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Sample records for preventing stroke recurrence

  1. Antiplatelet therapy to prevent recurrent stroke: Three good options.

    PubMed

    Mansoor, Atizazul H; Mujtaba, Mohammad T; Silver, Brian

    2013-12-01

    Drugs that prevent platelets from sticking together-ie, aspirin, dipyridamole, and clopidogrel-are an important part of therapy to prevent recurrence of ischemic stroke of atherosclerotic origin. We discuss current indications for these drugs and review the evidence behind our current use of aspirin, dipyridamole, and clopidogrel. PMID:24307163

  2. Effects of a Web-Based Stroke Education Program on Recurrence Prevention Behaviors among Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jae-Il; Lee, Sook; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of methods to prevent stroke recurrence and of education focusing on learners' needs has not been fully explored. The aims of this study were to assess the effects of such interventions among stroke patients and their primary caregivers and to evaluate the feasibility of a web-based stroke education program. The participants were…

  3. Telmisartan to Prevent Recurrent Stroke and Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Yusuf, Salim; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Sacco, Ralph L.; Cotton, Daniel; Ôunpuu, Stephanie; Lawton, William A.; Palesch, Yuko; Martin, Reneé H.; Albers, Gregory W.; Bath, Philip; Bornstein, Natan; Chan, Bernard P.L.; Chen, Sien-Tsong; Cunha, Luis; Dahlöf, Björn; De Keyser, Jacques; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Estol, Conrado; Gorelick, Philip; Gu, Vivian; Hermansson, Karin; Hilbrich, Lutz; Kaste, Markku; Lu, Chuanzhen; Machnig, Thomas; Pais, Prem; Roberts, Robin; Skvortsova, Veronika; Teal, Philip; Toni, Danilo; VanderMaelen, Cam; Voigt, Thor; Weber, Michael; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prolonged lowering of blood pressure after a stroke reduces the risk of recurrent stroke. In addition, inhibition of the renin–angiotensin system in high-risk patients reduces the rate of subsequent cardiovascular events, including stroke. However, the effect of lowering of blood pressure with a renin–angiotensin system inhibitor soon after a stroke has not been clearly established. We evaluated the effects of therapy with an angiotensin-receptor blocker, telmisartan, initiated early after a stroke. METHODS In a multicenter trial involving 20,332 patients who recently had an ischemic stroke, we randomly assigned 10,146 to receive telmisartan (80 mg daily) and 10,186 to receive placebo. The primary outcome was recurrent stroke. Secondary outcomes were major cardiovascular events (death from cardiovascular causes, recurrent stroke, myocardial infarction, or new or worsening heart failure) and new-onset diabetes. RESULTS The median interval from stroke to randomization was 15 days. During a mean followup of 2.5 years, the mean blood pressure was 3.8/2.0 mm Hg lower in the telmisartan group than in the placebo group. A total of 880 patients (8.7%) in the telmisartan group and 934 patients (9.2%) in the placebo group had a subsequent stroke (hazard ratio in the telmisartan group, 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86 to 1.04; P = 0.23). Major cardiovascular events occurred in 1367 patients (13.5%) in the telmisartan group and 1463 patients (14.4%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.87 to 1.01; P = 0.11). New-onset diabetes occurred in 1.7% of the telmisartan group and 2.1% of the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.65 to 1.04; P = 0.10). CONCLUSIONS Therapy with telmisartan initiated soon after an ischemic stroke and continued for 2.5 years did not significantly lower the rate of recurrent stroke, major cardiovascular events, or diabetes. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00153062.) PMID:18753639

  4. A program to improve secondary stroke prevention: the Colorado Neurological Institute stroke preventing recurrence of thromboembolic events through coordinated treatment program.

    PubMed

    Menard, Michelle M; Smith, Don B; Taormina, Cristina

    2011-08-01

    The key to secondary stroke prevention often lies in improved control of traditional stroke risk factors. Studies have shown that there is an evidence-practice gap, for both physicians and patients, when it comes to adhering to national stroke prevention guidelines. We developed a program to reinforce stroke prevention messages for 1 year after a patient's ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. Our results show encouraging improvement in our patients' adherence to treatment guidelines for 1 year after the event, as well as a reduction in recurrent strokes as compared with the number expected. PMID:21796042

  5. Preventing stroke

    MedlinePlus

    Stroke - prevention; CVA - prevention; cerebral vascular accident - prevention; TIA - prevention, transient ischemic attack - prevention ... Clinical Cardiology; Council on Functional Genomics and ... Council on Hypertension. Guidelines for the primary prevention ...

  6. Design of the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chimowitz, Marc I.; Lynn, Michael J.; Turan, Tanya N.; Fiorella, David; Lane, Bethany F.; Janis, Scott; Derdeyn, Colin P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with recent transient ischemic attack or stroke caused by 70–99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery are at high risk of recurrent stroke on usual medical management, suggesting the need for alternative therapies for this disease. Methods The Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent stroke in Intracranial Stenosis trial is an ongoing, randomized, multicenter, two-arm trial that will determine whether intracranial angioplasty and stenting adds benefit to aggressive medical management alone for preventing the primary endpoint (any stroke or death within 30 days after enrollment or after any revascularization procedure of the qualifying lesion during follow-up, or stroke in the territory of the symptomatic intracranial artery beyond 30 days) during a mean follow-up of 2 years in patients with recent TIA or stroke caused by 70–99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery. Aggressive medical management in both arms consists of aspirin 325 mg per day, clopidogrel 75mg per day for 90 days after enrollment, intensive risk factor management primarily targeting systolic blood pressure < 140 mm Hg (< 130 mm Hg in diabetics) and low density cholesterol < 70 mg / dl, and a lifetsyle modification program. The sample size required todetect a 35% reduction in the rate of the primary endpoint from angioplasty and stenting based on the log-rank test with an alpha of 0.05, 80% power, and adjusting for a 2% loss to follow-up and 5% crossover from the medical to the stenting arm is 382 patients per group. Conclusion This is the first randomized trial to compare intracranial angioplasty and stenting with medical therapy and to incorporate intensive management of multiple risk factors and a lifestyle modification program in the study design. Hopefully, the results of the trial will lead to more effective therapy for this high-risk disease. PMID:21729789

  7. Peer education for secondary stroke prevention in inner-city minorities: Design and methods of the Prevent Recurrence of All Inner-city Strokes through Education randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Goldfinger, Judith Z.; Kronish, Ian M.; Fei, Kezhen; Graciani, Albert; Rosenfeld, Peri; Lorig, Kate; Horowitz, Carol R.

    2012-01-01

    Background The highest risk for stroke is among survivors of strokes or transient ischemic attacks (TIA). However, use of proven-effective cardiovascular medications to control stroke risk is suboptimal, particularly among the Black and Latino populations disproportionately impacted by stroke. Methods A partnership of Harlem and Bronx community representatives, stroke survivors, researchers, clinicians, outreach workers and patient educators used community-based participatory research to conceive and develop the Prevent Recurrence of All Inner-city Strokes through Education (PRAISE) trial. Using data from focus groups with stroke survivors, they tailored a peer-led, community-based chronic disease self-management program to address stroke risk factors. PRAISE will test, in a randomized controlled trial, whether this stroke education intervention improves blood pressure control and a composite outcome of blood pressure control, lipid control, and use of antithrombotic medications. Results Of the 582 survivors of stroke and TIA enrolled thus far, 81% are Black or Latino and 56% have an annual income less than $15,000. Many (33%) do not have blood pressures in the target range, and most (66%) do not have control of all three major stroke risk factors. Conclusions Rates of stroke recurrence risk factors remain suboptimal in the high risk, urban, predominantly minority communities studied. With a community-partnered approach, PRAISE has recruited a large number of stroke and TIA survivors to date, and may prove successful in engaging those at highest risk for stroke and reducing disparities in stroke outcomes in inner-city communities. PMID:22710563

  8. Preventing stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partially-hydrogenated or hydrogenated fats Medical problems may lead to stroke Control your cholesterol and diabetes with ... increase the chance of blood clots, which can lead to stroke. Clots are more likely in women ...

  9. Rationale, design, and baseline features of a randomized controlled trial to assess the effects of statin for the secondary prevention of stroke: the Japan Statin Treatment Against Recurrent Stroke (J-STARS)

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Yoji; Kohriyama, Tatsuo; Origasa, Hideki; Minematsu, Kazuo; Yokota, Chiaki; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Ibayashi, Setsuro; Terayama, Yasuo; Takagi, Makoto; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Nomura, Eiichi; Hosomi, Naohisa; Ohtsuki, Toshiho; Yamawaki, Takemori; Matsubara, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Masakazu; Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu; Mori, Etsuro; Fukushima, Masanori; Kobayashi, Shotai; Shinohara, Yukito; Yamaguchi, Takenori; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2014-01-01

    Background Although statin therapy is beneficial for preventing first strokes, the benefit for recurrent stroke and its sub-types remains unknown in Asian populations. The aim of this study is to examine the role of pravastatin in the secondary prevention of stroke in Japanese patients. Methods This is a multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel group study of patients with noncardioembolic ischemic stroke (atherothrombotic infarction, lacunar infarction, and infarction of undetermined etiology). All patients were diagnosed with hyperlipidemia and with a total cholesterol level between 180 and 240 mg/dl at enrollment. Patients in the treatment group receive 10 mg/day of pravastatin, and those in the control group receive no statin treatment. The primary end-point is the recurrence of stroke, including transient ischemic attack. The secondary end-points include the onset of respective stroke sub-types and functional outcomes related to stroke. The patients were enrolled for five-years and will be followed up for five-years. Results A total of 1578 eligible patients (age: 66·2 years, men: 68·8%), including 64·2% with lacunar infarction, 25·4% with atherothrombotic infarction, and 10·4% with infarction of undetermined etiology were included in this study. Lipid levels were generally well controlled (total cholesterol: 210·0 mg/dl, low density lipoprotein cholesterol: 129·5 mg/dl) at baseline. In addition, the disability of patients was relatively mild, and cognitive function was preserved in the majority of patients. Conclusion This article reports the rationale, design, and baseline features of a randomized controlled trial to assess the effects of statin for the secondary prevention of stroke. Follow-ups of patients are in progress and will end in 2014. PMID:24015915

  10. Recurrent stroke: what have we learnt?

    PubMed

    Rabia, K; Khoo, Em

    2007-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death, a major cause of disability in adults, and is frequently more disabling than fatal. With a decline in mortality from initial cerebral infarction and an increase in the life expectancy of the population, the number of patients with recurrent stroke and ensuing cardiovascular events will become greater. Thus it is important to find out those patients at high risk of stroke recurrence. This case report illustrates the process of recurrent stroke and the resulting disabilities and morbidities in a 42-year- old man. The role of integrated stroke rehabilitation programme is described. PMID:25606084

  11. [Secondary prevention of ischemic non cardioembolic stroke].

    PubMed

    Armario, Pedro; Pinto, Xavier; Soler, Cristina; Cardona, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Stroke patients are at high risk for recurrence or new occurrence of other cardiovascular events or cardiovascular mortality. It is estimated that a high percentage of non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke can be prevented by a suitable modification of lifestyle (diet and exercise), reducing blood pressure (BP) with antihypertensive medication, platelet aggregation inhibitors, statins and high intake reducing consumption of. Unfortunately the degree of control of the different risk factors in secondary prevention of stroke is low. The clinical practice guidelines show clear recommendations with corresponding levels of evidence, but only if implemented in a general way they will get a better primary and secondary stroke prevention. PMID:25771074

  12. Stroke Prevention: Managing Modifiable Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Di Legge, Silvia; Koch, Giacomo; Diomedi, Marina; Stanzione, Paolo; Sallustio, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Prevention plays a crucial role in counteracting morbidity and mortality related to ischemic stroke. It has been estimated that 50% of stroke are preventable through control of modifiable risk factors and lifestyle changes. Antihypertensive treatment is recommended for both prevention of recurrent stroke and other vascular events. The use of antiplatelets and statins has been shown to reduce the risk of recurrent stroke and other vascular events. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) are indicated in stroke prevention because they also promote vascular health. Effective secondary-prevention strategies for selected patients include carotid revascularization for high-grade carotid stenosis and vitamin K antagonist treatment for atrial fibrillation. The results of recent clinical trials investigating new anticoagulants (factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors) clearly indicate alternative strategies in stroke prevention for patients with atrial fibrillation. This paper describes the current landscape and developments in stroke prevention with special reference to medical treatment in secondary prevention of ischemic stroke. PMID:23213626

  13. Stroke prevention: an update.

    PubMed

    Bousser, Marie-Germaine

    2012-03-01

    Stroke is a personal, familial, and social disaster. It is the third cause of death worldwide, the first cause of acquired disability, the second cause of dementia, and its cost is astronomic. The burden of stroke is likely to increase given the aging of the population and the growing incidence of many vascular risk factors. Prevention of stroke includes--as for all other diseases--a "mass approach" aiming at decreasing the risk at the society level and an individual approach, aiming at reducing the risk in a given subject. The mass approach is primarily based on the identification and treatment of vascular risk factors and, if possible, in the implementation of protective factors. These measures are the basis of primary prevention but most of them have now been shown to be also effective in secondary prevention. The individual approach combines a vascular risk factor modification and various treatments addressing the specific subtypes of stroke, such as antiplatelet drugs for the prevention of cerebral infarction in large and small artery diseases of the brain, carotid endarterectomy or stenting for tight carotid artery stenosis, and oral anticoagulants for the prevention of cardiac emboli. There is a growing awareness of the huge evidence-to-practice gap that exists in stroke prevention largely due to socio-economic factors. Recent approaches include low cost intervention packages to reduce blood pressure and cheap "polypills" combining in a single tablet aspirin and several drugs to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. Polypill intake should however not lead to abandon the healthy life-style measures which remain the mainstay of stroke prevention. PMID:22460445

  14. A Retrospective Cohort Study Comparing Stroke Recurrence Rate in Ischemic Stroke Patients With and Without Acupuncture Treatment.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chun-Chuan; Liao, Chien-Chang; Sun, Mao-Feng; Su, Yi-Chang; Wen, Chi-Pang; Morisky, Donald E; Sung, Fung-Chang; Hsu, Chung Y; Lin, Jaung-Geng

    2015-09-01

    Little was known about the effects of acupuncture on stroke recurrence. The aim of this study is to investigate whether ischemic stroke patients receiving acupuncture treatment have a decreased risk of stroke recurrence. A retrospective cohort study of 30,058 newly diagnosed cases of ischemic stroke in 2000 to 2004 was conducted based on the claims of Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The use of acupuncture treatment and stroke recurrence were identified during the follow-up period from 2000 to 2009. This study compared the risk of stroke recurrence between ischemic stroke cohorts with and without acupuncture treatment by calculating adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of acupuncture associated with stroke recurrence in the Cox proportional hazard model. The stroke recurrence rate per 1000 person-years decreased from 71.4 without to 69.9 with acupuncture treatment (P < 0.001). Acupuncture treatment was associated with reduced risk of stroke recurrence (HR 0.88; 95% CI 0.84-0.91). The acupuncture effect was noted in patients with or without medical treatment for stroke prevention but its impact decreased with aging of stroke patients. Compared with stroke patients without acupuncture treatment and medication therapy, the hazard ratios of stroke recurrence for those had medication therapy only, acupuncture only, and both were 0.42 (95% CI 0.38-0.46), 0.50 (95% CI 0.43-0.57), and 0.39 (95% CI 0.35-0.43), respectively. This study raises the possibility that acupuncture might be effective in lowering stroke recurrence rate even in those on medications for stroke prevention. Results suggest the need of prospective sham-controlled and randomized trials to establish the efficacy of acupuncture in preventing stroke. PMID:26426630

  15. A Retrospective Cohort Study Comparing Stroke Recurrence Rate in Ischemic Stroke Patients With and Without Acupuncture Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Chun-Chuan; Liao, Chien-Chang; Sun, Mao-Feng; Su, Yi-Chang; Wen, Chi-Pang; Morisky, Donald E.; Sung, Fung-Chang; Hsu, Chung Y.; Lin, Jaung-Geng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Little was known about the effects of acupuncture on stroke recurrence. The aim of this study is to investigate whether ischemic stroke patients receiving acupuncture treatment have a decreased risk of stroke recurrence. A retrospective cohort study of 30,058 newly diagnosed cases of ischemic stroke in 2000 to 2004 was conducted based on the claims of Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The use of acupuncture treatment and stroke recurrence were identified during the follow-up period from 2000 to 2009. This study compared the risk of stroke recurrence between ischemic stroke cohorts with and without acupuncture treatment by calculating adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of acupuncture associated with stroke recurrence in the Cox proportional hazard model. The stroke recurrence rate per 1000 person-years decreased from 71.4 without to 69.9 with acupuncture treatment (P < 0.001). Acupuncture treatment was associated with reduced risk of stroke recurrence (HR 0.88; 95% CI 0.84–0.91). The acupuncture effect was noted in patients with or without medical treatment for stroke prevention but its impact decreased with aging of stroke patients. Compared with stroke patients without acupuncture treatment and medication therapy, the hazard ratios of stroke recurrence for those had medication therapy only, acupuncture only, and both were 0.42 (95% CI 0.38–0.46), 0.50 (95% CI 0.43–0.57), and 0.39 (95% CI 0.35–0.43), respectively. This study raises the possibility that acupuncture might be effective in lowering stroke recurrence rate even in those on medications for stroke prevention. Results suggest the need of prospective sham-controlled and randomized trials to establish the efficacy of acupuncture in preventing stroke. PMID:26426630

  16. Effects of aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole versus clopidogrel and telmisartan on disability and cognitive function after recurrent stroke in patients with ischaemic stroke in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial: a double-blind, active and placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Sacco, Ralph L; Yusuf, Salim; Cotton, Daniel; Ôunpuu, Stephanie; Lawton, William A; Palesch, Yuko; Martin, Reneé H; Albers, Gregory W; Bath, Philip; Bornstein, Natan; Chan, Bernard P L; Chen, Sien-Tsong; Cunha, Luis; Dahlöf, Björn; Keyser, Jacques De; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Estol, Conrado; Gorelick, Philip; Gu, Vivian; Hermansson, Karin; Hilbrich, Lutz; Kaste, Markku; Lu, Chuanzhen; Machnig, Thomas; Pais, Prem; Roberts, Robin; Skvortsova, Veronika; Teal, Philip; Toni, Danilo; VanderMaelen, Cam; Voigt, Thor; Weber, Michael; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background The treatment of ischaemic stroke with neuroprotective drugs has been unsuccessful, and whether these compounds can be used to reduce disability after recurrent stroke is unknown. The putative neuroprotective effects of antiplatelet compounds and the angiotensin II receptor antagonist telmisartan were investigated in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial. Methods Patients who had had an ischaemic stroke were randomly assigned in a two by two factorial design to receive either 25 mg aspirin (ASA) and 200 mg extended-release dipyridamole (ER-DP) twice a day or 75 mg clopidogrel once a day, and either 80 mg telmisartan or placebo once per day. The predefined endpoints for this substudy were disability after a recurrent stroke, assessed with the modified Rankin scale (mRS) and Barthel index at 3 months, and cognitive function, assessed with the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) score at 4 weeks after randomisation and at the penultimate visit. Analysis was by intention to treat. The study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NTC00153062. Findings 20 332 patients (mean age 66 years) were randomised and followed-up for a median of 2·4 years. Recurrent strokes occurred in 916 (9%) patients randomly assigned to ASA with ER-DP and 898 (9%) patients randomly assigned to clopidogrel; 880 (9%) patients randomly assigned to telmisartan and 934 (9%) patients given placebo had recurrent strokes. mRS scores were not statistically different in patients with recurrent stroke who were treated with ASA and ER-DP versus clopidogrel (p=0·38), or with telmisartan versus placebo (p=0·61). There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients with recurrent stroke with a good outcome, as measured with the Barthel index, across all treatment groups. Additionally, there was no significant difference in the median MMSE scores, the percentage of patients with an MMSE score of 24 points or less, the

  17. Secondary stroke prevention: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Esenwa, Charles; Gutierrez, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the USA and a major cause of mortality worldwide. One out of four strokes is recurrent. Secondary stroke prevention starts with deciphering the most likely stroke mechanism. In general, one of the main goals in stroke reduction is to control vascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and smoking cessation. Changes in lifestyle like a healthy diet and aerobic exercise are also recommended strategies. In the case of cardioembolism due to atrial fibrillation, mechanical valves, or cardiac thrombus, anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy. The role of anticoagulation is less evident in the case of bioprosthetic valves, patent foramen ovale, and dilated cardiomyopathy with low ejection fraction. Strokes due to larger artery atherosclerosis account for approximately a third of all strokes. In the case of symptomatic extracranial carotid stenosis, surgical intervention as close as possible in time to the index event seems highly beneficial. In the case of intracranial large artery atherosclerosis, the best medical therapy consists of antiplatelets, high-dose statins, aggressive controls of vascular risk factors, and lifestyle modifications, with no role for intracranial arterial stenting or angioplasty. For patients with small artery occlusion (ie, lacunar stroke), the therapy is similar to that used in patients with intracranial large artery atherosclerosis. Despite the constant new evidence on how to best treat patients who have suffered a stroke, the risk of stroke recurrence remains unacceptably high, thus evidencing the need for novel therapies. PMID:26300647

  18. Secondary stroke prevention: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Esenwa, Charles; Gutierrez, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the USA and a major cause of mortality worldwide. One out of four strokes is recurrent. Secondary stroke prevention starts with deciphering the most likely stroke mechanism. In general, one of the main goals in stroke reduction is to control vascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and smoking cessation. Changes in lifestyle like a healthy diet and aerobic exercise are also recommended strategies. In the case of cardioembolism due to atrial fibrillation, mechanical valves, or cardiac thrombus, anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy. The role of anticoagulation is less evident in the case of bioprosthetic valves, patent foramen ovale, and dilated cardiomyopathy with low ejection fraction. Strokes due to larger artery atherosclerosis account for approximately a third of all strokes. In the case of symptomatic extracranial carotid stenosis, surgical intervention as close as possible in time to the index event seems highly beneficial. In the case of intracranial large artery atherosclerosis, the best medical therapy consists of antiplatelets, high-dose statins, aggressive controls of vascular risk factors, and lifestyle modifications, with no role for intracranial arterial stenting or angioplasty. For patients with small artery occlusion (ie, lacunar stroke), the therapy is similar to that used in patients with intracranial large artery atherosclerosis. Despite the constant new evidence on how to best treat patients who have suffered a stroke, the risk of stroke recurrence remains unacceptably high, thus evidencing the need for novel therapies. PMID:26300647

  19. Prevention of recurrent nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, D S; Coe, F L

    1999-11-15

    The first episode of nephrolithiasis provides an opportunity to advise patients about measures for preventing future stones. Low fluid intake and excessive intake of protein, salt and oxalate are important modifiable risk factors for kidney stones. Calcium restriction is not useful and may potentiate osteoporosis. Diseases such as hyperparathyroidism, sarcoidosis and renal tubular acidosis should be considered in patients with nephrolithiasis. A 24-hour urine collection with measurement of the important analytes is usually reserved for use in patients with recurrent stone formation. In these patients, the major urinary risk factors include hypercalciuria, hyperoxaluria, hypocitraturia and hyperuricosuria. Effective preventive and treatment measures include thiazide therapy to lower the urinary calcium level, citrate supplementation to increase the urinary citrate level and, sometimes, allopurinol therapy to lower uric acid excretion. Uric acid stones are most often treated with citrate supplementation. Data now support the cost-effectiveness of evaluation and treatment of patients with recurrent stones. PMID:10593318

  20. Protection against Recurrent Stroke with Resveratrol: Endothelial Protection

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Darren; Tuor, Ursula I.; Thompson, Roger; Institoris, Adam; Kulynych, Angela; Zhang, Xu; Kinniburgh, David W.; Bari, Ferenc; Busija, David W.; Barber, Philip A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite increased risk of a recurrent stroke following a minor stroke, information is minimal regarding the interaction between injurious mild cerebral ischemic episodes and the possible treatments which might be effective. The aim of the current study was to investigate recurrent ischemic stroke and whether resveratrol, a nutritive polyphenol with promising cardio- and neuro- protective properties, could ameliorate the associated brain damage. Experiments in adult rats demonstrated that a mild ischemic stroke followed by a second mild cerebral ischemia exacerbated brain damage, and, daily oral resveratrol treatment after the first ischemic insult reduced ischemic cell death with the recurrent insult (P<0.002). Further investigation demonstrated reduction of both inflammatory changes and markers of oxidative stress in resveratrol treated animals. The protection observed with resveratrol treatment could not be explained by systemic effects of resveratrol treatment including effects either on blood pressure or body temperature measured telemetrically. Investigation of resveratrol effects on the blood-brain barrier in vivo demonstrated that resveratrol treatment reduced blood-brain barrier disruption and edema following recurrent stroke without affecting regional cerebral blood flow. Investigation of the mechanism in primary cell culture studies demonstrated that resveratrol treatment significantly protected endothelial cells against an in vitro ‘ischemia’ resulting in improved viability against oxygen and glucose deprivation (39.6±6.6% and 81.3±9.5% in vehicle and resveratrol treated cells, respectively). An inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis did not prevent the improved cell viability following oxygen glucose deprivation but SIRT-1 inhibition with sirtinol partially blocked the protection (P<0.001) suggesting endothelial protection is to some extent SIRT-1 dependent. Collectively, the results support that oral resveratrol treatment provides a low risk

  1. Antithrombotic Medication for Cardioembolic Stroke Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Font, M. Àngels; Krupinski, Jerzy; Arboix, Adrià

    2011-01-01

    Embolism of cardiac origin accounts for about 20% of ischemic strokes. Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation is the most frequent cause of cardioembolic stroke. Approximately 1% of population is affected by atrial fibrillation, and its prevalence is growing with ageing in the modern world. Strokes due to cardioembolism are in general severe and prone to early recurrence and have a higher long-term risk of recurrence and mortality. Despite its enormous preventive potential, continuous oral anticoagulation is prescribed for less than half of patients with atrial fibrillation who have risk factors for cardioembolism and no contraindications for anticoagulation. Available evidence does not support routine immediate anticoagulation of acute cardioembolic stroke. Anticoagulation therapy's associated risk of hemorrhage and monitoring requirements have encouraged the investigation of alternative therapies for individuals with atrial fibrillation. New anticoagulants being tested for prevention of stroke are low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWH), unfractionated heparin, factor Xa inhibitors, or direct thrombin inhibitors like dabigatran etexilate and rivaroxaban. The later exhibit stable pharmacokinetics obviating the need for coagulation monitoring or dose titration, and they lack clinically significant food or drug interaction. Moreover, they offer another potential that includes fixed dosing, oral administration, and rapid onset of action. There are several concerns regarding potential harm, including an increased risk for hepatotoxicity, clinically significant bleeding, and acute coronary events. Therefore, additional trials and postmarketing surveillance will be needed. PMID:21822469

  2. Secondary prevention of stroke--results from the Southern Africa Stroke Prevention Initiative (SASPI) study.

    PubMed Central

    Thorogood, M.; Connor, M. D.; Lewando-Hundt, G.; Tollman, S.; Ngoma, B.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of risk factors and experience of preventive interventions in stroke survivors, and identilfy barriers to secondary prevention in rural South Africa. METHODS: A clinician visited individuals in the Agincourt field site (in South Africa's rural north east) who were identified in a census as possible stroke victims to confirm the diagnosis of stroke. We explored the impact of stroke on the individual's family, and health-seeking behaviour following stroke by conducting in-depth interviews in the households of 35 stroke survivors. We held two workshops to understand the knowledge, experience, and views of primary care nurses, who provide the bulk of professional health care. FINDINGS :We identified 103 stroke survivors (37 men), 73 (71%) of whom had hypertension, but only 8 (8%) were taking anti-hypertensive treatment. Smoking was uncommon; 8 men and 1 woman smoked a maximum of ten cigarettes daily. 94 (91%) stroke survivors had sought help, which involved allopathic health care for most of them (81; 79%). 42 had also sought help from traditional healers and churches, while another 13 people had sought help only from those sources. Of the 35 survivors who were interviewed, 29 reported having been prescribed anti-hypertensive pills after their stroke. Barriers to secondary prevention included cost of treatment, reluctance to use pills, difficulties with access to drugs, and lack of equipment to measure blood pressure. A negative attitude to allopathic care was not an important factor. CONCLUSION: In this rural area hypertension is the most important modifiable risk factor in stroke survivors. Effective secondary prevention may reduce the incidence of recurrent strokes, but there is no system to deliver such care. New strategies for care are needed involving both allopathic and non-allopathic-health care providers. PMID:15500283

  3. Stroke prevention: modifying risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Romero, José Rafael; Morris, Jane; Pikula, Aleksandra

    2009-01-01

    Risk factor modification remains as the principal aspect of care for stroke prevention. Understanding of risk factors has advanced and several options are now available to treat modifiable risk factors. However, effective treatment remains a challenging task in clinical practice. Prevention begins with awareness of risk factors by patients and clinicians. Risk factor assessment along with overall stroke risk estimation should be part of evaluation of patients with stroke, and used with careful clinical judgment. In this review we discuss the impact of modifiable traditional vascular risk factors on ischemic stroke, interventions for stroke prevention, and evidence for early treatment of risk factors where available as well as areas of research progress. Emphasis should be paid in education of patients, the community and medical personnel. Future research in the field of genetic determinants of vascular risk factors and stroke will increase our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of cerebrovascular disease and likely result in development of new therapies and individualized programs for stroke prevention. PMID:19124428

  4. Does cholesterol lowering prevent stroke?

    PubMed

    Henry, R Y; Kendall, M J

    1998-10-01

    The importance of lowering plasma cholesterol to reduce the incidence of coronary events is well established. However, in the prevention of stroke disease, control of hypertension has been the main aim of treatment and lipid lowering therapy has not hitherto been considered to be desirable or necessary. In this review, the evidence from large multicentre trials, imaging studies and meta-analyses is presented. It shows convincingly that HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (Statins) reduce stroke risk. PMID:9875681

  5. [Secondary prevention of stroke through arterial blood pressure reduction].

    PubMed

    Mancia, G; Grassi, G

    1997-07-01

    Large scale observational studies have conclusively demonstrated that systolic and diastolic blood pressure values are linearly related to the incidence of cerebrovascular diseases and that high blood pressure is an important risk factor for both primary and secondary development of stroke. Interventional studies have shown that blood pressure lowering by antihypertensive treatment reduces the incidence of stroke in hypertensive patients without a history of previous stroke. Whether this is the case also for the secondary prevention of cerebral ischemic attacks has not been unequivocally shown, however. The PROGRESS ("Perindopril Protection Against Recurrent Stroke Study") study has been designed and is under way to collect information on this important issue of the antihypertensive treatment, its purpose being to evaluate the blood pressure lowering effects with an ACE-inhibitor on recurrent stroke in an overall population of 6000 patients with a positive history of previous cerebral ischemic attacks or stroke. PMID:9340173

  6. Left Atrial Enlargement and Stroke Recurrence: The Northern Manhattan Stroke Study

    PubMed Central

    Yaghi, Shadi; Moon, Yeseon P.; Mora-McLaughlin, Consuelo; Willey, Joshua Z.; Cheung, Ken; Tullio, Marco R. Di; Homma, Shunichi; Kamel, Hooman; Sacco, Ralph L.; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose While left atrial enlargement (LAE) increases incident stroke risk, the association with recurrent stroke is less clear. Our aim was to determine the association of LAE with recurrent stroke most likely related to embolism (cryptogenic and cardioembolic), and all ischemic stroke recurrences. Methods We followed 655 first ischemic stroke patients in the Northern Manhattan Stroke Study for up to 5 years. LA size from 2-D echocardiography was categorized as normal (52.7%), mild LAE (31.6%), and moderate-severe LAE (15.7%). We used Cox proportional hazard models to calculate the hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (HR, 95%CI) for the association of LA size and LAE with recurrent cryptogenic/cardioembolic and total recurrent ischemic stroke. Results LA size was available in 529 (81%) patients. Mean age at enrollment was 69±13 years; 45.8% were male, 54.0% Hispanic, and 18.5% had atrial fibrillation. Over a median of 4 years there were 65 recurrent ischemic strokes (29 were cardioembolic or cryptogenic). In multivariable models adjusted for confounders including atrial fibrillation and heart failure, moderate-severe LAE compared to normal LA size was associated with greater risk of recurrent cardioembolic/cryptogenic stroke (adjusted HR 2.83, 95% CI 1.03-7.81), but not total ischemic stroke (adjusted HR 1.06, 95% CI, 0.48-2.30). Mild LAE was not associated with recurrent stroke. Conclusion Moderate to severe LAE was an independent marker of recurrent cardioembolic or cryptogenic stroke in a multiethnic cohort of ischemic stroke patients. Further research is needed to determine whether anticoagulant use may reduce risk of recurrence in ischemic stroke patients with moderate to severe LAE. PMID:25908460

  7. Preventing recurrent suicidal behaviour.

    PubMed Central

    Links, P. S.; Balchand, K.; Dawe, I.; Watson, W. J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To highlight recent empirical evidence for effective interventions that can guide family physicians in managing patients after suicide attempts. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Randomized control trials of psychosocial interventions for people after suicide attempts have provided some evidence for effective interventions. MAIN MESSAGE: Suicide attempts are more common than suicides; the number of attempts seen in a family practice is estimated to be 10 to 15 yearly. Up to two thirds of patients who take their lives by suicide have seen a family physician in the month before their death. Principles of care after a suicide attempt include actively engaging the patient, involving the family, restricting access to means of suicide, and developing intervention plans to deal with the psychopathology that has placed the patient at risk. CONCLUSIONS: Family physicians have a crucial role in preventing suicide through aftercare and ongoing monitoring of patients who have attempted suicide. PMID:10587773

  8. Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... with diabetes have a higher chance of having heart attacks and strokes. Smoking and having high blood pressure ... and cholesterol levels are very important for preventing heart attacks and strokes. See your doctor who treats your ...

  9. Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000080.htm Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke To use the sharing features on ... with diabetes have a higher chance of having heart attacks and strokes. Smoking and having high blood pressure ...

  10. Strokes in young adults: epidemiology and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Smajlović, Dževdet

    2015-01-01

    Strokes in young adults are reported as being uncommon, comprising 10%–15% of all stroke patients. However, compared with stroke in older adults, stroke in the young has a disproportionately large economic impact by leaving victims disabled before their most productive years. Recent publications report an increased incidence of stroke in young adults. This is important given the fact that younger stroke patients have a clearly increased risk of death compared with the general population. The prevalence of standard modifiable vascular risk factors in young stroke patients is different from that in older patients. Modifiable risk factors for stroke, such as dyslipidemia, smoking, and hypertension, are highly prevalent in the young stroke population, with no significant difference in geographic, climatic, nutritional, lifestyle, or genetic diversity. The list of potential stroke etiologies among young adults is extensive. Strokes of undetermined and of other determined etiology are the most common types among young patients according to TOAST (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) criteria. Prevention is the primary treatment strategy aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality related to stroke. Therefore, primary prevention is very important with regard to stroke in young adults, and aggressive treatment of risk factors for stroke, such as hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, is essential. The best form of secondary stroke prevention is directed toward stroke etiology as well as treatment of additional risk factors. However, there is a lack of specific recommendations and guidelines for stroke management in young adults. In conclusion, strokes in young adults are a major public health problem and further research, with standardized methodology, is needed in order to give us more precise epidemiologic data. Given the increasing incidence of stroke in the young, there is an objective need for more research in order to reduce this burden. PMID:25750539

  11. Strokes in young adults: epidemiology and prevention.

    PubMed

    Smajlović, Dževdet

    2015-01-01

    Strokes in young adults are reported as being uncommon, comprising 10%-15% of all stroke patients. However, compared with stroke in older adults, stroke in the young has a disproportionately large economic impact by leaving victims disabled before their most productive years. Recent publications report an increased incidence of stroke in young adults. This is important given the fact that younger stroke patients have a clearly increased risk of death compared with the general population. The prevalence of standard modifiable vascular risk factors in young stroke patients is different from that in older patients. Modifiable risk factors for stroke, such as dyslipidemia, smoking, and hypertension, are highly prevalent in the young stroke population, with no significant difference in geographic, climatic, nutritional, lifestyle, or genetic diversity. The list of potential stroke etiologies among young adults is extensive. Strokes of undetermined and of other determined etiology are the most common types among young patients according to TOAST (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) criteria. Prevention is the primary treatment strategy aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality related to stroke. Therefore, primary prevention is very important with regard to stroke in young adults, and aggressive treatment of risk factors for stroke, such as hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, is essential. The best form of secondary stroke prevention is directed toward stroke etiology as well as treatment of additional risk factors. However, there is a lack of specific recommendations and guidelines for stroke management in young adults. In conclusion, strokes in young adults are a major public health problem and further research, with standardized methodology, is needed in order to give us more precise epidemiologic data. Given the increasing incidence of stroke in the young, there is an objective need for more research in order to reduce this burden. PMID:25750539

  12. Clinical features of recurrent stroke after intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Nakase, Taizen; Yoshioka, Shotaroh; Sasaki, Masahiro; Suzuki, Akifumi

    2012-06-14

    There have been many reports about the prognosis and risk factors of stroke recurrence following brain infarction (BI). However, little is known about the stroke recurrence after primary intracerebral hemorrhage (PICH). Therefore, we explored the recurrent stroke patients after initial PICH retrospectively, to reveal the critical factors of stroke recurrence. Acute BI (n=4013) and acute PICH patients (n=1067) admitted to the hospital between April 2000 and March 2009 were consecutively screened. PICH patients with a history of ICH and BI patients with a history of ICH were then classified into the ICH-ICH group (n=64, age 70.8±9.5 years) and ICH-BI group (n=52, age 72.8±9.7years), respectively. ICH lesions were categorized into ganglionic and lober types according to the brain magnetic resonance imaging. Subtypes of BI were classified into cardioembolism, large-artery atherosclerosis, small-artery occlusion and others. There was no difference in incidence of risk factors between ICH-ICH and ICH-BI groups. Distribution of initial PICH lesions was significantly abundant in the lobar type in the ICH-ICH group (P<0.01) and in ganglionic type in the ICH-BI group (P<0.02). Age of onset was significantly older in recurrent lobar ICH compared with recurrent ganglionic ICH (P<0.01: 73.6±10.0 and 59.1±9.0 years, respectively). In conclusion, ganglionic ICH patients may have a chance of recurrent stroke in both brain infarction and ganglionic ICH, suggesting the participation of atherosclerosis in intracranial arteries. Lobar ICH patients were older and prone to recurrent lobar ICH, suggesting the participation of cerebral amyloid angiopathy as a risk of stroke recurrence. PMID:23139848

  13. Activated Protein C Resistance Does Not Increase Risk for Recurrent Stroke or Death in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Christoph; Sonntag, Natalie; Schleef, Michael; Rondak, Ina-Christine; Poppert, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Background Activated protein C (APC) resistance is the most common inherited prothrombotic disorder. The role of APC resistance in ischemic stroke is controversially discussed. Objectives The aim of this single center follow up study was to investigate the effect of APC resistance on stroke recurrence and survival in stroke patients. Patients/Methods We retrospectively identified 966 patients who had had an ischemic stroke or transitory ischemic attack (TIA) and in whom laboratory tests for APC resistance had been conducted. These patients were contacted to determine the primary outcomes of recurrent ischemic stroke or death. Results A total of 858 patients with an average follow up time of 8.48 years were included. APC resistance did not influence cumulative incidence functions for stroke free and total survival. In multivariate analyses, crude and adjusted hazard ratios for recurrent stroke as well as for death where not significantly increased in patients with APC resistance. This also applies to the subgroups of young patients, patients with cryptogenic stroke and patients with atrial fibrillation. Conclusion APC-resistance is not a risk factor for subsequent stroke or death in patients with a first ischemic stroke or TIA. Testing for APC-resistance in stroke patients therefore cannot be routinely recommended. PMID:27508300

  14. Guidelines for the Primary Prevention of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Meschia, James F.; Bushnell, Cheryl; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Braun, Lynne T.; Bravata, Dawn M.; Chaturvedi, Seemant; Creager, Mark A.; Eckel, Robert H.; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Fornage, Myriam; Goldstein, Larry B.; Greenberg, Steven M.; Horvath, Susanna E.; Iadecola, Costantino; Jauch, Edward C.; Moore, Wesley S.; Wilson, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this updated statement is to provide comprehensive and timely evidence-based recommendations on the prevention of stroke among individuals who have not previously experienced a stroke or transient ischemic attack. Evidence-based recommendations are included for the control of risk factors, interventional approaches to atherosclerotic disease of the cervicocephalic circulation, and antithrombotic treatments for preventing thrombotic and thromboembolic stroke. Further recommendations are provided for genetic and pharmacogenetic testing and for the prevention of stroke in a variety of other specific circumstances, including sickle cell disease and patent foramen ovale. PMID:25355838

  15. Risk of First and Recurrent Stroke in Childhood Cancer Survivors Treated With Cranial and Cervical Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Sabine; Sear, Katherine; Hills, Nancy K.; Chettout, Nassim; Afghani, Shervin; Gastelum, Erica; Haas-Kogan, Daphne; Fullerton, Heather J.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To assess, in a retrospective cohort study, rates and predictors of first and recurrent stroke in patients treated with cranial irradiation (CRT) and/or cervical irradiation at ≤18 years of age. Methods and Materials: We performed chart abstraction (n=383) and phone interviews (n=104) to measure first and recurrent stroke in 383 patients who received CRT and/or cervical radiation at a single institution between 1980 and 2009. Stroke was defined as a physician diagnosis and symptoms consistent with stroke. Incidence of first stroke was number of first strokes per person-years of observation after radiation. We used survival analysis techniques to determine cumulative incidence of first and recurrent stroke. Results: Among 325 subjects with sufficient follow-up data, we identified 19 first strokes (13 ischemic, 4 hemorrhagic, 2 unknown subtype) occurring at a median age of 24 years (interquartile range 17-33 years) in patients treated with CRT. Imaging was reviewed when available (n=13), and the stroke was confirmed in 12. Overall rate of first stroke was 625 (95% confidence interval [CI] 378-977) per 100,000 person-years. The cumulative incidence of first stroke was 2% (95% CI 0.01%-5.3%) at 5 years and 4% (95% CI 2.0%-8.4%) at 10 years after irradiation. With each 100-cGy increase in the radiation dose, the stroke hazard increased by 5% (hazard ratio 1.05; 95% CI 1.01-1.09; P=.02). We identified 6 recurrent strokes; 5 had available imaging that confirmed the stroke. Median time to recurrence was 15 months (interquartile range 6 months-3.2 years) after first stroke. The cumulative incidence of recurrent stroke was 38% (95% CI 17%-69%) at 5 years and 59% (95% CI 27%-92%) at 10 years after first stroke. Conclusion: Cranial irradiation puts childhood cancer survivors at high risk of both first and recurrent stroke. Stroke prevention strategies for these survivors are needed.

  16. The emergency department: first line of defense in preventing secondary stroke.

    PubMed

    Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2006-02-01

    Stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) are increasingly common conditions that are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The strongest predictor of recurrent stroke risk is an initial stroke or TIA; in fact, nearly 30% of all strokes are recurrent events. It is often the emergency department (ED) physician who, while treating the initial event, has the first opportunity to initiate effective preventive strategies, including pharmacotherapy and behavior modification. Evidence- and consensus-based guidelines are well established for the use of antiplatelet medications, anticoagulants, and antihypertensives for prevention of secondary stroke. Recent evidence suggests that the use of statins may be associated with improved clinical outcomes after ischemic stroke. In addition, behavioral interventions, such as smoking cessation, exercise, diet, and stroke education, can help patients avoid stroke recurrence. By initiating prevention therapies during the acute stroke or TIA encounter, EPs convey the message to patients that these therapies are important for the prevention of recurrent events and are an essential part of the treatment. PMID:16436789

  17. Prevention of stroke: a strategic global imperative.

    PubMed

    Feigin, Valery L; Norrving, Bo; George, Mary G; Foltz, Jennifer L; Roth, Gregory A; Mensah, George A

    2016-09-01

    The increasing global stroke burden strongly suggests that currently implemented primary stroke prevention strategies are not sufficiently effective, and new primary prevention strategies with larger effect sizes are needed. Here, we review the latest stroke epidemiology literature, with an emphasis on the recently published Global Burden of Disease 2013 Study estimates; highlight the problems with current primary stroke and cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention strategies; and outline new developments in primary stroke and CVD prevention. We also suggest key priorities for the future, including comprehensive prevention strategies that target people at all levels of CVD risk; implementation of an integrated approach to promote healthy behaviours and reduce health disparities; capitalizing on information technology to advance prevention approaches and techniques; and incorporation of culturally appropriate education about healthy lifestyles into standard education curricula early in life. Given the already immense and fast-increasing burden of stroke and other major noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), which threatens worldwide sustainability, governments of all countries should develop and implement an emergency action plan addressing the primary prevention of NCDs, possibly including taxation strategies to tackle unhealthy behaviours that increase the risk of stroke and other NCDs. PMID:27448185

  18. Niacin for stroke prevention: evidence and rationale.

    PubMed

    Keener, Adrienne; Sanossian, Nerses

    2008-01-01

    Low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are associated with increased atherothrombotic events, including stroke. Niacin is a safe and effective means of raising HDL, yet its role in stroke prevention is not well characterized. The purpose of the study is to determine the role of niacin in stroke prevention. A search of the PUBMED database using the keywords niacin, stroke, atherosclerosis, and/or carotid artery was undertaken to identify studies for review. National guidelines from the American Heart Association and National Cholesterol Education Program were reviewed. Treatment of low serum HDL (<40 mg/dL) is an identified goal of dyslipidemic therapy. Niacin is effective in raising HDL levels and reducing cardiovascular events in individuals with high vascular risk and can be used for treatment of stroke patients with low serum HDL. Niacin can be used safely in combination with statins, the first-line dyslipidemic treatment for secondary stroke risk reduction, with increased efficacy. Studies are needed to better define the role for niacin in secondary stroke prevention. Treatment of stroke patients with extended-release (ER) of niacin, alone or in combination with statins, should be considered in stroke patients with atherosclerotic mechanisms with low serum HDL-C levels. PMID:19040554

  19. Hepatitis C and recurrent treatment-resistant acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tarsia, Joseph; Dunn, Casey; Aysenne, Aimee; Shah, Basil; Moore, David F.

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and thrombolysis, acute ischemic stroke has become a treatable disorder if the patient presents within the 4.5-hour time window. Typically, sporadic stroke is caused by atherosclerotic disease involving large or small cerebral arteries or secondary to a cardioembolic source often associated with atrial fibrillation. In the over-65-year age group, more rare causes of stroke, such as antiphospholipid syndromes, are unusual; such stroke etiologies are mostly seen in a younger age group (<55 years). Here we describe acute ischemic stroke in three patients >65 years with hepatitis C–associated antiphospholipid antibodies. We suggest that screening for antiphospholipid disorders in the older patient might be warranted, with potential implications for therapeutic management and secondary stroke prevention. PMID:23543984

  20. Autopsy-Proven Intravascular Lymphoma Presenting as Rapidly Recurrent Strokes

    PubMed Central

    Usuda, Daisuke; Arahata, Masahisa; Temaru, Rie; Iinuma, Yoshitsugu; Kanda, Tsugiyasu; Hayashi, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    We present a 79-year-old Japanese woman diagnosed with cerebral infarction. In spite of enough antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy, she presented rapidly recurrent strokes three times for 3 months. Magnetic resonance imaging showed progression of bilateral cerebral infarcts, and chest-abdominal computed tomography showed multiple bilateral nodular lesions in the lung and multiple tumor lesions in the liver. Autopsy revealed diagnosis of intravascular lymphoma (IVL). This case indicates that IVL is rare and usually goes undiagnosed until time of autopsy because of its protean neurological manifestations; hence, it should be considered as a possible etiology if multiple strokes occur in a short period of time. PMID:27065845

  1. Practical Issues to Prevent Stroke Associated with Non-valvular Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chi Kyung; Jung, Seunguk

    2013-01-01

    Stroke associated with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is one of the most important subtypes of ischemic stroke, and its importance is becoming even more apparent in an aging population. To assess the risk of stroke associated with NVAF, the CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores are mainly used. Such scores can be used to predict the recurrence and prognosis of ischemic stroke. In addition, new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and devices are being evaluated in the prevention of stroke associated with NVAF in addition to treatment with the conventional oral anticoagulant, warfarin. Since clinical experience with NOACs is not globally sufficient, a cautious approach is needed. PMID:24396808

  2. Aspirin and Extended-Release Dipyridamole versus Clopidogrel for Recurrent Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Ralph L.; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Yusuf, Salim; Cotton, Daniel; Ôunpuu, Stephanie; Lawton, William A.; Palesch, Yuko; Martin, Reneé H.; Albers, Gregory W.; Bath, Philip; Bornstein, Natan; Chan, Bernard P.L.; Chen, Sien-Tsong; Cunha, Luis; Dahlöf, Björn; De Keyser, Jacques; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Estol, Conrado; Gorelick, Philip; Gu, Vivian; Hermansson, Karin; Hilbrich, Lutz; Kaste, Markku; Lu, Chuanzhen; Machnig, Thomas; Pais, Prem; Roberts, Robin; Skvortsova, Veronika; Teal, Philip; Toni, Danilo; VanderMaelen, Cam; Voigt, Thor; Weber, Michael; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recurrent stroke is a frequent, disabling event after ischemic stroke. This study compared the efficacy and safety of two antiplatelet regimens — aspirin plus extendedrelease dipyridamole (ASA–ERDP) versus clopidogrel. METHODS In this double-blind, 2-by-2 factorial trial, we randomly assigned patients to receive 25 mg of aspirin plus 200 mg of extended-release dipyridamole twice daily or to receive 75 mg of clopidogrel daily. The primary outcome was first recurrence of stroke. The secondary outcome was a composite of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death from vascular causes. Sequential statistical testing of noninferiority (margin of 1.075), followed by superiority testing, was planned. RESULTS A total of 20,332 patients were followed for a mean of 2.5 years. Recurrent stroke occurred in 916 patients (9.0%) receiving ASA–ERDP and in 898 patients (8.8%) receiving clopidogrel (hazard ratio, 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92 to 1.11). The secondary outcome occurred in 1333 patients (13.1%) in each group (hazard ratio for ASA–ERDP, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.92 to 1.07). There were more major hemorrhagic events among ASA–ERDP recipients (419 [4.1%]) than among clopidogrel recipients (365 [3.6%]) (hazard ratio, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.32), including intracranial hemorrhage (hazard ratio, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.83). The net risk of recurrent stroke or major hemorrhagic event was similar in the two groups (1194 ASA–ERDP recipients [11.7%], vs. 1156 clopidogrel recipients [11.4%]; hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.95 to 1.11). CONCLUSIONS The trial did not meet the predefined criteria for noninferiority but showed similar rates of recurrent stroke with ASA–ERDP and with clopidogrel. There is no evidence that either of the two treatments was superior to the other in the prevention of recurrent stroke. PMID:18753638

  3. Impact of 5A/6A polymorphism of matrix metalloproteinase-3 on recurrent atherosclerotic ischemic stroke in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Ya; Han, Li-Ya; Huang, Xiang-Dong; Guan, Chao-Hong; Mao, Xin-Lei; Ye, Zu-Sen

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the impact of the 5A/6A polymorphism of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) on recurrence of atherosclerotic ischemic stroke in Chinese. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of MMP-3 serum level and 5A/6A genetic polymorphism with the recurrence of atherosclerotic ischemic stroke in the Chinese Han population. We analyzed 106 large artery atherosclerosis (LAA) recurrent ischemic stroke patients and 545 LAA first onset ischemic stroke patients from January 2009 to June 2014. Serum MMP-3 concentrations were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The genotypes of MMP-3 promoter polymorphism (-1171 5A/6A) were determined using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The frequencies of MMP-3 5A/6A+5A/5A (32.08% vs. 21.47%, p = 0.02) genotype and 5A (16.98% vs. 11.01%, p = 0.01) allele in the recurrent group was significantly higher than those in the first onset group. After adjustment for vascular risk factors, multivariate logistic regression analysis suggested that the MMP-3 5A/6A+5A/5A genotype was an independent risk factor for LAA recurrent ischemic stroke (odds ratio [OR], 1.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-2.79, p = 0.021). No significant difference was observed for the MMP-3 serum concentrations between the recurrent group and the first onset group (22.23 ± 8.31 vs. 21.49 ± 7.89 ng/ul, t = 0.88, p = 0.38). The MMP-3 (-1171 5A/6A) polymorphism may contribute to LAA recurrent ischemic stroke susceptibility. Analysis of 5A/6A polymorphism in MMP-3 may identify patients at higher risk for LAA ischemic stroke recurrence, who may be selected for intensive preventive therapy. PMID:26314579

  4. [Primary and secondary prevention of stroke].

    PubMed

    Trenkwalder, Peter; Rüchardt, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    The basis for primary and secondary prevention of stroke (and also TIA) are both a healthy lifestyle with a healthy diet, non smoking, weight reduction and regular exercise, and consistent treatment of arterial hypertension with a target of < 140 /90 mmHg. The choice of the antihypertensive is depending on concomitant diseases, more important than the class of antihypertensive is treatment to target. Reduction of cholesterol with statins in primary prevention is dependant on total cardiovascular risk, in secondary prevention statins are integral part of modern treatment in non cardioembolic stroke. Atrial fibrillation is one of the major causes of stroke and should be treated with anticoagulation depending on the CHA2DS2-VASc score. Platelet inhibition is mandatory lifelong in all non cardioembolic strokes, in primary prevention only for patients with high total cardiovascular risk. Treatment of asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis should be determined on an individual basis. Symptomatic carotid artery stenosis should be treated immediately after the index stroke. PMID:26488098

  5. Stroke prevention in diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Kurukulasuriya, L Romayne; Govindarajan, Gurushankar; Sowers, James

    2006-07-01

    Stroke is an important cause of morbidity and mortality, and is an economic burden. Diabetes and obesity are two important modifiable risk factors for stroke. Patients with diabetes have a higher incidence of stroke and a poorer prognosis after stroke. Risk-factor modification is the most important aspect of prevention of stroke in diabetes and obesity. This includes lifestyle modifications and different therapeutic modalities to control conditions, such as diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia and arrhythmia. Recent landmark studies have shown the beneficial effects of statins in diabetic patients even with close to normal or normal low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Obesity, which is a risk factor for diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia has been shown to be an independent risk factor for stroke. Increased leptin, dysregulation of adipocyte proteins, increased insulin resistance and C-reactive protein may be factors involved in the increased incidence of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality directly related to obesity. Visceral fat is a much bigger health risk than subcutaneous fat. Lifestyle interventions and pharmacotherapeutic agents have been used to manage obesity. In morbidly obese patients, surgical intervention seems to be the best method of treatment with a long-lasting favorable metabolic outcome. In the 21st Century, with the advanced medical knowledge and the therapeutic modalities available, it should be possible to reduce the incidence of stroke associated with diabetes and obesity. PMID:16918267

  6. Intensive risk factor control in stroke prevention

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Stroke prevention is an urgent priority because of the aging of the population and the steep association of age and risk of stroke. Direct costs of stroke are expected to more than double in the US between 2012 and 2030. By getting everything right, patients can reduce the risk of stroke by 80% or more; however, getting everything right is a tall order. Roughly in order of importance, this requires smoking cessation, maintenance of a healthy weight, a Cretan Mediterranean diet, blood pressure control, lipid-lowering drugs, appropriate use of antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants, and appropriate carotid endarterectomy and stenting. A new approach called “treating arteries instead of targeting risk factors” appears promising but requires validation in randomized trials. PMID:24167723

  7. Newer Oral Anticoagulants: Stroke Prevention and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anand; Goddeau Jr, Richard P.; Henninger, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Warfarin is very effective in preventing stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, its use is limited due to fear of hemorrhagic complications, unpredictable anticoagulant effects related to multiple drug interactions and dietary restrictions, a narrow therapeutic window, frequent difficulty maintaining the anticoagulant effect within a narrow therapeutic window, and the need for inconvenient monitoring. Several newer oral anticoagulants have been approved for primary and secondary prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. These agents have several advantages relative to warfarin therapy. As a group, these direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC), which include the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran, and the factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban), are more effective than dose adjusted warfarin for prevention of all-cause stroke (including both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke), and have an overall more favorable safety profile. Nevertheless, an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (with the exception of apixaban), increased risk for thrombotic complication with sudden discontinuation, and inability to accurately assess and reverse anticoagulant effect require consideration prior to therapy initiation, and pose a challenge for decision making in acute stroke therapy. PMID:27347226

  8. Mortality, Recurrence, and Dependency Rates Are Higher after Acute Ischemic Stroke in Elderly Patients with Diabetes Compared to Younger Patients

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xue; Lou, Yongzhong; Gu, Hongfei; Guo, Xiaofei; Wang, Tao; Zhu, Yanxia; Zhao, Wenjuan; Ning, Xianjia; Li, Bin; Wang, Jinghua; An, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Stroke has a greater effect on the elderly than on younger patients. However, the long-term outcomes associated with stroke among elderly patients with diabetes are unknown. We aimed to assess the differences in long-term outcomes between young and elderly stroke patients with diabetes. A total of 3,615 acute ischemic stroke patients with diabetes were recruited for this study between 2006 and 2014. Outcomes at 12 and 36 months after stroke (including mortality, recurrence, and dependency) were compared between younger (age <75 years) and elderly (age ≥75 years) patients. The elderly group included 692 patients (19.1%) overall. Elderly patients were more likely than younger patients to have a Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classification of stroke due to cardioembolism, moderate and severe stroke, and atrial fibrillation, but less likely to have hypertension and dyslipidemia, current smokers, and alcohol consumers. Mortality, dependency, and recurrence rates at 12 months after stroke were 19.0, 48.5, and 20.9% in the elderly group and 7.4, 30.9, and 15.4% in the younger group, respectively (all P < 0.05). Corresponding rates at 36 months after stroke were 35.4, 78.7, and 53.8% in the elderly group and 13.7, 61.7, and 43.0% in the younger group, respectively (all P < 0.001). The mortality, dependency, and recurrence rates at 12 and 36 months after stroke were significantly higher in the elderly group than in the younger group after adjusting for stroke subtypes, stroke severity, and risk factors. Odds ratios (95% confidence interval) at 12 and 36 months after stroke were 2.18 (1.64–2.89) and 3.10 (2.35–4.08), respectively, for mortality, all P < 0.001; 1.81 (1.49–2.20) and 2.04 (1.57–2.34), respectively, for dependency, all P < 0.001; and 1.37 (1.06–1.76) and 1.40 (1.07–1.85), respectively, for recurrence, P = 0.016. The findings from this study suggest that management and secondary prevention should be emphasized in elderly patients with

  9. Mortality, Recurrence, and Dependency Rates Are Higher after Acute Ischemic Stroke in Elderly Patients with Diabetes Compared to Younger Patients.

    PubMed

    Long, Xue; Lou, Yongzhong; Gu, Hongfei; Guo, Xiaofei; Wang, Tao; Zhu, Yanxia; Zhao, Wenjuan; Ning, Xianjia; Li, Bin; Wang, Jinghua; An, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Stroke has a greater effect on the elderly than on younger patients. However, the long-term outcomes associated with stroke among elderly patients with diabetes are unknown. We aimed to assess the differences in long-term outcomes between young and elderly stroke patients with diabetes. A total of 3,615 acute ischemic stroke patients with diabetes were recruited for this study between 2006 and 2014. Outcomes at 12 and 36 months after stroke (including mortality, recurrence, and dependency) were compared between younger (age <75 years) and elderly (age ≥75 years) patients. The elderly group included 692 patients (19.1%) overall. Elderly patients were more likely than younger patients to have a Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classification of stroke due to cardioembolism, moderate and severe stroke, and atrial fibrillation, but less likely to have hypertension and dyslipidemia, current smokers, and alcohol consumers. Mortality, dependency, and recurrence rates at 12 months after stroke were 19.0, 48.5, and 20.9% in the elderly group and 7.4, 30.9, and 15.4% in the younger group, respectively (all P < 0.05). Corresponding rates at 36 months after stroke were 35.4, 78.7, and 53.8% in the elderly group and 13.7, 61.7, and 43.0% in the younger group, respectively (all P < 0.001). The mortality, dependency, and recurrence rates at 12 and 36 months after stroke were significantly higher in the elderly group than in the younger group after adjusting for stroke subtypes, stroke severity, and risk factors. Odds ratios (95% confidence interval) at 12 and 36 months after stroke were 2.18 (1.64-2.89) and 3.10 (2.35-4.08), respectively, for mortality, all P < 0.001; 1.81 (1.49-2.20) and 2.04 (1.57-2.34), respectively, for dependency, all P < 0.001; and 1.37 (1.06-1.76) and 1.40 (1.07-1.85), respectively, for recurrence, P = 0.016. The findings from this study suggest that management and secondary prevention should be emphasized in elderly patients with diabetes in

  10. Prevention of Recurrent Staphylococcal Skin Infections.

    PubMed

    Creech, C Buddy; Al-Zubeidi, Duha N; Fritz, Stephanie A

    2015-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections pose a significant health burden. The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant S aureus has resulted in an epidemic of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), and many patients experience recurrent SSTI. As S aureus colonization is associated with subsequent infection, decolonization is recommended for patients with recurrent SSTI or in settings of ongoing transmission. S aureus infections often cluster within households, and asymptomatic carriers serve as reservoirs for transmission; therefore, a household approach to decolonization is more effective than measures performed by individuals alone. Novel strategies for the prevention of recurrent SSTI are needed. PMID:26311356

  11. [Chronic subdural hematoma--recurrence and prevention].

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Fumihiro; Tsuzuki, Nobusuke; Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Shima, Katsuji

    2011-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma is one of the most common disorders observed in routine neurosurgical care. In the vast majority of cases, this disorder is treated by surgical evacuation, which usually yields a good prognosis. However, the recurrence rates after this initial procedure range from approximately 5% to 30%. In this study, we focused on the recurrence rate of chronic subdural hematoma and its prevention. We reviewed the risk factors for recurrence, surgical procedures used, perioperative management, timing of operation, and medical treatment. PMID:21228450

  12. CDC Vital Signs: Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... 35 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease & Stroke Improving care can save ... can reduce death among all ages. Problem Many deaths from heart disease and stroke can be prevented. ...

  13. Recurrent episodic hypoxaemic respiratory failure following a stroke.

    PubMed

    Foo, Aaron S C; Tan, Zi Kheng; Lee, Evelyn; Koh, Nien Yue

    2012-01-01

    A 68-year-old man with no cardiovascular risk factors was admitted with a stroke because of multiple brain infarcts in different vascular territories. He required mechanical ventilation for hypoxia as a result of aspiration pneumonia. Subsequent recovery was hindered by episodic, unexplained hypoxia. Investigations excluded pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hypertension and severe lung diseases. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) with saline bubble contrast showed mild, delayed, right-to-left shunting, thought to represent an insignificant, intrapulmonary, non-cardiac shunt. Hypoxic episodes worsened, requiring admission from community rehabilitation hospital to our centre and another period of mechanical ventilation. Elevated alveolar-arterial gradients indicated a non-hypoventilatory cause. Repeat TTE bubble contrast study and transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) demonstrated a patent foramen ovale (PFO) with large shunt potential, associated with an aneurysmal interatrial septum. This provided a unifying explanation for cryptogenic stroke and recurrent hypoxaemia. After percutaneous PFO closure hypoxic episodes ceased and he returned successfully to rehabilitation. PMID:22859382

  14. Cardioembolic stroke: practical considerations for patient risk management and secondary prevention.

    PubMed

    Amin, Hardik; Nowak, Richard J; Schindler, Joseph L

    2014-01-01

    Cardioembolic (CE) stroke constitutes approximately 20% of all occurrence of ischemic stroke in patients. Atrial fibrillation remains the most common and most studied mechanism underlying CE stroke events. Cardioembolic strokes carry high morbidity and are associated with early recurrence in patients. Our understanding of other patient mechanisms associated with CE stroke, including valvular disease, left ventricular dysfunction, and patent foramen ovale, continues to grow. Our review summarizes the diagnosis and management of patients who have sustained CE stroke as a result of the aforementioned cardiac mechanisms. Advances in primary and secondary risk management for prevention of CE stroke are also highlighted in our article-specifically, emerging data regarding monitoring of patients with atrial fibrillation, new anticoagulation therapy, and management of patients with decreased ejection fraction. PMID:24393752

  15. Novel anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation stroke prevention

    PubMed Central

    DiNicolantonio, James J; Topping, Taylor J; Wee, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    This review article evaluates novel oral anticoagulants in comparison with warfarin for thromboembolism prophylaxis in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). AF is the most frequently diagnosed arrhythmia in the United States. The most serious side effect of AF is stroke. Warfarin has several decades of proven efficacy in AF-related stroke prevention but the drug’s numerous drawbacks make its implementation difficult for practitioners and patients. The difficulties of warfarin have prompted the development of alternative anticoagulants for AF-related stroke prevention with better efficacy, safety, and convenience. The oral direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran, and the oral factor Xa inhibitors, rivaroxaban and apixaban, have been evaluated in a large phase III trial. Dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban were shown to be noninferior compared with warfarin in the prevention of stroke. Dabigatran and apixaban were found to be statistically superior to warfarin. All three may also have a better safety profile than warfarin. In conclusion, novel anticoagulants have a different pharmacologic profile compared with warfarin that may eliminate many of the treatment inconveniences. Practitioners must also be aware of the disadvantages these new drugs possess when choosing a management strategy for their patients. Drug selection may become clearer as these new drugs are used more extensively. PMID:23251773

  16. Aspirin After Mini-Stroke May Help Prevent Full-Blown Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_158939.html Aspirin After Mini-Stroke May Help Prevent Full-Blown Stroke Study finds risk is reduced by as much ... HealthDay News) -- Taking aspirin immediately after a mini-stroke significantly reduces the risk of a major stroke, ...

  17. The Prevention of Hemorrhagic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, J.; Mohr, JP; the TEAM-ARUBA collaborative groups

    2008-01-01

    Summary There is currently no evidence that preventive treatment of unruptured aneurysms or AVMs is beneficial and randomized trials have been proposed to address this clinical uncertainty. Participation in a trial may necessitate a shift of point of view compared to a certain habitual clinical mentality. A review of the ethical and rational principles governing the design and realization of a trial may help integrate clinical research into expert clinical practices. The treatment of unruptured aneurysms and AVMs remains controversial, and data from observational studies cannot provide a normative basis for clinical decisions. Prevention targets healthy individuals and hence has an obligation of results. There is no opposition between the search for objective facts using scientific methods and the ethics of medical practice since a good practice cannot forbid physicians the means to define what could be beneficial to patients. Perhaps the most difficult task is to recognize the uncertainty that is crucial to allow resorting to trial methodology. The reasoning that is used in research and analysis differs from the casuistic methods typical of clinical work, but clinical judgement remains the dominant factor that decides both who enters the trial and to whom the results of the trial will apply. Randomization is still perceived as a difficult and strange method to integrate into normal practice, but in the face of uncertainty it assures the best chances for the best outcome to each participant. Some tension exists between scientific methods and normal practice, but they need to coexist if we are to progress at the same time we care for patients. PMID:20557736

  18. Prevention of Recurrent Staphylococcal Skin Infections

    PubMed Central

    Creech, C. Buddy; Al-Zubeidi, Duha N.; Fritz, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Staphylococcus aureus infections pose a significant health burden. The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus has resulted in an epidemic of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), and many patients experience recurrent SSTI. As S. aureus colonization is associated with subsequent infection, decolonization is recommended for patients with recurrent SSTI or in settings of ongoing transmission. S. aureus infections often cluster within households and asymptomatic carriers serve as reservoirs for transmission; therefore, a household approach to decolonization is more effective than measures performed by individuals alone. Other factors, such as environmental surface contamination, may also be considered. Novel strategies for the prevention of recurrent SSTI are needed. PMID:26311356

  19. The Japan Statin Treatment Against Recurrent Stroke (J-STARS): A Multicenter, Randomized, Open-label, Parallel-group Study

    PubMed Central

    Hosomi, Naohisa; Nagai, Yoji; Kohriyama, Tatsuo; Ohtsuki, Toshiho; Aoki, Shiro; Nezu, Tomohisa; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Sunami, Norio; Yokota, Chiaki; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Terayama, Yasuo; Takagi, Makoto; Ibayashi, Setsuro; Nakamura, Masakazu; Origasa, Hideki; Fukushima, Masanori; Mori, Etsuro; Minematsu, Kazuo; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Shinohara, Yukito; Yamaguchi, Takenori; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2015-01-01

    Background Although statin therapy is beneficial for the prevention of initial stroke, the benefit for recurrent stroke and its subtypes remains to be determined in Asian, in whom stroke profiles are different from Caucasian. This study examined whether treatment with low-dose pravastatin prevents stroke recurrence in ischemic stroke patients. Methods This is a multicenter, randomized, open-label, blinded-endpoint, parallel-group study of patients who experienced non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke. All patients had a total cholesterol level between 4.65 and 6.21 mmol/L at enrollment, without the use of statins. The pravastatin group patients received 10 mg of pravastatin/day; the control group patients received no statins. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA), with the onset of each stroke subtype set to be one of the secondary endpoints. Finding Although 3000 patients were targeted, 1578 patients (491 female, age 66.2 years) were recruited and randomly assigned to pravastatin group or control group. During the follow-up of 4.9 ± 1.4 years, although total stroke and TIA similarly occurred in both groups (2.56 vs. 2.65%/year), onset of atherothrombotic infarction was less frequent in pravastatin group (0.21 vs. 0.64%/year, p = 0.0047, adjusted hazard ratio 0.33 [95%CI 0.15 to 0.74]). No significant intergroup difference was found for the onset of other stroke subtypes, and for the occurrence of adverse events. Interpretation Although whether low-dose pravastatin prevents recurrence of total stroke or TIA still needs to be examined in Asian, this study has generated a hypothesis that it may reduce occurrence of stroke due to larger artery atherosclerosis. Funding This study was initially supported by a grant from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan. After the governmental support expired, it was conducted in collaboration between Hiroshima University and the Foundation for Biomedical Research and

  20. Personalized approach to primary and secondary prevention of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Primary and secondary prevention of ischemic stroke represents a significant part of stroke management and health care. Although there are official guidelines concerning stroke management, new knowledge are introduced to them with a slight delay. This article provides an overview of current information on primary and secondary prevention of ischemic stroke. It summarizes information especially in the field of cardioembolic stroke, the use of new anticoagulants and the management of carotid stenosis based on the results of recent clinical studies. The optimal approach in stroke management is to follow these recommendations, to know new strategies and to apply an individual personalized approach in our clinical decisions. PMID:24949113

  1. [Statins in the secondary prevention of stroke: New evidence from the SPARCL Study].

    PubMed

    Castilla-Guerra, Luis; Fernández-Moreno, María Del Carmen; López-Chozas, José Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Until recently there was little evidence that statin therapy reduced the risk of stroke recurrence. The SPARCL trial, published in 2006, was the first trial to show the benefits of statin therapy in preventing recurrent stroke. The SPARCL trial showed that treatment with atorvastatin 80mg/day reduced recurrent stroke in patients with a recent stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Several post hoc analyses of different subgroups followed the SPARCL trial. They have not revealed any significant differences when patients were grouped by age, sex or type of stroke. The SPARCL trial has also helped to identify patients who may have a greater benefit from statins: Patients with carotid stenosis, with more intense lipid lowering, and those who achieve optimal levels of LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides, and blood pressure. The trial has also helped to identify individuals at high risk of new vascular events. Clearly there is a before and after in stroke prevention since the SPARCL trial was published. PMID:26150172

  2. Neurological Symptom Severity after a Recent Non-cardioembolic Stroke and Recurrent Vascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Ho; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a well-established relation of symptom severity with functional status and mortality after an index stroke. However, little is known about the impact of symptom severity of a recent index stroke on risk of recurrent vascular events. Methods We reviewed the dataset of a multicenter trial involving 3680 recent non-cardioembolic stroke patients aged ≥35 years and followed for 2 years. Independent associations of stroke severity (as measured by National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score) with recurrent stroke (primary outcome) and stroke/coronary heart disease (CHD)/vascular death (secondary outcome) were analyzed. NIHSS score was analyzed as a dichotomous (<4 vs. ≥4) and a continuous variable. Results Among study subjects, 550 (15%) had NIHSS scores ≥4 (overall scores ranged from 0 to 18, median score was 1 [25th to 75th percentile 0 to 2]). NIHSS was measured at a median 35 days after the index stroke. After adjusting for multiple covariates, NIHSS ≥4 was independently linked to higher risk of recurrent stroke (HR 1.37, 95% CI: 1.01–1.84) and risk of stroke/CHD/vascular death (HR 1.32, 95% CI: 1.07–1.64). Analysis of NIHSS score as a continuous variable also showed a higher risk of recurrent stroke (HR 1.06, 95% CI: 1.00–1.12) and stroke/CHD/vascular death (HR 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01–1.09) with increasing index stroke symptom severity. Conclusions Greater residual symptom severity after a recent stroke is associated with higher risk of recurrent vascular events. Future studies are needed to confirm this relationship and to clarify its underlying mechanisms. PMID:25817617

  3. Metabolomics predicts stroke recurrence after transient ischemic attack

    PubMed Central

    Jové, Mariona; Mauri-Capdevila, Gerard; Suárez, Idalmis; Cambray, Serafi; Sanahuja, Jordi; Quílez, Alejandro; Farré, Joan; Benabdelhak, Ikram; Pamplona, Reinald; Portero-Otín, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To discover, by using metabolomics, novel candidate biomarkers for stroke recurrence (SR) with a higher prediction power than present ones. Methods: Metabolomic analysis was performed by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in plasma samples from an initial cohort of 131 TIA patients recruited <24 hours after the onset of symptoms. Pattern analysis and metabolomic profiling, performed by multivariate statistics, disclosed specific SR and large-artery atherosclerosis (LAA) biomarkers. The use of these methods in an independent cohort (162 subjects) confirmed the results obtained in the first cohort. Results: Metabolomics analyses could predict SR using pattern recognition methods. Low concentrations of a specific lysophosphatidylcholine (LysoPC[16:0]) were significantly associated with SR. Moreover, LysoPC(20:4) also arose as a potential SR biomarker, increasing the prediction power of age, blood pressure, clinical features, duration of symptoms, and diabetes scale (ABCD2) and LAA. Individuals who present early (<3 months) recurrence have a specific metabolomic pattern, differing from non-SR and late SR subjects. Finally, a potential LAA biomarker, LysoPC(22:6), was also described. Conclusions: The use of metabolomics in SR biomarker research improves the predictive power of conventional predictors such as ABCD2 and LAA. Moreover, pattern recognition methods allow us to discriminate not only SR patients but also early and late SR cases. PMID:25471397

  4. Failure of old and new anticoagulants to prevent ischemic stroke in high-risk atrial fibrillation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bilora, Franca; Adamo, Angelo; Pomerri, Fabio; Prandoni, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Rivaroxaban is an oral anticoagulant that acts as a direct, competitive factor Xa inhibitor. Large randomized clinical trials have shown that, at a daily dose of 20 mg, Rivaroxaban is at least as effective as dose-adjusted warfarin for the prevention of stroke or other embolic complications in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF). The safety and efficacy of combining Rivaroxaban with an antiplatelet agent for secondary stroke prevention has not been established. We report the case of an elderly patient with permanent AF and coronary heart disease, who had already suffered an ischemic stroke while on warfarin treatment, and was consequently switched to treatment with an association of Rivaroxaban and Aspirin. Her CHA2DS2-VASc score was 9. The patient developed a severe recurrent disabling ischemic stroke. This case goes to show that the novel direct anticoagulants may fail to prevent recurrent stroke in patients at particularly high risk, even when associated with antiplatelet drugs. PMID:27228488

  5. Stroke Patients with a Past History of Cancer Are at Increased Risk of Recurrent Stroke and Cardiovascular Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Kui-Kai; Wong, Yuen-Kwun; Teo, Kay-Cheong; Chang, Richard Shek-Kwan; Hon, Sonny Fong-Kwong; Chan, Koon-Ho; Cheung, Raymond Tak-Fai; Li, Leonard Sheung-Wai; Tse, Hung-Fat; Ho, Shu-Leong; Siu, Chung-Wah

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cancer patients are at increased risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. It is unclear whether cancer confers any additional risk for recurrent stroke or cardiovascular mortality after stroke. Methods This was a single center, observational study of 1,105 consecutive Chinese ischemic stroke patients recruited from a large stroke rehabilitation unit based in Hong Kong. We sought to determine whether patients with cancer are at higher risk of recurrent stroke and cardiovascular mortality. Results Amongst 1,105 patients, 58 patients (5.2%) had cancer, of whom 74% were in remission. After a mean follow-up of 76±18 months, 241 patients developed a recurrent stroke: 22 in patients with cancer (38%, annual incidence 13.94%/year), substantially more than those without cancer (21%, 4.65%/year) (p<0.01). In a Cox regression model, cancer, age and atrial fibrillation were the 3 independent predictors of recurrent stroke with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.42 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.54–3.80), 1.01 (1.00–1.03) and 1.35 (1.01–1.82) respectively. Likewise, patients with cancer had a higher cardiovascular mortality compared with those without cancer (4.30%/year vs. 2.35%/year, p = 0.08). In Cox regression analysis, cancer (HR: 2.08, 95% CI: 1.08–4.02), age (HR: 1.04, 95% CI 1.02–1.06), heart failure (HR: 3.06, 95% CI 1.72–5.47) and significant carotid atherosclerosis (HR: 1.55, 95% CI 1.02–2.36) were independent predictors for cardiovascular mortality. Conclusions Stroke patients with a past history of cancer are at increased risk of recurrent stroke and cardiovascular mortality. PMID:24523883

  6. Impact of Libido at 2 Weeks after Stroke on Risk of Stroke Recurrence at 1-Year in a Chinese Stroke Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-Jing; Yuan, Huai-Wu; Wang, Chun-Xue; Luo, Ben-Yan; Ruan, Jie; Zhang, Ning; Shi, Yu-Zhi; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Yi-Long; Zhang, Tong; Zhou, Juan; Zhao, Xing-Quan; Wang, Yong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background: There were few studies on the relation between changes in libido and incidence of stroke recurrence. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between libido decrease at 2 weeks after stroke and recurrent stroke at 1-year. Methods: It is a multi-centered, prospective cohort study. The 14th item of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 was used to evaluate changes of libido in poststroke patients at 2 weeks. Stroke recurrence was defined as an aggravation of former neurological functional deficit, new local or overall symptoms, or stroke diagnosed at re-admission. Results: Among 2341 enrolled patients, 1757 patients had completed follow-up data, 533 (30.34%) patients had decreased libido at 2 weeks, and 166 (9.45%) patients had recurrent stroke at 1-year. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that, compared with patients with normal libido, the odds ratio (OR) of recurrent stroke in patients with decreased libido was reduced by 41% (OR = 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.40–0.87). The correlation was more prominent among male patients (OR = 0.52, 95% CI: 0.31–0.85) and patients of ≥60 years of age (OR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.35–0.93). Conclusions: One out of three stroke patients in mainland China has decreased libido at 2 weeks after stroke. Decreased libido is a protective factor for stroke recurrence at 1-year, which is more prominent among older male patients. PMID:25963346

  7. Changes in pre-hospital management of vascular risk factors among patients admitted due to recurrent stroke in Poland from 1995 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Bembenek, Jan P.; Karlinski, Michał; Kurkowska-Jastrzebska, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate long-term trends in secondary stroke prevention through management of vascular risk factors directly before hospital admission for recurrent stroke. Material and methods This is a retrospective registry-based analysis of consecutive recurrent acute stroke patients from a highly urbanized area (Warsaw, Poland) admitted to a single stroke center between 1995 and 2013 with previous ischemic stroke. We compared between four consecutive time periods: 1995–1999, 2000–2004, 2005–2009 and 2010–2013. Results During the study period, 894 patients with recurrent strokes were admitted (18% of all strokes), including 867 with previous ischemic stroke (our study group). Among those patients, the proportion of recurrent ischemic strokes (88.1% to 93.9%) (p = 0.319) and males (44% to 49.7%) (p = 0.5) remained stable. However, there was a rising trend in patients’ age (median age of 73, 74, 76 and 77 years, respectively). There was also an increase in the use of antihypertensives (from 70.2% to 83.8%) (p = 0.013), vitamin K antagonists (from 4.8% to 15.6%) (p = 0.012) and statins (from 32.5% to 59.4%) (p < 0.001). Nonetheless, 21% of patients did not receive any antithrombotic prophylaxis. Tobacco smoking pattern remained unchanged. Conclusions Our data indicate a clear overall improvement of secondary stroke prevention. However, persistent use of antithrombotic drugs and tobacco smoking after the first ischemic stroke is constantly suboptimal. PMID:27482236

  8. Antiplatelet Agents for the Secondary Prevention of Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack: A Network Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Weiming; Zhu, Qin; Lan, Qing; Zhao, Jizong

    2016-05-01

    Stroke can cause high morbidity and mortality, and ischemic stroke (IS) and transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients have a high stroke recurrence rate. Antiplatelet agents are the standard therapy for these patients, but it is often difficult for clinicians to select the best therapy from among the multiple treatment options. We therefore performed a network meta-analysis to estimate the efficacy of antiplatelet agents for secondary prevention of recurrent stroke. We systematically searched 3 databases (PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane) for relevant studies published through August 2015. The primary end points of this meta-analysis were overall stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and fatal stroke. A total of 30 trials were included in our network meta-analysis and abstracted data. Among the therapies evaluated in the included trials, the estimates for overall stroke and hemorrhagic stroke for cilostazol (Cilo) were significantly better than those for aspirin (odds ratio [OR] = .64, 95% credibility interval [CrI], .45-.91; OR = .23, 95% CrI, .08-.58). The estimate for fatal stroke was highest for Cilo plus aspirin combination therapy, followed by Cilo therapy. The results of our meta-analysis indicate that Cilo significantly improves overall stroke and hemorrhagic stroke in IS or TIA patients and reduces fatal stroke, but with low statistical significance. Our results also show that Cilo was significantly more efficient than other therapies in Asian patients; therefore, future trials should focus on Cilo treatment for secondary prevention of recurrent stroke in non-Asian patients. PMID:26856461

  9. [Stroke from the Perspective of Neurologists (Part 3): Update in the Secondary Prevention].

    PubMed

    Schur, Patrick; Luft, Andreas

    2016-05-25

    In this third edition the secondary prevention of stroke will be discussed. After the acute phase in which recanalization of an occluded brain artery is in the focus, the risks for a recurrent stroke have to be minimized and rehabilitation should be started. A systematic workup, an extended evaluation of (non-) modifiable risk factors and the clinical-radiological findings are the source of an effective preventive therapy. Risk assessment of the major risk factors such as arterial hypertension, atrial fibrillation, diabetes and dyslipidemia is established. The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and the complex atheromatosis with a complex structure are independent risk factors for stroke. The search for an etiology is usually a definition of probabilities. The most probable cause of stroke is assumed. PMID:27223418

  10. [Experience of stroke prevention-Enlightenment for cancer research].

    PubMed

    You, Weicheng

    2015-08-01

    Cancer, stroke and heart diseases are most common causes of death. This paper summarized the experience of stroke prevention, which is an enlightenment for cancer research. In addition, this paper also described the progress of cancer epidemiological research, particular the primary and second preventions in China. PMID:26733022

  11. Let's Talk about Lifestyle Changes to Prevent Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    Prevention let’s talk about Lifestyle Changes To Prevent Stroke You can do plenty to make your heart and blood vessels healthy, even if you’ve had a stroke. A healthy lifestyle plays a big part in decreasing your risk ...

  12. Primary stroke prevention in China - a new approach.

    PubMed

    Feigin, Valery L; Wang, Wenzhi; Fu, Hua; Liu, Liping; Krishnamurthi, Rita; Bhattacharjee, Rohit; Parmar, Priya; Hussein, Tasleem; Barker-Collo, Suzanne

    2015-05-01

    The growing burden of stroke in China, along with the increasing cost of health care calls for new, more effective strategies for stroke prevention. These strategies should include increasing awareness of stroke symptoms, awareness of risk factors, and provision of easily available information on means of modifying risk factors. The Stroke Riskometer App is exactly such a tool, available in Mandarin, for adult individuals to calculate their risk of stroke over the next 5 and 10  years, and to identify their individual stroke risk factors and linking them to possible means of modifying these risk factors. The use of this App could reduce the risk of stroke for individuals in the Chinese population and contribute to significant reduction in stroke burden in China. PMID:25820024

  13. Systems pharmacology dissection of multi-scale mechanisms of action for herbal medicines in stroke treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingxiao; Li, Yan; Chen, Xuetong; Pan, Yanqiu; Zhang, Shuwei; Wang, Yonghua

    2014-01-01

    Annually, tens of millions of first-ever strokes occur in the world; however, currently there is lack of effective and widely applicable pharmacological treatments for stroke patients. Herbal medicines, characterized as multi-constituent, multi-target and multi-effect, have been acknowledged with conspicuous effects in treating stroke, and attract extensive interest of researchers although the mechanism of action is yet unclear. In this work, we introduce an innovative systems-pharmacology method that combines pharmacokinetic prescreening, target fishing and network analysis to decipher the mechanisms of action of 10 herbal medicines like Salvia miltiorrhizae, Ginkgo biloba and Ephedrae herba which are efficient in stroke treatment and prevention. Our systematic analysis results display that, in these anti-stroke herbal medicines, 168 out of 1285 constituents with the favorable pharmacokinetic profiles might be implicated in stroke therapy, and the systematic use of these compounds probably acts through multiple mechanisms to synergistically benefit patients with stroke, which can roughly be classified as preventing ischemic inflammatory response, scavenging free radicals and inhibiting neuronal apoptosis against ischemic cerebral damage, as well as exhibiting lipid-lowering, anti-diabetic, anti-thrombotic and antiplatelet effects to decrease recurrent strokes. Relying on systems biology-based analysis, we speculate that herbal medicines, being characterized as the classical combination therapies, might be not only engaged in multiple mechanisms of action to synergistically improve the stroke outcomes, but also might be participated in reducing the risk factors for recurrent strokes. PMID:25093322

  14. Suicide in stroke survivors: epidemiology and prevention.

    PubMed

    Pompili, Maurizio; Venturini, Paola; Lamis, Dorian A; Giordano, Gloria; Serafini, Gianluca; Belvederi Murri, Martino; Amore, Mario; Girardi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a dramatic event and is associated with potentially severe consequences, including disability, mortality, and social costs. Stroke may occur at any age; however, most strokes occur in individuals aged 65 years and older. Previous research has found that stroke increases suicide risk, especially among women and younger patients. The aim of the current review is to investigate the relationship between suicide and stroke in order to determine which stroke patients are at elevated risk for suicide. Moreover, we review the literature in order to provide pharmacological treatment strategies for stroke patients at high risk of suicide. We performed a careful search to identify articles and book chapters focused on this issue, selecting only English-language articles published from 1990 to 2014 that addressed the issue of suicide after stroke and its pharmacological management. We found 12 clinical trials that explored the relationship between stroke and suicidal ideation and/or suicidal plans and 11 investigating suicide as the cause of death after stroke. We identified stroke as a significant risk factor for both suicide and suicidal ideation, especially among younger adult depressed patients in all articles, providing further support for the association between post-stroke and suicidality. Suicide risk is particularly high in the first 5 years following stroke. Depression, previous mood disorder, prior history of stroke, and cognitive impairment were found to be the most important risk factors for suicide. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) represent the treatment of choice for stroke survivors with suicide risk, and studies in rats have suggested that carbolithium is a promising treatment in these patients. Early identification and treatment of post-stroke depression may significantly reduce suicide risk in stroke patients. PMID:25491561

  15. Emerging Tools for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Voukalis, Christos; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Shantsila, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Ischaemic strokes resulting from atrial fibrillation (AF) constitute a devastating condition for patients and their carers with huge burden on health care systems. Prophylactic treatment against systemic embolization and ischaemic strokes is the cornerstone for the management of AF. Effective stroke prevention requires the use of the vitamin K antagonists or non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs). This article summarises the latest developments in the field of stroke prevention in AF and aims to assist physicians with the choice of oral anticoagulant for patients with non-valvular AF with different risk factor profile. PMID:26981569

  16. Recurrent stroke in a case of left atrial myxoma masquerading vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prashant K; Sureka, R K; Sharma, Anjani K; Bhuyan, Sushant; Gupta, Vikas

    2013-12-01

    We report a case of left atrial myxoma presenting as recurrent neurological deficits with absent peripheral pulses mimicking systemic vasculitis. Due to absence of cardiac signs and symptoms, there was one year delay in diagnosis from initial symptom. Left atrial myxomas are rare but treatable cause of recurrent stroke. PMID:24968552

  17. Prevention of Stroke in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zha, Alicia M; Di Napoli, Mario; Behrouz, Réza

    2015-12-01

    The risk of cerebrovascular disease is increased among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and remains an underserved area of medical need. Only a minor proportion of RA patients achieve suitable stroke prevention. Classical cardiovascular risk factors appear to be under-diagnosed and undertreated among patients with RA. Reducing the inflammatory burden is also necessary to lower the cardiovascular risk. An adequate control of disease activity and cerebrovascular risk assessment using national guidelines should be recommended for all patients with RA. For patients with a documented history of cerebrovascular or cardiovascular risk factors, smoking cessation and corticosteroids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs at the lowest dose possible are crucial. Risk score models should be adapted for patients with RA by introducing a 1.5 multiplication factor, and their results interpreted to appropriately direct clinical care. Statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and angiotensin-II receptor blockers are preferred treatment options. Biologic and non-biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs should be initiated early to mitigate the necessity of symptom control drugs and to achieve early alleviation of the inflammatory state. Early control can improve vascular compliance, decrease atherosclerosis, improve overall lipid and metabolic profiles, and reduce the incidence of heart disease that may lead to atrial fibrillation. In patients with significant cervical spine involvement, early intervention and improved disease control are necessary and may prevent further mechanical vascular injury. PMID:26486791

  18. Warfarin and low-dose aspirin for stroke prevention from severe intracranial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Bekavac, I; Hanna, J P; Sila, C A; Furland, A J

    1999-01-01

    Management of symptomatic, intracranial, large-arterial atherosclerosis is controversial. We assessed the safety and efficacy of combining warfarin and low-dose aspirin to prevent stroke from intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis failing prior treatment with either aspirin or warfarin. Patients with severe intracranial stenosis were prescribed combination therapy, warfarin (international normalized ratio [INR] 2 to 3) and aspirin 81 mg daily. Ten men and six women treated with combination therapy had one recurrent ischemic event during 382 months of therapy. No patient suffered a myocardial infarction or sudden vascular death. No serious hemorrhagic complication occurred. The combination of warfarin and low-dose aspirin seems safe and effective in preventing recurrent stroke from symptomatic, intracranial, large-arterial occlusive disease after failure with either aspirin or warfarin monotherapy. PMID:17895135

  19. Recurrent Embolic Strokes of Undetermined Source in a Patient with Extreme Lipoprotein(a) Levels

    PubMed Central

    Bulwa, Zachary; Kim, Audrey; Singh, Karandeep; Kantorovich, Alexander; Suhail, Faten

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a) is a plasma lipoprotein and known cardiovascular risk factor, most recently implicated in the development of high-risk carotid atherosclerotic plaques without significant carotid stenosis. We present a case of a young African-American female with recurrent embolic strokes of undetermined source. After our thorough investigation, we identified the link between a small, irregular plaque in the right internal carotid artery, and an extremely elevated plasma level of lipoprotein(a) as the source of her embolic strokes.

  20. Diffuse Cerebral Vasculopathy in a HIV-Positive Patient with Recurrent Strokes.

    PubMed

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Chen, Cheng-Yu; Hsueh, Chun-Jen; Lo, Chung-Ping; Juan, Chun-Jung; Chang, Wei-Chou; Huang, Guo-Shu

    2008-02-18

    The causes of ischemic stroke in the young adult are diverse. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection-related vasculopathy is usually not included in the list of differential diagnoses. HIV-positive patients may present with acute neurologic dysfunction of different causes, among which cerebral infarction is an uncommon one. Herein, we report a HIV-infected young man who suffered from recurrent ischemic strokes with evidence of cerebral vasculopathy on serial magnetic resonance images. PMID:24256749

  1. Carotid Plaque Hemorrhage on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Strongly Predicts Recurrent Ischemia and Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Akram A; Kandiyil, Neghal; MacSweeney, Shane T S; Altaf, Nishath; Auer, Dorothee P

    2013-01-01

    Objective There is a recognized need to improve selection of patients with carotid artery stenosis for carotid endarterectomy (CEA). We assessed the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-defined carotid plaque hemorrhage (MRIPH) to predict recurrent ipsilateral cerebral ischemic events, and stroke in symptomatic carotid stenosis. Methods One hundred seventy-nine symptomatic patients with ≥50% stenosis were prospectively recruited, underwent carotid MRI, and were clinically followed up until CEA, death, or ischemic event. MRIPH was diagnosed if the plaque signal intensity was >150% that of the adjacent muscle. Event-free survival analysis was done using Kaplan–Meier plots and Cox regression models controlling for known vascular risk factors. We also undertook a meta-analysis of reported data on MRIPH and recurrent events. Results One hundred fourteen patients (63.7%) showed MRIPH, suffering 92% (57 of 62) of all recurrent ipsilateral events and all but 1 (25 of 26) future strokes. Patients without MRIPH had an estimated annual absolute stroke risk of only 0.6%. Cox multivariate regression analysis proved MRIPH as a strong predictor of recurrent ischemic events (hazard ratio [HR] = 12.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.8–30.1, p < 0.001) and stroke alone (HR = 35.0, 95% CI = 4.7–261.6, p = 0.001). Meta-analysis of published data confirmed this association between MRIPH and recurrent cerebral ischemic events in symptomatic carotid artery stenosis (odds ratio = 12.2, 95% CI = 5.5–27.1, p < 0.00001). Interpretation MRIPH independently and strongly predicts recurrent ipsilateral ischemic events, and stroke alone, in symptomatic ≥50% carotid artery stenosis. The very low stroke risk in patients without MRIPH puts into question current risk–benefit assessment for CEA in this subgroup. ANN NEUROL 2013;73:774–784 PMID:23463579

  2. Prevention strategies for cardioembolic stroke: present and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Giacalone, Giacomo; Abbas, Mohammed Abballa; Corea, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cause of cardioembolism. An update on secondary prevention strategies, used to protect patients from the risk of stroke in many common cardiac conditions, is presented in the paper. The main line of actions of stroke prevention in cardioembolism is mostly connected with antithrombotic drugs, but also other, more invasive, techniques are quickly emerging. Also the classic pharmacological prevention with coumarins may soon be overcome by new generation anticoagulants. Is an aggressive treatment of Patent Foramen Ovale (PFO) always recommended? One of the main challenges of the future years will be to understand competitiveness between old and new preventive strategies. PMID:20721324

  3. Recurrent Stroke with Rapid Development of Intracranial Stenoses in Polycythemia Vera.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Ane M; Abraira, Laura; Guanyabens, Nicolau; Millán, Mónica; Munuera, Josep; Dávalos, Antoni; López-Cancio, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Polycythemia vera (PV) is a blood disorder in which the first expression may be an ischemic stroke. Stroke mechanism in PV is usually attributed to a hypercoagulability state and blood stasis. We report a case of a patient with PV presenting with recurrent ischemic stroke associated with the development of large intracranial stenosis in a period of 1 month. Stenosis was associated with microembolic signals detected by transcranial Doppler. One year later and after hematocrit control, stenosis persisted but microembolic signals disappeared. We discuss similar reports in the literature and the possible pathophysiological mechanism of large-vessel damage in these patients. PMID:26825349

  4. [Management of blood pressure for stroke prevention].

    PubMed

    Tanahashi, Norio

    2016-04-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for both cerebral infarction and intracerebral hemorrhage. The relationship between blood pressure (BP) and stroke risk is strong and continuous. Throughout the usual range of BPs, including the nonhypertensive range, the higher the BP is, the greater the risk of stroke. Regular BP screening and appropriate treatment of patients with hypertension, including life style modification and pharmacotherapy, are recommended. Patients who have hypertension should be treated with antihypertensive drugs to a target BP of < 140/90 mmHg. Successful reduction of BP is more important in reducing stroke risk than the choice of a specific agent, and treatment should be individualized on the basis of other patient characteristics and medication tolerance. In hypertensive patients with stroke, subjects to be treated with antihypertensive drugs and the target level of BP control are determined on the basis of clinical disease type, interval after onset, severity, age, and the use of antithrombotic. drugs. According to the guideline of the Japanese Society of Hypertension (JSH 2014), in the chronic phase of cerebral infarction, cerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage, target BP should be < 140/ 90 mmHg. In patients with lacunar infarction, those taking antithrombotic drugs, cerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage, a lower level, < 130/80 mmHg should be targeted if possible. Oral antihypertensive drugs such as Ca channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers and diuretics are recommended for patients with stroke. PMID:27333760

  5. Pioglitazone for Secondary Prevention after Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack: Rationale and Design of the Insulin Resistance Intervention after Stroke (IRIS) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Viscoli, Catherine M.; Brass, Lawrence M.; Carolei, Antonio; Conwit, Robin; Ford, Gary A.; Furie, Karen L.; Gorman, Mark; Guarino, Peter D.; Inzucchi, Silvio E.; Lovejoy, Anne M.; Parsons, Mark W.; Peduzzi, Peter N.; Ringleb, Peter; Schwartz, Gregory G.; Spence, J. David; Tanne, David; Young, Lawrence H.; Kernan, Walter N.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recurrent vascular events remain a major source of morbidity and mortality after stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). The Insulin Resistance Intervention after Stroke (IRIS) trial is evaluating an approach to secondary prevention based on the established association between insulin resistance and increased risk for ischemic vascular events. Specifically, IRIS will test the effectiveness of pioglitazone, an insulin-sensitizing drug of the thiazolidinedione class, for reducing the risk for stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) among insulin resistant, non-diabetic patients with a recent ischemic stroke or TIA. Design: Eligible patients for IRIS must have had insulin resistance defined by a Homeostasis Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance greater than 3.0 without meeting criteria for diabetes. Within 6 months of the index stroke or TIA, patients were randomly assigned to pioglitazone (titrated from 15mg to 45mg/day) or matching placebo and followed for up to 5 years. The primary outcome is time to stroke or MI. Secondary outcomes include time to stroke alone, acute coronary syndrome, diabetes, cognitive decline and all-cause mortality. Enrollment of 3876 participants from 179 sites in seven countries was completed in January, 2013. Participant follow-up will continue until July, 2015. Summary: The IRIS Trial will determine whether treatment with pioglitazone improves cardiovascular outcomes of non-diabetic, insulin-resistant patients with stroke or TIA. Results are expected in early 2016. PMID:25458644

  6. Antiplatelet therapy for secondary prevention of noncardioembolic ischemic stroke: a critical review.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Martin J; Hankey, Graeme J; Eikelboom, John W

    2008-05-01

    For patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack caused by atherothromboembolism, immediate and long-term aspirin reduces the relative risk of recurrent stroke, MI, and death attributable to vascular causes. Oral anticoagulation is not more effective than aspirin. Long-term clopidogrel reduces the relative risk of stroke, MI, or vascular death by about 9% (0.3% to 16.5%) compared with aspirin. Any long-term benefits of clopidogrel combined with aspirin, compared with aspirin or clopidogrel alone, appear to be offset by increased major bleeding. The combination of aspirin and extended-release dipyridamole reduces the relative odds of stroke, MI, or vascular death by about 18% (odds ratio 0.82, 0.74 to 0.91) compared with aspirin alone without causing more bleeding. Cilostazole reduces the risk of stroke, MI, or vascular death by 39% compared to placebo. A large clinical trial comparing clopidogrel with the combination of aspirin and dipyridamole, in >20 000 patients with recent (<120 days) atherothrombotic ischemic stroke, is expected to report in 2008. Emerging antiplatelet therapies presently being evaluated for secondary prevention of atherothromboembolism include other P(2)Y(12) ADP receptor antagonists (prasugrel, cangrelor, AZD 6140), thromboxane receptor antagonists (eg, S18886 - terutroban), and thrombin receptor (PAR-1) antagonists (eg, SCH530348). PMID:18369175

  7. Barriers to medication adherence for the secondary prevention of stroke: a qualitative interview study in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Jamison, James; Graffy, Jonathan; Mullis, Ricky; Mant, Jonathan; Sutton, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background Medications are highly effective at reducing risk of recurrent stroke, but success is influenced by adherence to treatment. Among survivors of stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA), adherence to medication is known to be suboptimal. Aim To identify and report barriers to medication adherence for the secondary prevention of stroke/TIA. Design and setting A qualitative interview study was conducted within general practice surgeries in the East of England, UK. Method Patients were approached by letter and invited to take part in a qualitative research study. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with survivors of stroke, caregivers, and GPs to explore their perspectives and views around secondary prevention and perceived barriers to medication adherence. Key themes were identified using a grounded theory approach. Verbatim quotes describing the themes are presented here. Results In total, 28 survivors of stroke, including 14 accompanying caregivers and five GPs, were interviewed. Two key themes were identified. Patient level barriers included ability to self-care, the importance people attach to a stroke event, and knowledge of stroke and medication. Medication level barriers included beliefs about medication and beliefs about how pills work, medication routines, changing medications, and regimen complexity and burden of treatment. Conclusion Patients who have had a stroke are faced with multiple barriers to taking secondary prevention medications in UK general practice. This research suggests that a collaborative approach between caregivers, survivors, and healthcare professionals is needed to address these barriers and facilitate medication-taking behaviour. PMID:27215572

  8. Homozygous MTHFR C677T gene mutation and recurrent stroke in an infant.

    PubMed

    Garoufi, Anastasia J; Prassouli, Alexia A; Attilakos, Achilleas V; Voudris, Konstantinos A; Katsarou, Eustathia S

    2006-07-01

    The role of homozygosity for the C677T mutation in the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene as an independent risk factor for primary and recurrent stroke has been questioned, although recent data appear to be supportive. However, the association of homozygous C677T MTHFR mutation with silent brain infarctions in infancy has not been reported. The authors describe an 11-month-old male who had suffered a silent brain infarction followed by a symptomatic arterial stroke. The evaluation revealed mildly elevated homocysteine levels secondary to homozygous C677T alleles for MTHFR and iron deficiency anemia. An extensive evaluation for other causes of infarction was negative. We suggest that the mother's homozygous MTHFR status played a role in the early onset of stroke and that iron deficiency anemia may have contributed to the recurrence. The patient was treated with anticoagulation therapy, folic acid, and iron supplementation and has not had a recurrent event during 3 years of follow-up. This case provides further evidence that homozygous MTHFR mutation is a predisposing factor for early and recurrent pediatric stroke, including silent infarcts, especially in the presence of other risk factors. PMID:16814086

  9. Epidemiology and prevention of stroke: a worldwide perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kuklina, Elena V; Tong, Xin; George, Mary G; Bansil, Pooja

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews how epidemiological studies during the last 5 years have advanced our knowledge in addressing the global stroke epidemic. The specific objectives were to review the current evidence supporting management of ten major modifiable risk factors for prevention of stroke: hypertension, current smoking, diabetes, obesity, poor diet, physical inactivity, atrial fibrillation, excessive alcohol consumption, abnormal lipid profile and psychosocial stress/depression. PMID:22288675

  10. A Practical Approach to Preventing Postoperative Recurrence in Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hashash, Jana G; Regueiro, Miguel

    2016-05-01

    Postoperative Crohn's disease recurrence remains common, and preventing additional surgery remains a challenge. A critical step to postoperative management of Crohn's disease is being able to identify patients who should receive immediate postoperative therapy from the patients who can wait for recurrence prior to starting medications. All patients, regardless of their risk for recurrence, are advised to undergo a colonoscopy at 6 to 12 months after surgery to evaluate for endoscopic evidence of Crohn's disease. Further management of patients depends on symptoms and the presence or absence of endoscopic recurrence. PMID:27086006

  11. Controversies and future perspectives of antiplatelet therapy in secondary stroke prevention

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Ralph; Diener, Hans-Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Antiplatelet agents are a cornerstone in the treatment of acute arterial thrombotic events and in the prevention of thrombus formation. However, existing antiplatelet agents (mainly aspirin, the combination of aspirin and dipyridamole and clopidogrel) reduce the risk of vascular events only by about one quarter compared with placebo. As a consequence, more efficacious antiplatelet therapies with a reduced bleeding risk are needed. We give an overview of several new antiplatelet agents that are currently investigated in secondary stroke prevention: adenosine 5′-diphosphonate receptor antagonists, cilostazol, sarpogrelate, terutroban and SCH 530348. There are unique features in secondary stroke prevention that have to be taken into account: ischaemic stroke is a heterogeneous disease caused by multiple aetiologies and the blood–brain barrier is disturbed after stroke which may result in a higher intracerebral bleeding risk. Several small randomized trials indicated that the combination of aspirin and clopidogrel might be superior to antiplatelet monotherapy in the acute and early post-ischaemic phase. There is an ongoing debate about antiplatelet resistance. Decreasing response to aspirin is correlated independently with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. However, there is still no evidence from randomized trials linking aspirin resistance and recurrent ischaemic events. Similarly, randomized trials have not demonstrated a clinical significantly decreased antiplatelet effect by the concomitant use of clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors. Nevertheless, a routine use of this drug combination is not recommended. PMID:20738445

  12. Update on Antithrombotic Therapy for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Opinion statement Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in the elderly, affecting 1 in 20 adults over the age of 70 years. Stroke is a major yet highly preventable complication of AF, and the strokes related to AF often are disabling and fatal. Warfarin is the treatment of choice in high-risk patients with AF, and its superior efficacy over aspirin for preventing stroke in these patients is widely recognized. However, several eligible patients with AF are not being treated with warfarin or are being treated inadequately, largely because of concerns regarding the attendant strict monitoring, drug interactions, and risk of major bleeding. As such, alternative antithrombotic therapies that can rival or exceed the efficacy of warfarin, yet compare favorably with its administration and side effect profile, are being sought. One such strategy, the use of a combination antiplatelet regimen, for stroke prevention in high-risk patients with nonvalvular AF was investigated recently in two clinical trials. This article reviews the role of combination antiplatelet regimens in stroke prevention for patients with AF. Other therapies discussed include oral anticoagulation, single antiplatelet therapies, oral anticoagulation plus antiplatelet treatment, direct thrombin inhibitors, and factor Xa inhibitors. PMID:20461116

  13. Orthopantomography contribution to prevent isquemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chimenos-Küstner, Eduardo; López-López, osé

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The ortopantomography (OPG) can be a valuable way for an early detection of calcified atheroma plaques, thus contributing for a preliminary stroke risk evaluation. The study looks for the existence of calcified atheroma plates through the use of OPG, comparing the results with the stenosis percentage found through eco-doppler. It has been analyzed the correlation of the number of years as a smoker, arterial hypertension and body mass index, against the risk of having calcified atheroma plaques. Study Design: Observational, transversal and prospective study with 84 patients from the Dental Center of Hospital Particular de Lisboa. First the patients answered to an inquiry and them they were submitted to an OPG and an eco-doppler. Results and Conclusions: It is possible to detect calcified atheroma plaques in the carotid artery through an OPG and patients who have them have got a fifteen fold greater risk of suffering from carotid stenosis. In this study, it has been confirmed the increase in carotid stenosis for long term smokers (OR = 1,033, n=18, 42,9%). The study results show that hypertension patients have a probability 5,426 greater than normal of developing atheroma plaques (with sig=0,049). Amid analyzed patients, the correlation between obesity and the existence of carotid atheroma plaques was significant, although negative (sig=0,047). OPG can help find patients with higher risk of isquemic stroke. Key words:Orthopantomography, Stroke, Carotid disease, Calcified atheroma. PMID:24790711

  14. Addressing Disparities in Stroke Prevention for Atrial Fibrillation: Educational Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Karcher, Rachel; Berman, Adam E; Gross, Hartmut; Hess, David C; Jauch, Edward C; Viser, Paul E; Solenski, Nina J; Wolf, Andrew M D

    2016-07-01

    Disparities in atrial fibrillation (AF)-related stroke and mortality persist, especially racial disparities, within the US "Stroke Belt." This study identified barriers to optimal stroke prevention to develop a framework for clinician education. A comprehensive educational needs assessment was developed focusing on clinicians within the Stroke Belt. The mixed qualitative-quantitative approach included regional surveys and one-on-one clinician interviews. Identified contributors to disparities included implicit racial biases, lack of awareness of racial disparities in AF stroke risk, and lack of effective multicultural awareness and training. Additional barriers affecting disparities included patient medical mistrust and clinician-patient communication challenges. General barriers included lack of consistency in assessing stroke and anticoagulant-related bleeding risk, underuse of standardized risk assessment tools, discomfort with novel anticoagulants, and patient education deficiencies. Effective cultural competency training is one strategy to reduce disparities in AF-related stroke and mortality by improving implicit clinician bias, addressing medical mistrust, and improving clinician-patient communication. PMID:25788477

  15. Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations: secondary prevention of stroke guidelines, update 2014.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Shelagh B; Wein, Theodore H; Lindsay, M Patrice; Buck, Brian; Cote, Robert; Ellis, Paul; Foley, Norine; Hill, Michael D; Jaspers, Sharon; Jin, Albert Y; Kwiatkowski, Brenda; MacPhail, Carolyn; McNamara-Morse, Dana; McMurtry, Michael S; Mysak, Tania; Pipe, Andrew; Silver, Karen; Smith, Eric E; Gubitz, Gord

    2015-04-01

    Every year, approximately 62,000 people with stroke and transient ischemic attack are treated in Canadian hospitals. The 2014 update of the Canadian Secondary Prevention of Stroke guideline is a comprehensive summary of current evidence-based recommendations for clinicians in a range of settings, who provide care to patients following stroke. Notable changes in this 5th edition include an emphasis on treating the highest risk patients who present within 48 h of symptom onset with transient or persistent motor or speech symptoms, who need to be transported to the closest emergency department with capacity for advanced stroke care; a recommendation for brain and vascular imaging (of the intra- and extracranial vessels) to be completed urgently using computed tomography/computed tomography angiography; prolonged cardiac monitoring for patients with suspective cardioembolic stroke but without evidence for atrial fibrillation on electrocardiogram or holter monitoring; and de-emphasizing the need for routine echocardiogram. The Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations include a range of supporting materials such as implementation resources to facilitate the adoption of evidence to practice, and related performance measures to enable monitoring of uptake and effectiveness of the recommendations using a standardized approach. The guidelines further emphasize the need for a systems approach to stroke care, involving an interprofessional team, with access to specialists regardless of patient location, and the need to overcome geographical barriers to ensure equity in access within a universal health-care system. PMID:25535808

  16. Trends in One-Year Recurrent Ischemic Stroke among the Elderly in the USA: 1994–2002

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Norrina B.; Holford, Theodore R.; Bracken, Michael B.; Goldstein, Larry B.; Howard, George; Wang, Yun; Lichtman, Judith H.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Of the 795,000 strokes occurring in the USA each year, over 20% are recurrent events. Little is known about how the rates of recurrent stroke in the country have changed over time. Our objective was to determine national trends in 1-year recurrent ischemic stroke rates by US county among the elderly from 1994 to 2002. Methods One-year recurrent stroke rates following incident ischemic stroke (ICD-9 433, 434, 436) among all fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries were determined by US county for 1994–1996, 1997–1999, and 2000–2002. Bayesian spatiotemporal Poisson modeling was used to determine county-specific trends in recurrent stroke rates over time with risk adjustment for demographics, medical history and comorbid conditions. Results The analysis included more than 2.5 million beneficiaries (56% women; mean age: 78 years; 87% white; n = 957,933 for 1994–1996; n = 838,330 for 1996–1999; n = 895,916 for 2000–2002) aggregated to all 3,118 US counties. After adjustment for changing patient demographics and comorbidities, there was a 4.5% decrease in recurrent stroke rates from 1994–1996 (13.2%) to 2000–2002 (12.6%; p for trend <0.0001). The geographic and temporal patterns were not uniform; the recurrent stroke rates decreased within sections of the Southeast (the ‘stroke belt’), but increased in counties in the middle and western sections of the USA. Conclusions The overall recurrent ischemic stroke rates declined by almost 5% from 1994 to 2002, but temporal patterns varied markedly by region. Additional research is needed to identify the reasons for this geographic disparity. PMID:20881382

  17. [The Japanese government's efforts to prevent heat stroke].

    PubMed

    Homma, Masato

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, as one of the effects of global warming and heat island phenomenon, the risk of heat stroke in daily life is increasing. The worst heat wave in our history attacked in 2010, which killed more than 1,700 people. Therefore, the Japanese Government, including the Ministry of the Environment, has promoted the following measures: (1) Provision of information about prediction and observation of temperature and warning of hot weather (2) Awareness-raising of preventive measures appropriate to the heat stroke (3) Dissemination of information on the occurrence of heat stroke, e.g. the number of deaths, the number of persons taken to hospital by ambulance (4) Promotion of research and study on heat stroke PMID:22690615

  18. Management of stroke risk factors during the process of rehabilitation. Secondary stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Halar, E M

    1999-11-01

    Epidemiologic and prospective cohort studies have shown a strong correlation between risk factors and stroke morbidity and mortality. The reduction or control of risk factors, on the other hand, can reduce stroke morbidity and mortality. Rehabilitation professionals involved in comprehensive rehabilitation of stroke patients may include the management of risk factors in the scope of their practice and thus contribute to longer life expectancy and improved quality of life of these patients. Decreasing disability, improving quality of life, and prolonging life are chief goals of the rehabilitation process. This article reviews the rationale for risk management and stresses the value of aerobic and conditioning exercises and is intended to supplement the article on stroke prevention co-authored by Daryl Gress and Vineeta Singh. PMID:10573711

  19. Vorapaxar for secondary stroke prevention: perspectives and obstacles.

    PubMed

    Serebruany, Victor L; Kim, Moo Hyun; Fortmann, Seth D; Hanley, Dan F

    2015-01-01

    Vorapaxar, a novel antiplatelet thrombin protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) inhibitor, has been evaluated in the successful TRA2P trial and failed TRACER trial. The drug is currently approved for post myocardial infarction and peripheral artery disease indications on top of clopidogrel and/or aspirin. The stroke data after vorapaxar are mixed, dominated with heavy excess of intracranial bleeding risks and slightly worsened second stroke rates, but show less primary ischemic strokes. Fortunately, these conflicting data do not belong purely to vorapaxar per se but rather, reflect unreasonably aggressive strategies, including predominantly triple antiplatelet therapy, utilized in both Trial to Assess the Effects of SCH 530348 in Preventing Heart Attack and Stroke in Patients with Arteriosclerosis (TRA2P) and especially in Thrombin-Receptor Antagonist Vorapaxar in Acute Coronary Syndromes (TRACER). The FDA-confirmed evidence strongly suggests that unique pharmacokinetics and a very mild "comfort zone" antiplatelet profile makes vorapaxar a good candidate for improved secondary stroke prevention. The outcome-driven, randomized trial should test head-to-head monotherapy with vorapaxar (Zontivity®) versus clopidogrel (Plavix®) and versus dipyridamole with very low dose aspirin (Aggrenox®). The advantages and potential pitfalls of such a trial are discussed in this article. PMID:26566105

  20. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stay Connected Home » Stroke Heath and Aging Stroke What Is a Stroke? Stroke Is an Emergency. ... IGNORE THE SIGNS OF STROKE! What Is a Stroke? A stroke happens when something changes how blood ...

  1. Glycated Hemoglobin Independently Predicts Stroke Recurrence within One Year after Acute First-Ever Non-Cardioembolic Strokes Onset in A Chinese Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuolin; Shi, Yuzhi; Wang, Chunxue; Jia, Qian; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Gaifen; Wang, Yilong; Liu, Liping; Wang, Yongjun

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia is related to stroke. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) can reflect pre-stroke glycaemia status. However, the information on the direct association between HbA1c and recurrence after non-cardioembolic acute ischemic strokes is rare and there is no consistent conclusion. Methods The ACROSS-China database comprised of 2186 consecutive first-ever acute ischemic stroke patients with baseline HbA1c values. After excluding patients who died from non-stroke recurrence and patients lost to follow up, 1817 and 1540 were eligible for 3-month and 1-year analyses, respectively. Multivariate Cox regression was performed to evaluate the associations between HbA1c and 3-month and 1-year stroke recurrence. Results The HbA1c values at admission were divided into 4 levels by quartiles: Q1 (<5.5%); Q2 (5.5 to <6.1%); Q3 (6.1% to <7.2%); and Q4 (≥7.2%). The cumulative recurrence rates were 8.3% and 11.0% for 3 months and 1 year, respectively. In multivariate analyses, when compared with Q1, the adjusted hazard ratios (AHRs) were 2.83 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28-6.26) in Q3 and 3.71(95% CI 1.68-8.21) in Q4 for 3-month stroke recurrence; 3.30 (95% CI 1.31-8.34) in Q3 and 3.35 (95% CI 1.36-8.21) in Q4 for 1-year stroke recurrence. Adding fasting plasma glucose in the multivariate analyses did not modify the association: AHRs were 2.75 (95% CI 1.24-6.11) in Q3 and 3.67 (95% CI 1.59-8.53) in Q4 for 3-month analysis; AHRs were 3.08 (95% CI 1.10-8.64) in Q3 and 3.31(95% CI 1.35-8.14) in Q4 for 1-year analysis. Conclusions A higher “normal” HbA1c level reflecting pre-stroke glycaemia status independently predicts stroke recurrence within one year after non-cardioembolic acute ischemic stroke onset. HbA1c is recommended as a routine test in acute ischemic stroke patients. PMID:24236195

  2. Early detection of occult atrial fibrillation and stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Keach, Joseph Walker; Bradley, Steven M; Turakhia, Mintu P; Maddox, Thomas M

    2015-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a very common arrhythmia and significantly increases stroke risk. This risk can be mitigated with oral anticoagulation, but AF is often asymptomatic, or occult, preventing timely detection and treatment. Accordingly, occult AF may cause stroke before it is clinically diagnosed. Currently, guidelines for the early detection and treatment of occult AF are limited. This review addresses recent advancements in occult AF detection methods, identification of populations at high risk for occult AF, the treatment of occult AF with oral anticoagulation, as well as ongoing trials that may answer critically important questions regarding occult AF screening. PMID:25935765

  3. Prevention and Treatment of Recurrent Hepatitis B after Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Maiwall, Rakhi; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B is a global health problem that leads to development of various complications, such as cirrhosis, liver cancer, and liver failure requiring liver transplantation. The recurrence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) post-liver transplantation is a major cause of allograft dysfunction, cirrhosis of the allograft, and graft failure. Patients with high viral load at the time of transplantation, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) positivity, or those with a history of anti-viral drug resistance are considered as high-risk for recurrent HBV post-liver transplantation, while patients with low viral load, including HBeAg negative status, acute liver failure, and hepatitis D virus (HDV) co-infection are considered to be at low-risk for recurrent HBV post-liver transplantation. Antivirals for patients awaiting liver transplantation(LT) cause suppression of HBV replication and reduce the risk of recurrent HBV infection of the allograft and, therefore, all HBV patients with decompensated cirrhosis should be treated with potent antivirals with high genetic barrier to resistance (entecavir or tenofovir) prior to liver transplantation. Prevention of post-liver transplantation recurrence should be done using a combination of hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) and antivirals in patients at high risk of recurrence. Low dose HBIG, HBIG-free protocols, and monoprophylaxis with high potency antivirals can still be considered in patients at low risk of recurrence. Even, marginal grafts from anti-HBc positive donors can be safely used in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) negative, preferably in anti-hepatitis B core (HBc)/anti-hepatitis B surface (HBs) positive recipients. In this article, we aim to review the mechanisms and risk factors of HBV recurrence post-LT in addition to the various treatment strategies proposed for the prevention of recurrent HBV infection PMID:27047773

  4. [Pathogenetic justification of statin use in ischaemic stroke prevention according to inflammatory theory in development of atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Kotlęga, Dariusz; Ciećwież, Sylwester; Turowska-Kowalska, Jolanta; Nowacki, Przemysław

    2012-01-01

    There is an inflammatory component in the pathogenesis of ischaemic stroke, which plays an important role in inducing atherothrombotic and embolic stroke. Statins, HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A) reductase inhibitors are widely used in the primary and secondary prevention of ischaemic stroke. It has been proved that beyond their main effect on inhibition of endogenous cholesterol, they also modify the inflammatory process. Additional benefits from the use of statins result from their effect on the immune system. Increased risk of recurrent vascular episodes and risk of death after statin withdrawal in patients with vascular disorders is connected with termination of the anti-inflammatory effect of these drugs. The authors highlight that because of the anti-inflammatory effect of statins it is reasonable to use them in all patients at risk of ischaemic stroke, including those with atrial fibrillation. PMID:22581600

  5. Secondary preventive medication persistence and adherence 1 year after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Olson, D.M.; Zhao, X.; Pan, W.; Zimmer, L.O.; Goldstein, L.B.; Alberts, M.J.; Fagan, S.C.; Fonarow, G.C.; Johnston, S.C.; Kidwell, C.; LaBresh, K.A.; Ovbiagele, B.; Schwamm, L.; Peterson, E.D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Data on long-term use of secondary prevention medications following stroke are limited. The Adherence eValuation After Ischemic stroke–Longitudinal (AVAIL) Registry assessed patient, provider, and system-level factors influencing continuation of prevention medications for 1 year following stroke hospitalization discharge. Methods: Patients with ischemic stroke or TIA discharged from 106 hospitals participating in the American Heart Association Get With The Guidelines–Stroke program were surveyed to determine their use of warfarin, antiplatelet, antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, and diabetes medications from discharge to 12 months. Reasons for stopping medications were ascertained. Persistence was defined as continuation of all secondary preventive medications prescribed at hospital discharge, and adherence as continuation of prescribed medications except those stopped according to health care provider instructions. Results: Of the 2,880 patients enrolled in AVAIL, 88.4% (2,457 patients) completed 1-year interviews. Of these, 65.9% were regimen persistent and 86.6% were regimen adherent. Independent predictors of 1-year medication persistence included fewer medications prescribed at discharge, having an adequate income, having an appointment with a primary care provider, and greater understanding of why medications were prescribed and their side effects. Independent predictors of adherence were similar to those for persistence. Conclusions: Although up to one-third of stroke patients discontinued one or more secondary prevention medications within 1 year of hospital discharge, self-discontinuation of these medications is uncommon. Several potentially modifiable patient, provider, and system-level factors associated with persistence and adherence may be targets for future interventions. PMID:21900638

  6. Pure Motor Stroke Secondary to Cerebral Infarction of Recurrent Artery of Heubner after Mild Head Trauma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Ali; Kizilay, Zahir; Ozkul, Ayca; Çirak, Bayram

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The recurrent Heubner’s artery is the distal part of the medial striate artery. Occlusion of the recurrent artery of Heubner, classically contralateral hemiparesis with fasciobrachiocrural predominance, is attributed to the occlusion of the recurrent artery of Heubner and is widely known as a stroke syndrome in adults. However, isolated occlusion of the deep perforating arteries following mild head trauma also occurs extremely rarely in childhood. CASE REPORT: Here we report the case of an 11-year-old boy with pure motor stroke. The brain MRI showed an acute ischemia in the recurrent artery of Heubner supply area following mild head trauma. His fasciobrachial hemiparesis and dysarthria were thought to be secondary to the stretching of deep perforating arteries leading to occlusion of the recurrent artery of Heubner. CONCLUSION: Post-traumatic pure motor ischemic stroke can be secondary to stretching of the deep perforating arteries especially in childhood.

  7. Stroke prevention by direct revascularization for patients with adult-onset moyamoya disease presenting with ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tackeun; Oh, Chang Wan; Kwon, O-Ki; Hwang, Gyojun; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Cho, Won-Sang; Bang, Jae Seung

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a progressive disease that can cause recurrent stroke. The authors undertook this retrospective case-control study with a large sample size in an attempt to assess the efficacy of direct or combined revascularization surgery for ischemia in adults with MMD. METHODS The authors investigated cases involving patients with moyamoya disease presenting with ischemia who visited Seoul National University Bundang Hospital and Seoul National University Hospital between 2000 and 2014. Among 441 eligible patients, 301 underwent revascularization surgery and 140 were treated conservatively. Variables evaluated included age at diagnosis, sex, surgical record, Suzuki stage, and occurrence of stroke. Patients were stratified into 2 groups based on whether or not they had undergone revascularization surgery. Actuarial 1-, 5-, and 10-year stroke rates were calculated using the life table method. Risk factor analysis for 5-year stroke occurrence was conducted with multivariate regression. RESULTS Of the 441 patients, 301 had been surgically treated (revascularization group) and 140 had not (control group). The mean follow-up durations were 45 and 77 months, respectively. The actuarial 10-year cumulative incidence rate for any kind of stroke was significantly lower in the revascularization group (9.4%) than in the control group (19.6%) (p = 0.041); the relative risk reduction (RRR) was also superior (52.0%) in the revascularization group, and the number needed to treat was 10. The 10-year rate of ischemic stroke was greater (13.3%) in the control group than in the revascularization group (3.9%) (p = 0.019). The RRR for ischemic stroke in the revascularization group was 70.7%, and the number needed to treat was 11. However, the actuarial 1- and 5-year rates of ischemic stroke did not significantly differently between the groups. Overall, revascularization surgery was shown to be an independent protective factor, as revealed by multivariate analysis

  8. Old and new anticoagulant agents for the prevention and treatment of patients with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Martí-Fàbregas, Joan; Mateo, José

    2009-01-01

    Vitamin K antagonists are the only oral anticoagulants available and are considered as well-established treatment to prevent a first stroke or a recurrent stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. The difficulties in the routine management of these patients cause an underuse of vitamin K antagonists. For long-term use, there is a need for safer and more effective oral anticoagulants that do not require routine monitoring of coagulation. Recently, new drugs have been developed and there are a number of clinical trials for the primary and secondary prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation. The new anticoagulants that are being investigated target factor Xa or thrombin. The factor Xa inhibitors include indirect inhibitors such as idraparinux and biotinylated idraparinux that inhibit factor Xa by potentiating antithrombin. Also being investigated are apixaban and rivaroxaban, orally active agents that inhibit factor Xa directly. Direct thrombin inhibitors include ximelagatran and dabigatran etexilate. Although ximelagatran was withdrawn early because of liver toxicity, it provided convincing evidence that new oral anticoagulants have the potential to replace warfarin. However, even if these new drugs prove superior to dose-adjusted warfarin, their benefits must be substantial (retaining high efficacy with added safety and convenience) to offset their increased cost. PMID:19342840

  9. Imaging Parameters and Recurrent Cerebrovascular Events in Patients With Minor Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack

    PubMed Central

    Yaghi, Shadi; Rostanski, Sara K.; Boehme, Amelia K.; Martin-Schild, Sheryl; Samai, Alyana; Silver, Brian; Blum, Christina A.; Jayaraman, Mahesh V.; Siket, Matthew S.; Khan, Muhib; Furie, Karen L.; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Marshall, Randolph S.; Willey, Joshua Z.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Neurological worsening and recurrent stroke contribute substantially to morbidity associated with transient ischemic attacks and strokes (TIA-S). OBJECTIVE To determine predictors of early recurrent cerebrovascular events (RCVEs) among patients with TIA-S and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores of 0 to 3. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A retrospective cohort study was conducted at 2 tertiary care centers (Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, and Tulane University Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana) between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2014. All patients with neurologist-diagnosed TIA-S with a National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 0 to 3 who presented to the emergency department were included. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome (adjudicated by 3 vascular neurologists) was RCVE: neurological deterioration in the absence of a medical explanation or recurrent TIA-S during hospitalization. RESULTS Of the 1258 total patients, 1187 had no RCVEs and 71 had RCVEs; of this group, 750 patients (63.2%) and 39 patients (54.9%), respectively, were aged 60 years or older. There were 505 patients with TIA-S at Columbia University; 31 (6.1%) had RCVEs (15 patients had neurological deterioration only, 11 had recurrent TIA-S only, and 5 had both). The validation cohort at Tulane University consisted of 753 patients; 40 (5.3%) had RCVEs (24 patients had neurological deterioration only and 16 had both). Predictors of RCVE in multivariate models in both cohorts were infarct on neuroimaging (computed tomographic scan or diffusion-weighted imaging sequences on magnetic resonance imaging) (Columbia University: not applicable and Tulane University: odds ratio, 1.75; 95% CI, 0.82–3.74; P = .15) and large-vessel disease etiology (Columbia University: odds ratio, 6.69; 95% CI, 3.10–14.50 and Tulane University: odds ratio, 8.13; 95% CI, 3.86–17.12; P < .001). There was an increase in the percentage of

  10. Prevention of hepatitis B recurrence after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Polak, Wojciech G; Gładysz, Andrzej; Rotter, Katarzyna

    2005-01-01

    Over the last decade significant improvement in patient and graft survival has been observed after liver transplantation for hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related liver disease, mostly because of efficient prophylaxis against hepatitis B reinfection. This review discusses different approches in prevention of hepatitis B recurrence in liver recipients including new concepts as vaccination against hepatitis B after liver transplantation. Based on available data combined prophylaxis with hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) and lamivudine is currently recommended prophylaxis for HBV recurrence after liver transplantation. PMID:16617660

  11. Probiotics for prevention of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis: a review.

    PubMed

    Falagas, Matthew E; Betsi, Gregoria I; Athanasiou, Stavros

    2006-08-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is a common infection affecting the quality of life of many women. Probiotics have been investigated as possible agents for the prevention of recurrences of VVC. We reviewed the available literature. In some studies the development of VVC was associated with either a low number of lactobacilli in the vagina or with the presence of H2O2-non-producing vaginal lactobacilli, although there are a few studies not supporting these statements. In addition, in vitro studies have shown that lactobacilli can inhibit the growth of Candida albicans and/or its adherence on the vaginal epithelium. The results of some clinical trials support the effectiveness of lactobacilli, especially Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus fermentum RC-14, administered either orally or intravaginally in colonizing the vagina and/or preventing the colonization and infection of the vagina by C. albicans, while the results of a small number of clinical trials do not corroborate these findings. Nevertheless, most of the relevant clinical trials had methodological problems such as small sample size, no control group (placebo) and included women without confirmed recurrent VVC, and thus they are not reliable for drawing definitive conclusions. Thus, the available evidence for the use of probiotics for prevention of recurrent VVC is limited. However, the empirical use of probiotics may be considered in women with frequent recurrence of VVC (more than three episodes per year), especially for those who have adverse effects from or contraindications for the use of antifungal agents, since adverse effects of probiotics are very rare. In any case women should be clearly informed about the unproven usefulness of probiotics for this purpose. In conclusion, despite the promising results of some studies, further research is needed to prove the effectiveness of probiotics in preventing the recurrences of VVC and to allow their wide use for this

  12. Unusual case of recurrent SMART (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Ramnath Santosh; Sreedher, Gayathri; Malhotra, Konark; Guduru, Zain; Agarwal, Deeksha; Flaherty, Mary; Leichliter, Timothy; Rana, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome is a rare delayed complication of cerebral radiation therapy. A 53-year-old female initially presented with headache, confusion and left homonymous hemianopia. Her medical history was notable for cerebellar hemangioblastoma, which was treated with radiation in 1987. Her initial brain MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) revealed cortical enhancement in the right temporo-parieto-occipital region. She improved spontaneously in 2 weeks and follow-up scan at 4 weeks revealed no residual enhancement or encephalomalacia. She presented 6 weeks later with aphasia. Her MRI brain revealed similar contrast-enhancing cortical lesion but on the left side. Repeat CSF studies was again negative other than elevated protein. She was treated conservatively and recovered completely within a week. Before diagnosing SMART syndrome, it is important to rule out tumor recurrence, encephalitis, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and stroke. Typically the condition is self-limiting, and gradually resolves. PMID:27570398

  13. Edoxaban in venous thromboembolism and stroke prevention: an appraisal.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Marco; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-01-01

    Oral anticoagulation is the therapeutic cornerstone in preventing thromboembolic risk in both atrial fibrillation (AF) and venous thromboembolism (VTE). After decades of the sole therapeutic oral anticoagulation option being warfarin, the introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants has heralded a new era. Edoxaban is the latest addition to these available for clinical use. Edoxaban was as effective and safer than warfarin in preventing thromboembolic risk in AF patients. Similarly, edoxaban effectiveness and safety was evident when treating VTE patients to prevent recurrent VTE or VTE-related death. Therefore, edoxaban represents a valuable alternative in treating thromboembolic risk for AF and VTE patients. PMID:27013883

  14. Edoxaban in venous thromboembolism and stroke prevention: an appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Proietti, Marco; Lip, Gregory YH

    2016-01-01

    Oral anticoagulation is the therapeutic cornerstone in preventing thromboembolic risk in both atrial fibrillation (AF) and venous thromboembolism (VTE). After decades of the sole therapeutic oral anticoagulation option being warfarin, the introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants has heralded a new era. Edoxaban is the latest addition to these available for clinical use. Edoxaban was as effective and safer than warfarin in preventing thromboembolic risk in AF patients. Similarly, edoxaban effectiveness and safety was evident when treating VTE patients to prevent recurrent VTE or VTE-related death. Therefore, edoxaban represents a valuable alternative in treating thromboembolic risk for AF and VTE patients. PMID:27013883

  15. Stroke - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    Preventing stroke; Stroke - prevention; CVA - prevention; TIA - prevention ... Biology; Council on Hypertension. Guidelines for the primary prevention of stroke: a statement for healthcare professionals from ...

  16. Medical prevention of recurrent acute otitis media: an updated overview.

    PubMed

    Marchisio, Paola; Nazzari, Erica; Torretta, Sara; Esposito, Susanna; Principi, Nicola

    2014-05-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is one of the most common pediatric diseases; almost all children experience at least one episode, and a third have two or more episodes in the first three years of life. The disease burden of AOM has important medical, social and economic effects. AOM requires considerable financial assistance due to needing at least one doctor visit and a prescription for antipyretics and/or antibiotics. AOM is also associated with high indirect costs, which are mostly related to lost days of work for one parent. Moreover, due to its acute symptoms and frequent recurrences, AOM considerably impacts both the child and family's quality of life. AOM prevention, particularly recurrent AOM (rAOM), is a primary goal of pediatric practice. In this paper, we review current evidence regarding the efficacy of medical treatments and vaccines for preventing rAOM and suggest the best approaches for AOM-prone children. PMID:24678887

  17. Environmental vascular risk factors: new perspectives for stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Bernal-Pacheco, Oscar; Román, Gustavo C

    2007-11-15

    Despite intensive evaluation of acute stroke patients, perhaps only half of the attributable stroke risk is usually identified. In addition to traditional and non-traditional vascular risk factors-including most recently homocysteine, inflammation, and alterations of coagulation-a number of environmental risk factors for stroke have been identified in the last decade. In this update we review the following: lower education and poor socioeconomic status (probable surrogates for exposure to traditional high-risk behaviors such as smoking, poor nutrition, lack of prenatal control, absence of preventive medical and dental care, and non-compliance of treatment of conditions such as hypertension); depression, stress and affective disorders; obstructive sleep apnea; passive smoking and environmental pollution; infections, in particular periodontal diseases that increase C-reactive protein (CRP); raised body mass index (obesity); exercise, and diet. The possible role of high-fructose corn syrup in the epidemic of obesity in the USA is reviewed. Protective diets include higher consumption of fish, olive oil, grains, fruits and vegetables (Mediterranean diet), as well as probiotic bacteria in yogurt and dairy products. Careful attention should be given to the patient's environment looking for modifiable factors. The effects of clean environmental air and water, adequate diet and appropriate nutrition, healthy teeth, exercise, and refreshing sleep in the prevention of stroke and cardiovascular disease appear to be quite compelling. Although some of these modifiable risk factors lack evidence-based information, judicious clinical sense should be used to counteract the potentially damaging effects of adverse environmental vascular risk factors. PMID:17655871

  18. The therapeutic value of laboratory testing for hypercoagulable states in secondary stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Kalaria, Chandni; Kittner, Steven

    2015-05-01

    Although screening for hypercoagulable states is commonly performed as part of the evaluation of first arterial ischemic stroke in young adults, available evidence does not support this as a routine practice, even in patients with cryptogenic stroke and a positive family history of early thrombotic events or in patients with a patent foramen ovale. Testing for antiphospholipid antibodies is a possible exception because persistent antibodies are associated with an increased risk of recurrent stroke. Despite the lack of supporting data, screening for hypercoagulable states in recurrent early-onset cryptogenic cerebral ischemia could be considered. PMID:25907919

  19. Sulodexide for the Prevention of Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Bignamini, Angelo A.; Davì, Giovanni; Palareti, Gualtiero; Matuška, Jiří; Holý, Martin; Pawlaczyk-Gabriel, Katarzyna; Džupina, Andrej; Sokurenko, German Y.; Didenko, Yury P.; Andrei, Laurentia D.; Lessiani, Gianfranco; Visonà, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Background— Patients with a first episode of unprovoked venous thromboembolism have a high risk of recurrence after discontinuation of anticoagulant therapy. Extending anticoagulation reduces the risk of recurrence but is associated with increased bleeding. Sulodexide, a glycosaminoglycan, exerts antithrombotic and profibrinolytic actions with a low bleeding risk when administered orally, but its benefit for preventing recurrent venous thromboembolism is not well known. Methods and Results— In this multicenter, double-blind study, 615 patients with first-ever unprovoked venous thromboembolism who had completed 3 to 12 months of oral anticoagulant treatment were randomly assigned to sulodexide 500 lipasemic units twice daily or placebo for 2 years, in addition to elastic stockings. The primary efficacy outcome was recurrence of venous thromboembolism. Major or clinically relevant bleeding was the primary safety outcome. Venous thromboembolism recurred in 15 of the 307 patients who received sulodexide and in 30 of the 308 patients who received placebo (hazard ratio, 0.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27–0.92; P=0.02). The analysis in which lost to follow-up was assigned to failure yielded a risk ratio among treated versus control subjects of 0.54 (95% confidence interval, 0.35–0.85; P=0.009). No major bleeding episodes occurred; 2 patients in each treatment group had a clinically relevant bleeding episode. Adverse events were similar in the 2 groups. Conclusion— Sulodexide given after discontinuation of anticoagulant treatment reduced the risk of recurrence in patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism, with no apparent increase of bleeding risk. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/. Identifier: EudraCT number 2009-016923-77. PMID:26408273

  20. Thrombus deflector stent for stroke prevention: A simulation study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyo Won; Navia, Jose A; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2015-07-16

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a dysfunction of heart rhythm and represents an increased predisposition to ischemic stroke in AF patients. It has been shown that the AF-induced hemodynamic conditions may contribute to the increased embolic propensity through the carotid arteries. We simulated a stroke-prevention device with a unique strut structure to deflect the trajectory of a blood clot to the carotid artery. We identified the important determinants of functionality in a device design using computational fluid dynamics simulations. Quantitative assessment of deflection efficacy over various clot dimensions was carried out for the device with different strut configurations under AF flow conditions. The simulations demonstrate that the trajectory of a clot destined to the left common carotid artery (LCCA) can be deflected by a strut-structured device at the LCCA inlet with virtually no change in flow resistance. The deflection efficacy of the device is dependent on the clot properties and strut designs of the device. A configuration of 0.75 mm thick and 0.75 mm distant struts with 50% of surface convexity were found to provide maximum deflection efficacy (e.g., 36% greater deflection efficacy than a flat filter) among the strut structures considered. The results suggest that a deflector stent implanted in the aortic branch may be an effective stroke-prevention device. The present simulations motivate pre-clinical animal studies as well as further studies on patient-specific design of the device that maximize the deflection efficacy while minimizing device safety issues. PMID:26049978

  1. H-Type Hypertension and C Reactive Protein in Recurrence of Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Qiu, De-Xing; Fu, Rong-Li; Xu, Tian-Fen; Jing, Meng-Juan; Zhang, Hui-Shan; Geng, He-Hong; Zheng, Long-Chao; Wang, Pei-Xi

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension with high homocysteine (HHcy) (H-type hypertension) and C reactive protein (CRP) can increase the incidence of ischemic stroke. However, it is not clear whether recurrent ischemic stroke (RIS) is related to H-type hypertension and CRP. The present study investigated the correlation of H-type hypertension and CRP level with RIS. Totally, 987 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke were recruited in a teaching hospital in Henan province, China during March 2014 to March 2015. The demographic and clinical characteristics and blood biochemical parameters of patients were analyzed. Elevated levels of CRP and homocysteine (Hcy) were defined as >8.2 mg/L and 10 μmol/L, respectively. Among the 987 patients, 234 were RIS. Thirty-eight percent of RIS patients had elevated CRP level and 91.5% of RIS patients had HHcy. In multivariate analysis, adjusted odds ratio (OR) of RIS in patients aged ≥60 years was 1.576 (95% CI: 1.125-2.207), in male patients 1.935 (95% CI: 1.385-2.704), in patients with diabetes 1.463 (95% CI: 1.037-2.064), CRP levels 1.013 (95% CI: 1.006-1.019), simple hypertension 3.370 (95% CI: 1.15-10.183), and H-type hypertension 2.990 (95% CI: 1.176-7.600). RIS was associated with older age, male, diabetes, H-type hypertension and CRP. Controlling H-type hypertension and CRP level may reduce the risk of RIS. PMID:27164124

  2. H-Type Hypertension and C Reactive Protein in Recurrence of Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing; Qiu, De-Xing; Fu, Rong-Li; Xu, Tian-Fen; Jing, Meng-Juan; Zhang, Hui-Shan; Geng, He-Hong; Zheng, Long-Chao; Wang, Pei-Xi

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension with high homocysteine (HHcy) (H-type hypertension) and C reactive protein (CRP) can increase the incidence of ischemic stroke. However, it is not clear whether recurrent ischemic stroke (RIS) is related to H-type hypertension and CRP. The present study investigated the correlation of H-type hypertension and CRP level with RIS. Totally, 987 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke were recruited in a teaching hospital in Henan province, China during March 2014 to March 2015. The demographic and clinical characteristics and blood biochemical parameters of patients were analyzed. Elevated levels of CRP and homocysteine (Hcy) were defined as >8.2 mg/L and 10 μmol/L, respectively. Among the 987 patients, 234 were RIS. Thirty-eight percent of RIS patients had elevated CRP level and 91.5% of RIS patients had HHcy. In multivariate analysis, adjusted odds ratio (OR) of RIS in patients aged ≥60 years was 1.576 (95% CI: 1.125–2.207), in male patients 1.935 (95% CI: 1.385–2.704), in patients with diabetes 1.463 (95% CI: 1.037–2.064), CRP levels 1.013 (95% CI: 1.006–1.019), simple hypertension 3.370 (95% CI: 1.15–10.183), and H-type hypertension 2.990 (95% CI: 1.176–7.600). RIS was associated with older age, male, diabetes, H-type hypertension and CRP. Controlling H-type hypertension and CRP level may reduce the risk of RIS. PMID:27164124

  3. Stroke survivors', caregivers' and GPs' attitudes towards a polypill for the secondary prevention of stroke: a qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    Jamison, James; Graffy, Jonathan; Mullis, Ricky; Mant, Jonathan; Sutton, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To understand the perspectives of stroke survivors, caregivers and general practitioners (GPs) on a polypill approach, consisting of blood pressure and cholesterol-lowering therapies, with or without aspirin, for the secondary prevention of stroke. Methods A qualitative interview study was undertaken in 5 GP surgeries in the East of England. 28 survivors of stroke/transient ischaemic attack (TIA) were interviewed, 14 of them with a caregiver present, along with a convenience sample of 5 GPs, to assess attitudes towards a polypill and future use. Topic guides explored participants attitudes, potential uptake and long-term use, management of polypill medication and factors influencing the decision to prescribe. Data were analysed using a grounded theory approach. Key themes are presented and illustrated with verbatim quotes. Results The analysis identified 3 key themes: polypill benefits, polypill concerns and polypill lessons for implementation. Stroke/TIA survivors were positive about the polypill concept and considered it acceptable in the secondary prevention of stroke. Perceived benefits of a polypill included convenience resulting in improved adherence and reduced burden of treatment. Caregivers felt that a polypill would improve medication-taking practices, and GPs were open to prescribing it to those at increased cardiovascular risk. However, concerns raised included whether a polypill provided equivalent therapeutic benefit, side effects through combining medications, consequences of non-adherence, lack of flexibility in regulating dosage, disruption to current treatment and suitability to the wider stroke population. Conclusions Participants acknowledged potential advantages in a polypill approach for secondary prevention of stroke; however, significant concerns remain. Further research on the efficacy of a polypill is needed to reassure practitioners whose concerns around inflexibility and treatment suitability are likely to influence the

  4. Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Strokes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart and Circulation For Women Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Strokes Did ... attacks. Please see the brochure Talk with Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attacks ...

  5. Microalgae for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and stroke.

    PubMed

    Raposo, Maria Filomena de Jesus; de Morais, Alcina Maria Miranda Bernardo

    2015-03-15

    This review focuses on and discusses the primary phytochemicals present in microalgal biomass - carotenoids, phenolic compounds, antioxidant vitamins, sterols, and polyunsaturated fatty acids - and also on the exopolysaccharides, which are produced by some types of microalgae and may play a significant role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and strokes. We have listed several preclinical trials and clinical studies supporting the health benefits that most of these compounds may provide. Microalgae are very easy to grow and are not vulnerable to contaminants when grown under controlled conditions. Proper handling and growth conditions may improve the production of phytochemicals. Therefore, they may represent an excellent source of nutraceuticals and food supplements once their safety as a food supplement has been confirmed. PMID:25277945

  6. Apixaban versus edoxaban for stroke prevention in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Qinmei; Lau, Yee C; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2015-08-01

    Oral anticoagulation therapy is the mainstay of stroke prevention in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation patients. Vitamin K antagonists (such as warfarin) have been effective conventional oral anticoagulants for several decades. However, due to their limitations in clinical use, several nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs, including dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) have been developed. Nonetheless, no head to head trials have been performed to directly compare these NOACs in patient cohorts. In this review article, two direct factor Xa inhibitors, apixaban and edoxaban, are briefly described with focus on their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles, plus drug interactions. Moreover, both efficacy and safety will be discussed based on the available data from the large Phase III clinical trials and indirect comparison studies. PMID:26274798

  7. The recurrent coronary prevention project. Some preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Thoresen, C E; Friedman, M; Gill, J K; Ulmer, D K

    1982-01-01

    The Recurrent Coronary Prevention Project (RCPP) was established as a 5-year clinical trial to examine two basic questions: --1. Can the recurrence rate of post-coronary subjects be substantially reduced over a 5-year period by means of a programme of behavioural change, in comparison with treatment by cardiologists focussing on medication, diet, exercise and cardiovascular issues, and with subjects who only receive regular care from their own physician? 2. Can the Type A behaviour pattern (TABP) be changed and do such changes correspond to reduced recurrences of coronary heart disease (CHD) over a 5 year period? To answer these questions, four major treatment groups are currently being compared: --1. A small group treatment programme (Section I) led by cardiologists emphasizing adherence to medication, diet and exercise, and giving cardiovascular and cardiological information. 2. A behavioural change treatment programme (Section II) based primarily on a cognitive social learning model and attempting to alter TABP. 3. A control group of subjects assessed annually and receiving private medical care from their own physicians. 4. A dropout comparison group composed of subjects voluntarily discontinuing participation in groups led by cardiologists or in behavioural change groups. Results to date show a significantly reduced rate of recurrence for subjects in the behavioural change group, compared to those in the groups led by cardiologists as well as control and dropout groups. These significantly lower recurrence rates are accompanied by data suggesting that subjects in the behavioural change programme are also altering their TABP as measured by both behavioural questionnaires and videotaped Type A structured interviews. Clinical impressions suggest that treatment programmes to alter TABP should consider the primary importance of the personal meaning of the TABP and other behaviours to the individual concerned, particularly how basic underlying beliefs set the stage

  8. Questions and Answers about Treating Arterial Stenosis and Preventing Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... context of stroke, “stenosis” is usually caused by atherosclerosis, a condition where a blood vessel supplying blood ... high cholesterol. How does stenosis contribute to stroke? Atherosclerosis can activate cells involved in blood clotting. As ...

  9. Aspirin After Mini-Stroke May Help Prevent Full-Blown Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... stroke expert at the University of Oxford in England. "This finding has implications for doctors, who should ... Webb is director of research and information at England's the Stroke Association. He said, "The findings suggest ...

  10. Is blood pressure control for stroke prevention the correct goal? The lost opportunity of preventing hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Howard, George; Banach, Maciej; Mary, Cushman; Goff, David C.; Howard, Virginia J.; Lackland, Daniel T.; McVay, Jim; Meschia, James F.; Muntner, Paul; Oparil, Suzanne; Rightmyer, Melanie; Taylor, Herman A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose While pharmacologic treatment of hypertension has important health benefits, it does not capture the benefit of maintenance of ideal health through the prevention or delay of hypertension. Methods 26,875 black and white participants aged 45+, were assessed and followed for incident stroke events. The association was assessed between incident stroke and: 1) systolic blood pressure categorized as normal (< 120 mmHg), prehypertension (120–139 mmHg), stage-1 hypertension (140–159 mmHg) and stage-2 hypertension (160 mmHg+), and 2) number of classes of antihypertensive medications, classified as none, 1, 2, or 3 or more. Results During 6.3 years of follow-up, 823 stroke events occurred. Nearly half (46%) of the population were successfully-treated (SBP < 140 mmHg) hypertensives. Within blood pressure strata, the risk of stroke increased with each additional class of required antihypertensive medication, with hazard ratio [HR]=1.33; 95%CI: 1.16–1.52 for normotensive, HR=1.15; 95%CI: 1.05–1.26 for prehypertension, and HR=1.22; 95%CI: 1.06–1.39 for stage 1 hypertension. A successfully treated (SBP<120 mmHg) hypertensive person on 3+ antihypertensive medication classes was at marginally higher stroke risk than a person with untreated stage 1 hypertension (HR=2.48 versus HR=2.19, relative to those with SBP <120 on no antihypertensive medications). Conclusions Maintaining the normotensive status solely through pharmacologic treatment has a profound impact, as nearly half of this general population cohort were treated to guideline (SBP<140 mmHg) but failed to return to risk levels similar to normotensive individuals. Even with successful treatment there is a substantial potential gain by prevention or delay of hypertension. PMID:25953369

  11. Could Stroke Trigger Be Prevented by Healthy Family Relationships?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochette, Annie; Gaulin, Philippe; Tellier, Myriam

    2009-01-01

    Although major stroke risk factors are well documented, little is known about which life circumstances are perceived to be related to the actual triggering of a first stroke. The purpose was to explore self-perceived spontaneously related life circumstances surrounding the trigger of a first stroke. A qualitative design with a phenomenological…

  12. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... the blockages that lead to ischemic strokes. A hemorrhagic stroke occurs if an artery in the brain leaks ... risms) are examples of conditions that can cause hemorrhagic strokes. (Aneurysms are balloon-like bulges in an artery ...

  13. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... to a hospital quickly to begin treatment. Acute stroke therapies try to stop a stroke while it is ... rehabilitation helps individuals overcome disabilities that result from stroke damage. Drug therapy with blood thinners is the most common treatment ...

  14. [Post Stroke Dementia].

    PubMed

    Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-07-01

    Post-stroke dementia (PSD) is a clinical entity that encompasses all types of dementia following an index stroke. Current evidence suggests that 25-30% of ischemic stroke survivors develop immediate or delayed vascular cognitive impairment or vascular dementia. The type of stroke can be either ischemic, hemorrhagic or hypoperfusive. There are multiple risk factors for PSD including older age, family history, genetic variants, low educational status, vascular comorbidities, prior transient ischemic attack or recurrent stroke and depressive illness. Pre-stroke dementia refers to the occurrence of cognitive impairment before the index stroke, which may be caused by a vascular burden as well as insidious neurodegenerative changes. Neuroimaging determinants of dementia after stroke include silent brain infarcts, white matter changes, lacunar infarcts and medial temporal lobe atrophy. Published clinical trials have not been promising and there is little information on whether PSD can be prevented using pharmacological agents. Control of vascular disease risk and prevention of recurrent strokes are key to reducing the burden of cognitive decline and post-stroke dementia. Modern imaging and analysis techniques will help to elucidate the mechanism of PSD and establish better treatment. PMID:27395459

  15. Homocysteine lowering for stroke prevention: Unravelling the complexity of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Spence, J David

    2016-10-01

    Elevated levels of total homocysteine impair endothelial dysfunction and increase thrombosis. Homocysteine is causal in animal models, and in human studies, elevated total homocysteine is significantly associated with carotid atherosclerosis, lacunar infarction, and markedly increased risk of stroke in atrial fibrillation. Because two of the early large trials of B vitamin therapy (Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention and the Norwegian Vitamin Study) did not show any reduction of stroke, and the Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation 2 trial was mistakenly interpreted as not showing a reduction of stroke (because the authors could not think of a biological difference between stroke and myocardial infarction), there has been widespread pessimism regarding treatment to lower total homocysteine for stroke prevention. However, the Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation 2 trial, the French trial of folic acid and omega three oils, the Vitamins to Prevent Stroke subgroup excluding antiplatelet therapy all showed a significant reduction of stroke. Reasons why the Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention trial were negative included folate fortification in North America, provision of injections of B12 to patients with low baseline serum B12, and as it turns out, harm from cyanide in cyanocobalamin among participants with impaired renal function. In the Diabetic Intervention with Vitamins in Nephropathy trial, B vitamins including cyanocobalamin were harmful, and in a Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention subgroup excluding participants who received B12 injections and those with impaired renal function, there was a statistically significant reduction of stroke/myocardial infarction/vascular death. In 2015, the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial (CSPPT), in over 20,000 participants followed for 5 years, showed a significant reduction of stroke with folic acid in a setting where folate fortification has not been implemented. In the setting of folate fortification

  16. Extracorporeal abdominal massage may help prevent recurrent bile duct stones after endoscopic sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Naohito; Hamaya, Sae; Tatsuta, Miwa; Nakatsu, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) is effective, but recurrent bile duct stones are a common late complication. Because there are still no effective therapies for preventing this complication, some patients have experienced bile duct stone recurrence many times. We describe herein a method of abdominal massage to treat patients with prior cholecystectomy who have experienced recurrence of bile duct stones. PMID:27540575

  17. Preventive health care, 1999 update: 2. Echocardiography for the detection of a cardiac source of embolus in patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kapral, M K; Silver, F L

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop guidelines for the use of echocardiography in the investigation of patients with stroke. OPTIONS: (1) Routine transthoracic echocardiography (TTE); (2) routine transesophageal echocardiography (TEE); (3) routine TTE followed by TEE if the TTE findings are noncontributory; (4) selective TTE or TEE in patients with cardiac disease who would not otherwise receive anticoagulant therapy. OUTCOMES: This article reviews the available evidence on the yield of TTE and TEE in detecting cardiac sources of cerebral emboli in patients with stroke, the effectiveness of treatment for cardiac sources of emboli and the effectiveness of screening echocardiography for secondary stroke prevention. EVIDENCE: MEDLINE was searched for relevant articles published from January 1966 to April 1998; also reviewed were additional articles identified from the bibliographies and citations obtained from experts. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Echocardiography can detect intracardiac masses (thrombus, vegetation or tumour) in about 4% (with TTE) to 11% (with TEE) of stroke patients. The yield is lower among patients without clinical evidence of cardiac disease by history, physical examination, electrocardiography or chest radiography (less than 2%) than among patients with clinical evidence of cardiac disease (less than 19%). The risks of echocardiography to patients are small. TTE has virtually no risks, and TEE is associated with cardiac, pulmonary and bleeding complications in 0.18%. Patients with an identified intracardiac thrombus are at increased risk for embolic events (absolute risk uncertain, range 0%-38%), and this appears to be reduced with anticoagulant therapy (absolute risk reduction uncertain). Anticoagulant therapy carries a risk of major hemorrhage of 1% to 3% per year. The overall effectiveness of echocardiography in the prevention of recurrent stroke is unknown. VALUES: The strength of evidence was evaluated using the methods of the Canadian Task Force on

  18. Update on the Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study (PASS): a randomised controlled phase 3 clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Stroke is a leading cause of death worldwide. Infections after stroke occur in 30% of stroke patients and are strongly associated with unfavourable outcome. Preventive antibiotic therapy lowers infection rate in patients after stroke, however, the effect of preventive antibiotic treatment on functional outcome after stroke has not yet been investigated.The Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study (PASS) is an ongoing, multicentre, prospective, randomised, open-label, blinded end point trial of preventive antibiotic therapy in acute stroke. Patients are randomly assigned to either ceftriaxone at a dose of 2 g, given every 24 hours intravenously for four-days, in addition to stroke-unit care, or standard stroke-unit care without preventive antibiotic therapy. Aim of the study is to assess whether preventive antibiotic treatment improves functional outcome at three months by preventing infections. Results To date, 2,470 patients have been included in PASS. Median stroke severity of the first 2,133 patients (second interim analysis) is 5 (IQR 3 to 9) on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Due to the PROBE design, no outcome data are available yet. In the initial trial protocol we proposed a dichotomisation of the mRS as primary analysis of outcome and ordinal regression analysis as secondary analysis of primary outcome, requiring a sample size of 3,200 patients. However, ordinal analysis of outcome data is becoming increasingly more common in acute stroke trials, as it increases statistical power. For PASS, funding is insufficient for inclusion of 3,200 patients with the overall inclusion rate of 15 patients per week. Therefore we change the analysis of our primary outcome from dichotomisation to ordinal regression analysis on the mRS. Power analysis showed that with similar assumptions 2,550 patients are needed using ordinal regression analysis. We expect to complete follow-up in June 2014. A full statistical analysis plan will be

  19. Guidelines for the primary prevention of stroke: a statement for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    PubMed

    Meschia, James F; Bushnell, Cheryl; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Braun, Lynne T; Bravata, Dawn M; Chaturvedi, Seemant; Creager, Mark A; Eckel, Robert H; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Fornage, Myriam; Goldstein, Larry B; Greenberg, Steven M; Horvath, Susanna E; Iadecola, Costantino; Jauch, Edward C; Moore, Wesley S; Wilson, John A

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this updated statement is to provide comprehensive and timely evidence-based recommendations on the prevention of stroke among individuals who have not previously experienced a stroke or transient ischemic attack. Evidence-based recommendations are included for the control of risk factors, interventional approaches to atherosclerotic disease of the cervicocephalic circulation, and antithrombotic treatments for preventing thrombotic and thromboembolic stroke. Further recommendations are provided for genetic and pharmacogenetic testing and for the prevention of stroke in a variety of other specific circumstances, including sickle cell disease and patent foramen ovale. PMID:25355838

  20. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds ... blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused ...

  1. 9 Out of 10 Strokes Could Be Prevented, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Health, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Exercise and Physical Fitness Nutrition Stroke Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics ...

  2. Direct oral anticoagulants: key considerations for use to prevent stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ment, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia worldwide. Strokes that occur as a complication of AF are usually more severe and associated with a higher disability or morbidity and mortality rate compared with non-AF-related strokes. The risk of stroke in AF is dependent on several risk factors; AF itself acts as an independent risk factor for stroke. The combination of effective anticoagulation therapy, risk stratification (based on stroke risk scores, such as CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc), and recommendations provided by guidelines is essential for decreasing the risk of stroke in patients with AF. Although effective in preventing the occurrence of stroke, vitamin K antagonists (VKAs; eg, warfarin) are associated with several limitations. Therefore, direct oral anticoagulants, such as apixaban, dabigatran etexilate, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban, have emerged as an alternative to the VKAs for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular AF. Compared with the VKAs, these agents have more favorable pharmacological characteristics and, unlike the VKAs, they are given at fixed doses without the need for routine coagulation monitoring. It remains important that physicians use these direct oral anticoagulants responsibly to ensure optimal safety and effectiveness. This article provides an overview of the existing data on the direct oral anticoagulants, focusing on management protocols for aiding physicians to optimize anticoagulant therapy in patients with nonvalvular AF, particularly in special patient populations (eg, those with renal impairment) and other specific clinical situations. PMID:26089678

  3. Recurrent Heat Stroke in a Runner: Race Simulation Testing for Return to Activity.

    PubMed

    Roberts, William O; Dorman, Jason C; Bergeron, Michael F

    2016-05-01

    Exertional heat stroke (EHS) occurs in distance runners and is a life-threatening condition. A 30-yr-old healthy recreational male distance runner (CR) collapsed at the 12-mile mark in two half marathon races 6 wk apart in fall 2009. In both episodes, CR was found on the ground confused, incoherent, sweaty, and warm to touch. The emergency medical team responded, and he was treated empirically for suspected EHS by cooling en route to the emergency department. In the emergency department, rectal temperatures were 40°C and 40.5°C for each episode, respectively. The first race start temperature was 16°C with 94% relative humidity (RH), and the second was 3°C, 75% RH. Heat tolerance test was within the normal range indicating low EHS risk. A race simulation test (environmental chamber, 25°C, 60% RH) at a treadmill pace of 10.5-12.9 km·h was stopped at 70 min coincident with a rectal temperature of 39.5°C. CR's body weight dropped 3.49 kg with an estimated sweat loss of 4.09 L and an estimated total sweat Na loss of 7610 mg. We recommended that he limit his runs to <1 h and replace salt and fluid during and (mostly) after activity, run with a partner, acclimate to heat before racing, and reduce his pace or stop at the first sign of symptoms. Race simulation testing should be considered in athletes with recurrent EHS to assist with the return-to-activity recommendation. PMID:26694842

  4. Effects of a Stroke Primary Prevention Program on Risk Factors for At-Home Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Mi Yang; Jeong, HyeonCheol

    2015-01-01

    Background To prevent stroke from occurring, stroke risk factors in at-risk subjects should be controlled and the diseases causing stroke should be managed. This study evaluated a nursing intervention to prevent stroke in at-risk elderly living at home. The program consisted of stroke and nutrition education as well as exercise guidance. Material/Methods This study targeted 93 elderly people living at home residing in E province with 1 or more stroke risk factors, including high blood pressure, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, obesity, smoking, or drinking alcohol. The 12-week program included a stroke education class once a week, a nutrition management class once a week, and exercise guidance 3 times a week. Each session lasted 50–70 min. Each disease education and nutrition management session lasted for 20 min and each exercise session lasted for 30–50 min. Results The experimental group’s body mass index (BMI) (t=8.27, p<.001), systolic blood pressure (t=2.39, p=.021), fasting blood sugar (t=0.39, p=.700), total cholesterol (t=4.18, p<.001), triglyceride levels (t=2.50, p=.016), and depression scores (t=5.48, p<.001) were significantly reduced and high-density phospholipid protein levels increased significantly by the end of the program (t=−2.94, p=.005). Conclusions Based on the results of this study, participating in a stroke prevention program enabled at-risk elderly participants who lived at home in rural areas to perform health-promoting behaviors. This program may reduce the incidence of stroke by reducing risk factors and managing stroke precursor diseases. PMID:26615035

  5. Effects of a Stroke Primary Prevention Program on Risk Factors for At-Home Elderly.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Mi Yang; Jeong, HyeonCheol

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND To prevent stroke from occurring, stroke risk factors in at-risk subjects should be controlled and the diseases causing stroke should be managed. This study evaluated a nursing intervention to prevent stroke in at-risk elderly living at home. The program consisted of stroke and nutrition education as well as exercise guidance. MATERIAL AND METHODS This study targeted 93 elderly people living at home residing in E province with 1 or more stroke risk factors, including high blood pressure, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, obesity, smoking, or drinking alcohol. The 12-week program included a stroke education class once a week, a nutrition management class once a week, and exercise guidance 3 times a week. Each session lasted 50-70 min. Each disease education and nutrition management session lasted for 20 min and each exercise session lasted for 30-50 min. RESULTS The experimental group's body mass index (BMI) (t=8.27, p<.001), systolic blood pressure (t=2.39, p=.021), fasting blood sugar (t=0.39, p=.700), total cholesterol (t=4.18, p<.001), triglyceride levels (t=2.50, p=.016), and depression scores (t=5.48, p<.001) were significantly reduced and high-density phospholipid protein levels increased significantly by the end of the program (t=-2.94, p=.005). CONCLUSIONS Based on the results of this study, participating in a stroke prevention program enabled at-risk elderly participants who lived at home in rural areas to perform health-promoting behaviors. This program may reduce the incidence of stroke by reducing risk factors and managing stroke precursor diseases. PMID:26615035

  6. Prevention of the recurrence of symptom and lesions after conservative surgery for endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Koga, Kaori; Takamura, Masashi; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Osuga, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    Although surgical excision of endometriosis both improves pain and enhances fertility, recurrence can further exacerbate pain and reduce fertility, which in turn impacts the quality of life and increases personal as well as social costs. Therefore, it is crucial to prevent the recurrence of symptoms and lesions after conservative surgery. This article reviews evidence regarding the prevention of postoperative recurrence of endometriosis reported since the 1990s. Over the past 5 years, many new studies have been conducted and have demonstrated that long-term postoperative medication markedly reduces the recurrence. Most of these studies used oral contraceptives (OC), with either the cyclic or continuous regimen, while some used oral or intrauterine progestin. Continuous OC is more efficacious than cyclic OC, especially for dysmenorrhea. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system is also shown to prevent recurrence of dysmenorrhea and possibly endometriosis lesions. Dienogest, a new progestin, is shown to reduce the recurrence of endometrioma. Similar to the case of ovarian endometriosis, long-term postoperative medication after conservative surgery for deep infiltrating or extragenital endometriosis seems important, although data are limited. Regardless of the lesion and the medication type, patients who discontinued medication experienced a higher incidence of recurrence, indicating that the protective effect of these medications seems to vanish rapidly after the discontinuation. On the basis of these facts, together with the pathogenesis of recurrence (retrograde menstruation and ovulation), regular and prolonged medication until the patient wishes to conceive is highly recommended to prevent the postoperative recurrence of endometriosis. PMID:26354093

  7. Statins for the Prevention of Stroke: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Zhang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Background Stroke is a frequently encountered clinical event that has a detrimental impact on the quality of life. Evidence has increasingly shown that statins can substantially reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. However, it remains to be determined whether statins are definitively effective in preventing stroke. Methods We systematically searched the PubMed, Embase, and Central databases for studies that compared the effects of statins and placebo in patients at high risk for stroke. The outcome measures were overall incidence of stroke, incidence of fatal stroke, and incidence of hemorrhagic stroke. Results Eighteen randomized controlled trials satisfied all the inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis. The analysis revealed that statins reduced the overall incidence of stroke than placebo (odds ratio [OR]: 0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.74–0.87; P<0.00001). In particular, statins showed efficacy in reducing the incidence of fatal stroke (OR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.67–1.21; P = 0.47) and hemorrhagic stroke (OR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.60–1.25; P = 0.45). On the contrary, they were found to increase the overall incidence of stroke (OR: 1.12; 95% CI: 0.89–1.41; P = 0.32) and fatal stroke (OR: 1.37; 95% CI: 0.93–2.03; P = 0.11) in renal transplant recipients and patients undergoing regular hemodialysis. Conclusion The results of this analysis suggest that statins may be beneficial in reducing the overall incidence of stroke and they may decrease the risk of fatal stroke and hemorrhagic stroke. However, statins should be used with caution in patients with a history of renal transplantation, regular hemodialysis, transient ischemic attack, or stroke. Further analyses should focus on multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trials with data stratification according to the nature of primary diseases and dose–effect relationship, to clarify the benefits of statins in protection against stroke. PMID:24643199

  8. The Mechanism of and Preventive Therapy for Stroke in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Roh, Seung-Young

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a major cardiac cause of stroke, and a pathogenesis involving thrombus formation in patients with atrial fibrillation is well established. A strategy for rhythm control that involves catheter ablation and anticoagulation therapy is evolving. A strategy for rhythm control that restores and maintains sinus rhythm should reduce the risk of ischemic stroke that is associated with atrial fibrillation; however, this is yet to be proven in large-scale randomized controlled trials. This paper reviews the emerging role of rhythm control therapy for atrial fibrillation to prevent stroke. PMID:27283277

  9. RECURRENT STROKE IN THE WARFARIN VERSUS ASPIRIN IN REDUCED EJECTION FRACTION (WARCEF) TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Pullicino, Patrick M.; Qian, Min; Sacco, Ralph L.; Freudenberger, Ron; Graham, Susan; Teerlink, John R.; Mann, Douglas; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Lok, Dirk J.; Anker, Stefan D.; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Estol, Conrado J.; Levin, Bruce; Mohr, J.P.; Thompson, John L. P.; Homma, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose WARCEF randomized 2305 patients in sinus rhythm with ejection fraction (EF) ≤35% to warfarin (INR 2.0–3.5) or aspirin 325 mg. Warfarin reduced the incident ischemic stroke (IIS) hazard rate by 48% over aspirin in a secondary analysis. The IIS rate in heart failure (HF) is too low to warrant routine anticoagulation but epidemiologic studies show that prior stroke increases the stroke risk in HF. We here explore IIS rates in WARCEF patients with and without baseline stroke to look for risk factors for IIS and determine if a subgroup with an IIS rate high enough to give a clinically relevant stroke risk reduction can be identified. Methods We compared potential stroke risk factors between patients with baseline stroke and those without using the exact conditional score test for Poisson variables. We looked for risk factors for IIS, by comparing IIS rates between different risk factors. For EF we tried cutoff points of 10%, 15% and 20%. 15% was used as it was the highest EF that was associated with a significant increase in IIS rate. IIS and EF strata were balanced as to warfarin/aspirin assignment by the stratified randomized design. A multiple Poisson regression examined the simultaneous effects of all risk factors on IIS rate. IIS rates per hundred patient years (/100PY) were calculated in patient groups with significant risk factors. Missing values were assigned the modal value. Results Twenty of 248 (8.1%) patients with baseline stroke and 64 of 2048 (3.1%) without had IIS. IIS rate in patients with baseline stroke (2.37/100PY) was greater than patients without (0.89/100PY)(rate ratio 2.68, p<0.001). Fourteen of 219 (6.4%) patients with ejection fraction (EF)<15% and 70 of 2079 (3.4%) with EF ≥15% had IIS. In the multiple regression analysis stroke at baseline (p<0.001) and EF<15% vs. ≥15% (p=.005) remained significant predictors of IIS. IIS rate was 2.04/100PY in patients with EF<15% and 0.95/100PY in patients with EF ≥15% (p=0

  10. Tissue plasminogen activator prevents white matter damage following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Fernando; Gauberti, Maxime; Parcq, Jérôme; Macrez, Richard; Hommet, Yannick; Obiang, Pauline; Hernangómez, Miriam; Montagne, Axel; Liot, Géraldine; Guaza, Carmen; Maubert, Eric; Ali, Carine; Vivien, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the only available treatment for acute stroke. In addition to its vascular fibrinolytic action, tPA exerts various effects within the brain, ranging from synaptic plasticity to control of cell fate. To date, the influence of tPA in the ischemic brain has only been investigated on neuronal, microglial, and endothelial fate. We addressed the mechanism of action of tPA on oligodendrocyte (OL) survival and on the extent of white matter lesions in stroke. We also investigated the impact of aging on these processes. We observed that, in parallel to reduced levels of tPA in OLs, white matter gets more susceptible to ischemia in old mice. Interestingly, tPA protects murine and human OLs from apoptosis through an unexpected cytokine-like effect by the virtue of its epidermal growth factor–like domain. When injected into aged animals, tPA, although toxic to the gray matter, rescues white matter from ischemia independently of its proteolytic activity. These studies reveal a novel mechanism of action of tPA and unveil OL as a target cell for cytokine effects of tPA in brain diseases. They show overall that tPA protects white matter from stroke-induced lesions, an effect which may contribute to the global benefit of tPA-based stroke treatment. PMID:21576385

  11. Urethral recurrence after cystectomy: current preventative measures, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yvonne; Fisher, Patrick; Tilki, Derya; Evans, Christopher P

    2016-04-01

    To summarise the current literature on the diagnosis and management of urethral recurrence (UR) after radical cystectomy (RC), as UR after RC is rare but associated with high mortality. With the recently increased use of orthotopic bladder substitution and the questionable benefit of prophylactic urethrectomy, identification of patients at high risk of UR, management of the remnant urethra, and treatment of UR become critical questions. A review of the PubMed database from 1980 to 2014 was performed to identify studies evaluating recurrent urothelial cancer of the urethra after RC. The search terms used included 'urethral recurrence', 'cystectomy' or 'cystoprostatectomy'. Selected studies provided information on the type of urinary diversion performed, the incidence of UR, and the time to UR. Incidence of UR after RC ranges from 1% to 8% with most recurrences occurring within the first 2 years after surgery. Increased risk of UR is associated with involvement of the prostate, tumour multifocality, bladder neck involvement, and cutaneous diversion. The median overall survival after UR ranges from 6 to 54 months and the 5-year disease-specific survival after UR is reported to be between zero and 83%. UR remains a relatively rare event. Current literature suggests that urethral wash cytology may be useful in patients with intermediate- to high-risk of recurrence to enable early detection of non-invasive disease, which may be amenable to conservative therapy before urethrectomy. PMID:26556525

  12. Protocol for Cilostazol Stroke Prevention Study for Antiplatelet Combination (CSPS.com): a randomized, open-label, parallel-group trial

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Kazunori; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Hoshino, Haruhiko; Kimura, Kazumi; Origasa, Hideki; Naritomi, Hiroaki; Minematsu, Kazuo; Yamaguchi, Takenori

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and aims Monotherapy with antiplatelet agents is only modestly effective in secondary prevention of ischemic stroke (IS), particularly in patients with multiple risk factors such as cervicocephalic arterial stenosis, diabetes, and hypertension. While dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with aspirin and clopidogrel reduced IS recurrence, particularly in the early stages after IS, it increased the risk of bleeding. Compared with aspirin, cilostazol prevented IS recurrence without increasing the incidence of serious bleeds. In patients with intracranial arterial stenosis, no significant increase in bleeding events was observed for DAPT with cilostazol and aspirin, compared to that for aspirin monotherapy. DAPT involving cilostazol may therefore be safer than conventional DAPT. These findings prompted us to conduct the Cilostazol Stroke Prevention Study for Antiplatelet Combination (CSPS.com; ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01995370) to evaluate the safety and efficacy of DAPT involving cilostazol for secondary IS prevention, in comparison with that of antiplatelet monotherapy. Design The CSPS.com is a multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group trial. A total of 4000 high-risk patients with noncardioembolic IS will be randomized 8–180 days after onset to receive aspirin or clopidogrel monotherapy, or DAPT with cilostazol and aspirin or clopidogrel for at least one-year. Study outcomes The primary outcome is IS recurrence. Secondary outcomes are composite occurrences of any stroke, death from any cause, myocardial infarction, vascular death, and other vascular events. Discussion The CSPS.com is expected to provide evidence indicating whether secondary IS prevention in high-risk patients can be improved by using DAPT involving cilostazol. PMID:25487817

  13. Oxidative stress markers are associated to vascular recurrence in non-cardioembolic stroke patients non-treated with statins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Since atherogenesis is related to oxidative stress, our objective was to study the association of oxidative stress markers with the vascular recurrence in non-cardioembolic stroke. Methods Atherosclerotic and oxidative stress markers were evaluated on admission, in 477 patients suffering from a first non-cardioembolic stroke. Patients were followed at 6 and 12 months after inclusion, recording cardiovascular events. As markers of endothelial oxidative stress we used oxidized LDL, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and 8-OH deoxiguanosine. 136 patients were being treated with statins at the moment of serum samples acquisition. Results Patients who suffered vascular recurrence or vascular-origin death had higher levels of 8-OHDG (40.06±24.70vs33.11±15.18;p=0.003). We also found associations between vascular recurrence or vascular origin death and Cu/ZnSOD (OR,1.02; 95%CI,1.00-1.03;p=0.0001) and 8-OHDG (OR,1.12;95%CI,1.08-1.16;p<0.0001) in a subgroup of 333 patients that were not in treatment with statins on admission. We also found associations between 8-OHDG and intima media thickness (IMT) (OR,1.13;95%CI,1.09-1.16;p<0.0001), presence of ipsilatieral stenosis≥50% (OR,1.03;95%CI1.00-1.05;p=0.007) and other atherosclerotic plaque characteristics. Conclusions Specific oxidative stress markers were found to be markers of atherosclerosis plaque types and vascular recurrence in non-statins treated patients at admission. PMID:22862793

  14. Adjuvant Chinese Herbal Products for Preventing Ischemic Stroke in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Muo, Chih-Hsin; Chiu, Hsienhsueh Elley; Liu, Chun-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chinese herbal products (CHPs) are widely used for atrial fibrillation (AF) in Taiwan. We investigated the effect of adjuvant CHPs in preventing ischemic stroke in patients with AF. Methods Taiwanese patients in the Health Insurance Database newly diagnosed with AF during 2000–2011 were enrolled. Medication treatment with/without CHPs was administered within 7 days after the AF diagnosis. The clinical endpoint was an ischemic stroke. The Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, and Student t test were used to examine differences between the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and non-TCM cohorts. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to assess the risk for ischemic stroke between two cohorts. Results Three hundred and eleven patients underwent TCM treatment and 1715 patients did not. Compared to non-TCM users, TCM users had a lower incidence of stroke (12.59% vs. 1.93%, respectively) and lower risk of stroke [CHA2DS2-VASc score = 0–2 (hazard ratio = 0.20; 95% confidence interval = 0.06–0.65)]. Compared to non-TCM users, the stroke risk was significantly lower in TCM users with AF who were female or younger than 65 years, but not in males, people more than 65 years old, or people with comorbidities. Compared to TCM users, non-TCM users who received conventional treatment had a higher ischemic stroke risk. The risk for AF-related hospitalization was significantly lower in TCM users (0.64%) than in non-TCM users (38.1%). Conclusions Users of TCM with AF have a lower risk of new-onset ischemic stroke. Therefore, adjuvant CHP therapy may have a protective effect and may be used in AF patients to prevent ischemic stroke. PMID:27428543

  15. Systematic review and network meta-analysis of stroke prevention treatments in patients with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Amy; Bielecki, Joanna M; Krahn, Murray; Dorian, Paul; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Boon, Heather; Husereau, Don; Pechlivanoglou, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Background In the last 4 years, four novel oral anticoagulants have been developed as alternatives to warfarin and antiplatelet agents for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. The objective of this review was to estimate the comparative effectiveness of all antithrombotic treatments for AF patients. Materials and methods Data sources were Medline Ovid (1946 to October 2015), Embase Ovid (1980 to October 2015), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 9, 2015). Randomized controlled trials of AF patients were selected if they compared at least two of the following: placebo, aspirin, aspirin and clopidogrel combination therapy, adjusted-dose warfarin (target international normalized ratio 2.0–3.0), dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban. Bayesian network meta-analyses were conducted for outcomes of interest (all stroke, ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, overall mortality, major bleeding, and intracranial hemorrhage). Results Based on 16 randomized controlled trials of 96,826 patients, all oral anticoagulants were more effective than antiplatelet agents at reducing the risk of ischemic stroke and all strokes. Compared to warfarin, dabigatran 150 mg (rate ratio 0.65, 95% credible interval 0.52–0.82) and apixaban (rate ratio 0.82, 95% credible interval 0.69–0.97) reduced the risk of all strokes. Dabigatran 150 mg was also more effective than warfarin at reducing ischemic stroke risk (rate ratio 0.76, 95% credible interval 0.59–0.99). Aspirin, apixaban, dabigatran 110 mg, and edoxaban were associated with less major bleeding than warfarin. Conclusion All oral anticoagulants reduce the risk of stroke in AF patients. Some novel oral anticoagulants are associated with a lower stroke and/or major bleeding risk than warfarin. In addition to the safety and effectiveness of drug therapy, as reported in this study, individual treatment recommendations should also consider the patient’s underlying stroke

  16. Detection of multiple annexin autoantibodies in a patient with recurrent miscarriages, fulminant stroke and seronegative antiphospholipid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Philipp; Auler, Markus; Brachvogel, Bent; Benzing, Thomas; Mallman, Peter; Streichert, Thomas; Klatt, Andreas R.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) is one of the main causes for recurrent miscarriages. The diagnosis of APS is based on the occurrence of clinical symptoms such as thrombotic events or obstetric complications as well as the detection of antiphospholipid antibodies directed against β2-glycoprotein I and cardiolipin, or a positive lupus anticoagulant assay. However, there is a subpopulation of patients with clinical symptoms of APS, but the lack of serological markers (seronegative APS). In addition, a large proportion of patients with unexplained recurrent miscarriages exist. These cases may be attributed, at least in part, to a seronegative APS.
The presence of autoantibodies against annexins is potentially associated with APS. Here we used immunoassays and immunoblots to detect autoantibodies directed against annexin A1-5, and A8, respectively, in a patient with a seronegative APS and a history of six recurrent pregnancy losses and fulminant stroke. We found strong IgM isotype antibody reactivity directed against annexin A2 and annexin A8, and moderate to weak IgM isotype antibody reactivity directed against annexin A1, A3, and A5. Further studies will evaluate the diagnostic value of IgM isotype antibodies against annexin A1-A5, and A8 for seronegative APS and recurrent miscarriages. PMID:27346975

  17. Detection of multiple annexin autoantibodies in a patient with recurrent miscarriages, fulminant stroke and seronegative antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Philipp; Auler, Markus; Brachvogel, Bent; Benzing, Thomas; Mallman, Peter; Streichert, Thomas; Klatt, Andreas R

    2016-01-01

    Anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) is one of the main causes for recurrent miscarriages. The diagnosis of APS is based on the occurrence of clinical symptoms such as thrombotic events or obstetric complications as well as the detection of antiphospholipid antibodies directed against β2-glycoprotein I and cardiolipin, or a positive lupus anticoagulant assay. However, there is a subpopulation of patients with clinical symptoms of APS, but the lack of serological markers (seronegative APS). In addition, a large proportion of patients with unexplained recurrent miscarriages exist. These cases may be attributed, at least in part, to a seronegative APS.
The presence of autoantibodies against annexins is potentially associated with APS. Here we used immunoassays and immunoblots to detect autoantibodies directed against annexin A1-5, and A8, respectively, in a patient with a seronegative APS and a history of six recurrent pregnancy losses and fulminant stroke. We found strong IgM isotype antibody reactivity directed against annexin A2 and annexin A8, and moderate to weak IgM isotype antibody reactivity directed against annexin A1, A3, and A5. Further studies will evaluate the diagnostic value of IgM isotype antibodies against annexin A1-A5, and A8 for seronegative APS and recurrent miscarriages. PMID:27346975

  18. Prevention of stricture recurrence following urethral internal urethrotomy: routine repeated dilations or active surveillance?

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Wazir, Romel; Wang, Jianzhong; Wang, Kunjie; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Strictures of the urethra are the most common cause of obstructed micturition in younger men and there is frequent recurrence after initial treatment. Currently, routine repeated dilations, including intermittent self-catheterisation (ISC) are prescribed by urologists to prevent urethral stricture recurrence. There is, however, no high level evidence available supporting the effectiveness of practicing these painful techniques. Balancing efficacy, adverse effects and costs, we hypothesize that active surveillance is a better option for preventing stricture recurrence as compared with routine repeated dilations. However, well designed, adequately powered multi-center trials with comprehensive evaluation are urgently needed to confirm our hypothesis. . PMID:27576888

  19. Compression for Primary Prevention, Treatment, and Prevention of Recurrence of Venous Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Stephanie; McNichol, Laurie; Gray, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency is a prevalent disease that frequently leads to development of venous leg ulcers. While a number of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines have been developed that provide guidance for clinicians when caring for patients with chronic venous insufficiency, they lack adequate detail concerning selection and application of compression for prevention and management of venous leg ulcers. In order to address this need, the WOCN Society appointed a task force to develop an algorithm for compression for primary prevention, treatment, and prevention of recurrent venous leg ulcers in persons with chronic venous insufficiency. The task force used findings from a scoping literature review to identify current best evidence needed to support decision points and pathways within the algorithm. In addition, the task force convened a panel of 20 clinicians and researchers with expertise in lower extremity venous disorders in order to establish consensus around pathways and decision points within the algorithm lacking robust evidence. Following initial construction of the algorithm, a second interdisciplinary group of expert clinicians established content validity and provided additional qualitative feedback used to complete final revisions of the algorithm. This article reviews the process used to create this landmark algorithm, including generation of the evidence- and consensus-based statements used in its construction, the various pathways, and rich supplemental materials embedded within the algorithm, and the process used to establish content validity. PMID:27163774

  20. Cervical artery dissection: early recognition and stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Rhonda

    2016-07-01

    Cervical artery dissections involve the carotid or vertebral arteries. Although the overall incidence is low, they remain a common cause of stroke in children, young adults, and trauma patients. Symptoms such as headache, neck pain, and dizziness are commonly seen in the emergency department, but may not be apparent in the obtunded trauma patient. A missed diagnosis of cervical artery dissection can result in devastating neurological sequelae, so emergency clinicians must act quickly to recognize this event and begin treatment as soon as possible while neurological consultation is obtained. This issue reviews the evidence in applying advanced screening criteria and choosing imaging and antithrombotic treatment strategies for patients with cervical artery dissections to reduce the occurrence of ischemic stroke. PMID:27315017

  1. Microglial Cells Prevent Hemorrhage in Neonatal Focal Arterial Stroke.

    PubMed

    Fernández-López, David; Faustino, Joel; Klibanov, Alexander L; Derugin, Nikita; Blanchard, Elodie; Simon, Franziska; Leib, Stephen L; Vexler, Zinaida S

    2016-03-01

    Perinatal stroke leads to significant morbidity and long-term neurological and cognitive deficits. The pathophysiological mechanisms of brain damage depend on brain maturation at the time of stroke. To understand whether microglial cells limit injury after neonatal stroke by preserving neurovascular integrity, we subjected postnatal day 7 (P7) rats depleted of microglial cells, rats with inhibited microglial TGFbr2/ALK5 signaling, and corresponding controls, to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Microglial depletion by intracerebral injection of liposome-encapsulated clodronate at P5 significantly reduced vessel coverage and triggered hemorrhages in injured regions 24 h after tMCAO. Lack of microglia did not alter expression or intracellular redistribution of several tight junction proteins, did not affect degradation of collagen IV induced by the tMCAO, but altered cell types producing TGFβ1 and the phosphorylation and intracellular distribution of SMAD2/3. Selective inhibition of TGFbr2/ALK5 signaling in microglia via intracerebral liposome-encapsulated SB-431542 delivery triggered hemorrhages after tMCAO, demonstrating that TGFβ1/TGFbr2/ALK5 signaling in microglia protects from hemorrhages. Consistent with observations in neonatal rats, depletion of microglia before tMCAO in P9 Cx3cr1(GFP/+)/Ccr2(RFP/+) mice exacerbated injury and induced hemorrhages at 24 h. The effects were independent of infiltration of Ccr2(RFP/+) monocytes into injured regions. Cumulatively, in two species, we show that microglial cells protect neonatal brain from hemorrhage after acute ischemic stroke. PMID:26961944

  2. Harnessing hypoxic adaptation to prevent, treat, and repair stroke

    PubMed Central

    Siddiq, Ambreena; Smirnova, Natalya; Karpisheva, Ksenia; Haskew-Layton, Renee; McConoughey, Stephen; Langley, Brett; Estevez, Alvaro; Huerta, Patricio T.; Volpe, Bruce; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K.; Gazaryan, Irina; Cho, Sunghee; Fink, Matthew; LaManna, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The brain demands oxygen and glucose to fulfill its roles as the master regulator of body functions as diverse as bladder control and creative thinking. Chemical and electrical transmission in the nervous system is rapidly disrupted in stroke as a result of hypoxia and hypoglycemia. Despite being highly evolved in its architecture, the human brain appears to utilize phylogenetically conserved homeostatic strategies to combat hypoxia and ischemia. Specifically, several converging lines of inquiry have demonstrated that the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF1-1) mediates the activation of a large cassette of genes involved in adaptation to hypoxia in surviving neurons after stroke. Accordingly, pharmacological or molecular approaches that engage hypoxic adaptation at the point of one of its sensors (e.g., inhibition of HIF prolyl 4 hydroxylases) leads to profound sparing of brain tissue and enhanced recovery of function. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms that could subserve protective and restorative effects of augmenting hypoxic adaptation in the brain. The strategy appears to involve HIF-dependent and HIF-independent pathways and more than 70 genes and proteins activated transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally that can act at cellular, local, and system levels to compensate for oxygen insufficiency. The breadth and depth of this homeostatic program offers a hopeful alternative to the current pessimism towards stroke therapeutics. PMID:18043901

  3. Harnessing hypoxic adaptation to prevent, treat, and repair stroke.

    PubMed

    Ratan, Rajiv R; Siddiq, Ambreena; Smirnova, Natalya; Karpisheva, Ksenia; Haskew-Layton, Renee; McConoughey, Stephen; Langley, Brett; Estevez, Alvaro; Huerta, Patricio T; Volpe, Bruce; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K; Gazaryan, Irina; Cho, Sunghee; Fink, Matthew; LaManna, Joseph

    2007-12-01

    The brain demands oxygen and glucose to fulfill its roles as the master regulator of body functions as diverse as bladder control and creative thinking. Chemical and electrical transmission in the nervous system is rapidly disrupted in stroke as a result of hypoxia and hypoglycemia. Despite being highly evolved in its architecture, the human brain appears to utilize phylogenetically conserved homeostatic strategies to combat hypoxia and ischemia. Specifically, several converging lines of inquiry have demonstrated that the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF1-1) mediates the activation of a large cassette of genes involved in adaptation to hypoxia in surviving neurons after stroke. Accordingly, pharmacological or molecular approaches that engage hypoxic adaptation at the point of one of its sensors (e.g., inhibition of HIF prolyl 4 hydroxylases) leads to profound sparing of brain tissue and enhanced recovery of function. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms that could subserve protective and restorative effects of augmenting hypoxic adaptation in the brain. The strategy appears to involve HIF-dependent and HIF-independent pathways and more than 70 genes and proteins activated transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally that can act at cellular, local, and system levels to compensate for oxygen insufficiency. The breadth and depth of this homeostatic program offers a hopeful alternative to the current pessimism towards stroke therapeutics. PMID:18043901

  4. Percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: an update

    PubMed Central

    De Backer, O; Arnous, S; Ihlemann, N; Vejlstrup, N; Jørgensen, E; Pehrson, S; Krieger, T D W; Meier, P; Søndergaard, L; Franzen, O W

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia encountered in clinical practice. One of its most devastating complications is the development of thromboembolism leading to fatal or disabling stroke. Oral anticoagulation (OAC, warfarin) is the standard treatment for stroke prevention in patients with AF with an increased stroke risk. However, there are several obstacles to long-term OAC therapy, including the risk of serious bleeding, several drug–drug interactions and the need for frequent blood testing. Although newer oral anticoagulants have been developed, these drugs also face issues of major bleeding and non-compliance. Therefore, alternative treatment options for stroke prevention in patients with AF with a high stroke risk are needed. Percutaneous left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion is an evolving therapy, which should be taken into consideration in those patients with non-valvular AF with a high stroke risk and contraindications for OAC. This article aims to discuss the rationale for LAA closure, the available LAA occlusion devices and their clinical evidence until now. Moreover, we discuss the importance of proper patient selection, the role of various imaging techniques and the need for a more tailored postprocedural antithrombotic therapy. PMID:25332785

  5. Warfarin versus aspirin: using CHADS2 to guide therapy for stroke prevention in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hopps, Sarah; Marcy, Todd R

    2009-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) results in nearly a quarter of the strokes suffered in patients 80 to 89 years of age. Aspirin and warfarin are primary choices for preventing these ischemic strokes. CHADS2 (Congestive heart failure, Hypertention, Age, Diabetes, Stroke) is a validated assessment tool for cardioembolic stroke in AF. Ischemic stroke rates increase from 1.9 to 18.2 events per 100 patient-years with CHADS2 scores of 0 and 6, respectively. Warfarin is more effective than aspirin at preventing stroke in AF, but is associated with more hemorrhagic events. The American College of Chest Physicians recommends the use of warfarin in patients with a CHADS2 score of 2 or higher and suggests warfarin be used in patients with a score of 1. We recommend a patient-specific approach to therapy in which warfarin is offered to patients with a CHADS2 score of 1 or higher unless the patient is at high risk for a hemorrhagic event or cannot attain regular warfarin monitoring. PMID:20092222

  6. Antithrombotic Treatments for Stroke Prevention in Elderly Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation: Drugs and Doses.

    PubMed

    Kilickap, Mustafa; Bosch, Jackie; Eikelboom, John W; Hart, Robert G

    2016-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac rhythm disturbance and is associated with a 5-fold increased risk of stroke. The most important risk factors for stroke in patients with AF are previous stroke and age ≥ 75 years. Canadian guidelines recommend anticoagulant therapy for patients with AF who are older than the age of 65 years, but the elderly often remain undertreated, primarily because of concerns regarding bleeding. Non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants appear to be safer, at least as efficacious, and more convenient than warfarin, and are a cost-effective alternative for elderly patients with AF. We review the evidence for the use of antithrombotic agents for stroke prevention in elderly patients (age ≥ 75 years) with nonvalvular AF. PMID:27568871

  7. Antithrombotic treatment for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: The Asian agenda.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Huan; Chen, Mien-Cheng; Gibbs, Harry; Kwon, Sun U; Lo, Sidney; On, Young Keun; Rosman, Azhari; Suwanwela, Nijasri C; Tan, Ru San; Tirador, Louie S; Zirlik, Andreas

    2015-07-15

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common heart arrhythmia. Untreated AF incurs a considerable burden of stroke and associated healthcare costs. Asians have AF risk factors similar to Caucasians and a similarly increased risk of AF-related stroke; however, with a vast and rapidly ageing population, Asia bears a disproportionately large disease burden. Urgent action is warranted to avert this potential health crisis. Antithrombotic therapy with oral anticoagulants is the most effective means of preventing stroke in AF and is a particular priority in Asia given the increasing disease burden. However, AF in Asia remains undertreated. Conventional oral anticoagulation with warfarin is problematic in Asia due to suboptimal control and a propensity among Asians to warfarin-induced intracranial haemorrhage. Partly due to concerns about intracranial haemorrhage, there are considerable gaps between AF treatment guidelines and clinical practice in Asia, in particular overuse of antiplatelet agents and underuse of anticoagulants. Compared with warfarin, new direct thrombin inhibitors and Factor Xa inhibitors are non-inferior in preventing stroke and significantly reduce the risk of life-threatening bleeding, particularly intracranial bleeding. These agents may therefore provide an appropriate alternative to warfarin in Asian patients. There is considerable scope to improve stroke prevention in AF in Asia. Key priorities include: early detection of AF and identification of asymptomatic patients; assessment of stroke and bleeding risk for all AF patients; evidence-based pharmacotherapy with direct-acting oral anticoagulant agents or vitamin K antagonists for AF patients at risk of stroke; controlling hypertension; and awareness-raising, education and outreach among both physicians and patients. PMID:25978611

  8. Concepts in Onychomycosis Treatment and Recurrence Prevention: An Update.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Theodore

    2016-03-01

    In considering therapy for onychomycosis, the most important factor to take into account is patient selection rather than treatment selection. Patients should be screened and evaluated for the extent of nail involvement, the amount of subungual debris, the degree of dystrophy, their ability and willingness to follow the regimen, and whether comorbidities are present that may affect the efficacy and/or safety of one or more therapies. Onychomycosis is a chronic disease with a high recurrence rate. Commonsense measures to reduce the risk for reinfection include patient education and a clinician-patient team approach to long-term management. PMID:27074701

  9. Ineffectiveness and toxicity of BCG vaccine for the prevention of recurrent genital herpes.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, J M; Vontver, L A; Stamm, W E; Reeves, W C; Critchlow, C; Remington, M L; Holmes, K K; Corey, L

    1985-01-01

    One hundred fifty-five patients with genital herpes were enrolled in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comparing 0.1 ml of intradermal BCG vaccine with placebo for the prevention of recurrent episodes of genital herpes. The mean rate or recurrence over 9 months of prospective follow-up was 0.528 recurrences per month in BCG recipients compared with 0.392 recurrences per month in placebo recipients (not significant). The BCG vaccine also failed to influence the duration of lesions in the first recurrent episode of genital herpes after vaccination. Six patients were given a second inoculation of BCG vaccine, and persistent cutaneous granulomas were noted in three of these six patients. Intradermal inoculation with BCG does not appear to affect the natural history of genital herpes, and repeated inoculations can be toxic. PMID:3885848

  10. Dietary Lignan and Proanthocyanidin Consumption and Colorectal Adenoma Recurrence in the Polyp Prevention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bobe, Gerd; Murphy, Gwen; Albert, Paul S.; Sansbury, Leah B.; Lanza, Elaine; Schatzkin, Arthur; Cross, Amanda J.

    2011-01-01

    Lignans and proanthocyanidins are plant polyphenols that have shown protective properties against colorectal neoplasms in some human studies. Using logistic regression, we estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to prospectively evaluate the association between lignan and proanthocyanidin intake, estimated from databases linked to a food frequency questionnaire, and adenoma recurrence in 1,859 participants of the Polyp Prevention Trial. Overall, individual or total lignans or proanthocyanidins were not associated with colorectal adenoma recurrence. However, in sex-specific analyses, total lignan intake was positively associated with any adenoma recurrence in women (highest versus lowest lignan intake quartile OR = 2.07, 95% CI: 1.22-3.52, P trend = 0.004) but not in men (P interaction = 0.04). To conclude, dietary lignan and proanthocyanidin consumption was not generally related to colorectal adenoma recurrence; however, high lignan intake may increase the risk of adenoma recurrence in women. PMID:21618513

  11. Cardioembolic Stroke in Atrial Fibrillation-Rationale for Preventive Closure of the Left Atrial Appendage

    PubMed Central

    Leithäuser, Boris

    2009-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmias, and a major cause of morbidity and mortality due to cardioembolic stroke. The left atrial appendage is the major site of thrombus formation in non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Loss of atrial systole in atrial fibrillation and increased relative risk of associated stroke point strongly toward a role for stasis of blood in left atrial thrombosis, although thrombus formation is multifactorial, and much more than blood flow irregularities are implicated. Oral anticoagulation with vitamin-K-antagonists is currently the most effective prophylaxis for stroke in atrial fibrillation. Unfortunately, this treatment is often contraindicated, particularly in the elderly, in whom risk of stroke is high. Moreover, given the risk of major bleeding, there is reason to be skeptical of the net benefit when warfarin is used in those patients. This work reviews the pathophysiology of cardioembolic stroke and critically spotlights the current status of preventive anticoagulation therapy. Various techniques to exclude the left atrial appendage from circulation were discussed as a considerable alternative for stroke prophylaxis. PMID:19997539

  12. Preferences and attitudes toward approaches to depression relapse/recurrence prevention among pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Dimidjian, Sona; Goodman, Sherryl H

    2014-03-01

    Patient preferences are increasingly recognized as important in clinical research and the delivery of evidence based practice in psychology. Although the prevention of depressive relapse/recurrence among perinatal women is an important public health goal, little is known about pregnant women's preferences and attitudes toward relapse/recurrence prevention interventions. Such information is important given low rates of care seeking among this population, and the potential for a relapse/recurrence prevention to avert negative outcomes among both vulnerable women and their offspring. Pregnant women seeking routine prenatal care in obstetric clinics (n = 200) were surveyed to assess their preferences for and attitudes about psychotherapy and pharmacological approaches to relapse/recurrence prevention. Women preferred psychotherapy (mindfulness based cognitive therapy and interpersonal therapy) more so than pharmacotherapy and reported significantly more favorable perceptions of the psychotherapy as compared to pharmacotherapy approaches to depression relapse/recurrence prevention. Results suggest also that depression history is important to consider in evaluating women's preferences and attitudes. Clinical and research implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:24440577

  13. Recurrent urethral hairball and stone in a hypospadiac: management and prevention.

    PubMed

    Singh, I; Hemal, A K

    2001-08-01

    A 32-year-old perineal hypospadiac man presented with recurrent urethral hair growth, stone, and stricture with a history of multiple urethroplasties. He was treated by urethrolithotomy, internal urethrotomy, laser epilation of the hair-bearing urethral graft, closure of the fistula, and chemical depilation of the neourethral hair. A dilute solution of thioglycolate was prophylactically instilled into the neourethra at intervals of 3 months to ensure complete tricholysis and to prevent recurrent hair growth in the future. PMID:11552792

  14. Metabolic vitamin B12 deficiency: a missed opportunity to prevent dementia and stroke.

    PubMed

    Spence, J David

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this narrative review is to highlight insights into the importance and frequency of metabolic vitamin B12 (B12) deficiency, reasons why it is commonly missed, and reasons for the widespread but mistaken belief that treatment of B12 deficiency does not prevent stroke or improve cognitive function. Metabolic B12 deficiency is common, being present in 10%-40% of the population; is frequently missed; is easily treated; and contributes importantly to cognitive decline and stroke in older people. Measuring serum B12 alone is not sufficient for diagnosis; it is necessary to measure holotranscobalamin or functional markers of B12 adequacy such as methylmalonic acid or plasma total homocysteine. B-vitamin therapy with cyanocobalamin reduces the risk of stroke in patients with normal renal function but is harmful (perhaps because of thiocyanate accumulation from cyanide in cyanocobalamin) in patients with renal impairment. Methylcobalamin may be preferable in renal impairment. B12 therapy slowed gray matter atrophy and cognitive decline in the Homocysteine and B Vitamins in Cognitive Impairment Trial. Undiagnosed metabolic B12 deficiency may be an important missed opportunity for prevention of dementia and stroke; in patients with metabolic B12 deficiency, it would be prudent to offer inexpensive and nontoxic supplements of oral B12, preferably methylcobalamin or hydroxycobalamin. Future research is needed to distinguish the effects of thiocyanate from cyanocobalamin on hydrogen sulfide, and effects of treatment with methylcobalamin on cognitive function and stroke, particularly in patients with renal failure. PMID:26597770

  15. Cognitive Impairment After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gauba, Charu; Chaudhari, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vascular dementia is extremely common and contributes to stroke-associated morbidity and mortality. The study of vascular dementia may help to plan preventive interventions. Aims: To study the frequency of cognitive impairment after stroke in a series of consecutive patients with acute stroke, along with factors which influence it. Methods: Fifty adults with acute infarct or hemorrhage (as seen on computed tomography of the brain) were included in the study. The National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and Barthel’s Index scores were done. Cognitive testing was done by PGI Battery of Brain Dysfunction (PGI-BBD) and Short Form of the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (SIQCODE). Statistical analysis was by Student’s t-test, Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, and Mann-Whitney U test. Results: Mean age of patients was 61.82 years; males and ischemic strokes predominated. Dementia was seen in 30%, cognitive impairment no dementia (CIND) in 42%, and normal cognition in 28% patients. Factors associated with vascular cognitive impairment included old age, male sex, low education, hemorrhages, recurrent or severe stroke, silent infarcts, severe cortical atrophy, and left hemispheric or subcortical involvement. Conclusions: Up to 72% of patients have some form of cognitive impairment after a stroke. Secondary stroke prevention could reduce the incidence of vascular dementia. PMID:26543693

  16. A tailored treatment strategy: a modern approach for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lip, G Y H; Potpara, T; Boriani, G; Blomström-Lundqvist, C

    2016-05-01

    The main priority in atrial fibrillation (AF) management is stroke prevention, following which decisions about rate or rhythm control are focused on the patient, being primarily for management of symptoms. Given that AF is commonly associated with various comorbidities, risk factors such as hypertension, heart failure, diabetes mellitus and sleep apnoea should be actively looked for and managed in a holistic approach to AF management. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of modern AF stroke prevention with a focus on tailored treatment strategies. Biomarkers and genetic factors have been proposed to help identify 'high-risk' patients to be targeted for oral anticoagulation, but ultimately their use must be balanced against that of more simple and practical considerations for everyday use. Current guidelines have directed focus on initial identification of 'truly low-risk' patients with AF, that is those patients with a CHA2 DS2 -VASc [congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75 years (two points), diabetes mellitus, stroke (two points), vascular disease, age 65-74 years, sex category] score of 0 (male) or 1 (female), who do not need any antithrombotic therapy. Subsequently, patients with ≥1 stroke risk factors can be offered effective stroke prevention, that is oral anticoagulation. The SAMe-TT2 R2 [sex female, age <60 years, medical history (>2 comorbidities), treatment (interacting drugs), tobacco use (two points), race non-Caucasian (two points)] score can help physicians make informed decisions on those patients likely to do well on warfarin (SAMe-TT2 R2 score 0-2) or those who are likely to have a poor time in therapeutic range (SAMe-TT2 R2 score >2). A clinically focused tailored approach to assessment and stroke prevention in AF with the use of the CHA2 DS2 VASc, HAS-BLED [hypertension, abnormal renal/liver function (one or two points), stroke, bleeding history or predisposition, labile international normalized ratio, elderly (>65

  17. Graduated compression stockings to prevent venous thromboembolism in hospital: evidence from patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Kearon, Clive; O'Donnell, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is the most common preventable cause of death in hospital patients and prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is cost-saving in high-risk patients. Low-dose anticoagulation is very effective at preventing VTE but increases bleeding. Graduated compression stockings and intermittent pneumatic compression devices are also used to prevent VTE and do not increase bleeding, which makes their use appealing in patients who cannot tolerate bleeding, such as patients with acute stroke. Studies that evaluated mechanical methods of preventing VTE were small and mainly used asymptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT), detected using screening tests, as the study outcome. The recently published CLOTS Trial 1 (Clots in Legs Or sTockings after Stroke) compared thigh-level compression stockings with no stockings in about 2500 patients with stroke and immobility, and found that thigh-level stockings were not effective. Indirectly, the findings of this study question the ability of stockings to prevent VTE in other patient groups, including those after surgery. CLOTS 1 compared thigh-level and below-knee stockings in about 3000 patients with acute stroke. Given that thigh-level stockings were ineffective in CLOTS 1, it is surprising that they were more effective than below-knee stockings in CLOTS Trial 2. A possible explanation is that below-knee stockings increase DVT, although this seems unlikely. CLOTS 1 and CLOTS 2 question whether graduated compression stockings prevent VTE and suggest the need for further trials evaluating their efficacy in medical and surgical patients. PMID:21346697

  18. Linking brain stroke risk factors to human movement features for the development of preventive tools

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, Christian; Plamondon, Réjean; Lebrun, Louise-Hélène

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses human movement analyses to assess the susceptibility of brain stroke, one of the most important causes of disability in elders. To that end, a computerized battery of nine neuromuscular tests has been designed and evaluated with a sample of 120 subjects with or without stoke risk factors. The kinematics of the movements produced was analyzed using a computational neuromuscular model and predictive characteristics were extracted. Logistic regression and linear discriminant analysis with leave-one-out cross-validation was used to infer the probability of presence of brain stroke risk factors. The clinical potential value of movement information for stroke prevention was assessed by computing area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the diagnostic of risk factors based on motion analysis. AUC mostly varying between 0.6 and 0.9 were obtained, depending on the neuromuscular test and the risk factor investigated (obesity, diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, cigarette smoking, and cardiac disease). Our results support the feasibility of the proposed methodology and its potential application for the development of brain stroke prevention tools. Although further research is needed to improve this methodology and its outcome, results are promising and the proposed approach should be of great interest for many experimenters open to novel approaches in preventive medicine and in gerontology. It should also be valuable for engineers, psychologists, and researchers using human movements for the development of diagnostic and neuromuscular assessment tools. PMID:25071559

  19. [A case of Behçet disease developing recurrent ischemic stroke with fever and scrotal ulcers].

    PubMed

    Koike, Yuka; Sakai, Naoko; Umeda, Yoshitaka; Umeda, Maiko; Oyake, Mutsuo; Fujita, Nobuya

    2015-01-01

    A 30-year-old man, who was diagnosed with Behçet disease at 10 years of age, was hospitalized because of transient right hemiparesis after presenting with high fever and scrotal ulcers. Brain MRI revealed ischemic lesions in the area supplied by the anterior cerebral arteries. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) showed pleocytosis and a high interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentration (668 pg/ml). The patient was diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke associated with exacerbation of Behçet disease. After initiation of corticosteroid therapy, his clinical symptoms improved, and the CSF IL-6 concentration decreased. One year later, the patient developed high fever and scrotal ulcers after the onset of transient left upper limb plegia. Brain MRI showed an acute ischemic lesion in the right putamen, and CSF analysis showed an elevated IL-6 concentration (287 pg/ml). Brain CT angiography revealed stenosis of the left anterior cerebral artery and occlusion of the right anterior cerebral artery, which had been well visualized one year previously. Involvement of the intracranial cerebral arteries in Behçet disease is extremely rare. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of a patient with recurrent symptomatic ischemic stroke associated with high fever and scrotal ulcers, which suggests exacerbation of Behçet disease. PMID:26103818

  20. [Blood lipids and adaptation to stress as risk factors for stroke prevention].

    PubMed

    Anders, I; Esterbauer, E; Fink, A; Ladurner, G; Huemer, M; Wranek, U

    2000-01-01

    Do stroke prevention patients with increased blood-fat-protein compounds (total cholesterol, HDL- and LDL cholesterol and triglyceride) have a different method of coping than patients with normal blood fat? 1159 stroke prevention patients participated in the following stroke risk investigations at this hospital: biographical and risk factor-orientated anamnesis, a neurological status investigation, a laboratory investigation, a sonographic investigation and a psychological investigation. The differences in the coping strategies of those patients with normal and those with higher blood-fat-protein compounds were investigated. Patients with higher total cholesterol showed significantly higher values in the avoidance of stress situations (sig. 0.041) and a stronger tendency towards escapist behaviour (sig. 0.05). Patients with normal HDL cholesterol values indicated a tendency (sig. 0.07) to higher values in positive self-instruction in comparison to patients with reduced HDL cholesterol values. Those prevention patients with higher LDL values showed a tendency (sig. 0.08) to higher values in the intake of narcotic substances (nicotine, alcohol, tranquillisers, pharmaceutical agents). Patients with increased triglyceride indicated significantly higher values in coping by compensation (eating, shopping, reward behaviour, watching TV; sig. 0.037) and the intake of narcotic substances (sig. 0.044). Prevention patients with higher total cholesterol, LDL/HDL, or triglyceride values showed significantly different coping strategies in comparison to those patients with normal values. Increased avoidance and escapism behaviour and also compensation and the abuse of narcotic substances could be seen in connection with an increase in the risk of a stroke. In contrast, a constructive coping strategy such as positive self-instruction could reduce the risk of a stroke, which goes along with normal HDL cholesterol. PMID:10756593

  1. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation and Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Saad; Wilt, Heath

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinically staggering burden of disease stemming from cerebrovascular events, of which a majority are ischemic in nature and many are precipitated by atrial fibrillation (AF). AF can occur in isolation or in association with myocardial or structural heart disease. In the latter case, and when considering health at an international level, congenital and acquired valve-related diseases are frequent contributors to the current pandemic of AF and its clinical impact. Guidelines crafted by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, European Society of Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Society underscore the use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) among patients with valvular heart disease, particularly in the presence of concomitant AF, to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke of cardioembolic origin; however, the non-VKAs, also referred to as direct, target-specific or new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), have not been actively studied in this particular population. In fact, each of the new agents is approved in patients with AF not caused by a valve problem. The aim of our review is to carefully examine the available evidence from pivotal phase 3 clinical trials of NOACs and determine how they might perform in patients with AF and concomitant valvular heart disease. PMID:27347228

  2. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation and Valvular Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saad; Wilt, Heath

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinically staggering burden of disease stemming from cerebrovascular events, of which a majority are ischemic in nature and many are precipitated by atrial fibrillation (AF). AF can occur in isolation or in association with myocardial or structural heart disease. In the latter case, and when considering health at an international level, congenital and acquired valve-related diseases are frequent contributors to the current pandemic of AF and its clinical impact. Guidelines crafted by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, European Society of Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Society underscore the use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) among patients with valvular heart disease, particularly in the presence of concomitant AF, to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke of cardioembolic origin; however, the non-VKAs, also referred to as direct, target-specific or new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), have not been actively studied in this particular population. In fact, each of the new agents is approved in patients with AF not caused by a valve problem. The aim of our review is to carefully examine the available evidence from pivotal phase 3 clinical trials of NOACs and determine how they might perform in patients with AF and concomitant valvular heart disease. PMID:27347228

  3. Prevention of recurrent spontaneous abortions by leukocyte transfusions.

    PubMed

    Taylor, C G; Faulk, W P; McIntyre, J A

    1985-08-01

    One hundred and thirty-nine couples referred because of recurrent abortions with no obvious cause were assessed for genetic similarity using the HLA major histocompatibility system. Comparison with 103 fertile control couples demonstrated that a much higher proportion of couples in the abortion group shared two or more HLA antigens. Using this criterion, 44 wives out of the 139 couples referred, when compared with a child-bearing group, appeared to share a greater than expected number of histocompatibility antigens and were therefore considered suitable for treatment. Twenty-eight wives have received treatment with white cell infusions from erythrocyte-compatible donors and so far they have delivered 17 babies plus 2 second babies. Another 3 wives are pregnant beyond their previous dates for abortions (1 first and 2 second pregnancies). There have been 5 failures (4 first pregnancy and 1 second pregnancy); one of these was treated a second time and has now successfully delivered. Seven couples are awaiting conception. Of the patients who have become pregnant, 81.5% have had successful deliveries. No adverse transfusion reactions have been observed. PMID:4020795

  4. Anticoagulation to prevent stroke in atrial fibrillation and its implications for managed care.

    PubMed

    Singer, D E

    1998-03-12

    Nonrheumatic atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most potent common risk factor for stroke, raising the risk of stroke 5-fold. Six randomized trials of anticoagulation in AFib consistently demonstrated a reduction in the risk of stroke by about two-thirds. In these trials, anticoagulation in AFib was quite safe. In contrast, randomized trials indicate that aspirin confers only a small reduction in risk of stroke, at best. Pooled data from the first set of randomized trials indicate that prior stroke, hypertension, diabetes, and increasing age are independent risk factors for future stroke with AFib. Individuals < 65 years old with none of the other risk factors might safely avoid anticoagulation; for all others, anticoagulation seems indicated. Studies of hemorrhagic risk highlight the importance of keeping the international normalized ratio (INR) < 4.0. Recent analyses also reveal that risk of ischemic stroke in AFib increases greatly at INR levels < 2.0. Efficacy and safety of anticoagulation in AFib depend on maintaining the INR between 2.0-3.0. Cost-effectiveness studies indicate that anticoagulation for AFib is among the most efficient preventive interventions in adults. Importantly, the benefits of anticoagulation in AFib accrue immediately. The implications for managed care organizations are that anticoagulation for AFib should be encouraged in their covered populations, and that dedicated anticoagulation services should be developed to promote system-wide control of anticoagulation intensity. Quality measures would include the proportion of patients with AFib who are anticoagulated, and the percentage of time patients' INR levels are between 2.0-3.0. Managed care organizations can benefit from recent research on anticoagulation for AFib; they have a responsibility to support future research and development efforts. PMID:9525571

  5. Prevention of experimental stroke by hypercapnic-hypoxic preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Yakushev, N N; Bespalov, A G; Kulikov, V P

    2008-09-01

    The effectiveness of hypercapnic hypoxic training in the prevention of acute disturbances in cerebral circulation was studied under experimental conditions. Hypercapnic hypoxic training was followed by a significant decrease in the severity of neurological deficit and locomotor and coordination disorders after cerebral ischemic injury. PMID:19240841

  6. Different Strokes: Models of Drug Abuse Prevention Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Martin R.

    This paper delineates models of drug abuse prevention education that have been indicated in the literature during the past six years, and discusses the research related to each. The nine models were considered according to: (1) basic premises, (2) positive and negative salient criticisms, and, (3) implications and modes of application for drug…

  7. [Outlook for recurrence prevention from the viewpoint of the guidelines on urolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Morita, Nobuyo; Suga, Kodai; Moriyama, Manabu T; Suzuki, Koji

    2012-12-01

    In Japan, the number of patients with urolithiasis has continued to increase at a faster rate, with a lifetime morbidity in 2005 of 15.1% for males and 6.8% for females, possibly due to : 1) westernization of dietary habits and lifestyle, 2) improvement of diagnostic technologies (CT and ultrasound examination), and 3) aging of the population. Additionally, this disease has a higher recurrence rate ; for example, approximately 50% for calcium-containing calculi. The guidelines on urolithiasis consist primarily of the guidelines for treatment and recurrence prevention, and the items concerning recurrence prevention were added in the 2007 updated Guidelines on Urolithiasis by the European Association of Urology (EAU) and the American Urological Association (AUA) (EAU/AUA guidelines). These facts reflect the importance of recurrence prevention. On the other hand, the Japanese guidelines on urolithiasis are now being revised and will adopt the form of "clinical questions". This paper provides an overview of the examination methods for recurrence, lifestyle guidance, and drug therapies based on the current guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of urolithiasis as well as the points for clinical questions to be included in the revised guidelines for a deeper understanding and, consequently, return to routine clinical practice. PMID:23328170

  8. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants for the prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Bauersachs, Rupert

    2016-08-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is associated with a risk of recurrence that depends on factors specific to index event and patient. A first unprovoked VTE increases the risk of a recurrent event, particularly during the first year after anticoagulation cessation. Determining a strategy for the long-term prevention of recurrent VTE poses challenges that stem from a lack of agreement on recommended therapy duration and varying treatment burden for the patient. Oral anticoagulants, including vitamin K antagonists and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs), are the main treatment options for the long-term prevention of recurrent VTE. However, the risk of VTE recurrence must be balanced against the risk of bleeding in each patient. Phase III clinical trials have evaluated rivaroxaban, apixaban and dabigatran for extended treatment and prevention of VTE versus placebo, and versus warfarin in the case of dabigatran. Compared with placebo treatment, each NOAC showed superior efficacy together with an acceptable safety profile during extended treatment periods of 6-18months. Patients receiving long-term NOAC therapy will still require regular risk factor assessment, but these agents may permit longer treatment duration with an improved benefit-risk profile. PMID:27263046

  9. Variants of COL3A1 are associated with the risk of stroke recurrence and prognosis in the Chinese population: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wenfei; Lin, Yahui; Song, Weihua; Sun, Kai; Yu, Hui; Zhang, Yinhui; Zhang, Channa; Li, Liang; Suo, Miaomiao; Hui, Rutai; Chen, Jingzhou

    2014-06-01

    Type III collagen plays an important role in activating platelets, forming thrombus, and maintaining the mechanical properties of arteries. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that genetic variants of COL3A1 (gene encoding type III collagen) contribute to recurrence and prognosis of stroke. We investigated the associations of three variants (rs2138533, rs11887092, and rs1800255) in the COL3A1 gene with stroke recurrence and prognosis in 1,544 patients with three subtypes of stroke: lacunar infarction (n = 442), atherothrombotic infarction (n = 670), and hemorrhage (n = 432). These associations were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression models. Patients were followed up for 4.5 years. The A allele of rs1800255 in the COL3A1 gene coding region was significantly associated with a reduced risk of stroke recurrence in patients with lacunar infarction (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.58, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.36-0.93, P = 0.024), but there was an increased risk of all-cause mortality of atherothrombotic patients (adjusted HR 1.43, 95 % CI 1.01-2.00, P = 0.044). The TT genotype of rs2138533 showed a significantly increased risk of death caused by cardiovascular disease or stroke in lacunar infarct patients (adjusted HR 2.98, 95 % CI 1.27-6.98, P = 0.012), but there was a reduced risk of all-cause mortality for patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (adjusted HR 0.34, 95 % CI 0.12-0.93, P = 0.036). The G allele of rs11887092 increased the risk of stroke recurrence in patients with atherothrombotic stroke (adjusted HR 1.59, 95 % CI 1.04-2.44, P = 0.035). In conclusion, variants of COL3A1 might play a vital role in determining the risk of recurrence and prognosis after stroke. PMID:24664438

  10. The Role of Nonvitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants (NOACs) in Stroke Prevention in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Sofya; Barcelona, Robert; Josephson, Richard A; Mohan, Sri K Madan

    2016-05-01

    Anticoagulation is important in stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. Until recently, heparins and vitamin K antagonists were the only available therapy for stroke reduction in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) including direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran) and direct factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) are now available and offer new options for stroke prevention. This article reviews the available data on the use of NOACs for primary and secondary stroke prevention in AF patients and describes specific patient populations to guide clinician in making the informed decision regarding appropriate use of those agents. It also addresses the use of NOACs early after acute stroke and use of thrombolysis while on NOAC. PMID:27023335

  11. Dissecting Xuesaitong's mechanisms on preventing stroke based on the microarray and connectivity map.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linli; Yu, Yunru; Yang, Jihong; Zhao, Xiaoping; Li, Zheng

    2015-11-01

    Elucidating action mechanisms of Chinese medicines has remained a challenging task due to the chemical and biological complexity that needs to be resolved. In this study we applied a gene expression data and connectivity map (CMAP) based approach to study action mechanisms of a Chinese medicine Xuesaitong injection (XST) on preventing cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. XST is a standardized patent Chinese medicine of Panax notoginseng roots and it has long been used for the effective prevention and treatment of stroke in China. However, more research is needed to understand the mechanisms underlying its effects against ischemic stroke. We first evaluated the effect of XST against ischemic stroke in an ischemia-reperfusion rat animal model and dissected its mechanisms based on gene expression data of injured brain. The results showed that treatment with XST significantly attenuated infarct area and histological damage. Based upon pathway analysis and the CMAP query of microarray data, anti-inflammatory response and anti-platelet coagulation were found as the major mechanisms of XST against stroke, which were further validated in vitro and with pharmacological assays of serum. We demonstrated the feasibility of applying the combination of the microarray with the CMAP in identifying mechanisms of Chinese medicine. PMID:26305988

  12. Final Results of Cilostazol-Aspirin Therapy against Recurrent Stroke with Intracranial Artery Stenosis (CATHARSIS)

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Toi, Sono; Ezura, Masayuki; Okada, Yasushi; Takagi, Makoto; Nagai, Yoji; Matsubara, Yoshihiro; Minematsu, Kazuo; Suzuki, Norihiro; Tanahashi, Norio; Taki, Waro; Nagata, Izumi; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the effect of cilostazol plus aspirin versus aspirin alone on the progression of intracranial arterial stenosis (IAS), and to compare ischemic and hemorrhagic events in patients with symptomatic IAS, an investigator-driven, nationwide multicenter cooperative randomized controlled trial (CATHARSIS; ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier 00333164) was conducted. Methods 165 noncardioembolic ischemic stroke patients with >50% stenosis in the responsible intracranial artery after 2 weeks to 6 months from the onset were randomly allocated to receive either cilostazol 200 mg/day plus aspirin 100 mg/day (n = 83, CA group) or aspirin 100 mg/day alone (n = 82, A group). The primary endpoint was the progression of IAS on magnetic resonance angiography at 2 years after randomization. Secondary endpoints were any vascular events, any cause of death, serious adverse events, new silent brain infarcts, and worsening of the modified Rankin Scale score. Results Progression of IAS was observed in 9.6% of the CA group patients and in 5.6% of the A group patients, with no significant intergroup difference (p = 0.53). The incidence of the secondary endpoints tended to be lower in the CA group compared with the A group, although the differences were not significant. By using exploratory logistic regression analysis adjusted for patient background characteristics, it was shown that the risk for certain combinations of secondary endpoints was lower in the CA group than in the A group [all vascular events and silent brain infarcts: odds ratio (OR) = 0.37, p = 0.04; stroke and silent brain infarcts: OR = 0.34, p = 0.04; all vascular events, worsening of modified Rankin Scale scores and silent brain infracts: OR = 0.41, p = 0.03]. Major hemorrhage was observed in 4 patients of the CA group and in 3 of the A group. Conclusion Progression of IAS during the 2-year observation period appears to be less frequent than previously reported in stroke patients on antiplatelet agents after

  13. Help Desk Answers: Do novel oral anticoagulants safely prevent stroke in patients with nonvalvular A-fib?

    PubMed

    Siewert, Ryan; Hostetter, Jeff

    2016-06-01

    Yes. Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban are safe and effective compared with warfarin for preventing stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. These novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are noninferior in reducing the number of strokes and systemic emboli and in lowering all-cause mortality while not increasing major bleeding complications and hemorrhagic events. PMID:27474824

  14. Stroke injury, cognitive impairment and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Kalaria, Raj N; Akinyemi, Rufus; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-05-01

    The global burden of ischaemic strokes is almost 4-fold greater than haemorrhagic strokes. Current evidence suggests that 25-30% of ischaemic stroke survivors develop immediate or delayed vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) or vascular dementia (VaD). Dementia after stroke injury may encompass all types of cognitive disorders. States of cognitive dysfunction before the index stroke are described under the umbrella of pre-stroke dementia, which may entail vascular changes as well as insidious neurodegenerative processes. Risk factors for cognitive impairment and dementia after stroke are multifactorial including older age, family history, genetic variants, low educational status, vascular comorbidities, prior transient ischaemic attack or recurrent stroke and depressive illness. Neuroimaging determinants of dementia after stroke comprise silent brain infarcts, white matter changes, lacunar infarcts and medial temporal lobe atrophy. Until recently, the neuropathology of dementia after stroke was poorly defined. Most of post-stroke dementia is consistent with VaD involving multiple substrates. Microinfarction, microvascular changes related to blood-brain barrier damage, focal neuronal atrophy and low burden of co-existing neurodegenerative pathology appear key substrates of dementia after stroke injury. The elucidation of mechanisms of dementia after stroke injury will enable establishment of effective strategy for symptomatic relief and prevention. Controlling vascular disease risk factors is essential to reduce the burden of cognitive dysfunction after stroke. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26806700

  15. Stroke injury, cognitive impairment and vascular dementia☆

    PubMed Central

    Kalaria, Raj N.; Akinyemi, Rufus; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    The global burden of ischaemic strokes is almost 4-fold greater than haemorrhagic strokes. Current evidence suggests that 25–30% of ischaemic stroke survivors develop immediate or delayed vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) or vascular dementia (VaD). Dementia after stroke injury may encompass all types of cognitive disorders. States of cognitive dysfunction before the index stroke are described under the umbrella of pre-stroke dementia, which may entail vascular changes as well as insidious neurodegenerative processes. Risk factors for cognitive impairment and dementia after stroke are multifactorial including older age, family history, genetic variants, low educational status, vascular comorbidities, prior transient ischaemic attack or recurrent stroke and depressive illness. Neuroimaging determinants of dementia after stroke comprise silent brain infarcts, white matter changes, lacunar infarcts and medial temporal lobe atrophy. Until recently, the neuropathology of dementia after stroke was poorly defined. Most of post-stroke dementia is consistent with VaD involving multiple substrates. Microinfarction, microvascular changes related to blood–brain barrier damage, focal neuronal atrophy and low burden of co-existing neurodegenerative pathology appear key substrates of dementia after stroke injury. The elucidation of mechanisms of dementia after stroke injury will enable establishment of effective strategy for symptomatic relief and prevention. Controlling vascular disease risk factors is essential to reduce the burden of cognitive dysfunction after stroke. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26806700

  16. Relapse and Recurrence Prevention in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Anne D.; Rohde, Paul; Kennard, Betsy D.; Robins, Michele

    2005-01-01

    Relapse and recurrence in adolescent depression are important problems. Much less is known about relapse prevention compared to the acute treatment of depression in adolescents. Based on previous research, theoretical predictions, and clinical experience, the Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS) protocol was designed to determine…

  17. [Phytoterapy: a glimmer of hope in the prevention of recurrent respiratory tract infections in children].

    PubMed

    Miniello, V L; Brunetti, L; Cafagna, R; Lieggi, M S; Lippolis, P; Natile, M; Francavilla, R; Armenio, L

    2007-08-01

    Evidence on the efficacy of standardised phytoterapic extracts for the prevention of recurrent respiratory tract infections (RRTIs) in children is reviewed. Echinacea extracts are widely used in European countries and in the United States as immune-stimulating agents. However, further prospective, appropriately powered clinical studies are required to confirm their benefits in reducing duration and severity of RRTIs. PMID:17947844

  18. The use of a sternothyroid muscle flap to prevent the re-recurrence of a recurrent tracheoesophageal fistula found 10 years after the primary repair.

    PubMed

    Takayasu, Hajime; Masumoto, Kouji; Ishikawa, Miki; Sasaki, Takato; Ono, Kentaro

    2016-12-01

    Recurrent tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) is still difficult to diagnose and repair. In almost all cases, recurrence appears relatively soon after the primary surgery. We herein describe a case of recurrent TEF that appeared 10 years after the primary repair. At 2 years of age, the patient suffered from mental retardation due to encephalitis and developed a hiatus hernia with gastro-esophageal reflux. He underwent the repair of a hiatus hernia and fundoplication at 3 years of age. However, the hiatus hernia recurred 6 months after the operation. The patient suffered from recurrent pneumonia for 6 years after the appearance of the recurrent hiatus hernia. At 9 years of age, he was hospitalized frequently due to recurrent severe pneumonia. After admission at 9 years of age, an endoscopic study under general anesthesia was performed and revealed subglottic stenosis and a dilated esophagus with a recurrent hiatus hernia. Tracheotomy or laryngotracheal separation was first planned in order to improve his upper airway and facilitate the safer repair of the recurrent hiatus hernia. After laryngotracheal separation, the patient still suffered from severe pneumonia. In addition, a small volume of nutritional supplement was aspirated from the tracheostomy. Thus, recurrent TEF was suspected. Tests using dye under both esophagoscopy and bronchoscopy confirmed recurrent TEF. The fistula recurred in the cervical area because of the elevation of the esophagus due to the recurrent hiatus hernia. The fistula was surgically closed, with a sternothyroid muscle flap to prevent re-recurrence. At 4 months after this operation, the recurrent hiatus hernia was repaired. Thereafter, the patient's respiratory symptoms showed a dramatic improvement. The patient is now doing well and free from further recurrences of TEF and hiatus hernia at 2 years after the final operation. PMID:27589983

  19. Retrospective case review of missed opportunities for primary prevention of stroke and TIA in primary care: protocol paper

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Grace M; Calvert, Melanie; Feltham, Max G; Marshall, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Stroke is a major health problem and transient ischaemic attack (TIA) is an important risk factor for stroke. Primary prevention of stroke and TIA will have the greatest impact on reducing the burden of these conditions. Evidence-based guidelines for stroke/TIA prevention identify individuals eligible for preventative interventions in primary care. This study will investigate: (1) the proportion of strokes/TIAs with prior missed opportunities for prevention in primary care; (2) the influence of patient characteristics on missed prevention opportunities and (3) how the proportion of missed prevention opportunities has changed over time. Methods and analysis A retrospective case review will identify first-ever stroke and patients with TIA between 2000 and 2013 using anonymised electronic medical records extracted from the health improvement network (THIN) database. Four categories of missed opportunities for stroke/TIA prevention will be sought: untreated high blood pressure in patients eligible for treatment (either blood pressure ≥160/100 or ≥140/90 mm Hg in patients at high cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk); patients with atrial fibrillation with high stroke risk and no anticoagulant therapy; no lipid modifying drug therapy prescribed in patients at high CVD risk or with familial hypercholesterolaemia. The proportion of patients with each missed opportunity and multiple missed opportunities will be calculated. Mixed effect logistic regression will model the relationship between demographic and patient characteristics and missed opportunities for care; practice will be included as a random effect. Ethics and dissemination THIN data collection was approved by the NHS South East Multi-centre Research Ethics Committee (MREC) in 2003. This study was approved by the independent scientific review committee in May 2013. Dissemination of findings has the potential to change practice, improve the quality of care provided to patients and ultimately

  20. Percutaneous Left Atrial Appendage Ligation for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Valderrábano, Miguel; Price, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of thromboembolic complications in atrial fibrillation remains a tremendous clinical challenge. Knowledge that the left atrial appendage (LAA) is the most common anatomical origin of cardioembolic strokes1 has been the main motivation to develop clinical and procedural strategies to exclude the LAA from the circulation, either surgically or percutaneously. This review discusses the rationale behind these strategies, their relative merits, and future prospects for LAA exclusion strategies. PMID:26306126

  1. Preventive effect of regional radiotherapy with phosphorus-32 glass microspheres in hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence after hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Ming; Yin, Zhen-Yu; Yu, Ren-Xiang; Peng, You-Yuan; Liu, Ping-Guo; Wu, Guo-Yang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the preventive effects of phosphorus-32 glass microspheres (P32-GMS) in the recurrence of massive hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) after tumor resection. METHODS: Twenty-nine patients with massive HCCs received local P32-GMS implantation after liver tumors were removed, while the other 38 patients with massive HCCs were not treated with P32-GMS after hepatectomies. The radioactivity of the blood, urine and liver were examined. The complications, HCC recurrence and overall survival rates in the patients were analyzed. RESULTS: P32-GMS implanted in the liver did not cause systemic absorption of P32. There were no significant differences of postoperative complications between the patients with and without P32-GMS treatment. The short-term (six months and 1 year) and long-term (2, 3 and over 3 years) recurrence rates in patients who received P32-GMS radiotherapy were significantly decreased, and the overall survival rates in this group were significantly improved. CONCLUSION: P32-GMS implantation in the liver can significantly decrease the postoperative recurrence and improve the overall survival in HCCs patients after hepatectomy. This therapy may provide an innovative method in prevention of HCC recurrence after operation. PMID:18203282

  2. [Prediction and preventive strategies for recurrence after surgery for hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Jia, H L; Qin, L X

    2016-05-20

    Many advances have been achieved in the clinical and basic studies on metastasis and recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) over the past 20 years. The achievements mainly include the following aspects: (1) a group of molecules related to metastasis and recurrence including osteopontin have been identified, and multi-molecular predictive models for metastasis have been established and optimized; (2) it has been found that the imbalance of immune response in tumor microenvironment is important in promoting metastasis and can be used to predict metastasis and recurrence; (3) it has been found and confirmed that interferon can prevent postoperative recurrence, and patients with a lower miR-26a expression level can achieve greater benefits; (4) the breakthroughs in liquid biopsy and immunotherapy bring a promising future for the prediction, prevention, and treatment of HCC metastasis and recurrence. However, these predictive models still need to be validated by multi-center studies, and the effects of adjuvant transarterial chemoembolization and targeted therapy with sorafenib still need further evaluation. PMID:27470884

  3. Efficacy of Supplementation with B Vitamins for Stroke Prevention: A Network Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongli; Pi, Fuhua; Ding, Zan; Chen, Wei; Pang, Shaojie; Dong, Wenya; Zhang, Qingying

    2015-01-01

    Background Supplementation with B vitamins for stroke prevention has been evaluated over the years, but which combination of B vitamins is optimal for stroke prevention is unclear. We performed a network meta-analysis to assess the impact of different combinations of B vitamins on risk of stroke. Methods A total of 17 trials (86 393 patients) comparing 7 treatment strategies and placebo were included. A network meta-analysis combined all available direct and indirect treatment comparisons to evaluate the efficacy of B vitamin supplementation for all interventions. Results B vitamin supplementation was associated with reduced risk of stroke and cerebral hemorrhage. The risk of stroke was lower with folic acid plus vitamin B6 as compared with folic acid plus vitamin B12 and was lower with folic acid plus vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 as compared with placebo or folic acid plus vitamin B12. The treatments ranked in order of efficacy for stroke, from higher to lower, were folic acid plus vitamin B6 > folic acid > folic acid plus vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 > vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 > niacin > vitamin B6 > placebo > folic acid plus vitamin B12. Conclusions B vitamin supplementation was associated with reduced risk of stroke; different B vitamins and their combined treatments had different efficacy on stroke prevention. Folic acid plus vitamin B6 might be the optimal therapy for stroke prevention. Folic acid and vitamin B6 were both valuable for stroke prevention. The efficacy of vitamin B12 remains to be studied. PMID:26355679

  4. Omeprazole maintenance therapy prevents recurrent ulcer bleeding after surgery for duodenal ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Demertzis, Konstantinos; Polymeros, Dimitrios; Emmanuel, Theodoros; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Tassios, Pericles; Ladas, Spiros D

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the omeprazole maintenance therapy in patients with recurrent ulcer bleeding after surgery for duodenal ulcer. METHODS: We studied 15 consecutive patients with recurrent ulcer bleeding after surgery for duodenal ulcer. Omeprazole (20 mg/d) maintenance therapy was given after ulcer healing. In addition to clinical follow-up, ambulatory 24-h gastric pH assay was performed before and during omeprazole therapy in those patients and controls with previous duodenal ulcer surgery but no ulcer recurrence. RESULTS: All the 15 ulcers were healed after being treated with omeprazole (40 mg/d) for 2 mo. Eleven patients with two (1-9) episodes of recurrent ulcer bleeding completed the follow-up (43, 12-72 mo). None of them had a bleeding episode while on omeprazole. One patient discontinued the therapy and had recurrent bleeding. The median 24-h fraction time of gastric pH <4 in patients was 80, 46-95%, and was reduced to 32, 13-70% by omeprazole (P = 0.002). CONCLUSION: Long-term maintenance therapy with omeprazole (20 mg/day) is effective in preventing recurrent ulcer bleeding. PMID:16521197

  5. Recurrent urinary tract infections in children: Preventive interventions other than prophylactic antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Tewary, Kishor; Narchi, Hassib

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common childhood infections. Permanent renal cortical scarring may occur in affected children, especially with recurrent UTIs, leading to long-term complications such as hypertension and chronic renal failure. To prevent such damage, several interventions to prevent UTI recurrences have been tried. The most established and accepted prevention at present is low dose long-term antibiotic prophylaxis. However it has a risk of break through infections, adverse drug reactions and also the risk of developing antibiotic resistance. The search is therefore on-going to find a safer, effective and acceptable alternative. A recent meta-analysis did not support routine circumcision for normal boys with no risk factors. Vaccinium Macrocarpon (cranberry), commonly used against UTI in adult women, is also effective in reducing the number of recurrences and related antimicrobial use in children. Sodium pentosanpolysulfate, which prevents bacterial adherence to the uroepithelial cells in animal models, has shown conflicting results in human trials. When combined with antibiotic, Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA-5) and Bifidobacterium, by blocking the in vitro attachment of uropathogenic bacteria to uroepithelial cells, significantly reduce in the incidence of febrile UTIs. Deliberate colonization of the human urinary tract of patients with recurrent UTI with Escherichia-coli (E. coli) 83972 has resulted in subjective benefit and less UTI requiring treatment. The non-pathogenic E. coli isolate NU14 DeltawaaL is a candidate to develop live-attenuated vaccine for the treatment and prevention of acute and recurrent UTI. Diagnosing and treating dysfunctional elimination syndromes decrease the incidence of recurrent UTI. A meta-analysis found the lack of robust prospective randomized controlled trials limited the strength of the established guidelines for surgical management of vesicoureteral reflux. In conclusion, several interventions

  6. Recurrent urinary tract infections in children: Preventive interventions other than prophylactic antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Tewary, Kishor; Narchi, Hassib

    2015-06-26

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common childhood infections. Permanent renal cortical scarring may occur in affected children, especially with recurrent UTIs, leading to long-term complications such as hypertension and chronic renal failure. To prevent such damage, several interventions to prevent UTI recurrences have been tried. The most established and accepted prevention at present is low dose long-term antibiotic prophylaxis. However it has a risk of break through infections, adverse drug reactions and also the risk of developing antibiotic resistance. The search is therefore on-going to find a safer, effective and acceptable alternative. A recent meta-analysis did not support routine circumcision for normal boys with no risk factors. Vaccinium Macrocarpon (cranberry), commonly used against UTI in adult women, is also effective in reducing the number of recurrences and related antimicrobial use in children. Sodium pentosanpolysulfate, which prevents bacterial adherence to the uroepithelial cells in animal models, has shown conflicting results in human trials. When combined with antibiotic, Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA-5) and Bifidobacterium, by blocking the in vitro attachment of uropathogenic bacteria to uroepithelial cells, significantly reduce in the incidence of febrile UTIs. Deliberate colonization of the human urinary tract of patients with recurrent UTI with Escherichia-coli (E. coli) 83972 has resulted in subjective benefit and less UTI requiring treatment. The non-pathogenic E. coli isolate NU14 DeltawaaL is a candidate to develop live-attenuated vaccine for the treatment and prevention of acute and recurrent UTI. Diagnosing and treating dysfunctional elimination syndromes decrease the incidence of recurrent UTI. A meta-analysis found the lack of robust prospective randomized controlled trials limited the strength of the established guidelines for surgical management of vesicoureteral reflux. In conclusion, several interventions

  7. Dietary flavonoids and colorectal adenoma recurrence in the Polyp Prevention Trial.

    PubMed

    Bobe, Gerd; Sansbury, Leah B; Albert, Paul S; Cross, Amanda J; Kahle, Lisa; Ashby, Jason; Slattery, Martha L; Caan, Bette; Paskett, Electra; Iber, Frank; Kikendall, James Walter; Lance, Peter; Daston, Cassandra; Marshall, James R; Schatzkin, Arthur; Lanza, Elaine

    2008-06-01

    Two recent case-control studies suggested that some flavonoid subgroups may play a role in preventing colorectal cancer. Previous prospective cohort studies generally reported no association; however, only a small subset of flavonoids was evaluated and partial flavonoid databases were used. We used the newly constructed U.S. Department of Agriculture flavonoid database to examine the association between consumption of total flavonoids, 6 flavonoid subgroups, and 29 individual flavonoids with adenomatous polyp recurrence in the Polyp Prevention Trial. The Polyp Prevention Trial was a randomized dietary intervention trial, which examined the effectiveness of a low-fat, high-fiber, high-fruit, and high-vegetable diet on adenoma recurrence. Intakes of flavonoids were estimated from a food frequency questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression models (adjusted for age, body mass index, sex, regular non-steroidal anti-inflammatory use, and dietary fiber intake) were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for both any and advanced adenoma recurrence within quartiles of energy-adjusted flavonoid intake (baseline, during the trial, and change during the trial). Total flavonoid intake was not associated with any or advanced adenoma recurrence. However, high intake of flavonols, which are at greater concentrations in beans, onions, apples, and tea, was associated with decreased risk of advanced adenoma recurrence (4th versus 1st quartile during the trial; odds ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.11, 0.53; P(trend) = 0.0006). Similar inverse associations were observed to a smaller extent for isoflavonoids, the flavonol kaempferol, and the isoflavonoids genistein and formononetin. Our data suggest that a flavonol-rich diet may decrease the risk of advanced adenoma recurrence. PMID:18559549

  8. Cholecystectomy for Prevention of Recurrence after Endoscopic Clearance of Bile Duct Stones in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Song, Myung Eun; Lee, Dong-Jun; Oh, Tak Geun; Park, Jeong Youp; Bang, Seungmin; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Chung, Jae Bock

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cholecystectomy in patients with an intact gallbladder after endoscopic removal of stones from the common bile duct (CBD) remains controversial. We conducted a case-control study to determine the risk of recurrent CBD stones and the benefit of cholecystectomy for prevention of recurrence after endoscopic removal of stones from the CBD in Korean patients. Materials and Methods A total of 317 patients who underwent endoscopic CBD stone extraction between 2006 and 2012 were included. Possible risk factors for the recurrence of CBD stones including previous cholecystectomy history, bile duct diameter, stone size, number of stones, stone composition, and the presence of a periampullary diverticulum were analyzed. Results The mean duration of follow-up after CBD stone extraction was 25.4±22.0 months. A CBD diameter of 15 mm or larger [odds ratio (OR), 1.930; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.098 to 3.391; p=0.022] and the presence of a periampullary diverticulum (OR, 1.859; 95% CI, 1.014 to 3.408; p=0.045) were independent predictive factors for CBD stone recurrence. Seventeen patients (26.6%) in the recurrence group underwent elective cholecystectomy soon after endoscopic extraction of CBD stones, compared to 88 (34.8%) in the non-recurrence group; the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.212). Conclusion A CBD diameter of 15 mm or larger and the presence of a periampullary diverticulum were found to be potential predictive factors for recurrence after endoscopic extraction of CBD stones. Elective cholecystectomy after clearance of CBD stones did not reduce the incidence of recurrent CBD stones in Korean patients. PMID:26632393

  9. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Celecoxib to Prevent Recurrence of Non-Muscle–Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sabichi, Anita L.; Lee, J. Jack; Grossman, H. Barton; Liu, Suyu; Richmond, Ellen; Czerniak, Bogdan A.; De la Cerda, Jorge; Eagle, Craig; Viner, Jaye L.; Palmer, J. Lynn; Lerner, Seth P.

    2014-01-01

    Significant morbidity and expense result from frequent recurrences of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) after standard treatment, and carcinoma in situ (Tis) is a poor prognostic factor. Predicated on observational and preclinical data strongly supporting cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the pathogenesis, and the activity of COX-2 inhibitors, in bladder cancer, we conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to determine if celecoxib could reduce the time-to-recurrence (TTR) in NMIBC patients at high risk for recurrence. 146 patients were randomized to celecoxib (200 mg) or placebo orally twice daily for at least 12 months. The average treatment duration was 1.25 years. Primary intent-to-treat analysis revealed celecoxib did not statistically significantly prolong TTR compared with placebo (P = 0.17, log-rank). With a median follow-up of 2.49 years the relative risk of recurrence in the celecoxib vs placebo arms was 0.64 (95% CI, 0.38, 1.17). The recurrence-free rate at 12 months with celecoxib was 88% (95% CI, 0.81,0.96) versus 78% (95% CI, 0.69, 0.89) with placebo. After controlling for covariates with Cox regression analysis, recurrence rates did not differ between the two study arms (HR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.37,1.29). Celecoxib had a marginally significant effect on reducing metachronous recurrences (vs. placebo) with hazard ratio of 0.56 (95% CI, 0.3,1.06; P=0.075). Celecoxib was well tolerated, with similar adverse events and quality-of-life in both arms. Our clinical trial results do not show a clinical benefit for celecoxib in preventing NMIBC recurrence but further investigation of COX-2 inhibitors in this setting is warranted. PMID:21881030

  10. XANTUS: rationale and design of a noninterventional study of rivaroxaban for the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Camm, A John; Amarenco, Pierre; Haas, Sylvia; Hess, Susanne; Kirchhof, Paulus; van Eickels, Martin; Turpie, Alexander GG

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with a fivefold increase in the risk of stroke. The Phase III ROCKET AF (Rivaroxaban Once-Daily Oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared with Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation) trial showed that rivaroxaban, an oral, direct Factor Xa inhibitor, was noninferior to warfarin for the reduction of stroke or systemic embolism in patients with AF. Compared with warfarin, rivaroxaban significantly reduced rates of intracranial and fatal hemorrhages, although not rates of bleeding overall. XANTUS (Xarelto® for Prevention of Stroke in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation) is a prospective, international, observational, postauthorization, noninterventional study designed to collect safety and efficacy data on the use of rivaroxaban for stroke prevention in AF in routine clinical practice. The key goal is to determine whether the safety profile of rivaroxaban established in ROCKET AF is also observed in routine clinical practice. XANTUS is designed as a single-arm cohort study to minimize selection bias, and will enroll approximately 6,000 patients (mostly from Europe) with nonvalvular AF prescribed rivaroxaban, irrespective of their level of stroke risk. Overall duration of follow-up will be 1 year; the first patient was enrolled in June 2012. Similar studies (XANTUS-EL [Xarelto® for Prevention of Stroke in Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation, Eastern Europe, Middle East, Africa and Latin America] and XANAP [Xarelto® for Prevention of Stroke in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation in Asia-Pacific]) are ongoing in Latin America and Asia-Pacific. Data from these studies will supplement those from ROCKET AF and provide practical information concerning the use of rivaroxaban for stroke prevention in AF. PMID:25083135

  11. Recovery After Stroke: Recurrent Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have made an effort to eat healthy foods and exercise? Then it’s time to talk to your doctor. A doctor can advise you about better lifestyle choices. Medicine may also be needed. Many drugs can ...

  12. Prevention of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism following stroke: a systematic review of published articles.

    PubMed

    André, C; de Freitas, G R; Fukujima, M M

    2007-01-01

    We performed a systematic review of the literature on venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis following cerebral infarct (CI) and haemorrhagic stroke. MEDLINE, Cochrane, LILACS and SciELO databases were scanned, and the Abstracts from Brazilian, American and European Neurology and Stroke Congresses were scrutinized for clinical trials. Moreover, the reference lists of articles and reviews were searched. A pooled analysis of two large studies with aspirin was made. Both unfractionated heparin and low molecular weight heparins/heparinoids (LMWH) are partially effective for VTE prophylaxis after CI, and should be routinely used in patients with motor deficit and reduced mobility and no contraindications. Reduction of deep venous thrombosis is better established than the effect over pulmonary embolism or mortality. Some evidence points to a greater efficacy of LMWH. The available evidence does not support the use of mechanical methods or dextran. Aspirin may have a mild protective effect. Low-dose Warfarin might be useful in the rehabilitation setting. Strict recommendations cannot be made in patients with haemorrhagic stroke but intermittent pneumatic compression merits further study. There are important limitations of current VTE preventive strategies following stroke. Additional studies on the combination of methods after CI and of low doses of anticoagulants following cerebral haemorrhage are urgently needed. PMID:17222109

  13. Prevention of stroke and myocardial infarction by amlodipine and Angiotensin receptor blockers: a quantitative overview.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Guang; Li, Yan; Franklin, Stanley S; Safar, Michel

    2007-07-01

    In the present quantitative overview of outcome trials, we investigated the efficacy of amlodipine or angiotensin receptor blockers in the prevention of stroke and myocardial infarction in patients with hypertension, coronary artery disease, or diabetic nephropathy. The analysis included 12 trials of 94 338 patients. The analysis of trials involving an amlodipine group showed that amlodipine provided more protection against stroke and myocardial infarction than other antihypertensive drugs, including angiotensin receptor blockers (-19%, P<0.0001 and -7%, P=0.03) and placebo (-37%, P=0.06 and -29%, P=0.04). The analysis of trials involving an angiotensin receptor blocker group showed contrasting results between trials versus amlodipine and trials versus other antihypertensive drugs for stroke (+19% versus -25%; P<0.0001) and myocardial infarction (+21% versus +1%; P=0.03). The results of 3 trials comparing an angiotensin receptor blocker with placebo were neutral (P> or =0.14). The within-trial between-group difference in achieved systolic pressure ranged from -1.1 to +4.7 mm Hg for trials involving an amlodipine group and from -2.8 to +4.0 mm Hg for trials involving an angiotensin receptor blocker group. The metaregression analysis correlating odds ratios with blood pressure differences showed a negative relationship (regression coefficients: -3% to -8%), which reached statistical significance (regression coefficient: -6%; P=0.01) for stroke in trials involving an amlodipine group. In conclusion, blood pressure differences largely accounted for cardiovascular outcome. PMID:17502490

  14. Oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: current status, special situations, and unmet needs.

    PubMed

    Verheugt, Freek W A; Granger, Christopher B

    2015-07-18

    In patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, oral anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists reduces the risk of stroke by more than 60%. But vitamin K antagonists have limitations, including causing serious bleeding such as intracranial haemorrhage and the need for anticoagulation monitoring. In part related to these limitations, they are used in only about half of patients who should be treated according to guideline recommendations. In the past decade, oral agents have been developed that directly block the activity of thrombin (factor IIa), as well as drugs that directly inhibit activated factor X (Xa), which is the first protein in the final common pathway to the activation of thrombin. These novel non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been shown to be at least as good as warfarin for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and they have proved to have better safety profiles. Their net advantage is underscored by significantly lower all-cause mortality compared with warfarin in large clinical trials. Because of these features and their ease of use, they are recommended for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. They have also a fast onset and offset of action, but they currently lack specific antidotes. This paper addresses the role of anticoagulation for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation in the era of NOACs, with a focus on special situations including management in the event of bleeding and around the time of procedures including cardioversion, catheter ablation, and device implantation. Also their use in patients with concomitant coronary artery disease, with advanced age, with chronic kidney disease, or with valvular heart disease will be discussed as well as the interaction of NOACs with other cardiac medication, and switching between anticoagulants. PMID:25777666

  15. Knowledge of Community General Practitioners and Nurses on Pre-Hospital Stroke Prevention and Treatment in Chongqing, China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Juan; Zhang, Jie; Ou, Shu; Wang, Ni; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study aimed to investigate the knowledge of community general practitioners (GPs) and nurses about pre-hospital stroke recognition, treatment and management and secondary stroke prevention; to identify the sociodemographic and educational factors influencing knowledge. Methods A self-designed test questionnaire was applied in a self-administered close-exam setting among 480 GPs and nurses working in community health centers (stations) in eight urban districts of Chongqing. Results A total of 331 (69%) valid test questionnaires were returned. Of the 331 participants, 39% were aware of the clinical guidelines for cerebrovascular diseases, whereas 48% considered themselves to have stroke management capabilities. The correct rate of answering questions of pre-hospital recognition and management knowledge was as low as 24%, the correct rate of secondary stroke prevention knowledge was only 38%. In terms of the total score for stroke prevention and treatment knowledge, there were significant differences between the medical staff with different specialties before engaging in community health services and whether they have received GP training (P <0.05). Conclusion The community GPs and nurses in the urban districts of Chongqing clearly lack knowledge of stroke, and the levels of stroke prevention and treatment urgently need to be improved. PMID:26384330

  16. Decision-making around antithrombotics for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: the health professionals' views.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yishen; Bajorek, Beata

    2016-08-01

    Background For stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), the decision-making around antithrombotic therapy has been complicated by older age, multiple comorbidities, polypharmacy and the different pharmacological properties of warfarin and the nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs). The complexity of decision-making has been associated with a reluctance by health professionals to use antithrombotic therapy, leading to poor clinical outcomes. In order to improve stroke prevention in patients with AF, the contemporary perspectives of health professionals on the decision-making around antithrombotic therapy needs exploration. Objective To elicit emerging themes describing health professionals' perspectives on the decision-making around antithrombotic therapy for stroke prevention in patients with AF. Setting Sydney metropolitan area of New South Wales, Australia. Method A qualitative study based on face-to-face interviews was conducted from August to October 2014. Seven pharmacists, seven specialists, six general practitioners and six nurses practising in the Sydney metropolitan area and managing antithrombotic therapy for AF were interviewed until theme saturation was achieved in each subgroup. Interview transcripts were analysed using manual inductive coding. Main outcome measure Emerging themes describing health professionals' perspectives on the decision-making around antithrombotic therapy for stroke prevention in patients with AF. Results Three overarching themes emerged. (1) Comprehensive assessment is necessary for decision-making but is not always implemented. Health professionals mostly focused on stroke risk assessment, not on the bleeding risk and medication safety issues. (2) Health professionals from different disciplines have different preferences for antithrombotic therapies. Although the majority of health professionals considered warfarin as the first-line therapy, NOACs were preferred by neurologists and

  17. Prevention of immediate recurrence of atrial fibrillation with low-dose landiolol after radiofrequency catheter ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ishigaki, Daisuke; Arimoto, Takanori; Iwayama, Tadateru; Hashimoto, Naoaki; Kutsuzawa, Daisuke; Kumagai, Yu; Nishiyama, Satoshi; Takahashi, Hiroki; Shishido, Tetsuro; Miyamoto, Takuya; Watanabe, Tetsu; Kubota, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Background Immediate recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) after radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation is commonly observed within 3 d after the procedure. The mechanism and pharmacological management of immediate AF recurrence remain unclear. Methods A total of 50 consecutive patients with paroxysmal AF were randomized to receive either low-dose landiolol (landiolol group) or a placebo (placebo group). In the landiolol group, intravenous landiolol (0.5 μg kg−1 min−1) was administered for 3 d after AF ablation. Results No serious adverse event associated with RF catheter ablation or landiolol administration was observed. The prevalence of immediate AF recurrence (≤3 d after RF catheter ablation) was significantly lower in the landiolol group than in the placebo group (16% vs. 48%, p=0.015). Although the postprocedural change in heart rate was significantly lower in the landiolol group compared to that in the placebo group, the changes in blood pressure and body temperature were not different between the two groups. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that landiolol treatment was the only independent predictor of immediate AF recurrence after ablation (odds ratio: 0.180; 95% confidence interval: 0.044–0.729; p=0.016). Conclusions Prophylactic administration of low-dose landiolol after AF ablation may be effective and safe for preventing immediate AF recurrence within 3 d after AF ablation. PMID:26550083

  18. The management of hypertension for primary stroke prevention: a proposed approach.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mukul; Hakim, Antoine M

    2011-04-01

    The prevalence of hypertension in society is high and increasing. Untreated hypertension results in stroke, dementia, and damage to major organs. This article reviews the risks that hypertension causes and the issues now generally accepted as playing a role in the low level of hypertension control. These include lack of public awareness of the significance of elevated blood pressure, lack of impetus to measure blood pressure, lack of sites to perform the measurements, occasional therapeutic inertia on the part of the medical community, and poor compliance with treatment on the part of affected individuals. Innovative measures that may result in improved management of this risk factor are discussed. These include ubiquitous blood pressure measurement sites, expanding therapeutic potential by involving allied health professionals, and offering rewards for treatment and for compliance. The article also emphasises that the ideal blood pressure target for the primary prevention of stroke remains unclear. PMID:21371277

  19. Using intervention mapping to develop and adapt a secondary stroke prevention program in Veterans Health Administration medical centers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Secondary stroke prevention is championed by the stroke guidelines; however, it is rarely systematically delivered. We sought to develop a locally tailored, evidence-based secondary stroke prevention program. The purpose of this paper was to apply intervention mapping (IM) to develop our locally tailored stroke prevention program and implementation plan. We completed a needs assessment and the five Steps of IM. The needs assessment included semi-structured interviews of 45 providers; 26 in Indianapolis and 19 in Houston. We queried frontline clinical providers of stroke care using structured interviews on the following topics: current provider practices in secondary stroke risk factor management; barriers and needs to support risk factor management; and suggestions on how to enhance secondary stroke risk factor management throughout the continuum of care. We then describe how we incorporated each of the five Steps of IM to develop locally tailored programs at two sites that will be evaluated through surveys for patient outcomes, and medical records chart abstraction for processes of care. PMID:21159171

  20. Trends in the Attack Rates, Incidence, and Mortality of Stroke during 1986–2012: Data of Kaunas (Lithuania) Stroke Registry

    PubMed Central

    Radisauskas, Ricardas; Malinauskiene, Vilija; Milinaviciene, Egle; Kranciukaite-Butylkiniene, Daina; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Bernotiene, Gailute; Luksiene, Dalia; Milasauskiene, Zemyna; Sopagiene, Diana; Rastenyte, Daiva

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a lack of reliable epidemiological data on longitudinal trends in stroke attack rates, incidence, and mortality in the countries of the Baltic region. Aims The aim of the present study was to explore the longitudinal trends of stroke in middle-aged urban population of Lithuania during the period of 1986 through 2012. Methods All stroke events in the studied population were ascertained and validated according to the standardized criteria outlined by the WHO MONICA Project. The study included all patients in Kaunas (Lithuania) city aged 25 to 64 years who experienced a stroke between 1986 and 2012. Estimates of time-trends of the annual percentage change in stroke attack rates, incidence of stroke, and mortality from this condition were made by applying the Joinpoint regression analysis. Results During the study period, 9,992 stroke events were registered. The overall proportion of recurrent events was 25.7%. Overall, 18.9% of the events (20.0% in men, and 17.4% in women) were fatal within 28 days. During the period of 1986 to 2012, a flat trend in the incidence of stroke was observed among both male and female middle-aged inhabitants of Kaunas city, while attack rates were increasing due to the increase in recurrent strokes. Both mortality and 28-day case fatality of stroke declined significantly over the study period in both sexes. Conclusions An increase both in the incidence and recurrence of stroke among middle-aged men residing in Kaunas city and in the recurrence of stroke among women denotes the inefficiency of measures applied both for primary and secondary prevention of stroke in Lithuania. The revision of current prevention strategies and the introduction of new ones are of paramount importance in order to fight the epidemic of stroke. PMID:27124412

  1. Stepping towards prevention of bone loss after stroke: a systematic review of the skeletal effects of physical activity after stroke.

    PubMed

    Borschmann, Karen; Pang, Marco Y C; Bernhardt, Julie; Iuliano-Burns, Sandra

    2012-06-01

    Bone loss after stroke is pronounced, and contributes to increased fracture risk. People who fracture after stroke experience reduced mobility and increased mortality. Physical activity can maintain or improve bone mineral density and structure in healthy older adults, likely reducing fracture risk. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the skeletal effects of physical activity in adults affected by stroke. A search of electronic databases was undertaken. Selection criteria of trials were • prospective and controlled • physical activity-based intervention • participants with history of stroke, and • bone-related outcome measures. Effect sizes were calculated for outcomes of paretic and nonparetic limbs. Three of 349 identified records met the inclusion criteria. Small effect sizes were found in favor of physical activity in adults with chronic stroke (n=95, 40% female, average age 63·8 years, more than one-year poststroke). Patients in intervention groups had significantly higher changes in femoral neck bone mineral density, tibial cortical thickness and trabecular bone mineral content of the paretic limb, compared with controls (P<0·05). It is not known whether these benefits reduced fracture risk. There are limited studies investigating the skeletal effect of physical activity for adults poststroke. Given the increased risk of, and poor outcomes following a fracture after stroke, randomized trials are warranted to investigate the benefits of physical activity on bone, after stroke. Interventions are likely to be beneficial if implemented soon after stroke, when bone loss appears to be rapid and pronounced. PMID:21967614

  2. Interleukin 10 (Tenovil) in the prevention of postoperative recurrence of Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Colombel, J; Rutgeerts, P; Malchow, H; Jacyna, M; Nielsen, O; Rask-Madsen, J; Van Deventer, S; Ferguson, A; Desreumaux, P; Forbes, A; Geboes, K; Melani, L; Cohard, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—New lesions of Crohn's disease occur early after ileal or ileocolonic resection and ileocolonic anastomosis. We performed a double blind controlled trial to evaluate the safety and tolerance of recombinant human interleukin 10 (IL-10; Tenovil) in subjects operated on for Crohn's disease. We also assessed the effect of Tenovil in preventing endoscopic recurrence 12 weeks after surgery.
METHODS—Patients with Crohn's disease who underwent curative ileal or ileocolonic resection and primary anastomosis were randomised within two weeks after surgery to receive subcutaneous Tenovil 4 µg/kg once daily (QD) (n=22) or 8 µg/kg twice weekly (TIW) (n=21), or placebo (QD or TIW) (n=22). An ileocolonoscopy was performed after 12 weeks of treatment.
RESULTS—Compliance was excellent. The most frequently observed adverse events were mild and moderate in severity and equally distributed across treatment groups. Thirty seven patients in the pooled Tenovil group and 21 patients in the pooled placebo group were evaluable by endoscopy. At 12 weeks, 11 of 21 patients (52%) in the placebo group had recurrent lesions compared with 17 of 37 patients (46%) in the Tenovil group (ns). The incidence of severe endoscopic recurrence was similar in both groups (9%).
CONCLUSION—Tenovil treatment for 12 consecutive weeks in patients with Crohn's disease after intestinal resection was safe and well tolerated. No evidence of prevention of endoscopic recurrence of Crohn's disease by Tenovil was observed.


Keywords: Crohn's disease; interleukin 10; endoscopic recurrence PMID:11413109

  3. The importance of the mesh shape in preventing recurrence after Nissen fundoplication

    PubMed Central

    Tanrikulu, Yusuf; Kar, Fatih; Yalcin, Boran; Yilmaz, Gokhan; Temi, Volkan; Cagsar, Mithat

    2015-01-01

    Gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common gastrointestinal disorder and often is associated with hiatal hernia (HH). Nissen fundoplication is the most common surgical treatment method. Despite surgical treatment, recurrence rate is still high. In this study, we aimed to identify the importance of the mesh shape in preventing recurrence after Nissen fundoplication. A hundred twenty two patients who operated Nissen fundoplication owing to GERD and/or HH were evaluated. Nissen fundoplication was made all patients. Patients were divided into three groups according to hiatoplasty procedure; group 1 (V-shaped mesh), group 2 (V-shaped mesh + Fibrin glue), and group 3 (special designed mesh, Kar’s mesh). Groups were compared regarding intraoperative, postoperative early- and long-term complications. Mean age was 42.75 years, and male to female ratio was 1:2.98. The mean follow-up period was 27 mounts. There was no mortality during follow-up. The most common presenting symptom was heartburn (93.4%). There wasn’t difference between groups in terms of the intraoperative complications and postoperative early-term complications. The overall recurrences rate was 4.9% and dysphagia > 3 months rate was 1.6%. No recurrence was not observed in group 3, while recurrence was observed in 4 patients in group 1 (P = 0.030). Patients should be carefully selected for surgery because complication rate is high despite successful anti-reflux surgical treatment. In this study, we have used a special designed mesh. We believe that this special designed mesh can be used safely and effectively in anti-reflux surgery because recurrence and complications were not observed. PMID:26309643

  4. The importance of the mesh shape in preventing recurrence after Nissen fundoplication.

    PubMed

    Tanrikulu, Yusuf; Kar, Fatih; Yalcin, Boran; Yilmaz, Gokhan; Temi, Volkan; Cagsar, Mithat

    2015-01-01

    Gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common gastrointestinal disorder and often is associated with hiatal hernia (HH). Nissen fundoplication is the most common surgical treatment method. Despite surgical treatment, recurrence rate is still high. In this study, we aimed to identify the importance of the mesh shape in preventing recurrence after Nissen fundoplication. A hundred twenty two patients who operated Nissen fundoplication owing to GERD and/or HH were evaluated. Nissen fundoplication was made all patients. Patients were divided into three groups according to hiatoplasty procedure; group 1 (V-shaped mesh), group 2 (V-shaped mesh + Fibrin glue), and group 3 (special designed mesh, Kar's mesh). Groups were compared regarding intraoperative, postoperative early- and long-term complications. Mean age was 42.75 years, and male to female ratio was 1:2.98. The mean follow-up period was 27 mounts. There was no mortality during follow-up. The most common presenting symptom was heartburn (93.4%). There wasn't difference between groups in terms of the intraoperative complications and postoperative early-term complications. The overall recurrences rate was 4.9% and dysphagia > 3 months rate was 1.6%. No recurrence was not observed in group 3, while recurrence was observed in 4 patients in group 1 (P = 0.030). Patients should be carefully selected for surgery because complication rate is high despite successful anti-reflux surgical treatment. In this study, we have used a special designed mesh. We believe that this special designed mesh can be used safely and effectively in anti-reflux surgery because recurrence and complications were not observed. PMID:26309643

  5. Knowledge, attitudes, and practice patterns of recurrent urinary stones prevention in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Binsaleh, Saleh; Habous, Mohamad; Madbouly, Khaled

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practice patterns of urologists in Saudi Arabia regarding prevention of recurrent stone formation and how much they follow preventive stone disease management guidelines. A questionnaire about knowledge, attitudes, and practice patterns of urologists in Saudi Arabia regarding prevention of recurrent stone formation was used. The survey comprised three domains: knowledge, attitudes, and practice patterns. Data about gender, duration of experience and health care sector were also collected. Individual responses were recorded, tabulated and compared using descriptive statistics. The overall response rate was 38.8 %. All respondents were male urologists. Most of them (62, 71.3 %) had an experience of 5-20 years in management of stone disease patients and the majority (74, 85.1 %) belonged to the governmental health care sector. A total of 51 % of the respondents answered in concordance with the best practice guidelines in at least half of the questions and 40 % in all of the questions. Overall, practice patterns of 58 % of the respondents were in concordance with the best practice guidelines in all the questions except for the question of practices regarding stone analysis. As regards to attitude domain, a total of 58.7 % respondents expressed their agreement or strong agreement with the questions. Urologists' knowledge of stone recurrence preventive programs is suboptimal. They do not apply effectively the best stone prevention practice guidelines in their daily practice as well. Efforts to increase knowledge and enforce its application in daily practice are strongly warranted. PMID:26296383

  6. [Prevention of ischemic stroke in patients with asymptomatic lesions of carotid arteries].

    PubMed

    Gavrilenko, A V; Guzenko, A S; Kuklin, A V; Kochetkov, V A

    2012-01-01

    Based on the data from both Russian and foreign literature, analysed herein are the methods of surgical and medicamentous prevention of ischaemic stroke in patients presenting with asymptomatic lesions of carotid arteries. This is followed by discussing haemodynamic parameters of the blood flow in the carotid arteries and their effect on cerebrovascular symptomatology. Also presented herein are the data concerning efficacy of different modalities of antithrombocytic therapy, followed by presenting own results regarding surgical management for stenoses and pathological kinking of carotid arteries in the patient cohort concerned. PMID:22929668

  7. Concerns Regarding the Use of Dabigatran for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Stöllberger, Claudia; Finsterer, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Dabigatran is an oral thrombin inhibitor which has been approved in several countries as an alternative to vitamin-K-antagonists for the prevention of stroke or embolism in atrial fibrillation patients. Dabigatran is introduced into clinical practice, although many issues regarding this drug are still unclear, like laboratory monitoring, use in elderly patients, drug- and food-interactions and use in patients with renal insufficiency. Additionally, there is no antidote for dabigatran. Thus, aim of the present review is to give an overview of concerns and unresolved issues concerning dabigatran. PMID:24288086

  8. Prevention of lung cancer recurrence using cisplatin-loaded superhydrophobic nanofiber meshes.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Jonah A; Liu, Rong; Freedman, Jonathan D; Padera, Robert; Schwartz, John; Colson, Yolonda L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2016-01-01

    For early stage lung cancer patients, local cancer recurrence after surgical resection is a significant concern and stems from microscopic disease left behind after surgery. Here we apply a local drug delivery strategy to combat local lung cancer recurrence after resection using non-woven, biodegradable nanofiber meshes loaded with cisplatin. The meshes are fabricated using a scalable electrospinning process from two biocompatible polymers--polycaprolactone and poly(glycerol monostearate-co-caprolactone)--to afford favorable mechanical properties for use in a dynamic tissue such as the lung. Owing to their rough nanostructure and hydrophobic polymer composition, these meshes exhibit superhydrophobicity, and it is this non-wetting nature that sustains the release of cisplatin in a linear fashion over ∼90 days, with anti-cancer efficacy demonstrated using an in vitro Lewis Lung carcinoma (LLC) cell assay. The in vivo evaluation of cisplatin-loaded superhydrophobic meshes in the prevention of local cancer recurrence in a murine model of LLC surgical resection demonstrated a statistically significant increase (p = 0.0006) in median recurrence-free survival to >23 days, compared to standard intraperitoneal cisplatin therapy of equivalent dose. These results emphasize the importance of supplementing cytoreductive surgery with local drug delivery strategies to improve prognosis for lung cancer patients undergoing tumor resection. PMID:26547283

  9. Resident Physicians Choices of Anticoagulation for Stroke Prevention in Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Oqab, Zardasht; McIntyre, William F; Quinn, Kieran L; Lamb, Tyler; Quadros, Kenneth; Yazdan-Ashoori, Payam; van Oosten, Erik; Chu, Karen; Lamba, Jasmine; Barake, Walid; Mohajer, Kiarash; Marr, Jeffrey N; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2016-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia and is associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke. The aim of this study was to identify practice patterns of Canadian resident physicians pertaining to stroke prevention in nonvalvular AF according to the Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines. A Web-based survey consisting of 16 multiple-choice questions was distributed to 11 academic centres. Questions involved identification of risks of stroke, bleeding, and selection of appropriate therapy in clinical scenarios that involve a patient with AF with a Congestive Heart Failure, Hypertension, Age, Diabetes, Stroke/Transient Ischemic Attack (CHADS2) score of 3 and no absolute contraindications to anticoagulation. There were 1014 total respondents, of whom 570 were internal, 247 family, 137 emergency medicine, and 60 adult cardiology residents. For a patient with a new diagnosis of AF, warfarin was chosen by 80.3%, novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) by 60.3%, and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) by 7.2% of residents. To a patient with a history of gastrointestinal bleed during ASA treatment, warfarin was recommended by 75.1%, NOACs by 36.1%, ASA by 12.1%, and 4% were unsure. For a patient with a history of an intracranial bleed, warfarin was recommended by 38.8%, NOACs by 23%, ASA by 24.8%, and 18.2% were unsure. For a patient taking warfarin who had a labile international normalized ratio, 89% would switch to a NOAC and 29.5% would continue warfarin. This study revealed that, across a wide sampling of disciplines and centres, resident physician choices of anticoagulation in nonvalvular AF differ significantly from contemporary Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines. PMID:26652126

  10. Exploratory Network Meta Regression Analysis of Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation Fails to Identify Any Interactions with Treatment Effect

    PubMed Central

    Batson, Sarah; Sutton, Alex; Abrams, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with atrial fibrillation are at a greater risk of stroke and therefore the main goal for treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation is to prevent stroke from occurring. There are a number of different stroke prevention treatments available to include warfarin and novel oral anticoagulants. Previous network meta-analyses of novel oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation acknowledge the limitation of heterogeneity across the included trials but have not explored the impact of potentially important treatment modifying covariates. Objectives To explore potentially important treatment modifying covariates using network meta-regression analyses for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. Methods We performed a network meta-analysis for the outcome of ischaemic stroke and conducted an exploratory regression analysis considering potentially important treatment modifying covariates. These covariates included the proportion of patients with a previous stroke, proportion of males, mean age, the duration of study follow-up and the patients underlying risk of ischaemic stroke. Results None of the covariates explored impacted relative treatment effects relative to placebo. Notably, the exploration of ‘study follow-up’ as a covariate supported the assumption that difference in trial durations is unimportant in this indication despite the variation across trials in the network. Conclusion This study is limited by the quantity of data available. Further investigation is warranted, and, as justifying further trials may be difficult, it would be desirable to obtain individual patient level data (IPD) to facilitate an effort to relate treatment effects to IPD covariates in order to investigate heterogeneity. Observational data could also be examined to establish if there are potential trends elsewhere. The approach and methods presented have potentially wide applications within any indication as to highlight the potential benefit

  11. Supportive therapies for prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence and preservation of liver function.

    PubMed

    Takami, Taro; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Saeki, Issei; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Suehiro, Yutaka; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-08-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the deadliest cancers in the world and is associated with a high risk of recurrence. The development of a wide range of new therapies is therefore essential. In this study, from the perspective of supportive therapy for the prevention of HCC recurrence and preservation of liver function in HCC patients, we surveyed a variety of different therapeutic agents. We show that branched chain amino acids (BCAA) supplementation and late evening snack with BCAA, strategies that address issues of protein-energy malnutrition, are important for liver cirrhotic patients with HCC. For chemoprevention of HCC recurrence, we show that viral control after radical treatment is important. We also reviewed the therapeutic potential of antiviral drugs, sorafenib, peretinoin, iron chelators. Sorafenib is a kinase inhibitor and a standard therapy in the treatment of advanced HCC. Peretinoin is a vitamin A-like molecule that targets the retinoid nuclear receptor to induce apoptosis and inhibit tumor growth in HCC cells. Iron chelators, such as deferoxamine and deferasirox, act to prevent cancer cell growth. These chelators may have potential as combination therapies in conjunction with peretinoin. Finally, we review the potential inhibitory effect of bone marrow cells on hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:27621572

  12. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) for prevention of recurrent pneumonia in the Neuromyelitis Optica patient

    PubMed Central

    Welker, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Traumatic spinal cord injury patients with quadriplegia associated respiratory compromise are at an immediately increased risk of developing pneumonia, but the onset of pneumonia risk and use of prevention strategies in the patient with quadriplegia due to Neuromyelitis Optica has not been described. Case report This is a case of a Neuromyelitis Optica patient with quadriplegia, dysphagia and tracheostomy that suffered recurrent fevers due to respiratory infections. The non-specific presentation and test results led to extensive testing, while the frequent recurrence resulted in the patient residing in the acute care hospital 201 days and outside of this hospital only 118 days during the period of August 2011 to June 2012. The initiation of CPAP 10 cm while sleeping overnight for 8–10 h eliminated the recurrence of respiratory infections and thereby reduced both the frequency and duration of the patient's hospital stays. Conclusions Patients with Neuromyelitis Optica differ from those with traumatic spinal cord injury as they have a chronic progressive systemic illness that causes continued deterioration of their nervous system resulting in the need for routine monitoring that ensures the timely addition of CPAP for the prevention of pneumonia and its associated medical expenses. PMID:26029535

  13. Supportive therapies for prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence and preservation of liver function

    PubMed Central

    Takami, Taro; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Saeki, Issei; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Suehiro, Yutaka; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the deadliest cancers in the world and is associated with a high risk of recurrence. The development of a wide range of new therapies is therefore essential. In this study, from the perspective of supportive therapy for the prevention of HCC recurrence and preservation of liver function in HCC patients, we surveyed a variety of different therapeutic agents. We show that branched chain amino acids (BCAA) supplementation and late evening snack with BCAA, strategies that address issues of protein-energy malnutrition, are important for liver cirrhotic patients with HCC. For chemoprevention of HCC recurrence, we show that viral control after radical treatment is important. We also reviewed the therapeutic potential of antiviral drugs, sorafenib, peretinoin, iron chelators. Sorafenib is a kinase inhibitor and a standard therapy in the treatment of advanced HCC. Peretinoin is a vitamin A-like molecule that targets the retinoid nuclear receptor to induce apoptosis and inhibit tumor growth in HCC cells. Iron chelators, such as deferoxamine and deferasirox, act to prevent cancer cell growth. These chelators may have potential as combination therapies in conjunction with peretinoin. Finally, we review the potential inhibitory effect of bone marrow cells on hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:27621572

  14. Prevention of Recurrent Thrombosis in Antiphospholipid Syndrome: Different from the General Population?

    PubMed

    Legault, Kimberly Janet; Ugarte, Amaia; Crowther, Mark Andrew; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo

    2016-05-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is characterized by arterial and/or venous thrombosis with or without pregnancy morbidity in the presence of autoantibodies targeting proteins that associate with membrane phospholipids, termed "antiphospholipid antibodies" (aPL). Management of arterial and venous thromboses shares some similarities with management of arterial and venous thromboses in the general population; however, there are key differences. The majority of studies addressing management of thrombotic APS focus on secondary prevention. Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) are typically used for secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism in APS. Optimal management of isolated arterial thrombosis, in particular ischemic stroke, in patients with APS is controversial, and proposed therapeutic options have included antiplatelet agents and VKA. Primary prophylaxis in aPL-positive patients should be an individualized decision taking into account patient-specific risks. There may be a role for adjuvant therapies such as hydroxychloroquine, vitamin D, statins, or novel therapeutics in specific patient populations. PMID:27032789

  15. Does antibacterial ointment applied to urethral meatus in women prevent recurrent cystitis?

    PubMed

    Meyhoff, H H; Nordling, J; Gammelgaard, P A; Vejlsgaard, R

    1981-01-01

    In a double-blind placebo controlled clinical trial the preventive value of the antibacterial ointment povidone-iodine 10% (Isodine, Betadine) applied to urethral meatus was evaluated in 17 females suffering from recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI). The patients applied povidone-iodine respectively placebo ointment twice daily and before sexual intercourse in two 6-month periods in a cross-over design. No difference was observed in number of UTI during povidone-iodine and placebo prophylaxis. A decrease in the incidence of UTI was seen during application of any ointment. The antibacterial properties of povidone-iodine ointment is unimportant in the prophylaxis of reinfections as also indicated from urethral and periurethral cultures during the study revealing no change in pathogenic bacterial flora. An improved perineal hygiene in the context of application of ointment may be responsible for the reduction in UTI incidence in females with recurrent cystitis. PMID:7036332

  16. Comparative Study of Different {beta}-Radiation Doses for Preventing Pterygium Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Takayuki; Mochizuki, Hideki; Ue, Takahiro; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Oinaka, Matsuyoshi

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To compare the pterygium recurrence rates after treatment with two different {beta}-radiation doses. Methods and Materials: A total of 84 patients with a mean age of 63.0 {+-} 10.3 years (men, 48 eyes, and women, 47 eyes) and initially treated with {beta}-radiation after pterygium excision were recruited. The mean follow-up period was 49.9 {+-} 51.3 months. The patients were assigned to two dose groups: a high-dose (40 Gy) or a low-dose (20 Gy) group. The statistical significance of differences in patient age, pterygium size, and interval between surgery and radiotherapy were analyzed in the 20-Gy group using the Cox proportional hazard model at p < .05. Results: The high- and low-dose groups included 28 and 67 eyes, respectively. Pterygia recurred in 11 eyes, all in the low-dose group. The interval between surgery and radiotherapy was not a significant predictor of recurrence. Smaller pterygia had a lower risk of recurrence than pterygia that had encroached the pupillary area (pterygium located within one-third of the corneal radius from the limbus, corrected hazard ratio [HR], 0.069; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.006-0.766; p = .030; pterygium extending beyond one-third of the corneal radius, corrected HR, 0.188; 95% CI, 0.018-0.696; p = 0.019; and pterygium reaching the pupillary area, corrected HR, 0.184; 95% CI, 0.036-0.929; p = .040). Older age was marginally significant as a negative predictor of recurrence (HR, 0.943; 95% CI, 0.887-1.003; p = .061). No scleromalacia developed during the follow-up period. Conclusions: {beta}-Radiation at 40 Gy was more efficacious than at 20 Gy in preventing pterygium recurrence without scleromalacia development, particularly for large-size pterygia and those in young patients.

  17. The potential health and economic benefits of preventing recurrent respiratory papillomatosis through quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Chesson, Harrell W; Forhan, Sara E; Gottlieb, Sami L; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2008-08-18

    We estimated the health and economic benefits of preventing recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) through quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. We applied a simple mathematical model to estimate the averted costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) saved by preventing RRP in children whose mothers had been vaccinated at age 12 years. Under base case assumptions, the prevention of RRP would avert an estimated USD 31 (range: USD 2-178) in medical costs (2006 US dollars) and save 0.00016 QALYs (range: 0.00001-0.00152) per 12-year-old girl vaccinated. Including the benefits of RRP reduced the estimated cost per QALY gained by HPV vaccination by roughly 14-21% in the base case and by <2% to >100% in the sensitivity analyses. More precise estimates of the incidence of RRP are needed, however, to quantify this impact more reliably. PMID:18598734

  18. Evolving Treatments for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Zerna, Charlotte; Hegedus, Janka; Hill, Michael D

    2016-04-29

    The purpose of this article is to review advances in stroke treatment in the hyperacute period. With recent evolutions of technology in the fields of imaging, thrombectomy devices, and emergency room workflow management, as well as improvement in statistical methods and study design, there have been ground breaking changes in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. We describe how stroke presents as a clinical syndrome and how imaging as the most important biomarker will help differentiate between stroke subtypes and treatment eligibility. The evolution of hyperacute treatment has led to the current standard of care: intravenous thrombolysis with tissue-type plasminogen activator and endovascular treatment for proximal vessel occlusion in the anterior cerebral circulation. All patients with acute ischemic stroke are in need of hyperacute secondary prevention because the risk of recurrence is highest closest to the index event. The dominant themes of modern stroke care are the use of neurovascular imaging and speed of diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27126651

  19. [Catheter-based closure of the left atrial appendage : Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Skurk, C; Leistner, D M; Park, J-W; Landmesser, U

    2016-09-01

    In patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, >90 % of thrombi are detected in the left atrial appendage (LAA). In particular these observations have resulted in the development of catheter-based LAA closure as an approach for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation in recent years. A preliminary randomized trial provided promising data with respect to efficacy and safety of this approach as compared to anticoagulation with warfarin. The safety of the procedure has been significantly improved in recent years due to procedural experience and refinement of implanted devices. In current clinical practice, this approach is particularly used for patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, a significant ischemic risk (CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥2), and a high bleeding risk, i. e., in patients in whom there are relevant concerns with respect to long-term anticoagulation. The present article discusses the data from randomized clinical studies and registries, the present guideline recommendations, and the practical clinical use of LAA closure for stroke prevention. PMID:27534868

  20. Safe use of antithrombotics for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: consideration of risk assessment tools to support decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Bajorek, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Clinical guidelines advocate stroke prevention therapy in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients, specifically anticoagulation. However, the decision to initiate treatment is based on the risk (bleeding) versus benefit (prevention of stroke) of therapy, which is often difficult to assess. This review identifies available risk assessment tools to facilitate the safe and optimal use of antithrombotic therapy for stroke prevention in AF. Using key databases and online clinical resources to search the literature (1992–2012), 19 tools have been identified and published to date: 11 addressing stroke risk, 7 addressing bleeding risk and 1 integrating both risk assessments. The stroke risk assessment tools (e.g. CHADS2, CHA2DS2-VASc) share common risk factors: age, hypertension, previous cerebrovascular attack. The bleeding risk assessment tools (e.g. HEMORR2HAGES, HAS-BLED) share common risk factors: age, previous bleeding, renal and liver impairment. In terms of their development, six of the stroke risk assessment tools have been derived from clinical studies, whilst five are based on refinement of existing tools or expert consensus. Many have been evaluated by prospective application to data from real patient cohorts. Bleeding risk assessment tools have been derived from trials, or generated from patient data and then validated via further studies. One identified tool (i.e. Computerised Antithrombotic Risk Assessment Tool [CARAT]) integrates both stroke and bleeding, and specifically considers other key factors in decision-making regarding antithrombotic therapy, particularly those increasing the risk of medication misadventure with treatment (e.g. function, drug interactions, medication adherence). This highlights that whilst separate tools are available to assess stroke and bleeding risk, they do not estimate the relative risk versus benefit of treatment in an individual patient nor consider key medication safety aspects. More effort is needed to synthesize these

  1. A lifetime approach to major depressive disorder: The contributions of psychological interventions in preventing relapse and recurrence.

    PubMed

    Bockting, Claudi L; Hollon, Steven D; Jarrett, Robin B; Kuyken, Willem; Dobson, Keith

    2015-11-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is highly disabling and typically runs a recurrent course. Knowledge about prevention of relapse and recurrence is crucial to the long-term welfare of people who suffer from this disorder. This article provides an overview of the current evidence for the prevention of relapse and recurrence using psychological interventions. We first describe a conceptual framework to preventive interventions based on: acute treatment; continuation treatment, or; prevention strategies for patients in remission. In brief, cognitive-behavioral interventions, delivered during the acute phase, appear to have an enduring effect that protects patients against relapse and perhaps others from recurrence following treatment termination. Similarly, continuation treatment with either cognitive therapy or perhaps interpersonal psychotherapy appears to reduce risk for relapse and maintenance treatment appears to reduce risk for recurrence. Preventive relapse strategies like preventive cognitive therapy or mindfulness based cognitive therapy (MBCT) applied to patients in remission protects against subsequent relapse and perhaps recurrence. There is some preliminary evidence of specific mediation via changing the content or the process of cognition. Continuation CT and preventive interventions started after remission (CBT, MBCT) seem to have the largest differential effects for individuals that need them the most. Those who have the greatest risk for relapse and recurrence including patients with unstable remission, more previous episodes, potentially childhood trauma, early age of onset. These prescriptive indications, if confirmed in future research, may point the way to personalizing prevention strategies. Doing so, may maximize the efficiency with which they are applied and have the potential to target the mechanisms that appear to underlie these effects. This may help make this prevention strategies more efficacious. PMID:25754289

  2. Imaging of Pediatric Stroke.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Aashim; Pruthi, Sumit

    2016-09-01

    Despite being as common as brain tumors in children, lack of awareness of pediatric stroke presents unique challenges, both in terms of diagnosis and management. Due to diverse and overlapping risk factors, as well as variable clinical presentations, the diagnosis can be either missed or frequently delayed. Early recognition and treatment of pediatric stroke is however critical in optimizing long-term functional outcomes, reducing morbidity and mortality, and preventing recurrent stroke. Neuroimaging plays a vital role in achieving this goal. The advancements in imaging over the last two decades have allowed for multiple modality options for suspected stroke with more accurate diagnosis, as well as quicker turnaround time in imaging diagnosis, especially at primary stroke centers. However, with the multiple imaging possibilities, referring physicians can be overwhelmed with the best option for each clinical situation and what the literature recommends. Here the authors review the etiology of pediatric stroke in the settings of arterial ischemia, hemorrhage, and cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT), with emphasis on the best diagnostic tools available, including advanced imaging techniques. PMID:26920396

  3. [Non-Antibiotic Strategies to Prevent the Recurrence of Uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infections in Women].

    PubMed

    Bauer, H W; Bessler, W G

    2016-05-01

    The aim of all medical treatment is "primum nihil nocere" ("First, do no harm").Restoring the integrity of intestinal microbiota and optimising the immune response in recurrent infections, especially in the urinary tract, are treatment alternatives which are closer to this target than the usual focus on antibiotic prevention of recurrence.In the future, antibiotics will continue to be recommended for the prevention of urinary tract infections on a case-by-case basis. However, the problems of an excessive use of antibiotics, e. g. resistance and long-term interference with intestinal microbiota, are forcing us to search for alternatives. The use of probiotics alone or in combination with immunotherapeutics, or the sole use of immunotherapeutics, are important treatment options, which are already routinely available in clinical practice. These therapies are focused on the pathomechanism of an infection and tackle the root cause of the problem. Phytotherapeutics or small molecules like mannose, which restricts the adherence of bacteria to the urothelium, are complementary approaches.The EAU guidelines recommend the following treatments for the long-term prevention of urinary tract infections:Oral and parenteral immunostimulants (StroVac(®)), local estrogen replacement and administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus reuteri. PMID:27138235

  4. Evidence on efficacy of treatments of venous ulcers and on prevention of ulcer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Gloviczki, Peter; Gloviczki, Monika L

    2009-12-01

    Venous ulcers affect almost 1 million people in the United States. Delayed healing and frequent recurrence result in pain, disability, decreased quality of life, and loss of working days for the patients. Compression therapy is the most effective treatment of ulcers, but compliance with conservative treatment is important, and recurrence must be prevented by treating the underlying ambulatory venous hypertension. Evidence from prospective randomized trials confirm that ulcer recurrence is decreased with superficial vein surgery. Evidence is also increasing about the superiority of endovenous interventions, such as laser or radiofrequency ablation, over the classic open surgical treatment of high ligation, division, and stripping of the saphenous vein. Well-conducted randomized trials are still needed to provide grade A evidence to justify treatment of incompetent perforating veins. Treatment of proximal venous occlusion is important, and venous stents have been effective and durable. Open surgery is only considered today for iliac or iliocaval venous obstruction if endovascular treatment is not possible or has already failed. Open surgery for deep venous incompetence is recommended in centers of excellence, although evidence to support its effectiveness is of low quality. PMID:20628101

  5. [Acetylsalicylic acid for the prevention of primary myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Samorodskaya, I V; Bolotova, E V; Boytsov, S A

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence that acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is effective in preventing events in a number of cardiovascular diseases. However, there is a number of unresolved problems concerning the efficiency and suitability of its use as an agent for the prevention of cardiovascular events (CVEs) (myocardial infarction (Ml) and/or ischemic stroke (IS) and/or death) in subjects without any clinical manifestations and/or diagnosed coronary heart disease (primary prevention of CVEs). The aim of the review is to compare the current recommendations of, professional communities for the.use of ASA as an agent for the primary prevention of CVEs, to analyze cohort studies and meta-analyses that are not included in the above recommendations (2013-2014), and to consider particular issues on ASA administration (resistance to ASA; barriers to its preventive use). The analysis performed suggests that there is no convincing evidence that it is reasonable to use ASA as a population-wide prevention strategy. The studies and meta-analyses often show conflicting data, which is likely to be associated with the clinical features of population groups included in the studies, with the presence or absence of ASA resistance and motivation for therapy. According to the current clinical recommendations, the results of studies and meta-analysis, and expert's opinions, deciding whether it is expedient to use ASA as an agent for the prevention of primary MI and/or IS and death from atherosclerostic vascular events should be based on the assessment of an individual's risks for the above disorders, which are related to a risk for hemorrhages due to ASA intake. PMID:26591559

  6. Intracranial Pressure Elevation 24 h after Ischemic Stroke in Aged Rats Is Prevented by Early, Short Hypothermia Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Murtha, Lucy A.; Beard, Daniel J.; Bourke, Julia T.; Pepperall, Debbie; McLeod, Damian D.; Spratt, Neil J.

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is predominantly a senescent disease, yet most preclinical studies investigate treatment in young animals. We recently demonstrated that short-duration hypothermia-treatment completely prevented the dramatic intracranial pressure (ICP) rise seen post-stroke in young rats. Here, our aim was to investigate whether a similar ICP rise occurs in aged rats and to determine whether short-duration hypothermia is an effective treatment in aged animals. Experimental middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo-3 h occlusion) was performed on male Wistar rats aged 19–20 months. At 1 h after stroke-onset, rats were randomized to 2.5 h hypothermia-treatment (32.5°C) or normothermia (37°C). ICP was monitored at baseline, for 3.5 h post-occlusion, and at 24 h post-stroke. Infarct and edema volumes were calculated from histology. Baseline pre-stroke ICP was 11.2 ± 3.3 mmHg across all animals. Twenty-four hours post-stroke, ICP was significantly higher in normothermic animals compared to hypothermia-treated animals (27.4 ± 18.2 mmHg vs. 8.0 ± 5.0 mmHg, p = 0.03). Infarct and edema volumes were not significantly different between groups. These data demonstrate ICP may also increase 24 h post-stroke in aged rats, and that short-duration hypothermia treatment has a profound and sustained preventative effect. These findings may have important implications for the use of hypothermia in clinical trials of aged stroke patients. PMID:27303291

  7. A clinical decision aid for the selection of antithrombotic therapy for the prevention of stroke due to atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    LaHaye, Stephen Andrew; Gibbens, Sabra Lynn; Ball, David Gerald Andrew; Day, Andrew George; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Skanes, Allan Cameron

    2012-01-01

    Aims The availability of new antithrombotic agents, each with a unique efficacy and bleeding profile, has introduced a considerable amount of clinical uncertainty with physicians. We have developed a clinical decision aid in order to assist clinicians in determining an optimal antithrombotic regime for the prevention of stroke in patients who are newly diagnosed with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Methods and results The CHA2DS2-VASc and HAS-BLED scoring systems were used to assess patients’ baseline risks of stroke and major bleeding, respectively. The relative risks of stroke and major bleeding for each antithrombotic agent were then used to identify the agent associated with the lowest net risk. Individual patient factors such as the treatment threshold, bleeding ratio, and cost threshold modified the recommendations in order to generate a final recommendation. By considering both patient factors and clinical research concurrently, this clinical decision aid is able to provide specific advice to clinicians regarding an optimal stroke prevention strategy. The resulting treatment recommendation tables are consistent with the recommendations of the European Society of Cardiology and Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines, which can be incorporated into either a paper-based or electronic format to allow clinicians to have decision support at the point of care. Conclusion The use of a clinical decision aid that considers both patient factors and evidence-based medicine will serve to bridge the knowledge gap and provide practical guidance to clinicians in the prevention of stroke due to atrial fibrillation. PMID:22752615

  8. Preventive Audiology: Screening for Hearing Impairment in Children Having Recurrent URTI.

    PubMed

    Sharma, K; Pannu, M S; Arora, A; Sharma, V

    2016-06-01

    A late detection of hearing impairment in children can affect speech and language development. Otitis media with effusion (OME) associated with risk factors like recurrent upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) is considered the most common cause of silent hearing impairment among children. So this study was carried out to screen such at risk children for hearing impairment. The study was conducted on 1000 children in the age group of 2-12 years who presented to the OPD of ENT and Pediatrics Department, Govt Medical College with the complaint of recurrent URTI. The children were screened by history taking, general physical examination and local ENT examination. This was followed by impedance audiometry and pure tone audiometry (PTA, wherever indicated). Children with discharging ears and perforated tympanic membrane (TM) were excluded from the study. The most common presenting complaint was nasal discharge (67.9 %), followed by mouth breathing (66.3 %) and snoring (65 %). Only 16.2 % cases actually complained of some hearing impairment on exploratory history indicating the silent nature of OME. On examination 52.65 % cases had a normal looking TM whereas 41.2 % had a dull retracted TM. Results of impedance audiometry showed Type A graph in 56.75 %, Type B in 33.4 % indicating OME and Type C in 9.85 % indicating Eustachian tube dysfunction. PTA showed a mild conductive hearing loss in 26.7 % cases. OME is quite prevalent in high risk children and incidence of OME resulting in silent hearing impairment is quite high especially in young children having recurrent URTI. Impedance audiometry has been proved to be an objective screening tool for the same with a diagnostic accuracy of 87 % and thus under preventive audiology, it has a definite role in young children having recurrent URTI. PMID:27340630

  9. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation: Understanding the New Oral Anticoagulants Dabigatran, Rivaroxaban, and Apixaban

    PubMed Central

    Ru San, Tan; Chan, Mark Yan Yee; Wee Siong, Teo; Kok Foo, Tang; Kheng Siang, Ng; Lee, Sze Huar; Chi Keong, Ching

    2012-01-01

    Unlike vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), the new oral anticoagulants (NOACs)—direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran, and direct activated factor X inhibitors, rivaroxaban, and apixaban—do not require routine INR monitoring. Compared to VKAs, they possess relatively rapid onset of action and short halflives, but vary in relative degrees of renal excretion as well as interaction with p-glycoprotein membrane transporters and liver cytochrome P450 metabolic enzymes. Recent completed phase III trials comparing NOACs with VKAs for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF)—the RE-LY, ROCKET AF, and ARISTOTLE trials—demonstrated at least noninferior efficacy, largely driven by significant reductions in haemorrhagic stroke. Major and nonmajor clinically relevant bleeding rates were acceptable compared to VKAs. Of note, the NOACs caused significantly less intracranial haemorrhagic events compared to VKAs, the mechanisms of which are not completely clear. With convenient fixed-dose administration, the NOACs facilitate anticoagulant management in AF in the community, which has hitherto been grossly underutilised. Guidelines should evolve towards simplicity in anticipation of greater use of NOACs among primary care physicians. At the same time, the need for caution with their use in patients with severely impaired renal function should be emphasised. PMID:22997573

  10. Pharmaceutical treatments to prevent recurrence of endometriosis following surgery: a model-based economic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Sanghera, Sabina; Barton, Pelham; Bhattacharya, Siladitya; Horne, Andrew W; Roberts, Tracy Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Objective Conduct an economic evaluation based on best currently available evidence comparing alternative treatments levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate, combined oral contraceptive pill (COCP) and ‘no treatment’ to prevent recurrence of endometriosis after conservative surgery in primary care, and to inform the design of a planned trial-based economic evaluation. Methods We developed a state transition (Markov) model with a 36-month follow-up. The model structure was informed by a pragmatic review and clinical experts. The economic evaluation adopted a UK National Health Service perspective and was based on an outcome of incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY). As available data were limited, intentionally wide distributions were assigned around model inputs, and the average costs and outcome of the probabilistic sensitivity analyses were reported. Results On average, all strategies were more expensive and generated fewer QALYs compared to no treatment. However, uncertainty attributing to the transition probabilities affected the results. Inputs relating to effectiveness, changes in treatment and the time at which the change is made were the main causes of uncertainty, illustrating areas where robust and specific data collection is required. Conclusions There is currently no evidence to support any treatment being recommended to prevent the recurrence of endometriosis following conservative surgery. The study highlights the importance of developing decision models at the outset of a trial to identify data requirements to conduct a robust post-trial analysis. PMID:27084280