar size (preventive resin restorations). In each case, the cavity preparation extended into dentin.

Jane Jakobsen

207

75 FR 33169 - Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation of Special Controls for Dental Amalgam, Mercury, and Amalgam Alloy; Technical Amendment...class II device, reclassified dental mercury from class I to class II, and...

2010-06-11

208

Experiences of dental care: what do patients value?  

PubMed Central

Background Dentistry in Australia combines business and health care service, that is, the majority of patients pay money for tangible dental procedures such as fluoride applications, dental radiographs, dental fillings, crowns, and dentures among others. There is evidence that patients question dentists’ behaviours and attitudes during a dental visit when those highly technical procedures are performed. However, little is known about how patients’ experience dental care as a whole. This paper illustrates the findings from a qualitative study recently undertaken in general dental practice in Australia. It focuses on patients’ experiences of dental care, particularly on the relationship between patients and dentists during the provision of preventive care and advice in general dental practices. Methods Seventeen patients were interviewed. Data analysis consisted of transcript coding, detailed memo writing, and data interpretation. Results Patients described their experiences when visiting dental practices with and without a structured preventive approach in place, together with the historical, biological, financial, psychosocial and habitual dimensions of their experience. Potential barriers that could hinder preventive activities as well as facilitators for prevention were also described. The offer of preventive dental care and advice was an amazing revelation for this group of patients as they realized that dentists could practice dentistry without having to “drill and fill” their teeth. All patients, regardless of the practice they came from or their level of clinical risk of developing dental caries, valued having a caring dentist who respected them and listened to their concerns without “blaming” them for their oral health status. These patients complied with and supported the preventive care options because they were being “treated as a person not as a patient” by their dentists. Patients valued dentists who made them aware of existing preventive options, educated them about how to maintain a healthy mouth and teeth, and supported and reassured them frequently during visits. Conclusions Patients valued having a supportive and caring dentist and a dedicated dental team. The experience of having a dedicated, supportive and caring dentist helped patients to take control of their own oral health. These dentists and dental teams produced profound changes in not just the oral health care routines of patients, but in the way patients thought about their own oral health and the role of dental professionals.

2012-01-01

209

Neuropathic orofacial pain patients in need of dental care.  

PubMed

Dental pain is a common complaint among the general population. Most pain is a result of traumatic injury or bacterial infection in pulpal and periapical tissues, and dental practitioners are successful at diagnosing these conditions and providing prompt relief. However, in some cases, patients continue to complain of persistent pain, which may be categorized as neuropathic. These people may avoid or neglect routine dental treatment or interventions to prevent precipitation, perpetuation or exacerbation of their pain condition, and practitioners may have to modify their procedures when managing the dental needs of this unique population. PMID:22985895

Klasser, Gary D; Gremillion, Henry A

2012-01-01

210

Alternative Practice Dental Hygiene in California: Past, Present, and Future  

PubMed Central

This study examines the development of the registered dental hygienist in alternative practice in California through an analysis of archival documents, stakeholder interviews, and two surveys of the registered dental hygienist in alternative practice. Designing, testing and implementing a new practice model for dental hygienists took 23 years. Today, registered dental hygienists in alternative practice have developed viable alternative methods for delivering preventive oral health care services in a range of settings with patients who often have no other source of access to care.

MERTZ, ELIZABETH; GLASSMAN, PAUL

2012-01-01

211

Dental Delivery Systems Terminology.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In order to facilitate communications among those involved in the study of dental services delivery the Delivery Systems Branch, Division of Dentistry prepared this glossary of the terms they use. They define dental health services as nonclinical services...

1976-01-01

212

Body, Facial, & Dental Hygiene  

MedlinePLUS

... Hygiene Body, Facial, & Dental Hygiene Dental Hygiene Water Fluoridation Facial Cleanliness Fish Pedicures and Spas Hygiene Etiquette ... Patient Admission Video Division of Oral Health Water Fluoridation Leadership Advocacy, Policy & Recommendations Fast Facts Healthy Water ...

213

Dental Implant Surgery  

MedlinePLUS

Dental implant surgery Basics Multimedia Expert Answers Resources Reprints A single copy of this article may be reprinted for personal, noncommercial use only. Dental implant surgery By Mayo Clinic staff Original Article: http:// ...

214

Placing Dental Implants  

MedlinePLUS

Placing Dental Implants Before Placing an Implant Placing the Implants Complications from Surgery Implant Failure When you get implants, more ... Implant Most people are good candidates to get dental implants. You must have enough bone in your jaw ...

215

Dental education in Malaysia.  

PubMed

There was only one dental school in Malaysia until 1997 but five new schools have been established since 1998. This review provides information about dental education in Malaysia including; the history of dental education, the current dental school system and curriculum, and dental licensure. There are four public and two private dental schools in Malaysia. High school graduates are required to take the nationwide matriculation entrance examination or the Higher School Certificate (HSC) to apply for a dental degree programme. A five-year dental programme leads to the BDS or the DDS degree. National or state examinations are not required to practise dentistry. Currently, there are approximately 2,500 dentists, with a ratio of 1 dentist for every 10,000 people. PMID:18265775

Komabayashi, Takashi; Razak, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Bird, William F

2007-12-01

216

Dental education in relation to the needs of the South African community.  

PubMed

The dental needs of a heterogeneous South African community are not being fully met because the majority of the already deficient dentist population is in private practice, mostly in urban areas, where they are rendering services to a small minority of the population who can afford comprehensive dental care. Contrary to public health services in general, public dental services are inadequate in extent and provide a limited range of treatment to some eighty-five per cent of the population. Millions of under-privileged people, particularly in rural areas, are not within range of any professional dental care whatsoever. Organized community preventive programmes and dental health education on a national basis are non-existent. Water fluoridation has not yet become a reality. Realizing the shortcomings in community dental services the Government recently adopted a national dental health policy which is aimed at limiting and preventing dental diseases and also at expanding the public dental service to bring it within reach of all sections of the community. In order to meet the dental needs of the community and also to give momentum to the national dental health policy, the following steps are being taken as far as dental education is concerned: (i) The Department of Health is planning to assist universities to establish departments of community dentistry with the object of promoting extended education in community dentistry at under-graduate and post-graduate level. (ii) Consideration is being given to a scheme whereby dental students will have to do one year compulsory intership. (iii) Additional dental schools are being established to enable more non-White dentists to qualify. (iv) With the extended education in community dentistry it is hoped to draw more dentists into community dental services. (v) Dental therapists are being educated to perform duties such as extractions, simple fillings, prevention and dental health education, under the supervision of dentists, in areas where the shortage of dentists is most crucial. PMID:265934

Taljaard, L T

1977-03-01

217

Urban decay  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Urban decay refers to a city or part of a city that cannot be repaired. This building may or may not fall under urban decay, but it is important to realize that non-living objects and structures will show signs of decay in time.

Peter Van den Bossche (None;)

2007-09-23

218

The 1993 national survey of children's dental health: a commentary on the preliminary report.  

PubMed

A preliminary report of the 1993 national survey of children's dental health shows encouraging evidence of a further marked decline in caries throughout the United Kingdom compared with earlier surveys in 1973 and 1983. Over the course of 20 years total decay experience (dmft/DMFT) among children in England and Wales has fallen by 55% in deciduous teeth at 5 years of age, 82% in permanent teeth at 8 years, 75% at 12 years and 74% at 14 years. Whereas in 1973 only 7% of 12-year-old children had no experience of permanent tooth decay (DMFT = 0), by 1993, 50% were caries-free. Nevertheless the marked regional inequalities in dental health of earlier years have been perpetuated with much higher caries levels in Scotland and particularly Northern Ireland than in England currently. It is also apparent that in 5-year-old children the decline in caries in deciduous teeth has now levelled out over many areas of the country. Particular groups of children are still at high risk to the disease and the need in many areas for population preventive strategies such as water fluoridation remains. PMID:8167063

Downer, M C

1994-03-19

219

The influence of the maxillary frenum on the development and pattern of dental caries on anterior teeth in breastfeeding infants: prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.  

PubMed

In breastfeeding infants, an abnormal attachment of maxillary frenum has the potential to become a significant factor in contributing to facial caries formation on the maxillary anterior teeth. This is in part due to the inability of infants to remove residual milk from the area between the lip and facial surfaces of the maxillary central and lateral incisors at the completion of nursing. Early diagnosis and treatment of an abnormal frenum attachment with the simple and quick revision technique using the Erbium: YAG or Diode laser can prevent these from occurring and does not present any significant risks to the infant. PMID:20308621

Kotlow, Lawrence A

2010-03-22

220

Dental records: An overview  

PubMed Central

Dental records consist of documents related to the history of present illness, clinical examination, diagnosis, treatment done, and the prognosis. A thorough knowledge of dental records is essential for the practicing dentist, as it not only has a forensic application, but also a legal implication with respect to insurance and consumerism. This article reviews the importance of dental records in forensics.

Charangowda, B K

2010-01-01

221

Dental Manpower Fact Book.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Statistical data on many aspects of dental and allied dental personnel supply, distribution, characteristics, and education and on certain other aspects of dental services are presented and discussed. The data on dentist supply show the national trend in the supply of active dentists since 1950 and the concurrent changes in dentist-to-population…

Ake, James N.; Johnson, Donald W.

222

Dental records: An overview.  

PubMed

Dental records consist of documents related to the history of present illness, clinical examination, diagnosis, treatment done, and the prognosis. A thorough knowledge of dental records is essential for the practicing dentist, as it not only has a forensic application, but also a legal implication with respect to insurance and consumerism. This article reviews the importance of dental records in forensics. PMID:21189983

Charangowda, B K

2010-01-01

223

Child dental expenditures: 1996  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: Because little has been reported about child dental expenditures, federal data were used to estimate dental care expenditures for U.S. children by age, sex, ethnic\\/ racial background, family income, parental education and parental employment. Methods: Parentally reported data on dental expenditures and sources of expenditures were extracted from the most recent available federal healthcare expenditures studies, the 1996 federal

Burton L. Edelstein; Richard J. Manski; John F. Moeller

224

DENTAL SCHOOL PLANNING.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|THIS DISCUSSION PRESENTS A COMPLETE PICTURE OF THE CURRENT STATE OF DENTAL EDUCATION WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR MEETING THE DEMANDS FOR DENTAL STAFF AND FACILITIES. THE AREAS INVESTIGATED ARE (1) OBJECTIVES IN DENTAL EDUCATION--COURSES, TEACHING MODES, INNOVATIONS IN CURRICULUM, COORDINATION OF BASIC AND CLINICAL INSTRUCTION, (2) FACILITY…

GALAGAN, DONALD J.

225

Trends in Childhood Use of Dental Care Products Containing Fluoride: United States, 1983-89.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The correlation between the concentration of fluoride in community drinking water and prevalence of dental caries (tooth decay) observed in the early 1940's resulted in a public health effort to encourage communities to add fluoride to their water supply ...

D. K. Wagener P. Nourjah A. M. Horowitz

1992-01-01

226

A comprehensive oral and dental management of an epileptic and intellectually deteriorated adolescent  

PubMed Central

Epilepsy along with intellectual deterioration and other neurological disorders can have social, physical, and psychological consequences, especially, when they begin in childhood. Moreover, the seizure episode along with mental deterioration may compromise the oral and dental care resulting in numerous decayed teeth. This report presents the case history of an adolescent with poor oral hygiene and numerous decayed teeth. This report also presents the comprehensive endodontic, surgical, and prosthodontic management of epileptic mentally challenged patient in the dental office. Epilepsy along with intellectual deterioration and other neurological disorders can have social, physical, and psychological consequences, especially, when they begin in childhood. Moreover, the seizure episode along with mental deterioration may compromise the oral and dental care resulting in numerous decayed teeth. This report presents the case history of an adolescent with poor oral hygiene and numerous decayed teeth. This report also presents the comprehensive endodontic, surgical, and prosthodontic management of epileptic mentally challenged patient in the dental office.

Joshi, Sourabh Ramesh; Pendyala, Gowri Swaminatham; Saraf, Veena; Choudhari, Shantanu; Mopagar, Viddyasagar

2013-01-01

227

Pressures on the dental care system in the United States.  

PubMed Central

A number of significant pressures are creating tensions in the dental profession and the dental care delivery system. These pressures may be categorized in five major areas: 1) regulation and deregulation pressures involve changes in the state dental practice acts, court decisions concerning antitrust and advertising, and the inclusion of consumers on State professional regulatory boards; 2) cost of services includes factors involving the out-of-pocket cost of dental care and the growth of dental insurance; 3) dentist-related factors include the increased number of dentists and the indebtedness of dental graduates; 4) the pressures of changes in the American populations include the decline in population growth and the increase in proportion of elderly people; 5) changes in the distribution of dental care are based on new epidemiologic data concerning dental caries and progress in the prevention of periodontal disease. Many of these pressures are inducing competition in the dental care system. It is clear that the dental care system is in the process of change as it responds to these complex pressures.

Wotman, S; Goldman, H

1982-01-01

228

Expansion of dental benefits under the Medicare Advantage program.  

PubMed

Uninsured older adults are twice as likely to not receive needed dental care as their insured counterparts. Yet, nearly one-third of older adults have untreated dental caries, and older adults are more likely to have complete tooth loss, periodontal disease, and oral cancer. Moreover, persons sixty-five and older had the lowest percentage of individuals with dental insurance and the highest average out-of-pocket expenses of all persons with a dental visit in 2000. Given that retiree health benefits for large companies have declined from 66 percent in 1988 to 38 percent in 2003, it is unlikely that the private sector will increase funding for dental benefits for the elderly. However, some Medicare managed care plans already cover either preventive or comprehensive dental benefits. The Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 created incentives for Medicare managed care plans to offer beneficiaries additional benefits, including dental. The First Seniority Dental Plan, described in this article, demonstrates that it is possible to create a dental plan that is affordable for the HMO, reimburses providers at reasonable rates, provides a reduction in costs to Medicare beneficiaries, and may present a method to expand dental benefits for elders of the future. PMID:16141091

Compton, Robert D

2005-09-01

229

Culture and Dental Health among African Immigrant School-Aged Children in the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: The paper examines African immigrant parents' views on dental decay and whether such views affect their decision to obtain dental insurance for their children. The paper also examines the cultural underpinnings of the immigrants' oral health care practices. Design/methodology/approach: The data for the study were collected in the states…

Obeng, Cecilia S.

2007-01-01

230

Dental health of the Rendille and Samburu of the northern frontier district of Kenya.  

PubMed

Nomadic groups inhabiting the Kaisut desert region of Kenya were treated and studied during two successive trips. It was found that dental decay was relatively rare and advanced periodontal disease was present mostly in older patients. The mechanical action and contents of the locally available miswak stick (toothbrush tree) seem to play a significant role in control of dental diseases. PMID:8327227

Carl, W; Zambon, J J

231

Dental Status and Associated Factors in a Dentate Adult Population in Bulgaria: A Cross-Sectional Survey  

PubMed Central

This study aimed to determine variations in the dental status of a dentate adult population in terms of “decayed,” “missing,” and “filled” teeth in relation to several sociodemographic and behavioral factors. Quota sampling was used to draw 2531 subjects aged 20 years and over. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire and an oral examination. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to observe associations between “decayed,” “missing,” and “filled” teeth and the factors of interest. The mean numbers of “decayed,” “missing,” and “filled” teeth were 2.2, 6.7, and 4.9, respectively. Molar teeth were significantly more often “missing” than premolar and anterior teeth. Age, gender, education, and tooth brushing revealed most noticeable associations. Increasing age was associated with a lower chance of having “decayed” and “filled” teeth, but with a higher chance of having “missing” teeth. Females were more likely to have “missing” and “filled” teeth. Higher education was associated with a lower chance of having “missing” teeth. More frequent tooth brushing was associated with a lower chance of having “decayed” and “missing” teeth, but with a higher chance of having “filled” teeth. These risk indicators should be considered in prevention program planning if reduction of tooth loss is to be achieved.

Damyanov, Nikola D.; Witter, Dick J.; Bronkhorst, Ewald M.; Creugers, Nico H. J.

2012-01-01

232

Dental Students' Attitudes towards Smoking Cessation Guidelines.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studied the smoking cessation attitudes and practices of 244 fourth-year dental students through a self-report survey. Students generally endorsed tobacco prevention practices, but perceived barriers to service provision. Findings show the receptivity of students to smoking cessation education and the need to include cessation counseling training…

Yip, Julie K.; Hay, Jennifer L.; Ostroff, Jamie S.; Stewart, Robert K.; Cruz, Gustavo D.

2000-01-01

233

Operations Handbook for Migrant Student Dental Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Migrant Education and the Superintendent of Public Instruction in the state of Washington have brought several agencies together to provide low cost dental services to migrant children. The program, initiated in 1980 and serving 138 children that year, has focused on the provision of preventative and emergency services. Migrant Education has…

Hansen, William E.; Resendez, Ignacio V.

234

Maintenance of Dental Health Through Advanced Age  

Microsoft Academic Search

l whereby further advancement of these diseases can be. for all practical purposes. entirely prevented and con­ trolled. This method consists of adequately cleaning all the teeth, at the particular vulnerable locations, with the right kind of hnth toothbrush and dental floss, every night before retiring. Nothing less than following this exact method can be entirely effective. The method and

Charles C. Bass

235

Antibacterial Activity of Dental Restorative Materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty-one commercial dental restorative materials, aged under various conditions, were checked on two different culture mediums for their antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus plantarum, a cariogenic streptococcus, and mixed bacteria from the mouth. The duration of bacteriostatic activity was decreased rapidly by leaching in water. Of the three acrylics checked for ability to prevent in vitro carieslike

David M. Updegraff; Robert W. H. Chang; Richard W. Joos

1971-01-01

236

Controlling the cost of dental care.  

PubMed Central

Methods for controlling dental care expenditures are taking on greater importance with the rapid increase in prepaid dental plans. The use of regulatory systems to monitor provider performance are necessary to prevent gross over-utilization but are unlikely to result in net savings of more than five per cent of total gross premiums. Theoretically, prepaid group dental practice (PGDP) may reduce expenditures by changing the mix of services patients receive. The modest estimated savings and the small number of PGDPs presently in operation limit the importance of this alternative for the next five to ten years. If substantial reductions in dental expenditures are to be obtained, it will be necessary to limit dental insurance plans to cover only those services which have demonstrated cost-effectiveness in improving health for the majority of people. The concept that richer benefit plans may have small marginal effects on improving oral health may not be easy for the public to accept but, until they do, expenditures for dental care will be difficult to control.

Bailit, H L; Raskin, M; Reisine, S; Chiriboga, D

1979-01-01

237

Racial/ethnic disparities in provision of dental procedures to children enrolled in Delta Dental insurance in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  

PubMed

Objectives: Most studies on the provision of dental procedures have focused on Medicaid enrollees known to have inadequate access to dental care. Little information on private insurance enrollees exists. This study documents the rates of preventive, restorative, endodontic, and surgical dental procedures provided to children enrolled in Delta Dental of Wisconsin (DDWI) in Milwaukee. Methods: We analyzed DDWI claims data for Milwaukee children aged 0-18 years between 2002 and 2008. We linked the ZIP codes of enrollees to the 2000 US Census information to derive racial/ethnic estimates in the different ZIP codes. We estimated the rates of preventive, restorative, endodontic, and surgical procedures provided to children in different racial/ethnic groups based on the population estimates derived from the US Census data. Descriptive and multivariable analysis was done using Poisson regression modeling on dental procedures per year. Results: In 7 years, a total of 266,380 enrollees were covered in 46 ZIP codes in the database. Approximately, 64?percent, 44?percent, and 49?percent of White, African American, and Hispanic children had at least one dental visit during the study period, respectively. The rates of preventive procedures increased up to the age of 9 years and decreased thereafter among children in all three racial groups included in the analysis. African American and Hispanic children received half as many preventive procedures as White children. Conclusion: Our study shows that substantial racial disparities may exist in the types of dental procedures that were received by children. PMID:22970893

Bhagavatula, Pradeep; Xiang, Qun; Eichmiller, Fredrick; Szabo, Aniko; Okunseri, Christopher

2012-09-13

238

Dental therapists: a global perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1921, New Zealand began training school dental nurses, subsequently deploying them throughout the country in school-based clinics providing basic dental care for children. The concept of training dental nurses, later to be designated dental therapists, was adopted by other countries as a means of improving access to care, particularly for children. This paper profiles six countries that utilise dental

David A. Nash; Jay W. Friedman; Thomas B. Kardos; Rosemary L. Kardos; Eli Schwarz; Julie Satur; Darren G. Berg; Jaafar Nasruddin; Elifuraha G. Mumghamba; Elizabeth S. Davenport; Ron Nagel

239

Latex sensitivity among dental students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary: Objectives: Nowadays latex allergy represents a relevant social and occupational problem because this substance constitutes the first material to realize many dental and non-dental products. Dental students regularly use latex gloves and they are at increased risk for latex sensitivity, during their education. Aim: This study aimed to assess latex allergy in dental students. Methods: 146 dental students, 70

Assya Krasteva; Iliana Stoeva; Georgi Nikolov; Bogdan Petrunov; Simona Dimitrov; Angelina Kisselov

2008-01-01

240

Biocompatibility of Dental Amalgams  

PubMed Central

Objective. The purpose of this review paper is to review the literature regarding the toxicology of mercury from dental amalgam and evaluate current statements on dental amalgam. Materials and Methods. Two key-words “dental amalgam” and “toxicity” were used to search publications on dental amalgam biocompatibility published in peer-reviewed journals written in English. Manual search was also conducted. The most recent declarations and statements were evaluated using information available on the internet. Case reports were excluded from the study. Results. The literature show that mercury released from dental amalgam restorations does not contribute to systemic disease or systemic toxicological effects. No significant effects on the immune system have been demonstrated with the amounts of mercury released from dental amalgam restorations. Only very rarely have there been reported allergic reactions to mercury from amalgam restorations. No evidence supports a relationship between mercury released from dental amalgam and neurological diseases. Almost all of the declarations accessed by the internet stated by official organizations concluded that current data are not sufficient to relate various complaints and mercury release from dental amalgam. Conclusions. Available scientific data do not justify the discontinuation of amalgam use from dental practice or replacement with alternative restorative dental materials.

Ucar, Yurdanur; Brantley, William A.

2011-01-01

241

American Dental Education Association  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The American Dental Education Association (ADEA) has over 19,000 members, including students, faculty, staff, and administrators from across the United States and Canada. One of the Association's stated goals is to foster "interconnected community experiences that enable members to meet their individual goals while leveraging their collective strength." This website offers a great deal of interconnectivity, as those seeking to join the dental profession can learn about scholarship opportunities, accredited dentistry schools, and professional development. In the Dental Education Pathways area, visitors can read guides like "ADEA Official Guide to Dental Schools" and "ADEA Opportunities for Minorities in United States Dental Schools." Further along is the Policy and Advocacy area, where visitors can learn about the current shortages in dental healthcare professionals and the group's special interest in dental education outreach. The site is rounded out by the Publications area, which contains some members-only publications, along with the open-access YouTube For Dental Students area. These videos profile dental students by asking them to respond to questions such as "What made you decide to go into dentistry?" and "How was your path to dental school unique?"

2012-08-01

242

Factor analysis on implementation of domiciliary dental care in Metropolitan Tokyo.  

PubMed

The need for domiciliary dental care has increased with the aging of Japanese society. The Tokyo Metropolitan Government and Tokyo Dental Association conducted a survey of dental institutions within Tokyo in order to clarify which factors influenced implementation of domiciliary dental care by dental institutions. The proportion was significantly higher in (1) dentists in their 50s or older, (2) those working in cooperation with primary care physicians, (3) those providing dysphagia rehabilitation, (4) those who give information on prevention of aspiration pneumonia, (5) those who attended training on medical or domiciliary dental care for the elderly in need of nursing care, and (6) those who attended training workshops and seminars provided by the Tokyo Dental Association in 2010. In the logistic regression analysis, a significant odds ratio was obtained for the same items, excluding age. Attendance at training on medical or domiciliary dental care for the elderly in need of nursing care had the highest odds ratio. Those who attended any kind of training course implemented domiciliary dental care significantly more often. Training conducted by the Tokyo Metropolitan Center for Oral Health of Persons with Disabilities, Tokyo Dental Association, and local dental associations showed a significant odds ratio, with the highest by the Tokyo Dental Association. Traditionally, education on domiciliary dental care in the elderly is not provided at the college level. The present results indicate the importance of educating students with regard to the unique challenges such work poses. Attending seminars hosted by the Tokyo Dental Association also significantly influenced implementation of domiciliary dental care. This seems to be an important result, suggesting the effectiveness of training provided by dental associations with regard to the promotion of domiciliary dental care. This indicates the need for dental associations to provide such training throughout Japan. PMID:23903576

Hirata, SoIchiro; Sakayori, Takaharu; Maki, Yoshinobu; Takano, Naohisa; Ishii, Takuo

2013-01-01

243

Health Manpower Study: Dental Manpower.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Results of a dental manpower study, which is part of a larger Health Manpower Study commissioned by the State Council of Higher Education, is presented in this report, which also includes information on the education of dentists, dental hygienists, dental...

J. M. Leyes N. C. Kilby

1974-01-01

244

Head Start Dental Health Curriculum.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

There are many ways to provide meaningful learning experiences about dental health that can help Head Start children develop good attitudes and habits. Learning about good dental health care at an early age can help children throughout their lives. Dental...

1997-01-01

245

ADA Success Dental Student Programs.  

PubMed

A young general practitioner in Tennessee talks about the rewards of speaking to dental students through the American Dental Association's Success Dental Student Program and how it reenergizes him and "restocks" the professional waters. PMID:23977747

Hasnani, Kaz

2013-01-01

246

Dental Complications of Eating Disorders  

MedlinePLUS

... Dental Complications of Eating Disorders Dental Complications of Eating Disorders Dietary habits can and do play a role ... associated with dental complications that causes individuals with eating disorders to seek treatment. Signs & Symptoms Loss of tissue ...

247

Explaining Racial/ethnic Disparities in children's dental health: a decomposition analysis  

PubMed Central

Objective To measure racial/ethnic inequalities in child dental health and quantify the contribution of several household, neighborhood, and geographic effects to these disparities using a decomposition analysis. Methods Using data from the 2007 National Survey of Children’s Health, we measured and decomposed racial/ethnic disparities in selected child dental health and dental preventive care outcomes. We employed a decomposition model to quantify the extent to which demographic, socioeconomic, maternal health, health insurance, neighborhood, and geographic effects explain these disparities. Results Significant racial/ethnic disparities in dental health were observed. Hispanic children had the poorest dental health and lowest preventive dental care use, followed by African-American children, compared to Whites. The model explanatory variables accounted for a large proportion of the disparities in dental health (58–77%) and for most of the disparities in preventive dental care (89–100%). Socioeconomic status (maternal education and household poverty level) was the single most relevant factor for explaining these disparities and accounted for 71% of the gap between African-American and white children in preventive dental care, and 55% of that gap between Hispanic and white children. Other relevant factors for explaining disparities included maternal health, age, and marital status, neighborhood safety and social capital, and state of residence. Conclusion Racial/ethnic disparities in child dental health in the US are mostly socioeconomically driven involving household and neighborhood contributors. Reducing these disparities requires policies that recognize the multilevel pathways underlying these disparities.

Guarnizo-Herreno, Carol Cristina; Wehby, George L.

2012-01-01

248

Dental Bacteremia in Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   Bacteremia resulting from dental extraction is regarded as an important cause of bacterial endocarditis, and it is therefore\\u000a recommended that patients undergoing tooth extraction be given prophylactic antibiotics. As dental procedures other than extractions\\u000a may also cause bacteremias, we studied a variety of dental procedures routinely used in pediatric dentistry. Blood samples\\u000a for cultures were obtained 30 s after

G. J. Roberts; H. S. Holzel; M. R. J. Sury; N. A. Simmons; P. Gardner; P. Longhurst

1997-01-01

249

Prevention and treatment of the orofacial complications of radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Radiotherapy of malignant head and neck tumors often causes extensive, permanent changes in salivary glands, peridental alveolar bone, and mucosal structures. Dental neglect and inappropriate dental management can cause complications. The potential orofacial side effects of radiotherapy are reviewed, as are preventive strategies for the dental treatment of patients scheduled to undergo radiotherapy.

Rothwell, B.R.

1987-03-01

250

A pilot of a school-based dental treatment programme for vulnerable children with possible dental neglect: the Back2School programme.  

PubMed

Background The general dental practitioners and community dental services of Barts Health NHS Trust in City and Hackney and Tower Hamlets PCTs in East London currently provide a school-based oral health prevention programme. The programme provides dental screening for three- to six-year-olds, fluoride varnish application twice during the school year and engaging with the families to encourage dental attendance. An evaluation of the programme suggested that children with a dental treatment need, identified by the screening, were not being taken for further dental care.Objective The aim of this 'Back2School' pilot was to evaluate the use of mobile dental units in the provision of care to this group of children. The objectives were to assess if this care was acceptable to the children and their families, to evaluate dental treatment provided, patient attendance, costs of the service and whether it would be a viable method to provide dental care.Methods The rotation of the mobile dental unit in this pilot offered ten sessions of dental care over five days in three different locations. The locations were chosen near the five schools covered by the community dental service.Results A total of 63 children were seen; 33 females and 30 males, which included 7 walk-in patients. Five children had extractions and the number of fillings ranged from one to six. Of the 63 children seen only 8 (13%) had attended a dentist before, 59 (93%) of the children were rated 'high risk' for dental disease, 61 (97%) of the children received a fluoride varnish application and 95.2 UDAs were achieved. Feedback was positive overall.Conclusions The use of a community-based mobile dental unit has the potential to be a cost-effective method to remove barriers to dental care access, both for the treatment of vulnerable children and as a first point of contact in the dental care pathway. PMID:24157789

Simons, D; Pearson, N; Evans, P

2013-10-25

251

Dental Care Coverage Transitions  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine dental insurance transition dynamics in the context of changing employment and retirement status. Study Design Data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) were analyzed for individuals aged 51 years and older between the 2004 and 2006 waves of the HRS. Methods The primary focus of the analysis is the relationship between retirement and transitions in dental care coverage. We calculate and present bivariate relationships between dental coverage and retirement status transitions over time and estimate a multivariate model of dental coverage controlling for retirement and other potentially confounding covariates. Results We find that elderly adults are likely to lose their dental coverage upon entering retirement compared to those who remain in the labor force between waves of the HRS. While over half of those persons in the youngest age group (51 to 64) were covered over this entire period, two-thirds of those in the oldest age group 75 and over were without coverage over the same period. We observe a relatively high percentage of elderly persons flowing into and out of dental coverage over the period of our study similar to flows into and out of poverty. Conclusions Dental insurance is an important factor in the decision to seek dental care. Yet, no dental coverage is provided by Medicare, which provides medical insurance for nearly all Americans age 65 and older. This loss of coverage could lead to distortions in the timing of when to seek care, ultimately leading to worse oral and overall health.

Manski, Richard J.; Moeller, John; Chen, Haiyan; St. Clair, Patricia A.; Schimmel, Jody; Magder, Larry; Pepper, John V.

2010-01-01

252

Use of Germfree Animals in the Study of Dental Caries.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Over the years, it has been possible to demonstrate that in the complete absence of all bacteria, germfree rats could not develop dental decay even though ingesting a caries-inducing diet for as long as 150 days when the early experiments were terminated....

F. J. Orland M. Wagner V. M. Carbonell

1967-01-01

253

Infection control recommendations for the dental office and the dental laboratory. ADA Council on Scientific Affairs and ADA Council on Dental Practice.  

PubMed

This report is based on the recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other publications in the medical and dental literature. The recommendations here, which have been accepted by the ADA Council on Scientific Affairs and the ADA Council on Dental Practice, are intended to offer general guidance for dental offices and laboratories on infection control. They are not intended to establish a standard of care or industry custom, nor are they intended to deprive the dentist of the ability to exercise his or her professional judgment. PMID:8642147

1996-05-01

254

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, December 19, 2003, Volume 52, Number RR-17. Guidelines for Infection Control in Dental Health-Care Settings, 2003.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report consolidates previous recommendations and adds new ones for infection control in dental settings. Recommendations are provided regarding (1) educating and protecting dental health-care personnel; (2) preventing transmission of bloodborne patho...

2003-01-01

255

Cross-cultural variations in dental knowledge among antenatal mothers.  

PubMed

This study evaluates the level of dental knowledge among 328 antenatal mothers from different ethnic groups and ascertains the importance of the various sources of dental information. The mothers were interviewed based on a structured questionnaire. Most mothers knew about the number of sets of teeth they possessed throughout their life. This was most evident among the Chinese and least among the Malays. Only 42.7% of the mothers interviewed were positive about the preservation of their teeth throughout life. This belief was highest among the Chinese followed by the Indians. However about 40% of the Chinese believed that tooth decay is hereditary. Generally the principal sources of dental information cited by most mothers were television or radio followed by dentists, school and family. This order of importance was similarly observed among the Malays and Chinese. However, among Indians, family members represent the second most important source of dental information. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:1287607

Esa, R; Razak, I A; Jalalludin, R L

1992-03-01

256

Myths of dental-induced prosthetic joint infections.  

PubMed

The overwhelming majority of orthopedists and dentists surveyed recommend antibiotic prophylaxis for dental procedures to prevent late prosthetic joint infection. It is time to stop this practice, which is not based on scientific evidence but rather on "myths" of prosthetic joint infections after dental procedures. The first myth is that there are close similarities between late prosthetic valve endocarditis and late prosthetic joint infection. The second myth is that dental treatment is the probable cause of a large percentage of prosthetic joint infections. The third myth is that results of animal experiments have shown that transient bacteremia due to dental procedures can cause prosthetic joint infections in humans. The fourth myth is that the benefits of antibiotic prophylaxis for patients with prosthetic joints outweigh the risks and costs. The fifth and final myth is that clinicians should recommend antibiotic prophylaxis before dental treatment for patients with prosthetic joints to protect themselves legally. PMID:7620036

Wahl, M J

1995-05-01

257

[New dental materials a health risk for dental staff. Acrylates can cause contact allergy and other problems].  

PubMed

The acrylic content of modern dental materials poses a risk of adverse reactions. Although the quantities of the substances released are normally too small to cause systemic reactions, local reactions may occur resulting in damage to the skin. A study, in which 81 dental workers referred to dermatologists for a variety of adverse reactions were patch tested, showed work-related dermatoses to represent a serious problem for dental staff, sometimes entailing occupational disability and re-schooling. Much of this could be avoided by observing special precautions to prevent direct contact with the sensitising substances in composite materials used in dental surgery. Since the use of dental amalgam has been reduced to about 10 per cent of all fillings in Sweden, the prevalence of adverse local reactions to the acrylic composite materials which are used instead may be expected to increase. PMID:9674364

Ekstrand, J; Björkman, L; Liu, Y; Sköldqvist, B; Björkner, B

1998-06-17

258

Latex reactions in an adult dental population.  

PubMed

A review of the medical histories of 300 adult patients presenting for emergency dental care at a dental college revealed no individuals who identified themselves as allergic to latex. A 32-item survey was distributed to adult dental patients receiving care at the dental school. 323 patients volunteered to complete the questionnaire. 3.7% of the patients reported adverse reactions associated with wearing latex gloves. However only 8.8% of the patient population reported work-related latex glove use. The reported incidence of sensitivity to latex products such as rubber dam material and condoms was equal to that associated with gloves, and slightly lower in the case of enema tips (2.8%) and balloons (2.5%). Sensitivity to rectal and/or vaginal examination with latex gloves was reported by 5.5% of the population. Predisposing factors to reported latex sensitivity found to be significant (P < .01) included a history of eczema and a familial history of allergies. No significant differences were found with regard to age or gender. Only two individuals reported severe systemic symptoms related to latex exposure. Data suggest that careful questioning of patients regarding a history of sensitivity to multiple latex-based products can facilitate the identification of possibly latex sensitive individuals, thus preventing latex-related allergic reactions in the dental operatory. PMID:7880473

Rankin, K V; Jones, D L; Rees, T D

1993-12-01

259

Water fluoridation: current effectiveness and dental fluorosis.  

PubMed

This paper reviewed the literature on the evidence for water fluoridation's effectiveness under current conditions of multiple fluoride use at recommended and at reduced concentrations, the extent of dental fluorosis at different fluoride concentrations, and the "halo" effect of water fluoridation. Using the relative difference in dental caries between communities with low and optimal water fluoride as an indicator, the effectiveness of water fluoridation has decreased over time as the use of other fluorides has increased. Thus the effectiveness of water fluoridation alone cannot now be determined. Compared to the early fluoridation studies, the differences in dental caries and fluorosis prevalence between fluoridated and non-fluoridated areas have markedly narrowed. Both the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis have increased since 1945; however, the portion of fluorosis due to water fluoridation is now less (40%) than that attributed to other fluoride sources (60%). Research also suggests that the "halo" effect of community water fluoridation may result in a significantly greater intake of fluoride for people in non-fluoridated communities. This review recognized that since water fluoridation has unique advantages from the perspectives of distribution, equity, compliance and cost-effectiveness over other fluoride technologies, it remains as the fundamental base for caries prevention. The increasingly greater contribution that other sources of fluoride make to dental fluorosis suggests that these sources of fluoride, many of which are used on an elective basis, should be more closely examined for needed changes. PMID:8070242

Lewis, D W; Banting, D W

1994-06-01

260

The future dental workforce?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Editor-in-Chief of the BDJ has previously raised important questions about dental workforce planning and the implications for dental graduates of recent changes and pressures. It is now time to revisit this issue. Much has changed since the last workforce review in England and Wales, and the rate of change is in all probability set to increase. First, at the

N. H. F. Wilson; J. E. Gallagher

2009-01-01

261

Forensic dental identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identification of deceased persons is the most common role of the forensic dentist. Forensic physical comparison of antemortem and postmortem dental data is used to establish that a found body and a missing person are one and the same to a high degree of certainty. An overview of this role is presented as a review of dental identification.

David Sweet

2010-01-01

262

Dental Laboratory Technician.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units to the occupation of dental laboratory technician. The following skill areas…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

263

Sports drinks and dental  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To discuss the composition and rationale for the use of sports drinks along with recent studies investigating the relationship between sports drinks and dental erosion. Methods: A review of the literature of sports drinks and dental erosion was done. Results: For most athletes and individuals engaged in physical activity, the use of sports drinks does not provide a benefit

JEFF S. COOMBES

264

Dental fraud: an introduction.  

PubMed

A manager of a dental benefits program defines fraud and abuse in the dental context. Such practices may cost as much as four billion dollars annually and have a damaging effect on the trust the profession places in the profession and on the way dentists relate to each other. PMID:14977381

Anderson, Max H

2003-01-01

265

Dental Infection Control Assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This project studies infection control practices of Migrant/Community Health Center (M/CHC) dental programs in PHS Region VI. Eighteen dental sites were visited in M/CHCs to determine the level of compliance with the Centers for Disease Control and Preven...

1994-01-01

266

Radioactive Decay  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With knowledge of Maple, Mathmatica, or MatLab, one should be able to develop a mathematical model for decay of radioactive substances and develop a technique for deciding whether quantitative data fits the model or not.

Smith, David

2001-01-22

267

Dental Fear Among University Employees: Implications for Dental Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A survey of 270 University of Washington permanent employees who were potential candidates for teaching clinics, found dental anxiety prevalent, correlating with poorer perceived dental health, longer intervals between dental appointments, higher frequency of past fear behaviors, more physical symptoms during last dental injection, and more…

Kaakko, Tarja; Milgrom, Peter; Coldwell, Susan E.; Getz, Tracy; Weinstein, Philip; Ramsay, Douglas S.

1998-01-01

268

Different Dental Caries Patterns among Smelter Workers with Dental Erosion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Different Dental Caries Patterns among Smelter Workers with Dental Erosion: Shingo FUKAYO, et al. Department of Hygiene and Public Health, Teikyo University School of Medicine— Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the characteristics of dental caries among smelter workers with mild dental acid erosion. Subjects and Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 350 male workers at a copper-mine

Shingo FUKAYO; Koichi NONAKA; Eiji YANO

2001-01-01

269

Dental unit waterlines: review and product evaluation.  

PubMed

Dental practitioners must be knowledgeable regarding microbial contamination and biofilm formation in dental unit waterlines. Education should stress the need for improvement in the quality of water delivered to patients during treatment. Manufacturers must also play an important role by providing training and education regarding the proper use and maintenance of their systems. Dental facilities, both public and private, need reliable methods to prevent the development of biofilms within DUWs. These methods must be economical and require minimal effort to use on the part of the dental staff. In order for the system to work efficiently, the effluent water that is produced must be compatible with dental materials and be potentially free from toxic or carcinogenic materials. There are numerous models of water filtration units and chemical flushes available to the dental practitioner. However, the Food and Drug Administration have not approved all products currently on the market. Our evaluation of Zerosil, a new waterline-cleaning product, indicates that it is very easy to use and is extremely effective in killing the commonly found microorganisms in dental unit waterlines, as well as eliminating existing biofilms. It is also economical and requires minimum staff time to keep the waterlines clean. Following the initial treatments during week one, the water emanating from the DUWs was free from any viable microorganisms. This effect was present the entire three weeks in which the waterlines were treated. The elimination of viable microorganisms continued into a fourth study week, even though no further treatment of the DUWs was performed. Although the manufacturer recommends weekly treatment of DUWs following the initial treatment regimen, this result indicates that the product has a longer lasting effect than previously thought. Finally, the product can be delivered through any of the commercially available reservoir/bottle water delivery systems. From our study, Zerosil appears to meet the demanding requirements of keeping dental unit waterlines clean. Based on the research that has been done thus far, no universal treatment protocol can be recommended. A combination of approaches may offer the best available assurance of high-quality dental treatment water. Independent water reservoir systems, when used with a periodic chemical treatment protocol, have demonstrated safety and efficacy. Until we reach a point when a recommendation based on thorough evaluations can be made, dental offices should follow current ADA, OSAP, and CDC guidelines: flush waterlines for two to three minutes at the beginning of each day and for 20 to 30 seconds between each patient, and anti-retraction valves should be installed to prevent oral fluids from being drawn into dental waterlines. It is expected that in the near future, the dental practitioner will have a choice of proven systems and products to deal with this issue. Until that time, one should carefully evaluate any product or system being considered to prevent the formation of biofilms in DUWs. PMID:11484611

Panagakos, F S; Lassiter, T; Kumar, E

2001-01-01

270

What is dental ecology?  

PubMed

Teeth have long been used as indicators of primate ecology. Early work focused on the links between dental morphology, diet, and behavior, with more recent years emphasizing dental wear, microstructure, development, and biogeochemistry, to understand primate ecology. Our study of Lemur catta at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, has revealed an unusual pattern of severe tooth wear and frequent tooth loss, primarily the result of consuming a fallback food for which these primates are not dentally adapted. Interpreting these data was only possible by combining our areas of expertise (dental anatomy [FC] and primate ecology [MS]). By integrating theoretical, methodological, and applied aspects of both areas of research, we adopted the term "dental ecology"-defined as the broad study of how teeth respond to the environment. Specifically, we view dental ecology as an interpretive framework using teeth as a vehicle for understanding an organism's ecology, which builds upon earlier work, but creates a new synthesis of anatomy and ecology that is only possible with detailed knowledge of living primates. This framework includes (1) identifying patterns of dental pathology and tooth use-wear, within the context of feeding ecology, behavior, habitat variation, and anthropogenic change, (2) assessing ways in which dental development and biogeochemical signals can reflect habitat, environmental change and/or stress, and (3) how dental microstructure and macro-morphology are adapted to, and reflect feeding ecology. Here we define dental ecology, provide a short summary of the development of this perspective, and place our new work into this context. PMID:22610892

Cuozzo, Frank P; Sauther, Michelle L

2012-06-01

271

Prevalence and Severity of Dental Fluorosis in the United States, 1999-2004. NCHS Data Brief, No. 53, November 2010.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Dental fluorosis refers to changes in the appearance of tooth enamel that are caused by long-term ingestion of fluoride during the time teeth are forming. Studies conducted in the 1930s showed that the severity of tooth decay was lower and dental fluorosi...

B. A. Dye E. D. Beltran-Aguilar L. Barker

2010-01-01

272

Ceramic and polymeric dental onlays evaluated by photo-elasticity, optical coherence tomography, and micro-computed tomography  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dental onlays are restorations used to repair rear teeth that have a mild to moderate amount of decay. They can also be used to restore teeth that are cracked or fractured if the damage is not severe enough to require a dental crown. The use of onlays requires less tooth reduction than does the use of metal fillings. This allows

Cosmin Sinescu; Meda Negrutiu; Florin Topala; Ciprian Ionita; Radu Negru; Mihai Fabriky; Corina Marcauteanu; Adrian Bradu; George Dobre; Liviu Marsavina; Mihai Rominu; Adrian Podoleanu

2011-01-01

273

Oral-dental concerns of the pediatric oncology patient  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the main concerns of all disciplines in health care today is maintaining the patient's quality of life and comfort during cancer therapy. Oral complications resulting from radiation or chemotherapy can be expected in a large percentage of patients. Conducting a dental evaluation and performing treatment before therapy can help prevent or lessen potential complications. With preventive care and

Kathy Lawson

1989-01-01

274

Dietary advice in dental practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper aims to provide dental health professionals with practical advice to pass on to patients about diet and dental health. Sugars are the most important dietary factor contributing to dental caries. Different foods carry different dental health risks; those containing non-milk, extrinsic sugars are potentially the most damaging. In the UK, sugared soft drinks and confectionery contribute approximately 50%

P. J. Moynihan

2002-01-01

275

Dental Practitioners and Eating Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

To better understand how dental practitioners identify, counsel, and refer patients with eating disorders. A questionnaire was mailed to 625 dental practitioners, 54 (19%) of the dentists and 69 (20%) of the dental hygienists responded. Most dental practitioners were aware of eating disorder patients in their practices and most discussed their findings with their patients or parents. However, one of

MELISSA BURGARD; AMY CANEVELLO; JAMES MITCHELL; MARTINA DE ZWAAN; ROSS CROSBY; STEVE WONDERLICH; JAMES ROERIG; NANCY ADDY

2003-01-01

276

Health Instruction Packages: Permanent Teeth, Dental Deposits, and Dental Instruments. Dientes Permanentes, Depositos Dentales y Instrumentos Dentales.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These five learning modules use text interspersed with illustrations and reinforcement exercises to instruct dental aide and dental hygiene students about jaw bones and gums, dental deposits, and dental instruments. The first four modules were prepared by Patricia Lind in both Spanish and English. "The Gum and Bone of Permanent Teeth" ("La Encia y…

Lind, Patricia; Germano, Catherine

277

Health Instruction Packages: Permanent Teeth, Dental Deposits, and Dental Instruments. Dientes Permanentes, Depositos Dentales y Instrumentos Dentales.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|These five learning modules use text interspersed with illustrations and reinforcement exercises to instruct dental aide and dental hygiene students about jaw bones and gums, dental deposits, and dental instruments. The first four modules were prepared by Patricia Lind in both Spanish and English. "The Gum and Bone of Permanent Teeth" ("La Encia…

Lind, Patricia; Germano, Catherine

278

Evaluation of two methods in controlling dental treatment water contamination.  

PubMed

Dental unit water systems are contaminated with biofilms that amplify bacterial counts in dental treatment water in excess of a million colony forming units per milliliter (cfu/ml). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Dental Association have agreed that the maximum allowable contamination of dental treatment water not exceed 500 cfu/ml. This study was conducted to evaluate two protocols in controlling contamination of dental unit water systems and dental treatment water. Both methods used an antimicrobial self-dissolving chlorine dioxide (ClO?) tablet at a high concentration (50 ppm) to shock the dental unit water system biofilms initially followed by periodic exposure. To treat dental treatment source water for patient care, 3 parts per million (ppm) ClO? in municipal/tap water was compared to use of a citrus botanical extract dissolved in municipal water. Heterotrophic microbial counts of effluent water and laser scanning confocal microscopy were performed to evaluate effects of the two treatments. Results from this study indicated that both treatments were effective in controlling biofilm contamination and reducing heterotrophic plate counts <500 cfu/ml. A comprehensive study addressing compatibility of 50 ppm ClO? on the metals and nonmetal components of the dental water system and effects of low-grade chemicals used on composite bonding to dentin and enamel is warranted before translation from efficacy studies to common clinical use. Clinical significance: This study provides evidence-based information of using two methods of controlling dental treatment water contamination. The study was conducted in a clinical practice setting in an active dental clinic and the results are meaningful to a clinician who is interested in providing safe dental treatment water for patient care. Keywords: Dental waterline biofilms, Dental treatment water contamination control, Chlorine dioxide, Emulsifiers, Heterotrophic plate counts, Laser scanning confocal microscopy. How to cite this article: Bansal R, Puttaiah R, Harris R, Reddy A. Evaluation of Two Methods in Controlling Dental Treatment Water Contamination. J Contemp Dent Pract 2011;12(2):73-83. Source of support: Nil Conflict of interest: None declared. PMID:22186748

Bansal, Ritu; Puttaiah, Raghunath; Harris, Robert; Reddy, Anil

2011-03-01

279

Experience of dental caries and its effects on early dental occlusion: a descriptive study  

PubMed Central

Summary Aim Describe the occurrence of dental caries in a sample of pre-school children and school children, aged 3 and 12, and study the possible association between caries and malocclusion. Methods We selected and analyzed the medical records of a sample of 588 patients who had their first dental examination at the Pediatric Dentistry Unit, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences of Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome. Results In the sample, 55.4% of the children had no decayed deciduous elements, while 44.6% had at least one decayed deciduous element. The prevalence of decayed permanent teeth was 10.2%, while 89.8% had no decayed permanent teeth. In the sample, 9.4% of the children showed advanced carious lesions, that needed tooth extraction and 6.6% needed a space maintainer for post-extractive interceptive treatment. In the sample, 26.7% of the examined patients had increased overjet, while 3.7% had decreased overjet and 25.4% of the sample had an increased overbite, 11, 2% had reduced over-bite values. A percentage over 10% of the sample had an anterior openbite in centric occlusion. The prevalence of posterior crossbite among entire samples was 19.8%. Conclusions Although the incidence of caries disease was high in the selected samples, the study did not show a statistically significant association between caries and clinical orthodontic abnormalities, except for the association between the midline deviation and the severe carious diseases, necessitating extraction.

Luzzi, Valeria; Fabbrizi, Miriam; Coloni, Camilla; Mastrantoni, Cristina; Mirra, Carla; Bossu, Maurizio; Vestri, Annarita; Polimeni, Antonella

2011-01-01

280

Strategies in the Design of Preventive Programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dental caries is mostly recorded at the cavity level only. A reduced mean number of cavities in new age cohorts is often thought of as a result of prevention of the disease, dental caries. However, what is measured is rather our success in controlling the disease in such a way that prevalence of its more severe manifestations (cavities) can be

O. Fejerskov

1995-01-01

281

Copper allergy from dental copper amalgam?  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 65-year-old female was investigated due to a gradually increasing greenish colour change of her plastic dental splint, which she used to prevent teeth grinding when sleeping. Furthermore, she had noted a greenish\\/bluish colour change on the back of her black gloves, which she used to wipe her tears away while walking outdoors. The investigation revealed that the patient had

Lars Gerhardsson; Bert Björkner; Magnus Karlsteen; Andrejs Schütz

2002-01-01

282

Nova Scotia Dental Association: Healthy Teeth  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What exact role does sugar play in the formation of cavities? Find the answer to this question and many more at Healthy Teeth, a comprehensive and lively oral health education website for 3rd-6th graders and created by the Nova Scotia Dental Association. The site contains sections on Cavities, Teeth and Gums, Prevention, and more. The sections are student-friendly with straightforward text and fun animated images. Additionally, the site offers hands-on classroom activities and experiments.

283

Dental education and dentistry system in Iran.  

PubMed

Before 1979, there were only 5 undergraduate dental schools in Iran with a total admission of 200 students per year, and only 2,000 dentists and about 50 specialists practicing in the country. Currently, there are 18 dental schools with a total admission of 750 undergraduate students, 5 postgraduate programs in 10 disciplines with a total of 100 students, more than 11,000 dentists (1 dentist per 5,500 population) and nearly 1,000 specialists in the country. Two new schools have recently begun offering specialty training courses in 2 disciplines. The length of the dentistry curriculum is 6 years. Students take general and basic science courses during the first 2 years, then continue on the predental and dental courses for the remaining 4 years. The curriculum has been revised over the past 20 years to establish intership and specialty programs and introduce courses reflecting current trends in the dental profession. Dental services in Iran are provided by both public and private sectors. Oral health care was integrated into the Public Health Care network by 1997, and 4 levels of a Dental Health Care Delivery System were established. The first level is concerned with primary prevention at 'health houses', where auxiliary health workers called 'behvarzes' provide periodic examinations, referrals, and oral health education. At the next level, oral hygienists and dentists in 'health centers' perform basic oral health care services such as fillings, scaling, and extraction. At the third level, dentists manage and treat oral diseases in 'urban health centers', while the last level is for advanced treatment by specialists in university health centers in the cities. PMID:12707502

Pakshir, Hamid Reza

2003-01-01

284

Dental care - child  

MedlinePLUS

... dental exams, and any necessary treatments such as fluoride, extractions, fillings, or braces and other orthodontics. See ... age). Ask your pediatrician if your infant needs fluoride added to his diet. THE FIRST TRIP TO ...

285

Radioactive Decay  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by William Barker and David Smith for the Connected Curriculum Project, the purposes of this module are to develop a mathematical model for decay of radioactive substances, and to develop a technique for deciding whether quantitative data fits the model or not. This is one lesson within a larger set of learning modules hosted by Duke University.

Smith, David; Barker, William

2010-07-05

286

Radioactive Decay  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by William Barker and David Smith for the Connected Curriculum Project, this module develops a mathematical model for decay of radioactive substances, and a technique for deciding whether quantitative data fits the model or not. This is one within a much larger set of learning modules hosted by Duke University.

Smith, David; Barker, William

2010-06-28

287

B decays  

Microsoft Academic Search

We review the prospects for B decay studies at the LHC. Contributing authors: J. Baines, S.P. Baranov, P. Bartalini, M. Beneke, E. Bouhova, G. Buchalla, I. Caprini, F. Charles, J. Charles, Y. Coadou, P. Colangelo, P. Colrain, J. Damet, F. De Fazio, A. Dighe, H. Dijkstra, P. Eerola, N. Ellis, B. Epp, S. Gadomski, P. Galumian, I. Gavrilenko, S. George,

P Ball; Robert Fleischer; F Tartarelli; P Vikas; G R Wilkinson; J T M Baines; S P Baranov; P Bartalini; Martin Beneke; E Bouhova-Thacker; Gerhard Buchalla; I Caprini; F Charles; J Charles; Y Coadou; P Colangelo; P Colrain; J Damet; F De Fazio; A S Dighe; H Dijkstra; Paule Anna Mari Eerola; Nick Ellis; B Epp; S Gadomski; P I Galumian; I Gavrilenko; S George; V M Ghete; V Gibson; L P Guy; Y Hasegawa; R Iengo; A Jacholkowska; R Jones; A Yu Khodjamirian; E Kneringer; P Koppenburg; H Korsmo; N Labanca; L P Lellouch; M H Lehto; Y Lemoigne; J Libby; J Matias; S Mele; M Misiak; A Nairz; Tatsuya Nakada; A N Nikitenko; N V Nikitin; A Nisati; Fabrizio Palla; E Polycarpo; J Rademacker; F K Rizatdinova; S A Robins; D Rousseau; W Rückstuhl; M A Sanchis; O Schneider; M Shapiro; C H Shepherd-Themistocleous; P Sherwood; L Smirnova; M Smizanska; Andrei Starodumov; N Stepanov; Z Xie; N Yu Zaitsev

2000-01-01

288

The evaluation of a managed dental delivery concept.  

PubMed

Phased dentistry (PD) is a philosophy of managed oral health care that emphasizes an orderly approach to dental risk assessment, prevention, and disease management. PD is divided into two stages. Phase I (PH1) care is intended to eliminate all conditions that may produce a dental emergency within 12 months. PH1 care is directed primarily to recruits and apprentice training students. Phase 2 (PH2) care strives to attain and maintain optimal oral health for Navy and Marine Corps personnel after their initial training period and throughout their military career. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of introducing PH1 into a recruit dental treatment facility. Data were obtained at Naval Dental Center (NDC), Orlando from 4,571 recruit dental patients who were in-processed and completed recruit training between May 27 and October 1, 1993. The incoming operational dental readiness (ODR) of recruits during the PD trial was 28.5%, whereas the ODR of graduating recruits was 85.8%. During this same period there was a 34% increase in completed dental treatments per provider full time equivalent. Although dramatic increases in ODR and productivity were noticed during PD, other variables may have contributed to these results. PMID:8754713

Meyer, D M; Simecek, J W; Stone, M E; Alexander, D C

1996-07-01

289

Dental hygienists and infection control: knowledge, attitudes and behaviour in Italy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated knowledge, attitudes and behaviour regarding infection control of dental hygienists in Italy. Among the 185 responders to the self-administered mailed questionnaire, 91.3% agreed with the correct responses to the three questions on knowledge about infection prevention and control procedures chosen as an indicator of ‘good’ knowledge. However, 21% were uncertain whether, or disagreed that, dental instruments should

I. F. Angelillo; G. Nardi; C. F. Rizzo; N. M. A. Viggiani

2001-01-01

290

Factors Discriminant of Dental Health Care Behavior Orientation in Southwest Cultures.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The study identified, among a multiplicity of demographic and psycho-social variables, the factors which discriminate between preventively and symptomatically oriented individuals regarding dental health care for both self (mother) and her children; determined if a relationship exists between orientation to medical care in general and dental

Solis, Enrique, Jr.

291

How confident are general dental practitioners in their decision to administer antibiotic prophylaxis? A questionnaire study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Common dental procedures induce bacteremia. To prevent infectious complications from bacteremia in patients with specific medical conditions, antibiotic prophylaxis is considered. Recommendations are often unclear and ambiguous. In a previous study we reported wide variations in general dental practitioners' (GDPs') administrations of antibiotic prophylaxis. We hypothesized that within such a conflicting clinical area, decisions are made with a high

Eva Ellervall; Berndt Brehmer; Kerstin Knutsson

2008-01-01

292

Factors Discriminant of Dental Health Care Behavior Orientation in Southwest Cultures.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study identified, among a multiplicity of demographic and psycho-social variables, the factors which discriminate between preventively and symptomatically oriented individuals regarding dental health care for both self (mother) and her children; determined if a relationship exists between orientation to medical care in general and dental

Solis, Enrique, Jr.

293

Minimal Intervention Dentistry (MID) for managing dental caries - a review  

PubMed Central

This publication describes the history of Minimal Intervention Dentistry (MID) for managing dental caries and presents evidence for various carious lesion detection devices, for preventive measures, for restorative and non-restorative therapies as well as for repairing rather than replacing defective restorations. It is a follow-up to the FDI World Dental Federation publication on MID, of 2000. The dental profession currently is faced with an enormous task of how to manage the high burden of consequences of the caries process amongst the world population. If it is to manage carious lesion development and its progression, it should move away from the ‘surgical’ care approach and fully embrace the MID approach. The chance for MID to be successful is thought to be increased tremendously if dental caries is not considered an infectious but instead a behavioural disease with a bacterial component. Controlling the two main carious lesion development related behaviours, i.e. intake and frequency of fermentable sugars, to not more than five times daily and removing/disturbing dental plaque from all tooth surfaces using an effective fluoridated toothpaste twice daily, are the ingredients for reducing the burden of dental caries in many communities in the world. FDI’s policy of reducing the need for restorative therapy by placing an even greater emphasis on caries prevention than is currently done, is therefore, worth pursuing.

Frencken, Jo E.; Peters, Mathilde C.; Manton, David J.; Leal, Soraya C.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Eden, Ece

2012-01-01

294

Dental benefits--expanding access to dental care.  

PubMed

The Executive Director of the National Association of Dental Plans presents statistics describing recent trends in product mix, growth in voluntary benefits and referral plans, geographic concentration, and industry consolidation in the dental benefits industry. Current issues include dental workforce, the economy, human resources policies, and regulation. The issue of quality oral health care is identified as needing consensus definition by the entire dental industry. PMID:11499069

Ireland, E F

2001-01-01

295

Effects of Enrollment in Medicaid Versus the State Children's Health Insurance Program on Kindergarten Children's Untreated Dental Caries  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We compared levels of untreated dental caries in children enrolled in public insurance programs with those in nonenrolled children to determine the impact of public dental insurance and the type of plan (Medicaid vs State Children’s Health Insurance Program [SCHIP]) on untreated dental caries in children. Methods. Dental health outcomes were obtained through a calibrated oral screening of kindergarten children (enrolled in the 2000–2001 school year). We obtained eligibility and claims data for children enrolled in Medicaid and SCHIP who were eligible for dental services during 1999 to 2000. We developed logistic regression models to compare children’s likelihood and extent of untreated dental caries according to enrollment. Results. Children enrolled in Medicaid or SCHIP were 1.7 times (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.65, 1.77) more likely to have untreated dental caries than were nonenrolled children. SCHIP-enrolled children were significantly less likely to have untreated dental caries than were Medicaid-enrolled children (odds ratio [OR]=0.74; 95% CI=0.67, 0.82). According to a 2-part regression model, children enrolled in Medicaid or SCHIP have 17% more untreated dental caries than do nonenrolled children, whereas those in SCHIP had 16% fewer untreated dental caries than did those in Medicaid. Conclusions. Untreated tooth decay continues to be a significant problem for children with public insurance coverage. Children who participated in a separate SCHIP program had fewer untreated dental caries than did children enrolled in Medicaid.

Brickhouse, Tegwyn H.; Rozier, R. Gary; Slade, Gary D.

2008-01-01

296

Microwave-detected photoconductance decay  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microwave-detected photoconductance decay provides a contactless measurement of the recombination lifetime of free carriers in semiconductors following a pulse of optical excitation. Several complications in interpreting the results obtained by this method have prevented its widespread acceptance. Detailed models are proposed and verified experimentally using a commercially available apparatus. The model adequately predicts the behavior of the microwave reflectance as

P. A. Basore; B. R. Hansen

1990-01-01

297

Dental practice network of U.S. dental schools.  

PubMed

As dental schools incorporate training in evidence-based dentistry (EBD) into their curricula, students must learn how to critically evaluate systematic reviews and meta-analyses. It is important that dental education in the United States support the American Dental Association's position statement on EBD, which defines "best evidence" as data obtained from all study designs. Given that much evidence is missing when EBD is derived from Cochrane Systematic Reviews' randomized clinical trials, we propose the creation of a dental practice network of U.S. dental schools. We developed an electronic clinical dentistry research database for EBD using Epi-Info (available at www.cdc.gov/epiinfo/downloads.htm). As a free, public use software, Epi-Info provides the foundation for the development of clinical research databases that can increase the research capacity through multisite studies designed to generate outcomes data on the effectiveness of dental treatment. The creation of a dental practice network of dental schools with their large number of patients would expand the research capacity for EBD practice and advance the EBD science regarding the effectiveness of dental treatment. The next step is to link clinical dental researchers/educators at multiple dental schools through a collaborative clinical research network, so that the findings can be applied to the EBD component of problem-based learning curricula of dental education. PMID:20007494

Fisher, Monica A; Beeson, Dennis C; Hans, Mark G

2009-12-01

298

Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

1990-01-01

299

Stress Response Pathways in Ameloblasts: Implications for Amelogenesis and Dental Fluorosis.  

PubMed

Human enamel development of the permanent teeth takes place during childhood and stresses encountered during this period can have lasting effects on the appearance and structural integrity of the enamel. One of the most common examples of this is the development of dental fluorosis after childhood exposure to excess fluoride, an elemental agent used to increase enamel hardness and prevent dental caries. Currently the molecular mechanism responsible for dental fluorosis remains unknown; however, recent work suggests dental fluorosis may be the result of activated stress response pathways in ameloblasts during the development of permanent teeth. Using fluorosis as an example, the role of stress response pathways during enamel maturation is discussed. PMID:23745169

Sierant, Megan L; Bartlett, John D

2012-09-01

300

Dental Minutes (Oral Health Basics)  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... Dental Minutes Dudley & Friends: Public Service Announcements Podcasts Media Resources Dental Minutes 211 East Chicago Ave. Chicago, ... Contact Us / Privacy Policy / Terms of Use / Advertise / Media Inquiries / JADA / MouthHealthy.org Copyright © 1995-2013 American ...

301

Dental trauma guidelines.  

PubMed

Guidelines have been developed for management of numerous medical and dental conditions. If carefully developed and based on best available evidence, they serve a very useful purpose in giving information in dealing with health problems to health care providers as well as patients. The history of trauma guidelines is quite limited, but the American Association of Endodontists has been involved since the 1980s. In recent years, the International Association of Dental Traumatology has developed guidelines for management of traumatic dental injuries, with input from specialists in all relevant disciplines of dentistry. These guidelines, first developed and published in 2001 and updated twice since then, have been accepted as reliable recommendations for the urgent care of traumatic dental injuries; the most recent trauma guidelines were completed by the International Association of Dental Traumatology and published in 2012. The application of these guidelines is to provide both patients and practitioners with the best available information about management of such injuries. As with most guidelines, there are limitations that are primarily related to the level of evidence available, which is low. However, they are useful and, when followed, can lead to better outcomes than when no guidelines are used. PMID:23439046

Bakland, Leif K

2013-03-01

302

Dental trauma guidelines.  

PubMed

Guidelines have been developed for management of numerous medical and dental conditions. If carefully developed and based on best available evidence, they serve a very useful purpose in giving information in dealing with health problems to health care providers as well as patients. The history of trauma guidelines is quite limited, but the American Association of Endodontists has been involved since the 1980s. In recent years, the International Association of Dental Traumatology has developed guidelines for management of traumatic dental injuries, with input from specialists in all relevant disciplines of dentistry. These guidelines, first developed and published in 2001 and updated twice since then, have been accepted as reliable recommendations for the urgent care of traumatic dental injuries; the most recent trauma guidelines were completed by the International Association of Dental Traumatology and published in 2012. The application of these guidelines is to provide both patients and practitioners with the best available information about management of such injuries. As with most guidelines, there are limitations that are primarily related to the level of evidence available, which is low. However, they are useful and, when followed, can lead to better outcomes than when no guidelines are used. PMID:23635976

Bakland, Leif K

303

Severe dental caries as the first presenting clinical feature in primary Sjögren's syndrome.  

PubMed

Background: Sjögren's syndrome is an autoimmune syndrome involving the exocrine glands specially the salivary and lacrimal glands leading to xerostomia and xerophtalmia. This paper presents a case with primary Sjögren's syndrome that severe dental caries were the first clinical manifestation. Case Presentation: A 42-year-old man was referred to the School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences due to unexplained severe dental decays. After systematic evaluation and consultation with the rheumatologist and the ophthalmologist, the diagnosis of primary Sjögren's syndrome was suggested and confirmed by serologic and histopathologic study. Conclusion: Primary Sjögren's syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with early severe dental caries. PMID:24009970

Ahmadi, Elham; Fallahi, Sasan; Alaeddini, Mojgan; Hasani Tabatabaei, Masoomeh

2013-01-01

304

Dental Health in Rural Areas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The concentration of dental health services in urban areas creates a problem for the rural population of America. The problem is analyzed in this document by looking at the population distribution today and the ratio of dental services per population, the location of dental education resources, and the concern of society for the quality of living.…

Howell, Charles S.

305

Dental Assistant Specialist. (AFSC 98150).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This four-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for dental assistant specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are an introduction to dental services (the mission and organization of medical/dental service, career ladder progressions, medical readiness/wartime training, and…

Eling, David R.

306

Dental Hygiene Realpolitik Affecting Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Current conditions in dental hygiene influencing professional education are discussed. Workplace/practice issues include dental hygiene care as a component of dental practice, content, effects, and quality of care, hygienist supply and demand, and job satisfaction. Professional issues include the knowledge base, definitions of practice, and…

Bader, James D.

1991-01-01

307

A dental health education exercise  

Microsoft Academic Search

A dental health educational exercise was carried out on a class of primary school children. A verbal questionnaire was conducted, some formal instruction on dental health was given and group activities on oral hygiene were performed. An attempt was made to promote dental awareness and induce motivation. The amount of learning derived from the exercise was assessed from an analysis

John A. Clewett

1973-01-01

308

Food Starches and Dental Caries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sucrose and starches are the predominant dietary carbohydrates in modern societies. While the causal relationship between sucrose and dental caries development is indisputable, the relationship between food starch and dental caries continues to be debated and is the topic of this review. The current view of dental caries etiology suggests that in-depth evaluation of the starch-caries relationship requires the consideration

P. Lingstrom; J. van Houte; S. Kashket

2000-01-01

309

Cognitive vulnerability and dental fear  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The Cognitive Vulnerability Model proposes that perceptions of certain characteristics of a situation are critical determinants of fear. Although the model is applicable to all animal, natural environment and situational fears, it has not yet been applied specifically to dental fear. This study therefore aimed to examine the association between dental fear and perceptions of dental visits as uncontrollable,

Jason M Armfield; Gary D Slade; A John Spencer

2008-01-01

310

Managed Care in Dental Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A survey of 44 dental school deans investigated ways in which managed health care programs are affecting dental schools, schools' experiences with their own managed-care programs, the perceived future impact of managed care, and the impact of plans in "sister" medical schools on the dental schools. Implications for school financing are…

Galbally, James F., Jr.; Stewart, Denice C. L.

1995-01-01

311

Predicting success in dental school  

Microsoft Academic Search

Test scores obtained as part of the national testing program and pre-dental school grades were correlated with grades earned by freshmen who entered the U. of Minnesota Dental School. For 3 of the 4 classes studied, pre-dental school grades were the best predictors of freshman grades. \\

Wilbur L. Layton

1953-01-01

312

Dental Assistant Specialist. (AFSC 98150).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This four-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for dental assistant specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are an introduction to dental services (the mission and organization of medical/dental service, career ladder progressions, medical readiness/wartime training, and…

Eling, David R.

313

The influence of dental caries on body growth in prepubertal children.  

PubMed

Dental decay and dental treatment are suggested to be related to body growth in children. The aim of this study was first to assess the relation between dental caries and body proportions cross-sectionally in a Suriname caries child population and secondly to investigate whether dental treatment had a significant influence on body growth of these children in a randomised controlled trial using different treatment strategies. Three hundred eighty 6-year-old children with untreated dental decay participated in the study. Caries prevalence and presence of dentogenic infections were recorded. All children were randomly assigned to four different treatment groups ranging from full dental treatment to no invasive treatment at all. Body growth was evaluated by children's height, weight and body mass index. Participants were evaluated after 6 months and 1, 2 and 3 years. Cross-sectionally, negative correlations were observed between anthropometric measures and the number of untreated carious surfaces and caries experience of the children. Next, no significant differences in growth pattern between the treatment groups were observed. Based on these results, it is suggested that caries activity is a negative predictor for body growth in children and dental intervention does not show significant improvement within 3 years. PMID:20111879

van Gemert-Schriks, Martine C M; van Amerongen, Evert W; Aartman, Irene H A; Wennink, Johanna M B; Ten Cate, Jacob M; de Soet, Johnannes J

2010-01-29

314

Dental amalgam: An update  

PubMed Central

Dental amalgam has served as an excellent and versatile restorative material for many years, despite periods of controversy. The authors review its history, summarize the evidence with regard to its performance and offer predictions for the future of this material. The PubMed database was used initially; the reference list for dental amalgam featured 8641 articles and 13 publications dealing with recent advances in dental amalgam. A forward search was undertaken on selected articles and using some author names. For the present, amalgam should remain the material of choice for economic direct restoration of posterior teeth. When esthetic concerns are paramount, tooth-colored materials, placed meticulously, can provide an acceptable alternative. All alternative restorative materials and procedures, however, have certain limitations.

Bharti, Ramesh; Wadhwani, Kulvinder Kaur; Tikku, Aseem Prakash; Chandra, Anil

2010-01-01

315

Dental obturation materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the last decades, people have tried to develop a better material for use in dental obturation materials. This new material should meet the following requirements: durability, wear resistance, biocompatibility and chemical adhesion to dentin enamel. Wear resistance is very important and it is related with the service life of dental replacements. We have obtained aesthetically promising novel nano composites that can be used as dental replacements. The main objective of this work is to study the scratch and wear resistance of these nano composites. To meet this goal, scratch tests are performed using a micro scratch tester machine (CSEM), where a diamond indenter is used to make the scratch and the penetration of this indenter is measured with high resolution (7nm). We will be looking at the penetration depth (Rp) and the residual (or healing) depth (Rh) to calculate the percent recovery. These measurements represent the scratch resistance of the material.

Stockton, Elizabeth; Chudej, Lauren; Bilyeu, Brian; Brostow, Witold

2006-10-01

316

[Oro-dental injuries during intubation anesthesia].  

PubMed

Injuries to the oro-dental tissue are still one of the most frequent mishaps during endotracheal intubation and general anaesthesia. However, damage to the soft and hard tissues in most cases involves oral structures already showing advanced pathogenic alterations. Injuries to the teeth are therefore rather more often due to the disease of the teeth than to mistakes during anaesthesia. The risk of injuries to the teeth can be ascertained by means of a presurgical inspection of the oral cavity and evaluation of the individual anatomical conditions in the head and neck region, which may well interfere with the endotracheal intubation. In contrast to anaesthetic pitfalls causing severe disturbance of general health, dental trauma can be treated with quite satisfying functional and aesthetic results. However, in order to maintain conditions for the complete restitution of injured teeth immediate dental therapy is recommended. In preterm infants which need mechanical ventilation during the postnatal period direct laryngoscopy as well as mechanical alterations caused by an oral tube can cause injuries to the tooth germs of the first and second dentition and deformation of the maxillary skeleton. In consequence the patient will need intensive therapy of the resulting disturbances for several years. This review gives information about the causes and types of injuries to the oral and maxillofacial region during general anaesthesia. In addition, the anatomical conditions and pathological changes associated with an increased risk for oro-dental injuries and the facilities for prevention are discussed. Finally, the main aspects of emergency treatment of injuries to the dental hard tissues are presented. PMID:9799977

Folwaczny, M; Hickel, R

1998-09-01

317

Community efforts to expand dental services for low-income people.  

PubMed

Poor oral health among low-income people is gaining attention as a significant health care problem. Key barriers to dental services include low rates of dental insurance coverage, limited dental benefits available through public insurance programs, and a lack of dentists willing to serve low-income patients, according to findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC) 2007 site visits to 12 nationally representative metropolitan communities. Communities are attempting to provide more dental services to low-income residents. Along with state efforts to increase dentists' participation in Medicaid and the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP), hospitals, community health centers, health departments, dental schools and others are working to expand dental services, with some focusing on basic preventive services and others pursuing more comprehensive dental care. Many community efforts rely on increasing the number of dental professionals available to treat low-income people. Without additional involvement from the dental community and state and federal policy makers, however, many low-income people likely will continue to lack access to dental care and suffer the consequences. PMID:18652062

Felland, Laurie E; Lauer, Johanna R; Cunningham, Peter J

2008-07-01

318

Clinical practice: dental trauma.  

PubMed

Approximately 50% of children under the age of 15 are victims of various kinds of injuries in the orofacial region. Post-traumatic complications may occur, including crown discolouration, cervical root fracture, ankylosis, root resorption and tooth loss. The most severe complication after dental injury in primary dentition can affect the developing permanent tooth germ, and various consequences may be seen several years later when the permanent tooth erupts. In the permanent dentition, the most severe dental injury affects the surrounding alveolar bone structure and will lead to loss of the tooth. Current literature emphasises that awareness of appropriate triage procedures following dental trauma is unsatisfactory and that delay in treatment is the single most influential factor affecting prognosis. What should a paediatrician know, and more importantly, how should he/she advise parents and caretakers? In an emergency situation such as tooth avulsion, reimplantation within 30 min is the best treatment option at the site of the accident. If reimplantation of the tooth is impossible, milk, saline or even saliva are the preferred transport media. The prognosis for an avulsed tooth depends upon prompt care, which is a determinant factor for successful treatment of the traumatised tooth. In all other dental trauma cases, it is important to refer the child to a paediatric dentist, to follow up the healing process and reduce late post-traumatic complications. With timely interventions and appropriate treatment, the prognosis for healing following most dental injuries is good. In conclusion, it is important that paediatricians are able to inform parents and caretakers about all possible and long-lasting consequences of different dental injuries. PMID:20058022

Emerich, Katarzyna; Wyszkowski, Jacek

2010-01-08

319

Pneumoconiosis and exposures of dental laboratory technicians.  

PubMed Central

One hundred and seventy-eight dental laboratory technicians and 69 non-exposed controls participated in an epidemiological respiratory study. Eight technicians who had a mean of 28 years' grinding nonprecious metal alloys were diagnosed as having a simple pneumoconiosis by chest radiograph. Mean values for per cent predicted FVC and FEV1 were reduced among male nonsmoker technicians compared to male nonsmoker controls; after controlling for age, there was also a reduction in spirometry with increasing work-years. An industrial hygiene survey was conducted in 13 laboratories randomly selected from 42 laboratories stratified by size and type of operation in the Salt Lake City, Utah metropolitan area. Personal exposures to beryllium and cobalt exceeded the Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) in one laboratory. Occupational exposures in dental laboratories need to be controlled to prevent beryllium-related lung disorders as well as simple pneumoconiosis.

Rom, W N; Lockey, J E; Lee, J S; Kimball, A C; Bang, K M; Leaman, H; Johns, R E; Perrota, D; Gibbons, H L

1984-01-01

320

Pneumoconiosis and exposures of dental laboratory technicians  

SciTech Connect

One hundred and seventy-eight dental laboratory technicians and 69 non-exposed controls participated in an epidemiological respiratory study. Eight technicians who had a mean of 28 years grinding nonprecious metal alloys were diagnosed as having a simple pneumoconiosis by chest radiograph. Mean values for per cent predicted FVC and FEV1 were reduced among male nonsmoker technicians compared to male nonsmoker controls; after controlling for age, there was also a reduction in spirometry with increasing work-years. An industrial hygiene survey was conducted in 13 laboratories randomly selected from 42 laboratories stratified by size and type of operation in the Salt Lake City, Utah metropolitan area. Personal exposures to beryllium and cobalt exceeded the Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) in one laboratory. Occupational exposures in dental laboratories need to be controlled to prevent beryllium-related lung disorders as well as simple pneumoconiosis.

Rom, W.N.; Lockey, J.E.; Lee, J.S.; Kimball, A.C.; Bang, K.M.; Leaman, H.; Johns, R.E. Jr.; Perrota, D.; Gibbons, H.L.

1984-11-01

321

Rapid HIV testing in dental practices.  

PubMed

Despite increasing discussion about the dental care setting as a logical, potentially fruitful venue for rapid HIV testing, dentists' willingness to take on this task is unclear. Semistructured interviews with 40 private practice dentists revealed their principal concerns regarding offering patients HIV testing were false results, offending patients, viewing HIV testing as outside the scope of licensure, anticipating low patient acceptance of HIV testing in a dental setting, expecting inadequate reimbursement, and potential negative impact on the practice. Dentists were typically not concerned about transmission risks, staff opposition to testing, or making referrals for follow-up after a positive result. A larger cultural change may be required to engage dentists more actively in primary prevention and population-based HIV screening. PMID:22397342

Siegel, Karolynn; Abel, Stephen N; Pereyra, Margaret; Liguori, Terri; Pollack, Harold A; Metsch, Lisa R

2012-02-16

322

Muon decay  

SciTech Connect

Improved searches for rare processes in muon decay have substantially improved existing limits, but no evidence for any non-standard behavior has been found. The result of a recent sensitive search for right-handed currents indicates that the ratio (V + A)-amplitude/(V - A)-amplitude less than or equal to 0.029. This experiment also imposed new limits on non-standard couplings and on the energy scales where lepton substructure and family symmetry breaking effects might manifest themselves.

Steiner, H.

1985-03-01

323

The immediate dental implant.  

PubMed

Numerous clinical studies have shown that dental implants can be placed immediately in extraction sockets with success when sites are carefully selected. Dental implants have been placed at the time of extraction with a variety of techniques. All the techniques report survival rates of 94 percent to 100 percent over a varied healing period of three months to approximately seven years. this article will review clinical criteria for determining patient selection for immediate implants and the advantages and disadvantages of immediate implant placement. PMID:12041804

Douglass, Gordon L; Merin, Robert L

2002-05-01

324

Sinusitis of dental origin.  

PubMed

Acute or chronic sinusitis may be odontogenic. Bacteria involved in odontogenic sinusitis are specific organisms associated with the teeth (Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus mutans, anaerobic germs). They are often secondary to an intrasinus foreign body following periodontitis. The treatment is both naso-sinusal and dental. Cysts of the maxilla can also invade the sinus. In particular, radiculo-dental cysts (periapical) must be surgically excised, in some cases associated with a middle meatotomy. Finally, one should look for oro-antral fistulae. The surgical technique for its closure should take into account the reversibility of the sinus lesions. PMID:9444378

Bertrand, B; Rombaux, P; Eloy, P; Reychler, H

1997-01-01

325

Performance of Dental Ceramics  

PubMed Central

The clinical success of modern dental ceramics depends on an array of factors, ranging from initial physical properties of the material itself, to the fabrication and clinical procedures that inevitably damage these brittle materials, and the oral environment. Understanding the influence of these factors on clinical performance has engaged the dental, ceramics, and engineering communities alike. The objective of this review is to first summarize clinical, experimental, and analytic results reported in the recent literature. Additionally, it seeks to address how this new information adds insight into predictive test procedures and reveals challenges for future improvements.

Rekow, E.D.; Silva, N.R.F.A.; Coelho, P.G.; Zhang, Y.; Guess, P.; Thompson, V.P.

2011-01-01

326

Osteoradionecrosis: Causes and prevention  

SciTech Connect

Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) is one of the most serious complications arising from head and neck radiation therapy. Current research has shown that ORN represents nonhealing, dead bone and is not a state of infection. ORN is the result of functional and structural bony changes that may not be expressed for months or years. ORN may occur spontaneously or in response to wounding. Predisposing factors include absorbed radiation dose, fractionation, delivery modality, and dental status. Timing of dental extractions and other factors have also been shown to affect incidence. ORN may be reduced through early intraoral evaluation, treatment, and adequate healing time prior to beginning RT. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy has been beneficial in the prevention and treatment of ORN. It is of paramount importance for the medical community to recognize the factors that may reduce ORN incidence, endorse oral care protocols, and acknowledge the value of HBO therapy in the prevention and treatment of this disease. 60 references.

Friedman, R.B. (Medical College of Virginia Hospitals, Richmond (USA))

1990-01-01

327

DENTAL CARE COVERAGE AND RETIREMENT  

PubMed Central

Dental insurance, generally not covered in Medicare, is an important factor in the decision to seek dental care. We examine the convergence of an aging population, retirement and a decreased availability of dental care coverage using data from the Health and Retirement Study. We show that being in the labor force is a strong predictor of having dental coverage. For older retired adults not in the labor force, the only source for dental coverage is either a post retirement health benefit or spousal coverage.

Manski, Richard J.; Moeller, John; Chen, Haiyan; Clair, Patricia A.; Schimmel, Jody; Magder, Larry; Pepper, John V.

2010-01-01

328

Rural-urban differences in dental service use among children enrolled in a private dental insurance plan in Wisconsin: analysis of administrative data  

PubMed Central

Background Studies on rural–urban differences in dental care have primarily focused on differences in utilization rates and preventive dental services. Little is known about rural–urban differences in the use of wider range of dental procedures. This study examined patterns of preventive, restorative, endodontic, and extraction procedures provided to children enrolled in Delta Dental of Wisconsin (DDWI). Methods We analyzed DDWI enrollment and claims data for children aged 0-18?years from 2002 to 2008. We modified and used a rural and urban classification based on ZIP codes developed by the Wisconsin Area Health Education Center (AHEC). We categorized the ZIP codes into 6 AHEC categories (3 rural and 3 urban). Descriptive and multivariable analysis using generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) were used to examine the patterns of dental procedures provided to children. Tukey-Kramer adjustment was used to control for multiple comparisons. Results Approximately, 50%, 67% and 68?% of enrollees in inner-city Milwaukee, Rural 1 (less than 2500 people), and suburban-Milwaukee had at least one annual dental visit, respectively. Children in inner city-Milwaukee had the lowest utilization rates for all procedures examined, except for endodontic procedures. Compared to children from inner-city Milwaukee, children in other locations had significantly more preventive procedures. Children in Rural 1-ZIP codes had more restorative, endodontic and extraction procedures, compared to children from all other regions. Conclusions We found significant geographic variation in dental procedures received by children enrolled in DDWI.

2012-01-01

329

Xylitol and dental caries: an overview for clinicians.  

PubMed

An overview of studies about xylitol and dental caries suggests potential clinical dental applications for xylitol. Xylitol is a naturally occurring, low-calorie sugar substitute with anticariogenic properties. Data from recent studies indicate that xylitol can reduce the occurrence of dental caries in young children, schoolchildren, and mothers, and in children via their mothers. Xylitol, a sugar alcohol, is derived mainly from birch and other hardwood trees. Short-term consumption of xylitol is associated with decreased Streptococcus mutans levels in saliva and plaque. Aside from decreasing dental caries, xylitol may also decrease the transmission of S. mutans from mothers to children. Commercial xylitol-containing products may be used to help control rampant decay in primary dentition. Studies of schoolchildren in Belize and Estonia, along with data from the University of Washington, indicate that xylitol gum, candy, ice pops, cookies, puddings, etc., in combination with other dental therapies, are associated with the arrest of carious lesions. A prospective trial in Finland has demonstrated that children of mothers treated with xylitol had lower levels of S. mutans than children of mothers treated with chlorhexidine or fluoride varnish. Food products containing xylitol are available commercially and through specialized manufacturers, and have the potential to be widely accessible to consumers. PMID:12693818

Lynch, Heather; Milgrom, Peter

2003-03-01

330

Dental patient preferences and choice in clinical decision-making.  

PubMed

In economics, the concept of utility refers to the strength of customer preference. In health care assessment, the visual analogue scale (VAS), the standard gamble, and the time trade-off are used to measure health state utilities. These utility measurements play a key role in promoting shared decision-making in dental care. Individual preference, however, is complex and dynamic. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between patient preference and educational intervention in the field of dental health. The data were collected by distributing questionnaires to employees of two companies in Japan. Participants were aged 18-65 years and consisted of 111 males and 93 females (204 in total). One company (Group A) had a dental program of annual check-ups and health education in the workplace, while the other company (Group B) had no such program. Statistical analyses were performed with the t-test and Chi-square test. The questionnaire items were designed to determine: (1) oral health-related quality of life, (2) dental health state utilities (using VAS), and (3) time trade-off for regular dental check-ups. The percentage of respondents in both groups who were satisfied with chewing function, appearance of teeth, and social function ranged from 23.1 to 42.4%. There were no significant differences between groups A and B in the VAS of decayed, filled, and missing teeth. The VAS of gum bleeding was 42.8 in Group A and 51.3 in Group B (p<0.05). The percentage of persons having a regular dental check-up every three months was 34.1 and 31.3% in Groups A and B respectively. These results suggest that low preference results from lack of opportunity or utilization of dental care in the worksite. Ascertaining the factors involved in patient preference may have significant potential benefits in shared decision-making. PMID:22790334

Fukai, Kakuhiro; Yoshino, Koichi; Ohyama, Atsushi; Takaesu, Yoshinori

2012-01-01

331

When and Why Parents Seek Dental Care for Children under 36 Months  

PubMed Central

Background: The aim was to analyze an infant preventive program determining at what age parents take their children for their first dental visit and the reasons why they do it. Materials & Methods: A total of 844 children aged from 0 to 36 months, enrolled in the program of oral health maintenance of the Baby Clinic, participated in this study. During the first dental visit, the parents were inquired about the reasons that led them to enroll their children in the program. One trained investigator identified this reasons on the records and classified them according to the following scores: orientation/prevention, caries treatment, malpositioned teeth, dental trauma, tooth color alterations and others. Results: Orientation/prevention was the most prevalent reason from 0-6 months to 25-30 months of age, and at the age 30-36 months, the reason caries/treatment overcame orientation/prevention, becoming the most prevalent reason in that age group. The third place was occupied by dental trauma. The mean age parents seek for dental care to their children was 14, 92 months. Conclusion: This study showed a preferentially preventive/educational profile for the children. However, lots of parents still take children to the dentist preferentially for curative instead of preventive treatment. How to cite this article: Volpato LE, Palti DG, Lima JE, Machado MA, Aranha AM, Bandeca MC, Pedro FL, Borges AH. When and Why Parents Seek Dental Care for Children under 36 Months. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(4):21-25.

Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci; Palti, Dafna Geller; Lima, Jose Eduardo de Oliveira; Machado, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira; Aranha, Andreza Maria Fabio; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Pedro, Fabio Luis Miranda; Borges, Alvaro Henrique

2013-01-01

332

Clinical canine dental radiography.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to provide small animal veterinarians in private practice a guideline for interpretation of the most common findings in canine intraoral radiology. Normal oral and dental anatomy is presented. A brief review of variations of normal, common periodontal and endodontic pathology findings and developmental anomalies is provided. PMID:23643019

Bannon, Kristin M

2013-05-01

333

Genotoxicity of dental materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was performed to characterize the (possible) DNA-damaging properties of dental materials and to identify specific compounds that contribute to this genotoxicity. For screening, three tests that assay for different aspects of genotoxicity (i) the bacterial umu-test; (ii) the eucaryotic DNA synthesis inhibition test; and (iii) the in vivo alkaline filter elution technique were chosen. This investigation gives several

Jürgen Heil; Georg Reifferscheid; Petra Waldmann; Gabriele Leyhausen; Werner Geurtsen

1996-01-01

334

Uranium in Dental Porcelain.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The radiological health aspects of the use of uranium in dental porcelain are presented. The concentration of uranium is reported for 18 sets of porcelain teeth and 23 samples of porcelain powder. Particle emission rates were obtained for uranium and for ...

D. L. Thompson

1976-01-01

335

Translucency of Dental Porcelains  

Microsoft Academic Search

The translucency of comparable shades of five dental porcelains was determined. Both direct transmittance and total transmittance were measured at wavelengths of 400 - 700 nm. For 1 mm of porcelain, the values for direct transmittance were low and averaged 0.13 percent, whereas the values for total transmittance averaged 26.8 percent. Transmittance increased with increasing incident wavelength. These results indicated

R. H. W. Brodbelt; W. J. OBrien; P. L. Fan

1980-01-01

336

Dental amalgam and mercury  

SciTech Connect

This paper looks at the issues of the current amalgam controversy: the daily dose of mercury from amalgam, hypersensitivity to mercury, claims of adverse effects from amalgam mercury and alleged overnight 'cures.' In addition, the toxicity and allergenicity of the proposed alternative materials are examined with the same kind of scrutiny applied by the anti-amalgam group to dental amalgam. 100 references.

Mackert, J.R. Jr. (Department of Restorative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta (United States))

1991-08-01

337

Dental amalgam and mercury  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper looks at the issues of the current amalgam controversy: the daily dose of mercury from amalgam, hypersensitivity to mercury, claims of adverse effects from amalgam mercury and alleged overnight 'cures.' In addition, the toxicity and allergenicity of the proposed alternative materials are examined with the same kind of scrutiny applied by the anti-amalgam group to dental amalgam. 100

Mackert; J. R. Jr

1991-01-01

338

Dental Hygiene Student Attrition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study to determine differences between graduating and withdrawing students in the University of Minnesota Dental Hygiene program is discussed. The identification of differences may prove useful in the selection process for future classes through identification of students likely to complete their education. (MLW)

Young, Lynda J.; Fellows, Avis L.

1981-01-01

339

Dental Amalgam— Environmental Aspects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increasing knowledge about the risk of toxic effects caused by anthropogenic mercury accumulation in ecosystems has resulted in a growing pressure for reduction of the discharge of mercury waste. Consequently, the mercury waste problems of dental clinics have been given increased attention, and restrictions on handling and discharge of contaminated waste have been established in several countries.Major amalgam particles from

D. Arenholt-Bindslev

1992-01-01

340

Dental 'erosion' revisited.  

PubMed

The term "erosion," as currently used in dentistry, is not only a misnomer but also is misleading, according to the authors. The authors highlight the critical roles of occlusal function and parafunction in the multifactorial etiology of cervical lesions and relate their significance to clinical practice. They propose a revised nomenclature for and classification of dental hard tissue lesions. PMID:7759687

Grippo, J O; Simring, M

1995-05-01

341

Sedation for dental procedures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Control of pain and anxiety is fundamental to the practice of dentistry. Patients who have a fear of dental treatment and those who are faced with the prospect of an unpleasant or distressing procedure, rightfully expect that the option of conscious sedation should be available. A satisfactory assessment visit is crucial to the success of subsequent treatment. The planned dentistry

Meg Skelly; David Craig

2005-01-01

342

An Evaluation of Porous Alumina Ceramic Dental Implants  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fabrication, characterization, and clinical results of porous rooted alumina dental implants in animals are presented. Failures of all implants occurred in less than six months and were attributed to the presence of microporosity on the crown and cervical portion of the implant which prevented the establishment of an effective bialogical seal between the oral cavity and the alveolus.

Jerome J. Klawitter; Allan M. Weinstein; Francis W. Cooke; Larry J. Peterson; Billy M. Pennel; Ralph V. Mckinney

1977-01-01

343

Managing dental caries in children in Turkey - a discussion paper  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: This paper describes the oral healthcare system and disease situation amongst children in Turkey. Considering the high prevalence and severity of dental caries, a proposal for improvement of oral health in this population group is formulated. DISCUSSION: A virtual absence of palliative, preventive and restorative care characterises juvenile oral healthcare in Turkey. Consequently, carious cavities remain untreated, which may

Asli Topaloglu-Ak; Ece Eden; J. E. F. M. Frencken

2009-01-01

344

Dental abnormalities in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to define the therapy-associated dental abnormalities in survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We reviewed the clinical records and panoramic radiographs of 423 survivors of ALL who were treated on one of four consecutive protocols (1975-1991). Dental abnormalities included root stunting, microdontia, hypodontia, taurodontia (enlarged pulp chambers), and over-retention of primary teeth. The frequency of these factors was determined in relation to age at initiation of treatment (< or = 8 years vs > 8 years), addition of cranial irradiation, and chemotherapeutic protocol. A total of 423 patients met the study criteria. The abnormalities comprised root stunting in 24.4% (n = 103), microdontia in 18.9% (n = 80), hypodontia in 8.5% (n = 36), taurodontia in 5.9% (n = 25), and over-retention of primary dentition in 4.0% (n = 17). Patients who were < or = 8 years old at diagnosis or who received cranial irradiation therapy developed more dental abnormalities than did those > 8 years and those who did not receive cranial irradiation (42 vs 32%). Survivors of childhood ALL often have dental abnormalities that may affect their quality of life. Dental evaluation at diagnosis and frequent follow-up may help to ensure appropriate preventive measures and minimize dental and periodontal disease. PMID:9177429

Kaste, S C; Hopkins, K P; Jones, D; Crom, D; Greenwald, C A; Santana, V M

1997-06-01

345

European Core Curriculum in Cariology for undergraduate dental students.  

PubMed

As dental caries prevalence is still high in many populations and groups of both children and adults worldwide, and as caries continues to be responsible for significant health, social and economic impacts, there is an urgent need for dental students to receive a systematic education in cariology based upon current best evidence. Although European curriculum guidelines for undergraduate students have been prepared in other dental fields over the last decade, none exist for cariology. Thus the European Organisation for Caries Research (ORCA) formed a task force to work with the Association of Dental Education in Europe (ADEE) on a European Core Curriculum in Cariology. In 2010, a workshop to develop such a curriculum was organised in Berlin, Germany, with 75 participants from 24 European and 3 North/South American countries. The Curriculum was debated by five pre-identified working groups: I The Knowledge Base; II Risk Assessment, Diagnosis and Synthesis; III Decision-Making and Preventive Non-surgical Therapy; IV Decision-making and Surgical Therapy; and V Evidence-based Cariology in Clinical and Public Health Practice and then finalised jointly by the group chairs. According to this Curriculum, on graduation, a dentist must be competent at applying knowledge and understanding of the biological, medical, basic and applied clinical sciences in order to recognise caries and make decisions about its prevention and management in individuals and populations. This document, which presents several major and numerous supporting competences, does not confine itself to dental caries alone, but refers also to dental erosion/non-erosive wear and other dental hard tissue disorders. PMID:22023541

Schulte, A G; Pitts, N B; Huysmans, M C D N J M; Splieth, C; Buchalla, W

2011-07-01

346

The evolving impact of aging America on dental practice.  

PubMed

American dentistry has recognized for a quarter century that the growth in the proportion of elderly in the population is impacting on the profession. Multiple articles in the professional literature have speculated on the ways in which this change will be manifested. Data and projections from earlier articles are revisited and five trends are offered to guide professionals as they position their practices for the coming years. The increase in number and proportion of elderly in dental practices stems from successes in preventing and controlling infectious diseases during the last century. The trend has not peaked but will continue for at least two more decades. Retention of teeth into advanced age has resulted from emerging and improved preventive and restorative dental advances directed at children and adults beginning mid-century, and dental utilization studies confirm the elderly are seeking dental care at an unprecedented and growing rate. Chronic disease and infirmity that accompany advanced age make dental care more challenging for this group. Dentists and their staff will need to continuously undertake educational opportunities that will foster and maintain their facility in providing care to the elderly. They will need to do this because Americans of advanced age are becoming the dominant age group seeking, and able to pay for, sophisticated dental services. The blend of those services is shifting away from removable prostheses to a rising demand for restorative, periodontic, and endodontic care. Root caries, in particular, will be a growing challenge to both providers and patients. There is mounting evidence oral disease impacts endocrine, cardiovascular, and pulmonary health, particularly in frail elders, and will likely provide many elderly additional stimuli to seek dental care. Providers who seek an alternative approach for delivering their services will find growing demand for and satisfaction with traveling to patients, rather than the other way around. PMID:15558095

Shay, Kenneth

2004-11-15

347

Research SummaryPreventive or restorative care for children?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives To identify the relationship between the preventive and restorative care provided to children who frequently attend the General Dental Service in the UK after taking into account socio-economic status, gender and dental caries experience.Setting General dental practices in the North West of England.Subjects and materials The study design involved a retrospective investigation of case notes of 677 children who

Denis O'Mullane

2003-01-01

348

Dental patients' use of the Internet  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims and objectives To determine the use of the Internet by patients attending a range of dental clinics to search for information regarding dental procedures, and also to investigate their interest in online dental consultations and 'dental tourism'.Methods A questionnaire was designed and randomly distributed to 520 patients attending the restorative dentistry, dental surgery and oral medicine clinics of Cork

C. McCreary; R. Ní Ríordáin

2009-01-01

349

Involving Parents in Their Children's Dental Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Asserts that parent education is vital to good dental hygiene for the whole family. Discusses what Head Start staffers can do to ensure that children's dental needs are being met, particularly in assisting parents with taking responsibility for children's dental hygiene. Covers dental care tips for parents, questions and answers about dental

Becker, Donna

1998-01-01

350

Involving Parents in Their Children's Dental Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Asserts that parent education is vital to good dental hygiene for the whole family. Discusses what Head Start staffers can do to ensure that children's dental needs are being met, particularly in assisting parents with taking responsibility for children's dental hygiene. Covers dental care tips for parents, questions and answers about dental

Becker, Donna

1998-01-01

351

Dental caries in rural Alaska Native children--Alaska, 2008.  

PubMed

In April 2008, the Arctic Investigations Program (AIP) of CDC was informed by the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) of a large number of Alaska Native (AN) children living in a remote region of Alaska who required full mouth dental rehabilitations (FMDRs), including extractions and/or restorations of multiple carious teeth performed under general anesthesia. In this remote region, approximately 400 FMDRs were performed in AN children aged <6 years in 2007; the region has approximately 600 births per year. Dental caries can cause pain, which can affect children's normal growth and development. AIP and Alaska DHSS conducted an investigation of dental caries and associated risk factors among children in the remote region. A convenience sample of children aged 4-15 years in five villages (two with fluoridated water and three without) was examined to estimate dental caries prevalence and severity. Risk factor information was obtained by interviewing parents. Among children aged 4-5 years and 12-15 years who were evaluated, 87% and 91%, respectively, had dental caries, compared with 35% and 51% of U.S. children in those age groups. Among children from the Alaska villages, those aged 4-5 years had a mean of 7.3 dental caries, and those aged 12-15 years had a mean of 5.0, compared with 1.6 and 1.8 dental caries in same-aged U.S. children. Of the multiple factors assessed, lack of water fluoridation and soda pop consumption were significantly associated with dental caries severity. Collaborations between tribal, state, and federal agencies to provide effective preventive interventions, such as water fluoridation of villages with suitable water systems and provision of fluoride varnishes, should be encouraged. PMID:21937973

2011-09-23

352

Achieving health outcomes through professional dental care: comparing the cost of dental treatment for children in three practice modes.  

PubMed Central

The search for effective strategies to deal with prevention and treatment of oral disease focuses on children as a natural target population. This article reports data on the comparative costs of delivering dental care to children via (1) a school-based practice using Expanded Function Dental Auxiliaries, (2) a school-based practice without EFDAs, and (3) a group of unrelated private dental practices operating independent of the school system. Utilization of a dentist's services varied significantly between the children assigned to private care and those assigned to the school-based programs, but it cost less per patient to provide dental treatment through the private practitioners. If school-based practices are clearly more effective in reducing dental disease, in the long run the need for manpower and resources in these programs might be lowered to a point where they will become more cost-effective than private practices. If the two delivery modes are equally effective in reducing dental disease, however, results from the study indicate that private practices are more cost-effective and will probably maintain their cost-effective advantage over school-based programs.

Bentley, J M; Green, P; Ship, I I

1984-01-01

353

PROVIDING A DENTAL HOME FOR PREGNANT WOMEN: A COMMUNITY PROGRAM TO ADDRESS DENTAL CARE ACCESS  

PubMed Central

Objective This paper describes a community-based intervention to provide a dental home for women covered by Medicaid in Klamath County, Oregon. In 2001, 8.8% of pregnant women served by Medicaid in Oregon received care. Methods Pregnant women received home/WIC visits and were assigned a dental home under a dental managed care program (DCO). All initial care was provided at the Oregon Institute of Technology Dental Hygiene Clinic under the contract with the DCO. Emergency, preventive and restorative care was provided. Result Between February 2004 and January 2006, 503 pregnant women were identified: 421 women were contactable. Of these, 339 received home visits (339/421, 80.5%) and 235 received care (235/339, 69.3%). Overall, 55.8% of eligible women received care (235/421). Most who did not have a visit either moved or were not the caretaker of the baby. The missed appointment rate was 9%. Conclusion A community health partnership led to a successful and sustainable model extending care to pregnant women.

Milgrom, Peter; Ludwig, Sharity; Mike Shirtcliff, R.; Smolen, Darlene; Sutherland, Marilynn; Gates, Patricia A.; Weinstein, Philip

2007-01-01

354

Prevalence of Dental Fear and Anxiety amongst Patients in Selected Dental Clinics in Ghana  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To find out the prevalence of dental anxiety and fear amongst patients in various selected dental clinics in Accra, Ghana. Study design: Dental patients (n = 279) who had either been exposed to dental treatments or had no prior dental exposure, attending four selected dental clinics in Accra were randomly sampled. They were interviewed…

Ofori, Marian A.; Adu-Ababio, F.; Nyako, E. A.; Ndanu, Tom A.

2009-01-01

355

Preparing for the dental team: investigating the views of dental and dental care professional students.  

PubMed

There is growing evidence to support the contention that interprofessional education (IPE) at both pre and post-qualification levels will improve professionals' abilities to work more effectively in a team and to communicate more effectively with colleagues and patients. This body of evidence, however, is primarily concerned with nursing, medical and associated professionals and students, and there are few studies that include dental students and particularly where learning occurs with the dental care professions (DCP). The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of dental and DCP students to IPE and to highlight some of the barriers to developing programmes for these students. It was also intended to examine the students' awareness of dental and DCP roles and responsibilities. Two questionnaires, the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) and a dental roles and responsibilities questionnaire, were distributed to all 5 years of dental students (n = 189) based at Queen's University Belfast (QUB), both years of the dental hygiene students (n = 8) also based at QUB, as well as to final year dental nursing students based at Belfast Institute of Further and Higher Education (BIFHE) (n = 64). The results indicated that dental and DCP students had a positive attitude to IPE as a means to improve teamwork and communication skills but there are potential obstacles as demonstrated by the differing perceptions of each of the three groups about the roles of the other. Some aspects of practice, involving personal care and advice to patients, were regarded by all groups as a shared role but the dental hygiene students regarded themselves as having a shared role in several tasks identified by dental and dental nurse students as the sole role of the dentist. Dental hygiene students in this study did not see their role as primarily to support the dentist but more as a partner in care. Professional identity and its development are issues that must be considered by dental and DCP educators developing IPE initiatives. PMID:18257761

Morison, Susan; Marley, John; Stevenson, Mike; Milner, Sharon

2008-02-01

356

Experiences with sedation and restraint during dental treatment in Romania.  

PubMed

In August, 1995 dental treatment was provided in an orphanage in Romania. This treatment took place over three weeks using three different dentists. Two dental nurses served for full the duration. For the last two weeks the team was joined by a dental health educator. All have given accounts of their time in Romania. The patients had various degrees of handicap but generally co-operation for treatment was poor. Most patients needed pre-operative sedation of oral valium. A papoose board was used for restraint. All the contributors agree that this was extremely helpful in controlling the patients. Dental treatment was mostly-restricted to extractions. A parallel preventive programme was run by the dental health educator. The team encountered bureaucratic problems which were overcome. All 220 children in the orphanage were screened and treated. Local children and adults were also given dental treatment when time allowed. The team wish to express gratitude to all who helped and supported them. They plan a future mission in 1997. In 1994, a dental team had previously travelled to Romania and carried out treatment of handicapped children using sedation & restraint. The principal difference between 1994 and 1995 was the introduction of the papoose board as the method of restraint. The papoose board is a temporary restraint device for use during medical or dental procedures. It is a set of canvas flaps with velcro fasteners on a board. A head strap and wrist straps are important accessories. Pre-operative sedation was given to the children 2-3 hours in advance of dental treatment. This usually was 10-20 mg oral valium. The child was then led into the dental surgery by hand and placed on the papoose board, which was already situated on the reclined dental chair. Before the child realised what was happening the wrist straps and leg straps were in place. Within seconds the other straps were closed and the child was totally restrained and ready for dental treatment. Dental treatment was then carried out using local anaesthesia. Care has to be taken that the restraint does not impair the patient's breathing, circulation, cause over-heating or positional injuries. A dental health education programme was run in parallel with the treatment service. The individual accounts of experiences follow. Firstly, the joint account of Dental Nurses Catherine Treacey and Karen Vaughan from the Dublin Dental Hospital, who were working for the full three weeks. Then follow the accounts of the dentists. On week 1 by Anne O'Neill, who works with the Eastern Health Board in the Dun Laoghaire area, week 2 by Robert Gorby, a dentist in private practice in Carlow, and week 3 by Brendan Fanning who works part-time for the Eastern Health Board, in Wicklow and part-time in practice in Ashford, Co. Wicklow. The final account is of the dental health education programme by Miriam Henshaw, Health Educator who works for the Eastern Health Board in the Wicklow area. PMID:9584753

Fanning, B; Gorby, R; Henshaw, M; O'Neill, A; Treacey, C; Vaughan, K

1997-01-01

357

Preventive Care, Care for Children and National Health Insurance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper is to examine issues related to the coverage of preventive care under national health insurance. Four specific kinds of medical care services are included under the rubric of preventive care: prenatal care; pediatric care, dental care, and preventive physicians' services for adults. We consider whether preventive care should be covered under national health insurance, and

Gilbert R. Ghez; Michael Grossman

1979-01-01

358

The effect of fluoridation on the dental health of urban Scottish Schoolchildren  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comparison was made of the dental health of children aged 4-5 and 9-10 in two Scottish towns, one with fluoridated drinking water and the other without. Striking differences were observed. A 44% reduction in decayed, missing, and filled deciduous teeth was found in 4-5 year-olds in the fluoridated compared with the non-fluoridated town and a 50% reduction in decayed,

A S Blinkhorn; M D Brown; D Attwood; M C Downer

1981-01-01

359

42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...licensed prior to practicing. The existing State dental hygiene licensure processes meet the intent and purpose...status or graduation from an accredited or approved dental hygiene or dental assisting education program. 2. For...

2009-10-01

360

42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...licensed prior to practicing. The existing State dental hygiene licensure processes meet the intent and purpose...status or graduation from an accredited or approved dental hygiene or dental assisting education program. 2. For...

2010-10-01

361

42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...practicing. The existing State dental hygiene licensure processes meet the intent and purpose of the Consumer-Patient Radiation Health and Safety Act of 1981 and the standards for licensing Dental Hygienists in dental radiography set forth below....

2012-10-01

362

42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...practicing. The existing State dental hygiene licensure processes meet the intent and purpose of the Consumer-Patient Radiation Health and Safety Act of 1981 and the standards for licensing Dental Hygienists in dental radiography set forth below....

2011-10-01

363

Challenges in Hyperon Decays.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We give a personal overview of some of the unsolved problems related to hyperon decays. We cover nonleptonic decays, radiative decays and magnetic moments. Some of the theoretical issues are also touched upon.

D. Chang

2000-01-01

364

Dental-service Dental Radiation Safety and Protection: Program guide  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of the program guide for Dental Radiation Safety and Protection is to assist VA dental personnel in developing radiologic procedures that ensure maximum safety for their patients and themselves. In order to do this, the authors have included a summary of the biological hazards associated with exposure to x-radiation, provided information on patient exposure levels associated with dental X-ray units, and explained the methods for reducing patient and staff exposure to X-rays.

Not Available

1991-08-27

365

Copper allergy from dental copper amalgam?  

PubMed

A 65-year-old female was investigated due to a gradually increasing greenish colour change of her plastic dental splint, which she used to prevent teeth grinding when sleeping. Furthermore, she had noted a greenish/bluish colour change on the back of her black gloves, which she used to wipe her tears away while walking outdoors. The investigation revealed that the patient had a contact allergy to copper, which is very rare. She had, however, had no occupational exposure to copper. The contact allergy may be caused by long-term exposure of the oral mucosa to copper from copper-rich amalgam fillings, which were frequently used in childhood dentistry up to the 1960s in Sweden. The deposition of a copper-containing coating on the dental splint may be caused by a raised copper intake from drinking water, increasing the copper excretion in saliva, in combination with release of copper due to electrochemical corrosion of dental amalgam. The greenish colour change of the surface of the splint is probably caused by deposition of a mixture of copper compounds, e.g. copper carbonates. Analysis by the X-ray diffraction technique indicates that the dominant component is copper oxide (Cu2O and CuO). The corresponding greenish/bluish discoloration observed on the back of the patient's gloves may be caused by increased copper excretion in tears. PMID:12083714

Gerhardsson, Lars; Björkner, Bert; Karlsteen, Magnus; Schütz, Andrejs

2002-05-01

366

Chlorhexidine-releasing methacrylate dental composite materials.  

PubMed

Light curable antibacterial, dental composite restoration materials, consisting of 80 wt% of a strontium fluoroaluminosilicate glass dispersed in methacrylate monomers have been produced. The monomers contained 40-100 wt% of a 10 wt% chlorhexidine diacetate (CHXA) in hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) solution and 60-0 wt% of a 50/50 mix of urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) and triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA). On raising HEMA content, light cure polymerisation rates decreased. Conversely, water sorption induced swelling and rates of diffusion controlled CHXA release from the set materials increased. Experimental composites with 50 and 90 wt% of the CHXA in HEMA solution in the monomer were shown, within a constant depth film fermentor (CDFF), to have slower rates of biofilm growth on their surfaces between 1 and 7 days than the commercial dental composite Z250 or fluoride-releasing dental cements, Fuji II LC and Fuji IX. When an excavated bovine dentine cylinder re-filled with Z250 was placed for 10 weeks in the CDFF, both bacteria and polymers from the artificial saliva penetrated between the material and dentine. With the 50 wt% experimental HEMA/CHXA formulation, this bacterial microleakage was substantially reduced. Polymer leakage, however, still occurred. Both polymer and bacterial microleakage were prevented with a 90 wt% HEMA/CHXA restoration in the bovine dentine due to swelling compensation for polymerisation shrinkage in combination with antibacterial release. PMID:15955557

Leung, Danny; Spratt, David A; Pratten, Jonathan; Gulabivala, Kishor; Mordan, Nicola J; Young, Anne M

2005-12-01

367

Patterns of dental therapists' scope of practice and employment in Victoria, Australia.  

PubMed

In Australia, dental therapists have practiced only within the state-operated School Dental Services (SDS) for around forty years providing preventive, diagnostic, restorative, and health promotion services to children and adolescents in a collaborative and referral relationship with dentists. Changes to legislation in 2000 have seen limits to dental therapists' employment removed, allowing private sector employment. This study examines the changes to dental therapists' employment since 2000 using a self-completed questionnaire with a response rate of 82 percent. Approximately one-third of responding dental therapists reported that they spent some time employed outside the SDS in community health services and private orthodontic and general practices, which indicates an acceptance of this type of dental care provider in these areas. The clinical services that dental therapists are currently providing are a complex mix with significant variations according to type and geographical location of practice, but include high levels of patient assessment, diagnosis, treatment planning, and the restoration of teeth. The findings from this study indicate that when legislative restrictions on employment settings are removed, there is a demand and demonstrable role for dental therapist-delivered services in nongovernment dental practices. PMID:19289730

Satur, Julie; Gussy, Mark; Mariño, Rodrigo; Martini, Tamsin

2009-03-01

368

The effects of finger rest positions on hand muscle load and pinch force in simulated dental hygiene work.  

PubMed

One of the techniques taught in dental and dental hygiene programs is to use finger rests to stabilize the instrument while performing dental scaling or other types of dental work. It is believed that finger rests may also reduce muscle stress and prevent injury due to muscle fatigue. In this study the effects of three different finger rest positions on hand muscle activity and thumb pinch force were compared. Twelve predental students performed simulated dental scaling tasks on a manikin using three different finger rest positions: 1) no finger rest, 2) one finger rest, and 3) two finger rests. Muscle activity and thumb pinch force were measured by surface electromyography and a pressure sensor, respectively. Using two finger rests was always associated with reduced thumb pinch force and muscle activity, as compared to not using any finger rests (p<0.05), while using one finger rest reduced thumb pinch force and muscle activity in most cases. Hence, using finger rests plays an important role in reducing the muscle load of the hand in students performing simulated dental hygiene work. It is concluded that dental and dental hygiene students may benefit from instructions for using finger rests at an early stage of their clinical training. Including biomechanical and ergonomic principles in dental and dental hygiene curricula will raise awareness of ergonomics among dental practitioners and help them incorporate these principles into daily practice. PMID:15800259

Dong, Hui; Barr, Alan; Loomer, Peter; Rempel, David

2005-04-01

369

Foreign body ingestion in dental practice.  

PubMed

Most foreign bodies pass through the gastrointestinal tract uneventfully. The majority of the reported literature describes the management of ingested blunt objects. However, ingestion of sharp objects can still occur with a higher rate of perforation corresponding to treatment dilemmas. We report a case of inadvertently ingested sharp foreign body by a special child, which was retrieved by endoscopic guided forceps. Urgent endoscopic assessment and retrieval of recently ingested sharp dental foreign body is indicated and routine use of preventive measures such as rubber dam, gauze throat screens or floss ligatures is suggested. PMID:22016321

Bhatnagar, S; Das, U M; Chandan, G D; Prashanth, S T; Gowda, L; Shiggaon, N

370

Gender differences in practice patterns for diagnosis and treatment of dental caries: Findings from The Dental PBRN  

PubMed Central

Objectives A number of articles have addressed gender differences in the productivity of dentists, but little is known about differences in practice patterns for caries management. This study compared the use of a comprehensive range of specific diagnostic methods, preventive agents, and restorative decision making for caries management between male and female dentists who were members of The Dental Practice-Based Research Network(DPBRN). Methods This study surveyed general dentists who were members of DPBRN and who practiced within the United States. The survey asked about dentist, practice, and patient characteristics, as well as prevention, assessment, and treatment of dental caries. Differences in years since dental school graduation, practice model, full/part-time status, and practice owner/employee were adjusted in the statistical models, before making conclusions about gender differences. Results Three hundred ninety-three male (84%) and seventy-three female (16%) dentists participated. Female dentists recommended at-home fluoride to a significantly larger proportion of their patients, whereas males had a preference for using in-office fluoride treatments with pediatric patients. Female dentists also choose to restore interproximal lesions at a significantly later stage of development, preferring to use preventive therapy more often at earlier stages of dental caries. There were few differences in diagnostic methods, time spent on or charges for restorative dentistry, and busyness of their practices. Conclusion DPBRN female dentists differ from their male counterparts in some aspects of the prevention, assessment, and treatment of dental caries, even with significant covariates taken into account. Practice patterns of female dentists suggest a greater caries preventive treatment philosophy.

Riley, Joseph L.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Rouisse, Kathleen M.; McClelland, Jocelyn; Gilbert, Gregg H.

2011-01-01

371

Stress Relaxation of Dental Amalgam Alloys.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Division of Dental Materials, U.S. Army Institute of Dental Research, has conducted detailed studies of the static and dynamic properties of dental amalgam alloys. Short term stress relaxation of four amalgam alloys was studied. Test materials include...

E. F. Huget L. B. de Simon R. S. Hertert

1977-01-01

372

American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine  

MedlinePLUS

... AADSM Fall Courses – Last Chance to Register! Dental Sleep Medicine: An area of practice that focuses on the ... Prosthetic Services Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine, All Rights Reserved. American Academy of Dental Sleep ...

373

Dental Auxiliary Utilization: A National Evaluation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Dental Auxiliary Utilization Grant Program has the purpose of providing Federal grants to dental schools for training dental students in the effective use of auxiliary personnel. Recently a new program, the Training in Expanded Auxiliary Management (T...

1973-01-01

374

21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental amalgamator is a device,...

2013-04-01

375

Dental Therapy Assistant: Expectations, Preferences, and Reality.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Army has implemented a program in dental care delivery which consists of dental treatment teams utilizing Dental Therapy Assistants (DTAs). The primary purpose of the present study was to look for overall conflicts between DTAs' attitudes and performa...

A. D. Mangelsdorff

1976-01-01

376

21 CFR 872.3240 - Dental bur.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental bur. 872.3240 Section...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3240 Dental bur. (a)...

2013-04-01

377

21 CFR 868.5820 - Dental protector.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-04-01 false Dental protector. 868.5820 ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...Therapeutic Devices § 868.5820 Dental protector. (a) Identification. A dental protector is a device...

2013-04-01

378

21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc...

2013-04-01

379

21 CFR 872.6390 - Dental floss.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-04-01 false Dental floss. 872.6390 Section...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6390 Dental floss. (a)...

2013-04-01

380

21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...amalgam capsules containing mercury and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam material is intended for filling dental caries. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The...

2010-04-01

381

21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...amalgam capsules containing mercury and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam material is intended for filling dental caries. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The...

2009-04-01

382

A literature review of dental erosion in children.  

PubMed

Dental erosion is increasingly recognized as a common condition in paediatric dentistry with complications of tooth sensitivity, altered aesthetics and loss of occlusal vertical dimension. The prevalence of erosion in children has been reported to range from 10% to over 80%. The primary dentition is thought to be more susceptible to erosion compared to the permanent dentition due to the thinner and less mineralized enamel. The aim of this paper was to critically review dental erosion in children with regards to its prevalence, aetiology, diagnosis and prevention. The associations between erosion and other common conditions in children such as caries and enamel hypoplasia are also discussed. PMID:21133936

Taji, S; Seow, W K

2010-12-01

383

Semileptonic Decays  

SciTech Connect

The following is an overview of the measurements of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}| that are based on detailed studies of semileptonic B decays by the BABAR and Belle Collaborations and major advances in QCD calculations. In addition, a new and improved measurement of the ratios R(D{sup (*)}) = {Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) is presented. Here D{sup (*)} refers to a D or a D* meson and {ell} is either e or {mu}. The results, R(D) = 0.440 {+-} 0.058 {+-} 0.042 and R(D*) = 0.332 {+-} 0.024 {+-} 0.018, exceed the Standard Model expectations by 2.0{sigma} and 2.7{sigma}, respectively. Taken together, they disagree with these expectations at the 3.4{sigma} level. The excess of events cannot be explained by a charged Higgs boson in the type II two-Higgs-doublet model.

Luth, Vera G.; /SLAC

2012-10-02

384

Dental office design.  

PubMed

Dental office design affects many aspects of dental practice often not realized or understood by the practitioner. These range from efficient operatory layout and equipment selection to lighting, effective appointment and business area design, and increased case acceptance. Although a major portion of the material presented in the area of office design is empirical and subjective in nature, there is a large enough body of information to suggest the need for dentists to consider strongly the opinions reviewed here. The financial investment required in achieving a new office or remodeling an existing one must be considered. The effective use of design professionals, ie, architects and interior designers, in planning and executing a project is also discussed in the literature reviewed. PMID:1807468

Demaree, H L

1991-10-01

385

Sports dentistry and dental traumatology.  

PubMed

Sports dentistry had its origins in the 1980s. More recently, the Academy for Sports Dentistry joined forces with the International Association of Dental Traumatology in cosponsoring the World Congress on Sports Dentistry and Dental Traumatology. It is the intent of the present paper to introduce readers to the arena of sports dentistry, suggest future areas for collaborative research, and stimulate authors to submit high quality, scientifically based manuscripts on sports dentistry to Dental Traumatology. PMID:12427197

Ranalli, Dennis N

2002-10-01

386

[Phenomenon of dental fear].  

PubMed

Odontophobia is a rather unique phobia with special psychosomatic components that impact on the dental health of odontophobic persons. It also has psychosocial components largely as a result of destruction of the teeth and subsequent embarrassment that can affect a person and cause a vicious cycle of dental fear. The phenomenon is facilitated by misunderstandings and myths generated by both patients and dentists. The most common reasons given in the literature for such strong fears of dental treatment are: 1) bad experiences in childhood for 85% of cases, 2) feeling of powerlessness and lack of control over personal emotional reactions and over the social situation in the dental chair, 3) social learning processes in which the image of the dentist is cast in a negative light by the mass media or by the person's relatives or friends and 4) that the person has other psychologic problems (in 20% of cases), such as serious phobias and/or neuroses. A strategy of researching and thus tackling the problem is presented which focuses on three essential targets that require studying and change: 1) the community at large and their image of the dentist, 2) the patient role and 3) the dentist role. Various model projects are presented along with their diagnostic systems. These are seen to focus in varying degrees on different elements of the target groups that effect the dentist-patient relationship but the need to come out into the community and make the social environment right for these patients is an important factor in all strategies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2377962

Moore, R; Birn, H

1990-01-01

387

Dental care - adult  

MedlinePLUS

Tooth decay and gum disease are largely caused by plaque, a sticky combination of bacteria and food. Plaque begins to accumulate on teeth within 20 minutes after eating. If this plaque is not removed ...

388

A psychodynamic theory for dental phobia.  

PubMed

Dentists recognise various degrees of dental anxiety in their patients. There are those who are relaxed, those who are anxious and those who are dentally phobic. The question remains why should disagreeable dental experiences result in dental anxiety in one patient, have little effect upon another and cause dental phobia in a third? The aim of this paper is to propose a psychodynamic theory for dental phobia based upon the ideas of false connections and displacement. PMID:9549911

Freeman, R

1998-02-28

389

Evaluation of an Academic Service-Learning Course on Special Needs Patients for Dental Hygiene Students: A Qualitative Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of a service-learning course on special needs patients for dental hygiene students by considering student reflections, community site coordinators' feedback, and faculty reflections in a qualitative analysis. Twenty-three female dental hygiene students beginning their fourth semester in the program provided preventive oral health services at eight community sites serving six

Nancy T. Keselyak; Melanie Simmer-Beck; Kimberly Krust Bray; Cynthia C. Gadbury-Amyot

390

Dental care and treatments provided under general anaesthesia in the Helsinki Public Dental Service  

PubMed Central

Background Dental general anaesthesia (DGA) is a very efficient treatment modality, but is considered only in the last resort because of the risks posed by general anaesthesia to patients’ overall health. Health services and their treatment policies regarding DGA vary from country to country. The aims of this work were to determine the reasons for DGA in the Helsinki Public Dental Service (PDS) and to assess the role of patient characteristics in the variation in reasons and in the treatments given with special focus on preventive care. Methods The data covered all DGA patients treated in the PDS in Helsinki in 2010. The data were collected from patient documents and included personal background: age (<6, 6–12, 13–17, 18–68), gender, immigration, previous conscious sedation and previous DGA; medical background; reasons for DGA and treatments provided. Chi-square tests, Fisher’s exact test, and logistic regression modelling were employed in the statistical analyses. Results The DGA patients (n=349) were aged 2.3 to 67.2 years. Immigrants predominated in the youngest age group (p<0.001) and medically compromised patients among the adults (p<0.001) relative to the other age groups. The main reason for DGA was extreme non-cooperation (65%) followed by dental fear (37%) and an excessive need for treatment (26%). In total, 3435 treatments were performed under DGA, 57% of which were restorations, 24% tooth extractions, 5% preventive measures, 5% radiography, 4% endodontics and the remaining 5% periodontics, surgical procedures and miscellaneous. The reasons for DGA and the treatments provided varied according to age, immigration, previous sedation and DGA and medical background. The logistic regression model showed that previous sedation (OR 2.3; 95%CI 1.3-4.1; p=0.005) and extreme non-cooperation (OR 1.7; 95%CI 0.9-3.2; p=0.103) were most indicative of preventive measures given. Conclusions Extreme non-cooperation, dental fear and an excessive need for treatment were the main reasons for the use of comprehensive, conservative DGA in the Helsinki PDS. The reasons for the use of DGA and the treatments provided varied according to personal and medical background, and immigration status with no gender-differences. Preventive measures formed only a minor part of the dental care given under DGA.

2012-01-01

391

Oral Health Status and Behaviour of Mauritians Visiting Private Dental Clinics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: This paper seeks to assess the oral health status and behaviour of a sample of the Mauritian population visiting private dental clinics. Design/methodology/approach: Oral health status was determined using the World Health Organization (Decayed, Missing, Filled Teeth (DMFT) index indicating the prevalence of caries, and factors…

Gunsam, P. Pugo; Banka, S.

2011-01-01

392

Prevalence of dental caries in schoolchildren of the province of Granada (Spain)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A sample of 3,347 students between 5 and 14 years of age was selected from the entire student population in the province of Granada (Spain) to study the prevalence of dental caries and several risk factors for the disease. Decay was ascertained in the study population by mean of the following indices: df, DMF, and DMFS. Risk factors considered were

R. Rodríguez-Contreras Pelayo; M. Delgado Rodríguez; R. Gálvez Vargas

1989-01-01

393

Risk factors for dental caries in the five-year-old South Australian population  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: This study tested the hypothesis that risk behaviours in disadvantaged groups would explain socio-economic inequality in dental caries prevalence among preschool children. Methods: Using a case-control study, children with caries experience (one or more decayed, missing or filled primary tooth surfaces) and with no caries experience were sampled with known probabilities from among five year olds attending the South

GD Slade; AE Sanders; CJ Bill

2006-01-01

394

Increased prevalence of dental caries and poor oral hygiene in juvenile idiopathic arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. Recent decades have seen a trend to treat juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) with increasing immunosuppression to improve the long-term outcome. Poor oral hygiene and dental decay cause significant morbidity, and patients with chronic disease (who may be further immunocompromised by treatment) are at greater risk. This study investigated patients with JIA using standard measures of oral health. Methods. One

R. R. Welbury; J. M. Thomason; J. L. Fitzgerald; I. N. Steen; N. J. Marshall; H. E. Foster

2003-01-01

395

The Effect of Nutritional Status on the Age Distribution of Dental Caries in the Primary Teeth  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cross-sectional study of dental caries in the primary teeth as a function of nutritional status was conducted on 1481 children one to 13 years old in Lima, Peru. Forty-one percent of the children were found to be chronically malnourished (stunted), 3% were acutely malnourished (wasted), and 5% were both stunted and wasted. A plot of decayed, extracted, and filled

J. O. Alvarez; J. C. Eguren; J. Caceda; J. M. Navia

1990-01-01

396

Paste, wrap, and shimmy: a regimen for the prevention of gum disease.  

PubMed

The body of evidence showing a possible correlation between gum infection and systemic diseases is well documented and growing. At the same time, the prevalence of gum infection is increasing in the general populace. Gum infection and disease are routinely seen in patients who adhere to regular dental hygiene regimens and see their dentists on a regular basis. One of the reasons typical daily dental care does not eradicate gum disease (gingivitis) is that the usual home care regimens do not attack a major underlying cause of gingivitis: the layer of biofilm in the sulcus surrounding the tooth's root. This biofilm harbors and protects the bacteria that cause gum disease and root decay. Research has shown that there are no "magic bullets" in the form of rinses, pills, or special tools that effectively destroy the bacteria and its protective calyx. Therefore, daily dental regimens must be changed until the absence of gum infection and inflammation becomes the standard of care. The Paste, Wrap, and Shimmy method is presented in a way that can be understood by all patients. It can be reproduced and used as a teaching supplement by the dental team. The method is conceptually simple and inexpensive, but not intuitive or easy. It must be coached and reinforced; however, if implemented, it can be very effective. The author's office has increased the length of new patient and recurring hygiene visits so that the method can be properly taught through repetitive practice and visual presentations. Prevention is not insurance-driven, so dentists most often provide it as a free service. The rewards are significant, however, and on initial exposure to this method, patients routinely ask: "Why haven't I been shown this before?" They will also have an expectation that the learning process will be repeated at each visit until they are free of infection. PMID:23302359

Jester, Craig W

397

RURAL MEXICAN IMMIGRANT PARENTS' INTERPRETATION OF CHILDREN'S DENTAL SYMPTOMS AND DECISIONS TO SEEK TREATMENT  

PubMed Central

Objective Mexican-origin children have higher rates of decay and lower dental utilization rates than children from all other racial/ethnic groups. Different cultural groups’ interpretations of dental symptoms illuminate their different decision-making process about seeking care. Through ethnography in a small rural U.S. city, we examined low-income Mexican immigrant caregivers’ interpretations of their children’s dental symptoms and evaluations of the need for treatment. Basic Research Design We conducted 49 in-depth interviews with 26 Mexican immigrant caregivers about their perceptions of their children’s dental symptoms, and observations of five such caregivers’ help-seeking episodes and 30 other caregivers’ presentation of their children’s symptoms at dental clinics. All interviews and fieldnotes were analyzed qualitatively through a series of readings and codings. Results A conceptual model of caregivers’ decision-making processes was developed. Most caregivers deduced the health of teeth from visible appearance, and thus children’s complaints of pain alone were often ineffective in triggering a dental visit. Caregivers often delayed treatment because they viewed their children’s oral disease as mere “stains” requiring cleaning rather than as bacterial infections requiring restorative treatment. Parents appeared to confuse carious “stains” with fluorosis stains common in rural Mexico. Conclusions Even when Mexican immigrant caregivers recognize a dental problem, they often misinterpret it as a “stain.” Caregivers’ interpretations of decay were shaped by their lack of experience with children’s decay in rural Mexico. Oral health education programs should help rural immigrant caregivers distinguish between “stains” and “cavities,” and understand the heightened oral hygiene requirements of the cariogenic diet in industrialized countries.

Horton, Sarah; Barker, Judith C.

2012-01-01

398

Mandatory Clinical Practice for Dental and Dental Hygiene Faculty.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dental and dental hygiene faculty should maintain their clinical skills through regular practice, to improve their ability to relate to students through instruction, provide an additional source of income, and improve their image in the community. Institutional policies fostering and regulating faculty practice plans are suggested. (Author/MSE)

Cameron, Cheryl A.; And Others

1982-01-01

399

Dental health status of recipients of community dental health services  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new information system was used routinely to monitor clinical dental services. Data on 20,729 courses of treatment support the validity and usefulness of continuously collected information about dental health status. Patients who had not attended a community clinic within the year before examination did not need courses of treatment that differed appreciably from those for patients who had attended

S Gelbier; J Packham; S Simmons; I Hopes

1983-01-01

400

Highly anxious dental patients report more pain during dental injections  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives In the present study, the relationship between anxiety and pain was investigated using a clinically relevant sample and stimulus.Methods A sample of highly anxious dental patients (n = 23) and a sample of 'normal' subjects (n = 57) were compared with respect to the duration and intensity of pain while receiving a dental anaesthetic injection.Results As expected, highly anxious

P. C. Makkes; A. J. van Wijk

2008-01-01

401

Forensic dental training in the dental school curriculum.  

PubMed

This article reviews the literature regarding forensic education in the dental school curriculum and describes an exercise in forensic identification of victims of a mass casualty. Radiographs were made of dentate human cadavers in the gross anatomy laboratory at the Southern Illinois School of Dental Medicine. The jaws were then removed to provide "wet specimens" for the exercise. Several restorations were performed on the cadaver teeth, after which radiographs of the dissected jaws were made. One author wrote up mock dental records for each of the victims. These records included the first set or "premortem" radiographs. Students participating in the exercise were provided with a plane crash scenario, the dental records of the passengers on the manifest, the dissected jaws, and the second set or "postmortem" radiographs. Students were expected to form three teams. The first two teams evaluated the ante-mortem and postmortem dental records. The third team compared the ante-mortem and postmortem records to arrive at identification. The purpose of the exercise was twofold. It introduced dental students to forensic dentistry and emphasized the need for complete and accurate record keeping in the dental office. Several factors lessened the realism of the exercise and made it difficult to reproduce in the future. These included the uniformity of the dental records and the destruction of cadaver material following the exercise. PMID:17456095

Stoeckel, Daniel C; Merkley, Patricia J; McGivney, James

2007-05-01

402

Dental hygiene preceptorship: an issue of risk management.  

PubMed

The potential for legal liabilities exists in all aspects of dental hygiene practice. Contemporary malpractice law demands the highest standards for oral healthcare. Formal educational credentials of dental hygiene practitioners contribute to the provision of quality healthcare, an environment that elicits societal trust, and the prevention of legal risks. The purpose of this paper is to explore an alternative to formal dental hygiene education--preceptorship training--as it relates to current theories and practices in risk management. Key issues explored include expectations and rights of society, responsibility of the professional and the profession to society, risk management in the practice setting, and how preceptorship and formal education compare, relative to these key issues. The paper also analyzes whether the preceptorship concept is counterproductive for society, the profession, and the employer; and explains how the malpractice crisis in America is challenging oral health providers to rise to higher levels of education and professional competence. PMID:2090779

Curran, A E; Darby, M

403

Evaluating oral health promotion activity within a general dental practice.  

PubMed

The prevention of the common dental diseases is fundamental to modern day general dental practice. Oral health promotion (OHP) is therefore key to facilitating health outcomes within organisations. The literature surrounding OHP stresses the importance of evaluation in order to assess the effectiveness of OHP activities. This paper describes the evaluation of OHP within a general dental practice setting. Early attendance, the use of adult toothpastes during childhood and consequential fluorosis are investigated. A small service evaluation study of 100 consecutive patients was undertaken. The results support the ongoing promotion of early attendance and the use of toothpastes with adequate fluoride levels. There was no evidence of unsightly fluorosis in the sample studied. PMID:23887535

Richards, W

2013-07-01

404

Strategic Protein Target Analysis for Developing Drugs to Stop Dental Caries  

PubMed Central

Dental caries is the most common disease to cause irreversible damage in humans. Several therapeutic agents are available to treat or prevent dental caries, but none besides fluoride has significantly influenced the disease burden globally. Etiologic mechanisms of the mutans group streptococci and specific Lactobacillus species have been characterized to various degrees of detail, from identification of physiologic processes to specific proteins. Here, we analyze the entire Streptococcus mutans proteome for potential drug targets by investigating their uniqueness with respect to non-cariogenic dental plaque bacteria, quality of protein structure models, and the likelihood of finding a drug for the active site. Our results suggest specific targets for rational drug discovery, including 15 known virulence factors, 16 proteins for which crystallographic structures are available, and 84 previously uncharacterized proteins, with various levels of similarity to homologs in dental plaque bacteria. This analysis provides a map to streamline the process of clinical development of effective multispecies pharmacologic interventions for dental caries.

Horst, J.A.; Pieper, U.; Sali, A.; Zhan, L.; Chopra, G.; Samudrala, R.; Featherstone, J.D.B.

2012-01-01

405

Dental caries knowledge in a group of Northwest Territories children.  

PubMed

A total of 953 children in schools in communities in the Northwest Territories was surveyed to determine their attitudes and knowledge about dental decay. A questionnaire was answered by these Native and non-Native children in the Northwest Territories. The median age of the children was 12.5 years. The girls tended to brush their teeth more frequently and consumed less sugared sweets between meals. More of the girls and in particular the Native girls knew about "nursing" caries. The Native students more often than not went for dental treatment when it was necessary. The Native students brushed their teeth less frequently and often learned to brush their teeth on their own. The consumption of sugared sweets between meals was greater in the Native sample. The knowledge level of the factors that affect dental decay rates was lower in the Native group, but was not extremely high in either group. These children should receive more information on oral health practices and be given an opportunity to improve their oral health knowledge. PMID:10093268

Thompson, G W; Schuller, P D; Lewis, D W

1998-01-01

406

Proton decay theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Topics include minimal SU(5) predictions, gauge boson mediated proton decay, uncertainties in tau\\/sub p\\/, Higgs scalar effects, proton decay via Higgs scalars, supersymmetric SU(5), dimension 5 operators and proton decay, and Higgs scalars and proton decay. (WHK)

Marciano

1983-01-01

407

Genetic susceptibility to dental implant failure: a critical review.  

PubMed

The observation that clinical factors alone do not explain why some patients develop implant loss; the understanding of the osseointegrated implant failure as a complex, multifactorial process; and the observed aggregation of repetitive failure in certain individuals raise interesting questions related to host susceptibility to dental implant failure. Genetic analysis applied to dental implants began in the late 1990s, and since then, increased interest in genetic susceptibility to the phenotype has been demonstrated by several studies. These studies, however, have been based on and limited to candidate gene association analysis and were intended to find associations between specific alleles and/or genotypes of genetic markers and susceptibility to implant failure. The aim of this review is to provide a brief description of the current methodology for genetic analysis of complex traits, followed by a comprehensive review of the literature related to genetic susceptibility to dental implant failure and a discussion of different aspects of the applied methodology. Moreover, a novel approach of genome wide, case-control analysis is discussed as an alternative method to access genetic influence to dental implant failure mechanisms. Advances toward the elucidation of the genetic basis of dental implant loss may contribute to the understanding of why some patients do not respond to currently available treatments while others do and provide potential targets for effective screening, prevention, and treatment. For example, clinicians might be able to estimate, before the elective surgical procedure, the risk of a given patient to develop a negative individual host response. PMID:18700362

Alvim-Pereira, Fabino; Montes, Claudia C; Mira, Marcelo T; Trevilatto, Paula C

408

Inhibition of human gelatinases by metals released from dental amalgam.  

PubMed

The interaction between metal ions and the oral environment is a major subject matter in dental research. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated in pathologic oral processes such as periodontal tissue destruction, root caries, tumor invasion and temporomandibular joint disorders. The aim of this study was to test the effect of metal ions released from dental amalgam on the major gingival gelatinolytic MMPs. Gingival human explants were cultured overnight in DMEM and the activity of secreted enzymes was analyzed by gelatin zymography in buffers conditioned with dispersed phase or concentional phase dental amalgams. The major enzymes present in conditioned media were characterized as MMP-2 and MMP-9 by immunoprecipitation. The proteolytic activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were strongly inhibited by dispersed phase amalgams conditioned buffers. Inhibition of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities was partly prevented by the addition of 1,10 phenanthroline, a divalent metal chelator, to the amalgam conditioned buffers. Dental amalgam conditioned buffer also inhibited the degradation of denatured type I collagen by purified MMP-2 on liquid phase assays. These findings suggest that the activity of oral tissue MMPs may be modulated by metal ions released from dental amalgam. PMID:11426881

Souza, A P; Gerlach, R F; Line, S R

2001-07-01

409

Health Instruction Packages: Dental Assisting.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of four learning modules to instruct dental assisting students in various office skills. The first module, "Dental Office Telephone Techniques," examines the qualities of a good telephone voice and demeanor and provides guidelines for taking a message and handling various telephone…

McEnery, Paula

410

Dental Chairside Technique. Student's Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: local anesthesia; dental office emergencies; oral hygiene;…

Apfel, Maura; Weaver, Trudy Karlene

411

Dental care utilization over time  

Microsoft Academic Search

Between 1950 and 1978, per capita real dental expenfitures in the U.S. grew at an average annual rate of 3.33%. Between 1978 and 1989 there was virtually no net growth in this measure of dental care utilization. This sharp curtailment of utilization growth has prompted debate about the sources of this change. Possible explanations include, among others, a reduction in

Tryfon Beazoglou; L. Jackson Brown; Dennis Heffley

1993-01-01

412

Translucency of Human Dental Enamel  

Microsoft Academic Search

Translucency of human dental enamel was determined by total transmittance of wavelengths from 400 to 700 nm. The transmission coefficient at 525 nm was 0.481 mm-1. Total transmission of light through human dental enamel increased with increasing wavelength. Human tooth enamel is more translucent at higher wavelengths. The translucency of wet human enamel and enamel after dehydration was also measured

R. H. W. Brodbelt; W. J. OBrien; P. L. Fan; J. G. Frazer-Dib; R. Yu

1981-01-01

413

Quality assurance and dental hygiene  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dental hygiene in Canada has experienced significant growth. It has shifted from an emerging occupation to a regulated health profession in several jurisdictions. Many achievements may be attributed to this growth, including self-regulation and a national code of ethics. However, the majority of Canadian dental hygienists are relying on traditional, outdated and ineffective quality assurance mechanisms, such as mandatory continuing

E. Bilawka; B. Craig

2003-01-01

414

Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A reference guide to laws, rules, and regulations that govern dentistry and dental hygiene practice in New York State is presented. In addition to identifying licensing requirements/procedures for dentists and dental hygienists, general provisions of Title VIII of the Education Law are covered, along with state management, professional misconduct,…

New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

415

Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The handbook contains laws, rules, and regulations of the New York State Education Department that govern dentistry and dental hygiene practice in the state. It describes licensure requirements and includes complete application forms and instructions for obtaining license and first registration as a dentist and dental hygienist. Applicants are…

New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

416

Denitrification in human dental plaque  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Microbial denitrification is not considered important in human-associated microbial communities. Accordingly, metabolic investigations of the microbial biofilm communities of human dental plaque have focused on aerobic respiration and acid fermentation of carbohydrates, even though it is known that the oral habitat is constantly exposed to nitrate (NO3-) concentrations in the millimolar range and that dental plaque houses bacteria that

Frank Schreiber; Peter Stief; Armin Gieseke; Ines M Heisterkamp; Willy Verstraete; Dirk de Beer; Paul Stoodley

2010-01-01

417

Regenerative Potential of Dental Pulp  

Microsoft Academic Search

The regenerative potential of dental pulp, particularly in mature teeth, has been considered extremely limited. However, our improved understanding of pulpal inflam- mation and repair and improved dental materials and technologies make vital pulp therapy a viable alterna- tive to root canal treatment. This article explores our knowledge in this regard and the future potential of saving or even regenerating

Martin Trope

418

Occlusion, TMDs, and dental education  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paradigmatic shift to evidence-based dentistry (EBD) that relates to occlusal therapy, selective occlusal adjustment (OA) and stabilization splints therapy (SS) for TMDs has had an unfavourable impact on the teaching of many of the important aspects of occlusion needed in dental practice. The teaching of OA systematically in dental schools has been nearly abandoned because of the belief that

Major M Ash Jr

2007-01-01

419

Clinical Guidelines. Dental Hygiene Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This manual contains information concerning the policies and procedures of the Southern Illinois University-Carbondale Dental Hygiene Clinic. The manual is presented in a question/answer format for the information and convenience of dental hygiene students in the program, and is intended to answer their questions concerning clinical policies and…

Branson, Bonnie

420

Dental anxiety in the elderly  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review of the literature shows that dental anxiety in the elderly has been estimated at a much lower level than that found in the general population. However, it is thought that the problem may have been underestimated because older persons may have masked their feelings by minimizing their needs for dental treatment. It is suggested that dentists need to

Andrée Liddell; David Locker

1993-01-01

421

Psychosocial Predictors of Dental Anxiety  

Microsoft Academic Search

Building on earlier research on psychosocial predictors of dental anxiety, this study examined the predictive ability of several demographic and personality variables. To accomplish this goal, a combined sample of 89 dental patients and 55 college students completed a self-report survey. Results indicated that greater age, female gender, lower income, greater satisfaction with life, greater thought suppression, and a stronger

James B. Hittner; Rebecca Hemmo

2009-01-01

422

Competition and dental services.  

PubMed

Dental services for adults are different from all other Norwegian health services in that they are provided by private producers (dentists) who have full freedom to establish a practice. They have had this freedom since the end of World War II. A further liberalization of the market for dental services occurred in November 1995, when the so-called normal tariff was repealed. The system changed from a fixed fee system to a deregulated fee system. In principle, the market for dental services for adults operates as a free competitive market, in which dentists must compete for a market share. The aim of this study was to study the short-term effects of competition. A comprehensive set of data on fees, practice characteristics, treatment profiles and factors that dentists take into account when determining fees was analysed. The main finding was that competition has a weak effect. No support was found for the theory that the level of fees is the result of monopolistic competition or monopoly. The results also provided some evidence against the inducement hypothesis. At this stage, it is interesting to notice that dentists do not seem to exploit the power they have to control the market. One explanation, which is consistent with the more recent literature, is that physicians' behaviour to a large extent is influenced by professional norms and caring concerns about their patients. Financial incentives are important, but these incentives are constrained by norms other than self-interest. The interpretation of the results should also take into account that the deregulation has operated for a short time and that dentists and patients may not yet have adjusted to changes in the characteristics of the market. PMID:10903544

Grytten, J; Sørensen, R

2000-07-01

423

The Prevalence of Dental Anxiety in Patients of a University Dental Clinic  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Dental anxiety remains a pervasive barrier to dental treatment for many individuals, including college-age patients. In this article, the author reviews dental anxiety and examines the usefulness of assessment instruments for identifying dental anxiety. Using 2 unique assessment instruments, he examines the prevalence of dental anxiety in his…

Woodmansey, Karl F.

2005-01-01

424

Degradation, fatigue and failure of resin dental composite materials  

PubMed Central

The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle or fiber filler containing, indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed mode loading on the flexure strength and fracture toughness. Next several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading and then an examination of 3D tomography using multiaxial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection) and after that time period from secondary decay.

Drummond, James L.

2008-01-01

425

Degradation, Fatigue, and Failure of Resin Dental Composite Materials  

SciTech Connect

The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle- or fiber-filler-containing indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on the effects of degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed-mode loading on flexure strength and fracture toughness. Several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading, and 3D tomography with multi-axial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and/or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection); after that time period, failure most often results from secondary decay.

Drummond, J.L. (UIC)

2008-11-03

426

Effects of iron salts in sucrose on dental caries and plaque in rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anaemia caused by iron deficiency and dental caries are still among the most prevalent diseases in some developing countries. Anaemia can be prevented by iron fortification of food. Previous studies demonstrated that iron-sucrose, which has been used for prevention of anaemia, reduces the incidence of caries in rats. The aim of the present study was to compare the influence of

J. C. Miguel; W. H. Bowen; S. K. Pearson

1997-01-01

427

Health risk factors and health promoting behavior of medical, dental and nursing students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The assumption of this study is: the preventive care beliefs and practices of health science students stand-out among the general public. To test this assumption, a survey of beliefs, behaviors and disease prevention practices of medical, dental, undergraduate and graduate nursing students in three health science schools was carried out in New Jersey. All students in these three schools were

G. Reza Najem; Marian Rose Catherine Passannante; James D. Foster

1995-01-01

428

Dental Disease in Infants and Toddlers: A Transdisciplinary Health Concern and Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the consequences of dental disease among children under age 3. "Early childhood carries" (ECC) is preventable but is still a major public health problem--especially in poor and medically underserved communities--due to lack of awareness about prevention. The authors explain that in transdisciplinary care, practitioners work…

Finn, Emanuel; Wolpin, Scott

2005-01-01

429

Evaluation of sterilization of dental handpieces by heating in synthetic compressor lubricant.  

PubMed

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Dental Association guidelines recommend sterilization of dental handpieces after each use. Steam autoclaving is the most commonly used sterilization method. However, pressurized steam causes corrosion and partial combustion of the handpiece lubricant, leaving a sticky carbon residue on the turbine which must then be replaced after several usages. Replacement of autoclave-damaged dental handpieces represents a major expense for dentists that may be avoided through the use of less destructive sterilization techniques. PMID:10687492

Silverstone, S E; Hill, D E

430

Undergraduate dental English education in Japanese dental schools.  

PubMed

Dental schools in Japan are among many worldwide whose medium of instruction is not in English. With advances in science, technology, and communication, the demand for the globalization of professions increases. At present, dental schools in Asia, the Middle East, and Europe have started revising their dental curricula to either include English courses for dentistry or offer a full English dental curriculum. In Japan, dental English courses started to be introduced into curricula in the early 1990s. However, a survey conducted in 1999 found that English courses were not offered in Japan's twenty-nine dental schools and there was no consensus as to what such courses should include or when and how they should be taught. Ten years after that survey, the survey results reported in this article found that the problems reported in the 1999 survey still exist. Additionally, there are still differences among schools offering English courses in terms of the timing and contents of the courses. Since teachers and school officials will have an important role in curriculum development, this article recommends that a fact-finding meeting with educators, school, and education officials be initiated to discuss, develop, and implement a core curriculum for these dental English courses. PMID:23658413

Rodis, Omar M M; Matsumura, Seishi; Kariya, Naoyuki; Nishimura, Michiko; Yoshida, Toshiko

2013-05-01

431

Factors Affecting Stress Among Indian Dental Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to investigate the perceived sources of stress and the role of parents in its etiology among dental students in a private dental school in India. A modified Dental Environment Stress (DES) Questionnaire was administered to 256 dental students. The main sources of stress were found to be fear of facing parents after failure, full

Shashidhar Acharya

432

Trends in Dentistry and Dental Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Compiled from many of the surveys that the American Dental Education Association routinely publishes, along with data from surveys conducted by the American Dental Association and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, presents statistical tables and descriptive text on trends among dental patients, among dental practitioners, and in…

Valachovic, Richard W.; Weaver, Richard G.; Sinkford, Jeanne C.; Haden, N. Karl

2001-01-01

433

The epidemic tendency of dental caries prevalence of school students from 1991 to 2005 in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  The epidemic tendency of dental caries of school students over the past 15 years in China was analyzed in order to provide\\u000a bases for prevention of dental caries. Data sets of boys and girls at the age of 7, 9, 12 years (deciduous caries) and 7,\\u000a 9, 12, 14, 17 years (permanent caries) were collected from the series of Chinese

Jie Tang; Yizhen Yu; Ying Ma

2010-01-01

434

Characteristics of Streptococcus mutans genotypes and dental caries in children.  

PubMed

This longitudinal cohort study evaluated the diversity, commonality, and stability of Streptococcus mutans genotypes associated with dental caries history. Sixty-seven 5- and 6-yr-old children, considered as being at high caries risk, had plaque collected from baseline through 36 months for S. mutans isolation and genotyping using repetitive extragenic palindromic-PCR (4,392 total isolates). Decayed, missing, or filled surfaces (dmfs (primary teeth)/DMFS (secondary teeth)) for each child were recorded at baseline. At baseline, 18 distinct genotypes were found among 911 S. mutans isolates from 67 children (diversity), and 13 genotypes were shared by at least two children (commonality). The number of genotypes per individual was positively associated with the proportion of decayed surfaces (p-ds) at baseline. Twenty-four of the 39 children who were available at follow-up visits maintained a predominant genotype for the follow-up periods (stability) and this was negatively associated with the p-ds. The observed diversity, commonality, and stability of S. mutans genotypes represent a pattern of dental caries epidemiology in this high-caries-risk community, which suggests that fewer decayed surfaces are significantly associated with lower diversity and higher stability of S. mutans genotypes. PMID:23659236

Cheon, Kyounga; Moser, Stephen A; Wiener, Howard W; Whiddon, Jennifer; Momeni, Stephanie S; Ruby, John D; Cutter, Gary R; Childers, Noel K

2013-04-19

435

The Use Of Combinations Of Caries Preventive Procedures  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are now a number of different approaches to preventing dental caries available to the clinician. Caries preventive methods are frequently used in combination. This paper reviews the potential effectiveness of combinations of preventive methods. Three groups of studies are reviewed; combinations of fluoride procedures; fluoride and fissure sealants; chlorhexadine and other agents. The review indicates that there is considerable

Helen Whelton; Denis O'Mullane

436

Update on dental nanocomposites.  

PubMed

Dental resin-composites are comprised of a photo-polymerizable organic resin matrix and mixed with silane-treated reinforcing inorganic fillers. In the development of the composites, the three main components can be modified: the inorganic fillers, the organic resin matrix, and the silane coupling agents. The aim of this article is to review recent studies of the development of dental nanocomposites and their clinical applications. In nanocomposites, nanofillers are added and distributed in a dispersed form or as clusters. For increasing the mineral content of the tooth, calcium and phosphate ion-releasing composites and fluoride-releasing nanocomposites were developed by the addition of DCPA-whiskers or TTCP-whiskers or by the use of calcium fluoride or kaolinite. For enhancing mechanical properties, nanocomposites reinforced with nanofibers or nanoparticles were investigated. For reducing polymerization shrinkage, investigators modified the resin matrix by using methacrylate and epoxy functionalized nanocomposites based on silsesquioxane cores or epoxy-resin-based nanocomposites. The effects of silanization were also studied. Clinical consideration of light-curing modes and mechanical properties of nanocomposites, especially strength durability after immersion, was also addressed. PMID:20299523

Chen, M-H

2010-03-18

437

Comparative effectiveness study to assess two examination modalities used to detect dental caries in preschool urban children.  

PubMed

Abstract Background: Dental caries affecting the primary dentition of U.S. children continues to be the most prevalent chronic childhood disease. Preventive screening for dental caries in toddlers by dental professionals is labor-intensive and costly. Studies are warranted to examine innovative screening modalities that reduce cost, are less labor-intensive, and have the potential to identify caries in high-risk children. Subjects and Methods: Two hundred ninety-one children were randomized into two groups: Group 1 received a traditional, visual tactile examination initially and follow up-examinations at 6 and 12 months, and Group 2 received a teledentistry examination initially and follow-up examinations at 6 and 12 months. The mean primary tooth decayed and filled surfaces (dfs) scores were calculated for all children at baseline and 6 and 12 months. Results: At baseline, the mean dfs score for children examined by means of teledentistry was 2.19, and for the children examined by means of the traditional method, the mean was 1.27; the means were not significantly different. At the 12-month examination, the mean dfs score for the children examined by means of teledentistry was 3.02, and for the children examined by means of the clinical method, the mean dfs was 1.70; the means were not significantly different. At 12 months the mean fillings score for the children examined by means of teledentistry was 1.43 and for the children examined by means of the clinical method was 0.51; the means were statistically significantly different (p<0.001). Conclusions: These results suggest that the teledentistry examinations were comparable to clinical examinations when screening for early childhood caries in preschool children. The data further showed that color printouts of teeth with cavities provided to parents of children who received teledentistry screenings promoted oral healthcare utilization, as children from the teledentistry study group received more dental care than children from the clinical study group. PMID:24053114

Kopycka-Kedzierawski, Dorota T; Billings, Ronald J

2013-09-21

438

Second life for dental education.  

PubMed

Dental education strives to balance the use of traditional teaching methods with technologically advanced systems to meet the needs of an ever-expanding curriculum. Establishing distance education technologies is an identified goal of dental education. Technologically adept students desire meaningful and efficient distance education instruction. A majority of preclinical instruction is devoted to acquiring psychomotor skills and methods of patient care delivery, and simulation is a pedagogical instructional tool used for acquisition of preclinical skills. The purpose of this article is to review the technological tool Second Life as a medium for total virtual patient simulation. Second Life demonstrates promise for enhancing current standardized instruction and competency testing and for promoting distance education. As an emerging technological tool, Second Life is valuable as an adjunct to preclinical teaching methods in virtual problem-solving and communication prior to student clinicians' treating patients in the clinical setting and as a resource for continuing dental education for practitioners. Because some degree of consistency exists in the curriculum objectives of preclinical patient care and assessment in dental and dental hygiene education, within the context of this article the term "dental education" refers to both professions of dentistry and dental hygiene. PMID:19910474

Phillips, Jane; Berge, Zane L

2009-11-01

439

Clinical use of dental classification.  

PubMed

The Dental Classification system used by the uniformed services is supposed to predict the incidence of dental emergencies in the operational setting, at least on the unit level. Since most Sailors and Marines are deployed without close dental support, the sea services have adopted a policy of early treatment of class 3 dental conditions during recruit training. The other services are beginning to do the same. Recently, two factors have emerged that are affecting this early dental class 3 treatment. These factors must be considered when planning to provide early dental treatment. First, changing population and dentist provider demographics in the civilian sector are beginning to affect the class 3 treatment needs of incoming military recruits. Second, attrition from recruit training results in treatment provided to recruits who leave military service before finishing their training. Some view this as a waste of resources, others as a cost of doing business. As operational jointness increases, the three services must develop and use a single dental classification terminology, as well as unified standards and guidelines, both for better research in this area and for the readiness and well-being of our patients. PMID:18277724

Jones, Gordon

2008-01-01

440

A clinical evaluation of comprehensive dental treatment for children under general anesthesia.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the comprehensive dental treatment for children under general anesthesia. From 1989 to 1991, 57 children with mean age of 3 years 2 months were treated, followed up with a minimal of 1 year. This procedure allows the dentition to be restored in one visit. Further care including preventive options and behavior shaping was provided on a 3-6 months recall schedule. The reasons for general anesthesia are that these children were either unable to accept treatment because of handicaps, extreme fear or young age. Their mean number of decayed tooth was 15 (Standard Deviation, SD = 5) and nearly three quarters of the children were under 6 years old. The most frequent treatment procedures were the extraction of teeth, composite resin restoration and Ni-Cr crown restoration. The Ni-Cr crown (1.7% failure rate) was more successful than the amalgam and composite resin restoration (9.7% failure rate). Pedo-strip crown had the highest failure rate (22%) for anterior teeth restoration. Nineteen children needed retreatment with conventional behavior guide. Six children had new caries and required further treatment. Thirty eight children returned for regular recall during the minimal 1 year follow-up period. PMID:1295652

Su, H L; Chen, P S

1992-12-01

441

78 FR 2647 - Dental Devices; Reclassification of Blade-Form Endosseous Dental Implant  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...classification of blade-form endosseous dental implants. DATES: Submit either electronic...classification of endosseous dental implants (without distinguishing implants...was published for endosseous dental implants (again without...

2013-01-14

442

Dental insurance: a purchaser perspective.  

PubMed

Principals in a dental health purchasing organization report their views and those of interviewed purchasers on dental insurance packages. Purchasers make their decisions in a market context, balancing cost with employee benefits needed to attract qualified employees. While having a dental plan is important, the financial and coverage details are not usually scrutinized by employees. Issues of access and freedom from hassle are important considerations. There is growing cynicism among purchasers that dentists are driven by a profit motive and a desire for attractive work hours. PMID:11764633

Pehacheck, P; Amundson, C

2001-01-01

443

Use of Dental Services and Dental Health, United States, 1986.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

For the 1986 National Health Interview Survey, a cross-sectional household survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics, questions were included on the dental health care of the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United State...

S. S. Jack

1988-01-01

444

Entrepreneurship in continuing dental education: a dental school perspective.  

PubMed

The definition of continuing dental education is presented, along with its benefits to the profession. The preeminence of dental schools in providing lifelong learning opportunities and freedom from commercial involvement that existed even twenty years ago has changed. Less than a quarter of CE takes place in school, and the focus there is increasingly on material with deep scientific background and hands-on learning. The newest innovations and those with the greatest commercial potential are taught elsewhere. Proposed changes in the ADA CERP standards would take on a "purist" approach that could place dental schools at a severe disadvantage while allowing "for profit" institutes to flourish and thus further undermine the role dental schools can play in providing quality professional development experiences. PMID:16350923

Liberto, Vincent N

2005-01-01

445

A Model for Dental Practice in the 21st Century  

PubMed Central

The dental profession is responsible for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases and disorders of the oral cavity and related structures. Although the majority of the US population receives excellent oral health care, a significant portion is unable to access regular care. Along with proposals to develop midlevel providers, the scope of practice for dentists needs to be reconceptualized and expanded. A broad number of primary health care activities may be conducted in the dental office, such as screening for hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dermatopathology; smoking prevention and cessation activities; and obesity interventions. More than 70% of adults saw a dentist in the past year, which represents an unrealized opportunity to improve both oral health and general health.

Eaves, Kayleigh

2011-01-01

446

Effect of osteopontin on the initial adhesion of dental bacteria.  

PubMed

Bacterial biofilms are involved in numerous infections of the human body, including dental caries. While conventional therapy of biofilm diseases aims at eradication and mechanical removal of the biofilms, recent therapeutic approaches target the mechanisms of biofilm formation and bacterial adhesion in particular. The effect of bovine milk osteopontin, a highly phosphorylated whey protein, on adhesion of Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus sanguinis, and Actinomyces naeslundii, three prominent colonizers in dental biofilms, to saliva-coated surfaces was investigated. While adhesion of A. naeslundii was not affected by osteopontin, a strong, dose-dependent reduction in the number of adhering S. mitis was shown. No difference in bacterial adhesion was observed for caseinoglycomacropeptide, another phosphorylated milk protein. Osteopontin did not affect bacterial viability, but changed bacterial surface hydrophobicity, and may be suggested to prevent the adhesins of S. mitis from interacting with their salivary receptors. The antiadhesive effect of osteopontin may be useful for caries prevention. PMID:23167781

Schlafer, Sebastian; Meyer, Rikke L; Sutherland, Duncan S; Städler, Brigitte

2012-11-20

447

Self Reported Dental Health Attitudes and Behaviour of Dental Students in Turkey  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the differences in self-reported oral health attitudes and behaviour between preclinical and clinical dental students in Turkey using Hiroshima University Dental Behavioural Inventory (HU-DBI). Methods: A Turkish version HU-DBI questionnaire with additional 7 questions, totally 27 items, was distributed among 1022 dental students. Results: The response rate was 75% (486 preclinical and 278 clinical students). Significantly higher (P=0.000) percentage of the preclinical students, compared to clinical students, worry about colour of their teeth, are bothered by the colour of their gums, put off going to the dentist until they have a toothache; think that their teeth are getting worse despite their daily brushing, it is impossible to prevent gum disease with tooth brushing alone, and they cannot help having false teeth when they are old. Moreover, the preclinical students more frequently agree on that their gums tend to bleed when they brush their teeth, they use a toothbrush which has hard bristles, and they don’t feel they’ve brushed well unless with strong strokes (P=0.000). However, a higher proportion of clinical students compared to preclinical students brush each of their teeth carefully, think that they can clean their teeth without using toothpaste, have had their dentist tell them that they brush very well (P=0.000). The HU-DBI score of clinical students (7.47±1.86) was significantly (P=0.000) higher than preclinical students (6.00±1.86). Conclusions: Dental students should have a comprehensive program, including their self-care regimes, starting from their first year of education.

Yildiz, Sinem; Dogan, Basak

2011-01-01