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1

Training pediatric health care providers in prevention of dental decay: results from a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Physicians report willingness to provide preventive dental care, but optimal methods for their training and support in such procedures are not known. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of three forms of continuing medical education (CME) on provision of preventive dental services to Medicaid-enrolled children by medical personnel in primary care physician offices. Methods Practice-based, randomized controlled trial. Setting: 1,400 pediatric and family physician practices in North Carolina providing care to an estimated 240,000 Medicaid-eligible children aged 0–3 years. Interventions: Group A practices (n = 39) received didactic training and course materials in oral health screening, referral, counseling and application of fluoride varnish. Group B practices (n = 41) received the same as Group A and were offered weekly conference calls providing advice and support. Group C practices (n = 41) received the same as Group B and were offered in-office visit providing hands-on advice and support. In all groups, physicians were reimbursed $38–$43 per preventive dental visit. Outcome measures were computed from reimbursement claims submitted to NC Division of Medical Assistance. Primary outcome measure: rate of preventive dental services provision per 100 well-child visits. Secondary outcome measure: % of practices providing 20 or more preventive dental visits. Results 121 practices were randomized, and 107 provided data for analysis. Only one half of Group B and C practices took part in conference calls or in-office visits. Using intention-to-treat analysis, rates of preventive dental visits did not differ significantly among CME groups: GroupA = 9.4, GroupB = 12.9 and GroupC = 8.5 (P = 0.32). Twenty or more preventive dental visits were provided by 38–49% of practices in the three study groups (P = 0.64). Conclusion A relatively high proportion of medical practices appear capable of adopting these preventive dental services within a one year period regardless of the methods used to train primary health care providers. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00464009

Slade, Gary D; Rozier, R Gary; Zeldin, Leslie P; Margolis, Peter A

2007-01-01

2

About Kids' Teeth: Prevent Kids' Tooth Decay  

MedlinePLUS

... Decay Thumb sucking Prevent Decay Nutrition Prevent Kids’ Tooth Decay You can prevent tooth decay for your kids by lowering the risk of your baby getting the bacteria that cause tooth decay. Make sure you take good care of your ...

3

A review of a child population dental preventive programme in Halton and St Helens.  

PubMed

Introduction An evaluation was undertaken to measure the dental health of five cohorts of 5-year-old children living in Halton and St Helens, each cohort having had a different length of time they were exposed to a population dental prevention programme before their fifth birthday.Method The dental health of each of five consecutive cohorts of 5-year-old children was measured epidemiologically using standardised methods.Results The mean level of active decay (dt) in the cohort that had the greatest exposure to the preventive intervention (cohort 5, 2011/12) was 0.83, whereas the mean level of active decay in the cohort with no exposure to the preventive programme (cohort 1, 2007/8) was 1.07. This represents a reduction of 22% in the mean level of active decay in 5-year-olds. There was also a 5.9% absolute increase in the number of 5-year-old children free from decay experience between cohorts 5 and 1. Children living in Halton and St Helens with postcodes in the more socially deprived index of multiple deprivation (IMD) tertiles gained the most from the programme. Comparing cohort 5 and cohort 1, the increase in the proportion of children free from decay was greatest in IMD tertiles 1 and 2 and least in IMD tertile 3 (least socially disadvantaged).Conclusion Following a four-year population dental preventive programme the dental health of 5-year-old children living in Halton and St Helens has improved and dental health inequalities have reduced. As there was no control group, the effects seen are associative and cannot be assumed to be causative. PMID:24762921

Milsom, K M; Rice, A; Kearney-Mitchell, P; Kellett, L

2014-04-25

4

Summary of: A review of a child population dental preventive programme in Halton and St Helens.  

PubMed

Introduction An evaluation was undertaken to measure the dental health of five cohorts of 5-year-old children living in Halton and St Helens, each cohort having had a different length of time they were exposed to a population dental prevention programme before their fifth birthday.Method The dental health of each of five consecutive cohorts of 5-year-old children was measured epidemiologically using standardised methods.Results The mean level of active decay (dt) in the cohort that had the greatest exposure to the preventive intervention (cohort 5, 2011/12) was 0.83, whereas the mean level of active decay in the cohort with no exposure to the preventive programme (cohort 1, 2007/8) was 1.07. This represents a reduction of 22% in the mean level of active decay in 5-year-olds. There was also a 5.9% absolute increase in the number of 5-year-old children free from decay experience between cohorts 5 and 1. Children living in Halton and St Helens with postcodes in the more socially deprived index of multiple deprivation (IMD) tertiles gained the most from the programme. Comparing cohort 5 and cohort 1, the increase in the proportion of children free from decay was greatest in IMD tertiles 1 and 2 and least in IMD tertile 3 (least socially disadvantaged).Conclusion Following a four-year population dental preventive programme the dental health of 5-year-old children living in Halton and St Helens has improved and dental health inequalities have reduced. As there was no control group, the effects seen are associative and cannot be assumed to be causative. PMID:24762902

Gough, Lesley I

2014-04-25

5

Compliance in Dental Health Education and Prevention - Executive Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Preventive programs based on self-care routines are important in dentistry because of their potential for reducing the need for dental treatment and the total cost of dental care. Dentistry is one of the few areas in health care in which prevention is kno...

M. K. Nikias N. S. Budner

1981-01-01

6

Dental fluorosis: Exposure, prevention and management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dental fluorosis is a developmental disturbance of dental enamel, caused by successive exposures to high con - centrations of fluoride during tooth development, leading to enamel with lower mineral content and increased porosity. The severity of dental fluorosis depends on when and for how long the overexposure to fluoride occurs, the individual response, weight, degree of physical activity, nutritional factors

Jenny Abanto Alvarez; Karla Mayra; P. C. Rezende; Susana María Salazar Marocho; Fabiana B. T. Alves; Paula Celiberti

2009-01-01

7

Mucositis prevention by improved dental care in acute leukemia patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Goals of work  The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of the intensive dental care protocol in preventing oral complications in acute leukemia patients.Patients and methods  Thirty-four patients hospitalized for induction remission therapy for acute leukemia were randomly assigned to one of two groups, whether to receive intensive dental care protocol or not. The intensive dental care group

Milanko Djuric; Valeria Hillier-Kolarov; Aranka Belic; Ljiljana Jankovic

2006-01-01

8

Utilization of Preventive Dental Practices by Graduates of One U.S. Dental School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of 113 graduates of the State University of New York at Stony Brook dental school now in general practice found a high rate of self-reported use of preventive practices (oral hygiene instruction, pit-and-fissure sealants, fluorides, and diet analysis) included in the dental school's curriculum. (MSE)

Ripa, Louis W.; Johnson, Robin M.

1991-01-01

9

Prevention and Control of Decay in Homes.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This manual is intended to provide architects, builders, inspectors, and pest control operators with a comprehensive reference on means of reducing or preventing damage to homes caused by the activities of wood - inhabiting fungi, particularly decay fungi...

A. F. Verrall T. L. Amburgey

1978-01-01

10

Evaluation of Isfahan's Dental Students' Awareness about Preventive Dentistry  

PubMed Central

Statement of Problem: The modern dentistry approach is moving toward preventive dentistry, an approach that has decreased the prevalence of caries within the past decades. Since some reports imply that dentists are not knowledgeable enough in this issue. Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the attitude and awareness of future dental graduates toward preventive dentistry regarding gender and educational characteristics. Materials and Method: This cross-sectional study was performed on one hundred and forty questionnaires which were distributed among dental students of Isfahan province, Azad university of Khorasgan, Iran. Data regarding the level of awareness of dental students about preventive dentistry were recorded and analyzed by using the mean and standard deviations on scores as appropriated. Results: Majority of dental students were aware about the role of sugar in caries process, while only a minority were aware about the role of fluoridated toothpaste and brushing method in caries prevention. Most of the students (82.1%) were among the group with medium level of awareness. Compared with their female counterparts, male students had more knowledge about fluoride efficacy and general hygiene role in caries process. Conclusion: Dental students of  the Isfahan State University and Azad University of Khorasgan had acceptable levels of awareness about the role of sugar and fluoridated water in caries process, but were not aware enough about the role of fluoridated toothpaste in preventing dental caries.

Nilchian, F.; Kazemi, Sh.; Abbasi, M.; Ghoreishian, F.; Kowkabi, M.

2014-01-01

11

Evaluation of Isfahan's Dental Students' Awareness about Preventive Dentistry.  

PubMed

Statement of Problem: The modern dentistry approach is moving toward preventive dentistry, an approach that has decreased the prevalence of caries within the past decades. Since some reports imply that dentists are not knowledgeable enough in this issue. Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the attitude and awareness of future dental graduates toward preventive dentistry regarding gender and educational characteristics. Materials and Method: This cross-sectional study was performed on one hundred and forty questionnaires which were distributed among dental students of Isfahan province, Azad university of Khorasgan, Iran. Data regarding the level of awareness of dental students about preventive dentistry were recorded and analyzed by using the mean and standard deviations on scores as appropriated. Results: Majority of dental students were aware about the role of sugar in caries process, while only a minority were aware about the role of fluoridated toothpaste and brushing method in caries prevention. Most of the students (82.1%) were among the group with medium level of awareness. Compared with their female counterparts, male students had more knowledge about fluoride efficacy and general hygiene role in caries process. Conclusion: Dental students of  the Isfahan State University and Azad University of Khorasgan had acceptable levels of awareness about the role of sugar and fluoridated water in caries process, but were not aware enough about the role of fluoridated toothpaste in preventing dental caries. PMID:24738083

Nilchian, F; Kazemi, Sh; Abbasi, M; Ghoreishian, F; Kowkabi, M

2014-03-01

12

Prevention of surgical skill decay.  

PubMed

The U.S. military medical community spends a great deal of time and resources training its personnel to provide them with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform life-saving tasks, both on the battlefield and at home. However, personnel may fail to retain specialized knowledge and skills if they are not applied during the typical periods of nonuse within the military deployment cycle, and retention of critical knowledge and skills is crucial to the successful care of warfighters. For example, we researched the skill and knowledge loss associated with specialized surgical skills such as those required to perform laparoscopic surgery (LS) procedures. These skills are subject to decay when military surgeons perform combat casualty care during their deployment instead of LS. This article describes our preliminary research identifying critical LS skills, as well as their acquisition and decay rates. It introduces models that identify critical skills related to laparoscopy, and proposes objective metrics for measuring these critical skills. This research will provide insight into best practices for (1) training skills that are durable and resistant to skill decay, (2) assessing these skills over time, and (3) introducing effective refresher training at appropriate intervals to maintain skill proficiency. PMID:24084308

Perez, Ray S; Skinner, Anna; Weyhrauch, Peter; Niehaus, James; Lathan, Corinna; Schwaitzberg, Steven D; Cao, Caroline G L

2013-10-01

13

Factors associated with receipt of preventive dental treatment procedures among adult patients at a dental training school in Wisconsin, 2001–2002  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Gender differences in oral health-related quality of life and the fear of dental pain in seeking and receiving preventive dental care have been recognized and documented. Preventive dental treatment procedures (PDTPs) are commonly accepted as the primary approach to prevent dental disease.Objective: We examined whether the likelihood of receiving PDTPs differed by gender in adult patients receiving dental care

Christopher Okunseri; Ruta Bajorunaite; Jessica Mehta; Brian Hodgson; Anthony M. Iacopino

2009-01-01

14

Dental caries: From infection to prevention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Dental caries is one of the most prevalent diseases in humans, second only to the common cold. It causes irreversible damage to the grinding machinery involved in the intake of food and hence causes great distress. The changes in the homeostasis of the oral cavity with an overgrowth of Streptococcus mutans is recognized as the primary cause of the

Barira Islam; Shahper N. Khan; Asad U. Khan

2007-01-01

15

Association of Streptococcus mutans with Human Dental Decay  

PubMed Central

The association of Streptococcus mutans with human dental decay was investigated by using several types of samples: (i) paraffin-stimulated saliva samples taken from children with from 0 to 15 decayed teeth; (ii) pooled occlusal and approximal plaque taken from children with no decayed or filled teeth, or from children with rampant caries of 10 or more teeth; (iii) plaque removed from single occlusal fissures that were either carious or noncarious. The results showed a significant association between plaque levels of S. mutans and caries. The strongest association, P < 0.0001, was found when plaque was removed from single occlusal fissures. Seventy-one percent of the carious fissures had S. mutans accounting for more than 10% of the viable flora, whereas 70% of the fissures that were caries free had no detectable S. mutans. Sixty-five percent of the pooled plaque samples from the children with rampant caries had S. mutans accounting for more than 10% of the viable flora, whereas 40% of the pooled samples from children that were caries free had no detectable S. mutans. Saliva samples tended to have low levels of S. mutans and were equivocal in demonstrating a relationship between S. mutans and caries.

Loesche, W. J.; Rowan, J.; Straffon, L. H.; Loos, P. J.

1975-01-01

16

Fluoride Programs in the School Setting: Preventive Dental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two types of school-based programs that increase students' use of fluoride for preventive dental health are described. In fluoride mouthrinse programs, teachers give their students a fluoride solution once a week in a paper cup. In areas where the level of fluoride in the water supply is insufficient, the flouride tablet program is used. (JN)

Rebich, Theodore, Jr.; And Others

1982-01-01

17

Diet, nutrition and the prevention of dental diseases.  

PubMed

Oral health is related to diet in many ways, for example, nutritional influences on craniofacial development, oral cancer and oral infectious diseases. Dental diseases impact considerably on self-esteem and quality of life and are expensive to treat. The objective of this paper is to review the evidence for an association between nutrition, diet and dental diseases and to present dietary recommendations for their prevention. Nutrition affects the teeth during development and malnutrition may exacerbate periodontal and oral infectious diseases. However, the most significant effect of nutrition on teeth is the local action of diet in the mouth on the development of dental caries and enamel erosion. Dental erosion is increasing and is associated with dietary acids, a major source of which is soft drinks. Despite improved trends in levels of dental caries in developed countries, dental caries remains prevalent and is increasing in some developing countries undergoing nutrition transition. There is convincing evidence, collectively from human intervention studies, epidemiological studies, animal studies and experimental studies, for an association between the amount and frequency of free sugars intake and dental caries. Although other fermentable carbohydrates may not be totally blameless, epidemiological studies show that consumption of starchy staple foods and fresh fruit are associated with low levels of dental caries. Fluoride reduces caries risk but has not eliminated dental caries and many countries do not have adequate exposure to fluoride. It is important that countries with a low intake of free sugars do not increase intake, as the available evidence shows that when free sugars consumption is <15-20 kg/yr ( approximately 6-10% energy intake), dental caries is low. For countries with high consumption levels it is recommended that national health authorities and decision-makers formulate country-specific and community-specific goals for reducing the amount of free sugars aiming towards the recommended maximum of no more than 10% of energy intake. In addition, the frequency of consumption of foods containing free sugars should be limited to a maximum of 4 times per day. It is the responsibility of national authorities to ensure implementation of feasible fluoride programmes for their country. PMID:14972061

Moynihan, Paula; Petersen, Poul Erik

2004-02-01

18

Periodic health examination, 1995 update: 2. Prevention of dental caries. The Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To make recommendations, based on current evidence, for practising physicians and dentists on interventions for the prevention of dental caries in their patients. OPTIONS: Systemic fluoride administration, professionally administered fluoride, use of fluoride mouth rinses, fissure sealants, oral-hygiene practices, dietary practices, identification of groups at a high risk of dental caries, and early diagnosis and treatment. OUTCOMES: Reduced prevalence of dental caries and fluorosis, longer retention of teeth and lower treatment costs. EVIDENCE: Several MEDLINE searches were conducted for articles published from January 1980 to December 1992, including relevant review articles. VALUES: Relevant clinical findings were evaluated and categorized with the use of the evidence-based methods and values of the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination. Recommendations were developed for each method of caries prevention, with reduced incidence of dental caries and improved prevalence of caries-free teeth given high values. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: The potential benefits of these measures in the long-term are a lower incidence of tooth decay, longer retention of teeth and prevention of fluorosis. The cost saving can be considerable for patients and insurers; however, implementation of some recommendations will be difficult, since the traditional preventive practices of dentists and dental hygienists are not easily changed. RECOMMENDATIONS: There is good evidence that the following manoeuvres are effective in preventing dental caries: use of dentifrices containing fluoride, fluoridation of drinking water, fluoride supplements for patients in areas where there is a low level (0.3 ppm or less) of fluoride in the drinking water, professionally applied topical fluoride and the use of fluoride mouth rinses for patients with very active decay or at a high risk of dental caries and selective use of professionally applied fissure sealants on permanent molar teeth. There is poor evidence that the following manoeuvres are effective in preventing dental caries: professionally applied topical fluoride and the use of fluoride mouth rinses for patients with a low risk of caries, toothbrushing (without a dentifrice containing fluoride) and flossing, cleaning of teeth by a dentist or dental hygienist before topical application of fluoride or at a dental visit and dietary counselling for the general population. There is good evidence to recommend against the use of over-the-counter fluoride mouth rinses by the general population. VALIDATION: These guidelines are compatible with those of the US Preventive Services Task Force. SPONSOR: These guidelines were developed and endorsed by the task force, which is funded by Health Canada. Major funding was provided by the Faculty of Dentistry of the University of Toronto, Toronto and the Faculty of Dentistry of Dalhousie University, Halifax.

Lewis, D W; Ismail, A I

1995-01-01

19

Hearings Before the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs of the United States Senate, Ninety-Third Congress, First Session. Nutrition Education--1973. Part 6--Phosphate Research and Dental Decay. Hearings Held Washington, D.C., April 16, 1973.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These hearings before the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs of the United States Senate include testimony on the subject of research into the use of phosphates to prevent dental decay. The purpose of the hearing was to explore certain dental health questions raised during the committee's recent hearings on the Television Advertising of…

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs.

20

Genetically modified Streptococcus mutans for the prevention of dental caries.  

PubMed

There are many examples of positive and negative interactions between different species of bacteria inhabiting the same ecosystem. This observation provides the basis for a novel approach to preventing microbial diseases called replacement therapy. In this approach, a harmless effector strain is permanently implanted in the host's microflora. Once established, the presence of the effector strain prevents the colonization or outgrowth of a particular pathogen. In the case of dental caries, replacement therapy has involved construction of an effector strain called BCS3-L1, which was derived from a clinical Streptococcus mutans isolate. Recombinant DNA technology was used to delete the gene encoding lactate dehydrogenase in BCS3-L1 making it entirely deficient in lactic acid production. This effector strain was also designed to produce elevated amounts of a novel peptide antibiotic called mutacin 1140 that gives it a strong selective advantage over most other strains of S. mutans. In laboratory and rodent model studies, BCS3-L1 was found to be genetically stable and to produce no apparent deleterious side effects during prolonged colonization. BCS3-L1 was significantly less cariogenic than wild-type S. mutans in gnotobiotic rats, and it did not contribute at all to the cariogenic potential of the indigenous flora of conventional Sprague-Dawley rats. And, its strong colonization properties indicated that a single application of the BCS3-L1 effector strain to human subjects should result in its permanent implantation and displacement over time of indigenous, disease-causing S. mutans strains. Thus, BCS3-L1 replacement therapy for the prevention of dental caries is an example of biofilm engineering that offers the potential for a highly efficient, cost effective augmentation of conventional prevention strategies. It is hoped that the eventual success of replacement therapy for the prevention of dental caries will stimulate the use of this approach in the prevention of other bacterial diseases. PMID:12369203

Hillman, Jeffrey D

2002-08-01

21

Tooth Decay  

MedlinePLUS

... 39 billion in dental expenditures due to the power of prevention. Since the 1950s, the total federal ... and reverse early decay. Examples of NIH research projects funded in 2010 include “Development of high performance, ...

22

Phytotherapeutic prevention of dental biofilm formation.  

PubMed

The antimicrobial and biofilm formation preventive properties of Mentha piperita and Rosmarinus officinalis essential oils and chlorhexidine were assessed against Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus pyogenes. 26 and 20 compounds were identified by GC and GC-MS analysis in hydrodistilled oils from M. piperita and R. officinalis, respectively. The minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of the M. piperita and R. officinalis oils and chlorhexidine were (6000, 2000, 8000 ppm) and (1000, 4000, 1000 ppm) for S. mutans and S. pyogenes, respectively. The decimal reduction time (D) of S. mutans exposed to the oils at their MBC levels was 2.8 min while chlorhexidine showed a longer time. The D values of S. pyogenes on exposure to the MBC levels of M. piperita and R. officinalis oils and of chlorhexidine were 2.14, 4.28 and 2.8 min, indicating a higher efficacy of M. piperita oil. Biofilm formation was performed by growing S. mutans culture with and without essential oils in LB medium in polystyrene tubes. In vitro biofilm inhibitory properties were in the order M. piperita > R. officinalis > chlorhexidine. In vivo experiments on the antibiofilm properties revealed that all concentrations of the oils were significantly (p < 0.001) more effective than chlorhexidine. In conclusion, essential oils may be considered as safe agents in the development of novel antibiofilm agents. PMID:18729251

Rasooli, Iraj; Shayegh, Shojaedin; Taghizadeh, Massoud; Astaneh, Shakiba Darvish Alipoor

2008-09-01

23

Local complications in dental implant surgery: prevention and treatment  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY There are many detailed articles regarding accidents and local complications in dental implantation. Comparison of the data they report is not always easy because different criteria have been followed in the various classifications and there is confusion between the terms accident and complication. The aim of this paper is to propose a classification that considers the timing of the events and makes a distinction between the two terms. Accidents are events that occur during surgery and complications are all the pathological conditions that appear postoperatively. The proper diagnostic procedures and surgical techniques for complications prevention and treatment are also described.

ANNIBALI, S.; RIPARI, M.; LA MONACA, G.; TONOLI, F.; CRISTALLI, M.P.

2008-01-01

24

Preventing baby bottle tooth decay in American Indian and Alaska native communities: a model for planning.  

PubMed Central

Baby bottle tooth decay (BBTD) is a preventable dental disease which surveys have shown affects more than 50 percent of Native American children. An experimental program to prevent BBTD was implemented in 12 Native American communities. The project represented a cooperative effort by three Department of Health and Human Service agencies: Administration for Children, Youth, and Families, Head Start Bureau; Indian Health Service, Dental Program; and Centers for Disease Control, Dental Disease Prevention Activity. Intervention strategies included the training of parent volunteers, health professionals, and the tribal employees who counseled caretakers of young children and made group presentations. There was also a media campaign in each community that ran for a 3-year period. Numerous educational materials were developed including training manuals, counseling booklets, tippee cups, posters, and bumper stickers. The BBTD project's planners encouraged tailoring the education materials and strategies to fit each community. Preliminary results documented statistically significant decreases in the prevalence of BBTD at the pilot sites. This multidisciplinary, comprehensive intervention offers a model for organizing members of minority communities to prevent health problems. Images p634-a p635-a p635-b

Bruerd, B; Kinney, M B; Bothwell, E

1989-01-01

25

Role of estrogen related receptor beta (ESRRB) in DFN35B hearing impairment and dental decay  

PubMed Central

Background Congenital forms of hearing impairment can be caused by mutations in the estrogen related receptor beta (ESRRB) gene. Our initial linkage studies suggested the ESRRB locus is linked to high caries experience in humans. Methods We tested for association between the ESRRB locus and dental caries in 1,731 subjects, if ESRRB was expressed in whole saliva, if ESRRB was associated with the microhardness of the dental enamel, and if ESRRB was expressed during enamel development of mice. Results Two families with recessive ESRRB mutations and DFNB35 hearing impairment showed more extensive dental destruction by caries. Expression levels of ESRRB in whole saliva samples showed differences depending on sex and dental caries experience. Conclusions The common etiology of dental caries and hearing impairment provides a venue to assist in the identification of individuals at risk to either condition and provides options for the development of new caries prevention strategies, if the associated ESRRB genetic variants are correlated with efficacy.

2014-01-01

26

Baden-Powell on teeth: a centenary perspective of a pioneer of preventive dental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the era when dental care, particularly preventive dental health, did not enjoy a high public profile, Lieut-General (later Lord) Robert Baden-Powell (1857–1941) was an influential advocate for the care of the teeth. He was a pioneer in a targeted outreach to youth, specifically boys and young men, emphasising the importance of dental health as an essential part of total

J. Pearn

2008-01-01

27

Factors associated with reduced compliance of children to dental preventive measures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to record self-reported factors for non-compliance to ‘dental home’ preventive measures among pediatric\\u000a patients, and to clarify whether number or frequency of recall appointments increases their long-term compliance to dental\\u000a home. Children attending recall appointments in a pediatric dental clinic were interviewed regarding their compliance as well\\u000a as factors for non-compliance with the previously

Malka Ashkenazi; Mervat Bidoosi; Liran Levin

28

Topical fluoride for preventing dental caries in children and adolescents.  

PubMed

The use of topically applied fluoride has been widely researched as a means to reduce the risk of dental caries in conjunction with other treatment modalities (mechanical oral hygiene, dietary control, antimicrobial intervention, pit and fissure sealants). There is overwhelming evidence that reports not only the significance and importance of the use of fluoride as a caries-preventive agent, but also how safe fluoride application is when used appropriately, particularly in higher risk individuals and populations. This paper reviews the caries-protective benefits of topical fluoride application in children and adolescents, with an emphasis on the clinical efficacy and safety of the vehicles by which fluoride is topically delivered. Fluoride toothpaste represents today the most cost-effective fluoride-delivery system in the oral cavity and its use should be the centerpiece in all caries-preventive strategies. On the other hand, mouthrinses, gels and varnishes currently represent adjuncts to toothpaste use and should be targeted towards individuals and groups at high risk of caries. PMID:22632397

Miller, Faith Y; Campus, Guglielmo; Giuliana, Giovanna; Piscopo, Maria R; Pizzo, Giuseppe

2012-01-01

29

American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Practice Management and for Preventive Dentistry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Curricular guidelines developed by the American Association of Dental Schools for use by individual educational institutions as curriculum development aids are provided. The guidelines were developed by the Sections on Community and Preventive Dentistry and Practice Administration. (MLW)

Journal of Dental Education, 1980

1980-01-01

30

76 FR 2383 - Proposed HHS Recommendation for Fluoride Concentration in Drinking Water for Prevention of Dental...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for Fluoride Concentration in Drinking Water for Prevention of Dental Caries AGENCY...U.S. Public Health Service Drinking Water Standards related to recommendations for fluoride concentrations in drinking water. The U.S. Public Health Service...

2011-01-13

31

Diet, nutrition and the prevention of dental diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oral health is related to diet in many ways, for example, nutritional influences on craniofacial development, oral cancer and oral infectious diseases. Dental diseases impact considerably on self-esteem and quality of life and are expensive to treat. The objective of this paper is to review the evidence for an association between nutrition, diet and dental diseases and to present dietary

Paula Moynihan; Poul Erik Petersen

2004-01-01

32

Laser dental decay prevention: does it have a future?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies have recorded the reduction of caries-like lesions or demineralization in extracted human teeth that have been irradiated using CO2, Nd:YAG and Argon lasers, with CO2 or Argon showing up to 40 - 50% reduction. By adding a chemical inhibitor, such as DAC or fluoride to lasing procedures, the demineralization can be reduced 60 - 80%. Studies have demonstrated

Glen L. Powell

1997-01-01

33

Personal Factors in Dental Disease Prevention: I. A Test to Measure Dental Health Knowledge.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A dental health knowledge test was devised and was evaluated in 106 Submarine School students. Criteria of evaluation consisted of response distribution spreads, and objectively evaluated gingivitis and oral hygiene. A test score, derived from selected qu...

W. R. Shiller

1969-01-01

34

The importance of preventive dental visits from a young age: systematic review and current perspectives  

PubMed Central

Background Dental caries, the most common childhood chronic disease, disproportionately affects vulnerable parts of the population and confers substantial impacts to children, families, and health systems. Because efforts directed toward oral health promotion and disease prevention are fundamentally superior to dental rehabilitation secondary to disease development, early preventive dental visits (EPDVs) are widely advocated by professional and academic stakeholders. The aim of this comprehensive review was to critically review and summarize available evidence regarding the effectiveness of EPDVs in improving children’s oral health outcomes. Materials and methods A systematic literature search of the PubMed and Embase electronic databases was undertaken to identify peer-reviewed publications investigating the effectiveness of EPDVs on oral health outcomes, including clinical, behavioral, and cost end points up to October 30, 2013. Outcomes of the identified studies were abstracted and summarized independently by two investigators. Results Four manuscripts met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. All studies were conducted in the US and employed a retrospective cohort study design using public insurance-claims data, whereas one study matched claims files with kindergarten state dental surveillance data. That study found no benefit of EPDVs in future clinically determined dental caries levels in kindergarten. The other three studies found mixed support for an association of EPDVs with subsequent more preventive and fewer nonpreventive visits and lower nonpreventive service-related expenditures. Selection bias and a problem-driven dental care-seeking pattern were frequently articulated themes in the reviewed studies. Conclusion The currently available evidence base supporting the effectiveness of EPDVs and the year 1 first dental visit recommendation is weak, and more research is warranted. The benefits of EPDVs before the age of 3 years are evident among children at high risk or with existing dental disease. However, EPDVs may be associated with reduced restorative dental care visits and related expenditures during the first years of life.

Bhaskar, Vaishnavi; McGraw, Kathleen A; Divaris, Kimon

2014-01-01

35

Microbial contamination of dental unit waterlines: current preventive measures and emerging options.  

PubMed

Various approaches to prevention and control of microbial contamination of dental unit water are evolving. Currently available methods and emerging technologies are reviewed here in the context of contemporary federal regulatory and advisory agency positions on water quality in the dental operatory. Clean water systems, fully autoclavable systems, and a variety of devices designed to provide physical barriers to the influx and accumulation of microbial contaminants can all be used to assure satisfactory quality for coolant and irrigant water. There is one important proviso: all require a commitment to maintenance if they are to be deployed successfully. Stricter adherence to American Dental Association/American National Standards Institute standards in manufacturing and production and compliance with federal regulatory marketing procedures for equipment and devices would do much to advance the cause of dental unit water quality control. PMID:9051941

Williams, J F; Andrews, N; Santiago, J I

1996-07-01

36

Addressing Tooth Decay in Head Start Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tooth decay is the most prevalent chronic disease of childhood. Oral health education and dental services are crucial to reducing the number of children afflicted with dental cavities. Due to limited access to preventative care, Head Start children are particularly vulnerable to tooth decay. This article outlines practical implications of a…

Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

2012-01-01

37

Aeration prevents methyl mercury production in dental wastewater.  

PubMed

Although research has demonstrated that Hg is methylated in the reducing conditions of the dental clinic wastewater collection system, studies are inconclusive as to whether further methylation occurs in the aeration basin of activated sludge wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) which typically treats this waste. Given the high levels of methyl Hg reported in dental wastewater (DWW), it is important to determine whether additional methylation occurs once it enters the WWTP. To achieve this objective, we incubated DWW under conditions designed to mimic the oxidized conditions of the activated sludge aeration basin in a WWTP. Duplicate bioreactors were charged with raw DWW collected from a 12-chair dental clinic and incubated both with and without aeration. Aeration was continued for 15 days, consistent with the typical mean cell residence time (MCRT) necessary for both heterotrophic carbon oxidation (typically 5-6 days) and nitrification (typically 12-15 days), thus ensuring that incubation time exceeded those for most conceivable MCRTs used in the activated sludge process. Results demonstrate a rapid increase in pH concomitant with an increase in dissolved oxygen (DO) to near saturation in the aerated reactor. The non-aerated reactor remained low or at zero DO due to low surface reaeration coupled with the high levels of organic matter. The rate of mercury methylation increased in the unaearated reactors rapidly upon incubation, reaching highest levels when DO was at the lowest levels during the experiment. In great contrast, methyl mercury levels were much lower and net mercury methylation does not appear to occur at any significant rate under aeration. These results imply that although some mercury methylation may occur in the sewer collection system (or anaerobic digesters), net methylation is unlikely to occur in the aeration basin in activated sludge WWTPs, and thus methyl Hg influent levels from DWW represent an upper bound on effluent levels. PMID:22375543

Zhao, Xiuhong; Rockne, Karl J; Drummond, James L

2012-01-01

38

Children's Dental Care: Advice and Visits, Ages 2-17, 2011.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, tooth decay affects children in the United States more than any other chronic infectious disease. Untreated tooth decay causes pain and infections that may lead to other serious problems. Dental...

A. Soni

2014-01-01

39

[A survey of preventive measures against infection risk in dental surgery].  

PubMed

In dental healthcare surgeries, both workers and patients are regularly exposed to various infectious agents. It is essential therefore that dental healthcare workers have a good knowledge of disinfection systems and that dentists' surgeries be effectively managed so as to reduce or even eliminate the risk of cross infections. In order to evaluate infectious risk prevention methods and describe the procedures used by dental healthcare workers on a daily basis, a sample of dentists who work in public surgeries were asked to anonymously fill up a questionnaire. The results of this survey show that dental healthcare workers are sufficiently well-informed about the infectious hazards present in the workplace and are aware of the high risk of exposure to infections but seem to be especially concerned about blood-borne infections (hepatitis, AIDS). Only 67.5%, however, are immunised against HBV. Individual safety devices are used correctly while there seems to be a lack of knowledge about the proper use of disinfection and sterilization systems. In addition, some dental healthcare workers still today refuse to treat HIV-positive patients. PMID:17206193

Napoli, Christian; Tatò, Daniela; De Benedittis, Michele; Pastore, Luca; Serpico, Rosario; Quarto, Michele; Montagna, Maria Teresa

2005-01-01

40

Enzyme Replacement Therapy Prevents Dental Defects in a Model of Hypophosphatasia  

PubMed Central

Hypophosphatasia (HPP) occurs from loss-of-function mutation in the tissue-non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNALP) gene, resulting in extracellular pyrophosphate accumulation that inhibits skeletal and dental mineralization. TNALP-null mice (Akp2-/-) phenocopy human infantile hypophosphatasia; they develop rickets at 1 week of age, and die before being weaned, having severe skeletal and dental hypomineralization and episodes of apnea and vitamin B6-responsive seizures. Delay and defects in dentin mineralization, together with a deficiency in acellular cementum, are characteristic. We report the prevention of these dental abnormalities in Akp2-/- mice receiving treatment from birth with daily injections of a mineral-targeting, human TNALP (sALP-FcD10). sALP-FcD10 prevented hypomineralization of alveolar bone, dentin, and cementum as assessed by micro-computed tomography and histology. Osteopontin – a marker of acellular cementum – was immuno-localized along root surfaces, confirming that acellular cementum, typically missing or reduced in Akp2-/- mice, formed normally. Our findings provide insight concerning how acellular cementum is formed on tooth surfaces to effect periodontal ligament attachment to retain teeth in their osseous alveolar sockets. Furthermore, they provide evidence that this enzyme-replacement therapy, applied early in post-natal life – where the majority of tooth root development occurs, including acellular cementum formation – could prevent the accelerated tooth loss seen in individuals with HPP.

McKee, M.D.; Nakano, Y.; Masica, D.L.; Gray, J.J.; Lemire, I.; Heft, R.; Whyte, M.P.; Crine, P.; Millan, J.L.

2011-01-01

41

Comparative Efficacies of Amoxicillin, Clindamycin, and Moxifloxacin in Prevention of Bacteremia following Dental Extractions  

PubMed Central

We evaluated the efficacies of oral prophylactic treatment with amoxicillin (AMX), clindamycin (CLI), and moxifloxacin (MXF) in the prevention of bacteremia following dental extractions (BDE). Two hundred twenty-one adults who required dental extractions under general anesthesia were randomly assigned to a control group, an AMX group, a CLI group, and an MXF group (the individuals in the drug treatment groups received 2 g, 600 mg, and 400 mg, respectively, 1 to 2 h before anesthesia induction). Venous blood samples were collected from each patient at the baseline and 30 s, 15 min, and 1 h after the dental extractions. The samples were inoculated into BACTEC Plus aerobic and anaerobic blood culture bottles and were processed in a BACTEC 9240 instrument. Subculture and the further identification of the isolated bacteria were performed by conventional microbiological techniques. The prevalences of BDE in the control group, AMX group, CLI group, and MXF group were 96, 46, 85, and 57%, respectively, at 30 s; 64, 11, 70, and 24%, respectively, at 15 min; and 20, 4, 22, and 7%, respectively, at 1 h. Streptococcus spp. were the most frequently identified bacteria in all groups (44 to 68%), with the lowest percentage being detected in the AMX group (44%). AMX and MXF prophylaxis showed high efficacies in reducing the prevalence and duration of BDE, but CLI prophylaxis was noneffective. As a consequence, MXF prophylaxis is a promising antibiotic alternative for the prevention of BDE when beta-lactams are not indicated.

Diz Dios, P.; Tomas Carmona, I.; Limeres Posse, J.; Medina Henriquez, J.; Fernandez Feijoo, J.; Alvarez Fernandez, M.

2006-01-01

42

A holistic food labelling strategy for preventing obesity and dental caries.  

PubMed

Obesity and dental caries in childhood are among the major public health concerns described as a global pandemic because of their global distribution and severe consequences. A consensus has developed as to a recently emerging and alarming common risk factor that leads to the double burden of dental caries and obesity; energy-dense foods (sugar-coated cereals, high-sugar yogurt, soft drinks) are becoming very popular among children because of their dense marketing, cheaper price, increased supply and variety. Implementation of health-promoting and -supporting marketing strategies for healthy food can be one initial cornerstone for successful application of the common risk factor approach in prevention of obesity and dental caries, as also suggested by World Health Organization. Labelling healthy food with a 'health-friendly' logo, illustrating that the teeth and the heart are both parts of the whole body (standing side by side supporting each other as close friends), both happy and protected because of consumption of healthy food for the whole body, can promote the foods that are friendly to health of the whole body, implementing the common risk factor approach under a single theme. Labelling healthy food as 'health-friendly' based on an international consensus will provide a clear and uniform picture of what is healthy to eat and result in an international integrated programme for prevention of obesity and caries. PMID:19207877

Cinar, A B; Murtomaa, H

2009-05-01

43

Triclosan-Loaded Tooth-Binding Micelles for Prevention and Treatment of Dental Biofilm  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  To develop tooth-binding micelle formulations of triclosan for the prevention and treatment of dental caries.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Alendronate (ALN) was conjugated to the chain termini of different Pluronic copolymers to confer tooth-binding ability to\\u000a the micelles. Using 3 different formulation methods, Pluronics and ALN-modified Pluronics were used to prepare triclosan-loaded\\u000a tooth-binding micelles. The formulation parameters were optimized for triclosan solubility, particle size,

Fu Chen; Kelly C. Rice; Xin-Ming Liu; Richard A. Reinhardt; Kenneth W. Bayles; Dong Wang

2010-01-01

44

A comparative study of the effect of probiotics on cariogenic biofilm model for preventing dental caries.  

PubMed

Dental caries is induced by oral biofilm containing Streptococcus mutans. Probiotic bacteria were mainly studied for effect on the gastrointestinal tract and have been known to promote human health. However, the information of probiotics for oral health has been lack yet. In this study, we investigated influence of various probiotics on oral bacteria or cariogenic biofilm and evaluated candidate probiotics for dental caries among them. The antimicrobial activity of the spent culture medium of probiotics for oral streptococci was performed. Probiotics were added during the biofilm formation with salivary bacteria including S. mutans. The oral biofilms were stained with a fluorescent dye and observed using the confocal laser scanning microscope. To count bacteria in the biofilm, the bacteria were plated on MSB and BHI agar plates after disrupting the biofilm and cultivated. Glucosyltransferases (gtfs) expression of S. mutans and integration of lactobacilli into the biofilm were evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Among probiotics, Lactobacillus species strongly inhibited growth of oral streptococci. Moreover, Lactobacillus species strongly inhibited formation of cariogenic biofilm model. The expression of gtfs was significantly reduced by Lactobacillus rhamnosus. The integration of L. rhamnosus into the biofilm model did not exhibit. However, L. acidophilus and L casei integrated into the biofilm model. These results suggest that L. rhamnosus may inhibit oral biofilm formation by decreasing glucan production of S. mutans and antibacterial activity and did not integrate into oral biofilm, which can be a candidate for caries prevention strategy. PMID:24919536

Lee, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Young-Jae

2014-08-01

45

Characterization of a marine-derived dextranase and its application to the prevention of dental caries.  

PubMed

The dextranase added in current commercial dextranase-containing mouthwashes is largely from fungi. However, fungal dextranase has shown much higher optimum temperature than bacterial dextranase and relatively low activity when used in human oral cavities. Bacterial dextranase has been considered to be more effective and suitable for dental caries prevention. In this study, a dextranase (Dex410) from marine Arthrobacter sp. was purified and characterized. Dex410 is a 64-kDa endoglycosidase. The specific activity of Dex410 was 11.9 U/mg at optimum pH 5.5 and 45 °C. The main end-product of Dex410 was isomaltotriose, isomaltoteraose, and isomaltopentaose by hydrolyzing dextran T2000. In vitro studies showed that Dex410 effectively inhibited the Streptococcus mutans biofilm growth in coverage, biomass, and water-soluble glucan (WSG) by more than 80, 90, and 95 %, respectively. The animal experiment revealed that for short-term use (1.5 months), both Dex410 and the commercial mouthwash Biotene (Laclede Professional Products, Gardena, CA, USA) had a significant inhibitory effect on caries (p = 0.0008 and 0.0001, respectively), while for long-term use (3 months), only Dex410 showed significant inhibitory effect on dental caries (p = 0.005). The dextranase Dex410 from a marine-derived Arthrobacter sp. strain possessed the enzyme properties suitable to human oral environment and applicable to oral hygiene products. PMID:24197466

Jiao, Yu-Liang; Wang, Shu-Jun; Lv, Ming-Sheng; Jiao, Bing-Hua; Li, Wei-Juan; Fang, Yao-Wei; Liu, Shu

2014-01-01

46

Caregiver Burden and Preventive Dental Care Use for US Children with Special Health Care Needs: A Stratified Analysis Based on Functional Limitation.  

PubMed

The objectives of this study were to evaluate the association between caregiver burden and preventive dental care use for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) and assess if caregiver burden explains the relationship between child- and family-level characteristics and preventive dental care use. Samples of US CSHCN ages 3-17 years with a functional limitation (n = 7,559) and those without (n = 26,345) were derived from the 2005-2006 National Survey of CSHCN. We generated structural equation models, stratified by functional limitation, to describe the relationships between caregiver burden and preventive dental utilization. We measured caregiver burden using six items on whether the child's health condition impacted work, time spent on health management, and finances. About 80.9 % of CSHCN used preventive dental care. Higher levels of caregiver burden were associated with significantly lower odds of preventive dental care use for CHSCN with a functional limitation (? = -0.06; P < 0.001) and those without (? = -0.07; P < 0.001). For CSHCN with a functional limitation, family poverty and being uninsured were significantly associated with greater caregiver burden and less preventive dental use. Findings were similar for CSHCN without a functional limitation, except that lower caregiver education was also associated with greater caregiver burden and less preventive dental care use. Caregiver burden is potential barrier to preventive dental care use for CSHCN and explains the relationship between child- and family-level characteristics and preventive dental care use. Interventions to improve the oral health of CSHCN should include strategies to reduce caregiver burden, especially within socioeconomically vulnerable families. PMID:23793537

Chi, Donald L; McManus, Beth M; Carle, Adam C

2014-05-01

47

Effect of honey in preventing gingivitis and dental caries in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study was conducted to investigate the following: (1) the effects of chewing honey on plaque formation in orthodontic patients, (2) the effect of chewing honey on dental plaque bacterial counts, (3) determine if honey possesses antibacterial effects on bacteria recovered from plaques. Methods Female orthodontic patients (n = 20, 12–18 years of age) participated in this randomized controlled study. The effects of honey were compared to treatment with either 10% sucrose or 10% sorbitol that served as positive and negative controls, respectively. The pH of plaque was measured using a digital pH meter prior to baseline and at 2, 5, 10, 20, and 30 min after chewing honey or rinsing with control solutions and the numbers of Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacilli, and Prophymonas gingivalis in respective plaques were determined. The antibacterial activity of honey was tested against commonly used antibiotics using the disk diffusion method. Results Significant differences in pH were observed in the honey and sucrose groups compared to the pH observed in the sorbitol group (p ? 0.001). The maximum pH drop occurred at 5 min in both the honey and sucrose groups; however the pH in the honey group rapidly recovered 10–20 min after exposure and did not drop below the critical decalcification pH of 5.5. On the other hand, the pH following sucrose exposure fell <5.5 and was associated with a 30 min recovery time. The pH observed for the sorbitol group did not change over time. Bacterial counts were significantly reduced in the honey group compared to the other treatment groups (p ? 0.001) and honey significantly inhibited the growth of all studied strains compared to inhibition observed with antibiotics (p ? 0.001). Conclusions Honey can be used as an alternative to traditional remedies for the prevention of dental caries and gingivitis following orthodontic treatment.

Atwa, AL-Dany A.; AbuShahba, Ramadan Y.; Mostafa, Marwa; Hashem, Mohamed I.

2014-01-01

48

An examination of the advances in science and technology of prevention of tooth decay in young children since the Surgeon General's Report on Oral Health.  

PubMed

This paper addresses a number of areas related to how effectively science and technology have met Healthy People 2010 goals for tooth decay prevention. In every area mentioned, it appears that science and technology are falling short of these goals. Earlier assessments identified water fluoridation as one of the greatest public health accomplishments of the last century. Yet, failure to complete needed clinical and translational research has shortchanged the caries prevention agenda at a critical juncture. Science has firmly established the transmissible nature of tooth decay. However, there is evidence that tooth decay in young children is increasing, although progress has been made in other age groups. Studies of risk assessment have not been translated into improved practice. Antiseptics, chlorhexidine varnish, and polyvinylpyrrolidone iodine (PVI-I) may have value, but definitive trials are needed. Fluorides remain the most effective agents, but are not widely disseminated to the most needy. Fluoride varnish provides a relatively effective topical preventive for very young children, yet definitive trials have not been conducted. Silver diamine fluoride also has potential but requires study in the United States. Data support effectiveness and safety of xylitol, but adoption is not widespread. Dental sealants remain a mainstay of public policy, yet after decades of research, widespread use has not occurred. We conclude that research has established the public health burden of tooth decay, but insufficient research addresses the problems identified in the report Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General. Transfer of technology from studies to implementation is needed to prevent tooth decay among children. This should involve translational research and implementation of scientific and technological advances into practice. PMID:19837019

Milgrom, Peter; Zero, Domenick T; Tanzer, Jason M

2009-01-01

49

Near-infrared image-guided laser ablation of dental decay  

Microsoft Academic Search

Image-guided laser ablation systems are now feasible for dentistry with the recent development of nondestructive high-contrast imaging modalities such as near-IR (NIR) imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) that are capable of discriminating between sound and demineralized dental enamel at the early stages of development. Our objective is to demonstrate that images of demineralized tooth surfaces have sufficient contrast to

You-Chen Tao; Daniel Fried

2009-01-01

50

Economic evaluation of preventive dental programs: what can they tell us?  

PubMed

The role of public health program planners is to determine the effectiveness of public health programs, what recommendations should be made, what future initiatives should be taken, and what policies should be developed. At a basic level, to choose between competing alternatives, two characteristics of an intervention must be considered; these are its outcome and its cost. Based on cost and outcome, planners must select the option that offers the most advantages. Economic evaluation is commonly adopted by decision makers in the health sector to investigate the effectiveness of public health programs and to help plan future initiatives. Economic evaluation assists decision makers who must weigh the information it provides in the context of many and often competing options. In this way, an economic evaluation is an aid to decision making rather than the decision itself. Economic evaluation is becoming essential for informed decision making, with potential implications for public health policy and practice and for clinical practice too. While economic evaluations are commonly used in decision-making processes about health programs, few examples exist in the oral health literature. In the case of preventive oral health programs, economic analysis is often difficult, largely because it makes demands on epidemiological and demographic data that are hard to meet. This study will address the concepts and tools required to conduct economic evaluations of prevention programs. The emphasis will be on oral health and preventive dental programs, although the concepts presented could be useful for other public health programs by practitioners and managers with the aim of producing effective and efficient oral health programs. PMID:22998315

Morgan, Mike; Mariño, Rodrigo; Wright, Clive; Bailey, Denise; Hopcraft, Matthew

2012-10-01

51

Role of sweeteners in the etiology and prevention of dental caries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dental caries is a multifactorial disease that is caused by an interplay of three major factors, i.e., teeth, cariogenic bacteria, and fermentable sugars. Streptococcus mutans and S. sobrinus, collectively termed mutans streptococci (MS), are principal causative agents of dental caries. Initial MS-tooth surface attachment is followed by firm and irreversible adhesion of MS to the tooth surface, accompanied by the

Shigeyuki Hamada

2002-01-01

52

In Vivo Near-IR Imaging of Approximal Dental Decay at 1,310 nm  

PubMed Central

Objective The high transparency of dental enamel in the near-IR (NIR) light at 1,310-nm can be exploited for imaging dental caries without the use of ionizing radiation (X-rays). We present the results of the first in vivo imaging study in which NIR images were acquired of approximal contact surfaces. Methods NIR imaging hand-pieces were developed and attached to a compact InGaAs focal plane array and subsequently used to acquire in vivo NIR images of 33 caries lesions on 18 test subjects. The carious lesions were discernible on bitewing radiographs, but were not visible upon clinical examination. Results NIR images were acquired in vivo from three directions and the majority of lesions examined were too small to require restoration, based on accepted bitewing radiograph criteria. All but one of the 33 lesions examined were successfully imaged from at least one direction. Conclusion This first in vivo study of imaging at the 1,310-nm wavelength region shows that NIR imaging has great potential as a screening tool for the detection of approximal lesions without the use of ionizing radiation.

Staninec, Michal; Lee, Chulsung; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

2011-01-01

53

Near-infrared image-guided laser ablation of dental decay.  

PubMed

Image-guided laser ablation systems are now feasible for dentistry with the recent development of nondestructive high-contrast imaging modalities such as near-IR (NIR) imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) that are capable of discriminating between sound and demineralized dental enamel at the early stages of development. Our objective is to demonstrate that images of demineralized tooth surfaces have sufficient contrast to be used to guide a CO(2) laser for the selective removal of natural and artificial caries lesions. NIR imaging and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) operating at 1310-nm are used to acquire images of natural lesions on extracted human teeth and highly patterned artificial lesions produced on bovine enamel. NIR and PS-OCT images are analyzed and converted to binary maps designating the areas on the samples to be removed by a CO(2) laser to selectively remove the lesions. Postablation NIR and PS-OCT images confirmed preferential removal of demineralized areas with minimal damage to sound enamel areas. These promising results suggest that NIR and PS-OCT imaging systems can be integrated with a CO(2) laser ablation system for the selective removal of dental caries. PMID:19895146

Tao, You-Chen; Fried, Daniel

2009-01-01

54

Screening preharvest/postharvest strategies to prevent fruit rot decay.  

PubMed

In fruit growing preharvest sprayings in the orchard are mainly applied to protect fruit from decaying. Next to multisite fungicides (captan, thiram, tolylfluanid) the most commonly used products recognized for the Belgium market are Bellis (pyraclostrobin & boscalid) and the combination of Topsin M (thiophanate-methyl) and Frugico (diethofencarb). In general the spraying schedule varies depending on weather conditions (infection risk), preharvest interval of available fungicides, fruitgrower and cultivar of pome fruit (apple/pear). Facing the climatological conditions before picking the residue loading on the fruit surface can differ enormously. Also wet (pre)grading is considered to decrease the product residue resulting to fruits which are less protected before entering the cold storage room. In this context a partially replacement of the preharvest treatments by one postharvest application could offer a reliable alternative to the PPP reduction program (Plant Protection Products) in the orchard. A standardized application method by dipping or drenching will cover the fruits homogenically resulting in a rationalized fungicide use compared to the preharvest sprayings in the orchard. For the Belgium market Philabuster (imazalil & pyrimethanil) is registered for postharvest treatments since for this product a proper solution for the waste water of postharvest uses was developed to protect surface waters (Funds technology). Philabuster provides an advanced mould control towards fruit rot pathogens Gloeosporium spp., Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium spp. In this context several trials were set up to evaluate the biological efficacy of Philabuster alone or in combination with preharvest sprayings in the orchard. In concrete different preharvest spraying schedules were applied in the last six weeks before harvest on apple and pear facing parameters as rational fungicide use, antifungal effectiveness and cost price. The purpose was to select the optimal combination in use of preharvest fungicides with Philabuster as postharvest treatment, which offer full protection towards all key pathogens in apple and pear. PMID:18396828

Vorstermans, B; Creemers, P

2007-01-01

55

Seal Out Tooth Decay  

MedlinePLUS

... Home > OralHealth > Topics > Tooth Decay (Caries) Seal Out Tooth Decay What are dental sealants? How are sealants put ... fix decayed teeth. Back to Top What causes tooth decay? Germs in the mouth use the sugar in ...

56

[Conscious survey of dental patients. 2. Questionnaire related to prevention (in the case of the new patients of the Nippon Dental University Hospital)].  

PubMed

A questionnaire on the consciousness of new patients was conducted in Nippon Dental University Hospital. Following our prior report, items regarding dental prevention were asked to 196 subjects in the present case. The results are as follows. 1. 53.1% of the subjects had experienced scaling of the teeth. However only 15.4% of them had regularly scaling. 2. 62.8% of the subjects had been given guidance in brushing and 39.8% of them had used toothbrushes by themselves in the guidance. 3. 99.5% of the subjects brushed their teeth everyday. 58.5% of them brushed twice a day. Regarding the brushing period, "3 minutes" amounded the highest radio, 33.3%. 4. Regarding the major purpose of brushing, "prevention of oral diseases" amounted to 50.5%, followed by "unknown". Namely, 23.0% of the subjects had no definite purpose of brushing. This figure suggests that the awareness on brushing was unexpectedly low. 5. 85.7% of the subjects wanted to have oral sanitation guidance and oral health management. Among them. 59.5% wanted to have "regular examination". To the question "How often can you visit our hospital except treatment?", 48.2% of the subjects answered "twice or more per year", 41.1% "a day for each examination" and 53.6% answered "60 minutes per day". Among those who wanted to have oral sanitation guidance and oral health management, only 32.7% wanted to participate in our oral sanitation class. These results indicate that many patients want to have passive management but for would start action by themselves. Thus it is the most important for dentists to carry out sufficient education and guidance under these situations. PMID:2489301

Kobayashi, T; Ozawa, Y; Sato, M; Masaya, M; Uchikawa, Y; Tosaka, S; Uchikura, Y; Takahashi, K; Shibata, M; Noda, M

1989-08-01

57

Tranexamic acid mouthwash — A prospective randomized study of a 2-day regimen vs 5-day regimen to prevent postoperative bleeding in anticoagulated patients requiring dental extractions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This prospective randomized study analyses the use of a prescribed 4.8% tranexamic acid post-operative mouthwash over 2 days vs 5 days to prevent bleeding in patients taking warfarin who require dental extractions. Eighty-five patients therapeutically anticoagulated with warfarin for various conditions, ranging in age from 21 to 86 years and requiring dental extractions, were randomly divided into two groups. Group

G. Carter; A. Goss

2003-01-01

58

[Knowledge, attitudes and practices of physicians west of Montreal Island regarding fluoride and the prevention of dental fluorosis].  

PubMed

In 1991, a questionnaire aimed at evaluating the knowledge, attitudes and practices with regard to fluoride and dental fluorosis was mailed to all the general practitioners and pediatricians of the Montreal West Island territory. The response rate after two mailings was 47.9%. The pediatricians know better than the general practitioners the fluoridation status of the cities of the territory; similarly for physicians with more than 15 years experience since graduation versus the younger physicians. In practice, 92.3% of the physicians prescribe fluoride supplements or vitamins for at least some of their patients aged less than six years old. As much as 76.3% of the physicians believe that the pediatricians and the general practitioners are responsible for prescribing fluoride to children less than six years old who visit them; only 59.4% believe themselves responsible for the dental health of these children. There are educational needs concerning fluoride, fluoride prescribing and prevention of dental fluorosis. Public health dentists should assist the medical profession in this educational process. PMID:8334616

Vallée, J G; Kandelman, D

1993-01-01

59

Nutrition and physical activity in health promotion and disease prevention: potential role for the dental profession.  

PubMed

Nutrition contributes to many of the leading causes of death in the United States, yet less than one-third of dental students feel competent to discuss the relationship of nutrition and systemic disease with their patients. The American Dental Association policy statements acknowledge a need for health professionals and organizations to provide continuing education to professionals and counseling to patients to combat the growing problems of overweight and obesity. Dentists can play a major role in educating patients to adopt a healthier lifestyle, including nutrition and physical activity recommendations. An understanding of the complexity of behavior change may enhance the dentist's ability to assist their patients in making desired changes. PMID:23017551

Akabas, Sharon R; Chouinard, Joanne D; Bernstein, Bonnie R

2012-10-01

60

Prevention and management of oral surgery complications in general dental practice.  

PubMed

In recent decades advances in dentistry have enabled more patients to keep their teeth for longer. However, when the time does come to extract these teeth it can be far from straightforward. This article, and the associated session at the 2014 British Dental Conference & Exhibition, describes the assessment of teeth for extraction and highlights potential problem areas and how to deal with them. Tips and techniques for dealing with failed or stubborn extractions are also discussed, as well as how to manage some of the more common complications of dental extractions. PMID:24603269

Oliver, R

2014-03-01

61

Recruiting College Students as Patients via a Pre-paid Preventive Dental Health Plan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The New York University College of Dentistry provides oral health care services for a low annual fee. The program meets its objective of providing additional operative procedures to fulfill dental students' educational requirements and accommodates students' oral health care needs at reasonable cost. Some members patronize the clinic after…

Klinghofer, Ilsa Peta; Marchese, Ann Marie

1990-01-01

62

Status of occupational hazards and their prevention among dental professionals in Chandigarh, India: A comprehensive questionnaire survey  

PubMed Central

Background: To assess the status of occupational hazards and their prevention among the practicing dentists in Chandigarh city, India. Materials and Methods: A closed-ended questionnaire was prepared to record demographic status, types of occupational hazards encountered, and status of measures used for their prevention. A total 113 out of 130 dentists completed the questionnaire and the response rate was 86.9%. Frequency tables were prepared and coefficient of correlation was computed to check correlation between different variables. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: The most common occupational hazard reported was injury from “sharps” (77%), out of which needle prick injury was the most frequent. Of the other occupational problems job related stress (43.3%), musculoskeletal problems (39.8%), and allergies (23.8%) from things used in dental clinics were most common. A reasonably high percentage of dentists were immunized against hepatitis-B virus (88.4%) and were following proper infection control measures and hospital waste disposal methods. Very few dentists were following the correct method of disposal of excess amalgam (11%) and measurement of radiation exposure (27.5%) within their clinic. Most of them (90.2%) were satisfied with their current working hours and job. Conclusion: Prevalence of occupational hazards among the studied group was high and certain preventive measures were not being followed properly. Therefore, there is a need to improve the knowledge of dentists regarding these hazards and their prevention.

Mehta, Abhishek; Gupta, Mohit; Upadhyaya, Nancy

2013-01-01

63

Design and implementation of a dental caries prevention trial in remote Canadian Aboriginal communities  

PubMed Central

Background The goal of this cluster randomized trial is to test the effectiveness of a counseling approach, Motivational Interviewing, to control dental caries in young Aboriginal children. Motivational Interviewing, a client-centred, directive counseling style, has not yet been evaluated as an approach for promotion of behaviour change in indigenous communities in remote settings. Methods/design Aboriginal women were hired from the 9 communities to recruit expectant and new mothers to the trial, administer questionnaires and deliver the counseling to mothers in the test communities. The goal is for mothers to receive the intervention during pregnancy and at their child's immunization visits. Data on children's dental health status and family dental health practices will be collected when children are 30-months of age. The communities were randomly allocated to test or control group by a random "draw" over community radio. Sample size and power were determined based on an anticipated 20% reduction in caries prevalence. Randomization checks were conducted between groups. Discussion In the 5 test and 4 control communities, 272 of the original target sample size of 309 mothers have been recruited over a two-and-a-half year period. A power calculation using the actual attained sample size showed power to be 79% to detect a treatment effect. If an attrition fraction of 4% per year is maintained, power will remain at 80%. Power will still be > 90% to detect a 25% reduction in caries prevalence. The distribution of most baseline variables was similar for the two randomized groups of mothers. However, despite the random assignment of communities to treatment conditions, group differences exist for stage of pregnancy and prior tooth extractions in the family. Because of the group imbalances on certain variables, control of baseline variables will be done in the analyses of treatment effects. This paper explains the challenges of conducting randomized trials in remote settings, the importance of thorough community collaboration, and also illustrates the likelihood that some baseline variables that may be clinically important will be unevenly split in group-randomized trials when the number of groups is small. Trial registration This trial is registered as ISRCTN41467632.

2010-01-01

64

[The overview of the prevention and treatment of dental disease in ancient China].  

PubMed

About 2000 years ago, our country already had a record about mouth washing. It was one of the earliest countries that invented teeth brushing and the toothbrush. It mentioned many kinds of effective techniques of teeth protection and health improvment such as swallowing the saliva, knocking the teeth and practising Qigong. About 3000 years ago, our country already had records about dental disease and had established the specialty of stomatology and dentistry in the Tang dynasty. The methods of treating toothache by acupuncture and external medicine, treating caries by arsenic trioxide and using silver paste to fill the teeth, using artificial teeth for restoration, and treating periodontosis by teeth-cleaning techniques all took the lead in the world. Traditional Chinese Medicines are still used today to treat toothache and periodontosis in clinic. PMID:19824370

Zhao, Wei; Zhao, Qi

2009-03-01

65

Children's acceptance of milk with xylitol or sorbitol for dental caries prevention  

PubMed Central

Background Xylitol, a polyol sugar, has been shown to reduce dental caries when mixed with food or chewing gum. This study examines the taste acceptability of xylitol in milk as a first step toward measuring the effectiveness of xylitol in milk for the reduction of dental caries in a public health program. Methods Three different types of milk (Ultra High Temperature (UHT), powder and evaporated) were tested for acceptability by 75 Peruvian children (25 per milk group, ages 4 to 7 years). Each group evaluated xylitol and sorbitol in one type of milk. In the first phase, each child was presented with a tray of four plastic cups containing 50 ml of milk with 0.021 g/ml xylitol, 0.042 g/ml xylitol, 0.042 g/ml sorbitol or no sugar. Each child was asked to taste the samples in a self-selected order. After tasting each sample, the child placed the milk cup in front of one of three cartoon faces (smile, frown or neutral) representing the child's response to the taste of each sample. In the second phase, the child was asked to rank order the milk samples within each category (smile, frown or neutral). Ranks within categories were then combined to obtain a rank ordering for all the test samples. Results The ranking from best to worst for the samples across categories (UHT, powder, evaporated) was xylitol (0.0.042 g/ml), sorbitol (0.042 g/ml), xylitol (0.021 g/ml) and milk alone (Friedman's ANOVA). Xylitol and sorbitol were preferred over milk alone, and xylitol (0.042 g/ml) was preferred to sorbitol (0.042 g/ml)(p < .05 sign test). Conclusion Milk sweetened with xylitol is well accepted by Peruvian children ages 4–7 years.

Castillo, Jorge L; Milgrom, Peter; Coldwell, Susan E; Castillo, Ramon; Lazo, Rocio

2005-01-01

66

Oral and dental health in Huntington's disease - an observational study  

PubMed Central

Background Only a few case reports and case series dealing with oral and dental health care are available in literature until now. The aim of the present pilot study was to determine the status of dental health in comparison to matched controls and to heighten the neurologists’ and dentists’ awareness of the oral aspects of the disease. Methods 42 Huntington’s disease (HD) participants were scored according to the Unified Huntington’s Disease Rating Scale. The dental status was assessed by using the well established score for decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) and the dental plaque score (Silness-Loe plaque index). Results Compared to controls HD participants showed significantly more decayed teeth and more plaques in both plaque indices. A higher motor impairment and a lower functional status of the patients lead to a worsening in dental status. Conclusion Possible reasons for our findings are discussed. Apart from local oral complications general complications may also occur. Thus, as a consequence, we would encourage patients, caregivers, neurologists, and the dentists to ensure regular preventive dental examinations and dental treatments of individuals with Huntington’s disease even in the premanifest stage of this disease.

2013-01-01

67

Dental Caries  

PubMed Central

Dental caries is one of the most prevalent diseases afflicting mankind. It reached a peak in the 1950s but has been declining drastically in recent years in children and young adults. This article describes the three contributing factors in dental caries: microbial plaque, tooth susceptibility, and diet, and discusses practical preventive measures which help to reduce caries incidence. Some of these, such as vaccines and antimicrobial varnishes, are still in the research stages, while others, such as sucrose substitutes, low-calorie sweeteners, and limitation of frequency of sugar snacks are well established and can be promoted by family physicians.

Burgess, Ralph C.

1988-01-01

68

Comparing Dental and Pharmacy Students' Perceptions on Public Health and Preventive Health Care Course  

PubMed Central

Objectives: A Public health course has an important role in the undergraduate education of pharmacy and dentistry in terms of emphasizing preventive care. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the views of pharmacy and dentistry students on a public health course and preventive health care. Methods: 173 students enrolled at Ege University, Faculties of Pharmacy and Dentistry completed a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis and replied to 18 Likert type question to determine their perceptions on a public health course and preventive health care. The comments of the students were reviewed and categorized into key themes. Results: SWOT analysis and the results of quantitative Likert type questions supported each other. According to the quantitative results, there was no significant difference between the scores of students from both schools in terms of their statements about the public health course and preventive care. Both groups of students mentioned the contribution of the public health course to their professions in the future. They also appreciated the importance of preventive care in the health services.

Mandiracioglu, Aliye; Dogan, Fethi

2012-01-01

69

Impact of the "Guidelines for infection prevention in dentistry" (2006) by the Commission of Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention at the Robert Koch-Institute (KRINKO) on hygiene management in dental practices - analysis of a survey from 2009.  

PubMed

Aim: To assess trends in hygiene management in dental practices in comparison to an earlier survey in 2002/2003 and to point out key aspects for future efforts. Method: The infection prevention management of all dental practices in Greifswald (n=35) was determined by a questionnaire in a personal interview in 2008/2009.Results: 26% of the dentists did not use sufficient personal protective equipment during the general examination of the patient. In conservative and prosthetic dentistry, 15% still did not use adequate measures and 9% did not even in surgical interventions. Vaccination coverage was clearly too low, as only 35% of dentists were vaccinated against influenza and coverage with other vaccinations was also quite low. 11% of the dentists did not perform a documented anamnesis and in 29% of the dental practices no appointment system for risk patients existed.There were significant deficiencies in the reprocessing of medical devices and in the equipment needed for reprocessing. The opportunity to participate in further training in this field was rejected by 23% of the dentists.In 10 dental practices, the colony count in the dental unit water-conducting system was five times higher than the limit. A contamination with P. aeruginosa was discovered in 4 practices. All units were renovated.Discussion: Overall, both the hygiene management and hygiene equipment in the practices have improved considerably compared to the previous survey in 2002/2003. This demonstrates the positive effect of the KRINKO guidelines from 2006. However, the survey again showed relevant deficiences in the hygiene management of dental practices, which agrees with a Germany-wide online survey from 2009.Conclusion: While the study revealed persistent deficiencies in hygiene management, especially in reprocessing, it confirms that the KRINKO guidelines for dental practices from 2006 led to significant improvements in hygiene management. Doubts about the impact of the guidelines are not backed by evidence. PMID:22558048

Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Handrup, Stephan; Meyer, Georg; Kramer, Axel

2012-01-01

70

Impact of the "Guidelines for infection prevention in dentistry" (2006) by the Commission of Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention at the Robert Koch-Institute (KRINKO) on hygiene management in dental practices - analysis of a survey from 2009  

PubMed Central

Aim: To assess trends in hygiene management in dental practices in comparison to an earlier survey in 2002/2003 and to point out key aspects for future efforts. Method: The infection prevention management of all dental practices in Greifswald (n=35) was determined by a questionnaire in a personal interview in 2008/2009. Results: 26% of the dentists did not use sufficient personal protective equipment during the general examination of the patient. In conservative and prosthetic dentistry, 15% still did not use adequate measures and 9% did not even in surgical interventions. Vaccination coverage was clearly too low, as only 35% of dentists were vaccinated against influenza and coverage with other vaccinations was also quite low. 11% of the dentists did not perform a documented anamnesis and in 29% of the dental practices no appointment system for risk patients existed. There were significant deficiencies in the reprocessing of medical devices and in the equipment needed for reprocessing. The opportunity to participate in further training in this field was rejected by 23% of the dentists. In 10 dental practices, the colony count in the dental unit water-conducting system was five times higher than the limit. A contamination with P. aeruginosa was discovered in 4 practices. All units were renovated. Discussion: Overall, both the hygiene management and hygiene equipment in the practices have improved considerably compared to the previous survey in 2002/2003. This demonstrates the positive effect of the KRINKO guidelines from 2006. However, the survey again showed relevant deficiences in the hygiene management of dental practices, which agrees with a Germany-wide online survey from 2009. Conclusion: While the study revealed persistent deficiencies in hygiene management, especially in reprocessing, it confirms that the KRINKO guidelines for dental practices from 2006 led to significant improvements in hygiene management. Doubts about the impact of the guidelines are not backed by evidence.

Hubner, Nils-Olaf; Handrup, Stephan; Meyer, Georg; Kramer, Axel

2012-01-01

71

Chemico-therapeutic approach to prevention of dental caries. [using stannous fluoride gel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The program of chemical preventive dentistry is based primarily upon the development of a procedure for stabilizing stannous fluoride in solution by forcing it into glycerin. New topical fluoride treatment concentrates, fluoride containing gels and prophylaxis pastes, as well as a completely stable stannous fluoride dentifrice are made possible by the development of a rather complicated heat application method to force stannous fluoride into solution in glycerin. That the stannous fluoride is clinically effective in such a preparation is demonstrated briefly on orthodontic patients.

Shannon, I. L.

1975-01-01

72

Influence of an Intervention to Prevent Early Childhood Caries Initiated before Birth on Children's Use of Dental Services up to 7 Years of Age  

PubMed Central

Background : In a previously reported randomised controlled trial, advising first time mothers on the prevention of early childhood caries from before their child was born, decreased the prevalence of early childhood caries at 20 months of age 5-fold. Objective: We examined the effect of the intervention on the frequency and nature of dental visits up to 7 years of age. Methods: Of 649 expectant mothers who participated in the trial, 277 completed a “Child Oral Health Survey” 7 years later. Their answers were compared with those of a comparison group of 277 mothers selected at random among those living in the same area with a first child born in the same year enrolled with the South Australian School Dental Services (SA SDS). Results: Only 1.5% of children had a dental visit before 12 months of age and only 4% before 2 years of age unless a dental problem had arisen. The age at the first visit did not differ among groups, but the reasons for the visit did as did the number of visits and the need for treatment under sedation or anaesthesia. In the trial group, 34% of first visits were for pain, 29% for injury, and 29% for concern with appearance. In the comparison group, pain was the main concern in 49%, injury in 9.5%, and appearance in 25% (p=0.019). Over time, children in the trial had an average of 2.2 visits compared with 3.1 in the comparison group. In the intervention group of the trial, no child had required treatment under sedation or general anaesthesia compared with 2.9% in the control group, and 6.5% in the comparison group. Only 15% of mothers reported that they had received any information on caries prevention from health care professionals other than dental care practitioners. Conclusion: Providing first-time mothers with guidance on the prevention of childhood caries decreased the use of dental services to deal with problems in preschool children.

Plutzer, Kamila; Keirse, Marc J.N.C

2014-01-01

73

IQuaD dental trial; improving the quality of dentistry: a multicentre randomised controlled trial comparing oral hygiene advice and periodontal instrumentation for the prevention and management of periodontal disease in dentate adults attending dental primary care  

PubMed Central

Background Periodontal disease is the most common oral disease affecting adults, and although it is largely preventable it remains the major cause of poor oral health worldwide. Accumulation of microbial dental plaque is the primary aetiological factor for both periodontal disease and caries. Effective self-care (tooth brushing and interdental aids) for plaque control and removal of risk factors such as calculus, which can only be removed by periodontal instrumentation (PI), are considered necessary to prevent and treat periodontal disease thereby maintaining periodontal health. Despite evidence of an association between sustained, good oral hygiene and a low incidence of periodontal disease and caries in adults there is a lack of strong and reliable evidence to inform clinicians of the relative effectiveness (if any) of different types of Oral Hygiene Advice (OHA). The evidence to inform clinicians of the effectiveness and optimal frequency of PI is also mixed. There is therefore an urgent need to assess the relative effectiveness of OHA and PI in a robust, sufficiently powered randomised controlled trial (RCT) in primary dental care. Methods/Design This is a 5 year multi-centre, randomised, open trial with blinded outcome evaluation based in dental primary care in Scotland and the North East of England. Practitioners will recruit 1860 adult patients, with periodontal health, gingivitis or moderate periodontitis (Basic Periodontal Examination Score 0–3). Dental practices will be cluster randomised to provide routine OHA or Personalised OHA. To test the effects of PI each individual patient participant will be randomised to one of three groups: no PI, 6 monthly PI (current practice), or 12 monthly PI. Baseline measures and outcome data (during a three year follow-up) will be assessed through clinical examination, patient questionnaires and NHS databases. The primary outcome measures at 3 year follow up are gingival inflammation/bleeding on probing at the gingival margin; oral hygiene self-efficacy and net benefits. Discussion IQuaD will provide evidence for the most clinically-effective and cost-effective approach to managing periodontal disease in dentate adults in Primary Care. This will support general dental practitioners and patients in treatment decision making. Trial registration Protocol ID: ISRCTN56465715

2013-01-01

74

Dental Implants  

MedlinePLUS

... 11.14 Read More Find a Cosmetic Dentist Teeth Whitening Accredited and General Member Dental Patients ? Cosmetic Procedures ? Dental Implants Dental Implants The ... key benefit of dental implants over other tooth replacement systems is that an implant connects directly ...

75

Referrals for Dental Care During Pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Oral health is essential to overall health in the prenatal period. Pregnancy is not a time to delay dental care. Several studies have shown an association between periodontal disease and poor pregnancy outcomes including preterm birth. Interventions to provide periodontal treatment to pregnant women yield inconsistent results regarding preterm birth but have established the safety of periodontal therapy during pregnancy. Postpartum, women in poor dental health readily transmit the tooth decay pathogen Streptococcus mutans from their saliva to their infants resulting in increased risk of early childhood caries. Preventive services and treatment for acute problems should be recommended, fears allayed, and women referred. Dental x-rays may be performed safely with the use of appropriate shielding. Non-emergent interventions are best provided between 14 and 20 weeks of gestation for comfort and optimal fetal safety. Most gravid women do not seek dental care. Increased interprofessional communication to encourage dentists to treat pregnant women will reduce the number of women without care. In states where it is available, Medicaid coverage of dental services for pregnant women is typically allowed during pregnancy and for two months postpartum. Women’s health providers should understand the importance of protecting oral health during pregnancy and educate their patients accordingly.

Kloetzel, Megan K.; Huebner, Colleen E.; Milgrom, Peter

2011-01-01

76

Dental Assisting Program Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This program guide contains the standard dental assisting curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level dental assistants, and includes job skills in the technical areas of preventive dentistry; four-handed dentistry; chairside assisting with emphasis in diagnostics,…

Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

77

Dental onlay bridge-like prosthesis in three koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus): the use of Premise trimodal composite to prevent interproximal Eucalyptus spp. retention and infection.  

PubMed

Three koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) presented with moderate to severe interproximal space accumulation with Eucalyptus spp. at the San Diego Zoo. Premise trimodal composite was used to create dental onlay bridge-like prostheses to eliminate open, enlarged interproximal spaces. The prostheses prevented further leaf material accumulation within the interproximal spaces and consequently reduced periodontal disease. Aesthetically, the prosthesis replicates normal tooth coloration and appearance and wears at a similar rate to surrounding teeth. Prosthetic repair or replacement may be required, so periodic examination every 3-6 mo is recommended. PMID:25000719

Perry, Sean M; Pye, Geoffrey W; Fagan, David A

2014-06-01

78

The Level of Dental Anxiety and Dental Status in Adult Patients  

PubMed Central

Background: The present study aimed to assess potential correlation between dental anxiety and overall dental status in adult patients, in consideration of the frequency of dental appointments and individual dental hygiene practices. Materials and Methods: Individual dental anxiety levels were assessed with the aid of the Corah’s dental anxiety scale (DAS). The study embraced 112 patients of the University Dental Clinic, Kraków. Following clinical and X-ray exams, respectively, decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) index and dental treatment index (DTI) were computed for each study subject. Results: Mean DAS among the 112 subjects under study was 9.41 standard deviation (SD = 3.36). Mean DMFT value was 15.86 (SD = 7.00), whereas DTI value was 0.76 (SD = 0.27). The number of decayed teeth and an individual dental anxiety level were found to be correlated (r = 0.26). Higher dental anxiety correlated with lower DTI value (r = ?0.22) and lesser frequency of dental appointments (r = 0.22). Conclusions: Individual dental anxiety level appears to impact overall dental status, frequency of dental appointments and everyday oral health practices. Every conceivable effort should therefore be undertaken with a view to effectively diminishing dental anxiety levels in the patients. How to cite the article: Dobros K, Hajto-Bryk J, Wn?k A, Zarzecka J, Rzepka D. The level of dental anxiety and dental status in adult patients. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):11-4.

Dobros, Katarzyna; Hajto-Bryk, Justyna; Wnek, Anna; Zarzecka, Joanna; Rzepka, Dominik

2014-01-01

79

Tooth decay  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Teeth can decay and break or fall out of the gum line if they become damaged. One way in which they can be damaged is if dental plaque builds up on teeth. Plaque consists mostly of bacteria, and these bacteria cause cavities to be made in teeth if they are not removed on a regular basis.

N/A N/A (None;)

2005-05-21

80

Review of Spaceflight Dental Emergencies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

All exploration class missions--extending beyond earth's orbit--differ from existing orbital missions by being of longer duration and often not having a means of evacuation. If an exploration mission extends beyond a year, then there will be a greater lapse since the crewmembers last terrestrial dental exams, which routinely occur each year. This increased time since professional dental care could increase the chance of a dental emergency such as intractable pain, dental decay requiring a temporary filling, crown replacement, exposed pulp, abscess, tooth avulsion, or toothache. Additionally, any dental emergency will have to be treated in-flight with available resources and personnel who may not have extensive training in dental care. Thus, dental emergencies are an important risk to assess in preparation for exploration missions.

Menon, Anil

2012-01-01

81

Dental Problems and Irradiation of the O.R.L. Sphere: A New Attitude. Preliminary Results on 488 Cases.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

High-energy radiotherapy has greatly improved the percentage of cures in cancers of the ORL sphere, but it is debatable whether the same progress has been made in the prevention of its sequels and complications. Post-radiotherapeutic dental decay, the res...

C. R. Paget

1975-01-01

82

Results of a promising open trial to prevent baby bottle tooth decay: a fluoride varnish study.  

PubMed

One hundred thirty-three farm worker children with an average age of 17 months participated in a study of a fluoride varnish in WIC programs in the Yakima Valley of Central Washington. After parents were interviewed, the child was examined and a fluoride varnish applied to the maxillary incisors. At the six-month recall 62 children and their parents returned. Results indicated a significant decrease in decalcification from 35 percent to 21 percent and an increase in decay from 3 percent to 16 percent. The rate of decay was lower than the 30 percent found in this age-group in this population. Of 130 sound teeth at baseline, 13 percent were decayed or decalcified in six months; of 73 decalcified teeth at baseline, 51 percent were found to be sound in six months. Additional experimentation with fluoride varnish is warranted. PMID:7897002

Weinstein, P; Domoto, P; Koday, M; Leroux, B

1994-01-01

83

Head Start Combats Baby Bottle Tooth Decay Among Native American Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents current developments concerning nursing bottle caries--"baby bottle tooth decay"--and spotlights a program funded by Head Start to reduce the prevalence of these painful and disfiguring, but preventable, children's dental diseases among American Indians and Alaska Native families. (Author/BB)

Phillips, Margaret G.; Stubbs, Phyllis E.

1987-01-01

84

The geriatric dental patient.  

PubMed

The life expectancy of our citizens has increased due to better living conditions and medical care. This poses new challenges to dental surgeons because geriatric dental patients have different needs brought on by ageing. Tooth loss, periodontal disease, alveolar bone resorption, mucosal changes, edentulism are just some of the problems faced by the elderly. Recognition of the dental needs of this special category of the population compels us to bear the responsibility of treating them now and in the future. We require a gerodontology programme that emphasizes prevention, maintenance of the oral health and understanding of their psychological status. PMID:3592599

Loh, F C; Neo, J; Tan, P H

1987-01-01

85

Application of Stem Cell Technology in Dental Regenerative Medicine  

PubMed Central

Significance In this review, we summarize the current literature regarding the isolation and characterization of dental tissue-derived stem cells and address the potential of these cell types for use in regenerative cell transplantation therapy. Recent Advances Looking forward, platforms for the delivery of stem cells via scaffolds and the use of growth factors and cytokines for enhancing dental stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are discussed. Critical Issues We aim to understand the developmental origins of dental tissues in an effort to elucidate the molecular pathways governing the genesis of somatic dental stem cells. The advantages and disadvantages of several dental stem cells are discussed, including the developmental stage and specific locations from which these cells can be purified. In particular, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth may act as a very practical and easily accessibly reservoir for autologous stem cells and hold the most value in stem cell therapy. Dental pulp stem cells and periodontal ligament stem cells should also be considered for their triple lineage differentiation ability and relative ease of isolation. Further, we address the potentials and limitations of induced pluripotent stem cells as a cell source in dental regenerative. Future Directions From an economical and a practical standpoint, dental stem cell therapy would be most easily applied in the prevention of periodontal ligament detachment and bone atrophy, as well as in the regeneration of dentin-pulp complex. In contrast, cell-based tooth replacement due to decay or other oral pathology seems, at the current time, an untenable approach.

Feng, Ruoxue; Lengner, Chistopher

2013-01-01

86

About Kids' Teeth: Baby Tooth Decay is Real  

MedlinePLUS

... Tooth Decay Thumb sucking Prevent Decay Nutrition Baby Tooth Decay Is Real As soon as teeth appear in ... news – decay is mostly preventable . What Are Cavities? Causes of Decay Tooth decay begins when cavity- ...

87

Prevalence of Dental Caries and Periodontal Disease in Mexican American Children Aged 5 to 17 Years: Results from Southwestern HHANES, 1982-83.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dental caries and periodontal disease in Mexican American children of the southwestern United States occur mainly in molars, lending strong support for the use of fissure sealants as a preventive procedure. This study also reports on the prevalence of fillings decay and gingivitis in this population. (VM)

Ismail, Amid L.; And Others

1987-01-01

88

Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Prevents AU-Rich-Element-Mediated mRNA Decay  

PubMed Central

During lytic Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection, host gene expression is severely restricted by a process of global mRNA degradation known as host shutoff, which rededicates translational machinery to the expression of viral proteins. A subset of host mRNAs is spared from shutoff, and a number of these contain cis-acting AU-rich elements (AREs) in their 3? untranslated regions. AREs are found in labile mRNAs encoding cytokines, growth factors, and proto-oncogenes. Activation of the p38/MK2 signal transduction pathway reverses constitutive decay of ARE-mRNAs, resulting in increased protein production. The viral G-protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR) is thought to play an important role in promoting the secretion of angiogenic molecules from KSHV-infected cells during lytic replication, but to date it has not been clear how vGPCR circumvents host shutoff. Here, we demonstrate that vGPCR activates the p38/MK2 pathway and stabilizes ARE-mRNAs, augmenting the levels of their protein products. Using MK2-deficient cells, we demonstrate that MK2 is essential for maximal vGPCR-mediated ARE-mRNA stabilization. ARE-mRNAs are normally delivered to cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein granules known as processing bodies (PBs) for translational silencing and decay. We demonstrate that PB formation is prevented during KSHV lytic replication or in response to vGPCR-mediated activation of RhoA subfamily GTPases. Together, these data show for the first time that vGPCR impacts gene expression at the posttranscriptional level, coordinating an attack on the host mRNA degradation machinery. By suppressing ARE-mRNA turnover, vGPCR may facilitate escape of certain target mRNAs from host shutoff and allow secretion of angiogenic factors from lytically infected cells.

Corcoran, Jennifer A.; Khaperskyy, Denys A.; Johnston, Benjamin P.; King, Christine A.; Cyr, David P.; Olsthoorn, Alisha V.

2012-01-01

89

Comparing medical and dental providers of oral health services on early dental caries experience.  

PubMed

Objectives. Most state Medicaid programs reimburse nondental primary care providers (PCPs) for providing preventive oral health services to young children. We examined the association between who (PCP, dentist, or both) provides these services to Medicaid enrollees before age 3 years and oral health at age 5 years. Methods. We linked North Carolina Medicaid claims (1999-2006) to oral health surveillance data (2005-2006). Regression models estimated oral health status (number of decayed, missing, and filled primary teeth) and untreated disease (proportion of untreated decayed teeth), with adjustment for relevant characteristics and by using inverse-probability-of-treatment weights to address confounding. Results. We analyzed data for 5235 children with 2 or more oral health visits from a PCP, dentist, or both. Children with multiple PCP or dentist visits had a similar number of overall mean decayed, missing, and filled primary teeth in kindergarten, whereas children with only PCP visits had a higher proportion of untreated decayed teeth. Conclusions. The setting and provider type did not influence the effectiveness of preventive oral health services on children's overall oral health. However, children having only PCP visits may encounter barriers to obtaining dental treatment. PMID:24832418

Kranz, Ashley M; Rozier, R Gary; Preisser, John S; Stearns, Sally C; Weinberger, Morris; Lee, Jessica Y

2014-07-01

90

[Complications of dental infections].  

PubMed

Infectious dental complications are quite frequent given the high incidence of tooth decay. Other pathologies not related to dental decay can cause mouth infectious such as periodontal infections, alveolitis, peri-coronitis of impacted wisdom tooth and secondary infection of dental fragments. Dental infection can be localised to apex (top of the root) or progress to soft and bony tissues surrounding the teeth. The most frequent germs involved in these infections are generally the same as saprophyte buccal flora but are often associated to other anaerobic germs. The following complications will be described in what concerns their etiology, pathology and treatment: abcess, fistula, phlegmon and cellulitis, odontogenic cysts, actinomycosis, craniofacial thrombophlebitis, osteitis and osteomyelitis, maxillary sinusitis, septicemia and local odontogenic infections. The consequences of these infections can vary according to immunologic resistance of the patient as well as the resistance of some germs to the most common antibiotics. Several factors should be taken in consideration in the treatment; patient history factors, germ virulence, maintaining or suppression of etiologic factors and drainage possibilities. PMID:11680190

Deroux, E

2001-09-01

91

[Numerical anomalies of the dentition (main characteristics, therapy, prevention). Dental anomalies from the caseload of a district dentist, 9].  

PubMed

The principal characteristics of numerical anomalies of the teeth are described: the occurrence, the incidence, the nomenclature. With healing such anomalies the cooperation of the oral surgeon, the prosthetic and the orthodontist is important. Methods of orthodontical, oral, surgical, and prosthetical treatment are described. Possibility of prevention, its significance and the necessity of examining such anomalies are mentioned. PMID:2205517

Sárhegyi, J

1990-08-01

92

Dental Disease Prevalence among Methamphetamine and Poly-drug Users in an Urban Setting: A Pilot Study  

PubMed Central

Background/Objectives Rampant tooth decay has been reported among methamphetamine users. We investigated the prevalence of dental disease and associated risk behaviors in methamphetamine users compared to heroin users. Methods This pilot project is a cross-sectional study of an on-going cohort of young adult injection-drug users (IDUs) in San Francisco. An oral health questionnaire was administered by a research-assistant, and two dentists performed clinical examinations to record the Decayed-Missing-Filled-Surfaces (DMFS) index, presence of residual roots, the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index, and salivary hypofunction. Results The prevalence of dental disease among 58 young adult IDUs was strikingly high compared to the U.S. general population, however, there was no difference in the level of dental disease between the methamphetamine and heroin users in this study. The mean DMFS and number of decayed surfaces exceeded 28 in both groups. Conclusions While no difference in dental disease between methamphetamine and heroin users was detected, we found a high prevalence of caries and caries-associated behaviors in this sample of young adult IDUs. Clinical Implications Given the high level of dental disease observed in this population of young adult IDUs, one next step may be to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of providing low-intensity preventative measures (e.g., distribution of chlorhexidine rinses, xylitol gum, application of fluoride varnishes) through outreach workers.

Brown, Carolyn; Krishnan, Sumathi; Hursh, Kevin; Yu, Michelle; Johnson, Paul; Page, Kimberly; Shiboski, Caroline H.

2013-01-01

93

The Chemistry of Modern Dental Filling Materials.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses materials used by dentists to restore teeth after decay has been removed. Shows how dental-material science is an interdisciplinary field in which chemistry plays a major part. Reviews the many developments polymer chemistry has contributed to the field of dental fillings. (CCM)

Nicholson, John W.; Anstice, H. Mary

1999-01-01

94

IMP3 RNP Safe Houses Prevent miRNA-Directed HMGA2 mRNA Decay in Cancer and Development.  

PubMed

The IMP3 RNA-binding protein is associated with metastasis and poor outcome in human cancer. Using solid cancer transcriptome data, we found that IMP3 correlates with HMGA2 mRNA expression. Cytoplasmic IMP3 granules contain HMGA2, and IMP3 dose-dependently increases HMGA2 mRNA. HMGA2 is regulated by let-7, and let-7 antagomiRs make HMGA2 refractory to IMP3. Removal of let-7 target sites eliminates IMP3-dependent stabilization, and IMP3-containing bodies are depleted of Ago1-4 and miRNAs. The relationship between Hmga2 mRNA and IMPs also exists in the developing limb bud, where IMP1-deficient embryos show dose-dependent Hmga2 mRNA downregulation. Finally, IMP3 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) contain other let-7 target mRNAs, including LIN28B, and a global gene set enrichment analysis demonstrates that miRNA-regulated transcripts in general are upregulated following IMP3 induction. We conclude that IMP3 RNPs may function as cytoplasmic safe houses and prevent miRNA-directed mRNA decay of oncogenes during tumor progression. PMID:24703842

Jønson, Lars; Christiansen, Jan; Hansen, Thomas V O; Vikeså, Jonas; Yamamoto, Yohei; Nielsen, Finn C

2014-04-24

95

Minority Participation in a School-Based Randomized Clinical Trial of Tooth Decay Prevention in the United States  

PubMed Central

Purpose To describe the strategies--based on the social triad concept of a partnership of researchers, school personnel and community-- employed to recruit low-income, minority parent/caregivers of kindergarten children into a school-based tooth decay prevention trial in the United States. Methods The study site was an urban school district with five elementary schools. Recruitment was carried out once each year for three years. Recruitment involved strategies at the school district, school, classroom, and student-parent level. A coalition of researchers, school personnel and community individuals was established for communication and recruitment. Outreach workers from the community were hired to promote, recruit, and disseminate oral health information. Study promotion included both print materials (logos, flyers, pictorial story boards) and presentations at school and community events. Results The School District Superintendent and administrators approved the study, and all five school principals and kindergarten teachers participated. All children within the classrooms were eligible: the overall participation rate of was 86% (580/672). Community outreach workers actively facilitated the recruitment and participants were recruited at open house for parent-teacher meeting (37% of all participants), sending letters and consent forms home (31%), at a prearranged convenient time during drop off and pick up of the child at their respective schools (30%), curriculum nights and health fairs (2%). Conclusion Utilizing the social triad concept led to success in planning and carrying out the recruitment of predominantly minority school children with high participation rates.

Milgrom, Peter

2011-01-01

96

[Dental trauma and dental practitioners' role in disaster events].  

PubMed

Dental and facial trauma is not uncommon during normal Life routine, particularly during disaster events. The aim of this report is to review the recommendations for dental professionals' role in disaster events and the IsraeLi experience in oral, dental and facial injuries during wars and terror attacks. PrincipLes for prevention and primary care for those injuries are also reported. Education and preparation of medical and dental teams to take part in medical emergency management in disaster events is warranted. Dentists should be prepared to take a role in disaster preparedness while heaLthcare givers, and physicians, should be knowledgeabLe in treating oral, dental and facial injuries. Proper education and preparation will lead to better treatment and disaster event management. PMID:21465762

Lin, Shaul; Zadik, Yehuda; Levin, Liran

2010-07-01

97

Infection Control in Air Force Dental Clinics (Second Edition).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The rationale and procedures for preventing cross-contamination in Air Force dental facilities are discussed, including dental instrument and DTR furnishings; instrument preparation; sterilization--materials, methods, and monitoring; storage and shelf lif...

L. P. Crigger B. A. Matis J. M. Young

1983-01-01

98

[Osteosynthesis of mandible by means of solcoseryl dental adhesive paste].  

PubMed

The author presents the method of mandibular fractures treatment--osteosynthesis by means of solcoseryl dental adhesive paste. The use of solcoseryl dental adhesive paste accelerates the incarnation of wound and prevents the surgical complications. PMID:17261883

Zalyan, G; Zalyan, G

2006-12-01

99

Dental Restorations Using Titanium Osseointegrated Dental Implants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dental implantology (ie, the science of replacing teeth) has evolved from the use of crude, unstable, natural materials to the use of titanium osseointegrated dental implants and sophisticated prosthetic appliances. Dental prosthetics are used in an increasing number of routine dental restorations. Postoperative patients who have undergone dental restorations using titanium osseointegrated dental implants enjoy results that approximate the look

Donna R. McEwen; Maria M. Sanchez; Pearl M. Goode

1995-01-01

100

Absorption and thermal study of dental enamel when irradiated with Nd:YAG laser with the aim of caries prevention  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is widely recognized that Nd:YAG can increase enamel resistance to demineralization; however, the safe parameters and conditions that enable the application of Nd:YAG laser irradiation in vivo are still unknown. The aim of this study was to determine a dye as a photoabsorber for Nd:YAG laser and to verify in vitro a safe condition of Nd:YAG irradiation for caries prevention. Fifty-eight human teeth were selected. In a first morphological study, four dyes (waterproof India ink., iron oxide, caries indicator and coal paste) were tested before Nd:YAG laser irradiation, under two different irradiation conditions: 60 mJ/pulse and 10 Hz (84.9 J/cm2); 80 mJ/pulse and 10 Hz (113.1 J/cm2). In a second study, the enamel surface and pulp chamber temperatures were evaluated during laser irradiations. All dyes produced enamel surface melting, with the exception of the caries indicator, and coal paste was the only dye that could be completely removed. All irradiation conditions produced temperature increases of up to 615.08°C on the enamel surface. Nd:YAG laser irradiation at 60 mJ/pulse, 10 Hz and 84.9 J/cm2 promoted no harmful temperature increase in the pulp chamber (ANOVA, p < 0.05). Among all dyes tested, the coal paste was an efficient photoabsorber for Nd:YAG irradiation, considered feasible for clinical practice. Nd:YAG laser at 84.9 J/cm2 can be indicated as a safe parameter for use in caries prevention.

Boari, H. G. D.; Ana, P. A.; Eduardo, C. P.; Powell, G. L.; Zezell, D. M.

2009-07-01

101

Ergonomic design for dental offices.  

PubMed

The increasing complexity of the dental office environment influences productivity and workflow for dental clinicians. Advances in technology, and with it the range of products needed to provide services, have led to sprawl in operatory setups and the potential for awkward postures for dental clinicians during the delivery of oral health services. Although ergonomics often addresses the prevention of musculoskeletal disorders for specific populations of workers, concepts of workflow and productivity are integral to improved practice in work environments. This article provides suggestions for improving workflow and productivity for dental clinicians. The article applies ergonomic principles to dental practice issues such as equipment and supply management, office design, and workflow management. Implications for improved ergonomic processes and future research are explored. PMID:20448328

Ahearn, David J; Sanders, Martha J; Turcotte, Claudia

2010-01-01

102

Dental Assistant.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide, developed for use in dental assistant education programs in Michigan, describes a task-based curriculum that can help a teacher to develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. It is based on task analysis and reflects the skills, knowledge, and attitudes that employers expect entry-level dental

Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

103

Utilization of dental care: An Indian outlook  

PubMed Central

Oral health has a significant impact on the quality of life, appearance, and self-esteem of the people. Preventive dental visits help in the early detection and treatment of oral diseases. Dental care utilization can be defined as the percentage of the population who access dental services over a specified period of time. There are reports that dental patients only visit the dentist when in pain and never bother to return for follow-up in most cases. To improve oral health outcomes an adequate knowledge of the way the individuals use health services and the factors predictive of this behavior is essential. The interest in developing models explaining the utilization of dental services has increased; issues like dental anxiety, price, income, the distance a person had to travel to get care, and preference for preservation of teeth are treated as barriers in regular dental care. Published materials which pertain to the use of dental services by Indian population have been reviewed and analyzed in depth in the present study. Dental surgeons and dental health workers have to play an adequate role in facilitating public enlightenment that people may appreciate the need for regular dental care and make adequate and proper use of the available dental care facilities.

Gambhir, Ramandeep Singh; Brar, Prabhleen; Singh, Gurminder; Sofat, Anjali; Kakar, Heena

2013-01-01

104

Diet, nutrition and the prevention of dental diseases Background paper for the Joint WHO\\/FAO Expert Consultation on diet, nutrition and the prevention of chronic diseases (Geneva, 28 January1 February 2002)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oral health is related to diet in many ways, for example, nutritional influences on Q1 craniofacial development, oral cancer and oral infectious diseases. Dental diseases impact considerably on self-esteem and quality of life and are expensive to treat. The objective of this paper is to review the evidence for an association between nutrition, diet and dental diseases and to present

Paula Moynihan; Poul Erik Petersen

105

Use and Effectiveness of a Coated, Elastomeric Dental Ribbon Compared to Conventional Dental Floss. Characterization of Dental Floss: before, during and after Use.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Dental floss is used as an adjunct to toothbrushing for the control of plaque and the prevention of dental disease. The literature contains many reports suggesting and supporting the use of dental floss as one method of removing plaque from interproximal ...

C. Garber G. J. Shemaka

1980-01-01

106

Dental photography in record keeping and litigation.  

PubMed

The value of producing high quality dental photographs has been recognised by more and more dental practitioners, both to enhance their patient records and prevent litigation, particularly in the field of cosmetic dentistry and orthodontics. In recent years with the advent of digital photography the necessary camera set ups for clinical use have become easier to use, more available and affordable. With suitable training any member of the dental team is capable of taking high quality and repeatable images. PMID:24557408

Wander, P

2014-02-01

107

Wireless sensor networks evaluation for heritage monitoring; in the development of decay detecting techniques for a preventive conservation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Monitoring systems using sensor techniques are widely used in the field of cultural heritage. In recent decades, the use of monitoring techniques involving sensors has been evolving in a wide way, because of the increasing importance they have in the observation of decay phenomena in order to establish predictive strategies to promote a preventive conservation. Wireless sensor networks, formed by a group of sensors nodes or monitoring points which have wireless communication, allow us a great number of nonexistent advantages until now since they have an easier way of installation, maintenance and fault detection versus wired networks previously used, with the costs reduction and the increase of reliability in measurement systems that this fact entails. To assess the suitability of wireless sensor networks it is necessary to take into account many factors since heritage is a very demanding field. This paper evaluates the quality of communications in various deployments of heritage interest, both architectural and natural heritage, of a competitive wireless sensor networks platform which has been subjected to different conditions of range in demanding monitoring environments. To measure the communication quality, multiple parameters for the characterization of the received signal and the links were taken into account, such as the RSSI, which measures the power level of the received signal and the percentage of correctly received messages, among others. Additionally, it will be also of relevance to achieve a long-term and low energy monitoring, since measured parameters do not undergo significant variations in short periods of study, so that the evaluation includes energy and consumption aspects of wireless sensor networks systems, establishing a final assessment methodology for this type of technology applied to the heritage monitoring field. Furthermore some design software / hardware aspects are evaluated for an appropriate validation of the system from the point of view of the end user. Research funded by Geomateriales (S2009/MAT-16), projects CGL2010-19554 and CGL2011-27902. M.I. Martínez-Garrido has been supported by a PICATA predoctoral fellowship of the Moncloa Campus of International Excellence (UPM-UCM, CSIC).

Inmaculada Martínez Garrido, María; Fort, Rafael

2014-05-01

108

[Dental caries among children in institutions for orphans].  

PubMed

Epidemiological studies show that the level of dental care for children-orphans in institutions inadequate. Dominated by untreated and remote carious permanent teeth. If the traditional dental treatment difficult to implement need to develop special programs for the prevention of dental caries. PMID:22332381

Dmitrova, A G; Kulakov, A A; Gorbatova, L N

2011-01-01

109

Planning an Education Program for Dental Hygienists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intended for adaptation to local situations, the handbook was prepared to assist interested groups to determine whether a dental hygiene educational program is needed and feasible, and to supply basic guidelines for planning. The introduction deals with dental hygiene in preventive dentistry and the historical development of educational programs.…

Bruce, Harry W.; And Others

110

Organo-Selenium-containing Dental Sealant Inhibits Bacterial Biofilm  

PubMed Central

Oral bacteria, including Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus salivarius, contribute to tooth decay and plaque formation; therefore, it is essential to develop strategies to prevent dental caries and plaque formation. We recently showed that organo-selenium compounds covalently attached to different biomaterials inhibited bacterial biofilms. Our current study investigates the efficacy of an organo-selenium dental sealant (SeLECT-DefenseTM sealant) in inhibiting S. mutans and S. salivarius biofilm formation in vitro. The organo-selenium was synthesized and covalently attached to dental sealant material via standard polymer chemistry. By colony-forming unit (CFU) assay and confocal microscopy, SeLECT-DefenseTM sealant was found to completely inhibit the development of S. mutans and S. salivarius biofilms. To assess the durability of the anti-biofilm effect, we soaked the SeLECT-DefenseTM sealant in PBS for 2 mos at 37°C and found that the biofilm-inhibitory effect was not diminished after soaking. To determine if organo-selenium inhibits bacterial growth under the sealant, we placed SeLECT-Defense sealant over a lawn of S. mutans. In contrast to a control sealant, SeLECT-DefenseTM sealant completely inhibited the growth of S. mutans. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of SeLECT-DefenseTM sealant against S. mutans and S. salivarius biofilms is very effective and durable.

Tran, P.; Hamood, A.; Mosley, T.; Gray, T.; Jarvis, C.; Webster, D.; Amaechi, B.; Enos, T.; Reid, T.

2013-01-01

111

Dental Trauma related to General Anesthesia: Should the Anesthesiologist Perform a Preanesthetic Dental Evaluation?  

PubMed

Perioperative dental damage is one of the most common anesthesia-related adverse events and is responsible for the greatest number of malpractice claims against anesthesiologists; therefore, several dental considerations are warranted. A thorough evaluation may necessitate a dentist's help, requires that anesthesiologists receive more formal training regarding oral and dental anatomy, and enables performing the treatments necessary to minimize the risks of dental injuries. Nevertheless, this preanesthetic assessment is frequently overlooked by surgeons and anesthesiologists. The present study aimed to investigate, for both dentists and anesthesiologists, how often and under what circumstances dental trauma occurs during general anesthesia as well as isolate possible anatomical, dental, and anesthesiological risk factors, based on which suggestions for preventive measures could be made. Anesthesiologists must perform a thorough preoperative oral evaluation to help identify the dentition at risk; the evaluation should include the patient's dental history, oral/dental examination, and a specific discussion with the patient about any existing dentures or crowns. The dental examination should especially include an assessment of the patient's upper incisors-the teeth most likely to be injured during the perioperative period-for pre-existing damage. Preoperative notes should record any damages or missing teeth. In addition, anesthesiologists must take adequate intraprocedure precautions to prevent/minimize iatrogenic dental injury. PMID:24984632

Idrees, Saeed Riad; Fujimura, Kazuma; Bessho, Kazuhisa

2014-06-01

112

Feasibility and validation of virtual autopsy for dental identification using the Interpol dental codes.  

PubMed

Virtual autopsy is a medical imaging technique, using full body computed tomography (CT), allowing for a noninvasive and permanent observation of all body parts. For dental identification clinically and radiologically observed ante-mortem (AM) and post-mortem (PM) oral identifiers are compared. The study aimed to verify if a PM dental charting can be performed on virtual reconstructions of full-body CT's using the Interpol dental codes. A sample of 103 PM full-body CT's was collected from the forensic autopsy files of the Department of Forensic Medicine University Hospitals, KU Leuven, Belgium. For validation purposes, 3 of these bodies underwent a complete dental autopsy, a dental radiological and a full-body CT examination. The bodies were scanned in a Siemens Definition Flash CT Scanner (Siemens Medical Solutions, Germany). The images were examined on 8- and 12-bit screen resolution as three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions and as axial, coronal and sagittal slices. InSpace(®) (Siemens Medical Solutions, Germany) software was used for 3D reconstruction. The dental identifiers were charted on pink PM Interpol forms (F1, F2), using the related dental codes. Optimal dental charting was obtained by combining observations on 3D reconstructions and CT slices. It was not feasible to differentiate between different kinds of dental restoration materials. The 12-bit resolution enabled to collect more detailed evidences, mainly related to positions within a tooth. Oral identifiers, not implemented in the Interpol dental coding were observed. Amongst these, the observed (3D) morphological features of dental and maxillofacial structures are important identifiers. The latter can become particularly more relevant towards the future, not only because of the inherent spatial features, yet also because of the increasing preventive dental treatment, and the decreasing application of dental restorations. In conclusion, PM full-body CT examinations need to be implemented in the PM dental charting protocols and the Interpol dental codes should be adapted accordingly. PMID:23622469

Franco, Ademir; Thevissen, Patrick; Coudyzer, Walter; Develter, Wim; Van de Voorde, Wim; Oyen, Raymond; Vandermeulen, Dirk; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Willems, Guy

2013-05-01

113

Symposium on Dental Health Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document presents papers, critiques, and comments from a symposium which assessed the current status of preventive dental behavior. The field was divided into the following three major areas: (a) mass media programs, (b) school health programs, and (c) effect of the private practitioner. Each author was asked to review the literature, provide…

Green, Lawrence W., Ed.; And Others

1974-01-01

114

Barodontalgias, dental and orofacial barotraumas.  

PubMed

SUMMARY Changing ambient pressure can lead to medical conditions in body cavities filled with air. Intraoral pain elicited by changes in pressure is referred to as barodontalgia. Dental barotraumas are defined as pressure-induced damages of teeth and restorations. The pathophysiologic background so far is not completely clear. The present study deals with dental and orofacial symptoms which can occur as a result of pressure variations. With the aid of cantonal administrations, diving associations, and tunnel construction firms, 520 pressure-exposed individuals (499 scuba/ professional divers, 21 caisson workers operating at excess pressure) were questioned regarding dental problems. A personal interview was conducted with affected individuals. Problems in the dental area were experienced by 15% of all respondents. Toothaches were suffered by 10.2% of the participants. Tooth injuries occurred in 6.3% of all interviewees (26 fractured amalgam restorations, 4 crown fractures, 3 losses of tooth fragments). A proportion of 11.3% among the respondents complained about temporomandibular joint problems or mucosal irritations (for example aphthae) related to the mouthpieces. Barotraumas outside the dental area were incurred by 31.9% of the divers. Of these, 69.9% concerned the ears and 65.6% occurred during the descent. Based on the results obtained from the survey and taking into account the current literature, recommendations for the prevention of barotraumas in divers and caisson workers were prepared. Diagnostic exclusion of dental pathologies and avoidance of retentive reconstruction materials are important factors for the prevention of barodontalgias and dental barotraumas. PMID:24853026

Zanotta, Cristina; Dagassan-Berndt, Dorothea; Nussberger, Peter; Waltimo, Tuomas; Filippi, Andreas

2014-01-01

115

Dentist - Dental Hygienist Team.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The expanded use of dental hygienists and dental assistants is proposed to meet increased dental health care needs. Studies indicate that dental auxiliaries can be trained to perform selected simple procedures that do not require a dental degree. It has a...

H. L. Applewhite

1970-01-01

116

Socio-behavioral factors influence prevalence and severity of dental caries in children with primary dentition.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of socio-behavioral variables on the prevalence and severity of dental caries in 4- to 6-year-old children. A cross-sectional study was performed on a sample of 1993 children enrolled in 58 public preschools from Araçatuba City, São Paulo State, Brazil, during 2010. The exams were made using the decayed, missing, and filled teeth index (World Health Organization methodology) and detection criteria for non-cavitated lesions. A tested, self-administered questionnaire was sent to parents to obtain information about their socio-behavioral characteristics. Standardization was performed to verify concordance among examiners (kappa = 0.84). The prevalence of cavitated caries lesions was 41.2% (821), and the prevalence of both, cavitated and non-cavitated caries lesions, was 43.9% (875). The means ± standard deviations of the decayed, missing, and filled teeth index for children aged 4, 5, and 6 years were 1.18 ± 2.45, 1.65 ± 2.67, and 1.73 ± 2.77, respectively. Caries were significantly more prevalent in children from families with low incomes and low educational levels. The presence of dental caries was associated with access to dental services (p < 0.05). The associations between both, cavitated and non-cavitated dental caries lesions, and the frequency of oral hygiene were statistically significant. The prevalence of dental caries in preschoolers was strongly associated with factors related to the children's parents. Therefore, information about parents' socio-economic status, behaviors, and attitudes in relation to oral health should be considered when planning prevention and educational programs for the oral health of preschool children. PMID:23184168

Borges, Heloisa Carvalho; Garbín, Cléa Adas Saliba; Saliba, Orlando; Saliba, Nemre Adas; Moimaz, Suzely Adas Saliba

2012-01-01

117

Finding Dental Care  

MedlinePLUS

... Repayment Programs NIH Loan Repayment Programs Finding Dental Care NIDCR leads the nation in conducting and supporting ... the care you need. Does NIDCR provide dental care? No, NIDCR does not provide dental care or ...

118

Bactericidal Effect of a Disinfectant Dental Stone on Irreversible Hydrocolloid Impressions and Stone Casts.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Infection control in dentistry focuses on the prevention of cross contamination among patients, dentists, and dental auxiliary personnel. This study evaluated the bactericidal effect of a dental gypsum material containing 0.25% chloramine-T on oral irreve...

R. W. Schutt

1989-01-01

119

Dental students--dental advocates.  

PubMed

Student advocacy and involvement in the political process is built into the structure of the American Student Dental Association (ASDA), especially in its Legislative Grassroots Network and an internal communication network among students to ensure political awareness. Students are concerned with such issues as a universally accepted, non-patient-based licensure process, mid-level providers, loan availability and tax deductibility, financial support for schools, and service early in one's professional career (giving forward rather than giving back). Through collaboration with the American Dental Education Association and with many state associations, students participate in lobbying, awareness campaigns, and behind the scenes as legislative aids. Although students share the same love for the profession that animates established practitioners, they are perceived by legislators as being different. Students are involved in the legislative process because it represents their future. PMID:21314046

Bensch, Brittany

2010-01-01

120

42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G ...Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The...education program. 2. For dental assistants, special eligibility to...

2009-10-01

121

42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G ...Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The...education program. 2. For dental assistants, special eligibility to...

2010-10-01

122

The Effects of Finger Rest Positions on Hand Muscle Load and Pinch Force in Simulated Dental Hygiene Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the techniques taught in dental and dental hygiene programs is to use finger rests to stabilize the instrument while performing dental scaling or other types of dental work. It is believed that finger rests may also reduce muscle stress and prevent injury due to muscle fatigue. In this study the effects of three different finger rest positions on

Hui Dong; Alan Barr; Peter Loomer; David Rempel

123

Systematic dental management in head and neck irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Preservation of teeth has been possible in 528 head and neck patients treated with irradiation at Centre Georges Leclerc, University of Dijon, by careful adherence to precise dental care. Careful initial dental evaluation with appropriate x rays, restoration of oral hygiene, atraumatic extraction technique where indicated, and institution of a program of topical fluoridation has resulted in an overall incidence of less than 3% post-irradiation dental decay and 2% osteoradionecrosis. In a small group of 22 patient who required extraction post-irradiation, precise, strict technique resulted in successful extraction in all but one patient who subsequently developed osteonecrosis. Soft-based dental prostheses were well tolerated in nearly 90% of patients. Adherence to the described principles of dental care will virtually eliminate post-irradiation decay and osteoradionecrosis.

Horiot, J.C. (Centre Georges Leclerc, Dijon, France); Bone, M.C.; Ibrahim, E.

1981-08-01

124

Dental Caries in Adult and Elderly Chinese  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on a study of dental caries conducted among 1744 urban and rural Chinese (from 20 to 80 years old), who were selected by means of a systematic srratifzed sampling procedure. The prevalence of one or more decayed or filled teeth ranged from 48 to 90% in urban residents, and from 51 to 97% in rural residents, depending

W.-M. Luan; V. Baelum; X. Chen; O. Fejerskov

1989-01-01

125

[Dental materials can cause oral allergic reactions].  

PubMed

A large number of materials used in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of dental, periodontal and oral mucosal diseases may induce acute or chronic reactions in the oral cavity including allergic reactions. Clinically, it may be difficult to discriminate oral mucosal changes caused by dental materials from changes related to oral mucosal diseases. Diagnosis and management of allergic reactions in the oral mucosa may therefore be a major challenge. The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to commonly used dental materials, which can trigger typical, but also atypical, symptoms and clinical signs of an allergic reaction. PMID:23773217

Røn Larsen, Kristine; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Arenholt-Bindslev, Dorthe; Reibel, Jesper; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge

2013-06-17

126

Ergonomic applications to dental practice.  

PubMed

The term "work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs)," refers to musculoskeletal disorders to which the work environment contributes significantly, or to musculoskeletal disorders that are made worse or longer lasting by work conditions or workplace risk factors. In recent years, there has been an increase in reporting WMSDs for dental persons. Risk factors of WMSDs with specific reference to dentistry include - stress, poor flexibility, improper positioning, infrequent breaks, repetitive movements, weak postural muscles, prolonged awkward postures and improper adjustment of equipment. Ergonomics is the science of designing jobs, equipment and workplaces to fit workers. Proper ergonomic design is necessary to prevent repetitive strain injuries, which can develop over time and can lead to long-term disability. In this article, 20 strategies to prevent WMSDs in the dental operatory are discussed. PMID:22484877

Gupta, Shipra

2011-01-01

127

Dental anxiety and fear: relationship with oral health behavior in a Turkish population.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to assess fear and anxiety in dental patients. Five hundred patients were evaluated using the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale and the Dental Fear Scale, along with a questionnaire. Oral health status was assessed using the Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT)/Decayed, Missing, and Filled Surfaces (DMFS) index. Statistic al analysis was performed (P < .05). Sex significantly affected dental anxiety (P < .05), and sex, marital status, having children, and time elapsed since last visit to clinician affected dental fear (P < .05). DMFT/DMFS scores were not related to dental anxiety or fear (P > .05). Female sex alone was a significant predictor of dental anxiety; female sex, adulthood, marriage, having children, and time passed since last visit to a clinician are significant predictors of fear. PMID:24392477

Yüzügüllü, Bulem; Gül?ahi, Ayse; Celik, Cigdem; Bulut, Sule

2014-01-01

128

The relationship of dental caries and dental fear in Malaysian adolescents: a latent variable approach  

PubMed Central

Background To investigate the role of geography (place of residence) as a moderator in the relationship between dental caries disease and treatment experience and dental fear in 16-year-olds living in Malaysia. Methods A multi-stage-stratified sampling method was employed. Five hundred and three, 16-year-olds from 6 government secondary schools participated in this study. The questionnaire examined participants’ demographic profile and assessed their dental fear using the Dental Fear Survey (DFS). The clinical examination consisted of the DMFT as the outcome measure of dental caries disease and treatment experience by a single examiner (ICC?=?0.98). Structural equation modelling inspected the relationship between dental fear and dental caries disease and treatment experience. Results The mean DMFT was 2.76 (SD 3.25). The DT, MT and FT components were 0.64 (SD 1.25), 0.14 (SD 0.56) and 1.98 (SD 2.43) respectively. Rural compared with urban adolescents had significantly greater mean numbers of decayed and missing teeth. The mean DFS score was 40.8 (SD 12.4). Rural compared with urban adolescents had significantly higher mean scores for physical symptoms of dental fear. The correlation between dental fear (DFS) and dental caries disease and treatment experience (DMFT) was 0.29, p?dental caries disease and treatment experience. The strength of the relationship between dental fear and dental caries disease and treatment experience varied in accordance with place of residence. Conclusion In conclusion a relationship between dental fear and dental caries disease and treatment experience was shown to exist in 16-year-old adolescents living in Malaysia. This study showed that the rural–urban dichotomy acted as a moderator upon this relationship.

2014-01-01

129

Surface treatment for preventing decay and termite attack in wood using didecyl dimethyl ammonium tetrafluoroborate (DBF) incorporated with acryl-silicon type resin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surface treatment of wood was carried out using acryl-silicon type resin including didecyl dimethyl ammonium tetrafluoroborate (DBF), boron-containing quaternary ammonia compound. Surface-treated wood specimens were exposed laboratory decay resistance tests after completing a 10-cyle severe weathering process. In laboratory decay resistance tests, one brown-rot decay fungus, Fomitopsis palustris and one white-rot decay fungus, Trametes versicolor were used. The specimens were

W. J. Hwang; S. N. Kartal; K. Shinoda; Y. Imamura

2005-01-01

130

Powdered milk micellar casein prevents oral colonization by Streptococcus sobrinus and dental caries in rats: a basis for the caries-protective effect of dairy products.  

PubMed

Three animal studies were performed to investigate the influence of the macromolecular structure of milk casein on caries incidence and the possible ecological changes of the oral microbiota by such casein fractions. Towards this end, rats were infected with mixed bacterial suspensions of Streptococcus sobrinus OMZ 176 and Actinomyces viscosus Ny1. Various milk protein fractions were incorporated into carefully balanced powdered cariogenic diets to constitute the sole major protein component. Diets containing micellar casein had a pronounced and highly significant effect on almost all clinical and microbiological parameters examined. Both the formation of advanced dentinal fissure (B) and smooth surface (E) caries lesions was inhibited by diets containing micellar casein; this caries-inhibiting effect appeared to be due mainly to modifications within the plaque microbiota. The proportion of S. sobrinus in the oral cavity of rats was reduced (73-80%) by micellar casein-containing preparations, whereas the A. viscosus population was increased. Both these microbiological parameters were always negatively correlated. This appears to be the first example of a food component other than dietary sugars, selectively modifying the composition of the dental plaque microbiota of rats in such a way as to reduce its pathogenic potential. It also demonstrates the importance of establishing a molecular basis for the role of food components, which prove to be beneficial to oral health. PMID:10529530

Guggenheim, B; Schmid, R; Aeschlimann, J M; Berrocal, R; Neeser, J R

1999-01-01

131

Dental and Periodontal Health Status of Beta Thalassemia Major and Sickle Cell Anemic Patients: A Comparative Study  

PubMed Central

Background: This study aimed to assess the dental and periodontal health status of beta thalassemia major and sickle cell anemic patients in Bilaspur, Chattishgarh, India. Materials & Methods: A total of 750 patients were included in the study. The patients were randomly divided into three groups I (n=250), II (n=250) and III (n=250), ranging from 3-15 years. After performing a thourough general examination, including their demographic data, intraoral examination was done using Decayed-Missing-Filled Teeth Index (DMFT Index), Plaque index (PI) and Gingival index (GI). Statistical analysis was done using statistical software SPSS 17.5 version. Chi square test & student t test was used for the comparison of study and control groups. The level of significance was set at P<0.05. Results: In the present study, it was found that, prevalence of dental caries and periodontal diseases was significantly more in beta thalassemic patients followed by sickle cell anemic patients than control group. However, when group I (beta thalassemia) was compared with group II (sickle cell anemia), results were found to highly significant (P<0.001) only for decayed missing filled tooth. Conclusion: Appropriate dental and periodontal care improves a patient's quality of life. Preventive dental care is must for thalassemic and Sickle cell disease patients. How to cite this article: Singh J, Singh N, Kumar A, Kedia NB, Agarwal A. Dental and Periodontal Health Status of Beta Thalassemia Major and Sickle Cell Anemic Patients: A Comparative Study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):53-8.

Singh, Jaideep; Singh, Nitin; Kumar, Amit; Kedia, Neal Bharat; Agarwal, Anil

2013-01-01

132

Post-trial costs, clinical outcomes, and dental service utilization after a randomized clinical trial for caries control among Finnish adolescents.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to assess post-trial treatment costs, clinical outcomes [decayed, missing or filled surfaces (DMFS) scores], and utilization of dental services among adolescents who had participated in a randomized clinical trial (RCT) in Pori, Finland, in 2001-2005. At baseline the children were 11-12 yr of age and had had at least one active initial caries lesion. The children in the experimental group (n = 250) had been exposed to multiple measures for caries control, while those in the control group (n = 247) had received standard dental care. During the post-trial period (2005-2008), all participants received the standard dental care offered in public dental clinics in Pori. In both groups the costs of treatment procedures and outcomes for the post-trial period were calculated for each adolescent. Information from patient records was available for 487 adolescents (former experimental n = 246, control n = 241). The mean total costs per adolescent were lower and the clinical outcome was better among the former experimental-group participants. The differences in mean costs between the groups were statistically significant for preventive and restorative procedures. The utilization of dental services was significantly more regular among the former experimental-group participants. PMID:20572860

Hietasalo, Pauliina; Seppä, Liisa; Niinimaa, Ahti; Kallio, Jouko; Lahti, Satu; Hausen, Hannu

2010-06-01

133

A Modern Pioneer in Preventive Dentistry--Sumter S. Arnim, DDS, PhD: Teacher, Researcher, and National Dental Consultant--An Interview.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the life story of Dr. Sumter S. Arnim, DDS, PhD, of Brownsville, Texas, as told in detail to interviewer A. G. Christen. Dr. Arnim, a National Consultant in Preventive Dentistry to the USAF Surgeon General (1968-1972), is a noted author, lecturer,...

A. G. Christen

1979-01-01

134

Undiagnosed multiple myeloma causing extensive dental bleeding: Report of a case and review  

Microsoft Academic Search

A case of multiple myeloma causing profuse bleeding during a minor dental surgical procedure is presented. The value of dental radiography in detection of bone changes associated with an undiagnosed case of multiple myeloma is highlighted. We show that the extensive bleeding during the dental procedure could have been prevented if the panoramic radiograph had been evaluated carefully before initiation

Eisa Mozaffari; Muralidhar Mupparapu; Linda Otis

2002-01-01

135

Dental Students' Self-Assessed Competence in Geriatric Dentistry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of four classes of dental students (n=172) exposed to both didactic and clinical geriatric dental training found that the students perceived significant improvements in their abilities to manage geriatric patients in all areas assessed, notably treatment planning, preventive dentistry, referrals, and providing care in alternative settings.…

Kiyak, H. Asuman; Brudvik, James

1992-01-01

136

POLICIES AND GUIDELINES FOR THE TRAINING OF DENTAL AUXILIARIES.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

ALTHOUGH THE DENTAL PROFESSION NOW SEEKS SUPPORT FOR AUXILIARY TRAINING PROGRAMS FROM EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTES OTHER THAN DENTAL SCHOOLS, IT IS CONCERNED THAT TRAINING IN NONDENTAL SCHOOL SETTINGS SUCH AS JUNIOR COLLEGES, TECHNICAL INSTITUTES, UNIVERSITY EXTENSION PROGRAMS, AND POST-HIGH SCHOOL VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS PREVENTS TRAINEE EXPOSURE TO…

American Dental Association, Chicago, IL. Council on Dental Education.

137

The Dental Plaque Microbiome in Health and Disease  

PubMed Central

Dental decay is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases worldwide. A variety of factors, including microbial, genetic, immunological, behavioral and environmental, interact to contribute to dental caries onset and development. Previous studies focused on the microbial basis for dental caries have identified species associated with both dental health and disease. The purpose of the current study was to improve our knowledge of the microbial species involved in dental caries and health by performing a comprehensive 16S rDNA profiling of the dental plaque microbiome of both caries-free and caries-active subjects. Analysis of over 50,000 nearly full-length 16S rDNA clones allowed the identification of 1,372 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the dental plaque microbiome. Approximately half of the OTUs were common to both caries-free and caries-active microbiomes and present at similar abundance. The majority of differences in OTU’s reflected very low abundance phylotypes. This survey allowed us to define the population structure of the dental plaque microbiome and to identify the microbial signatures associated with dental health and disease. The deep profiling of dental plaque allowed the identification of 87 phylotypes that are over-represented in either caries-free or caries-active subjects. Among these signatures, those associated with dental health outnumbered those associated with dental caries by nearly two-fold. A comparison of this data to other published studies indicate significant heterogeneity in study outcomes and suggest that novel approaches may be required to further define the signatures of dental caries onset and progression.

Peterson, Scott N.; Snesrud, Erik; Liu, Jia; Ong, Ana C.; Kilian, Mogens; Schork, Nicholas J.; Bretz, Walter

2013-01-01

138

Dental Auxiliary Occupations. Interim Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of a dental auxiliaries project, a Dental Auxiliary National Technical Advisory Committee was established, and its major undertaking was to assist in the development of a functional inventory for each of the three dental auxiliary occupations (dental assisting, dental hygiene, and dental laboratory technology). The analysis consisted of…

Kingston, Richard D.

139

Simple Steps to Better Dental Health  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Simple Steps to Better Dental Health is a joint project of the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine and the health insurance company, Aetna. The site serves as "an independent consumer dental portal," offering loads of nicely presented Web pages on just about anything youâÂÂd ever want to know about dental health. The content falls into three main sections: Prevent Problems, Understanding Conditions, and Explore Treatments. The site is bursting with interactive tools and easy-to-understand diagrams, and also includes a section just for kids. From head and neck anatomy to cosmetic dentistry to your basic cavity, this Web site is a fantastically comprehensive resource that would be worth bookmarking for future reference.

2007-03-20

140

Early childhood caries: determining the risk factors and assessing the prevention strategies for nursing intervention.  

PubMed

Early childhood caries (ECC) is the most common chronic disease condition in childhood and involves the presence of one or more decayed (noncavitated or cavitated lesions), missing (due to caries), or filled teeth in children under 72 months of age (American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, 2010a). ECC is a multifactorial disease that is preventable and requires intervention by the nurse. When teeth are discolored and damaged by dental caries, children may be reluctant to smile, have difficulty talking, miss school, or be unable to focus on studies due to dental pain. This "state of the science" article reviews the literature to determine the risk factors for ECC, assess the prevention strategies, and apply that information to enhance nursing practice. Computerized searches from MEDLINE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library were used. PMID:21485616

Marrs, Jo-Ann; Trumbley, Sharon; Malik, Gaurav

2011-01-01

141

Dental x-rays  

MedlinePLUS

... shot. It is used to plan treatment for dental implants, check for impacted wisdom teeth, and detect jaw ... computerized tomography (CBCT) may be used prior to dental surgery, especially when multiple implants are being placed.

142

About Dental Amalgam Fillings  

MedlinePLUS

... However, the estimated amount of mercury in breast milk attributable to dental amalgam is low and falls ... risk for adverse health effects from the breast milk of women exposed to mercury vapor from dental ...

143

Dental Care in Scleroderma  

MedlinePLUS

... M. Leader, DMD of the Department of General Dentistry atTufts University School of Dental Medicine, for his ... M. Leader, DMD of the Department of General Dentistry atTufts University School of Dental Medicine, for his ...

144

Dental iatrogenesis.  

PubMed

In order to substantiate biocompatibility of dental materials and techniques and thereby reduce iatrogenesis, tests for pulpal and dentinal responses have been developed. These have shown that: high-speed tooth cutting techniques are superior to low-speed techniques even when both incorporate air and water coolant sprays; pressure when condensing restorative materials intensifies pulpal responses induced by the cutting procedure, and that chemically self-cured resin composites requiring the application of a matrix to enhance adaptation intensify pulpal response as compared to visible light-cured equivalents applied incrementally, fully cured throughout and not requiring the pressure of a matrix. Most cements are irritating to the pulp especially when used as luting agents and when used less than 0.5 mm from it. Conditioning agents utilising weak acids for short periods induce little irritation whilst bonding agents appear to be beneficial by providing protection from subsequently placed restorative materials. Clinicians should make every effort to minimise the development of pulpal responses and reduce iatrogenic effects. PMID:8021030

Stanley, H R

1994-02-01

145

Mechanism of action of a desensitizing fluoride toothpaste delivering calcium and phosphate ingredients in the treatment of dental hypersensitivity. Part III: Prevention of dye penetration through dentin vs a calcium- and phosphate-free control.  

PubMed

It is generally accepted that the pain of dental hypersensitivity resulting from gum recession is from the movement of fluid within the exposed tubules of dentin, causing changes in pressure on the nerve within the pulpal cavity. One method of treating hypersensitivity is to occlude the tubules, preventing fluid movement. This article discusses the use of a dye penetration technique, which establishes this mechanism of action for a desensitizing fluoride toothpaste containing calcium and phosphate. Two groups of intact teeth were perfectly sealed with enamel paint. Windows 100-micro to 200-micro deep were opened on opposite sides of each tooth at the dentin-enamel junction and briefly etched using 20% polyacrylic acid. One batch of teeth was treated eight times for 30 mins each with a 1:3 slurry of the desensitizing toothpaste and another set with a similar slurry prepared from a calcium- and phosphate-free control. A 0.85% aqueous solution of acid red fuchsin dye was applied to each window and allowed to dry. After a brief rinse, the teeth were sectioned across the windows. Almost no dye penetration was seen in teeth treated with the desensitizing toothpaste; however, extensive penetration through the dentin was visible in the control-treated teeth. The differences in dye penetration for the two sets of teeth were significant by both subjective (P < .001) and objective (P < .01) measures. Tubule occlusion because of calcium and phosphate ions from the desensitizing toothpaste accounts for its tooth desensitizing efficacy. PMID:20158016

Winston, Anthony E; Charig, Andrew J; Thong, Stephen

2010-01-01

146

Dental findings in patients with West syndrome: a report of two cases.  

PubMed

West syndrome a rare, severe form of epilepsy occurs in early infancy. It is characterized by a triad consisting of infantile spasms that occurs in clusters, arrest of psychomotor development and hypsarrhythmia on electroencephalogram. We present here two cases of west syndrome where patients required dental care due to the presence of certain dental findings. Preventive measurements such as controlled diet and proper oral hygiene along with professional dental management are recommended in patients with west syndrome to avoid dental problems. PMID:24739920

Khatri, Amit; Kalra, Namita; Tyagi, Rishi; Baweja, Mani; Khandelwal, Deepak

2014-01-01

147

Dental complications of rickets in early childhood: case report on 2 young girls.  

PubMed

Vitamin D is an essential hormone for calcium gut absorption. It is also involved in child growth, cancer prevention, immune system responses, and tooth formation. Due to inadequate vitamin D intake and/or decreased sunlight exposure, vitamin D deficiency has resurfaced in developed countries despite known inexpensive and effective preventive methods. Vitamin D deficiency is a common cause of rickets, a condition that affects bone development in children and that can have serious dental complications. Deficiency during pregnancy can cause enamel hypoplasia of primary teeth. Enamel regeneration is currently impossible; hypoplasia is therefore irreversible, and once affected, teeth are prone to fast caries development. Deficiency during early childhood can affect permanent teeth and ensuing caries can sometimes lead to tooth loss at a young age. Oral manifestations of rickets should be diagnosed early by both physicians and dentists to prevent severe dental complications. This case study presents 2 young girls with rickets in early childhood who suffered from subsequent serious tooth decay. PMID:24616355

Davit-Béal, Tiphaine; Gabay, Julie; Antoniolli, Pauline; Masle-Farquhar, Jeanne; Wolikow, Maryse

2014-04-01

148

Accreditation in Dental Hygiene.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Council on Dental Education cooperates with the American Dental Hygienists' Association in developing educational requirements for schools of dental hygiene. To be eligible for accreditation, schools must operate on a non-profit basis. A school applying for accreditation completes a previsitation questionnaire concerning its program. The…

National Commission on Accrediting, Washington, DC.

149

DENTAL SCHOOL PLANNING.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS DISCUSSION PRESENTS A COMPLETE PICTURE OF THE CURRENT STATE OF DENTAL EDUCATION WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR MEETING THE DEMANDS FOR DENTAL STAFF AND FACILITIES. THE AREAS INVESTIGATED ARE (1) OBJECTIVES IN DENTAL EDUCATION--COURSES, TEACHING MODES, INNOVATIONS IN CURRICULUM, COORDINATION OF BASIC AND CLINICAL INSTRUCTION, (2) FACILITY…

GALAGAN, DONALD J.

150

Dental Assisting Laboratory Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compiled to introduce the dental assisting student to various techniques used in the dental office and to present theoretical information essential for the student's professional development, this laboratory guide consists of three units of instruction. The first unit is an introduction to dental assisting and contains five topics of study. The…

Thiel, Sandra J.

151

Dental injuries at the 1989 Canada games: an epidemiological study.  

PubMed

The management and prevention of dental trauma is an integral part of the medical services provided at major athletic events. This paper reviews the organization and delivery of the dental services provided at the 1989 Canada Games. The nature, incidence and management of the dental problems reported in the participant population of 3,411 athletes are also described. During the two-week competition, 15 participants were assessed and treated for various dental conditions, including hard- and soft-tissue injury of the oral cavity, and temporomandibular joint sprain. The sports with the highest incidence of dental injury for the male population were wrestling (one per cent) and basketball (0.8 per cent). For the female population, these sports were basketball (2.5 per cent) and field hockey (1.3 per cent). The dental services provided during the games included emergency assessment and treatment, fabrication of mouthguards, and in-service education to medical team members. PMID:1356606

Lee-Knight, C T; Harrison, E L; Price, C J

1992-10-01

152

[Update on current care guideline: shortened dental arch (SDA)].  

PubMed

The shortened dental arch (SDA) 10 occluding pairs is often accepted by the patient. However, SDA carries a risk for temporomandibular disorders and instable occlusion, although these effects are usually transient. If the missing molars are replaced, implants are the most recommendable choice, although the negative effects of removable prostheses can also be prevented with a proper treatment plan. Individual preventive dental care must always be included in the treatment. PMID:23614228

2013-01-01

153

Recent Developments in the Study of Dental Caries  

Microsoft Academic Search

The chief consideration in a study of this kind is obviously the prevention of the disease in question. Effective preventive measures, however, must be based upon a full knowledge of the factors involved in the production of the disease. Unfortunately, at the present time there are certain missing links in the evidence concerning the etiology of dental caries which prevent

Russell W. Bunting

1933-01-01

154

Description and Documentation of the Dental School Dental Delivery System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was undertaken to describe and document the dental school dental delivery system using an integrated systems approach. In late 1976 and early 1977, a team of systems analysts and dental consultants visited three dental schools to observe the delivery of dental services and patient flow and to interview administrative staff and faculty.…

Chase, Rosen and Wallace, Inc., Alexandria, VA.

155

MedLinePlus: Dental Health  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Drawing on the very fine resources of the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health, this particular section of the MedLine Plus website provides a number of high-quality resources dealing with the area of dental health. Dental practitioners, students in the field, and the general web-browsing public will want to look at the content guide on the left-hand side of the homepage for starters. Here, they can quickly locate areas of specific interest, including prevention, nutrition, and specific conditions dealing with dental health. This guide to the siteâÂÂs dental health materials is complemented nicely by a âÂÂLatest Newsâ feature, which includes reports from a variety of dental health organizations and news wire services. Finally, visitors can also use their built-in âÂÂGo Localâ search engine feature to learn about services and providers for dental health in their particular geographic locale.

156

Costs and prices of single dental fillings in Europe: a micro-costing study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dental fillings represent an established procedure to treat tooth decay. The present paper provides a cost comparison of dental filling procedures across nine European countries. More specifically, the paper aims to estimate the costs and prices (i.e. reimbursement fees) of a single dental filling procedure in an approximately 12-year-old child with a toothache in a lower molar who presents at

Siok Swan Tan; W. Ken Redekop; Frans F. H. Rutten

2008-01-01

157

Dental Erosion in Industry  

PubMed Central

Five hundred and fifty-five acid workers were examined between March 1962 and October 1964. One hundred and seventy-six (31·7%) were affected by industrial dental erosion at the first examinations. In 33 cases (6·0%) the dentine was affected. During the period of the survey, 66 (20·4%) of 324 workers examined more than once showed evidence that erosion was progressing. The prevalence and incidence of erosion were highest among battery formation workers, lower among picklers, and least among other processes covered by the survey. The age of workers did not appear to influence their susceptibility to erosion. The habit of working with the lips slightly parted had little effect. Erosion superimposed upon attrition predisposed to more severe loss of tooth structure than either operating alone. Little inconvenience or functional disability was suffered by acid workers due to erosion. Twenty-seven (23·7%) of 114 erosions were considered to be disfiguring. Regular dental treatment was sought less by acid workers than by controls, and the oral hygiene of the latter was superior. There was no evidence to show any difference between caries experience among acid workers and controls. Calculus and periodontal disease were more prevalent among acid workers than among controls, but it was not possible to attribute this to the working environment. Black staining in iron picklers was considered to be due to the working environment. The use of closed acid containers or lip extraction on open acid vats prevented significant atmospheric contamination and diminished the prevalence of erosion. The use of wall fans and detergent foaming agents was helpful. Images

Cate, H. J. Ten Bruggen

1968-01-01

158

Methods used by Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) dentists to diagnose dental caries  

PubMed Central

Objectives To (1) identify the methods that dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) use to diagnose dental caries; (2) quantify their frequency of use; and (3) test the hypothesis that certain dentist and dental practice characteristics are significantly associated with their use. Methods A questionnaire about methods used for caries diagnosis was sent to DPBRN dentists who reported doing at least some restorative dentistry; 522 dentists participated. Questions included use of dental radiographs, dental explorer, laser fluorescence, air-drying, fiber optic devices, and magnification, as used when diagnosing primary, secondary/recurrent, or non-specific caries lesions. Variations on the frequency of their use were tested using multivariate analysis and Bonferroni tests. Results Overall, the dental explorer was the instrument most commonly used to detect primary occlusal caries as well as to detect caries at the margins of existing restorations. In contrast, laser fluorescence was rarely used to help diagnose occlusal primary caries. For proximal caries, radiographs were used to help diagnose 75-100% of lesions by 96% of the DPBRN dentists. Dentists who use radiographs most often to assess proximal surfaces of posterior teeth, were significantly more likely to also report providing a higher percentage of patients with individualized caries prevention (p = .040) and seeing a higher percentage of pediatric patients (p = .001). Conclusion Use of specific diagnostic methods varied substantially. The dental explorer and radiographs are still the most commonly used diagnostic methods.

Gordan, Valeria V.; Riley, Joseph L; Carvalho, Ricardo M.; Snyder, John; Sanderson, James L; Anderson, Mary; Gilbert, Gregg H.

2010-01-01

159

Prevalence of dental caries among school children in Kulasekharam village: a correlated prevalence survey.  

PubMed

The prevalence of the most common dental disease, dental caries has been a subject of intense debate due to its importance in statistical measurement and for the clinical control of this disease. Kulasekharam, a small village, situated in Kanyakumari District has a large number of hospitals and a dental college; yet the people seem to have a very poor knowledge about dental health. This prompted us to do a study among school children in the age group of 6-12 years to assess the prevalence of dental caries and to increase their awareness toward oral health. This paper further strives to find any correlation between patient awareness and prevalence of dental decay. The dental caries prevalence was noted to be low compared to the WHO-recommended values. The fluoride level was also tested and was found to be far below the optimal level. PMID:16224134

Joshi, N; Rajesh, R; Sunitha, M

2005-09-01

160

American Dental Education Association  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The American Dental Education Association (ADEA) has over 19,000 members, including students, faculty, staff, and administrators from across the United States and Canada. One of the Association's stated goals is to foster "interconnected community experiences that enable members to meet their individual goals while leveraging their collective strength." This website offers a great deal of interconnectivity, as those seeking to join the dental profession can learn about scholarship opportunities, accredited dentistry schools, and professional development. In the Dental Education Pathways area, visitors can read guides like "ADEA Official Guide to Dental Schools" and "ADEA Opportunities for Minorities in United States Dental Schools." Further along is the Policy and Advocacy area, where visitors can learn about the current shortages in dental healthcare professionals and the group's special interest in dental education outreach. The site is rounded out by the Publications area, which contains some members-only publications, along with the open-access YouTube For Dental Students area. These videos profile dental students by asking them to respond to questions such as "What made you decide to go into dentistry?" and "How was your path to dental school unique?"

2012-01-01

161

Biocompatibility of dental amalgams.  

PubMed

Objective. The purpose of this review paper is to review the literature regarding the toxicology of mercury from dental amalgam and evaluate current statements on dental amalgam. Materials and Methods. Two key-words "dental amalgam" and "toxicity" were used to search publications on dental amalgam biocompatibility published in peer-reviewed journals written in English. Manual search was also conducted. The most recent declarations and statements were evaluated using information available on the internet. Case reports were excluded from the study. Results. The literature show that mercury released from dental amalgam restorations does not contribute to systemic disease or systemic toxicological effects. No significant effects on the immune system have been demonstrated with the amounts of mercury released from dental amalgam restorations. Only very rarely have there been reported allergic reactions to mercury from amalgam restorations. No evidence supports a relationship between mercury released from dental amalgam and neurological diseases. Almost all of the declarations accessed by the internet stated by official organizations concluded that current data are not sufficient to relate various complaints and mercury release from dental amalgam. Conclusions. Available scientific data do not justify the discontinuation of amalgam use from dental practice or replacement with alternative restorative dental materials. PMID:22145006

Uçar, Yurdanur; Brantley, William A

2011-01-01

162

Children's Dental Health, School Performance and Psychosocial Well-Being  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the effects of dental health on school performance and psychosocial well-being in a nationally representative sample of children in the US. Study design We analyzed data from the 2007 National Survey of Children’s Health for 40,752– 41,988 children. The effects of dental problems and maternal-rated dental health on school performance and psychosocial well-being outcomes were evaluated using regression models adjusting for demographic, socioeconomic, and health characteristics. Results Dental problems were significantly associated with reductions in school performance and psychosocial well-being. Children with dental problems were more likely to have problems at school (OR=1.52; 95% CI: 1.37–1.72) and to miss school (OR=1.42; 95% CI: 1.23–1.64) and were less likely to do all required homework (OR=0.76; 95% CI: 0.68–0.85). Dental problems were associated with shyness, unhappiness, feeling of worthlessness, and reduced friendliness. The effects of dental problems on unhappiness and feeling of worthlessness were largest for adolescents between 15 and 17 years. Conclusion Preventing and treating dental problems and improving dental health may benefit child academic achievement and cognitive and psychosocial development.

Guarnizo-Herreno, Carol Cristina

2012-01-01

163

Mount Sinai Hospital dental program for persons with disabilities: role in undergraduate dental education.  

PubMed

Access to dental care for persons with special needs or disabilities continues to be a problem. This population is known to have a high incidence of dental disease, but unfortunately oral health is a significant unmet health need in many cases. To address this need, the Mount Sinai Hospital Dental Program for Persons with Disabilities was developed over 30 years ago by staff within the discipline of pediatric dentistry at the faculty of dentistry of the University of Toronto. Undergraduate students receive hands-on clinical training in dental management of persons with disabilities, the majority of whom have a developmental disability and could receive care in a community-based dental practice. This program has been successful, but access to community care is still an issue for the population served. Two new initiatives have been introduced in an attempt to develop personal links between persons with disabilities and future dentists, the first a series of lectures given by persons with disabilities and the second a nonprofit organization dedicated to raising awareness of the need for dental care for persons with disabilities. Among other activities, the organization sponsors a community-based event called Sharing Smiles Day, which brings together dental students and persons with disabilities in a carnival-like setting where the emphasis is on personal interactions. Dental preventive education is also provided but is of secondary importance. These initiatives and the program as a whole represent recognition of the responsibility of educators to ensure that new graduates have both the education and the desire to provide needed dental care to persons with disabilities. PMID:20483037

Sigal, Michael J

2010-01-01

164

Dental Mission for Children – Vietnam  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article by Noel Perkins and Lan Jones describes the ongoing work of the charity Dental Mission for Children, which provides dental care and dental health education in socioeconomically deprived areas of Vietnam.

Noel Perkins

2009-01-01

165

Head Start Dental Health Curriculum.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

There are many ways to provide meaningful learning experiences about dental health that can help Head Start children develop good attitudes and habits. Learning about good dental health care at an early age can help children throughout their lives. Dental...

1997-01-01

166

Health Manpower Study: Dental Manpower.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Results of a dental manpower study, which is part of a larger Health Manpower Study commissioned by the State Council of Higher Education, is presented in this report, which also includes information on the education of dentists, dental hygienists, dental...

J. M. Leyes N. C. Kilby

1974-01-01

167

Dental conditions. Final rule.  

PubMed

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adopts as a final rule the proposal to amend its adjudication regulations regarding service connection of dental conditions for treatment purposes. This amendment clarifies that principles governing determinations by VA's Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) for service connection of dental conditions for the purpose of establishing eligibility for dental treatment by VA's Veterans Health Administration (VHA), apply only when VHA requests information or a rating from VBA for those purposes. This amendment also clarifies existing regulatory provisions and reflects the respective responsibilities of VHA and VBA in determinations concerning eligibility for dental treatment. PMID:22359800

2012-01-30

168

Dental anomalies associated with genetic factors.  

PubMed

The article reviews the association between dental anomalies and genetic diseases. Knowledge of these hereditary diseases will enable the dentist to make a more extensive analysis of the families in which such diseases occur, and above all to evaluate more precisely the dental aspects that such conditions favour. This will lead to better management of diseases linked to malocclusion, congenital absence of teeth and anomalous development of dental tissues. Hereditary diseases are caused either by a single mutant gene, inherited from 1 parent and acting as dominant gene, or from a pair of mutant genes, inherited from both parents and acting recessively. Autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive inherited diseases are described, together with hereditary sex-linked conditions and those of multi-factorial origin. The purpose is to review such diseases so that the dentist can make an early diagnosis in clinical practice, check the predisposition toward such diseases and put in place preventive measures. PMID:14765023

Vozza, I; Barbato, E; De Muro, G; Quaranta, M

2003-12-01

169

Characterization of dental interfaces with electron tomography.  

PubMed

Understanding the interface between dental materials and tooth is critical in the prevention of secondary caries. Assessing this interface with high-resolution clarity has traditionally been challenging. This work highlights electron tomography, carried out in the transmission electron microscope, as a novel technique to obtain both three-dimensional and nanometer scaled information on dental materials in contact with dentin. In this study, commercial calcium aluminate and glass ionomer based luting agents in contact with human dentin were prepared for electron microscopy via focused ion beam milling. Imaging with high-angle annular dark field provided compositional contrast, and combined with tilting over large angular ranges, enabled the reconstruction of the three-dimensional interface between tissue and cement. The characteristics of the interface were observed with this extra dimensionality and superior resolution, providing evidence for the viability of this technique in interfacial studies of dental materials. PMID:24985205

Grandfield, Kathryn; Engqvist, Håkan

2014-06-01

170

Anxiety and depressive disorders and dental fear among adults in Finland.  

PubMed

We studied the association between dental fear and anxiety or depressive disorders, as well as the comorbidity of dental fear with anxiety and depressive disorders, controlling for socio-demographic characteristics, dental attendance, and dental health. Nationally representative data on Finnish adults, ? 30 yr of age (n = 5,953), were gathered through interviews and clinical examination. Dental fear was measured using the question: 'How afraid are you of visiting a dentist?' Anxiety and/or depressive disorders were assessed using a standardized structured psychiatric interview according to criteria presented in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition) (DSM-IV).Those with depressive disorders, generalized anxiety disorder or social phobia more commonly reported high dental fear than did those without these disorders. When age, gender, education, dental attendance, and the number of decayed, missing, and restored teeth were considered, those with generalized anxiety disorder were more likely to have high dental fear than were participants with neither anxiety nor depressive disorders. The comorbidity of depressive and anxiety disorders also remained statistically significantly associated with dental fear; those with both depressive and anxiety disorders were more likely to have high dental fear than were those without these disorders. Our findings support the suggestion that some individuals may have a personality that is vulnerable to dental fear. PMID:21244512

Pohjola, Vesa; Mattila, Aino K; Joukamaa, Matti; Lahti, Satu

2011-02-01

171

Acute focal infections of dental origin.  

PubMed

This article describes the most important pus-producing acute oral infections (dental infections) that can spread extra-orally. Most of these infections are spread by bacteria entering the bloodstream. However, dental infections have a number of other pathways for dissemination. By forming abscesses or phlegmon they can reach facial spaces that communicate with each other and then spread downwards to the mediastinum or upwards to the brain. In such cases dental infections can become, if not properly treated, life-threatening. It seems that early diagnosis and treatment are imperative, and potentially infectious foci should be traced and eliminated. Dental hygiene and prophylaxis to prevent dental biofilm formation are important measures to reduce the risk of these calamities. The more compromised the host defense is, the more importance should be put on these measures. Although commensal bacteria are often involved in these infections, attention should also be paid to specific periodontal pathogens, and a proper microbial diagnosis, obtained using molecular methods plus bacterial sensitivity testing, can provide the patient with optimal care. Drainage of pus must be established where possible so that the optimal effect of antibiotics can be achieved. Penicillin is still the drug of first choice in settings where suspicion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is low. PMID:24738592

Olsen, Ingar; van Winkelhoff, Arie J

2014-06-01

172

Dental unit waterline contamination--a review.  

PubMed

Manufacturers of dental units have responded positively to the challenge from the American Dental Association (ADA) and the subsequent guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to deliver patient treatment water that is at least as pure as drinking water. Dental units are now routinely manufactured with anti-retraction devices that are designed to control oral fluids from being aspirated into the lines during treatment and many units have water systems that isolate source water from municipal water supply. The dental industry has also produced an array of devices and cleaning/disinfectant products to further facilitate the use of clean patient treatment water. Products that claim disinfectant efficacy must be registered with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). If they are not EPA-registered, they can be labeled as waterline cleaners only. Waterline treatment devices that are sold separately and require connection to dental units must be registered with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as medical devices. Patient treatment water quality can be monitored by using in-office chairside kits or through commercial laboratory services. PMID:20737988

Porteous, Nuala

2010-07-01

173

Endotoxin contamination in the dental surgery.  

PubMed

Dental waterlines contain large numbers of Gram-negative bacteria. Endotoxin, a component of such organisms, has significant health implications. Paired samples of dental unit water and the aerosols generated during dental procedures were collected, and assayed for bacteria and endotoxin levels, using heterotrophic plate counts and the Limulus amoebocyte lysate test. Consistent with published studies, the extent of bacterial contamination in the dental waters sampled for this investigation surpassed the levels associated with potable water, with counts in excess of 2.0x10(6) c.f.u. ml(-1) in some samples. Correspondingly high concentrations of endotoxin [up to 15 000 endotoxin units (EU) ml(-1)] were present in the water. A statistically significant Spearman correlation coefficient of rho=0.94 between endotoxin (EU ml(-1)) and bacterial load (c.f.u. ml(-1)) was demonstrated. All of the aerosol samples contained detectable endotoxin. Further studies of the consequences of dental endotoxin exposure, and evaluation of means to prevent exposure, are warranted. PMID:17761488

Huntington, M K; Williams, J F; Mackenzie, C D

2007-09-01

174

Water fluoridation: current effectiveness and dental fluorosis.  

PubMed

This paper reviewed the literature on the evidence for water fluoridation's effectiveness under current conditions of multiple fluoride use at recommended and at reduced concentrations, the extent of dental fluorosis at different fluoride concentrations, and the "halo" effect of water fluoridation. Using the relative difference in dental caries between communities with low and optimal water fluoride as an indicator, the effectiveness of water fluoridation has decreased over time as the use of other fluorides has increased. Thus the effectiveness of water fluoridation alone cannot now be determined. Compared to the early fluoridation studies, the differences in dental caries and fluorosis prevalence between fluoridated and non-fluoridated areas have markedly narrowed. Both the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis have increased since 1945; however, the portion of fluorosis due to water fluoridation is now less (40%) than that attributed to other fluoride sources (60%). Research also suggests that the "halo" effect of community water fluoridation may result in a significantly greater intake of fluoride for people in non-fluoridated communities. This review recognized that since water fluoridation has unique advantages from the perspectives of distribution, equity, compliance and cost-effectiveness over other fluoride technologies, it remains as the fundamental base for caries prevention. The increasingly greater contribution that other sources of fluoride make to dental fluorosis suggests that these sources of fluoride, many of which are used on an elective basis, should be more closely examined for needed changes. PMID:8070242

Lewis, D W; Banting, D W

1994-06-01

175

Utilization of mobile dental vans at post graduate dental institutions in India.  

PubMed

Background: Mobile Dental Van (MDV) removes the barrier of accessibility and improves the care of underserved populations. Dental institutions across India, providing postgraduate training in dental public health organize and conduct MDV programs as part of their curriculum. Aim: To describe the structure, conduct and utilization of MDV programs in consideration to duration of use by the academic institutions for oral health care delivery in rural areas. Methods: Hundred postgraduates in Public Health Dentistry representing 27 dental institutions of India completed a 40 item questionnaire on MDV program and utilization. Descriptive statistics and Fisher's exact test were used for statistical analysis. Results: The mobile dental van programs were more curative with limited orientation towards preventive services. The institutionally sponsored programs with experience of more than 10 years had better organized setup and adequate emergency management system together with electricity, water and storage facilities. Chair side assistants were employed in 90 percent of newer programs compared to only 50 percent of older programs. Dental hygienists were helping the dentists in only 60 percent of programs. Conclusions: The utilization of MDV in treating rural underserved is indispensable, but revenue and high productivity is difficult to achieve as lower socioeconomic patients are predominantly served. MDV programs operational in postgraduate institutions have to improvise on correcting the shortcomings regarding the facilities and manpower to improve the utilization of the programs. PMID:24603911

Sandesh, Nagarajappa; Nagarajappa, Ramesh; Hussain, Seema Abid; Ramesh, Gayathri; Singla, Ashish; Prabhusankar, K

2014-03-01

176

Dental obturation materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the last decades, people have tried to develop a better material for use in dental obturation materials. This new material should meet the following requirements: durability, wear resistance, biocompatibility and chemical adhesion to dentin enamel. Wear resistance is very important and it is related with the service life of dental replacements. We have obtained aesthetically promising novel nano composites

Elizabeth Stockton; Lauren Chudej; Brian Bilyeu; Witold Brostow

2006-01-01

177

Workbook for Dental Records.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This workbook contains l8 units of instruction for dental assistant students, each designed to give students practical experience in completing forms that simulate realistic situations in a dental office. Units are: (1) The Appointment Record, (2) The Recall System, (3) Clinical Records, (4) Estimates, (5) Daily Record Sheet, (6) Patient's…

Carpenter, Corinne K.; Volpe, Margaret E.

178

Dental and related infections.  

PubMed

Emergency physicians should be comfortable treating most dental and related infections. In this article, we outline recommended techniques to perform a dental examination, explore common pathologies, recommend pain and antibiotic management strategies and review common pitfalls. How to avoid overprescribing opioid analgesics is discussed in depth, along with recent studies to support this strategy. PMID:23601483

Hodgdon, Alan

2013-05-01

179

Dental Laboratory Technician.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units to the occupation of dental laboratory technician. The following skill areas…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

180

Dental laser safety.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to inform the reader about dental laser safety and to suggest practical guidelines. The laser safety officer plays a major role, ensuring that the instrument is used safely and effectively. With adequate precautions and proper training, dental lasers can be used to deliver excellent care. PMID:15464553

Piccione, Pamela J

2004-10-01

181

Dental Care and Travel  

MedlinePLUS

A-Z Topics Popular Dental Slideshows Take a MouthHealthy Quiz! Top Ten Topics ADA Seal Products Find ADA Seal Products by Category Search by Product ... List A-Z Topics Top Ten Topics Popular Dental Slideshows Quiz Time Throwback Tooth Day Nutrition Food ...

182

Degradability of Dental Ceramics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The degradation of dental ceramics generally occurs because of mechanical forces or chemical attack. The possible physiological side-effects of ceramics are their tendency to abrade opposing dental structures, the emission of radiation from radioactive components, the roughening of their surfaces by chemical attack with a corresponding increase in plaque retention, and the release of potentially unsafe concentrations of elements as

K. J. Anusavice

1992-01-01

183

The future dental workforce?  

PubMed

The Editor-in-Chief of the BDJ has previously raised important questions about dental workforce planning and the implications for dental graduates of recent changes and pressures. It is now time to revisit this issue. Much has changed since the last workforce review in England and Wales, and the rate of change is in all probability set to increase. First, at the time of writing this paper the momentous step of including dental care professionals (DCPs) on General Dental Council (GDC) registers in the United Kingdom has recently been completed. Second, the Scope of Practice of all dental professionals has been under consultation by the General Dental Council, and research evidence suggests that greater use should be made of skill-mix in the dental team. Third, within England, Lord Darzi has just published the 'Final Report of the NHS Next Stage Review', which emphasises 'quality care' and 'team-working' as key features of healthcare; this report was accompanied by an important document entitled 'A High Quality Workforce', in which plans for local workforce planning within the NHS are outlined, placing responsibilities at national, local and regional levels. Fourth, policy makers across the UK are wrestling with addressing oral health needs, promoting health and facilitating access to dental care, all of which have implications for the nature and shape of the dental workforce. Fifth, with the impact of globalisation and European policies we are net gainers of dentists as well as having more in training. Sixth, although there have been reviews and policy initiatives by regulatory, professional and other bodies in support of shaping the dental workforce, there has been little serious consideration of skill-mix and funding mechanisms to encourage team-working. Together, these events demand that we enter a fresh debate on the future dental workforce which should extend beyond professional and national boundaries and inform workforce planning. This debate is of great importance to future generations of dental healthcare professionals, funders, commissioners and providers of both dental services and dental education and training, and most importantly our patients and the public whom we serve. Furthermore, workforce planning must be linked to a philosophy of care which promotes promotion of health and embraces quality care, rather than merely treatment of disease, and addresses oral health needs and demands. PMID:19247334

Gallagher, J E; Wilson, N H F

2009-02-28

184

The Relationship Between Dietary Factors and Dental Caries.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The relationship between the development of tooth decay and the diet includes a multitude of variables other than sugar. However, the frequency with which food is consumed and its consistency or stickiness may be primary contributors to the development of dental caries. (JN)

Watson, M. Lisa

1982-01-01

185

Florida Dental Hygiene Association  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Florida Dental Hygiene Association's (FDHA) mission is to advance the art and science of dental hygiene by increasing awareness as well as ensuring access to quality oral health care, promoting the highest standards of dental hygiene education, licensure and practice while promoting the interests of dental hygiene. Available on the FDHA's website is their official publication Prophyways. This is a seasonal publication covering a wide range of information in the dental hygienist field, including changes to local organizations, such as the Board of Dentistry, to upcoming events in the State of Florida and nationally. Also available on the website is a calendar of events for the entire year as well as a directory of contact information for FDHA board members.

2006-11-02

186

How does diabetes alter treatment in the dental office?  

PubMed

Diabetes mellitus affects approximately seven percent of the American population; thus, patients with diabetes are seen in every dental practice. Advances in medical management of diabetes have resulted in intensification of treatment regimens, with a resulting decrease in long-term complications of the eyes, kidneys, and nervous system. This intensified treatment may place the diabetic patient at increased risk of hypoglycemic emergencies during dental appointments. Dental practitioners should understand methods of preventing hypoglycemia and must be able to recognize and treat hypoglycemia, should it occur in the office. PMID:10530099

Mealey, B L

1998-01-01

187

Familial Polythelia associated with dental anomalies: a case report  

PubMed Central

Polythelia has been defined as the presence of supernumerary nipples without accessory glandular tissue. Usually, these growths follow imaginary mammary lines running from the armpits to the groin. Although the presence of dental anomalies may occasion only a simple cosmetic problem with specific clinical considerations, the association with familial polythelia has been scarcely reported. This paper reports on a case of polythelia that is associated with dental anomalies in an Argentine family and discusses suggestions for a thorough dental history and medical consultation to prevent possible pathological conditions or potential malignant transformation of mammary tissues.

Cantin, Mario

2014-01-01

188

Histologic study of cyclophosphamide's action on dental transplants.  

PubMed

The effect of cyclophosphamide on transplanted continuously growing teeth was studied histologically. Two groups of 36 rats each were used in this study. Rats of Group I underwent dental transplants and postoperative sutures. Those of Group II underwent the same procedures and received daily doses of the cytostatic agent until the day of sacrifice. An analysis was made of cyclophosphamide action on epithelium of the gingival mucosa, periodontal ligament, alveolar osseous tissue, connective tissue situated between the bone and enamel, cementum, dentin, and dental pulp. Cyclophosphamide prevents the appearance of atypical mineralized masses and dental germs. PMID:6935594

Garrafa, V; Okamoto, T; dos Santos Pinto, R

1980-11-01

189

Oral and Dental Considerations in Pediatric Leukemic Patient  

PubMed Central

Throughout the world, there have been drastic decline in mortality rate in pediatric leukemic population due to early diagnosis and improvements in oncology treatment. The pediatric dentist plays an important role in the prevention, stabilization, and treatment of oral and dental problems that can compromise the child's health and quality of life during, and follow up of the cancer treatment. This manuscript discusses recommendations and promotes dental care of the pediatric leukemic patients.

Padmini, Chiyadu; Bai, K. Yellamma

2014-01-01

190

Evaluation of two methods in controlling dental treatment water contamination.  

PubMed

Dental unit water systems are contaminated with biofilms that amplify bacterial counts in dental treatment water in excess of a million colony forming units per milliliter (cfu/ml). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Dental Association have agreed that the maximum allowable contamination of dental treatment water not exceed 500 cfu/ml. This study was conducted to evaluate two protocols in controlling contamination of dental unit water systems and dental treatment water. Both methods used an antimicrobial self-dissolving chlorine dioxide (ClO?) tablet at a high concentration (50 ppm) to shock the dental unit water system biofilms initially followed by periodic exposure. To treat dental treatment source water for patient care, 3 parts per million (ppm) ClO? in municipal/tap water was compared to use of a citrus botanical extract dissolved in municipal water. Heterotrophic microbial counts of effluent water and laser scanning confocal microscopy were performed to evaluate effects of the two treatments. Results from this study indicated that both treatments were effective in controlling biofilm contamination and reducing heterotrophic plate counts <500 cfu/ml. A comprehensive study addressing compatibility of 50 ppm ClO? on the metals and nonmetal components of the dental water system and effects of low-grade chemicals used on composite bonding to dentin and enamel is warranted before translation from efficacy studies to common clinical use. Clinical significance: This study provides evidence-based information of using two methods of controlling dental treatment water contamination. The study was conducted in a clinical practice setting in an active dental clinic and the results are meaningful to a clinician who is interested in providing safe dental treatment water for patient care. Keywords: Dental waterline biofilms, Dental treatment water contamination control, Chlorine dioxide, Emulsifiers, Heterotrophic plate counts, Laser scanning confocal microscopy. How to cite this article: Bansal R, Puttaiah R, Harris R, Reddy A. Evaluation of Two Methods in Controlling Dental Treatment Water Contamination. J Contemp Dent Pract 2011;12(2):73-83. Source of support: Nil Conflict of interest: None declared. PMID:22186748

Bansal, Ritu; Puttaiah, Raghunath; Harris, Robert; Reddy, Anil

2011-01-01

191

Dental student debt.  

PubMed

The aim of this investigation is to provide information about the financial status of dental students enrolled on the Bachelor of Dental Surgery degree course at the University of Birmingham. All undergraduate dental students enrolled during the academic year 1993-94 were asked to participate in the study. The pre-tested questionnaire, which was given to all students, covered personal details, expenditure levels, income, loans, overdrafts, use of government schemes ('top-up loans'), and so on. The questionnaire was completed by 115 dental students (response rate 47%). The results showed that dental students' debts increased each year throughout the course. A top-up loan (range 700 Pounds-850 Pounds) had been taken out by 36% of students. The financial status of 9% of students was severe enough to warrant their eligibility for awards from access funds. Credit cards were possessed by 52% of the surveyed students, and although only half of these owed money, 22% owed between 500 Pounds and 2000 Pounds. Personal overdrafts were held by 56% of respondents. A total of 17% of students engaged in weekly part-time employment. The average debt for final year students was 1200 Pounds. Dental students' estimates of the level of debt they were likely to incur was greater than the actual debt presently experienced by final year students. In conclusion, this preliminary study showed that most dental students incur debt during their undergraduate course and that this debt increases during the course. PMID:8941799

Mannion, H; Bedi, R

1995-09-01

192

Manager's guide to reducing dental hygiene turnover.  

PubMed

The purpose of this paper is to address the issue of dental hygiene turnover and provide managers with strategies for preventing and reducing turnover. Employee turnover is a problem which affects dental health care delivery and the health of the public. Employee turnover is costly to work settings and creates a stressful working environment which has an impact on professional-client relationships. To reduce or prevent turnover in a private practice setting, office managers must be informed about the causes and effects of this problem and be able to implement solutions. Some strategies managers can use to reduce turnover are hiring employees who have the same goals as the organization; improving the working climate; rewarding longevity; encouraging the active participation of all staff members in office management; improving office communication; and providing opportunities for self-growth, recognition, and greater responsibilities. PMID:2637341

Loiacono, C

1989-09-01

193

Copper allergy from dental copper amalgam?  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 65-year-old female was investigated due to a gradually increasing greenish colour change of her plastic dental splint, which she used to prevent teeth grinding when sleeping. Furthermore, she had noted a greenish\\/bluish colour change on the back of her black gloves, which she used to wipe her tears away while walking outdoors. The investigation revealed that the patient had

Lars Gerhardsson; Bert Björkner; Magnus Karlsteen; Andrejs Schütz

2002-01-01

194

Nova Scotia Dental Association: Healthy Teeth  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What exact role does sugar play in the formation of cavities? Find the answer to this question and many more at Healthy Teeth, a comprehensive and lively oral health education website for 3rd-6th graders and created by the Nova Scotia Dental Association. The site contains sections on Cavities, Teeth and Gums, Prevention, and more. The sections are student-friendly with straightforward text and fun animated images. Additionally, the site offers hands-on classroom activities and experiments.

2007-03-19

195

Nova Scotia Dental Association: Healthy Teeth  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What exact role does sugar play in the formation of cavities? Find the answer to this question and many more at Healthy Teeth, a comprehensive and lively oral health education website for 3rd-6th graders and created by the Nova Scotia Dental Association. The site contains sections on Cavities, Teeth and Gums, Prevention, and more. The sections are student-friendly with straightforward text and fun animated images. Additionally, the site offers hands-on classroom activities and experiments.

196

Dental Alloys: Biological Considerations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In recent years, costs related to the laboratory fabrication of cast fixed dental restorations have increased markedly. Increased production costs have been, for the most part, manifestations of current gold prices. Searches for less expensive materials f...

E. F. Huget

1977-01-01

197

Dental care - child  

MedlinePLUS

... dental exams, and any necessary treatments such as fluoride, extractions, fillings, or braces and other orthodontics. See ... age). Ask your pediatrician if your infant needs fluoride added to his diet. THE FIRST TRIP TO ...

198

Body, Facial, & Dental Hygiene  

MedlinePLUS

... Challenges and Resources Hygiene-related Diseases Athlete's Foot (tinea pedis) Body Lice Chronic Diarrhea Dental Caries Head Lice Hot Tub Rash Lymphatic Filariasis Pinworms Pubic Lice ("Crabs") Ringworm (Tinea) Swimmer's Ear (otitis externa) Scabies Trachoma Information for ...

199

Dental arch asymmetry  

PubMed Central

Objective: This study was conducted to assess the dental arch asymmetry in a Yemeni sample aged (18-25) years. Materials and Methods: The investigation involved clinical examination of 1479 adults; only 253 (129 females, 124 males) out of the total sample were selected to fulfill the criteria for the study sample. Study models were constructed and evaluated to measure mandibular arch dimensions. Three linear distances were utilized on each side on the dental arch: Incisal-canine distance, canine-molar distance and incisal-molar distance, which represent the dental arch segmental measurements. Results: When applying “t-test” at P < 0.05, no significant differences were found between the right and left canine-molar, incisal-canine and incisal-molar distances in both dental arches for both sexes. The greater variation (0.30 mm) was observed between right and left canine-molar distance in the maxillary dental arch in male and the smaller (0.04 mm) in the mandibular dental arch between the right and left canine-molar distance in females. Conclusion: The findings of the present study revealed a symmetrical pattern of dental arches, since the right and left sides showed no statistically significant difference. In general, it can be observed that the measurements related to the central incisors and canines have the widest range of reading and give the impression that the location of central incisor and canines to each other and to other teeth is the strongest factor in determining the dental arch asymmetry.

Al-Zubair, Nabil Muhsen

2014-01-01

200

Portable Dental System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Portable dental system provides dental care in isolated communities. System includes a patient's chair and a dentist's stool, an X-ray machine and a power unit, all of which fold into compact packages. A large yellow "pumpkin" is a collapsible compressed air tank. Portable system has been used successfully in South America in out of the way communities with this back-packable system, and in American nursing homes. This product is no longer manufactured.

1980-01-01

201

Etruscan Gold Dental Appliances  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a By 630 BCE Etruscan metallurgists in central Italy had begun to apply their impressive goldworking skills in the production\\u000a of dental bridges (pontics). The achievement of this technological development began with the fabrication of a hollow gold\\u000a tooth mounted on a thin band of gold. The band served to anchor this dental appliance to the healthy teeth adjacent to the

Marshall Joseph Becker

202

Factors that limit access to dental care for adults with spinal cord injury.  

PubMed

This study investigated dental care service utilization among adults with spinal cord injury (SCI) and identified barriers and other factors affecting utilization among this population. There were 192 subjects with SCI who participated in the oral health survey assessing dental care service utilization and they were compared with subjects from the 2004 Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance System (BRFSS). There was no significant difference in the proportion of subjects with SCI who visited the dentist for any reason in the past year compared to the general population (65.5% vs. 68.8%, p= .350). However, subjects with SCI were less likely to go to the dentist for a dental cleaning in the past year compared to the general population (54.6% vs. 69.4%, p < .001). The three most commonly reported barriers to accessing dental care were cost (40.1%), physical barriers (22.9%), and dental fear (15.1%). Multivariate modeling showed that physical barriers and fear of dental visits were the two significant factors deterring subjects from dental visits in the past year. Physical barriers preventing access to dental facilities and dental fear are prevalent and significantly impede the delivery of dental health care to adults with SCI. Dentists should undertake necessary physical remodeling of their facilities to accommodate wheelchair users and implement appropriate strategies for the management of dental fear among patients with SCI. PMID:20618781

Yuen, Hon K; Wolf, Bethany J; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Magruder, Kathryn M; Selassie, Anbesaw W; Salinas, Carlos F

2010-01-01

203

21 CFR 872.3700 - Dental mercury.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3700 Dental mercury. (a) Identification. Dental mercury is a device composed of mercury intended for use as a component of amalgam alloy in the restoration of a dental cavity or a broken...

2009-04-01

204

21 CFR 872.3700 - Dental mercury.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3700 Dental mercury. (a) Identification. Dental mercury is a device composed of mercury intended for use as a component of amalgam alloy in the restoration of a dental cavity or a broken...

2010-04-01

205

Craniofacial and dental phenotype of Smith-Magenis syndrome.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to assess and characterize dental and craniofacial findings in individuals with a confirmed diagnosis of Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS). Extraoral and intraoral examination including dental and craniofacial radiographs and three-dimensional facial photoimaging were performed for 15 cases between ages 4 and 19 years old. Tooth agenesis (13/15 cases) affecting primarily the mandibular second premolars and taurodontism (13/15 cases) were common findings. Dilaceration of the tooth roots was present in one-third of the cases. At least one dental anomaly was present in each case. These findings occur with greater frequency than in the general population (P < 0.001). An age-related increase in decayed and restored teeth was found. Poorer oral hygiene, increased dental plaque, and increased gingival inflammation progressed from childhood to teenage years. Radiographic findings suggest the prognathic appearance is not caused by excessive mandibular growth. Other findings including protrusion of the mandibular anterior teeth, increased bony chin size, and macroglossia were noted, which may contribute to the prognathic appearance. The high prevalence of dental anomalies (>90%) further expands the phenotype and indicates that dental evaluation may aid in the diagnosis of SMS. PMID:17001665

Tomona, Natalia; Smith, Ann C M; Guadagnini, Jean Pierre; Hart, Thomas C

2006-12-01

206

Musculoskeletal pain reports among Mashhad dental students, Iran.  

PubMed

Dental practitioners are susceptible to Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs). The symptoms may begin from education courses. The aim of this study was to assess prevalence of musculoskeletal pain reports and correlated factors among the Mashhad Dental School students, Iran. A total of 177 undergraduate and postgraduate dental students, who were involved in educational clinical training, completed a questionnaire focusing on pain reports of different body anatomical regions. Variables such as gender, academic grade, academic year, clinical working hour, regular exercise times and also pain characteristics including pain duration intensity and frequency were evaluated. As results 82% of undergraduate students and 90% of postgraduate students reported body pain in at least one region. The most prevalent pain locations were: chest/shoulder (46.9%), head/neck (41.8%), middle back (33.9%) and right hand (25.4%). Severity of reported pain was increased due to performing dental work, increased working stress and working fatigue. Regular exercise was associated with alleviated some pain characteristics. As conclusions musculoskeletal pain reports were highly prevalent among dental students. Attention to prevention of musculoskeletal disorders should be considered as priority in dental schools. For dental students exercise training courses for strengthening muscles of shoulder/chest, neck and back are necessary. PMID:24199491

Movahhed, Taraneh; Ajami, Behjatalmolook; Soltani, Mostafa; Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi; Dehghani, Mahboobe

2013-01-15

207

Nuclear Decay  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson provides an overview of basic atomic structure and the concept of radioactive decay. Topics include the particles that make up an atom, binding forces, and the concept of isotopes. There is also discussion of decay methods and half-life versus activity. The lesson includes an activity in which students use online applets to investigate the half-life and activity of selected isotopes and to examine possible decay chains for some others. They will also use a pair of dice to simulate the process of decay.

Pratte, John

208

Minimal Intervention Dentistry (MID) for managing dental caries - a review  

PubMed Central

This publication describes the history of Minimal Intervention Dentistry (MID) for managing dental caries and presents evidence for various carious lesion detection devices, for preventive measures, for restorative and non-restorative therapies as well as for repairing rather than replacing defective restorations. It is a follow-up to the FDI World Dental Federation publication on MID, of 2000. The dental profession currently is faced with an enormous task of how to manage the high burden of consequences of the caries process amongst the world population. If it is to manage carious lesion development and its progression, it should move away from the ‘surgical’ care approach and fully embrace the MID approach. The chance for MID to be successful is thought to be increased tremendously if dental caries is not considered an infectious but instead a behavioural disease with a bacterial component. Controlling the two main carious lesion development related behaviours, i.e. intake and frequency of fermentable sugars, to not more than five times daily and removing/disturbing dental plaque from all tooth surfaces using an effective fluoridated toothpaste twice daily, are the ingredients for reducing the burden of dental caries in many communities in the world. FDI’s policy of reducing the need for restorative therapy by placing an even greater emphasis on caries prevention than is currently done, is therefore, worth pursuing.

Frencken, Jo E.; Peters, Mathilde C.; Manton, David J.; Leal, Soraya C.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Eden, Ece

2012-01-01

209

Microbial contamination of dental unit waterlines.  

PubMed

The specific structure of dental units favours the presence of biofilm and microbial contamination of the dental unit waterlines (DUWL) water. The ability of bacteria to colonize surfaces and to form biofilm in water supply tubes, including DUWL, is a common phenomenon, which has been well documented, just as with difficulties in biofilm removal and prevention of its regrowth. Microorganisms from contaminated DUWL are transmitted with aerosol and splatter, generated by working unit handpieces. On the basis of the detailed literature review, the state-of-the art knowledge of the microflora of dental unit waterlines is presented. Most of the microorganisms isolated from DUWL are of low pathogenicity. Nevertheless, the public health significance of many of the microorganisms found in DUWL is unknown. According to current knowledge, it is not the mere presence of bacteria that is important in DUWL contamination monitoring, but their number, the presence of potential pathogens, and patients' oral cavity microflora. Numerous studies emphasize the need for effective mechanisms to reduce the microbial contamination in DUWL and highlight the risk for cross-infection in general practice, especially in view of the ever-increasing number of immunocompromised persons who present at outpatient dental clinics. PMID:19061251

Szyma?ska, Jolanta; Sitkowska, Jolanta; Dutkiewicz, Jacek

2008-12-01

210

Dental Caries and Enamel Defects in Very Low Birth Weight Adolescents  

PubMed Central

Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine developmental enamel defects and dental caries in very low birth weight adolescents with high risk (HR-VLBW) and low risk (LR-VLBW) compared to full-term (term) adolescents. Methods The sample consisted of 224 subjects (80 HR-VLBW, 59 LR-VLBW, 85 term adolescents) recruited from an ongoing longitudinal study. Sociodemographic and medical information was available from birth. Dental examination of the adolescent at the 14-year visit included: enamel defects (opacity and hypoplasia); decayed, missing, filled teeth of incisors and molars (DMFT-IM) and of overall permanent teeth (DMFT); Simplified Oral Hygiene Index for debris/calculus on teeth, and sealant presence. A caregiver questionnaire completed simultaneously assessed dental behavior, access, insurance status and prevention factors. Hierarchical analysis utilized the zero-inflated negative binomial model and zero-inflated Poisson model. Results The zero-inflated negative binomial model controlling for sociodemographic variables indicated that the LR-VLBW group had an estimated 75% increase (p < 0.05) in number of demarcated opacities in the incisors and first molar teeth compared to the term group. Hierarchical modeling indicated that demarcated opacities were a significant predictor of DMFT-IM after control for relevant covariates. The term adolescents had significantly increased DMFT-IM and DMFT scores compared to the LR-VLBW adolescents. Conclusion LR-VLBW was a significant risk factor for increased enamel defects in the permanent incisors and first molars. Term children had increased caries compared to the LR-VLBW group. The effect of birth group and enamel defects on caries has to be investigated longitudinally from birth.

Nelson, S.; Albert, J.M.; Lombardi, G.; Wishnek, S.; Asaad, G.; Kirchner, H.L.; Singer, L.T.

2011-01-01

211

Influence of dental materials on dental MRI  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To investigate the potential influence of standard dental materials on dental MRI (dMRI) by estimating the magnetic susceptibility with the help of the MRI-based geometric distortion method and to classify the materials from the standpoint of dMRI. Methods: A series of standard dental materials was studied on a 1.5?T MRI system using spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences and their magnetic susceptibility was estimated using the geometric method. Measurements on samples of dental materials were supported by in vivo examples obtained in dedicated dMRI procedures. Results: The tested materials showed a range of distortion degrees. The following materials were classified as fully compatible materials that can be present even in the tooth of interest: the resin-based sealer AH Plus® (Dentsply, Maillefer, Germany), glass ionomer cement, gutta-percha, zirconium dioxide and composites from one of the tested manufacturers. Interestingly, composites provided by the other manufacturer caused relatively strong distortions and were therefore classified as compatible I, along with amalgam, gold alloy, gold–ceramic crowns, titanium alloy and NiTi orthodontic wires. Materials, the magnetic susceptibility of which differed from that of water by more than 200?ppm, were classified as non-compatible materials that should not be present in the patient’s mouth for any dMRI applications. They included stainless steel orthodontic appliances and CoCr. Conclusions: A classification of the materials that complies with the standard grouping of materials according to their magnetic susceptibility was proposed and adopted for the purposes of dMRI. The proposed classification can serve as a guideline in future dMRI research.

Tymofiyeva, O; Vaegler, S; Rottner, K; Boldt, J; Hopfgartner, AJ; Proff, PC; Richter, E-J; Jakob, PM

2013-01-01

212

Explanatory models in the interpretations of clinical features of dental patients within a university dental education setting.  

PubMed

Clinicians may acquire biased perceptions during their dental education that can affect decisions about treatment/management of dental decay. This study established explanatory models used by students to interpret clinical features of patients. It employed a stereotypical dental patient under standardised consultation conditions to identify the interpretation of oral health/disease features in the eyes of student clinicians. The study aimed to establish the perceptions of the patient as a client of the university dental clinic, as seen through the ideological lens of a formal Dental Education system. The discourse during simulated clinical consultations was qualitatively analysed to interpret values and concepts relevant to the assessment of restorative treatment needs and oral health status. Three constructs during the consultation were identified: the Dual Therapeutic Realms, the Choices Underlying Treatment Options, and the High-Risk Triad. Comparing these discourse components, the Patient Factors of the Bader and Shugars model for treatment decisions supported the existence of a core set of themes. It was concluded that certain consultation circumstances influenced the adequacy of diagnostic strategies, mainly by introducing loosely defined but highly specific socio-cultural biases ingrained in the Dental Education concepts and diagnostic/treatment needs systems. PMID:11872067

Maupomé, Gerardo; Sheiham, Aubrey

2002-02-01

213

Esthetic dental anomalies as motive for bullying in schoolchildren  

PubMed Central

Facial esthetics, including oral esthetics, can severely affect children's quality-of-life, causing physical, social and psychological impairment. Children and adolescents with esthetic-related dental malformations are potential targets for bullies. This study was aimed to present and discuss patients who suffered from bullying at school and family environment due to esthetic-related teeth anomalies. Providing an adequate esthetic dental treatment is an important step in their rehabilitation when the lack of esthetic is the main source of bullying. After dental treatment, we noted significant improvement in self-esteem, self-confidence, socialization and academic performance of all patients and improvement in parental satisfaction regarding the appearance of their children. It is imperative that both family and school care providers be constantly alert about bullying in order to prevent or interrupt aggressive and discriminatory practices against children and adolescents. Clearly, dental anomalies may be a motive for bullying.

Scheffel, Debora Lopes Salles; Jeremias, Fabiano; Fragelli, Camila Maria Bullio; dos Santos-Pinto, Lourdes Aparecida Martins; Hebling, Josimeri; de Oliveira, Osmir Batista

2014-01-01

214

Esthetic dental anomalies as motive for bullying in schoolchildren.  

PubMed

Facial esthetics, including oral esthetics, can severely affect children's quality-of-life, causing physical, social and psychological impairment. Children and adolescents with esthetic-related dental malformations are potential targets for bullies. This study was aimed to present and discuss patients who suffered from bullying at school and family environment due to esthetic-related teeth anomalies. Providing an adequate esthetic dental treatment is an important step in their rehabilitation when the lack of esthetic is the main source of bullying. After dental treatment, we noted significant improvement in self-esteem, self-confidence, socialization and academic performance of all patients and improvement in parental satisfaction regarding the appearance of their children. It is imperative that both family and school care providers be constantly alert about bullying in order to prevent or interrupt aggressive and discriminatory practices against children and adolescents. Clearly, dental anomalies may be a motive for bullying. PMID:24966759

Scheffel, Débora Lopes Salles; Jeremias, Fabiano; Fragelli, Camila Maria Bullio; Dos Santos-Pinto, Lourdes Aparecida Martins; Hebling, Josimeri; de Oliveira, Osmir Batista

2014-01-01

215

Dental Therapy: Evolving in Minnesota's Safety Net.  

PubMed

Objectives. We identified Minnesota's initial dental therapy employers and surveyed dental safety net providers' perceptions of dental therapy. Methods. In July 2011, we surveyed 32 Minnesota dental safety net providers to assess their prospective views on dental therapy employment options. In October 2013, we used an employment scan to reveal characteristics of the early adopters of dental therapy. Results. Before the availability of licensed dental therapists, safety net dental clinic directors overwhelmingly (77%) supported dental therapy. As dental therapists have become licensed over the past 2 years, the early employers of dental therapists are safety net clinics. Conclusions. Although the concept of dental therapy remains controversial in Minnesota, it now has a firm foundation in the state's safety net clinics. Dental therapists are being used in innovative and diverse ways, so, as dental therapy continues to evolve, further research to identify best practices for incorporating dental therapists into the oral health care team is needed. PMID:24825234

Self, Karl; Born, David; Nagy, Amanda

2014-06-01

216

Stress Response Pathways in Ameloblasts: Implications for Amelogenesis and Dental Fluorosis  

PubMed Central

Human enamel development of the permanent teeth takes place during childhood and stresses encountered during this period can have lasting effects on the appearance and structural integrity of the enamel. One of the most common examples of this is the development of dental fluorosis after childhood exposure to excess fluoride, an elemental agent used to increase enamel hardness and prevent dental caries. Currently the molecular mechanism responsible for dental fluorosis remains unknown; however, recent work suggests dental fluorosis may be the result of activated stress response pathways in ameloblasts during the development of permanent teeth. Using fluorosis as an example, the role of stress response pathways during enamel maturation is discussed.

Sierant, Megan L.; Bartlett, John D.

2012-01-01

217

A systematic review of dental late effects in survivors of childhood cancer.  

PubMed

Survivors of childhood cancer are at risk for dental late effects. This systematic review summarizes associations between treatment exposures and dental late effects among survivors of childhood cancer. We included investigations with at least 20 study participants conducted for 2 or more years after completion of childhood, adolescent, or young adult cancer therapy. This review suggests both independent and additive effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy on dental complications, and identifies vulnerable groups with specific host and treatment characteristics. This summary provides information that will assist clinicians to prevent, detect, and facilitate early intervention for dental late effects. PMID:24424790

Gawade, Prasad L; Hudson, Melissa M; Kaste, Sue C; Neglia, Joseph P; Constine, Louis S; Robison, Leslie L; Ness, Kirsten K

2014-03-01

218

Infection Control in Dental Settings  

MedlinePLUS

... CDC.gov . Infection Control in Dental Settings Oral Health home School-Based Dental Sealant Programs Community Water Fluoridation Fluoridation Basics Benefits Guidelines Safety Infant Formula and Fluorosis Scientific Reviews ...

219

Study: VA Dental Manpower Requirements.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study, performed by the UCLA School of Dentistry and submitted to the National Academy of Sciences, was conducted to determine manpower requirements in the VA dental facilities. Although primarily concerned with dental staffing, this study also inclu...

M. Marcus L. Drabek

1976-01-01

220

Dental Health: The Basic Facts  

MedlinePLUS

... from the dental visit RESOURCES Academy of General Dentistry 211 East Chicago Avenue Suite 900 Chicago, Illinois ... state dental department of health National Foundation of Dentistry for the Handicapped 1800 15th Street Suite 100 ...

221

Dental Assistants: A Frank Appraisal.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author describes the training, certification, and tasks of dental assistants. She offers a look at some of the dissatisfactions of dental assistants and a brief glimpse at future employment prospects. (Author)

Wiley, Carolyn

1982-01-01

222

DENTAL PULP TISSUE ENGINEERING  

PubMed Central

Dental pulp is a highly specialized mesenchymal tissue, which have a restrict regeneration capacity due to anatomical arrangement and post-mitotic nature of odontoblastic cells. Entire pulp amputation followed by pulp-space disinfection and filling with an artificial material cause loss of a significant amount of dentin leaving as life-lasting sequelae a non-vital and weakened tooth. However, regenerative endodontics is an emerging field of modern tissue engineering that demonstrated promising results using stem cells associated with scaffolds and responsive molecules. Thereby, this article will review the most recent endeavors to regenerate pulp tissue based on tissue engineering principles and providing insightful information to readers about the different aspects enrolled in tissue engineering. Here, we speculate that the search for the ideal combination of cells, scaffolds, and morphogenic factors for dental pulp tissue engineering may be extended over future years and result in significant advances in other areas of dental and craniofacial research. The finds collected in our review showed that we are now at a stage in which engineering a complex tissue, such as the dental pulp, is no longer an unachievable and the next decade will certainly be an exciting time for dental and craniofacial research.

Demarco, FF; Conde, MCM; Cavalcanti, B; Casagrande, L; Sakai, V; Nor, JE

2013-01-01

223

Maintaining proper dental records.  

PubMed

Referred to as Standard of Care, the legal duty of a dentist requires exercising the degree of skill and care that would be exhibited by other prudent dentists faced with the same patient-care situation. Primarily, the goal of keeping good dental records is to maintain continuity of care. Diligent and complete documentation and charting procedures are essential to fulfilling the Standard of Care. Secondly, because dental records are considered legal documents they help protect the interest of the dentist and/or the patient by establishing the details of the services rendered. Patients today are better educated and more assertive than ever before and dentists must be equipped to protect themselves against malpractice claims. Every record component must be handled as if it could be summoned to a court room and scrutinized by an attorney, judge or jury. Complete, accurate, objective and honest entries in a patient record are the only way to defend against any clinical and/or legal problems that might arise. Most medical and dental malpractice claims arise from an unfavorable interaction with the dentist and not from a poor treatment outcome. By implementing the suggestions mentioned in this course, dental health care professionals can minimize the legal risks associated with the delivery of dental care to promote greater understanding for patients of their rights and privileges to their complete record. PMID:24834675

Leeuw, Wilhemina

2014-01-01

224

Dental Health in Rural Areas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The concentration of dental health services in urban areas creates a problem for the rural population of America. The problem is analyzed in this document by looking at the population distribution today and the ratio of dental services per population, the location of dental education resources, and the concern of society for the quality of living.…

Howell, Charles S.

225

Fibre reinforced composite dental bridge  

Microsoft Academic Search

This experimental investigation aims at revealing the mechanical behaviour and failure pattern of direct fibre-reinforced resin-bonded dental bridge with various designs. To evaluate the overall effects of some newly developed dental materials, in the experiment, genuine composite dental bridge specimens are prepared and tested. The ultimate load, stiffness and mode at the failure of the bridges are measured and compared

W. Li; M. V. Swain; Q. Li; J. Ironside; G. P. Steven

2004-01-01

226

Dental Assistant Specialist. (AFSC 98150).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This four-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for dental assistant specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are an introduction to dental services (the mission and organization of medical/dental service, career ladder progressions, medical readiness/wartime training, and…

Eling, David R.

227

Dental obturation materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the last decades, people have tried to develop a better material for use in dental obturation materials. This new material should meet the following requirements: durability, wear resistance, biocompatibility and chemical adhesion to dentin enamel. Wear resistance is very important and it is related with the service life of dental replacements. We have obtained aesthetically promising novel nano composites that can be used as dental replacements. The main objective of this work is to study the scratch and wear resistance of these nano composites. To meet this goal, scratch tests are performed using a micro scratch tester machine (CSEM), where a diamond indenter is used to make the scratch and the penetration of this indenter is measured with high resolution (7nm). We will be looking at the penetration depth (Rp) and the residual (or healing) depth (Rh) to calculate the percent recovery. These measurements represent the scratch resistance of the material.

Stockton, Elizabeth; Chudej, Lauren; Bilyeu, Brian; Brostow, Witold

2006-10-01

228

Dental disease in type 3 Von Willebrand disease: a neglected problem.  

PubMed

? Type 3 Von Willebrand disease (VWD) is a rare, severe, autosomal recessive bleeding disorder. In our institution, we follow 17 children with type 3 VWD. We have observed a high prevalence of dental disease in these patients prompting us to undertake a retrospective review of our cohort of patients with type 3 VWD to catalogue the extent of their dental disease. Sixteen of these patients have been assessed by our dentistry department. Five children have undergone minor dental procedures (e.g. restorations, stainless steel crowns) and seven major procedures (e.g. dental extractions, pulpotomies and root canal treatments). These patients have collectively used 85,400 (ristocetin cofactor) IU of Humate-P on dental procedures alone. In addition to the considerable costs of factor are the cost of operating room time, dentists' costs, and the cost of other topical haemostatic agents (e.g. Tisseel) used during their dental procedures. As such there is considerable morbidity and cost from dental disease in these patients that is much higher than what is seen in patients with haemophilia or in the normal paediatric population. We speculate that the combination of these patients having a significant mucosal bleeding disorder together with various socioeconomic factors contribute to the significant degree of dental disease seen in this group of patients. We would suggest that better preventive dental care needs to be provided to these patients to avoid the considerable morbidity and very high burden of dental disease in type 3 VWD. PMID:20565545

Carcao, M D; Seary, M E; Casas, M; Winter, L; Stain, A M; Judd, P

2010-11-01

229

Clinical practice: dental trauma.  

PubMed

Approximately 50% of children under the age of 15 are victims of various kinds of injuries in the orofacial region. Post-traumatic complications may occur, including crown discolouration, cervical root fracture, ankylosis, root resorption and tooth loss. The most severe complication after dental injury in primary dentition can affect the developing permanent tooth germ, and various consequences may be seen several years later when the permanent tooth erupts. In the permanent dentition, the most severe dental injury affects the surrounding alveolar bone structure and will lead to loss of the tooth. Current literature emphasises that awareness of appropriate triage procedures following dental trauma is unsatisfactory and that delay in treatment is the single most influential factor affecting prognosis. What should a paediatrician know, and more importantly, how should he/she advise parents and caretakers? In an emergency situation such as tooth avulsion, reimplantation within 30 min is the best treatment option at the site of the accident. If reimplantation of the tooth is impossible, milk, saline or even saliva are the preferred transport media. The prognosis for an avulsed tooth depends upon prompt care, which is a determinant factor for successful treatment of the traumatised tooth. In all other dental trauma cases, it is important to refer the child to a paediatric dentist, to follow up the healing process and reduce late post-traumatic complications. With timely interventions and appropriate treatment, the prognosis for healing following most dental injuries is good. In conclusion, it is important that paediatricians are able to inform parents and caretakers about all possible and long-lasting consequences of different dental injuries. PMID:20058022

Emerich, Katarzyna; Wyszkowski, Jacek

2010-09-01

230

Rapid HIV Testing in Dental Practices  

PubMed Central

Despite increasing discussion about the dental care setting as a logical, potentially fruitful venue for rapid HIV testing, dentists’ willingness to take on this task is unclear. Semistructured interviews with 40 private practice dentists revealed their principal concerns regarding offering patients HIV testing were false results, offending patients, viewing HIV testing as outside the scope of licensure, anticipating low patient acceptance of HIV testing in a dental setting, expecting inadequate reimbursement, and potential negative impact on the practice. Dentists were typically not concerned about transmission risks, staff opposition to testing, or making referrals for follow-up after a positive result. A larger cultural change may be required to engage dentists more actively in primary prevention and population-based HIV screening.

Abel, Stephen N.; Pereyra, Margaret; Liguori, Terri; Pollack, Harold A.; Metsch, Lisa R.

2012-01-01

231

Pneumoconiosis and exposures of dental laboratory technicians.  

PubMed Central

One hundred and seventy-eight dental laboratory technicians and 69 non-exposed controls participated in an epidemiological respiratory study. Eight technicians who had a mean of 28 years' grinding nonprecious metal alloys were diagnosed as having a simple pneumoconiosis by chest radiograph. Mean values for per cent predicted FVC and FEV1 were reduced among male nonsmoker technicians compared to male nonsmoker controls; after controlling for age, there was also a reduction in spirometry with increasing work-years. An industrial hygiene survey was conducted in 13 laboratories randomly selected from 42 laboratories stratified by size and type of operation in the Salt Lake City, Utah metropolitan area. Personal exposures to beryllium and cobalt exceeded the Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) in one laboratory. Occupational exposures in dental laboratories need to be controlled to prevent beryllium-related lung disorders as well as simple pneumoconiosis.

Rom, W N; Lockey, J E; Lee, J S; Kimball, A C; Bang, K M; Leaman, H; Johns, R E; Perrota, D; Gibbons, H L

1984-01-01

232

[Hardening of dental instruments].  

PubMed

The possibility of prolonging the service life of stomatological instruments by the local hardening of their working parts is discussed. Such hardening should be achieved by using hard and wear-resistant materials. The examples of hardening dental elevators and hard-alloy dental drills are given. New trends in the local hardening of instruments are the treatment of their working parts with laser beams, the application of coating on their surface by the gas-detonation method. The results of research work and trials are presented. PMID:7300627

Gerasev, G P

1981-01-01

233

Performance of Dental Ceramics  

PubMed Central

The clinical success of modern dental ceramics depends on an array of factors, ranging from initial physical properties of the material itself, to the fabrication and clinical procedures that inevitably damage these brittle materials, and the oral environment. Understanding the influence of these factors on clinical performance has engaged the dental, ceramics, and engineering communities alike. The objective of this review is to first summarize clinical, experimental, and analytic results reported in the recent literature. Additionally, it seeks to address how this new information adds insight into predictive test procedures and reveals challenges for future improvements.

Rekow, E.D.; Silva, N.R.F.A.; Coelho, P.G.; Zhang, Y.; Guess, P.; Thompson, V.P.

2011-01-01

234

Sinusitis of dental origin.  

PubMed

Acute or chronic sinusitis may be odontogenic. Bacteria involved in odontogenic sinusitis are specific organisms associated with the teeth (Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus mutans, anaerobic germs). They are often secondary to an intrasinus foreign body following periodontitis. The treatment is both naso-sinusal and dental. Cysts of the maxilla can also invade the sinus. In particular, radiculo-dental cysts (periapical) must be surgically excised, in some cases associated with a middle meatotomy. Finally, one should look for oro-antral fistulae. The surgical technique for its closure should take into account the reversibility of the sinus lesions. PMID:9444378

Bertrand, B; Rombaux, P; Eloy, P; Reychler, H

1997-01-01

235

Osteoradionecrosis: Causes and prevention  

SciTech Connect

Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) is one of the most serious complications arising from head and neck radiation therapy. Current research has shown that ORN represents nonhealing, dead bone and is not a state of infection. ORN is the result of functional and structural bony changes that may not be expressed for months or years. ORN may occur spontaneously or in response to wounding. Predisposing factors include absorbed radiation dose, fractionation, delivery modality, and dental status. Timing of dental extractions and other factors have also been shown to affect incidence. ORN may be reduced through early intraoral evaluation, treatment, and adequate healing time prior to beginning RT. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy has been beneficial in the prevention and treatment of ORN. It is of paramount importance for the medical community to recognize the factors that may reduce ORN incidence, endorse oral care protocols, and acknowledge the value of HBO therapy in the prevention and treatment of this disease. 60 references.

Friedman, R.B. (Medical College of Virginia Hospitals, Richmond (USA))

1990-01-01

236

Prevalence of dental caries among 12-14 year old children in Qatar  

PubMed Central

Background To ensure the oral health of a population, clinicians must deliver appropriate dental services, and local communities need to have access to dental care facilities. However, establishment of this infrastructure must be based on reliable information regarding disease prevalence and severity in the target population. Objectives The aims of this study were to measure the incidence of dental caries in school children aged 12–14 throughout Qatar, including the influence of socio-demographic factors. Materials and methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in Qatar from October 2011 to March 2012. A total of 2113 children aged 12–14 were randomly selected from 16 schools located in different geographic areas. Three calibrated examiners using World Health Organization (WHO) criteria to diagnose dental caries performed the clinical examinations. Data analyses were subsequently conducted. Results The mean decayed, missing, and filled teeth index values were respectively 4.62 (±3.2), 4.79 (±3.5), and 5.5 (±3.7), for 12, 13, and 14 year-old subjects. Caries prevalence was 85%. The mandibular incisors and canines were least affected by dental caries, while maxillary and mandibular molars exhibited the highest incidence of dental caries. Dental caries were affected by socio-demographic factors; significant differences were detected between female and male children, where more female children showed dental caries than male children. In addition, children residing in semi-urban areas showed more dental caries than in urban areas. Conclusion Results indicated that dental caries prevalence among school children in Qatar has reached critical levels, and is influenced by socio-demographic factors. The mean decayed, missing, and filled teeth values obtained in this study were the second highest detected in the Eastern Mediterranean region.

Al-Darwish, Mohammed; El Ansari, Walid; Bener, Abdulbari

2014-01-01

237

Radioactive Decay  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With knowledge of Maple, Mathmatica, or MatLab, one should be able to develop a mathematical model for decay of radioactive substances and develop a technique for deciding whether quantitative data fits the model or not.

Smith, David

2001-01-22

238

When and Why Parents Seek Dental Care for Children under 36 Months  

PubMed Central

Background: The aim was to analyze an infant preventive program determining at what age parents take their children for their first dental visit and the reasons why they do it. Materials & Methods: A total of 844 children aged from 0 to 36 months, enrolled in the program of oral health maintenance of the Baby Clinic, participated in this study. During the first dental visit, the parents were inquired about the reasons that led them to enroll their children in the program. One trained investigator identified this reasons on the records and classified them according to the following scores: orientation/prevention, caries treatment, malpositioned teeth, dental trauma, tooth color alterations and others. Results: Orientation/prevention was the most prevalent reason from 0-6 months to 25-30 months of age, and at the age 30-36 months, the reason caries/treatment overcame orientation/prevention, becoming the most prevalent reason in that age group. The third place was occupied by dental trauma. The mean age parents seek for dental care to their children was 14, 92 months. Conclusion: This study showed a preferentially preventive/educational profile for the children. However, lots of parents still take children to the dentist preferentially for curative instead of preventive treatment. How to cite this article: Volpato LE, Palti DG, Lima JE, Machado MA, Aranha AM, Bandeca MC, Pedro FL, Borges AH. When and Why Parents Seek Dental Care for Children under 36 Months. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(4):21-25.

Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci; Palti, Dafna Geller; Lima, Jose Eduardo de Oliveira; Machado, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira; Aranha, Andreza Maria Fabio; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Pedro, Fabio Luis Miranda; Borges, Alvaro Henrique

2013-01-01

239

Cooling profile following prosthetic preparation of 1-piece dental implants.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of water irrigation on heat dissipation kinetics following abutment preparation of 1-piece dental implants. UNO 1-piece dental implants were mounted on Plexiglas apparatus clamping the implant at the collar. T-type thermocouple was attached to the first thread of the implant and recorded thermal changes at 100 millisecond intervals. Implants were prepared using highspeed dental turbine at 400,000 RPM with a coarse diamond bur. Once temperature reached 47 degrees C, abutment preparation was discontinued. Thirty implants were divided into 2 groups. Group A: Passive cooling without water irrigation. Group B: Cooling with turbine's water spray adjacent to the implant (30 mL/min). The following parameters were measured: T47 (time from peak temperature to 47 degrees C), T50%, T75% (time until the temperature amplitude decayed by 50% and 75%, respectively), dTemp50%/dt decay, and dTemp75%/dt decay (cooling rate measured at 50% and 75% of amplitude decay, respectively). Water spray irrigation significantly reduced T47 (1.37+/-0.29 seconds vs 19.97+/-3.06 seconds, P<0.0001), T50% (3.04+/-0.34 seconds vs 27.37+/-2.56 seconds, P<0.0001), and T75% (5.71+/-0.57 seconds vs 57.61+/-5.47 seconds, P<0.0001). Water spray irrigation also increased cooling capacity ninefold: dTemp50%/dt decay (4.14+/-0.61 degrees C/s vs 0.48+/-0.06 degrees C/s, P<0.0001), and dTemp50%/dt decay (1.70+/-0.29 degrees C/s vs 0.19+/-0.03 degrees C/s, P<0.0001). The continuous use of water spray adjacent to the abutment following the cessation of implant preparation might prove beneficial for rapid cooling of the implant. PMID:20521943

Cohen, Omer; Gabay, Eran; Machtei, Eli E

2010-01-01

240

Aspirin Use and Post-operative Bleeding from Dental Extractions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aspirin is a common, chronically administered preventive treatment for cardiovascular disease, but is often discontinued prior to invasive dental procedures because of concern for bleeding complications. We hypothesized that aspirin does not cause increased bleeding following a single tooth extraction. Thirty-six healthy persons requiring a tooth extraction were randomized to receive 325 mg\\/day aspirin or placebo for 4 days. Cutaneous

M. T. Brennan; M. A. Valerin; J. L. Noll; J. J. Napeñas; M. L. Kent; P. C. Fox; H. C. Sasser; P. B. Lockhart

2008-01-01

241

Smoking Policies of U.S. Dental Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objectives of a study on the preventive health activity concerning smoking at dental schools were to determine the smoking policies and what actions were taken to reduce health hazards of smoke to personnel in institutions. The majority of schools surveyed (N=46) restricted smoking to certain areas in their facility. (MLW)

Cheney, H. Gordon

1990-01-01

242

Dental abnormalities in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to define the therapy-associated dental abnormalities in survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We reviewed the clinical records and panoramic radiographs of 423 survivors of ALL who were treated on one of four consecutive protocols (1975-1991). Dental abnormalities included root stunting, microdontia, hypodontia, taurodontia (enlarged pulp chambers), and over-retention of primary teeth. The frequency of these factors was determined in relation to age at initiation of treatment (< or = 8 years vs > 8 years), addition of cranial irradiation, and chemotherapeutic protocol. A total of 423 patients met the study criteria. The abnormalities comprised root stunting in 24.4% (n = 103), microdontia in 18.9% (n = 80), hypodontia in 8.5% (n = 36), taurodontia in 5.9% (n = 25), and over-retention of primary dentition in 4.0% (n = 17). Patients who were < or = 8 years old at diagnosis or who received cranial irradiation therapy developed more dental abnormalities than did those > 8 years and those who did not receive cranial irradiation (42 vs 32%). Survivors of childhood ALL often have dental abnormalities that may affect their quality of life. Dental evaluation at diagnosis and frequent follow-up may help to ensure appropriate preventive measures and minimize dental and periodontal disease. PMID:9177429

Kaste, S C; Hopkins, K P; Jones, D; Crom, D; Greenwald, C A; Santana, V M

1997-06-01

243

Total antioxidant capacity of saliva and dental caries  

PubMed Central

Objective: Dental caries is one of the most common infectious diseases worldwide. Saliva has many functions in the oral cavity and is the first line defense against dental caries. Oxidative stress can affect initiation and progression of many inflammatory and infectious diseases such as dental caries. Thus the aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of saliva and dental caries. Study Design: 100 healthy high school students (50 female and 50 male) with age range of 15 -17 years were randomly selected, divided to four groups. Unstimulated whole saliva specimens were collected at the morning. TAC of saliva was evaluated by spectrophotometric assay. Statistical comparisons were performed using Student’s t-test, by SPSS 13. Results: The level of TAC was significantly higher in the saliva of caries active group relative to the caries free subjects. Statistical analysis for male and female groups showed a statistically significant reduction of TAC level in female group. Conclusion: TAC was higher in caries active group. Thus this result showed that total antioxidant capacity may influence in dental caries and activity can be measured by salivary factors and this may be helpful in preventive dentistry. Key words:Dental caries, saliva, total antioxidant capacity.

Goodarzi, Mohammad T.; Hendi, Seyedeh S.; Kasraei, Shahin; Moghimbeigi, Abbas

2013-01-01

244

Representation of dental care and oral health in children's drawings.  

PubMed

Background Paediatric dentistry requires knowledge of preventive measures, restorative skills and an understanding of child development.Aim This exploratory, descriptive and qualitative study has analysed children's drawings regarding their perception of dental treatment and oral health.Method Children aged from six to ten years attending a dental school for treatment were randomly invited to create a drawing about 'dental treatment' and 'oral health'. Verbal expressions made by the children whilst drawing were also recorded and attached to the drawings. These representations were analysed and categorised using Vygotsky postulations for context reading.Discussion During the drawing analysis different themes emerged. Five categories regarding perceptions of dental treatment were identified: personal relationship; power relation; trauma; childhood resistance; and contextualisation of dental care in the child's life. Three categories relating to oral health were determined: dichotomy of health/sickness; ludic representation of health; and sickness seen as a process.Conclusion Drawing can be used to understand children's emotions and expectations about dental treatment. Besides possessing technical skills and scientific knowledge, dentists have an obligation to pay attention to children's feelings. PMID:24970540

Torriani, D D; Goettems, M L; Cademartori, M G; Fernandez, R R; Bussoletti, D M

2014-06-27

245

Uranium in Dental Porcelain.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The radiological health aspects of the use of uranium in dental porcelain are presented. The concentration of uranium is reported for 18 sets of porcelain teeth and 23 samples of porcelain powder. Particle emission rates were obtained for uranium and for ...

D. L. Thompson

1976-01-01

246

Dental Operatory Contamination.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A microbiological sampling of instruments intended for use in the treatment of patients in a dental operatory was taken. Selected instruments routinely used were sterilized by means of steam under pressure, dry heat, or ethylene oxide gas. Half of these s...

R. W. Longton I. L. Shklair P. B. Carroll L. M. Armstrong

1967-01-01

247

Metrics for Dental Assistants.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed to meet the job-related metric measurement needs of students interested in becoming dental assistants, this instructional package is one of five for the health occupations cluster, part of a set of 55 packages for metric instruction in different occupations. The package is intended for students who already know the occupational…

Cooper, Gloria S., Ed.; Magisos, Joel H., Ed.

248

The Dental Admissions Interview.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of Canadian and US dental school admissions offices concerning their use of the admissions interview revealed that use of the interview is increasing, interviewers are generally untrained, and schools use the interview to assess applicants' character, motivation, communication ability, knowledge, and intelligence. (MSE)

Myslinski, Norbert R.; Jeffrey, Robert I.

1985-01-01

249

Dental amalgam and mercury  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper looks at the issues of the current amalgam controversy: the daily dose of mercury from amalgam, hypersensitivity to mercury, claims of adverse effects from amalgam mercury and alleged overnight 'cures.' In addition, the toxicity and allergenicity of the proposed alternative materials are examined with the same kind of scrutiny applied by the anti-amalgam group to dental amalgam. 100

Mackert; J. R. Jr

1991-01-01

250

Dental Amalgam— Environmental Aspects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increasing knowledge about the risk of toxic effects caused by anthropogenic mercury accumulation in ecosystems has resulted in a growing pressure for reduction of the discharge of mercury waste. Consequently, the mercury waste problems of dental clinics have been given increased attention, and restrictions on handling and discharge of contaminated waste have been established in several countries.Major amalgam particles from

D. Arenholt-Bindslev

1992-01-01

251

Dental amalgam and mercury  

SciTech Connect

This paper looks at the issues of the current amalgam controversy: the daily dose of mercury from amalgam, hypersensitivity to mercury, claims of adverse effects from amalgam mercury and alleged overnight 'cures.' In addition, the toxicity and allergenicity of the proposed alternative materials are examined with the same kind of scrutiny applied by the anti-amalgam group to dental amalgam. 100 references.

Mackert, J.R. Jr. (Department of Restorative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta (United States))

1991-08-01

252

Skylab Dental Examination  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Skylab 2 Commander Charles Conrad is seen undergoing a dental examination by the Medical Officer, Joseph Kerwin in the Skylab Medical Facility. In the absence of an examination chair, Conrad simply rotated his body to an upside down position to facilitate the procedure.

1973-01-01

253

Dental patient preferences and choice in clinical decision-making.  

PubMed

In economics, the concept of utility refers to the strength of customer preference. In health care assessment, the visual analogue scale (VAS), the standard gamble, and the time trade-off are used to measure health state utilities. These utility measurements play a key role in promoting shared decision-making in dental care. Individual preference, however, is complex and dynamic. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between patient preference and educational intervention in the field of dental health. The data were collected by distributing questionnaires to employees of two companies in Japan. Participants were aged 18-65 years and consisted of 111 males and 93 females (204 in total). One company (Group A) had a dental program of annual check-ups and health education in the workplace, while the other company (Group B) had no such program. Statistical analyses were performed with the t-test and Chi-square test. The questionnaire items were designed to determine: (1) oral health-related quality of life, (2) dental health state utilities (using VAS), and (3) time trade-off for regular dental check-ups. The percentage of respondents in both groups who were satisfied with chewing function, appearance of teeth, and social function ranged from 23.1 to 42.4%. There were no significant differences between groups A and B in the VAS of decayed, filled, and missing teeth. The VAS of gum bleeding was 42.8 in Group A and 51.3 in Group B (p<0.05). The percentage of persons having a regular dental check-up every three months was 34.1 and 31.3% in Groups A and B respectively. These results suggest that low preference results from lack of opportunity or utilization of dental care in the worksite. Ascertaining the factors involved in patient preference may have significant potential benefits in shared decision-making. PMID:22790334

Fukai, Kakuhiro; Yoshino, Koichi; Ohyama, Atsushi; Takaesu, Yoshinori

2012-01-01

254

European Core Curriculum in Cariology for undergraduate dental students.  

PubMed

As dental caries prevalence is still high in many populations and groups of both children and adults worldwide, and as caries continues to be responsible for significant health, social and economic impacts, there is an urgent need for dental students to receive a systematic education in cariology based upon current best evidence. Although European curriculum guidelines for undergraduate students have been prepared in other dental fields over the last decade, none exist for cariology. Thus the European Organisation for Caries Research (ORCA) formed a task force to work with the Association of Dental Education in Europe (ADEE) on a European Core Curriculum in Cariology. In 2010, a workshop to develop such a curriculum was organised in Berlin, Germany, with 75 participants from 24 European and 3 North/South American countries. The Curriculum was debated by five pre-identified working groups: I The Knowledge Base; II Risk Assessment, Diagnosis and Synthesis; III Decision-Making and Preventive Non-surgical Therapy; IV Decision-making and Surgical Therapy; and V Evidence-based Cariology in Clinical and Public Health Practice and then finalised jointly by the group chairs. According to this Curriculum, on graduation, a dentist must be competent at applying knowledge and understanding of the biological, medical, basic and applied clinical sciences in order to recognise caries and make decisions about its prevention and management in individuals and populations. This document, which presents several major and numerous supporting competences, does not confine itself to dental caries alone, but refers also to dental erosion/non-erosive wear and other dental hard tissue disorders. PMID:22023541

Schulte, A G; Pitts, N B; Huysmans, M C D N J M; Splieth, C; Buchalla, W

2011-11-01

255

Dental Therapy Assistant: Attitudes of Army Dentists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The U. S. Army Dental Corps has implemented a formal program based on the concept that dental care can be more efficiently and effectively provided with treatment teams composed of one dental officer, two dental therapy assistants, one basic assistant, and the shared support of other auxiliary personnel. Such a team will use three dental treatment…

Heid, Theodore H.; Bair, Jeffrey H.

256

Achieving health outcomes through professional dental care: comparing the cost of dental treatment for children in three practice modes.  

PubMed Central

The search for effective strategies to deal with prevention and treatment of oral disease focuses on children as a natural target population. This article reports data on the comparative costs of delivering dental care to children via (1) a school-based practice using Expanded Function Dental Auxiliaries, (2) a school-based practice without EFDAs, and (3) a group of unrelated private dental practices operating independent of the school system. Utilization of a dentist's services varied significantly between the children assigned to private care and those assigned to the school-based programs, but it cost less per patient to provide dental treatment through the private practitioners. If school-based practices are clearly more effective in reducing dental disease, in the long run the need for manpower and resources in these programs might be lowered to a point where they will become more cost-effective than private practices. If the two delivery modes are equally effective in reducing dental disease, however, results from the study indicate that private practices are more cost-effective and will probably maintain their cost-effective advantage over school-based programs.

Bentley, J M; Green, P; Ship, I I

1984-01-01

257

PROVIDING A DENTAL HOME FOR PREGNANT WOMEN: A COMMUNITY PROGRAM TO ADDRESS DENTAL CARE ACCESS  

PubMed Central

Objective This paper describes a community-based intervention to provide a dental home for women covered by Medicaid in Klamath County, Oregon. In 2001, 8.8% of pregnant women served by Medicaid in Oregon received care. Methods Pregnant women received home/WIC visits and were assigned a dental home under a dental managed care program (DCO). All initial care was provided at the Oregon Institute of Technology Dental Hygiene Clinic under the contract with the DCO. Emergency, preventive and restorative care was provided. Result Between February 2004 and January 2006, 503 pregnant women were identified: 421 women were contactable. Of these, 339 received home visits (339/421, 80.5%) and 235 received care (235/339, 69.3%). Overall, 55.8% of eligible women received care (235/421). Most who did not have a visit either moved or were not the caretaker of the baby. The missed appointment rate was 9%. Conclusion A community health partnership led to a successful and sustainable model extending care to pregnant women.

Milgrom, Peter; Ludwig, Sharity; Mike Shirtcliff, R.; Smolen, Darlene; Sutherland, Marilynn; Gates, Patricia A.; Weinstein, Philip

2007-01-01

258

Oral-dental concerns of the pediatric oncology patient  

SciTech Connect

One of the main concerns of all disciplines in health care today is maintaining the patient's quality of life and comfort during cancer therapy. Oral complications resulting from radiation or chemotherapy can be expected in a large percentage of patients. Conducting a dental evaluation and performing treatment before therapy can help prevent or lessen potential complications. With preventive care and fewer infections, the patient will be able to communicate with friends and family, and optimum care and comfort can be provided.

Lawson, K.

1989-01-01

259

Anxiety about dental hygienist treatment.  

PubMed

Although dental anxiety is a well investigated phenomenon in dental health care, remarkably little is known about anxiety reactions related to treatment carried out by the dental hygienist. In the present study anxiety reactions were measured among 101 patients attending the dental hygienist. General level of anxiety was assessed through the PAQ (Photo Anxiety Questionnaire; STOUTHARD, DE JONGH & HOOGSTRATEN, 1991), whereas an additional questionnaire was used to obtain information about specific stimuli and situations that might provoke anxiety in the dental hygienist situation. The results indicated that during dental hygienist treatment only 15% of the patients experienced no feelings of anxiety. Another 15% of the patients reported that a visit to the dental hygienist was more distressing than dental treatment. The level of anxiety appeared to be strongly related to a number of stimuli and situations, with actual pain (78%) and expected pain (67%) major anxiety provoking factors. The relation between pain and anxiety was highly significant, with highly anxious patients having more fear for pain than their low anxious counterparts. Also feelings and sounds of instruments, patient's helplessness and perceived lack of control over what happens were identified as important contributors to anxiety for the dental hygienist treatment. The results of this study suggests that treatment by the dental hygienist is a distressing event for many patients. PMID:8485976

de Jongh, A; Stouthard, M E

1993-04-01

260

Dental extractions using improvised equipment.  

PubMed

Extracting a tooth is the final treatment for multiple dental problems. Persons who are not dentists, however, have little experience with tooth extractions. When a remote setting makes it impossible to send a patient for optimal dental treatment, the clinician may need to extract teeth, sometimes using improvised equipment. The following cases of two patients with three carious, painful molars describe such a situation. The non-dental clinicians had to improvise not only appropriate dental tools, but also personal protective equipment, a functional suction machine, medications for a dental block, a dental chair, and dental consent forms and follow-up instructions in the patients' language. In these cases, they also communicated with their patients through a translator. To prepare to do tooth extractions in remote settings, clinicians should learn and practice dental blocks and review extraction techniques before they deploy. If they must do an extraction, clinicians should use the closest approximation available to the appropriate dental tools. When done correctly, a dental extraction can take some time and should not be rushed. PMID:24076092

Iserson, Kenneth V

2013-12-01

261

Dental-service Dental Radiation Safety and Protection: Program guide  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of the program guide for Dental Radiation Safety and Protection is to assist VA dental personnel in developing radiologic procedures that ensure maximum safety for their patients and themselves. In order to do this, the authors have included a summary of the biological hazards associated with exposure to x-radiation, provided information on patient exposure levels associated with dental X-ray units, and explained the methods for reducing patient and staff exposure to X-rays.

Not Available

1991-08-27

262

Patient and provider acceptance of oral HIV screening in a dental school setting.  

PubMed

In 2006, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended routine HIV screening in health care settings regardless of the patient's level of risk. This pilot study was developed in response to the suggestion by some health care professionals that dental settings would be appropriate for expansion of HIV testing. This project consisted of two parts: oral fluid HIV testing of patients in the clinic of a dental school and a survey of the clinical dental faculty members' attitudes about acceptability of routine HIV testing in the dental clinic. When patients' agreement to participate in oral fluid HIV testing was examined, 8.2 percent of the patients contacted by the clinic administration staff completed testing. When approached by a faculty member or student during the dental visit admission and tested during the dental visit, however, 88.2 percent completed testing. Of the faculty members who took the survey, 27.4 percent were neutral, 26.4 percent were somewhat in agreement, and 32.1 percent were willing to incorporate HIV testing into routine dental care. In this pilot study, HIV testing of dental patients was most successful when a dental care provider approached patients about testing. If consent was given, the testing was performed during the visit. For the faculty members, the major barrier to testing was a lack of protocol familiarity. PMID:22942410

Nassry, David D; Phelan, Joan A; Ghookasian, Miganoush; Barber, Cheryl A; Norman, Robert G; Lloyd, Madeleine M; Schenkel, Andrew; Malamud, Daniel; Abrams, William R

2012-09-01

263

Open wide: looking into the safety culture of dental school clinics.  

PubMed

Although dentists perform highly technical procedures in complex environments, patient safety has not received the same focus in dentistry as in medicine. Cultivating a robust patient safety culture is foundational to minimizing patient harm, but little is known about how dental teams view patient safety or the patient safety culture within their practice. As a step toward rectifying that omission, the goals of this study were to benchmark the patient safety culture in three U.S. dental schools, identifying areas for improvement. The extensively validated Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture (MOSOPS), developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, was administered to dental faculty, dental hygienists, dental students, and staff at the three schools. Forty-seven percent of the 328 invited individuals completed the survey. The "Teamwork" category received the highest marks and "Patient Care Tracking and Follow-Up" and "Leadership Support for Patient Safety" the lowest. Only 48 percent of the respondents rated systems and processes in place to prevent/catch patient problems as good/excellent. All patient safety dimensions received lower marks than in medical practices. These findings and the inherent risk associated with dental procedures lead to the conclusion that dentistry in general, and academic dental clinics in particular, stands to benefit from an increased focus on patient safety. This first published use of the MOSOPS in a dental clinic setting highlights both clinical and educational priorities for improving the safety of care in dental school clinics. PMID:24789834

Ramoni, Rachel; Walji, Muhammad F; Tavares, Anamaria; White, Joel; Tokede, Oluwabunmi; Vaderhobli, Ram; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

2014-05-01

264

Teledentistry-assisted, affiliated practice for dental hygienists: an innovative oral health workforce model.  

PubMed

The 2010 U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) calls for training programs to develop mid-level dental health care providers to work in areas with underserved populations. In 2004, legislation was passed in Arizona allowing qualified dental hygienists to enter into an affiliated practice relationship with a dentist to provide oral health care services for underserved populations without general or direct supervision in public health settings. In response, the Northern Arizona University (NAU) Dental Hygiene Department developed a teledentistry-assisted, affiliated practice dental hygiene model that places a dental hygienist in the role of the mid-level practitioner as part of a digitally linked oral health care team. Utilizing current technologies, affiliated practice dental hygienists can digitally acquire and transmit diagnostic data to a distant dentist for triage, diagnosis, and patient referral in addition to providing preventive services permitted within the dental hygiene scope of practice. This article provides information about the PPACA and the Arizona affiliated practice dental hygiene model, defines teledentistry, identifies the digital equipment used in NAU's teledentistry model, give an overview of NAU's teledentistry training, describes NAU's first teledentistry clinical experience, presents statistical analyses and evaluation of NAU students' ability to acquire diagnostically efficacious digital data from remote locations, and summarizes details of remote applications of teledentistry-assisted, affiliated practice dental hygiene workforce model successes. PMID:21642518

Summerfelt, Fred F

2011-06-01

265

Copper allergy from dental copper amalgam?  

PubMed

A 65-year-old female was investigated due to a gradually increasing greenish colour change of her plastic dental splint, which she used to prevent teeth grinding when sleeping. Furthermore, she had noted a greenish/bluish colour change on the back of her black gloves, which she used to wipe her tears away while walking outdoors. The investigation revealed that the patient had a contact allergy to copper, which is very rare. She had, however, had no occupational exposure to copper. The contact allergy may be caused by long-term exposure of the oral mucosa to copper from copper-rich amalgam fillings, which were frequently used in childhood dentistry up to the 1960s in Sweden. The deposition of a copper-containing coating on the dental splint may be caused by a raised copper intake from drinking water, increasing the copper excretion in saliva, in combination with release of copper due to electrochemical corrosion of dental amalgam. The greenish colour change of the surface of the splint is probably caused by deposition of a mixture of copper compounds, e.g. copper carbonates. Analysis by the X-ray diffraction technique indicates that the dominant component is copper oxide (Cu2O and CuO). The corresponding greenish/bluish discoloration observed on the back of the patient's gloves may be caused by increased copper excretion in tears. PMID:12083714

Gerhardsson, Lars; Björkner, Bert; Karlsteen, Magnus; Schütz, Andrejs

2002-05-01

266

[Patient safety in general dental practice 2009].  

PubMed

In recent years various studies have been published which indicate that adverse events in health care facilities are the result of structural factors. In 2009 a national study was carried out in the Netherlands to gain insight into patient safety in primary care settings, including general dental practices. In 20 randomly selected practices, patient records were investigated and oral care professionals reported, during a period of 2 weeks, adverse events which occurred. For each practice, 2 researchers screened, with the help of a checklist, 50 randomly selected patient records covering a period of 1 year. A total of 8 preventable adverse events were found in the 1000 patient records (0.8%). Anonymous reports made during the 2 weeks of the research period resulted in 7 adverse events. Practically all of the adverse events had to do with diagnostics and treatment and resulted in limited harmful consequences for patients. On the basis of these results, oral care in general dental practice would appear to be safe, but the concept 'patient safety' is not at all or only minimally active among general dental practitioners. Regarding patient safety performance, improvement in the quality of record-keeping would be desirable. PMID:21298891

Mettes, T G; Bruers, J M; van der Sanden, W J M; van Eeten Kruiskamp, L; van der Horst, R H; Harmsen, M; Wensing, M

2010-12-01

267

Medical Emergency Education in American Dental Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

American dental schools were surveyed to determine the state of development of programs in medical emergencies in the dental curriculum. Results show that programs for teaching the diagnosis and management of medical emergencies are seriously underdeveloped in dental schools. (MLW)

Clark, Morris S.; And Others

1985-01-01

268

A model for a children's dental health carnival.  

PubMed

A children's dental health carnival can yield many benefits. Some of these are: The general public becomes better informed regarding the importance of dentistry for children; children are presented with preventive-dentistry information in an entertaining environment; and students gain experience in organizing and participating in a community service project. The Children's Dental Health Carnivals have provided the children of Lincoln, Nebraska and the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Dentistry with these benefits. The authors would be pleased to share additional information with interested parties. PMID:1939797

Harn, S D; Kuster, C G

1991-01-01

269

2013 AAHA dental care guidelines for dogs and cats.  

PubMed

Veterinary dentistry is constantly progressing. The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines for the practice of companion animal dentistry for the veterinary profession. Dental care is necessary to provide optimum health and optimize quality of life. Untreated diseases of the oral cavity are painful and can contribute to local and systemic diseases. This article includes guidelines for preventive oral health care, client communication, evaluation, dental cleaning, and treatment. In addition, materials and equipment necessary to perform a medically appropriate procedure are described. PMID:23443202

Holmstrom, Steven E; Bellows, Jan; Juriga, Stephen; Knutson, Kate; Niemiec, Brook A; Perrone, Jeanne

2013-01-01

270

Management of needlestick injuries in general dental practice.  

PubMed

The objective of this paper is to advise on the development of practical policies for needlestick injuries in general dental practice. Policies for dealing with occupational exposure to chronic blood borne viruses, namely, hepatitis B, C and HIV are evolving. This article was particularly prompted by recent changes in post exposure prophylaxis for HIV infection. A flow chart is also included which should be of possible use in general dental practice. Needlestick injuries are of increasing concern to healthcare workers. Successful prophylaxis requires careful planning in advance. Whilst all practices should have a policy for sharps injuries, prevention of needlestick injuries remains the best policy. PMID:11453154

Smith, A J; Cameron, S O; Bagg, J; Kennedy, D

2001-06-23

271

Dental Assisting Education in California.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of 22 dental assisting programs showed an average of 1,124 hours of instruction in dental assisting for 15 four-semester, 955 for three three-semester, and 1,042 for four two-semester programs. The average instructional hours for the four-semester programs were 48 in introduction to dental assisting, 179 in the life sciences, 221 in the…

California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Industrial Education.

272

Dental amalgam and mercury vapor release.  

PubMed

Dental diseases are among the most common ailments, and dentists in the United States spend over 50% of their time in dental practice rebuilding carious, malformed, and traumatically injured teeth. It is logical, therefore, that the majority of the dental school curriculum is devoted to the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of teeth with anomalies. Dentists have several choices of materials they can use to accomplish the task of rebuilding teeth. Besides amalgam, they have ceramic materials, resin composites, base-metal and noble casting alloys, and glass-ionomer cements to use to restore the posterior dentition. Each of these restorative materials has advantages and disadvantages, and the clinical judgment as to when a particular material should be used is given a high priority in dental education. Amalgam is the most widely used of these restorative materials, with 92% of dentists listing it as the material of choice in the posterior of the mouth (Clinical Research Associates, 1990). Dentists have been placing amalgams for over 150 years in the US. They placed 150 million last year, which represents over 75 tons of amalgam alloy. The reasons that dentists use this restorative material so frequently are its durability, ease of manipulation, and low cost. Numerous clinical studies have been conducted on the serviceability of amalgam. Most of these have been on the old, low-copper alloys, and results indicate that they last from 8 to 15 years (Bailit et al., 1979; Osborne et al., 1980; Qvist et al., 1986). In the past 20 years, vast improvements have been made in amalgams with the development of the high-copper systems.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1292454

Osborne, J W

1992-09-01

273

Dental articulator mount  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

A mounting apparatus for a dental articulator including a stationary base, a rigid support member extending from the base and an upper clamp for releasably receiving and supporting the articulator upper member. An adjustable support piece is retained on the rigid support member and is adapted to contact the articulator lower member to limit the lowermost position thereof while permitting at least lateral movement of the articulator lower member relative to the articulator upper member to thus stimulate human jaw movements.

1988-07-19

274

Pennsylvania dental establishments in 2001.  

PubMed

Census Bureau reports for 2001 were used to develop data for "average" dental establishments in the counties of the state of Pennsylvania. There have been marked decreases in the number of residents per establishment and the proportional representation of smaller dental establishments (less than five employees) since 1980. Dental establishment "average" employee salaries ranged from $17,400 to more than $37,100 in the various counties. The need to monitor dental establishment activities beyond the confines of one's own facility is emphasized. PMID:15116509

Waldman, H Barry

2004-01-01

275

Strategies for combating dental anxiety.  

PubMed

Dental anxiety and subsequent avoidance of dental care and deterioration of oral health pose a significant problem for the dental profession. In an attempt to elucidate preferences of anxious dental patients, we gathered survey data from 121 persons at a small, private liberal arts college in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Half of the respondents experienced dental anxiety, and most of these (66 percent) attributed anxiety to fear of anticipated pain. The majority of anxious patients preferred a dentist to be friendly (93 percent), talkative (82 percent), and to have an office with adorned walls (89 percent) and a slightly cool temperature (63 percent). Patients who identified themselves as anxious also indicated that music in the background (89 percent) and magazines and books in the dental office (75 percent) were helpful. Anxious patients were more likely than non-anxious patients to prefer a male dentist (77 percent versus 52 percent). This finding was especially marked among anxious male respondents, 93 percent of whom preferred a male dentist compared to 73 percent of anxious female respondents. These survey data may assist dental professionals in understanding and combating patients' dental anxiety, in order to increase the frequency of dental visits and to prompt a corresponding restoration or maintenance of oral health. PMID:15520236

Bare, Lyndsay C; Dundes, Lauren

2004-11-01

276

Radioactive Decay  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by William Barker and David Smith for the Connected Curriculum Project, the purposes of this module are to develop a mathematical model for decay of radioactive substances, and to develop a technique for deciding whether quantitative data fits the model or not. This is one lesson within a larger set of learning modules hosted by Duke University.

Barker, William; Smith, David

2010-07-05

277

Radioactive Decay  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by William Barker and David Smith for the Connected Curriculum Project, this module develops a mathematical model for decay of radioactive substances, and a technique for deciding whether quantitative data fits the model or not. This is one within a much larger set of learning modules hosted by Duke University.

Barker, William; Smith, David

2010-06-28

278

USAF Dental Instrument Processing Center Design Guidance.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Design Guidance includes USAF dental clinic dental instrument processing center space planning and construction criteria inclusive of architectural, mechanical, and electrical design requirements.

J. H. Hatfield J. J. Kane R. H. Blankman

1996-01-01

279

Dental erosion and acid reflux disease: an overview.  

PubMed

Dental erosion can be difficult to detect, especially in the early stages when lesions are subtle and can be easily overlooked. Patients often are not aware of erosion until the dentition has sustained severe damage that requires extensive and expensive dental rehabilitation. The pH of stomach acid is much lower than the critical pH of enamel dissolution; therefore, reflux of stomach contents into the oral cavity over an extended period of time can cause severe loss of tooth structure. Dental treatment for reflux-induced erosion should focus not only on appropriate restoration but also on all available preventive measures, such as neutralization of acid and remineralization or strengthening of enamel against acid attack. Dentists must maintain a high degree of suspicion for reflux-induced erosion whenever a patient displays symptoms of acid reflux disease or a pattern of erosion that suggests an intrinsic source of acid exposure. PMID:19552365

Lazarchik, David A; Frazier, Kevin B

2009-01-01

280

Alternatives to mouthpiece noninvasive ventilatory support to permit dental care.  

PubMed

Patients who are dependent on continuous noninvasive intermittent positive pressure ventilation for ventilatory support via angled mouthpiece interfaces during daytime hours often need dental interventions that are prevented by the presence of the mouthpiece. To permit dental interventions, however, the noninvasive intermittent positive pressure ventilation can most conveniently and safely be delivered via nasal interface using oximetry monitoring as long as both sedation and supplemental oxygen are avoided. Three mouthpiece continuous noninvasive intermittent positive pressure ventilation users are described who were switched to nasal noninvasive intermittent positive pressure ventilation to permit dental care. The most common mistake is to fail to cover the nasal interface exhalation portals when switching from ventilatory assistance by bilevel positive airway pressure devices with passive ventilator circuits to portable ventilators with active ventilator circuits and exhalation valves. PMID:24322432

Tran, Jiaxin; Bach, John R; Gonçalves, Miguel R

2014-02-01

281

Guidelines for infection control in dental health-care settings--2003.  

PubMed

This report consolidates previous recommendations and adds new ones for infection control in dental settings. Recommendations are provided regarding 1) educating and protecting dental health-care personnel; 2) preventing transmission of bloodborne pathogens; 3) hand hygiene; 4) personal protective equipment; 5) contact dermatitis and latex hypersensitivity; 6) sterilization and disinfection of patient-care items; 7) environmental infection control; 8) dental unit waterlines, biofilm, and water quality; and 9) special considerations (e.g., dental handpieces and other devices, radiology, parenteral medications, oral surgical procedures, and dental laboratories). These recommendations were developed in collaboration with and after review by authorities on infection control from CDC and other public agencies, academia, and private and professional organizations. PMID:14685139

Kohn, William G; Collins, Amy S; Cleveland, Jennifer L; Harte, Jennifer A; Eklund, Kathy J; Malvitz, Dolores M

2003-12-19

282

[Relationship of dental treatment and oral hygiene to caries prevalence and need for periodontal treatment].  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between differences in dental attendance and oral hygiene patterns and dental caries and periodontal treatment needs. 1469 young people, aged 7, 12 and 15-19 years, and representing the urban (60%) and rural (40%) population from Spain were evaluated. Dental caries and periodontal treatment needs were registered according to the index D.M.F.T. and C.P.I.T.N., following the criteria of W.H.O. Regular dental attendance was observed in 16.6% of subjects examined, and only 9.4 saw a dentist regularly for dental prophylaxis. Statistical analyses showed that while the more frequent the dental visits, the lower the rate of caries, and periodontal treatment needs, the higher, however, the average number of fillings and the D.M.F.T. scores. These individuals had the higher number of functioning teeth, restored or sound, but they also had the disadvantage of having higher levels of disease experience. By the other way the individuals who saw the dentist regularly for dental prophylaxis presented the lower caries rate and periodontal treatment needs, the fewer tooth loss, and also an important reduction in the D.M.F.T. scores. Similar observations had been made in the individuals who brush their teeth frequently or with a correct technique. The results suggested that while frequent dental visits do not apparently help to prevent the onset of further dental disease, we can achieve this goal with regular preventive oriented dental therapy. PMID:2222654

Sicilia, A; Noguerol, B; Hernández, R; Cobo, J; Ainamo, J; Bascones, A; Lucas, V; López Arranz, J S

1990-06-01

283

Inhibition of human gelatinases by metals released from dental amalgam.  

PubMed

The interaction between metal ions and the oral environment is a major subject matter in dental research. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated in pathologic oral processes such as periodontal tissue destruction, root caries, tumor invasion and temporomandibular joint disorders. The aim of this study was to test the effect of metal ions released from dental amalgam on the major gingival gelatinolytic MMPs. Gingival human explants were cultured overnight in DMEM and the activity of secreted enzymes was analyzed by gelatin zymography in buffers conditioned with dispersed phase or concentional phase dental amalgams. The major enzymes present in conditioned media were characterized as MMP-2 and MMP-9 by immunoprecipitation. The proteolytic activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were strongly inhibited by dispersed phase amalgams conditioned buffers. Inhibition of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities was partly prevented by the addition of 1,10 phenanthroline, a divalent metal chelator, to the amalgam conditioned buffers. Dental amalgam conditioned buffer also inhibited the degradation of denatured type I collagen by purified MMP-2 on liquid phase assays. These findings suggest that the activity of oral tissue MMPs may be modulated by metal ions released from dental amalgam. PMID:11426881

Souza, A P; Gerlach, R F; Line, S R

2001-07-01

284

Dietary behaviours and dental fluorosis among Gaza Strip children.  

PubMed

A high prevalence of dental fluorosis has been identified among children in the Gaza Strip. This study aimed to determine the history of breastfeeding and dietary behaviours among children in the Gaza Strip and to examine potential associations with the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis. A cross-sectional study recruited a stratified cluster random sample of 350 children aged 12-18 years and their mothers. Data about dietary behaviours in the first 7 years of life were collected by interview questionnaire. Dental fluorosis was determined using the Thyllstrup-Fejerskov index. A majority of children were breastfed exclusively in the first 6 months (82.9%) but 98.1% were given tea in the first year of life. The prevalence of dental fluorosis was 78.0%. Both intake of animal proteins and plant proteins were negatively associated with the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis. Further studies to investigate fluoride intake is required to plan preventive interventions. PMID:24975312

Abuhaloob, L; Abed, Y

2013-07-01

285

Impact of cleaning regimes on dental water unit contamination.  

PubMed

Microorganisms that have been identified in dental unit waterlines (DUWLs) are of concern because they can cause infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. This study aimed to assess the incidence of microbial contamination in DUWLs before and after intervention to reduce contamination, and to investigate the presence of coliforms, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Water samples were collected aseptically from the waterlines. The high-speed hand-piece and dental chair units were served by one distillation apparatus, which was fed by the potable tap water of four dental clinics. Different interventions were used: chlorination, flushing before clinics and between patients, draining at the end of the day, and freshly distilled water on a daily basis. There was a significant difference between the level of contamination in the high-speed hand-piece (1.5-2.7 log CFU/ml) and dental chair unit water (2.0-3.5 log CFU/ml). Coliforms (0.9%) E. coli (0.9%) and Pseudomonas (1.8%) were detected during 2008. This study indicates the need to monitor water quality regularly and prevent stagnation in DUWLs to reduce the number of viable bacteria to <100 CFU/ml. We recommend flushing the DUWL for 2 min before the first patient and for 10-20 s between patients, flushing the dental unit at the end of the day and draining it overnight to reduce the development of biofilms, and chlorination of the DUWLs. PMID:22048424

Abdallah, Soad A; Khalil, Ahmed I

2011-12-01

286

Dietary Factors Associated with Dental Erosion: A Meta-Analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Some diet factors are risk factors for dental erosion. Methods We performed computer searches of PubMed, Cochrane Library, EBSCO, CALIS, et al., to search for studies investigating risk factors for dental erosion. For risk factors investigated in a comparative way, we computed pooled odds ratios (ORs) using the Mantel and Haenszel method. Results A total of 9 studies met the inclusion criteria, and 6 risk factors were considered, including soft drinks, sports drinks, juice, vitamin C, milk, and yoghourt. The following associations were found for soft drinks (OR?=?2.41, 95%CI?=?2.03–2.85) and vitamin C (OR?=?1.16, 95%CI?=?1.10–1.22). While juice (OR?=?0.90, 95%CI?=?0.25–3.24), sports drinks (OR?=?1.58, 95%CI?=?0.88–2.85), milk (OR?=?0.67, 95%CI?=?0.11–4.01), and yoghourt products (OR?=?1.05, 95%CI?=?0.28–3.96) were not associated with dental erosion. Conclusions This meta-analysis provides comprehensive evidence-based assessment of diet-related factors for dental erosion. Preventive strategies should be taken to reduce dental erosion.

Li, Haifeng; Zou, Yan; Ding, Gangqiang

2012-01-01

287

Dental Laboratory Technology Program Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This program guide contains the standard dental laboratory technology curriculum for both diploma programs and associate degree programs in technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level workers in the dental laboratory technology field. The general information section contains the…

Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

288

Clinical Guidelines. Dental Hygiene Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual contains information concerning the policies and procedures of the Southern Illinois University-Carbondale Dental Hygiene Clinic. The manual is presented in a question/answer format for the information and convenience of dental hygiene students in the program, and is intended to answer their questions concerning clinical policies and…

Branson, Bonnie

289

Health Instruction Packages: Dental Assisting.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of four learning modules to instruct dental assisting students in various office skills. The first module, "Dental Office Telephone Techniques," examines the qualities of a good telephone voice and demeanor and provides guidelines for taking a message and handling various telephone…

McEnery, Paula

290

Dental Assisting Competencies. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains dental assisting competencies and competency-based performance objectives, learning activities, resources, and evaluation procedures for each competency that was adapted and developed by instructors of dental assisting to suit the needs and legal parameters of Pennsylvania. The competencies and associated elements are…

Richards, Beverly; And Others

291

Denitrification in human dental plaque  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Microbial denitrification is not considered important in human-associated microbial communities. Accordingly, metabolic investigations of the microbial biofilm communities of human dental plaque have focused on aerobic respiration and acid fermentation of carbohydrates, even though it is known that the oral habitat is constantly exposed to nitrate (NO3-) concentrations in the millimolar range and that dental plaque houses bacteria that

Frank Schreiber; Peter Stief; Armin Gieseke; Ines M Heisterkamp; Willy Verstraete; Dirk de Beer; Paul Stoodley

2010-01-01

292

Current trends in dental implants  

PubMed Central

Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants.

Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja

2014-01-01

293

Longitudinal investigation of bacteriology of human fissure decay: epidemiological studies in molars shortly after eruption.  

PubMed Central

In the present investigation, the proportions of Streptococcus mutans, lactobacilli, Streptococcus sanguis, veillonellae, and an unidentified actinomyces-like organism in dental plaque on occlusal fissures of first mandibular molars were monitored at 6-month intervals over a 3-year period in 368 children who were initially in grades 1 or 2. Teeth destined to become decayed exhibited a significant increase in the proportions of S. mutans from 6 to 24 months before the diagnosis of dental decay. Lactobacilli were sporadically detected but when present were associated with dental decay. Children whose teeth exhibited the greatest number of decayed surfaces had, at all time periods, significantly higher proportions of S. mutans than did children who were caries free. Many teeth had high proportions of S. mutans at their entry into the study. About 10% of the monitored teeth erupted during the period of observation, and in these teeth both S. mutans and lactobacilli could be significantly associated with decay. In these newly erupted teeth S. mutans outnumbered lactobacilli by ca. 20 to 1. S. sanguis, veillonellae, and the unidentified actinomyces-like organism could not be associated with the development of decay. These findings strongly implicate S. mutans and possibly lactobacilli as dental pathogens and suggest that if decay is to be controlled by strategies based upon a S. mutans infection, then the various tactics used probably will have to be performed on primary teeth, as these teeth are the most likely sources of infection for the permanent teeth.

Loesche, W J; Eklund, S; Earnest, R; Burt, B

1984-01-01

294

Dental Disease in Infants and Toddlers: A Transdisciplinary Health Concern and Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the consequences of dental disease among children under age 3. "Early childhood carries" (ECC) is preventable but is still a major public health problem--especially in poor and medically underserved communities--due to lack of awareness about prevention. The authors explain that in transdisciplinary care, practitioners work…

Finn, Emanuel; Wolpin, Scott

2005-01-01

295

Evaluation of sterilization of dental handpieces by heating in synthetic compressor lubricant.  

PubMed

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Dental Association guidelines recommend sterilization of dental handpieces after each use. Steam autoclaving is the most commonly used sterilization method. However, pressurized steam causes corrosion and partial combustion of the handpiece lubricant, leaving a sticky carbon residue on the turbine which must then be replaced after several usages. Replacement of autoclave-damaged dental handpieces represents a major expense for dentists that may be avoided through the use of less destructive sterilization techniques. PMID:10687492

Silverstone, S E; Hill, D E

1999-01-01

296

Dental cleaning before and during pregnancy among Maryland mothers.  

PubMed

Despite increasing recognition of the importance of oral health to overall health, dental care utilization remains low in the US. Given the established link between maternal oral health and child oral health, this study examined factors related to preventive dental care utilization at two critical time points, before and during pregnancy. Data were obtained from a sample of 6,171 women who delivered a live birth during 2004-2008 and completed the Maryland Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System postpartum survey. Multinomial logistic analyses examined associations between predisposing and enabling factors with dental cleaning before and during pregnancy. Women with less than a high school education or a history of physical abuse and non-Hispanic black and Hispanic women were less likely to report teeth cleaning before and during pregnancy. Having no insurance at the start of pregnancy was associated with significantly lower risk of teeth cleaning before pregnancy and both before and during pregnancy. Receipt of oral health counseling during pregnancy was positively related to teeth cleaning during pregnancy. Dental cleaning is associated with insurance, oral health counseling and maternal factors such as race, ethnicity, education and history of physical abuse. Better integration of oral health into prenatal health care, particularly among ethnic and racial minority groups, may be beneficial to maternal and infant well-being. Oral health promotion, disease prevention and health care should be a part of the local, state and national health policy agendas. PMID:22311579

Thompson, Terri-Ann; Cheng, Diana; Strobino, Donna

2013-01-01

297

Flemish general dental practitioners' knowledge of dental radiology.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to assess general dental practitioners' knowledge of dental radiography and radiation protection in order to alert the Belgian authorities and dental professional societies. Prior to attending a postgraduate course on intraoral radiology, general dental practitioners in Flanders, Belgium, were asked to fill in a questionnaire regarding the radiological equipment and the techniques they used for intraoral radiography. The availability and type of dental panoramic equipment were also assessed. A total of 374 questionnaires were available for this study. 15% of the attendants used radiographic equipment that was more than 27 years old and 43% reported equipment that operated with a clockwork timer. 32% and 75% respectively had no idea what the kV or mA settings were on their intraoral equipment. 5% were unaware which cone geometry or geometric technique (paralleling or bisecting angle technique) they were using. 81% claimed to be using a short cone technique. 47% did not know what collimation meant, whereas 40% stated that they were using circular collimation. 38% used digital intraoral image detectors (63% were photostimulable storage phosphorplate (PSPP)), but 16% were not sure about the type of sensor they were using (PSPP or solid-state sensors). 61% also had dental panoramic equipment available, 25% of which was digital (10% charge coupled device (CCD) and 15% PSPP). These results clearly indicate the need for continued education on this subject. The latter is an important signal to Belgian authorities and dental professional societies. PMID:20100924

Aps, J K M

2010-02-01

298

The Dental Neglect Scale in adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Dental neglect has been found to be related to poor oral health, a tendency not to have had routine check-ups, and a longer period of time since the last dental appointment in samples of children and adults. The Dental Neglect Scale (DNS) has been found to be a valid measure of dental neglect in samples of children and adults,

Trilby Coolidge; Masahiro Heima; Elissa K Johnson; Philip Weinstein

2009-01-01

299

Nanotechnology and Dental Implants  

PubMed Central

The long-term clinical success of dental implants is related to their early osseointegration. This paper reviews the different steps of the interactions between biological fluids, cells, tissues, and surfaces of implants. Immediately following implantation, implants are in contact with proteins and platelets from blood. The differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells will then condition the peri-implant tissue healing. Direct bone-to-implant contact is desired for a biomechanical anchoring of implants to bone rather than fibrous tissue encapsulation. Surfaces properties such as chemistry and roughness play a determinant role in these biological interactions. Physicochemical features in the nanometer range may ultimately control the adsorption of proteins as well as the adhesion and differentiation of cells. Nanotechnologies are increasingly used for surface modifications of dental implants. Another approach to enhance osseointegration is the application of thin calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings. Bioactive CaP nanocrystals deposited on titanium implants are resorbable and stimulate bone apposition and healing. Future nanometer-controlled surfaces may ultimately direct the nature of peri-implant tissues and improve their clinical success rate.

Lavenus, Sandrine; Louarn, Guy; Layrolle, Pierre

2010-01-01

300

Occult peri-implant oroantral fistulae: posterior maxillary peri-implantitis/sinusitis of zygomatic or dental implant origin. Treatment and prevention with bone morphogenetic protein-2/absorbable collagen sponge sinus grafting.  

PubMed

Sinus floor grafting with bone morphogenetic protein-2 for transsinus implant placement or as a salvage technique for sinus-involved peri-implantitis has been found to be successful. Transsinus implants for All-on-Four treatment, zygomatic implants including quad zygomatics, and infected transsinus implants underwent peri-implant grafting, which was found to seal off the sinus cavity from the oral cavity in an effort to prevent or treat sinusitis/peri-implantitis. PMID:24278959

Jensen, Ole T; Adams, Mark; Cottam, Jared R; Ringeman, Jason

2013-01-01

301

Pain Management for Nerve Injury following Dental Implant Surgery at Tokyo Dental College Hospital  

PubMed Central

By allowing reconstruction of compromised occlusion, dental implants contribute to an improvement in quality of life (QOL) and diet. Injury to a nerve during such treatment, however, can result in a sudden decline in QOL. And once a nerve has been injured, the chances of a full recovery are slim unless the damage is only slight. If such damage causes neuropathic pain severe enough to prevent sleep, the patient's QOL will deteriorate dramatically. While damage to skin tissue or bone invariably heals over time, damage to nerves does not, indicating the need to avoid such injury while performing implant insertion, for example. This means not relying solely on X-ray images, which can be rather unclear, but also using computed tomography to allow preoperative planning and intraoperative execution to be performed as accurately as possible. Moreover, if sensory damage does occur it is essential to avoid breaking the bond of trust between dentist and patient by giving false assurances of recovery. In such cases, appropriate measures must be taken promptly. This paper describes pain management for nerve injury following dental implant surgery at the Orofacial Pain Center of Tokyo Dental College Suidoubashi Hospital.

Fukuda, Ken-ichi; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Kaneko, Yuzuru

2012-01-01

302

Dental implant changes following incineration.  

PubMed

Non-visual identification of victims utilizes DNA, fingerprint and dental comparison as primary scientific identifiers. In incidents where a victim has been incinerated, there may be loss of fingerprint detail and denaturing of DNA. Although extremely durable, tooth loss will also occur with extreme temperatures and the characteristics of recovered dental implants, if any, may be the only physical identifying data available. Currently, there are no experimental investigations to determine what changes occur to dental implants following high temperature exposure. A selection of dental implants was radiographed, utilizing purpose built apparatus to allow standard methodology. They were then heated in an INFI-TROL™ kiln to a maximum temperature of 1125°C and the radiographic procedure repeated. Image subtraction evaluation of the radiographs was recorded using Adobe(®) Photoshop(®). Both commercially pure titanium and titanium alloy dental implants survived the incineration and there was oxidation of the surface leading to minor alteration of the image. There was, however, no detectable sagging of the implants. The results of this research suggest that dental implants are still recognizable following incineration. In scenarios commonly seen by forensic odontologists, heat will destroy both teeth and conventional dental restorative materials. Implants, however, will resist these conditions and will also retain the features necessary to identify the type of implant. PMID:20880643

Berketa, J; James, H; Marino, V

2011-04-15

303

Research evaluation and policy in dental public health.  

PubMed

Decision and policy makers in dental public health are confronted increasingly with the problem of which programs make the best use of limited resources and are the most worthwhile investments. One way that the research and public health community can assist the decision process and thereby facilitate policy development is through rigorous, objective, quantitative, policy-oriented research evaluations that synthesize findings from relevant epidemiologic studies of particular oral conditions and clinical trials of preventive and treatment technologies. Issues covered in the most recent research evaluations of oral health topics include the assessment of cost-effectiveness analyses for various procedures and techniques used in caries prevention and oral cancer screening. Several papers in the dental public health literature also have critically discussed basic methodologic issues involved in performing cost-effectiveness analyses and implications of research evaluations for the development and assessment of oral health policy. PMID:1839360

Lipton, J A

1991-06-01

304

A Model for Dental Practice in the 21st Century  

PubMed Central

The dental profession is responsible for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases and disorders of the oral cavity and related structures. Although the majority of the US population receives excellent oral health care, a significant portion is unable to access regular care. Along with proposals to develop midlevel providers, the scope of practice for dentists needs to be reconceptualized and expanded. A broad number of primary health care activities may be conducted in the dental office, such as screening for hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dermatopathology; smoking prevention and cessation activities; and obesity interventions. More than 70% of adults saw a dentist in the past year, which represents an unrealized opportunity to improve both oral health and general health.

Eaves, Kayleigh

2011-01-01

305

Bioinspired design of dental multilayers.  

PubMed

This paper considers the use of bioinspired functionally graded structures in the design of dental multi-layers that are more resistant to sub-surface crack nucleation. Unlike existing dental crown restorations that give rise to high stress concentration, the functionally graded layers (between crown materials and the joins that attach them to dentin) are shown to promote significant reductions in stress and improvements in the critical crack size. Special inspiration is drawn from the low stress concentrations associated with the graded distributions in the dentin-enamel-junction (DEJ). The implications of such functionally graded structures are also discussed for the design of dental restorations. PMID:17200814

Huang, M; Wang, R; Thompson, V; Rekow, D; Soboyejo, W O

2007-01-01

306

Increasing dental student diversity through the UNLV Dental Prospects Program.  

PubMed

Adequately providing for the health care of the growing minority population in the United States requires increased racial and ethnic diversity of the health care workforce. Long-term diversity in the dental profession depends on a more diverse student population in dental schools. The University of Nevada, Las Vegas School of Dental Medicine's (UNLV SDM) Dental Prospects Club is a predental education program that has increased the number of underrepresented minority and disadvantaged students in the school by concentrating on outreach, recruitment, and retention initiatives. The approaches used by the club members and faculty advisors to increase the number of underrepresented minority students recruited to and enrolled in the UNLV SDM are discussed in this report. Also described are the strategies, methods, internal infrastructure, and organizational support used to increase the number of underrepresented minority students at the school. PMID:23658399

McClain, Mildred A; Jones, Francis R; McClain, Clifford R; Curd, Francis M

2013-05-01

307

Characteristics of Streptococcus mutans genotypes and dental caries in children.  

PubMed

This longitudinal cohort study evaluated the diversity, commonality, and stability of Streptococcus mutans genotypes associated with dental caries history. Sixty-seven 5- and 6-yr-old children, considered as being at high caries risk, had plaque collected from baseline through 36 months for S. mutans isolation and genotyping using repetitive extragenic palindromic-PCR (4,392 total isolates). Decayed, missing, or filled surfaces (dmfs (primary teeth)/DMFS (secondary teeth)) for each child were recorded at baseline. At baseline, 18 distinct genotypes were found among 911 S. mutans isolates from 67 children (diversity), and 13 genotypes were shared by at least two children (commonality). The number of genotypes per individual was positively associated with the proportion of decayed surfaces (p-ds) at baseline. Twenty-four of the 39 children who were available at follow-up visits maintained a predominant genotype for the follow-up periods (stability) and this was negatively associated with the p-ds. The observed diversity, commonality, and stability of S. mutans genotypes represent a pattern of dental caries epidemiology in this high-caries-risk community, which suggests that fewer decayed surfaces are significantly associated with lower diversity and higher stability of S. mutans genotypes. PMID:23659236

Cheon, Kyounga; Moser, Stephen A; Wiener, Howard W; Whiddon, Jennifer; Momeni, Stephanie S; Ruby, John D; Cutter, Gary R; Childers, Noel K

2013-06-01

308

Dental Arch Wire  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Straightening teeth is an arduous process requiring months, often years, of applying corrective pressure by means of arch wires-better known as brace-which may have to be changed several times in the course of treatment. A new method has been developed by Dr. George Andreasen, orthodontist and dental scientist at the University of Iowa. The key is a new type of arch wire material, called Nitinol, with exceptional elasticity which helps reduce the required number of brace changes. An alloy of nickel and titanium, Nitinol was originally developed for aerospace applications by the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, now the Naval Surface Weapons Laboratory, White Oaks, Maryland. NASA subsequently conducted additional research on the properties of Nitinol and on procedures for processing the metal.

1979-01-01

309

Dental abscess: A microbiological review  

PubMed Central

Dental abscess is a frequently occurring infectious process known to the health practice. The fate of the infection depends on the virulence of the bacteria, host resistance factors, and regional anatomy. Serious consequences arising from the spread of a dental abscess lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Acute dental abscess is polymicrobial, comprising of strict anaerobes, such as anaerobic cocci, Prevotella, Fusobacterium species, and facultative anaerobes, such as viridans group streptococci and the Streptococcus anginosus group. Numerous novel, uncultivable and fastidious organisms have been identified as potential pathogens with the use of non-culture techniques. The majority of localized dental abscesses respond to surgical treatment while the use of antimicrobials is limited to severe spreading infections. There is a need for good-quality clinical trials of sufficient size to identify the ideal treatment. The microbiology of the acute dentoalveolar abscess and its treatment in the light of improved culture and diagnostic methods are reviewed.

Shweta; Prakash, S Krishna

2013-01-01

310

Before and After (Dental Restorations)  

MedlinePLUS

... to the Highest Standards of Care in the Restoration and Replacement of Teeth This site brought to ... with dental implants and crowns. This treatment allows restoration of the missing teeth without preparing or involving ...

311

Dental materials: 1997 literature review.  

PubMed

This review of the published literature on dental materials for the year 1997 has been compiled by the Dental Materials Panel of UK. It continues a series of annual reviews started in 1973. Emphasis has been placed upon publications, which report upon the materials science or clinical performance of the materials. The review has been divided by accepted materials classifications (fissure sealants, glass polyalkenoate cements, dentine bonding, dental amalgam, endodontic materials, casting alloys, ceramometallic restorations and resin-bonded bridges, ceramics, denture base resins and soft lining materials, impression materials, dental implant materials, orthodontic materials, biomechanics and image processing, resin composites, and casting investment materials and waxes). Three hundred and thirty three articles have been reviewed. PMID:10399409

Whitters, C J; Strang, R; Brown, D; Clarke, R L; Curtis, R V; Hatton, P V; Ireland, A J; Lloyd, C H; McCabe, J F; Nicholson, J W; Scrimgeour, S N; Setcos, J C; Sherriff, M; van Noort, R; Watts, D C; Wood, D

1999-08-01

312

Dental materials: 1995 literature review.  

PubMed

This critical review of the published literature on dental materials for the year 1995 has been compiled by the Dental Materials Panel of the United Kingdom. It continues the series of annual reviews started in 1973 and published in the Journal of Dentistry. Emphasis has been placed upon publications which report upon the materials science or clinical performance of the materials. The review has been divided by accepted materials classifications (fissure sealants, glass polyalkenoate cements, resin composites, dentine bonding, dental amalgam, endodontic materials, casting alloys, investment materials, resin-bonded bridges and ceramo-metallic restorations, all ceramic restorations, denture base and soft lining materials, impression materials, dental implants, orthodontic materials and biomechanics). Three hundred and thirty articles published in 68 titles have been reviewed. PMID:9175346

Lloyd, C H; Scrimgeour, S N; Brown, D; Clarke, R L; Curtis, R V; Hatton, P V; Ireland, A J; McCabe, J F; Nicholson, J W; Setcos, J C; Sherriff, M; van Noort, R; Watts, D C; Whitters, C J; Wood, D

1997-01-01

313

Rethinking tenure in dental education.  

PubMed

In the midst of changes in the environment of academic dentistry over the past two decades, reform of traditional tenure is one way for dental schools to respond to these changes while maintaining scholarly, evidence-based learning environments. Challenges facing academic dentistry today and in the future include a crisis in workforce capacity, difficulty attracting recent graduates into academic positions, overburdened faculty members with limited time for scholarly activity, loss of tenured faculty members due to retirement, and a potentially diminished voice for dental schools within the parent university. The purpose of this opinion article is to suggest ways to reform the current tenure system in dental education as a means of improving recruitment and retention of new faculty members while maintaining or increasing scholarly activity within dental schools. PMID:22550103

Slayton, Rebecca L; Kachalia, Parag R; Lozano-Pineda, Juanita; Rolf, David D; Kovarik, Robert E; Dillon, Joycelyn A

2012-05-01

314

Managing dental fear and anxiety.  

PubMed

Fear and anxiety are primary reasons why individuals avoid visiting the dental practitioner. Dental anxiety appears to vary by type of treatment, with periodontic and endodontic patients reporting higher levels of anxiety than patients receiving restorative or prophylactic treatment. Parents who experience dental anxiety often pass along such feelings to their children. Front office employees are the first line in screening for anxiety-related behaviors while the patient is in the reception area. It is extremely important to recognize dental fear and anxiety before the patient receives oral care because the stresses can lead to exacerbation of medical problems such as angina, seizures, asthma or hyperventilation. Applying behavioral techniques helps to induce the patient's relaxation, reduce anxiety and also reduce the need for analgesics with their potential side effects. PMID:24600761

Rayman, Salim; Dincer, Elvir; Almas, Khalid

2013-11-01

315

Mercury Toxicity and Dental Amalgam.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

There is adequate evidence that dental amalgam restorations, during and after placement, results in the release of Hg into the patients's body. Whether the Hg released from amalgam is due to placement procedures, surface abrasion, or later corrosion break...

M. Wolff J. W. Osborne A. L. Hanson

1982-01-01

316

Dosimetric essay in dental radiology.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A neck study was observated in the tiroids glands,laryngeal zone, sensitive organs for the ionizing radiation for increase dental xray exams. Was selected 29th patients with radiography prescription complete (in the Odontology Faculty Clinics Uruguaian). ...

M. Lopez Salaberry A. Dato Carfagna R. Rodriguez Dorgia

1998-01-01

317

Osseointegrated dental implants produced via microwave processing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research is a comprehensive effort to develop osseointegrated dental implants via microwave processing. A net-shape microwave sintering procedure was employed to fabricate dental implants. Commercial pure titanium powders (-100, -200 and -325 mesh sizes) were used in this work. This process eliminates the need for machining of implants and prevents contamination. The idea was to take advantage of the peculiar way microwave couple with metallic powders, i.e. generating heat in the interior of the sample and dissipating it away through the surface. The desired features for an implant, a dense core with surface pores, is not possible via conventional sintering. Coating with hydroxyapatite via electrodeposition and chemical combustion vapor deposition was also attempted to further enhance the bioactivity of this layer. Surface roughness and area were measured using a non-contact surface profilometer to further describe the unique surface. In-vitro studies, conducted using osteoblast cells extracted from neonatal rat calvarial, showed improved cell growth on all the uncoated porous samples. However, the highest cell growth was observed on the -200 mesh size samples. The higher surface area of the -200 mesh samples is attributed to this observation. This work was able to identify the processing parameters for titanium in microwave and establishes the importance of surface area as a key parameter for cell growth on porous surfaces as compared to surface roughness.

Kutty, Muralithran G.

318

Waterborne pathogens and dental waterlines.  

PubMed

Humans, like every other living thing on Earth, have evolved in a world dominated by many billions of microscopic life forms. Most of the time, we live in a state of harmony (or even mutualism) with our invisible coinhabitants. When this balance becomes disturbed however, the consequences can be devastating. Infectious diseases including malaria, tuberculosis, and AIDS remain the world's greatest mass murderers. Dental workers strive to reduce infection risks for their patients through infection control measures that reduce or eliminate potentially pathogenic agents in the clinical environment. As increasing numbers of patients with varying degrees of immune suppression present for dental treatment, the need to ensure an aseptic treatment environment will become a higher priority for the dental profession. The possibility that exposure to aerosols contaminated with endotoxin might exacerbate asthma or cause chronic respiratory problems in dental health care workers should be investigated. Although direct evidence of widespread complications among patients or occupationally acquired illness among dental workers is presently lacking, reducing the numbers of microorganisms present in dental treatment water is consistent with other empiric measures that form the basis of infection-control practice. PMID:12848464

Mills, Shannon E

2003-07-01

319

When and Why Parents Seek Dental Care for Children under 36 Months.  

PubMed

Background: The aim was to analyze an infant preventive program determining at what age parents take their children for their first dental visit and the reasons why they do it. Materials & Methods: A total of 844 children aged from 0 to 36 months, enrolled in the program of oral health maintenance of the Baby Clinic, participated in this study. During the first dental visit, the parents were inquired about the reasons that led them to enroll their children in the program. One trained investigator identified this reasons on the records and classified them according to the following scores: orientation/prevention, caries treatment, malpositioned teeth, dental trauma, tooth color alterations and others. Results: Orientation/prevention was the most prevalent reason from 0-6 months to 25-30 months of age, and at the age 30-36 months, the reason caries/treatment overcame orientation/prevention, becoming the most prevalent reason in that age group. The third place was occupied by dental trauma. The mean age parents seek for dental care to their children was 14, 92 months. Conclusion: This study showed a preferentially preventive/educational profile for the children. However, lots of parents still take children to the dentist preferentially for curative instead of preventive treatment. How to cite this article: Volpato LE, Palti DG, Lima JE, Machado MA, Aranha AM, Bandeca MC, Pedro FL, Borges AH. When and Why Parents Seek Dental Care for Children under 36 Months. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(4):21-25. PMID:24155615

Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci; Palti, Dafna Geller; Lima, Jose Eduardo de Oliveira; Machado, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira; Aranha, Andreza Maria Fabio; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Pedro, Fabio Luis Miranda; Borges, Alvaro Henrique

2013-08-01

320

Dental Caries in American Indian Toddlers after a Community-Based Beverage Intervention  

PubMed Central

Objective/Setting The Toddler Overweight and Tooth decay prevention Study (TOTS) was an overweight and early childhood caries (ECC) project in the Pacific Northwest USA. It targeted American Indian (AI) toddlers from birth, to effect changes in breastfeeding and sweetened beverage consumption. Design/Intervention/Participants The intervention cohort was children born in three communities during 12 months; expectant mothers were identified through prenatal visits, and recruited by tribal coordinators. The local comparison cohorts were children in those communities who were 18–30 months at study start. A control longitudinal cohort consisted of annual samples of children aged 18–30 months in a fourth community, supplying secular trends. Outcome measures d1–2mfs was used to identify incident caries in intervention, comparison, and control cohorts after 18-to-30 months of follow-up in 2006. Results No missing or filled teeth were found. For d1t, all three intervention cohorts showed statistically significant downward intervention effects, decreases of between 0.300 and 0.631 in terms of the fraction of affected mouths. The results for d2t were similar but of smaller magnitudes, decreases of between 0.342 and 0.449; these results met the 0.05 level for significance in two of three cases. In light of an estimated secular increase in dental caries in the control site, all three intervention cohorts showed improvements in both d1t and d2t. Conclusions Simple interventions targeting sweetened beverage availability (in combination with related measures) reduced high tooth decay trends, and were both feasible and acceptable to the AI communities we studied.

Maupome, Gerardo; Karanja, Njeri; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Lutz, Tam; Aickin, Mikel; Becker, Thomas

2014-01-01

321

Effect of year of study on stress levels in male undergraduate dental students  

PubMed Central

Objective Stress among dental students can be a significant threat, resulting in physical and/or mental illness, and have a negative effect on students’ performance and the professional practice of dentistry. Stress can occur from different sources. The purpose of this study is to test whether the year of study has an effect on the stress levels of dental students. Method Our study consisted of a cross-sectional survey using a modified version of the Dental Environment Stress (DES) questionnaire. The questionnaires were filled out by male undergraduate dental students at King Saud University in Riyadh City during the 2010–2011 academic year (n = 214). Results The results show the most common sources of stress: examinations and completing clinical requirements. Moreover, in the five-year lecture-based traditional curriculum, the third year students reported the highest level of stress, whereas the first year reported the lowest level of stress. Conclusion Third year undergraduate dental students reported the highest level of stress. This stress could be reduced by reviewing and modifying the dental curriculum by allowing students to have contact with patients more gradually, starting from the first year, in addition to adding stress prevention and intervention programs in dental curricula.

Alzahem, Abdullah M; Van der Molen, Henk T; De Boer, Benjamin J

2013-01-01

322

Dental Issues & Down Syndrome  

MedlinePLUS

... gums clean and help to minimize the inflammation. Cavities Some research says that people with Down syndrome ... of cavities. What Can I Do to Prevent Cavities and Gum Disease? Brush teeth twice daily with ...

323

Haemodynamic response and psychometric test measuring dental anxiety in a spanish population in galicia.  

PubMed

Purpose: To evaluate haemodynamic changes during dental checkups and preventive treatments and establish the relationship between haemodynamic parameters and psychometric tests. Materials and Methods: Seventy-one paediatric patients (39 boys and 32 girls ages 6 to 14 years, mean age 8.04) scheduled to receive dental procedures fulfilled the inclusion criteria for this prospective study. Anxiety was measured at three time points by using the following haemodynamic parameters: heart rate (HR), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP) and oxygen saturation (SaO2). The Children's Fear Survey Schedule Dental Subscale (CFSS-DS) and the Facial Image Scale (FIS) were used as psychometric tests before and after child attendance, respectively. Results: Variations in HR and BP during dental procedures were statistically significant while SaO2 values were not. The highest mean HR, SBP and DBP values were obtained during dental procedures, while the lowest SBP and DBP were recorded at baseline. HR and BP changes (r = 0.32, P < 0.01) were statistically correlated. The most anxious children based on both CFSS-DS and FIS scales also had the highest mean HR. Changes in BP and oxygen saturation parameters were found to have no relationship with anxiety groups in either scale. Conclusions: Dental checkups and preventive treatments cause significant changes in HR and BP. However, the CFSS-DS questionnaire does not adequately predict these changes. PMID:24046826

Muinelo-Lorenzo, Juan; Sanfeliú, Jose Otero; Alegre, Santiago Vivas; Lombardía, Fátima López; Cepeda, Xosé Luis; Suarez-Cunqueiro, Maria Mercedes

2014-01-01

324

[The effectiveness of a school-based fluoride rinsing program for dental risk groups].  

PubMed

In the Netherlands there are still groups of children whose dental health is worse compared with the majority of children. Mostly these children are from lower socio-economic strata in the larger Dutch cities. The Municipal Health Departments in Rotterdam and Amsterdam have developed a prevention programme for those risk groups. This article concentrates on the effects of fluoride mouthrinsing in children in Rotterdam who can be considered at risk as far as dental health is considered. For a period of 5 years these children participated in a fluoride mouthrinsing program at school. At three moments in time dental examinations took place: when the children were 5-6 years old, when they were 9-10 years old and finally when they were 11-12 years old. Compared to a controlgroup it appears that after 5 years the increase of dental caries in the experimental group is significantly lower than in the controlgroup. Fluoride mouthrinsing at primary schools therefore seems to be an effective form of dental prevention for groups at risk as far as dental health is considered. PMID:12891888

Reelick, N F; Guldenmundt, M; Bleeker, J

2003-07-01

325

Prosthetic joint infection, dental treatment and antibiotic prophylaxis  

PubMed Central

Current international and national prophylactic antibiotic regimens have been analyzed in respect of the prevention of bacteremia after dental and surgical procedures and, therefore, of joint prosthesis infection. This information was used to formulate guidelines for the Department of Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery. Publications since 2003 were used in this research. In addition, recommendations of accredited institutions and associations were examined. These included the guidelines of the American Dental Association in association with the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (2003), the American Heart Association (2007), the Working Party of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (2006) and the Australian Dental Guidelines (2005). No guidelines published by any institution in South Africa were found. The general rationale for the use of antibiotic prophylaxis for surgical (including dental) interventions is that those procedures may result in a bacteremia that may cause infection in joint prostheses. Antibiotics, however, should therefore be administered to susceptible patients, e.g. immunocompromised patients, prior to the development of bacteremia. The guidelines recommended for use in South Africa are based solely on those used outside South Africa. South Africa is regarded as a developing country with its own population and demographic characteristics. Eleven percent of our population is infected with HIV, and a specific guideline for prophylactic antibiotic treatment is, therefore, essential.

Kotze, Marthinus J.

2009-01-01

326

Dental Therapy Assistant: Quality of Restorations Placed and Finished.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The U.S. Army Dental Corps has implemented a new concept of dental care delivery, formally identified as the Improved Dental Care Delivery System. The concept is based on the conservation of professional manpower resources through the use of dental treatment teams employing expanded duty dental assistants. Dental Therapy Assistant (DTA) is the…

Heid, Theodore H.; Bair, Jeffrey H.

327

Cerebrovascular accident under anesthesia during dental surgery.  

PubMed

Abstract Stroke, or cerebrovascular accident (CVA), is a medical emergency that may lead to permanent neurological damage, complications, and death. The rapid loss of brain function due to disruption of the blood supply to the brain is caused by blockage (thrombosis, arterial embolism) or hemorrhage. The incidence of CVA during anesthesia for noncardiac nonvascular surgery is as high as 1% depending on risk factors. Comprehensive preoperative assessment and good perioperative management may prevent a CVA. However, should an ischemic event occur, appropriate and rapid management is necessary to minimize the deleterious effects caused to the patient. This case report describes a patient who had an ischemic CVA while under general anesthesia for dental alveolar surgery and discusses the anesthesia management. PMID:24932981

Cooke, Mathew; Cuddy, Michael A; Farr, Brad; Moore, Paul A

2014-01-01

328

Association between Childhood Dental Experiences and Dental Fear among Dental, Psychology and Mathematics Undergraduates in Brazil  

PubMed Central

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between childhood dental experiences and dental fear in adulthood among dentistry, psychology and mathematics undergraduate students. A cross-sectional study of 1,256 students from the city of Belo Horizonte, Brazil, was performed. Students responded to the Brazilian version of the Dental Fear Survey (DFS) and a questionnaire regarding previous dental experiences. Both the DFS and the questionnaire were self-administered. Association was tested using descriptive, bivariate and multivariate linear regression analysis, with a 5% significance level. Dentistry undergraduates reported lower scores than psychology (p < 0.001) and mathematics undergraduates (p < 0.05) for all three dimensions of the DFS. Negative dental experiences in childhood was associated with dimensions of Avoidance (B = 2.70, p < 0.001), Physiological arousal (B = 1.42, p < 0.001) and Fears of specific stimuli/situations (B = 3.44, p < 0.001). The reason for first visit to dentist was associated with dimensions of Physiological arousal (B = 0.76, p < 0.01) and Fears of specific stimuli/situations (B = 1.29, p < 0.01). Dentists should be encouraged to evaluate the dental fear of their patients before treatment. The DFS has been found to be an effective instrument for this purpose.

Oliveira, Mauricio A.; Bendo, Cristiane B.; Ferreira, Meire C.; Paiva, Saul M.; Vale, Miriam P.; Serra-Negra, Junia M.

2012-01-01

329

[Adherence to oral hygiene and dental self-care].  

PubMed

Nearly every person will be in need of dental treatment in his lifetime, whether purely for health causes or alternately for esthetic issues. Yet the main reasons of seeking dental treatment are in fact Caries, Gingivitis and Periodontitis. In spite of the fact that these pathologies occur due to the accumulation of Plaque around the oral cavity and teeth, they are fairly easy to prevent. Using simple techniques such as oral rinsing, flossing and brushing of the teeth, are normally sufficient for obtaining good oral health. If this is actually the case, than how is it that we are witnessing a massive spread of dental problems? How come there are so many incidents of people suffering from dental problems if the preventative care is that easy to manage? The answer lies in the concept of Adherence, referring to the cooperation of an individual with the demands of his treatment regime and the dental staff. The idea of promoting health adherence aims mainly for using medication, attending the periodic inspections and examination, and making lifestyle changes such as preventive care illustrated above. This article exemplifies how one of the current trends in Medical Psychology discipline is to enhance adherence by establishing a secure therapeutic alliance which is based upon a positive relationship between the patient and his doctor, increasing patient's confidence and sense of self-efficacy, and recruiting family members and friends to the patient's process of change. A distinctive emphasis is put on expanding the patient's knowledge about his condition, and raising awareness to the linkage between his medical (to be more specific-dental) problem and its symptoms to the implications. The most modish and putative intervention nowadays is Patient Centered, where the guiding principles used are urging the patient to be responsible for implying the treatment regime, taking active participation, and make decisions regarding his current and future status. This article illustrates, through a comprehensive literature review of theories, models and researches, the contemporary methods for promoting adherence to oral hygiene, dental Self-Care and treatment. Using the combination of a survey from a select sample of specialists in the field of Dentistry, and the conclusions inferred from studies reviewed, I was able to determine how investment in the Bio-Psycho-Social approach would improve patient satisfaction from their doctors and outcomes of the treatment, shorten the duration of treatment, consume only little resources, improve dental health of patients and prevent repetitive visits to the dentists clinics. At the same time, despite the fact that dentistry practitioners acknowledge the importance of patient's adherence and take active measures such as talks, praises, guidance and providing information, most of them don't seem to comprehend interfusion of family members or friends as an integral part of the treatment. Moreover, their overall feeling is of incompetence when regarding dealing with un-adherent patients. Therefore, maybe there is room for providing dentists and staff with seminars, conventions etc. about the latest novelties on the subject. In conclusion, enhancing dental patient's adherence to health behavior is a domain mainly under the responsibility of the dentist, but also of his staff. As elaborated in the article, the measures for doing so are: 1. Information- the dentist should guide patients about the different methods for maintaining oral hygiene, explain how proper adherence benefits positive treatment outcome, and provide a broad and informative picture of the patient's specific problem. 2. Positive rapport - the need for establishing a good relationship between the doctor and his patients is crucial for attaining effective and satisfactory treatment outcomes. No doubt that this matter depends upon the personality and character of both the doctor and the patient, but using positive verbal reinforcements, symbolic incentives (such as free toothpaste samples), support throughout the treatment, sharing the rati

Poplinger, A

2010-04-01

330

Salivary characteristics and dental caries: Evidence from general dental practices  

PubMed Central

Background Saliva is one of the intraoral host factors that influence caries development. The authors conducted a study to investigate whether salivary characteristics are associated with recent dental caries experience. Methods Dentist-investigators and dental staff members collected data pertaining to a two-year cumulative incidence of dental caries (previous 24 months) and salivary characteristics during baseline assessment in an ongoing longitudinal study. The systematic random sample consisted of patients (n = 1,763) visiting general dental practices (n = 63) within the Northwest Practice-based REsearch Collaborative in Evidence-based DENTistry (PRECEDENT). The authors estimated adjusted rate ratios (RRs) by using generalized estimating equations log-linear regression to relate salivary characteristics to coronal carious lesions into dentin. Results Low resting pH (? 6.0) in the overall sample and low stimulated salivary flow rate (? 0.6 milliliter/minute) in older adults (? 65 years old) were associated with increased dental caries (RR, 1.6; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 1.1–2.2; RR, 2.4; 95 percent CI, 1.5–3.8, respectively). Low buffering capacity was associated with decreased dental caries in children and adolescents (RR, 0.3; 95 percent CI, 0.1–1.0; RR, 0.2; 95 percent CI, 0.1–0.7, respectively). A thick, sticky or frothy salivary consistency also was associated with decreased dental caries in adults (RR, 0.6; 95 percent CI, 0.4–1.0). Associations between other salivary characteristics and dental caries for the overall sample and within each age group were not statistically significant. Conclusions Salivary characteristics were associated weakly with previous dental caries experience, but the authors did not find consistent trends among the three age groups. Different salivary characteristics were associated with an increased caries experience in older adults and a lowered caries experience in children and adolescents and adults. Practical Implications Further investigations are needed in this population setting to understand the study’s conflicting results. The study findings cannot support the use of salivary tests to determine caries risk in actual clinical settings.

Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Scott, JoAnna; Rothen, Marilynn; Mancl, Lloyd; Lawhorn, Timothy; Brossel, Kenneth; Berg, Joel

2013-01-01

331

What steroid supplementation is required for a patient with primary adrenal insufficiency undergoing a dental procedure?  

PubMed

Patients with primary adrenal insufficiency (Addison's disease) lack the endogenous steroid hormones cortisol and aldosterone and require daily steroid therapy (usually hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone) to replace them. These patients are unable to adapt physiologically to stress and may need supplemental steroid therapy when having dental procedures, to prevent adrenal crisis. This paper provides guidance on dental procedures for which steroid supplementation may be required in patients with primary adrenal insufficiency and gives advice on doses and timing of supplementation. It does not address the management of patients with secondary adrenal insufficiency caused by long-term use of high doses of steroids. This document is for guidance only. Patients with primary adrenal insufficiency should be assessed individually as steroid requirements will vary. Clinical Relevance: Although patients with primary adrenal insufficiency (Addison's disease) are invariably very well informed about their steroid requirements prior to a dental procedure, dental staff should have an understanding of the steroid supplementation that may be required. PMID:24930256

Henderson, Simone

2014-05-01

332

Faculty and student perceptions of academic integrity at U.S. and Canadian dental schools.  

PubMed

The issues of cheating and plagiarism in educational settings have received a large amount of attention in recent years. The purpose of this study was to assess the degree to which academic integrity issues currently exist in the dental schools throughout the United States and Canada. An online survey was developed to gather data pertaining to this topic from two key groups in dental education: faculty and students. Responses were obtained from 1,153 students and 423 faculty members. The results of the survey clearly reveal that cheating is a significant problem in dental schools and that significant differences exist between students' and faculty members' perceptions of academic integrity. The challenge for dental schools is to identify effective strategies to prevent cheating opportunities and to implement and enforce effective means of dealing with specific examples of cheating. PMID:17687085

Andrews, Kenneth G; Smith, Linda A; Henzi, David; Demps, Elaine

2007-08-01

333

Sharing MedlinePlus®/MEDLINE® for information literacy education (SMILE): a dental public health information project.  

PubMed

The SMILE project represented a partnership among the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Libraries, the Gateway Clinic in Laredo, and the San Antonio Metropolitan Health District. The project focused on improving dental practitioners' access to reliable information resources and integrating the best evidence into public health dental practice. Through its training program, SMILE cultivated a set of "power information users" among the dentists, dental hygienists, and community health workers (promotores) who provided public health preventive care and oral health education. The dental public health practitioners gained information literacy skills and increased their knowledge about reliable sites such as blogs, PubMed®, and MedlinePlus®. This project fostered opportunities for expanded partnerships with public health personnel. PMID:22040242

Gaines, Julie K; Levy, Linda S; Cogdill, Keith W

2011-01-01

334

The Vine Trust's Amazon Hope boats--providing a dental service on the Amazon.  

PubMed

The Vine Trust's Amazon Hope Project is a medical and dental programme providing healthcare to communities along the Amazon River in Peru. Volunteers from the UK and other countries work alongside Peruvian staff employed by their partner organization, Union Biblica del Peru, to provide a health service from a boat which serves communities on several tributaries who otherwise would have no other access to care. The dental programme involves a basic restorative and extraction service, with scope to develop a preventive programme. Clinical Relevance: Dentists'and DCPs' skills are transferable globally: this article illustrates how one volunteer dental project is working to provide relevant and sustainable dental health care in the Amazon jungle. PMID:23505857

Mason, Shona M C

2013-01-01

335

42 CFR 410.24 - Limitations on services of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine. 410.24 Section 410.24 Public...of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine. Medicare Part B pays for services...by a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine within the scope of his or her...

2013-10-01

336

42 CFR 410.24 - Limitations on services of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Limitations on services of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine. 410.24 Section...Limitations on services of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine. Medicare Part...services furnished by a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine within the...

2010-10-01

337

42 CFR 410.24 - Limitations on services of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Limitations on services of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine. 410.24 Section...Limitations on services of a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine. Medicare Part...services furnished by a doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine within the...

2009-10-01

338

Food insecurity and dental caries in schoolchildren: a cross-sectional survey in the western Brazilian Amazon.  

PubMed

We analyzed the association between food insecurity and dental caries in 7- to 9-yr-old schoolchildren. We performed a cross-sectional survey nested in a population-based cohort study of 203 schoolchildren. The participants lived in the urban area of a small town within the western Brazilian Amazon. Dental examinations were performed according to criteria recommended by the World Health Organization. The number of decayed deciduous and permanent teeth as a count variable was the outcome measure. Socio-economic status, food security, behavioral variables, and child nutritional status, measured by Z-score for body mass index (BMI), were investigated, and robust Poisson regression models were used. The results showed a mean (SD) of 3.63 (3.26) teeth affected by untreated caries. Approximately 80% of schoolchildren had at least one untreated decayed tooth, and nearly 60% lived in food-insecure households. Sex, household wealth index, mother's education level, and food-insecurity scores were associated with dental caries in the crude analysis. Dental caries was 1.5 times more likely to be associated with high food-insecurity scores after adjusting for socio-economic status and sex. A significant dose-response relationship was observed. In conclusion, food insecurity is highly associated with dental caries in 7- to 9-yr-old children and may be seen as a risk factor. These findings suggest that food-security policies could reduce dental caries. PMID:24754799

Frazão, Paulo; Benicio, Maria H D; Narvai, Paulo C; Cardoso, Marly A

2014-06-01

339

Dental anxiety and quality of life: the effect of dental treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The aim of the present study was to determine the association between dental anxiety and quality of life (QoL) and to test the hypothesis that treatment of highly anxious patients would significantly enhance QoL. Material and methods: Subjects were 35 highly anxious dental patients of a Dutch dental fear clinic who were assessed on dental trait anxiety (DAS and

J. H. Vermaire; Ad de Jongh; Irene H. A. Aartman

2008-01-01

340

Prevalence of dental caries among school children of Bharatpur city, India  

PubMed Central

Background: Healthy teeth and oral tissues and the need for oral health care are important for any section of society. Dental caries is an infectious microbial disease of multifactorial origin in which diet, host, and microbial flora interacts over a period of time in such a way so as to encourage demineralization of the tooth enamel with resultant caries formation. Dental caries, the product of man's progress towards civilization, has a very high morbidity potential and thus, is coming into focus of the mankind. Aims and Objectives: To assess the prevalence of dental caries among 12-15 year old government and private school children of Bharatpur city. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study carried out on total 1400 school children, of which 700 school children were from government schools and 700 were from private schools. Simple random sampling methodology was used to select the sample. The subjects were examined for dental caries according to WHO 1997 assessment form. Significant Caries Index was also used to assess the prevalence of dental caries. Results: The prevalence of dental caries was found higher among government school children, that is, 53%, when compared to private school children, that is, 47% and this difference was found to be statistically significant. The mean decayed, missing, and filled teeth were found to be higher in government school children (7.61 ± 2.86) as compared to private school children (4.76 ± 2.42). Conclusion: Dental caries was found to be the major public health problems among both the government and private school children of Bharatpur city, which need immediate attention. Regular dental checkups and practice of routine oral hygiene procedures will enable them to lead a healthier life.

Ingle, Navin Anand; Dubey, Harsh Vardhan; Kaur, Navpreet; Gupta, Rahul

2014-01-01

341

Redesign of the Field Dental Bag to Accommodate Dental Instruments, Supplies, and the Battery Operated Dental Handpiece.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

It is United States Marine Corps (USMC) policy for the corpsman to use the M-3 aid bag as an emergency dental kit. The USMC incorporated a dental handpiece into the kit, which mandated the design of a new dental bag. A prototype was designed by the U.S. A...

C. R. Paschal R. R. Brewer

1991-01-01

342

The role of postgraduate dental deans.  

PubMed

Postgraduate Dental Deans commission and manage the delivery of postgraduate dental and medical education and training for dental practitioners. They are charged with developing and quality assuring opportunities for trainees in primary and secondary care so that they can reach their full potential, and must work with local organisations to ensure that sufficient training places are available to meet the future needs of the NHS. Postgraduate dental deans influence training opportunities and standards in NHS Trusts as well as dental vocational training practices. They also play a role in developing national policies on postgraduate dental education and implement new initiatives. Their roles cover modernising dental careers, national and international recruitment and retention in primary and secondary care. They are involved in leading the development of the dental workforce, including professions complementary to dentistry as well as managing the provision and quality assurance of CPD for general practitioners. They also provide support for doctors and dentists facing difficult situations. PMID:16192928

Franklin, C D; Smith, D G

2005-09-01

343

Dental Health - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus  

MedlinePLUS

... za dobro zdravlje - Bosanski (Bosnian) Multimedia Healthy Roads Media Chinese - Simplified (????) Diabetic Dental Care English ?????????? - ???? ( ... Dental Care English ?????????? - ???? (Chinese - Traditional) PDF Chinese ... (Russian) Multimedia Healthy Roads Media Getting Older? Why Your Teeth and Gums are ...

344

Additive Composition for Making Dental Materials.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The patent application relates to a substitute for distilled water normally used in the fabrication or preparation of dental materials. The addition of ammonium stabilized colloidal silica, borax and boric acid to the distilled water in which dental porce...

C. P. Mabie

1976-01-01

345

Challenges and Opportunities for Effective Dental Automation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Considered are aspects of effective dental automation, including integrating "islands of computing"; definition of a dental record; common nomenclature; an enabling architecture; capturing data at its source; computer-assisted software engineering; and system security. (DB)

Hieb, Barry R.

1991-01-01

346

Dental stem cells--characteristics and potential.  

PubMed

Soft dental tissues have been identified as easily accessible sources of multipotent postnatal stem cells. Dental stem cells are mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) capable of differentiating into at least three distinct cell lineages: osteo/odontogenic, adipogenic and neurogenic. They express various markers including those specific for MSC, embryonic stem cells and neural cells. Five different types of dental stem cells have been isolated from mature and immature teeth: dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth, periodontal ligament stem cells, stem cells from apical papilla and dental follicle progenitor cells. Dental stem cells may be used in dental tissue engineering including dental, enamel and periodontal tissue regeneration. They could also be used as a promising tool in potential treatment of neurodegenerative, ischemic and immune diseases. PMID:24446280

Bojic, Sanja; Volarevic, Vladislav; Ljujic, Biljana; Stojkovic, Miodrag

2014-06-01

347

decays revisited  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We revisit the determination of ? S (m {/? 2}) using a fit to inclusive ? hadronic spectral moments in light of (1) the recent calculation of the fourth-order perturbative coefficient K 4 in the expansion of the Adler function, (2) new precision measurements from BABAR of e+e- annihilation cross sections, which decrease the uncertainty in the separation of vector and axial-vector spectral functions, and (3) improved results from BABAR and Belle on ? branching fractions involving kaons. We estimate that the fourth-order perturbative prediction reduces the theoretical uncertainty, introduced by the truncation of the series, by 20% with respect to earlier determinations. We discuss to some detail the perturbative prediction of two different methods: fixed-order perturbation theory (FOPT) and contour-improved perturbative theory (CIPT). The corresponding theoretical uncertainties are studied at the ? and Z mass scales. The CIPT method is found to be more stable with respect to the missing higher order contributions and to renormalization scale variations. It is also shown that FOPT suffers from convergence problems along the complex integration contour. Nonperturbative contributions extracted from the most inclusive fit are small, in agreement with earlier determinations. Systematic effects from quark-hadron duality violation are estimated with simple models and found to be within the quoted systematic errors. The fit based on CIPT gives ? S (m {/? 2})=0.344±0.005±0.007, where the first error is experimental and the second theoretical. After evolution to M Z we obtain ? S (M {/Z 2})=0.1212±0.0005±0.0008±0.0005, where the errors are respectively experimental, theoretical and due to the evolution. The result is in agreement with the corresponding N3LO value derived from essentially the Z width in the global electroweak fit. The ? S (M {/Z 2}) determination from ? decays is the most precise one to date.

Davier, M.; Descotes-Genon, S.; Höcker, A.; Malaescu, B.; Zhang, Z.

2008-08-01

348

Dental iatrogenesis, Part 2.  

PubMed

To substantiate biocompatibility of dental materials and techniques, and thereby reduce iatrogenesis, tests for pulp and dentinal responses have been developed. These have shown that high-speed tooth cutting techniques are superior to low-speed techniques even when both incorporate air-water coolant sprays; pressure when placing restorative materials intensifies pulp responses induced by the cutting procedure, and that chemically self-cured resin composites requiring the application of a matrix to enhance adaptation intensify pulp response as compared to visible light-cured equivalents applied incrementally, fully cured throughout, and not requiring the pressure of a matrix. Most cements are irritating to the pulp when used as luting agents and when used less than 0.5 mm from it. Conditioning agents using weak acids for short periods induce little irritation while bonding agents appear to be beneficial by providing protection from subsequently placed restorative material. Clinicians should make every effort to minimize the development of pulp responses and reduce iatrogenic efforts. PMID:9567113

Stanley, H R

1995-02-01

349

Disparity between dental needs and dental treatment provided.  

PubMed

We hypothesized that more teeth would be treated by fee-for-service dentists than predicted by salaried dentists. In a cohort of 3818 participants, the number of teeth treated was related to the number of teeth with treatment needs by means of a zero-inflated negative binomial model. Among those obtaining dental care within 6 months (study population, n = 1239), the adjusted predicted number of teeth treated was 2 (95%CI = 1.7;2.3) for patients with no treatment needs. The sum of teeth treated by fee-for-service dentists (4374 when considering the whole cohort and 3550 when considering the study population) was much higher than that predicted by salaried dentists (4220 when considering the whole cohort and 1770 when considering the study population). Our findings demonstrate a disparity between dental needs assessment and the dental treatment actually provided. PMID:20505048

Naegele, E R; Cunha-Cruz, J; Nadanovsky, P

2010-09-01

350

Preventive Dentistry for Massachusetts: Facts, Goals, Strategies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The overall purpose of this report is to provide in language familiar to the lay person a broad picture of the current measures to prevent and/or control the most common oral diseases: dental caries, periodontal disease, malocclusion, cleft lip, cleft pal...

1978-01-01

351

Factors involved in dental surgery fires: a review of the literature.  

PubMed

Surgical fires are well-characterized, readily preventable, potentially devastating operating room catastrophes that continue to occur from 20 to 100 times per year or, by one estimate, up to 600 times per year in US operating rooms, sometimes with fatal results. The most significant risk factors for surgical fires involve (a) the use of an ignition source, such as laser or electrocautery equipment, in or around an oxygen-enriched environment in the head, neck, and upper torso area and (b) the concurrent delivery of supplemental oxygen, especially via nasal cannula. Nonetheless, while these 2 conditions occur very commonly in dental surgery, especially in pediatric dental surgery where sedation and anesthesia are regularly indicated, there is a general absence of documented dental surgical fires in the literature. Barring the possibility of underreporting for fear of litigation, this may suggest that there is another mechanism or mechanisms present in dental or pediatric dental surgery that mitigates this worst-case risk of surgical fires. Some possible explanations for this include: greater fire safety awareness by dental practitioners, incidental ventilation of oxygen-enriched environments in patient oral cavities due to breathing, or suction used by dental practitioners during procedures. This review of the literature provides a background to suggest that the practice of using intraoral suction in conjunction with the use of supplemental oxygen during dental procedures may alter the conditions needed for the initiation of intraoral fires. To date, there appear to be no published studies describing the ability of intraoral suctioning devices to alter the ambient oxygen concentration in an intraoral environment. In vivo models that would allow examination of intraoral suction on the ambient oxygen concentration in a simulated intraoral environment may then provide a valuable foundation for evaluating the safety of current clinical dental surgical practices, particularly in regard to the treatment of children. PMID:24697822

VanCleave, Andrea M; Jones, James E; McGlothlin, James D; Saxen, Mark A; Sanders, Brian J; Walker, LaQuia A

2014-01-01

352

Aesthetic management of dental fluorosis.  

PubMed

Significant numbers of patients visiting the paediatric dental clinics have aesthetically objectionable brown stains and desire treatment for them. Intrinsic tooth discolouration can be a significant aesthetic, and in some instances, functional, problem. Dental fluorosis, tetracycline staining, localised and chronological hypoplasia, and both amelogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta can all produce a cosmetically unsatisfactory dentition. The aetiology of intrinsic discolouration of enamel may sometimes be deduced from the patient's history, and one factor long associated with the problem has been a high level of fluoride intake. Optimal use of topical fluorides leads to a decrease in the caries prevalence but may show an increase in the prevalence of fluorosis staining because of metabolic alterations in the ameloblasts, causing a defective matrix formation and improper calcification. A 12-year-old male patient was screened at the dental clinic for routine dental care. He wanted us to remove and/or minimise the noticeable brown/yellow staining of his teeth. He requested the least invasive and most cost-effective treatment to change his smile. Various treatment modalities are present for the treatment of fluorosis stains. This report discusses the microabrasion technique in the patient having dental fluorosis. PMID:23704468

Khandelwal, Vishal; Nayak, Ullal Anand; Nayak, Prathibha Anand; Ninawe, Nupur

2013-01-01

353

The evolution of dental group practices.  

PubMed

Dentists and the dental profession are changing. One significant change in the deliver of dental care is the evolution of group practices to include networks of dental practices with central management by various service organizations that are owned or financed by private equity firms. This article discusses their evolution and potential advantages and disadvantages for dentists who join them. The article concludes with a prediction about the future heterogeneity of the dental care system. PMID:24597018

Guay, Albert Henry

2013-12-01

354

Novel preventive treatment options.  

PubMed

A number of novel preventive treatment options which, as with traditional methods, can be differentiated into 3 categories of prevention (primary, secondary and tertiary), have been and are being currently investigated. Those reviewed are either commercially available or appear relatively close to that point. These include: approximal sealants; fluoride applications, including slow-release devices; measures to help remineralize demineralized tissue, including 3 different methods of delivering amorphous calcium phosphate; measures to help modify the biofilm to reduce the cariogenic challenge, including ozone therapy and probiotics; measures to increase enamel resistance to demineralization, including laser treatment of enamel, and a novel 'hybrid' technique for the treatment of primary molar caries which involves 'overlapping' of secondary and tertiary prevention--the Hall technique. Although many of these techniques show considerable promise and dentists should be aware of these developments and follow their progress, the evidence for each of these novel preventive treatment options is currently insufficient to make widespread recommendations. Changes in dental practice should be explored to see how oral health can be best supported through novel preventive systems. Further research is also required involving double-blind randomized controlled trials in order to bring further benefits of more effective caries control to patients. Implementation in practice should follow promptly as new techniques are shown to be clinically valuable for individual patients. PMID:19494683

Longbottom, C; Ekstrand, K; Zero, D; Kambara, M

2009-01-01

355

The IHS dental program--a historical perspective.  

PubMed

The federal government provides health services for American Indians and Alaska Natives based on treaties with tribes, legislation, and executive orders. These services began in the late 1700s, when they were the responsibility of the Department of War. This responsibility was later transferred to the Bureau of Indian Affairs and in 1955 the Indian Health Service was established within the United States Public Health Service. This paper describes the development and mission of the Indian Health Service dental program. During the 1950s, Public Health Service officers were assigned to the dental program, dental assistant training centers were established, and clinical prevention programs were implemented. Increased dentist recruitment, the implementation of four-handed dentistry, and the development of an automated information system were the highlights of the 1960s. Considerable effort was placed on work force development during the 1970s, while expansions of both treatment and prevention services were the highlights of the 1980s. Unfortunately, decreases in administrative staffing and a decline in clinical services have been noted during the last decade. The main reasons for the decline were initiatives to reduce the size of federal government and inability to recruit and retain dentists in clinical positions. Also, many tribes have elected to manage their own programs and have requested and received their share of IHS administrative funds to use in their programs. Recent pay and budget legislation along with changes in program management should reverse this trend. PMID:11243041

Martin, R F

2000-01-01

356

Infection control procedures used in conjunction with computed dental radiography.  

PubMed

Infection control guidelines for dental radiography have been modified since 1986, when the American Dental Association and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention supported the concept of "universal blood and body fluid precautions." With the introduction of computed digital radiography, hardware manufacturers recommend that alternative infection control techniques are necessary to prevent potential damage to the digital x-ray sensors placed inside the patient's mouth. Thirty first-year dental hygiene students were asked to insert and remove a Schick CDR number 2 size intraoral digital x-ray sensor into modified Rinn XCP bitewing bite blocks and a modified Rinn Snap-a-ray five times with each of the recommended infection control covers. Reduced rates of cross contamination are possible if the plastic barrier envelope has an additional latex finger cot stretched over it and the x-ray sensor. Sole usage of a latex finger cot will result in a reduced incidence of contamination, but still not to acceptable levels. However, a plastic barrier envelope placed over the x-ray sensor and over the modified XCP bite block together or a covered sensor in a Snap-a-ray under normal conditions does not result in a perforation and is least likely to result in cross contamination. PMID:11410973

Hubar, J S; Gardiner, D M

2000-10-01

357

Cytotoxicity and bonding property of dental ceramics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. Yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YPSZ) ceramic is suitable for dental and medical use because of its high fracture toughness and chemical durability. The purpose of this study was to estimate the cytotoxicity and bonding property of zirconia ceramic compared to other dental ceramics.Methods. Eight commercial dental ceramics including Denzir (YPSZ) are used in this cytotoxicity test. The human gingival

Motohiro Uo; Göran Sjoren; Anders Sundh; Fumio Watari; Maud Bergman; Ulf Lerner

2003-01-01

358

Dental Assisting Course. Bilingual Vocational Instructional Materials.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This course in dental assisting, one of a series of bilingual English-Spanish vocational education courses, is designed to prepare the student to assist the dentist at the chairside in the dental operatory, to perform reception and clerical functions, and to carry out selected dental laboratory work. The course covers an introduction to the…

Lopez-Cox, Guadalupe

359

Reforming the mission of public dental services.  

PubMed

Australia has a complex history of providing public dental services to its communities. From the early days of Colonial settlement, the provision of dental care to the Australian public has largely been driven and influenced by organized groups and associations of dentists. The Constitution of Australia, under Section 51 xxiii A, allows for the Commonwealth to provide for medical and dental services. Unlike the United Kingdom, however, dental services have not been embedded into a universal national health service agenda. In 1974, that the Australian Government through the Australian School Dental Program provided the first funding and national direction for public dental services - and that, limited to children. The Commonwealth Dental Health Program 1993-1997 was the second national endeavor to provide public dental services, this time to financially disadvantaged adults. Since that time, public dental service responsibility has been shuttled between States/Territories and the Commonwealth. A new paradigm for public dental services in Australia requires strong Commonwealth leadership, as well as the commitment of State and Territories and the organized dental profession. The National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission provided the most recent scenario for a radical change in mission. This paper canvases the competing roles of strategic, functional, and structural issues in relationship to social network and policy issues, which must be recognized if Australians truly seek to reform public dental services. PMID:22998313

Wright, F A C; List, P F

2012-10-01

360

Early detection of dental caries using photoacoustics  

Microsoft Academic Search

For decades, visual, tactile and radiographic examinations have been the standard for diagnosing caries. Nonetheless, the extent of variation in the diagnosis of dental caries is substantial among dental practitioners using these traditional techniques. Therefore, a more reliable standard for detecting incipient caries would be desirable. Using photoacoustics, near-infrared (NIR) optical contrast between sound and carious dental tissues can be

K. Kim; R. Witte; I. Koh; S. Ashkenazi; M. O'Donnell

2006-01-01

361

Special cluster issue on tribocorrosion of dental materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tribocorrosion affects all walks of life from oil and gas conversion to biomedical materials. Wear can interact with corrosion to enhance it or impede it; conversely, corrosion can enhance or impede wear. The understanding of the interactions between physical and chemical phenomena has been greatly assisted by electrochemical and microscopic techniques. In dentistry, it is well recognized that erosion due to dissolution (a term physicists use to denote wear) of enamel can result in tooth decay; however, the effects of the oral environment, i.e. pH levels, electrochemical potential and any interactions due to the forces involved in chewing are not well understood. This special cluster issue includes investigations on the fundamentals of wear-corrosion interactions involved in simulated oral environments, including candidate dental implant and veneer materials. The issue commences with a fundamental study of titanium implants and this is followed by an analysis of the behaviour of commonly used temporomandibular devices in a synovial fluid-like environment. The analysis of tribocorrosion mechanisms of Ti6Al4V biomedical alloys in artificial saliva with different pHs is addressed and is followed by a paper on fretting wear, on hydroxyapatite-titanium composites in simulated body fluid, supplemented with protein (bovine serum albumin). The effects of acid treatments on tooth enamel, and as a surface engineering technique for dental implants, are investigated in two further contributions. An analysis of the physiological parameters of intraoral wear is addressed; this is followed by a study of candidate dental materials in common beverages such as tea and coffee with varying acidity and viscosity and the use of wear maps to identify the safety zones for prediction of material degradation in such conditions. Hence, the special cluster issue consists of a range of tribocorrosion contributions involving many aspects of dental tribocorrosion, from analysis of physiological approaches and tissue engineering to studying of the effects of the environments encountered in clinical practice and management which lead to tooth decay. A wide range of analytical techniques and tribocorrosion experimental approaches is used to simulate, assess and model the synergistic interactions of wear and corrosion, many of them leading to new insights. We hope it will lead to increased awareness of tribocorrosion phenomena for researchers and dental clinicians alike and 'food for thought' for further studies in this field.

Mathew, Mathew T.; Stack, Margaret M.

2013-10-01

362

Proton decay theory  

SciTech Connect

Topics include minimal SU(5) predictions, gauge boson mediated proton decay, uncertainties in tau/sub p/, Higgs scalar effects, proton decay via Higgs scalars, supersymmetric SU(5), dimension 5 operators and proton decay, and Higgs scalars and proton decay. (WHK)

Marciano, W.J.

1983-01-01

363

[Stem cells of dental pulp].  

PubMed

Any clinician dreams to obtain the regeneration of the destroyed organ for his patient. In the human being, the regeneration of complex structures is not possible, except the liver and the bone marrow, which can be regenerated because of the presence of adult stem cells in these tissues. The stem cells have two principal properties: they ensure their self-renewal and they have the ability to differentiate into several cellular types. Using specific markers allowing the identification of the stem cells in bone marrow, stem cells were observed in dental pulp tissues. Although the origin, the identification, and the localization of these stem cells of dental pulp remain under consideration, the optimism in research on stem cells permits to believe that the knowledge on dental stem cells will lead to their use in therapeutics. PMID:17720580

Renard, Emmanuelle; Lopez-Cazaux, Séréna; Guicheux, Jérome; Weiss, Pierre; Laboux, Olivier; Alliot-Licht, Brigitte

2007-09-01

364

Dental materials: 1996 literature review.  

PubMed

This critical review of the published literature on dental materials for the year 1996 has been compiled by the Dental Materials Panel of the UK. It continues the series of annual reviews started in 1973 and published in the Journal of Dentistry. Emphasis has been placed upon publications which report upon the materials science or clinical performance of the materials. The review has been divided by accepted materials classifications (fissure sealants, glass polyalkenoate cements, dentine bonding, dental amalgam, endodontic materials, casting alloys, resin-bonded bridges and ceramo-metallic restorations, ceramics, denture base resins and soft lining materials, impression materials, implants materials, orthodontic materials, biomechanics and image processing, resin composites and casting investment materials and waxes). Three hundred and thirteen articles have been reviewed. PMID:9594471

Strang, R; Whitters, C J; Brown, D; Clarke, R L; Curtis, R V; Hatton, P V; Ireland, A J; Lloyd, C H; McCabe, J F; Nicholson, J W; Scrimgeour, S N; Setcos, J C; Sherriff, M; van Noort, R; Watts, D C; Woods, D

1998-03-01

365

Biofilm and dental unit waterlines.  

PubMed

Aquatic biofilms, which are well-organized communities of microorganisms, are widespread in nature. They constitute a major problem in many environmental, industrial and medical settings. The use of advanced techniques has revealed biofilm structure, formation and ecology. Special attention was given to the build-up of biofilm in dental unit waterlines (DUWLs), which are small-bore flexible plastic tubing to bring water to different handpieces. They are coated with well-established biofilms. Active biofilm is a source of microbial contamination of DUWLs water. The safety of dental treatment requires a good quality of the water used. The knowledge of nature, formation and the ways to eliminate the biofilm is the first step towards reducing health risk, both for patients and dental personnel. The article reviews these issues. PMID:14677905

Szymanska, Jolanta

2003-01-01

366

Removal of a Dental Implant Displaced into the Maxillary Sinus by Means of the Bone Lid Technique  

PubMed Central

Background. Rehabilitation of edentulous jaws with implant-supported prosthesis has become a common practice among oral surgeons in the last three decades. This therapy presents a very low incidence of complications. One of them is the displacement of dental implants into the maxillary sinus. Dental implants, such as any other foreign body into the maxillary sinus, should be removed in order to prevent sinusitis. Methods. In this paper, we report a case of dental implant migrated in the maxillary sinus and removed by means of the bone lid technique. Results and Conclusion. The migration of dental implants into the maxillary sinus is rarely reported. Migrated implants should be considered for removal in order to prevent possible sinusal diseases. The implant has been removed without any complications, confirming the bone lid technique to be safe and reliable.

Fusari, Pietro; Doto, Matteo; Chiapasco, Matteo

2013-01-01

367

The use of CDA best management practices and amalgam separators to improve the management of dental wastewater.  

PubMed

Concerns over the persistence and effects of mercury in the environment, particularly in wastewater, have increased significantly over the past decade. Because mercury is a component of dental amalgam, comprising about 50 percent of amalgam among other metals, in recent years the concern has affected dental practices and even educational curricula in the dental schools. While numbers vary widely from area to area, on average, it is estimated dentistry contributes less than 1 percent of the mercury generated from human activity to the environment. Despite dentistry's low contribution to the environmental mercury load, organized dentistry's position is that dentistry's role as a public health profession includes environmental stewardship, as well as patient safety, and that dental professionals must act responsibly by taking steps to prevent amalgam waste or any potentially harmful materials from entering the environment, no matter how small the amount. In support of this belief, both the California Dental Association and the American Dental Association have developed recommendations for best practice that dental offices should follow when handling dental amalgam waste. Many dental schools and auxiliary programs have shown their commitment to minimizing detrimental effects to the environment, evidenced by the fact that most, if not all, have incorporated safe work practices including mercury hygiene procedures as part of clinical coursework. Some local jurisdictions hardest hit by the effects of mercury in wastewater have gone even further to recommend, or even require, the installation of amalgam separators in dental offices. This article will describe the history of BMPs and amalgam separators usage in California, and examine the practical aspects of their usage in reducing the discharge of dental amalgam into waste streams. PMID:15468540

Condrin, Amy Knepshield

2004-07-01

368

[Dental status and treatment needs in a Vizcaya geriatric institutionalized population].  

PubMed

We have studied the Dental State and the Need of treatment in a population of ancients in a institucionalized regime in the province of Vizcaya. From the 565 studied individual, 300 of the were edentulate and the rest still had remanent pieces in their oral cavity. The CAOD in men was 27,86 and 29,50 in women. On average 2,83 (d.e. 1,15) teeth were pasturing but only 0,14 (d.e. 0,01) obturated teeth. Concerning to the general patology, people affected by insanity had the highest CAOD (30,45)., followed by those with Rheumatism (25,51). It existed a high level dental illness without treatment in the studied sample. The needs of treatment for dental decay were not high didn't require a complex treatment. PMID:2064696

Caballero Garcia, J; Rodriguez Baciero, G; Martinez Garcia, M A

1991-01-01

369

An Anthropological Perspective: Another Dimension to Modern Dental Wear Concepts  

PubMed Central

For many years, research on tooth wear by dental academics has been diametrically opposite to that of anthropological research, with each discipline having a different understanding as to the nature of the wear processes. Dental focus revolved around preventive and restorative considerations while the anthropological focus was a biological understanding related to human evolution, diet, environment, form, and function and included all the craniofacial structures. Introducing the anthropological perspective into modern dentistry gives an insight into the “bigger picture” of the nature and extent of tooth wear. By combining anthropological evidence with clinical knowledge and experience, it is most likely to provide the best-informed and biologically based approach to the management of tooth wear in modern societies.

Kaidonis, John A.; Ranjitkar, Sarbin; Lekkas, Dimitra; Townsend, Grant C.

2012-01-01

370

[Oral health and dental care in refugee children].  

PubMed

An epidemiological study was performed on caries, fluorosis and plaque in children of refugees 8, 9 and 10 years of age. Tooth brushing habits and dental attendance were evaluated with a questionnaire. Of the 87 children participating (response rate 89%), 85% showed caries experience, 17% fluorosis and 46% clearly visible plaque. Only 14% of the children had filled teeth. The number of children brushing their teeth two times a day was 42%; 58% ever visited a dentist, mostly because of toothache. Statistically significant differences exist between ethnic categories for caries prevalence, tooth brushing frequency and dental attendance. As oral health in refugee children turned out to be less favourable than in Dutch children, organised activities are recommended to fulfill the observed need of professional curative and preventive oral care. PMID:11680075

Kalsbeek, H; Zijlstra-Remon, N; Filedt Kok-Weimar, T L

2001-10-01

371

Guidelines for nutrition screening, assessment, and intervention in the dental office.  

PubMed

Patients with complicated disease and medication histories are being seen with increasing frequency in the dental office. Many are at high nutritional risk, which can impact their oral health status. Nutrition is an integral part of health promotion and prevention, but it often is a poorly utilized component of preventive dentistry. This article provides the dental hygienist with a systematic approach to determining which patients are in need of nutrition intervention, and discusses screening, assessment, counseling, and referral. Dental hygienists, as part of a multidisciplinary healthcare team, are in an ideal position to identify patients at nutritional and oral health risk, help them attain optimal oral and general health, and improve overall quality of life. PMID:10356541

Boyd, L D; Dwyer, J T

1998-01-01

372

Variations in tobacco control in National Dental PBRN practices: the role of patient and practice factors.  

PubMed

We engaged dental practices enrolled in The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network to quantify tobacco screening (ASK) and advising (ADVISE); and to identify patient and practice -characteristics associated with tobacco control. Dental practices (N = 190) distributed patient surveys that measured ASK and ADVISE. Twenty-nine percent of patients were ASKED about tobacco use during visit, 20% were identified as tobacco users, and 41% reported being ADVISED. Accounting for clustering of patients within practices, younger age and male gender were positively associated with ASK and ADVISE. Adjusting for patient age and gender, a higher proportion of non-whites in the practice, preventive services and proportion on public assistance were positively associated with ASK. Proportion of tobacco users in the practice and offering other preventive services were more strongly associated with ASK and ADVISE than other practice characteristics. Understanding variations in performance is an important step toward designing strategies for improving tobacco control in dentistry. PMID:24164227

Ray, Midge N; Allison, Jeroan J; Coley, Heather L; Williams, Jessica H; Kohler, Connie; Gilbert, Gregg H; Richman, Joshua S; Kiefe, Catarina I; Sadasivam, Rajani S; Houston, Thomas K

2013-01-01

373

Dental ceramics: a current review.  

PubMed

Ceramics are used for many dental applications and are characterized in various ways, including by their hardness, brittleness, thermal and electrical insulation, and biocompatibility. The ceramics most commonly used in dentistry are oxides, particularly silicon dioxide (SiO2), or silica; aluminum oxide (Al2O3), or alumina; and zirconium dioxide (ZrO2), or zirconia. This article reviews the microstructure of current dental ceramic materials and how it relates to their mechanical properties, clinical techniques, and optical properties. Typical ceramics currently in use are described, and their clinically relevant properties such as strength, fracture, polishability, and wear are compared. Cementation methods are also discussed. PMID:24773195

Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O

2014-03-01

374

Mercury toxicity and dental amalgam  

SciTech Connect

There is adequate evidence that dental amalgam restorations, during and after placement, results in the release of Hg into the patients's body. Whether the Hg released from amalgam is due to placement procedures, surface abrasion, or later corrosion breakdown, there is evidence that a low level Hg release continues for years. With new and more accurate techniques of measuring Hg levels, especially in tissue and blood, additional studies are necessary to relate blood-Hg levels with dental amalgam restorations. Studies must relate existing restorations as well as the placement of new restorations to body-Hg levels. It is possible that we have accepted a potentially dangerous material as being safe.

Wolff, M.; Osborne, J.W.; Hanson, A.L.

1982-01-01

375

Dental Stem Cells and their Applications in Dental Tissue Engineering  

PubMed Central

Tooth loss or absence is a common condition that can be caused by various pathological circumstances. The replacement of the missing tooth is important for medical and aesthetic reasons. Recently, scientists focus on tooth tissue engineering, as a potential treatment, beyond the existing prosthetic methods. Tooth engineering is a promising new therapeutic approach that seeks to replace the missing tooth with a bioengineered one or to restore the damaged dental tissue. Its main tool is the stem cells that are seeded on the surface of biomaterials (scaffolds), in order to create a biocomplex. Several populations of mesenchymal stem cells are found in the tooth. These different cell types are categorized according to their location in the tooth and they demonstrate slightly different features. It appears that the dental stem cells isolated from the dental pulp and the periodontal ligament are the most powerful cells for tooth engineering. Additional research needs to be performed in order to address the problem of finding a suitable source of epithelial stem cells, which are important for the regeneration of the enamel. Nevertheless, the results of the existing studies are encouraging and strongly support the belief that tooth engineering can offer hope to people suffering from dental problems or tooth loss.

Lymperi, S; Ligoudistianou, C; Taraslia, V; Kontakiotis, E; Anastasiadou, E

2013-01-01

376

Spatially-oriented EMR for dental surgery.  

PubMed

As digital dental images become widely available, a new Electronic MR system (EMR) will be critical for the success of applying new technology to dental care. This project is designed an image-based and spatially-oriented EMR for dental surgery. A new panoramic image-based annotation model will be developed, which will complement dental charting precisely locating specific spatial findings for each patient. A spatially-oriented, multilayered data model for dental EMR will be developed using Geographic Information System (GIS) methods. This project will explore the possibility of applying head and neck images from VHP into a spatially-oriented EMR system. PMID:17238766

Wu, Min; Koenig, Lisa; Lynch, John; Wirtz, Thomas

2006-01-01

377

VA Dental Insurance Program. Final rule.  

PubMed

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its regulations to establish rules and procedures for the VA Dental Insurance Program (VADIP), a pilot program that offers premium-based dental insurance to enrolled veterans and certain survivors and dependents of veterans. Under the pilot program, VA will contract with a private insurer, through the Federal contracting process, to offer dental insurance to eligible individuals. The private insurer will be responsible for the administration of the dental insurance plan. VA will form the contract and verify the eligibility of individuals who apply for the private dental insurance. PMID:23724428

2013-05-29

378

Health maintenance facility: Dental equipment requirements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objectives were to test the effectiveness of the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) dental suction/particle containment system, which controls fluids and debris generated during simulated dental treatment, in microgravity; to test the effectiveness of fiber optic intraoral lighting systems in microgravity, while simulating dental treatment; and to evaluate the operation and function of off-the-shelf dental handheld instruments, namely a portable dental hand drill and temporary filling material, in microgravity. A description of test procedures, including test set-up, flight equipment, and the data acquisition system, is given.

Young, John; Gosbee, John; Billica, Roger

1991-01-01

379

What's in a dental practice-based research network?  

PubMed Central

Objectives The authors conducted a study to describe the general dentists, practices, patients and patient care patterns of the dental practice-based research network (PBRN) Northwest Practice-based REsearch Collaborative in Evidence-based DENTistry (PRECEDENT). Methods Northwest PRECEDENT is a dental PBRN of general and pediatric dentists and orthodontists from five U.S. states in the Northwest: Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Utah and Washington. The authors collected data from general dentists in Northwest PRECEDENT (n = 101) regarding the diagnosis and treatment of oral diseases in a survey with a systematic random sample of patients (N = 1,943) visiting their practices. They also obtained demographic data from the general dentists and their patients. Results The authors found that 50 percent of the general dentists were 51 to 60 years of age, 14 percent were female and 76 percent were non-Hispanic white. More than one-half (55 percent) of the dentists had practiced dentistry for more than 20 years, 83 percent had private solo practices and 32 percent practiced in rural community settings. The majority (71 percent) of patients visiting the dental practices was in the age range of 18 to 64 years, 55 percent were female and 84 percent were non-Hispanic white. In terms of reasons for seeking dental care, 52 percent of patients overall visited the dentist for oral examinations, checkups, prophylaxis or caries-preventive treatment. In the preceding year, 85 percent of the patients had received prophylaxis, 49 percent restorative treatments, 34 percent caries-preventive treatments and 10 percent endodontic treatments. Conclusions Northwest PRECEDENT general dentists are dispersed geographically and are racially and ethnically diverse, owing in part to efforts by network administrators and coordinators to enroll minority dentists and those who practice in rural areas. Estimates of characteristics of dentists and patients in Northwest PRECEDENT will be valuable in planning future studies of oral diseases and treatments.

Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Hilton, Thomas J.; Ferracane, Jack; Berg, Joel; Zhou, Lingmei; Rothen, Marilynn

2011-01-01

380

Factors for Increasing Adoption of E-Courses Among Dental and Dental Hygiene Faculty Members  

PubMed Central

The incorporation of web-based learning into the dental curriculum has been consistently recommended in the literature on reform in dental education. There has been growing support for web-based learning in dental and dental hygiene education as demonstrated by deans’ identifying this as a planned curricular innovation. The purpose of our study was to explore characteristics of e-courses that may serve to increase adoption among dental and dental hygiene faculty members. Eight ninety-minute focus groups (three dental; five dental hygiene) were conducted with dental (n=27) and dental hygiene (n=23) faculty members from six academic institutions. The resulting data were analyzed to identify two overarching themes and associated subthemes with regard to benefits and barriers influencing adoption of e-courses. A working conceptual framework, based on the Diffusion of Innovations, was developed from these themes to understand the characteristics that may influence the rate of adoption of e-courses among dental and dental hygiene faculty members. Analysis of the data revealed four main adoption barriers: 1) low perceived relative advantage to faculty members; 2) low compatibility with current curriculum; 3) high perceived time commitment; and 4) complexity of e-course development. This exploratory assessment identifies leverage points for facilitating the adoption and sustainability of e-courses in dental and dental hygiene education.

DeBate, Rita D.; Cragun, Deborah; Severson, Herbert H.; Shaw, Tracy; Christiansen, Steve; Koerber, Anne; Tomar, Scott; Brown, Kelli McCormack; Tedesco, Lisa A.; Hendricson, William

2011-01-01

381

Polarization Resolved Near-IR Imaging of Sound and Carious Dental Enamel  

PubMed Central

A thorough understanding of how polarized near-IR light is reflected from and transmitted through sound and carious dental hard tissues is important for the development of optical imaging devices. New optical imaging tools employing non-ionizing radiation are needed for the detection and assessment of dental caries. In this investigation, an automated system was developed to collect images for the full 16-element Mueller Matrix. The polarized light was controlled by linear polarizers and liquid crystal retarders and the 36 images were acquired as the polarized near-IR light is reflected from the occlusal surface or transmitted through thin sections of extracted human whole teeth. Previous near-IR imaging studies suggest that polarization imaging can be exploited to obtain higher contrast images of early dental caries due to the rapid depolarization of incident polarized light by the highly scattering areas of decay. In this study, the reflectance from tooth occlusal surfaces with demineralization and transmitted light through tooth thin sections with caries lesions were investigated. Major differences in the Mueller matrix elements were observed in both sound and demineralized enamel. This study suggests that polarization resolved optical imaging could be exploited to obtain higher contrast images of dental decay.

Darling, Cynthia L.; Chan, Kenneth H.; Fried, Daniel

2011-01-01

382

Noise Exposure Assessment in a Dental School  

PubMed Central

Objectives This cross-sectional study was performed in the Dental School of Prince of Songkla University to ascertain noise exposure of dentists, dental assistants, and laboratory technicians. A noise spectral analysis was taken to illustrate the spectra of dental devices. Methods A noise evaluation was performed to measure the noise level at dental clinics and one dental laboratory from May to December 2010. Noise spectral data of dental devices were taken during dental practices at the dental services clinic and at the dental laboratory. A noise dosimeter was set following the Occupational Safety and Health Administration criteria and then attached to the subjects' collar to record personal noise dose exposure during working periods. Results The peaks of the noise spectrum of dental instruments were at 1,000, 4,000, and 8,000 Hz which depended on the type of instrument. The differences in working areas and job positions had an influence on the level of noise exposure (p < 0.01). Noise measurement in the personal hearing zone found that the laboratory technicians were exposed to the highest impulsive noise levels (137.1 dBC). The dentists and dental assistants who worked at a pedodontic clinic had the highest percent noise dose (4.60 ± 3.59%). In the working areas, the 8-hour time-weighted average of noise levels ranged between 49.7-58.1 dBA while the noisiest working area was the dental laboratory. Conclusion Dental personnel are exposed to noise intensities lower than occupational exposure limits. Therefore, these dental personnel may not experience a noise-induced hearing loss.

Kaimook, Wandee; Tantisarasart, Ratchada; Sooksamear, Puwanai; Chayaphum, Satith; Kongkamol, Chanon; Srisintorn, Wisarut; Phakthongsuk, Pitchaya

2011-01-01

383

Addressing Disparities in Children's Oral Health: A Dental-Medical Partnership to Train Family Practice Residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Providing oral health care to rural populations in the United States is a major challenge. Lack of community water fluoridation, dental workforce shortages, and geographical barriers all aggravate oral health and access problems in the largely rural Northwest. Children from low-income and minority families and children with special needs are at particular risk. Family- centered disease prevention strategies are needed

Wendy E. Mouradian; Douglas C. Schaad; Sara Kim; Penelope J. Leggott; Peter S. Domoto; Russell Maier; Nancy G. Stevens; Mark Koday

384

Osteonecrosis: study of the relationship of dental extractions in patients receiving radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Osteonecrosis is a severe complication of radiotherapy for cancer. Prevention of osteonecrosis is most important, as the condition may be chronic, progressive, and lead to pathologic fracture. The clinical experience, of 627 dental extractions at the Cancer Control Agency of British Columbia either before or after radiotherapy is presented.

Epstein, J.B.; Rea, G.; Wong, F.L.; Spinelli, J.; Stevenson-Moore, P.

1987-09-01

385

Calcium solubility of dental enamel following Er, Cr:YSGG laser irradiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ever since the laser was introduced in dental medicine, there has been a constant discussion about its use in caries prevention. Various studies have already illustrated the possible uses of CO2 and argon lasers in this field of dentistry. The aim of the present study was to examine the Er,Cr:YSGG laser with regard to potential in reducing the acid solubility

Christian Apel; Hans-Georg Graeber; Norbert Gutknecht

2000-01-01

386

Prophylactic dental treatment for a patient with vitamin D-resistant rickets: report of case.  

PubMed

Spontaneous oral dental abscesses in caries-free teeth has been a common sequela in patients with vitamin D-resistant rickets (VDRR). A successful attempt has been made to prevent such abscesses in a 41/2-year-old boy with VDRR by covering susceptible teeth with chrome crowns. PMID:3003172

Breen, G H

1986-01-01

387

Importance of dental problems according to 12- to 16-year old children  

Microsoft Academic Search

The willingness to take preventive action is partly determined by the perceived importance of the disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of age, sex, education, and ethnicity to the importance of dental and other health problems by 12- to 16-year-old children. The children (361 boys, 272 girls) attending Dutch schools were asked a series of

M. H. J. Assink; J. G. C. Verhey; J. Hoogstraten; H. Goedhart

1996-01-01

388

Cytotoxicity of three dentin bonding agents on human dental pulp cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. Dentin bonding agents (DBA) have been widely used in operative restoration to prevent leakage and promote bonding strength in the resin–dentin interface. However, DBA may exert potentially harmful effects to the dental pulp. In the present study, differential cytotoxicity of three DBA (Syntac Sprint, SP; Prime and Bond 2.1, PB; and Single Bond, SB) on the pulp cells was

Ruey-Song Chen; Ching-Cheng Liu; Wan-Yu Tseng; Jiiang-Huei Jeng; Chun-Pin Lin

2003-01-01

389

Factors associated with hematoma of the floor of the mouth after placement of dental implants  

PubMed Central

Purpose The aim of this article is to determine factors associated with hematoma during placement of dental implants in the anterior mandible and to provide the dental practitioner with preventive measures to avoid such a life-threatening complication. Methods All available clinical case studies from (1986 to 2010) published in English or with English abstract were reviewed and analyzed. Results Nineteen studies have been identified and written in the literature. Most of the reported studies were case series and they showed that hematoma is a very rare complication, but general dental practitioners do not pay attention to the significance of the mandible anatomy in the anterior area and the possibility of perforation of the lingual cortex during placement of the dental implants in that position. Conclusions The use of dental CT in planning the implant treatment coupled with accurate determination of implant length in order to provide detailed data about the mandible anatomy are highly recommended to avoid the occurrence of hematoma in the floor of the mouth and the airway obstruction that may lead to death during placement of dental implants in the anterior mandible.

Tarakji, Bassel; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

2011-01-01

390

Impact of dental considerations on the quality of life of oral cancer patients  

PubMed Central

Aim: To evaluate the significance of pre-treatment dental care in oral cancer patients and to assess its impact on the quality of life of these patients. Materials and Methods: The sample size included 50 oral cancer patients who were visiting to a palliative care unit at Jaipur. Assessment was based on thorough case history, complete dental examination. Quality of life was estimated by W.H.O quality of life questionnaire. Result: On analysis, patients of age group 50-59 avoided to prophylactic dental treatment before cancer treatment and therapy. Seventy-eight percent patients experienced worst quality of life after the treatment as a result of dental complications. Out of those 78%, only 2% of patients took preventive dental treatments before the cancer therapy. Conclusion: Dental negligence is still a major cause of worsening of post treatment quality of life of an individual. Therefore, the treating oncologist should always take these considerations seriously to provide quality treatment to the patient.

Thanvi, Jaishree; Bumb, Dipika

2014-01-01

391

Dental Care for Handicapped People.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The prevailing view is that handicapped people--particularly adults not in institutions--have great difficulty in obtaining dental services. It is with this view in mind that the work group attempts, in this report, to make recommendations for actions des...

1980-01-01

392

HIV infection among dental patients.  

PubMed

Oral manifestations may be the important indicators of ongoing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Serum samples were collected from 100 patients repeatedly attending dental outpatients' department of SV Medical College and SVRR Hospital, Tirupati and tested for the presence of HIV antibodies. HIV 1 antibodies were detected in one person, the seropositivity rate being 1%. PMID:10063284

Lakshmi, N; Kumar, A G; Subbarayudu, S; Rao, B S

1998-09-01

393

Denitrification in human dental plaque  

PubMed Central

Background Microbial denitrification is not considered important in human-associated microbial communities. Accordingly, metabolic investigations of the microbial biofilm communities of human dental plaque have focused on aerobic respiration and acid fermentation of carbohydrates, even though it is known that the oral habitat is constantly exposed to nitrate (NO3-) concentrations in the millimolar range and that dental plaque houses bacteria that can reduce this NO3- to nitrite (NO2-). Results We show that dental plaque mediates denitrification of NO3- to nitric oxide (NO), nitrous oxide (N2O), and dinitrogen (N2) using microsensor measurements, 15N isotopic labelling and molecular detection of denitrification genes. In vivo N2O accumulation rates in the mouth depended on the presence of dental plaque and on salivary NO3- concentrations. NO and N2O production by denitrification occurred under aerobic conditions and was regulated by plaque pH. Conclusions Increases of NO concentrations were in the range of effective concentrations for NO signalling to human host cells and, thus, may locally affect blood flow, signalling between nerves and inflammatory processes in the gum. This is specifically significant for the understanding of periodontal diseases, where NO has been shown to play a key role, but where gingival cells are believed to be the only source of NO. More generally, this study establishes denitrification by human-associated microbial communities as a significant metabolic pathway which, due to concurrent NO formation, provides a basis for symbiotic interactions.

2010-01-01

394

Health Instruction Packages: Dental Personnel.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of four learning modules designed to instruct non-professional dental personnel in selected job-related skills. The first module, by Gary E. Hayes, describes how to locate the hinge axis point of the jaw, place and secure a bitefork, and perform a facebow transfer. The second module,…

Hayes, Gary E.; And Others

395

Dental Health for the Handicapped.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Guidelines to aid attendants to maintain good dental health among institutionalized mentally retarded persons are presented. Aspects considered include reasons for taking care of the mouth and means of adapting the oral hygiene program to each individual. Also described are oral hygiene programs now existing in group living settings and methods of…

Alabama Univ., Birmingham. Dental Advisory Committee.

396

Capillary Action Around Dental Structures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The capillary action of saliva occurs in the crevices around and between teeth and around dental restorations. Marginal leakage and denture retention caused by a thin film of saliva are aspects of capillary phenomena. Liquids in capillaries isolated from a reservoir showed an increase in surface tension and lower vapor pressure. The strength of thin films of human saliva was

W. J. OBrien

1973-01-01

397

Cheating Behaviors of Dental Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has always been some degree of cheating in educational institutions. Many students who have difficulty retaining information, or who are just too lazy to work, turn to cheating as an easy way to obtain high marks. The aims of this study were to investigate undergraduate dental students' attitudes about the seriousness of thirteen cheating behaviors and to determine the

Ziad Nawaf Al-Dwairi; E. M. Al-Waheidi

398

Mercury toxicity and dental amalgam  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is adequate evidence that dental amalgam restorations, during and after placement, results in the release of Hg into the patients's body. Whether the Hg released from amalgam is due to placement procedures, surface abrasion, or later corrosion breakdown, there is evidence that a low level Hg release continues for years. With new and more accurate techniques of measuring Hg

M. Wolff; J. W. Osborne; A. L. Hanson

1982-01-01

399

Nanoparticle release from dental composites.  

PubMed

Dental composites typically contain high amounts (up to 60 vol.%) of nanosized filler particles. There is a current concern that dental personnel (and patients) may inhale nanosized dust particles (<100 nm) during abrasive procedures to shape, finish or remove restorations but, so far, whether airborne nanoparticles are released has never been investigated. In this study, composite dust was analyzed in real work conditions. Exposure measurements of dust in a dental clinic revealed high peak concentrations of nanoparticles in the breathing zone of both dentist and patient, especially during aesthetic treatments or treatments of worn teeth with composite build-ups. Further laboratory assessment confirmed that all tested composites released very high concentrations of airborne particles in the nanorange (>10(6)cm(-3)). The median diameter of airborne composite dust varied between 38 and 70 nm. Electron microscopic and energy dispersive X-ray analysis confirmed that the airborne particles originated from the composite, and revealed that the dust particles consisted of filler particles or resin or both. Though composite dust exhibited no significant oxidative reactivity, more toxicological research is needed. To conclude, on manipulation with the bur, dental composites release high concentrations of nanoparticles that may enter deeply into the lungs. PMID:24121193

Van Landuyt, K L; Hellack, B; Van Meerbeek, B; Peumans, M; Hoet, P; Wiemann, M; Kuhlbusch, T A J; Asbach, C

2014-01-01

400

Management Practices in Dental Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Five articles on management practices in dental schools include: "Overview" (Robert W. Comer et al.); "Patient Support Services" (Betsy A. Hagan et al.); "Health and Financial Records" (Robert W. Comer et al.); "Support Services and Staff Responsibilities" (Wayne William Herman et al.) and "Implications and Future Challenges" (Robert W. Comer et…

Journal of Dental Education, 2000

2000-01-01

401

Gold color in dental alloys.  

PubMed

This article will help the dental laboratory with alloy selection by exploring how the relationship among color, ductility and strength applies to gold and how color can be quantified. Because higher quality materials translate into higher profits, upselling to the dentist and patient is also discussed. PMID:9524484

Cameron, T

1997-01-01

402

The relationship between body system-based chronic conditions and dental utilization for Medicaid-enrolled children: a retrospective cohort study  

PubMed Central

Background Dental care is the most common unmet health care need for children with chronic conditions. However, anecdotal evidence suggests that not all children with chronic conditions encounter difficulties accessing dental care. The goals of this study are to evaluate dental care use for Medicaid-enrolled children with chronic conditions and to identify the subgroups of children with chronic conditions that are the least likely to use dental care services. Methods This study focused on children with chronic conditions ages 3-14 enrolled in the Iowa Medicaid Program in 2005 and 2006. The independent variables were whether a child had each of the following 10 body system-based chronic conditions (no/yes): hematologic; cardiovascular; craniofacial; diabetes; endocrine; digestive; ear/nose/throat; respiratory; catastrophic neurological; or musculoskeletal. The primary outcome measure was use of any dental care in 2006. Secondary outcomes, also measured in 2006, were use of diagnostic dental care, preventive dental care, routine restorative dental care, and complex restorative dental care. We used Poisson regression models to estimate the relative risk (RR) associated with each of the five outcome measures across the 10 chronic conditions. Results Across the 10 chronic condition subgroups, unadjusted dental utilization rates ranged from 44.3% (children with catastrophic neurological conditions) to 60.2% (children with musculoskeletal conditions). After adjusting for model covariates, children with catastrophic neurological conditions were significantly less likely to use most types of dental care (RR: 0.48 to 0.73). When there were differences, children with endocrine or craniofacial conditions were less likely to use dental care whereas children with hematologic or digestive conditions were more likely to use dental care. Children with respiratory, musculoskeletal, or ear/nose/throat conditions were more likely to use most types of dental care compared to other children with chronic conditions but without these specific conditions (RR: 1.03 to 1.13; 1.0 to 1.08; 1.02 to 1.12; respectively). There was no difference in use across all types of dental care for children with diabetes or cardiovascular conditions compared to other children with chronic conditions who did not have these particular conditions. Conclusions Dental utilization is not homogeneous across chronic condition subgroups. Nearly 42% of children in our study did not use any dental care in 2006. These findings support the development of multilevel clinical interventions that target subgroups of Medicaid-enrolled children with chronic conditions that are most likely to have problems accessing dental care.

2012-01-01

403

Near-IR Polarization Imaging of Sound and Carious Dental Enamel  

PubMed Central

A thorough understanding of how polarized near-IR light propagates through sound and carious dental hard tissues is important for the development of dental optical imaging systems. New optical imaging tools for the detection and assessment of dental caries (dental decay) such as near-IR imaging and optical coherence tomography can exploit the enhanced contrast provided by polarization sensitivity. In this investigation, an automated system was developed to collect images for the full 16-element Mueller Matrix. The polarized light was controlled by linear polarizers and liquid crystal retarders and the 36 images were acquired as the polarized near-IR light propagates through the enamel of extracted human thin tooth sections. In previous work, we reported that polarized light is rapidly depolarized by demineralized enamel, and sound and demineralized dentin.1 The rapid depolarization of polarized light by dental caries in the near-IR provides high contrast for caries imaging and detection. In this initial study, major differences in the Mueller matrix elements were observed in both sound and demineralized enamel which supports this approach and warrants further investigation.

Darling, Cynthia L.; Jiao, Jane J.; Lee, Chulsung; Kang, Hobin; Fried, Daniel

2011-01-01

404

NATURAL HISTORY OF DENTAL PLAQUE ACCUMULATION IN MECHANICALLY VENTILATED ADULTS: A DESCRIPTIVE CORRELATIONAL STUDY  

PubMed Central

Summary Objective The purpose of this study was to describe the pattern of dental plaque accumulation in mechanically ventilated adults. Accumulation of dental plaque and bacterial colonization of the oropharynx is associated with a number of systemic diseases including ventilator associated pneumonia. Research Methodology/Design Data were collected from mechanically ventilated critically ill adults (n=137), enrolled within 24 hours of intubation. Dental plaque, counts of decayed, missing and filled teeth and systemic antibiotic use was assessed on study days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Dental plaque averages per study day, tooth type and tooth location were analyzed. Setting Medical Respiratory, Surgical Trauma and Neuroscience ICU’s of a large tertiary care center in the southeast United States. Results Plaque: All surfaces > 60% plaque coverage from day 1 to day 7; Molars and Premolars contained greatest plaque average >70%. Systemic antibiotic use on day 1 had no significant effect on plaque accumulation on day 3 (p=0.73). Conclusions Patients arrive in critical care units with preexisting oral hygiene issues. Dental plaque tends to accumulate in the posterior teeth (molars and premolars) that may be hard for nurses to visualize and reach; this problem may be exacerbated by endotracheal tubes and other equipment. Knowing accumulation trends of plaque will guide the development of effective oral care protocols.

Jones, Deborah J.; Munro, Cindy L.; Grap, Mary Jo

2011-01-01

405

Radioactive Decay of Candium  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this simulation, learners use M&M⢠candy to explore radioactive isotope decay. Learners pour out a bag of candy and count and record the number of candy pieces that have "decayed" or show the print side up. Learners get to consume the "decayed atoms." Then, they will shake the bag again and recount the decay. Learners will continue shaking, counting and consuming until all the atoms have decayed, and then graph the results. This activity is a great introduction to half-life and nuclear decay.

House, The S.

2014-01-28

406

Fluoride and Dental Health  

PubMed Central

Studies conducted under the widest variety of controlled conditions attest to the safety, efficacy, and cost benefits of fluoridation. A program that combines the use of systemic and topical fluoride results in maximum benefits. The author of this article reviews the metabolism of fluoride and its mechanism of action, and discusses practical modes of employing fluoride in caries prevention with special emphasis on the use of fluoride supplements for infants and young children in areas of non-fluoridated water. The author also discusses the factors responsible for the dramatic decline in caries prevalence in the industrialized nations.

Nikiforuk, Gordon

1988-01-01

407

Psychometric properties of Spanish-language adult dental fear measures  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: It would be useful to have psychometrically-sound measures of dental fear for Hispanics, who comprise the largest ethnic minority in the United States. We report on the psychometric properties of Spanish-language versions of two common adult measures of dental fear (Modified Dental Anxiety Scale, MDAS; Dental Fear Survey, DFS), as well as a measure of fear of dental injections

Trilby Coolidge; Mark A Chambers; Laura J Garcia; Lisa J Heaton; Susan E Coldwell

2008-01-01

408

An Overview of Dental Radiology. NCHCT Monograph Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This overview of dental radiology contains sections on demographics, equipment, dental radiology quality assurance, efficacy, dental radiology education curricula, professional organizations' guidelines for training and use, and state activities. In section 1 dental personnel, population of dental personnel, employment and earning prospects,…

Manny, Edward F.; And Others

409

Creating a Successful School-Based Mobile Dental Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Dental disease is one of the leading causes of school absenteeism for children. This article describes the creation and evolution of the St. David's Dental Program, a mobile school-based dental program for children. Methods: The dental program is a collaboration of community partners in Central Texas that provides free dental care to…

Jackson, David M.; Jahnke, Lauren R.; Kerber, Lisa; Nyer, Genie; Siemens, Kammi; Clark, Carol

2007-01-01

410

Preventing Suicide  

MedlinePLUS

... for self-inflicted injuries. September 10th is World Suicide Prevention Day. Help prevent suicide in your community. Suicide ( ... is having thoughts of suicide, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (1-800- ...

411

Readability of pediatric health materials for preventive dental care  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: This study examined the content and general readability of pediatric oral health education materials for parents of young children. METHODS: Twenty-seven pediatric oral health pamphlets or brochures from commercial, government, industry, and private nonprofit sources were analyzed for general readability (\\

Rachel L Hendrickson; Colleen E Huebner; Christine A Riedy

2006-01-01

412

Enzymatic Prevention and Control of Dental Plaque Formation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The solubilization of human plaque and materia alba was measured in vitro using 78 different enzyme preparations from 22 different companies or investigators. Enzymes were normally incubated at 17 micrograms/ml with about 700 micrograms/ml of brushings (d...

D. L. Williams S. Turesky J. H. Kerrigan

1979-01-01

413

[Contribution to the study of dental caries in 0-30-month-old infants].  

PubMed

This study evaluated the oral health conditions of 340 children, aged 0-30 months (21.3 +/- 5.6)--54.4% of girls and 45.6% of boys--from 20 public day nurseries of Salvador (Brazil), as to the presence of incipient carious lesions. The exam was carried out by a single examiner, who utilized a mirror, a probe and a penlight. The teeth were wiped with gauzes in order to remove the dental plaque. A questionnaire was answered by the children's parents or caretakers in order to assess information regarding knowledge on caries, caries risk factors, socioeconomic status of the family and utilization of fluoride. Two hundred and twenty-nine answered questionnaires (67.35%) were obtained. The observed lesions were classified in five stages, according to their severity (C0-C4; active/inactive). The data were analyzed using the Epi-info 6.02. The prevalence of caries was 55.3% when all stages were registered: 25% for subjects aged 0-12 months, 51.18% for subjects aged 13-24 months and 71.03% for those aged 25-30 months (chi 2 = 25.31, p < 0.01). When only active white spots were considered, 49.7% of the children were affected; 17.6% of the children presented with cavitated lesions. Among the affected children, 90.96% had lesions only on anterior teeth: 80% of the lesions were white spots and 20%, cavities. No significant difference was observed between genders. The increased amount of biofilm was positively associated with dental decay in toddlers (chi 2 = 67.61, p < 0.01), and the number of affected children increased when the sleep-time nursing habit was present (chi 2 = 0.24, p = 0.62). The prevalence of lesions increased with age and with the number of erupted teeth (chi 2 = 25.31, p < 0.01; chi 2 = 122.95, p < 0.01). Early oral health attention, diagnosis of incipient lesions, as well as educative and preventive programs to change oral hygiene and dietary habits are suggested. PMID:11705269

de Barros, S G; Alves, A C; Pugliese, L S; Reis, S R

2001-01-01

414

Evidence for the decay  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evidence is presented for the decay using proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1, collected with the LHCb detector. A signal yield of 32 ± 8 decays is found with a significance of 4.5 standard deviations. The ratio of the branching fraction of the decay to that of the decay is measured to be where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Gomez, M. Calvo; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Caponio, F.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Suárez, A. Dosil; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Esen, S.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Albor, V. Fernandez; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Torreira, A. Gallas; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Gándara, M. Grabalosa; Diaz, R. Graciani; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Hafkenscheid, T. W.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Morata, J. A. Hernando; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jezabek, M.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.

2014-05-01

415

A Community-based Randomized Trial of Postcard Mailings to Increase Dental Utilization Among Low-income Children  

PubMed Central

Purpose Increasing awareness about the importance of preventive dental care among low-income families has been considered to be key to overcoming nonfinancial access to care barriers for children. The purpose of this randomized, controlled trial was to measure the impact of postcard mailings on dental utilization by low-income children through a dental society program designed to increase access to dental care. Methods Five thousand eight hundred and seven low-income 2- to 4-year-olds were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: (1) Group 1 (N=2,014) received postcards containing information on how to enroll in the Yakima County Access to Baby and Child Dentistry program; (2) Group 2 (N=2,014) received the enrollment information as well as additional information on the availability of fluoride varnish and the need to visit the dentist by the age of 1-year-old; and (3) Group 3 (N=1,779) did not receive postcards. Results Preventive services utilization rates were not different among the groups: 61% for Group 1, 62% for Group 2, and 60% for Group 3, although rates were high for a Medicaid population. Conclusions Postcard mailings did not significantly increase utilization of preventive dental services. Other strategies to increase utilization of preventive oral health measures are needed.

Cruz, Asia Dela; Mueller, Gregory; Milgrom, Peter; Coldwell, Susan E.

2013-01-01

416

Mycological contamination in dental unit waterlines in Istanbul, Turkey.  

PubMed

Studies on dental units (DUs) are conducted either for the prevention or the reduction of the density of bacterial contamination in dental unit waterlines (DUWLs). However, the existence of fungi in the these systems requires more attention. During dental treatment, direct contact with water contaminated with fungi such as Candida, Aspergillus, or inhalation of aerosols from high-speed drill may cause various respiratory infections, such as asthma, allergies, and wounds on mucose membranes, especially on immunocompromised patients and dentists. The aims of this study are to investigate the number and colonization of fungi in DUWLs in the city of Istanbul, Turkey. Water samples were collected from air-water syringes, high-speed drills, and inlet waters from 41 DUs. The aerobic mesophilic fungi count in high- speed drills was higher than inlet waters and air-water syringes. Non-sporulating fungi were found in 7 DUs. The isolated fungi were identified as Penicillium waksmanii, Cladosporium spp., Penicillium spp., Candida famata, Cryptococcus laurentii, Candida guilliermondii, Penicillium verrucosum, Aspergillus pseudoglaucus, Penicillium decumbens, and Acremonium sp. Some of these fungal genera are known as opportunistic pathogens that led to respiratory diseases such as allergic rhinits. This study shows the importance of regular control of mycological contamination on water at DUs. PMID:24516467

Kadaifciler, Duygu Göksay; Ökten, Suzan; Sen, Burhan

2013-01-01

417

Observation of B ? ?? decays  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have found the first evidence for the Cabibbo suppressed, color suppressed decay B? ? ??? in a data sample of 4 million B decays obtained by the CLEO detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR). The branching ratio is found to be (4.3±2.3)% of the Cabibbo allowed B? ? ?K? decay mode, which is consistent with theoretical expectations.

J. P. Alexander; C. Bebek; K. Berkelman; T. E. Browder; D. G. Cassel; H. A. Cho; D. M. Coffman; D. S. Crowcroft; P. S. Drell; D. Dumas; R. Ehrlich; P. Gaidarev; M. Garcia-Sciveres; B. Geiser; B. Gittelman; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; S. Henderson; C. D. Jones; S. L. Jones; J. Kandaswamy; N. Katayama; P. C. Kim; D. L. Kreinick; G. S. Ludwig; J. Masui; J. Mevissen; N. B. Mistry; C. R. Ng; E. Nordberg; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; D. Riley; S. Salman; M. Sapper; F. Würthwein; P. Avery; A. Freyberger; J. Rodriguez; S. Yang; J. Yelton; D. Cinabro; T. Liu; M. Saulnier; R. Wilson; H. Yamamoto; T. Bergfeld; B. I. Eisenstein; G. Gollin; B. Ong; M. Palmer; M. Selen; J. J. Thaler; K. W. Edwards; M. Ogg; A. Bellerive; D. I. Britton; E. R. F. Hyatt; D. B. MacFarlane; P. M. Patel; B. Spaan; A. J. Sadoff; R. Ammar; P. Baringer; A. Bean; D. Besson; D. Coppage; N. Copty; R. Davis; N. Hancock; M. Kelly; S. Kotov; I. Kravchenko; N. Kwak; H. Lam; Y. Kubota; M. Lattery; M. Momayezi; J. K. Nelson; S. Patton; R. Poling; V. Savinov; S. Schrenk; R. Wang; M. S. Alam; I. J. Kim; Z. Ling; A. H. Mahmood; J. J. O'Neill; H. Severini; C. R. Sun; F. Wappler; G. Crawford; C. M. Daubenmier; R. Fulton; D. Fujino; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. Lee; R. Malchow; Y. Skovpen; M. Sung; C. White; M. M. Zoeller; F. Butler; X. Fu; B. Nemati; W. R. Ross; P. Skubic; M. Wood; M. Bishai; J. Fast; E. Gerndt; R. L. McIlwain; T. Miao; D. H. Miller; M. Modesitt; D. Payne; E. I. Shibata; I. P. J. Shipsey; P. N. Wang; M. Battle; J. Ernst; L. Gibbons; Y. Kwon; S. Roberts; E. H. Thorndike; C. H. Wang; J. Dominick; M. Lambrecht; S. Sanghera; V. Shelkov; T. Skwarnicki; R. Stroynowski; I. Volobouev; G. Wei; P. Zadorozhny; M. Artuso; M. Gao; M. Goldberg; D. He; N. Horwitz; G. C. Moneti; F. Muheim; Y. Mukhin; S. Playfer; Y. Rozen; S. Stone; X. Xing; G. Zhu; J. Bartelt; S. E. Csorna; Z. Egyed; V. Jain; D. Gibaut; K. Kinoshita; P. Pomianowski; B. Barish; M. Chadha; S. Chan; D. F. Cowen; G. Eigen; J. S. Miller; C. O'Grady; J. Urheim; A. J. Weinstein; M. Athanas; W. Brower; G. Masek; H. P. Paar; J. Gronberg; R. Kutschke; S. Menary; R. J. Morrison; S. Nakanishi; H. N. Nelson; T. K. Nelson; C. Qiao; J. D. Richman; A. Ryd; H. Tajima; D. Sperka; M. S. Witherell; R. Balest; K. Cho; W. T. Ford; D. R. Johnson; K. Lingel; M. Lohner; P. Rankin; J. G. Smith

1995-01-01

418

An inquiry into the decay of teeth.  

PubMed Central

John Hunter's observations on dental caries are described and various early speculative theories of its nature and causation are mentioned. With the demonstration in the late 19th century of the chemicoparasitic nature of the late 19th century of the chemicoparasitic nature of the disease attention focused on dietary methods of prevention. An account is given of research carried out at the Royal College of Surgeons in the past 25 years, with particular reference to efforts to develop a means of immunisation against Streptococcus mutans. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 6

Cohen, B.

1982-01-01

419

Cardiac risk factors for dental procedures: knowledge among dental practitioners in Wales  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives To determine knowledge and educational needs of dental practitioners in Wales regarding congenital or acquired cardiac disease and the provision of antibiotic prophylaxis.Design Self-administered postal questionnaire.Settings Cardiff University Dental Hospital, district general hospitals (HDS), all general dental practices (GDP) and community dental service (CDS) clinics throughout Wales.Methods A questionnaire sent to 1,182 dentists in Wales in 2004-5.Results 528 questionnaires

J. Davies; M. Allen; M. L. Hunter; S. J. Oliver; S. T. Bryant; O. Uzun; S. A. Thompson

2007-01-01

420

38 CFR 17.165 - Emergency outpatient dental treatment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...eligibility for outpatient dental care, the treatment will...or the remediation of a dental condition which is determined to be endangering life or health. The provision...persons found ineligible for dental care will not entitle...

2009-07-01

421

38 CFR 17.165 - Emergency outpatient dental treatment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...eligibility for outpatient dental care, the treatment will...or the remediation of a dental condition which is determined to be endangering life or health. The provision...persons found ineligible for dental care will not entitle...

2010-07-01

422

Dental Care for a Child with Cleft Lip and Palate  

MedlinePLUS

... procedures may be completed during the same anesthesia. Restorations or dental extractions can be scheduled at the ... to remove damaged, malformed, or malpositioned teeth. Dental Restoration – dental procedures performed to repair or correct damaged, ...

423

Hemodynamic and Plasma Catecholamine Responses to Routine Restorative Dental Care.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Dental anxiety and stress are experienced by many persons. Despite this major health problem, little study has been done to measure the body's physiologic response to routine dental procedures. The administration of epinephrine-containing local dental ane...

G. A. Cioffi B. Chernow R. P. Glahn G. T. Terezhalmy C. R. Lake

1985-01-01

424

21 CFR 872.4535 - Dental diamond instrument.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental diamond instrument. 872.4535 Section 872...Surgical Devices § 872.4535 Dental diamond instrument. (a) Identification. A dental diamond instrument is an abrasive device...

2010-04-01

425

21 CFR 872.4535 - Dental diamond instrument.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-04-01 2009-04-01 false Dental diamond instrument. 872.4535 Section 872...Surgical Devices § 872.4535 Dental diamond instrument. (a) Identification. A dental diamond instrument is an abrasive device...

2009-04-01

426

21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3640 Endosseous dental implant. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy, that is intended to be surgically...

2010-04-01

427

21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which...silver alloy is intended to be mixed with mercury to form dental amalgam. (b) Classification....

2010-04-01

428

21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which...silver alloy is intended to be mixed with mercury to form dental amalgam. (b) Classification....

2009-04-01

429

21 CFR 872.4130 - Intraoral dental drill.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Identification. An intraoral dental drill is a rotary device intended to be attached to a dental handpiece to drill holes in teeth to secure cast or preformed pins to retain operative dental appliances. (b)...

2009-04-01

430

21 CFR 872.4130 - Intraoral dental drill.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Identification. An intraoral dental drill is a rotary device intended to be attached to a dental handpiece to drill holes in teeth to secure cast or preformed pins to retain operative dental appliances. (b)...

2010-04-01

431

Dental care for patients who are unable to open their mouths.  

PubMed

There are a number of diseases and conditions that prevent the sufferer from adequately opening the mouth. The danger of inanition, malnutrition, chronic periodontal disease, caries, and abscessed teeth are very real to this population. Dental treatment issues include inadequate access to the oral cavity, inability to locally anesthetize mandibular posterior teeth, inability to gain access for traditional operative dentistry, and lack of clearance for most oral surgery procedures. The purpose of this article is to provide the reader with a discussion of the various conditions and then discuss the dental and anesthesia issues for this unique population. PMID:19269400

Nussbaum, Burton L

2009-04-01

432

Drug therapy for the pregnant dental patient.  

PubMed

Providing needed dental treatment, managing oral infection, and controlling pain are essential functions of dentists for helping patients maintain overall health during pregnancy. Medications commonly required for dental care consist of local anesthetics and associated vasoconstrictors, centrally and peripherally acting analgesics, sedative and anxiolytic agents, and antibiotics. Therapeutic drugs routinely used in dental practice are selected because of their known safety and effectiveness. However, for a pregnant patient requiring dental care, the agents routinely prescribed should be reevaluated for potential risks to the mother and/or fetus. The decision to administer a specific drug requires that the benefits outweigh the potential risks of the drug therapy. This article reviews and updates the recommendations for using dental therapeutic agents, thereby enabling general practitioners to select the safest drugs when treating pregnant dental patients. PMID:22953600

Mendia, Jonathan; Cuddy, Michael A; Moore, Paul A

2012-09-01

433

Optical detection dental disease using polarized light  

DOEpatents

A polarization sensitive optical imaging system is used to detect changes in polarization in dental tissues to aid the diagnosis of dental disease such as caries. The degree of depolarization is measured by illuminating the dental tissue with polarized light and measuring the polarization state of the backscattered light. The polarization state of this reflected light is analyzed using optical polarimetric imaging techniques. A hand-held fiber optic dental probe is used in vivo to direct the incident beam to the dental tissue and collect the reflected light. To provide depth-resolved characterization of the dental tissue, the polarization diagnostics may be incorporated into optical coherence domain reflectometry and optical coherence tomography (OCDR/OCT) systems, which enables identification of subsurface depolarization sites associated with demineralization of enamel or bone.

Everett, Matthew J. (Livermore, CA); Colston, Jr., Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Sathyam, Ujwal S. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Fried, Daniel (San Francisco, CA)

2003-01-01

434

DISR: Dental Image Segmentation and Retrieval.  

PubMed

In this paper, we propose novel algorithms for retrieving dental images from databases by their contents. Based on special information of dental images, for better content-based dental image retrieval and representation, the image attributes are used. We propose Dental Image Segmentation and Retrieval (DISR), a content-based image retrieval method that is robust to translation and scaling of the objects in the images. A novel model is used to calculate the features of the image. We implemented the dentition plaster casts and proposed a special technique for segmenting teeth in our dental study models. For testing the efficiency of the presented algorithm, a software system is developed and 60 dental study models are used. The models are covering different kinds of malocclusions. Our experiments show that 95% of the extracted results are accurate and the presented algorithm is efficient. PMID:23492867

Pilevar, Abdol Hamid

2012-01-01

435

The management of risk. Part 1: Why complaints happen and how to prevent them.  

PubMed

There is increasing concern amongst dentists, and dental care professionals (DCPs), about the risks associated with complaints from patients and the possibility of escalation to legal action or referral to the General Dental Council (GDC). This is the first of a series of four articles considering the management of risk. It will describe why complaints happen, how to identify problems at an early stage and strategies for preventing complaints occurring. Clinical Relevance: The prevention of complaints will reduce stress and anxiety for all members of the dental team. PMID:24783886

Collier, Andrew

2014-03-01

436

Evaluation of Senior Dental Students' General Attitude towards the Use of Rubber Dam: A Survey among Two Dental Schools  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the general attitude of senior dental students towards rubber dam use, specifically focusing on endodontic practices prior to starting to serve community. Questionnaires were distributed to senior year students of a private school and a state school in Istanbul. Questions were asked about areas where the students used rubber dam, its advantages and difficulties, and whether they agreed or disagreed with some aspects of the rubber dam. The private school students rated isolation whereas those of the state school selected prevention of aspiration which the top advantage rubber dam provides. Students of the state school agreed with the opinion that isolation cannot be achieved without rubber dam and it extended the procedure with a significantly higher ratio compared to the private school. Within the limitations of the present study, it can be concluded that the perceptions of dental students on rubber dam needs to be improved and strategies should be developed so that this valuable adjunct will comprise one of the indispensable elements of dental care.

Tanalp, Jale; Kayatas, Muzeyyen; Baser Can, Elif Delve; Kayahan, Mehmet Baybora; Timur, Tugce

2014-01-01

437

Neuropathic pain after dental treatment.  

PubMed

The head and neck regions are the most common sites of the human body to be involved in chronic pain conditions. Neuropathic pain is a chronic pain condition, and refers to all pain initiated or caused by a primary lesion or dysfunction or transitory perturbation in the peripheral or central nervous system (CNS). Trigeminal neuralgia, atypical odontalgia (phantom tooth pain), burning mouth syndrome, traumatic neuropathies, postherpetic neuralgias and complex regional pain syndrome are neuropathic pain conditions in the orofacial region that can be encountered in pain and dental clinics. The majority of the time this problem is misdiagnosed by the dentist, which can lead to unnecessary treatments. These treatments may include endodontic treatment and extraction of the tooth or teeth in the region. In this review, only post-traumatic peripheral pain neuropathies seen after dental treatments will be discussed. PMID:23588863

T?nastepe, Neslihan; Oral, Koray

2013-01-01

438

Dental archives based on images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes the Orthoscope, an equipment for acquisition, processing, and archiving of images of patients mouth or skin. The equipment can capture and process images of single tooth, group of teeth or the whole dental arc. A dentist can easily observe the situation in mouth, demonstrate intended plan of treatment to patient and document its results. A dermatologist can evaluate treatment progress. Unlike other methods, our device shows geometrically undistorted calibrated image.The presented equipment is intended for daily practice. The image processing module is connected to an insurance office system and medical archives. This eliminates time consuming literal description of the patient dental/dermatological status. The images can be used later checking of the diagnosis and treatment.

Dostalova, Tatjana; Smutny, Vladimir

1997-05-01

439

Dental radiographic changes in chronic renal disease.  

PubMed

The clinical and radiological aspects of the consecutive effect of renal osteodystrophy on dental and alveolar were discussed in 42 patients under the hemodialytic treatment with 252 dental and 84 panoramic radiographs used in order to verify the diagnosis. It has been established that the duration with the increase of periodontal indices as well as with the loss of lamine dure, deviations within the trabecular pattern and an increase of pseudocystic formations as well as the calcifications in dental pulp. PMID:10934