Sample records for preventing dental decay

  1. Prevention and management of dental decay in the pre-school child

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sergio Uribe

    2006-01-01

    Scope and purposeThe guideline addresses effective strategies for preventing and managing dental decay in the preschool child. The nature of dental decay, its diagnosis and its epidemiology are reviewed. Methods for prevention and management of the disease at an individual and population level are reviewed and identification of children at increased risk of developing dental disease is discussed.MethodologyThe guideline was

  2. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... High School and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings Loan Repayment Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care ...

  3. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution. PMID:25885796

  4. Weaker Dental Enamel Explains Dental Decay

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; Gibson, Carolyn W.; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is “weaker” while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution. PMID:25885796

  5. Reasons preventing regular dental care.

    PubMed

    Syrjälä, A M; Knuuttila, M L; Syrjälä, L K

    1992-02-01

    The aim was to determine what reasons restrict people's daily cleaning of their teeth and yearly attendance for a dental check-up, using as a theoretical background the ideas of Eichholz & Rogers on the rejection of innovation. The series consisted of young and middle-aged persons, 207 women and 183 men, who filled in a questionnaire on the above topics. The questions were phrased so as to cover different reasons for rejecting innovations. Factors analysis revealed the following factors: reasons preventing daily brushing, practical reasons, unpleasant experiences of dental care, laziness, and lack of appreciation. The reliability of the questionnaire was found to be good. Sex showed a significant correlation with reasons preventing daily brushing. Those for whom a long time had elapsed since the last visit to a dentist had more barriers relating to daily brushing, unpleasant experiences and laziness. The more educated the participants were, the fewer barriers they had in relation to the factors appreciation, unpleasant experiences, and daily brushing. PMID:1547605

  6. Preventing Dental Caries in Children from Birth Through Age Five Years

    MedlinePLUS

    ... age 5 and to preventive services provided by primary care clinicians. Primary care clinicians include doctors and nurses who provide general ... the potential benefits and harms of efforts by primary care clinicians to prevent dental caries (tooth decay): (1) ...

  7. Dental Decay Among Texas School Children.

    E-print Network

    Whitacre, Jessie (Jessie Opal)

    1934-01-01

    'WXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIOP *4. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION. BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS ULLET 'IN NO. DIVISION OF RURAL HOME RESEARCH url rNTAL DECAY AMONG ,,XAS SCHOOL CHILDREN ICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0.... S. Department of Agriculture. $In cooperation with Texaa Extension Service. lmong 6701 school children of Texas, dental decay was fot in approximately 70 per cent of the white group, 65 per cent o the Mexican, and 45 per cent of the negro...

  8. Protocol for “Seal or Varnish?” (SoV) trial: a randomised controlled trial to measure the relative cost and effectiveness of pit and fissure sealants and fluoride varnish in preventing dental decay

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dental caries remains a significant public health problem, prevalence being linked to social and economic deprivation. Occlusal surfaces of first permanent molars are the most susceptible site in the developing permanent dentition. Cochrane reviews have shown pit and fissure sealants (PFS) and fluoride varnish (FV) to be effective over no intervention in preventing caries. However, the comparative cost and effectiveness of these treatments is uncertain. The primary aim of the trial described in this protocol is to compare the clinical effectiveness of PFS and FV in preventing dental caries in first permanent molars in 6-7 year-olds. Secondary aims include: establishing the costs and the relative cost-effectiveness of PFS and FV delivered in a community/school setting; examining the impact of PFS and FV on children and their parents/carers in terms of quality of life/treatment acceptability measures; and examining the implementation of treatment in a community setting. Methods/design The trial design comprises a randomised, assessor-blinded, two-arm, parallel group trial in 6–7 year old schoolchildren. Clinical procedures and assessments will be performed at 66 primary schools, in deprived areas in South Wales. Treatments will be delivered via a mobile dental clinic. In total, 920 children will be recruited (460 per trial arm). At baseline and annually for 36 months dental caries will be recorded using the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) by trained and calibrated dentists. PFS and FV will be applied by trained dental hygienists. The FV will be applied at baseline, 6, 12, 18, 24 and 30 months. The PFS will be applied at baseline and re-examined at 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 months, and will be re-applied if the existing sealant has become detached/is insufficient. The economic analysis will estimate the costs of providing the PFS versus FV. The process evaluation will assess implementation and acceptability through acceptability scales, a schools questionnaire and interviews with children, parents, dentists, dental nurses and school staff. The primary outcome measure will be the proportion of children developing new caries on any one of up to four treated first permanent molars. Discussion The objectives of this study have been identified by the National Institute for Health Research as one of importance to the National Health Service in the UK. The results of this trial will provide guidance on which of these technologies should be adopted for the prevention of dental decay in the most susceptible tooth-surface in the most at risk children. Trial registrations ISRCTN ref: ISRCTN17029222 EudraCT: 2010-023476-23 UKCRN ref: 9273 PMID:23167481

  9. The Importance of Tooth Decay Prevention in Children under Three

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milgrom, Peter; Huebner, Colleen; Chi, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Tooth decay and tooth loss was once the norm but public health interventions have led to major improvements for most people. Nevertheless, not all children have benefited. Dental disease in young children is unacceptably high. Tooth decay is preventable. Early childhood educators are often the first to notice the problem. Professional…

  10. Diagnosis and Prevention Strategies for Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon

    2013-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the oldest and most common diseases found in humans. With the recent shift from the surgical model, which emphasized restorative treatment, to a medical model of disease management, newer strategies emphasize disease prevention and conservation of tooth structure. For early detection and monitoring of caries, rather than waiting until a cavity is formed and restorative treatment is needed, devices such as DIAGNOdent, Digital Imaging Fiber-Optic Transillumination, quantitative light-induced fluorescence, and the Electronic Caries Monitor have been introduced. For caries prevention, oral hygiene measures, fluoride application, pit-and-fissure sealants, the use of xylitol, the development of a dental caries vaccine, and the role of the primary caregiver for infants are briefly discussed.

  11. "Hepatitis" - Prevention and management in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Parveen; Kamal, Reet; Sharma, Varun; Kaur, Saravpreet

    2015-01-01

    Today, viral hepatitis has become a silent epidemic worldwide. It is the major cause of liver cirrhosis and liver carcinoma. In a dental office, infections can be expedited through several routes, including direct or indirect contact with blood, oral fluids, droplet splatter, aerosols, etc. The aim of the present review is to increase the awareness among dental practitioners, so as to reduce the burden of hepatitis in their community. Electronic databases like PubMed, Medline, ProQuest, etc. were searched using the keywords hepatitis, dentist, liver disease, and infection control. Manual search of various journals and books was also carried out. Only highly relevant articles from English literature were considered for the present review. The results revealed that the dentists were among the high-risk groups for hepatitis, and they have little information on the factors associated with adherence to hepatitis B vaccination. A dentist can play a major role in the prevention of hepatitis by considering each and every patient as a potential carrier of hepatitis. Proper infection control, sterilization, and prophylactic vaccination protocols should be followed in order to reduce the risk of hepatitis. PMID:26097847

  12. “Hepatitis” – Prevention and management in dental practice

    PubMed Central

    Dahiya, Parveen; Kamal, Reet; Sharma, Varun; Kaur, Saravpreet

    2015-01-01

    Today, viral hepatitis has become a silent epidemic worldwide. It is the major cause of liver cirrhosis and liver carcinoma. In a dental office, infections can be expedited through several routes, including direct or indirect contact with blood, oral fluids, droplet splatter, aerosols, etc. The aim of the present review is to increase the awareness among dental practitioners, so as to reduce the burden of hepatitis in their community. Electronic databases like PubMed, Medline, ProQuest, etc. were searched using the keywords hepatitis, dentist, liver disease, and infection control. Manual search of various journals and books was also carried out. Only highly relevant articles from English literature were considered for the present review. The results revealed that the dentists were among the high-risk groups for hepatitis, and they have little information on the factors associated with adherence to hepatitis B vaccination. A dentist can play a major role in the prevention of hepatitis by considering each and every patient as a potential carrier of hepatitis. Proper infection control, sterilization, and prophylactic vaccination protocols should be followed in order to reduce the risk of hepatitis.

  13. Reflections on a training course reorienting dental teams towards prevention.

    PubMed

    Watt, R G; D'Cruz, L; Rai, A; Jones, E

    2015-01-01

    Prevention is a core element of routine dental practice. However, members of the dental team often lack the required knowledge and skills to deliver effective evidence-based advice and support to patients. This paper describes the development and delivery of an innovative course designed to develop the preventive capacity of dental teams working in dental foundation training practices across London. The course contents were based upon national guidelines on evidence-based preventive care delivered in primary dental care settings (Delivering better oral health). An experienced team of trainers from diverse backgrounds successfully designed and delivered the courses and the initial feedback from participants indicate strong support for the approach developed. PMID:25571821

  14. Utilization of Preventive Dental Practices by Graduates of One U.S. Dental School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripa, Louis W.; Johnson, Robin M.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 113 graduates of the State University of New York at Stony Brook dental school now in general practice found a high rate of self-reported use of preventive practices (oral hygiene instruction, pit-and-fissure sealants, fluorides, and diet analysis) included in the dental school's curriculum. (MSE)

  15. Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Patients Undergoing Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Watters, William; Rethman, Michael P; Hanson, Nicholas Buck; Abt, Elliot; Anderson, Paul A; Carroll, Karen C; Futrell, Harry C; Garvin, Kevin; Glenn, Stephen O; Hellstein, John; Hewlett, Angela; Kolessar, David; Moucha, Calin; O'Donnell, Richard J; O'Toole, John E; Osmon, Douglas R; Evans, Richard Parker; Rinella, Anthony; Steinberg, Mark J; Goldberg, Michael; Ristic, Helen; Boyer, Kevin; Sluka, Patrick; Martin, William Robert; Cummins, Deborah S; Song, Sharon; Woznica, Anne; Gross, Leeaht

    2013-03-01

    The Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Patients Undergoing Dental Procedures evidence-based clinical practice guideline was codeveloped by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Dental Association. This guideline replaces the previous AAOS Information Statement, "Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Bacteremia in Patients With Joint Replacement," published in 2009. Based on the best current evidence and a systematic review of published studies, three recommendations have been created to guide clinical practice in the prevention of orthopaedic implant infections in patients undergoing dental procedures. The first recommendation is graded as Limited; this recommendation proposes that the practitioner consider changing the long-standing practice of routinely prescribing prophylactic antibiotic for patients with orthopaedic implants who undergo dental procedures. The second, graded as Inconclusive, addresses the use of oral topical antimicrobials in the prevention of periprosthetic joint infections. The third recommendation, a Consensus statement, addresses the maintenance of good oral hygiene. PMID:23457068

  16. Predicting levels of preventive dental behaviors.

    PubMed

    McCaul, K D; Glasgow, R E; Gustafson, C

    1985-10-01

    This study examined the value of SLT as a model for predicting levels of dental hygiene behaviors. The brushing and flossing frequency of 131 adults was measured both retrospectively (via questionnaire) and prospectively (via self-monitoring records). Two types of SLT variables--expectations and environmental influences--were reliably related to dental hygiene behaviors. Such variables (for example, self-efficacy expectations and the dental behaviors of significant others) accounted for up to 38% of the variance in brushing frequency and 33% of the variance in flossing frequency. Overall, a SLT model appears to hold promise for identifying psychosocial variables that are related to dental hygiene behaviors. The findings suggest that educational programs intended to increase the frequency of such behaviors should focus on increasing self-efficacy, reducing structural and life-style barriers to adherence, and involving significant others in educational efforts. PMID:3863862

  17. A dietary procedure for preventing dental caries in young adults.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, K K

    1993-01-01

    Significant improvement in the dental caries status of children in the United States has been seen in recent decades. The percentage of children who are free from dental caries, however, rapidly decreases with age. By the time young people enter colleges or universities, only a few are caries free. Colleges and universities are places where the young are simultaneously, and perhaps for the last time, reachable as large cohorts before their lives undergo further "individualization." This makes college age a time that is crucial for channeling information about proper oral health practices by organizing mass-directed strategies for prevention of dental caries. It is now clear that dental caries can effectively be prevented. This calls for placing strong emphasis on dietary behavior and on the use of sugar substitutes as part of the strategy. Scientific evidence also suggests that the addition of small daily quantities of xylitol, a natural carbohydrate sweetener, to the diet of children and young adults causes significant reduction in the incidence of dental caries. On the basis of detailed long-term clinical trials carried out during the past 20 years, it appears that a reduction ranging from 30% to more than 85% in dental caries can be achieved simply by using a few xylitol chewing gums daily over a period of 1 to 3 years. In individual cases, virtually total, long-term protection against caries has been observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8436732

  18. The reliability and validity of the RAPIDD scale: readiness assessment of parents concerning infant dental decay.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, P; Riedy, C A

    2001-01-01

    This study assessed the instrument, Readiness Assessment of Parents concerning Infant Dental Decay (RAPIDD), as a measure of parental readiness to change children's dental behaviors. The 38-item instrument based on four constructs (Openness to Health Information, Valuing Dental Health, Convenience/Difficulty, Child Permissiveness) was administered to a random sample of parents of 6-to-36 month old children on Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, USA. Alpha values for each construct's internal consistency ranged from 0.51 to 0.75. Correlations were found with feeding (e.g., Convenience/Difficulty and receiving bottle (r = .24, p < 0.01)) and oral hygiene (e.g., Valuing Dental Health and tooth-cleaning (r = .27, p < 0.01)). Parental responses were used to categorize respondents into precontemplators (16 percent), contemplators (77 percent), and actions (6.7 percent). This categorization was associated with the number of decalcified and decayed surfaces (alpha 2 = 34.8, p = 0.04; alpha 2 = 65.7, p < 0.01). This suggests that parental readiness is associated with infant dental health and that most parents would be willing to contemplate prevention. PMID:11475689

  19. Fluoride Programs in the School Setting: Preventive Dental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebich, Theodore, Jr.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Two types of school-based programs that increase students' use of fluoride for preventive dental health are described. In fluoride mouthrinse programs, teachers give their students a fluoride solution once a week in a paper cup. In areas where the level of fluoride in the water supply is insufficient, the flouride tablet program is used. (JN)

  20. Evidence-based prevention, management, and monitoring of dental caries.

    PubMed

    Barber, Lois Rigmont; Wilkins, Esther M

    2002-01-01

    Dental caries, not unlike periodontal diseases, is now recognized as an infectious, transmissible, multifactorial disease of bacterial origin. Current evidence-based emphasis is on the need to recognize a carious lesion in its earliest stage before demineralization has produced a cavitated lesion that requires restoration by a dentist. As a result of current understanding of caries control, the dental hygienist's role as a prevention specialist is to determine the dental caries risk factors for patients of all ages and to introduce remineralization strategies into the patient's dental hygiene care plan. Conservative strategies of a concentrated program include initial infection control with a chlorhexidine rinse; extra daily fluoride exposures; placement of pit and fissure sealants where indicated; control of sucrose exposures; use of sugar substitutes, particularly xylitol-containing sugar-free chewing gum; and an emphasis on a daily bacterial plaque removal routine. Evidence supports the management and monitoring of dental caries. Caries risk level must be reevaluated at each maintenance appointment. Appropriate in-office strategies to preserve tooth structure should be carried out and followed by applicable home regimens that are based on need, not age. PMID:12592918

  1. Preventative measures for bulimic patients with dental erosion.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, G; Bartlett, D

    2001-03-01

    The preventative techniques suggested to bulimic patients are frequently undervalued and ignored in favour of restorative treatment, possibly because the dentist may not be aware of the eating disorder. Educating bulimic patients about fluoride application, the use of brushing techniques, antacids, cheese, xylitol chewing gum and the possible use of mouth guards may minimise the effect of acids. Together with attempts at improving patient compliance they can be a valuable adjunct to treatment of bulimic patients with dental problems. Monitoring the wear on teeth by comparing study casts is a good way to maintain control but there are circumstances when restorations are indicated, perhaps when further delay may result in the prognosis of the teeth being compromised. Following a brief introduction to causes of bulimia and the consequences to the dentition, this paper, based on a literature review, considers patient-orientated techniques for prevention and provisional management of erosion of dental hard tissues for patients with bulimia nervosa. PMID:11695131

  2. Patient education and preventive care in Malaysian dental practice.

    PubMed

    Abdul Razak, I; Lind, O P

    1994-01-01

    A questionnaire survey was conducted to examine the attitudes of Malaysian dentists toward patient education and preventive dentistry and the level of preventive care adopted in Malaysian dental practice. An adjusted response rate of 73.1% was obtained. Generally the Malaysian dentists had positive attitudes towards patient education and preventive dentistry including fluoridation. However, a sizable proportion of them considered that preventive measures were no challenge for the dentist. The common preventive measures given to patients were scaling, dental health education, prophylaxis and instruction in correct brushing and flossing in as much as 40 to 50 percent of the queried dentist claimed that these preventive items were provided to most or all of their new patients. In spite of the fact that the majority of the dentists had good knowledge about the application and effects of sealants only about 41 percent of the dentists claimed to have used sealants. More dentists in the private sector reportedly having done so. Also many Malaysian dentists (18.5%) did not use leaded protection for any of their new patients when taking radiographs. PMID:7811664

  3. Occurrence of Dental Decay in Children after Maternal Consumption of Xylitol Chewing Gum, a Follow-up from 0 to 5 Years of Age

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Isokangas; E. Soderling; K. Pienihakkinen; P. Alanen

    2000-01-01

    Studies have shown that prevention of mutans streptococci (MS) colonization in early childhood can lead to prevention of dental decay. In the microbiological part of the present study in Ylivieska, Finland, with 195 mothers with high salivary MS levels, regular maternal use of xylitol chewing gum resulted in a statistically significant reduction in MS colonization in their children's teeth at

  4. Local complications in dental implant surgery: prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    ANNIBALI, S.; RIPARI, M.; LA MONACA, G.; TONOLI, F.; CRISTALLI, M.P.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY There are many detailed articles regarding accidents and local complications in dental implantation. Comparison of the data they report is not always easy because different criteria have been followed in the various classifications and there is confusion between the terms accident and complication. The aim of this paper is to propose a classification that considers the timing of the events and makes a distinction between the two terms. Accidents are events that occur during surgery and complications are all the pathological conditions that appear postoperatively. The proper diagnostic procedures and surgical techniques for complications prevention and treatment are also described. PMID:23285333

  5. Prevention of surgical skill decay.

    PubMed

    Perez, Ray S; Skinner, Anna; Weyhrauch, Peter; Niehaus, James; Lathan, Corinna; Schwaitzberg, Steven D; Cao, Caroline G L

    2013-10-01

    The U.S. military medical community spends a great deal of time and resources training its personnel to provide them with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform life-saving tasks, both on the battlefield and at home. However, personnel may fail to retain specialized knowledge and skills if they are not applied during the typical periods of nonuse within the military deployment cycle, and retention of critical knowledge and skills is crucial to the successful care of warfighters. For example, we researched the skill and knowledge loss associated with specialized surgical skills such as those required to perform laparoscopic surgery (LS) procedures. These skills are subject to decay when military surgeons perform combat casualty care during their deployment instead of LS. This article describes our preliminary research identifying critical LS skills, as well as their acquisition and decay rates. It introduces models that identify critical skills related to laparoscopy, and proposes objective metrics for measuring these critical skills. This research will provide insight into best practices for (1) training skills that are durable and resistant to skill decay, (2) assessing these skills over time, and (3) introducing effective refresher training at appropriate intervals to maintain skill proficiency. PMID:24084308

  6. Kids Get Care: Integrating Preventive Dental and Medical Care Using a Public Health Case Management Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tracy E. Garland; Susan M. Johnson

    Kids Get Care is a public health-based program in the Seattle area designed to ensure that low-income children, regardless of insurance status, receive early integrated preventive medical, dental, and developmental health services through attachment to medical and dental homes (the usual sources of medical or dental care). The oral health component of the program focuses on cross-training medical and dental

  7. Association of Streptococcus mutans with Human Dental Decay

    PubMed Central

    Loesche, W. J.; Rowan, J.; Straffon, L. H.; Loos, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    The association of Streptococcus mutans with human dental decay was investigated by using several types of samples: (i) paraffin-stimulated saliva samples taken from children with from 0 to 15 decayed teeth; (ii) pooled occlusal and approximal plaque taken from children with no decayed or filled teeth, or from children with rampant caries of 10 or more teeth; (iii) plaque removed from single occlusal fissures that were either carious or noncarious. The results showed a significant association between plaque levels of S. mutans and caries. The strongest association, P < 0.0001, was found when plaque was removed from single occlusal fissures. Seventy-one percent of the carious fissures had S. mutans accounting for more than 10% of the viable flora, whereas 70% of the fissures that were caries free had no detectable S. mutans. Sixty-five percent of the pooled plaque samples from the children with rampant caries had S. mutans accounting for more than 10% of the viable flora, whereas 40% of the pooled samples from children that were caries free had no detectable S. mutans. Saliva samples tended to have low levels of S. mutans and were equivocal in demonstrating a relationship between S. mutans and caries. PMID:1140847

  8. Perceived competency towards preventive dentistry among dental graduates: the need for curriculum change

    PubMed Central

    Arheiam, Arheiam; Bankia, Ibtesam; Ingafou, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Background A previous study has shown that dental practitioners in Benghazi believed that the less prevention-oriented education system is one of the barriers to applying preventive dentistry. Objective To assess attitudes and perceived competence of the dental graduates in Benghazi towards prevention and early management of dental caries. Methods A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey was conducted among internship students attending the Department of Community and Preventive Dentistry in Faculty of Dentistry, Benghazi, Libya. The participants were asked to provide demographic information, to respond to statements about their attitudes towards preventive dentistry, and to answer questions regarding their perceived competence in applying preventive dentistry procedures. Results Data from 108 Libyan dental graduates were analysed for this study, of which 64% of them were females and 42.1% of them passed their final year with grade: acceptable. The most acknowledged aspects of preventive dentistry were being useful and essential to the community (95.4 and 90.8%, respectively). The percentage of participants expressing a proficiency in providing oral hygiene instructions was the highest (95.4%). There were differences between study subgroups in their perceived competence of preventive dental practices by gender and academic performance (p?0.05). Conclusion This study highlighted that the currently implemented undergraduate education programme in Benghazi dental school does not provide dentists with the required attitude and skills to fulfil their role in providing preventive-oriented health services. PMID:25556523

  9. An Evaluation of the School-Based Dental Disease Prevention Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Legislature, Sacramento. Office of the Legislative Analyst.

    This report analyzes the effect of the California Dental Disease Prevention Program (DDPP). The program includes education about dental health and nutrition, daily toothbrushing and flossing, and weekly application of a fluoride mouthrinse. The DDPP serves approximately 350,000 elementary school children. The implementation of the DDPP is…

  10. 76 FR 2383 - Proposed HHS Recommendation for Fluoride Concentration in Drinking Water for Prevention of Dental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ...for Fluoride Concentration in Drinking Water for Prevention of Dental Caries AGENCY...U.S. Public Health Service Drinking Water Standards related to recommendations for fluoride concentrations in drinking water. The U.S. Public Health Service...

  11. Pediatric Dental Care: Prevention and Management Protocols Based on Caries Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    RAMOS-GOMEZ, FRANCISCO J.; CRYSTAL, YASMI O.; NG, MAN WAI; CRALL, JAMES J.; FEATHERSTONE, JOHN D.B.

    2012-01-01

    Recent increases in caries prevalence in young children, especially among minorities and the economically disadvantaged, highlight the need for early establishment of dental homes and simple, effective infant oral care preventive programs for all children as part of a medical disease prevention management model.1–3 This article presents an updated approach and practical tools for pediatric dental caries management by risk assessment, CAMBRA, in an effort to stimulate greater adoption of infant oral care programs among clinicians and early establishment of dental homes for young children. PMID:21162350

  12. A Dietary Procedure for Preventing Dental Caries in Young Adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kauko K. Mäkinen

    1993-01-01

    Significant improvement in the dental caries status of children in the United States has been seen in recent decades. The percentage of children who are free from dental caries, however, rapidly decreases with age. By the time young people enter colleges or universities, only a few are caries free. Colleges and universities are places where the young are simultaneously, and

  13. Diet, nutrition and the prevention of dental diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paula Moynihan; Poul Erik Petersen

    2004-01-01

    Oral health is related to diet in many ways, for example, nutritional influences on craniofacial development, oral cancer and oral infectious diseases. Dental diseases impact considerably on self-esteem and quality of life and are expensive to treat. The objective of this paper is to review the evidence for an association between nutrition, diet and dental diseases and to present dietary

  14. Tertiary Prevention in Oral - Dental Health: Dental Prosthesis Materials (A?iz - Di? Sa?li?inda Tersiyer Korunma: Dental Protez Materyalleri)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wolfgang H. Koch

    SUMMARY Nowadays preventive action and modern peridontic and endodontic methods make it possible to forego artificial teeth in favour of natural teeth. Nevertheless, if inadequate dental protheses or loss of teeth is unavoidable, the missing teeth have to be replaced by all means to restore chewing performance, not only on aesthetics grounds but also for health reasons. There is a

  15. Focus on Fluorides: Update on the Use of Fluoride for the Prevention of Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Clifton M.

    2014-01-01

    Declarative Title: Improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies reduces dental caries and lowers fluoride exposure. Background Fluoride is delivered to the teeth systemically or topically to aid in the prevention of dental caries. Systemic fluoride from ingested sources is in blood serum and can be deposited only in teeth that are forming in children. Topical fluoride is from sources such as community water, processed foods, beverages, toothpastes, mouthrinses, gels, foams, and varnishes. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Dental Association (ADA) have proposed changes in their long standing recommendations for the amount of fluoride in community drinking water in response to concerns about an increasing incidence of dental fluorosis in children. Current research is focused on the development of strategies to improve fluoride efficacy. The purpose of this update is to inform the reader about new research and policies related to the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. Methods Reviews of the current research and recent evidence based systematic reviews on the topics of fluoride are presented. Topics discussed include: updates on community water fluoridation research and policies; available fluoride in dentifrices; fluoride varnish compositions, use, and recommendations; and other fluoride containing dental products. This update provides insights into current research and discusses proposed policy changes for the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. Conclusions The dental profession is adjusting their recommendations for fluoride use based on current observations of the halo effect and subsequent outcomes. The research community is focused on improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies thus reducing dental caries and lowering the amount of fluoride required for efficacy. PMID:24929594

  16. What Maryland Adults With Young Children Know and Do About Preventing Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Kleinman, Dushanka V.; Wang, Min Qi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to determine Maryland adults’ knowledge, understanding, opinions, and practices with respect to prevention and early detection of dental caries. Methods. We conducted a statewide random-digit-dialing, computer-assisted telephone survey in 2010 among 770 adults who had a child aged 6 years or younger living in their home. A traditional random-digit sample and a targeted low-income sample were included. Analyses included frequencies, percentages, the ?2 test, and multivariate logistic regression. Results. Respondents’ overall level of knowledge about preventing dental caries was low. Those with higher levels of education were more likely to have correct information regarding prevention and early detection of dental caries. Nearly all respondents (97.9%) reported that they were aware of fluoride, but only 57.8% knew its purpose. More than one third (35.1%) of the respondents were not aware of dental sealants. Those with lower levels of education were significantly less likely to drink tap water, as were their children, and significantly less likely to have had a dental appointment in the preceding past 12 months. Conclusions. Our results demonstrate the need to increase oral health literacy regarding caries prevention and early detection. PMID:23597372

  17. Dental sealants

    MedlinePLUS

    ... prevent cavities. Dental sealants are a thin resin coating that covers the grooves of molars. ... cost of dental sealants is usually priced per tooth. Many dental insurance plans cover the cost of ...

  18. Dental Decay in Southern Illinois Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers: An Analysis of Clinical Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukes, Sherri M.; Simon, Bret

    2005-01-01

    Context: Migrant and seasonal farmworkers are a population at risk for oral health problems. Data on the oral health conditions of migrant and seasonal farmworkers' permanent teeth are particularly lacking. Purpose: To document the relative rates of treated and untreated dental decay in a sample of southern Illinois migrant and seasonal…

  19. Hair keratin mutations in tooth enamel increase dental decay risk.

    PubMed

    Duverger, Olivier; Ohara, Takahiro; Shaffer, John R; Donahue, Danielle; Zerfas, Patricia; Dullnig, Andrew; Crecelius, Christopher; Beniash, Elia; Marazita, Mary L; Morasso, Maria I

    2014-12-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body and has a unique combination of hardness and fracture toughness that protects teeth from dental caries, the most common chronic disease worldwide. In addition to a high mineral content, tooth enamel comprises organic material that is important for mechanical performance and influences the initiation and progression of caries; however, the protein composition of tooth enamel has not been fully characterized. Here, we determined that epithelial hair keratins, which are crucial for maintaining the integrity of the sheaths that support the hair shaft, are expressed in the enamel organ and are essential organic components of mature enamel. Using genetic and intraoral examination data from 386 children and 706 adults, we found that individuals harboring known hair disorder-associated polymorphisms in the gene encoding keratin 75 (KRT75), KRT75(A161T) and KRT75(E337K), are prone to increased dental caries. Analysis of teeth from individuals carrying the KRT75(A161T) variant revealed an altered enamel structure and a marked reduction of enamel hardness, suggesting that a functional keratin network is required for the mechanical stability of tooth enamel. Taken together, our results identify a genetic locus that influences enamel structure and establish a connection between hair disorders and susceptibility to dental caries. PMID:25347471

  20. Education of tobacco use prevention and cessation for dental professionals--a paradigm shift.

    PubMed

    Davis, Joan M; Ramseier, Christoph A; Mattheos, Nikos; Schoonheim-Klein, Meta; Compton, Sharon; Al-Hazmi, Nadia; Polychronopoulou, Argy; Suvan, Jean; Antohé, Magda E; Forna, Doriana; Radley, Nicki

    2010-02-01

    The use of tobacco continues to be a substantial risk factor in the development and progression of oral cancer, periodontitis, implant failure and poor wound healing. Dental and dental hygiene education providers have made great advances towards the incorporation of tobacco education into their curricula in recent years. Unfortunately, however, both medical and dental education research has consistently reported schools providing only basic knowledge-based curricula that rarely incorporate more effective, behaviourally-based components affecting long-term change. The limited training of oral healthcare students, at least in part, is reflected in practising dental professionals continuing to report offering incomplete tobacco interventions. In order to prepare the next generation of oral healthcare providers, this paper proposes a paradigm shift in how tobacco use prevention and cessation (TUPAC) may be incorporated into existing curricula. It is suggested that schools should carefully consider: to what level of competency should TUPAC be trained in dental and dental hygiene schools; the importance of establishing rapport through good communication skills; the core knowledge level for TUPAC; suggested instructional and assessment strategies; the importance of continuing professional education for the enhancement of TUPAC. PMID:20361575

  1. Fluoride Varnish Effect on Preventing Dental Caries in a Sample of 3-6 Years Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Tayebeh Malek; Hajizamani, Abolghasem; Hajizamani, Hamid Reza; Abolghasemi, Batol

    2015-01-01

    Background: Early childhood caries is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases of children that affect their life and their family in different aspects. Using different types of fluoride is one of the most effective ways for preventing the disease. Fluoride varnish is a topical fluoride product which could use in the community even by non-professional. This study aimed to assess the effect of fluoride varnish on dental caries in a group of children aged 3-6 years old in Kerman kindergarten during 6 month’s period. Materials and Methods: This community interventional study recruited a sample of volunteer children from 12 kindergartens through a cluster sampling. Kindergarten randomly allocated to test and control group after matching. Dental examination was performed in three phases of the study by a trained dentist using criteria of Intentional Caries Detection and Assessment System. Fluoride varnish was applied for test group in the first phase after dental examination and also 3 and 6 months after this phase. Control group has received varnish product just after 3 and 6 months after the first dental exam. Mean decayed, missed and filled teeth (dmft) were compared between and within groups using T-test. Results: From 476 children who participated in the study 55% were boys and the 6 years group was the most frequent group with 35% (166). Mean dmft difference was significant between Phase 1 and 2 (P = 0.05) in the test group but there was no significant difference between Phase 2 and 3 (P = 0.07). The difference was not significant between Phase 1 and 2 (P = 0.09) but it was significant between Phase 1 and 3 (P = 0.03) in the control group. Conclusion: The study results showed a decrease in mean dmft after applying the fluoride varnish which confirms previous studies. PMID:25709364

  2. Disparities in Children's Oral Health and Access to Dental Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wendy E. Mouradian; Elizabeth Wehr; James J. Crall

    2000-01-01

    Dental caries can be prevented by a combination of community, profes- sional, and individual measures including water fluoridation, professionally applied topical fluorides and dental sealants, and use of fluoride tooth- pastes. Yet, tooth decay is the most common chronic disease of childhood. Dental care is the most prevalent unmet health need in US children with wide disparities existing in oral

  3. Readability of pediatric health materials for preventive dental care

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Rachel L; Huebner, Colleen E; Riedy, Christine A

    2006-01-01

    Background This study examined the content and general readability of pediatric oral health education materials for parents of young children. Methods Twenty-seven pediatric oral health pamphlets or brochures from commercial, government, industry, and private nonprofit sources were analyzed for general readability ("usability") according to several parameters: readability, (Flesch-Kincaid grade level, Flesch Reading Ease, and SMOG grade level); thoroughness, (inclusion of topics important to young childrens' oral health); textual framework (frequency of complex phrases, use of pictures, diagrams, and bulleted text within materials); and terminology (frequency of difficult words and dental jargon). Results Readability of the written texts ranged from 2nd to 9th grade. The average Flesch-Kincaid grade level for government publications was equivalent to a grade 4 reading level (4.73, range, 2.4 – 6.6); F-K grade levels for commercial publications averaged 8.1 (range, 6.9 – 8.9); and industry published materials read at an average Flesch-Kincaid grade level of 7.4 (range, 4.7 – 9.3). SMOG readability analysis, based on a count of polysyllabic words, consistently rated materials 2 to 3 grade levels higher than did the Flesch-Kincaid analysis. Government sources were significantly lower compared to commercial and industry sources for Flesch-Kincaid grade level and SMOG readability analysis. Content analysis found materials from commercial and industry sources more complex than government-sponsored publications, whereas commercial sources were more thorough in coverage of pediatric oral health topics. Different materials frequently contained conflicting information. Conclusion Pediatric oral health care materials are readily available, yet their quality and readability vary widely. In general, government publications are more readable than their commercial and industry counterparts. The criteria for usability and results of the analyses presented in this article can be used by consumers of dental educational materials to ensure that their choices are well-suited to their specific patient population. PMID:17109743

  4. Antimicrobial Strategies in the Prevention of Dental Caries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. D. Marsh

    1993-01-01

    Antimicrobial agents, applied either professionally or delivered from dentifrices or mouthwashes, could reduce caries by controlling plaque formation, suppressing cariogenic species, or by inhibiting bacterial metabolism. Chlorhexidine has proven anticaries activity; other agents might also prevent caries by means of their antiplaque properties. Sugar substitutes stabilize the microflora by reducing the number of acid challenges to plaque and stimulating saliva

  5. Antimicrobial strategies in the prevention of dental caries.

    PubMed

    Marsh, P D

    1993-01-01

    Antimicrobial agents, applied either professionally or delivered from dentifrices or mouthwashes, could reduce caries by controlling plaque formation, suppressing cariogenic species, or by inhibiting bacterial metabolism. Chlorhexidine has proven anticaries activity; other agents might also prevent caries by means of their antiplaque properties. Sugar substitutes stabilize the microflora by reducing the number of acid challenges to plaque and stimulating saliva flow; some also have antimicrobial properties, especially against mutans streptococci. Vaccines have been prepared from purified antigens of mutans streptococci. These vaccines confer protection in non-human primates, but have yet to be tested in a human clinical trial. PMID:8500130

  6. Sugar substitutes in dental caries prevention. Significance of sorbitol and xylitol.

    PubMed

    Hefti, A F; Pink, F E

    1992-04-01

    To date, effective caries prevention largely relies on the regular use of fluoride and oral hygiene. The potential efficacy of basing caries prevention on nutritional modifications has been suggested a long time ago. Subsequently, a great number of laboratory, animal and clinical investigations have convincingly demonstrated that partial substitution of sugar by noncariogenic sweeteners offers considerable benefits for dental health. This article reviews scientific information on sorbitol and xylitol, two caloric sugar substitutes that have been extensively studied with regard to their noncariogenic properties. PMID:19274874

  7. A holistic food labelling strategy for preventing obesity and dental caries.

    PubMed

    Cinar, A B; Murtomaa, H

    2009-05-01

    Obesity and dental caries in childhood are among the major public health concerns described as a global pandemic because of their global distribution and severe consequences. A consensus has developed as to a recently emerging and alarming common risk factor that leads to the double burden of dental caries and obesity; energy-dense foods (sugar-coated cereals, high-sugar yogurt, soft drinks) are becoming very popular among children because of their dense marketing, cheaper price, increased supply and variety. Implementation of health-promoting and -supporting marketing strategies for healthy food can be one initial cornerstone for successful application of the common risk factor approach in prevention of obesity and dental caries, as also suggested by World Health Organization. Labelling healthy food with a 'health-friendly' logo, illustrating that the teeth and the heart are both parts of the whole body (standing side by side supporting each other as close friends), both happy and protected because of consumption of healthy food for the whole body, can promote the foods that are friendly to health of the whole body, implementing the common risk factor approach under a single theme. Labelling healthy food as 'health-friendly' based on an international consensus will provide a clear and uniform picture of what is healthy to eat and result in an international integrated programme for prevention of obesity and caries. PMID:19207877

  8. Perception of tobacco use prevention and cessation among faculty members in Latin American and Caribbean dental schools.

    PubMed

    Tamí-Maury, Irene; Aigner, Carrie J; Hong, Judy; Strom, Sara; Chambers, Mark S; Gritz, Ellen R

    2014-12-01

    Rates of tobacco use are increasing in the regions of Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). Unfortunately, tobacco cessation education is not a standard component of the dental curriculum in LAC dental schools. The objective of this study was to identify the perceptions of LAC dental faculty members regarding the tobacco use prevention and cessation (TUPAC) competencies that should be addressed in the dental curricula. Dental deans and faculty completed a web-based questionnaire in Spanish, Portuguese, French, or English. The questionnaire contained 32 competencies grouped into the five A's (Ask, Advise, Assess, Assist, and Arrange) of tobacco cessation and six supplementary questions for identifying barriers to providing TUPAC education to dental students. Respondents indicated the degree to which they believed each competency should be incorporated into the dental curricula using a five-point Likert scale ("1"?=?strongly disagree to "5"?=?strongly agree). Responses were obtained from 390 faculty members (66 % South America, 18 % Mexico/Central America, 16 % the Caribbean). Of the respondents, 2, 12, and 83 % reported that smoking was allowed in clinical environments, other indoor environments, and outdoor environments of their dental schools, respectively. Mean importance ratings for each of the competencies were as follows: Ask (4.71), Advise (4.54), Assess (4.41), Assist (4.07), and Arrange (4.01). Overall, LAC dental educators agree that TUPAC training should be incorporated into the dental curricula. Assist and Arrange competencies were rated lower, relative to other competencies. Tobacco use among dental educators and high rates of on-campus smoking could potentially pose barriers to promoting cessation interventions in the LAC dental schools. PMID:24385339

  9. Dental plaque, preventive care, and tooth brushing associated with dental caries in primary teeth in schoolchildren ages 6–9 years of Leon, Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    del Socorro Herrera, Miriam; Medina-Solis, Carlo Eduardo; Minaya-Sánchez, Mirna; Pontigo-Loyola, América Patricia; Villalobos-Rodelo, Juan José; Islas-Granillo, Horacio; de la Rosa-Santillana, Rubén; Maupomé, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    Background Our study aimed to evaluate the effect of various risk indicators for dental caries on primary teeth of Nicaraguan children (from Leon, Nicaragua) ages 6 to 9, using the negative binomial regression model. Material/Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out to collect clinical, demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioral data from 794 schoolchildren ages 6 to 9 years, randomly selected from 25 schools in the city of León, Nicaragua. Clinical examinations for dental caries (dmft index) were performed by 2 trained and standardized examiners. Socio-demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioral data were self-reported using questionnaires. Multivariate negative binomial regression (NBR) analysis was used. Results Mean age was 7.49±1.12 years. Boys accounted for 50.1% of the sample. Mean dmft was 3.54±3.13 and caries prevalence (dmft >0) was 77.6%. In the NBR multivariate model (p<0.05), for each year of age, the expected mean dmft decreased by 7.5%. Brushing teeth at least once a day and having received preventive dental care in the last year before data collection were associated with declines in the expected mean dmft by 19.5% and 69.6%, respectively. Presence of dental plaque increased the expected mean dmft by 395.5%. Conclusions The proportion of students with caries in this sample was high. We found associations between dental caries in the primary dentition and dental plaque, brushing teeth at least once a day, and having received preventive dental care. To improve oral health, school programs and/or age-appropriate interventions need to be developed based on the specific profile of caries experience and the associated risk indicators. PMID:24247119

  10. [Sugar substitutes in the prevention of dental caries: review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Borges Yáñez, S A

    1991-08-01

    The prevention of dental caries is not only limited to the use of fluorides or sealants which, in combination with health education programmes and an appropriate oral hygiene, decrease the prevalence of the disease. The partial substitution of sucrose with nonfermentable sweeteners in the diet have shown to have a caries-inhibitory effect. A literature review regarding sugar substitutes is presented. The objective is to identify and describe the different kinds of sweeteners, with special emphasis in sugar alcohols like xylitol and sorbitol, which have shown to have such caries inhibitory-effect. PMID:1796084

  11. Suppression and prevention of the gag reflex with a TENS device during dental procedures.

    PubMed

    Morrish, R B

    1997-01-01

    Individuals who are prone to gagging and apprehension during dental treatments present a problem for the clinician and themselves. Patients may delay prescribed therapy or interfere with the fabrication of accurate oral impressions and diagnostic radiographs, because of this fear. The common wisdom has been to try one of the following procedures: (1) distraction of the patient, (2) forced respiration, (3) induced lagophthalmus, or (4) hypnosis. A preventive approach suggests that the sensory stimulation of the cranial nerves of the superior laryngeal nerve branch, (Cr N, IX, pharyngeal branch of X, Cr. N. V, and Cr N. X.) would block the physiologic response of gagging and retching. PMID:9515420

  12. Assessing implementation difficulties in tobacco use prevention and cessation counselling among dental providers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Tobacco use adversely affects oral health. Clinical guidelines recommend that dental providers promote tobacco abstinence and provide patients who use tobacco with brief tobacco use cessation counselling. Research shows that these guidelines are seldom implemented, however. To improve guideline adherence and to develop effective interventions, it is essential to understand provider behaviour and challenges to implementation. This study aimed to develop a theoretically informed measure for assessing among dental providers implementation difficulties related to tobacco use prevention and cessation (TUPAC) counselling guidelines, to evaluate those difficulties among a sample of dental providers, and to investigate a possible underlying structure of applied theoretical domains. Methods A 35-item questionnaire was developed based on key theoretical domains relevant to the implementation behaviours of healthcare providers. Specific items were drawn mostly from the literature on TUPAC counselling studies of healthcare providers. The data were collected from dentists (n = 73) and dental hygienists (n = 22) in 36 dental clinics in Finland using a web-based survey. Of 95 providers, 73 participated (76.8%). We used Cronbach's alpha to ascertain the internal consistency of the questionnaire. Mean domain scores were calculated to assess different aspects of implementation difficulties and exploratory factor analysis to assess the theoretical domain structure. The authors agreed on the labels assigned to the factors on the basis of their component domains and the broader behavioural and theoretical literature. Results Internal consistency values for theoretical domains varied from 0.50 ('emotion') to 0.71 ('environmental context and resources'). The domain environmental context and resources had the lowest mean score (21.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 17.2 to 25.4) and was identified as a potential implementation difficulty. The domain emotion provided the highest mean score (60%; 95% CI, 55.0 to 65.0). Three factors were extracted that explain 70.8% of the variance: motivation (47.6% of variance, ? = 0.86), capability (13.3% of variance, ? = 0.83), and opportunity (10.0% of variance, ? = 0.71). Conclusions This study demonstrated a theoretically informed approach to identifying possible implementation difficulties in TUPAC counselling among dental providers. This approach provides a method for moving from diagnosing implementation difficulties to designing and evaluating interventions. PMID:21615948

  13. Brief oral health promotion intervention among parents of young children to reduce early childhood dental decay

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Severe untreated dental decay affects a child’s growth, body weight, quality of life as well as cognitive development, and the effects extend beyond the child to the family, the community and the health care system. Early health behavioural factors, including dietary practices and eating patterns, can play a major role in the initiation and development of oral diseases, particularly dental caries. The parent/caregiver, usually the mother, has a critical role in the adoption of protective health care behaviours and parental feeding practices strongly influence children’s eating behaviours. This study will test if an early oral health promotion intervention through the use of brief motivational interviewing (MI) and anticipatory guidance (AG) approaches can reduce the incidence of early childhood dental decay and obesity. Methods The study will be a randomised controlled study with parents and their new-born child/ren who are seen at 6–12 weeks of age by a child/community health nurse. Consenting parents will complete a questionnaire on oral health knowledge, behaviours, self-efficacy, oral health fatalism, parenting stress, prenatal and peri-natal health and socio-demographic factors at study commencement and at 12 and 36 months. Each child–parent pair will be allocated to an intervention or a standard care group, using a computer-generated random blocks. The standard group will be managed through the standard early oral health screening program; “lift the lip”. The intervention group will be provided with tailored oral health counselling by oral health consultants trained in MI and AG. Participating children will be examined at 24, and 36 months for the occurrence of dental decay and have their height and weight recorded. Dietary information obtained from a food frequency chart will be used to determine food and dietary patterns. Data analysis will use intention to treat and per protocol analysis and will use tests of independent proportions and means. Multivariate statistical tests will also be used to take account of socio-economic and demographic factors in addition to parental knowledge, behaviour, self-efficacy, and parent/child stress. Discussion The study will test the effects of an oral health promotion intervention to affect oral health and general health and have the potential to demonstrate the “common risk factor” approach to health promotion. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: http://ACTRN12611000997954 PMID:23509932

  14. Forensic Luminol Blood Test for Preventing Cross-contamination in Dentistry: An Evaluation of a Dental School Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Cadore, Peterson; Gallon, Andrea; Imanishi, Soraia Almeida Watanabe

    2014-01-01

    Background: More than 200 different diseases may be transmitted from exposure to blood in the dental setting. The aim of this study is to identify possible faults in the crosscontamination chain control in a dental school clinic searching for traces of blood in the clinical contact surfaces (CCS) through forensic luminol blood test. Methods: Traces of invisible blood where randomly searched in CCS of one dental school clinic. Results: Forty eight surfaces areas in the CCS were tested and the presence of invisible and remnant blood was identified in 28 (58.3%) items. Conclusions: We suggest that the luminol method is suitable for identifying contamination with invisible blood traces and this method may be a useful tool to prevent cross-contamination in the dental care setting. PMID:25400895

  15. Design of the Prevention of Adult Caries Study (PACS): A randomized clinical trial assessing the effect of a chlorhexidine dental coating for the prevention of adult caries

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dental caries is one of the primary causes of tooth loss among adults. It is estimated to affect a majority of Americans aged 55 and older, with a disproportionately higher burden in disadvantaged populations. Although a number of treatments are currently in use for caries prevention in adults, evidence for their efficacy and effectiveness is limited. Methods/Design The Prevention of Adult Caries Study (PACS) is a multicenter, placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized clinical trial of the efficacy of a chlorhexidine (10% w/v) dental coating in preventing adult caries. Participants (n = 983) were recruited from four different dental delivery systems serving four diverse communities, including one American Indian population, and were randomized to receive either chlorhexidine or a placebo treatment. The primary outcome is the net caries increment (including non-cavitated lesions) from baseline to 13 months of follow-up. A cost-effectiveness analysis also will be considered. Discussion This new dental treatment, if efficacious and approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), would become a new in-office, anti-microbial agent for the prevention of adult caries in the United States. Trial Registration Number NCT00357877 PMID:20923557

  16. ASSESSMENT OF AWARENESS OF RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PREVENTION OF BACTERIAL ENDOCARDITIS AMONG A GROUP OF 136 IRANIAN DENTAL AND MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. R. Zarei; N. Navabie; G. Chamani

    Bacterial endocarditis is a serious disease that could occur after invasive dental procedures. Despite a large number of papers written about the knowledge of prevention of bacterial endocarditis among health care workers in western countries, little is known about awareness of this subject among practitioners and students in other countries. The purpose of the present study was to assess the

  17. The Outcome of a Preventive Dental Care Programme on the Prevalence of Localized Aggressive Periodontitis in Down's Syndrome Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigmond, Maora; Stabholz, A.; Shapira, J.; Bachrach, G.; Chaushu, G.; Becker, A.; Yefenof, E.; Merrick, J.; Chaushu, S.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Periodontal disease in Down's syndrome (DS) individuals develops earlier and is more rapid and extensive than in age-matched normal individuals. The present study evaluated a group of DS patients, who had been participating in a 10-year preventive dental programme, for the impact of the programme on their periodontal status. Methods:…

  18. Dietary factors in the prevention of dental caries: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lingström, Peter; Holm, Anna-Karin; Mejàre, Ingegerd; Twetman, Svante; Söder, Birgitta; Norlund, Anders; Axelsson, Susanna; Lagerlöf, Folke; Nordenram, Gunilla; Petersson, Lars G; Dahlgren, Helena; Källestål, Carina

    2003-12-01

    The aim of this study was, systematically, to evaluate the effect of dietary changes in the prevention of dental caries. A search and analysis strategy was followed, as suggested by the Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). The search strategy for articles published in 1966-2003 was performed using electronic databases and reference lists of articles and selected textbooks. Out of 714 articles originally identified, 18 met the inclusion criteria for a randomized or controlled clinical trial--at least 2 years' follow-up and caries increment as a primary endpoint. This included the total or partial substitution of sucrose with sugar substitutes or the addition of protective foods to chewing gum. No study was found evaluating the effect of information designed to reduce sugar intake/frequency as a single preventive measure. It is suggested that the evidence for the use of sorbitol or xylitol in chewing gum, or for the use of invert sugar, is inconclusive. No caries-preventive effect was found from adding calcium phosphate or dicalcium phosphate dihydrate to chewing gums. The review dearly demonstrates the need for well-designed randomized clinical studies with adequate control groups and high compliance. PMID:14960004

  19. Including Preventive Dental Services in Maternal and Newborn Care Will Improve Health Outcomes

    E-print Network

    Stoneham, Katsume

    2013-01-01

    ify for MediCal, medical and dental services (for adults)most adult dental care was removed from MediCal, preventivedental benefits to address oral health conditions are currently included in the MediCal

  20. Caregiver burden and preventive dental care use for US children with special health care needs: a stratified analysis based on functional limitation.

    PubMed

    Chi, Donald L; McManus, Beth M; Carle, Adam C

    2014-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the association between caregiver burden and preventive dental care use for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) and assess if caregiver burden explains the relationship between child- and family-level characteristics and preventive dental care use. Samples of US CSHCN ages 3-17 years with a functional limitation (n = 7,559) and those without (n = 26,345) were derived from the 2005-2006 National Survey of CSHCN. We generated structural equation models, stratified by functional limitation, to describe the relationships between caregiver burden and preventive dental utilization. We measured caregiver burden using six items on whether the child's health condition impacted work, time spent on health management, and finances. About 80.9 % of CSHCN used preventive dental care. Higher levels of caregiver burden were associated with significantly lower odds of preventive dental care use for CHSCN with a functional limitation (? = -0.06; P < 0.001) and those without (? = -0.07; P < 0.001). For CSHCN with a functional limitation, family poverty and being uninsured were significantly associated with greater caregiver burden and less preventive dental use. Findings were similar for CSHCN without a functional limitation, except that lower caregiver education was also associated with greater caregiver burden and less preventive dental care use. Caregiver burden is potential barrier to preventive dental care use for CSHCN and explains the relationship between child- and family-level characteristics and preventive dental care use. Interventions to improve the oral health of CSHCN should include strategies to reduce caregiver burden, especially within socioeconomically vulnerable families. PMID:23793537

  1. 220 Stoneridge Drive, Suite 204 Columbia, SC 29210 P: 803-251-6317 F: 803-251-6399 http://rhr.sph.sc.edu State Policy Levers for Addressing Preventive Dental Care Disparities

    E-print Network

    Almor, Amit

    ) or requiring non-dental clinicians to demonstrate moderate to high- levels of caries risk (58%, 19 of 33 states://rhr.sph.sc.edu State Policy Levers for Addressing Preventive Dental Care Disparities for Rural Children: Medicaid Reimbursement to Non-Dental Clinicians for Fluoride Varnish and Dental Hygiene Supervision in Primary Care

  2. 220 Stoneridge Drive, Suite 204 Columbia, SC 29210 P: 803-251-6317 F: 803-251-6399 http://rhr.sph.sc.edu State Policy Levers for Addressing Preventive Dental Care Disparities

    E-print Network

    Almor, Amit

    clinicians to demonstrate moderate to high- levels of caries risk (58%, 19 of 33 states). o Non-dental://rhr.sph.sc.edu State Policy Levers for Addressing Preventive Dental Care Disparities for Rural Children: Medicaid Reimbursement to Non-Dental Clinicians for Fluoride Varnish and Dental Hygiene Supervision in Primary Care

  3. A cohort study on the association of early mutans streptococci colonisation and dental decay.

    PubMed

    Laitala, M; Alanen, P; Isokangas, P; Söderling, E; Pienihäkkinen, K

    2012-01-01

    In children, a strong relationship between the timing of colonisation of mutans streptococci (MS) and future caries risk has been shown to exist. The aim of the study was to examine the association of early MS colonisation with dental decay and the need for restorative treatment. The subjects had been participants in an earlier Finnish mother-child study and assumed to be high-caries-risk subjects due to their mothers' high MS levels. The information on MS colonisation at 2 years of age was available for 164 children. Of them, comprehensive data on dental health, visits and treatments until 10 years of age were found in the registers for 147 subjects. The children who had not been colonised by MS at 2 years of age (n = 118) maintained their teeth caries-free longer than the MS-colonised (n = 29) children. The median value for the caries-free time for MS-colonised children was 4.6 years, in comparison with 8.0 years for non-MS-colonised children (p < 0.001, hazard ratio 2.70; 95% CI 1.72-4.25, Cox regression). Until 10 years of age, the MS-colonised children had made on average 4.6 visits for restorative treatment, while the non-MS-colonised had made 2.8 visits (p = 0.005, Student's t test). The results suggest that the avoided early MS colonisation may lead to favourable long-term effects on caries experience and need for restorative treatment. PMID:22517111

  4. Alternatives to fluoride in the prevention and treatment of dental erosion.

    PubMed

    Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Wiegand, Annette

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, different agents have been discussed as potential alternatives to fluoride in the prevention of dental erosion. These agents are intended to form acid-resistant layers on the surface, to induce repair of eroded lesions by mineral precipitation or to prevent the enzymatic degradation of demineralised collagen. The application of adhesives and/or fissure sealants is considered to be an effective alternative to fluoride, but requires professional application and, depending on the product used, a re-sealing of the surface every several months. Studies testing film-forming products, such as polymers, have suggested the potential effectiveness of some of these approaches, such as chitosan, although further studies are needed to confirm the effectiveness of this approach. Other studies have demonstrated that products designed to deliver calcium and/or phosphate have not been successful at providing a significant anti-erosive effect. In advanced erosive lesions, the demineralised collagenous dentine matrix can be degraded by host enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). As well as fluorides, epigallocatechin gallate and chlorhexidine have been identified as effective MMP inhibitors, with the potential to reduce the progression of dentine erosion. While fluoride compounds have been shown to have an anti-erosive potential, particularly those containing tin, alternative approaches that provide even greater protective capacity still need to be developed and proven to be effective. PMID:24993272

  5. The effect of non-cariogenic sweeteners on the prevention of dental caries: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Hayes, C

    2001-10-01

    The role of sugar substitutes such as xylitol and sorbitol in the prevention of dental caries has been investigated in several clinical studies. The purpose of this report is to review the current published evidence regarding the relationship between sugar substitutes and dental caries. A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE and EMBASE and included studies published from 1966 to 2001. Studies that included human subjects and were published in English were included in this review. A total of fourteen clinical studies were reviewed that evaluated the effect of sorbitol or xylitol or the combination of both sugar substitutes on the incidence of dental caries. Most of the reports were of studies conducted with children outside of the United States. These studies demonstrated a consistent decrease in dental caries, ranging from 30 to 60 percent, among subjects using sugar substitutes as compared to subjects in a control group. These caries rate reductions were observed in subjects using xylitol or sorbitol as the sugar substitute in chewing gum or toothpaste. The highest caries reductions were observed in subjects using xylitol. These findings suggest that the replacement of sucrose with sorbitol and xylitol may significantly decrease the incidence of dental caries. PMID:11699985

  6. Integration of Oral Health Care and Mental Health Services: Dental Hygienists’ Readiness and Capacity for Secondary Prevention of Eating Disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rita DiGioacchino DeBate; Stacey B. Plichta; Lisa A. Tedesco; Wendy E. Kerschbaum

    2006-01-01

    Often the first to observe overt health effects of eating disorders, dentists and dental hygienists play a fundamental role\\u000a in the secondary prevention of eating disorders. The purpose of this study was to explore readiness and capacity for integration\\u000a of oral health and mental health services. Employing a randomized cross-sectional study based upon the Transtheoretical and\\u000a Health Belief Models, data

  7. Effects of common dental materials used in preventive or operative dentistry on dentin permeability and remineralization.

    PubMed

    Sauro, Salvatore; Thompson, Ian; Watson, Timothy F

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dentin remineralization induced by bioactive substances contained in common dental materials used in preventive and operative dentistry. Several materials were applied on human dentin segments. Dentin permeability was quantified using a fluid filtration system working at 20 cm H(2)O. Micro-Raman, SEM-EDX, and microhardness calculation were used to evaluate changes in the mineralization of dentin. Dentin treated with the prophylactic materials showed different dentin permeability values, in particular subsequent to immersion in remineralizing solutions (RSS). The bioactive glass (Sylc) was the only substance able to reduce dentin permeability after immersion in remineralizing solution and to show hydroxyapatite precipitation as a sign of dentin remineralization. The reduction in dentin permeability obtained after the application of the other prophylactic materials used in this study was due to the presence of the remnant material in the dentinal tubules, with no remineralization effect after storage in remineralizing solution. In conclusion, the results indicated that bioactive glass prophy powder may induce immediate remineralization of dentin. PMID:21777102

  8. Community-oriented administration of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries: a summary of the current situation in Asia.

    PubMed

    Petersen, P E; Baez, R J; Lennon, M A

    2012-02-01

    Dental caries is the most prevalent chronic disease affecting human populations around the world. It is recognized that fluoride plays a significant role in dental caries reduction. Meanwhile, several low- and middle-income countries of Asia have not yet implemented systematic fluoride programs; contributing factors relate to misconceptions about the mechanisms of fluoride, low priority given to oral health in national health policy and strategic plans, and lack of interest among public health administrators. A workshop on the effective use of fluoride in Asia took place in Phang-Nga, Thailand, in 2011. A series of country presentations addressed some of the topics mentioned above; in addition, speakers from countries of the region provided examples of successful fluoride interventions and discussed program limitations, barriers encountered, and solutions, as well as possibilities for expanding coverage. Participants acknowledged that automatic fluoridation through water, salt, and milk is the most effective and equitable strategy for the prevention of dental caries. Concerns were expressed that government-subsidized community fluoride prevention programs may face privatization. In addition, the use of affordable fluoride-containing toothpastes should be encouraged. The workshop identified: strengths and weaknesses of ongoing community-based fluoride programs, as well as the interest of countries in a particular method; the requirement for World Health Organization (WHO) technical assistance on various aspects, including fluoridation process, feasibility studies, and implementation of effective epidemiological surveillance of the program; exchange of information; and the need for inter-country collaboration. It was acknowledged that program process and evaluation at the local and country levels need further dissemination. The meeting was co-sponsored by the World Health Organization, the International Association for Dental Research, and the World Dental Federation. PMID:22261256

  9. Not All Cavities Are Treated Equal: Increasing Access to Preventive Dental Care in Texas 

    E-print Network

    Andrews, Sarah; Barrett, Elizabeth; Beonigk, Rachel; Broughton, Whitney; Cifuentes-Soto, Mauricio; Hill, Jenny; Louder, Nathan; Nwanze, Chukwudebe; Wang, Yefeng (Caryl)

    2012-01-01

    Canceled Loan Repayment Program ........................................................................................ 51 Utilization Demand: A Patient Shortage .......................................................................................... 52 Barriers... health of their patients. Twelve years later, many Americans still do not receive sufficient oral health care. In 2011, over 30 million Americans lived in dental Health Professional Shortage Areas,4 limiting access to care and causing dental caries...

  10. Role of sweeteners in the etiology and prevention of dental caries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shigeyuki Hamada

    2002-01-01

    Dental caries is a multifactorial disease that is caused by an interplay of three major factors, i.e., teeth, cariogenic bacteria, and fermentable sugars. Streptococcus mutans and S. sobrinus, collectively termed mutans streptococci (MS), are principal causative agents of dental caries. Initial MS-tooth surface attachment is followed by firm and irreversible adhesion of MS to the tooth surface, accompanied by the

  11. [Empathy and prevention: from the child's viewpoint. Comments on a school diary developed from dental prophylaxis messages].

    PubMed

    Amadori, A; Saran, G; Ferro, R

    1990-08-01

    The paper presents, explains and comments on the theoretical, practical and applied aspects of a collaborative enterprise between Health Services and a primary school in the context of a dental hygiene and preventive project organised by the USSL no. 19 in Mediobrenta. The enterprise in question concerned the experimental writing, by the children themselves, of a school diary, based on messages regarding dental health and hygiene formulated by the Odontostomatological Service in line with learning processes and communication models used during infancy. The experiment formed part of the general active approach of modern psychological pedagogy, and proved particularly efficacious in introducing medical concepts to an infantile population which would otherwise have met with much greater resistance. PMID:2287334

  12. Access to Dental Care for Children in Rhode Island. Rhode Island Kids Count Issue Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Linda; Fontes, Janice; Ross, Maureen; Lawrence, Robin; Andrews, John; Kernan, Sharon; Leddy, Tricia; O'Bara, Joan; Young, John

    Dental disease restricts activities in school, work, and home, and often significantly diminishes the quality of life for many children and adults, especially those who are low income or uninsured. Noting that dental caries (tooth decay) is the most common preventable chronic childhood disease, this Kids Count issue brief considers the extent to…

  13. A Comparison of Selected Evidence Reviews and Recommendations on Interventions to Prevent Dental Caries, Oral and Pharyngeal Cancers, and Sports Related Craniofacial Injuries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara F. Gooch; Benedict I. Truman; Susan O. Griffin; William G. Kohn; Iddrisu Sulemana; Helen C. Gift; Alice M. Horowitz; Caswell A. Evans

    Medical Subject Headings (MeSH): cariostatic agents, community dentistry, community health planning, community health services, decision making, dental caries, evidence- based medicine, facial injuries, fluoridation, intervention studies, meta-analysis, mouth protectors, oral health, pharyngeal neoplasms, pit and fissure sealants, practice guidelines, preventive dentistry, preventive health services, public health dentistry, public health practice, review literature, tooth injuries

  14. An evaluation of a pilot study of a web-based educational initiative for educating and training undergraduate dental students in infection prevention

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. Smith; D. E. A. Lockhart

    2009-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the views of undergraduate dental students on a pilot web-based e-learning programme to establish its merit in providing education in infection prevention and control. The initiative was commissioned by NHS Education for Scotland as an educational resource for healthcare workers.Design, sample and setting This was a retrospective analysis of questionnaire data from the first cohort of dental students

  15. Drug resistance of bacterial dental biofilm and the potential use of natural compounds as alternative for prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kouidhi, Bochra; Al Qurashi, Yasir Mohammed A; Chaieb, Kamel

    2015-03-01

    Oral diseases, such as dental caries and periodontal disease are directly linked with the ability of bacteria to form biofilm. The development of dental caries involves acidogenic and aciduric Gram-positive bacteria colonizing the supragingival biofilm (Streptococcus, Lactobacillus and Actinomycetes). Periodontal diseases have been linked to anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria forming a subgingival plaque (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Actinobacillus, Prevotella and Fusobacterium). Cells embedded in biofilm are up to 1000-fold more resistant to antibiotics compared to their planctonic ones. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain biofilms drug resistance. Given the increased bacterial resistance to antibiotics currently used in dentistry, a great importance is given to natural compounds for the prevention of oral bacterial growth, adhesion and colonization. Over the past decade, interest in drugs derived from medicinal plants has markedly increased. It has been well documented that medicinal plants and natural compounds confer considerable antibacterial activity against various microorganisms including cariogenic and periodontal pathogens. This paper provides a review of the literature focusing on the studies on (i) biofilm in the oral cavity, (ii) drug resistance of bacterial biofilm and (iii) the potential use of plant extracts, essential oils and natural compounds as biofilm preventive agents in dentistry, involving their origin and their mechanism of biofilm inhibition. PMID:25708507

  16. Enhancing implementation of tobacco use prevention and cessation counselling guideline among dental providers: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Tobacco use adversely affects oral health. Tobacco use prevention and cessation (TUPAC) counselling guidelines recommend that healthcare providers ask about each patient's tobacco use, assess the patient's readiness and willingness to stop, document tobacco use habits, advise the patient to stop, assist and help in quitting, and arrange monitoring of progress at follow-up appointments. Adherence to such guidelines, especially among dental providers, is poor. To improve guideline implementation, it is essential to understand factors influencing it and find effective ways to influence those factors. The aim of the present study protocol is to introduce a theory-based approach to diagnose implementation difficulties of TUPAC counselling guidelines among dental providers. Methods Theories of behaviour change have been used to identify key theoretical domains relevant to the behaviours of healthcare providers involved in implementing clinical guidelines. These theoretical domains will inform the development of a questionnaire aimed at assessing the implementation of the TUPAC counselling guidelines among Finnish municipal dental providers. Specific items will be drawn from the guidelines and the literature on TUPAC studies. After identifying potential implementation difficulties, we will design two interventions using theories of behaviour change to link them with relevant behaviour change techniques aiming to improve guideline adherence. For assessing the implementation of TUPAC guidelines, the electronic dental record audit and self-reported questionnaires will be used. Discussion To improve guideline adherence, the theoretical-domains approach could provide a comprehensive basis for assessing implementation difficulties, as well as designing and evaluating interventions. After having identified implementation difficulties, we will design and test two interventions to enhance TUPAC guideline adherence. Using the cluster randomised controlled design, we aim to provide further evidence on intervention effects, as well as on the validity and feasibility of the theoretical-domain approach. The empirical data collected within this trial will be useful in testing whether this theoretical-domain approach can improve our understanding of the implementation of TUPAC guidelines among dental providers. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN15427433 PMID:21320312

  17. Mucoadhesive electrospun chitosan-based nanofibre mats for dental caries prevention.

    PubMed

    Samprasit, Wipada; Kaomongkolgit, Ruchadaporn; Sukma, Monrudee; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2015-03-01

    The mucoadhesive electrospun nanofibre mats were developed using chitosan (CS) and thiolated chitosan (CS-SH) as mucoadhesive polymers. Garcinia mangostana (GM) extract was incorporated into nanofibre mats. The antibacterial activity in the single and combined agents was evaluated against dental caries pathogens. The morphology of mats was observed using SEM. The mats were evaluated for GM extract amount, mucoadhesion, in vitro release, antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity. The mucoadhesion and antibacterial activity were determined in healthy human volunteers. The prepared mats were in nanoscale with good physical and mucoadhesive properties. The CS-SH caused the higher mucoadhesion. All mats rapidly released active substances, which had the synergistic antibacterial activity. In addition, the reduction of bacteria and good mucoadhesion in the oral cavity occurred without cytotoxicity. The results suggest that mats have the potential to be mucoadhesive dosage forms to maintain oral hygiene by reducing the bacterial growth that causes the dental caries. PMID:25498719

  18. Dental occlusion and postural control in adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Corinne Tardieu; Michel Dumitrescu; Anne Giraudeau; Jean-Luc Blanc; François Cheynet; Liliane Borel

    2009-01-01

    We studied the influence of a dental occlusion perturbation on postural control. The tests were performed in three dental occlusion conditions: (Rest Position: no dental contact, Maximal Intercuspal Occlusion: maximal dental contact, and Thwarted Laterality Occlusion: simulation of a dental malocclusion) and four postural conditions: static (stable platform) and dynamic (unstable platform), with eyes open and eyes closed. A decay

  19. Sequential years of dental outreach to Jamaica. Gains toward improved caries status of children.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Charles D; Larsen, Michael D; Kim, Michelle; Yang, Esther; Brown, Noel; Cunningham, Ralph P

    2014-01-01

    In the years 2007 to 2011, faculty, pediatric dental residents and dental students lead by New York University College of Dentistry and Healthcare International Reachout, Inc., traveled to the Hoolebury School, Saint Ann Parish, Jamaica, where they provided treatment to 172 children. The service project focused on dental health promotion, education and prevention. Although not a randomized controlled trial, the statistical evidence from records of treatment received and the presence of decay strongly suggests the positive benefit of repeat dental visits and the placement of sealants on permanent molars in these children. PMID:25672077

  20. Design and implementation of a dental caries prevention trial in remote Canadian Aboriginal communities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The goal of this cluster randomized trial is to test the effectiveness of a counseling approach, Motivational Interviewing, to control dental caries in young Aboriginal children. Motivational Interviewing, a client-centred, directive counseling style, has not yet been evaluated as an approach for promotion of behaviour change in indigenous communities in remote settings. Methods/design Aboriginal women were hired from the 9 communities to recruit expectant and new mothers to the trial, administer questionnaires and deliver the counseling to mothers in the test communities. The goal is for mothers to receive the intervention during pregnancy and at their child's immunization visits. Data on children's dental health status and family dental health practices will be collected when children are 30-months of age. The communities were randomly allocated to test or control group by a random "draw" over community radio. Sample size and power were determined based on an anticipated 20% reduction in caries prevalence. Randomization checks were conducted between groups. Discussion In the 5 test and 4 control communities, 272 of the original target sample size of 309 mothers have been recruited over a two-and-a-half year period. A power calculation using the actual attained sample size showed power to be 79% to detect a treatment effect. If an attrition fraction of 4% per year is maintained, power will remain at 80%. Power will still be > 90% to detect a 25% reduction in caries prevalence. The distribution of most baseline variables was similar for the two randomized groups of mothers. However, despite the random assignment of communities to treatment conditions, group differences exist for stage of pregnancy and prior tooth extractions in the family. Because of the group imbalances on certain variables, control of baseline variables will be done in the analyses of treatment effects. This paper explains the challenges of conducting randomized trials in remote settings, the importance of thorough community collaboration, and also illustrates the likelihood that some baseline variables that may be clinically important will be unevenly split in group-randomized trials when the number of groups is small. Trial registration This trial is registered as ISRCTN41467632. PMID:20465831

  1. Near-infrared image-guided laser ablation of dental decay

    PubMed Central

    Tao, You-Chen; Fried, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Image-guided laser ablation systems are now feasible for dentistry with the recent development of nondestructive high-contrast imaging modalities such as near-IR (NIR) imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) that are capable of discriminating between sound and demineralized dental enamel at the early stages of development. Our objective is to demonstrate that images of demineralized tooth surfaces have sufficient contrast to be used to guide a CO2 laser for the selective removal of natural and artificial caries lesions. NIR imaging and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) operating at 1310-nm are used to acquire images of natural lesions on extracted human teeth and highly patterned artificial lesions produced on bovine enamel. NIR and PS-OCT images are analyzed and converted to binary maps designating the areas on the samples to be removed by a CO2 laser to selectively remove the lesions. Postablation NIR and PS-OCT images confirmed preferential removal of demineralized areas with minimal damage to sound enamel areas. These promising results suggest that NIR and PS-OCT imaging systems can be integrated with a CO2 laser ablation system for the selective removal of dental caries. PMID:19895146

  2. Preventing Tooth Decay: A Guide for Implementing Self-Applied Fluoride in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Dental Research (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This guidebook was developed to assist citizens in initiating programs to prevent tooth decay in young children through the use of fluoridation. It contains outlines for determining the needs of the school and community for fluoride in drinking water, and presents the various steps and activities that are necessary for developing and implementing…

  3. Dental Surgery Standards for Perioperative Nurses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ruby Annette Sanders; Irvene Q. Daniel; Pamela Bridget Fuhrmann

    1995-01-01

    Practice standards for dental surgery are necessary to maintain quality care for dental patients. Specific standards or recommended practices for dental surgery have not been addressed by AORN, and none are available from the American Dental Association or the Georgia Dental Association. We incorporated the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, and Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations had

  4. Dental care resistance prevention and antibiotic prescribing modification—the cluster-randomised controlled DREAM trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial resistance development is one of the most urgent problems in healthcare worldwide. In Europe, dentistry accounts for a comparatively high amount of antibiotic prescriptions. In light of increasing levels of bacterial resistance, this development is alarming. So far, very few interventional studies have been performed, and further research is urgently needed. By means of a complex educational intervention, the DREAM trial aims at optimising antibiotic prescribing behaviour of general dentists in Germany. Method This is a cluster-randomised controlled trial, where each cluster consists of one dental practice and all of its patients in a defined period. Participants are general dentists practicing in the German region of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania. Randomisation takes place after baseline data collection (6 months) and will be stratified by the antibiotic prescribing rates of the participating dental practices. Dentists randomised into the intervention group will participate in a complex small group educational seminar that aims at: increasing knowledge on bacterial resistance, pharmacology, and prophylaxis of infectious endocarditis; increasing awareness of dentist-patient communication using video-taped vignettes of dentist-patient communication on antibiotic treatment; improving collaboration between general dentists, general practitioners, and practice-based cardiologists on the necessity of antibiotic prophylaxis; enhancing awareness of the dentists’ own prescribing habits by providing antibiotic prescribing feedback; and increasing patient knowledge on antibiotic treatment by providing patient-centred information material on antibiotic prophylaxis of endocarditis. The dentists randomised into the control group will not receive any educational programme and provide care as usual. Primary outcome is the overall antibiotic prescribing rate measured at T1 (period of six months after intervention). In a subgroup of adult patients affected by odontogenic infections, microbiological analyses for antibiotic resistance of oral streptococci are performed. Discussion Major aim of the study is to improve the process of decision making with regard to antibiotic prescribing. The approach is simple to implement and might be used rapidly in graduate and post-graduate medical education. We expect the results of this trial to have a major impact on antibiotic prescription strategies and practices in Germany. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN09576376 PMID:24559212

  5. Screening of Probiotic Candidates in Human Oral Bacteria for the Prevention of Dental Disease.

    PubMed

    Terai, Tomohiko; Okumura, Takekazu; Imai, Susumu; Nakao, Masumi; Yamaji, Kazuaki; Ito, Masahiko; Nagata, Tsuyoshi; Kaneko, Kimiyuki; Miyazaki, Kouji; Okada, Ayako; Nomura, Yoshiaki; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity in healthy subjects has a well-balanced microbiota that consists of more than 700 species. However, a disturbance of this balance, with an increase of harmful microbes and a decrease of beneficial microbes, causes oral disorders such as periodontal disease or dental caries. Nowadays, probiotics are expected to confer oral health benefits by modulating the oral microbiota. This study screened new probiotic candidates with potential oral health benefits and no harmful effects on the oral cavity. We screened 14 lactobacillus strains and 36 streptococcus strains out of 896 oral isolates derived from healthy subjects. These bacteria did not produce volatile sulfur compounds or water-insoluble glucan, had higher antibacterial activity against periodontal bacteria, and had higher adherence activity to oral epithelial cells or salivary-coated hydroxyapatite in vitro. We then evaluated the risk of primary cariogenicity and infective endocarditis of the selected oral isolates. As a result, Lactobacillus crispatus YIT 12319, Lactobacillus fermentum YIT 12320, Lactobacillus gasseri YIT 12321, and Streptococcus mitis YIT 12322 were selected because they showed no cariogenic potential in an artificial mouth system and a lower risk of experimental infective endocarditis in a rat model. These candidates are expected as new probiotics with potential oral health benefits and no adverse effects on general health. PMID:26053410

  6. Screening of Probiotic Candidates in Human Oral Bacteria for the Prevention of Dental Disease

    PubMed Central

    Terai, Tomohiko; Okumura, Takekazu; Imai, Susumu; Nakao, Masumi; Yamaji, Kazuaki; Ito, Masahiko; Nagata, Tsuyoshi; Kaneko, Kimiyuki; Miyazaki, Kouji; Okada, Ayako; Nomura, Yoshiaki; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity in healthy subjects has a well-balanced microbiota that consists of more than 700 species. However, a disturbance of this balance, with an increase of harmful microbes and a decrease of beneficial microbes, causes oral disorders such as periodontal disease or dental caries. Nowadays, probiotics are expected to confer oral health benefits by modulating the oral microbiota. This study screened new probiotic candidates with potential oral health benefits and no harmful effects on the oral cavity. We screened 14 lactobacillus strains and 36 streptococcus strains out of 896 oral isolates derived from healthy subjects. These bacteria did not produce volatile sulfur compounds or water-insoluble glucan, had higher antibacterial activity against periodontal bacteria, and had higher adherence activity to oral epithelial cells or salivary-coated hydroxyapatite in vitro. We then evaluated the risk of primary cariogenicity and infective endocarditis of the selected oral isolates. As a result, Lactobacillus crispatus YIT 12319, Lactobacillus fermentum YIT 12320, Lactobacillus gasseri YIT 12321, and Streptococcus mitis YIT 12322 were selected because they showed no cariogenic potential in an artificial mouth system and a lower risk of experimental infective endocarditis in a rat model. These candidates are expected as new probiotics with potential oral health benefits and no adverse effects on general health. PMID:26053410

  7. Dental caries.

    PubMed

    Burgess, R C

    1988-06-01

    Dental caries is one of the most prevalent diseases afflicting mankind. It reached a peak in the 1950s but has been declining drastically in recent years in children and young adults. This article describes the three contributing factors in dental caries: microbial plaque, tooth susceptibility, and diet, and discusses practical preventive measures which help to reduce caries incidence. Some of these, such as vaccines and antimicrobial varnishes, are still in the research stages, while others, such as sucrose substitutes, low-calorie sweeteners, and limitation of frequency of sugar snacks are well established and can be promoted by family physicians. PMID:21253193

  8. Can early exposure to probiotics in children prevent dental caries? A current perspective

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Garima; Pandey, Ramesh Kumar; Singh, Rajeev Kumar; Pandey, Neelisha

    2012-01-01

    Background Probiotics are supplements or foods that contain viable microorganisms which cause alterations of the microflora of the host. Probiotics have already been established in the treatment and prevention of various gastrointestinal system. Recently, role of probiotics has become an important issue for research in dentistry in the era of increased antibiotic resistance. Materials and methods The basis of the paper is the clinical studies and research done in relation to probiotics on oral health using PUBMED search database. Results and conclusions Although many clinical studies have demonstrated positive outcome in preventing caries and periodontal diseases, the data is still scarce in recommending probiotics for the oral health. Moreover, since initial colonization of oral cavity of the newborn is very important for developing immunity and prevention of future diseases. Hence, measures should be directed towards its preventive use in infants and children. The formulations produced for oral cavity should also be within reach of common man especially in underdeveloped and developing countries. This review endeavors to compile the research of probiotics on oral cavity and throws a light on its evolving status in developing countries. It also evaluates its use in children for a long-term benefit. PMID:25737845

  9. 76 FR 10899 - Proposed HHS Recommendation for Fluoride Concentration in Drinking Water for Prevention of Dental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ...SERVICES Proposed HHS Recommendation for Fluoride Concentration in Drinking Water for Prevention...community water systems adjust the amount of fluoride in drinking water to 0.7 mg/L to...period on the proposed recommendations for fluoride concentration in drinking water for...

  10. Specific Anti Cross-Infection Measures may Help to Prevent Viral Contamination of Dental Unit Waterlines: a Pilot Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Artini; G. L. Scoarughi; R. Papa; G. Dolci; M. De Luca; G. Orsini; S. Pappalardo; J. W. Costerton; L. Selan

    2008-01-01

    Background: In recent years, several reports have suggested, but never definitely demonstrated that dental units (DU) could be potential sources of viral cross-infections sustained by viral agents including HBV, HCV and HIV. This work aims at assessing the risk of HCV cross-infection by dental unit water lines (DUWLs). Materials and Methods: Ten anti-HCV positive viremic patients were submitted to dental

  11. Chemico-therapeutic approach to prevention of dental caries. [using stannous fluoride gel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, I. L.

    1975-01-01

    The program of chemical preventive dentistry is based primarily upon the development of a procedure for stabilizing stannous fluoride in solution by forcing it into glycerin. New topical fluoride treatment concentrates, fluoride containing gels and prophylaxis pastes, as well as a completely stable stannous fluoride dentifrice are made possible by the development of a rather complicated heat application method to force stannous fluoride into solution in glycerin. That the stannous fluoride is clinically effective in such a preparation is demonstrated briefly on orthodontic patients.

  12. Dental porcelain/Ni alloy interface reactions and their effective prevention.

    PubMed

    Williams, T R; Winchell, P G; Phillips, R W

    1978-04-01

    In a Be-bearing Ni alloy porcelainized without preoxidation, Be diffuses to the interface, oxidizes, and oxygen is supplied by the atmosphere at the porcelain surface and by reduction of SiO2 at the porcelain-alloy interface. On the alloy side of the interface, pits develop locally and near them Ni and Cr oxidize. In the oxide, Ni and Si are reduced to form nickel silicides. Preoxidation of the alloy prevents Be oxidation and Si reduction for several hours of porcelainization. PMID:361774

  13. Attitudes and knowledge about preventive dental care in Chilean refugees in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, M; Bornstein, R; Martinsson, T

    1993-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a simplified oral health programme on attitudes to and knowledge of preventive dentistry. The subjects were Chilean refugees and the programme was delivered at one or two sessions in the form of group information/discussion. Because of increasing immigration, Sweden has become a multicultural society. The number of non-Nordic immigrants has doubled in the past decade. The major refugee groups have come from Iran, Chile and Poland. The subjects comprised 193 Chilean refugees: 106 in a single-visit group and 87 in a two-visit group. The oral health programme was completed by 94 and 65 subjects respectively and was evaluated after 6 months. Positive effects were discernible in attitudes to and knowledge of preventive dentistry, particularly with respect to oral hygiene. A key to success may have been group discussion in which the refugees could relate oral health problems to their own ethnic group. This could have an important function in bridging cultural, linguistic and situational barriers. Different forms of outreach programmes for oral health via groups, organisations or authorities in close contact with refugees shortly after arrival in Sweden are proposed. This approach may be particularly effective in a multicultural society and also in the context of the turbulent conditions the newly-arrived refugee experiences. PMID:8124622

  14. [Preventive and remineralization effect over incipient lesions of caries decay by phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate].

    PubMed

    Juárez-López, María Lilia Adriana; Hernández-Palacios, Rosa Diana; Hernández-Guerrero, Juan Carlos; Jiménez-Farfán, Dolores; Molina-Frechero, Nelly

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. Dental caries continues to affect a large percentage of Mexican children and currently advises that if diagnosed at an early stage can be reversed with minimally invasive treatments. The casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate known as CPP-ACP is a phosphoprotein capable of releasing calcium and phosphate ions in the oral environment promoting remineralization. OBJECTIVE. To evaluate the effect of CPP-ACP with fluoride added in a scholar preventive program. MATERIAL AND METHODS. A cuasi- experimental study was conducted in 104 schools of six years old. The children were classified into three groups and received six months biweekly applications of different treatments: casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate added fluoride (CPP-ACPF), sodium fluoride (NaF) and a control group. Clinical evaluation was performed with the laser fluorescence technique (Diagnodent model 2095). 1340 teeth were included: 294 teeth with incipient lesions and 1,046 healthy teeth. Statistical tests of ?2 y Mc Nemar were used. RESULTS. In the group that received the application of CPP-ACPF, 38% of incipient carious lesions were remineralizing compared with 21% in the group receiving the NaF (p < 0.001) and 15% in the control group (p < 0.0001) The percentage of teeth free of caries were preserved in the therapy group phosphoprotein was the biggest. This group also showed the lower proportion of deep carious lesion development (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION. The application biweekly for six months of CPP-ACPF showed a protective and remineralizing effect on incipient carious lesions. His action was better than the application of NaF. However, to reduce the impact from dental caries in schoolchildren is important to have a comprehensive preventive approach that includes promoting self-care, as well as the application of sealants. PMID:24960324

  15. Dental Assisting Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard dental assisting curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level dental assistants, and includes job skills in the technical areas of preventive dentistry; four-handed dentistry; chairside assisting with emphasis in diagnostics,…

  16. Dental Implants

    MedlinePLUS

    Dental Implants A fuller, more complete smile is within reach. The following information is designed to provide helpful ... whether dental implants are right for your situation. Dental Implants and Roots The key benefit of dental implants ...

  17. Dental onlay bridge-like prosthesis in three koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus): the use of Premise trimodal composite to prevent interproximal Eucalyptus spp. retention and infection.

    PubMed

    Perry, Sean M; Pye, Geoffrey W; Fagan, David A

    2014-06-01

    Three koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) presented with moderate to severe interproximal space accumulation with Eucalyptus spp. at the San Diego Zoo. Premise trimodal composite was used to create dental onlay bridge-like prostheses to eliminate open, enlarged interproximal spaces. The prostheses prevented further leaf material accumulation within the interproximal spaces and consequently reduced periodontal disease. Aesthetically, the prosthesis replicates normal tooth coloration and appearance and wears at a similar rate to surrounding teeth. Prosthetic repair or replacement may be required, so periodic examination every 3-6 mo is recommended. PMID:25000719

  18. Polypeptide nanocoatings for preventing dental and orthopaedic device-associated infection: pH-induced antibiotic capture, release, and antibiotic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bingbing; Li, Bingyun

    2009-02-01

    Implant-associated infection is one of the most common and problematic complications for dental and orthopaedic patients. Modification of currently used implant surfaces aimed at bestowing them with antibacterial properties is a promising approach in the development of new biomaterials. In this study, a novel nanotechnology, that is, electrostatic self-assembly, was developed to construct biomimetic polypeptide nanocoatings on commonly used metal implants. A model antibacterial drug, cefazolin, was captured in the polypeptide nanocoating and its release was studied. We have shown that the capture and release of cefazolin was pH-induced and could be controlled, and the developed antibiotic-incorporated polypeptide multilayer nanocoatings could prevent Staphylococcus aureus colonization thus showing great potential for preventing implant-associated infection. PMID:18161817

  19. Ability Of Optical Coherence Tomography To Detect Caries Beneath Commonly Used Dental Sealants

    PubMed Central

    Osann, Kathryn; Pharar, Jessica; Lee, Kenneth; Ahn, Yeh-chan; Tucker, Travis; Sabet, Sharareh; Chen, Zhongping; Gukasyan, Ripsik; Wilder-Smith, Petra

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objective The onset and progression of early tooth decay is often preventable with dental sealants. However, occasionally decay progresses underneath the sealant. Current technology does not permit monitoring of potential lesion progression or arrest. Dental sealants themselves mask the visual cues that identify early tooth decay, and radiographs are not sufficiently sensitive. Therefore clinicians can be reluctant to use dental sealant. The objective of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the ability of dentists to detect decay beneath commonly used dental sealants using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) imaging. Study Designs/Materials/Methods Forty extracted teeth were divided into equal groups of carious and non-carious teeth, as determined by visual inspection. After radiographs and OCT imaging, teeth were randomly assigned for sealant placement with one of four commonly purchased dental sealants: Clinpro™, Fuji Triage™, Embrace Wet Bond™, and Delton™. Following sealant placement, teeth were radiographed, imaged with OCT, sectioned, examined histologically, and scored as healthy/not healthy. OCT and radiographic images were scored separately. The gold standard was histopathological diagnosis from the serial sections. Cohen’s Kappa, sensitivity, negative predictive value and positive predictive value were computed for all measures. Results After 90 mins training, pre-standardized dentists were able to detect tooth decay more accurately using OCT than with visual or radiographic examination. Detection using OCT was somewhat better prior to sealant placement than afterwards. This effect varied in size depending on the type of sealant used. Radiographic diagnosis was also less accurate after sealant placement. Of the four dental sealants, Delton provided excellent positive predictive value and the best post-sealant negative predictive values. Conclusion In this ex vivo study, dentists were able to detect tooth decay beneath four commonly used dental sealants based on OCT images. Clinical investigations are now underway to determine the usefulness of this approach in vivo. PMID:20848554

  20. Review of Spaceflight Dental Emergencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Anil

    2012-01-01

    All exploration class missions--extending beyond earth's orbit--differ from existing orbital missions by being of longer duration and often not having a means of evacuation. If an exploration mission extends beyond a year, then there will be a greater lapse since the crewmembers last terrestrial dental exams, which routinely occur each year. This increased time since professional dental care could increase the chance of a dental emergency such as intractable pain, dental decay requiring a temporary filling, crown replacement, exposed pulp, abscess, tooth avulsion, or toothache. Additionally, any dental emergency will have to be treated in-flight with available resources and personnel who may not have extensive training in dental care. Thus, dental emergencies are an important risk to assess in preparation for exploration missions.

  1. A three-year randomized controlled trial in 6-year-old children on caries-preventive strategies in a general dental practice in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Vermaire, J H; Poorterman, J H G; van Herwijnen, L; van Loveren, C

    2014-01-01

    A parallel-randomized controlled trial on caries-preventive strategies was conducted in a general dental practice with a mixed socioeconomic background patient population. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that, compared to regular care consisting of check-ups twice a year with professional fluoride applications and pit and fissure sealants in all permanent molars, a larger caries-preventive effect can be achieved by following a non-operative caries treatment and prevention (NOCTP) strategy or by following, in addition to regular care, an increased number of professional topical fluoride applications (IPFA). A total of 230 children (6.0 years ± 3 months of age) were randomly assigned to the two experimental groups or the control group. After 3 years, 179 participants remained in the study (54 NOCTP, 62 IPFA and 63 control). The children were examined at baseline and at 3 years by the same experienced examiner, who was blinded for the allocation of the children. Caries was scored clinically at the D3 level. Per protocol analysis revealed a mean DMFS increment after 3 years of 0.15 (95% CI -0.05 to 0.35) for NOCTP, 0.34 (95% CI 0.11 to 0.54) for IPFA and 0.47 (95% CI 0.26 to 0.68) for the control group. To account for missing data, multiple imputation was used, after which the mean DMFS increment was 0.11 (95% CI -0.05 to 0.27) for NOCTP, 0.29 (95% CI 0.11 to 0.46) for IPFA and 0.40 (95% CI 0.21 to 0.55) for the control group. Testing the differences with independent samples t test revealed a lower caries increment in the NOCTP group compared to the control group. ANCOVA was used to correct for differences in baseline dmfs, socioeconomic status and perceived dental hygiene burden. The ?DMFS effect size between the NOCTP and the control group dropped, losing statistical significance (p = 0.06). Although the results in this study are promising, it has yet to be established in a larger study whether NOCTP has the ability to be effective in regular dental practice with a mixed socioeconomic status population. PMID:24924292

  2. Modelling community, family, and individual determinants of childhood dental caries.

    PubMed

    Duijster, Denise; van Loveren, Cor; Dusseldorp, Elise; Verrips, Gijsbert H W

    2014-04-01

    This cross-sectional study empirically tested a theoretical model of pathways and inter-relationships among community, family, and individual determinants of childhood dental caries in a sample of 630, 6-year-old children from the Netherlands. Children's decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmft) scores were extracted from dental records. A validated parental questionnaire was used to collect data on sociodemographic characteristics, psychosocial factors, and oral hygiene behaviours. Data on neighbourhood quality were obtained from the Dutch Central Bureau of Statistics. Structural equation modelling indicated that the model was valid after applying a few modifications. In the revised model, lower maternal education level was related to poorer family organization, lower levels of social support, lower dental self-efficacy, and an external dental health locus of control. These, in turn, were associated with poorer oral hygiene behaviours, which were linked to higher levels of childhood dental caries. In addition, lower maternal education level and poorer neighbourhood quality were directly associated with higher caries levels in children. This model advances our understanding of determinants of childhood dental caries and the pathways in which they operate. Conception of these pathways is essential for guiding the development of caries-preventive programmes for children. Clues for further development of the model are suggested. PMID:24524246

  3. Feline dental disease.

    PubMed

    Frost, P; Williams, C A

    1986-09-01

    Periodontal disease and chronic gingivitis/stomatitis are the most common feline dental diseases. With routine dental care and increased emphasis on home oral hygiene, these diseases can be controlled. Cats can be seen with a number of other dental disorders, and improved treatment methods such as restorations of early subgingival resorptive lesions, endodontic therapy, and orthodontic therapy can be performed successfully. More study and research are necessary about the gingivitis/stomatitis syndrome and subgingival resorptive lesions so that improved prevention and treatment recommendations can be made. PMID:3490037

  4. Dental Health and Orthodontic Problems

    MedlinePLUS

    ... dental health primarily to increased access to fluoridation. “Fluoride reduces tooth decay as well as slows down ... than 95 percent of all toothpastes now have fluoride in them, and about 65 percent of our ...

  5. [Dental caries].

    PubMed

    Inén Egozcue, M; Bordoni, N

    1980-01-01

    Recent studies on the etiology and prevention of dental caries are synthetized. Caries is an infectious disease produced by the bacterial plaque where microorganisms act upon hydrocarbon substrate producing acids (lactic, pyruvic, acetic, etc.). These acids decalcify the enamel surface producing the carious cavity. The three types of caries are mentioned: 1. The sucrose-dependent caries on the free surfaces of the tooth with the Streptococcus mutans predominance. 2. The pits and fissures caries with Lactobacillus acidophilus predominance. 3. The root caries with Acinomyces viscosus predominance. Caries prevention points out to three aspects. 1. Increasing tooth resistance through the use of ingested fluoride and/or topical fluorides and pits and fissure sealants. 2. A profuse and promising research work on control of microbial plaque is being done. Meanwhile, the correct and periodically controlled toothbrushing is still the most efficient preventive measure. 3. Diet control. Being carbohydrates a deep rooted habit of our modern culture, its control has to be carefully evaluated. A judicious and reduced strategic consumption of carbohydrates and the use of substitutes are useful ways of achieving the preventive aims. PMID:7378185

  6. 77 FR 12517 - VA Dental Insurance Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ...64.009 Veterans Medical Care Benefits and 64.011 Veterans Dental Care. Signing Authority...follows: PART 17--MEDICAL 1. The authority...Sec. 17.169 VA Dental Insurance Plan program...if no claims for dental services or benefits...prevented by serious medical condition from...

  7. Dental exarticulation.

    PubMed

    Yadav, S; Sisodia, N; Jha, V; Yadav, M

    2015-01-01

    Tooth exarticulation or avulsion refers to the complete displacement of the tooth out of its socket. It is a complex injury, requiring immediate intervention for optimal results. Literature indicates that prolonged dry time and improper handling may be associated with increased risk of failure. Immediate replantation of the tooth allows for immediate restoration of esthetics and phonetics. This case report presents the management of an avulsed mature tooth in a young boy, with a two-year follow-up, which had been preserved in milk after around 15-20 minutes of injury and transplanted after two hours at a dental hospital. Timely modified endodontic therapy prevented subsequent inflammatory root resorption. PMID:25772931

  8. Minimally invasive endoscopic middle meatal antrostomy for the prevention of maxillary sinusitis in association with dental implantation in the posterior maxilla--a proposal.

    PubMed

    Kunihiro, Takanobu; Araki, Yasutomo; Oba, Toshihiko

    2014-09-01

    Penetration of the maxillary sinus floor membrane during sinus lift occasionally induces maxillary sinusitis. However, maxillary sinusitis may still develop even when its floor membrane has been kept intact during such procedures. The decisive factor for the occurrence of maxillary sinusitis is not the integrity of the membrane; more important is the patency of the maxillary sinus natural ostium. The occlusion of the natural ostium presumably results from the expansive edema of the sinus membrane induced by surgical manipulations to the maxillary sinus floor. We propose a minimally invasive endoscopic sinus surgery which conceivably is useful to prevent potential occlusion of the natural ostium associated with maxillary sinus floor augmentation procedures. Although our technique is not a new concept, this is the first report to propose this kind of procedure as an adjunct to dental implantation. Our method is cost-effective and can be performed under topical anesthesia as a same-day surgery. In addition, it brings about no serious complications, such as orbital injuries or cerebrospinal fluid leakage. It aims to correct anatomical deviations, such as septal deviation, concha bullosa, hypertrophied uncinate process, and excessively pneumatized ethmoid bulla, all of which precipitate the occlusion of the natural ostium. Our method consists of a combination of resection of the uncinate process, widening of the natural ostium, and excision of the anterior and inferior edge of the middle turbinate. First, the anterior and inferoposterior segments of the uncinate process are resected with a curved rongeur, leaving the agger nasi cell intact (caution must be exercised to avoid injury to the nasolacrimal duct). This enables visualization of the maxillary natural ostium. The ostium is widened in all directions, using a forceps and/or a scalpel. The resultant widened ostium is bordered anteriorly by the nasolacrimal duct, inferiorly by the base of the inferior turbinate, posteriorly by the anterior surface of the ethmoid bulla, and superiorly by the medio-inferior angle of the orbit. Then the anterior and inferior edge of the middle turbinate is trimmed to prevent its adhesion to the lateral nasal wall or narrowing of the middle meatus. This surgery does not cause cerebrospinal fluid leakage and, at the same time, minimizes the risk for olfactory dysfunction. The antrostomy window thus formed is large enough to secure drainage and ventilation of the maxillary sinus. Moreover, the middle meatus, now deprived of the antero-inferior aspect of the middle turbinate, enables the patient to irrigate the maxillary sinus with a saline solution at home. Septal deviation can also be corrected simultaneously, if postoperative packing of bilateral nasal cavities is tolerable to the patient. Our experiences in treating over 100 patients are encouraging; although postoperative care such as irrigation of the maxillary sinus at home was mandatory and the start of dental implantation was delayed for 2-6 months, no patient who underwent surgery at our clinic developed maxillary sinusitis during the following course of dental implantation. We believe that collaboration between the otorhinolaryngologist and the dentist/oral surgeon is required to minimize the risk of maxillary sinusitis associated with dental implantation in the maxilla. PMID:25639025

  9. Dental Sealants

    MedlinePLUS

    ... High School and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings Loan Repayment Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care ...

  10. Dental Amalgam

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Medical Devices Print this page Share this page E-mail this page Home Medical Devices Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam ...

  11. Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    NCI’s prevention research has a broad focus, from identifying environmental and lifestyle factors that influence cancer risk to studying the biology of how cancer develops and studying ways to disseminate prevention interventions.

  12. Prevalence of Dental Caries and Periodontal Disease in Mexican American Children Aged 5 to 17 Years: Results from Southwestern HHANES, 1982-83.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Amid L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Dental caries and periodontal disease in Mexican American children of the southwestern United States occur mainly in molars, lending strong support for the use of fissure sealants as a preventive procedure. This study also reports on the prevalence of fillings decay and gingivitis in this population. (VM)

  13. School dental health in Honduras.

    PubMed

    Flanders, R A

    1988-01-01

    Project HOPE has been working with the Honduran government since 1983 to establish educational programs for health workers and improve the country's health care services. The Ministry of Health in Honduras, under the direction of the president, is planning a new emphasis on preventive dentistry. The feasibility of community water fluoridation is being examined, and dental health programs have been implemented in pilot schools around the country. The Ministry of Health plans to expand these pilot programs to include all elementary schools in Honduras. This article describes the dental health services in Honduras and the government's effort to establish a nationwide school dental health program with emphasis on preventive dentistry. PMID:3166066

  14. The Impact of Stannous, Fluoride Ions and Its Combination on Enamel Pellicle Proteome and Dental Erosion Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Algarni, A. A.; Mussi, M. C. M.; Moffa, E. B.; Lippert, F.; Zero, D. T.; Siqueira, W. L.; Hara, A. T.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare the effects of stannous (Sn) and fluoride (F) ions and their combination on acquired enamel pellicle (AEP) protein composition (proteome experiment), and protection against dental erosion (functional experiment). Methods In the proteome experiment, bovine enamel specimens were incubated in whole saliva supernatant for 24h for AEP formation. They were randomly assigned to 4 groups (n=10), according to the rinse treatment: Sn (800ppm/6.7mM, SnCl2), F (225ppm/13mM, NaF), Sn and F combination (Sn+F) and deionized water (DIW, negative control). The specimens were immersed 3× in the test rinses for 2min, 2h apart. Pellicles were collected, digested, and analyzed for protein content using liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. In the functional experiment, bovine enamel specimens (n=10) were similarly treated for pellicle formation. Then, they were subjected to a five-day erosion cycling model, consisting of 5min erosive challenges (15.6 mM citric acid, pH 2.6, 6×/d) and 2min treatment with the rinses containing Sn, F or Sn+F (3×/d). Between the treatments, all specimens were incubated in whole saliva supernatant. Surface loss was determined by profilometry. Results Our proteome approach on bovine enamel identified 72 proteins that were common to all groups. AEP of enamel treated with Sn+F demonstrated higher abundance for most of the identified proteins than the other groups. The functional experiment showed reduction of enamel surface loss for Sn+F (89%), Sn (67%) and F (42%) compared to DIW (all significantly different, p<0.05). Conclusion This study highlighted that anti-erosion rinses (e.g. Sn+F) can modify quantitatively and qualitatively the AEP formed on bovine enamel. Moreover, our study demonstrated a combinatory effect that amplified the anti-erosive protection on tooth surface. PMID:26030135

  15. Enhancing implementation of tobacco use prevention and cessation counselling guideline among dental providers: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masamitsu Amemori; Tellervo Korhonen; Taru Kinnunen; Susan Michie; Heikki Murtomaa

    2011-01-01

    Background  Tobacco use adversely affects oral health. Tobacco use prevention and cessation (TUPAC) counselling guidelines recommend that\\u000a healthcare providers ask about each patient's tobacco use, assess the patient's readiness and willingness to stop, document\\u000a tobacco use habits, advise the patient to stop, assist and help in quitting, and arrange monitoring of progress at follow-up\\u000a appointments. Adherence to such guidelines, especially among

  16. Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... LinkedIn Twitter Digg Delicious Reddit StubmleUpon Print About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... try to avoid secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  17. Comparing Medical and Dental Providers of Oral Health Services on Early Dental Caries Experience

    PubMed Central

    Rozier, R. Gary; Preisser, John S.; Stearns, Sally C.; Weinberger, Morris; Lee, Jessica Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Most state Medicaid programs reimburse nondental primary care providers (PCPs) for providing preventive oral health services to young children. We examined the association between who (PCP, dentist, or both) provides these services to Medicaid enrollees before age 3 years and oral health at age 5 years. Methods. We linked North Carolina Medicaid claims (1999–2006) to oral health surveillance data (2005–2006). Regression models estimated oral health status (number of decayed, missing, and filled primary teeth) and untreated disease (proportion of untreated decayed teeth), with adjustment for relevant characteristics and by using inverse-probability-of-treatment weights to address confounding. Results. We analyzed data for 5235 children with 2 or more oral health visits from a PCP, dentist, or both. Children with multiple PCP or dentist visits had a similar number of overall mean decayed, missing, and filled primary teeth in kindergarten, whereas children with only PCP visits had a higher proportion of untreated decayed teeth. Conclusions. The setting and provider type did not influence the effectiveness of preventive oral health services on children’s overall oral health. However, children having only PCP visits may encounter barriers to obtaining dental treatment. PMID:24832418

  18. The use of sub-ablative Er:YAG laser irradiation in prevention of dental caries during orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Brulat, Nathalie; Milia, Giulia; Rockl, Andrea; Rocca, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This « in-vitro » study had two specific aims: the first, to test using a universal testing machine whether sub-ablative Er:YAG laser irradiation prior to acid etching is effective in orthodontic bracket bonding and secondly using micro-hardness measurements and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observations to investigate the effectiveness of de-mineralization reduction in enamel treated with sub-ablative Er:YAG laser irradiation followed by fluoride varnish application. Materials and Methods: One hundred and eighty bovine permanent maxillary incisors were selected for shear bond strength testing and microhardness measurements. Sub-ablative Er:YAG laser irradiation was set at a power density of 2.5 J/cm2, a frequency of 7 Hz and air/water spray. Brackets were bonded with an auto-curing resin paste. The shear bond strength was measured comparing laser irradiated and non-irradiated enamel surface, followed by SEM observation of the bracket-resin-enamel interface. Microhardness measurements were made on enamel samples before treatment, after samples preparation, and after demineralization. Results: While the adhesion of orthodontic brackets to bovine enamel after sub-ablative Er:YAG laser irradiation and acid etching is comparable to that obtained after conventional acid etching, the effect of laser irradiation associated with topical application of fluoride varnish increases the microhardness of enamel. Conclusion: Sub-ablative Er:YAG laser irradiation before the acid etching doesn't reduce the shear bond whereas when associated with fluoride application it may play a role in caries prevention. Further studies will be necessary to establish the mechanism by which the protective laser activated fluoride effect is achieved. PMID:25368443

  19. Dental Disease Prevalence among Methamphetamine and Poly-drug Users in an Urban Setting: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Carolyn; Krishnan, Sumathi; Hursh, Kevin; Yu, Michelle; Johnson, Paul; Page, Kimberly; Shiboski, Caroline H.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objectives Rampant tooth decay has been reported among methamphetamine users. We investigated the prevalence of dental disease and associated risk behaviors in methamphetamine users compared to heroin users. Methods This pilot project is a cross-sectional study of an on-going cohort of young adult injection-drug users (IDUs) in San Francisco. An oral health questionnaire was administered by a research-assistant, and two dentists performed clinical examinations to record the Decayed-Missing-Filled-Surfaces (DMFS) index, presence of residual roots, the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index, and salivary hypofunction. Results The prevalence of dental disease among 58 young adult IDUs was strikingly high compared to the U.S. general population, however, there was no difference in the level of dental disease between the methamphetamine and heroin users in this study. The mean DMFS and number of decayed surfaces exceeded 28 in both groups. Conclusions While no difference in dental disease between methamphetamine and heroin users was detected, we found a high prevalence of caries and caries-associated behaviors in this sample of young adult IDUs. Clinical Implications Given the high level of dental disease observed in this population of young adult IDUs, one next step may be to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of providing low-intensity preventative measures (e.g., distribution of chlorhexidine rinses, xylitol gum, application of fluoride varnishes) through outreach workers. PMID:22942146

  20. 38 CFR 17.169 - VA Dental Insurance Program for veterans and survivors and dependents of veterans (VADIP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false VA Dental Insurance Program for...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.169...plan, if no claims for dental services or benefits...prevented by serious medical condition from...

  1. 38 CFR 17.169 - VA Dental Insurance Program for veterans and survivors and dependents of veterans (VADIP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false VA Dental Insurance Program for...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.169...plan, if no claims for dental services or benefits...prevented by serious medical condition from...

  2. Dental knowledge and attitude toward school dental-health programs among parents of kindergarten children in Winterthur.

    PubMed

    Gläser-Ammann, Patricia; Lussi, Adrian; Bürgin, Walter; Leisebach, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The current study investigated the attitudes and knowledge regarding diet and oral hygiene of parents with kindergarten children. The parents' statements were evaluated in terms of their socioeconomic background and were compared with the annual clinical examination of the children. The objective of the study was to assess the effectiveness of the school dental-health program and adapt it to today's societal needs. Of those who participated in the interview, 61% were Swiss, 16% were from former Yugoslavia or Turkey, and 12% each from the EU or other countries. Of the children examined, 39% already had caries, and 18% of those showed more than two lesions. The parents' knowledge correlated with the severity of the child's caries as well as with the parents' income, country of origin, and education. There was a correlation between the child's dental decay and lower income, as well as lower education and non-Swiss nationality of the parents. Parents with higher income and better education more often participated in the preschool's preventive program. Parents from former Yugoslavia or Turkey participated less frequently than parents from other countries. The study demonstrated that parents who especially needed instruction and prophylaxis are contacted too late or not at all through the dental-health program at kindergarten and that new approaches to prevention should be implemented to more effectively reach the parents. PMID:25120153

  3. Tooth decay

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    N/A N/A (None; )

    2005-05-21

    Teeth can decay and break or fall out of the gum line if they become damaged. One way in which they can be damaged is if dental plaque builds up on teeth. Plaque consists mostly of bacteria, and these bacteria cause cavities to be made in teeth if they are not removed on a regular basis.

  4. Dental Assistants

    MedlinePLUS

    ... use. These programs also include supervised, practical experience. Training Dental assistants who do not have formal education ... all workers was $34,750. On-the-job Training Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in ...

  5. Osseointegrated dental implants produced via microwave processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Muralithran G. Kutty

    2004-01-01

    This research is a comprehensive effort to develop osseointegrated dental implants via microwave processing. A net-shape microwave sintering procedure was employed to fabricate dental implants. Commercial pure titanium powders (-100, -200 and -325 mesh sizes) were used in this work. This process eliminates the need for machining of implants and prevents contamination. The idea was to take advantage of the

  6. First Aid for Sports-Related Dental Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castaldi, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    Sports-related dental injuries are common but first aid is usually performed by non-dental personnel. This article describes basic procedures to be followed in order to diagnose the type and severity of the injury and to determine whether emergency treatment is required. Prevention of dental injuries is addressed. (Author/MT)

  7. Polypeptide nanocoatings for preventing dental and orthopaedic device-associated infection: pH-induced antibiotic capture, release, and antibiotic efficacy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bingbing Jiang; Bingyun Li

    2009-01-01

    Implant-associated infection is one of the most common and problematic complications for dental and orthopaedic patients. Modification of currently used implant surfaces aimed at bestowing them with antibacterial properties is a promising approach in the development of new biomaterials. In this study, a novel nanotechnology, that is, electrostatic self-assembly, was developed to construct biomimetic polypeptide nanocoatings on commonly used metal

  8. Tooth decay - early childhood

    MedlinePLUS

    Bottle mouth; Bottle carries; Baby bottle tooth decay; Early childhood caries (ECC) ... health. Am Fam Physician . 2004;70:2113-2120. Dental caries. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton ...

  9. Influence of the coating material on the loosing of dental implant abutment screw joints

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. N. Elias; D. C. Figueira; P. R. Rios

    2006-01-01

    Dental implant abutment screw joints tend to loosen and prosthesis rotation has been observed under clinical conditions. Some dental implant manufacturers suggest coated abutment screw to prevent the displacement of dental prosthesis. In the present work, the opening torque (N cm) was measured as a function of tightening torque (N cm) for dental implant abutment screws coated with four different

  10. [Dental state in patients with head and neck cancers].

    PubMed

    Rouers, M; Truntzer, P; Dubourg, S; Guihard, S; Antoni, D; Noël, G

    2015-05-01

    In France, in 2005, there were approximately 16,000 new cases of head and neck cancer. These cancers have an unfavourable prognosis: the survival rates at 3 and 10 years are 50% and 10% respectively. The consumption of alcohol and tobacco is the most important risk factor; in some countries HPV infection was identified as a risk factor of head and neck tumours. Furthermore, a poor oral hygiene seems to raise this risk. We found many decay and periodontium problems in patients with an upper aerodigestive tract cancer. An evaluation of dental state is necessary before any cancer treatment. Treatments by radiotherapy engender noxious effects: hypocellular, hypovascularization, hypoxie of the irradiated tissues, which lead to immediate and chronically oral complications such as mucositis, fibrosis, xerostomia, decay, or osteoradionecrosis. An oral follow-up of these patients can prevent these complications, or reduce the severity of oral complications, and promote a good oral state. PMID:25937188

  11. Medicaid: Extent of Dental Disease in Children Has Not Decreased, and Millions Are Estimated to Have Untreated Tooth Decay. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-08-1121

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosgrove, James C.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, concerns have been raised about the adequacy of dental care for low-income children. Attention to this subject became more acute due to the widely publicized case of Deamonte Driver, a 12-year-old boy who died as a result of an untreated infected tooth that led to a fatal brain infection. Deamonte had health coverage through…

  12. [Prevalence of dental caries among 12-year old schoolchildren in the Dakar region].

    PubMed

    Benoist, F Leye; Bane, K; Aidara, A W; Ndiaye, D; Chouker, Y; Kane, A W

    2014-06-01

    Oral diseases are considered as major public health problem. Dental caries restricts the school activities and are the dominant cause of dental morbidity. The aims of this survey were to determine prevalence of dental caries among pupils of Dakar and to study their food habits and oral hygiene. A descriptive transversal study was conducted from February 15th to May 07th, 2011 with respect of WHO directives (protocol of 1997) readjusted to Senegalese context. Our results showed a prevalence of 41.8%; a mean DMF index of 0.644; a proportion of teeth decayed of 65%, 32.2% for missing teeth and 2.7% of filled teeth. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that snacking, consumption of sweetened drinks far from meals and brushing teeth before the meals were significantly linked to the presence of dental caries. These results showed that the state of oral health and the prevention level of dental caries among these children were not so good. A new orientation of oral health policy based on messages regarding the main etiologic factors is imperative. PMID:25223148

  13. [Updates on rickets and osteomalacia. dental diseases in rickets].

    PubMed

    Kubota, Takuo

    2013-10-01

    Rickets is characterized by mineralization defect in bone and cartilage. X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH) is the most common form of inherited rickets. Mineralization defect is observed in dentin as well as in bone and cartilage in XLH. The dominant feature is the occurrence of infectious periradicular abscesses on deciduous and permanent teeth, not associated with trauma or decay. Dental care including the maintenance of good oral hygiene and periodical examinations should be performed. A preventive sealing of occlusal surfaces can be considered. Endodontic treatment or extraction are carried out in the presence of periradicular abscesses. Further studies are necessary for elucidating mechanisms of dentin mineralization defect and the occurrence of periradicular abscesses and for developing preventive and curative measures in XLH. PMID:24076649

  14. Dental Caries Experience and Use of Dental Services among Brazilian Prisoners

    PubMed Central

    Leite Cavalcanti, Alessandro; Araujo Rodrigues, Iris Sant´Anna; de Melo Silveira, Ingrid Thays; Sarmento de Oliveira, Thaliny Batista; de Almeida Pinto, Magaly Suenya; Cabral Xavier, Alidianne Fabia; Dias de Castro, Ricardo; Nascimento Padilha, Wilton Wilney

    2014-01-01

    This ross-sectional study involving 127 male prisoners evaluates the use of dental services and dental caries among Brazilian inmates. Data were collected by interview and clinical examination. Sociodemographic and sentencing information as well as use of dental services, self-reported dental morbidity, self-perception, and oral health impacts were investigated. The mean DMFT index value was 19.72. Of the components, the decayed component showed the highest mean value (11.06 ± 5.37). Statistically significant association was found between DMFTs with values from 22 to 32 and oral health satisfaction (p = 0.002), difficulty speaking (p = 0.024), shame of talking (p = 0.004) and smiling (p < 0.001). Regarding the use of dental services, 80% had their last dental appointment less than one year ago, with most visits occurring in prison (80%), with restorative treatment (32%), followed by dental pain (26.4%), being the main reasons for such appointments. Most prisoners used dental services provided by the prison. Although restorative treatment has been the main reason for the use of dental services, “decayed” and “missing” components contributed to the high mean DMFT index. PMID:25429680

  15. Dental caries experience and use of dental services among Brazilian prisoners.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Alessandro Leite; Rodrigues, Iris Sant Anna Araujo; de Melo Silveira, Ingrid Thays; de Oliveira, Thaliny Batista Sarmento; de Almeida Pinto, Magaly Suenya; Xavier, Alidianne Fabia Cabral; de Castro, Ricardo Dias; Padilha, Wilton Wilney Nascimento

    2014-12-01

    This ross-sectional study involving 127 male prisoners evaluates the use of dental services and dental caries among Brazilian inmates. Data were collected by interview and clinical examination. Sociodemographic and sentencing information as well as use of dental services, self-reported dental morbidity, self-perception, and oral health impacts were investigated. The mean DMFT index value was 19.72. Of the components, the decayed component showed the highest mean value (11.06 ± 5.37). Statistically significant association was found between DMFTs with values from 22 to 32 and oral health satisfaction (p = 0.002), difficulty speaking (p = 0.024), shame of talking (p = 0.004) and smiling (p < 0.001). Regarding the use of dental services, 80% had their last dental appointment less than one year ago, with most visits occurring in prison (80%), with restorative treatment (32%), followed by dental pain (26.4%), being the main reasons for such appointments. Most prisoners used dental services provided by the prison. Although restorative treatment has been the main reason for the use of dental services, "decayed" and "missing" components contributed to the high mean DMFT index. PMID:25429680

  16. Feasibility and validation of virtual autopsy for dental identification using the Interpol dental codes.

    PubMed

    Franco, Ademir; Thevissen, Patrick; Coudyzer, Walter; Develter, Wim; Van de Voorde, Wim; Oyen, Raymond; Vandermeulen, Dirk; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Willems, Guy

    2013-05-01

    Virtual autopsy is a medical imaging technique, using full body computed tomography (CT), allowing for a noninvasive and permanent observation of all body parts. For dental identification clinically and radiologically observed ante-mortem (AM) and post-mortem (PM) oral identifiers are compared. The study aimed to verify if a PM dental charting can be performed on virtual reconstructions of full-body CT's using the Interpol dental codes. A sample of 103 PM full-body CT's was collected from the forensic autopsy files of the Department of Forensic Medicine University Hospitals, KU Leuven, Belgium. For validation purposes, 3 of these bodies underwent a complete dental autopsy, a dental radiological and a full-body CT examination. The bodies were scanned in a Siemens Definition Flash CT Scanner (Siemens Medical Solutions, Germany). The images were examined on 8- and 12-bit screen resolution as three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions and as axial, coronal and sagittal slices. InSpace(®) (Siemens Medical Solutions, Germany) software was used for 3D reconstruction. The dental identifiers were charted on pink PM Interpol forms (F1, F2), using the related dental codes. Optimal dental charting was obtained by combining observations on 3D reconstructions and CT slices. It was not feasible to differentiate between different kinds of dental restoration materials. The 12-bit resolution enabled to collect more detailed evidences, mainly related to positions within a tooth. Oral identifiers, not implemented in the Interpol dental coding were observed. Amongst these, the observed (3D) morphological features of dental and maxillofacial structures are important identifiers. The latter can become particularly more relevant towards the future, not only because of the inherent spatial features, yet also because of the increasing preventive dental treatment, and the decreasing application of dental restorations. In conclusion, PM full-body CT examinations need to be implemented in the PM dental charting protocols and the Interpol dental codes should be adapted accordingly. PMID:23622469

  17. Organo-Selenium-containing Dental Sealant Inhibits Bacterial Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Tran, P.; Hamood, A.; Mosley, T.; Gray, T.; Jarvis, C.; Webster, D.; Amaechi, B.; Enos, T.; Reid, T.

    2013-01-01

    Oral bacteria, including Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus salivarius, contribute to tooth decay and plaque formation; therefore, it is essential to develop strategies to prevent dental caries and plaque formation. We recently showed that organo-selenium compounds covalently attached to different biomaterials inhibited bacterial biofilms. Our current study investigates the efficacy of an organo-selenium dental sealant (SeLECT-DefenseTM sealant) in inhibiting S. mutans and S. salivarius biofilm formation in vitro. The organo-selenium was synthesized and covalently attached to dental sealant material via standard polymer chemistry. By colony-forming unit (CFU) assay and confocal microscopy, SeLECT-DefenseTM sealant was found to completely inhibit the development of S. mutans and S. salivarius biofilms. To assess the durability of the anti-biofilm effect, we soaked the SeLECT-DefenseTM sealant in PBS for 2 mos at 37°C and found that the biofilm-inhibitory effect was not diminished after soaking. To determine if organo-selenium inhibits bacterial growth under the sealant, we placed SeLECT-Defense sealant over a lawn of S. mutans. In contrast to a control sealant, SeLECT-DefenseTM sealant completely inhibited the growth of S. mutans. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of SeLECT-DefenseTM sealant against S. mutans and S. salivarius biofilms is very effective and durable. PMID:23475900

  18. Dental Caries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. H. Chauncey; R. L. Glass; J. E. Alman

    1989-01-01

    Comprehensive oral examinations carried out over a period of about 10 years on participants in the Veterans Administration Dental Longitudinal Study were evaluated to identify teeth extracted during this time and to ascertain the apparent reason for these extractions. The study population included 736 dentulous adult males, 49% of whom experienced 1,142 extractions. Caries was judged to be the primary

  19. Dental Training Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    This dental training films catalog is organized into two sections. Section I is a category listing of the films by number and title, indexed according to generalized headings; categories are as follow: anatomy, articulator systems, complete dentures, dental assisting, dental laboratory technology, dental materials, dental office emergencies,…

  20. Structure and types of dental manpower.

    PubMed

    Bezroukov, V

    1979-09-01

    The different categories of dental health personnel, professional, operating and non-operating auxiliary are defined and their roles examined. Where professional and auxiliary dental manpower is in short supply the use of non-dental personnel such as teachers and health educators should be emphasised as a means of providing firrst aid and preventive measures. Manpower remains the central problem in improving oral health. Although the number of dental schools and the total number of dentists has increased in the past two decades, the dentist/population ratio has declined. Considerable variations occur between countries and the geographical distribution within countries is very uneven, an undue proportion often practising within the large cities. A greater increase in numbers of dentists, though desirable, will not be sufficient to solve the problem of adequate dental health coverage in this century. The advanced skills of the dental graduate are not required for many routine procedures and greater use must be made of operating auxiliaries. More research is needed into the best composition of the dental team. Increased use of larger, more complex teams seems likely to be the most important development for the future. This will require a careful reappraisal of the curricula for all categories of personnel. WHO is actively engaged in formulating guidelines for dental administrators in the development of educational and planning criteria for the improvment of dental health. PMID:290562

  1. Dental education and dental practice.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J R

    1984-01-01

    This paper relates recent modes of dental practice to changes that the public and government are likely to ask the health care professions to make in the future. As usual they are asking for the best of all worlds. First, that we maintain the clinical model to the highest standards of personal dental care based and tested against the best research at our disposal, whilst we ensure there is no reduction in the high technical standards for which british dentists have a reputation. Second, that the profession is required to consider ways of providing care on the medicosocial model for the whole community at an economic level the country will afford. The broad changes in dental education have been reviewed, from the technical apprenticeship to the establishment of strong university departments in teaching hospitals. The importance of a sound biomedical foundation and of research both to education and the credibility of dental practice as a primary health care profession is stressed if the profession is to retain its position as a sister to medicine and not slide down to that of a technical ancillary. PMID:6374141

  2. Can coffee prevent caries?

    PubMed Central

    Anila Namboodiripad, PC; Kori, Sumathi

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To determine the anti-carious effect of coffee in humans. Coffee represents one of the most consumed products by the population. Materials and Methods: A random sample of 1000 individuals, of both sexes, who consumed only coffee as a beverage and who visited the Out-Patient Department of KLE Society's Institute of Dental Sciences, with a dental complaint and no history of any major illness, were considered as subjects. The patients' histories with regard to the coffee intake, such as, period of consumption, frequency of consumption, whether taken with milk or wihout milk, with sugar or without sugar, and the brand make, was noted. History of the type of diet, consumption of sweets, periodicity of brushing, and whether they had undergone fluoride applications were also noted. A thousand patients who consumed beverages other than coffee were taken as the control. Results: The results showed that coffee most consumed was roasted coffee, and the frequency on an average was about three cups per day, for an average period of 35 years. The Decayed/Missing/Filled Surface (DMFS) scores varied from 2.9, in subjects who drank black coffee, to 5.5 in subjects who consumed coffee together with sweeteners and creaming agents. The DMFS score was 3.4 in subjects who consumed coffee together with milk but no sugar. The DMFS score of the control subjects was 4, indicating that coffee if consumed alone had anticaries action, but in the presence of additives the antibacterial and anticaries action was totally minimized. Conclusion: Thus coffee can help in prevention of dental caries if consumed without additives. PMID:20379435

  3. Application of hypno-dissociative strategies during dental treatment of patients with severe dental phobia.

    PubMed

    Meyerson, Joseph; Uziel, Nir

    2014-01-01

    Dental phobia is a well-known condition that may prevent patients from receiving adequate dental care. Dentists offer varied methods to help their patients overcome their phobic reactions and to enable them to proceed with needed dental treatment. These methods include diverse medical and behavioral interventions that are generally intended to regulate physiological, behavioral, cognitive, and emotional expressions of stress. Some patients with severe dental phobia together with actual or assumed traumatic background are only minimally responsive to these stress management procedures. The authors propose hypnotically induced dissociative strategies as a model of intervention for this category of dental phobic patients. The proposed model can help reduce or even suspend symptomatic behavior during dental treatment. PMID:24568324

  4. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Associated Conditions » Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental care is important for everybody, but people ... is Different About the Teeth of People With Down Syndrome? Delayed Eruption The teeth of people with Down ...

  5. Dental Fear among Medical and Dental Undergraduates

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, H.; Razak, I. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht's Dental Fear Survey (DFS) questionnaire. Methods. Kleinknecht's DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates' of the University of Malaya. Results. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%). However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%). Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P = 0.004). “Heart beats faster” and “muscle being tensed” were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. “Drill” and “anesthetic needle” were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Conclusion. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services. PMID:25386615

  6. Noninvasive Quantitative Evaluation of the Dentin Layer during Dental Procedures Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Bradu, Adrian; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2015-01-01

    A routine cavity preparation of a tooth may lead to opening the pulp chamber. The present study evaluates quantitatively, in real time, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the drilled cavities during dental procedures. An established noninvasive imaging technique, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), is used. The main scope is to prevent accidental openings of the dental pulp chamber. Six teeth with dental cavities have been used in this ex vivo study. The real time assessment of the distances between the bottom of the drilled cavities and the top of the pulp chamber was performed using an own assembled OCT system. The evaluation of the remaining dentin thickness (RDT) allowed for the positioning of the drilling tools in the cavities in relation to the pulp horns. Estimations of the safe and of the critical RDT were made; for the latter, the opening of the pulp chamber becomes unavoidable. Also, by following the fractures that can occur when the extent of the decay is too large, the dentist can decide upon the right therapy to follow, endodontic or conventional filling. The study demonstrates the usefulness of OCT imaging in guiding such evaluations during dental procedures.

  7. Reimbursing Dentists for Smoking Cessation Treatment: Views From Dental Insurers

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Shana; McNeely, Jennifer; Rotrosen, John; Winitzer, Rebecca F.; Pollack, Harold; Abel, Stephen; Metsch, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Screening and delivery of evidence-based interventions by dentists is an effective way to reduce tobacco use. However, dental visits remain an underutilized opportunity for the treatment of tobacco dependence. This is, in part, because the current reimbursement structure does not support expansion of dental providers’ role in this arena. The purpose of this study was to interview dental insurers to assess attitudes toward tobacco use treatment in dental practice, pros and cons of offering dental provider reimbursement, and barriers to instituting a tobacco use treatment-related payment policy for dental providers. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 dental insurance company executives. Participants were identified using a targeted sampling method and represented viewpoints from a significant share of companies within the dental insurance industry. Results: All insurers believed that screening and intervention for tobacco use was an appropriate part of routine care during a dental visit. Several indicated a need for more evidence of clinical and cost-effectiveness before reimbursement for these services could be actualized. Lack of purchaser demand, questionable returns on investment, and segregation of the medical and dental insurance markets were cited as additional barriers to coverage. Conclusions: Dissemination of findings on efficacy and additional research on financial returns could help to promote uptake of coverage by insurers. Wider issues of integration between dental and medical care and payment systems must be addressed in order to expand opportunities for preventive services in dental care settings. PMID:22387994

  8. Dental Status of New Caledonian Children: Is There a Need for a New Oral Health Promotion Programme?

    PubMed Central

    Pichot, Hélène; Hennequin, Martine; Rouchon, Bernard; Pereira, Bruno; Tubert-Jeannin, Stéphanie

    2014-01-01

    Background Before implementing a new oral health promotion program in the French overseas territory of Nouvelle Calédonie, the health authorities needed recent data about dental status of the New Caledonian child population. Objectives This study aimed to describe the dental status of 6, 9 and 12-yr-old New Caledonian children and to investigate the environmental and behavioural risk factors related to oral health. Methods A randomly selected sample of 2734 children (744 6-yr-olds, 789 9-yr-olds, and 1201 12-yr-olds) was examined clinically by seven calibrated investigators and participants responded to a questionnaire. The main variables were objective criteria about dental status and subjective criteria about experience of dental care, dental fear, self-perception of oral health, cultural or ethnic identity and environmental and behavioural risk factors. Results Overall, most of the children had infectious oral diseases: more than 50% had gingivitis, and 60% of 6- and 9 yr-olds had at least one deciduous or permanent tooth with untreated caries. The mean 12-yr-old number of decayed missing and filled teeth (DMFT) was 2.09±2.82. The number of carious lesions was related to the unfavourable lifestyle, deprived social status and no preventive dental care. Kanak, Polynesians and Caledonians (respectively 27%, 18% and 45% of the study sample) were more affected by caries than metropolitan French and Asian children. Children with many untreated carious lesions had negative perceptions of their oral health; they complained of chewing difficulty and had higher scores for dental anxiety. Conclusion This study highlights the need for new strategies aimed at improving oral health and at reducing inequalities in New Caledonia. An oral health promotion program would need to be developed in connection with other health programmes using the common risk factor approach within the context of the local environment. PMID:25380304

  9. Dental education in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Jorge A.; Pulido, Jairo H. Ternera; Núñez, Jaime A. Castro; Bird, William F.; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    This article describes Colombia's development of formal dentistry, its dental school system, curriculum, and dental licensure, and current issues in oral health care. In 1969, there were only 4 dental schools in Colombia; at this writing there are 21. Five dental schools are public and the other 16 are private. Nearly all classes are conducted in Spanish. Undergraduate pre-dental coursework is not a prerequisite for dental school in Colombia. To obtain licensure, Colombian dental students must complete 5 years of study in dental school, earn a diploma, and work for the government for 1 year. There are approximately 41,400 dentists in Colombia, and the number is increasing quickly. However, the unemployment rate among dentists is very high, even though graduation from dental school is extremely difficult. Although the 1,100:1 ratio of citizens to dentists is considered satisfactory, access to dental care is limited due to the high rate of poverty. PMID:20339245

  10. Therapeutic ultrasound for dental tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Scheven, B A A; Shelton, R M; Cooper, P R; Walmsley, A D; Smith, A J

    2009-10-01

    Dental disease affects human health and the quality of life of millions worldwide. Tooth decay (caries) and diseases of the dental pulp result in loss of tooth vitality and function requiring invasive treatment to restore the tooth to health. "Therapeutic" low intensity pulsed ultrasound has been shown to accelerate bone fracture healing indicating that ultrasound may be used as a tool to facilitate hard tissue regeneration. We have shown recently that low frequency ultrasound is able to exert biological effects on odontoblast-like cells. In this paper, we postulate that low frequency, low intensity ultrasound may stimulate endogenous coronal tooth repair by stimulating dentine formation from existing odontoblasts or by activating dental pulp stem cells to differentiate into new reparative dentine-producing cells. Ultrasound therapy promoting dentine formation and repair may also have the potential benefit of alleviating dentine hypersensitivity by inducing occlusion of dentinal tubules. It is envisaged that therapeutic ultrasound may be used in future to facilitate dental tissue engineering and stem cell therapy applications for dental tissue regeneration. Further research is warranted in this clinically important area and we envisage that novel strategies in dental therapy will be realised that may ultimately lead to the development of novel non-invasive, multifunctional ultrasound devices for dental diagnostics, repair and regeneration. PMID:19553029

  11. Natural products and caries prevention.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lei; Li, Jiyao; He, Libang; Zhou, Xuedong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is considered as the most common polymicrobial oral disease in the world. With the aim of developing alternative approaches to reduce or prevent the decay, numerous papers showed the potential anticaries activity of a number of natural products. The natural products with anticaries effects are selected from e.g. food, beverages, flowers or traditional herbs. Most of the effective components are proven to be polyphenol compounds. Many of the natural products are studied as antibacterial agents, while some of them are found to be effective in shifting the de-/remineralization balance. However, the mechanisms of the anticaries effects are still unclear for most of the natural products. In the future, more efforts need to be made to seek novel effective natural products via in vitro experiment, animal study and in situ investigations, as well as to enhance their anticaries effects with the help of novel technology like nanotechnology. PMID:25871417

  12. The FiCTION dental trial protocol – filling children’s teeth: indicated or not?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a lack of evidence for effective management of dental caries (decay) in children’s primary (baby) teeth and an apparent failure of conventional dental restorations (fillings) to prevent dental pain and infection for UK children in Primary Care. UK dental schools’ teaching has been based on British Society of Paediatric Dentistry guidance which recommends that caries in primary teeth should be removed and a restoration placed. However, the evidence base for this is limited in volume and quality, and comes from studies conducted in either secondary care or specialist practices. Restorations provided in specialist environments can be effective but the generalisability of this evidence to Primary Care has been questioned. The FiCTION trial addresses the Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Programme’s commissioning brief and research question “What is the clinical and cost effectiveness of restoration caries in primary teeth, compared to no treatment?” It compares conventional restorations with an intermediate treatment strategy based on the biological (sealing-in) management of caries and with no restorations. Methods/Design This is a Primary Care-based multi-centre, three-arm, parallel group, patient-randomised controlled trial. Practitioners are recruiting 1461 children, (3–7 years) with at least one primary molar tooth where caries extends into dentine. Children are randomized and treated according to one of three treatment approaches; conventional caries management with best practice prevention, biological management of caries with best practice prevention or best practice prevention alone. Baseline measures and outcome data (at review/treatment during three year follow-up) are assessed through direct reporting, clinical examination including blinded radiograph assessment, and child/parent questionnaires. The primary outcome measure is the incidence of either pain or infection related to dental caries. Secondary outcomes are; incidence of caries in primary and permanent teeth, patient quality of life, cost-effectiveness, acceptability of treatment strategies to patients and parents and their experiences, and dentists’ preferences. Discussion FiCTION will provide evidence for the most clinically-effective and cost-effective approach to managing caries in children’s primary teeth in Primary Care. This will support general dental practitioners in treatment decision making for child patients to minimize pain and infection in primary teeth. The trial is currently recruiting patients. Trial registration Protocol ID: NCTU: ISRCTN77044005 PMID:23725316

  13. Emerging technologies for diagnosis of dental caries: The road so far

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaechi, Bennett T.

    2009-05-01

    It is now universally recognized that the development of new technologies for early detection and quantitative monitoring of dental decay at an early stage of formation could provide health and economic benefits ranging from timely preventive interventions to reduction in the time required for clinical trials of anticaries agents. The use of technologies as adjunct to clinical visual examination for caries diagnosis will facilitate preventive care in dentistry to lower treatment cost as well as reduce the cost and time for testing potential anticaries agents. This article describes the various technologies available to aid the dental practitioners in detecting dental caries at the earliest stage of its formation, assessing the activities of the detected carious lesion, and quantitatively or qualitatively monitoring of the lesion over time. The need and the importance of these technologies were also discussed. The data discussed are primarily based on published scientific studies and reviews from case reports, clinical trials, and in vitro and in vivo studies. References have been traced manually by MEDLINE® or through manufacturer's websites. While some of the devices are fully developed and commercially available, others are still under development. The devices vary in their modes of action as well as their capability as caries diagnostic aids. It is clear that the differences in caries presentations and behavior in different anatomical sites make it unlikely that any one diagnostic modality will have adequate sensitivity and specificity of detection of carious lesions for all sites; a combination of diagnostic tools will help us diagnose lesions earlier and detect failing restorations sooner, all to avoid more costly, destructive dental procedures and truly take dentistry into the preventive rather than the reactive mode.

  14. Meth mouth severity in response to drug-use patterns and dental access in methamphetamine users.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ronni E; Morisky, Donald E; Silverstein, Steven J

    2013-06-01

    Meth mouth is the rapid development of tooth decay in methamphetamine users. Our study questioned whether drug-use patterns and dental care access are risk factors affecting the severity of meth mouth. Participants received dental examinations, and the number of decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) were counted and used to measure meth mouth severity. PMID:23875434

  15. Systematic dental management in head and neck irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Horiot, J.C. (Centre Georges Leclerc, Dijon, France); Bone, M.C.; Ibrahim, E.

    1981-08-01

    Preservation of teeth has been possible in 528 head and neck patients treated with irradiation at Centre Georges Leclerc, University of Dijon, by careful adherence to precise dental care. Careful initial dental evaluation with appropriate x rays, restoration of oral hygiene, atraumatic extraction technique where indicated, and institution of a program of topical fluoridation has resulted in an overall incidence of less than 3% post-irradiation dental decay and 2% osteoradionecrosis. In a small group of 22 patient who required extraction post-irradiation, precise, strict technique resulted in successful extraction in all but one patient who subsequently developed osteonecrosis. Soft-based dental prostheses were well tolerated in nearly 90% of patients. Adherence to the described principles of dental care will virtually eliminate post-irradiation decay and osteoradionecrosis.

  16. Dental Caries and the Associated Factors Influencing It in Tribal, Suburban and Urban School Children of Tamil Nadu, India: A Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    John, J. Baby; Asokan, Sharath; Aswanth, KP; Priya, P.R. Geetha; Shanmugaavel, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background The study was planned to assess the prevalence of dental caries among tribal, suburban and urban children of Tiruchengode and Erode of Tamil Nadu state, India. The objective of the study was to assess the association of dental caries with family background, dental service availability, transportation and knowledge on preventive dental measures among these three groups Design and methods Cross-sectional study. A total of 1028 school children in the age range of 9-12 years from various government schools located in Palamalai and Kolli Hills (tribal), Tiruchengode (suburban) and Erode (urban), Tamil Nadu, were included in the study. Decayed, filled, and missing teeth (DMFT), decayed and filled teeth (dft) and Significant Caries Index were recorded. A specially prepared questionnaire was used to record all the data regarding oral hygiene practices, socioeconomic background, dental treatment availability, parent’s education level were used for the study. ANOVA t-test and post hoc test were used for comparing quantitative variables between the 3 subgroups. Results The tribal school children had 89.3% caries prevalence, where as it was 77% in suburban and 55% in urban school children. The mean DMFT score among tribal, suburban and urban school children were statistically significant different (P=0.001) between the three groups. There was a highly significant difference (P=0.001) in the mean DMFT score based on brushing frequency. There was a statistically significant difference (P=0.018) in the mean DMFT scores in the urban group based on the mothers education status. There were no statistically significant differences in the mean DMFT scores based on the presence or absence of television in their house and the parents’ income. Conclusions Oral hygiene practices, dietary habits and access to dental care services played an important role in prevalence of dental caries. It was observed that the socioeconomic status, parents’ educational status and mass media influenced the oral health of these children but without a significant contribution. Significance for public health It was observed from the present study that the socioeconomic status, parents’ educational status, media and family structure influence the oral health of children in under-privileged communities. Oral hygiene practices, dietary habits and access to dental care services also play an important role in the prevalence of dental caries among children. Children of government schools in Tamil Nadu, India, don’t get adequate information on oral health, related diseases and methods of prevention. Oral health education and health promotion should be mandatory for all school children. PMID:25918690

  17. Influence of private practice employment of dental therapists in Saskatchewan on the future supply of dental therapists in Canada.

    PubMed

    Uswak, Gerry; Keller-Kurysh, Emory

    2012-08-01

    The profession of dental therapy has long been held up as a model for reducing access to care barriers in high-risk, underserved populations worldwide. Dental therapists practice in many countries delivering preventive and basic restorative care to children and adults. In North America, dental therapy education and practice date back to 1972 with the establishment of training programs at the National School of Dental Therapy in Fort Smith, Northwest Territories, and the Wascana Institute of Applied Arts and Science in Regina, Saskatchewan, as a means of reducing access to care barriers in Canada's northern territories and to implement the Saskatchewan Health Dental Plan, respectively. At present, dental therapy in North America has reached a crossroads: in the United States, the profession is cautiously being explored as a solution for improving access to care in at-risk populations. In 2011, Canada's sole training program, the National School of Dental Therapy in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, closed when the federal government eliminated its funding. This article examines the impact of private practice employment of dental therapists in Saskatchewan on the supply of dental therapist human resources for health in Canada's three northern territories (Northwest Territories, Nunavut, and Yukon), its role in the closure of the National School of Dental Therapy in 2011, and ramifications for the future of dental therapy in Canada. PMID:22855596

  18. Experiences of dental care: what do patients value?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dentistry in Australia combines business and health care service, that is, the majority of patients pay money for tangible dental procedures such as fluoride applications, dental radiographs, dental fillings, crowns, and dentures among others. There is evidence that patients question dentists’ behaviours and attitudes during a dental visit when those highly technical procedures are performed. However, little is known about how patients’ experience dental care as a whole. This paper illustrates the findings from a qualitative study recently undertaken in general dental practice in Australia. It focuses on patients’ experiences of dental care, particularly on the relationship between patients and dentists during the provision of preventive care and advice in general dental practices. Methods Seventeen patients were interviewed. Data analysis consisted of transcript coding, detailed memo writing, and data interpretation. Results Patients described their experiences when visiting dental practices with and without a structured preventive approach in place, together with the historical, biological, financial, psychosocial and habitual dimensions of their experience. Potential barriers that could hinder preventive activities as well as facilitators for prevention were also described. The offer of preventive dental care and advice was an amazing revelation for this group of patients as they realized that dentists could practice dentistry without having to “drill and fill” their teeth. All patients, regardless of the practice they came from or their level of clinical risk of developing dental caries, valued having a caring dentist who respected them and listened to their concerns without “blaming” them for their oral health status. These patients complied with and supported the preventive care options because they were being “treated as a person not as a patient” by their dentists. Patients valued dentists who made them aware of existing preventive options, educated them about how to maintain a healthy mouth and teeth, and supported and reassured them frequently during visits. Conclusions Patients valued having a supportive and caring dentist and a dedicated dental team. The experience of having a dedicated, supportive and caring dentist helped patients to take control of their own oral health. These dentists and dental teams produced profound changes in not just the oral health care routines of patients, but in the way patients thought about their own oral health and the role of dental professionals. PMID:22726888

  19. Dear Prospective Dental Hygiene Student: Thank you for your interest in the Dental Hygiene Program at Southern Illinois University

    E-print Network

    Nickrent, Daniel L.

    247 Preventive Oral Care 3 DH226 Head & Neck Anatomy 2 DH248 General & Oral Pathology 4 Total: 15 Pharmacology 3 DH322 Op.Oral Care & Adj. Procedures 2 DH320 Dental Hygiene Clinic & Radiology II 4 DH347 Community Oral Care 2 DH341 Periodontics 3 DH355 Dental Hygiene Clinic & Radiology III 4 UC Elec. Elective 3

  20. The relationship of dental caries and dental fear in Malaysian adolescents: a latent variable approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To investigate the role of geography (place of residence) as a moderator in the relationship between dental caries disease and treatment experience and dental fear in 16-year-olds living in Malaysia. Methods A multi-stage-stratified sampling method was employed. Five hundred and three, 16-year-olds from 6 government secondary schools participated in this study. The questionnaire examined participants’ demographic profile and assessed their dental fear using the Dental Fear Survey (DFS). The clinical examination consisted of the DMFT as the outcome measure of dental caries disease and treatment experience by a single examiner (ICC?=?0.98). Structural equation modelling inspected the relationship between dental fear and dental caries disease and treatment experience. Results The mean DMFT was 2.76 (SD 3.25). The DT, MT and FT components were 0.64 (SD 1.25), 0.14 (SD 0.56) and 1.98 (SD 2.43) respectively. Rural compared with urban adolescents had significantly greater mean numbers of decayed and missing teeth. The mean DFS score was 40.8 (SD 12.4). Rural compared with urban adolescents had significantly higher mean scores for physical symptoms of dental fear. The correlation between dental fear (DFS) and dental caries disease and treatment experience (DMFT) was 0.29, p?dental caries disease and treatment experience. The strength of the relationship between dental fear and dental caries disease and treatment experience varied in accordance with place of residence. Conclusion In conclusion a relationship between dental fear and dental caries disease and treatment experience was shown to exist in 16-year-old adolescents living in Malaysia. This study showed that the rural–urban dichotomy acted as a moderator upon this relationship. PMID:24621226

  1. Mechanism of action of a desensitizing fluoride toothpaste delivering calcium and phosphate ingredients in the treatment of dental hypersensitivity. Part III: Prevention of dye penetration through dentin vs a calcium- and phosphate-free control.

    PubMed

    Winston, Anthony E; Charig, Andrew J; Thong, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the pain of dental hypersensitivity resulting from gum recession is from the movement of fluid within the exposed tubules of dentin, causing changes in pressure on the nerve within the pulpal cavity. One method of treating hypersensitivity is to occlude the tubules, preventing fluid movement. This article discusses the use of a dye penetration technique, which establishes this mechanism of action for a desensitizing fluoride toothpaste containing calcium and phosphate. Two groups of intact teeth were perfectly sealed with enamel paint. Windows 100-micro to 200-micro deep were opened on opposite sides of each tooth at the dentin-enamel junction and briefly etched using 20% polyacrylic acid. One batch of teeth was treated eight times for 30 mins each with a 1:3 slurry of the desensitizing toothpaste and another set with a similar slurry prepared from a calcium- and phosphate-free control. A 0.85% aqueous solution of acid red fuchsin dye was applied to each window and allowed to dry. After a brief rinse, the teeth were sectioned across the windows. Almost no dye penetration was seen in teeth treated with the desensitizing toothpaste; however, extensive penetration through the dentin was visible in the control-treated teeth. The differences in dye penetration for the two sets of teeth were significant by both subjective (P < .001) and objective (P < .01) measures. Tubule occlusion because of calcium and phosphate ions from the desensitizing toothpaste accounts for its tooth desensitizing efficacy. PMID:20158016

  2. Simple Steps to Better Dental Health

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Simple Steps to Better Dental Health is a joint project of the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine and the health insurance company, Aetna. The site serves as "an independent consumer dental portal," offering loads of nicely presented Web pages on just about anything youâ??d ever want to know about dental health. The content falls into three main sections: Prevent Problems, Understanding Conditions, and Explore Treatments. The site is bursting with interactive tools and easy-to-understand diagrams, and also includes a section just for kids. From head and neck anatomy to cosmetic dentistry to your basic cavity, this Web site is a fantastically comprehensive resource that would be worth bookmarking for future reference.

  3. Innovations in dental care delivery for the older adult.

    PubMed

    Bethel, Lynn Ann; Kim, Esther E; Seitz, Charles M; Swann, Brian J

    2014-10-01

    Access to and reducing disparities in oral health for older adults is a complex problem that requires innovative strategies. In addition to offering dental services in alternative settings, such as senior centers, places that are familiar to older adults, and where physical limitations can be better accommodated, alternatives to the traditional provider should be considered. Many states are changing laws and practice acts to allow dental hygienists to provide preventive services without the supervision of a dentist. Also, collaborations between dental and non-dental professionals can be a successful strategy for increasing access to oral health care for this high-risk population. PMID:25201546

  4. Microbiologic aspects of dental plaque and dental caries.

    PubMed

    Marsh, P D

    1999-10-01

    Dental plaque is an example of a microbial biofilm with a diverse microbial composition; it is found naturally on teeth and confers advantages to the host, for example, by preventing colonization by exogenous, and often pathogenic, micro-organisms. In individuals with a high frequency sugar diet, or with a severely compromised saliva flow, the levels of potentially cariogenic bacteria (acid-producing and acid-tolerating species) can increase beyond those compatible with enamel health. This article discusses antimicrobial strategies to control dental caries, including; reducing plaque levels, in general or specific cariogenic bacteria in particular, by antiplaque or antimicrobial agents; reducing bacterial acid production by replacing fermentable carbohydrates in the diet with sugar substitutes, or by interfering with bacterial metabolism with fluoride or antimicrobial agents. PMID:10553246

  5. Gaps in Prevention and Treatment: Dental Care for Low-Income Children. New Federalism: National Survey of America's Families, Series B, No. B-15. Assessing the New Federalism: An Urban Institute Program To Assess Changing Social Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Genevieve M.; Ko, Grace; Ormond, Barbara A.

    Using estimates drawn from the 1997 National Survey of America's Families (NSAF), this brief examines variations in the receipt of dental care services and in unmet need for dental care across different subgroups of children aged 3 and over, both nationally and across 13 states. The NSAF is a household survey that provides information on more than…

  6. American Dental Hygienists' Association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Boston American Dental Hygienists’ Association Announces 2012-2013 Leadership The American Dental Hygienists' Association Responds to PBS ... ADHA About Promo (DO NOT DELETE) Mission / History Leadership & Governance Board of Trustees Officers & Bios Bylaws & Ethics ...

  7. Diabetes: Dental Tips

    MedlinePLUS

    ... High School and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings Loan Repayment Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care ...

  8. Finding Dental Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... High School and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings Loan Repayment Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care ...

  9. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePLUS

    ... shot. It is used to plan treatment for dental implants, check for impacted wisdom teeth, and detect jaw ... computerized tomography (CBCT) may be used prior to dental surgery, especially when multiple implants are being placed.

  10. Placing Dental Implants

    MedlinePLUS

    Placing Dental Implants Before Placing an Implant Placing the Implants Complications from Surgery Implant Failure When you get implants, more ... Implant Most people are good candidates to get dental implants. You must have enough bone in your jaw ...

  11. Dental Care and Travel

    MedlinePLUS

    ... leave, especially if you'll be traveling in developing countries or remote areas without access to good dental ... or Canada. In addition, the standard of dental education in many European countries is comparable with that ...

  12. Microbial contamination of dental unit waterlines: the scientific argument.

    PubMed

    Pankhurst, C L; Johnson, N W; Woods, R G

    1998-08-01

    The quality of dental unit water is of considerable importance since patients and dental staff are regularly exposed to water and aerosols generated from the dental unit. The unique feature of dental chair water lines is the capacity for rapid development of a biofilm on the dental water supply lines combined with the generation of potentially contaminated aerosols. The biofilm, which is derived from bacteria in the incoming water and is intrinsically resistant to most biocides, then becomes the primary reservoir for continued contamination of the system. Dental water may become heavily contaminated with opportunistic respiratory pathogens such as Legionella and Mycobacterium spp. The significance of such exposure to patients and the dental team is discussed. There is at the present time, no evidence of a widespread public health problem from exposure to dental unit water. Nevertheless, the goal of infection control is to minimise the risk from exposure to potential pathogens and to create a safe working environment in which to treat patients. This paper evaluates the range of currently available infection control methods and prevention strategies which are designed to reduce the impact of the biofilm on dental water contamination, and are suitable for use in general practice. Bacterial load in dental unit water can be kept at or below recommended guidelines for drinking water (less than 200 colony forming units/ml) using a combination of readily available measures and strict adherence to maintenance protocols. Sterile water should be employed for all surgical treatments. PMID:9779119

  13. Dental Manpower Fact Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ake, James N.; Johnson, Donald W.

    Statistical data on many aspects of dental and allied dental personnel supply, distribution, characteristics, and education and on certain other aspects of dental services are presented and discussed. The data on dentist supply show the national trend in the supply of active dentists since 1950 and the concurrent changes in dentist-to-population…

  14. Dental records: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Charangowda, B K

    2010-01-01

    Dental records consist of documents related to the history of present illness, clinical examination, diagnosis, treatment done, and the prognosis. A thorough knowledge of dental records is essential for the practicing dentist, as it not only has a forensic application, but also a legal implication with respect to insurance and consumerism. This article reviews the importance of dental records in forensics. PMID:21189983

  15. DENTAL SCHOOL PLANNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GALAGAN, DONALD J.

    THIS DISCUSSION PRESENTS A COMPLETE PICTURE OF THE CURRENT STATE OF DENTAL EDUCATION WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR MEETING THE DEMANDS FOR DENTAL STAFF AND FACILITIES. THE AREAS INVESTIGATED ARE (1) OBJECTIVES IN DENTAL EDUCATION--COURSES, TEACHING MODES, INNOVATIONS IN CURRICULUM, COORDINATION OF BASIC AND CLINICAL INSTRUCTION, (2) FACILITY…

  16. Operations Handbook for Migrant Student Dental Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, William E.; Resendez, Ignacio V.

    Migrant Education and the Superintendent of Public Instruction in the state of Washington have brought several agencies together to provide low cost dental services to migrant children. The program, initiated in 1980 and serving 138 children that year, has focused on the provision of preventative and emergency services. Migrant Education has…

  17. Dental Erosion in Industry

    PubMed Central

    Cate, H. J. Ten Bruggen

    1968-01-01

    Five hundred and fifty-five acid workers were examined between March 1962 and October 1964. One hundred and seventy-six (31·7%) were affected by industrial dental erosion at the first examinations. In 33 cases (6·0%) the dentine was affected. During the period of the survey, 66 (20·4%) of 324 workers examined more than once showed evidence that erosion was progressing. The prevalence and incidence of erosion were highest among battery formation workers, lower among picklers, and least among other processes covered by the survey. The age of workers did not appear to influence their susceptibility to erosion. The habit of working with the lips slightly parted had little effect. Erosion superimposed upon attrition predisposed to more severe loss of tooth structure than either operating alone. Little inconvenience or functional disability was suffered by acid workers due to erosion. Twenty-seven (23·7%) of 114 erosions were considered to be disfiguring. Regular dental treatment was sought less by acid workers than by controls, and the oral hygiene of the latter was superior. There was no evidence to show any difference between caries experience among acid workers and controls. Calculus and periodontal disease were more prevalent among acid workers than among controls, but it was not possible to attribute this to the working environment. Black staining in iron picklers was considered to be due to the working environment. The use of closed acid containers or lip extraction on open acid vats prevented significant atmospheric contamination and diminished the prevalence of erosion. The use of wall fans and detergent foaming agents was helpful. Images PMID:5723349

  18. Controlling the cost of dental care.

    PubMed Central

    Bailit, H L; Raskin, M; Reisine, S; Chiriboga, D

    1979-01-01

    Methods for controlling dental care expenditures are taking on greater importance with the rapid increase in prepaid dental plans. The use of regulatory systems to monitor provider performance are necessary to prevent gross over-utilization but are unlikely to result in net savings of more than five per cent of total gross premiums. Theoretically, prepaid group dental practice (PGDP) may reduce expenditures by changing the mix of services patients receive. The modest estimated savings and the small number of PGDPs presently in operation limit the importance of this alternative for the next five to ten years. If substantial reductions in dental expenditures are to be obtained, it will be necessary to limit dental insurance plans to cover only those services which have demonstrated cost-effectiveness in improving health for the majority of people. The concept that richer benefit plans may have small marginal effects on improving oral health may not be easy for the public to accept but, until they do, expenditures for dental care will be difficult to control. PMID:110154

  19. Dental Usage Under Changing Economic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Manski, Richard J.; Moeller, John F.; Chen, Haiyan; Schimmel, Jody; St Clair, Patricia A.; Pepper, John V.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to examine the relationship between changes in household finances (wealth and income) and changes in dental utilization at the onset of the recent recession in a population of older Americans. Methods Data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) were analyzed for U.S. individuals aged 51 years and older during the 2006 and 2008 waves of the HRS. We estimated logistic models of (1) starting and (2) stopping dental use between 2006 and 2008 survey periods as a function of changes in household wealth and income, controlling for other potentially confounding covariates. Results We found that only when household wealth falls by 50 percent or more were older adults less likely to seek dental care. Changes in household income and other changes in household wealth were not associated with changes in dental utilization among this population. Conclusions Older Americans’ dental care utilization appeared to be fairly resilient to changes in household finances; only when wealth fell by 50 percent or more did individuals decrease dental use. This finding might extend to other health care services that are preventive, routine, and relatively inexpensive. PMID:22994647

  20. Methods used by Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) dentists to diagnose dental caries

    PubMed Central

    Gordan, Valeria V.; Riley, Joseph L; Carvalho, Ricardo M.; Snyder, John; Sanderson, James L; Anderson, Mary; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To (1) identify the methods that dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) use to diagnose dental caries; (2) quantify their frequency of use; and (3) test the hypothesis that certain dentist and dental practice characteristics are significantly associated with their use. Methods A questionnaire about methods used for caries diagnosis was sent to DPBRN dentists who reported doing at least some restorative dentistry; 522 dentists participated. Questions included use of dental radiographs, dental explorer, laser fluorescence, air-drying, fiber optic devices, and magnification, as used when diagnosing primary, secondary/recurrent, or non-specific caries lesions. Variations on the frequency of their use were tested using multivariate analysis and Bonferroni tests. Results Overall, the dental explorer was the instrument most commonly used to detect primary occlusal caries as well as to detect caries at the margins of existing restorations. In contrast, laser fluorescence was rarely used to help diagnose occlusal primary caries. For proximal caries, radiographs were used to help diagnose 75-100% of lesions by 96% of the DPBRN dentists. Dentists who use radiographs most often to assess proximal surfaces of posterior teeth, were significantly more likely to also report providing a higher percentage of patients with individualized caries prevention (p = .040) and seeing a higher percentage of pediatric patients (p = .001). Conclusion Use of specific diagnostic methods varied substantially. The dental explorer and radiographs are still the most commonly used diagnostic methods. PMID:21488724

  1. An In Vitro Microbial-Caries Model Used to Study the Efficacy of Antibodies to Streptococcus mutans Surface Proteins in Preventing Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Margherita; Buller, Tiffany L.; Dunipace, Ann J.; Stookey, George K.; Gregory, Richard L.

    2000-01-01

    The first step for a pathogenic bacterium to initiate infection is via attachment (i.e., through surface determinants) to a suitable receptor. An in vitro microbial artificial-mouth model was used to test the efficacy of polyclonal antibodies to Streptococcus mutans cell surface proteins (CsAb) and a cell surface 59-kDa protein (59Ab) in preventing S. mutans colonization and carious lesion formation. In study 1, groups of 12 human teeth specimens were inoculated with S. mutans, which were incubated with different concentrations of CsAb (A1 [positive control], sterile saline, no antibody; A2, 0.007 mg of antibody protein/ml; and A3, 0.7 mg of antibody protein/ml) for 1 h at 37°C. The negative control group (B1) was not infected and was incubated with Trypticase soy broth (TSB) without dextrose supplemented with 5% sucrose (TSBS). In study 2, the same study design was used except that 59Ab was used instead of CsAb, normal rabbit serum was used in the positive control group (A1), and TSB supplemented with 1% glucose was used as the nutrient to control for sucrose-dependent colonization. All groups were exposed for 4 days to circulating cycles of TSBS and TSB (study 1 and study 2, respectively; 30 min each, three times per day) and a mineral washing solution (21 h per day). Prior to each nutrient cycle, 1 ml of the appropriate CsAb or 59Ab solution was administered to each group and allowed to mix for 30 min before cycling was resumed. Data obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated the presence of a significantly smaller (P < 0.05) lesion area and a smaller total lesion fluorescence in group A3 than in group A1 for both studies. In study 1, group A2 had significantly smaller values than A1 for lesion depth and area. There were no significant differences between groups A2 and A3 for lesion area or between groups A1 and A2 for total lesion fluorescence. In study 2, there were no significant differences among groups A1 and A2 for lesion depth or between groups A2 and A3 for all of the parameters studied. In both studies, there were no significant differences between S. mutans plaque CFU numbers among any of the groups. These studies demonstrated the efficacy of CsAb and 59Ab in reducing primary caries development in this model, although the underlying mechanism remains unclear. PMID:10618276

  2. Silver Nanoparticles in Dental Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Juliana Mattos; Mori, Matsuyoshi; Sanches, Heloísa Lajas; da Cruz, Adriana Dibo; Poiate, Isis Andréa Venturini Pola

    2015-01-01

    Silver has been used in medicine for centuries because of its antimicrobial properties. More recently, silver nanoparticles have been synthesized and incorporated into several biomaterials, since their small size provides great antimicrobial effect, at low filler level. Hence, these nanoparticles have been applied in dentistry, in order to prevent or reduce biofilm formation over dental materials surfaces. This review aims to discuss the current progress in this field, highlighting aspects regarding silver nanoparticles incorporation, such as antimicrobial potential, mechanical properties, cytotoxicity, and long-term effectiveness. We also emphasize the need for more studies to determine the optimal concentration of silver nanoparticle and its release over time. PMID:25667594

  3. American Dental Education Association

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-01-01

    The American Dental Education Association (ADEA) has over 19,000 members, including students, faculty, staff, and administrators from across the United States and Canada. One of the Association's stated goals is to foster "interconnected community experiences that enable members to meet their individual goals while leveraging their collective strength." This website offers a great deal of interconnectivity, as those seeking to join the dental profession can learn about scholarship opportunities, accredited dentistry schools, and professional development. In the Dental Education Pathways area, visitors can read guides like "ADEA Official Guide to Dental Schools" and "ADEA Opportunities for Minorities in United States Dental Schools." Further along is the Policy and Advocacy area, where visitors can learn about the current shortages in dental healthcare professionals and the group's special interest in dental education outreach. The site is rounded out by the Publications area, which contains some members-only publications, along with the open-access YouTube For Dental Students area. These videos profile dental students by asking them to respond to questions such as "What made you decide to go into dentistry?" and "How was your path to dental school unique?"

  4. 76 FR 14600 - Dental Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ...nonservice-connected dental disability professionally...service-connected medical condition (Class...i.e., a dental condition is complicating a medical condition currently...care to eliminate dental infection prior...insure successful medical...

  5. 75 FR 33169 - Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ...2001N-0067) RIN 0910-AG21 Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification...Subjects in 21 CFR Part 872 Medical devices. 0 Therefore, under...amended as follows: PART 872--DENTAL DEVICES 0 1. The...

  6. Dental Charting. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Trudy Karlene; Apfel, Maura

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: dental anatomical terminology; tooth numbering systems;…

  7. Oral health need and access to dental services: evidence from the National Survey of Children's Health, 2007.

    PubMed

    Bell, Janice F; Huebner, Colleen E; Reed, Sarah C

    2012-04-01

    This study examines associations between parents' report of their children's oral health and receipt of a dental visit for preventive care. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of oral health status and receipt of a preventive dental visit among US children and youth, ages 1-17 years, using data from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health (n = 86,764). Survey-weighted logistic regression was used to estimate associations between perceived oral health status and receipt of a preventive dental health visit in the prior 12 months. Overall, 78 % of children and youth received at least one preventive dental health visit in the prior year. Among the youngest children, lower oral health status was associated with higher odds of receiving a preventive dental visit; among older children, lower oral health status was associated with lower odds of receiving a dental visit for preventive care. Use of preventive dental health care is below national target goals. Younger children in worse oral health are more likely, and older youth less likely, to receive preventive dental care. Public health efforts to educate parents to seek early and ongoing preventive oral health care, rather than services in response to problems, may yield oral health benefits later in childhood and over the life course. PMID:22456986

  8. Arresting rampant dental caries with silver diamine fluoride in a young teenager suffering from chronic oral graft versus host disease post-bone marrow transplantation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rampant caries is an advanced and severe dental disease that affects multiple teeth. This case describes the management of rampant caries in a young teenager suffering from chronic oral graft versus host disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Case presentation A 14-year-old Chinese boy suffering from ?–thalassemia major was referred to the dental clinic for the management of rampant dental caries. An oral examination revealed pale conjunctiva, bruising of lips, and depapillation of tongue indicating an underlying condition of anemia. The poor oral condition due to topical and systemic immunosuppressants was seriously aggravated, and rampant caries developed rapidly, affecting all newly erupted, permanent teeth. The teeth were hypersensitive and halitosis was apparent. Strategies for oral health education and diet modification were given to the patient. Xylitol chewing gum was used to stimulate saliva flow to promote remineralization of teeth. Silver diamine fluoride was topically applied to arrest rampant caries and to relieve pain from hypersensitivity. Carious teeth with pulpal involvement were endodontically treated. Stainless steel crowns were provided on molars to restore chewing function, and polycarbonate crowns were placed on premolars, upper canines and incisors. Conclusion This case report demonstrates success in treating a young teenager with severe rampant dental decay by contemporary caries control and preventive strategy. PMID:24383434

  9. An audit of dental prescriptions between clinics and dental laboratories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. A. Stewart

    2011-01-01

    Aim To discover the quality of written instructions from dentists to dental technicians and the nature of non-compliant prescriptions. Method An audit of laboratory prescription compliance was conducted within an NHS Trust Dental Teaching Hospital to determine the level of communication between dentists and dental technicians. One hundred and fifty prescriptions were audited from dental undergraduates and qualified dentists throughout

  10. Information for Students Interested in Dental Medicine Dental Careers

    E-print Network

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    process. Timeline The dental application cycle is similar to that for medical schools with applicantsInformation for Students Interested in Dental Medicine Dental Careers · Dentists may have a variety disease, and teach and perform research. · Over 80% are general practitioners while about 20% are dental

  11. MR-byMIT-dental-1011 Dental Service

    E-print Network

    Polz, Martin

    and provide proof of legal authority to release the records. b. MIT Medical's Dental Service does not fax a copy of my dental Provider or service information to the person or facility below. Note: MIT MedicalMR-byMIT-dental-1011 Dental Service 77 Massachusetts Ave., E23-023 Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 Phone

  12. PEBB Dental Benefits Summary ODS Traditional (Premier) Dental Plan

    E-print Network

    Oregon, University of

    PEBB Dental Benefits Summary ODS Traditional (Premier) Dental Plan How To Use this Dental Plan (treatment of tissues supporting the teeth) - Crowns Apr 1 & after 50% - Implants - Cast Restorations) Advantages * * * Dependent Eligibility 80% When you visit your dental provider, tell him or her you

  13. University of New Mexico Dental Plans Administered by Delta Dental

    E-print Network

    New Mexico, University of

    University of New Mexico Dental Plans Administered by Delta Dental Delta Dental Premier® Delta Dental PPOSM · The broadest selection of dentists ­ over 370 points of access in the Albuquerque Metro Services (such as crowns, bridges and implants). · $1,000 Lifetime Orthodontia Services Benefit. · $50

  14. Dental Decay Among Texas School Children. 

    E-print Network

    Whitacre, Jessie (Jessie Opal)

    1934-01-01

    carious teeth, and in one of the Mexican groups percentages of the sexes having one or more carious teeth were equal, and more boys than girls had carious 6-year molars. The sex difference is too small, to be given serious consideration. Number..., the small sex differences may be detected, the slightly worse record for carious teeth among the girls than the boys being more apparent with the 6-year molars than with "any tooth". The three largest sex differences are in the case of the negro children...

  15. Dental hygiene public health supervision: changes in Maine law.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, E

    2000-01-01

    The author analyzed data from a set of reports submitted to the Maine Board of Dental Examiners by dental hygienists practicing under a new supervision category entitled "Public Health Supervision" enacted in Maine in 1995. The data set included information on public health dental hygiene applicants and projects reported between May 1995 and November 1998. With mounting interest from dental hygienists seeking to serve the population with limited access to preventive dental care, the regulatory board created a public health dental hygiene supervision category in the Maine regulations. The analysis revealed that dental hygienists are seeking and receiving the public health supervision endorsement. Sixty percent of the public health projects were implemented by dental hygienists in public service agencies. Those who addressed a need in their own communities without the benefit of a public health organization accounted for 40% of the applications. Examples of projects are described. The report serves as a summary of three years of data from which to assess future trends. PMID:11314054

  16. An Intergenerational Approach to Oral Health Promotion: Pregnancy and Utilization of Dental Services

    PubMed Central

    Le, Mai; Riedy, Christine; Weinstein, Philip; Milgrom, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Dental services during pregnancy can improve maternal oral health, reduce mother-child transmission of cariogenic bacteria, and create opportunities for anticipatory guidance. This study aimed to understand why low-income women did or did not utilize dental services in a pilot program to promote dental visits during pregnancy in Klamath County, Oregon. Methods Sixty women were contacted and 51 participated in semi-structured telephone interviews regarding utilization of dental services during pregnancy. Women were selected randomly from the pilot program: 45 women (88%) utilized dental services and six did not. Transcripts were content analyzed using a mixed method qualitative approach - grounded theory and Stages of Change model - to identify themes and sub-themes. Results Most women overcame stress or dentally-related barriers to use care. Stressors included poor domestic relationships, personal finances, and employment. Dentally-related factors included perception of dental experience, attitude toward dental providers, importance/valuing of oral health, perceived ability to pay for care, time constraints, dental providers’ and office staff attitudes toward clients. Conclusions Identifying barriers that prevent low-income women from taking action to access dental care during pregnancy provides information essential for enhancing public-private health programs to promote dental visits, reduce mother-child transmission, and provide guidance to new mothers. PMID:19341579

  17. Bodybuilding supplementation and tooth decay.

    PubMed

    Ali, M S; Batley, H; Ahmed, F

    2015-07-10

    Supplementation is a key component in bodybuilding and is increasingly being used by amateur weight lifters and enthusiasts to build their ideal bodies. Bodybuilding supplements are advertised to provide nutrients needed to help optimise muscle building but they can contain high amounts of sugar. Supplement users are consuming these products, while not being aware of their high sugar content, putting them at a higher risk of developing dental caries. It is important for dental professionals to recognise the increased risk for supplement users and to raise awareness, provide appropriate preventative advice and be knowledgeable of alternative products to help bodybuilders reach their goals, without increasing the risk of dental caries. PMID:26159983

  18. Nova Scotia Dental Association: Healthy Teeth

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    What exact role does sugar play in the formation of cavities? Find the answer to this question and many more at Healthy Teeth, a comprehensive and lively oral health education website for 3rd-6th graders and created by the Nova Scotia Dental Association. The site contains sections on Cavities, Teeth and Gums, Prevention, and more. The sections are student-friendly with straightforward text and fun animated images. Additionally, the site offers hands-on classroom activities and experiments.

  19. Sleep medicine content in dental hygiene education.

    PubMed

    Minichbauer, Brittany C; Sheats, Rose D; Wilder, Rebecca S; Phillips, Ceib L; Essick, Gregory K

    2015-05-01

    According to the National Research Council, 70 million Americans chronically suffer from approximately 60 medically recognized sleep disorders. With most clinicians unaware of these disorders, many individuals remain undiagnosed. To effectively address this issue, health care professionals must work collaboratively to educate, identify, and treat patients with sleep disorders. However, medical and dental clinicians do not receive adequate education in sleep medicine. On the frontline regarding prevention and counseling, dental hygienists play an important role in patient education, screening, and management of sleep disorders. The aim of this study was to assess the amount of sleep medicine content in U.S. dental hygiene programs. An electronic survey was emailed to all 334 accredited U.S. dental hygiene programs. The 18-question survey assessed the sleep medicine content presented during the 2012-13 academic year. A total of 35.3% (n=118) of the programs responded. The mean number of hours devoted to sleep medicine in their curricula was 1.55 hours (SD=1.37). Although 69% (n=79) of the responding programs reported spending time on sleep bruxism (mean=1.38 hours, SD=0.85), only 28% (n=32) reported spending time on other topics such as snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (mean=1.39 hours, SD=0.72). These results suggest that sleep medicine is included in the majority of U.S. dental hygiene programs, but the content is limited and focused on sleep bruxism. This level of training is inadequate to prepare dental hygienists for their potential role in patient education, screening, and management of sleep-related breathing disorders. PMID:25941141

  20. Sugar and Dental Caries: A Review of Human Studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ernest Newbrun

    1982-01-01

    Studies of special population groups, epidemiological surveys, controlled longitudinal studies of humans, and longitudinal studies on the effect of sugar substitutes indicate that frequent or high intake of sugary foods predisposes to dental decay. The relation is not always clear-cut, and most studies have important methodological problems and limitations. Longitudinal measurements of caries increments combined with multiple dietary histories are

  1. Dental Assisting Program Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This publication contains statewide standards for the dental assisting program in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories: foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation); admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment, evaluation and planning); program…

  2. Dental Care in Scleroderma

    MedlinePLUS

    Dental Care in Scleroderma People living with scleroderma face unique challenges while trying to maintain their oral health. They are more likely to ... important for people who have scleroderma. HOW DOES SCLERODERMA AFFECT MY ORAL HEALTH? WHAT CAN MY DENTIST ...

  3. Portable Dental System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Portable dental system provides dental care in isolated communities. System includes a patient's chair and a dentist's stool, an X-ray machine and a power unit, all of which fold into compact packages. A large yellow "pumpkin" is a collapsible compressed air tank. Portable system has been used successfully in South America in out of the way communities with this back-packable system, and in American nursing homes. This product is no longer manufactured.

  4. American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Growth in Dental Sleep Medicine More news... Dental Sleep Medicine: An area of practice that focuses on the ... Appliance Inc. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine, All Rights Reserved. American Academy of Dental Sleep ...

  5. Minimal Intervention Dentistry (MID) for managing dental caries – a review

    PubMed Central

    Frencken, Jo E.; Peters, Mathilde C.; Manton, David J.; Leal, Soraya C.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Eden, Ece

    2012-01-01

    This publication describes the history of Minimal Intervention Dentistry (MID) for managing dental caries and presents evidence for various carious lesion detection devices, for preventive measures, for restorative and non-restorative therapies as well as for repairing rather than replacing defective restorations. It is a follow-up to the FDI World Dental Federation publication on MID, of 2000. The dental profession currently is faced with an enormous task of how to manage the high burden of consequences of the caries process amongst the world population. If it is to manage carious lesion development and its progression, it should move away from the ‘surgical’ care approach and fully embrace the MID approach. The chance for MID to be successful is thought to be increased tremendously if dental caries is not considered an infectious but instead a behavioural disease with a bacterial component. Controlling the two main carious lesion development related behaviours, i.e. intake and frequency of fermentable sugars, to not more than five times daily and removing/disturbing dental plaque from all tooth surfaces using an effective fluoridated toothpaste twice daily, are the ingredients for reducing the burden of dental caries in many communities in the world. FDI’s policy of reducing the need for restorative therapy by placing an even greater emphasis on caries prevention than is currently done, is therefore, worth pursuing. PMID:23106836

  6. Forensic considerations when dealing with incinerated human dental remains.

    PubMed

    Reesu, Gowri Vijay; Augustine, Jeyaseelan; Urs, Aadithya B

    2015-01-01

    Establishing the human dental identification process relies upon sufficient post-mortem data being recovered to allow for a meaningful comparison with ante-mortem records of the deceased person. Teeth are the most indestructible components of the human body and are structurally unique in their composition. They possess the highest resistance to most environmental effects like fire, desiccation, decomposition and prolonged immersion. In most natural as well as man-made disasters, teeth may provide the only means of positive identification of an otherwise unrecognizable body. It is imperative that dental evidence should not be destroyed through erroneous handling until appropriate radiographs, photographs, or impressions can be fabricated. Proper methods of physical stabilization of incinerated human dental remains should be followed. The maintenance of integrity of extremely fragile structures is crucial to the successful confirmation of identity. In such situations, the forensic dentist must stabilise these teeth before the fragile remains are transported to the mortuary to ensure preservation of possibly vital identification evidence. Thus, while dealing with any incinerated dental remains, a systematic approach must be followed through each stage of evaluation of incinerated dental remains to prevent the loss of potential dental evidence. This paper presents a composite review of various studies on incinerated human dental remains and discusses their impact on the process of human identification and suggests a step by step approach. PMID:25572078

  7. Respiratory morbidity in a population of French dental technicians

    PubMed Central

    Radi, S; Dalphin, J; Manzoni, P; Pernet, D; Leboube, M; Viel, J

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To compare wage earner dental technicians with non-exposed salaried subjects for the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and function, and chest x ray abnormalities. Methods: A total of 134 dental technicians and 131 non-exposed subjects participated. A medical and an occupational questionnaire were filled in to evaluate the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and occupational exposures. Subjects underwent respiratory tests and chest x ray examination. Results: Mean age of the dental technicians was 36.6 years with a mean duration of dental work of 16.5 years. There was a significant risk of cough (day and night) and usual phlegm in dental technicians. Respiratory function parameters were lower in dental technicians with a significant difference between exposed and non-exposed groups for % FVC (forced vital capacity), % FEF25 (forced mid expiratory flow), and % FEF50. The prevalence of small opacities increased with age. Small opacities were significantly related to an exposure to asbestos in the past. Conclusions: Our young population of dental technicians is at risk of respiratory morbidity. They should benefit from adequate technical prevention measures. PMID:12040116

  8. Dental caries in adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a population-based follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Blomqvist, M; Ahadi, S; Fernell, E; Ek, U; Dahllöf, G

    2011-10-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) exhibit a higher prevalence of caries than adolescents in a control group. Thirty-two adolescents with ADHD and a control group of 55 adolescents from a population-based sample, all 17 yr of age, underwent a clinical and radiographic dental examination. The mean ± SD number of decayed surfaces (DS) was 2.0 ± 2.2 in adolescents with ADHD and 0.9 ± 1.4 in adolescents of the control group. Thirty-one per cent of the adolescents in the ADHD group had no new caries lesions (DS = 0) compared with 62% in the control group. Six per cent of the adolescents in the ADHD group were caries free [decayed, missing or filled surfaces (DMFS) = 0] compared with 29% in the control group. Adolescents with ADHD also had a higher percentage of gingival sites that exhibited bleeding on probing compared with the control group: 35 ± 39% vs. 16 ± 24% (mean ± SD), respectively. At 17 yr of age, adolescents with ADHD exhibited a statistically significantly higher prevalence of caries compared with an age-matched control group. Adolescents with ADHD need more support regarding oral hygiene and dietary habits. They should be followed up with shorter intervals between dental examinations to prevent caries progression during adulthood. PMID:21896055

  9. Influence of dental materials on dental MRI

    PubMed Central

    Tymofiyeva, O; Vaegler, S; Rottner, K; Boldt, J; Hopfgartner, AJ; Proff, PC; Richter, E-J; Jakob, PM

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the potential influence of standard dental materials on dental MRI (dMRI) by estimating the magnetic susceptibility with the help of the MRI-based geometric distortion method and to classify the materials from the standpoint of dMRI. Methods: A series of standard dental materials was studied on a 1.5?T MRI system using spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences and their magnetic susceptibility was estimated using the geometric method. Measurements on samples of dental materials were supported by in vivo examples obtained in dedicated dMRI procedures. Results: The tested materials showed a range of distortion degrees. The following materials were classified as fully compatible materials that can be present even in the tooth of interest: the resin-based sealer AH Plus® (Dentsply, Maillefer, Germany), glass ionomer cement, gutta-percha, zirconium dioxide and composites from one of the tested manufacturers. Interestingly, composites provided by the other manufacturer caused relatively strong distortions and were therefore classified as compatible I, along with amalgam, gold alloy, gold–ceramic crowns, titanium alloy and NiTi orthodontic wires. Materials, the magnetic susceptibility of which differed from that of water by more than 200?ppm, were classified as non-compatible materials that should not be present in the patient’s mouth for any dMRI applications. They included stainless steel orthodontic appliances and CoCr. Conclusions: A classification of the materials that complies with the standard grouping of materials according to their magnetic susceptibility was proposed and adopted for the purposes of dMRI. The proposed classification can serve as a guideline in future dMRI research. PMID:23610088

  10. Aetna Dental presents A Dental Benefit Summary for

    E-print Network

    Plan 63 Aetna Dental presents A Dental Benefit Summary for Rice University CODE PROCEDURE PATIENT, Occlusal No Charge D2781 Crown, ¾ Cast Metal* $315 D0250 X-ray, Extraoral, First Film No Charge D2910

  11. Osteoradionecrosis: Causes and prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, R.B. (Medical College of Virginia Hospitals, Richmond (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) is one of the most serious complications arising from head and neck radiation therapy. Current research has shown that ORN represents nonhealing, dead bone and is not a state of infection. ORN is the result of functional and structural bony changes that may not be expressed for months or years. ORN may occur spontaneously or in response to wounding. Predisposing factors include absorbed radiation dose, fractionation, delivery modality, and dental status. Timing of dental extractions and other factors have also been shown to affect incidence. ORN may be reduced through early intraoral evaluation, treatment, and adequate healing time prior to beginning RT. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy has been beneficial in the prevention and treatment of ORN. It is of paramount importance for the medical community to recognize the factors that may reduce ORN incidence, endorse oral care protocols, and acknowledge the value of HBO therapy in the prevention and treatment of this disease. 60 references.

  12. Compliance with infection control practices in an university hospital dental clinic

    PubMed Central

    Mutters, Nico T.; Hägele, Ulrike; Hagenfeld, Daniel; Hellwig, Elmar; Frank, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Compliance with infection control practices is the key to quality care and excellence in dentistry. Infection control remains one of the most cost-beneficial interventions available. However, implementing control procedures requires full compliance of the whole dental team. The aim of our study was to measure the compliance in daily clinical practice. Methods: The compliance with infection control practices in dentistry by dental health care personnel (DHCP) in a German university dental clinic was observed during clinical work. In addition, a survey was conducted to assess the individual knowledge about infection control procedures. Contamination of the workplace during invasive dental procedures was tested, as well. Results: A total of 58 invasive dental treatments implying close contacts between HCWs and patients were scrutinized. All HCWs (100%) wore gloves during dental work, but in some cases (female dentists: 14.3%; dental assistants: 28.6%) gloves were neither changed nor hands were disinfected between different activities or patient contacts (female dentists: 68.6%; male dentists: 60.9%; dental assistants: 93%). Only 31.4% of female and 39.1% of male dentists carried out adequate hygienic hand disinfection after removing gloves. Male dentists wore significantly more often (100%) protective eyewear compared to 77.1% of female dentists (p<0.05). In addition, most of female dentists (62.9%) and dental assistants (80.7%) wore jewelry during dental procedures. Conclusion: Despite the knowledge of distinct hygiene procedures only a small percentage of dental staff performs hygiene practices according to recommended guidelines. Strict audit is clearly needed in the dental setting to ensure compliance with infection control guidelines to prevent transmission of pathogens. Our results provide insights for the development of a targeted education and training strategy to enhance compliance of dental staff especially of dental assistants with infection control procedures. PMID:25285262

  13. Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

  14. Dental Education in the Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, David A.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Dental education in the Netherlands is reviewed in terms of dental practice, overall development, structure and functioning of a typical school of dentistry, admissions, student finances, curriculum, certification, postgraduate education, and education for related professions. (MSE)

  15. Seal Out Tooth Decay: A Fact Sheet for Parents

    MedlinePLUS

    Seal Out Tooth Decay A Fact Sheet for Parents National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research What are dental sealants? Sealants are thin, plastic coatings painted on the chewing surfaces of the back teeth. Sealants are put on in dentists’ offices, clinics, and ...

  16. Frequency and Risk Indicators of Tooth Decay among Pregnant Women in France: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vergnes, Jean-Noel; Kaminski, Monique; Lelong, Nathalie; Musset, Anne-Marie; Sixou, Michel; Nabet, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Little is known on the prevalence of tooth decay among pregnant women. Better knowledge of tooth decay risk indicators during pregnancy could help to develop follow-up protocols for women at risk, along with better prevention strategies. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of tooth decay and the number of decayed teeth per woman in a large sample of pregnant women in France, and to study associated risk indicators. Methods A secondary cross-sectional analysis of data from a French multicentre case-control study was performed. The sample was composed of 1094 at-term women of six maternity units. A dental examination was carried out within 2 to 4 days post-partum. Socio-demographic and behavioural characteristics were obtained through a standardised interview with the women. Medical characteristics were obtained from the women’s medical records. Risk indicators associated with tooth decay were identified using a negative binomial hurdle model. Results 51.6% of the women had tooth decay. The mean number of decayed teeth among women having at least one was 3.1 (s.d.?=?2.8). Having tooth decay was statistically associated with lower age (aOR?=?1.58, 95%CI [1.03,2.45]), lower educational level (aOR?=?1.53, 95%CI [1.06,2.23]) and dental plaque (aOR?=?1.75, 95%CI [1.27,2.41]). The number of decayed teeth was associated with the same risk indicators and with non-French nationality and inadequate prenatal care. Discussion The frequency of tooth decay and the number of decayed teeth among pregnant women were high. Oral health promotion programmes must continue to inform women and care providers about the importance of dental care before, during and after pregnancy. Future research should also assess the effectiveness of public policies related to oral health in target populations of pregnant women facing challenging social or economic situations. PMID:22586442

  17. Knowledge and attitude of tobacco use and cessation among dental professionals

    PubMed Central

    Awan, K.H.; Hammam, M.K.; Warnakulasuriya, S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Smoking is the one of the most preventable causes of death worldwide. Dental professionals may play an important role in anti-smoking campaigns. The aim of this study was to evaluate current knowledge of and attitudes toward smoking and its cessation among dental professionals. Materials and methods This questionnaire-based study was carried out among general dental practitioners (GDPs) and dental students in Saudi Arabia. The questionnaire was used to collect data on sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge, and attitudes toward tobacco use and cessation. Data were analyzed using SPSS software (version 18.0; IBM) and the Mann–Whitney U-test, with a significance level of p < 0.001. Results A total of 342 participants (130 GDPs, 212 dental students) with the mean age of 24 (standard deviation, 5) years participated in the study. One-third (33.8%, n = 44) of GDPs and 30.2% (n = 64) of dental students were smokers; small percentages (GDPs, 9.1% [n = 4]; dental students, 7.8% [n = 5]) were heavy smokers. The majority of participants rated both smoking cessation and prevention together as a very important preventive measure. Families were rated as the most important factor responsible for smoking cessation, whereas general practitioners were rated as the most important factor for providing assistance with cessation. Conclusion More meaningful participation of dental professionals in tobacco cessation is needed, with implications for related curriculum changes.

  18. Diet and dental caries.

    PubMed

    Jensen, M E

    1999-10-01

    Dental caries is a diet-related disease that continues to be a problem for certain dental patients. Frequent consumption of fermentable carbohydrates that have low oral clearance rates increases the risk for enamel caries and perhaps is even more dangerous for root surfaces. Highly acidogenic snack foods should be consumed at mealtimes to reduce the risk, and between-meal snacks should be either nonacidogenic (such as xylitol products) or hypoacidogenic (such as sorbitol and HSH products). Cheeses present a naturally occurring situation that may provide anticariogenic effects from the diet. Certain additives as well as sugar substitutes show great promise for the provision of between-meal snack foods that reduce the risk of dental caries. The dental team should thoroughly understand the relationship of diet to caries and conscientiously apply that knowledge to educate the patients in general as well as counsel specific high-risk individuals. Further emphasis should be placed on the acquisition of sound scientific data for counseling caries patients concerning diet and dental caries. PMID:10553247

  19. Name: Dixon Question: In children with caries will F varnish as compared to F foam be more efficient in preventing caries?

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    :fvarnish C:ffoam O: prevention of dental caries Question Type: treatment Search Strategy: fluorides AND gel AND foam AND dental caries Bottom Line: My PICO question was not answered, but my bottom line foam in preventing and treating dental caries, but from an ease of application standpoint, I do agree

  20. Rapid HIV Testing in Dental Practices

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Stephen N.; Pereyra, Margaret; Liguori, Terri; Pollack, Harold A.; Metsch, Lisa R.

    2012-01-01

    Despite increasing discussion about the dental care setting as a logical, potentially fruitful venue for rapid HIV testing, dentists’ willingness to take on this task is unclear. Semistructured interviews with 40 private practice dentists revealed their principal concerns regarding offering patients HIV testing were false results, offending patients, viewing HIV testing as outside the scope of licensure, anticipating low patient acceptance of HIV testing in a dental setting, expecting inadequate reimbursement, and potential negative impact on the practice. Dentists were typically not concerned about transmission risks, staff opposition to testing, or making referrals for follow-up after a positive result. A larger cultural change may be required to engage dentists more actively in primary prevention and population-based HIV screening. PMID:22397342

  1. Pneumoconiosis and exposures of dental laboratory technicians.

    PubMed Central

    Rom, W N; Lockey, J E; Lee, J S; Kimball, A C; Bang, K M; Leaman, H; Johns, R E; Perrota, D; Gibbons, H L

    1984-01-01

    One hundred and seventy-eight dental laboratory technicians and 69 non-exposed controls participated in an epidemiological respiratory study. Eight technicians who had a mean of 28 years' grinding nonprecious metal alloys were diagnosed as having a simple pneumoconiosis by chest radiograph. Mean values for per cent predicted FVC and FEV1 were reduced among male nonsmoker technicians compared to male nonsmoker controls; after controlling for age, there was also a reduction in spirometry with increasing work-years. An industrial hygiene survey was conducted in 13 laboratories randomly selected from 42 laboratories stratified by size and type of operation in the Salt Lake City, Utah metropolitan area. Personal exposures to beryllium and cobalt exceeded the Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) in one laboratory. Occupational exposures in dental laboratories need to be controlled to prevent beryllium-related lung disorders as well as simple pneumoconiosis. PMID:6496819

  2. Pneumoconiosis and exposures of dental laboratory technicians.

    PubMed

    Rom, W N; Lockey, J E; Lee, J S; Kimball, A C; Bang, K M; Leaman, H; Johns, R E; Perrota, D; Gibbons, H L

    1984-11-01

    One hundred and seventy-eight dental laboratory technicians and 69 non-exposed controls participated in an epidemiological respiratory study. Eight technicians who had a mean of 28 years' grinding nonprecious metal alloys were diagnosed as having a simple pneumoconiosis by chest radiograph. Mean values for per cent predicted FVC and FEV1 were reduced among male nonsmoker technicians compared to male nonsmoker controls; after controlling for age, there was also a reduction in spirometry with increasing work-years. An industrial hygiene survey was conducted in 13 laboratories randomly selected from 42 laboratories stratified by size and type of operation in the Salt Lake City, Utah metropolitan area. Personal exposures to beryllium and cobalt exceeded the Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) in one laboratory. Occupational exposures in dental laboratories need to be controlled to prevent beryllium-related lung disorders as well as simple pneumoconiosis. PMID:6496819

  3. 77 FR 4469 - Dental Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-30

    ...38 U.S.C. chapter 17 if dental care is reasonably necessary...types of surgery for which dental care may be necessary to minimize...complications due to infection from dental conditions. The examples provided...but rather merely examples of medical conditions commonly...

  4. Dental Assistant Specialist. (AFSC 98150).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eling, David R.

    This four-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for dental assistant specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are an introduction to dental services (the mission and organization of medical/dental service, career ladder progressions, medical readiness/wartime training, and…

  5. Dental caries in school girls

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. N. Mathur; T. P. Jain; M. L. Jain

    1979-01-01

    1011 school girls belonging to different socio-economic status were examined for assessing the prevalence of dental caries.\\u000a The relation of various socio-cultural and personal factors associated with dental caries has been discussed. The overall\\u000a prrvalence rate of dental caries was found to be 9.19 per cent.

  6. The Primary Dental Care Workforce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neenan, M. Elaine; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A study describes the characteristics of the current primary dental care workforce (dentists, hygienists, assistants), its distribution, and its delivery system in private and public sectors. Graduate dental school enrollments, trends in patient visits, employment patterns, state dental activities, and workforce issues related to health care…

  7. Dental Laboratory Technology Program Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This guide contains 45 program standards for the dental laboratory technology program conducted in technical institutes in Georgia. The dental laboratory technology program, either diploma or associate degree, is designed to ensure that students gain basic competence in the job skills needed for an entry-level employee in dental laboratory…

  8. Performance of Dental Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Rekow, E.D.; Silva, N.R.F.A.; Coelho, P.G.; Zhang, Y.; Guess, P.; Thompson, V.P.

    2011-01-01

    The clinical success of modern dental ceramics depends on an array of factors, ranging from initial physical properties of the material itself, to the fabrication and clinical procedures that inevitably damage these brittle materials, and the oral environment. Understanding the influence of these factors on clinical performance has engaged the dental, ceramics, and engineering communities alike. The objective of this review is to first summarize clinical, experimental, and analytic results reported in the recent literature. Additionally, it seeks to address how this new information adds insight into predictive test procedures and reveals challenges for future improvements. PMID:21224408

  9. Changing dental images--from stone tablets to comic strips.

    PubMed

    Mandel, I D

    1989-06-01

    From deworming and tooth drawing to rehabilitation and prevention--the dentist's role has changed decidedly over the centuries. Dental images have changed as well. The perceptions of teeth and dentistry in myth and folklore, in art, literature, and popular cultural forms are varied, shifting, and reflective of both the growth of the profession and the fluxes and attitudinal changes in society. PMID:2738246

  10. Aspirin Use and Post-operative Bleeding from Dental Extractions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. T. Brennan; M. A. Valerin; J. L. Noll; J. J. Napeñas; M. L. Kent; P. C. Fox; H. C. Sasser; P. B. Lockhart

    2008-01-01

    Aspirin is a common, chronically administered preventive treatment for cardiovascular disease, but is often discontinued prior to invasive dental procedures because of concern for bleeding complications. We hypothesized that aspirin does not cause increased bleeding following a single tooth extraction. Thirty-six healthy persons requiring a tooth extraction were randomized to receive 325 mg\\/day aspirin or placebo for 4 days. Cutaneous

  11. Smoking Policies of U.S. Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheney, H. Gordon

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of a study on the preventive health activity concerning smoking at dental schools were to determine the smoking policies and what actions were taken to reduce health hazards of smoke to personnel in institutions. The majority of schools surveyed (N=46) restricted smoking to certain areas in their facility. (MLW)

  12. Oral-dental concerns of the pediatric oncology patient

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, K.

    1989-01-01

    One of the main concerns of all disciplines in health care today is maintaining the patient's quality of life and comfort during cancer therapy. Oral complications resulting from radiation or chemotherapy can be expected in a large percentage of patients. Conducting a dental evaluation and performing treatment before therapy can help prevent or lessen potential complications. With preventive care and fewer infections, the patient will be able to communicate with friends and family, and optimum care and comfort can be provided.

  13. Dental pain and associated factors among pregnant women: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Marta S M; Lang, Celina A; Almeida, Luiza H S; Bello-Corrêa, Fernanda O; Romano, Ana R; Pappen, Fernanda G

    2015-03-01

    The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of dental pain during pregnancy and its association with sociodemographic factors and oral health conditions among 315 pregnant women in South Brazil. Participants were interviewed to obtain sociodemographic data, such as age, educational level, employment status, family income, and marital and parity status. Medical and dental histories were also collected, including the occurrence of dental pain and the use of dental services during pregnancy. Clinical examinations were performed to assess the presence of visible plaque and gingival bleeding and to calculate the decayed, missing, and filled teeth index. Means and standard deviations of continuous variables and frequencies and percentages of categorical variables were calculated. Independent variables were included in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 173 (54.9 %) pregnant women reported dental pain during pregnancy. After adjustment of the analysis, caries activity remained the main determinant of dental pain (odds ratio 3.33, 95 % CI 1.67-6.65). The prevalence of dental pain during pregnancy was high and the presence of caries activity was a determinant of dental pain. Moreover, access to oral health care was low, despite pregnant women's increased need for dental assistance. PMID:24894731

  14. General dental practitioners' views on early childhood caries and timing of the first dental visit in Selangor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Alaa S; Schroth, Robert J; Abu-Hassan, Mohamed I

    2015-03-01

    This survey evaluated the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of general dental practitioners (GDPs) in Selangor regarding early childhood caries (ECC) prevention and the recommended timing of a child's first dental visit. A questionnaire was mailed to 521 licensed GDPs. Descriptive statistics were used, and bivariate and logistic regression analyses were performed. The response rate was 52.6%. Although 89.8% mentioned counseling parents and caregivers, only 44.2% were familiar with anticipatory guidance. Whereas 98.2% agreed that early examinations are important to prevent ECC, only 51.8% were aware of the recommendation for a first visit by 12 months of age. GDPs who recommended early dental visits were significantly more likely to be recent graduates, more familiar with professional guidelines, and less likely to be deterred by a child's crying or behavior. In conclusion, GDPs in Selangor are aware about the importance of early dental visits in ECC prevention. However, a considerable number of them are still not aware of the recommendation that children must first visit the dentist by 12 months of age. Furthermore, some of their current practices in ECC management and prevention do not match professional recommendations. PMID:23420056

  15. Drugs that promote dental caries.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries result from erosion of tooth enamel or cementum by acidic substances produced by bacteria found in dental plaque. Caries can lead to pulp necrosis and tooth loss. Risk factors include certain dietary habits, poor oral hygiene, and dry mouth. Diabetes and Sjogren's syndrome can also promote dental caries. Psychotropic substances such as cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin and cannabis can promote dental caries. Many medicinal drugs facilitate the formation of dental caries, through various mechanisms; they include formulations with a high sugar content; drugs that cause dry mouth (especially antimuscarinics); drugs that lower the buccal pH (inhaled powders, etc.); and drugs that cause demineralisation (tetracyclines, etc.). In practice, patients (and parents) should be informed that some drugs can increase the risk of dental caries. They should be encouraged to adapt and reinforce dental hygiene, and advised to visit a dentist regularly. PMID:25802916

  16. [Frequency and manifestations of back pain in the dental profession].

    PubMed

    Zitzmann, Nicola Ursula; Chen, Monika Danzkay; Zenhäusern, René

    2008-01-01

    Dentists, dental hygienists and dental assistants due to the nature of their work-related physical activity often have to deal with physical stress that will cause actual physical damage. The aim of the current survey was to analyse the frequency of job-related pain and associated impairment. The questionnaire for the cervical and lumbal region of the North American Spine Society was modified and used in the present investigation. Out of 6962 subjects, 2025 returned the questionnaire (response rate 34.5%). Between 20% and 36% of the participants suffered from pain in the cervical and lumbal region and were impaired in their daily activities, particularly during the lifting of objects, while standing or sleeping. Almost 40% of the dentists and 53% of the dental hygienists/dental assistants experienced problems related to perceived pain during or after dental treatments. More than half of the participants had already sought out medical help and/or physiotherapy due to job-related pain. The present data indicate that prophylactic and therapeutically based preventative measures should be encouraged in order to prevent cervical and back pain in this affected occupational group. PMID:18720645

  17. FATIGUE OF DENTAL CERAMICS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. Data/sources The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Conclusions Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically-assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Clinical significance Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. PMID:24135295

  18. Dental optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yao-Sheng; Ho, Yi-Ching; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Chuang, Ching-Cheng; Tsai, Jui-che; Lin, Kun-Feng; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2013-01-01

    This review paper describes the applications of dental optical coherence tomography (OCT) in oral tissue images, caries, periodontal disease and oral cancer. The background of OCT, including basic theory, system setup, light sources, spatial resolution and system limitations, is provided. The comparisons between OCT and other clinical oral diagnostic methods are also discussed. PMID:23857261

  19. TRICARE Dental Coverage

    MedlinePLUS

    ... See What's Covered Is It Covered? Dental Care Mental Health Care Pharmacy Special Needs Vision Care Benefit Updates Find a Doctor Book Appointments Getting Care When Traveling Military Hospitals and Clinics Multi-Service Markets Network Providers Non-Network Providers Overseas Providers ...

  20. Skylab Dental Examination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Skylab 2 Commander Charles Conrad is seen undergoing a dental examination by the Medical Officer, Joseph Kerwin in the Skylab Medical Facility. In the absence of an examination chair, Conrad simply rotated his body to an upside down position to facilitate the procedure.

  1. Dental amalgam and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Mackert, J.R. Jr. (Department of Restorative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta (United States))

    1991-08-01

    This paper looks at the issues of the current amalgam controversy: the daily dose of mercury from amalgam, hypersensitivity to mercury, claims of adverse effects from amalgam mercury and alleged overnight 'cures.' In addition, the toxicity and allergenicity of the proposed alternative materials are examined with the same kind of scrutiny applied by the anti-amalgam group to dental amalgam. 100 references.

  2. Contaminated dental instruments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Smith; M. Dickson; J. Aitken; J. Bagg

    2002-01-01

    There is current concern in the UK over the possible transmission of prions via contaminated surgical instruments. Some dental instruments (endodontic files) raise particular concerns by virtue of their intimate contact with terminal branches of the trigeminal nerve. A visual assessment using a dissecting light microscope and scanning electron microscopy of endodontic files after clinical use and subsequent decontamination was

  3. Undergraduate Dental Hygiene

    E-print Network

    Bristol, University of

    of oral disease. Specialising in the treatment and monitoring of periodontal (gum) health, they are responsible for developing patients' oral hygiene practices. Undertaking detailed clinical procedures that patients are educated and motivated to maintain their periodontal and oral health. Dental hygienists

  4. Odontology and Dental History \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerold Rüdiger Heckert

    In this study, a medal of dental relevance will be discussed. This bronze medal was dedicated in 1962 to profes- sor Erwin Reichenbach. It was a honory medal of the Leopoldina in Halle (Germany). The Leopoldina is one of the oldest societies of science in the world. Reichenbach was the Vice-President of the Leopoldina (1955- 1973) and also the Director

  5. Infective Endocarditis Prevention: Update on 2007 Guidelines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Jane Burton; Stephen A. Geraci

    Antibiotic prophylaxis for preventing infective endocarditis is unproven. The recently issued American Heart Association guidelines for endocarditis prevention call for restricting the use of preprocedure antibiotics. We discuss how these revisions apply to clinical practice in patients undergoing elective medical and dental procedures.

  6. Infective Endocarditis Prevention: Update on 2007 Guidelines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Jane Burton; Stephen A. Geraci

    2008-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis for preventing infective endocarditis is unproven. The recently issued American Heart Association guidelines for endocarditis prevention call for restricting the use of preprocedure antibiotics. We discuss how these revisions apply to clinical practice in patients undergoing elective medical and dental procedures.

  7. Trends in Dentistry and Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valachovic, Richard W.; Weaver, Richard G.; Sinkford, Jeanne C.; Haden, N. Karl

    2001-01-01

    Compiled from many of the surveys that the American Dental Education Association routinely publishes, along with data from surveys conducted by the American Dental Association and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, presents statistical tables and descriptive text on trends among dental patients, among dental practitioners, and in dental

  8. Involving Parents in Their Children's Dental Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Donna

    1998-01-01

    Asserts that parent education is vital to good dental hygiene for the whole family. Discusses what Head Start staffers can do to ensure that children's dental needs are being met, particularly in assisting parents with taking responsibility for children's dental hygiene. Covers dental care tips for parents, questions and answers about dental

  9. Gender differences in practice patterns for diagnosis and treatment of dental caries: Findings from The Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Joseph L.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Rouisse, Kathleen M.; McClelland, Jocelyn; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives A number of articles have addressed gender differences in the productivity of dentists, but little is known about differences in practice patterns for caries management. This study compared the use of a comprehensive range of specific diagnostic methods, preventive agents, and restorative decision making for caries management between male and female dentists who were members of The Dental Practice-Based Research Network(DPBRN). Methods This study surveyed general dentists who were members of DPBRN and who practiced within the United States. The survey asked about dentist, practice, and patient characteristics, as well as prevention, assessment, and treatment of dental caries. Differences in years since dental school graduation, practice model, full/part-time status, and practice owner/employee were adjusted in the statistical models, before making conclusions about gender differences. Results Three hundred ninety-three male (84%) and seventy-three female (16%) dentists participated. Female dentists recommended at-home fluoride to a significantly larger proportion of their patients, whereas males had a preference for using in-office fluoride treatments with pediatric patients. Female dentists also choose to restore interproximal lesions at a significantly later stage of development, preferring to use preventive therapy more often at earlier stages of dental caries. There were few differences in diagnostic methods, time spent on or charges for restorative dentistry, and busyness of their practices. Conclusion DPBRN female dentists differ from their male counterparts in some aspects of the prevention, assessment, and treatment of dental caries, even with significant covariates taken into account. Practice patterns of female dentists suggest a greater caries preventive treatment philosophy. PMID:21454850

  10. Microbial contamination of used dental handpieces.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gordon; Smith, Andrew

    2014-09-01

    Microbial contamination of used, unprocessed internal components of dental handpieces (HPs) was assessed. HPs were dismantled aseptically, immersed in phosphate-buffered saline, ultrasonicated, and cultured. A median of 200 CFU per turbine (n = 40), 400 CFU per spray channel (n = 40), and 1000 CFU per item of surgical gear (n = 20) was detected. Isolates included oral streptococci, Pseudomonas spp, and Staphylococcus aureus. Recovery of S aureus confirms the need for appropriate HP cleaning and sterilization after each patient to prevent cross-infection. PMID:25179340

  11. Oral Health Presentation Objectives

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    and mouth care we can develop dental caries or tooth decay. This is caused by bacteria in our mouths, increase calcium intake, tobacco prevention (chew r/t oral cancer and dental decay). 4. Dental Decay

  12. Future priorities for a successful dental school.

    PubMed

    Ranney, R R

    1999-01-01

    Priorities for success for a dental school of the future are considered. University relations, demographic changes, digital information technology and functional genetic technology are emphasised as important environmental pressures that will influence the priorities. The goal advocated for university relations is creating a culture in which the dental school is viewed as integral and necessary to the University's mission. Financial stability, quality research and scholarship and provision of health care for employees may be important ingredients. Keeping an eye on demographic changes and taking the school's business where the customers are is another key to success in the future. Ethnic diversity, changing approaches with changing disease patterns, flexibility in schedule and collaborations in areas of need are strategies to be considered. The emerging field of functional genetics typifies a new biology with which currency will be needed in a health-sciences field. Necessity for faculty development, adoption of molecular diagnostic technologies, emphasis on risk assessment and preventive counselling, and a shift to a wellness model are likely consequences. Digital information technology will result in increased distance-learning opportunity. Dental schools will also need to make accommodating changes in curriculum structure available. Conversion to electronic imaging and totally electronic patient records are likely to become standard. PMID:10865371

  13. Prevalence of dental caries among 12–14 year old children in Qatar

    PubMed Central

    Al-Darwish, Mohammed; El Ansari, Walid; Bener, Abdulbari

    2014-01-01

    Background To ensure the oral health of a population, clinicians must deliver appropriate dental services, and local communities need to have access to dental care facilities. However, establishment of this infrastructure must be based on reliable information regarding disease prevalence and severity in the target population. Objectives The aims of this study were to measure the incidence of dental caries in school children aged 12–14 throughout Qatar, including the influence of socio-demographic factors. Materials and methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in Qatar from October 2011 to March 2012. A total of 2113 children aged 12–14 were randomly selected from 16 schools located in different geographic areas. Three calibrated examiners using World Health Organization (WHO) criteria to diagnose dental caries performed the clinical examinations. Data analyses were subsequently conducted. Results The mean decayed, missing, and filled teeth index values were respectively 4.62 (±3.2), 4.79 (±3.5), and 5.5 (±3.7), for 12, 13, and 14 year-old subjects. Caries prevalence was 85%. The mandibular incisors and canines were least affected by dental caries, while maxillary and mandibular molars exhibited the highest incidence of dental caries. Dental caries were affected by socio-demographic factors; significant differences were detected between female and male children, where more female children showed dental caries than male children. In addition, children residing in semi-urban areas showed more dental caries than in urban areas. Conclusion Results indicated that dental caries prevalence among school children in Qatar has reached critical levels, and is influenced by socio-demographic factors. The mean decayed, missing, and filled teeth values obtained in this study were the second highest detected in the Eastern Mediterranean region. PMID:25057232

  14. Dental-service Dental Radiation Safety and Protection: Program guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-27

    The primary purpose of the program guide for Dental Radiation Safety and Protection is to assist VA dental personnel in developing radiologic procedures that ensure maximum safety for their patients and themselves. In order to do this, the authors have included a summary of the biological hazards associated with exposure to x-radiation, provided information on patient exposure levels associated with dental X-ray units, and explained the methods for reducing patient and staff exposure to X-rays.

  15. Importance of Dental Records in Forensic Dental Identification

    PubMed Central

    Waleed, Petro; Baba, Feras; Alsulami, Salem; Tarakji, Bassel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The patient’s record maintains all the diagnostic information with regards to patients and contains valuable information that can be beneficial to the dentist as well as legal authorities during forensic human identification. Aim: Objective of the study was to compare dental records with an ideal dental record form, as well as to compare between dental records of private clinics and academic hospitals and to assess the awareness and the knowledge of the dentists regarding the maintenance of their dental records accurate for medico-legal purposes. Material and Methods: A comparative cross-sectional study between records kept in private clinics and academic teaching hospitals in Khartoum locality. Results: Our results showed that Students are more likely to encounter accurate dental records more than dentists in private clinics. In conclusion Students are more aware regarding medicolegal purposes of maintenance of dental records. Accurate maintenance of dental records is more among dental students. Therefore, private clinics encounter dental records as financial documents. PMID:25870492

  16. Dental public health for the 21st century: implications for specialty education and practice.

    PubMed

    Shulman, J D; Niessen, L C; Kress, G C; DeSpain, B; Duffy, R

    1998-01-01

    A panel of public health practitioners sponsored by the Health Resources and Services Administration met December 6-8, 1994, to examine current roles and responsibilities for dental public health workers and to recommend changes in education and training to meet challenges posed by an evolving health care system. Overall, at least the same number, if not more, dental public health personnel will be needed in the future. While some new roles were identified, the panel felt that only small numbers of personnel will be needed to fill these new roles. Not all of these roles necessarily require a dental degree. The panel felt that a need exists for more academicians for dental schools, schools of public health, dental public health residencies, and dental hygiene programs; oral epidemiologists and health services researchers; health educators; and specialists in utilization review/outcomes assessment, dental informatics, nutrition, program evaluation, and prevention. To meet these personnel needs: (1) dental public health residency programs should be structured to meet the educational needs of working public health dentists with MPH degrees through on-the-job residency programs; (2) the standards for advanced specialty education programs in dental public health should be made sufficiently flexible to include dentists who have advanced education and the requisite core public health courses; (3) flexible MPH degree programs must be available because of the rising debt of dental students and the decreased numbers of graduating dentists; (4) loan repayment should be available for dentists who have pursued public health training and are working in state or local health departments; and (5) standards for advanced education in dental public health should be developed for dental hygienists. PMID:9661106

  17. 21 CFR 868.5820 - Dental protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 false Dental protector. 868.5820...HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES...Therapeutic Devices § 868.5820 Dental protector. (a) Identification. A dental protector is a device...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5820 - Dental protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Dental protector. 868.5820...HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES...Therapeutic Devices § 868.5820 Dental protector. (a) Identification. A dental protector is a device...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5820 - Dental protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 false Dental protector. 868.5820...HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES...Therapeutic Devices § 868.5820 Dental protector. (a) Identification. A dental protector is a device...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5820 - Dental protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 false Dental protector. 868.5820...HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES...Therapeutic Devices § 868.5820 Dental protector. (a) Identification. A dental protector is a device...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5820 - Dental protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 false Dental protector. 868.5820...HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES...Therapeutic Devices § 868.5820 Dental protector. (a) Identification. A dental protector is a device...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...amalgam capsules containing mercury and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam material is intended for filling dental caries. (b) Classification. Class...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...amalgam capsules containing mercury and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam material is intended for filling dental caries. (b) Classification. Class...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3700 - Dental mercury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Prosthetic Devices § 872.3700 Dental mercury. (a) Identification. Dental mercury is a device composed of mercury intended for use as a component of amalgam alloy in the restoration of a dental cavity or a broken tooth....

  5. 21 CFR 872.6390 - Dental floss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6390 Dental floss. (a) Identification. Dental floss is a string-like device made of cotton or other fibers intended to remove plaque and food particles from between the teeth to...

  6. 21 CFR 872.6390 - Dental floss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6390 Dental floss. (a) Identification. Dental floss is a string-like device made of cotton or other fibers intended to remove plaque and food particles from between the teeth to...

  7. 21 CFR 872.6390 - Dental floss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6390 Dental floss. (a) Identification. Dental floss is a string-like device made of cotton or other fibers intended to remove plaque and food particles from between the teeth to...

  8. Dental care and instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Easley, J

    1998-08-01

    Equine dentistry is not just carpentry work that involves floating the sharp enamel points off cheek teeth. Although floating is the most common and essential part of equine dentistry, every horse deserves a complete veterinary dental examination on a regular basis. Without such an examination, the equine practitioner can not determine the corrective procedures needed inside the horse's mouth. Dentistry for all ages is covered. Necessary instruments for a complete oral examination are also discussed. PMID:9742666

  9. Translucency of dental porcelains.

    PubMed

    Brodbelt, R H; O'Brien, W J; Fan, P L

    1980-01-01

    The translucency of comparable shades of five dental porcelains was determined. Both direct transmittance and total transmittance were measured at wavelengths of 400-700 nm. For 1 mm of porcelain, the values for direct transmittance were low and averaged 0.13 percent, whereas the values for total transmittance averaged 26.8 percent. Transmittance increased with increasing incident wavelength. These results indicated a high degree of light scattering. PMID:6927988

  10. Obstacles to regular dental care related to extrinsic and intrinsic motivation.

    PubMed

    Syrjälä, A M; Knuuttila, M L; Syrjälä, L K

    1994-08-01

    The aim of this study was to test factors preventing regular dental care as put forward by persons who are extrinsically or intrinsically motivated in relation to dental care. The series consisted of 390 randomly selected young and middle-aged patients, 207 women and 183 men, visiting two occupational health centers in Oulu, Finland. Logistic regression analysis showed that the probability of being extrinsically motivated was greater among those who mentioned the purposelessness of brushing their teeth, lack of time, lack of interest, expense, laziness and failure to appreciate the seriousness of dental care as factors hindering regular dental care very much or somewhat. Thus extrinsically motivated persons seemed to propose superficial reasons and reasons related to non-appreciation of dental care more often than intrinsically motivated persons. PMID:7924243

  11. Fate of the Molar Dental Lamina in the Monophyodont Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Dosed?lová, Hana; Dumková, Jana; Lesot, Hervé; Glocová, Kristýna; Kunová, Michaela; Tucker, Abigail S.; Veselá, Iva; Krej?í, Pavel; Tichý, František; Hampl, Aleš; Buchtová, Marcela

    2015-01-01

    The successional dental lamina (SDL) plays an essential role in the development of replacement teeth in diphyodont and polyphyodont animals. A morphologically similar structure, the rudimental successional dental lamina (RSDL), has been described in monophyodont (only one tooth generation) lizards on the lingual side of the developing functional tooth. This rudimentary lamina regresses, which has been proposed to play a role in preventing the formation of future generations of teeth. A similar rudimentary lingual structure has been reported associated with the first molar in the monophyodont mouse, and we show that this structure is common to all murine molars. Intriguingly, a lingual lamina is also observed on the non-replacing molars of other diphyodont mammals (pig and hedgehog), initially appearing very similar to the successional dental lamina on the replacing teeth. We have analyzed the morphological as well as ultrastructural changes that occur during the development and loss of this molar lamina in the mouse, from its initiation at late embryonic stages to its disappearance at postnatal stages. We show that loss appears to be driven by a reduction in cell proliferation, down-regulation of the progenitor marker Sox2, with only a small number of cells undergoing programmed cell death. The lingual lamina was associated with the dental stalk, a short epithelial connection between the tooth germ and the oral epithelium. The dental stalk remained in contact with the oral epithelium throughout tooth development up to eruption when connective tissue and numerous capillaries progressively invaded the dental stalk. The buccal side of the dental stalk underwent keratinisation and became part of the gingival epithelium, while most of the lingual cells underwent programmed cell death and the tissue directly above the erupting tooth was shed into the oral cavity. PMID:26010446

  12. Fate of the molar dental lamina in the monophyodont mouse.

    PubMed

    Dosed?lová, Hana; Dumková, Jana; Lesot, Hervé; Glocová, Kristýna; Kunová, Michaela; Tucker, Abigail S; Veselá, Iva; Krej?í, Pavel; Tichý, František; Hampl, Aleš; Buchtová, Marcela

    2015-01-01

    The successional dental lamina (SDL) plays an essential role in the development of replacement teeth in diphyodont and polyphyodont animals. A morphologically similar structure, the rudimental successional dental lamina (RSDL), has been described in monophyodont (only one tooth generation) lizards on the lingual side of the developing functional tooth. This rudimentary lamina regresses, which has been proposed to play a role in preventing the formation of future generations of teeth. A similar rudimentary lingual structure has been reported associated with the first molar in the monophyodont mouse, and we show that this structure is common to all murine molars. Intriguingly, a lingual lamina is also observed on the non-replacing molars of other diphyodont mammals (pig and hedgehog), initially appearing very similar to the successional dental lamina on the replacing teeth. We have analyzed the morphological as well as ultrastructural changes that occur during the development and loss of this molar lamina in the mouse, from its initiation at late embryonic stages to its disappearance at postnatal stages. We show that loss appears to be driven by a reduction in cell proliferation, down-regulation of the progenitor marker Sox2, with only a small number of cells undergoing programmed cell death. The lingual lamina was associated with the dental stalk, a short epithelial connection between the tooth germ and the oral epithelium. The dental stalk remained in contact with the oral epithelium throughout tooth development up to eruption when connective tissue and numerous capillaries progressively invaded the dental stalk. The buccal side of the dental stalk underwent keratinisation and became part of the gingival epithelium, while most of the lingual cells underwent programmed cell death and the tissue directly above the erupting tooth was shed into the oral cavity. PMID:26010446

  13. Approaches to Arresting Dental Caries: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Puranik, Manjunath P.; K.R., Sowmya

    2015-01-01

    Background Dental caries is one of the most prevalent chronic oral diseases across the globe that can be both treated and prevented. Preventive management strategies can effectively arrest and even completely reverse the caries process. This article aimed to review the literature on different approaches explored towards arresting caries progression. Materials and Methods Literature search of publications in Pubmed/Medline was carried out. Total 73 articles including clinical trials, invitro studies, case reports and review articles were reviewed. Results Twenty-two clinical trials and invitro studies were selected for review. Most studies suggested use of Silver Diamine Fluoride (SDF) as simple and effective caries arresting approach. Fluoride varnish treatment effectively arrests caries by inhibiting demineralization, resulting in highly significant caries reductions. Arginine with an insoluble calcium compound enhances arresting and reversing buccal, coronal and root caries. A few clinical studies have shown that sealants placed in caries fissures can arrest the caries process. Conclusion Various fluoride containing agents are clinically effective in arresting progression of carious lesion. However, these materials should be used appropriately understanding their scope and limitations to arrest dental caries. PMID:26155592

  14. Health risk factors and health promoting behavior of medical, dental and nursing students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Reza Najem; Marian Rose Catherine Passannante; James D. Foster

    1995-01-01

    The assumption of this study is: the preventive care beliefs and practices of health science students stand-out among the general public. To test this assumption, a survey of beliefs, behaviors and disease prevention practices of medical, dental, undergraduate and graduate nursing students in three health science schools was carried out in New Jersey. All students in these three schools were

  15. Satisfaction with school dental service provided by mobile dental squads.

    PubMed

    Othman, Noormi; Razak, Ishak Abdul

    2010-10-01

    Feedback on satisfaction with dental care is vital for continuous improvement of the service delivery process and outcome. The objective of this study was to assess the satisfaction with school dental service (SDS) provided via mobile dental squads in Selangor, Malaysia, under 4 domains of satisfaction: patient-personnel interaction, technical competency, administrative efficiency, and clinic setup using self-administered questionnaires. Among the 607 participants who had received treatment, 62% were satisfied with the services provided. In terms of domains, technical competency achieved the highest satisfaction score, whereas clinic setup was ranked the lowest. As for items within the domains, the most acceptable was "dental operator did not ask personal things which were not dentally related," whereas privacy of treatment was the least acceptable. In conclusion, whereas children were generally satisfied with the SDS, this study indicates that there are still areas for further improvement. PMID:20462854

  16. Caregiver's education level and child's dental caries in African Americans: a path analytic study.

    PubMed

    Heima, Masahiro; Lee, Wonik; Milgrom, Peter; Nelson, Suchita

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of caregiver education level on children's dental caries mediated by both caregiver and child oral health behaviors. Participants were 423 low-income African American kindergarteners and their caregivers who were part of a school-based randomized clinical trial. Path analysis tested the hypothesis that caregiver education level affected untreated dental caries and cumulative overall caries experience (decayed or filled teeth) through the mediating influence of frequency of dental visits, use of routine care, and frequency of toothbrushing for both the caregiver and the child. The results supported the hypothesis: caregivers who completed high school were 1.76 times more likely to visit dentists compared with those who did not complete high school (e(0.56) = 1.76, 95% CI: 1.03-2.99), which in turn was associated with 5.78 times greater odds of dental visits among their children (e(1.76) = 5.78, 95% CI: 3.53-9.48). Children's dental visits, subsequently, were associated with 26% fewer untreated decayed teeth compared with children without dental visits (e(-0.31) = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.60-0.91). However, this path was not present in the model with overall caries experience. Additionally, caregiver education level was directly associated with 34% less untreated decayed teeth (e(-0.42) = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.54-0.79) and 28% less decayed or filled teeth (e(-0.32) = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.60-0.88) among the children. This study overcomes important conceptual and analytic limitations in the existing literature. The findings confirm the role of caregiver education in child dental caries and indicate that caregiver's behavioral factors are important mediators of child oral health. PMID:25661111

  17. Dental erosion in workers exposed to sulfuric acid in lead storage battery manufacturing facility.

    PubMed

    Suyama, Yuji; Takaku, Satoru; Okawa, Yoshikazu; Matsukubo, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Dental erosion, and specifically its symptoms, has long been studied in Japan as an occupational dental disease. However, in recent years, few studies have investigated the development of this disease or labor hygiene management aimed at its prevention. As a result, interest in dental erosion is comparatively low, even among dental professionals. Our investigation at a lead storage battery factory in 1991 found that the work environmental sulfuric acid density was above the tolerable range (1.0mg/m(3)) and that longterm workers had dental erosion. Therefore, workers handling sulfuric acid were given an oral examination and rates of dental erosion by tooth type, rates of erosion by number of working years and rates of erosion by sulfuric acid density in the work environment investigated. Where dental erosion was diagnosed, degree of erosion was identified according to a diagnostic criterion. No development of dental erosion was detected in the maxillary teeth, and erosion was concentrated in the anterior mandibular teeth. Its prevalence was as high as 20%. Rates of dental erosion rose precipitously after 10 working years. The percentages of workers with dental erosion were 42.9% for 10-14 years, 57.1% for 15-19 years and 66.7% for over 20 years with 22.5% for total number of workers. The percentages of workers with dental erosion rose in proportion to work environmental sulfuric acid density: 17.9% at 0.5-1.0, 25.0% at 1.0-4.0 and 50.0% at 4.0-8.0mg/m(3). This suggests that it is necessary to evaluate not only years of exposure to sulfuric acid but also sulfuric acid density in the air in factory workers. PMID:20689238

  18. Bioinspired design of dental multilayers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Huang; Rizhi Wang; V. Thompson; Dianne Rekow; Wole Soboyejo

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers the use of bioinspired func- tionally graded structures in the design of dental multi-layers that are more resistant to sub-surface crack nucleation. Unlike existing dental crown restorations that give rise to high stress concentration, the functionally graded layers (between crown materials and the joins that attach them to dentin) are shown to promote significant reductions in stress

  19. Stress analysis in dental prosthesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Merdji; B. Bachir Bouiadjra; T. Achour; B. Serier; B. Ould Chikh; Z. O. Feng

    2010-01-01

    Dental implant has been used and studied for the replacement of missing teeth for many years. It has been well known that the success of dental implant is heavily dependent on initial stability and long-term osseointegration due to optimal stress distribution in the surrounding bones. In this study, the 3D finite element analysis is used o study the stresses distribution

  20. Delta Dental PPO Plus Premier

    E-print Network

    Fraden, Seth

    Delta Dental PPO Plus Premier Deductible: $50 per individual / $150 per family. Deductible waived & Onlays Once per tooth. Emergency Dental Care 80% 80% Minor treatment for Pain Relief Three occurrences. Implants An Endosteal Implant is covered to replace one missing tooth (in lieu of a three unit bridge

  1. Dental Laboratory Technology Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard dental laboratory technology curriculum for both diploma programs and associate degree programs in technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level workers in the dental laboratory technology field. The general information section contains the…

  2. Dental Chairside Technique. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apfel, Maura; Weaver, Trudy Karlene

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: local anesthesia; dental office emergencies; oral hygiene;…

  3. Competition and dental services.

    PubMed

    Grytten, J; Sørensen, R

    2000-07-01

    Dental services for adults are different from all other Norwegian health services in that they are provided by private producers (dentists) who have full freedom to establish a practice. They have had this freedom since the end of World War II. A further liberalization of the market for dental services occurred in November 1995, when the so-called normal tariff was repealed. The system changed from a fixed fee system to a deregulated fee system. In principle, the market for dental services for adults operates as a free competitive market, in which dentists must compete for a market share. The aim of this study was to study the short-term effects of competition. A comprehensive set of data on fees, practice characteristics, treatment profiles and factors that dentists take into account when determining fees was analysed. The main finding was that competition has a weak effect. No support was found for the theory that the level of fees is the result of monopolistic competition or monopoly. The results also provided some evidence against the inducement hypothesis. At this stage, it is interesting to notice that dentists do not seem to exploit the power they have to control the market. One explanation, which is consistent with the more recent literature, is that physicians' behaviour to a large extent is influenced by professional norms and caring concerns about their patients. Financial incentives are important, but these incentives are constrained by norms other than self-interest. The interpretation of the results should also take into account that the deregulation has operated for a short time and that dentists and patients may not yet have adjusted to changes in the characteristics of the market. PMID:10903544

  4. Lasers In Dental Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everse, K. E.; Sinor, T. W.; Menzel, E. R.

    1987-01-01

    We have investigated the potential of lasers for real time in situ dental diagnosis via transillumination of teeth and gums and via fluorescence. Not surprisingly, absorption and/or scattering of light by teeth was found to be insensitive to light color. However, monochromatic transillumination revealed detail better than white light. Transillumination of gums was best performed with orange-red light because of tissue absorption. Illumination of oral structures by 488 nm Ar-laser light was effective in revealing diagnosis detail by fluorescence. Incipient caries and fine tooth fracture lines that are generally not revealed by radiography were observable by laser.

  5. The american dental dream.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Nathan

    2015-09-01

    The American Dental Dream-the cultural desire for straight, white teeth-is difficult, if not impossible, for poor and working-class people to achieve. Using ethnographic fiction, autoethnography, poetry, and qualitative interviewing, I brush away the taken-for-granted assumptions about teeth. I explore the personal, relational, and structural consequences of this cultural desire, and show how social class writes itself on our bodies. I write these culture-centered teeth tales to show how one might cope with their teeth. PMID:25257392

  6. Children's Dental Health | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hygiene practices such as thorough brushing with a fluoride toothpaste can help keep children from getting cavities. ... Fluoridation Nearly all naturally occurring water sources contain fluoride— a mineral that prevents tooth decay and even ...

  7. UnitedHealthcare dental plan Voluntary Options PPO/covered dental services P4935

    E-print Network

    Bordenstein, Seth

    UnitedHealthcare dental plan Voluntary Options PPO/covered dental services P4935 NON. Occlusal Guard:Covered only if prescribed to control habitual grinding, and limited to 1 guard every dental plan provides that where two or more professionally acceptable dental treatments for a dental

  8. The Academic Dental Careers Fellowship Program: A Pilot Program to Introduce Dental Students to Academia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James M. Rogér

    The Academic Dental Careers Fellowship Program (ADCFP) was established in 2006 by the American Dental Educa- tion Association (ADEA) and the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) with the financial support of the ADA Foundation to encourage dental students to consider careers in dental education and to provide participating fellows with insights into academic life. The ADA Foundation provided funding

  9. Prevalence of dental caries in primary and permanent teeth and its relation with tooth brushing habits among schoolchildren in Eastern Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Farooqi, Faraz A.; Khabeer, Abdul; Moheet, Imran A.; Khan, Soban Q.; Farooq, Imran; ArRejaie, Aws S.,

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of dental caries in the primary and permanent teeth, and evaluate the brushing habits of school children in Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Methods: This study was conducted at Dammam, KSA. Oral examination of the participants was conducted from February to May 2014. The total sample size for this cross-sectional study was 711. There were 397 children between the age of 6-9 years, who were examined for primary teeth caries, and 314 between the age 10-12 years were examined for permanent teeth caries. Primary and permanent dentitions were studied for decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmft [primary teeth], DMFT [permanent teeth]). Results: The overall prevalence of dental caries in primary and permanent teeth was almost 73% (n=711). Among the 6-9-year-old, the prevalence of caries was approximately 78% (n=397) whereas, among the 10-12-year-old children, it was approximately 68% (n=314). Mean dmft value among the 6-9-year-olds was 3.66±3.13 with decayed (d) component of 3.28±2.92, missing (m) component of 0.11±0.69, and filled (f) component of 0.26±0.9. Mean DMFT value among the 10-12-year-old children was 1.94±2.0 with decayed (D) component of 1.76±1.85, missing (M) component of 0.03±0.22, and filled (F) of component 0.15±0.73. Daily tooth brushing had a positive effect on caries prevention, and this effect was statistically significant for caries in primary teeth. Conclusion: Although the prevalence of dental caries in primary and permanent teeth was not found to be as high as other researchers reported from different cities of KSA, still the prevalence was high considering the World Health Organization future oral health goals. Awareness should be provided to students, as well as, teachers and parents regarding the importance of good brushing habits and regular dental visits. PMID:25987118

  10. Sugar Industry Influence on the Scientific Agenda of the National Institute of Dental Research’s 1971 National Caries Program: A Historical Analysis of Internal Documents

    PubMed Central

    Kearns, Cristin E.; Glantz, Stanton A.; Schmidt, Laura A.

    2015-01-01

    Background In 1966, the National Institute of Dental Research (NIDR) began planning a targeted research program to identify interventions for widespread application to eradicate dental caries (tooth decay) within a decade. In 1971, the NIDR launched the National Caries Program (NCP). The objective of this paper is to explore the sugar industry’s interaction with the NIDR to alter the research priorities of the NIDR NCP. Methods and Findings We used internal cane and beet sugar industry documents from 1959 to 1971 to analyze industry actions related to setting research priorities for the NCP. The sugar industry could not deny the role of sucrose in dental caries given the scientific evidence. They therefore adopted a strategy to deflect attention to public health interventions that would reduce the harms of sugar consumption rather than restricting intake. Industry tactics included the following: funding research in collaboration with allied food industries on enzymes to break up dental plaque and a vaccine against tooth decay with questionable potential for widespread application, cultivation of relationships with the NIDR leadership, consulting of members on an NIDR expert panel, and submission of a report to the NIDR that became the foundation of the first request for proposals issued for the NCP. Seventy-eight percent of the sugar industry submission was incorporated into the NIDR’s call for research applications. Research that could have been harmful to sugar industry interests was omitted from priorities identified at the launch of the NCP. Limitations are that this analysis relies on one source of sugar industry documents and that we could not interview key actors. Conclusions The NCP was a missed opportunity to develop a scientific understanding of how to restrict sugar consumption to prevent tooth decay. A key factor was the alignment of research agendas between the NIDR and the sugar industry. This historical example illustrates how industry protects itself from potentially damaging research, which can inform policy makers today. Industry opposition to current policy proposals—including a World Health Organization guideline on sugars proposed in 2014 and changes to the nutrition facts panel on packaged food in the US proposed in 2014 by the US Food and Drug Administration—should be carefully scrutinized to ensure that industry interests do not supersede public health goals. PMID:25756179

  11. Dental Education at the Crossroads--Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1995

    1995-01-01

    An Institute of Medicine study concerning dental education's future is summarized. Eight principles guiding the study are outlined, and findings/recommendations in each area (oral health status, dental education's mission, focus on health outcomes, research role, patient care, dental school's role in the university, accreditation, dental

  12. Airborne Microbial Contamination of Dental Units

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mansour R. Azari; Ali Ghadjari; Mohammad Reza Massoudi Nejad; Negar Faghih Nasiree

    Background: Occupational risk of dental personnel to microbial airborne contamination has been demonstrated through the increased prevalence of respiratory infections. The American Dental Association has suggested stringent protection for infectious agents present in dental aerosols. Materials and Methods: Occupational exposure of dentists to airborne microbial and mycological contamination in various locations of a dental school was monitored by sampling of

  13. Dental lab technology in the digital age.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, S M

    2001-01-01

    The "Information Age" is starting to have an impact on dental technology. Procera, Cerac and several other digital systems are commonly used by many technicians. Other systems are being developed and marketed. Computer Aided Design (CAD) can be used by dental technicians to create precise dental restorations. Solid modeling techniques can provide unique dental applications. PMID:11323954

  14. OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY DENTAL HYGIENE CARE FACILITY

    E-print Network

    will be treated as a re-care. Dental Hygiene Services Include: a. Medical history and blood pressure b. OralOLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY DENTAL HYGIENE CARE FACILITY CLINIC FEES Service 2010-2011 Fees 1. Dental cancer examination, dental and periodontal charting, periodontal assessment. c. Oral Health Education d

  15. UK Dental Care Certificate of Coverage

    E-print Network

    Hayes, Jane E.

    UK Dental Care Certificate of Coverage July 2013 ­ June 2014 www.mc.uky.edu/Dentistry/patients/ukdental.html #12;UK Dental Care Plans Certificate of Coverage Employee Benefit Booklet This Certificate is issued and administered by UK Dental Care plans, for persons who have selected the UK Dental Care plan benefit structure

  16. Delta Dental Program Highlights For Employees of

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    Delta Dental Program Highlights For Employees of The University of Oklahoma Basic Plan (PPO "Point-of-Service") This brochure provides a brief description of the most important features of your new Delta Dental dental benefits program. If you have more specific questions regarding your benefits, please contact Delta Dental

  17. Delta Dental PPO Easy, Friendly, Accessible

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Delta Dental PPO SM ­ Easy, Friendly, Accessible We're pleased to be your partner in maintaining great oral health. The Delta Dental PPO* plan makes it easy for you to find a dentist, and easy about enrolling with Delta Dental: E HL_PPO_2col #73286 (rev. 5/13) · Save money with a Delta Dental PPO

  18. [Dental anatomy of dogs].

    PubMed

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate dog teeth anatomy as animal model for study of etiopathogenesis of caries disease and physiological tooth wear in human. After examining the dog's dental system, following conclusions were drawn: the dog has 42 permanent teeth, which are distributed over the dental arches not equally, and so the upper dentition consists of 20, and the lower of 22 teeth. The largest are considered upper fourth premolar and lower first molars, which are called discordant teeth. Between discordant teeth and fangs a dog has an open bite, which is limited to the top and bottom conical crown premolar teeth. Thus, in the closed position of the jaws, behind this occlusion is limited by discordant teeth, just in contact are smaller in size two molars. Only large dog's molars in a valid comparison can be likened to human molars, which allows us to use them in an analog comparison between them with further study of the morphological features ensure durability short-crown teeth and their predisposition to caries. PMID:25617107

  19. Update on dental nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Chen, M-H

    2010-06-01

    Dental resin-composites are comprised of a photo-polymerizable organic resin matrix and mixed with silane-treated reinforcing inorganic fillers. In the development of the composites, the three main components can be modified: the inorganic fillers, the organic resin matrix, and the silane coupling agents. The aim of this article is to review recent studies of the development of dental nanocomposites and their clinical applications. In nanocomposites, nanofillers are added and distributed in a dispersed form or as clusters. For increasing the mineral content of the tooth, calcium and phosphate ion-releasing composites and fluoride-releasing nanocomposites were developed by the addition of DCPA-whiskers or TTCP-whiskers or by the use of calcium fluoride or kaolinite. For enhancing mechanical properties, nanocomposites reinforced with nanofibers or nanoparticles were investigated. For reducing polymerization shrinkage, investigators modified the resin matrix by using methacrylate and epoxy functionalized nanocomposites based on silsesquioxane cores or epoxy-resin-based nanocomposites. The effects of silanization were also studied. Clinical consideration of light-curing modes and mechanical properties of nanocomposites, especially strength durability after immersion, was also addressed. PMID:20299523

  20. The dental informatics online community.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Jeannie; Schleyer, Titus; Spallek, Heiko

    2010-01-01

    Dental Informatics (DI) is the application of computer and information science to improve dental practice, research, education, and program administration. To support the growth of this emerging discipline, we created the Dental Informatics Online Community (DIOC). The DIOC provides a dedicated professional home for DI researchers and serves as an open, common, and worldwide forum for all individuals interested in the field. It was created and is maintained by the Center for Dental Informatics at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, independent from any professional association, corporate interest or funding source. The DIOC's Website provides many useful features, such as a learning center, publication archive, member and project directories, and the Current Awareness Service (CAS). The CAS automatically notifies members about new information added to the Community. Notifications are individualized according to a member's profile and activities on the site. The DIOC is a research-oriented online community which provides resources in the dental informatics and dental technology field, as well as a way to establish social connections to share ideas, problems and research opportunities. Member and activity growth since the community's inception in 2005 have been steady, but future sustainability of the community depends on many factors. PMID:21364841

  1. Nanomaterials in preventive dentistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthias Hannig; Christian Hannig

    2010-01-01

    The prevention of tooth decay and the treatment of lesions and cavities are ongoing challenges in dentistry. In recent years, biomimetic approaches have been used to develop nanomaterials for inclusion in a variety of oral health-care products. Examples include liquids and pastes that contain nano-apatites for biofilm management at the tooth surface, and products that contain nanomaterials for the remineralization

  2. Dental insurance: a purchaser perspective.

    PubMed

    Pehacheck, P; Amundson, C

    2001-01-01

    Principals in a dental health purchasing organization report their views and those of interviewed purchasers on dental insurance packages. Purchasers make their decisions in a market context, balancing cost with employee benefits needed to attract qualified employees. While having a dental plan is important, the financial and coverage details are not usually scrutinized by employees. Issues of access and freedom from hassle are important considerations. There is growing cynicism among purchasers that dentists are driven by a profit motive and a desire for attractive work hours. PMID:11764633

  3. Rural dentistry: Is it an imagination or obligation in community dental health education?

    PubMed Central

    Dülgergil, Çoruh Türksel; Çolak, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    During the past two decades, epidemiologic studies in less developed or developing countries have clearly reported that caries prevalence shows the distinctive patterns over the word, even though it is declining in many developed countries. Due to huge rural districts where arrival is problematic and ineffective dental and preventive care centers in most suburban districts, there has been significant difference between the different parts of the communities to provide dental care service, and unfortunately the sole preventive measure has been limited with the advising of using the tooth brush and paste. The problems are usually arisen not only from the inadequacy of trained personnel but also from the absence of an effective economic and pragmatic system which aims to effectively dispense the dental service to all over the country. For this reason, the basic aim of dental care should be to carry out the many dental services in a multidisciplinary manner within the first appointment and to serve the people at their own homes and/or districts. Clearly, the needed multidisciplinary dental care system can lead to a new educational doctrine for rural dental practice. This versatile and practical training program based on specific perceived needs of a specific population(s) could need a new educational program. So, various preventive and/or restorative procedures included by this new doctrine could be named as “rural dentistry.” In this review, with the examples from the many in vivo studies carried out under rural conditions over the world, the probable practices in this specific dental doctrine have generally been exemplified. PMID:23271836

  4. TQM in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Harr, R

    2001-01-01

    Society now expects more from its doctors and dentists, and these increasing demands can be summed up in one relatively new term for the medical profession: "quality management" (QM). Doctors and dentists formerly took the view that their performance could be assessed solely on the basis of their technical skills, ethics and expertise, but are now confronted with a new social imperative, from outside the profession--quality management. The author, prize-winner of the European Quality Award 2000 describes his approach to introduce the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) Excellence Model in his dental practice. He shows that the EFQM model is well suited as a basis for a quality management system in healthcare. PMID:11436753

  5. Osseointegrated dental implants produced via microwave processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutty, Muralithran G.

    This research is a comprehensive effort to develop osseointegrated dental implants via microwave processing. A net-shape microwave sintering procedure was employed to fabricate dental implants. Commercial pure titanium powders (-100, -200 and -325 mesh sizes) were used in this work. This process eliminates the need for machining of implants and prevents contamination. The idea was to take advantage of the peculiar way microwave couple with metallic powders, i.e. generating heat in the interior of the sample and dissipating it away through the surface. The desired features for an implant, a dense core with surface pores, is not possible via conventional sintering. Coating with hydroxyapatite via electrodeposition and chemical combustion vapor deposition was also attempted to further enhance the bioactivity of this layer. Surface roughness and area were measured using a non-contact surface profilometer to further describe the unique surface. In-vitro studies, conducted using osteoblast cells extracted from neonatal rat calvarial, showed improved cell growth on all the uncoated porous samples. However, the highest cell growth was observed on the -200 mesh size samples. The higher surface area of the -200 mesh samples is attributed to this observation. This work was able to identify the processing parameters for titanium in microwave and establishes the importance of surface area as a key parameter for cell growth on porous surfaces as compared to surface roughness.

  6. Oral Health Status and Behaviour of Mauritians Visiting Private Dental Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunsam, P. Pugo; Banka, S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to assess the oral health status and behaviour of a sample of the Mauritian population visiting private dental clinics. Design/methodology/approach: Oral health status was determined using the World Health Organization (Decayed, Missing, Filled Teeth (DMFT) index indicating the prevalence of caries, and factors associated…

  7. Dental Health: The Basic Facts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... you (keep in mind that persons who use wheelchairs may need other types of assistance as well) ... accessibledentistry.html > Accessible dentistry for persons who use wheelchairs > Consumer tips > Resources advocating accessible dental care > Architectural ...

  8. Surface texture measurement for dental wear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, R. S.; Mullen, F.; Bartlett, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    The application of surface topography measurement and characterization within dental materials science is highly active and rapidly developing, in line with many modern industries. Surface measurement and structuring is used extensively within oral and dental science to optimize the optical, tribological and biological performance of natural and biomimetic dental materials. Although there has historically been little standardization in the use and reporting of surface metrology instrumentation and software, the dental industry is beginning to adopt modern areal measurement and characterization techniques, especially as the dental industry is increasingly adopting digital impressioning techniques in order to leverage CAD/CAM technologies for the design and construction of dental restorations. As dental treatment becomes increasingly digitized and reliant on advanced technologies such as dental implants, wider adoption of standardized surface topography and characterization techniques will become evermore essential. The dental research community welcomes the advances that are being made in surface topography measurement science towards realizing this ultimate goal.

  9. 38 CFR 17.163 - Posthospital outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. 17.163 Section 17...Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.163 Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. The Chief, Dental...

  10. 38 CFR 17.163 - Posthospital outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. 17.163 Section 17...Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.163 Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. The Chief, Dental...

  11. 38 CFR 17.163 - Posthospital outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. 17.163 Section 17...Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.163 Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. The Chief, Dental...

  12. 21 CFR 872.2050 - Dental sonography device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental sonography device. 872.2050 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.2050 Dental sonography device. (a) Dental...

  13. 38 CFR 17.163 - Posthospital outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. 17.163 Section 17...Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.163 Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. The Chief, Dental...

  14. 21 CFR 872.2050 - Dental sonography device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental sonography device. 872.2050 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.2050 Dental sonography device. (a) Dental...

  15. 38 CFR 17.163 - Posthospital outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. 17.163 Section 17...Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.163 Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. The Chief, Dental...

  16. 21 CFR 872.2050 - Dental sonography device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental sonography device. 872.2050 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.2050 Dental sonography device. (a) Dental...

  17. 21 CFR 872.2050 - Dental sonography device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental sonography device. 872.2050 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.2050 Dental sonography device. (a) Dental...

  18. 21 CFR 872.2050 - Dental sonography device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental sonography device. 872.2050 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.2050 Dental sonography device. (a) Dental...

  19. Survey on awareness and perceptions of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw in dental hygienists in Seoul.

    PubMed

    Mah, Y-J; Kang, G-Y; Kim, S-J

    2015-08-01

    We investigated awareness in dental hygienists of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) in patients with osteoporosis and cancer and assessed the situation in systemic history investigations to broaden the scope of the dental hygienists' BRONJ awareness as a basis for contributing to preventing this disease. The study was carried out through a survey; 217 dental hygienists responded to the survey. They worked at 12 university and general hospitals, 10 dental hospitals and 35 dental clinics, for a total of 57 institutions in Seoul. The survey consisted of 37 questions: general characteristics (J Oral Maxillofac Surg 65: 2007; 369), systemic history investigations (Ruggiero et al. J Oral Maxillofac Surg 62: 2004; 527) and awareness of BRONJ (Park et al. J Korean Dent Assoc 49: 2011; 389). Among them, 79.7% were aware of BRONJ. Recognition was highest among those from 25 to 35 years old (P < 0.05). In terms of work experience, those with 5-10 years experience showed the highest awareness (P < 0.05). In terms of institutions type, dental clinics showed lower awareness than general and dental hospitals (P < 0.05). It was found that 55.3% of the dental hygienists had been educated about BRONJ. Those aged 25-35 years were the most educated. In terms of institutions, dental clinic staff were the least educated. The degree of understanding about BRONJ was analysed with the average score of 6.14 points. According to these results, dental hygienists working in university hospitals and general hospitals had more opportunity to receive training than those working in dental clinics. Thus, it is considered that the development of professional training programs about BRONJ for all dental hygienists is necessary. PMID:25677614

  20. Prevalence of Dental Caries in the Municipality Gorazde During the Period 2007-2012

    PubMed Central

    Deljo, Emsudina; Cavaljuga, Semra; Meskovic, Belma

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Dental caries today, regardless of known multi causal etiology of the disease and the possibility of its effective prevention still represents the most widespread disease of our civilization, which affects about 95% of our population. It affects all populations and age groups and is a disease that is very difficult to completely eradicate due to a complex interaction of biological factors, eating habits, social status Etc. Goal: Goal is to report the prevalence of dental caries, DMFT-index and DMFT index in the first and seventh grades of grammar school in the municipality Gorazde during the last six years. Material and methods: Children, which have yet to enroll in school and in the seventh grade children, have required medical examinations. A total of 1198 first grade and 1666 seventh-grade students are included. To determine the prevalence of dental caries DMFT was used. Examinations are carried out in accordance with the methodology and criteria of the WHO, by a dental mirror and dental probe. Results: The prevalence of dental caries is extremely high as well as the values of DMFT index in the first and seventh grades in the municipality Gorazde. Conclusion: In practice it is necessary to introduce prevention programs for pregnant women, toddlers, preschool and school-aged children with a wider use of the mass media. PMID:24167427

  1. Effect of year of study on stress levels in male undergraduate dental students

    PubMed Central

    Alzahem, Abdullah M; Van der Molen, Henk T; De Boer, Benjamin J

    2013-01-01

    Objective Stress among dental students can be a significant threat, resulting in physical and/or mental illness, and have a negative effect on students’ performance and the professional practice of dentistry. Stress can occur from different sources. The purpose of this study is to test whether the year of study has an effect on the stress levels of dental students. Method Our study consisted of a cross-sectional survey using a modified version of the Dental Environment Stress (DES) questionnaire. The questionnaires were filled out by male undergraduate dental students at King Saud University in Riyadh City during the 2010–2011 academic year (n = 214). Results The results show the most common sources of stress: examinations and completing clinical requirements. Moreover, in the five-year lecture-based traditional curriculum, the third year students reported the highest level of stress, whereas the first year reported the lowest level of stress. Conclusion Third year undergraduate dental students reported the highest level of stress. This stress could be reduced by reviewing and modifying the dental curriculum by allowing students to have contact with patients more gradually, starting from the first year, in addition to adding stress prevention and intervention programs in dental curricula. PMID:24159265

  2. Cutaneous sinus tract of dental origin in children-a report of 28 new cases.

    PubMed

    Bodner, Lipa; Manor, Esther; Joshua, Ben Zion; Barabas, Jozsef; Szabo, George

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the characteristics of cutaneous sinus tract (CST) of dental origin in children. 28 cases of CST of dental origin in children were evaluated. Age, sex, site of skin lesion, duration until diagnosis, teeth involved, etiology, treatment, and outcome were recorded. The last dental care visit was also recorded. The mean age was 10.25 years (range 4-16). The male to female ratio was 1:1.74. The mandibular-submandibular area was the most common site of skin lesions. The mandibular first molar was the most involved tooth, followed by the mandibular incisor. Caries was the most common etiology. The mean duration of lesions until correct diagnosis was 6.5 months (range 0.3-12 mos). The treatment was root canal therapy or extraction. After appropriate dental treatment, CSTs resolve rapidly. Surgical revision of the scars were indicated in eight (29%) patients, to provide better cosmetic results. In these patients, the duration of lesions were longer. Preventive dental care, as indicated by last dental care visit, was poor. CST in children is different from that in adults in terms of sites of skin lesions, duration of lesions, and involved tooth and similar to that in adults in terms of etiology and treatment modality. Early treatment of the dental infection may cause healing of the cutaneous lesion spontaneously, without a scar. PMID:22329589

  3. Comparative Effectiveness Study to Assess Two Examination Modalities Used to Detect Dental Caries in Preschool Urban Children

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: Dental caries affecting the primary dentition of U.S. children continues to be the most prevalent chronic childhood disease. Preventive screening for dental caries in toddlers by dental professionals is labor-intensive and costly. Studies are warranted to examine innovative screening modalities that reduce cost, are less labor-intensive, and have the potential to identify caries in high-risk children. Subjects and Methods: Two hundred ninety-one children were randomized into two groups: Group 1 received a traditional, visual tactile examination initially and follow up-examinations at 6 and 12 months, and Group 2 received a teledentistry examination initially and follow-up examinations at 6 and 12 months. The mean primary tooth decayed and filled surfaces (dfs) scores were calculated for all children at baseline and 6 and 12 months. Results: At baseline, the mean dfs score for children examined by means of teledentistry was 2.19, and for the children examined by means of the traditional method, the mean was 1.27; the means were not significantly different. At the 12-month examination, the mean dfs score for the children examined by means of teledentistry was 3.02, and for the children examined by means of the clinical method, the mean dfs was 1.70; the means were not significantly different. At 12 months the mean fillings score for the children examined by means of teledentistry was 1.43 and for the children examined by means of the clinical method was 0.51; the means were statistically significantly different (p<0.001). Conclusions: These results suggest that the teledentistry examinations were comparable to clinical examinations when screening for early childhood caries in preschool children. The data further showed that color printouts of teeth with cavities provided to parents of children who received teledentistry screenings promoted oral healthcare utilization, as children from the teledentistry study group received more dental care than children from the clinical study group. PMID:24053114

  4. Cerebrovascular Accident Under Anesthesia During Dental Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Mathew; Cuddy, Michael A.; Farr, Brad; Moore, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke, or cerebrovascular accident (CVA), is a medical emergency that may lead to permanent neurological damage, complications, and death. The rapid loss of brain function due to disruption of the blood supply to the brain is caused by blockage (thrombosis, arterial embolism) or hemorrhage. The incidence of CVA during anesthesia for noncardiac nonvascular surgery is as high as 1% depending on risk factors. Comprehensive preoperative assessment and good perioperative management may prevent a CVA. However, should an ischemic event occur, appropriate and rapid management is necessary to minimize the deleterious effects caused to the patient. This case report describes a patient who had an ischemic CVA while under general anesthesia for dental alveolar surgery and discusses the anesthesia management. PMID:24932981

  5. [Adherence to oral hygiene and dental self-care].

    PubMed

    Poplinger, A

    2010-04-01

    Nearly every person will be in need of dental treatment in his lifetime, whether purely for health causes or alternately for esthetic issues. Yet the main reasons of seeking dental treatment are in fact Caries, Gingivitis and Periodontitis. In spite of the fact that these pathologies occur due to the accumulation of Plaque around the oral cavity and teeth, they are fairly easy to prevent. Using simple techniques such as oral rinsing, flossing and brushing of the teeth, are normally sufficient for obtaining good oral health. If this is actually the case, than how is it that we are witnessing a massive spread of dental problems? How come there are so many incidents of people suffering from dental problems if the preventative care is that easy to manage? The answer lies in the concept of Adherence, referring to the cooperation of an individual with the demands of his treatment regime and the dental staff. The idea of promoting health adherence aims mainly for using medication, attending the periodic inspections and examination, and making lifestyle changes such as preventive care illustrated above. This article exemplifies how one of the current trends in Medical Psychology discipline is to enhance adherence by establishing a secure therapeutic alliance which is based upon a positive relationship between the patient and his doctor, increasing patient's confidence and sense of self-efficacy, and recruiting family members and friends to the patient's process of change. A distinctive emphasis is put on expanding the patient's knowledge about his condition, and raising awareness to the linkage between his medical (to be more specific-dental) problem and its symptoms to the implications. The most modish and putative intervention nowadays is Patient Centered, where the guiding principles used are urging the patient to be responsible for implying the treatment regime, taking active participation, and make decisions regarding his current and future status. This article illustrates, through a comprehensive literature review of theories, models and researches, the contemporary methods for promoting adherence to oral hygiene, dental Self-Care and treatment. Using the combination of a survey from a select sample of specialists in the field of Dentistry, and the conclusions inferred from studies reviewed, I was able to determine how investment in the Bio-Psycho-Social approach would improve patient satisfaction from their doctors and outcomes of the treatment, shorten the duration of treatment, consume only little resources, improve dental health of patients and prevent repetitive visits to the dentists clinics. At the same time, despite the fact that dentistry practitioners acknowledge the importance of patient's adherence and take active measures such as talks, praises, guidance and providing information, most of them don't seem to comprehend interfusion of family members or friends as an integral part of the treatment. Moreover, their overall feeling is of incompetence when regarding dealing with un-adherent patients. Therefore, maybe there is room for providing dentists and staff with seminars, conventions etc. about the latest novelties on the subject. In conclusion, enhancing dental patient's adherence to health behavior is a domain mainly under the responsibility of the dentist, but also of his staff. As elaborated in the article, the measures for doing so are: 1. Information- the dentist should guide patients about the different methods for maintaining oral hygiene, explain how proper adherence benefits positive treatment outcome, and provide a broad and informative picture of the patient's specific problem. 2. Positive rapport - the need for establishing a good relationship between the doctor and his patients is crucial for attaining effective and satisfactory treatment outcomes. No doubt that this matter depends upon the personality and character of both the doctor and the patient, but using positive verbal reinforcements, symbolic incentives (such as free toothpaste samples), support throughout the treatment, sharing the rati

  6. A review of the dental caries status of ethnic minority children in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shinan; Lo, Edward Chin Man; Liu, Juan; Chu, Chun Hung

    2015-02-01

    China has 55 ethnic minority groups comprised of 113 million persons, or 7.0% of total population. Dental caries is a major health problem for children in China, and national oral health surveys currently report dental caries based on geographical location rather than by ethnic group. This study reviews the literature on dental caries in ethnic minority children in China. Publications were retrieved in Chinese and English from five electronic databases; thirty-eight studies from 1983 to 2012 met inclusion criteria and described 25 ethnic minority groups. Primary dentition median caries prevalence and experience were higher (51% and dmft = 3.0, respectively) than permanent dentition caries prevalence and experience (39% and DMFT = 0.8). Median caries prevalence was highest (80%) for permanent dentition among aggregated ethnic minorities with population greater than 1 million. More work and research is needed to expand dental caries prevention and treatment measures for ethnic minority child populations in China. PMID:24057753

  7. Utilization of xylitol as a preventive substance in dentistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roberto de Magalhães Bastos; Lucilene Sanches; Cirilo da Cunha; Ricardo Henrique; Alves da Silva; Fabíola Elias; Hilton José Gurgel Rodrigues

    Dental caries is an infectious-contagious disease of multifactorial origin, which requires interference in one or more of its etiologic factors for prevention. Within this context, the utilization of xylitol is highlighted, which was initially studied as a sugar substitute because of its similarity as regards the sweetening power and later was also employed in other forms for caries prevention and

  8. Nutritional Disorders of Children. Prevention, Screening, and Followup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fomon, Samuel J.

    Intended for child health care providers, the text contains information on improving preventive efforts in nutrition, particurlarly those focused on prevention of the major health problems which are nutrition related (obesity, atherosclerosis, dental caries, and anemia). Part I focuses on screening of individual children likely to be at risk of…

  9. Impact of a risk management plan on Legionella contamination of dental unit water.

    PubMed

    Leoni, Erica; Dallolio, Laura; Stagni, Francesca; Sanna, Tiziana; D'Alessandro, Giovanni; Piana, Gabriela

    2015-03-01

    The study aimed to assess the prevalence of Legionella spp. in dental unit waterlines of a dental clinic and to verify whether the microbiological parameters used as indicators of water quality were correlated with Legionella contamination. A risk management plan was subsequently implemented in the dental health care setting, in order to verify whether the adopted disinfection protocols were effective in preventing Legionella colonization. The water delivered from syringes and turbines of 63 dental units operating in a dental clinic, was monitored for counts of the heterotrophic bacteria P. aeruginosa and Legionella spp. (22 °C and 37 °C). At baseline, output water from dental units continuously treated with disinfection products was more compliant with the recommended standards than untreated and periodically treated water. However, continuous disinfection was still not able to prevent contamination by Legionella and P. aeruginosa. Legionella was isolated from 36.4%, 24.3% and 53.3% of samples from untreated, periodically and continuously treated waterlines, respectively. The standard microbiological parameters used as indicators of water quality proved to be unreliable as predictors of the presence of Legionella, whose source was identified as the tap water used to supply the dental units. The adoption of control measures, including the use of deionized water in supplying the dental unit waterlines and the application of a combined protocol of continuous and periodic disinfection, with different active products for the different devices, resulted in good control of Legionella contamination. The efficacy of the measures adopted was mainly linked to the strict adherence to the planned protocols, which placed particular stress on staff training and ongoing environmental monitoring. PMID:25711357

  10. Dental hard tissue characterization using laser-based ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, David W.; Massey, Ward L.

    2003-07-01

    Dental health care and research workers require a means of imaging the structures within teeth in vivo. One critical need is the detection of tooth decay in its early stages. If decay can be detected early enough, the process can be monitored and interventional procedures, such as fluoride washes and controlled diet, can be initiated to help re-mineralize the tooth. Currently employed x-ray imaging is limited in its ability to visualize interfaces and incapable of detecting decay at a stage early enough to avoid invasive cavity preparation followed by a restoration. To this end, non-destructive and non-contact in vitro measurements on extracted human molars using laser-based ultrasonics are presented. Broadband ultrasonic waves are excited in the extracted sections by using a pulsed carbon-dioxide (CO2) laser operating in a region of high optical absorption in the dental hard tissues. Optical interferometric detection of the ultrasonic wave surface displacements in accomplished with a path-stabilized Michelson-type interferometer. Results for bulk and surface in-vitro characterization of caries are presented on extracted molars with pre-existing caries.

  11. Transmission of Microorganisms from Dentists to Dental Laboratory Technicians through Contaminated Dental Impressions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonas Junevicius; Alvydas Pavilonis; Algimantas Surna

    SUMMARY During dental procedures, dentists and their assistants, dental laboratory technicians and their assistants may be exposed to a wide variety of microorganisms in the blood, saliva, and oral cavity of the patients. These microorganisms may cause various air-borne and blood borne infections. The efficient infection control procedures in the dental office and the dental laboratory are not sufficiently used,

  12. 1274 Journal of Dental Education Volume 73, Number 11 Dental Students' Preparation and Study

    E-print Network

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    , Department of Bio- medical Sciences, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, School of Dental Medicine. Direct1274 Journal of Dental Education Volume 73, Number 11 Dental Students' Preparation and Study Habits for the National Board Dental Examination Part I Nathan Hawley, B.A.; Devin Johnson, D.M.D.; Keith

  13. School of Dental Medicine Academic Policy Approved by Dental Council, April 10, 2001

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    School of Dental Medicine Academic Policy Approved by Dental Council, April 10, 2001 GENERAL OBJECTIVES The School of Dental Medicine aims to graduate broadly competent general practitioners of dental be able to gather data required to formulate a medical and oral health risk assessment, and a diagnosis

  14. Eagles Direct Reimbursement Dental our dental plan is based on a calendar year. That means your

    E-print Network

    Pilyugin, Sergei S.

    Title Dental Eagles Direct Reimbursement Dental Y our dental plan is based on a calendar year. That means your benefits run from January 1 to December 31 each year. This dental plan pays by a dollar tier of your choice. · The only exclusions are implants and cosmetic dentistry such as teeth bleaching

  15. Experiences of Dental Care and Dental Anxiety in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Dahllöf, Göran; Bejerot, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Dental anxiety is associated with previous distressing dental experiences, such as lack of understanding of the dentist intentions, perceptions of uncontrollability and experiences of pain during dental treatment. People with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are impaired in building flexible predictions and expectations, which is very much needed during a dental visit. The aims of the study were to investigate if people with ASD have more negative dental experiences and a higher level of dental anxiety compared to a matched control group. Forty-seven adults with ASD and of normal intellectual performance, and 69 age- and sex-matched typically developing controls completed questionnaires on previous dental experiences and dental anxiety, the Dental Anxiety Scale, and the Dental Beliefs Survey. The ASD group experienced pain during dental treatments more often than the controls and 22% had repeatedly experienced being forced to dental treatment they were not prepared for, compared to 3% of the controls. A higher level of dental anxiety was reported by the ASD group. Dental treatment and methods for supporting the communication with patients with ASD need to be developed, in order to reduce the negative dental experiences and dental anxiety in people with ASD. PMID:25530879

  16. A Dental School Sponsored, Pre-Paid Dental Plan for College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Paula K,

    1992-01-01

    Boston University (Massachusetts) developed and marketed a dental care plan to three colleges and universities in the Boston area. After 5 academic years of operation, the dental program has 16 institutional affiliates, increased its patient pool by almost 1,500, generated substantial revenue, and exposed dental students to an alternative dental

  17. 42 CFR 410.24 - Limitations on services of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine. 410.24 Section 410.24 Public...of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine. Medicare Part B pays for services...by a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine within the scope of his or her...

  18. Probiotics for preventive health.

    PubMed

    Minocha, Anil

    2009-01-01

    Gut flora and probiotics have potential to affect health and disease far beyond the gut. There is increasing evidence that probiotics have beneficial effects in preventing a wide range of conditions and improving health. Randomized, double-blind studies have provided evidence of the effectiveness of probiotics for preventing various diarrheal illnesses as well as allergic disorders. Evidence for their efficacy for use in the prevention and treatment of bacterial vaginosis and urinary tract infections is also mounting. In addition, probiotics may be useful for preventing respiratory infections, dental caries, necrotizing enterocolitis, and certain aspects of inflammatory bowel disease. Data also suggest that probiotics may promote good health in day care and work settings, and may enhance growth in healthy as well as ill and malnourished children. Results from meta-analyses and systematic reviews that combine results of studies from different types of probiotics to examine the effects in any disease state should be interpreted with caution. Specific strains are effective in specific disease states. No 2 probiotics are exactly alike; we should not expect reproducible results from studies that employ different species or strains, variable formulations, and diverse dosing schedules. PMID:19321897

  19. Factors involved in dental surgery fires: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    VanCleave, Andrea M; Jones, James E; McGlothlin, James D; Saxen, Mark A; Sanders, Brian J; Walker, LaQuia A

    2014-01-01

    Surgical fires are well-characterized, readily preventable, potentially devastating operating room catastrophes that continue to occur from 20 to 100 times per year or, by one estimate, up to 600 times per year in US operating rooms, sometimes with fatal results. The most significant risk factors for surgical fires involve (a) the use of an ignition source, such as laser or electrocautery equipment, in or around an oxygen-enriched environment in the head, neck, and upper torso area and (b) the concurrent delivery of supplemental oxygen, especially via nasal cannula. Nonetheless, while these 2 conditions occur very commonly in dental surgery, especially in pediatric dental surgery where sedation and anesthesia are regularly indicated, there is a general absence of documented dental surgical fires in the literature. Barring the possibility of underreporting for fear of litigation, this may suggest that there is another mechanism or mechanisms present in dental or pediatric dental surgery that mitigates this worst-case risk of surgical fires. Some possible explanations for this include: greater fire safety awareness by dental practitioners, incidental ventilation of oxygen-enriched environments in patient oral cavities due to breathing, or suction used by dental practitioners during procedures. This review of the literature provides a background to suggest that the practice of using intraoral suction in conjunction with the use of supplemental oxygen during dental procedures may alter the conditions needed for the initiation of intraoral fires. To date, there appear to be no published studies describing the ability of intraoral suctioning devices to alter the ambient oxygen concentration in an intraoral environment. In vivo models that would allow examination of intraoral suction on the ambient oxygen concentration in a simulated intraoral environment may then provide a valuable foundation for evaluating the safety of current clinical dental surgical practices, particularly in regard to the treatment of children. PMID:24697822

  20. Factors Involved In Dental Surgery Fires: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    VanCleave, Andrea M.; Jones, James E.; McGlothlin, James D.; Saxen, Mark A.; Sanders, Brian J.; Walker, LaQuia A.

    2014-01-01

    Surgical fires are well-characterized, readily preventable, potentially devastating operating room catastrophes that continue to occur from 20 to 100 times per year or, by one estimate, up to 600 times per year in US operating rooms, sometimes with fatal results. The most significant risk factors for surgical fires involve (a) the use of an ignition source, such as laser or electrocautery equipment, in or around an oxygen-enriched environment in the head, neck, and upper torso area and (b) the concurrent delivery of supplemental oxygen, especially via nasal cannula. Nonetheless, while these 2 conditions occur very commonly in dental surgery, especially in pediatric dental surgery where sedation and anesthesia are regularly indicated, there is a general absence of documented dental surgical fires in the literature. Barring the possibility of underreporting for fear of litigation, this may suggest that there is another mechanism or mechanisms present in dental or pediatric dental surgery that mitigates this worst-case risk of surgical fires. Some possible explanations for this include: greater fire safety awareness by dental practitioners, incidental ventilation of oxygen-enriched environments in patient oral cavities due to breathing, or suction used by dental practitioners during procedures. This review of the literature provides a background to suggest that the practice of using intraoral suction in conjunction with the use of supplemental oxygen during dental procedures may alter the conditions needed for the initiation of intraoral fires. To date, there appear to be no published studies describing the ability of intraoral suctioning devices to alter the ambient oxygen concentration in an intraoral environment. In vivo models that would allow examination of intraoral suction on the ambient oxygen concentration in a simulated intraoral environment may then provide a valuable foundation for evaluating the safety of current clinical dental surgical practices, particularly in regard to the treatment of children. PMID:24697822

  1. National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

    MedlinePLUS

    ... High School and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Careers Job Openings Careers in Dental Research Loan Repayment Programs NIH Loan Repayment Programs ...

  2. Curricular Guidelines for Teaching Dental Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okeson, Jeffrey; Buckman, James

    1981-01-01

    Guidelines developed by the Section on Dental Anatomy and Occlusion of the American Association of Dental Schools for use by individual educational institutions as curriculum development aids are provided. (MLW)

  3. [Websites of dental practices evaluated].

    PubMed

    Poorterman, J H G; Tjiook, S P; Moeijes, S F S; Brand, H S

    2014-05-01

    In 2013, a dental practice without a website is almost unthinkable. Using a sample of309 dentists drawn from the list of members of the Dutch Dental Association in 2012, a study was carried out to find out whether the dental practice of the general dental practitioner had a website. The content of each website was subsequently inventoried using a questionnaire. Eighty-nine percent of the dental practices had a website. The content of the websites, however, varied enormously. An element such as the professional registration number with a reference to the professional register were absent in 73% of the websites and the date of the most recent update of the website was mentioned only once. The name of the dentist, his or her professional qualification and an email address were missing on respectively 9%, 20% and 9% of the websites. Contracts of the practice with insurance companies were rarely clearly indicated. The websites of many practices would benefit considerably from a significant improvement. PMID:24881254

  4. Sedation in Japanese dental schools.

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Zac; Sano, Kimito; Fujii, Kazuyuki; Kanri, Tomio

    2004-01-01

    There is very little information about the practice of sedation in Japan. Despite the remarkable advances in dentistry, fear and anxiety continue to be significant deterrents for seeking dental services. Most dental procedures can fortunately be undertaken with the aid of sedation. A comprehensive survey of all the dental schools in Japan was carried out to determine what sedation practices were used in Japan. All 29 dental schools in Japan possessed a dedicated department of anesthesiology at the time of this survey. The survey attempted to determine the specific sedation methods (techniques, routes of administration, and agents used in sedation) as well as practices (monitoring, fasting, location, education, and fees involved in sedation). The results indicate that there was a broad range in sedation practices. The Japanese Dental Society of Anesthesiology may wish to examine the findings of this study and may wish to formulate guidelines appropriate for the practice of sedation in Japan. Others may also wish to compare their own practices with those of Japan. PMID:15497299

  5. Health literacy, acculturation, and the use of preventive oral health care by Somali refugees living in massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Geltman, Paul L; Hunter Adams, Jo; Penrose, Katherine L; Cochran, Jennifer; Rybin, Denis; Doros, Gheorghe; Henshaw, Michelle; Paasche-Orlow, Michael

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the impact of English health literacy and spoken proficiency and acculturation on preventive dental care use among Somali refugees in Massachusetts. 439 adult Somalis in the US ?10 years were interviewed. English functional health literacy, dental word recognition, and spoken proficiency were measured using STOFHLA, REALD, and BEST Plus. Logistic regression tested associations of language measures with preventive dental care use. Without controlling for acculturation, participants with higher health literacy were 2.0 times more likely to have had preventive care (P = 0.02). Subjects with higher word recognition were 1.8 times as likely to have had preventive care (P = 0.04). Controlling for acculturation, these were no longer significant, and spoken proficiency was not associated with increased preventive care use. English health literacy and spoken proficiency were not associated with preventive dental care. Other factors, like acculturation, were more predictive of care use than language skills. PMID:23748902

  6. Micro-educational opportunities in outreach clinical dental education.

    PubMed

    Radford, D R; Weld, J A

    2013-10-01

    Outreach education at the University of Portsmouth Dental Academy is providing a valuable platform to offer students 'micro-educational opportunities'. Some of these are highly innovative experiences, which allow senior students across the dental team to take short periods of time away from the clinic to broaden their life experience. The maturity of senior students generates a significant added-value to their educational experiences with minimal loss of clinical time. Another important outcome, which echoes the Marmot review on Health Inequalities (2010), is the population of the City of Portsmouth, particularly the socially deprived, gain better access to oral health advice, prevention and treatment. Our experience suggests these opportunities enhance the undergraduate experience, equipping our new colleagues for a professional life in a changing and challenging environment. PMID:24157758

  7. An Anthropological Perspective: Another Dimension to Modern Dental Wear Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Kaidonis, John A.; Ranjitkar, Sarbin; Lekkas, Dimitra; Townsend, Grant C.

    2012-01-01

    For many years, research on tooth wear by dental academics has been diametrically opposite to that of anthropological research, with each discipline having a different understanding as to the nature of the wear processes. Dental focus revolved around preventive and restorative considerations while the anthropological focus was a biological understanding related to human evolution, diet, environment, form, and function and included all the craniofacial structures. Introducing the anthropological perspective into modern dentistry gives an insight into the “bigger picture” of the nature and extent of tooth wear. By combining anthropological evidence with clinical knowledge and experience, it is most likely to provide the best-informed and biologically based approach to the management of tooth wear in modern societies. PMID:23304146

  8. 78 FR 32126 - VA Dental Insurance Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ...contract with a private dental insurer to offer dental insurance coverage to...veterans who are eligible for medical care under 38 U.S...are 64.009 Veterans Medical Care Benefits and 64.011 Veterans Dental Care. Signing...

  9. MEDICAL/ DENTAL/ VISION OPEN ENROLLMENT / CHANGE FORM

    E-print Network

    New Mexico, University of

    MEDICAL/ DENTAL/ VISION OPEN ENROLLMENT / CHANGE FORM Visit hr effective July 1, 2014. UNM Medical Plan Third Party Administrator Election Dental Plan Election Vision Plan Type of Coverage for each Enrollee Spouse Add Remove Medical Dental Vision Child Add Remove Medical

  10. First-Aid Algorithms in Dental Avulsion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baginska, Joanna; Wilczynska-Borawska, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    Almost one fourth of traumatic dental injuries occur at schools or in their surroundings. Prevalence of tooth avulsion varies from 0.5% to 16% of all cases of dental trauma. Children with dental avulsion may seek help from school nurses so they should be able to provide first-aid treatment. However, many studies showed that the general level of…

  11. PEBB Dental Benefits Summary Preferred Option Plan

    E-print Network

    Oregon, University of

    PEBB Dental Benefits Summary Preferred Option Plan How To Use this Dental Plan (Revised April 1% 50% 50% Implants MAJOR - Deductible Applies 3rd year-100% Endodontic (pulp therapy & root canal from a dental provider not in the Preferred Professional Panel, Out of Network coverage levels apply

  12. Diversity and Critical Forces in Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Paul B.

    1997-01-01

    Critical forces affecting dental education in general, and the connection between science and practice in particular include shifts in patterns of oral disease; changes in the backgrounds of students entering the dental profession; public skepticism and funding; the response of the dental community to several recent major reports; and managed…

  13. Reforming the mission of public dental services.

    PubMed

    Wright, F A C; List, P F

    2012-10-01

    Australia has a complex history of providing public dental services to its communities. From the early days of Colonial settlement, the provision of dental care to the Australian public has largely been driven and influenced by organized groups and associations of dentists. The Constitution of Australia, under Section 51 xxiii A, allows for the Commonwealth to provide for medical and dental services. Unlike the United Kingdom, however, dental services have not been embedded into a universal national health service agenda. In 1974, that the Australian Government through the Australian School Dental Program provided the first funding and national direction for public dental services - and that, limited to children. The Commonwealth Dental Health Program 1993-1997 was the second national endeavor to provide public dental services, this time to financially disadvantaged adults. Since that time, public dental service responsibility has been shuttled between States/Territories and the Commonwealth. A new paradigm for public dental services in Australia requires strong Commonwealth leadership, as well as the commitment of State and Territories and the organized dental profession. The National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission provided the most recent scenario for a radical change in mission. This paper canvases the competing roles of strategic, functional, and structural issues in relationship to social network and policy issues, which must be recognized if Australians truly seek to reform public dental services. PMID:22998313

  14. Dental amalgam: A review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Eggleston, D.W.

    1989-09-01

    Since the 1800s, dental amalgam has been the most commonly used dental restorative material. Each year, dentistry in the United States uses over 100 tons of mercury, continuing a controversy regarding mercury's safety for patients and dental personnel. 65 references.

  15. DENTAL REIMBURSEMENT PROGRAM (DPR) - HIV/AIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Dental Reimbursement Program (DPR) under Part F of the Ryan White CARE Act is intended to help accredited dental schools and post-doctoral dental education program cover their non-reimbursed costs of providing oral health care to individuals with HIV....

  16. Instituto Nacional de Investigacin Dental y Craneofacial

    E-print Network

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    por qué los dientes de leche son importantes, da consejos sobre cómo prevenir la caries dental en la dientes contra la caries dental Este folleto fue diseñado para padres de niños entre 6 y 14 años. ExplicaInstituto Nacional de Investigación Dental y Craneofacial Institutos Nacionales de la Salud

  17. Social Inequalities in Childhood Dental Caries: The Convergent Roles of Stress, Bacteria and Disadvantage

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, W. Thomas; Den Besten, Pamela K; Stamperdahl, Juliet; Zhan, Ling; Jiang, Yebin; Adler, Nancy E; Featherstone, John D

    2010-01-01

    The studies reported here examines stress-related psychobiological processes that might account for the high, disproportionate rates of dental caries, the most common chronic disease of childhood, among children growing up in low socioeconomic status (SES) families. In two 2004 – 2006 studies of kindergarten children from varying socioeconomic backgrounds in the San Francisco Bay Area of California (Ns = 94 and 38), we performed detailed dental examinations to count decayed, missing or filled dental surfaces and microtomography to assess the thickness and density of microanatomic dental compartments in exfoliated, deciduous teeth (i.e., the shed, primary dentition). Cross-sectional, multivariate associations were examined between these measures and SES-related risk factors, including household education, financial stressors, basal and reactive salivary cortisol secretion, and the number of oral cariogenic bacteria. We hypothesized that family stressors and stress-related changes in oral biology might explain, fully or in part, the known socioeconomic disparities in dental health. We found that nearly half of the five-year-old children studied had dental caries. Low SES, higher basal salivary cortisol secretion, and larger numbers of cariogenic bacteria were each significantly and independently associated with caries, and higher salivary cortisol reactivity was associated with thinner, softer enamel surfaces in exfoliated teeth. The highest rates of dental pathology were found among children with the combination of elevated salivary cortisol expression and high counts of cariogenic bacteria. The socioeconomic partitioning of childhood dental caries may thus involve social and psychobiological pathways through which lower SES is associated with higher numbers of cariogenic bacteria and higher levels of stress-associated salivary cortisol. This convergence of psychosocial, infectious and stress-related biological processes appears to be implicated in the production of greater cariogenic bacterial growth and in the conferral of an increased physical vulnerability of the developing dentition. PMID:20870333

  18. Biocompatibility of dental casting alloys.

    PubMed

    Geurtsen, Werner

    2002-01-01

    Most cast dental restorations are made from alloys or commercially pure titanium (cpTi). Many orthodontic appliances are also fabricated from metallic materials. It has been documented in vitro and in vivo that metallic dental devices release metal ions, mainly due to corrosion. Those metallic components may be locally and systemically distributed and could play a role in the etiology of oral and systemic pathological conditions. The quality and quantity of the released cations depend upon the type of alloy and various corrosion parameters. No general correlation has been observed between alloy nobility and corrosion. However, it has been documented that some Ni-based alloys, such as beryllium-containing Ni alloys, exhibit increased corrosion, specifically at low pH. Further, microparticles are abraded from metallic restorations due to wear. In sufficient quantities, released metal ions-particularly Cu, Ni, Be, and abraded microparticles-can also induce inflammation of the adjacent periodontal tissues and the oral mucosa. While there is also some in vitro evidence that the immune response can be altered by various metal ions, the role of these ions in oral inflammatory diseases such as gingivitis and periodontitis is unknown. Allergic reactions due to metallic dental restorations have been documented. Ni has especially been identified as being highly allergenic. Interestingly, from 34% to 65.5% of the patients who are allergic to Ni are also allergic to Pd. Further, Pd allergy always occurrs with Ni sensitivity. In contrast, no study has been published which supports the hypothesis that dental metallic materials are mutagenic/genotoxic or might be a carcinogenic hazard to man. Taken together, very contradictory data have been documented regarding the local and systemic effects of dental casting alloys and metallic ions released from them. Therefore, it is of critical importance to elucidate the release of cations from metallic dental restorations in the oral environment and to determine the biological interactions of released metal components with oral and systemic tissues. PMID:12097239

  19. Dental ceramics: a current review.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O

    2014-03-01

    Ceramics are used for many dental applications and are characterized in various ways, including by their hardness, brittleness, thermal and electrical insulation, and biocompatibility. The ceramics most commonly used in dentistry are oxides, particularly silicon dioxide (SiO2), or silica; aluminum oxide (Al2O3), or alumina; and zirconium dioxide (ZrO2), or zirconia. This article reviews the microstructure of current dental ceramic materials and how it relates to their mechanical properties, clinical techniques, and optical properties. Typical ceramics currently in use are described, and their clinically relevant properties such as strength, fracture, polishability, and wear are compared. Cementation methods are also discussed. PMID:24773195

  20. Mercury toxicity and dental amalgam

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, M.; Osborne, J.W.; Hanson, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    There is adequate evidence that dental amalgam restorations, during and after placement, results in the release of Hg into the patients's body. Whether the Hg released from amalgam is due to placement procedures, surface abrasion, or later corrosion breakdown, there is evidence that a low level Hg release continues for years. With new and more accurate techniques of measuring Hg levels, especially in tissue and blood, additional studies are necessary to relate blood-Hg levels with dental amalgam restorations. Studies must relate existing restorations as well as the placement of new restorations to body-Hg levels. It is possible that we have accepted a potentially dangerous material as being safe.

  1. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Nidhi; Bansal, Kalpana; Chopra, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Special and medically compromised patients present a unique population that challenges the dentist’s skill and knowledge. Providing oral care to people with cerebral palsy (CP) requires adaptation of the skills we use everyday. In fact, most people with mild or moderate forms of CP can be treated successfully in the general practice setting. This article is to review various dental considerations and management of a CP patient. How to cite this article: Sehrawat N, Marwaha M, Bansal K, Chopra R. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):109-118. PMID:25356010

  2. “Everybody Brush!”: Protocol for a Parallel-Group Randomized Controlled Trial of a Family-Focused Primary Prevention Program With Distribution of Oral Hygiene Products and Education to Increase Frequency of Toothbrushing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Twice daily toothbrushing with fluoridated toothpaste is the most widely advocated preventive strategy for dental caries (tooth decay) and is recommended by professional dental associations. Not all parents, children, or adolescents follow this recommendation. This protocol describes the methods for the implementation and evaluation of a quality improvement health promotion program. Objective The objective of the study is to show a theory-informed, evidence-based program to improve twice daily toothbrushing and oral health-related quality of life that may reduce dental caries, dental treatment need, and costs. Methods The design is a parallel-group, pragmatic randomized controlled trial. Families of Medicaid-insured children and adolescents within a large dental care organization in central Oregon will participate in the trial (n=21,743). Families will be assigned to one of three groups: a test intervention, an active control, or a passive control condition. The intervention aims to address barriers and support for twice-daily toothbrushing. Families in the test condition will receive toothpaste and toothbrushes by mail for all family members every three months. In addition, they will receive education and social support to encourage toothbrushing via postcards, recorded telephone messages, and an optional participant-initiated telephone helpline. Families in the active control condition will receive the kit of supplies by mail, but no additional instructional information or telephone support. Families assigned to the passive control will be on a waiting list. The primary outcomes are restorative dental care received and, only for children younger than 36 months old at baseline, the frequency of twice-daily toothbrushing. Data will be collected through dental claims records and, for children younger than 36 months old at baseline, parent interviews and clinical exams. Results Enrollment of participants and baseline interviews have been completed. Final results are expected in early summer, 2017. Conclusions If proven effective, this simple intervention can be sustained by the dental care organization and replicated by other organizations and government. Trial Registration Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02327507; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02327507 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6YCIxJSor). PMID:26002091

  3. Addressing Disparities in Children's Oral Health: A Dental-Medical Partnership to Train Family Practice Residents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wendy E. Mouradian; Douglas C. Schaad; Sara Kim; Penelope J. Leggott; Peter S. Domoto; Russell Maier; Nancy G. Stevens; Mark Koday

    Providing oral health care to rural populations in the United States is a major challenge. Lack of community water fluoridation, dental workforce shortages, and geographical barriers all aggravate oral health and access problems in the largely rural Northwest. Children from low-income and minority families and children with special needs are at particular risk. Family- centered disease prevention strategies are needed

  4. Potential Efficacy of Chlorhexidine against Mutans Streptococci and Human Dental Caries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. G. Emilson

    1994-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents have been considered as having potential for the prevention of dental caries. Several substances have been evaluated as possible candidates, but no antimicrobial agent, with the exception of fluoride, has received as much experimental attention as the bisbiguanide chlorhexidine. This substance represents, so far, the most effective and best-documented agent. To be effective against caries, therapeutic dosages of

  5. Pulsed laser sintering of photo-active calcium phosphates for dental enamel restoration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Jha; E Elmadani; G. Jose; C. G. Leburn; C T A Brown; W Sibbett; M S Duggal; J Toumba

    2011-01-01

    to sensitivity of teeth is a common condition amongst large population worldwide. It is a lifestyle related condition, resulting from the progressive loss of mineral phase from enamel surface. Unlike bone, the dental enamel is a dead tissue and cannot regenerate itself and it must be restored for preventing exposure of softer dentinal tubules and nerves [1], which is the

  6. Childhood Obesity & Dental Disease: Common Causes, Common Solutions. Oral Health & Obesity Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children Now, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Too many California children suffer from high rates of preventable chronic conditions associated with childhood obesity and dental disease. The state is experiencing a crisis in both areas. Fortunately, common factors that contribute to both conditions--including the rates of breastfeeding, access to healthy food and the consumption of…

  7. DENTAL HEALTH STATUS AND DENTAL HEALTH SERVICES FOR RURAL YOUTH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DONNELLY, CHARLES J.

    ALTHOUGH DENTAL PROBLEMS ARE COMMON IN BOTH RURAL AND URBAN AREAS, RURAL CHILDREN SEEM TO HAVE MORE DIFFICULTIES. THE REASONS FOR THIS APPEAR TO BE THAT THERE ARE FEWER DENTISTS PER CAPITA IN RURAL AREAS, AND THAT THE RURAL CHILD IS USUALLY EXPOSED TO A WATER SYSTEM LACKING FLUORIDATION, WHICH IS THE MOST EFFECTIVE WAY OF ADMINISTERING FLUORIDES.…

  8. Prevalence of dental caries among school-going children in Namakkal district: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Karunakaran, Ramachandran; Somasundaram, Sujatha; Gawthaman, Murugesan; Vinodh, Selvaraj; Manikandan, Sundaram; Gokulnathan, Subramanian

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of dental caries in primary teeth among 4-6 years old school going children in the Namakkal District. Materials and Methods: The study covered a total of 850 school going children in a total of 26 schools in the Namakkal district of Tamil Nadu. The age group selected for this study ranged from 4 to 6 years of age. Each child was examined in their respective schools by one of the four calibrated examiners and decay, missing and filled teeth (dmft) index was recorded along with demographic details. This study was done in September-October 2013 in a span of 1 month duration. Results: Of 850 children examined, 560 (65.88%) children had dental caries. Mean dmft score was 2.86. Prevalence of dental caries was higher in boys (69.6%) than in girls (61.5%). The untreated decay teeth accounted for 92.4%. Conclusion: The prevalence of dental caries among 4-6 years old children is high in the Namakkal district. The need for the creation of dental awareness among children and their primary caregivers is crucial and the need for developing immediate oral health promotion strategies including an increase in school dental health programs is recommended. PMID:25210362

  9. Perceptions of Oral Health, Preventive Care, and Care-Seeking Behaviors Among Rural Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Virginia J.; Logan, Henrietta; Brown, Cameron D.; Calderon, Angela; Catalanotto, Frank

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND An asymmetrical oral disease burden is endured by certain population subgroups, particularly children and adolescents. Reducing oral health disparities requires understanding multiple oral health perspectives, including those of adolescents. This qualitative study explores oral health perceptions and dental care behaviors among rural adolescents. METHODS Semistructured individual interviews with 100 rural, minority, low socioeconomic status adolescents revealed their current perceptions of oral health and dental care access. Respondents age ranged from 12 to 18 years. The sample was 80% black and 52% male. RESULTS Perceived threat from dental disease was low. Adolescents perceived regular brushing and flossing as superseding the need for preventive care. Esthetic reasons were most often cited as reasons to seek dental care. Difficulties accessing dental care include finances, transportation, fear, issues with Medicaid coverage and parental responsibility. In general, adolescents and their parents are in need of information regarding the importance of preventive dental care. CONCLUSIONS Findings illuminate barriers to dental care faced by low-income rural adolescents and counter public perceptions of government-sponsored dental care programs as being “free” or without cost. The importance of improved oral health knowledge, better access to care, and school-based dental care is discussed. PMID:25388597

  10. Health maintenance facility: Dental equipment requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, John; Gosbee, John; Billica, Roger

    1991-01-01

    The objectives were to test the effectiveness of the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) dental suction/particle containment system, which controls fluids and debris generated during simulated dental treatment, in microgravity; to test the effectiveness of fiber optic intraoral lighting systems in microgravity, while simulating dental treatment; and to evaluate the operation and function of off-the-shelf dental handheld instruments, namely a portable dental hand drill and temporary filling material, in microgravity. A description of test procedures, including test set-up, flight equipment, and the data acquisition system, is given.

  11. Household expenditure for dental care in low and middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Masood, Mohd; Sheiham, Aubrey; Bernabé, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the extent of household catastrophic expenditure in dental health care and its possible determinants in 41 low and middle income countries. Data from 182,007 respondents aged 18 years and over (69,315 in 18 low income countries, 59,645 in 15 lower middle income countries and 53,047 in 8 upper middle income countries) who participated in the WHO World Health Survey (WHS) were analyzed. Expenditure in dental health care was defined as catastrophic if it was equal to or higher than 40% of the household capacity to pay. A number of individual and country-level factors were assessed as potential determinants of catastrophic dental health expenditure (CDHE) in multilevel logistic regression with individuals nested within countries. Up to 7% of households in low and middle income countries faced CDHE in the last 4 weeks. This proportion rose up to 35% among households that incurred some dental health expenditure within the same period. The multilevel model showed that wealthier, urban and larger households and more economically developed countries had higher odds of facing CDHE. The results of this study show that payments for dental health care can be a considerable burden on households, to the extent of preventing expenditure on basic necessities. They also help characterize households more likely to incur catastrophic expenditure on dental health care. Alternative health care financing strategies and policies targeted to improve fairness in financial contribution are urgently required in low and middle income countries. PMID:25923691

  12. Radiographic signs and diagnosis of dental disease.

    PubMed

    Bellows, J

    1993-08-01

    Dental radiographs are critical for the complete assessment and treatment of dental diseases. Dental radiography is commonly used to evaluate congenital dental defects, periodontal disease, orthodontic manipulations, oral tumors, endodontic treatments, oral trauma, and any situation where an abnormality is suspected. Although standard radiographic equipment and film can be used to produce dental radiographs, dental X-ray equipment and film provide superior quality images and greater convenience of animal patient positioning. An understanding of normal dental radiographic anatomy is important when interpreting dental radiographs. Stage III periodontitis is the earliest stage of periodontal disease at which radiographic abnormalities become apparent. Bone loss associated with periodontal disease can be classified as either horizontal or vertical. Periapical radiolucencies can represent granulomas, cysts, or abscesses, whereas periapical radiodensities may represent sclerotic bone or condensing osteitis. Lytic lesions of the bone of the jaw often represent oral neoplasms. Neoplasms also can displace or disrupt teeth in the dental arch. Resorptive lesions can be external or internal and appear as radiolucent areas involving the external surface of the root or the pulp cavity, respectively. Feline dental resorptive lesions, also known as odontoclastic resorptions, are a specific form of dental resorptive lesions unique to cats. PMID:8210796

  13. Factors for increasing adoption of e-courses among dental and dental hygiene faculty members.

    PubMed

    DeBate, Rita D; Cragun, Deborah; Severson, Herbert H; Shaw, Tracy; Christiansen, Steve; Koerber, Anne; Tomar, Scott; Brown, Kelli McCormack; Tedesco, Lisa A; Hendricson, William

    2011-05-01

    The incorporation of web-based learning into the dental curriculum has been consistently recommended in the literature on reform in dental education. There has been growing support for web-based learning in dental and dental hygiene education as demonstrated by deans' identifying this as a planned curricular innovation. The purpose of our study was to explore characteristics of e-courses that may serve to increase adoption among dental and dental hygiene faculty members. Eight ninety-minute focus groups (three dental; five dental hygiene) were conducted with dental (n=27) and dental hygiene (n=23) faculty members from six academic institutions. The resulting data were analyzed to identify two overarching themes and associated subthemes with regard to benefits and barriers influencing adoption of e-courses. A working conceptual framework, based on the Diffusion of Innovations, was developed from these themes to understand the characteristics that may influence the rate of adoption of e-courses among dental and dental hygiene faculty members. Analysis of the data revealed four main adoption barriers: 1) low perceived relative advantage to faculty members; 2) low compatibility with current curriculum; 3) high perceived time commitment; and 4) complexity of e-course development. This exploratory assessment identifies leverage points for facilitating the adoption and sustainability of e-courses in dental and dental hygiene education. PMID:21546592

  14. Urban decay

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Peter Van den Bossche (None; )

    2007-09-23

    Urban decay refers to a city or part of a city that cannot be repaired. This building may or may not fall under urban decay, but it is important to realize that non-living objects and structures will show signs of decay in time.

  15. Socioeconomic and psychosocial predictors of dental healthcare use among Brazilian preschool children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Disparities in utilization of oral healthcare services have been attributed to socioeconomic and individual behavioral factors. Parents’ socioeconomic status, demographics, schooling, and perceptions of oral health may influence their children’s use of dental services. This cross-sectional study assessed the relationships between socioeconomic and psychosocial factors and the utilization of dental health services by children aged 1–5 years. Methods Data were collected through clinical exams and a structured questionnaire administered during the National Day of Children’s Vaccination. A Poisson regression model was used to estimate prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Results Data were collected from a total of 478 children. Only 112 (23.68%) were found to have visited a dentist; 67.77% of those had seen the dentist for preventive care. Most (63.11%) used public rather than private services. The use of dental services varied according to parental socioeconomic status; children from low socioeconomic backgrounds and those whose parents rated their oral health as “poor” used dental services less frequently. The reason for visiting the dentist also varied with socioeconomic status, in that children of parents with poor socioeconomic status and who reported their child’s oral health as “fair/poor” were less likely to have visited the dentist for preventive care. Conclusion This study demonstrated that psychosocial and socioeconomic factors are important predictors of the utilization of dental care services. PMID:24171711

  16. Barodontalgias, dental and orofacial barotraumas: a survey in Swiss divers and caisson workers.

    PubMed

    Zanotta, Cristina; Dagassan-Berndt, Dorothea; Nussberger, Peter; Waltimo, Tuomas; Filippi, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Changing ambient pressure can lead to medical conditions in body cavities filled with air. Intraoral pain elicited by changes in pressure is referred to as barodontalgia. Dental barotraumas are defined as pressure-induced damages of teeth and restorations. The pathophysiologic background so far is not completely clear. The present study deals with dental and orofacial symptoms which can occur as a result of pressure variations. With the aid of cantonal administrations, diving associations, and tunnel construction firms, 520 pressure-exposed individuals (499 scuba/ professional divers, 21 caisson workers operating at excess pressure) were questioned regarding dental problems. A personal interview was conducted with affected individuals. Problems in the dental area were experienced by 15% of all respondents. Toothaches were suffered by 10.2% of the participants. Tooth injuries occurred in 6.3% of all interviewees (26 fractured amalgam restorations, 4 crown fractures, 3 losses of tooth fragments). A proportion of 11.3% among the respondents complained about temporomandibular joint problems or mucosal irritations (for example aphthae) related to the mouthpieces. Barotraumas outside the dental area were incurred by 31.9% of the divers. Of these, 69.9% concerned the ears and 65.6% occurred during the descent. Based on the results obtained from the survey and taking into account the current literature, recommendations for the prevention of barotraumas in divers and caisson workers were prepared. Diagnostic exclusion of dental pathologies and avoidance of retentive reconstruction materials are important factors for the prevention of barodontalgias and dental barotraumas. PMID:24853026

  17. Management Practices in Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Five articles on management practices in dental schools include: "Overview" (Robert W. Comer et al.); "Patient Support Services" (Betsy A. Hagan et al.); "Health and Financial Records" (Robert W. Comer et al.); "Support Services and Staff Responsibilities" (Wayne William Herman et al.) and "Implications and Future Challenges" (Robert W. Comer et…

  18. Nanoparticle release from dental composites.

    PubMed

    Van Landuyt, K L; Hellack, B; Van Meerbeek, B; Peumans, M; Hoet, P; Wiemann, M; Kuhlbusch, T A J; Asbach, C

    2014-01-01

    Dental composites typically contain high amounts (up to 60 vol.%) of nanosized filler particles. There is a current concern that dental personnel (and patients) may inhale nanosized dust particles (<100 nm) during abrasive procedures to shape, finish or remove restorations but, so far, whether airborne nanoparticles are released has never been investigated. In this study, composite dust was analyzed in real work conditions. Exposure measurements of dust in a dental clinic revealed high peak concentrations of nanoparticles in the breathing zone of both dentist and patient, especially during aesthetic treatments or treatments of worn teeth with composite build-ups. Further laboratory assessment confirmed that all tested composites released very high concentrations of airborne particles in the nanorange (>10(6)cm(-3)). The median diameter of airborne composite dust varied between 38 and 70 nm. Electron microscopic and energy dispersive X-ray analysis confirmed that the airborne particles originated from the composite, and revealed that the dust particles consisted of filler particles or resin or both. Though composite dust exhibited no significant oxidative reactivity, more toxicological research is needed. To conclude, on manipulation with the bur, dental composites release high concentrations of nanoparticles that may enter deeply into the lungs. PMID:24121193

  19. Head Start Dental Health Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC. Head Start Bureau.

    This curriculum for Head Start programs provides preschool learning experiences that teach about dental health. The majority of the curriculum guide is devoted to the following lesson plans: (1) "Introduction of 'Smiley the Super Pup'," an optional puppet character which may be used to review the concepts covered in each lesson; (2) "Visiting the…

  20. The relationship between body system-based chronic conditions and dental utilization for Medicaid-enrolled children: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dental care is the most common unmet health care need for children with chronic conditions. However, anecdotal evidence suggests that not all children with chronic conditions encounter difficulties accessing dental care. The goals of this study are to evaluate dental care use for Medicaid-enrolled children with chronic conditions and to identify the subgroups of children with chronic conditions that are the least likely to use dental care services. Methods This study focused on children with chronic conditions ages 3-14 enrolled in the Iowa Medicaid Program in 2005 and 2006. The independent variables were whether a child had each of the following 10 body system-based chronic conditions (no/yes): hematologic; cardiovascular; craniofacial; diabetes; endocrine; digestive; ear/nose/throat; respiratory; catastrophic neurological; or musculoskeletal. The primary outcome measure was use of any dental care in 2006. Secondary outcomes, also measured in 2006, were use of diagnostic dental care, preventive dental care, routine restorative dental care, and complex restorative dental care. We used Poisson regression models to estimate the relative risk (RR) associated with each of the five outcome measures across the 10 chronic conditions. Results Across the 10 chronic condition subgroups, unadjusted dental utilization rates ranged from 44.3% (children with catastrophic neurological conditions) to 60.2% (children with musculoskeletal conditions). After adjusting for model covariates, children with catastrophic neurological conditions were significantly less likely to use most types of dental care (RR: 0.48 to 0.73). When there were differences, children with endocrine or craniofacial conditions were less likely to use dental care whereas children with hematologic or digestive conditions were more likely to use dental care. Children with respiratory, musculoskeletal, or ear/nose/throat conditions were more likely to use most types of dental care compared to other children with chronic conditions but without these specific conditions (RR: 1.03 to 1.13; 1.0 to 1.08; 1.02 to 1.12; respectively). There was no difference in use across all types of dental care for children with diabetes or cardiovascular conditions compared to other children with chronic conditions who did not have these particular conditions. Conclusions Dental utilization is not homogeneous across chronic condition subgroups. Nearly 42% of children in our study did not use any dental care in 2006. These findings support the development of multilevel clinical interventions that target subgroups of Medicaid-enrolled children with chronic conditions that are most likely to have problems accessing dental care. PMID:22870882

  1. [Sugar substitutes--their significance in preventing dental caries].

    PubMed

    Römer, F

    1989-01-01

    Sugar is the most prominent antagonist of teeth. In the Federal Republic of Germany, approx. 2 million tons of sugar were sold for human nutrition in 1986/87. The per capita consumption was 34.8 kg. The significance of sugar substitutes can be derived from the possibility to make some particularly caries-causing confectionery types tolerable for the teeth: On the one hand, they will thus lose their caries triggering property; on the other hand, they contribute to the remineralization of carious initial lesions by stimulating the saliva. Teeth-tolerable confectionery can be specially marked. Measures and media for familiarising the public with this special "brand" are shown. PMID:2531355

  2. Preventing dental caries: breaking the chain of transmission.

    PubMed

    Newbrun, E

    1992-06-01

    Besides using all possible techniques to increase host resistance (fluoride, sealants) and decrease exposure to fermentable carbohydrates (for example, use of sugar substitutes), dentists must treat caries as infectious and transmissible. Antimicrobial agents are recommended. PMID:1619146

  3. DENTAL SERVICES CLAIM FORM DENTIST'S PRE-TREATMENT ESTIMATE

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    SERVICES Blue Shield ­ Oral Surgery Dental Insurance Major Medical FEP Dental Insurance PART I OF THE CLAIM FORM (I.E. BLUE SHIELD ­ ORAL SURGERY, DENTAL INSURANCE, MAJOR MEDICAL, OR FEP DENTAL INSURANCESTATE DENTAL SERVICES CLAIM FORM DENTIST'S PRE-TREATMENT ESTIMATE DENTIST'S STATEMENT OF ACTUAL

  4. Association of Environmental Cadmium Exposure with Pediatric Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Manish; Weuve, Jennifer; Schwartz, Joel; Wright, Robert O.

    2008-01-01

    Background Although animal experiments have shown that cadmium exposure results in severe dental caries, limited epidemiologic data are available on this issue. Objectives We aimed to examine the relationship between environmental cadmium exposure and dental caries in children 6–12 years of age. Methods We analyzed cross-sectional data, including urine cadmium concentrations and counts of decayed or filled tooth surfaces, from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We used logistic and zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB) regression to estimate the association between urine cadmium concentrations and caries experience, adjusting these analyses for potential confounders including environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). Results Urine cadmium concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 3.38 ng/mL. Approximately 56% of children had experienced caries in their deciduous teeth, and almost 30% had been affected by caries in their permanent dentition. An interquartile range (IQR) increase in creatinine-corrected cadmium concentrations (0.21 ?g/g creatinine) corresponded to a 16% increase in the odds of having experienced caries in deciduous teeth [prevalence odds ratio (OR) = 1.16; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.96–1.40]. This association was statistically significant in children with low ETS exposure (prevalence OR = 1.30; 95% CI, 1.01–1.67). The results from the ZINB regression indicated that, among children with any caries history in their deciduous teeth, an IQR increase in cadmium was associated with 17% increase in the number of decayed or filled surfaces. We observed no association between cadmium and caries experience in permanent teeth. Conclusions Environmental cadmium exposure may be associated with increased risk of dental caries in deciduous teeth of children. PMID:18560540

  5. Radiographic evaluation and treatment of feline dental resorptive lesions.

    PubMed

    DuPont, Gregg A

    2005-07-01

    Many feline resorptive lesions are easily diagnosed by clinical oral examination, whereas others require dental radiographs. Radiographs can reveal the presence of resorption, and often the nature of the resorptive process as well. Removal of affected teeth when they cause discomfort, or of the portion of the tooth causing the discomfort, remains the only treatment that provides long-term resolution. Until we understand the etiology of the inciting causes and of the factors contributing to the progression of resorptive lesions, reliable prevention cannot be offered. PMID:15979520

  6. The use of dental services for children: implications of the 2010 dental reform in Israel.

    PubMed

    Shahrabani, Shosh; Benzion, Uri; Machnes, Yaffa; Gal, Assaf

    2015-02-01

    Routine dental examinations for children are important for early diagnosis and treatment of dental problems. The level of dental morbidity among Israeli children is higher than the global average. A July 2010 reform of Israel's National Health Insurance Law gradually offers free dental services for children up to age 12. The study examines the use of dental services for children and the factors affecting mothers' decision to take their children for routine checkups. In addition, the study examines the impact of the reform on dental checkups for children in various populations groups. A national representative sample comprising 618 mothers of children aged 5-18 was surveyed by telephone. The survey integrated the principles of the health beliefs model and socio-demographic characteristics. The results show that mothers' decision to take their children for dental checkups is affected by their socio-demographic status and by their health beliefs with respect to dental health. After the reform, the frequency of children's dental checkups significantly increased among vulnerable populations. Therefore, the reform has helped reduce gaps in Israeli society regarding children's dental health. Raising families' awareness of the reform and of the importance of dental health care together with expanding national distribution of approved dental clinics can increase the frequency of dental checkups among children in Israel. PMID:25465981

  7. Child Dental Neglect: A Short Review

    PubMed Central

    Ramazani, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    Context: Child dental neglect is a terrible tragedy with a high prevalence. Dealing with this issue is important regarding psychological and physical health policies. The current review was conducted to provide health professionals insight into the different aspects of child dental neglect as reported in previous literature. Evidence Acquisition: Our review was prepared through an electronic search using Pub Med, Science Direct, Medline, Google, Cochran Library, Google Scholar and EMBASE databases. Relevant papers published since 2000 until now in English, discussing child dental neglect were retrieved. Both original and review papers were included. Eligible articles were fully read by the author. A data form was used to record useful findings. Results: Distinguishing the direct and indirect signs of dental neglect is the first step for improvement of this matter. The dental team are the main professionals who can improve parental knowledge about the consequences of child dental neglect. Victims suffer from short and long-term adverse outcomes. Collaborative attempts need to be made by different health professionals to deal with this problem. Conclusions: Child dental neglect has many long-term impacts. The main professionals who are responsible for identification, intervention and treatment of child dental neglect are dental practitioners. However, other professionals cannot ignore this task. Finally, child dental neglect, despite its derivative outcomes, may be a presentation of a broader maltreatment. PMID:25741483

  8. Effect of endurance training on dental erosion, caries, and saliva.

    PubMed

    Frese, C; Frese, F; Kuhlmann, S; Saure, D; Reljic, D; Staehle, H J; Wolff, D

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this investigation was to give insights into the impact of endurance training on oral health, with regard to tooth erosion, caries, and salivary parameters. The study included 35 triathletes and 35 non-exercising controls. The clinical investigation comprised oral examination, assessment of oral status with special regard to caries and erosion, saliva testing during inactivity, and a self-administered questionnaire about eating, drinking, and oral hygiene behavior. In addition, athletes were asked about their training habits and intake of beverages and sports nutrition. For saliva assessment during exercise, a subsample of n?=?15 athletes volunteered in an incremental running field test (IRFT). Athletes showed an increased risk for dental erosion (P?=?0.001). No differences were observed with regard to caries prevalence and salivary parameters measured during inactivity between athletes and controls. Among athletes, a significant correlation was found between caries prevalence and the cumulative weekly training time (r?=?0.347, P?=?0.04). In athletes after IRFT and at maximum workload, saliva flow rates decreased (P?=?0.001 stimulated; P?=?0.01 unstimulated) and saliva pH increased significantly (P?=?0.003). Higher risk for dental erosions, exercise-dependent caries risk, and load-dependent changes in saliva parameters point out the need for risk-adapted preventive dental concepts in the field of sports dentistry. PMID:24917276

  9. Mycological contamination in dental unit waterlines in Istanbul, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Kadaifciler, Duygu Göksay; Ökten, Suzan; Sen, Burhan

    2013-01-01

    Studies on dental units (DUs) are conducted either for the prevention or the reduction of the density of bacterial contamination in dental unit waterlines (DUWLs). However, the existence of fungi in the these systems requires more attention. During dental treatment, direct contact with water contaminated with fungi such as Candida, Aspergillus, or inhalation of aerosols from high-speed drill may cause various respiratory infections, such as asthma, allergies, and wounds on mucose membranes, especially on immunocompromised patients and dentists. The aims of this study are to investigate the number and colonization of fungi in DUWLs in the city of Istanbul, Turkey. Water samples were collected from air-water syringes, high-speed drills, and inlet waters from 41 DUs. The aerobic mesophilic fungi count in high- speed drills was higher than inlet waters and air-water syringes. Non-sporulating fungi were found in 7 DUs. The isolated fungi were identified as Penicillium waksmanii, Cladosporium spp., Penicillium spp., Candida famata, Cryptococcus laurentii, Candida guilliermondii, Penicillium verrucosum, Aspergillus pseudoglaucus, Penicillium decumbens, and Acremonium sp. Some of these fungal genera are known as opportunistic pathogens that led to respiratory diseases such as allergic rhinits. This study shows the importance of regular control of mycological contamination on water at DUs. PMID:24516467

  10. Early childhood feeding practices and dental caries in preschool children: a multi-centre birth cohort study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amit Arora; Jane A Scott; Sameer Bhole; Loc Do; Eli Schwarz; Anthony S Blinkhorn

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dental caries (decay) is an international public health challenge, especially amongst young children. Early Childhood Caries is a rapidly progressing disease leading to severe pain, anxiety, sepsis and sleep loss, and is a major health problem particularly for disadvantaged populations. There is currently a lack of research exploring the interactions between risk and protective factors in the development of

  11. Treatment of Dental and Dental-Related Behavioral Dysfunctions in a Consultative Outpatient Clinic: A Preliminary Report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Kleinhauz; I. Eli; Z. Rubinstein

    1985-01-01

    Dental and dental-related behavioral dysfunctions, such as dental anxiety or phobia, extreme gagging reflex, orofacial pain, rejection of prosthesis, glossal symptoms, and others, often cause severe problems during routine dental treatment. The multidisciplinary team of the Consultatory Outpatient Clinic for Behavioral Dysfunctions of the School of Dental Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, works toward creating a proper environment for the treatment of

  12. The utilization of dental skills in non-dental situations.

    PubMed

    McLean, R

    1975-03-01

    The development of electronic control systems has enabled severely physically handicapped people to revolutionize their lives by using any minimal residual movements they may have to operate micro-switches linking them with typewriters and other environmetal controls. Technical skills of a high order are required in making the unique splint or interface which links the switches with these residual movements whether of the tongue, lips, chin, eyebrow, finger or toe. Through the initiative of the Cordent Trust and generous financial support from the Leverhulme Trust a mobile laboratory was designed and built and a dental technician appointed for a three-year development project in the use of these switches as it was felt that his experience was particularly appropriate to the work and would also demonstrate how dental skills can be used to bring about a degree of rehabilitation far beyond the oral environment. PMID:1054327

  13. Dental caries is correlated with knowledge of comprehensive food education in Japanese university students.

    PubMed

    Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Mizutani, Shinsuke; Furuta, Michiko; Irie, Koichiro; Azuma, Tetsuji; Kojima, Azusa; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Morita, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    In Japan, the "Food Education Basic Law" (The Basic Law on Shokuiku, food education) was enacted in 2005. The comprehensive food education programs, namely Shokuiku, aim to improve dietary practices to reduce lifestyle-related diseases. Dental caries is one of the diseases associated with inappropriate dietary habits. Thus, food education may influence the prevalence of dental caries. However, there are no data regarding the association between public based-food education and dental caries. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between knowledge about comprehensive food education (Shokuiku) and dental caries experience in Japanese university students. A total of 2,184 students (1,240 men, 944 women), aged 18-20 years, were examined. They had attended the Shokuiku program while in junior/senior high school. The numbers of teeth present, and decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) (dental caries experience) were recorded. Additional information was collected via a questionnaire regarding knowledge about food education, dietary habits and oral health behavior. Of the students, 315 men (20.7%) and 345 women (52.8%) reported that they know and can explain the meaning and content of the word "Shokuiku". After adjusting for potential confounding factors, subjects who did not have knowledge about Shokuiku had higher adjusted odds ratio (OR) for dental caries experience (DMFT >0) than those who had (adjusted OR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.02-1.48; p<0.05). These observations revealed that having knowledge about comprehensive food education in university students correlates with low prevalence of dental caries. PMID:23635378

  14. Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) of dental enamel for retrospective assessment of radiation exposure

    PubMed Central

    Yukihara, E.G.; Mittani, J.; McKeever, S.W.S.; Simon, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) properties of dental enamel and discusses the potential and challenges of OSL for filling the technology gap in biodosimetry required for medical triage following a radiological/nuclear accident or terrorist event. The OSL technique uses light to stimulate a radiation-induced luminescence signal from materials previously exposed to ionizing radiation. This luminescence originates from radiation-induced defects in insulating crystals and is proportional to the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation. In our research conducted to date, we focused on fundamental investigations of the OSL properties of dental enamel using extracted teeth and tabletop OSL readers. The objective was to obtain information to support the development of the necessary instrumentation for retrospective dosimetry using dental enamel in laboratory, or for in situ and non-invasive accident dosimetry using dental enamel in emergency triage. An OSL signal from human dental enamel was detected using blue, green, or IR stimulation. Blue/green stimulation associated with UV emission detection seems to be the most appropriate combination in the sense that there is no signal from un-irradiated samples and the shape of the OSL decay is clear. Improvements in the minimum detection level were achieved by incorporating an ellipsoidal mirror in the OSL system to maximize light collection. Other possibilities to improve the sensitivity and research steps necessary to establish the feasibility of the technique for retrospective assessment of radiation exposure are also discussed. PMID:19623269

  15. Oral lactic acid bacteria related to the occurrence and/or progression of dental caries in Japanese preschool children.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Ayumi; Noda, Masafumi; Matoba, Yasuyuki; Kumagai, Takanori; Kozai, Katsuyuki; Sugiyama, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the presence of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), especially those classified into the genus Lactobacillus, is associated with the progression of dental caries in preschool children. Nevertheless, the kinds of species of LAB and the characteristics that are important for dental caries have been unclear. The aims of this study were: (1) to investigate the distribution of oral LAB among Japanese preschool children with various prevalence levels of caries; and (2) to reveal the characteristics of these isolated LAB species. Seventy-four Japanese preschool children were examined for caries scores and caries progression, and their dental cavity samples were collected for LAB isolation and identification. The saliva-induced agglutination rate and the resistance to acidic environments of the identified strains were measured. Statistical analysis showed that preschool children carrying Lactobacillus (L.) salivarius or Streptococcus mutans have a significantly higher prevalence of dental caries, the growth ability in acidic environments correlates with the caries scores of individuals with L. salivarius, and the caries scores exhibit positive correlation with saliva-induced agglutination in L. salivarius. These results show that specific Lactobacillus species are associated with dental caries based on the level of carious lesion severity. The present study suggests that these specific Lactobacillus species, especially those with easily agglutinated properties and acid resistance, affect the dental caries scores of preschool children, and that these properties may provide useful information for research into the prevention of dental caries. PMID:25918670

  16. How the insightful leadership of James English transformed a traditional dental school into a leading educational institution.

    PubMed

    Mohl, Norman D; Scannapieco, Frank A; Fischman, Stuart L

    2013-01-01

    During the 1960s, the dental school at the University of Buffalo underwent a profound change, as a result of its merger with the State University of New York (SUNY), and, very importantly, because of the outstanding leadership provided by Dean James A. English. This article contrasts what the school was like in 1960 before Dean English's arrival, and what it had become in 1970 when his deanship ended. It also recounts the leadership qualities of Dean English and the measures he took to transform the dental school into a leading educational institution. During his tenure, the school experienced profound change, including integration of medicine with dentistry in the curriculum; "internationalization" of dental education and research; organization of the first Oral Biology Department and PhD graduate program in a dental school in the United States; insistence on "knowledge-driven" dental practice--a concept we now term "evidenced-based dentistry"; the establishment of novel approaches to dental education including the "diagonal" curriculum; incorporation of prevention in practice; elective courses for dental students; and comprehensive clinical care. All of these accomplishments were novel for the day and greatly influenced incorporation of similar innovations in many schools around the world. PMID:24665523

  17. Evaluation of environmental bacterial contamination and procedures to control cross infection in a sample of Italian dental surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Monarca, S.; Grottolo, M.; Renzi, D.; Paganelli, C.; Sapelli, P.; Zerbini, I.; Nardi, G.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To perform a pilot study on bacterial contamination in some dental surgeries (n=51) in a local health unit in Brescia (Lombardy Region, Italy) and to evaluate the procedures to control cross infection used by the personnel to reduce the risk of infection in dental practice.?METHODS—A survey was carried out by interviewing 133 dental personnel with a questionnaire on the procedures used to control infection. The autoclaves, chemical baths (chemiclaves), and ovens present in the surgeries were tested for sterilisation efficiency with a spore test, and already packed and sterilised instruments were randomly sampled and tested for sterility. Microbial contamination of air, surface, and dental unit water samples were also studied.?RESULTS—The dental personnel did not generally follow the principal procedures for infection control: 30% of personnel were not vaccinated against hepatitis B virus, infected instruments were often not decontaminated, periodic checks of autoclave efficiency were lacking, and the knowledge of disinfection mechanisms and procedures was incomplete. High bacteriological contamination of water at dental surgeries was often found and total bacteriological counts in air samples were high. Surface studies showed widespread bacterial contamination.?CONCLUSIONS—On the basis of these results, an educational programme for the prevention of infective hazards has been prepared and carried out. The results of this pilot study will be used for planning a national survey.???Keywords: dental surgeries; bacterial contamination; cross infection control procedures PMID:11024194

  18. Personality types of Chinese dental school applicants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shengjun; Miao, Danmin; Zhu, Xia; Luo, Zhengxue; Liu, Xufeng

    2007-12-01

    This his article reports the findings of a study conducted to investigate the personality types of Chinese dental school applicants. The Chinese version of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) (Form G) was used to assess the personality styles of 332 dental school applicants from the mainland of China. The results of the MBTI for Chinese dental school applicants were compared with a previous study of applicants from the U.K. A higher percentage of this group of Chinese applicants scored higher for Introversion (I) than Extroversion (E); both Chinese and English applicants preferred Judging (J) to Perceiving (P). The dominant personality types in Chinese applicants were ISTJ, ESTJ, and ISFP. The findings suggest that the personality types of Chinese dental students may be somewhat different from the personality profiles exhibited by dental students from other nations. The findings may be of value to individuals who desire to investigate personality type differences among dental students with different cultural backgrounds. PMID:18096885

  19. 38 CFR 17.161 - Authorization of outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.161...may receive outpatient dental care which is medically...i.e. , is for dental condition clinically...to be complicating a medical condition currently...

  20. 21 CFR 872.6640 - Dental operative unit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental operative unit and accessories. 872...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6640 Dental operative unit and accessories....

  1. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980...AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a)...

  2. 21 CFR 872.4565 - Dental hand instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental hand instrument. 872.4565 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4565 Dental hand instrument. (a)...

  3. 32 CFR 199.22 - TRICARE Retiree Dental Program (TRDP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CIVILIAN HEALTH AND MEDICAL PROGRAM OF THE UNIFORMED...22 TRICARE Retiree Dental Program (TRDP...current and enduring medical or dental condition from being...TRDP. The specific medical or dental condition and...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630 ...AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a)...

  5. 21 CFR 872.4130 - Intraoral dental drill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 false Intraoral dental drill. 872.4130 Section 872...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4130 Intraoral dental drill. (a) Identification....

  6. 21 CFR 872.4565 - Dental hand instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental hand instrument. 872.4565 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4565 Dental hand instrument. (a)...

  7. 21 CFR 872.4200 - Dental handpiece and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental handpiece and accessories. 872.4200...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4200 Dental handpiece and accessories. (a)...

  8. 21 CFR 872.4630 - Dental operating light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental operating light. 872.4630 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4630 Dental operating light. (a)...

  9. 21 CFR 872.4535 - Dental diamond instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental diamond instrument. 872.4535 ...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4535 Dental diamond instrument. (a)...

  10. 21 CFR 872.4130 - Intraoral dental drill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 false Intraoral dental drill. 872.4130 Section 872...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4130 Intraoral dental drill. (a) Identification....

  11. 21 CFR 872.4730 - Dental injecting needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental injecting needle. 872.4730 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4730 Dental injecting needle. (a)...

  12. 21 CFR 872.6250 - Dental chair and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental chair and accessories. 872.6250...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6250 Dental chair and accessories. (a)...

  13. 21 CFR 872.4620 - Fiber optic dental light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Fiber optic dental light. 872.4620 Section 872...AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4620 Fiber optic dental light. (a) Identification....

  14. 38 CFR 17.160 - Authorization of dental examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.160 Authorization...aggravation of an existing dental injury, as the result of examination, hospitalization, or medical or surgical (including dental) treatment that had...

  15. 21 CFR 872.4920 - Dental electrosurgical unit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental electrosurgical unit and accessories...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4920 Dental electrosurgical unit and...

  16. 21 CFR 872.4630 - Dental operating light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental operating light. 872.4630 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4630 Dental operating light. (a)...

  17. 38 CFR 17.160 - Authorization of dental examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.160 Authorization...aggravation of an existing dental injury, as the result of examination, hospitalization, or medical or surgical (including dental) treatment that had...

  18. 21 CFR 872.4920 - Dental electrosurgical unit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental electrosurgical unit and accessories...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4920 Dental electrosurgical unit and...

  19. 21 CFR 872.4130 - Intraoral dental drill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 false Intraoral dental drill. 872.4130 Section 872...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4130 Intraoral dental drill. (a) Identification....

  20. 38 CFR 17.165 - Emergency outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Emergency outpatient dental treatment. 17.165 Section 17.165...Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.165 Emergency outpatient dental treatment. When outpatient...

  1. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a)...

  2. 38 CFR 17.161 - Authorization of outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.161...may receive outpatient dental care which is medically...i.e. , is for dental condition clinically...to be complicating a medical condition currently...

  3. 21 CFR 872.4130 - Intraoral dental drill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 false Intraoral dental drill. 872.4130 Section 872...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4130 Intraoral dental drill. (a) Identification....

  4. 21 CFR 872.4620 - Fiber optic dental light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Fiber optic dental light. 872.4620 Section 872...AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4620 Fiber optic dental light. (a) Identification....

  5. 38 CFR 17.165 - Emergency outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Emergency outpatient dental treatment. 17.165 Section 17.165...Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.165 Emergency outpatient dental treatment. When outpatient...

  6. 21 CFR 872.4730 - Dental injecting needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental injecting needle. 872.4730 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4730 Dental injecting needle. (a)...

  7. 21 CFR 872.4200 - Dental handpiece and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental handpiece and accessories. 872.4200...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4200 Dental handpiece and accessories. (a)...

  8. 21 CFR 872.4200 - Dental handpiece and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental handpiece and accessories. 872.4200...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4200 Dental handpiece and accessories. (a)...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a)...

  10. 21 CFR 872.4920 - Dental electrosurgical unit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental electrosurgical unit and accessories...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4920 Dental electrosurgical unit and...

  11. 38 CFR 17.160 - Authorization of dental examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.160 Authorization...aggravation of an existing dental injury, as the result of examination, hospitalization, or medical or surgical (including dental) treatment that had...

  12. 21 CFR 872.6250 - Dental chair and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental chair and accessories. 872.6250...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6250 Dental chair and accessories. (a)...

  13. 21 CFR 872.4130 - Intraoral dental drill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Intraoral dental drill. 872.4130 Section 872...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4130 Intraoral dental drill. (a) Identification....

  14. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980...AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a)...

  15. 21 CFR 872.4920 - Dental electrosurgical unit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental electrosurgical unit and accessories...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4920 Dental electrosurgical unit and...

  16. 21 CFR 872.4620 - Fiber optic dental light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Fiber optic dental light. 872.4620 Section 872...AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4620 Fiber optic dental light. (a) Identification....

  17. 21 CFR 872.4730 - Dental injecting needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental injecting needle. 872.4730 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4730 Dental injecting needle. (a)...

  18. 21 CFR 872.4630 - Dental operating light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental operating light. 872.4630 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4630 Dental operating light. (a)...

  19. 21 CFR 872.6640 - Dental operative unit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental operative unit and accessories. 872...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6640 Dental operative unit and accessories....

  20. 21 CFR 872.6640 - Dental operative unit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental operative unit and accessories. 872...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6640 Dental operative unit and accessories....

  1. 21 CFR 872.4730 - Dental injecting needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental injecting needle. 872.4730 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4730 Dental injecting needle. (a)...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630 ...AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a)...

  3. 38 CFR 17.160 - Authorization of dental examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.160 Authorization...aggravation of an existing dental injury, as the result of examination, hospitalization, or medical or surgical (including dental) treatment that had...

  4. 21 CFR 872.4200 - Dental handpiece and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental handpiece and accessories. 872.4200...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4200 Dental handpiece and accessories. (a)...

  5. 21 CFR 872.4565 - Dental hand instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental hand instrument. 872.4565 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4565 Dental hand instrument. (a)...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630 ...AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a)...

  7. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980...AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a)...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630 ...AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a)...

  9. 38 CFR 17.165 - Emergency outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Emergency outpatient dental treatment. 17.165 Section 17.165...Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.165 Emergency outpatient dental treatment. When outpatient...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a)...

  11. 38 CFR 17.161 - Authorization of outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.161...may receive outpatient dental care which is medically...i.e. , is for dental condition clinically...to be complicating a medical condition currently...

  12. 38 CFR 17.161 - Authorization of outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.161...may receive outpatient dental care which is medically...i.e. , is for dental condition clinically...to be complicating a medical condition currently...

  13. 38 CFR 17.165 - Emergency outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Emergency outpatient dental treatment. 17.165 Section 17.165...Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.165 Emergency outpatient dental treatment. When outpatient...

  14. 21 CFR 872.4920 - Dental electrosurgical unit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental electrosurgical unit and accessories...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4920 Dental electrosurgical unit and...

  15. 38 CFR 17.160 - Authorization of dental examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.160 Authorization...aggravation of an existing dental injury, as the result of examination, hospitalization, or medical or surgical (including dental) treatment that had...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a)...

  17. 21 CFR 872.4535 - Dental diamond instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental diamond instrument. 872.4535 ...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4535 Dental diamond instrument. (a)...

  18. 21 CFR 872.4630 - Dental operating light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental operating light. 872.4630 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4630 Dental operating light. (a)...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a)...

  20. 32 CFR 199.22 - TRICARE Retiree Dental Program (TRDP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CIVILIAN HEALTH AND MEDICAL PROGRAM OF THE UNIFORMED...22 TRICARE Retiree Dental Program (TRDP...current and enduring medical or dental condition from being...TRDP. The specific medical or dental condition and...

  1. 21 CFR 872.4200 - Dental handpiece and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental handpiece and accessories. 872.4200...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4200 Dental handpiece and accessories. (a)...

  2. 32 CFR 199.22 - TRICARE Retiree Dental Program (TRDP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CIVILIAN HEALTH AND MEDICAL PROGRAM OF THE UNIFORMED...22 TRICARE Retiree Dental Program (TRDP...current and enduring medical or dental condition from being...TRDP. The specific medical or dental condition and...

  3. 38 CFR 17.161 - Authorization of outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.161...may receive outpatient dental care which is medically...i.e. , is for dental condition clinically...to be complicating a medical condition currently...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980...AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a)...

  5. 38 CFR 17.165 - Emergency outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Emergency outpatient dental treatment. 17.165 Section 17.165...Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.165 Emergency outpatient dental treatment. When outpatient...

  6. 21 CFR 872.4535 - Dental diamond instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental diamond instrument. 872.4535 ...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4535 Dental diamond instrument. (a)...

  7. 78 FR 62441 - VA Dental Insurance Program-Federalism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ...64.009 Veterans Medical Care Benefits and 64.011 Veterans Dental Care. Signing Authority...practice and procedure, Dental health, Government...follows: PART 17--MEDICAL 0 1. The authority...Sec. 17.169 VA Dental Insurance...

  8. 21 CFR 872.6640 - Dental operative unit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental operative unit and accessories. 872...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6640 Dental operative unit and accessories....

  9. 21 CFR 872.4620 - Fiber optic dental light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Fiber optic dental light. 872.4620 Section 872...AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4620 Fiber optic dental light. (a) Identification....

  10. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980...AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a)...

  11. 21 CFR 872.4620 - Fiber optic dental light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Fiber optic dental light. 872.4620 Section 872...AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4620 Fiber optic dental light. (a) Identification....

  12. 78 FR 63143 - VA Dental Insurance Program-Federalism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ...64.009 Veterans Medical Care Benefits and 64.011 Veterans Dental Care. Signing Authority...practice and procedure, Dental health, Government...follows: PART 17--MEDICAL 0 1. The authority...Sec. 17.169 VA Dental Insurance...

  13. 32 CFR 199.22 - TRICARE Retiree Dental Program (TRDP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CIVILIAN HEALTH AND MEDICAL PROGRAM OF THE UNIFORMED...22 TRICARE Retiree Dental Program (TRDP...current and enduring medical or dental condition from being...TRDP. The specific medical or dental condition and...

  14. 21 CFR 872.4565 - Dental hand instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental hand instrument. 872.4565 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4565 Dental hand instrument. (a)...

  15. 21 CFR 872.4730 - Dental injecting needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental injecting needle. 872.4730 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4730 Dental injecting needle. (a)...

  16. 21 CFR 872.6250 - Dental chair and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental chair and accessories. 872.6250...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6250 Dental chair and accessories. (a)...

  17. 21 CFR 872.4630 - Dental operating light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental operating light. 872.4630 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4630 Dental operating light. (a)...

  18. 21 CFR 872.4535 - Dental diamond instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental diamond instrument. 872.4535 ...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4535 Dental diamond instrument. (a)...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630 ...AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a)...

  20. 21 CFR 872.4565 - Dental hand instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental hand instrument. 872.4565 Section...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4565 Dental hand instrument. (a)...

  1. 21 CFR 872.6640 - Dental operative unit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental operative unit and accessories. 872...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6640 Dental operative unit and accessories....

  2. 32 CFR 199.22 - TRICARE Retiree Dental Program (TRDP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CIVILIAN HEALTH AND MEDICAL PROGRAM OF THE UNIFORMED...22 TRICARE Retiree Dental Program (TRDP...current and enduring medical or dental condition from being...TRDP. The specific medical or dental condition and...

  3. 21 CFR 872.4535 - Dental diamond instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental diamond instrument. 872.4535 ...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4535 Dental diamond instrument. (a)...

  4. 21 CFR 872.6250 - Dental chair and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental chair and accessories. 872.6250...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6250 Dental chair and accessories. (a)...

  5. 21 CFR 872.6250 - Dental chair and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental chair and accessories. 872.6250...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6250 Dental chair and accessories. (a)...

  6. 76 FR 30373 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ...Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Meeting Notice...Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis...Review Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, 6701...

  7. Clinical implications of panic symptoms in dental phobia.

    PubMed

    Potter, Carrie M; Kinner, Dina G; Tellez, Marisol; Ismail, Amid I; Heimberg, Richard G

    2014-10-01

    The occurrence of panic symptoms in various anxiety disorders has been associated with more severely impaired and difficult-to-treat cases, but this has not been investigated in dental phobia. We examined the clinical implications of panic symptoms related to sub-clinical and clinically significant dental phobia. The sample consisted of 61 patients at a university dental clinic who endorsed symptoms of dental phobia, 25 of whom met criteria for a formal diagnosis of dental phobia. Participants with dental phobia endorsed more panic symptoms than did those with sub-clinical dental phobia. In the total sample, greater endorsement of panic symptoms was associated with higher dental anxiety, more avoidance of dental procedures, and poorer oral health-related quality of life. Among those with dental phobia, certain panic symptoms exhibited associations with specific anxiety-eliciting dental procedures. Panic symptoms may serve as indicators of clinically significant dental phobia and the need for augmented treatment. PMID:25173979

  8. Business Barriers and Opportunities for Transforming to Preventive Care to Treat Early Childhood Caries.

    PubMed

    Compton, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Primary, secondary, and tertiary preventive dental services have the potential for achieving the triple aim of better health outcomes for populations, better patient experience of care, and lower per capita costs. Yet, maximization of preventive services has not occurred in dental practice nor been promoted by dental plans. While the lack of such things as diagnostic codes, caries classification systems, and validated risk assessment tools are barriers to increasing preventive care, they may not be the primary barriers that need to be addressed. The purpose of this paper was to focus on three issues: (1) the dental care business model based on a value proposition of surgical care rather than preventive care; (2) the benefit plan design that undervalues or does not cover effective primary, secondary, and tertiary preventive services; and (3) the current financial crisis in health care. It is the business model of dental practice and the benefit design of payers that are the biggest barriers that will have to change to transform dental care into a more effective and efficient means of achieving and maintaining health. PMID:26063558

  9. The Effect of Community-Level Unemployment on Preventive Oral Health Care Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Brian C; Catalano, Ralph A; Felber, Eugene

    2009-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that high community-level unemployment is associated with reduced use of preventive dental care services by a dentally insured population. Data The study uses monthly data on population dental visits and unemployment in the Seattle and Spokane areas from 1995 to 2004. Utilization data come from Washington Dental Services. Unemployment data were obtained from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and Washington's Employment Security Department. Study Design The study uses a Box–Jenkins Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) method to measure the association between the variables over time. The approach controls for the effects of autocorrelation, seasonality, and confounding variables. Findings In the Seattle area, an unexpected 10,000 unit increase in the number of unemployed individuals is associated with a 1.24 percent decrease in preventive visits during the month (p=.0043). In the Spokane area, a similar increase in unemployment is associated with a 5.95 percent decrease in preventive visits (p=.0326). The findings persist when the independent variable is the number of initial unemployment insurance claims. Conclusions The analysis suggests that utilization of preventive dental care declines during periods of high community-level unemployment. Community-level unemployment may impede or distract populations from utilizing preventive dental services. The study's findings have implications for insurers, dentists, policy makers, and researchers. PMID:18793212

  10. Experts' opinions on the role of diet in caries prevention.

    PubMed

    van Loveren, C; Duggal, M S

    2004-01-01

    A questionnaire was sent to 54 experts in preventive dentistry in 23 European countries in order to make an inventory of existing national dietary guidelines for the prevention of dental caries. In addition, the experts were asked to give their personal opinion on several issues concerning the relationship between diet and dental caries. Forty-five experts from 20 countries returned the questionnaire. In 13 European countries dietary guidelines for caries prevention were available issued by a National (Dental) Association or a Government Body. All guidelines emphasised a reduction of the frequency of intakes of cariogenic foods. Two of them included a threshold level for the amount of sugar. When asked for their personal opinions, almost all experts mentioned reduction of frequency of 'cariogenic' intakes as the principal dietary messages for caries prevention. Four experts, however, explicitly mentioned that proper oral hygiene with fluoride toothpaste is more important. There was no agreement among the experts about a daily number of cariogenic intakes in between meals that can be regarded as safe, nor whether the message: 'Use products with sugar substitutes' should be part of the dietary guidelines for the prevention of dental caries. There was no agreement amongst experts on preventive dentistry in Europe on the contemporary validity of the paradigm: 'Sucrose is the arch criminal of dental caries.' Taking the variation in opinions into account and the fact that a balanced diet may lead to a moderate eating and snacking frequency, the authors propose that the emphasis on good versus bad foods for caries prevention should be replaced by an emphasis on good versus bad diets. PMID:14685020

  11. Hadronic decays

    E-print Network

    C. Michael

    2005-09-09

    Hadronic decays and transitions are a key ingredient of hadronic physics. I discuss how hadronic decays can be explored in lattice gauge theory and review studies undertaken. I also discuss the impact of decays on masses and how lattice studies can explore the nature of a hadronic state: namely whether it is a molecular or quark-antiquark state. A brief discussion of lattice exploration of pentaquark states is presented.

  12. Dental archives based on images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Smutny, Vladimir

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes the Orthoscope, an equipment for acquisition, processing, and archiving of images of patients mouth or skin. The equipment can capture and process images of single tooth, group of teeth or the whole dental arc. A dentist can easily observe the situation in mouth, demonstrate intended plan of treatment to patient and document its results. A dermatologist can evaluate treatment progress. Unlike other methods, our device shows geometrically undistorted calibrated image.The presented equipment is intended for daily practice. The image processing module is connected to an insurance office system and medical archives. This eliminates time consuming literal description of the patient dental/dermatological status. The images can be used later checking of the diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Soft skills and dental education.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, M A G; Abu Kasim, N H; Naimie, Z

    2013-05-01

    Soft skills and hard skills are essential in the practice of dentistry. While hard skills deal with technical proficiency, soft skills relate to a personal values and interpersonal skills that determine a person's ability to fit in a particular situation. These skills contribute to the success of organisations that deal face-to-face with clients. Effective soft skills benefit the dental practice. However, the teaching of soft skills remains a challenge to dental schools. This paper discusses the different soft skills, how they are taught and assessed and the issues that need to be addressed in their teaching and assessment. The use of the module by the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malaya for development of soft skills for institutions of higher learning introduced by the Ministry of Higher Education, Malaysia. PMID:23574183

  14. DEALING WITH DENTAL IMPLANT FAILURES

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Liran

    2008-01-01

    An implant-supported restoration offers a predictable treatment for tooth replacement. Reported success rates for dental implants are high. Nevertheless, failures that mandate immediate implant removal do occur. The consequences of implant removal jeopardize the clinician's efforts to accomplish satisfactory function and esthetics. For the patient, this usually involves further cost and additional procedures. The aim of this paper is to describe different methods and treatment modalities to deal with dental implant failure. The main topics for discussion include identifying the failing implant, implants replacing failed implants at the exact site, and the use of other restorative options. When an implant fails, a tailor made treatment plan should be provided to each patient according to all relevant variables. Patients should be informed regarding all possible treatment modalities following implant failure and give their consent to the most appropriate treatment option for them. PMID:19089213

  15. Threshold concepts in dental education.

    PubMed

    Kinchin, I M; Cabot, L B; Kobus, M; Woolford, M

    2011-11-01

    The paper presents a conceptual framework to inform dental education. Drawing from a vast body of research into student learning, the simple model presented here has an explanatory value in describing what is currently observed to happen and a predictive value in guiding future teaching practices. We introduce to dental education the application of threshold concepts that have a transformative role in offering a new vision of the curriculum that helps to move away from the medieval transmission model of higher education towards a dual processing model that better reflects the way in which professionals operate within the discipline. Threshold concepts give a role for the student voice in offering a novice perspective which is paradoxically something that is out of reach of the subject expert. Finally, the application of threshold concepts highlights some of the weaknesses in the competency-based training model of clinical teaching. PMID:21985204

  16. Seal Out Tooth Decay

    MedlinePLUS

    ... High School and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings Loan Repayment Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care ...

  17. Contact dermatitis from beryllium in dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Haberman, A L; Pratt, M; Storrs, F J

    1993-03-01

    An increasing number of metals with the potential to cause allergic contact dermatitis have found their way into dental alloys for economic and practical reasons. 2 patients are reported who developed gingivitis adjacent to the Rexillium III alloy in their dental prostheses. Patch testing demonstrated positive reactions to beryllium sulfate, a component of the alloy. Components of dental alloys and the mechanism of the contact dermatitis are discussed. PMID:8462293

  18. Dental and allied dental students' attitudes towards and perceptions of intraprofessional education.

    PubMed

    Brame, Jennifer L; Mitchell, Shannon H; Wilder, Rebecca S; Sams, Lattice D

    2015-06-01

    Interprofessional and intraprofessional learning opportunities in health professions education are vital to emphasize evidence-based practice, quality improvement, and cost-effectiveness in patients' oral health care. The aim of this study was to assess dental, dental hygiene, and dental assisting students' readiness for intraprofessional education and to evaluate their attitudes towards and perceptions of intraprofessional teamwork, communication, respect, and understanding of professional roles. In 2013, students at one dental school (N=247) were surveyed, and focus groups were conducted for this convergent parallel mixed-methods study. Survey response rates were as follows: senior dental students 54.4% (N=43), senior dental hygiene students 100% (N=32), dental assisting students 95% (N=19), junior dental students 51.8% (N=42), and junior dental hygiene students 100% (N=33). The results showed that the dental hygiene students had more positive responses about intraprofessional education than the dental and dental assisting students (p<0.05). Most (94%, N=160) of the respondents in the combined groups agreed that intraprofessional learning would help them become more effective members of the oral health care team. The three focus group sessions (N=17) revealed consistency among the groups regarding the value of an integrated clinical design and intraprofessional education. These students were eager and positive about intraprofessional learning and agreed that a shared learning model can improve communication and respect among team members, provide a better understanding of roles, and ultimately enhance patient care. PMID:26034025

  19. 1) Anthem Blue Dental PPO Plus 2) Anthem Blue Dental PPO

    E-print Network

    medical/dental membership card. It will be mailed to your home. Premium Payments To assist in reducing the document titled, "Important Tax Information for Domestic Partners - Medical and Dental Benefits the document titled, "Important Tax Information for Partners in Civil Union ­ Medical, Dental and Term Life

  20. dental.tufts.edu http://dental.tufts.edu/patient-care/contact/#mainContact Patient Directory

    E-print Network

    Dennett, Daniel

    dental.tufts.edu http://dental.tufts.edu/patient-care/contact/#mainContact Patient Directory, headache, sleep) (617) 636-6817 6 Emergency Clinic (Acute pain and urgent dental needs) (617) 636-6828 3 for patients with HIV/AIDS) (617) 636-6814 - Implant Center (Surgical replacement of teeth) (617) 636-6930 5