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Sample records for preventing surgical adhesion

  1. Pathophysiology and prevention of postoperative peritoneal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Arung, Willy; Meurisse, Michel; Detry, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Peritoneal adhesions represent an important clinical challenge in gastrointestinal surgery. Peritoneal adhesions are a consequence of peritoneal irritation by infection or surgical trauma, and may be considered as the pathological part of healing following any peritoneal injury, particularly due to abdominal surgery. The balance between fibrin deposition and degradation is critical in determining normal peritoneal healing or adhesion formation. Postoperative peritoneal adhesions are a major cause of morbidity resulting in multiple complications, many of which may manifest several years after the initial surgical procedure. In addition to acute small bowel obstruction, peritoneal adhesions may cause pelvic or abdominal pain, and infertility. In this paper, the authors reviewed the epidemiology, pathogenesis and various prevention strategies of adhesion formation, using Medline and PubMed search. Several preventive agents against postoperative peritoneal adhesions have been investigated. Their role aims in activating fibrinolysis, hampering coagulation, diminishing the inflammatory response, inhibiting collagen synthesis or creating a barrier between adjacent wound surfaces. Their results are encouraging but most of them are contradictory and achieved mostly in animal model. Until additional findings from future clinical researches, only a meticulous surgery can be recommended to reduce unnecessary morbidity and mortality rates from these untoward effects of surgery. In the current state of knowledge, pre-clinical or clinical studies are still necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of the several proposed prevention strategies of postoperative peritoneal adhesions. PMID:22147959

  2. Surgical Adhesives in Facial Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Toriumi, Dean M; Chung, Victor K; Cappelle, Quintin M

    2016-06-01

    In facial plastic surgery, attaining hemostasis may require adjuncts to traditional surgical techniques. Fibrin tissue adhesives have broad applications in surgery and are particularly useful when addressing the soft tissue encountered in facial plastic surgery. Beyond hemostasis, tissue adhesion and enhanced wound healing are reported benefits associated with a decrease in operating time, necessity for drains and pressure dressings, and incidence of wound healing complications. These products are clinically accessible to most physicians who perform facial plastic surgery, including skin grafts, flaps, rhytidectomy, and endoscopic forehead lift. PMID:27267012

  3. PLGA-PEG-PLGA microspheres as a delivery vehicle for antisense oligonucleotides to CTGF: Implications on post-surgical peritoneal adhesion prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azeke, John Imuetinyan-Jesu, Jr.

    Abdominal adhesions are the aberrant result of peritoneal wound healing commonly associated with surgery and inflammation. A subject of a large number of studies since the first half of the last century, peritoneal adhesion prevention has, for the most part, evaded the scientific community and continues to cost Americans an estimated $2-4 billion annually. It is known that transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) plays a key role in the wound healing cascade; however, suppression of this multifunctional growth factor's activity may have more harmful consequences than can be tolerated. As a result, much attention has fallen on connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a downstream mediator of TGF-beta's fibrotic action. It has been demonstrated in several in vitro models, that the suppression of CTGF hinders fibroblast proliferation, a necessary condition for fibrosis. Furthermore, antisense oligonucleotides (antisense oligos, AO) to CTGF have been shown to knock down CTGF mRNA levels by specifically hindering the translation of CTGF protein. Antisense technologies have met with a great deal of excitement as a viable means of preventing diseases such as adhesions by hindering protein translation at the mRNA level. However, the great challenge associated with the use of these drugs lies in the short circulation time when administered "naked". Viral delivery systems, although excellent platforms in metabolic studies, are not ideal for diagnostic use because of the inherent danger associated with viral vectors. Microparticles made of biodegradable polymers have therefore presented themselves as a viable means of delivering these drugs to target cells over extended periods. Herein, we present two in vivo studies confirming the up-regulation of TGF-beta protein and CTGF mRNA following injury to the uterine tissues of female rats. We were able to selectively knockdown post-operative CTGF protein levels following surgery, however, our observations led us to conclude that

  4. Adhesive small bowel adhesions obstruction: Evolutions in diagnosis, management and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Catena, Fausto; Di Saverio, Salomone; Coccolini, Federico; Ansaloni, Luca; De Simone, Belinda; Sartelli, Massimo; Van Goor, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Intra-abdominal adhesions following abdominal surgery represent a major unsolved problem. They are the first cause of small bowel obstruction. Diagnosis is based on clinical evaluation, water-soluble contrast follow-through and computed tomography scan. For patients presenting no signs of strangulation, peritonitis or severe intestinal impairment there is good evidence to support non-operative management. Open surgery is the preferred method for the surgical treatment of adhesive small bowel obstruction, in case of suspected strangulation or after failed conservative management, but laparoscopy is gaining widespread acceptance especially in selected group of patients. "Good" surgical technique and anti-adhesive barriers are the main current concepts of adhesion prevention. We discuss current knowledge in modern diagnosis and evolving strategies for management and prevention that are leading to stratified care for patients. PMID:27022449

  5. [Prevention of intrauterine adhesions after hysteroscopic surgery].

    PubMed

    Revaux, A; Ducarme, G; Luton, D

    2008-03-01

    Intrauterine adhesions are the most frequent complications after hysteroscopic surgery in women of reproductive age. The prevalence of intrauterine adhesions after hysteroscopic surgery is correlated to intrauterine pathology (myoma, polyp, or adhesions). Few clinical trials have demonstrated the efficiency of barrier agents developed in order to prevent adhesions after operative hysteroscopy. Adhesion barriers are mechanic agent (intrauterine device), fluid agents (Seprafilm, Hyalobarrier) and postoperative systemic treatment (estroprogestative treatment). In this article, we evaluate the efficiency of these barrier agents for adhesion prevention in hysteroscopic surgery, undertaking a review of clinical trials published. The most frequent published studies evaluate the anatomic efficiency of antiadhesion agents after hysteroscopic surgery in order to evaluate the fertility. Data are still insufficient to evaluate them for clinical use. There is a need for other randomised controlled trials. PMID:18308609

  6. Evaluation of progestogens for postoperative adhesion prevention.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, P J; Quigley, M M; Held, B

    1984-10-01

    Progesterone (P) has been shown to have potent antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. Previous reports have suggested that the use of P decreases postoperative adhesion formation. To further evaluate the role of pharmacologic doses of progestogens in adhesion prevention, 42 mature New Zealand White rabbits underwent standardized injuries to the uterine horns, fimbriae, and pelvic peritoneum and received one of six treatments. Group S had intraperitoneal placement of normal saline (0.9%); group H received intraperitoneal placement of 32% dextran 70; group IM-P received intramuscular P-in-oil 10 days before and after laparotomy in addition to intraperitoneal saline; group IP-P had intraperitoneal placement of an aqueous P suspension; group DP received medroxyprogesterone acetate intraperitoneally; and group C received no intramuscular or intraperitoneal adhesion-prevention agents. The animals were sacrificed 6 weeks after laparotomy, and the adhesions were scored. Intraperitoneal saline (group S) significantly reduced the amount of adhesions when compared with the control group (C) (P less than 0.05). No significant difference was observed when group S was compared with group H. Intramuscular P added to saline (group IM-P) did not cause further reduction in adhesions when compared with group S. Both group IP-P and group DP had more adhesions than did group S (P less than 0.01). These data fail to support previous claims regarding adhesion prevention by the use of locally or parenterally administered progestogens. PMID:6237937

  7. Injectable pullulan hydrogel for the prevention of postoperative tissue adhesion.

    PubMed

    Bang, Sumi; Lee, Eungjae; Ko, Young-Gwang; Kim, Won Il; Kwon, Oh Hyeong

    2016-06-01

    Methods for reducing and preventing postoperative abdominal adhesions have been researched for decades; however, despite these efforts, the formation of postoperative peritoneal adhesions is continuously reported. Adhesions cause serious complications such as postoperative pain, intestinal obstruction, and infertility. Tissue adhesion barriers have been developed as films, membranes, knits, sprays, and hydrogels. Hydrogels have several advantages when used as adhesion barriers, including flexibility, low tissue adhesiveness, biodegradability, and non-toxic degraded products. Furthermore, compared with preformed hydrogels, injectable hydrogels can fill and cover spaces of any shape and do not require a surgical procedure for implantation. In this study, pullulan was modified through reaction with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) to introduce carboxyl and phenyl groups as crosslinking sites. The grafting of tyramine on pullulan allows crosslinking branches on pullulan backbone. We successfully fabricated pullulan hydrogel with an enzymatic reaction using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The chemical structure of modified pullulan was analyzed with ATR-FTIR and (1)H NMR spectroscopies. Rheological properties were tested by measuring storage modulus with varying H2O2, HRP, polymer solution concentrations and tyramine substitution rates. Cell viability and animal tests were performed. The modified pullulan hydrogel is an invaluable advance in anti-adhesion agents. PMID:26879910

  8. Guideline Implementation: Prevention of Retained Surgical Items.

    PubMed

    Fencl, Jennifer L

    2016-07-01

    A surgical item unintentionally retained in a patient after an operative or other invasive procedure is a serious, preventable medical error with the potential to cause the patient great harm. Perioperative RNs play a key role in preventing retained surgical items (RSIs). The updated AORN "Guideline for prevention of retained surgical items" provides guidance for implementing a consistent, multidisciplinary approach to RSI prevention; accounting for surgical items; preventing retention of device fragments; reconciling count discrepancies; and using adjunct technologies to supplement manual count procedures. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel provide optimal care during a procedure. Key points addressed include taking responsibility for RSI prevention as a team; minimizing distractions, noise, and interruptions during counts; using consistent counting methods; reconciling discrepancies; and participating in performance-improvement activities. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance in writing and updating policies and procedures. PMID:27350354

  9. 21 CFR 878.4730 - Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent... Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent. (a) Identification. A surgical skin degreaser or an adhesive tape solvent is a device that consists of a liquid such as...

  10. 21 CFR 878.4730 - Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent... Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent. (a) Identification. A surgical skin degreaser or an adhesive tape solvent is a device that consists of a liquid such as...

  11. Periderm prevents pathological epithelial adhesions during embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Rebecca J.; Hammond, Nigel L.; Coulombe, Pierre A.; Saloranta, Carola; Nousiainen, Heidi O.; Salonen, Riitta; Berry, Andrew; Hanley, Neil; Headon, Denis; Karikoski, Riitta; Dixon, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate development of stratified, squamous, keratinizing epithelia, such as the epidermis and oral epithelia, generates an outer protective permeability barrier that prevents water loss, entry of toxins, and microbial invasion. During embryogenesis, the immature ectoderm initially consists of a single layer of undifferentiated, cuboidal epithelial cells that stratifies to produce an outer layer of flattened periderm cells of unknown function. Here, we determined that periderm cells form in a distinct pattern early in embryogenesis, exhibit highly polarized expression of adhesion complexes, and are shed from the outer surface of the embryo late in development. Mice carrying loss-of-function mutations in the genes encoding IFN regulatory factor 6 (IRF6), IκB kinase-α (IKKα), and stratifin (SFN) exhibit abnormal epidermal development, and we determined that mutant animals exhibit dysfunctional periderm formation, resulting in abnormal intracellular adhesions. Furthermore, tissue from a fetus with cocoon syndrome, a lethal disorder that results from a nonsense mutation in IKKA, revealed an absence of periderm. Together, these data indicate that periderm plays a transient but fundamental role during embryogenesis by acting as a protective barrier that prevents pathological adhesion between immature, adhesion-competent epithelia. Furthermore, this study suggests that failure of periderm formation underlies a series of devastating birth defects, including popliteal pterygium syndrome, cocoon syndrome, and Bartsocas-Papas syndrome. PMID:25133425

  12. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesions Ovarian cyst References Munireddy S, Kavalukas SL, Barbul A. Intra-abdominal healing: gastrointestinal tract and adhesions. Surg Clin N Am Kulaylat MN, Dayton, MT. Surgical complications. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, ...

  13. [Surgical smoke: risks and preventive measures].

    PubMed

    Carbajo-Rodríguez, Hilario; Aguayo-Albasini, José Luis; Soria-Aledo, Víctor; García-López, Concepción

    2009-05-01

    The application of the advanced technologies in medicine has led to the appearance of new risk factors for health personnel. One of these could be the surgical smoke produced by electrosurgical instruments, ultrasounds or laser. However, there is still insufficient evidence in the published population studies on the detrimental effects of chronic exposure to surgical smoke. The main concern on the possible damage to the health of operating room staff is mainly based on the components currently detected until the date and laboratory experiments. Caution must also be used when extrapolating the results of in vitro studies to daily clinical practice. The organisations responsible for protecting the health of the workers in different countries have still not issued guidelines for the treatment and removal of the surgical smoke generated in both open and laparoscopic procedures. In this article we try to present a view of the consequences that surgical smoke has on health and the preventive measures that can be adopted. PMID:19376504

  14. Prevention of VTE in Nonorthopedic Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, David A.; Wren, Sherry M.; Karanicolas, Paul J.; Arcelus, Juan I.; Heit, John A.; Samama, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: VTE is a common cause of preventable death in surgical patients. Methods: We developed recommendations for thromboprophylaxis in nonorthopedic surgical patients by using systematic methods as described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines. Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: We describe several alternatives for stratifying the risk of VTE in general and abdominal-pelvic surgical patients. When the risk for VTE is very low (< 0.5%), we recommend that no specific pharmacologic (Grade 1B) or mechanical (Grade 2C) prophylaxis be used other than early ambulation. For patients at low risk for VTE (∼1.5%), we suggest mechanical prophylaxis, preferably with intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC), over no prophylaxis (Grade 2C). For patients at moderate risk for VTE (∼3%) who are not at high risk for major bleeding complications, we suggest low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) (Grade 2B), low-dose unfractionated heparin (Grade 2B), or mechanical prophylaxis with IPC (Grade 2C) over no prophylaxis. For patients at high risk for VTE (∼6%) who are not at high risk for major bleeding complications, we recommend pharmacologic prophylaxis with LMWH (Grade 1B) or low-dose unfractionated heparin (Grade 1B) over no prophylaxis. In these patients, we suggest adding mechanical prophylaxis with elastic stockings or IPC to pharmacologic prophylaxis (Grade 2C). For patients at high risk for VTE undergoing abdominal or pelvic surgery for cancer, we recommend extended-duration, postoperative, pharmacologic prophylaxis (4 weeks) with LMWH over limited-duration prophylaxis (Grade 1B). For patients at moderate to high risk for VTE who are at high risk for major bleeding complications or those in whom the consequences of bleeding are believed to be particularly severe, we suggest

  15. [Interest in agents for adhesion prevention after gynecologic surgery].

    PubMed

    Ait Menguellet, S; Collinet, P; Cosson, M; Mariette, C; Triboulet, J-P; Vinatier, D

    2007-04-01

    Adhesion barriers are intraperitoneal agents, solid or fluid, developed in order to prevent postoperative adhesions. In this article, we evaluate the efficiency of these new barrier agents for adhesion prevention in gynaecologic surgery, undertaking a review of controlled clinical trials published. Several human clinical trials demonstrated the safety and efficiency of both Interceed and Seprafilm. As far as other barrier agents are concerned, data are still insufficient to recommend them for clinical use. There is a need for other randomised controlled trials in order to evaluate functional efficiency of anti adhesion agents. PMID:17337231

  16. Prevention of peritendinous adhesions with electrospun polyethylene glycol/polycaprolactone nanofibrous membranes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Chen, Shih-Hsien; Shalumon, K T; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2015-09-01

    Postoperative adhesion formation is the major complication that could occur after acute tendon surgery. The application of an anti-adhesive membrane at the post-surgical site is deemed as a potential way to solve this problem by preventing adhesive fibrotic tissue development. In this study, we fabricated electrospun composite poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)/poly(caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibrous membrane (NFM) to prevent peritendinous adhesions, which could act as a barrier between the tendon and surrounding tissues, without interrupting mass transfer and normal tendon gliding. PCL/PEG NFMs of 0% PEG (PCL), 25% PEG (25PECL), 50% PEG (50PECL) and 75% PEG (75PECL) were prepared and characterized for physico-chemical properties. The PCL NFM shows the lowest protein permeability while 25PECL NFM exhibited the largest fiber diameter, smallest pore size and the largest ultimate stress and strain. The 75PECL NFM had the lowest water contact angle and the highest Young's modulus. In vitro cell adhesion and migration experiments with fibroblasts indicate that all NFMs could prevent cell penetration, with 75PECL NFM having the least cell attachment. In vivo application of 75PECL NFM on the repaired site of rabbit flexor tendon rupture model demonstrated improved efficacy compared with the PCL NFM and a commercial anti-adhesion barrier (Seprafilm™), from gross observation, histological analysis and functional assays. We concluded that 75PECL NFM could function as an effective anti-adhesion membrane after tendon surgery in a clinical setting. PMID:26115533

  17. Adhesion prevention after cesarean delivery: evidence, and lack of it.

    PubMed

    Walfisch, Asnat; Beloosesky, Ron; Shrim, Alon; Hallak, Mordechai

    2014-11-01

    In spite of the recognized occurrence of cesarean-attributable adhesions, its clinical significance is uncertain. The presence of adhesions during a repeat cesarean section can make fetal extraction lengthy and the procedure challenging and may increase the risk of injury to adjacent organs. Two methods for adhesion prevention are discussed, peritoneal closure and use of adhesion barriers. Peritoneal closure appears to be safe in the short term. In the long term, conflicting evidence arise from reviewing the literature for possible adhesion reduction benefits. A systematic review of the literature on the use of adhesion barriers in the context of cesarean section yielded only a few studies, most of which are lacking in methodology. For now, it appears that the available evidence does not support the routine use of adhesion barriers during cesarean delivery. PMID:24858198

  18. [Experimental studies of the prevention of postoperative adhesions].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, J; Donat, H

    1989-01-01

    Female wistar rats were used for the testing of different substances to prevent postoperative intraabdominal adhesions. It could be demonstrated that the best results were obtained by dextran 70 with a concentration of 10%. Good effects were seen also by contrykal (aprotinin) and hylase (hyaluronidase). By the combination of dextran 70 30% with contrykal the spread of adhesions was very low but the effect was not significant better than with dextran 70 10% alone. For the prevention of intraabdominal adhesions operative techniques with minimal lesions are important too of the peritoneal epithelium. PMID:2466384

  19. A pilot investigation of poloxamer 407 for the prevention of leptomeningeal adhesions in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Reigel, D H; Bazmi, B; Shih, S R; Marquardt, M D

    1993-01-01

    Leptomeningeal adhesion formation frequently complicates operations and diseases of the central nervous system. Chronic adhesive arachnoiditis may follow intraspinal surgery for disc, tumor, and closure of myelomeningocele, eventually producing pain and declining neurological status of the patient. Reoperation for scar removal is seldom successful as the arachnoidal adhesions reform. Poloxamer 407 (P407) has been shown to reduce postoperative peritoneal adhesion formation in rats and golden hamsters. In a rabbit model, we investigated the potential of P407 to prevent the production of arachnoidal adhesions and nerve root scarring following laminectomy and surgical meningeal injury. The lumbar spinal roots of 8 New Zealand white rabbits were surgically isolated under magnification. One root sleeve axilla was opened and immediately closed with 10-0 suture (control site) and a second root sleeve axilla was opened, P407 injected, and closed with 10-0 suture (treatment site). Five of 7 rabbits treated with P407 and followed for 7-42 days showed no arachnoidal adhesions at the level of the nerve root. Four New Zealand white rabbits had the lamina removed, and the dura over the spinal cord was opened at two sites separated by one to two lumbar segments. At one site P407 was inserted beneath the dura following durotomy, and the other site was opened in a similar fashion and immediately closed without the insertion of P407. There was a 50% reduction in leptomeningeal adhesion formation with the use of P407. P407 may be useful in neurosurgery for the prevention of arachnoidal adhesions. PMID:8398849

  20. Surgical attire and the operating room: role in infection prevention.

    PubMed

    Salassa, Tiare E; Swiontkowski, Marc F

    2014-09-01

    ➤ Although there is some evidence that scrubs, masks, and head coverings reduce bacterial counts in the operating room, there is no evidence that these measures reduce the prevalence of surgical site infection.➤ The use of gloves and impervious surgical gowns in the operating room reduces the prevalence of surgical site infection.➤ Operating-room ventilation plays an unclear role in the prevention of surgical site infection.➤ Exposure of fluids and surgical instruments to the operating-room environment can lead to contamination. Room traffic increases levels of bacteria in the operating room, although the role of this contamination in surgical site infection is unclear. PMID:25187588

  1. Biodegradable-Polymer-Blend-Based Surgical Sealant with Body-Temperature-Mediated Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Adam M; Lee, Nora G; Casey, Brendan J; Srinivasan, Priya; Sikorski, Michael J; Daristotle, John L; Sandler, Anthony D; Kofinas, Peter

    2015-12-22

    The development of practical and efficient surgical sealants has the propensity to improve operational outcomes. A biodegradable polymer blend is fabricated as a nonwoven fiber mat in situ. After direct deposition onto the tissue of interest, the material transitions from a fiber mat to a film. This transition promotes polymer-substrate interfacial interactions leading to improved adhesion and surgical sealant performance. PMID:26554545

  2. 21 CFR 878.4730 - Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent. 878.4730 Section 878.4730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  3. 21 CFR 878.4730 - Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent. 878.4730 Section 878.4730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  4. 21 CFR 878.4730 - Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Surgical skin degreaser or adhesive tape solvent. 878.4730 Section 878.4730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  5. The Topical Application of Rosuvastatin in Preventing Knee Intra-Articular Adhesion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haixiao; Germanov, Alexey V.; Goryaeva, Galina L.; Yachmenev, Alexander N.; Gordienko, Dmitriy I.; Kuzin, Victor V.; Skoroglyadov, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Intra-articular adhesion is one of the common complications of post knee surgery and injury. The formation of joint adhesion can lead to serious dysfunction. Rosuvastatin (ROS) is a new 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor, with multiple biological effects. In our study, the object was to evaluate the effectiveness of ROS in the prevention of post-operative knee adhesion in rats. Material/Methods Femoral condyle exposing surgery was performed on 45 healthy Sprague Dawley rats. Gelatin sponges soaked with 20 mg/kg of ROS, 10 mg/kg of ROS, or saline were used to cover the surgical site. The post-operative knee joints were fixed in a flexed position with micro Kirschner wires for four weeks. ROS effectiveness for treating intra-articular adhesion was determined with visual score evaluation, hydroxyproline content, histological analyses, immunohistochemistry, and inflammatory and vascular endothelial growth factors expression. Results The animals’ recovery was stable after surgery. The hydroxyproline content, visual score, and inflammatory vascular growth factors expression levels suggested that, compared with the control group, the ROS treatment groups showed better outcomes. ROS prevented joint adhesion formation, collagen deposition, and vascularization at the surgical site, and also inhibited inflammatory activity post-operatively. Compared with the 10 mg/kg ROS group, the 20 mg/kg ROS group showed significantly better outcomes. Conclusions The local application of ROS reduced intra-articular adhesion formation, collagen deposition, and vascularization at the surgical site, and inhibited inflammatory activity post-operatively. These results suggested optimal concentration of ROS to be 20 mg/kg. PMID:27115197

  6. The effect of polyethylene glycol adhesion barrier (Spray Gel) on preventing peritoneal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Dasiran, F; Eryilmaz, R; Isik, A; Okan, I; Somay, A; Sahin, M

    2015-01-01

    The prominent cells in the late phase of wound healing during proliferation and matrix deposition are fibroblasts. Foreign materials in the operation site like prosthesis prolong the inflammation and induce fibroblast proliferation (8). 3 different prostheses used in this study induced chronic inflammation and fibrosis and provided an effective repair. Dense and thick adhesions due to fibrosis also induced strong adhesions to omentum and small intestine if only polypropylene mesh used for hernia repair. However, there was no difference between SprayGel treated polypropylene mesh and Sepramesh when compared for fibrosis. It also prevents the intraabdominal adhesion formation. It is nontoxic, sticky adherent, non- immigrant and easy to use both in open and laparoscopic surgeries. This experimental study revealed that polyethyleneglycol applied polypropylene mesh accomplishes hernia repair with significantly less adhesion formation than polypropylene mesh alone while securing a remarkable economy than adhesion barrier coated dual meshes (Tab. 6, Fig. 7, Ref. 23). Text in PDF www.elis.sk. PMID:26084740

  7. Prevention of nerve root adhesions after laminectomy.

    PubMed

    Yong-Hing, K; Reilly, J; de Korompay, V; Kirkaldy-Willis, W H

    1980-01-01

    In repeat lumbar surgery for failure of the original operation to provide lasting relief, well-organized fibrous tissue is often noted binding together the dura, nerve roots, and erector spinae muscles. Lumbar laminectomy was carried out in 46 dogs and seven groups of animals studied. Gelfoam failed to prevent fibrosis. Free fat grafts prevented fibrosis whether the graft was placed at the laminectomy site or around the nerve roots. Vascularization of the grafts was demonstrated by injection of India ink before sacrifice. Ligamentum nuchae, which is similar to ligamentum flavum in its high elastic content, was also effective in preventing scar formation. The operative biopsy findings at reexploration in four patients who had free fat grafts following laminectomy are presented. PMID:7361199

  8. [Update on prevention of epidural adhesion after lumbar laminectomy].

    PubMed

    Feng, Ming-xuan; Hong, Dun

    2015-11-01

    Postoperative epidural adhesion is one of the most common causes of failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS), which can lead to back and leg pain or neurological deficit. Prevention of epidural adhesion after laminectomy is critical for improving the outcomes of lumbar surgery. The main origins of epidural fibrosis are raw surface of erector muscles and rupture fibers of intervertebral disc. The main current preventive methods for epidural adhesion include the usage of implants, chemicals and low dose radiation. However, most of them are still in experiment period. There are still controversies on the clinic usage of autograft free fat, ADCON-L, and Mitomycin C (MMC). The optimal implants are characteristics of better biocompatibility, degradable absorption and capability of existing for a certain period in body. The optimal medicine should have good effect on anti-desmoplasia, less side effects and long half-life. Besides, the combination of biodegradable medical film and drug and the mixture of two or more medical films are also the research frontlines of epidural adhesion. Further researches are required to explore new materials and drugs with stable and most favorable effect in preventing epidural adhesion. PMID:26757539

  9. Surgical Adhesive Drape (IO-ban) as Postoperative Surgical Site Dressing

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Hasan R; Snyder, Rita; McGowan, Jason E; Jha, Ribhu T; Nair, Mani N

    2015-01-01

    Study Design: Retrospective chart analysis. Objective: The objective of this study is to describe the senior author’s (MNN) experience applying a widely available surgical drape as a postoperative sterile surgical site dressing for both cranial and spinal procedures. Summary of Background Data: Surgical site infection (SSI) is an important complication of spine surgery that can result in significant morbidity. There is wide variation in wound care management in practice, including dressing type. Given the known bactericidal properties of the surgical drape, there may be a benefit of continuing its use immediately postoperatively. Methods: All of the senior author’s cases from September 2014 through September 2015 were reviewed. These were contrasted to the previous year prior to the institution of a sterile surgical drape as a postoperative dressing. Results: Only one surgical case out of 157 operative interventions (35 cranial, 124 spinal) required operative debridement due to infection. From September 2013 to September 2014, prior to the institution of a sterile surgical drape as dressing, the author had five infections out of 143 operations (46 cranial, 97 spinal) requiring intervention. Conclusion: The implementation of a sterile surgical drape as a closed postoperative surgical site dressing has led to a decrease in surgical site infections. The technique is simple and widely available, and should be considered for use to diminish surgical site infections. PMID:26798570

  10. Back to Basics: Preventing Surgical Fires.

    PubMed

    Spruce, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    When fires occur in the OR, they are devastating and potentially fatal to both patients and health care workers. Fires can be prevented by understanding the fire triangle and methods of reducing fire risk, conducting fire risk assessments, and knowing how to respond if a fire occurs. This Back to Basics article addresses the basics of fire prevention and the steps that can be taken to prevent fires from occurring. PMID:27568534

  11. [Preventive effect of changzhankang in experimental intestinal adhesions in rats].

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Q; Wei, J Q; Dai, D Z

    1991-08-01

    Intestinal adhesions were induced in rats by stabbing the terminal part of the ileum. Adhesion prevention by ibuprofen and changzhankang (CZK), which was composed by traditional Chinese medicines, was evaluated with a grading system. All of the 13 rats in the non-treated group created severe adhesions. The severity was significantly modified by orally administered CZK of 20 g/kg (in crude drugs) once or twice daily for five days (P less than 0.01 and P less than 0.05 compared with the non-treated). Intramuscular injection of ibuprofen (35 mg/kg, 3 times daily) also alleviated the severity of adhesions. There was no significant difference between the ibuprofen-treated and CZK-treated groups though some of the rats were virtually free from adhesion formation in the latter. It is plausible to expect CZK to become a promising drug used in treating intestinal adhesions, for the natural drug has greater security and less side effects than synthesized drugs. PMID:1954667

  12. Performance improvement initiative: prevention of surgical site infection (SSI).

    PubMed

    Ng, Wai Khuan; Awad, Nawal

    2015-01-01

    Mafraq Hospital performs an average of 10,000 surgeries every year. The impact of having high volume high risk surgical procedures calls for the need to ensure safe surgery and a prevention of surgical site infection (SSI). SSI represents a significant portion of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The impact on morbidity, mortality, and cost of care has resulted in identifying the need to reduce SSI as a top priority to prevent healthcare associated infections. The good news is that the majority of SSIs are preventable. Mafraq Hospital performs a range of surgical procedures that covers 14 surgical specialties. The infection prevention and control team performs surveillance for SSI for all patients who undergo operative procedure included in Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) Operative Procedure Category (40 surgical procedures). Out of the 40 CDC NHSN listed, 33 operative procedures were performed at Mafraq Hospital, of which 17 were reported with SSI for 2013 and 2014. Surgical site infection has implicated an increase average length of stay from seven to 10 additional postoperative hospital days and additional costs of AED 10,000 to AED 100,000/SSI depending on procedure and pathogen. A multidisciplinary team was formed to develop and implement measures to reduce/eliminate surgical site infection, as well as evaluate and monitor compliance. Hence a group of multidisciplinary teams were initiated to analyse the results, find out the gaps, and implement a quality improvement project to correct the deficits. Recommendations for appropriate improvement measures were formed on evidence-based international guidelines from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) and CDC. Evidence based practice supports that many of the causes of surgical site infection can be prevented with proper medical attention and care. PMID:26732804

  13. Prevention of Peritoneal Adhesions Using Polymeric Rheological Blends

    PubMed Central

    Hoare, Todd; Yeo, Yoon; Bellas, Evangelia; Bruggeman, Joost P.

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of rheological blends of high molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HA) and low molecular weight hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) in the prevention of peritoneal adhesions post-surgery is demonstrated. The physical mixture of the two carbohydrates increased the dwell time in the peritoneum while significantly improving the injectability of the polymer compared to hyaluronic acid alone. HA-HPMC treatment decreased the total adhesion area by ~70% relative to a saline control or no treatment in a repeated cecal injury model in the rabbit. No significant cytotoxicity and minimal inflammation was associated with the blend, and no chemical or physical processing was required prior to their use beyond simple mixing. PMID:24365709

  14. Rapidly light-activated surgical protein glue inspired by mussel adhesion and insect structural crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Eun Young; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Yang, Yun Jung; Kim, Bum Jin; Choi, Bong-Hyuk; Jung, Gyu Yong; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2015-10-01

    Currently approved surgical tissue glues do not satisfy the requirements for ideal bioadhesives due to limited adhesion in wet conditions and severe cytotoxicity. Herein, we report a new light-activated, mussel protein-based bioadhesive (LAMBA) inspired by mussel adhesion and insect dityrosine crosslinking chemistry. LAMBA exhibited substantially stronger bulk wet tissue adhesion than commercially available fibrin glue and good biocompatibility in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Besides, the easily tunable, light-activated crosslinking enabled an effective on-demand wound closure and facilitated wound healing. Based on these outstanding properties, LAMBA holds great potential as an ideal surgical tissue glue for diverse medical applications, including sutureless wound closures of skin and internal organs. PMID:26197411

  15. In-vivo tissue repair using light-activated surgical adhesive in a porcine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.; Riley, Jill N.; Dickson, Tonya J.; Hou, Dong Ming; Rogers, Pamela; March, Keith L.

    2001-05-01

    An in vivo study was conducted to investigate the feasibility, mechanical function, and chronic biocompatibility of a new light-activated surgical adhesive for achieving rapid hemostasis of the puncture site following diagnostic catheterization and interventional cardiac procedures. Porcine carotid arteries (nequals6) and femoral arteries (nequals6) were exposed, and an incision was made in the arterial walls using a 16G needle. The surgical adhesive, composed of a poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold doped with the traditional protein solder mix of serum albumin and indocyanine green dye, was used to close the incisions in conjunction with an 805-nm diode laser. Blood flow was restored to the vessels immediately after the procedure and the incision sites were checked for patency. The strength and hemostatic abilities of the new surgical adhesive were evaluated in the context of arterial pressure, persistence of hemostatis and presence of any inflammatory reaction after 3 days. After this evaluation period, the surgical procedure was repeated on the carotid arteries (nequals6) and femoral arteries (nequals6) of three additional animals that had been heparinized prior to surgery to closer approximate the conditions seen in a typical vascular surgical setting.

  16. Controlled release of curcumin from curcumin-loaded nanomicelles to prevent peritendinous adhesion during Achilles tendon healing in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weizhong; Li, Xuanyi; Comes Franchini, Mauro; Xu, Ke; Locatelli, Erica; Martin, Robert C; Monaco, Ilaria; Li, Yan; Cui, Shusen

    2016-01-01

    We introduced curcumin-loaded nanomicelles into a tendon-healing model to evaluate their effects on tendon healing and adhesion. Three groups consisting of 36 rats underwent rupture and repair of the Achilles tendon. The treatment group received an injection of curcumin-loaded nanomicelles (gold nanorods [GNRs]-1/curcumin in polymeric nanomicelles [curc@PMs] at a dosage of 0.44 mg curcumin/kg in 0.1 mL saline) into the surgical site and exposed to laser postoperatively at weeks 1, 2, and 3, for three times 10 seconds each, on the surgical site in the rats that underwent tendon rupture and repair, while the other two groups received 0.44 mg curcumin/kg in 0.1 mL saline and 0.1 mL of saline, respectively. The specimens were harvested at 4 weeks and subjected to biomechanical and histological evaluation. The scoring results of tendon adhesion indicated that GNRs-1/curc@PMs group was in the lowest grade of peritendinous adhesions compared to the other groups. Histological assessment further confirmed the preventive effect of GNRs-1/curc@PMs on tendon adhesion. These findings indicated greater tendon strength with less adhesion in the group treated with GNRs-1/curc@PMs combined with laser exposure, and that nanoparticle-based therapy may be applied to prevent adhesion in clinical patients. PMID:27382278

  17. Preventable Adverse Events in Surgical Care in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Lena; Risberg, Madeleine Borgstedt; Montgomery, Agneta; Sjödahl, Rune; Schildmeijer, Kristina; Rutberg, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Adverse events (AEs) occur in health care and may result in harm to patients especially in the field of surgery. Our objective was to analyze AEs in surgical patient care from a nationwide perspective and to analyze the frequency of AEs that may be preventable. In total 19,141 randomly selected admissions in 63 Swedish hospitals were reviewed each month during 2013 using a 2-stage record review method based on the identification of predefined triggers. The subgroup of 3301 surgical admissions was analyzed. All AEs were categorized according to site, type, level of severity, and degree of preventability. We reviewed 3301 patients’ records and 507 (15.4%) were associated with AEs. A total of 62.5% of the AEs were considered probably preventable, over half contributed to prolonged hospital care or readmission, and 4.7% to permanent harm or death. Healthcare acquired infections composed of more than one third of AEs. The majority of the most serious AEs composed of healthcare acquired infections and surgical or other invasive AEs. The incidence of AEs was 13% in patients 18 to 64 years old and 17% in ≥65 years. Pressure sores and drug-related AEs were more common in patients being ≥65 years. Urinary retention and pressure sores showed the highest degree of preventability. Patients with probably preventable AEs had in median 7.1 days longer hospital stay. We conclude that AEs are common in surgical care and the majority are probably preventable. PMID:26986126

  18. Prevention of Surgical Site Infections in Joint Replacement Surgery.

    PubMed

    Marculescu, Camelia E; Mabry, Tad; Berbari, Elie F

    2016-04-01

    Prosthetic joint infections (PJI), although rare, represent a serious complication of total joint arthroplasty as they pose not only a direct financial burden to the patient but also an indirect burden related to psychosocial impact that PJI incur on the patient. Treatment of PJI is complex and requires a combined surgical and medical approach. Patients are often subjected to multiple surgical procedures and prolonged courses of antimicrobial therapy. Therefore, all efforts should be directed toward maximizing the prophylactic measures in the peri-operative and post-operative phases in order to prevent the occurrence of surgical site infections. This article explores primarily the prophylactic measures that target the host and the operative theater environment. Implementation of such preventive measures requires a multi-disciplinary approach and is crucial for a successful outcome of the total joint arthroplasty. PMID:26855288

  19. In situ cross-linkable hyaluronic acid hydrogels prevent post-operative abdominal adhesions in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Yoon; Highley, Christopher B; Bellas, Evangelia; Ito, Taichi; Marini, Robert; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S

    2006-09-01

    We studied the efficacy of an in situ cross-linked hyaluronic acid hydrogel (HAX) in preventing post-surgical peritoneal adhesions, using a rabbit sidewall defect-cecum abrasion model. Two cross-linkable precursors were prepared by modifying hyaluronic acid with adipic dihydrazide and aldehyde, respectively. The hydrogel precursors cross-linked to form a flexible hydrogel upon mixing. The hydrogel was biodegradable and provided a durable physical barrier, which was highly effective in reducing the formation of post-operative adhesions. Ten out of 12 animals in the untreated control group developed fibrous adhesions requiring sharp dissection, while only 2 out of 8 animals treated with HAX gels showed such adhesions, and those occurred in locations that were not covered by the hydrogel. We also studied means by which gel degradation time can be modulated by varying the precursor concentration and molecular weight. PMID:16750564

  20. [Prevention from secondary nerve root adhesion: an experimental study].

    PubMed

    Yao, M; Sun, Y; Yan, J

    1996-06-01

    In the study, 27 dogs were divided into three groups: A, B and C. Then all of the dogs had their lumbar intervertebral disks removed. Into the wounded cavity of group A, 1 ml of dimethicone was dropped and gelatin sponge was applied on the surface of the nerve root of group B. Group C was served as the control. The dogs were killed and the operation area was removed respectively 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 12 weeks after the operation for macroscopical observation, nerve root motility measurement and histological examination. The result of the experiment proved that dimethicone was fairly effective in the prevention from secondary nerve root adhesion. While gelatin sponge in the process of its absorption induced the formation of quite a few scar tissues, thus aggrevating nerve root adhesion. PMID:9594172

  1. Patient Satisfaction of Surgical Treatment of Clitoral Phimosis and Labial Adhesions Caused by Lichen Sclerosus

    PubMed Central

    King, Michelle; Rieff, Mollie; Krapf, Jill; Goldstein, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Lichen sclerosus (LS) is a chronic inflammatory dermatosis, usually affecting the anogenital skin in women. This chronic inflammation can cause scarring of genitalia including narrowing of the introitus and phimosis of the clitoris. These architectural changes can lead to recurrent tearing during intercourse (vulvar granuloma fissuratum) and decreased clitoral sensation. Surgical correction of vulvar granuloma fissuratum (VGF) and clitoral phimosis can be performed, but there is little data on the patient satisfaction and complications following these surgical procedures. Aim To evaluate patient experience and outcomes in women undergoing surgical correction of scarring caused by anogenital LS. Methods A retrospective chart review of patients at a vulvar disorders clinic was performed to identify women who had undergone surgical correction of clitoral phimosis or lysis of vulvar adhesions for VGF due to LS. Twenty‐eight women were contacted via telephone between 4 and 130 months postoperatively. An eight‐question survey was used to determine patient experience and outcomes. Main Outcome Measures All participants completed an eight‐question survey to evaluate patient satisfaction with the surgery, effects on clitoral sensation, orgasm and pain with intercourse, postoperative symptoms or complications, and the presence of recurrent vulvar scarring. Results Participants reported that they were either very satisfied (44%) or satisfied (40%) with the procedure. Of the women who experienced decreased clitoral sensation prior to surgery, 75% endorsed increased clitoral sensitivity postoperatively. Of the women who had dyspareunia prior to surgery, the majority of women reported having pain‐free sex (33%) or improved but not completely pain‐free sex (58%) after surgery. There were no complications or symptoms made worse by the surgical procedures. Conclusions This study shows high patient satisfaction and low complication risk associated

  2. Prevention of Peritendinous Adhesions Using an Electrospun DegraPol Polymer Tube: A Histological, Ultrasonographic, and Biomechanical Study in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Meier Bürgisser, Gabriella; Müller, Angela; Bonavoglia, Eliana; Fessel, Gion; Snedeker, Jess G.; Giovanoli, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. One of the great challenges in surgical tendon rupture repair is to minimize peritendinous adhesions. In order to reduce adhesion formation, a physical barrier was applied to a sutured rabbit Achilles tendon, with two different immobilization protocols used postoperatively. Methods. Thirty New Zealand white rabbits received a laceration on the Achilles tendon, sutured with a 4-strand Becker suture, and half of the rabbits got a DegraPol tube at the repair site. While fifteen rabbits had their treated hind leg in a 180° stretched position during 6 weeks (adhesion provoking immobilization), the other fifteen rabbits were recasted with a 150° position after 3 weeks (adhesion inhibiting immobilization). Adhesion extent was analysed macroscopically, via ultrasound and histology. Inflammation was determined histologically. Biomechanical properties were analysed. Results. Application of a DegraPol tube reduced adhesion formation by approximately 20%—independently of the immobilization protocol. Biomechanical properties of extracted specimen were not affected by the tube application. There was no serious inflammatory reaction towards the implant material. Conclusions. Implantation of a DegraPol tube tightly set around a sutured tendon acts as a beneficial physical barrier and prevents adhesion formation significantly—without affecting the tendon healing process. PMID:25101292

  3. Decrease of Staphylococcal adhesion on surgical stainless steel after Si ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braceras, Iñigo; Pacha-Olivenza, Miguel A.; Calzado-Martín, Alicia; Multigner, Marta; Vera, Carolina; Broncano, Luis Labajos-; Gallardo-Moreno, Amparo M.; González-Carrasco, José Luis; Vilaboa, Nuria; González-Martín, M. Luisa

    2014-08-01

    316LVM austenitic stainless steel is often the material of choice on temporal musculoskeletal implants and surgical tools as it combines good mechanical properties and acceptable corrosion resistance to the physiologic media, being additionally relatively inexpensive. This study has aimed at improving the resistance to bacterial colonization of this surgical stainless steel, without compromising its biocompatibility and resistance. To achieve this aim, the effect of Si ion implantation on 316LVM has been studied. First, the effect of the ion implantation parameters (50 keV; fluence: 2.5-5 × 1016 ions/cm2; angle of incidence: 45-90°) has been assessed in terms of depth profiling of chemical composition by XPS and nano-topography evaluation by AFM. The in vitro biocompatibility of the alloy has been evaluated with human mesenchymal stem cells. Finally, bacterial adhesion of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus on these surfaces has been assessed. Reduction of bacterial adhesion on Si implanted 316LVM is dependent on the implantation conditions as well as the features of the bacterial strains, offering a promising implantable biomaterial in terms of biocompatibility, mechanical properties and resistance to bacterial colonization. The effects of surface composition and nano-topography on bacterial adhesion, directly related to ion implantation conditions, are also discussed.

  4. Mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in the pathogenesis of post-surgical peritoneal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Pilar; Jiménez-Heffernan, José A; Guerra-Azcona, Gonzalo; Pérez-Lozano, María L; Rynne-Vidal, Ángela; Albar-Vizcaíno, Patricia; Gil-Vera, Fernando; Martín, Paloma; Coronado, María José; Barcena, Carmen; Dotor, Javier; Majano, Pedro Lorenzo; Peralta, Abelardo Aguilera; López-Cabrera, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Peritoneal adhesions (PAs) are fibrotic bands formed between bowel loops, solid organs, and the parietal peritoneum, which may appear following surgery, infection or endometriosis. They represent an important health problem with no effective treatment. Mesothelial cells (MCs) line the peritoneal cavity and undergo a mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMT) under pathological conditions, transforming into myofibroblasts, which are abundant in peritoneal fibrotic tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate if peritoneal MCs undergo a MMT contributing to the formation of post-surgical adhesions. Biopsies from patients with PAs were analysed by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and quantitative RT-PCR. A mouse model of PAs based on ischaemic buttons was used to modulate MMT by blocking the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) pathway. The severity of adhesions and MMT-related marker expression were studied. We observed myofibroblasts derived from the conversion of MCs in submesothelial areas of patients with PAs. In addition, MMT-related markers were dysregulated in adhesion zones when compared to distant normal peritoneal tissue of the same patient. In animal experiments, blockage of TGF-β resulted in molecular reprogramming of markers related to the mesenchymal conversion of MCs and in a significant decrease in the severity of the adhesions. These data indicate for the first time that MMT is involved in PA pathogenesis. This finding opens new therapeutic strategies to interfere with adhesion formation by modulating MMT with a wide range of pharmacological agents. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27071481

  5. A technique to prevent dural adhesions to chronically implanted microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Maynard, E M; Fernandez, E; Normann, R A

    2000-04-15

    Minimizing relative movements between neural tissues and arrays of microelectrodes chronically implanted into them is expected to greatly enhance the capacity of the microelectrodes to record from single cortical neurons on a long-term basis. We describe a new surgical technique to minimize the formation of adhesions between the dura and an implanted electrode array using a 12 microm (0.5 mil) thick sheet of Teflon film positioned between the array and the dura. A total of 15 cats were implanted using this technique. Gross examination of 12 implant sites at the time of sacrifice failed to find evidence of adhesions between the arrays and the dura when the Teflon(R) film remained in its initial position. In six implants from which recordings were made, an average of nine of the 11 (81%) connected electrodes in each array recorded evoked neural activity after 180 days post implantation. Further, on average, two separable units were identified on each of the implanted electrodes in these arrays. No significant change was found in the density of cell bodies around implanted electrodes of four of the implanted electrode arrays. However, histological evaluation of the implant sites revealed evidence of meningeal proliferation beneath the arrays. The technique described is shown to be effective at preventing adhesions between implanted electrode arrays and improve the characteristics of chronic recordings obtained with these structures. PMID:10788663

  6. Injury and adhesion formation following ovarian wedge resection with different thermal surgical modalities.

    PubMed

    Bhatta, N; Isaacson, K; Flotte, T; Schiff, I; Anderson, R R

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the role of bleeding, acute thermal damage, and charring in adhesion formation. Postoperative adhesions were compared following ovarian wedge resection in 48 rabbits using different lasers, electrosurgery, and scalpel. Twelve ovaries were sectioned per modality, in randomized pairs. Acute thermal injury as assessed by histology, bleeding, and charring differed among the modalities used. Adhesions were assessed 4 weeks later, by an investigator completely blinded of the treatment protocol. The adhesion scores were 11.6 +/- 8.0 with pulsed Er:YAG laser; 11.9 +/- 7.5 with scalpel; 8.3 +/- 9.3 with electrocautery; 6.7 +/- 8.8 with a continuous (c.w.) Nd:YAG laser; 5.3 +/- 4.8 with c.w. CO2 laser; 3.1 +/- 2.7 with pulsed CO2 laser; 1.7 +/- 1.8 with pulsed Ho:YAG laser; and 0.8 +/- 1.5 in the control (no resection) group. Ho:YAG, Nd:YAG, and electrocautery were completely hemostatic. Bleeding was minimal with the CO2 lasers. Er:YAG and scalpel caused maximum bleeding, requiring hemostatic measures to prevent exsanguination. Charring occurred with electrocautery, CO2 laser, and Nd:YAG laser. Bleeding and charring correlated with adhesion formation, but the histological depth of thermal damage did not. The Ho:YAG laser is a hemostatic, fiber-optic compatible laser causing significantly fewer adhesions (P < 0.04) than scalpel, electrocautery, Nd:YAG, Er:YAG, and c.w. CO2 lasers. Clinical use of the Ho:YAG laser, and the role of carbonization in promoting adhesions, deserve further study. PMID:8515673

  7. PREVENTING SURGICAL CONFUSIONS IN OPHTHALMOLOGY (AN AMERICAN OPHTHALMOLGICAL SOCIETY THESIS)

    PubMed Central

    Simon, John W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Surgical confusions have been rarely studied, especially in ophthalmology. The author hypothesized that such confusions occur rarely but are unacceptable in the public, legal, and regulatory arenas; often occur in circumstances presenting predictable risk; more often involve wrong lens implant than wrong eye, procedure, or patient; and can be prevented by following the Universal Protocol. Methods A retrospective series of 106 cases occurring between 1982 and 2005 included 42 closed files from the Ophthalmic Mutual Insurance Company and 64 cases reported to the New York State Health Department. Records were grouped by procedure planned and analyzed to answer these questions: How did the error occur? By whom and when was the error recognized? Who was responsible? Was the patient informed? What was done to the patient? What was the outcome? What liability payments were made? What policy changes or sanctions resulted? Was the error preventable by following the Universal Protocol? Results The most common confusion was wrong lens implant, accounting for 67 (63%) of the 106 cases. Wrong eye surgery occurred in 15 cases, wrong eye blocks in 14, wrong patient/procedure in 8, and wrong corneal transplant in 2. In 16 cases, the Universal Protocol would have been unlikely to prevent the confusion. Conclusions Surgical confusions occur infrequently and usually cause little or no permanent injury, but they may be devastating to the patient, the physician, and the profession. Measures to prevent such confusions, including the Universal Protocol and related checklists, deserve the acceptance, support, and active participation of ophthalmologists. PMID:18427628

  8. The Prevention of Surgical Site Infection in Elective Colon Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Donald E.

    2013-01-01

    Infections at the surgical site continue to occur in as many as 20% of elective colon resection cases. Methods to reduce these infections are inconsistently applied. Surgical site infection (SSI) is the result of multiple interactive variables including the inoculum of bacteria that contaminate the site, the virulence of the contaminating microbes, and the local environment at the surgical site. These variables that promote infection are potentially offset by the effectiveness of the host defense. Reduction in the inoculum of bacteria is achieved by appropriate surgical site preparation, systemic preventive antibiotics, and use of mechanical bowel preparation in conjunction with the oral antibiotic bowel preparation. Intraoperative reduction of hematoma, necrotic tissue, foreign bodies, and tissue dead space will reduce infections. Enhancement of the host may be achieved by perioperative supplemental oxygenation, maintenance of normothermia, and glycemic control. These methods require additional research to identify optimum application. Uniform application of currently understood methods and continued research into new methods to reduce microbial contamination and enhancement of host responsiveness can lead to better outcomes. PMID:24455434

  9. The prevention of surgical site infection in elective colon surgery.

    PubMed

    Fry, Donald E

    2013-01-01

    Infections at the surgical site continue to occur in as many as 20% of elective colon resection cases. Methods to reduce these infections are inconsistently applied. Surgical site infection (SSI) is the result of multiple interactive variables including the inoculum of bacteria that contaminate the site, the virulence of the contaminating microbes, and the local environment at the surgical site. These variables that promote infection are potentially offset by the effectiveness of the host defense. Reduction in the inoculum of bacteria is achieved by appropriate surgical site preparation, systemic preventive antibiotics, and use of mechanical bowel preparation in conjunction with the oral antibiotic bowel preparation. Intraoperative reduction of hematoma, necrotic tissue, foreign bodies, and tissue dead space will reduce infections. Enhancement of the host may be achieved by perioperative supplemental oxygenation, maintenance of normothermia, and glycemic control. These methods require additional research to identify optimum application. Uniform application of currently understood methods and continued research into new methods to reduce microbial contamination and enhancement of host responsiveness can lead to better outcomes. PMID:24455434

  10. Surgical management and prevention of vaginal vault prolapse.

    PubMed

    Imparato, E; Aspesi, G; Rovetta, E; Presti, M

    1992-09-01

    From 1984 to 1988, we corrected and prevented the prolapse of the vaginal vault of patients who wanted to maintain a satisfactory sexual function. This was done by adopting two different surgical techniques. The first, generally favored technique, was performed upon 179 patients and consisted of a colposuspension to the sacrospinous ligaments. The second technique, a colposacropexis, was performed upon 71 patients, in which abdominal associated pathologic changes required an abdominal surgical approach. Colposacropexis was performed, whenever possible, directly to the anterior longitudinal vertebral ligament or using synthetic materials (Mersilene [polyester fiber], Teflon [polytetrafluoroethylene] and Gore-Tex [expanded, reinforced polytetrafluoroethylene]). Both colposacropexis and vaginal suspension to sacrospinous ligaments have had comparable results in vaginal accommodation and long term fixation. Vaginal approach has a lower incidence of operative complications than the abdominal approach and seems to ensure a lower risk of recurrent cystocele, even if simple and asymptomatic. PMID:1514157

  11. Effect of carbodiimide-derivatized hyaluronic acid gelatin on preventing postsurgical intra-abdominal adhesion formation and promoting healing in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fang; Lin, Long-Xiang; Zhang, Hui-Hui; Huang, Dan; Sun, Yu-Long

    2016-05-01

    Adhesions often occur after abdominal surgery. It could cause chronic pelvic pain, intestinal obstruction, and infertility. A hydrogel biomaterial, carbodiimide-derivatized hyaluronic acid gelatin (cd-HA gelatin), has been successfully used to reduce adhesion formation after flexor tendon grafting. This study investigated the efficacy of cd-HA gelatin in preventing postsurgical peritoneal adhesions in a rat model. The surgical traumas were created on the underlying muscle of the abdominal wall and the serosal layer of the cecum. The wounds were covered with or without cd-HA gelatin. Animals were euthanized at day 14 after surgery. Adhesion formation was assessed with adhesion degree and adhesion breaking strength. The healing of abdominal wall was evaluated with biomechanical testing and histological analysis. The adhesions occurred in all rats (n = 12) without cd-HA gelatin treatment. The application of cd-HA gelatin significantly reduced the adhesion rate from 100% to 58%. The decrease of adhesion breaking strength also manifested that cd-HA gelatin could reduce postsurgical intra-abdominal adhesion formation. Moreover, it was found that cd-HA gelatin was a safe material and could promote tissue healing. The cd-HA gelatin hydrogel could reduce the formation of intra-abdominal adhesions without adversely effects on wound healing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1175-1181, 2016. PMID:26749008

  12. The efficacy of a hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose membrane in prevention of postoperative adhesion in a rat uterine horn model.

    PubMed

    Kelekci, Sefa; Yilmaz, Bulent; Oguz, Serdar; Zergeroğlu, Sema; Inan, Ismet; Tokucoğlu, Selma

    2004-11-01

    The current study was designed to investigate the efficacy of a hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose membrane for the prevention of post-operative adhesion in a rat uterine horn model. This is a prospective double-blinded controlled study. Nineteen injured uterine horns were treated with a hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose membrane as a barrier and 19 injured uterine horns without any treatment served as a control group. Two weeks later, second look laparotomies were performed in order to assess the degree of the adhesion. Total adhesion scores, histopathological analysis of inflammation process and vascularization of adhesions were compared with control group. P values of 5% or less were considered statistically significant. Animals treated with a hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose membrane had significantly reduced post-surgical adhesion scores when compared with control group. In histopathological examination, there was less vascularization in the treatment group. The types and extent of inflammation were similar in two groups. Clinically and histopathologically, a hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose membrane is effective in reducing postoperative adhesion formation in the rat uterine horn model. PMID:15502417

  13. Nonconcordance with surgical site infection prevention guidelines and rates of surgical site infections for general surgical, neurological, and orthopedic procedures.

    PubMed

    Young, Barnaby; Ng, Tat Ming; Teng, Christine; Ang, Brenda; Tai, Hwei Yee; Lye, David C

    2011-10-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common and preventable complication of surgery, but the relative importance of individual measures recommended by guidelines has not been determined. Elective general surgical, neurological, and orthopedic procedures requiring antibiotic prophylaxis from a 3-month period were retrospectively studied to determine concordance with SSI prevention guidelines and to identify factors which predicted the development of SSIs. A total of 216 surgeries were reviewed, with 18 SSIs (8.3%). A mean of 1.4 antibiotic prophylaxis errors per surgery were identified, with correct antibiotic type identified for 64%, antibiotic timing for 83%, supplemental antibiotic dosing for 34%, and antibiotic duration of less than 24 h for 44%. Normothermia was present in 79% of surgeries, and normoglycemia was present in 17%. Univariate analysis of the SSI rate identified four significant factors. Antibiotic prophylaxis for less than 24 h postoperatively (odds ratio [OR], 0.213; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]0.060 to 0.757) and neurosurgery (OR, 0.118; 95% CI, 0.15 to 0.903) correlated with a reduced risk of SSI. The mean number of prophylaxis errors (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.02 to 2.4) and a duration of surgical drainage for more than 3 days (OR, 2.679; 95% CI, 1.009 to 7.113) predicted SSI. By multivariate analysis, errors in individual antibiotic prophylaxis measures were not significantly associated with SSI; however, the presence of more than two errors was significant (OR, 4.030; 95% CI, 1.018 to 15.96). A strong correlation was identified between the degree of concordance to SSI prevention guidelines and the SSI rate (P = 0.001, Mantel-Haenszel linear-by-linear association chi-square test). PMID:21825293

  14. [Prevention of postoperative surgical site infections : Between tradition and evidence].

    PubMed

    Scheithauer, S; Artelt, T; Bauer, M; Waeschle, R M

    2016-05-01

    Postoperative wound infections represent a relevant complication of invasive interventions. Current European prevalence data show that for participating hospitals from Germany (n = 132) surgical site infections represent the most commonly occurring nosocomial infection with 24.3 %. This corresponds to a point prevalence of 1.31 %. It is assumed that approximately 25-33 % of all infections acquired in hospital could be prevented if all possible precautions would be taken. Recent studies have indicated that this rate might be even higher for individual infection entities. Infection control measures can be divided into general measures, which are valid for prevention in many fields and for many infection entities and into specific precautions related to hospital-specific circumstances or specific infection entities. In this article the various hygiene measures and recommendations are presented with respect to the level of evidence. PMID:27146286

  15. Photocurable surgical tissue adhesive glues composed of photoreactive gelatin and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Y; Matsuda, T

    1999-01-01

    This article presents a novel photochemically driven surgical tissue adhesive technology using photoreactive gelatins and a water-soluble difunctional macromer (poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate: PEGDA).The gelatins were partially derivatized with photoreactive groups, such as ultraviolet light (UV)-reactive benzophenone and visible light-reactive xanthene dye (e.g., fluorescein sodium salt, eosin Y, and rose bengal). A series of the prepared photocurable tissue adhesive glues, consisting of the photoreactive gelatin, PEGDA, and a saline solution with or without ascorbic acid as a reducing agent, were viscous solutions under warming, and their effectiveness was evaluated as hemostasis- and anastomosis-aid in cardiovascular surgery. Regardless of the type of photoreactive groups, the irradiation of the photocurable tissue adhesive glues by UV or visible light within 1 min produced water-swollen gels, which had a high adhesive strength to wet collagen film. These were due to the synergistic action of photoreactive group-initiated photo-cross-linking and photograft polymerization. An increase in the irradiation time resulted in increased gel yield and reduced water swellability. A decrease in the molecular weight of PEGDA and an increase in concentration of both gelatin and PEGDA resulted in reduced water swellability and increased tensile and burst strengths of the resultant gels. In rats whose livers were injured with a trephine in laparotomy, the bleeding spots were coated with the photocurable adhesive glue and irradiated through an optical fiber. The coated solution was immediately converted to a swollen gel. The gel was tightly adhered to the liver tissue presumably by interpenetration, and concomitantly hemostasis was completed. The anastomosis treatment with the photocurable glue in the canine abdominal or thoracic aortas incised with a knife resulted in little bleeding under pulsatile flow after declamping. Histological examination showed that the glues

  16. A Targeted E-Learning Program for Surgical Trainees to Enhance Patient Safety in Preventing Surgical Infection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHugh, Seamus Mark; Corrigan, Mark; Dimitrov, Borislav; Cowman, Seamus; Tierney, Sean; Humphreys, Hilary; Hill, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical site infection accounts for 20% of all health care-associated infections (HCAIs); however, a program incorporating the education of surgeons has yet to be established across the specialty. Methods: An audit of surgical practice in infection prevention was carried out in Beaumont Hospital from July to November 2009. An…

  17. Effect of a Chitosan Gel on Hemostasis and Prevention of Adhesion After Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Young-Jun; An, Se-Young; Yeon, Je-Yeob; Shim, Woo Sub; Mo, Ji-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Postoperative bleeding and adhesion formation are the two most common complications after endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). The former sometimes can be life threatening and the latter is the most common reason requiring revision surgery. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of newly developed chitosan gel (8% carboxymethyl chitosan, Surgi shield) on hemostasis and wound healing after ESS. Methods A prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled trial was conducted in 33 patients undergoing symmetric ESS. At the conclusion of the operation, Surgi shield was randomly applied on one side of the nasal cavity, with the opposite side acting as control and the bleeding quantity of the surgical field was evaluated every 2 minutes. And then, Merocel was placed in the ethmoidectomized areas of the both sides. Five milliliters of Surgi shield was applied to the Merocel of intervention side and saline was applied to the other side. Merocel in both nasal cavities was removed and 5 mL of Surgi shield was applied again to the intervention side on the second day after surgery. The nasal cavity was examined using a nasal endoscope and the degree of adhesion, crusting, mucosal edema, infection, and granulations were graded at 1, 2, and 4 weeks after surgery. Results Complete hemostasis was rapidly achieved in the Surgi shield applied side compared with the control side at 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 minutes after application of Surgi shield (P#x0003d;0.007, P#x0003d;0.004, P<0.001, P#x0003d;0.001, and P<0.001, respectively). There were significantly less adhesions on the Surgi shield applied side at postoperative 1, 2, and 4 weeks (P#x0003d;0.001, P<0.001, and P<0.001, respectively). The degree of mucosal edema, infection, crusting, or granulation formation assessed by the endoscopic features in the Surgi shield applied side was not significantly different from that of the control side (P>0.05). No adverse effects were noted in the patient series. Conclusion Surgi shield

  18. Manual Physical Therapy for Non-Surgical Treatment of Adhesion-Related Small Bowel Obstructions: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Amanda D.; King, Richard; Reed, Evette D’Avy; Patterson, Kimberley; Wurn, Belinda F.; Wurn, Lawrence J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Adhesion formation is a widely acknowledged risk following abdominal or pelvic surgery. Adhesions in the abdomen or pelvis can cause or contribute to partial or total small bowel obstruction (SBO). These adhesions deter or prevent the passage of nutrients through the digestive tract, and may bind the bowel to the peritoneum, or other organs. Small bowel obstructions can quickly become life-threatening, requiring immediate surgery to resect the bowel, or lyse any adhesions the surgeon can safely access. Bowel repair is an invasive surgery, with risks including bowel rupture, infection, and peritonitis. An additional risk includes the formation of new adhesions during the healing process, creating the potential for subsequent adhesiolysis or SBO surgeries. Objective: Report the use of manual soft tissue physical therapy for the reversal of adhesion-related partial SBOs, and create an initial inquiry into the possibility of nonsurgical lysis of adhesions. Case Reports: Two patients presenting with SBO symptoms due to abdominal adhesions secondary to abdominal and pelvic surgery were treated with manual soft tissue physical therapy focused on decreasing adhesions. Conclusions: Successful treatment with resolution of symptom presentation of partial SBO and sustained results were observed in both patients treated. PMID:26237678

  19. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 prevents intra-abdominal adhesions by decreasing activity of peritoneal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guangbing; Chen, Xin; Wang, Guanghui; Jia, Pengbo; Xu, Qinhong; Ping, Gaofeng; Wang, Kang; Li, Xuqi

    2015-01-01

    Background Postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions are common complications after abdominal surgery. The exact molecular mechanisms that are responsible for these complications remain unclear, and there are no effective methods for preventing adhesion formation or reformation. The aim of the study reported here was to investigate the preventive effects and underlying potential molecular mechanisms of selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors in a rodent model of postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions. Materials and methods The expression of COX-2 in postoperative intra-abdominal adhe-sions and normal peritoneal tissue was examined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Assays were performed to elucidate the effect of COX-2 inhibition on hypoxia-induced fibroblast activity in vitro and on intra-abdominal adhesion formation in vivo. Results Hypoxia-induced COX-2 expression in peritoneal fibroblasts was increased in postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions. Inhibition of COX-2 attenuated the activating effect of hypoxia on normal peritoneal fibroblasts in vitro. Data indicate that selective COX-2 inhibitor prevents in vivo intra-abdominal adhesion by inhibition of basic fibroblast growth factor and transforming growth factor-beta expression, but not through an antiangiogenic mechanism. Furthermore, using selective COX-2 inhibitors to prevent intra-abdominal adhesions did not adversely affect the weight, bowel motility, or healing of intestinal anastomoses in a rat model. Conclusion These results show that hypoxia-induced COX-2 expression in peritoneal fibroblasts is involved in the formation of intra-abdominal adhesions. Inhibition of COX-2 prevents postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions through suppression of inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26109851

  20. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Peritoneal Adhesion Prevention Devices in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Poehnert, D; Grethe, L; Maegel, L; Jonigk, D; Lippmann, T; Kaltenborn, A; Schrem, H; Klempnauer, J; Winny, M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Abdominal operations are followed by adhesions, a prevalent cause of abdominal pain, and the most frequent cause for bowel obstruction and secondary female infertility. This rat study addresses adhesion prevention capability of Adept®, Interceed®, Seprafilm®, and a novel device, 4DryField® PH which is provided as powder and generates its effect as gel. Methods: Sixty-eight male Lewis rats had cecal abrasion and creation of an equally sized abdominal wall defect, and were grouped randomly: A control group without treatment (n=10); two groups treated with 4DryField® PH using premixed gel (n=15) or in-situ gel technique (n=16); one group each was treated with Seprafilm® (n=8), Interceed® (n=9), or Adept® (n=10). Sacrifice was on day 7 to evaluate incidence, quality, and quantity of adhesions, as expressed via adhesion reduction rate (AR). Histologic specimens were evaluated. Statistical analyses used ANOVA and unpaired t-tests. Results: 4DryField® PH significantly reduced incidence and severity of adhesions both as premixed gel (AR: 85.2%) and as in-situ made gel (AR: 100%), a comparison between these two application techniques showed no differences in efficacy. Seprafilm® did not reduce incidence but severity of adhesions significantly (AR: 53.5%). With Interceed® (AR: 3.7%) and Adept® (AR: 16.1%) no significant adhesion-reduction was achieved. Except for inflammatory response with Interceed®, histopathology showed good tissue compatibility of all other devices. Conclusion: 4DryField® PH and Seprafilm® showed significant adhesion prevention capabilities. 4DryField® PH achieved the highest adhesion prevention effectiveness without restrictions concerning mode of application and compatibility and, thus, is a promising strategy to prevent abdominal adhesions. PMID:27429589

  1. Adhesions: What Are They and How Can They Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the office or may be done in the operating room. HSG and SHG are also useful screening tests for intrauterine adhesions. HSG is an x-ray procedure during which a dye that can be seen ... A special operating hysteroscope is used to cut the scar tissue. ...

  2. Preventing postoperative abdominal adhesions in a rat model with PEG-PCL-PEG hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bing; Gong, ChangYang; Zhao, Xia; Zhou, ShengTao; Li, ZhengYu; Qi, XiaoRong; Zhong, Qian; Luo, Feng; Qian, ZhiYong

    2012-01-01

    Background Poly (ethylene glycol)-poly (ɛ-caprolactone)-poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG, PECE) hydrogel has been demonstrated to be biocompatible and thermosensitive. In this study, its potential efficacy and mechanisms of preventing postsurgical abdominal adhesions were investigated. Results PECE hydrogel was transformed into gel state from sol state in less than 20 seconds at 37°C. None of the animals treated with the hydrogel (n = 15) developed adhesions. In contrast, all untreated animals (n = 15) had adhesions that could only be separated by sharp dissection (P < 0.001). The hydrogel adhered to the peritoneal wounds, gradually disappeared from the wounds within 7 days, and transformed into viscous fluid, being completely absorbed within 12 days. The parietal and visceral peritoneum were remesothelialized in about 5 and 9 days, respectively. The hydrogel prevented the formation of fibrinous adhesion and the invasion of fibroblasts. Also, along with the hydrogel degradation, a temporary inflammatory cell barrier was formed which could effectively delay the invasion of fibroblasts during the critical period of mesothelial regeneration. Conclusion The results suggested that PECE hydrogel could effectively prevent postsurgical intra-abdominal adhesions, which possibly result from the prevention of the fibrinous adhesion formation and the fibroblast invasion, the promotion of the remesothelialization, and the hydroflotation effect. PMID:22346350

  3. Evaluation of a new range of light-activated surgical adhesives for tissue repair in a porcine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Jill N.; Hodges, Diane E.; March, Keith L.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.

    2001-05-01

    An in vitro study was conducted to determine the feasibility of using a new range of light-activated surgical adhesives for incision repair in a wide range of tissue types. Biodegradable polymer membranes of controlled porosity were fabricated with poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and salt particles using a solvent-casting and particulate- leaching technique. The porous membranes were doped with protein solder composed of 50%(w/v) bovine serum albumin solder and 0.5 mg/ml indocyanine green (ICG) dye mixed in deionized water. Tissue incisions were repaired using the surgical adhesive in conjunction with an 805-nm diode laser. Nine organs were tested ranging from skin to liver to the small intestine, as well as the coronary, pulmonary, carotid, femoral and splenetic arteries. Acute breaking strengths were measured and the data were analyzed by Student's T-test. Repairs formed on the small intestine were most successful followed by spleen, atrium, kidney, muscle and skin. The strongest vascular repairs were achieved in the carotid artery and femoral artery. The new surgical adhesive could possibly be used as a simple and effective method to stop bleeding and repair tissue quickly in an emergency situation, or as a substitute to mechanical staples or sutures in many clinical applications.

  4. Computer aided detection of surgical retained foreign object for prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjiiski, Lubomir Marentis, Theodore C.; Rondon, Lucas; Chan, Heang-Ping; Chaudhury, Amrita R.; Chronis, Nikolaos

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Surgical retained foreign objects (RFOs) have significant morbidity and mortality. They are associated with approximately $1.5 × 10{sup 9} annually in preventable medical costs. The detection accuracy of radiographs for RFOs is a mediocre 59%. The authors address the RFO problem with two complementary technologies: a three-dimensional (3D) gossypiboma micro tag, the μTag that improves the visibility of RFOs on radiographs, and a computer aided detection (CAD) system that detects the μTag. It is desirable for the CAD system to operate in a high specificity mode in the operating room (OR) and function as a first reader for the surgeon. This allows for fast point of care results and seamless workflow integration. The CAD system can also operate in a high sensitivity mode as a second reader for the radiologist to ensure the highest possible detection accuracy. Methods: The 3D geometry of the μTag produces a similar two dimensional (2D) depiction on radiographs regardless of its orientation in the human body and ensures accurate detection by a radiologist and the CAD. The authors created a data set of 1800 cadaver images with the 3D μTag and other common man-made surgical objects positioned randomly. A total of 1061 cadaver images contained a single μTag and the remaining 739 were without μTag. A radiologist marked the location of the μTag using an in-house developed graphical user interface. The data set was partitioned into three independent subsets: a training set, a validation set, and a test set, consisting of 540, 560, and 700 images, respectively. A CAD system with modules that included preprocessing μTag enhancement, labeling, segmentation, feature analysis, classification, and detection was developed. The CAD system was developed using the training and the validation sets. Results: On the training set, the CAD achieved 81.5% sensitivity with 0.014 false positives (FPs) per image in a high specificity mode for the surgeons in the OR and 96

  5. PLGA nanofiber membranes loaded with epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate are beneficial to prevention of postsurgical adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yong Cheol; Yang, Won Jun; Lee, Jong Ho; Oh, Jin-Woo; Kim, Tai Wan; Park, Jong-Chul; Hyon, Suong-Hyu; Han, Dong-Wook

    2014-01-01

    This study concentrates on the development of biodegradable nanofiber membranes with controlled drug release to ensure reduced tissue adhesion and accelerated healing. Nanofibers of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) loaded with epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), the most bioactive polyphenolic compound in green tea, were electrospun. The physicochemical and biomechanical properties of EGCG-releasing PLGA (E-PLGA) nanofiber membranes were characterized by atomic force microscopy, EGCG release and degradation profiles, and tensile testing. In vitro antioxidant activity and hemocompatibility were evaluated by measuring scavenged reactive oxygen species levels and activated partial thromboplastin time, respectively. In vivo antiadhesion efficacy was examined on the rat peritonea with a surgical incision. The average fiber diameter of E-PLGA membranes was approximately 300–500 nm, which was almost similar to that of pure PLGA equivalents. E-PLGA membranes showed sustained EGCG release mediated by controlled diffusion and PLGA degradation over 28 days. EGCG did not adversely affect the tensile strength of PLGA membranes, whereas it significantly decreased the elastic modulus and increased the strain at break. E-PLGA membranes were significantly effective in both scavenging reactive oxygen species and extending activated partial thromboplastin time. Macroscopic observation after 1 week of surgical treatment revealed that the antiadhesion efficacy of E-PLGA nanofiber membranes was significantly superior to those of untreated controls and pure PLGA equivalents, which was comparable to that of a commercial tissue-adhesion barrier. In conclusion, the E-PLGA hybrid nanofiber can be exploited to craft strategies for the prevention of postsurgical adhesions. PMID:25187710

  6. Cross-linked hyaluronate hydrogel prevents adhesion formation and reformation in mouse uterine horn model.

    PubMed

    Sawada, T; Tsukada, K; Hasegawa, K; Ohashi, Y; Udagawa, Y; Gomel, V

    2001-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cross-linked hyaluronate hydrogel (HA gel) as an adjuvant for postoperative adhesion prevention, in a mouse uterine horn model. In experiment 1 uterine horns were abrased with iodine. HA gel was applied to the injured surface before closure in the treatment group. In experiment 2, after injuring the uterine horns, three stitches were placed at equal distances around the uterine horns to appose the injured medial surfaces of the two horns during healing. HA gel was inserted between the uterine horns in the treatment group. In experiment 3 prevention of adhesion reformation was assessed. After lysis of adhesions that were induced as in experiment 2, HA gel was introduced between the serosal surfaces of apposing uterine horns. Untreated animals served as controls in each experiment. Statistical analysis was carried out using Student's t-test. The adhesion score was significantly lower in the HA gel group on the 14th day compared with controls in all the experiments: in experiment 1, 0.3 +/- 0.4 versus 1.7 +/- 1.2; in experiment 2, 0.9 +/- 1.0 versus 2.6 +/- 0.5; and in experiment 3, 1.5 +/- 0.9 versus 2.2 +/- 0.6 respectively. Cross-linked HA gel significantly reduced de-novo adhesions (P< 0.03) and adhesion reformation (P < 0.03). PMID:11157833

  7. Administration of Intravenous Inf liximab for Prevention of Peritoneal Adhesions Formation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nikeghbalian, Saman; Vafaei, Homeira; Moradian, Farid; Kazemi, Kourosh; Tanideh, Nader; Shayan, Leila; Nikeghbalian, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effects of intravenous infliximab in preventing the formation of peritoneal adhesions in an animal model of rat. Methods: This was an experimental study being performed in animal laboratory of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences during 2012. Sixty albino rats were randomly assigned in to three groups by Random Design Method. The first group received single infliximab injection (n=20), the second one received double infliximab injection (n=20) and the third received nothing (n=20), after receiving intra-peritoneal injection of talc for induction of peritoneal adhesions. All the animals were sacrificed after 6 weeks and the peritoneal adhesions were evaluated according to Nair classification. Results: We observed that the mean adhesion grade was lower in those who received double dose of infliximib when compared to single dose and controls. However the difference did not reach a significant value (p=0.178). The grade of peritoneal adhesion was also comparable between the three study groups (p=0.103). The mean number of 1st WBC count was also comparable between three study groups (p=0.382). We observed that 2nd WBC count was also comparable between two study groups (p=0.317). Conclusion: Administration of intravenous infliximab after intraabdominal surgicalprocedures would not prevent the formation of peritoneal adhesions in animal model of albino rat. PMID:27162911

  8. Cost Evaluation of Surgical and Pharmaceutical Options in Treatment for Vitreomacular Adhesions and Macular Holes

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jonathan S.; Smiddy, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate cost-effectiveness and cost utilities for treatment options for vitreomacular adhesions (VMA) and full thickness macular holes (MH). Design A Markov model of cost-effectiveness and utility. Participants There were no participants. Methods Outcomes of published clinical trials (index studies) of surgical treatment of VMA and MH, and a prospective, multicenter clinical trial of pharmaceutical vitreolysis with intravitreal ocriplasmin with saline control were used to generate a model for costs of treatment and visual benefits. All techniques were assumed to result in a 2.5 line visual benefit if anatomy was resolved. Markov analysis, with cost data from the Center of Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), was used to calculate imputed costs for each primary treatment modality in a facility setting with surgery performed in a hospital serving as the highest end of the range and non-facility setting with surgery performed in an ambulatory surgery center (ASC) serving as the lowest end of the range. Main Outcome Measures Imputed costs of therapy, cost per line saved, cost per line-year saved, cost per quality-adjusted life years (QALY). Results When PPV was selected as the primary procedure, the overall imputed cost ranged from $5,802-$7,931. The cost per line was $2,368-$3,237, the cost per line-year saved was $163-$233 and the cost per QALY was $5,444-$7,442. If intravitreal injection of ocriplasmin (IVO) was the primary procedure, the overall imputed cost was $8,767-$10,977. The cost per line ranged from $3,549-$4,456, the cost per line-year saved was $245-$307, and the cost per QALY was between $8,159-$10,244. If intravitreal saline injection (IVS) were used as a primary procedure, the overall imputed cost was $5,828-8,098. The cost per line was $2,374-3,299, the cost per line-year saved was $164-227 and the cost per QALY was $5,458-7,583. Conclusions PPV as a primary procedure was the most cost-effective therapy in this model. The other

  9. Prevention of peritendinous adhesions with electrospun chitosan-grafted polycaprolactone nanofibrous membranes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Hsien; Chen, Chih-Hao; Fong, Yi Teng; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2014-12-01

    As one of the common complications after tendon injury and subsequent surgery, peritendinous adhesions could be minimized by directly placing a physical barrier between the injured site and the surrounding tissue. With the aim of solving the shortcomings of current biodegradable anti-adhesion barrier membranes, we propose the use of an electrospun chitosan-grafted polycaprolactone (PCL-g-CS) nanofibrous membrane (NFM) to prevent peritendinous adhesions. After introducing carboxyl groups on the surface by oxygen plasma treatment, the polycaprolactone (PCL) NFM was covalently grafted with chitosan (CS) molecules, with carbodiimide as the coupling agent. Compared with PCL NFM, PCL-g-CS NFM showed a similar fiber diameter, permeation coefficient for bovine serum albumin, ultimate tensile strain, reduced pore diameter, lower water contact angle, increased water sorption and tensile strength. With its submicrometer pore diameter (0.6-0.9μm), both NFMs could allow the diffusion of nutrients and waste while blocking fibroblast penetration to prevent adhesion formation after tendon surgery. Cell culture experiments verified that PCL-g-CS NFM can reduce fibroblast attachment while maintaining the biocompatibility of PCL NFM, implicating a synergistic anti-adhesion effect to raise the anti-adhesion efficacy. In vivo studies with a rabbit flexor digitorum profundus tendon surgery model confirmed that PCL-g-CS NFM effectively reduced peritendinous adhesion from gross observation, histology, joint flexion angle, gliding excursion and biomechanical evaluation. An injured tendon wrapped with PCL-g-CS NFM showed the same tensile strength as the naturally healed tendon, indicating that the anti-adhesion NFM will not compromise tendon healing. PMID:25192729

  10. Silicon prevents post laminectomy epidural root adhesions. An experimental study in rats.

    PubMed

    Hadani, M; Ram, Z; Horowitz, A; Shacked, I

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study was designed to test the efficacy of a silicon barrier around a nerve root in order to prevent post operative epidural root scar adhesions. In 32 Sprague-Dawley rats a lumbar nerve root was microsurgically exposed bilaterally. In 16 animals a silicon tube, prepared with a longitudinal cut along half of its wall, was placed around one nerve root, while the contralateral side served as control. In another group of 12 animals, an autologous subcutaneous fat graft was placed on the exposed root. A group of 4 animals served as the control group which had not been operated upon. No post operative neurological deficit was observed in any of the animals. All animals were sacrificed 60 days after the operation and a block of tissue including the nerve roots were resected bilaterally without removal of the silicon or fat graft. Longitudinal and transverse cuts of the roots were stained with Haematoxilin and Eosin and with Masson's trichrome collagen stain. The roots in the "unoperated" control group were clean of any scar tissue. In 13 out of 16 animals, silicon prevented scar formation around the root as opposed to scar adhesions around control root on the contralateral side and as compared to unoperated roots. In the silicon group, adhesions penetrated only through the longitudinal narrow cut edge of the tube. Fat did not prevent adhesions in 11 out of 12 animals. We conclude that a silicon barrier is an effective method preventing post operative epidural root scarring in rats. PMID:8237494

  11. Investigation of bioinspired gecko fibers to improve adhesion of HeartLander surgical robot.

    PubMed

    Tortora, Giuseppe; Glass, Paul; Wood, Nathan; Aksak, Burak; Menciassi, Arianna; Sitti, Metin; Riviere, Cameron

    2012-01-01

    HeartLander is a medical robot proposed for minimally invasive epicardial intervention on the beating heart. To date, all prototypes have used suction to gain traction on the epicardium. Gecko-foot-inspired micro-fibers have been proposed for repeatable adhesion to surfaces. In this paper, a method for improving the traction of HeartLander on biological tissue is presented. The method involves integration of gecko-inspired fibrillar adhesives on the inner surfaces of the suction chambers of HeartLander. Experiments have been carried out on muscle tissue ex vivo assessing the traction performance of the modified HeartLander with bio-inspired adhesive. The adhesive fibers are found to improve traction on muscle tissue by 57.3 %. PMID:23366040

  12. The prevention of adhesions after laminectomy. Adverse results of Zenoderm implantations into laminectomy sites in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Boot, D A; Hughes, S P

    1987-02-01

    Zenoderm (Ethicon Ltd., Edinburgh, Scotland) is porcine skin dermis specially treated so as to be weakly antigenic when implanted. Its use as an extradural spinal and nerve root membrane to reduce postoperative adhesions after laminectomy was tested in 22 rabbits with laminectomy in the second and fourth lumbar vertebra. The sites were reviewed histologically two to 36 weeks after operation. Histologic sections showed that Zenoderm was initially surrounded by hematoma that organized into fibrous tissue and, later, bone. When Zenoderm was placed immediately adjacent to the dura, dense adhesions formed, which were slower to resolve than those in the control sites. The rate of Zenoderm resorption was variable. In general, Zenoderm did not excite excessive fibrous tissue formation and was slowly replaced by bone. Contrary to the experience of others, it was unusual to find adhesions between the laminectomy site, and the dura began disappearing after six to nine weeks. In rabbits, Zenoderm is unlikely to prevent adhesions forming after lumbar disc surgery. The resorption rate is variable, and laminectomy sites are unsuitable for the investigation of material for the prevention of spinal dural adhesions. PMID:3542330

  13. Prevention of Polyglycolic Acid-Induced Peritoneal Adhesions Using Alginate in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Matoba, Mari; Hashimoto, Ayumi; Tanzawa, Ayumi; Orikasa, Taichi; Ikeda, Junki; Iwame, Yoshizumi; Ozamoto, Yuki; Miyamoto, Hiroe; Yoshida, Chiko; Hashimoto, Toru; Torii, Hiroko; Takamori, Hideki; Morita, Shinichiro; Tsujimoto, Hiroyuki; Hagiwara, Akeo

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative intra-abdominal or intrathoracic adhesions sometimes cause significant morbidity. We have designed three types of alginate-based treatments using strongly cross-linked (SL), weakly cross-linked (WL), and non-cross-linked (NL) alginate with calcium gluconate. In rat experiments, we compared the antiadhesive effects of the three types of alginate-based treatments, fibrin glue treatment (a standard treatment), and no treatment against adhesions caused by polyglycolic acid (PGA) mesh (PGA-induced adhesions). The antiadhesive materials were set on the PGA sheet fixed on the parietal peritoneum of the abdomen. Fifty-six days later, the adhesions were evaluated macroscopically by the adhesion scores and microscopically by hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunostaining. We also tested the fibroblast growth on the surface of the antiadhesive materials in vitro. The antiadhesive effects of WL and NL were superior to the no treatment and fibrin glue treatment. A microscopic evaluation confirmed that the PGA sheet was covered by a peritoneal layer constructed of well-differentiated mesothelial cells, and the inflammation was most improved in the NL and WL. The fibroblast growth was inhibited most on the surfaces of the NL and WL. These results suggest that either the WL or NL treatments are suitable for preventing PGA-induced adhesions compared to SL or the conventional treatment. PMID:26078949

  14. Surgical prevention of femoral neck fractures in elderly osteoporotic patients. A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chiarello, Eugenio; Tedesco, Giuseppe; Cadossi, Matteo; Capra, Paola; Terrando, Silvio; Miti, Andrea; Giannini, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Fragility fractures of the femur are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The incidence of new contralateral hip fractures in elderly osteoporotic patients ranges from 7 to 12% within 2 years after the first fracture. Secondary prevention can be divided in: pharmacological therapy based on the prescription of anti-osteoporotic drugs with different mechanism of action and non-pharmacological therapy which is based on modification of environmental risk factors, on a healthy diet with daily supplements of calcium and vitamin D and calcium and on the use of hip protectors. Recently a new form of prevention is becoming achievable: surgical prevention; the rationale of surgical reinforcement is the need to increase the resistance of the femoral neck to the compression and distraction forces acting on it. In this paper we analyse all the experimental and “on the market” device available for the surgical prevention of femoral neck fracture. PMID:27252744

  15. A surgical procedure to prevent tracheo-innominate artery erosion.

    PubMed

    Dellon, A L; Wells, J H; Cowley, R A

    1978-07-01

    The innominate artery of a patient requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation was palpated in the inferior portion of his tracheostomy wound. Life-threatening hemorrhage was prevented by rotation of a local muscle flap the protect the artery and rotation of pedicled skin flaps to create a permanent tracheostomy. PMID:353296

  16. Poly(ethylene oxide) functionalized polyimide-based microporous films to prevent bacterial adhesion.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gómez, Aránzazu; Alvarez, Cristina; de Abajo, Javier; del Campo, Adolfo; Cortajarena, Aitziber L; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Juan

    2015-05-13

    Preventing microbial adhesion onto membranes is a crucial issue that determines the durability of the membrane. In this Research Article, we prepared aromatic polyimides (extensively employed for the elaboration of ultrafiltration membranes) containing PEO branches. Four polyimide-g-PEO copolymers were prepared from 6F dianhydride and a novel aromatic diamine containing PEO-550 side groups. The copolymers were designed to have variable PEO content, and were characterized by their spectroscopic and physical properties. The Breath Figure technique was successfully applied to create an ordered surface topography, where the PEO chains were preferentially located on the surface of the micrometer size holes. These unique features were explored to reduce bacterial adhesion. It was established that surface modified polyimide membranes have a high resistance to biofouling against Staphylococcus aureus. In particular, we observed that an increase of the PEO the content in the copolymer produced a decrease in the bacterial adhesion. PMID:25909661

  17. Development of a multifunctional adhesive system for prevention of root caries and secondary caries

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Melo, Mary A. S.; Chen, Chen; Liu, Jason; Weir, Michael D.; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a novel adhesive for prevention of tooth root caries and secondary caries by possessing a combination of protein-repellent, antibacterial, and remineralization capabilities for the first time; and (2) investigate the effects of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM), and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) on dentine bond strength, protein-repellent properties, and dental plaque microcosm biofilm response. Methods MPC, DMAHDM and NACP were added into Scotchbond Multi-Purpose primer and adhesive. Dentine shear bond strengths were measured. Adhesive coating thickness, surface texture and dentine-adhesive interfacial structure were examined. Protein adsorption onto adhesive resin surface was determined by the micro bicinchoninic acid method. A human saliva microcosm biofilm model was used to investigate biofilm metabolic activity, colony-forming unit (CFU) counts, and lactic acid production. Results The resin with 7.5% MPC + 5% DMAHDM + 30% NACP did not adversely affect dentine shear bond strength (p > 0.1). The resin with 7.5% MPC + 5% DMAHDM + 30% NACP produced a coating on root dentine with a thickness of approximately 70 μm and completely sealed all the dentinal tubules. The resin with 7.5% MPC + 5% DMAHDM + 30% NACP had 95% reduction in protein adsorption, compared to SBMP control (p < 0.05). The resin with 7.5% MPC + 5% DMAHDM + 30% NACP was strongly antibacterial, with biofilm CFU being four orders of magnitude lower than that of SBMP control. Significance The novel multifunctional adhesive with strong protein-repellent, antibacterial and remineralization properties is promising to coat tooth roots to prevent root caries and secondary caries. The combined use of MPC, DMAHDM and NACP may have wide applicability to bonding agents, cements, sealants and composites to inhibit caries. PMID:26187532

  18. Preventable Adverse Events in Surgical Care in Sweden: A Nationwide Review of Patient Notes.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Lena; Risberg, Madeleine Borgstedt; Montgomery, Agneta; Sjödahl, Rune; Schildmeijer, Kristina; Rutberg, Hans

    2016-03-01

    Adverse events (AEs) occur in health care and may result in harm to patients especially in the field of surgery. Our objective was to analyze AEs in surgical patient care from a nationwide perspective and to analyze the frequency of AEs that may be preventable.In total 19,141 randomly selected admissions in 63 Swedish hospitals were reviewed each month during 2013 using a 2-stage record review method based on the identification of predefined triggers. The subgroup of 3301 surgical admissions was analyzed. All AEs were categorized according to site, type, level of severity, and degree of preventability.We reviewed 3301 patients' records and 507 (15.4%) were associated with AEs. A total of 62.5% of the AEs were considered probably preventable, over half contributed to prolonged hospital care or readmission, and 4.7% to permanent harm or death. Healthcare acquired infections composed of more than one third of AEs. The majority of the most serious AEs composed of healthcare acquired infections and surgical or other invasive AEs. The incidence of AEs was 13% in patients 18 to 64 years old and 17% in ≥65 years. Pressure sores and drug-related AEs were more common in patients being ≥65 years. Urinary retention and pressure sores showed the highest degree of preventability. Patients with probably preventable AEs had in median 7.1 days longer hospital stay.We conclude that AEs are common in surgical care and the majority are probably preventable. PMID:26986126

  19. Preventive effect of dexamethasone gelatin sponge on the lumbosacral epidural adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fuming; Dou, Changwu; Qi, Songtao; Zhao, Liqun; Chen, Bo; Yan, Haicheng; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to explore the preventive effect of dexamethasone gelatin sponge on the lumbosacral epidural adhesion in the laminectomy. Methods: A total of 36 Wista rats were divided into A, B, C and D groups randomly. Dexamethasone was not used in group A, Dexamethasone was used in group B, Dexamethasone was not used in group C but covered with gelatin sponge, dexamethasone gelatin sponge was used in group D. 3 rats in each group were sacrificed at 4, 8 and 12 weeks after operation respectively and the wound was opened to observe the dural scar formation and the dura adhesion. Immunohistochemical technique was used for histology observation. The expressions of VEGF and VEGFR2 in the epidural scar and surrounding tissues were detected with western blotting and immunohistochemical methods. Results: According to the Rydell score standard, there were different degree of adhesion formation in A, B and C groups while there was no obvious adhesion formation in D group. It was confirmed that the expressions of VEGF and VEGFR2 in group D were lower than that of the other groups. Conclusions: Dexamethasone gelatin sponge could significantly reduce the occurrence of epidural scar tissue hyperplasia and adhesion after laminectomy in rats, and its mechanism may be related to the decreased expression of VEGF and VEGFR2. PMID:26131126

  20. The optimal concentration of topical hydroxycamptothecin in preventing intraarticular scar adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yuan; Sun, Yu; Li, Xiaolei; Yan, Lianqi; Wang, Jingcheng; Hu, Jinlong; Yu, Huan; Xiao, Haixiang; Chen, Hui; Sun, Zhongwei; Cai, Jun; Feng, Xinmin; Xiong, Chuanzhi; He, Jinshan

    2014-01-01

    10-Hydroxycamptothecin could reduce intraarticular adhesion by inhibiting fibroblasts proliferation after knee surgery. However, the ideal concentration of hydroxycamptothecin have not been defined. This study was tried to verify the optimal concentration of 10-hydroxycamptothecin in preventing knee intraarticular adhesion. Sixty rabbits were randomly divided into five groups. Approximately 10 mm × 10 mm of the cortical bone was removed from both sides of the femoral condyle and the underneath cancellous bone was exposed. Various concentrations of hydroxycamptothecin (0.1 mg/ml, 0.5 mg/ml, 1.0 mg/ml, 2.0 mg/ml) or saline were applied to the decorticated areas for 10 minutes. After four weeks, the degree of inraarticular adhesion was assessed by macroscopic evaluation, biochemical analysis of hydroxyproline content and histological evaluation. The results demonstrated that the extent of knee inraarticular adhesion in 1.0 mg/ml group and 2.0 mg/ml hydroxycamptothecin group were significantly lower than those of 0.5 mg/ml group, 0.1 mg/ml hydroxycamptothecin group and control group. Moreover, there was no significant difference between 1.0 mg/ml group and 2.0 mg/ml hydroxycamptothecin group. In conclusion, topical application of 1.0 mg/ml hydroxycamptothecin may be the optimal concentration in reducing intraarticular adhesion after knee surgery in rabbits. PMID:24714729

  1. Blocking the Adhesion Cascade at the Premetastatic Niche for Prevention of Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Shin-Ae; Hasan, Nafis; Mann, Aman P; Zheng, Wei; Zhao, Lichao; Morris, Lynsie; Zhu, Weizhu; Zhao, Yan D; Suh, K Stephen; Dooley, William C; Volk, David; Gorenstein, David G; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Rui, Hallgeir; Tanaka, Takemi

    2015-01-01

    Shear-resistant adhesion and extravasation of disseminated cancer cells at the target organ is a crucial step in hematogenous metastasis. We found that the vascular adhesion molecule E-selectin preferentially promoted the shear-resistant adhesion and transendothelial migration of the estrogen receptor (ER)–/CD44+ hormone-independent breast cancer cells, but not of the ER+/CD44-/low hormone-dependent breast cancer cells. Coincidentally, CD44+ breast cancer cells were abundant in metastatic lung and brain lesions in ER– breast cancer, suggesting that E-selectin supports hematogenous metastasis of ER–/CD44+ breast cancer. In an attempt to prevent hematogenous metastasis through the inhibition of a shear-resistant adhesion of CD44+ cancer cells to E-selectin-expressing blood vessels on the premetastatic niche, an E-selectin targeted aptamer (ESTA) was developed. We demonstrated that a single intravenous injection of ESTA reduced metastases to a baseline level in both syngeneic and xenogeneic forced breast cancer metastasis models without relocating the site of metastasis. The effect of ESTA was absent in E-selectin knockout mice, suggesting that E-selectin is a molecular target of ESTA. Our data highlight the potential application of an E-selectin antagonist for the prevention of hematogenous metastasis of ER–/CD44+ breast cancer. PMID:25815697

  2. Effect of Temperature-Sensitive Poloxamer Solution/Gel Material on Pericardial Adhesion Prevention: Supine Rabbit Model Study Mimicking Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyun; Chung, Yoon Sang; Kim, Sang Wook; Choi, Geun Joo; Kim, Beom Gyu; Park, Suk Won; Seok, Ju Won; Hong, Joonhwa

    2015-01-01

    Objective We investigated the mobility of a temperature-sensitive poloxamer/Alginate/CaCl2 mixture (PACM) in relation to gravity and cardiac motion and the efficacy of PACM on the prevention of pericardial adhesion in a supine rabbit model. Methods A total of 50 rabbits were randomly divided into two groups according to materials applied after epicardial abrasion: PACM and dye mixture (group PD; n = 25) and saline as the control group (group CO; n = 25). In group PD, rabbits were maintained in a supine position with appropriate sedation, and location of mixture of PACM and dye was assessed by CT scan at the immediate postoperative period and 12 hours after surgery. The grade of adhesions was evaluated macroscopically and microscopically two weeks after surgery. Results In group PD, enhancement was localized in the anterior pericardial space, where PACM and dye mixture was applied, on immediate post-surgical CT scans. However, the volume of the enhancement was significantly decreased at the anterior pericardial space 12 hours later (P < .001). Two weeks after surgery, group PD had significantly lower macroscopic adhesion score (P = .002) and fibrosis score (P = .018) than did group CO. Inflammation score and expression of anti-macrophage antibody in group PD were lower than those in group CO, although the differences were not significant. Conclusions In a supine rabbit model study, the anti-adhesion effect was maintained at the area of PACM application, although PACM shifted with gravity and heart motion. For more potent pericardial adhesion prevention, further research and development on the maintenance of anti-adhesion material position are required. PMID:26580394

  3. New and Simple Approach for Preventing Postoperative Peritoneal Adhesions: Do not Touch the Peritoneum without Viscous Liquid—A Multivariate Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Aysan, Erhan; Bektas, Hasan; Ersoz, Feyzullah; Sari, Serkan; Kaygusuz, Arslan; Huq, Gulben Erdem

    2012-01-01

    Background. Postoperative peritoneal adhesions (PPAs) are an unsolved and serious problem in abdominal surgery. Method. Viscous liquids of soybean oil, octyl methoxycinnamate, flax oil, aloe vera gel, and glycerol were used in five experiments, using the same methodology for each. Liquids were applied in the peritoneal cavity before and after mechanical peritoneal trauma. Results were evaluated by multivariate analysis. Results. Compared with the control group, macroscopic and microscopic adhesion values before (P < .001) and after (P < .05) application of viscous liquids significantly reduced PPAs. Values were significantly lower when liquids were applied before rather than after peritoneal trauma (P < .0001). Discussion. Viscous liquids injected into the peritoneal cavity before or after mechanical peritoneal trauma decrease PPA. Injection before trauma was more effective than after trauma. In surgical practice, PPA formation may be prevented or decreased by covering the peritoneal cavity with an appropriate viscous liquid before abdominal surgery. PMID:22363347

  4. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abdominal Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91– ... are abdominal adhesions and intestinal obstructions ... generally do not require treatment. Surgery is the only way to treat abdominal ...

  5. Scar prevention and remodeling: a review of the medical, surgical, topical and light treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Kerwin, Leonard Y; El Tal, Abdel Kader; Stiff, Mark A; Fakhouri, Tarek M

    2014-08-01

    Cosmetic, functional, and structural sequelae of scarring are innumerable, and measures exist to optimize and ultimately minimize these sequelae. To evaluate the innumerable methods available to decrease the cosmetic, functional, and structural repercussions of scarring, pubMed search of the English literature with key words scar, scar revision, scar prevention, scar treatment, scar remodeling, cicatrix, cicatrix treatment, and cicatrix remodeling was done. Original articles and reviews were examined and included. Seventy-nine manuscripts were reviewed. Techniques, comparisons, and results were reviewed and tabulated. Overall, though topical modalities are easier to use and are usually more attractive to the patient, the surgical approaches still prove to be superior and more reliable. However, advances in topical medications for scar modification are on the rise and a change towards medical treatment of scars may emerge as the next best approach. Comparison studies of the innumerable specific modalities for scar revision and prevention are impossible. Standardization of techniques is lacking. Scarring, the body's natural response to a wound, can create many adverse effects. At this point, the practice of sound, surgical fundamentals still trump the most advanced preventative methods and revision techniques. Advances in medical approaches are available, however, to assist the scarring process, which even the most advanced surgical fundamentals will ultimately lead to. Whether through newer topical therapies, light treatment, or classical surgical intervention, our treatment armamentarium of scars has expanded and will allow us to maximize scar prevention and to minimize scar morbidity. PMID:24697346

  6. Multi-layer electrospun membrane mimicking tendon sheath for prevention of tendon adhesions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shichao; Yan, Hede; Fan, Dapeng; Song, Jialin; Fan, Cunyi

    2015-01-01

    Defect of the tendon sheath after tendon injury is a main reason for tendon adhesions, but it is a daunting challenge for the biomimetic substitute of the tendon sheath after injury due to its multi-layer membrane-like structure and complex biologic functions. In this study, a multi-layer membrane with celecoxib-loaded poly(l-lactic acid)-polyethylene glycol (PELA) electrospun fibrous membrane as the outer layer, hyaluronic acid (HA) gel as middle layer, and PELA electrospun fibrous membrane as the inner layer was designed. The anti-adhesion efficacy of this multi-layer membrane was compared with a single-layer use in rabbit flexor digitorum profundus tendon model. The surface morphology showed that both PELA fibers and celecoxib-loaded PELA fibers in multi-layer membrane were uniform in size, randomly arrayed, very porous, and smooth without beads. Multi-layer membrane group had fewer peritendinous adhesions and better gliding than the PELA membrane group and control group in gross and histological observation. The similar mechanical characteristic and collagen expression of tendon repair site in the three groups indicated that the multi-layer membrane did not impair tendon healing. Taken together, our results demonstrated that such a biomimetic multi-layer sheath could be used as a potential strategy in clinics for promoting tendon gliding and preventing adhesion without poor tendon healing. PMID:25822877

  7. Prevention of postcardiopulmonary bypass pericardial adhesions by a new resorbable collagen membrane

    PubMed Central

    Bel, Alain; Ricci, Massimo; Piquet, Julie; Bruneval, Patrick; Perier, Marie-Cécile; Gagnieu, Christian; Fabiani, Jean-Noël; Menasché, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Reduction in mediastinal adhesions is an issue in cardiac surgery. To evaluate a porcine-bioengineered collagen membrane (Cova™ CARD) intended to promote tissue regeneration, 18 sheep underwent a sternotomy and a 30 min period of cardiopulmonary bypass. They were divided into three equal groups: pericardium left open, placement of an e-polytetrafluoroethylene membrane (Preclude®) taken as a non-absorbable substitute comparator and placement of the absorbable Cova™ CARD membrane. Four months thereafter, the study animals underwent repeat sternotomy and were macroscopically assessed for the degree of material resorption and the intensity of adhesions. Explanted hearts were evaluated blindly for the magnitude of the inflammatory response, fibrosis and epicardial re-mesothelialization. The bioengineered membrane was absorbed by 4 months and replaced by a loosely adherent tissue leading to the best adhesion score. There was no inflammatory reaction (except for a minimal one in an animal). Fibrosis was minimal (P = 0.041 vs Preclude®). The highest degree of epicardial re-mesothelialization, albeit limited, was achieved by the bioengineered group in which five of six sheep demonstrated a new lining of mesothelial cells in contrast to two animals in each of the other groups. This collagen membrane might thus represent an attractive pericardial substitute for preventing post-operative adhesions. PMID:22268067

  8. Acquired Muscle Weakness in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit: Nosology, Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Farhan, Hassan; Moreno-Duarte, Ingrid; Latronico, Nicola; Zafonte, Ross; Eikermann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Muscle weakness is common in the surgical intensive care unit (ICU). Low muscle mass at ICU admission is a significant predictor of adverse outcomes. The consequences of ICU-acquired muscle weakness depend on the underlying mechanism. Temporary drug-induced weakness when properly managed may not affect outcome. Severe perioperative acquired weakness that is associated with adverse outcomes (prolonged mechanical ventilation, increases in ICU length of stay, and mortality) occurs with persistent (time frame: days) activation of protein degradation pathways, decreases in the drive to the skeletal muscle, and impaired muscular homeostasis. ICU-acquired muscle weakness can be prevented by early treatment of the underlying disease, goal-directed therapy, restrictive use of immobilizing medications, optimal nutrition, activating ventilatory modes, early rehabilitation, and preventive drug therapy. In this article, the authors review the nosology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and prevention of ICU-acquired weakness in surgical ICU patients. PMID:26445385

  9. Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Update

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deverick J.; Podgorny, Kelly; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I.; Bratzler, Dale W.; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Greene, Linda; Nyquist, Ann-Christine; Saiman, Lisa; Yokoe, Deborah S.; Maragakis, Lisa L.; Kaye, Keith S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Previously published guidelines are available that provide comprehensive recommendations for detecting and preventing healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The intent of this document is to highlight practical recommendations in a concise format designed to assist acute care hospitals in implementing and prioritizing their surgical site infection (SSI) prevention efforts. This document updates “Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals,”1 published in 2008. This expert guidance document is sponsored by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and is the product of a collaborative effort led by SHEA, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise. The list of endorsing and supporting organizations is presented in the introduction to the 2014 updates.2 PMID:24799638

  10. Use of mupirocin-chlorhexidine treatment to prevent Staphylococcus aureus surgical-site infections.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, X; Slekovec, C; Talon, D

    2010-05-01

    Evaluation of: Bode LGM, Kluytmans JAJW, Wertheim HFL et al.: Preventing surgical-site infections in nasal carriers of Staphylococcus aureus. N. Engl. J. Med. 362, 9-17 (2010). Staphylococcus aureus is the main pathogen responsible for surgical-site infections and nasal carriage is a major risk factor for subsequent infection with this bacteria. Mupirocin is considered to be the topical antibacterial agent of choice for eradication of nasal S. aureus. The paper by Bode et al. provides strong evidence that the combination of a rapid identification of a S. aureus nasal carrier, mupirocin nasal ointment and chlorhexidine gluconate soap, significantly reduces the rate of S. aureus surgical-site infection by nearly 60%. In conclusion, mupirocin nasal ointment use in S. aureus carriers before surgery has numerous advantages with few side effects. PMID:20441543

  11. Preventive effects of various types of footwear and cleaning methods on dermatophyte adhesion.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kumi; Katoh, Takuro; Irimajiri, Junya; Taniguchi, Hiroko; Yokozeki, Hiroo

    2006-08-01

    Tinea pedis is contagious and typically spreads from infected to non-infected persons. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of footwear in preventing tinea pedis adhesion. Using the stamp culture method, we investigated the effectiveness of preventing dermatophyte passage by the wearing of stockings made of nylon, socks made of cotton and tabi (Japanese socks), as well as the effect of removing dermatophytes from these items by washing with soap, cold water and cold water after turning inside-out. For sandals, sneakers and boots, we also investigated the effect of dermatophyte removal by pouring cold water into the footwear, wiping with a wet towel, and pouring boiling water into the footwear. The wearing of socks or tabi was effective in preventing passage of dermatophytes. The stocking material proved to be too thin to prevent passage. On the inner side of socks (the side of the sole), all treatments were effective at removing dermatophytes, but on the outer side of socks (the side touching the surface of the sandals), the treatment of washing in cold water after turning inside-out resulted in significantly more dermatophytes as compared with the other treatments. Pouring cold water, wiping with a wet towel and pouring boiling water were all effective for removing dermatophytes from sandals and sneakers. However, for boots, the treatment of pouring cold water was less effective. To prevent the adhesion of dermatophytes to sandals, wearing socks or tabi was effective, and the treatments of washing socks in cold water after turning inside-out and of pouring cold water into the boots were less effective than the others. PMID:16923133

  12. [Implementation and evaluation of error prevention measures in surgical clinics: Results of a current online survey].

    PubMed

    Rothmund, Matthias; Kohlmann, Thomas; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter; Siebert, Hartmut; Ansorg, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    In the autumn of 2014, more than 3,000 surgeons completed an online questionnaire asking for the prevalence and efficiency of instruments to prevent adverse events within surgical departments in Germany. About 90 % of the respondents stated that perioperative checklists, preoperative marking of the surgical site and the documentation of hospital infections had been implemented in their institution; and 75 % of the institutions had introduced critical incident reporting systems (CIRS), morbidity and mortality conferences and identification bracelets for patients. The surgeons were asked to rank the different instruments for the prevention of adverse events. According to the respondents, preoperative marking of the surgical site and the use of checklists were at the top of the efficacy ranking, followed by an introductory course for surgeons starting work in a hospital or when new devices became available. Only 50 % of the responding surgeons perceived CIRS as being efficient. Overall, the answers showed that instruments to increase patient safety were commonly available in surgical departments. On the other hand, there is still room for improvement in daily practice. PMID:26354140

  13. Surface immobilization of kanamycin-chitosan nanoparticles on polyurethane ureteral stents to prevent bacterial adhesion.

    PubMed

    Venkat Kumar, Govindarajan; Su, Chia-Hung; Velusamy, Palaniyandi

    2016-09-13

    Bacterial adhesion is a major problem that can lead to the infection of implanted urological stents. In this study, kanamycin-chitosan nanoparticles (KMCSNPs) were immobilized on the surface of a polyurethane ureteral stent (PUS) to prevent urinary bacterial infection. KMCSNPs were synthesized using the ionic gelation method. The synthesized KMCSNPs appeared spherical with a ζ-average particle size of 225 nm. KMCSNPs were immobilized on the PUS surface by covalent immobilization techniques. The surface-modified PUS was characterized using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The surface-modified PUS showed significantly increased antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli MTCC 729 and Proteus mirabilis MTCC 425 relative to the surface of an unmodified PUS. These findings suggest that the KMCSNP-immobilized PUS has the potential to prevent bacterial infection in the human urinary tract. PMID:27436679

  14. Endomucin prevents leukocyte–endothelial cell adhesion and has a critical role under resting and inflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zahr, Alisar; Alcaide, Pilar; Yang, Jinling; Jones, Alexander; Gregory, Meredith; dela Paz, Nathaniel G.; Patel-Hett, Sunita; Nevers, Tania; Koirala, Adarsha; Luscinskas, Francis W.; Saint-Geniez, Magali; Ksander, Bruce; D'Amore, Patricia A.; Argüeso, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Endomucin is a membrane-bound glycoprotein expressed luminally by endothelial cells that line postcapillary venules, a primary site of leukocyte recruitment during inflammation. Here we show that endomucin abrogation on quiescent endothelial cells enables neutrophils to adhere firmly, via LFA-1-mediated binding to ICAM-1 constitutively expressed by endothelial cells. Moreover, TNF-α stimulation downregulates cell surface expression of endomucin concurrent with increased expression of adhesion molecules. Adenovirus-mediated expression of endomucin under inflammatory conditions prevents neutrophil adhesion in vitro and reduces the infiltration of CD45+ and NIMP-R14+ cells in vivo. These results indicate that endomucin prevents leukocyte contact with adhesion molecules in non-inflamed tissues and that downregulation of endomucin is critical to facilitate adhesion of leukocytes into inflamed tissues. PMID:26831939

  15. Endomucin prevents leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion and has a critical role under resting and inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    Zahr, Alisar; Alcaide, Pilar; Yang, Jinling; Jones, Alexander; Gregory, Meredith; dela Paz, Nathaniel G; Patel-Hett, Sunita; Nevers, Tania; Koirala, Adarsha; Luscinskas, Francis W; Saint-Geniez, Magali; Ksander, Bruce; D'Amore, Patricia A; Argüeso, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Endomucin is a membrane-bound glycoprotein expressed luminally by endothelial cells that line postcapillary venules, a primary site of leukocyte recruitment during inflammation. Here we show that endomucin abrogation on quiescent endothelial cells enables neutrophils to adhere firmly, via LFA-1-mediated binding to ICAM-1 constitutively expressed by endothelial cells. Moreover, TNF-α stimulation downregulates cell surface expression of endomucin concurrent with increased expression of adhesion molecules. Adenovirus-mediated expression of endomucin under inflammatory conditions prevents neutrophil adhesion in vitro and reduces the infiltration of CD45(+) and NIMP-R14(+) cells in vivo. These results indicate that endomucin prevents leukocyte contact with adhesion molecules in non-inflamed tissues and that downregulation of endomucin is critical to facilitate adhesion of leukocytes into inflamed tissues. PMID:26831939

  16. Effects of Intraperitoneal Administration of Simvastatin in Prevention of Postoperative Intra-abdominal Adhesion Formation in Animal Model of Rat

    PubMed Central

    Javaherzadeh, Mojtaba; Shekarchizadeh, Ali; Kafaei, Marjan; Mirafshrieh, Abass; Mosaffa, Nariman; Sabet, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the preventive effects of local administration of simvastatin for postoperative intra-abdominal adhesion formation in animal model of rat.  Methods: In this experimental study, 32 Wistar albino rats as the animal model of intra-abdominal adhesion formation were included. Adhesions were induced in all the animals via abrasion of the peritoneal and intestinal surface during laparotomy. Afterwards, the rats were randomly assigned to receive simvastatin (30 mg/kg body weight) as a single intraperitoneal dose at the time of laparotomy (n=16) or normal saline in same volume at the same time (n=16). At the day 21, animals were euthanized and the adhesions were quantified clinically (via repeated laparotomy) and pathologically and compared between the two groups. Results: The baseline characteristics of the animals were comparable between two study groups. Clinically, in simvastatin group, 10 rats (62.5%) did not develop any adhesion and 6 (37.5%) had first-grade adhesion; whereas in the control group, 11 (68.8%) rats had first- and 5 (31.2%) had second-grade adhesions (p<0.001). Pathologically, in simvastatin group, 6 rats (37.5%) had first-grade adhesion, while in control group, 11 rats (68.8%) had first- and 5 (31.2%) had second-grade adhesions (p<0.001). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that intraperitoneal administration of simvastatin is an effective method for prevention of postoperative intra-abdominal adhesion formation in animal model of rat.   PMID:27540550

  17. Vitamin C Prevents Cigarette Smoke-Induced Leukocyte Aggregation and Adhesion to Endothelium in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehr, Hans-Anton; Frei, Balz; Arfors, Karl-E.

    1994-08-01

    A common feature of cigarette-smoke (CS)-associated diseases such as atherosclerosis and pulmonary emphysema is the activation, aggregation, and adhesion of leukocytes to micro- and macrovascular endothelium. A previous study, using a skinfold chamber model for intravital fluorescence microscopy in awake hamsters, has shown that exposure of hamsters to the smoke generated by one research cigarette elicits the adhesion of fluorescently labeled leukocytes to the endothelium of arterioles and small venules. By the combined use of intravital microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, we now demonstrate in the same animal model that (i) CS-induced leukocyte adhesion is not confined to the microcirculation, but that leukocytes also adhere singly and in clusters to the aortic endothelium; (ii) CS induces the formation in the bloodstream of aggregates between leukocytes and platelets; and (iii) CS-induced leukocyte adhesion to micro- and macrovascular endothelium and leukocyte-platelet aggregate formation are almost entirely prevented by dietary or intravenous pretreatment with the water-soluble antioxidant vitamin C (venules, 21.4 ± 11.0 vs. 149.6 ± 38.7 leukocytes per mm^2, P < 0.01; arterioles, 8.5 ± 4.2 vs. 54.3 ± 21.6 leukocytes per mm^2, P < 0.01; aortas, 0.8 ± 0.4 vs. 12.4 ± 5.6 leukocytes per mm^2, P < 0.01; means ± SD of n = 7 animals, 15 min after CS exposure). No inhibitory effect was observed by pretreatment of the animals with the lipid-soluble antioxidants vitamin E or probucol. The protective effects of vitamin C on CS-induced leukocyte adhesion and aggregation were seen at vitamin C plasma levels (55.6 ± 22.2 μM, n = 7) that can easily be reached in humans by dietary means or supplementation, suggesting that vitamin C effectively contributes to protection from CS-associated cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases in humans.

  18. Hydroxycamptothecin induces apoptosis of fibroblasts and prevents intraarticular scar adhesion in rabbits by activating the IRE-1 signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolei; Sun, Yu; Chen, Hui; Zhu, Gengyao; Liang, Yuan; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Jingcheng; Yan, Lianqi

    2016-06-15

    Hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) has been proven to prevent intraarticular scar adhesion, but the mechanism is still unclear. ER stress is known to participate in many diseases, and the IRE-1 signal pathway has been reported in fibrotic diseases. The aim of this study was to illustrate the mechanism of HCPT-induced apoptosis in fibroblasts and the prevention of intraarticular scar adhesion. The effects of HCPT on fibroblasts were determined by CCK-8 assay, Hoechst staining and Western blot. The effect of HCPT on intraarticular scar adhesion was detected by macroscopic evaluation, hydroxyproline content, histological evaluation, fibroblast counting and immunohistochemical analysis. HCPT induced apoptosis of fibroblasts, according to CCK-8 assays, Hoechst staining and Western blot analysis. As the concentration of HCPT increased, the expressions of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), inositol-requiring kinase1 (IRE-1), C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and Bax were all increased, but the expression of Bcl-2 was decreased. Knockdown of IRE-1 alleviated the HCPT-induced apoptosis in our fibroblast model. HCPT could prevent intraarticular scar adhesion, according to the results of macroscopic evaluation, hydroxyproline content, histological evaluation and fibroblast counting in a rabbit model. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that IRE-1 expression increased as the concentration increased. The present study showed that the IRE-1 signal pathway might be involved in HCPT-induced apoptosis of fibroblast and might play a role in preventing intraarticular scar adhesion. PMID:27068147

  19. Meloxicam prevents COX-2 mediated post-surgical inflammation but not pain following laparotomy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Roughan, John V.; Bertrand, Henri G.M.J.; Isles, Hannah M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation is thought to be a major contributor to post-surgical pain so nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used analgesics. However, compared to rats, considerably less is known as to how successfully these prevent pain in mice. Methods A fluorescent COX-2 selective probe was used for the first time to evaluate the post-surgical anti-inflammatory effects of meloxicam, and automated behaviour analyses (HomeCageScan; HCS), the Mouse Grimace Scale (MGS) and body weight changes to assess its pain preventative properties. Groups of 8-9 BALB/c mice were subcutaneously injected with saline (0.3mls) or meloxicam at (1, 5 or 20mg/kg) 1 hour before a 1.5cm midline laparotomy. The probe or a control dye (2mg/kg) was injected intravenously 3 hours later. Imaging was used to quantify inflammation at 7, 24 and 48 hours following surgery. HCS data and MGS scores were obtained from video recordings and photographs before and at 24 hours. Results Post-surgical inflammation was dose dependently reduced by meloxicam; with 5 or 20mg/kg being most effective compared to saline. However, all mice lost weight, MGS scores increased and behavioural activity was reduced by surgery for at least 24 hours with no perceivable beneficial effect of meloxicam on any of these potentially pain-associated changes. Conclusions Although meloxicam prevented inflammation, even large doses did not prevent post-laparotomy pain possibly arising due a range of factors, including, but not limited to inflammation. MGS scoring can be applied by very naïve assessors and so should be effective for cage-side use. PMID:25908253

  20. Preventing Oxide Adhesion of Liquid Metal Alloys to Enable Actuation in Microfluidic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshipura, Ishan; Johnson, Alexander; Ayers, Hudson; Dickey, Michael

    This work explores the wetting behavior of an oxide-coated liquid metal, eutectic alloy of gallium and indium (`EGaIn'), which remains a liquid at room temperature. Liquid metals uniquely combine fluidity with metallic properties. Combined, these properties enable soft, stretchable, and shape reconfigurable electronics with `softer than skin' interfaces. Ga forms spontaneously a thin surface oxide that alters its wetting behavior and makes it difficult to move across surfaces without leaving residue behind. We examine the effects of surface roughness (i.e., Cassie-Baxter state) and lubrication to minimize adhesion of Ga oxide to surfaces. Lubricated surfaces create a `slip-layer' of liquid between the metal and surface that also inhibits wetting. This slip layer allows the metal to move reversibly through microchannels by preventing adhesion of the oxide. The metal may be pumped or moved by using low voltages or pneumatic actuation. Optical microscopy confirms the importance of the slip-layer, which enables non-stick motion of the metal through capillaries. Finally, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy characterizes the electrohydrodynanic motion of EGaIn in capillary systems.

  1. A systemic review of randomized controlled studies about prevention with pharmacologic agents of adhesion formation in the rat uterine horn model

    PubMed Central

    Ulug, Pasa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Evaluation of treatment attempts in postoperative adhesion formation is pivotal for the prevention of several morbidities including infertility, pelvic pain, bowel obstruction, and subsequent intraoperative complications. The purpose of this systemic review was to assess the literature on the rat uterine horn model for adhesion formation and treatment modalities to prevent adhesion in the most frequently used experimental animal model. Material and methods We performed a systemic review of publications from January 1st 2000 to December 31st 2013 via a PubMed search. A high number of agents were evaluated for the prevention of postoperative adhesion formation in the rat uterine horn model. Results According to most of the studies, adjuvants such as antiinflamatuars, antiestrogens, antioxidants were effective to prevent adhesion formation. Conclusions Prevention of adhesion formation is pivotal and numerous types of agents were described in the literature were summarized in this review. PMID:25995741

  2. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  3. Normothermia to Prevent Surgical Site Infections After Gastrointestinal Surgery: Holy Grail or False Idol?

    PubMed Central

    Lehtinen, Simon J.; Onicescu, Georgiana; Kuhn, Kathy M.; Cole, David J.; Esnaola, Nestor F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the association between perioperative normothermia (temperature ≥36°C) and surgical site infections (SSIs) after gastrointestinal (GI) surgery. Summary of Background Data Although active warming during colorectal surgery reduces SSIs, there is limited evidence that perioperative normothermia is associated with lower rates of SSI. Nonetheless, hospitals participating in the Surgical Care Improvement Project must report normothermia rates during major surgery. Methods We conducted a nested, matched, case-control study; cases consisted of GI surgery patients enrolled in our National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database between March 2006 and March 2009 who developed SSIs. Patient/surgery risk factors for SSI were obtained from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Perioperative temperature/antibiotic/glucose data were obtained from medical records. Cases/controls were compared using univariate/random effects/logistic regression models. Independent risk factors for SSIs were identified using multivariate/random effects/logistic regression models. Results A total of 146 cases and 323 matched controls were identified; 82% of patients underwent noncolorectal surgery. Cases were more likely to have final intraoperative normothermia compared with controls (87.6% vs. 77.8%, P = 0.015); rates of immediate postoperative normothermia were similar (70.6% vs. 65.3%, respectively, P = 0.19). Emergent surgery/higher wound class were associated with higher rates of intraoperative normothermia. Independent risk factors for SSI were diabetes, surgical complexity, small bowel surgery, and nonlaparoscopic surgery. There was no independent association between perioperative normothermia and SSI (adjusted odds ratio, 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 0.48–2.33; P = 0.90). Conclusions Pay-for-reporting measures focusing on perioperative normothermia may be of limited value in preventing SSI after GI surgery. Studies to define the benefit

  4. Prolonging the duration of preventing bacterial adhesion of nanosilver-containing polymer films through hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Bing; Liu, Tao; Yin, Yansheng

    2012-12-11

    A superhydrophobic coating composed of silver nanoparticles was developed on copper from fluorinated multilayered polyelectrolyte films to examine its performance in preventing microbial adhesion. Antibacterial and antibiofouling experiments for this novel coating were conducted with SRB. From the disk diffusion tests (for 48 h), it was found that, compared to the traditional coating composed of nanosilver, this novel coating significantly improved antibacterial performance and long-term effectiveness. The oxidation states of the immobilized silver in polyelectrolyte multilayer films were investigated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the stability of the immobilized silver was evaluated through a leaching test. It was found that if silver was exposed to aqueous environments some ionic silver species would be produced and released. The ion release kinetics showed that the duration of sustained release of antibacterial Ag ions from the novel coatings was prolonged, which was why they had more long-term antibacterial performance. PMID:23137302

  5. Prevention of bleeding and hemorrhagic complications in surgical patients with inherited factor VII deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wiszniewski, Adam; Szczepanik, Andrzej; Misiak, Andrzej; Bykowska, Ksenia; Szopiński, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    Inherited factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive hemorrhagic disorder. The major clinical symptoms include: bleeding from the oral cavity, epistaxis, menorrhagia, spontaneous hemarthros, bleeding to the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system, and perioperative bleeding. The aim of this study was to present our experience in preventing bleeding and hemorrhagic disorders in surgical patients with inherited FVII deficiency by using recombinant activated FVIIa (rFVIIa), and with prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs). In 2002-2011, 17 patients with inherited FVII deficiency underwent surgery. Thirteen patients had isolated FVII deficiency below 10%, and four patients 10-25. To prevent bleeding and hemorrhagic complications, we administered small single doses of rFVIIa (Novo-Seven) at 12-h intervals to 15 patients on surgery day and on day 1 following surgery, then every 24 h; PCCs were administered (Prothromplex, Beriplex) to two patients. No symptoms of bleeding, hemorrhagic or thromboembolic complications were observed in the perioperative and 1-month observation period in surgical patients treated with rFVIIa. One patient treated with PCC (Prothromplex) developed distal deep vein thrombosis on postoperative day 7. The results suggest that small, single, every 12-h doses of rFVIIa (NovoSeven) and in next days after surgery one time every 24 h are well tolerated and effective for prevention of thromboembolic, bleeding and hemorrhagic complications in FVII-deficient patients. Antithrombotic prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin should be applied in patients using PCCs. PMID:25688458

  6. The Preventive Effect of Dexmedetomidine Against Postoperative Intra-abdominal Adhesions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kuru, Serdar; Bozkirli, Osman Bahadir; Barlas, Aziz Mutlu; Duymus, Mehmet Esat; Senes, Mehmet; Yumusak, Nihat; Yilmaz, Cevdet; Kismet, Kemal

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the possible preventive effects of dexmedetomidine on postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions. Dexmedetomidine is a highly selective and potent α2 adrenergic agonist with sedative, analgesic, anxiolytic, sympatholytic, hemodynamic, and diuretic properties. In recent years, investigations have shown that dexmedetomidine possesses secondary antioxidant and also anti-inflammatory effects. Thirty Wistar albino male rats were randomized and divided into 3 groups of 10 animals each: group 1, sham-operated; group 2, cecal abrasion + peritoneal dissection; group 3, cecal abrasion + peritoneal dissection followed by daily intravenous injection of 10 μg/kg dexmedetomidine for 10 days. The animals were killed on postoperative day 21. Blood and cecal samples were taken for biochemical and histopathologic evaluation. In this study, biochemical and pathologic parameters were significantly better in the cecal abrasion + peritoneal dissection + dexmedetomidine group when compared with the cecal abrasion + peritoneal dissection group. Tissue malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase, total sulfhydryl, and catalase were found to be significantly different between the cecal abrasion/peritoneal dissection + dexmedetomidine and the cecal abrasion/peritoneal dissection groups. Plasma malondialdehyde and total sulfhydryl values were also statistically different between these groups (P < 0.05). Statistical analyses of mean pathologic scores showed that the histopathologic damage in the cecal abrasion/peritoneal dissection + dexmedetomidine group was significantly less than the damage in the control group (P < 0.05 for all pathologic parameters). The results of this study show that dexmedetomidine had a significant preventive effect on postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions. We concluded that these effects might be due to antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:25594644

  7. Management and Prevention of Surgical and Nutritional Complications After Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Marcotte, Eric; Chand, Bipan

    2016-08-01

    Bariatric surgery is well-recognized for its effects on health, beyond weight-loss. It underwent a revolution recently with the growing performance of laparoscopic procedures, leading to enhanced recovery and a reduction in procedural risk. However, surgical complications, although rare, do develop. It is important to recognize the complications, and ideally prevent them from happening. This article reviews the risks of the four most commonly performed bariatric procedures, with an emphasis on technique and management in the intraoperative and postoperative period. The nutritional aspect of bariatric surgery is of the utmost importance, because catastrophic consequences have been linked to malnutrition and vitamin deficiencies. PMID:27473805

  8. Safety and Efficacy of Sodium Hyaluronate Gel and Chitosan in Preventing Postoperative Peristomal Adhesions After Defunctioning Enterostomy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiancong; Fan, Dejun; Lin, Xutao; Wu, Xianrui; He, Xiaosheng; He, Xiaowen; Wu, Xiaojian; Lan, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Peristomal adhesions complicate closure of defunctioning enterostomy. The efficacy and safety of sodium hyaluronate gel and chitosan in preventing postoperative adhesion have not been extensively studied. This study aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of sodium hyaluronate gel and chitosan in the prevention of postoperative peristomal adhesions. This was a prospective randomized controlled study. One hundred and fourteen patients undergoing defunctioning enterostomy were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to receive sodium hyaluronate gel (SHG group) or chitosan (CH group) or no antiadhesion treatment (CON group) during defunctioning enterostomy. The safety outcomes included toxicities, stoma-related complications, and short-term and long-term postoperative complications. Eighty-seven (76.3%) of the 114 patients received closure of enterostomy, during which occurrence and severity of intra-abdominal adhesions were visually assessed by a blinded assessor. Incidence of adhesion appears to be lower in patients received sodium hyaluronate gel or chitosan but differences did not reach a significant level (SHG group vs CH group vs CON group: 62.1% vs 62.1% vs 82.8%, P = 0.15). Compared with the CON group, severity of postoperative adhesion was significantly decreased in the SHG and CH group (SHG group vs CH group vs CON group: 31.0% vs 27.6% vs 62.1%; P = 0.01). There was no significant difference in the occurrence of postoperative complications and other safety outcomes among the 3 groups. Sodium hyaluronate gel or chitosan smeared around the limbs of a defunctioning enterostomy was safe and effective in the prevention of postoperative peristomal adhesions. PMID:26705233

  9. Healthcare associated infection: novel strategies and antimicrobial implants to prevent surgical site infection

    PubMed Central

    Leaper, David; McBain, Andrew J; Kramer, Axel; Assadian, Ojan; Sanchez, Jose Luis Alfonso; Lumio, Jukka; Kiernan, Martin

    2010-01-01

    This report is based on a Hygienist Panel Meeting held at St Anne's Manor, Wokingham on 24–25 June 2009. The panel agreed that greater use should be made of antiseptics to reduce reliance on antibiotics with their associated risk of antibiotic resistance. When choosing an antiseptic for clinical use, the Biocompatibility Index, which considers both the microbiocidal activity and any cytotoxic effects of an antiseptic agent, was considered to be a useful tool. The need for longer and more proactive post-discharge surveillance of surgical patients was also agreed to be a priority, especially given the current growth of day-case surgery. The introduction of surgical safety checklists, such as the World Health Organization's Safe Surgery Saves Lives initiative, is a useful contribution to improving safety and prevention of SSIs and should be used universally. Considering sutures as ‘implants’, with a hard or non-shedding surface to which micro-organisms can form biofilm and cause surgical site infections, was felt to be a useful concept. PMID:20819330

  10. Prevention of infectious complications in surgical patients: potential role of probiotics.

    PubMed

    Besselink, Marc G H; Timmerman, Harro M; van Minnen, L Paul; Akkermans, Louis M A; Gooszen, Hein G

    2005-01-01

    Infectious complications in surgical patients often originate from the intestinal microflora. In the critically ill patient, small bowel motility is disturbed, leading to bacterial overgrowth and subsequent bacterial translocation due to dysfunction of the gut mucosal barrier. The optimal prophylactic strategy should act on all these factors, but such a strategy is not yet available. For several decades, antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent translocation of pathogenic bacteria has been studied with conflicting results. Selective decontamination of the digestive tract has shown good results, but fear for bacterial multiresistance has prevented worldwide implementation. In recent years, probiotics, living bacteria with a potential beneficial effect to their host, have shown promising results in several randomized placebo-controlled trials. Currently, in vitro and experimental research focuses on the effects of probiotics on the microflora responsible for gut-derived infections, structural mucosal barrier function and the immune system. PMID:16174980

  11. [Preventive effects of various socks against adhesion of dermatophytes to healthy feet].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, H; Nishioka, K; Maruyama, R; Katoh, T

    2000-01-01

    We studied the preventive effects of socks against dermatophyte infection. Wearing various socks (cotton socks, nylon stockings, wool socks and "tabi"), a healthy volunteer walked on a bath mat on which a patient with tinea pedis had stepped earlier. The volunteer pressed her right foot with socks onto large agar medium (Foot-press method), then, took off the socks and performed the Foot-press method again. The number of colonies of isolated dermatophytes on the medium was counted. The number of isolated colonies from the sole after taking off the nylon stockings was larger than that from the foot wearing the stockings. Dermatophytes were also isolated from the sole after taking off cotton socks. In contrast, few dermatophytes were isolated from the sole after taking off wool socks or "tabi". On microscopic observation, fibers of the nylon stockings and cotton socks were seen to be loose enough for dermatophytes to pass through. In contrast with those socks, fibers of wool socks and "tabi" were tight or fluffy. In conclusion, the nylon stockings and cotton socks are unsatisfactory in preventing the adhesion of dermatophytes. PMID:10938520

  12. A Novel Prevention Bundle to Reduce Surgical Site Infections in Pediatric Spinal Fusion Patients.

    PubMed

    Gould, Jane M; Hennessey, Patricia; Kiernan, Andrea; Safier, Shannon; Herman, Martin

    2016-05-01

    BACKGROUND The Surgical Care Improvement Project bundle emphasizes operative infection prevention practices. Despite implementing the Surgical Care Improvement Project bundle in 2008, spinal fusion surgical site infections (SF-SSI) continued to be prevalent for this low-volume, high-risk surgery. OBJECTIVE To design a combined pre-, peri-, and postoperative bundle (PPPB) that would lead to sustained reductions in SF-SSI rates. DESIGN Quality improvement project, before-after trial with cost-effectiveness analysis. SETTING Children's hospital. PATIENTS All spinal fusion patients, 2008-2015. INTERVENTION A multidisciplinary team developed the PPPB composed of Surgical Care Improvement Project elements plus improved wound care practices, nursing standard of care, dedicated nursing unit, dermatology assessment tool and consultation, nursing education tool using "teach back" technique, and a "Back Home" kit. SF-SSI rates were compared before (2008-2010) and after (2011-February 2015) implementation of PPPB. PPPB compliance was monitored. RESULTS A total of 224 SF surgeries were performed from 2008 to February 2015. Pre-PPPB analysis revealed median time to SF-SSI of 28 days, secondary to skin and bowel flora. Mean 3-year pre-PPPB SF-SSI rate per 100 SF surgeries was 8.2 (8/98) (2008: 13.3 [4/30], 2009: 2.7 [1/37], 2010: 9.7 [3/31]). Mean SF-SSI rate after PPPB was 2.4 (3/126) (January 2011-February 2015); there was a 71% reduction in mean SSI rate (P=.0695). No SF-SSI occurred in neuromuscular patients (P=.008) after PPPB. Compliance with PPPB elements has been 100%. CONCLUSIONS PPPB led to sustained improvement in SF-SSI rates over 50 months. The PPPB could be reproduced for other surgeries. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:527-534. PMID:26818613

  13. Peptides Targeting the Desmoglein 3 Adhesive Interface Prevent Autoantibody-induced Acantholysis in Pemphigus*

    PubMed Central

    Heupel, Wolfgang-Moritz; Müller, Thomas; Efthymiadis, Athina; Schmidt, Enno; Drenckhahn, Detlev; Waschke, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) autoantibodies directly inhibit desmoglein (Dsg) 3-mediated transinteraction. Because cellular signaling also seems to be required for PV pathogenesis, it is important to characterize the role of direct inhibition in pemphigus acantholysis to allow establishment of new therapeutic approaches. Therefore, we modeled the Dsg1 and Dsg3 sequences into resolved cadherin structures and predicted peptides targeting the adhesive interface of both Dsg3 and Dsg1. In atomic force microscopy single molecule experiments, the self-designed cyclic single peptide specifically blocked homophilic Dsg3 and Dsg1 transinteraction, whereas a tandem peptide (TP) consisting of two combined single peptides did not. TP did not directly block binding of pemphigus IgG to their target Dsg antigens but prevented PV-IgG-induced inhibition of Dsg3 transinteraction in cell-free (atomic force microscopy) and cell-based (laser tweezer) experiments, indicating stabilization of Dsg3 bonds. Similarly, PV-IgG-mediated acantholysis and disruption of Dsg3 localization in HaCaT keratinocytes was partially blocked by TP. This is the first evidence that direct inhibition of Dsg3 binding is important for PV pathogenesis and that peptidomimetics stabilizing Dsg transinteraction may provide a novel approach for PV treatment. PMID:19164289

  14. Highly Conductive and Reliable Copper-Filled Isotropically Conductive Adhesives Using Organic Acids for Oxidation Prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenjun; Deng, Dunying; Cheng, Yuanrong; Xiao, Fei

    2015-07-01

    The easy oxidation of copper is one critical obstacle to high-performance copper-filled isotropically conductive adhesives (ICAs). In this paper, a facile method to prepare highly reliable, highly conductive, and low-cost ICAs is reported. The copper fillers were treated by organic acids for oxidation prevention. Compared with ICA filled with untreated copper flakes, the ICA filled with copper flakes treated by different organic acids exhibited much lower bulk resistivity. The lowest bulk resistivity achieved was 4.5 × 10-5 Ω cm, which is comparable to that of commercially available Ag-filled ICA. After 500 h of 85°C/85% relative humidity (RH) aging, the treated ICAs showed quite stable bulk resistivity and relatively stable contact resistance. Through analyzing the results of x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis, we found that, with the assistance of organic acids, the treated copper flakes exhibited resistance to oxidation, thus guaranteeing good performance.

  15. Biobased silver nanocolloid coating on silk fibers for prevention of post-surgical wound infections

    PubMed Central

    Dhas, Sindhu Priya; Anbarasan, Suruthi; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2015-01-01

    Bombyx mori silk fibers are an important biomaterial and are used in surgical sutures due to their remarkable biocompatibility. The major drawback to the application of biomaterials is the risk of bacterial invasion, leading to clinical complications. We have developed an easy and cost-effective method for fabrication of antibacterial silk fibers loaded with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by an in situ and ex situ process using an aqueous extract of Rhizophora apiculata leaf. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that well dispersed nanoparticles impregnated the silk fibers both in situ and ex situ. The crystalline nature of the AgNPs in the silk fibers was demonstrated by X-ray diffraction. The thermal and mechanical properties of the silk fibers were enhanced after they were impregnated with AgNPs. The silver-coated silk fibers fabricated by the in situ and ex situ method exhibited more than 90% inhibition against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Silk fibers doped with AgNPs were found to be biocompatible with 3T3 fibroblasts. The results obtained represent an important advance towards the clinical application of biocompatible AgNP-loaded silk fibers for prevention of surgical wound infections. PMID:26491317

  16. Efficacy and mechanism of tanshinone IIA liquid nanoparticles in preventing experimental postoperative peritoneal adhesions in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Fei; Ma, Yun; Li, Xiao; Wang, Xian; Wei, Yuanyi; Hou, Chuqi; Lin, Si; Hou, Lianbing; Wang, Chengxi

    2015-01-01

    Up to 90% of patients develop adhesion following laparotomy. Upregulating fibrinolysis within the peritoneum reduces adhesions. Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA) promotes fibrinolysis in hepatic fibrosis and the cardiovascular system and may play a role in preventing adhesions. We report preparation and characterization of liquid nanoparticles of Tan IIA for intravenous administration and investigate its feasibility in clinical practice. Tan IIA liquid nanoparticles (Tan IIA-NPs) were prepared using the emulsion/solvent evaporation method. Adhesions were induced in Sprague–Dawley rats by injuring the parietal peritoneum and cecum, followed by intravenous administration of various Tan IIA-NP dosages. The adhesion scores for each group were collected 7 days after the initial laparotomy. The activity of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) was measured from the peritoneal lavage fluid. The messenger RNA and protein expression levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. TGF-β1 and collagen I expressions were measured immunohistochemically in the ischemic tissues. The effects of Tan IIA-NPs and free-Tan IIA on tPA and PAI-1 were measured in vitro in TGF-β1-induced HMrSV5 cells. Tan IIA-NPs exhibited small particle size, high encapsulation efficiency, good stability for storage, and safety for intravenous administration. Tan IIA-NPs were effective in preventing adhesion. Tan IIA-NPs increased tPA activity in peritoneal lavage fluid, and tPA mRNA and protein expression, and decreased PAI-1 mRNA and protein expression in the ischemic tissues. Moreover, Tan IIA-NPs decreased TGF-β1 and collagen I expressions in the ischemic tissues. Tan IIA-NPs administered via tail veins upregulated fibrinolysis in the peritoneum. In vitro studies showed that these effects may be mediated by the TGF-β signal pathway. PMID:26056449

  17. Economic Value of Dispensing Home-Based Preoperative Chlorhexidine Bathing Cloths to Prevent Surgical Site Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Rachel R.; Stuckey, Dianna R.; Norman, Bryan A.; Duggan, Andrew P.; Bacon, Kristina M.; Connor, Diana L.; Lee, Ingi; Muder, Robert R.; Lee, Bruce Y.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the economic value of dispensing preoperative home-based chlorhexidine bathing cloth kits to orthopedic patients to prevent surgical site infection (SSI). METHODS A stochastic decision-analytic computer simulation model was developed from the hospital’s perspective depicting the decision of whether to dispense the kits preoperatively to orthopedic patients. We varied patient age, cloth cost, SSI-attributable excess length of stay, cost per bed-day, patient compliance with the regimen, and cloth antimicrobial efficacy to determine which variables were the most significant drivers of the model’s outcomes. RESULTS When all other variables remained at baseline and cloth efficacy was at least 50%, patient compliance only had to be half of baseline (baseline mean, 15.3%; range, 8.23%–20.0%) for chlorhexidine cloths to remain the dominant strategy (ie, less costly and providing better health outcomes). When cloth efficacy fell to 10%, 1.5 times the baseline bathing compliance also afforded dominance of the preoperative bath. CONCLUSIONS The results of our study favor the routine distribution of bathing kits. Even with low patient compliance and cloth efficacy values, distribution of bathing kits is an economically beneficial strategy for the prevention of SSI. PMID:21515977

  18. Reinforcing endothelial junctions prevents microvessel permeability increase and tumor cell adhesion in microvessels in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Bingmei M.; Yang, Jinlin; Cai, Bin; Fan, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min

    2015-10-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to the microvessel wall is a critical step during tumor metastasis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a secretion of tumor cells, can increase microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion in the microvessel. To test the hypothesis that inhibiting permeability increase can reduce tumor cell adhesion, we used in vivo fluorescence microscopy to measure both microvessel permeability and adhesion rates of human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells in post-capillary venules of rat mesentery under the treatment of VEGF and a cAMP analog, 8-bromo-cAMP, which can decrease microvessel permeability. By immunostaining adherens junction proteins between endothelial cells forming the microvessel wall, we further investigated the structural mechanism by which cAMP abolishes VEGF-induced increase in microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion. Our results demonstrate that 1) Pretreatment of microvessels with cAMP can abolish VEGF-enhanced microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion; 2) Tumor cells prefer to adhere to the endothelial cell junctions instead of cell bodies; 3) VEGF increases microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion by compromising endothelial junctions while cAMP abolishes these effects of VEGF by reinforcing the junctions. These results suggest that strengthening the microvessel wall integrity can be a potential approach to inhibiting hematogenous tumor metastasis.

  19. Memantine before Mastectomy Prevents Post-Surgery Pain: A Randomized, Blinded Clinical Trial in Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Véronique; Joly, Dominique; Villatte, Christine; Dubray, Claude; Durando, Xavier; Daulhac, Laurence; Coudert, Catherine; Roux, Delphine; Pereira, Bruno; Pickering, Gisèle

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain following surgical treatment for breast cancer with or without chemotherapy is a clinical burden and patients frequently report cognitive, emotional and quality of life impairment. A preclinical study recently showed that memantine administered before surgery may prevent neuropathic pain development and cognitive dysfunction. With a translational approach, a clinical trial has been carried out to evaluate whether memantine administered before and after mastectomy could prevent the development of neuropathic pain, the impairment of cognition and quality of life. Method A randomized, pilot clinical trial included 40 women undergoing mastectomy in the Oncology Department, University Hospital, Clermont-Ferrand, France. Memantine (5 to 20 mg/day; n = 20) or placebo (n = 20) was administered for four weeks starting two weeks before surgery. The primary endpoint was pain intensity measured on a (0–10) numerical rating scale at three months post-mastectomy. Results Data analyses were performed using mixed models and the tests were two-sided, with a type I error set at α = 0.05. Compared with placebo, patients receiving memantine showed at three months a significant difference in post-mastectomy pain intensity, less rescue analgesia and a better emotional state. An improvement of pain symptoms induced by cancer chemotherapy was also reported. Conclusions This study shows for the first time the beneficial effect of memantine to prevent post-mastectomy pain development and to diminish chemotherapy-induced pain symptoms. The lesser analgesic consumption and better well-being of patients for at least six months after treatment suggests that memantine could be an interesting therapeutic option to diminish the burden of breast cancer therapy. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01536314 PMID:27050431

  20. [Therapeutic evaluation of the polylactic acid gel (PLA-G) used for preventing skin flap adhesion in modified radical mastectomy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Guojing; Liu, Tao

    2013-12-01

    The present preliminary study was to observe the feasibility of the use of polylactic acid gel (PLA-G) in modified radical mastectomy and the ability of the PLA-G in the prevention of flap adhesion after operation. Sixty-eight patients were diagnosed with breast cancer, and received modified radical mastectomy from Jan. 2004 to Dec. 2006. The patients were divided randomly into a treatment group and a control group (with 34 cases each). The PLA-G was used under the surface of the auxiliary operative wound in the treatment group, and nothing was used in the control group. The wound healing, the wound complication, the amount of drainage solution, the indwelling time of the drainage tube and the auxiliary skin adhesion were evaluated after operation in both groups. There were no statistical difference on wound healing between the first intension (29:27) and the second intention (5:7), and the wound dehiscence after taking the stitches out (0:0) between the two intensions, the hematoma (0:1) and the effusion of the wound (5:6), and the flap necrosis (1:2) between two groups. There were also no statistical difference on the amount of drainage solution per day (6 +/- 3) and indwelling time of the drainage tube (6 +/- 4) after operation between the two groups (P > 0.5). After the operation, the case load with no flap adhesion in the treatment group was significant higher compared with the control group (22:8). The case load with complete acquired skin flap adhesion in the treatment group was visibly lower than in the control group (3:19), which proved that there was a significant statistical difference between the two groups (P < 0.05). This study suggested that the using of PLA-G in the breast cancer modified radical mastectomy could prevent skin flap adhesion without any harmful effects in the wound healing. PMID:24645611

  1. Hemostats, sealants, and adhesives III: a new update as well as cost and regulatory considerations for components of the surgical toolbox.

    PubMed

    Spotnitz, William D; Burks, Sandra

    2012-10-01

    The hemostat, sealant, and adhesive components of the surgical toolbox continue to evolve and enter clinical practice at a rapid rate. The goal of this comprehensive, sequential review is to update these components to include those now available (February 2012) as well as to explore cost and regulatory factors that impact the development and use of these materials. A unique system of definitions for organizing these components based on group, category, and class is used as a means of improving the understanding and appropriate use of these materials. The system will be used here to present the most recent additions to the toolbox, which are evaluated based on safety, efficacy, usability, and cost. These new additions include pooled human plasma fibrinogen and thrombin embedded in an equine collagen patch for cardiac surgical hemostasis, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and human serum albumin for lung surgical pneumostasis, modified PEG and trilysine amine for spinal sealing, octyl and butyl lactoyl cyanoacrylate for vascular sealing, and a variety of octyl and butyl cyanoacrylates with or without dyes and/or polyester mesh for skin closure with the creation of a bacterial barrier. The system of definitions will also be used to clarify key strategies in the current health care environment for reducing costs and for increasing understanding of Food and Drug Administration regulatory decisions for these materials. PMID:22612730

  2. A protein fragment of streptococcal cell surface antigen I/II which prevents adhesion of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Munro, G H; Evans, P; Todryk, S; Buckett, P; Kelly, C G; Lehner, T

    1993-01-01

    Attachment of Streptococcus mutans to the tooth surface involves a cell surface protein with an M(r) of 185,000, termed streptococcal antigen (SA) I/II. Four overlapping fragments of the gene encoding SA I/II were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, cloned, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant polypeptides were assayed for adhesion-binding activity to salivary receptors and for recognition by a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) raised against SA I/II. Two of the MAbs which are known to prevent colonization of S. mutans in vivo bound the recombinant polypeptide comprising residues 816 to 1161. In vitro adhesion of S. mutans to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads was also inhibited specifically by a polypeptide (residues 816 to 1213) encompassing the same region. The evidence from the MAbs preventing colonization of S. mutans and the adherence inhibition assay suggests that an adhesion-binding activity resides within the portion of SA I/II comprising residues 816 to 1213, which is highly conserved among oral streptococcal species. Images PMID:7691754

  3. Peri-operative glycaemic control regimens for preventing surgical site infections in adults

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Lillian S; Meeks, Derek; Moyer, Virginia A; Lally, Kevin P

    2010-01-01

    Background Surgical site infections (SSIs) are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and resource utilization and are potentially preventable. Peri-operative hyperglycaemia has been associated with increased SSIs and previous recommendations have been to treat glucose levels above 200 mg/dL. However, recent studies have questioned the optimal glycaemic control regimen to prevent SSIs. Whether the benefits of strict or intensive glycaemic control with insulin infusion as compared to conventional management outweigh the risks remains controversial. Objectives To summarise the evidence for the impact of glycaemic control in the peri-operative period on the incidence of surgical site infections, hypoglycaemia, level of glycaemic control, all-cause and infection-related mortality, and hospital length of stay and to investigate for differences of effect between different levels of glycaemic control. Search strategy A search strategy was developed to search the following databases: Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 25 March 2009), The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 1; Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to March Week 2 2009); Ovid EMBASE (1980 to 2009 Week 12) and EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to March Week 3 2009). The search was not limited by language or publication status. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were eligible for inclusion if they evaluated two (or more) glycaemic control regimens in the peri-operative period (within one week pre-, intra-, and/or post-operative) and reported surgical site infections as an outcome. Data collection and analysis The standard method for conducting a systematic review in accordance with the Cochrane Wounds Group was used. Two review authors independently reviewed the results from the database searches and identified relevant studies. Two review authors extracted study data and outcomes from each study and reviewed each study for methodological quality. Any

  4. Possible involvement of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 channel in postoperative adhesive obstruction and its prevention by a kampo (traditional Japanese) medicine, daikenchuto.

    PubMed

    Tokita, Yohei; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Satoh, Kazuko; Nishiyama, Mitsue; Iizuka, Seiichi; Imamura, Sachiko; Kase, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    This study focused on the localization of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) in the intestines in postoperative adhesion model rats and investigated the underlying mechanism for the anti-adhesion action of daikenchuto (DKT), especially in relation to TRPV1. Postoperative intestinal adhesion was induced by sprinkling talc in the small intestine. The expression of TRPV1 mRNA was examined by in situ hybridization and real-time RT-PCR. The effects of DKT and its major ingredient, hydroxy sanshool, with or without ruthenium red, a TRP-channel antagonist, on talc-induced intestinal adhesions were evaluated. The level of TRPV1 mRNA was higher in the adhesion regions of talc-treated rats than in normal small intestine of sham-operated rats. Localization of TRPV1 mRNA expression was identified in the submucosal plexus of both sham-operated and talc-treated rats; and in talc-treated rats, it was observed also in the myenteric plexus and regions of adhesion. Capsaicin, DKT, and hydroxy sanshool significantly prevented formation of intestinal adhesions. The effects of DKT and hydroxy sanshool were abrogated by subcutaneous injection of ruthenium red. These results suggest that pharmacological modulation of TRPV1 might be a possible therapeutic option in postoperative intestinal adhesion, which might be relevant to the prevention of postoperative adhesive obstruction by DKT. PMID:21186335

  5. Surgical retained foreign object (RFO) prevention by computer aided detection (CAD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marentis, Theodore C.; Hadjiiyski, Lubomir; Chaudhury, Amrita R.; Rondon, Lucas; Chronis, Nikolaos; Chan, Heang-Ping

    2014-03-01

    Surgical Retained Foreign Objects (RFOs) cause significant morbidity and mortality. They are associated with $1.5 billion annually in preventable medical costs. The detection accuracy of radiographs for RFOs is a mediocre 59%. We address the RFO problem with two complementary technologies: a three dimensional (3D) Gossypiboma Micro Tag (μTa) that improves the visibility of RFOs on radiographs, and a Computer Aided Detection (CAD) system that detects the μTag. The 3D geometry of the μTag produces a similar 2D depiction on radiographs regardless of its orientation in the human body and ensures accurate detection by a radiologist and the CAD. We create a database of cadaveric radiographs with the μTag and other common man-made objects positioned randomly. We develop the CAD modules that include preprocessing, μTag enhancement, labeling, segmentation, feature analysis, classification and detection. The CAD can operate in a high specificity mode for the surgeon to allow for seamless workflow integration and function as a first reader. The CAD can also operate in a high sensitivity mode for the radiologist to ensure accurate detection. On a data set of 346 cadaveric radiographs, the CAD system performed at a high specificity (85.5% sensitivity, 0.02 FPs/image) for the OR and a high sensitivity (96% sensitivity, 0.73 FPs/image) for the radiologists.

  6. Comparative stability of the bioresorbable ferric crosslinked hyaluronic acid adhesion prevention solutions.

    PubMed

    Luu, Hoan-My Do; Chen, Angela; Isayeva, Irada S

    2013-08-01

    The Intergel® ferric crosslinked hyaluronate (FeHA) adhesion prevention solution (APS) (FDA) is associated with serious post-operative complications (Henley, http://www.lawyersandsettlements.com/features/gynecare-intergel/intergel-timeline.html, 2007; FDA, 2003; Roman et al., Fertil Steril 2005, 83 Suppl 1:1113-1118; Tang et al., Ann Surg 2006;243(4):449-455; Wiseman, Fertil Steril 2006;86(3):771; Wiseman, Fertil Steril 2006;85(4):e7). This prompted us to examine the in situ stability of crosslinked HA materials to hyaluronidase lyase degradation. Variables such as ferric ionic crosslink density, HA concentration, gel geometry, and molecular weight (MW) of HA polymer were studied. Various formulations of the crosslinked "in house" [Isayeva et al., J Biomed Mater Res: Part B - Appl Biomater 2010, 95B (1):9-18] FeHA (0.5%, w/v; 30, 50, 90% crosslinked), the Intergel® FeHA (0.5%, w/v; 90%), and the non-crosslinked HA (0.05-0.5%, w/v) were degraded at a fixed activity of hyaluronidase lyase from Streptomyces hyalurolyticus (Hyase) at 37°C over time according to the method [Payan et al., J Chrom B: Biomed Sci Appl 1991;566(1):9-18]. Under our conditions, the data show that the crosslink density affects degradation the most, followed by HA concentration and then gel geometry. We found that MW has no effect. Our results are one possible explanation of the observations that the Intergel® FeHA APS (0.5%, w/v; 90%) material persisted an order of magnitude longer than expected [t1/2 = 500 hrs vs. t1/2 = 50 hrs (FDA; Johns et al., Fertil Steril 1997;68(1):37-42)]. These data also demonstrate the sensitivity of the in vitro hyaluronidase assay to predict the in situ stability of crosslinked HA medical products as previously reported [Sall et al., Polym Degrad Stabil 2007;92(5):915-919]. PMID:23559362

  7. Role of Epidural Injections to Prevent Surgical Intervention in Patients with Chronic Sciatica: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sunny

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the different types of epidural injections (EI) to prevent surgical intervention in patients suffering from chronic sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Material and Methods: Studies were identified by searching PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar to retrieve all available relevant articles. Lists of references of several systematic reviews were also used for scanning further references. Publications from the past ten years (2006-2016) were considered, and all studies selected were in the English language only. The studies employed specified the use of EI to treat sciatica caused by LDH. A total of 19 papers meeting the eligibility criteria (mentioned below) were included in this study. The pain scores, functional disability scores, and surgical rates from these studies were considered, and meta-analysis was performed. Outcome measures: Pain scores, functional disability scores, and surgical rates were assessed from the included studies. The Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) have been the most commonly used baseline scales for pain evaluation followed by the Verbal Numerical Rating Scale (VNRS) and Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA). The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) scales were used for the functional disability scoring system in the literature. Results: Significant improvement in the pain scores and functional disability scores were observed. Additionally, greater than 80% of the patients suffering from chronic sciatica caused by LDH could successfully prevent surgical intervention after EI treatment with or without steroids. Conclusion: The management of sciatica with EI treatment results in significant improvements in the pain score, functional disability score, and surgical rate. We concluded that EI provides new hope to prevent surgical intervention in patients suffering from sciatica caused by LDH. PMID

  8. A scaffold-enhanced light-activated surgical adhesive technique: surface selection for enhanced tensile strength in wound repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soller, Eric C.; Hoffman, Grant T.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; Duffy, Mark T.; Bloom, Jeffrey N.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.

    2004-07-01

    An ex vivo study was conducted to determine the effect of the irregularity of the scaffold surface on the tensile strength of repairs formed using our Scaffold-Enhanced Biological Adhesive (SEBA). Two different scaffold materials were investigated: (i) a synthetic biodegradable material fabricated from poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid); and (ii) a biological material, small intestinal submucosa, manufactured by Cook BioTech. The scaffolds were doped with protein solder composed of 50%(w/v) bovine serum albumin solder and 0.5mg/ml indocyanine green dye mixed in deionized water, and activated with an 808-nm diode laser. The tensile strength of repairs performed on bovine thoracic aorta, liver, spleen, small intestine and lung, using the smooth and irregular surfaces of the above scaffold-enhanced materials were measured and the time-to-failure was recorded. The tensile strength of repairs formed using the irregular surfaces of the scaffolds were consistently higher than those formed using the smooth surfaces of the scaffolds. The largest difference was observed on repairs formed on the aorta and small intestine, where the repairs were, on average, 50% stronger using the irregular versus the smooth scaffold surfaces. In addition, the time-to-failure of repairs formed using the irregular surfaces of the scaffolds were between 50% and 100% longer than that achieved using the smooth surfaces of the scaffolds. It has previously been shown that distributing or dispersing the adhesive forces over the increased surface area of the scaffold, either smooth or irregular, produces stronger repairs than albumin solder alone. The increase in the absolute strength and longevity of repairs seen in this new study when the irregular surfaces of the scaffolds are used is thought to be due to the distribution of forces between the many independent micro-adhesions provided by the irregular surfaces.

  9. High-density lipoprotein modulates thrombosis by preventing von Willebrand factor self-association and subsequent platelet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Chung, Dominic W; Chen, Junmei; Ling, Minhua; Fu, Xiaoyun; Blevins, Teri; Parsons, Scott; Le, Jennie; Harris, Jeff; Martin, Thomas R; Konkle, Barbara A; Zheng, Ying; López, José A

    2016-02-01

    The ability of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to initiate platelet adhesion depends on the number of monomers in individual VWF multimers and on the self-association of individual VWF multimers into larger structures. VWF self-association is accelerated by shear stress. We observed that VWF self-association occurs during adsorption of VWF onto surfaces, assembly of secreted VWF into hyperadhesive VWF strings on the endothelial surface, and incorporation of fluid-phase VWF into VWF fibers. VWF adsorption under static conditions increased with increased VWF purity and was prevented by a component of plasma. We identified that component as high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and its major apolipoprotein ApoA-I. HDL and ApoA-I also prevented VWF on the endothelium from self-associating into longer strands and inhibited the attachment of fluid-phase VWF onto vessel wall strands. Platelet adhesion to VWF fibers was reduced in proportion to the reduction in self-associated VWF. In a mouse model of thrombotic microangiopathy, HDL also largely prevented the thrombocytopenia induced by injection of high doses of human VWF. Finally, a potential role for ApoA-I in microvascular occlusion associated with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and sepsis was revealed by the inverse relationship between the concentration of ApoA-I and that of hyperadhesive VWF. These results suggest that interference with VWF self-association would be a new approach to treating thrombotic disorders. PMID:26552698

  10. Fibrotic contracture of the canine infraspinatus muscle: pathophysiology and prevention by early surgical intervention.

    PubMed

    Devor, Morten; Sørby, R

    2006-01-01

    Fibrotic contracture of the canine infraspinatus muscle (FCIM) is considered a rare musculotendineous disorder mainly affecting hunting dogs. After an acute onset of a painful non-weight bearing lameness, the initial pain and lameness improve over a period of one to four weeks, after which a characteristic circumducted gait abnormality develops in the forelimb. The initial injury to the infraspinatus muscle is not fully recognized or correctly interpreted in most cases, at least not with regard to its potential as a precursor of myopathy and FCIM. A mixed breed hunting dog developed an acute and extremely painful swelling of the infraspinatus muscle. The injury was easily recognized during clinical examination. The clinical signs were interpreted as an osteo-fascial compartment syndrome (OFCS) of the infraspinatus muscle. Immediate surgical decompression of the osteo-fascial compartment to prevent development of FCIM was undertaken. The histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations of the injured infrapinatus muscle revealed tissue changes that indicated acute muscle rupture, without any signs of an initiating degenerative process. On the day following surgery the dog was fully weight bearing. Restriction of activity for four weeks was recommended. Eight months after the initial injury, the dog had completely recovered and had full days of vigorous exercise and hunting activity without any apparent lameness. The findings in this case suggested that the infraspinatus muscle may be considered to be an osteo-fascial compartment in dogs and must be added to the list of compartments that may pose a potential risk for OFCS in the canine extremity. PMID:16810356

  11. The Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (Ep-CAM) as a Morphoregulatory Molecule Is a Tool in Surgical Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Manon J.; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; van Krieken, J. Han J. M.; Litvinov, Sergey V.

    2003-01-01

    Cell adhesion receptors (CAMs) are actively involved in regulating various cell processes, including growth, differentiation, and cell death. Therefore, CAMs represent a large group of morphoregulating molecules, mediating cross-talk between cells and of cells with their environment. From this perspective, CAMs do contribute to cells and tissue organization, and in diseased tissue, to the disease development and biological characteristics. Therefore, observed changes in expression patterns of adhesion molecules may contribute to establish a diagnosis. A distinct shift in expression patterns in neoplastic epithelium has been described, for example for cadherins, integrins, and CD44. A relatively novel cell CAM, Ep-CAM, was first reported to be a pan-carcinoma antigen, although it is rather a marker of epithelial lineage. Several antibodies directed to Ep-CAM have been generated, and many epithelial tissues and their neoplastic appendages have been studied. This article outlines the results of these studies. Based on the results of these studies, we conclude that Ep-CAM immunohistochemistry can be a useful tool in the diagnosis of disturbed epithelial tissues. PMID:14633587

  12. Complete Expulsion of Testicular Prosthesis via the Scrotum: A Case-Based Review of the Preventive Surgical Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Deb, A.; Jay Mathias, Suresh; Fraser Saxby, Mark; Fernando, Herman

    2015-01-01

    Testicular prostheses are regularly used in urological surgery and are important for postoperative psychological well-being in many patients undergoing orchiectomy. One of the recognised complications of this procedure is graft extrusion, which can result in significant morbidity for patients and require operative reintervention. Whilst most cases of extrusion involve upward graft migration to the external inguinal ring or direct displacement through the scrotal skin, we present an unusual case of complete expulsion of testicular implant three weeks postoperatively through a previously healthy scrotum. During surgical insertion of testicular prostheses, the urological surgeon must carefully consider the different surgical strategies at each step of the operation to prevent future extrusion of the graft. A stepwise review of the preventive surgical strategies to reduce the risk of graft extrusion encompasses the choice of optimal surgical incision, the technique of dissection to create the receiving anatomical pouch, the method of fixation of the implant within the receiving hemiscrotum, and the adoption of good postoperative care measures in line with the principles of sound scrotal surgery. PMID:26137344

  13. Evidence-Based Update to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee Guideline for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection: Developmental Process.

    PubMed

    Berríos-Torres, Sandra I

    2016-04-01

    Recommendations in the "Guideline for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection, 1999" were based on experts' selective interpretation of the scientific evidence. Effective 2009, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and its Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC) updated their guideline development process. This is a narrative summary of the updated process focusing on key changes and challenges specific to the Guideline for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection. The guideline development process now incorporates evidence-based methodology and provides explicit links between the evidence and the recommendations using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) method. There is also participation by professional surgical societies, an updated guideline structure (core and procedure-specific sections), additional planned related manuscripts (introductions to the guideline and research opportunities), and new proposed venues for publication. The new CDC and HICPAC "Guideline for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection" represents a substantial advancement from recommendations for infection control practices based on expert opinion to evidence-based practices. The new structure is meant to facilitate future updates, in particular, those addressing specialty or procedure-specific surgical site infection prevention questions. Increased presence by the surgical community through the professional surgical societies' engagement in the guideline development process, lead authorship of related manuscripts, and proposed publication in the surgical literature not only increase adherence by the surgical community, but also promote an ongoing collaboration with public health and other partners in a multidisciplinary approach to SSI prevention. PMID:26891203

  14. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase prevents experimental lung fibrosis and myofibroblast formation

    PubMed Central

    Lagares, David; Busnadiego, Oscar; García-Fernández, Rosa Ana; Kapoor, Mohit; Liu, Shangxi; Carter, David E.; Abraham, David; Shi-Wen, Xu; Carreira, Patricia; Fontaine T, Benjamin A; Shea, Barry S; Tager, Andrew M; Leask, Andrew; Lamas, Santiago; Rodríguez-Pascual, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Objective Enhanced adhesive signaling including activation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a hallmark of fibroblasts from lung fibrosis patients, and FAK has been therefore hypothesized to be a key mediator of this disease. This study was undertaken to characterize the contribution of FAK to the development of pulmonary fibrosis both in vivo and in vitro. Methods FAK expression and activity were analyzed in lung tissue samples from lung fibrosis patients by immunohistochemistry. Mice orally treated with the FAK inhibitor, PF-562,271, or with siRNA-mediated silencing of FAK, were exposed to intratracheally instilled bleomycin to induce lung fibrosis, and the lungs were harvested for histological and biochemical analysis. Using endothelin-1 (ET-1) as stimulus, cell adhesion and contraction, as well as profibrotic gene expression were studied in fibroblasts isolated from wild type and FAK-deficient mouse embryos. ET-1-mediated FAK activation and gene expression were studied in primary mouse lung fibroblasts, as well as in wild type and integrin β1-deficient fibroblasts. Results Increased FAK expression and activity are upregulated in fibroblast foci and remodeled vessels in lung fibrosis patients. Pharmacological or siRNA-mediated targeting of FAK resulted in marked abrogation of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis. Loss of FAK impaired the acquisition of a profibrotic phenotype in response to ET-1. Profibrotic gene expression leading to myofibroblast differentiation required cell adhesion, and was driven by Jun N-terminal kinase activation through integrin β1/FAK signaling. Conclusion These results implicate FAK as a central mediator of fibrogenesis, and highlight this kinase as a potential therapeutic target in fibrotic diseases. PMID:22492165

  15. Nano-micro structured superhydrophobic zinc coating on steel for prevention of corrosion and ice adhesion.

    PubMed

    Brassard, J D; Sarkar, D K; Perron, J; Audibert-Hayet, A; Melot, D

    2015-06-01

    Thin films of zinc have been deposited on steel substrates by electrodeposition process and further functionalized with ultra-thin films of commercial silicone rubber, in order to obtain superhydrophobic properties. Morphological feature, by scanning electron microscope (SEM), shows that the electrodeposited zinc films are composed of micro-nano rough patterns. Furthermore, chemical compositions of these films have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and infra-red (IRRAS). An optimum electrodeposition condition, based on electrical potential and deposition time, has been obtained which provides superhydrophobic properties with a water contact angle of 155±1°. The corrosion resistance properties, in artificial seawater, of the superhydrophobic zinc coated steel are found to be superior to bare steel. Similarly, the measured ice adhesion strength on superhydrophobic surfaces, using the centrifugal adhesion test (CAT), is found to be 6.3 times lower as compared to bare steel. This coating has promising applications in offshore environment, to mitigate corrosion and reduce ice adhesion. PMID:25529334

  16. INHIBITION OF CELL-MATRIX ADHESIONS PREVENTS CARTILAGE CHONDROCYTE DEATH FOLLOWING IMPACT INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Kee W.; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Martin, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Focal adhesions are transmembrane protein complexes that attach chondrocytes to the pericellular cartilage matrix and in turn, are linked to intracellular organelles via cytoskeleton. We previously found that excessive compression of articular cartilage leads to cytoskeleton-dependent chondrocyte death. Here we tested the hypothesis that this process also requires integrin activation and signaling via focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Src family kinase (SFK). Osteochondral explants were treated with FAK and SFK inhibitors (FAKi, SFKi respectively) for 2 hours and then subjected to a death-inducing impact load. Chondrocyte viability was assessed by confocal microscopy immediately and at 24 hours post-impact. With no treatment immediate post-impact viability was 59%. Treatment with 10μM SFKi, 10μM or 100μM FAKi improved viability to 80%, 77%, and 82% respectively (p<0.05). After 24 hours viability declined to 34% in controls, 48% with 10μM SFKi, 45% with 10μM FAKi, and 56% with 100μM FAKi (p<0.01) treatment. These results confirmed that most of the acute chondrocyte mortality was FAK- and SFK-dependent, which implicates integrin-cytoskeleton interactions in the death signaling pathway. Together with previous findings, these data support the hypothesis that the excessive tissue strains accompanying impact loading induce death via a pathway initiated by strain on cell adhesion receptors. PMID:24249698

  17. Prevention of post-operative infections after surgical treatment of bite wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Axel; Assadian, Ojan; Frank, Matthias; Bender, Claudia; Hinz, Peter

    2010-01-01

    After reviewing the literature about the microbial spectrum, the risk factors of post-operative infections, and the results of surgical interventions, the following recommendation can be made for the management of bite wounds: fresh, open wounds: surgical debridement, if appropriate, then an antiseptic lavage with a fluid consisting of povidone iodine and ethanol (e.g., Betaseptic®), no antibiotics, primary wound closure nearly closed fresh wounds (e.g., cat bites): surgical debridement, if appropriate, dressing with an antiseptic-soaked compress for ~60 minutes with repeated soaking (e.g., Betaseptic®), no antibiotics older wounds after ~4 hours: surgical debridement, if appropriate, dressing with an antiseptic-soaked compress or bandage for ~60 minutes with repeated soaking (e.g., Betaseptic®), at the same time intravenous or dose-adapted oral antibiotics (Amoxicillin and/or clavulanic acid) older wounds after ~24 hours: surgical debridement, then antiseptic lavage (Betaseptic®), in case of clinically apparent infection or inflammation surgical revision with opening of wound and treatment with antibiotics according to resistogram (empirical start with Amoxicillin and/or clavulanic acid). For each kind of bite wound, the patient’s tetanus immunization status as well as the risk of exposure to rabies have to be assessed. Similarly, the possibility of other infections, such as lues (Syphilis), hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HBC), hepatitis D (HDV) and HIV, in the rare case of a human bite wound, has to be taken into account. PMID:20941334

  18. Preventing healthcare-associated infections in cardiac surgical patients as a hallmark of excellence.

    PubMed

    Masud, Faisal; Vykoukal, Daynene

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HAI) are the tenth-leading cause of death in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that HAIs annually account for 1.7 million infections, 99,000 associated deaths, and a cost of approximately $30 billion. Nonreimbursement of some of these HAIs by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, public reporting of data (currently in 27 states), and the statistics listed above are driving quality initiatives to reduce or eliminate HAIs. However, a 2009 report from the Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality showed that little progress has been made towards eliminating HAIs. Reducing the risk of healthcare-associated infections is the Joint Commission's National Patient Safety Goal Number 7. Cardiac surgery has always been at the leading edge of innovation and quality care. Improvements in this field have been brought about by the needs of critically ill patients who are at high risk of death and by leaders such as Dr. Michael DeBakey who were driven to provide excellence in patient care. One of the prime examples of quality initiatives in cardiac surgery has been the development of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) National Database. This has helped to develop benchmarks by which different institutions are measured. The STS database will lead another initiative by providing public presentation of hospital- and surgeon-specific data in the near future. Even so, cardiac surgery patients are at especially high risk of developing HAIs. Use of invasive devices such as central lines, urinary catheters, ventilators, etc. - all of which are commonly utilized in the care of cardiac surgical patients - is one of the most significant risk factors for acquiring HAIs. Cardiac patients also have significant co-morbidities such as diabetes, obesity, increasing frailty, advanced age, and multiple redo-operations. This combination makes our patients more vulnerable to HAIs. Accordingly, in 2010 the

  19. Adrenohepatic fusion: Adhesion or invasion in primary virilizant giant adrenal carcinoma? Implications for surgical resection. Two case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Alastrué Vidal, Antonio; Navinés López, Jordi; Julián Ibáñez, Juan Francisco; De la Ossa Merlano, Napoleón; Botey Fernandez, Mireia; Sampere Moragues, Jaume; Sánchez Torres, Maria del Carmen; Barluenga Torres, Eva; Fernández-Llamazares Rodríguez, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adrenohepatic fusion means union between the adrenal gland and the liver, intermingling its parenchymas. It is not possible to identify this condition by image tests. Its presence implies radical and multidisciplinar approach. Presentation of cases We report two female cases of 45 and 50 years old with clinical virilization and palpable mass on the abdominal right upper quadrant corresponding to adrenocortical carcinoma with hepatic fusion. The contrast-enhanced tomography showed an indistinguishable mass involving the liver and the right adrenal gland. In the first case, the patient had a two-time operation, the former removing only the adrenal carcinoma, and the second performing a radical surgery after an early relapse. In the second case, a radical right en bloc adrenohepatectomy was performed. Both cases were pathologically reported as liver-infiltrating adrenal carcinoma. Only in the second case the surgery was radical effective as first intention to treat, with 3 years of disease-free survival. Discussion ACC is a rare entity with poor prognosis. The major indicators of malignancy are tumour diameter over 6 cm, local invasion or metastasis, secretion of corticosteroids, virilization and hypertension and hypokalaemia. The parenchymal fusion of the adrenal cortical layer can be misdiagnosed as hepatocellular carcinoma with adhesion with the Glisson capsule. AHF in such cases may be misinterpreted during surgery, what may impair its resectability, and therefore the survival. The surgical treatment must be performed en bloc, often using liver vascular control. Postoperative treatment must be offered immediately after surgery. Conclusion We report two consecutive rare cases of adrenohepatic fusion in giant right adrenocortical carcinoma, not detectable by imaging, what has important implications for the surgical decision-making. As radical surgery is the best choice to offer a curative treatment, it has to be performed by a multidisciplinary well

  20. Plasma-deposited fluorocarbon polymer films on titanium for preventing cell adhesion: a surface finishing for temporarily used orthopaedic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, B.; Testrich, H.; Rebl, H.; Walschus, U.; Schlosser, M.; Zietz, C.; Staehlke, S.; Nebe, J. B.; Weltmann, K. D.; Meichsner, J.; Polak, M.

    2016-06-01

    The design of a titanium implant surface should ideally support its later application in clinical use. Temporarily used implants have to fulfil requirements different from permanent implants: they should ensure the mechanical stabilization of the bone stock but in trauma surgery they should not be integrated into the bone because they will be removed after fracture healing. Finishing of the implant surface by a plasma-fluorocarbon-polymer (PFP) coating is a possible approach for preventing cell adhesion of osteoblasts. Two different low pressure gas-discharge plasma processes, microwave (MW 2.45 GHz) and capacitively coupled radio frequency (RF 13.56 MHz) plasma, were applied for the deposition of the PFP film using a mixture of the precursor octafluoropropane (C3F8) and hydrogen (H2). The thin films were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, and water contact angle measurements. Cell culture experiments show that cell adhesion and spreading of MG-63 osteoblasts were clearly reduced or nonexistent on these surfaces, also after 24 h of storage in the cell culture medium. In vivo data demonstrated that the local inflammatory tissue response for the PFP films deposited in MW and RF plasma were comparable to uncoated controls.

  1. Adhesions and Adhesiolysis: The Role of Laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kavic, Suzanne M.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Adhesions commonly result from abdominal and pelvic surgical procedures and may result in intestinal obstruction, infertility, chronic pain, or complicate subsequent operations. Laparoscopy produces less peritoneal trauma than does conventional laparotomy and may result in decreased adhesion formation. We present a review of the available data on laparoscopy and adhesion formation, as well as laparoscopic adhesiolysis. We also review current adjuvant techniques that may be used by practicing laparoscopists to prevent adhesion formation. Database: A Medline search using “adhesions,” “adhesiolysis,” and “laparoscopy” as key words was performed for English-language articles. Further references were obtained through cross-referencing the bibliography cited in each work. Discussion: The majority of studies indicate that laparoscopy may reduce postoperative adhesion formation relative to laparotomy. However, laparoscopy by itself does not appear to eliminate adhesions completely. A variety of adjuvant materials are available to surgeons, and the most recent investigation has demonstrated significant potential for intraperitoneal barriers. Newer technologies continue to evolve and should result in clinically relevant reductions in adhesion formation. PMID:12113430

  2. Utilization of star-shaped polymer architecture in the creation of high-density polymer brush coatings for the prevention of platelet and bacteria adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Totani, Masayasu; Terada, Kayo; Terashima, Takaya; Kim, Ill Yong; Ohtsuki, Chikara; Xi, Chuanwu; Tanihara, Masao

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate utilization of star-shaped polymers as high-density polymer brush coatings and their effectiveness to inhibit the adhesion of platelets and bacteria. Star polymers consisting of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) and/or poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), were synthesized using living radical polymerization with a ruthenium catalyst. The polymer coatings were prepared by simple drop casting of the polymer solution onto poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) surfaces and then dried. Among the star polymers prepared in this study, the PHEMA star polymer (star-PHEMA) and the PHEMA/PMMA (mol. ratio of 71/29) heteroarm star polymer (star-H71M29) coatings showed the highest percentage of inhibition against platelet adhesion (78–88% relative to noncoated PET surface) and Escherichia coli (94–97%). These coatings also showed anti-adhesion activity against platelets after incubation in Dulbecco's phosphate buffered saline or surfactant solution for 7 days. In addition, the PMMA component of the star polymers increased the scratch resistance of the coating. These results indicate that the star-polymer architecture provides high polymer chain density on PET surfaces to prevent adhesion of platelets and bacteria, as well as coating stability and physical durability to prevent exposure of bare PET surfaces. The star polymers provide a simple and effective approach to preparing anti-adhesion polymer coatings on biomedical materials against the adhesion of platelets and bacteria. PMID:25485105

  3. Utilization of star-shaped polymer architecture in the creation of high-density polymer brush coatings for the prevention of platelet and bacteria adhesion.

    PubMed

    Totani, Masayasu; Ando, Tsuyoshi; Terada, Kayo; Terashima, Takaya; Kim, Ill Yong; Ohtsuki, Chikara; Xi, Chuanwu; Kuroda, Kenichi; Tanihara, Masao

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate utilization of star-shaped polymers as high-density polymer brush coatings and their effectiveness to inhibit the adhesion of platelets and bacteria. Star polymers consisting of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) and/or poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), were synthesized using living radical polymerization with a ruthenium catalyst. The polymer coatings were prepared by simple drop casting of the polymer solution onto poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) surfaces and then dried. Among the star polymers prepared in this study, the PHEMA star polymer (star-PHEMA) and the PHEMA/PMMA (mol. ratio of 71/29) heteroarm star polymer (star-H71M29) coatings showed the highest percentage of inhibition against platelet adhesion (78-88% relative to noncoated PET surface) and Escherichia coli (94-97%). These coatings also showed anti-adhesion activity against platelets after incubation in Dulbecco's phosphate buffered saline or surfactant solution for 7 days. In addition, the PMMA component of the star polymers increased the scratch resistance of the coating. These results indicate that the star-polymer architecture provides high polymer chain density on PET surfaces to prevent adhesion of platelets and bacteria, as well as coating stability and physical durability to prevent exposure of bare PET surfaces. The star polymers provide a simple and effective approach to preparing anti-adhesion polymer coatings on biomedical materials against the adhesion of platelets and bacteria. PMID:25485105

  4. Surgical Technologists

    MedlinePlus

    ... in place during the procedure, or set up robotic surgical equipment. Technologists also may handle specimens taken ... sterilization techniques, how to set up technical or robotic equipment, and preventing and controlling infections. In addition ...

  5. Surgical Mesh

    MedlinePlus

    ... Device Safety Safety Communications Surgical Mesh: FDA Safety Communication Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Prolapse and Stress Urinary Incontinence More in Safety Communications Information About Heparin Preventing Tubing and Luer Misconnections ...

  6. Adhesion Awareness: A National Survey of Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Schreinemacher, Marc H. F.; ten Broek, Richard P.; Bakkum, Erica A.; van Goor, Harry

    2010-01-01

    Background Postoperative adhesions are the most frequent complication of abdominal surgery, leading to high morbidity, mortality, and costs. However, the problem seems to be neglected by surgeons for largely unknown reasons. Methods A survey assessing knowledge and personal opinion about the extent and impact of adhesions was sent to all Dutch surgeons and surgical trainees. The informed-consent process and application of antiadhesive agents were questioned in addition. Results The response rate was 34.4%. Two thirds of all respondents (67.7%) agreed that adhesions exert a clinically relevant, negative effect. A negative perception of adhesions correlated with a positive attitude regarding adhesion prevention (ρ = 0.182, p < 0.001). However, underestimation of the extent and impact of adhesions resulted in low knowledge scores (mean test score 37.6%). Lower scores correlated with more uncertainty about indications for antiadhesive agents which, in turn, correlated with never having used any of these agents (ρ = 0.140, p = 0.002; ρ = 0.095, p = 0.035; respectively). Four in 10 respondents (40.9%) indicated that they never inform patients on adhesions and only 9.8% informed patients routinely. A majority of surgeons (55.9%) used antiadhesive agents in the past, but only a minority (13.4%) did in the previous year. Of trainees, 82.1% foresaw an increase in the use of antiadhesive agents compared to 64.5% of surgeons (p < 0.001). Conclusions The magnitude of the problem of postoperative adhesions is underestimated and informed consent is provided inadequately by Dutch surgeons. Exerting adhesion prevention is related to the perception of and knowledge about adhesions. PMID:20814678

  7. Strategies Aimed at Preventing Chronic Post-surgical Pain: Comprehensive Perioperative Pain Management after Total Joint Replacement Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Woodhouse, Linda J.; Kennedy, Deborah; Stratford, Paul; Katz, Joel

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Chronic post-surgical pain (CPSP) is a frequent outcome of musculoskeletal surgery. Physiotherapists often treat patients with pain before and after musculoskeletal surgery. The purposes of this paper are (1) to raise awareness of the nature, mechanisms, and significance of CPSP; and (2) to highlight the necessity for an inter-professional team to understand and address its complexity. Using total joint replacement surgeries as a model, we provide a review of pain mechanisms and pain management strategies. Summary of Key Points: By understanding the mechanisms by which pain alters the body's normal physiological responses to surgery, clinicians selectively target pain in post-surgical patients through the use of multi-modal management strategies. Clinicians should not assume that patients receiving multiple medications have a problem with pain. Rather, the modern-day approach is to manage pain using preventive strategies, with the aims of reducing the intensity of acute postoperative pain and minimizing the development of CPSP. Conclusions: The roles of biological, surgical, psychosocial, and patient-related risk factors in the transition to pain chronicity require further investigation if we are to better understand their relationships with pain. Measuring pain intensity and analgesic use is not sufficient. Proper evaluation and management of risk factors for CPSP require inter-professional teams to characterize a patient's experience of postoperative pain and to examine pain arising during functional activities. PMID:22654235

  8. Tranexamic acid for the prevention and management of orthopedic surgical hemorrhage: current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Christopher; Park, Sam Si-Hyeong; Davey, J Roderick

    2015-01-01

    Total joint arthroplasty can be associated with major blood loss and require subsequent blood transfusions for postoperative anemia. Measures to effectively and safely decrease blood loss and reduce the need for blood transfusions would help improve patient safety and lower health care costs. A possible pharmacological option to reduce surgical blood loss in total joint arthroplasty is the use of tranexamic acid. Abundant literature has shown that intravenous and/or topical administration of tranexamic acid is effective in reducing blood loss and blood transfusions, with no increased risk of venous thromboembolic events or other complications. PMID:26345147

  9. Surgical site infection prevention: a survey to identify the gap between evidence and practice in University of Toronto teaching hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Eskicioglu, Cagla; Gagliardi, Anna R.; Fenech, Darlene S.; Forbes, Shawn S.; McKenzie, Marg; McLeod, Robin S.; Nathens, Avery B.

    2012-01-01

    Background A gap exists between the best evidence and practice with regards to surgical site infection (SSI) prevention. Awareness of evidence is the first step in knowledge translation. Methods A web-based survey was distributed to 59 general surgeons and 68 residents at University of Toronto teaching hospitals. Five domains pertaining to SSI prevention with questions addressing knowledge of prevention strategies, efficacy of antibiotics, strategies for changing practice and barriers to implementation of SSI prevention strategies were investigated. Results Seventy-six individuals (60%) responded. More than 90% of respondents stated there was evidence for antibiotic prophylaxis and perioperative normothermia and reported use of these strategies. There was a discrepancy in the perceived evidence for and the self-reported use of perioperative hyperoxia, omission of hair removal and bowel preparation. Eighty-three percent of respondents felt that consulting published guidelines is important in making decisions regarding antibiotics. There was also a discrepancy between what respondents felt were important strategies to ensure timely administration of antibiotics and what strategies were in place. Checklists, standardized orders, protocols and formal surveillance programs were rated most highly by 75%–90% of respondents, but less than 50% stated that these strategies were in place at their institutions. Conclusion Broad-reaching initiatives that increase surgeon and trainee awareness and implementation of multifaceted hospital strategies that engage residents and attending surgeons are needed to change practice. PMID:22617541

  10. Desmopressin in treatment of haematological disorders and in prevention of surgical bleeding.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Peter J; Bergqvist, Peter B F; Juul, Kristian Vinter; Berntorp, Erik

    2014-05-01

    Stimulation with the vasopressin analogue desmopressin (DDAVP) of extrarenal arginine vasopressin (AVP) V2-receptors in endothelial cells and possible in platelets increases the circulating levels of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII), von Willebrand factor (VWF) and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). The purpose of this paper is to provide an updated review of current information on the efficacy and safety of DDAVP in the treatment of haemophilia, von Willebrand disease (VWD), uremia, liver cirrhosis, and in congenital or drug-induced platelet dysfunction--under surgical or non-surgical conditions. In summary, desmopressin is an effective haemostatic drug that when administered i.v., s.c. or intranasally increases plasma levels of FVIII and VWF 2-6 times and improves platelet function. It has a proven haemostatic efficacy in mild haemophilia A and VWD as well as in uremia, liver cirrhosis and in congenital and acquired, drug induced platelet dysfunction. Desmopressin has few side effects but observation is advised in small children and elderly. PMID:24703870

  11. What is new in the surgical management and prevention of breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Spillane, Andrew J

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in Australian women. As most women now survive breast cancer, improving quality-of-life outcomes is increasingly important and major changes are occurring in breast surgery to meet this challenge. Use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy results in lower mastectomy rates, broader surgical options and less surgical morbidity. Oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS) facilitates less frequent need for mastectomy, better aesthetic outcomes and improved quality of life. Immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) improves quality of life and can be considered in a large proportion of women requiring mastectomy; however, Australia's rate of IBR is low compared with similar countries. Breast cancer risk reduction can be achieved with lifestyle modifications and, in women at high risk, chemoprevention with selective oestrogen receptor modulators or aromatase inhibitors. Bilateral prophylactic mastectomy is an option for BRCA gene mutation carriers or those women otherwise established to have a high level of risk. Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) is increasingly performed at the time of initial breast cancer management, largely driven by patient preference. However, CPM does not improve survival and has similar rates of complications as therapeutic mastectomy. It should be cautiously considered, with full discussion of risks and benefits. Breast Surgeons of Australia and New Zealand (BreastSurgANZ) coordinates training of most new breast surgeons and is fostering a broader range of multidisciplinary oncology, OBS and IBR skills in its members. The BreastSurgANZ Quality Audit monitors the quality of care provided by members. Training breast surgeons now have access to a Graduate Certificate in Surgery (Breast Surgery) to broaden their knowledge base. PMID:27125805

  12. Use of Modified Polysaccharide 4DryField (®) PH for Adhesion Prevention and Hemostasis in Gynecological Surgery: A Two-Center Observational Study by Second-Look Laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Korell, Matthias; Ziegler, Nicole; De Wilde, Rudy Leon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study evaluates both scopes of 4DryField PH, certified for adhesion prevention and hemostasis, in patients undergoing surgery for various and severe gynecological disorders. Methods. This is a two-institutional study. Adhesion prevention efficacy was evaluated using video documentation of first-look laparoscopies (FLL) and second-look laparoscopies (SLL); other patient data were analyzed retrospectively. Twenty patients with various disorders were evaluated, 4 assigned to a uterus pathology, 10 to endometriosis, and 6 to an adhesion disease group. Nine patients received 4DryField primarily for hemostasis and 11 solely for adhesion prevention. Nineteen patients had SLL after 5 to 12 weeks and one after 13 months. Results. At FLL with 4DryField, immediate hemostasis could be achieved in diffuse bleeding. At SLL, effective adhesion prevention was observed in 18 of all 20 women, with only 2 revealing major adhesions. In particular, only 1 of the 6 women with adhesion disease as predominant disorder showed major adhesions at SLL. Conclusions. Modified polysaccharide 4DryField is not only effective in diffuse bleeding. In this cohort with extensive surgery for various gynecological pathologies, 4DryField showed effective adhesion prevention as confirmed at SLL, too. Its use as premixed gel is a convenient variant for treatment of large peritoneal wounds. PMID:26904672

  13. Use of Modified Polysaccharide 4DryField® PH for Adhesion Prevention and Hemostasis in Gynecological Surgery: A Two-Center Observational Study by Second-Look Laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Korell, Matthias; Ziegler, Nicole; De Wilde, Rudy Leon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study evaluates both scopes of 4DryField PH, certified for adhesion prevention and hemostasis, in patients undergoing surgery for various and severe gynecological disorders. Methods. This is a two-institutional study. Adhesion prevention efficacy was evaluated using video documentation of first-look laparoscopies (FLL) and second-look laparoscopies (SLL); other patient data were analyzed retrospectively. Twenty patients with various disorders were evaluated, 4 assigned to a uterus pathology, 10 to endometriosis, and 6 to an adhesion disease group. Nine patients received 4DryField primarily for hemostasis and 11 solely for adhesion prevention. Nineteen patients had SLL after 5 to 12 weeks and one after 13 months. Results. At FLL with 4DryField, immediate hemostasis could be achieved in diffuse bleeding. At SLL, effective adhesion prevention was observed in 18 of all 20 women, with only 2 revealing major adhesions. In particular, only 1 of the 6 women with adhesion disease as predominant disorder showed major adhesions at SLL. Conclusions. Modified polysaccharide 4DryField is not only effective in diffuse bleeding. In this cohort with extensive surgery for various gynecological pathologies, 4DryField showed effective adhesion prevention as confirmed at SLL, too. Its use as premixed gel is a convenient variant for treatment of large peritoneal wounds. PMID:26904672

  14. Reduction of postsurgical adhesion formation with hydrogels synthesized by radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nho, Young-Chang; Lee, Joon-Ho

    2005-07-01

    Biocompatible and biodegradable hydrogels based on carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and polyethyleneglycol (PEG) were prepared as physical barriers for preventing surgical adhesions. These interpolymeric hydrogels were synthesized by gamma irradiation crosslinking technique. A 1.5 cm × 1.5 cm of cecal serosa and an adjacent abdominal wall were abraded with bone burr until the serosal surface was disrupted and hemorrhagic but not perforated. The denuded cecum was covered with either CMC/PEG hydrogels or a solution from a CMC/PEG hydrogel. Control rat serosa was not covered. Two weeks later, the rats were sacrificed and the adhesion was scored on a 0-5 scale. Control rat showed a significantly higher incidence of adhesions than either the CMC/PEG hydrogels or a solution from the CMC/PEG hydrogel. In conclusion, these studies demonstrate that CMC/PEG hydrogels have a function of the prevention for an intra abdominal adhesion in a rat model.

  15. CHOLINE PARTIALLY PREVENTS THE IMPACT OF ETHANOL ON THE LIPID RAFT DEPENDENT FUNCTIONS OF L1 CELL ADHESION MOLECULE

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ningfeng; Bamford, Penny; Jones, Jace; He, Min; Kane, Maureen A.; Mooney, Sandra M.; Bearer, Cynthia F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, the leading known cause of mental retardation, is caused by alcohol exposure during pregnancy. One mechanism of ethanol teratogenicity is the disruption of the function of L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1). These functions include enhancement of neurite outgrowth, trafficking through lipid rafts, and signal transduction. Recent data have shown that choline supplementation of rat pups reduces the effects of ethanol on neurobehavior. We sought to determine if choline could prevent the effect of ethanol on L1 function using a simple experimental system. Methods Cerebellar granule neurons (CGN) from postnatal day 6 rat pups were cultured with and without supplemental choline, and the effects on L1 signaling, lipid raft distribution and neurite outgrowth were measured in the presence or absence of ethanol. Results Choline significantly reduced the effect of ethanol on L1 signaling, the distribution of L1 in lipid rafts and L1 mediated neurite outgrowth. However, choline supplemented ethanol exposed cultures remained significantly different than controls. Conclusions Choline pretreatment of CGN significantly reduces the disruption of L1 function by ethanol, but does not completely return L1 function to baseline. This experimental system will enable discovery of the mechanism of the neuroprotective effect of choline. PMID:25421509

  16. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity prevents anchorage-independent ovarian carcinoma cell growth and tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Kristy K.; Tancioni, Isabelle; Lawson, Christine; Miller, Nichol L.G.; Jean, Christine; Chen, Xiao Lei; Uryu, Sean; Kim, Josephine; Tarin, David; Stupack, Dwayne G.; Plaxe, Steven C.; Schlaepfer, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Recurrence and spread of ovarian cancer is the 5th leading cause of death for women in the United States. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase located on chromosome 8q24.3 (gene is Ptk2), a site commonly amplified in serous ovarian cancer. Elevated FAK mRNA levels in serous ovarian carcinoma are associated with decreased (logrank P = 0.0007, hazard ratio 1.43) patient overall survival, but how FAK functions in tumor progression remains undefined. We have isolated aggressive ovarian carcinoma cells termed ID8-IP after intraperitoneal (IP) growth of murine ID8 cells in C57Bl6 mice. Upon orthotopic implantation within the periovarian bursa space, ID8-IP cells exhibit greater tumor growth, local and distant metastasis, and elevated numbers of ascites-associated cells compared to parental ID8 cells. ID8-IP cells exhibit enhanced growth under non-adherent conditions with elevated FAK and c-Src tyrosine kinase activation compared to parental ID8 cells. In vitro, the small molecule FAK inhibitor (Pfizer, PF562,271, PF-271) at 0.1 uM selectively prevented anchorage-independent ID8-IP cell growth with the inhibition of FAK tyrosine (Y)397 but not c-Src Y416 phosphorylation. Oral PF-271 administration (30 mg/kg, twice daily) blocked FAK but not c-Src tyrosine phosphorylation in ID8-IP tumors. This was associated with decreased tumor size, prevention of peritoneal metastasis, reduced tumor-associated endothelial cell number, and increased tumor cell-associated apoptosis. FAK knockdown and re-expression assays showed that FAK activity selectively promoted anchorage-independent ID8-IP cell survival. These results support the continued evaluation of FAK inhibitors as a promising clinical treatment for ovarian cancer. PMID:23275034

  17. Evaluation of lid speculum with a drape (LiDrape®) for preventing surgical-field contamination

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Toru; Kasaoka, Masataka; Sagawa, Kimitaka; Yamakawa, Ryoji

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the degree of surgical-field contamination in cataract surgeries between a new draping method using a lid speculum with a drape (LiDrape®) and a conventional draping method. Methods Cataract surgery was performed on 21 eyes using LiDrape® (LiDrape® group) and on 22 eyes using a conventional draping method (conventional group). Contamination was evaluated by bacterial culture of conjunctival sac scrapings and ocular surface irrigation fluid. Conjunctival sac scrapings were collected before and after application of preoperative antibiotics. Ocular surface irrigation fluid was collected before incision placement and during surgery. Bacterial detection rate and types of organisms isolated at these four time points were examined. Results Bacterial detection rates were significantly decreased in the LiDrape® group at all time points after the application of antibiotics compared with preapplication. Regarding between-group comparisons, the bacterial detection rate in the LiDrape® group was only significantly lower than that in the conventional group in the intraoperative sample. Propionibacterium acnes was the most common organism isolated from ocular surface irrigation fluid. The number of P. acnes in the intraoperative sample was significantly lower in the LiDrape® group compared with the conventional group. There were no significant differences in detection rates for other bacteria between the groups. Conclusion LiDrape® was as effective as conventional draping for preventing surgical-field contamination. The number of P. acnes during surgery was significantly lower in the LiDrape® group compared with the conventional group, suggesting that LiDrape® may contribute to the prevention of postoperative infection. PMID:26185413

  18. Costimulation-Adhesion Blockade is Superior to Cyclosporine A and Prednisone Immunosuppressive Therapy for Preventing Rejection of Differentiated Human Embryonic Stem Cells Following Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Bruno C.; Ransohoff, Julia D.; Ransohoff, Katherine J.; Riegler, Johannes; Ebert, Antje; Kodo, Kazuki; Gong, Yongquan; Sanchez-Freire, Veronica; Dey, Devaveena; Kooreman, Nigel G.; Diecke, Sebastian; Zhang, Wendy Y.; Odegaard, Justin; Hu, Shijun; Gold, Joseph D.; Robbins, Robert C.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derivatives are attractive candidates for therapeutic use. The engraftment and survival of hESC derivatives as xenografts or allografts require effective immunosuppression to prevent immune cell infiltration and graft destruction. Objective To test the hypothesis that a short-course, dual-agent regimen of two costimulation-adhesion blockade agents can induce better engraftment of hESC derivatives compared to current immunosuppressive agents. Methods and Results We transduced hESCs with a double fusion reporter gene construct expressing firefly luciferase (Fluc) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), and differentiated these cells to endothelial cells (hESC-ECs). Reporter gene expression enabled longitudinal assessment of cell engraftment by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Costimulation-adhesion therapy resulted in superior hESC-EC and mouse EC engraftment compared to cyclosporine therapy in a hindlimb model. Costimulation-adhesion therapy also promoted robust hESC-EC and hESC-derived cardiomyocyte (hESC-CM) survival in an ischemic myocardial injury model. Improved hESC-EC engraftment had a cardioprotective effect after myocardial injury, as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Mechanistically, costimulation-adhesion therapy is associated with systemic and intra-graft upregulation of T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3 (TIM3) and a reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine profile. Conclusions Costimulation-adhesion therapy is a superior alternative to current clinical immunosuppressive strategies for preventing the post-transplant rejection of hESC derivatives. By extending the window for cellular engraftment, costimulation-adhesion therapy enhances functional preservation following ischemic injury. This regimen may function through a TIM3-dependent mechanism. PMID:24038578

  19. The use of surveillance and preventative measures for methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus infections in surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality (AHRQ) found that Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is associated with up to 375,000 infections and 23,000 deaths in the United States. It is a major cause of surgical site infections, with a higher mortality and longer duration of care than Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. A multifactorial bundled approach is needed to control this epidemic, with single interventions unlikely to have a significant impact on attenuating MRSA infection rates. Active surveillance has been studied in a wide range of surgical patients, including surgical intensive care and non-intensive care units; cardiac, vascular, orthopedic, obstetric, head and neck cancer and gastrostomy patients. There is sufficient evidence demonstrating a beneficial effect of surveillance and eradication prior to surgery to recommend its use on an expanded basis. Studies on MRSA surveillance in surgical patients that were published over the last 10 years were reviewed. In at least five of these studies, the MRSA colonization status of patients was reported to be a factor in preoperative antibiotic selection, with the modification of treatment regiments including the switching to vancomycin or teicoplanin in MRSA positive preoperative patients. Several authors also used decolonization protocols on all preoperative patients but used surveillance to determine the duration of the decolonization. Universal decolonization of all patients, regardless of MRSA status has been advocated as an alternative prevention protocol in which surveillance is not utilized. Concern exists regarding antimicrobial stewardship. The daily and universal use of intranasal antibiotics and/or antiseptic washes may encourage the promotion of bacterial resistance and provide a competitive advantage to other more lethal organisms. Decolonization protocols which indiscriminately neutralize all bacteria may not be the best approach. If a patient's microbiome is markedly

  20. 21 CFR 878.4380 - Drape adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drape adhesive. 878.4380 Section 878.4380 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4380 Drape adhesive. (a) Identification. A drape adhesive is a device intended to be placed on the skin to attach a surgical drape....

  1. 21 CFR 878.4380 - Drape adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drape adhesive. 878.4380 Section 878.4380 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4380 Drape adhesive. (a) Identification. A drape adhesive is a device intended to be placed on the skin to attach a surgical drape....

  2. The Prevention of Delirium and Complications Associated with Surgical Treatments (PODCAST) study: protocol for an international multicentre randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Avidan, Michael S; Fritz, Bradley A; Maybrier, Hannah R; Muench, Maxwell R; Escallier, Krisztina E; Chen, Yulong; Ben Abdallah, Arbi; Veselis, Robert A; Hudetz, Judith A; Pagel, Paul S; Noh, Gyujeong; Pryor, Kane; Kaiser, Heiko; Arya, Virendra Kumar; Pong, Ryan; Jacobsohn, Eric; Grocott, Hilary P; Choi, Stephen; Downey, Robert J; Inouye, Sharon K; Mashour, George A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Postoperative delirium is one of the most common complications of major surgery, affecting 10–70% of surgical patients 60 years and older. Delirium is an acute change in cognition that manifests as poor attention and illogical thinking and is associated with longer intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stay, long-lasting cognitive deterioration and increased mortality. Ketamine has been used as an anaesthetic drug for over 50 years and has an established safety record. Recent research suggests that, in addition to preventing acute postoperative pain, a subanaesthetic dose of intraoperative ketamine could decrease the incidence of postoperative delirium as well as other neurological and psychiatric outcomes. However, these proposed benefits of ketamine have not been tested in a large clinical trial. Methods The Prevention of Delirium and Complications Associated with Surgical Treatments (PODCAST) study is an international, multicentre, randomised controlled trial. 600 cardiac and major non-cardiac surgery patients will be randomised to receive ketamine (0.5 or 1 mg/kg) or placebo following anaesthetic induction and prior to surgical incision. For the primary outcome, blinded observers will assess delirium on the day of surgery (postoperative day 0) and twice daily from postoperative days 1–3 using the Confusion Assessment Method or the Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU. For the secondary outcomes, blinded observers will estimate pain using the Behavioral Pain Scale or the Behavioral Pain Scale for Non-Intubated Patients and patient self-report. Ethics and dissemination The PODCAST trial has been approved by the ethics boards of five participating institutions; approval is ongoing at other sites. Recruitment began in February 2014 and will continue until the end of 2016. Dissemination plans include presentations at scientific conferences, scientific publications, stakeholder engagement and popular media. Registration details The study is

  3. Efficacy and Safety of Sodium Hyaluronate with 1,4-Butanediol Diglycidyl Ether Compared to Sodium Carboxymethylcellulose in Preventing Adhesion Formation after Lumbar Discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Gyu Yeul; Oh, Chang Hyun; Moon, Byung Gwan; Yi, Seong; Han, In Bo; Heo, Dong Hwa; Kim, Ki-Tack; Kim, Keung Nyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Epidural injection of hyaluronic acid may prevent adhesion formation after spine surgery, but the compounds used to stabilize hyaluronidase could interfere with its anti-adhesion effects. The present study was conducted as a clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an experimental medical gel in preventing adhesion formation. Methods This study was designed as a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, and comparative controlled clinical trial with an observation period of 6 weeks. Subjects were randomly assigned into two groups: group A with sodium hyaluronate + 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDE) and group B with sodium hyaluronate + sodium carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). Visual analogue scale (VAS) of back and leg pain and the Oswestry disability index (ODI) and scar score ratings were assessed after surgery. Results Mean scar grade was 2.37±1.13 in group A and 2.75±0.97 in group B, a statistically significant difference (p=0.012). VAS of back and leg pain and ODI scores decreased significantly from baseline to 3 and 6 weeks postoperatively in both groups (p<0.001). However, VAS and ODI scores were not statistically different between groups A and B at baseline or at 3 and 6 weeks after operation (p>0.3). The number of adverse reactions related to the anti-adhesion gels was not statistically different (p=0.569), but subsequent analysis of nervous adverse reactions showed group B was superior with a statistically difference (p=0.027). Conclusion Sodium hyaluronate with BDDE demonstrated similar anti-adhesion properties to sodium hyaluronate with CMC. But, care should be used to nervous adverse reactions by using sodium hyaluronate with BDDE. PMID:26217381

  4. Sulforaphane reduces vascular inflammation in mice and prevents TNF-α-induced monocyte adhesion to primary endothelial cells through interfering with the NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Nallasamy, Palanisamy; Si, Hongwei; Babu, Pon Velayutham Anandh; Pan, Dengke; Fu, Yu; Brooke, Elizabeth A S; Shah, Halley; Zhen, Wei; Zhu, Hong; Liu, Dongmin; Li, Yunbo; Jia, Zhenquan

    2014-08-01

    Sulforaphane, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate present in cruciferous vegetables, has received wide attention for its potential to improve vascular function in vitro. However, its effect in vivo and the molecular mechanism of sulforaphane at physiological concentrations remain unclear. Here, we report that a sulforaphane concentration as low as 0.5 μM significantly inhibited tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced adhesion of monocytes to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, a key event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis both in static and under flow conditions. Such physiological concentrations of sulforaphane also significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced production of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and adhesion molecules including soluble vascular adhesion molecule-1 and soluble E-selectin, key mediators in the regulation of enhanced endothelial cell-monocyte interaction. Furthermore, sulforaphane inhibited TNF-α-induced nuclear factor (NF)-κB transcriptional activity, Inhibitor of NF-κB alpha (IκBα) degradation and subsequent NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in endothelial cells, suggesting that sulforaphane can inhibit inflammation by suppressing NF-κB signaling. In an animal study, sulforaphane (300 ppm) in a mouse diet significantly abolished TNF-α-increased ex vivo monocyte adhesion and circulating adhesion molecules and chemokines in C57BL/6 mice. Histology showed that sulforaphane treatment significantly prevented the eruption of endothelial lining in the intima layer of the aorta and preserved elastin fibers' delicate organization, as shown by Verhoeff-van Gieson staining. Immunohistochemistry studies showed that sulforaphane treatment also reduced vascular adhesion molecule-1 and monocyte-derived F4/80-positive macrophages in the aorta of TNF-α-treated mice. In conclusion, sulforaphane at physiological concentrations protects against TNF-α-induced vascular endothelial inflammation, in both in vitro and in vivo models. This anti

  5. Prevention of postoperative pericardial adhesions by closure of the pericardium with absorbable polymer patches. An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Malm, T; Bowald, S; Bylock, A; Busch, C

    1992-09-01

    Pericardial adhesions after cardiac operations are a widely known phenomenon. They may severely complicate reoperations, making reentry hazardous, increasing bleeding, and prolonging the operation time. The anatomic orientation and visibility of both bypass grafts and coronary arteries are also impaired. With the aim of minimizing pericardial adhesions after cardiac operations, we studied the course of tissue regeneration after implantation of a new absorbable patch made from poly-hydroxy-butyrate. A total of 23 sheep were studied. Of these, 18 formed the test group and five served as control animals. The animals were killed at intervals of 2 to 30 months after the operation. In 14 of the 18 test animals no adhesions developed. In three animals loose adhesions were found, and in one with signs of postoperative infection there were moderate, generalized adhesions. All control sheep showed moderate adhesions; no infection was noted in this group. Light microscopy in the test group revealed a layer of mesothelium-like cells facing the epicardial side; this was already present in the early specimens. Poly-hydroxy-butyrate appeared to be slowly phagocytosed by polynucleated macrophages, which were still found occasionally in the late samples. Lymphocytes and platelets were rare. Scanning electron microscopy showed, on the epicardial side of the regenerated tissue, a mesothelium-like lining that completely covered the underlying collagen layer. The surface cell morphology grossly resembled that of native pericardium. It was concluded that in this animal model poly-hydroxy-butyrate pericardial patches decreased adhesions and preserved coronary anatomy. The findings in the control group demonstrated that pericardial surgery in the sheep was associated with adhesion formation. PMID:1513149

  6. Temporalis Muscle Transfer for the Treatment of Lagophthalmos in Patients With Leprosy: Refinement in Surgical Techniques to Prevent Postoperative Ptosis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung Yul; Park, Hyang Joon; Kim, Jong Pill; Park, Tae Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Facial paralysis resulting from leprosy has a serious impact on the entire face especially in the areas innervated by the facial nerves. In particular, lagophthalmos in patients with leprosy causes exposure keratitis, corneal, and conjunctival dryness, which can progress to blindness and disfigurement. Recently, we conducted 4 different temporalis muscle transfer (TMT) methods over the last 4 years to reduce ptosis. The methods used included Brown-McDowell, McCord-Codner, modified Gillies-Anderson, and modified Gillies. Seventy-five TMT operations in 60 patients were performed between 2011 and 2014. The mean age was 70.1. Fifteen patients had bilateral TMT procedures. As a result, ptosis appeared in 14(18.7%) of 75 TMT procedures for 4 years. To prevent or correct this complication, the following 4 technical refinements have simplified the surgery and yield better surgical outcomes. First, an increase in the length of the temporalis muscle flap to approximately 8 cm with a parallel course to the lateral canthus will reduce oblique pull. Second, the width of the fascia sling in the upper eyelid is narrowed (3-4 mm) to reduce weight on the eyelid. Third, the fascia sling in the upper lid should not be located along the full length of the upper lid but terminate 3.5 cm medial to lateral canthal tendon and in other words, should not be tied at the medial canthal tendon to reduce tension and weight. Lastly, the fascia sling in the eyelid should be located shallow (probably in subdermal layer) and as near as possible to the lid margin to prevent any functional disturbance in levator aponeurosis. PMID:26674897

  7. Prevention of Incisional Surgical Site Infection Using a Subcuticular Absorbable Suture in Elective Surgery for Gastrointestinal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bou, Hideki; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Maejima, Kentarou; Uchida, Eiji; Tokunaga, Akira

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether subcuticular absorbable sutures actually reduce incisional SSI in patients undergoing surgery for gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. Surgical site infection (SSI) is still a source of major complications in digestive tract surgery. Reportedly, incisional SSI can be reduced using subcuticular suturing. We performed subcuticular suturing using a 4-0 absorbable monofilament in patients undergoing elective surgery for GI cancer beginning in 2008. Using an interrupted technique, sutures were placed 1.5-2.0cm from the edge of the wound, with everted subcuticular sutures created at intervals of 1.5-2.0cm. The control group consisted of cases in which the common subcutaneous suture method using clip. One hundred cases were examined in the subcuticular group. The incidence of SSI was 0% in the subcuticular suture group, compared with 13.9% in the control group; this difference was significant. Incisional SSI can be prevented using the devised subcuticular absorbable sutures in patients undergoing elective surgery for GI cancer. PMID:26414820

  8. The Architecture and Biological Function of Dual Antibody-Coated Dendrimers: Enhanced Control of Circulating Tumor cells and Their Hetero-Adhesion to Endothelial Cells for Metastasis Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jingjing; Zhao, Rongli; Gu, Songen; Dong, Haiyan; Wang, Jichuang; Lu, Yusheng; Sinko, Patrick J.; Yu, Ting; Xie, Fangwei; Wang, Lie; Shao, Jingwei; Jia, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Dissemination of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood and their hetero-adhesion to vascular endothelial bed of distant metastatic secondary organs are the critical steps to initiate cancer metastasis. The rarity of CTCs made their in vivo capture technically challenging. Current techniques by virtue of nanostructured scaffolds monovalently conjugated with a single antibody and/or drug seem less efficient and specific in capturing CTCs. Here, we report a novel platform developed to re-engineer nanoscale dendrimers for capturing CTCs in blood and interfering their adhesion to vascular endothelial bed to form micrometastatic foci. The nanoscale dendrimers were spatiotemporally accommodated with dual antibodies to target two surface biomarkers of colorectal CTCs. Physiochemical characterization, including spectra, fluorescence, electron microscope, dynamic light scattering, electrophoresis, and chromatography analyses, was conducted to demonstrate the successful conjugation of dual antibodies to dendrimer surface. The dual antibody conjugates were able to specifically recognize and bind CTCs, moderately down-regulate the activity of the captured CTCs by arresting them in S phase. The related adhesion assay displayed that the dual antibody conjugates interfered the hetero-adhesion of CTCs to fibronectin (Fn)-coated substrates and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The dual antibody conjugates also showed the enhanced specificity and efficiency in vitro and in vivo in restraining CTCs in comparison with their single antibody counterparts. The present study showed a novel means to effectively prevent cancer metastatic initiation by binding, restraining CTCs and inhibiting their hetero-adhesion to blood vessels, not by traditional cytotoxic-killing of cancer cells. PMID:25285173

  9. Effect of Hypericum perforatum on intraperitoneal adhesion formation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hızlı, Fatih; Köşüş, Aydın; Yılmaz, Saynur; Köşüş, Nermin; Haltaş, Hacer; Dede, Hülya; Kafalı, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Hypericum perforatum for prevention of adhesion formation in rats. Material and methods Twenty-four female wistar rats underwent left uterine horn adhesion model. Rats were randomised into 4 groups. Group 1 (Control): Closure of abdominal incision without any agent administration. Group 2: Closure of incision after administration of intraperitoneal (i.p.) Ringer's lactate solution. Group 3: Closure of incision after administration of i.p. olive oil (diluent of H. perforatum). Group 4: Hypericum perforatum extract (Ecodab®) was administered i.p. before the closure of incision. Fourteen days later, relaparatomy was performed and surgical adhesion scores, inflammation and fibrosis scores were noted. Groups were compared according to these scores. Results There was statistical significant difference between ringer's lactate group and olive oil group according to surgical adhesion score (p = 0.009). However, groups were not different according to inflammation and fibrosis scores (p > 0.05). Conclusions Despite antiinflammatory, antioxidants and antimicrobial properties of H. perforatum, our results revealed no positive effect of H. perforatum on the prevention of intraperitoneal adhesion formation. PMID:24904678

  10. Chemical Modification of Reactive Multilayered Films Fabricated from Poly(2-Alkenyl Azlactone)s: Design of Surfaces that Prevent or Promote Mammalian Cell Adhesion and Bacterial Biofilm Growth

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Maren E.; Breitbach, Anthony S.; Belgrade, Sonja K.; Blackwell, Helen E.; Lynn, David M.

    2009-01-01

    We report an approach to the design of reactive polymer films that can be functionalized post-fabrication to either prevent or promote the attachment and growth of cells. Our approach is based on the reactive layer-by-layer assembly of covalently crosslinked thin films using a synthetic polyamine and a polymer containing reactive azlactone functionality. Our results demonstrate (i) that the residual azlactone functionality in these films can be exploited to immobilize amine-functionalized chemical motifs similar to those that promote or prevent cell and protein adhesion when assembled as self-assembled monolayers on gold-coated surfaces, and (ii) that the immobilization of these motifs changes significantly the behaviors and interactions of cells with the surfaces of these polymer films. We demonstrate that films treated with the hydrophobic molecule decylamine support the attachment and growth of mammalian cells in vitro. In contrast, films treated with the hydrophilic carbohydrate D-glucamine prevent cell adhesion and growth almost completely. The results of additional experiments suggest that these large differences in cell behavior can be understood, at least in part, in terms of differences in the abilities of these two different chemical motifs to promote or prevent the adsorption of protein onto film coated surfaces. We demonstrate further that this approach can be used to pattern regions of these reactive films that resist the initial attachment and subsequent invasion of mammalian cells for periods of at least one month in the presence of serum-containing cell culture media. Finally, we report that films that prevent the adhesion and growth of mammalian cells also prevent the initial formation of bacterial biofilms when incubated in the presence of the clinically relevant pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The results of these studies, collectively, suggest the basis of general approaches to the fabrication and functionalization of thin films that prevent

  11. A monoclonal antibody directed against a human cell membrane antigen prevents cell substrate adhesion and tumor invasion.

    PubMed Central

    De Potter, C. R.; Schelfhout, A. M.; De Smet, F. H.; Van Damme, S.; de Ridder, L.; Dhont, E.; van Emmelo, J.

    1994-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to design mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that can inhibit the invasion of breast cancer cells in the host tissue. Therefore, MAbs were raised against epitopes on the extracellular domain of SK-BR-3 human breast cancer cells, and biological assays were performed to test the capability of the MAbs to inhibit cell substrate adhesion. MAb 14C5 bound an extracellular plasma membrane antigen of SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and inhibited the cell substrate adhesion of these cells in vitro. The MAb delayed the adhesion of MCF-7 and SK-BR-3 cells on precultured embryonic heart fragments (PHFS). It inhibited the destruction of the PHF by MCF-7 cells and the invasion of the PHF by SK-BR-3 cells. The MAb reacted with an epitope on the cell membrane of in situ and invasive ductal carcinomas of the breast in immunohistochemistry. Poorly differentiated, highly invasive ductal carcinomas show extensive staining of long plasma membrane extensions. Normal multilayered epithelia, normal connective tissue, and tumors derived from these tissues as well as normal breast tissue were negative. From both cell lines a protein complex consisting of two subunits with molecular weight of 50 and 90 kd, respectively, was immunoprecipitated. It is concluded that the 14C5 antigen plays a role in cell substrate adhesion and subsequently also in invasion of breast cancer cells. The 14C5 MAb was able to inhibit cell substrate adhesion and invasion in vitro of breast cancer cells. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8291615

  12. An insect trap as habitat: cohesion-failure mechanism prevents adhesion of Pameridea roridulae bugs to the sticky surface of the plant Roridula gorgonias.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Dagmar; Gorb, Stanislav

    2008-08-01

    The glandular trichomes of the plant Roridula gorgonias release an extremely adhesive, visco-elastic, resinous secretion that traps a variety of insects, including those having a considerable body size. However, the specialized mutualistic mirid bug Pameridea roridulae lives and walks on this sticky plant surface without being trapped. We have sought to reveal the mechanism underlying the apparent non-sticky nature of the cuticle of this bug. In this study, we have visualized intact plant and insect surfaces using cryo-scanning electron microscopy and measured the adhesive properties of the plant secretion on different surfaces. We present a combination of structural and experimental results that suggest that a thick and cohesively weak film of an outermost, epicuticular greasy secretion acts as a ;sloughing-off' layer, preventing the formation of contacts between the sticky plant secretion and the solid insect cuticle. In a comparative study of fresh cuticle fractures of flies representing a typical prey of R. gorgonias, a thin, fragmentary layer of epicuticular grease was revealed. These results indicate that, when trapping prey, the plant adhesive might form proper contact with solid islands of the insect cuticle that are free of epicuticular grease. PMID:18689418

  13. Inhibition of postsurgical adhesions by methylene blue-loaded nanofibers versus cast film matrices.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Nesma; Galal, Sally; El-Gowelli, Hanan; El-Khordagui, Labiba

    2016-07-01

    In the quest for barrier membranes for the prevention of post-surgical tissue adhesions, polymer matrices may provide a platform of biomaterials with versatile properties. However, the relationship between the anti-adhesion effects of different polymer matrices and their physicochemical and structural properties is not yet adequately understood. In a preclinical study using a rat cecum model, we directly compared the anti-adhesion potential of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) electrospun nanofibrous versus cast film matrices loaded with methylene blue (MB) as antioxidant adhesion inhibitor. PHB retained MB presumably forming MB-bioactivated matrices. In the preclinical study, quantitative morphologic assessment in addition to histopathologic and SEM examinations 14 days post-surgery indicated that plain PHB NFs and MB-PHB NFs, moderately enhanced cecal wall healing and inhibited adhesion formation. In contrast, reshaping PHB as cast films, significantly enhanced healing, reduced adhesion bands and prevented inter-visceral adhesions. Cast films also inhibited tissue attachment to the matrix recovered 14 days post-surgery. Both PHB matrix types reduced tissue inflammation. Despite tissue anti-adhesion potential of individual matrix components, modulation of the micro-architectural properties generated polymer barriers with varying tissue anti-adhesion and healing potentials, the MB-loaded cast film achieving the best outcome. PMID:27093975

  14. Polyurethane adhesive ingestion.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Polyurethane adhesives are found in a large number of household products in the United States and are used for a variety of purposes. Several brands of these expanding wood glues (those containing diphenylmethane diisocyanate [MDI]) have the potential to form gastrointestinal (GI) foreign bodies if ingested. The ingested adhesive forms an expanding ball of glue in the esophagus and gastric lumen. This expansion is caused by a polymerization reaction using the heat, water, and gastric acids of the stomach. A firm mass is created that can be 4-8 times its original volume. As little as 2 oz of glue have been reported to develop gastric foreign bodies. The obstructive mass is reported to form within minutes of ingestion of the adhesive. The foreign body can lead to esophageal impaction and obstruction, airway obstruction, gastric outflow obstruction, mucosal hemorrhage, ulceration, laceration, perforation of the esophageal and gastric linings, and death. Clinical signs following ingestion include anorexia, lethargy, vomiting, tachypnea, and abdominal distention and pain, and typically develop within 12 hours. Clinical signs may depend upon the size of the mass. If left untreated, perforation and rupture of the esophagus or stomach can occur. The glue mass does not stick to the GI mucosa and is not always detectable on abdominal palpation. Radiographs are recommended to confirm the presence of the "glue-ball" foreign body, and radiographic evidence of the obstruction may be seen as early as 4-6 hours following ingestion. Emesis is contraindicated owing to the risk of aspiration of the glue into the respiratory tree or the subsequent lodging of the expanding glue mass in the esophagus. Likewise, efforts to dilute the glue and prevent the formation of the foreign body through administration of liquids, activated charcoal, or bulk-forming products to push the foreign body through the GI tract have proven ineffective. Even endoscopy performed to remove the foreign body has

  15. Sulforaphane reduces vascular inflammation in mice and prevents TNF-α-induced monocyte adhesion to primary endothelial cells through interfering with the NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nallasamy, Palanisamy; Si, Hongwei; Babu, Pon Velayutham Anandh; Pan, Dengke; Fu, Yu; Brooke, Elizabeth A.S.; Shah, Halley; Zhen, Wei; Zhu, Hong; Liu, Dongmin; Li, Yunbo; Jia, Zhenquan

    2014-01-01

    Sulforaphane, a naturally-occurring isothiocyanate present in cruciferous vegetables, has received wide attention for its potential to improve vascular function in vitro. However, its effect in vivo and the molecular mechanism of sulforaphane at physiological concentrations remain unclear. Here, we report that a sulforaphane concentration as low as 0.5 μM significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced adhesion of monocytes to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), a key event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis both in static and under flow conditions. Such physiological concentrations of sulforaphane also significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced production of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), adhesion molecule sVCAM-1 and sE-Selectin, key mediators in the regulation of enhanced endothelial cell-monocyte interaction. Furthermore, sulforaphane inhibited TNF-α-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity, IκBα degradation and subsequent NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in endothelial cells, suggesting that sulforaphane can inhibit inflammation by suppressing NF-κB signaling. In an animal study, sulforaphane (300 ppm) in a mouse diet significantly abolished TNF-α-increased ex vivo monocyte adhesion and circulating adhesion molecules and chemokines in C57BL/6 mice. Histology showed that sulforaphane treatment significantly prevented the eruption of endothelial lining in the intima layer of the aorta and preserved elastin fibers’ delicate organization as shown by Verhoeff-van Gieson staining. Immunohistochemistry studies showed that sulforaphane treatment also reduced VCAM-1 and monocytes-derived F4/80-positive macrophages in the aorta of TNF-α-treated mice. In conclusion, sulforaphane at physiological concentrations protects against TNF-α-induced vascular endothelial inflammation, in both in vitro and in vivo models. This anti-inflammatory effect of sulforaphane may be, at least in part, associated with interfering with the NF-κB pathway. PMID:24880493

  16. Aggregation of human platelets by endotoxic glycolipid-bearing Salmonella minnesota Re595 is prevented by synthetic peptide analogs of cell adhesion sites of fibrinogen and fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Timmons, S.; Grabarek, J.; Kloczewiak, M.; Hawiger, J.

    1986-03-01

    Thrombocytopenia often accompanies sepsis due to endotoxin producing gram-negative bacteria. The authors have observed that mutant Re595 of S. minnesota induced aggregation of human platelets separated from plasma fibrinogen (Theta) and other proteins. This aggregation is dependent on ADP secreted from storage granules in response to mutant Re595. Platelet aggregation induced by mutant Re595 was prevented by simultaneously added EDTA and EGTA (5mM), whereas secretion of /sup 14/C-serotonin was maintained. Preincubation of platelets with chelators (1 hr, 37/sup 0/C), known to dissociate irreversibly the platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb x IIIa complex, abolished aggregation while serotonin secretion was decreased by only one fourth. Since the GPIIb x IIIa complex constitutes the receptor for Theta, its role was examined using synthetic peptide analogs of sites on gamma and alpha chains of Theta. Gamma 400-411 (225 ..mu..M) inhibited platelet aggregation induced by mutant Re595 while serotonin secretion was unaffected. Alpha 572-575 (RGDS; 100 ..mu..M), analogous to cell adhesion site of fibronectin, also prevented aggregation induced by mutant Re595. Thus, mutant Re595 causes platelet aggregation which is divalent cation-dependent and proceeds via receptor pathway for secreted adhesive macromolecules.

  17. The cost-effectiveness of multi-component interventions to prevent delirium in older people undergoing surgical repair of hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Akunne, Anayo; Davis, Sarah; Westby, Maggie; Young, John

    2014-02-01

    This article summarizes the detailed cost-effectiveness analysis of delirium prevention interventions in people undergoing surgical repair of hip fracture. We compared a multi-component delirium prevention intervention with usual care using a model based on a decision tree analysis. The model was used to estimate the incremental net monetary benefit (INMB). The robustness of the cost-effectiveness result was explored using deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. The multi-component prevention intervention was cost-effective when compared to usual care. It was associated with an INMB of £8,180 using a cost-effectiveness threshold of £20,000 per QALY. It remained cost-effective in the majority of the deterministic sensitivity analyses and was cost-effective in 96.4 % of the simulations carried out in the probabilistic sensitivity analysis. We have demonstrated the cost-effectiveness of a multi-component delirium prevention intervention that targets modifiable risk factors for delirium in older people undergoing surgical repair of hip fracture. It is an attractive intervention for practitioners and health care policy makers as they address the double burden of hip fracture and delirium. PMID:23412312

  18. Adhesive Performance of Biomimetic Adhesive-Coated Biologic Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, John L.; Vollenweider, Laura; Xu, Fangmin; Lee, Bruce P.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical repair of a discontinuity in traumatized or degenerated soft tissues is traditionally accomplished using sutures. A current trend is to reinforce this primary repair with surgical grafts, meshes, or patches secured with perforating mechanical devices (i.e., sutures, staples, or tacks). These fixation methods frequently lead to chronic pain and mesh detachment. We developed a series of biodegradable adhesive polymers that are synthetic mimics of mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs), composed of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA)-derivatives, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and polycaprolactone (PCL). These polymers can be cast into films, and their mechanical properties, extent of swelling, and degradation rate can be tailored through the composition of the polymers as well as blending with additives. When coated onto a biologic mesh used for hernia repair, these adhesive constructs demonstrated adhesive strengths significantly higher than fibrin glue. With further development, a pre-coated bioadhesive mesh may represent a new surgical option for soft tissue repair. PMID:20919699

  19. Knowledge, Practice, and Associated Factors towards Prevention of Surgical Site Infection among Nurses Working in Amhara Regional State Referral Hospitals, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Teshager, Freahiywot Aklew; Engeda, Eshetu Haileselassie; Worku, Workie Zemene

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge and practice of nurses about surgical site infections (SSIs) are not well studied in Ethiopia. This paper contains findings about Northwest Ethiopian nurses' knowledge and practice regarding the prevention of SSIs. The main objective of the study was to assess knowledge, practice, and associated factors of nurses towards the prevention of SSIs. The study was done using a questionnaire survey on randomly selected 423 nurses who were working in referral hospitals during the study period. The study showed that more than half of the nurses who participated in the survey had inadequate knowledge about the prevention of SSIs. Moreover, more than half of them were practicing inappropriately. The most important associated factors include lack of training on evidence based guidelines and sociodemographic variables (age, year of service, educational status, etc.). Training of nurses with the up-to-date SSIs guidelines is recommended. PMID:26788549

  20. Ghrelin Inhibits Post-Operative Adhesions via Blockage of the TGF-β Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Enrica; Boekelheide, Kim; Sigman, Mark; Lamb, Dolores J.; Hall, Susan J.; Hwang, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Post-operative adhesions are a critical problem in pelvic and abdominal surgery despite a multitude of studies dedicated to finding modalities to prevent their occurrence. Ghrelin administration promotes an anti-fibrotic response in a surgical mouse model of adhesion-induction, but the mechanisms mediating this effect have not been established. In the current study, the molecular mechanisms that underlie the anti-adhesion effect of ghrelin were investigated. Post-surgical adhesions were experimentally created in C57BL/6 wild-type mice via a combination of ischemic peritoneal buttons and cecal multiple abrasions. Ghrelin or saline intraperitoneal injections were given twice daily from two days before surgery to selected time points post-surgically to assess the phenotypic and molecular effects of treatment (1 day (n = 20), 4 days (n = 20) and 20 days (n = 40) after surgery). Endpoints included the scoring of adhesions and gene and protein expression analysis of pro-fibrogenic factors conducted on peritoneal ischemic tissue by quantitative PCR and Western blot. Ghrelin administration significantly reduced post-surgical adhesions and down-regulated pro-inflammatory gene and protein expression, including Tgfb3 and Tgfbr2. The up-regulation of inhibitory proteins Smad6 and Smad7 confirmed the ghrelin-induced blockage of TGF-β signaling. Ghrelin is a candidate therapeutic drug for post-operative adhesion prevention, inhibiting inflammatory responses via blockage of the TGF-β signaling pathway at the onset of surgery before the occurrence of the granulation-remodeling phase. PMID:27082244

  1. Cimetidine inhibits cancer cell adhesion to endothelial cells and prevents metastasis by blocking E-selectin expression.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Matsumoto, S; Morishima, T; Kawabe, T; Okamoto, T

    2000-07-15

    Although the beneficial effect of cimetidine on survival in cancer has been clinically demonstrated in colorectal cancer patients, the mode of action of cimetidine has not been elucidated. In this report, we have demonstrated for the first time that cimetidine can block the adhesion of a colorectal tumor cell line to the endothelial cell monolayer in cell culture and that it can suppress the metastasis of the tumor cell in a nude mouse model. We also demonstrated that these antimetastasis effects of cimetidine might occur through down-regulation of the cell surface expression of E-selectin on endothelial cells, a ligand for sialyl Lewis antigens on tumor cells. We found that the cimetidine-mediated down-regulation of E-selectin did not involve down-regulation of E-selectin mRNA or blocking of the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappaB, a transcriptional activator of E-selectin gene expression. Because two other histamine type 2 receptor antagonists, famotidine and ranitidine, did not show any similar effect, these actions of cimetidine probably do not occur via blocking of the histamine receptor. These observations support the idea that cancer metastasis can be blocked by cimetidine administration through blocking the adhesion of tumor cells to the endothelium when an interaction between E-selectin and sialyl-Lewis antigens plays a role. PMID:10919677

  2. Abortion - surgical

    MedlinePlus

    Suction curettage; Surgical abortion; Elective abortion - surgical; Therapeutic abortion - surgical ... problem. Your pregnancy is harmful to your health (therapeutic abortion). The pregnancy resulted after a traumatic event ...

  3. Peritoneal Response to Abdominal Surgery: The Role of Equine Abdominal Adhesions and Current Prophylactic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Juliana de Moura; Alves, Ana Liz Garcia; Watanabe, Marcos Jun; Rodrigues, Celso Antonio; Hussni, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Intra-abdominal adhesions constitute a significant clinical and surgical problem that can lead to complications such as pain and bowel occlusion or subocclusion. These adhesions are frustrating and potentially fatal, representing a major postoperative complication in abdominal surgery. It is estimated that 32% of horses undergoing laparotomy will present clinical symptoms due to adhesions, but the true prevalence is not known because a large proportion of animals with postoperative recurrent colics are medically treated or submitted to euthanasia without necropsy. Adhesions are highly cellular, vascularized, dynamic structures that are influenced by complex signaling mechanisms. Understanding their pathogenesis could assist in applying better therapeutic strategies and in developing more effective antiadhesion products. Currently, there are no definitive strategies that prevent adhesion formation, and it is difficult to interpret the results of existing studies due to nonstandardization of an induction model and evaluation of their severity. The best clinical results have been obtained from using minimally traumatic surgical techniques, anti-inflammatory agents, antimicrobials, anticoagulants, and mechanical separation of serosal surfaces by viscous intraperitoneal solutions or physical barriers. This paper aims to review adhesion formation pathogenesis, guide the understanding of major products and drugs used to inhibit adhesion formation, and address their effectiveness in the equine species. PMID:24587939

  4. Effects of cranberry extract on prevention of urinary tract infection in dogs and on adhesion of Escherichia coli to Madin-Darby canine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsin-I; Chen, Kuan-Sheng; Wang, Hsien-Chi; Lee, Wei-Ming

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine effects of cranberry extract on development of urinary tract infection (UTI) in dogs and on adherence of Escherichia coli to Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. ANIMALS 12 client-owned dogs (in vivo experiment) and 6 client-owned dogs (in vitro experiment). PROCEDURES 12 dogs with a history of recurrent UTI received an antimicrobial (n = 6) or cranberry extract (6) orally for 6 months. Dogs were monitored for a UTI. For the in vitro experiment, cranberry extract was orally administered to 6 dogs for 60 days. Voided urine samples were collected from each dog before and 30 and 60 days after onset of extract administration. Urine was evaluated by use of a bacteriostasis assay. An antiadhesion assay and microscopic examination were used to determine inhibition of bacterial adherence to MDCK cells. RESULTS None of the 12 dogs developed a UTI. The bacteriostasis assay revealed no zone of inhibition for any urine samples. Bacterial adhesion was significantly reduced after culture with urine samples obtained at 30 and 60 days, compared with results for urine samples obtained before extract administration. Microscopic examination revealed that bacterial adherence to MDCK cells was significantly reduced after culture with urine samples obtained at 30 and 60 days, compared with results after culture with urine samples obtained before extract administration. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Oral administration of cranberry extract prevented development of a UTI and prevented E coli adherence to MDCK cells, which may indicate it has benefit for preventing UTIs in dogs. PMID:27027843

  5. Prevention of Intraoperative Awareness with Explicit Recall in an Unselected Surgical Population: A Randomized Comparative Effectiveness Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mashour, George A.; Shanks, Amy; Tremper, Kevin K.; Kheterpal, Sachin; Turner, Christopher R.; Ramachandran, Satya Krishna; Picton, Paul; Schueller, Christa; Morris, Michelle; Vandervest, John C.; Lin, Nan; Avidan, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Intraoperative awareness with explicit recall occurs in approximately 0.15% of all surgical cases. Efficacy trials based on the Bispectral Index™ (BIS) monitor and anesthetic concentrations have focused on high-risk patients, but there are no effectiveness data applicable to an unselected surgical population. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled trial of unselected surgical patients at three hospitals of a tertiary academic medical center. Surgical cases were randomized to alerting algorithms based on either BIS values or anesthetic concentrations. The primary outcome was the incidence of definite intraoperative awareness; prespecified secondary outcomes included postanesthetic recovery variables. Results The study was terminated due to futility. At interim analysis the incidence of definite awareness was 0.12% (11/9376) (95% CI 0.07 to 0.21%) in the anesthetic concentration group and 0.08% (8/9460) (95% CI 0.04 to 0.16%) in the BIS group (p = 0.48). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of meeting criteria for recovery room discharge or incidence of nausea and vomiting. By post hoc secondary analysis, the BIS protocol was associated with a 4.7-fold reduction in definite or possible awareness events compared to a cohort receiving no intervention (p = 0.001; 95% CI 1.7 to 13.1). Conclusion This negative trial could not detect a difference in the incidence of definite awareness or recovery variables between monitoring protocols based on either BIS values or anesthetic concentration. By post hoc analysis, a protocol based on BIS monitoring reduced the incidence of definite or possible intraoperative awareness compared to routine care. PMID:22990178

  6. A case report of the use of nanocrystalline silver dressing in the management of acute surgical site wound infected with MRSA to prevent cutaneous necrosis following revision surgery.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Mayukh; Bradley, Helen

    2008-03-01

    The authors report the use of nanocrystalline silver (Acticoat 7, Smith and Nephew, London, UK) in an acute surgical wound to prevent localized skin necrosis due to infection, thereby avoiding skin grafting as a secondary procedure. Two patients were successfully treated with Acticoat 7 dressings without using systemic antimicrobials after developing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in the surgical site. Despite a history of smoking and incision through scar tissues, the wound did not progress into deep infection nor was there recurrence of infection at 2 years follow-up. The intention was to use this particular dressing to assess the effect of silver on infected keratinocytes in an acute wound environment. It is possible that the use of Acticoat 7 may reduce the bacterial loading at the wound site, thereby decreasing a propensity for skin necrosis caused by the infective process. This case report demonstrates that the acute surgical wound with impending cutaneous necrosis due to localized infection may be treated without oral antimicrobials. PMID:18372271

  7. Abortion - surgical

    MedlinePlus

    Suction curettage; Surgical abortion; Elective abortion - surgical; Therapeutic abortion - surgical ... Surgical abortion involves dilating the opening to the uterus (cervix) and placing a small suction tube into the uterus. ...

  8. Biosynthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Using Aegle marmelos (Bael) Fruit Extract and Its Application to Prevent Adhesion of Bacteria: A Strategy to Control Microfouling

    PubMed Central

    Nithya Deva Krupa, A.

    2014-01-01

    Marine biofilms formed due to adhesion of bacteria and other microorganisms on submerged surfaces are generally considered to be a major form of microfouling. Subsequent attachment of larvae of higher organisms like barnacles, mussels, and so forth, on marine biofilms, causes macrofouling. Several approaches have been used to prevent micro- and macrofouling. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are known to exhibit strong inhibitory and antimicrobial activity. Biological synthesis of AgNPs is rapidly gaining importance due to its growing success. Hence, the present study is focused on the biosynthesis of AgNPs using fruit extract of Aegle marmelos and its characterization through UV-Vis spectrophotometer, X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Further isolation and identification of marine biofilm forming bacteria were carried out through 16S rDNA analysis. The antimicrofouling effect of the biosynthesized AgNPs was tested against marine biofilm forming bacteria and the results suggested that it could effectively inhibit biofilm formation. This preliminary study has proved that AgNPs may be used as antimicrofouling agent for the prevention of biofouling in the early stages. PMID:25258620

  9. [Post-operative bowel obstruction. Part 2: Mechanical post-operative small bowel obstruction by bands and adhesions].

    PubMed

    Duron, J J

    2003-12-01

    Small Bowel obstruction due to post-operative adhesions is a common problem in a general surgical practice. Any laparotomy initiates the lifelong risk of this complication. Mortality rates have improved dramatically in the last three decades. The basic evaluation and treatment of small bowel obstruction is well defined but many individual strategies may result from the variety of clinical presentations and from techniques and equipment available to a local surgical practice. Recent advances in surgical techniques and preventive strategies may improve overall results. Results will remain linked to the continuous aging of the populations of Western countries. PMID:14978440

  10. A Potential Nanofiber Membrane Device for Filling Surgical Residual Cavity to Prevent Glioma Recurrence and Improve Local Neural Tissue Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Daoxiang; Lin, Chao; Wen, Xuejun; Gu, Shuying; Zhao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to develop a novel device with nanofiber membrane capable of sustained release of temozolomide (TMZ) and neuron growth factor (NGF). An improved bio-availability of TMZ and NGF in surroundings proximal to the device was expected to be attained for a prolonged period of time. The device was developed by integrating TMZ-doped polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofiber (TP) membrane and NGF-coated PCL (NGFP) membrane using sodium alginate hydrogel. TP was prepared by direct electrospinning of TMZ/PCL. NGFP membrane was developed by layer-by-layer assembling technology. The incorporation of TMZ-doped nanofiber and NGFP nanofiber in the device was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The number of NGF layer in NGF-coated PCL membrane could be readily measured with energy spectrum analysis. The in vitro release study showed that TP-NGFP-TP membrane could efficiently liberate TMZ to inhibit the growth of C6 glioma cells, and sufficient NGF to induce the differentiation of PC12 neuron cells over four weeks. Such TP-NGFP-TP membrane device can be employed as a tampon to fill up surgical residual cavity and afford residual glioma removal, structural support, hemostasis, and local neural tissue reconstruction in the surgical treatment of glioma. The study opens a horizon to develop multifunctional biomaterial device for maximized glioma treatment efficacy. PMID:27548322

  11. A Potential Nanofiber Membrane Device for Filling Surgical Residual Cavity to Prevent Glioma Recurrence and Improve Local Neural Tissue Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Daoxiang; Lin, Chao; Wen, Xuejun; Gu, Shuying; Zhao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to develop a novel device with nanofiber membrane capable of sustained release of temozolomide (TMZ) and neuron growth factor (NGF). An improved bio-availability of TMZ and NGF in surroundings proximal to the device was expected to be attained for a prolonged period of time. The device was developed by integrating TMZ-doped polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofiber (TP) membrane and NGF-coated PCL (NGFP) membrane using sodium alginate hydrogel. TP was prepared by direct electrospinning of TMZ/PCL. NGFP membrane was developed by layer-by-layer assembling technology. The incorporation of TMZ-doped nanofiber and NGFP nanofiber in the device was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The number of NGF layer in NGF-coated PCL membrane could be readily measured with energy spectrum analysis. The in vitro release study showed that TP-NGFP-TP membrane could efficiently liberate TMZ to inhibit the growth of C6 glioma cells, and sufficient NGF to induce the differentiation of PC12 neuron cells over four weeks. Such TP-NGFP-TP membrane device can be employed as a tampon to fill up surgical residual cavity and afford residual glioma removal, structural support, hemostasis, and local neural tissue reconstruction in the surgical treatment of glioma. The study opens a horizon to develop multifunctional biomaterial device for maximized glioma treatment efficacy. PMID:27548322

  12. Investigation of Efficacy of Mitomycin-C, Sodium Hyaluronate and Human Amniotic Fluid in Preventing Epidural Fibrosis and Adhesion Using a Rat Laminectomy Model

    PubMed Central

    Bolat, Elif; Kocamaz, Erdoğan; Kulahcilar, Zeki; Yilmaz, Ali; Topcu, Abdullah; Coskun, Mehmet Erdal

    2013-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose The aim of this study was to evalute the effects of mitomycin-C, sodium hyaluronate and human amniotic fluid on preventing spinal epidural fibrosis. Overview of Literature The role of scar tissue in pain formation is not exactly known, but it is reported that scar tissue causes adhesions between anatomic structures. Intensive fibrotic tissue compresses on anatomic structures and increases the sensitivity of the nerve root for recurrent herniation and lateral spinal stenosis via limiting movements of the root. Also, neuronal atrophy and axonal degeneration occur under scar tissue. Methods The study design included 4 groups of rats: group 1 was the control group, groups 2, 3, and 4 receieved antifibrotic agents, mitomycin-C (group 2), sodium hyaluronate (group 3), and human amniotic fluid (group 4). Midline incision for all animals were done on L5 for total laminectomy. Four weeks after the surgery, the rats were sacrificed and specimens were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and photos of the slides were taken for quantitive assesment of the scar tissue. Results There was no significant scar tissue in the experimental animals of groups 2, 3, and 4. It was found that there was no significant difference between drug groups, but there was a statistically significant difference between the drug groups and the control group. Conclusions This experimental study shows that implantation of mitomycin-C, sodium hyaluronate and human amniotic fluid reduces epidural fibrosis and adhesions after spinal laminectomy in rat models. Further studies in humans are needed to determine the complications of the agents researched. PMID:24353840

  13. Nasogastric tube placement into the hepaticojejunostomy anastomosis in pancreaticoduodenectomy: a simple surgical technique for prevention of bile leak.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Bulent; Ozcabi, Yetkin; Tasdelen, Iksan; Onur, Ender; Memisoglu, Kemal

    2016-05-01

    Hepaticojejunostomy is an important part of many surgical procedures including pancreaticoduodenectomy. Biliary leakage from hepaticojejunostomy may be associated with intraabdominal abscess formation, biliary peritonitis, and even mortality. A 72-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital with obstructive jaundice. After initial evaluation, she was diagnosed with distal common bile duct obstruction without accurate diagnosis. Before planned pancreaticoduodenectomy, biliary drainage with a T-tube was performed due to the presence of cholangitis. After the first operation, pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Postinflammatory changes around the hilar region made the hepaticojejunostomy risky. A bilio-digestive anastomosis was performed using a new technique. A nasogastric tube was placed into the common bile duct proximal to the anastomosis. The postoperative course of the patient was uneventful. The use of a nasogastric tube as a stent in risky hepaticojejunostomies is a simple technique that can be beneficial. PMID:27212998

  14. Nasogastric tube placement into the hepaticojejunostomy anastomosis in pancreaticoduodenectomy: a simple surgical technique for prevention of bile leak

    PubMed Central

    Ozcabi, Yetkin; Tasdelen, Iksan; Onur, Ender; Memisoglu, Kemal

    2016-01-01

    Hepaticojejunostomy is an important part of many surgical procedures including pancreaticoduodenectomy. Biliary leakage from hepaticojejunostomy may be associated with intraabdominal abscess formation, biliary peritonitis, and even mortality. A 72-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital with obstructive jaundice. After initial evaluation, she was diagnosed with distal common bile duct obstruction without accurate diagnosis. Before planned pancreaticoduodenectomy, biliary drainage with a T-tube was performed due to the presence of cholangitis. After the first operation, pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Postinflammatory changes around the hilar region made the hepaticojejunostomy risky. A bilio-digestive anastomosis was performed using a new technique. A nasogastric tube was placed into the common bile duct proximal to the anastomosis. The postoperative course of the patient was uneventful. The use of a nasogastric tube as a stent in risky hepaticojejunostomies is a simple technique that can be beneficial. PMID:27212998

  15. Does the Application of Incisional Negative Pressure Therapy to High-Risk Wounds Prevent Surgical Site Complications? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ingargiola, Michael J.; Daniali, Lily N.; Lee, Edward S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The application of incisional negative pressure wound therapy (INPWT) to clean, closed surgical incisions is a growing clinical practice. A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the effect of INPWT on surgical sites healing by primary intention. The primary outcomes of interest are incidence of complications (infection, dehiscence, seroma, hematoma, skin necrosis, or blistering). Methods: Two independent reviewers performed a search of the Ovid MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from 2006 to 2012 for published articles. Supplemental searches were performed using reference lists and conference proceedings. Studies were selected for inclusion based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data extraction regarding study quality, demographic and clinical characteristics, and outcomes was performed independently, and data on the incidence of infection was combined using a fixed-effects meta-analysis model. Results: Ten (5 randomized controlled trials and 5 observational) studies were included, which investigated the outcomes of 626 incisions on 610 patients. Six studies compared INPWT with sterile dry dressings (SDDs). The literature shows a significant decrease in rates of infection when using INPWT. Results on dehiscence do show a decrease in some studies, but results are inconsistent to make a conclusion. Because of limited studies, it is difficult to make any assertions on seroma, hematoma, and skin necrosis. Conclusions: This systematic review shows possible evidence of a decrease in the incidence of infection with application of INPWT. Looking at other variables such as dehiscence, seroma, hematoma, and skin necrosis show no consistent data and suggest further studies in order for proper recommendations for INPWT. PMID:24106562

  16. Hydrogen sulfide augments neutrophil migration through enhancement of adhesion molecule expression and prevention of CXCR2 internalization: role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Dal-Secco, Daniela; Cunha, Thiago M; Freitas, Andressa; Alves-Filho, José Carlos; Souto, Fabrício O; Fukada, Sandra Y; Grespan, Renata; Alencar, Nylane M N; Neto, Alberto F; Rossi, Marcos A; Ferreira, Sérgio H; Hothersall, John S; Cunha, Fernando Q

    2008-09-15

    In this study, we have addressed the role of H(2)S in modulating neutrophil migration in either innate (LPS-challenged naive mice) or adaptive (methylated BSA (mBSA)-challenged immunized mice) immune responses. Treatment of mice with H(2)S synthesis inhibitors, dl-propargylglycine (PAG) or beta-cyanoalanine, reduced neutrophil migration induced by LPS or methylated BSA (mBSA) into the peritoneal cavity and by mBSA into the femur/tibial joint of immunized mice. This effect was associated with decreased leukocyte rolling, adhesion, and P-selectin and ICAM-1 expression on endothelium. Predictably, treatment of animals with the H(2)S donors, NaHS or Lawesson's reagent, enhanced these parameters. Moreover, the NaHS enhancement of neutrophil migration was not observed in ICAM-1-deficient mice. Neither PAG nor NaHS treatment changed LPS-induced CD18 expression on neutrophils, nor did the LPS- and mBSA-induced release of neutrophil chemoattractant mediators TNF-alpha, keratinocyte-derived chemokine, and LTB(4). Furthermore, in vitro MIP-2-induced neutrophil chemotaxis was inhibited by PAG and enhanced by NaHS treatments. Accordingly, MIP-2-induced CXCR2 internalization was enhanced by PAG and inhibited by NaHS treatments. Moreover, NaHS prevented MIP-2-induced CXCR2 desensitization. The PAG and NaHS effects correlated, respectively, with the enhancement and inhibition of MIP-2-induced G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 expression. The effects of NaHS on neutrophil migration both in vivo and in vitro, together with CXCR2 internalization and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 expression were prevented by the ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)(+)) channel blocker, glybenclamide. Conversely, diazoxide, a K(ATP)(+) channel opener, increased neutrophil migration in vivo. Together, our data suggest that during the inflammatory response, H(2)S augments neutrophil adhesion and locomotion, by a mechanism dependent on K(ATP)(+) channels. PMID:18768887

  17. Prevention of Surgical Site Infection After Ankle Surgery Using Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy in High-Risk Patients With Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Liu, Ya-Ke; Chen, Hong-Lin; Liu, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Patients with diabetes have a high risk of surgical site infection (SSI) after ankle surgery. The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) in the prevention of SSI after ankle surgery compared with the efficacy of standard moist wound care (SMWC). A retrospective study was performed of unstable ankle fractures for surgical fixation in patients with diabetes from January 2012 to December 2014. VAC and SMWC were used for surgical incision coverage. The primary outcome was the incidence of SSI, and the secondary outcomes were the length of hospital stay and crude hospital costs. The data from 76 patients were analyzed, with 22 (28.95%) in the VAC group and 54 (71.05%) in the SMWC group. The incidence of SSI was 4.6% in the VAC group compared with 27.8% in the SMWC group (chi-square 5.076; p = .024), and the crude odds ratio for SSI in the VAC group was 0.124 (95% confidence interval 0.002 to 0.938). The length of hospital stay was lower in the VAC group than in the SMWC group (12.6 ± 2.7 days and 15.2 ± 3.5 days, respectively; t = 3.122, p = .003). The crude hospital costs were also lower in the VAC group than in the SMWC group (Chinese yuan 8643.2 ± 1195.3 and 9456.2 ± 1106.3, respectively; t = 2.839, p = .006). After logistic regression analysis, the adjusted odds ratio for the total SSI rate comparing VAC and SMWC was 0.324 (95% confidence interval 0.092 to 0.804; p = .021). Compared with SMWC, VAC can decrease the SSI rate after ankle surgery in patients with diabetes. This finding should be confirmed by prospective, randomized controlled clinical trials. PMID:26603948

  18. Importance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus eradication in carriers to prevent postoperative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus surgical site infection.

    PubMed

    Pofahl, Walter E; Ramsey, Keith M; Nobles, Delores L; Cochran, M Kathy; Goettler, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Although infrequent, postoperative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) surgical site infection (SSI) is associated with significant morbidity and cost. Previous studies have identified the importance of MRSA screening to diminish the risk of postoperative MRSA SSI. The current study quantifies the importance of eradication of the MRSA carrier state to prevent MRSA SSI. Beginning February 2007, all admissions to an 800-bed tertiary care hospital were screened for MRSA by nasal swab using rapid polymerase chain reaction-based testing. Patients found to be nasal carriers of MRSA were treated with 2 per cent mupirocin nasal ointment and 4 per cent chlorhexidine soap before surgery. The subset of patients undergoing procedures that are part of the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) were followed for MRSA SSI (n = 8980). The results of preoperative MRSA screening and eradication of the carrier state were analyzed. Since the initiation of universal MRSA screening, 11 patients undergoing SCIP procedures have developed MRSA SSI (0.12%). Of these, six patients (55%) had negative preoperative screens. Of the five patients with positive preoperative screens, only one received treatment to eradicate the carrier state. In patients who develop MRSA SSI, failure to treat the carrier state before surgery results in MRSA SSI. PMID:21396301

  19. Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating Dialkylcarbamoyl Chloride Impregnated Dressings for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections in Adult Women Undergoing Cesarean Section

    PubMed Central

    Bizoń, Magdalena; Cendrowski, Krzysztof; Sawicki, Włodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Surgical site infections (SSI) occur in 1.8%–9.2% of women undergoing cesarean section (CS) and lead to greater morbidity rates and increased treatment costs. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of dialkylcarbamoyl chloride (DACC) impregnated dressings to prevent SSI in women subject to CS. Methods: Randomized, controlled trial was conducted at the Mazovian Bródno Hospital, a tertiary care center performing approximately 1300 deliveries per year, between June 2014 and April 2015. Patients were randomly allocated to receive either DACC impregnated dressing or standard surgical dressing (SSD) following skin closure. In order to analyze cost-effectiveness of the selected dressings in the group of patients who developed SSI, the costs of ambulatory visits, additional hospitalization, nursing care, and systemic antibiotic therapy were assessed. Independent risk factors for SSI were determined by multivariable logistic regression. Results: Five hundred and forty-three women undergoing elective or emergency CS were enrolled. The SSI rates in the DACC and SSD groups were 1.8% and 5.2%, respectively (p = 0.04). The total cost of SSI prophylaxis and treatment was greater in the control group as compared with the study group (5775 EUR vs. 1065 EUR, respectively). Independent risk factors for SSI included higher pre-pregnancy body mass index (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.08; [95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0–1.2]; p < 0.05), smoking in pregnancy (aOR = 5.34; [95% CI: 1.6–15.4]; p < 0.01), and SSD application (aOR = 2.94; [95% CI: 1.1–9.3]; p < 0.05). Conclusion: The study confirmed the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of DACC impregnated dressings in SSI prevention among women undergoing CS. PMID:26891115

  20. Thigh length versus knee length antiembolism stockings for the prevention of deep vein thrombosis in postoperative surgical patients; a systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Ros; Paton, Fiona; Rice, Stephen; Stansby, Gerard; Millner, Peter; Flavell, Hayley; Fox, Dave; Woolacott, Nerys

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the clinical effectiveness of thigh length versus knee length antiembolism stockings for the prevention of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in surgical patients. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis using direct methods and network meta-analysis. Methods Previous systematic reviews and electronic databases were searched to February 2014 for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of thigh length or knee length antiembolism stockings in surgical patients. Study quality was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. The primary outcome was incidence of DVT. Analysis of the DVT data was performed using ORs along with 95% CIs. The I2 statistic was used to quantify statistical heterogeneity. Results 23 RCTs were included; there was substantial variation between the trials and many were poorly reported with an unclear risk of bias. Five RCTs directly comparing thigh length versus knee length stockings were pooled and the summary estimate of effect favouring thigh length stockings was not statistically significant (OR 1.48, 95% CI 0.80 to 2.73). 13 RCTs were included in the network meta-analysis; thigh length stockings with pharmacological prophylaxis were more effective than knee length stockings with pharmacological prophylaxis, but again results were not statistically significant (OR 1.76, 95% credible intervals 0.82 to 3.53). Conclusions Thigh length stockings may be more effective than knee length stockings, but results did not reach statistical significance and the evidence base is weak. Further research to confirm this finding is unlikely to be worthwhile. While thigh length stockings appear to have superior efficacy, practical issues such as patient acceptability may prevent their wide use in clinical practice. Systematic review registration number CRD42014007202. PMID:26883236

  1. Infection Prevention in Shoulder Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Daniel J; Crosby, Lynn A

    2015-12-01

    The microbiome of the shoulder demonstrates distinctive differences to other orthopaedic surgical sites. Recent studies have demonstrated that the most common organisms found in deep shoulder infections are coagulase-negative staph lococcal species and Propionibacterium acnes . Many studies support diligent hand washing, decreasing operative time, routine glove changing, minimizing operating room traffic, and covering instruments as means for decreasing the risk of deep infection. On the other hand, hair clipping and the use of adhesive drapes may have little effect on decreasing the incidence of deep infection. Although generally considered the most efficacious skin preparation solution, chlorhexidine gluconate has minimal effect on eradication of P. acnes from the surgical site; however, the addition of preoperative topical applications of benzoyl peroxide to standard surgical preparation has shown promise in decreasing the rate of P . acnes culture positivity. Additionally, the use of local antibiotic formulations seems to be an effective means of preventing deep infection. PMID:26631211

  2. Biological adhesives and fastening devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolpert, H. D.

    2012-04-01

    Sea creatures are a leading source to some of the more interesting discoveries in adhesives. Because sea water naturally breaks down even the strongest conventional adhesive, an alternative is important that could be used in repairing or fabricating anything that might have regular contact with moisture such as: Repairing broken and shattered bones, developing a surgical adhesive, use in the dental work, repairing and building ships, and manufacturing plywood. Some of nature's prototypes include the common mussel, limpet, some bacteria and abalone. As we learn more about these adhesives we are also developing non adhesive fasteners, such as mimicked after studying the octopus, burdock burrs (i.e. Velcro®) and the gecko.

  3. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Prevention Basic Facts & Information Some factors that affect your ... control of the things that you can change. Preventive Recommendations for Adults Aged 65 and Older The ...

  4. Surgical Materials: Current Challenges and Nano-enabled Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Annabi, Nasim; Tamayol, Ali; Shin, Su Ryon; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M.; Peppas, Nicholas A.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Surgical adhesive biomaterials have emerged as substitutes to sutures and staples in many clinical applications. Nano-enabled materials containing nanoparticles or having a distinct nanotopography have been utilized for generation of a new class of surgical materials with enhanced functionality. In this review, the state of the art in the development of conventional surgical adhesive biomaterials is critically reviewed and their shortcomings are outlined. Recent advancements in generation of nano-enabled surgical materials with their potential future applications are discussed. This review will open new avenues for the innovative development of the next generation of tissue adhesives, hemostats, and sealants with enhanced functionality for various surgical applications. PMID:25530795

  5. 21 CFR 878.4380 - Drape adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drape adhesive. 878.4380 Section 878.4380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4380 Drape adhesive. (a) Identification....

  6. 21 CFR 878.4380 - Drape adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drape adhesive. 878.4380 Section 878.4380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4380 Drape adhesive. (a) Identification....

  7. 21 CFR 878.4380 - Drape adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drape adhesive. 878.4380 Section 878.4380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4380 Drape adhesive. (a) Identification....

  8. Prevention of Recurrence in the Surgical Correction of Cryptotia Using Local Flaps With a Cartilage Wedge Graft

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Kyung Ho; Kim, Byung Guk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cryptotia attributable to deficient posterior skin coverage frequently recurs. Because local flaps cover only the posterior aspects of the defective upper auricular cartilage and lack functional support to resist collapse of the helix, especially if severe helical cartilage anomalies are present, additional support is required to prevent the postoperative recurrence of this anomaly. The authors present cases of cryptotia treated using local flaps including a Z-plasty or formation of a trefoil flap with an additional cartilage wedge graft on the cephaloauricular sulcus to enhance projection of the helix. The combination of a graft with a local flap using a large Z-plasty or trefoil flap efficiently corrects the cryptotia, and is associated with minimal visible scarring and few complications, including recurrence. PMID:26967080

  9. Meta-Analysis of Prevention of Surgical Site Infections following Incision Closure with Triclosan-Coated Sutures: Robustness to New Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Edmiston, Charles E.; Leaper, David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: A systematic literature review (SLR) and meta-analysis of surgical site infections (SSIs) after surgical incision closure with triclosan-coated sutures (TS) compared with non-antibacterial coated sutures (NTS) published previously by the authors suggested that fewer SSIs occurred in the TS study arm. However, the results were vulnerable to the removal of one key randomized controlled trial (RCT) because of insufficient data. Furthermore, recently published RCTs highlighted the need for an update of the SLR to challenge the robustness of results. Methods: The protocol for the new SLR included more stringent tests of robustness than used initially and the meta-analysis was updated with the results of two new RCTs as well as the count of patients and SSIs by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) incision class. Results: The updated SLR included 15 RCTs with 4,800 patients. No publication bias was suggested in the analysis. The predominant effect estimated a relative risk of 0.67 (95% CI: 0.54–0.84, p=0.00053) with an overall lower frequency of SSI in the TS arm than in the NTS arm. Results were robust to sensitivity analysis. Conclusions: The two additional peer-reviewed double-blind RCTs of this update confirmed the predominant effect found in the authors' previous meta-analysis and established the robustness of conclusions that were lacking previously. This SLR and meta-analysis showed that the use of triclosan antimicrobial sutures reduced the incidence of SSI after clean, clean-contaminated, and contaminated surgery. The two additional peer-reviewed double blind RCTs reinforced the evidence level of this SLR (CEBM level 1a). PMID:24738988

  10. Inhibition of Adhesion, Proliferation, and Invasion of Primary Endometriosis and Endometrial Stromal and Ovarian Carcinoma Cells by a Nonhyaluronan Adhesion Barrier Gel

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Stefan P.; Strissel, Pamela L.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Lermann, Johannes; Hackl, Janina; Fasching, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic disease of women in the reproductive age, defined as endometrial cells growing outside of the uterine cavity and associated with relapses. Relapses are hypothesized to correlate with incomplete surgical excision or result from nonrandom implantation of new endometrial implants in adjacent peritoneum. Thus, surgical excision could lead to free endometriotic cells or tissue residues, which readhere, grow, and invade into recurrent lesions. Barrier agents are frequently used to prevent postoperative adhesions. We tested if the absorbable cell adhesion barrier gel Intercoat consisting of polyethylene oxide and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose could inhibit cellular adhesion, proliferation, and invasion of primary endometriosis and endometrial cells. Due to an association of endometriosis with ovarian carcinoma, we tested two ovarian carcinoma cell lines. Prior to cell seeding, a drop of the barrier gel was placed in cell culture wells in order to test inhibition of adherence and proliferation or coated over a polymerized collagen gel to assay for prevention of invasion. Results showed that the barrier gel significantly inhibited cell adherence, proliferation, and invasion of endometriosis and endometrial stromal cells as well as ovarian carcinoma cells in culture. Our findings could help to prevent local cell growth/invasion and possible consequent recurrences. PMID:25785270

  11. Using a case-mix-adjusted pressure sore incidence study in a surgical directorate to improve patient outcomes in pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Watret, L

    1999-10-01

    The Glasgow Acute Clinical Audit Sub-Committee on Pressure Sores has previously carried out studies of incidence of pressure ulcers in the medical directorates and case-mix-adjusted the figures for length of hospital stay and risk assessment score. Case-mix classification is 'classification of people or treatment placed into groups using characteristics associated with condition, treatment or outcome that can be used to predict need, resource, use of outcomes'. In this instance, crude pressure ulcer incidence figures may be adjusted for length of hospital stay and pressure sore risk assessment score, and stratified into groups, which allows like to be compared with like. The value in case-mix-adjusted figures lies in repeating the exercise, thus determining the trend for individual areas and assessing whether improvement in the quality of care is being achieved. This is more positive than creation of 'league tables' comparing simultaneous studies in a number of areas. The figures showed that there was no statistically significant difference between surgical directorates in trusts with regard to risk assessment scores and length of hospital stay. Gathering data on the incidence of pressure ulcer development allows us to identify where new sores are occurring, but does not critically analyse the nursing intervention taken in individual cases, which identifies preventive strategies. The Glasgow group's primary aim was to gather data on case-mix-adjusted incidence of pressure damage; the secondary objectives were to scrutinize the data to gather more general information on intrinsic and extrinsic factors which may predispose to pressure ulcer development. The study was carried out in the surgical directorate. Findings showed that incidence was low (1.1%), with the majority of sores being superficial. There was a correlation between pressure ulcer development and incontinence, evidence of under-utilization of moving and handling aids for prevention of pressure ulcers

  12. A new technique for surgical treatment of vaginal agenesis using combined abdominal-perineal approach.

    PubMed

    Beksac, Mehmet Sinan; Salman, Mehmet Coskun; Dogan, Nasuh Utku

    2011-01-01

    Optimum therapeutic approach in vaginal agenesis has always been an area of extensive controversies. Although surgical management gained priority due to the evolution of techniques, there is currently no consensus in the literature regarding the best type of surgical approach. The most commonly preferred surgical procedure among gynecologists is McIndoe operation which involves the creation of a space between bladder and rectum, insertion of a mold covered with split-thickness skin graft into that neovaginal space, and use of postoperative vaginal dilation to avoid stenosis. However, many modifications have been introduced in time in an attempt to increase the success rates. In this paper, we describe two cases with vaginal agenesis with functioning uterus who were subjected to surgery by combined abdominal-perineal approach. The surgical technique also included the use of a specially designed vaginal mold made up of polymethyl methacrylate and use of Hyalobarrier gel which is an adhesion-preventing agent. PMID:21577259

  13. A Novel Model of Surgical Injury in Adult Rat Kidney: A “Pouch Model”

    PubMed Central

    Litbarg, Natalia O.; Vujicic, Snezana; Setty, Suman; Sethupathi, Periannan; Dunea, George; Arruda, Jose A.; Singh, Ashok K.

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative mechanisms after surgical injury have been studied in many organs but not in the kidney. Studying surgical injury may provide new insights into mechanisms of kidney regeneration. In rodent models, extrarenal tissues adhere to surgical kidney wound and interfere with healing. We hypothesized that this can be prevented by wrapping injured kidney in a plastic pouch. Adult rats tolerated 5/6 nephrectomy with pouch application well. Histological analysis demonstrates that application of the pouch effectively prevented formation of adhesions and induced characteristic wound healing manifested by formation of granulation tissue. Additionally, selected tubules of the wounded kidney extended into the granulation tissue forming branching tubular epithelial outgrowths (TEOs) without terminal differentiation. Tubular regeneration outside of renal parenchyma was not previously observed, and suggests previously unrecognized capacity for regeneration. Our model provides a novel approach to study kidney wound healing. PMID:24100472

  14. Activation of glial glutamate transporter via MAPK p38 prevents enhanced and long-lasting non-evoked resting pain after surgical incision in rats.

    PubMed

    Reichl, Sylvia; Segelcke, Daniel; Keller, Viktor; Jonas, Robin; Boecker, Armin; Wenk, Manuel; Evers, Dagmar; Zahn, Peter K; Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther M

    2016-06-01

    Pain after surgery has recently become a major issue not only due to lack of treatment success in the acute phase; even more alarming is the large number of patients developing prolonged pain after surgery. Because spinal glutamate as well as spinal glia plays a major role in acute incisional pain, we investigated the role of the spinal glial glutamate transporters (GT), GLAST, GLT-1, for acute and prolonged pain and hyperalgesia caused by an incision. Spinal administration of the GT-inhibitor DL-TBOA increased non-evoked pain but not evoked pain behavior (hyperalgesia) up to 2 weeks after incision. In accordance, spinal GLAST (and to a lesser degree GLT-1) were upregulated after incision for several days. Long-term incision induced GT upregulation was prevented by long-lasting p38-inhibitor administration but not by long-lasting ERK1/2-inhibition after incision. In accordance, daily treatment with the p38-inhibitor (but not the ERK1/2 inhibitor) prolonged non-evoked but not evoked pain behavior after incision. In electrophysiological experiments, spontaneous activity of high threshold (HT) (but not wide dynamic range (WDR)) neurons known to transmit incision induced non-evoked pain was increased after prolonged treatment with the p38-inhibitor. In conclusion, our findings indicate a new spinal pathway by which non-evoked pain behavior after incision is modulated. The pathway is modality (non-evoked pain) and neuron (HT) specific and disturbance contributes to prolonged long-term pain after surgical incision. This may have therapeutic implications for the treatment of acute and - even more relevant - for prevention of chronic pain after surgery in patients. PMID:26920805

  15. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Treatment 2003 U.S. Outbreak African Rodent Importation Ban For Clinicians Clinical Recognition Specimen Collection Treatment Smallpox ... Examining Animals with Suspected Monkeypox African Rodent Importation Ban Resources Related Links Poxvirus Molluscum Contagiosum Orf Virus ( ...

  16. Surgical extraction of lower third molars: diagnostic tests and operative technique in the prevention of inferior alveolar nerve injury. Case study

    PubMed Central

    MELEO, D.; PACIFICI, L.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Increased knowledge and technical refinement have broadened the limits of outpatient oral surgery; however, these changes have at the same time led to a greater number of complications and poor outcomes and, accordingly, to legal action for professional responsibility. Oral surgery represents 10% of all actions, and almost all of these are attributable to exodontic surgery, of which around a third are related to inferior alveolar nerve injury following the extraction of lower third molars. The aim of this case study is to suggest operative technical strategies in accordance with a correct clinical-diagnostic pathway in order to prevent neurological complications involving the inferior alveolar nerve subsequent to lower third molar extraction. Cases should be carefully selected and surgical intervention undertaken solely when genuinely necessary. The patient should be informed of the risks, the methods and the possible results of the treatment. These are the bases for correct indication, along with a sufficient diagnostic path and a good level of communication between operator and patient. PMID:23285341

  17. Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Trzpis, Monika; McLaughlin, Pamela M.J.; de Leij, Lou M.F.H.; Harmsen, Martin C.

    2007-01-01

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM, CD326) is a glycoprotein of ∼40 kd that was originally identified as a marker for carcinoma, attributable to its high expression on rapidly proliferating tumors of epithelial origin. Normal epithelia express EpCAM at a variable but generally lower level than carcinoma cells. In early studies, EpCAM was proposed to be a cell-cell adhesion molecule. However, recent insights revealed a more versatile role for EpCAM that is not limited only to cell adhesion but includes diverse processes such as signaling, cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Cell surface expression of EpCAM may actually prevent cell-cell adhesion. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the current knowledge on EpCAM biology in relation to other cell adhesion molecules. We discuss the implications of the newly identified functions of EpCAM in view of its prognostic relevance in carcinoma, inflammatory pathophysiology, and tissue development and regeneration as well as its role in normal epithelial homeostasis. PMID:17600130

  18. Use of N,O-carboxymethyl chitosan to prevent postsurgical adhesions in a rabbit double uterine horn model: a randomized controlled design.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chang; Zhao, Dachun; Zhu, Lan

    2016-05-01

    In previous studies, N,O-carboxymethyl chitosan has been shown to decrease the incidence and intensity of abdominal adhesions. In the present study, adhesions were induced in 220 rabbits using a double uterine horn model. Rabbits were randomized to receive an operation only or an operation+medical chitosan intraperitoneally. Twenty-two rabbits from each group were euthanized at one of five different times (Day 3, 7, 14, 28, or 42), and adhesion formation was given gross and histopathological scores. Reductions were observed in adhesion extent (P=0.0337) and tenacity (P=0.0271) as well as inflammation (P<0.0001) on Day 3 when medical chitosan was applied. Prior to Day 14, fibrosis was less obvious in the medical chitosan group (P< 0.0005). The tenacity scores were significantly lower in the medical chitosan group following Day 14 (P<.05), while the type scores were lower in the medical chitosan group following Day 28 (P<.03). Thus, medical chitosan decreased both the gross and the histopathological scores of the induced adhesions. PMID:26842129

  19. Corrugated pipe adhesive applicator apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shirey, Ray A.

    1983-06-14

    Apparatus for coating selected portions of the troughs of a corrugated pipe within an adhesive includes a support disposed within the pipe with a reservoir containing the adhesive disposed on the support. A pump, including a spout, is utilized for supplying the adhesive from the reservoir to a trough of the pipe. A rotatable applicator is supported on the support and contacts the trough of the pipe. The applicator itself is sized so as to fit within the trough, and contacts the adhesive in the trough and spreads the adhesive in the trough upon rotation. A trough shield, supported by the support and disposed in the path of rotation of the applicator, is utilized to prevent the applicator from contacting selected portions of the trough. A locator head is also disposed on the support and provides a way for aligning the spout, the applicator, and the trough shield with the trough.

  20. Corrugated pipe adhesive applicator apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shirey, R.A.

    1983-06-14

    Apparatus for coating selected portions of the troughs of a corrugated pipe with an adhesive includes a support disposed within the pipe with a reservoir containing the adhesive disposed on the support. A pump, including a spout, is utilized for supplying the adhesive from the reservoir to a trough of the pipe. A rotatable applicator is supported on the support and contacts the trough of the pipe. The applicator itself is sized so as to fit within the trough, and contacts the adhesive in the trough and spreads the adhesive in the trough upon rotation. A trough shield, supported by the support and disposed in the path of rotation of the applicator, is utilized to prevent the applicator from contacting selected portions of the trough. A locator head is also disposed on the support and provides a way for aligning the spout, the applicator, and the trough shield with the trough. 4 figs.

  1. Polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, D. J.; Bell, V. L.; Saintclair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A process of preparing aromatic polyamide-acids for use as adhesives is described. An equimolar quantity of an aromatic dianhydride is added to a stirred solution of an aromatic diamine in a water or alcohol-miscible ether solvent to obtain a viscous polymer solution. The polymeric-acid intermediate polymer does not become insoluble but directly forms a smooth viscous polymer solution. These polyamic-acid polymers are converted, by heating in the range of 200-300 C and with pressure, to form polyimides with excellent adhesive properties.

  2. Coating Reduces Ice Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Trent; Prince, Michael; DwWeese, Charles; Curtis, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The Shuttle Ice Liberation Coating (SILC) has been developed to reduce the adhesion of ice to surfaces on the space shuttle. SILC, when coated on a surface (foam, metal, epoxy primer, polymer surfaces), will reduce the adhesion of ice by as much as 90 percent as compared to the corresponding uncoated surface. This innovation is a durable coating that can withstand several cycles of ice growth and removal without loss of anti-adhesion properties. SILC is made of a binder composed of varying weight percents of siloxane(s), ethyl alcohol, ethyl sulfate, isopropyl alcohol, and of fine-particle polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The combination of these components produces a coating with significantly improved weathering characteristics over the siloxane system alone. In some cases, the coating will delay ice formation and can reduce the amount of ice formed. SILC is not an ice prevention coating, but the very high water contact angle (greater than 140 ) causes water to readily run off the surface. This coating was designed for use at temperatures near -170 F (-112 C). Ice adhesion tests performed at temperatures from -170 to 20 F (-112 to -7 C) show that SILC is a very effective ice release coating. SILC can be left as applied (opaque) or buffed off until the surface appears clear. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data show that the coating is still present after buffing to transparency. This means SILC can be used to prevent ice adhesion even when coating windows or other objects, or items that require transmission of optical light. Car windshields are kept cleaner and SILC effectively mitigates rain and snow under driving conditions.

  3. Natural Underwater Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Russell J.; Ransom, Todd C.; Hlady, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The general topic of this review is protein-based underwater adhesives produced by aquatic organisms. The focus is on mechanisms of interfacial adhesion to native surfaces and controlled underwater solidification of natural water-borne adhesives. Four genera that exemplify the broad range of function, general mechanistic features, and unique adaptations are discussed in detail: blue mussels, acorn barnacles, sandcastle worms, and freshwater caddisfly larva. Aquatic surfaces in nature are charged and in equilibrium with their environment, populated by an electrical double layer of ions as well as adsorbed natural polyelectrolytes and microbial biofilms. Surface adsorption of underwater bioadhesives likely occurs by exchange of surface bound ligands by amino acid sidechains, driven primarily by relative affinities and effective concentrations of polymeric functional groups. Most aquatic organisms exploit modified amino acid sidechains, in particular phosphorylated serines and hydroxylated tyrosines (dopa), with high-surface affinity that form coordinative surface complexes. After delivery to the surfaces as a fluid, permanent natural adhesives solidify to bear sustained loads. Mussel plaques are assembled in a manner superficially reminiscent of in vitro layer-by-layer strategies, with sequentially delivered layers associated through Fe(dopa)3 coordination bonds. The adhesives of sandcastle worms, caddisfly larva, and barnacles may be delivered in a form somewhat similar to in vitro complex coacervation. Marine adhesives are secreted, or excreted, into seawater that has a significantly higher pH and ionic strength than the internal environment. Empirical evidence suggests these environment triggers could provide minimalistic, fail-safe timing mechanisms to prevent premature solidification (insolubilization) of the glue within the secretory system, yet allow rapid solidification after secretion. Underwater bioadhesives are further strengthened by secondary covalent

  4. Surgical wound infection surveillance.

    PubMed

    Lee, J T

    2003-12-01

    Measuring the frequency of a defined outcome flaw for a series of patients undergoing operative procedures generates information for performance evaluation. Such data influence decisions to improve care if used responsibly. Wound infection (WI), bacterial invasion of the incision, is the most common infectious complication of surgical care and WI prevention has value because the complication affects economic, patient satisfaction, and patient functional status outcomes. WI frequency, one kind of surgical outcome flaw rate, is traditionally used to judge one aspect of surgical care quality. At the author's institution, global WI surveillance was conducted without interruption for 20 years. Results for 85,260 consecutive inpatient operations performed during the period showed that secular changes in infection rates occurred but were not necessarily caused by surgical care quality decrements. PMID:14750065

  5. Surgical Airway

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapna A; Meyer, Tanya K

    2014-01-01

    Close to 3% of all intubation attempts are considered difficult airways, for which a plan for a surgical airway should be considered. Our article provides an overview of the different types of surgical airways. This article provides a comprehensive review of the main types of surgical airways, relevant anatomy, necessary equipment, indications and contraindications, preparation and positioning, technique, complications, and tips for management. It is important to remember that the placement of a surgical airway is a lifesaving procedure and should be considered in any setting when one “cannot intubate, cannot ventilate”. PMID:24741501

  6. [Prevention and treatment of intra-uterine synechiae: Review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Warembourg, S; Huberlant, S; Garric, X; Leprince, S; de Tayrac, R; Letouzey, V

    2015-04-01

    Intra-uterine adhesions are a major cause of secondary infertility. The prevalence of adhesions is probably underestimated due to the heterogeneity of the symptoms. An exhaustive literature search using search engines MEDLINE, Pubmed, Cochrane library and Web of Science was performed to make a focus on the origins, consequences and methods of prevention of intra-uterine adhesions. Intra-uterine adhesions are likely to occur after any endo-uterine surgery via dysregulated activation of coagulation chain linked to the inflammatory process. Early and late obstetric complications are also recognized as caused by adhesions. The diagnosis is currently performed by hysteroscopy but it remains an invasive procedure even if it can be done with an ambulatory management. Several research approaches inspired by intra-abdominal surgery for the prevention of pelvic adhesions have been developed. However, no current method of prevention has proven its effectiveness in terms of improving spontaneous fertility. The improvement in surgical practices, the design of new intra-uterine medical devices and new research especially in the field of endometrial stem cells can maybe reduce the rate of adhesions end their complications after intra-uterine surgery. PMID:25479692

  7. Labial adhesions in pubertal girls.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Roy Kallol; Sonika, Agarwal; Charu, Chanana; Sunesh, Kumar; Neena, Malhotra

    2006-01-01

    Labial adhesions after puberty are rare and are usually the result of chronic inflammation, urinary tract infection, hypoestrogenism or surgical procedures leading to vulval trauma. Sexual abuse leading to labial adhesions is extremely rare in girls who have attained menarche. Complete vulval fusion can rarely occur without any evidence of hypoestrogenism. We address this rare entity in three young pubertal girls wherein one had a history of genital trauma, the second had a history of surgical intervention due to urinary retention and the last one had a history of sexual abuse. All patients had history of genital trauma in common. Accepted management of this condition is adhesiolysis followed by application of estrogen cream in the postoperative period. PMID:16189695

  8. Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Leanne M.; Middleton, Philippa F.; Anthony, Adrian; Hamdorf, Jeffrey; Cregan, Patrick; Scott, David; Maddern, Guy J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of surgical simulation compared with other methods of surgical training. Summary Background Data: Surgical simulation (with or without computers) is attractive because it avoids the use of patients for skills practice and provides relevant technical training for trainees before they operate on humans. Methods: Studies were identified through searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and other databases until April 2005. Included studies must have been randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing any training technique using at least some elements of surgical simulation, which reported measures of surgical task performance. Results: Thirty RCTs with 760 participants were able to be included, although the quality of the RCTs was often poor. Computer simulation generally showed better results than no training at all (and than physical trainer/model training in one RCT), but was not convincingly superior to standard training (such as surgical drills) or video simulation (particularly when assessed by operative performance). Video simulation did not show consistently better results than groups with no training at all, and there were not enough data to determine if video simulation was better than standard training or the use of models. Model simulation may have been better than standard training, and cadaver training may have been better than model training. Conclusions: While there may be compelling reasons to reduce reliance on patients, cadavers, and animals for surgical training, none of the methods of simulated training has yet been shown to be better than other forms of surgical training. PMID:16495690

  9. Surgical revolutions.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2008-01-01

    Many surgical revolutions distinguish the history and evolution of surgery. They come in different sizes and exert a variable effect on the development and practice of the discipline. As science and technology rapidly evolve, so too does the creation of new paradigms, ideas and innovations or discoveries for the improvement of the surgical sciences. Surgical revolutions are not new, and have existed for centuries even though they have been more frequently recognized since the middle of the 19th century, 20th century and down to the present. Surgical revolutionaries are indispensable in the conception and completion of any surgical revolution. However, scientific and technological advances have supported the culmination of each revolution. PMID:18615311

  10. Glatiramer acetate (GA) prevents TNF-α-induced monocyte adhesion to primary endothelial cells through interfering with the NF-κB pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Guoqian; Zhang, Xueyan; Su, Zhendong; Li, Xueqi

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • GA inhibited TNF-α-induced binding of monocytes to endothelial cells. • GA inhibited the induction of adhesion molecules MCP-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin. • GA inhibits NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity. • GA inhibits TNF-α-induced IκBα degradation. - Abstract: Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is considered to be the major one contributing to the process of development of endothelial dysfunction. Exposure to TNF-α induces the expression of a number of proinflammatory chemokines, such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and adhesion molecules, including vascular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and E-selectin, which mediate the interaction of invading monocytes with vascular endothelial cells. Glatiramer acetate (GA) is a licensed clinical drug for treating patients suffering from multiple sclerosis (MS). The effects of GA in vascular disease have not shown before. In this study, we found that GA significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced binding of monocytes to endothelial cells. Mechanistically, we found that GA ameliorated the upregulation of MCP-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin induced by TNF-α. Notably, this process is mediated by inhibiting the nuclear translocation and activation of NF-κB. Our results also indicate that GA pretreatment attenuates the up-regulation of COX-2 and iNOS. These data suggest that GA might have a potential benefit in therapeutic endothelial dysfunction related diseases.

  11. Preparation and characterization of antiadhesion barrier film from hyaluronic acid-grafted electrospun poly(caprolactone) nanofibrous membranes for prevention of flexor tendon postoperative peritendinous adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Hsien; Chen, Chih-Hao; Shalumon, K T; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Peritendinous adhesion is one of the common complications encountered after tendon injury and subsequent surgery, and it can be minimized by introducing a physical barrier between the injured site and the surrounding tissue. An electrospun hyaluronic acid-grafted poly(caprolactone) (PCL-g-HA) nanofibrous membrane (NFM) is proposed as an alternative to current antiadhesion barrier films. HA is covalently grafted to surface-aminolyzed PCL nanofibers, using carbodiimide as the coupling agent. Pristine PCL and PCL-g-HA NFMs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and mechanical testing. In vitro cell culture with fibroblasts showed that PCL-g-HA NFMs reduced cellular adhesion on the membrane surface while maintaining cell proliferation. Animal experiments using a rabbit flexor digitorum profundus tendon model confirmed the efficacy of PCL-g-HA in reducing peritendinous adhesion, based on gross observation, histology, joint flexion-angle measurements, gliding tests, and biomechanical evaluation. PMID:25187711

  12. Brachial artery perforator-based propeller flap coverage for prevention of readhesion after ulnar nerve neurolysis.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Hirotake; Motomiya, Makoto; Sakurai, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Dai; Funakoshi, Tadanao; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2015-02-01

    It is difficult for most plastic and orthopaedic surgeons to treat nerve dysfunction related to neural adhesion because the pathophysiology and suitable treatment have not been clarified. In the current report, we describe our experience of surgical treatment for adhesive ulnar neuropathy. A 58-year-old male complained of pain radiating to the ulnar nerve-innervated area during elbow and wrist motion caused by adhesive ulnar neuropathy after complex open trauma of the elbow joint. The patient obtained a good clinical outcome by surgical neurolysis of the ulnar nerve combined with a brachial artery perforator-based propeller flap to cover the soft tissue defect after resection of the scar tissue and to prevent readhesion of the ulnar nerve. This flap may be a useful option for ulnar nerve coverage after neurolysis without microvascular anastomosis in specific cases. PMID:25088214

  13. Laboratory evaluation of adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Barkmeier, W W; Cooley, R L

    1992-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of resin materials to acid-conditioned enamel is a clinically proven technique in preventative, restorative, and orthodontic procedures. Laboratory evaluations of etched-enamel resin bonding have shown excellent bond strengths and the virtual elimination of marginal microleakage. Adhesion to dentin has been more of a challenge. Earlier-generation dentin bonding systems did not yield high bond strengths in the laboratory or prevent marginal microleakage. Newer-generation adhesive systems generally use a dentin conditioner to modify or remove the smear layer and a subsequent application of an adhesive resin bonding agent. Laboratory evaluations of newer systems have shown bond strengths that approach or actually exceed that of etched enamel resin bonding. Bond strengths have improved with the evolution of dentin bonding systems, and microleakage from the cementum/dentin margin has been significantly reduced or prevented with the newer systems. Although laboratory testing of adhesive systems provides a mechanism to screen and compare newly developed systems, clinical trials are essential to document long-term clinical performance. PMID:1470553

  14. A Comparison of the Haider Tube-Guard® Endotracheal Tube Holder Versus Adhesive Tape to Determine if This Novel Device Can Reduce Endotracheal Tube Movement and Prevent Unplanned Extubation

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Jack C.; Brown, Adam P.; Shin, John S.; Rogers, Kirsten M.

    2016-01-01

    a high extubation risk (endotracheal tube movement >4 cm) when the endotracheal tube was secured with tape versus 0% (0/30) when secured with the Haider Tube-Guard (P = 0.004). Six patients with taped endotracheal tubes required the traction to be aborted before 15 N of force was achieved to prevent potential extubation as the tape either separated from the face or stretched to allow excessive endotracheal tube movement. None of the patients appeared to sustain any injury from the Haider Tube-Guard device. CONCLUSIONS: The Haider Tube-Guard significantly reduced the mobility of the endotracheal tube when compared with adhesive tape and was well tolerated in our observations. PMID:26983051

  15. Large bowel obstruction secondary to adhesive bands.

    PubMed

    El-Masry, Nabil S; Geevarghese, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Large bowel obstruction (LBO) is most commonly due to malignancy, volvulus, hernia, diverticular disease and inflammatory bowel disease. LBO due to adhesions is unusual. A literature review was conducted which revealed that only a few such cases have been reported. We report two cases of LBO secondary to adhesions in patients, one with and one without a past abdominal surgical history. We highlight that while rare, the aetiology of LBO secondary to adhesions must be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients presenting with obstructive symptoms. PMID:25650387

  16. Preventing adhesion of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium LT2 on tomato surfaces via ultrathin polyethylene glycol film.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Yang, Fan; Pasupuleti, Sasikiran; Oh, Jun Kyun; Kohli, Nandita; Lee, I-Syuan; Perez, Keila; Verkhoturov, Stanislav V; Schweikert, Emile A; Jayaraman, Arul; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis; Akbulut, Mustafa

    2014-08-18

    This work deals with adhesion of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 (S. Typhimurium LT2) on polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated tomato surfaces. PEG coating was characterized by water contact angle technique, scanning electron microscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. It was shown that PEG films could physisorb on the tomato surfaces after the oxygen plasma treatment, which made some outermost layers of the surfaces hydrophilic. Bacterial adhesion on PEG coated tomato surface was studied by standard plate count, fluorescence microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Fully covered PEG film reduced the bacterial attachment 90% or more in comparison to the bare tomato surface. The degree of bacterial attachment decreased exponentially with increasing PEG coverage. When desired, PEG film could be removed by rinsing with water. Overall, this work demonstrates the proof-of-concept that an ultrathin film of polyethylene glycol may be used to effectively inhibit the attachment of pathogenic bacteria on tomato surfaces. PMID:24935688

  17. Surgical bleeding in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. R.; Billica, R. D.; Johnston, S. L. 3rd

    1993-01-01

    A surgical procedure performed during space flight would occur in a unique microgravity environment. Several experiments performed during weightlessness in parabolic flight were reviewed to ascertain the behavior of surgical bleeding in microgravity. Simulations of bleeding using dyed fluid and citrated bovine blood, as well as actual arterial and venous bleeding in rabbits, were examined. The high surface tension property of blood promotes the formation of large fluid domes, which have a tendency to adhere to the wound. The use of sponges and suction will be adequate to prevent cabin atmosphere contamination with all bleeding, with the exception of temporary arterial droplet streams. The control of the bleeding with standard surgical techniques should not be difficult.

  18. Efficiency of Hyaloglide in the prevention of the recurrence of adhesions after tenolysis of flexor tendons in zone II: a randomized, controlled, multicentre clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Riccio, M; Battiston, B; Pajardi, G; Corradi, M; Passaretti, U; Atzei, A; Altissimi, M; Vaienti, L; Catalano, F; Del Bene, M; Fasolo, P; Ceruso, M; Luchetti, R; Landi, A

    2010-02-01

    Hyaloglide is a hyaluronan-based gel based on a novel auto-crosslinked technology designed to reduce postsurgical adhesions. Its efficacy was assessed in a multicentred randomized controlled trial comparing the results of flexor tenolysis in zone 2 following failed flexor tendon repairs. In the control group a standard release was performed. In the treated group, Hyaloglide was applied into the flexor sheath and around the site of tenolysis. Forty-five patients, 19 controls and 26 treated with Hyaloglide, were enrolled in 13 centres. All the patients were evaluated at 30, 60, 90 and 180 days after surgery by testing Total Active Motion, Quick-DASH questionnaire and number of working days lost after surgery. Patients in the Hyaloglide group had a statistically better recovery of finger motion at all time intervals and returned earlier to work and daily activities. The use of Hyaloglide did not appear to increase the complication rate. PMID:19710086

  19. Prevention of periprosthetic joint infection: what are the effective strategies?

    PubMed

    Alijanipour, Pouya; Heller, Snir; Parvizi, Javad

    2014-08-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) following total knee arthroplasty is a major burden for patients and health systems. Prevention of this challenging complication through implementation of effective strategies should be a priority. These strategies should encompass various levels of patient care. Multiple modifiable risk factors such as uncontrolled hyperglycemia, obesity, smoking, substance abuse, and nasal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus have been described for PJI. Preoperative recognition and mitigation of these risk factors along with optimization of nonmodifiable risk factors such as kidney, liver, or immune system insufficiency can considerably decrease the risk of PJI. A comprehensive perioperative protocol should involve optimization of the operative environment to reduce the number of bacteria and particulates in the air. Several surgical and nonsurgical details of intraoperative care such as maintenance of normothermia, skin preparation, surgical field irrigation, wound closure, and duration of surgical and anesthetic procedure can influence the occurrence of PJI. Prophylactic perioperative antibiotic administration is probably one of the most important strategies in preventing PJI. Implementation of surgical safety checklist can diminish the risk of perioperative complications, particularly surgical site infection. Controversy regarding efficacy, efficiency, and optimization of some preventive measures continues to exist due to inconsistency or inadequacy of available evidence. Novel research has focused on designing PJI-resistant implants and developing vaccines that target molecule components with major role in the process of bacterial adhesion to the implant or periprosthetic tissues. PMID:24792971

  20. Surgical Tips in Frozen Abdomen Management: Application of Coliseum Technique.

    PubMed

    Kyriazanos, Ioannis D; Manatakis, Dimitrios K; Stamos, Nikolaos; Stoidis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Wound dehiscence is a serious postoperative complication, with an incidence of 0.5-3% after primary closure of a laparotomy incision, and represents an acute mechanical failure of wound healing. Relatively recently the concept of "intentional open abdomen" was described and both clinical entities share common pathophysiological and clinical pathways ("postoperative open abdominal wall"). Although early reconstruction is the target, a significant proportion of patients will develop adhesions between abdominal viscera and the anterolateral abdominal wall, a condition widely recognized as "frozen abdomen," where delayed wound closure appears as the only realistic alternative. We report our experience with a patient who presented with frozen abdomen after wound dehiscence due to surgical site infection and application of the "Coliseum technique" for its definitive surgical management. This novel technique represents an innovative alternative to abdominal exploration, for cases of "malignant" frozen abdomen due to peritoneal carcinomatosis. Lifting the edges of the surgical wound upwards and suspending them under traction by threads from a retractor positioned above the abdomen facilitates approach to the peritoneal cavity, optimizes exposure of intra-abdominal organs, and prevents operative injury to the innervation and blood supply of abdominal wall musculature, a crucial step for subsequent hernia repair. PMID:26064759

  1. Surgical Tips in Frozen Abdomen Management: Application of Coliseum Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kyriazanos, Ioannis D.; Stamos, Nikolaos; Stoidis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Wound dehiscence is a serious postoperative complication, with an incidence of 0.5–3% after primary closure of a laparotomy incision, and represents an acute mechanical failure of wound healing. Relatively recently the concept of “intentional open abdomen” was described and both clinical entities share common pathophysiological and clinical pathways (“postoperative open abdominal wall”). Although early reconstruction is the target, a significant proportion of patients will develop adhesions between abdominal viscera and the anterolateral abdominal wall, a condition widely recognized as “frozen abdomen,” where delayed wound closure appears as the only realistic alternative. We report our experience with a patient who presented with frozen abdomen after wound dehiscence due to surgical site infection and application of the “Coliseum technique” for its definitive surgical management. This novel technique represents an innovative alternative to abdominal exploration, for cases of “malignant” frozen abdomen due to peritoneal carcinomatosis. Lifting the edges of the surgical wound upwards and suspending them under traction by threads from a retractor positioned above the abdomen facilitates approach to the peritoneal cavity, optimizes exposure of intra-abdominal organs, and prevents operative injury to the innervation and blood supply of abdominal wall musculature, a crucial step for subsequent hernia repair. PMID:26064759

  2. [New possibilities in the postoperative measures to prevent bleeding in cardiac surgery. Will the recombinant activated factor VII improve surgical results?].

    PubMed

    Skalski, Janusz H; Czapla, Jerzy; Nadziakiewicz, Paweł; Kaczmarski, Jacek; Zembala, Marian

    2002-01-01

    The authors present the diagnostic and therapeutic management in bleeding episodes associated with cardiosurgical operations, which constitutes the policy that is employed at Department of Cardiac Surgery and Transplantology, Silesian Academy of Medicine, Zabrze, Poland. The paper also presents a compendium of information on the pathophysiology of coagulation processes, most significant from the standpoint of cardiosurgical practice. Separate issues associated with providing optimal hemostasis in patients operated on using cardiopulmonary bypass are discussed, along with the effect of cardiac procedures on coagulation processes. Further, the authors present their clinical observations and experience in the utilization of the recombinant activated factor VII (NovoSeven, NovoNordisk) in two patients with severe perioperative bleeding. In the first case bleeding was associated heart transplantation procedure in a 37-year old woman, who had previously been twice subjected to operations for valvular heart disease. A dysfunction of two artificial valves implanted 15 years previously resulted in considerable heart muscle damage and an extremenally severe form of cardiac insufficiency. Two months after the heart transplant the patient unfortunately died due to infectious complications. In the second patient the recombinant activated factor VII was employed in an attempt at controlling severe bleeding encountered in a 15-year old boy in the course of reoperation in surgical treatment of a complex congenital heart defect. In this case the treatment was successful. In both described patients who were characterized by a high risk of surgical bleeding, the employment of the recombinant activated factor VII led to significant improvement in coagulation system indices and the hemostatic outcome was regarded positive. The authors state that the introduction of the recombinant activated factor VII to clinical practice in a selected group of patients presenting with most serious

  3. Surgical management of presbyopia

    PubMed Central

    Torricelli, André AM; Junior, Jackson B; Santhiago, Marcony R; Bechara, Samir J

    2012-01-01

    Presbyopia, the gradual loss of accommodation that becomes clinically significant during the fifth decade of life, is a physiologic inevitability. Different technologies are being pursued to achieve surgical correction of this disability; however, a number of limitations have prevented widespread acceptance of surgical presbyopia correction, such as optical and visual distortion, induced corneal ectasia, haze, anisometropy with monovision, regression of effect, decline in uncorrected distance vision, and the inherent risks with invasive techniques, limiting the development of an ideal solution. The correction of the presbyopia and the restoration of accommodation are considered the final frontier of refractive surgery. The purpose of this paper is to provide an update about current procedures available for presbyopia correction, their advantages, and disadvantages. PMID:23055664

  4. Thermal Characterization of Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.

    1999-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Down-selection and performance testing of the structural adhesives resulted in the selection of two candidate replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's Tiga 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. This paper describes rocket motor testing of these two adhesives. Four forty-pound charge motors were fabricated in configurations that would allow side by side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives and the current RSRM adhesives. The motors provided an environment where the thermal performance of adhesives in flame surface bondlines was compared. Results of the FPC testing show that: 1) The phenolic char depths on radial bond lines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used; 2) The adhesive char depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the char depth of the current adhesives; 3) The heat-affected depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the heat-affected depth of the current adhesives; and 4) The ablation rates for both replacement adhesives are slower than that of the current adhesives.

  5. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  6. Understanding marine mussel adhesion.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Heather G; Roberto, Francisco F

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  7. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Francisco F.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  8. Reducing Surgical Site Infections: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Reichman, David E; Greenberg, James A

    2009-01-01

    Infection at or near surgical incisions within 30 days of an operative procedure contributes substantially to surgical morbidity and mortality each year. The prevention of surgical site infections encompasses meticulous operative technique, timely administration of appropriate preoperative antibiotics, and a variety of preventive measures aimed at neutralizing the threat of bacterial, viral, and fungal contamination posed by operative staff, the operating room environment, and the patient’s endogenous skin flora. It is the latter aspect of contamination, and specifically mechanical methods of prevention, on which this review focuses. PMID:20111657

  9. Treatment of adhesive capsulitis: a review

    PubMed Central

    D’Orsi, Giovanni Maria; Via, Alessio Giai; Frizziero, Antonio; Oliva, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Summary Adhesive capsulitis is a condition “difficult to define, difficult to treat and difficult to explain from the point of view of pathology”. This Codman’s assertion is still actual because of a variable nomenclature, an inconsistent reporting of disease staging and many types of treatment. There is no consensus on how the best way best to manage patients with this condition, so we want to provide an evidence-based overview regarding the effectiveness of conservative and surgical interventions to treat adhesive capsulitis. PMID:23738277

  10. Peritoneal adhesions after laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mais, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Although laparoscopy has the potential to reduce peritoneal trauma and post-operative peritoneal adhesion formation, only one randomized controlled trial and a few comparative retrospective clinical studies have addressed this issue. Laparoscopy reduces de novo adhesion formation but has no efficacy in reducing adhesion reformation after adhesiolysis. Moreover, several studies have suggested that the reduction of de novo post-operative adhesions does not seem to have a significant clinical impact. Experimental data in animal models have suggested that CO2 pneumoperitoneum can cause acute peritoneal inflammation during laparoscopy depending on the insufflation pressure and the surgery duration. Broad peritoneal cavity protection by the insufflation of a low-temperature humidified gas mixture of CO2, N2O and O2 seems to represent the best approach for reducing peritoneal inflammation due to pneumoperitoneum. However, these experimental data have not had a significant impact on the modification of laparoscopic instrumentation. In contrast, surgeons should train themselves to perform laparoscopy quickly, and they should complete their learning curves before testing chemical anti-adhesive agents and anti-adhesion barriers. Chemical anti-adhesive agents have the potential to exert broad peritoneal cavity protection against adhesion formation, but when these agents are used alone, the concentrations needed to prevent adhesions are too high and could cause major post-operative side effects. Anti-adhesion barriers have been used mainly in open surgery, but some clinical data from laparoscopic surgeries are already available. Sprays, gels, and fluid barriers are easier to apply in laparoscopic surgery than solid barriers. Results have been encouraging with solid barriers, spray barriers, and gel barriers, but they have been ambiguous with fluid barriers. Moreover, when barriers have been used alone, the maximum protection against adhesion formation has been no greater than

  11. [Surgical treatment of syringomyelia].

    PubMed

    Abe, T; Okuda, Y; Nagashima, H; Isojima, A; Tani, S

    1995-12-01

    Eighty cases of surgically treated syringomyelia were retrospectively reviewed. The cases were classified into following 4 types, type 1: syringomyelia with Chiari malformation (54 cases), type 2: syringomyelia with basal arachnoiditis (15 cases), type 3: syringomyelia with an obstruction of the foramen Magendie (1 case), and type 4: syringomyelia with spinal arachnoiditis (14 cases). Foramen magnum decompression (FMD) was performed in patients with type 1, in type 2 fourth ventricle-subarachnoid shunt was additionally performed. Gardner's operation was performed in patients with type 3. Syrinx-peritoneal shunt was performed in patients with type 4. Surgical procedures for syringomyelia which we selected were thought to be appropriate, based on postoperative syrinx collapse rate in MRI. However, postoperative clinical course was much different in each type of syringomyelia after the collapse of syrinx had been equally achieved. Neurological disorders were stopped in deterioration after surgery in all cases of type 1. However, motor weakness was still deteriorated in half cases of type 2, and in 60% of type 4. When clinical severity of the patients with type 1 and 2, based on the distribution of dissociated sensory loss and motor weakness, were classified into 5 grades. The rate of improvement of patient's symptoms and signs was higher in the lower grades. We concluded that a surgical treatment for syringomyelia was essentially a preventive one, therefore it should be done in early stage of disorders. PMID:8752412

  12. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  13. Systematic review and meta-analysis of sutures coated with triclosan for the prevention of surgical site infection after elective colorectal surgery according to the PRISMA statement

    PubMed Central

    Sandini, Marta; Mattavelli, Ilaria; Nespoli, Luca; Uggeri, Fabio; Gianotti, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Several randomized clinical trials (RCTs) conducted to evaluate the effect of triclosan-coated suture on surgical site infection (SSI) yield to controversial results. The primary purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to analyze the available RCTs, comparing the effect of triclosan-coated suture with uncoated suture on the incidence of SSI after elective colorectal operations. As secondary endpoint of the analysis, we considered length of hospital stay after surgery. Methods: We performed a systematic literature review through Medline, Embase, Pubmed, Scopus, Ovid, ISI Web of Science, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register searching for RCTs published from 1990 to 2015. To conduct these meta-analyses, we followed the guidelines and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. Study inclusion criteria were as follows: parallel-group RCTs in adult populations reporting the closure of the abdominal wall after elective colorectal operation with triclosan-coated suture or noncoated suture, and reporting the outcomes considered in the meta-analysis. Results: Six trials including 2168 patients (1102 treated and 1066 controls) provided data on SSIs. The overall rate was 11.7% (129/1102) in the triclosan group and 13.4% (143/1066) in the control group (odds ratio 0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.58–1.13, P = 0.220). Heterogeneity among studies was moderate (I2 = 44.9%). No evidence of publication bias was detectable. Five RCTs (1783 patients; 914 treated and 689 controls) described hospital length of stay with no significant effect (mean difference: −0.02, 95% CI −0.11 to −0.07, P = 0.668). The I2 test for heterogeneity was 0% (P = 0.836). Moderator analyses showed no significant differences were detected in analyses comparing the suture materials (polydioxanone vs polyglactin). In open-label trials, the odds ratio for SSI risk was 0.62 (95% CI 0.20–1.93, P = 0

  14. Bacterial colonization of the skin following aseptic preoperative preparation and impact of the use of plastic adhesive drapes.

    PubMed

    Falk-Brynhildsen, Karin; Friberg, Orjan; Söderquist, Bo; Nilsson, Ulrica G

    2013-04-01

    Surgical site contamination, for example, with coagulase-negative staphylococci, probably derives from both the patient's own skin flora and those of the surgical team. Despite preoperative antiseptic preparation with chlorhexidine solution, complete sterilization of the skin is not possible and gradual recolonization will occur. Plastic adhesive drape is an established method used to prevent direct wound contamination from adjacent skin. In this study, the time to skin recolonization after antiseptic preparation was measured and the impact of using plastic adhesive drape on this recolonization was evaluated. Repeated bacterial sampling using three different methods over 6 hr was conducted after antiseptic preparation in 10 volunteers. Recolonization of skin was observed after 30 min with plastic drape and after 60 min without plastic drape; there were significantly more positive cultures with the plastic drape than without (31% vs. 7.5%, respectively, p < .001). Sampling with a rayon swab was the most sensitive sampling method. In conclusion, covering the skin with a plastic adhesive drape seems to hasten recolonization of the skin after antiseptic preparation. However, clinical trials to confirm this finding are warranted. PMID:22278031

  15. Labial adhesion in children at the Jos University Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Ephraim; Ocheke, Amaka Ngozi; Samuels, Nathaniel E. O.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Labial adhesion is one of the most common reasons for gynaecologic consultations in children. We sought to determine the prevalence of labial adhesions, mode of presentation and treatment in children at the Jos University Teaching Hospital. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of labial adhesions in children from January 2004 to December 2013. Data on paediatric gynaecological consultations, and labial adhesions were retrieved from the gynaecological clinic and the theatre records. The case notes of those with labial adhesions were retrieved and the relevant data extracted. Results: The total number of paediatric patients seen at the gynaecology clinic over the study period was 379 and 25 had labial adhesion (6.6%). The majority (88%) presented in the first 2 years of life, all the patients were asymptomatic, and 2 (8%) had surgical separation of the adhesions while the rest were managed conservatively. A total of 5 (20%) came for follow-up. While 2 (8%) came a week later following surgical management, 3 (12%) came back more than 6 months later due to recurrence following conservative management. Conclusion: Labial adhesions account for significant proportion of paediatric gynaecologic consultations. They are usually asymptomatic, occur in the first 2 years of life and frequently managed conservatively. PMID:27251516

  16. 21 CFR 878.4011 - Tissue adhesive with adjunct wound closure device for topical approximation of skin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tissue adhesive with adjunct wound closure device... DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4011 Tissue adhesive with adjunct wound closure device for topical approximation of skin. (a) Identification. A tissue adhesive with adjunct wound closure device intended for...

  17. 21 CFR 878.4011 - Tissue adhesive with adjunct wound closure device for topical approximation of skin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tissue adhesive with adjunct wound closure device... DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4011 Tissue adhesive with adjunct wound closure device for topical approximation of skin. (a) Identification. A tissue adhesive with adjunct wound closure device intended for...

  18. 21 CFR 878.4011 - Tissue adhesive with adjunct wound closure device for topical approximation of skin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tissue adhesive with adjunct wound closure device... DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4011 Tissue adhesive with adjunct wound closure device for topical approximation of skin. (a) Identification. A tissue adhesive with adjunct wound closure device intended for...

  19. 21 CFR 878.4011 - Tissue adhesive with adjunct wound closure device for topical approximation of skin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tissue adhesive with adjunct wound closure device... DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4011 Tissue adhesive with adjunct wound closure device for topical approximation of skin. (a) Identification. A tissue adhesive with adjunct wound closure device intended for...

  20. Adhesive capsulitis of the hip: a review.

    PubMed

    Looney, Colin G; Raynor, Brett; Lowe, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Adhesive capsulitis of the hip (ACH) is a rare clinical entity. Similar to adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder, ACH is characterized by a painful decrease in active and passive range of motion as synovial inflammation in the acute stages of the disease progresses to capsular fibrosis in the chronic stages. Once other diagnoses have been ruled out, management of ACH is tailored to reduce inflammation in the acute stages with NSAIDs, intra-articular steroid injections, and targeted physical therapy while biomechanical dysfunction in the spine, hip, sacroiliac joint, or lower limb joints is addressed. In chronic stages of the disease, intervention should focus on decreasing the progression of fibrotic changes and regaining range of motion through aggressive physical therapy. Interventions described for chronic ACH include manipulation under anesthesia; pressure dilatation; and open or arthroscopic synovectomy, lysis of adhesions, and capsular release. Surgical intervention should be considered only after failure of a minimum 3-month course of nonsurgical treatment. PMID:24292931

  1. Use of cyanoacrylate adhesives in general surgery.

    PubMed

    García Cerdá, David; Ballester, Antonio Martín; Aliena-Valero, Alicia; Carabén-Redaño, Anna; Lloris, José M

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a review of the use of cyanoacrylate adhesives (CA) in general surgery and digestive surgery, studies the mechanisms of action and interactions of CAs in adherent tissues, and compiles data on the latest experimental and clinical applications. More than seven million traumatic injuries are estimated to occur every year, and between 26 and 90 million surgical procedures using different techniques are performed to close the resulting wounds. Traditional methods not only are both useful and effective, but also have some drawbacks. This review covers a considerable number of surgical procedures for which CAs had satisfactory results. The adhesive facilitated the healing of very diverse tissues, such as solid organs, vascular tissue or the abdominal wall. In other cases, no significant differences were found when CA was compared to traditional methods, with the adhesive standing out as a simple and reliable solution. The number of procedures in which CA was detrimental was very low. This review also collects and describes these. In conclusion, the surgical fields and procedures in which CA was successfully used are highly diverse. This review will allow physicians to determine which techniques were first used experimentally, but finally settled in clinical practice as feasible alternatives to standard treatments. PMID:25344231

  2. NOTE: A cooled intraesophageal balloon to prevent thermal injury during endocardial surgical radiofrequency ablation of the left atrium: a finite element study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berjano, Enrique J.; Hornero, Fernando

    2005-10-01

    Recent clinical studies on intraoperative monopolar radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation have reported some cases of injury to the esophagus. The aim of this study was to perform computer simulations using three-dimensional finite element models in order to investigate the feasibility of a cooled intraesophageal balloon appropriately placed to prevent injury. The models included atrial tissue and a fragment of esophagus and lung linked by connective tissue. The lesion depth in the esophagus was assessed using a 50 °C isotherm and expressed as a percentage of thickness of the esophageal wall. The results are as follows: (1) chilling the esophagus by means of a cooled balloon placed in the lumen minimizes the lesion in the esophageal wall compared to the cases in which no balloon is used (a collapsed esophagus) and with a non-cooled balloon; (2) the temperature of the cooling fluid has a more significant effect on the minimization of the lesion than the rate of cooling (the thermal transfer coefficient for forced convection); and (3) pre-cooling periods previous to RF ablation do not represent a significant improvement. Finally, the results also suggest that the use of a cooled balloon could affect the transmurality of the atrial lesion, especially in the cases where the atrium is of considerable thickness.

  3. Protocol for a randomised controlled trial comparing aqueous with alcoholic chlorhexidine antisepsis for the prevention of superficial surgical site infection after minor surgery in general practice: the AVALANCHE trial

    PubMed Central

    Heal, C F; Charles, D; Hardy, A; Delpachitra, M; Banks, J; Wohlfahrt, M; Saednia, Sabine; Buettner, P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surgical site infection (SSI) after minor skin excisions has a significant impact on patient morbidity and healthcare resources. Skin antisepsis prior to surgical incision is used to prevent SSI, and is performed routinely worldwide. However, in spite of the routine use of skin antisepsis, there is no consensus regarding which antiseptic agents are most effective. The AVALANCHE trial will compare Aqueous Versus Alcoholic Antisepsis with Chlorhexidine for Skin Excisions. Methods and analysis The study design is a prospective, randomised controlled trial (RCT) with the aim of investigating the impact of two different antiseptic preparations on the incidence of superficial SSI in patients undergoing minor skin excisions. The intervention of 0.5% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) in 70% alcohol will be compared with that of 0.5% CHG in aqueous solution. The trial will be conducted in four Australian general practices over a 9-month period, with 920 participants to be recruited. Consecutive patients presenting for minor skin excisions will be eligible to participate. Randomisation will be on the level of the patient. The primary outcome is superficial SSI in the first 30 days following the excision. Secondary outcomes will be adverse effects, including anaphylaxis, skin irritation, contact dermatitis and rash and patterns of antibiotic resistance. Ethics and dissemination The study has been approved by the James Cook University Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC). Findings will be disseminated in conference presentations and journals and through online electronic media. Discussion RCTs conducted in general practice differ from hospital-based projects in terms of feasibility, pragmatism and funding. The success of this trial will be cemented in the fact that the research question was established by a group of general practitioners who identified an interesting question which is relevant to their clinical practice and not answered by current evidence. Trial

  4. Isolation and biochemical characterization of underwater adhesives from diatoms.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Nicole; Kröger, Nils; Harrington, Matthew J; Brunner, Eike; Paasch, Silvia; Buhmann, Matthias T

    2014-01-01

    Many aquatic organisms are able to colonize surfaces through the secretion of underwater adhesives. Diatoms are unicellular algae that have the capability to colonize any natural and man-made submerged surfaces. There is great technological interest in both mimicking and preventing diatom adhesion, yet the biomolecules responsible have so far remained unidentified. A new method for the isolation of diatom adhesive material is described and its amino acid and carbohydrate composition determined. The adhesive materials from two model diatoms show differences in their amino acid and carbohydrate compositions, but also share characteristic features including a high content of uronic acids, the predominance of hydrophilic amino acid residues, and the presence of 3,4-dihydroxyproline, an extremely rare amino acid. Proteins containing dihydroxyphenylalanine, which mediate underwater adhesion of mussels, are absent. The data on the composition of diatom adhesives are consistent with an adhesion mechanism based on complex coacervation of polyelectrolyte-like biomolecules. PMID:24689803

  5. [Surgical therapy of liver echinococcosis].

    PubMed

    Bähr, R; Gaebel, G

    1985-01-01

    There is still no other therapeutic management for echinococcosis of the liver than surgical treatment. Indeed, drug therapy with Mebendazol prevents parasitosis from spreading. However, a complete regression has not been observed hitherto. Surgical procedure is dependent on expansion, localisation and type of echinococcosis. Generally, cystectomy is possible and adequate in case of Echinococcus granulosus, in case of Echinococcus multilocularis with its infiltrating growth, a complete healing can only be attained by lobectomy. With the hilus being invaded and obstructive jaundice proceeding, an improvement can be reached by Mebendazol or a palliative endless drainage tube. PMID:4013541

  6. Surgical management of ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Stock, Laura; Milad, Magdy

    2012-06-01

    Surgery remains an acceptable, and sometimes necessary, modality for the treatment of ectopic pregnancy. Laparoscopy is the preferred method of access, yet controversy remains regarding the optimal procedure and postoperative management. Generally, salpingostomy is employed with the goal of maintaining fertility, although data to support this tenet are lacking. In most cases, the decision to perform conservative versus radical surgery is on the basis of the patient's history, her desire for future fertility, and surgical findings. The procedures of salpingostomy and salpingectomy, techniques to prevent and control blood loss at the time of surgery, and surgical options for nontubal ectopic pregnancies are reviewed. PMID:22510627

  7. Adhesion molecules in antibacterial defenses: effects of bacterial extracts.

    PubMed

    Marchant, A; Duchow, J; Goldman, M

    1992-01-01

    Adhesion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) to vascular endothelium is one of the first events in their response against local bacterial infection. Different adhesion molecules sequentially mediate PMN adherence to endothelium and extravasation into inflamed tissues. We show that bacterial extracts OM-85 BV and OM-89 increase the expression of adhesion molecules at the surface of PMN and we suggest that this upregulation could be linked to the beneficial effect of bacterial extracts in the prevention of respiratory tract infections. PMID:1439236

  8. Strategies to Minimize Adhesion Formation After Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lazarou, George; Mondesir, Carlene; Wei, Kai; Khullar, Poonan; Ogden, Lorna

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the potential for postoperative laparoscopic adhesion formation utilizing either monopolar cautery or ultrasonic energy and to determine whether there is added benefit with the addition of a suspension of hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose in saline versus saline alone. Methods: Injuries were induced in rabbits by using monopolar cautery on 1 uterine horn and adjacent sidewall and ultrasonic energy on the opposite. Hyaluronate/ carboxymethylcellulose or saline was added to every other animal. Autopsies were performed after 3 weeks. Clinical and pathologic scoring of adhesions was performed by blinded investigators. Results: A very significant difference occurred in pathologic adhesion scores favoring the ultrasonic scalpel when the animals were treated with saline. However, a borderline significant difference was found in pathologic scores favoring the ultrasonic scalpel compared to the monopolar cautery. There was no significant difference in clinical adhesion scores between the 2 modalities. No significant difference in either score was found with the addition of hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose or saline with either instrument. Conclusion: No benefit was found for adhesion prevention with hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose. Although no reduction was achieved in clinical adhesions, the ultrasonic scalpel resulted in fewer histologic signs of tissue inflammation in the early postoperative period, suggesting that further clinical adhesions might develop over time with cautery. PMID:21985723

  9. Lactobacillus plantarum CS24.2 prevents Escherichia coli adhesion to HT-29 cells and also down-regulates enteropathogen-induced tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-8 expression.

    PubMed

    Dhanani, Akhilesh S; Bagchi, Tamishraha

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential of Lactobacillus plantarum CS24.2 to antagonize Escherichia coli adhesion and modulate expression of the responses by HT-29 cells of inflammatory molecules to E. coli adhesion. Experiments were performed under different adhesion conditions and findings compared with the responses of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Tests of competitive adhesion, adhesion inhibition and displacement assays were performed for lactobacilli (L. rhamnosus GG and L. plantarum CS24.2) and E. coli O26:H11 to HT-29 cells. Both the lactobacilli significantly reduced E. coli adhesion to HT-29 cells (P < 0.05). The ability of lactobacilli to modulate tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-8 expression was analyzed in HT-29 cells stimulated with E. coli using qRT-PCR. L. plantarum CS24.2 significantly down regulated expression of both the genes induced by E. coli in HT-29 cells at 6 hr as well as 24 hr, which was more significant than the corresponding findings for L. rhamnosus GG. The present findings suggest that L. plantarum CS24.2 inhibits pathogen adhesion to a similar extent as does the established probiotic strain L. rhamnosus GG. It may also attenuate tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-8 expression in HT-29 cells stimulated with E. coli. PMID:23586634

  10. Ins and Outs of Microbial Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virji, Mumtaz

    Microbial adhesion is generally a complex process, involving multiple adhesins on a single microbe and their respective target receptors on host cells. In some situations, various adhesins of a microbe may co-operate in an apparently hierarchical and sequential manner whereby the first adhesive event triggers the target cell to express receptors for additional microbial adhesins. In other instances, adhesins may act in concert leading to high avidity interactions, often a prelude to cellular invasion and tissue penetration. Mechanisms used to target the host include both lectin-like interactions and protein-protein interactions; the latter are often highly specific for the host or a tissue within the host. This reflective chapter aims to offer a point of view on microbial adhesion by presenting some experiences and thoughts especially related to respiratory pathogens and explore if there can be any future hope of controlling bacterial infections via preventing adhesion or invasion stages of microbial pathogenesis.

  11. Adhesive and sealant interfaces for general surgery applications.

    PubMed

    Scognamiglio, Francesca; Travan, Andrea; Rustighi, Isabella; Tarchi, Paola; Palmisano, Silvia; Marsich, Eleonora; Borgogna, Massimiliano; Donati, Ivan; de Manzini, Nicolò; Paoletti, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    The main functions of biological adhesives and sealants are to repair injured tissues, reinforce surgical wounds, or even replace common suturing techniques. In general surgery, adhesives must match several requirements taking into account clinical needs, biological effects, and material features; these requirements can be fulfilled by specific polymers. Natural or synthetic polymeric materials can be employed to generate three-dimensional networks that physically or chemically bind to the target tissues and act as hemostats, sealants, or adhesives. Among them, fibrin, gelatin, dextran, chitosan, cyanoacrylates, polyethylene glycol, and polyurethanes are the most important components of these interfaces; various aspects regarding their adhesion mechanisms, mechanical performance, and resistance to body fluids should be taken into account to choose the most suitable formulation for the target application. This review aims to describe the main adhesives and sealant materials for general surgery applications developed in the past decades and to highlight the most important aspects for the development of future formulations. PMID:25891348

  12. Microtubule-dependent modulation of adhesion complex composition.

    PubMed

    Ng, Daniel H J; Humphries, Jonathan D; Byron, Adam; Millon-Frémillon, Angélique; Humphries, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    The microtubule network regulates the turnover of integrin-containing adhesion complexes to stimulate cell migration. Disruption of the microtubule network results in an enlargement of adhesion complex size due to increased RhoA-stimulated actomyosin contractility, and inhibition of adhesion complex turnover; however, the microtubule-dependent changes in adhesion complex composition have not been studied in a global, unbiased manner. Here we used label-free quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics to determine adhesion complex changes that occur upon microtubule disruption with nocodazole. Nocodazole-treated cells displayed an increased abundance of the majority of known adhesion complex components, but no change in the levels of the fibronectin-binding α5β1 integrin. Immunofluorescence analyses confirmed these findings, but revealed a change in localisation of adhesion complex components. Specifically, in untreated cells, α5-integrin co-localised with vinculin at peripherally located focal adhesions and with tensin at centrally located fibrillar adhesions. In nocodazole-treated cells, however, α5-integrin was found in both peripherally located and centrally located adhesion complexes that contained both vinculin and tensin, suggesting a switch in the maturation state of adhesion complexes to favour focal adhesions. Moreover, the switch to focal adhesions was confirmed to be force-dependent as inhibition of cell contractility with the Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor, Y-27632, prevented the nocodazole-induced conversion. These results highlight a complex interplay between the microtubule cytoskeleton, adhesion complex maturation state and intracellular contractile force, and provide a resource for future adhesion signaling studies. The proteomics data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001183. PMID:25526367

  13. Mussel-inspired soft-tissue adhesive based on poly(diol citrate) with catechol functionality.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yali; Ji, Ting; Liang, Kai; Zhu, Lei

    2016-02-01

    Marine mussels tightly adhering to various underwater surfaces inspires human to design adhesives for wet tissue adhesion in surgeries. Characterization of mussel adhesive plaques describes a matrix of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), which provides strong adhesion in aquatic conditions. Several synthetic polymer systems have been developed based on this DOPA chemistry. Herein, a citrate-based tissue adhesives (POEC-d) was prepared by a facile one-pot melt polycondensation of two diols including 1,8-octanediol and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), citric acid (CA) and dopamine, and the effects of hydrophilic and soft PEO on the properties of adhesives were studied. It was found that the obtained adhesives exhibited water-soluble when the mole ratio of PEO to 1,8-octanediol was 70%, and the equilibrium swelling percentage of cured adhesive was about 144%, and degradation rate was in the range of 1-2 weeks. The cured adhesives demonstrated soft rubber-like behavior. The lap shear adhesion strength measured by bonding wet pig skin was in the range of 21.7-33.7 kPa, which was higher than that of commercial fibrin glue (9-15 kPa). The cytotoxicity tests showed the POEC-d adhesives had a low cytotoxicity. Our results supports that POEC-d adhesives, which combined strong wet adhesion with good biodegradability, acceptable swelling ratio, good elasticity and low cytotoxicity, have potentials in surgeries where surgical tissue adhesives, sealants, and hemostatic agents are used. PMID:26704547

  14. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  15. Adhesion at metal interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A basic adhesion process is defined, the theory of the properties influencing metallic adhesion is outlined, and theoretical approaches to the interface problem are presented, with emphasis on first-principle calculations as well as jellium-model calculations. The computation of the energies of adhesion as a function of the interfacial separation is performed; fully three-dimensional calculations are presented, and universality in the shapes of the binding energy curves is considered. An embedded-atom method and equivalent-crystal theory are covered in the framework of issues involved in practical adhesion.

  16. Simulation in Surgical Education

    PubMed Central

    de Montbrun, Sandra L.; MacRae, Helen

    2012-01-01

    The pedagogical approach to surgical training has changed significantly over the past few decades. No longer are surgical skills solely acquired through a traditional apprenticeship model of training. The acquisition of many technical and nontechnical skills is moving from the operating room to the surgical skills laboratory through the use of simulation. Many platforms exist for the learning and assessment of surgical skills. In this article, the authors provide a broad overview of some of the currently available surgical simulation modalities including bench-top models, laparoscopic simulators, simulation for new surgical technologies, and simulation for nontechnical surgical skills. PMID:23997671

  17. Electronic surgical record management.

    PubMed

    Rockman, Justin

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the challenges surgical practices face in coordinating surgeries and how the electronic surgical record management (ESRM) approach to surgical coordination can solve these problems and improve efficiency. Surgical practices continue to experience costly inefficiencies when managing surgical coordination. Application software like practice management and electronic health record systems have enabled practices to "go digital" for their administrative, financial, and clinical data. However, surgical coordination is still a manual and labor-intensive process. Surgical practices need to create a central and secure record of their surgeries. When surgical data are inputted once only and stored in a central repository, the data are transformed into active information that can be outputted to any form, letter, calendar, or report. ESRM is a new approach to surgical coordination. It enables surgical practices to automate and streamline their processes, reduce costs, and ensure that patients receive the best possible care. PMID:20480775

  18. Surgical Site Infections After Pediatric Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Floccari, Lorena V; Milbrandt, Todd A

    2016-04-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after spinal deformity surgery is a complication in the pediatric population resulting in high morbidity and cost. Despite modern surgical techniques and preventative strategies, the incidence remains substantial, especially in the neuromuscular population. This review focuses on recent advancements in identification of risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment strategies for acute and delayed pediatric spine infections. It reviews recent literature, including the best practice guidelines for infection prevention in high-risk patients. Targets of additional research are highlighted to assess efficacy of current practices to further reduce risk of SSI in pediatric patients with spinal deformity. PMID:26772947

  19. Development and characterization of a novel hydrogel adhesive for soft tissue applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Lindsey Kennedy

    With laparoscopic and robotic surgical techniques advancing, the need for an injectable surgical adhesive is growing. To be effective, surgical adhesives for internal organs require bulk strength and compliance to avoid rips and tears, and adhesive strength to avoid leakage at the application site, while not hindering the natural healing process. Although a number of tissue adhesives and sealants approved by the FDA for surgical use are currently available, attaining a useful balance in all of these qualities has proven difficult, particularly when considering applications involving highly expandable tissue, such as bladder and lung. The long-term goal of this project is to develop a hydrogel-based tissue adhesive that provides proper mechanical properties to eliminate the need for sutures in various soft tissue applications. Tetronic (BASF), a 4-arm poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PPO-PEO) block copolymer, has been selected as the base material for the adhesive hydrogel system. Solutions of Tetronic T1107 can support reverse thermal gelation at physiological temperatures, which can be combined with covalent crosslinking to achieve a "tandem gelation" process making it ideal for use as a tissue adhesive. The objective of this doctoral thesis research is to improve the performance of the hydrogel based tissue adhesive developed previously by Cho and co-workers by applying a multi-functionalization of Tetronic. Specifically, this research aimed to improve bonding strength of Tetronic tissue adhesive using bi-functional modification, incorporate hemostatic function to the bi-functional Tetronic hydrogel, and evaluate the safety of bi-functional Tetronic tissue adhesive both in vitro and in vivo. In summary, we have developed a fast-curing, mechanically strong hemostatic tissue adhesive that can control blood loss in wet conditions during wound treatment applications (bladder, liver and muscle). Specifically, the bi-functional Tetronic adhesive (TAS) with a

  20. Postoperative Peritoneal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Graeme B.; Grobéty, Jocelyne; Majno, Guido

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental model of peritoneal adhesions, in the rat, based on two relatively minor accidents that may occur during abdominal surgery in man: drying of the serosa, and bleeding. Drying alone had little effect; drying plus bleeding consistently produced adhesions to the dried area. Fresh blood alone produced adhesions between the three membranous structures [omentum and pelvic fat bodies (PFBs)]. The formation of persistent adhesions required whole blood. Preformed clots above a critical size induced adhesions even without previous serosal injury; they were usually captured by the omentum and PFBs. If all three membranous structures were excised, the clots caused visceral adhesions. The protective role of the omentum, its structure, and the mechanism of omental adhesions, are discussed. These findings are relevant to the pathogenesis of post-operative adhesions in man. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 12Fig 13Fig 1Fig 2Fig 14Fig 15Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11 PMID:5315369

  1. Lumbar disk. Surgical tricks for safeguarding the "root's ecology".

    PubMed

    de Divitiis, E; Spaziante, R; Cappabianca, P; Donzelli, R

    1984-07-01

    Restoration of a physiologic periradicular environment is a fundamental step toward improving the results of surgical procedures on the herniated lumbar disk. Combined with the preservation of periradicular fat (or free transplant of subcutaneous fat), reconstruction of the yellow ligament, recreating the interlaminar plane, may act as a barrier against postoperative adhesions. An operative technique is described that is aimed toward preserving the yellow ligament with the purpose of reconstructing it at the end of the surgical procedure on the root. PMID:6729694

  2. A Randomized, Multi-Center, Single Blind, Active-Controlled, Matched Pairs Clinical Study to Evaluate Prevention of Adhesion Formation and Safety of HyFence in Patients After Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chul; Hong, Sung-Moon; Cho, Jin-Hee; Shim, Sang Yul; Cho, Jung-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Recurrent mucosal disease and anatomic obstruction are commonly cited causes of failed endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). Hyaluronic acid (HA) has been reported to reduce scarring and to promote wound healing in sinonasal surgery. HyFence is HA stabilized by 1, 4-butandiol diglycidyl ether, which makes it less-water-soluble and highly viscoelastic. The purpose of this study is to examine the anti-adhesion effect of HyFence after ESS compared to that of HA-CMC (Guardix-Sol). Methods Seventy-four patients with chronic rhinosinusitis who underwent ESS were included in the study. After the ESS procedure, Merocel was placed in the ethmoidectomized areas of the both sides. Five milliliters of Guardix-Sol was then applied to the Merocel of one side and HyFence LV was applied to the other side. The effect of the agents was evaluated at one, two, and four weeks after surgery by endoscopic examination. The severity of adhesion, edema, infection and complications were evaluated. Results There was no significant difference in the incidence of postoperative adhesion between the HyFence group and the Guardix-Sol group (P>0.05). Mean postoperative grades of edema and infection showed no significant difference between groups (P>0.05). There was no significant postoperative complications associated with either anti-adhesion agent (P>0.05). Conclusion HyFence has equivalent anti-adhesion effect compared to Guardix-Sol following ESS. PMID:24587878

  3. The thoracic anterior spinal cord adhesion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, T R; Dineen, R; White, B; Jaspan, T

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study included a series of middle-aged male and female patients who presented with chronic anterior hemicord dysfunction progressing to paraplegia. Imaging of anterior thoracic cord displacement by either a dural adhesion or a dural defect with associated cord herniation is presented. Methods This is a retrospective review of cases referred to a tertiary neuroscience centre over a 19-year period. Imaging series were classified by two experienced neuroradiologists against several criteria and correlated with clinical examination and/or findings at surgery. Results 16 cases were available for full review. Nine were considered to represent adhesions (four confirmed surgically) and four to represent true herniation (three confirmed surgically). In the three remaining cases the diagnosis was radiologically uncertain. Conclusion The authors propose “thoracic anterior spinal cord adhesion syndrome” as a novel term to describe this patient cohort and suggest appropriate clinicoradiological features for diagnosis. Several possible aetiologies are also suggested, with disc rupture and inflammation followed by disc resorption and dural pocket formation being a possible mechanism predisposing to herniation at the extreme end of a clinicopathological spectrum. PMID:22665931

  4. Tongue-lip adhesion in Pierre Robin sequence

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Pierre Robin sequence exhibit varying degrees of airway obstruction and feeding difficulty. In some patients, airway obstruction may be profound, warranting surgical intervention to maintain a patent airway. The purpose of this article is to highlight the advantages of the tongue-lip adhesion procedure for the management of airway obstruction in such patients compared to the currently available options. PMID:26904495

  5. Beetle adhesive hairs differ in stiffness and stickiness: in vivo adhesion measurements on individual setae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, James M. R.; Federle, Walter

    2011-05-01

    Leaf beetles are able to climb on smooth and rough surfaces using arrays of micron-sized adhesive hairs (setae) of varying morphology. We report the first in vivo adhesive force measurements of individual setae in the beetle Gastrophysa viridula, using a smooth polystyrene substrate attached to a glass capillary micro-cantilever. The beetles possess three distinct adhesive pads on each leg which differ in function and setal morphology. Visualisation of pull-offs allowed forces to be measured for each tarsal hair type. Male discoidal hairs adhered with the highest forces (919 ± 104 nN, mean ± SE), followed by spatulate (582 ± 59 nN) and pointed (127 ± 19 nN) hairs. Discoidal hairs were stiffer in the normal direction (0.693 ± 0.111 N m-1) than spatulate (0.364 ± 0.039 N m-1) or pointed (0.192 ± 0.044 N m-1) hairs. The greater adhesion on smooth surfaces and the higher stability of discoidal hairs help male beetles to achieve strong adhesion on the elytra of females during copulation. A comparison of pull-off forces measured for single setae and whole pads (arrays) revealed comparable levels of adhesive stress. This suggests that beetles are able to achieve equal load sharing across their adhesive pads so that detachment through peeling is prevented.

  6. Cytotoxicity of denture adhesives.

    PubMed

    de Gomes, Pedro Sousa; Figueiral, Maria Helena; Fernandes, Maria Helena R; Scully, Crispian

    2011-12-01

    Ten commercially available denture adhesives, nine soluble formulations (six creams, three powders) and one insoluble product (pad), were analyzed regarding the cytotoxicity profile in direct and indirect assays using L929 fibroblast cells. In the direct assay, fibroblasts were seeded over the surface of a thick adhesive gel (5%, creams; 2.5%, powders and pad). In the indirect assay, cells were cultured in the presence of adhesive extracts prepared in static and dynamic conditions (0.5-2%, creams; 0.25-1%, powders and pad). Cell toxicity was assessed for cell viability/proliferation (MTT assay) and cell morphology (observation of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization by confocal laser scanning microscopy). Direct contact of the L929 fibroblasts with the thick adhesive gels caused no, or only a slight, decrease in cell viability/proliferation. The adhesive extracts (especially those prepared in dynamic conditions) caused significantly higher growth inhibition of fibroblasts and, in addition, caused dose- and time-dependent effects, throughout the 6-72 h exposure time. Also, dose-dependent effects on cell morphology, with evident disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization, were seen in the presence of most adhesives. In conclusion, the adhesives possessed different degrees of cytotoxicity, but similar dose- and time-dependent biological profiles. PMID:20844908

  7. Postoperative Adhesion Development Following Cesarean and Open Intra-Abdominal Gynecological Operations

    PubMed Central

    Awonuga, Awoniyi O.; Fletcher, Nicole M.; Saed, Ghassan M.; Diamond, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology of adhesion development, the impact of physiological changes associated with pregnancy on markers of adhesion development, and the clinical implications of adhesion development following cesarean delivery (CD). Although peritoneal adhesions develop after the overwhelming majority of intra-abdominal and pelvic surgery, there is evidence in the literature that suggests that patients having CD may develop adhesions less frequently. However, adhesions continue to be a concern after CD, and are likely significant, albeit on average less than after gynecological operations, but with potential to cause significant delay in the delivery of the baby with serious, lifelong consequences. Appreciation of the pathophysiology of adhesion development described herein should allow a more informed approach to the rapidly evolving field of intra-abdominal adhesions and should serve as a reference for an evidence-based approach to consideration for the prevention and treatment of adhesions. PMID:21775773

  8. Focal adhesions in osteoneogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M.J.P; Dalby, M.J

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of tissue engineering advances, the role of cellular adhesive mechanisms, in particular the interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device technology is to use the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to the material surface or chemical stimuli in order to help develop next-generation biomaterials. The focus of this review is on recent studies and developments concerning focal adhesion formation in osteoneogenesis, with an emphasis on the influence of synthetic constructs on integrin mediated cellular adhesion and function. PMID:21287830

  9. Cell adhesion force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sagvolden, G.; Giaever, I.; Pettersen, E. O.; Feder, J.

    1999-01-01

    The adhesion forces of cervical carcinoma cells in tissue culture were measured by using the manipulation force microscope, a novel atomic force microscope. The forces were studied as a function of time and temperature for cells cultured on hydrophilic and hydrophobic polystyrene substrates with preadsorbed proteins. The cells attached faster and stronger at 37°C than at 23°C and better on hydrophilic than on hydrophobic substrates, even though proteins adsorb much better to the hydrophobic substrates. Because cell adhesion serves to control several stages in the cell cycle, we anticipate that the manipulation force microscope can help clarify some cell-adhesion related issues. PMID:9892657

  10. Adhesive Contact Sweeper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Jonathan D.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive contact sweeper removes hair and particles vacuum cleaner leaves behind, without stirring up dust. Also cleans loose rugs. Sweeper holds commercially available spools of inverted adhesive tape. Suitable for use in environments in which air kept free of dust; optics laboratories, computer rooms, and areas inhabited by people allergic to dust. For carpets, best used in tandem with vacuum cleaner; first pass with vacuum cleaner removes coarse particles, and second pass with sweeper extracts fine particles. This practice extends useful life of adhesive spools.

  11. Perioperative Warming in Surgical Patients: A Comparison of Interventions.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Brenda; Kerr, Marsi; Van Poperin, Judy; Everett, Cindy; Stommel, Manfred; Lehto, Rebecca H

    2015-08-01

    The four arm study investigates how use of a preoperative forced-air warming blanket and adjustment of ambient surgical room temperature may contribute to prevention of perioperative hypothermia. Active warming interventions may prevent the drop in core temperature that occur as a result of surgical anesthesia. Core body temperatures from a convenience sample of 220 adult surgical patients were sequentially monitored in the preoperative, intraoperative, and post-anesthesia care units (PACU) while receiving: (a) routine surgical care, (b) application of preoperative forced-air warming blanket, (c) application of preoperative forced-air warming blanket with adjustment of ambient surgical room temperatures, or (d) adjustment of ambient surgical room temperature only. Sample characteristics were evenly distributed among the four groups. There were no statistical differences in PACU core body temperatures. The application of forced-air warming blankets and room temperature adjustment interventions were not more effective than current practice in preventing perioperative hypothermia. PMID:24913925

  12. Abortion - surgical - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000658.htm Abortion - surgical - aftercare To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. You have had a surgical abortion. This is a procedure that ends pregnancy by ...

  13. Hypothesis: Role for the circadian Clock system and sleep in the pathogenesis of adhesions and chronic pelvic pain?

    PubMed

    Sadek, Khaled; Macklon, Nick; Bruce, Kim; Cagampang, Felino; Cheong, Ying

    2011-03-01

    Intra-peritoneal adhesions ensuing from surgery or infection may lead to chronic pelvic pain, bowel obstruction, infertility and additional invasive surgery to resolve adhesion-related complications. As a result adhesions are a major clinical, social and economic concern. The cumulative year-on-year direct costs of adhesion-related readmissions for a 10-year period are more than £ 569 million. The degree of intra-abdominal adhesion formation in an individual patient after a surgical or infective insult remains difficult to predict. This reflects a lack of understanding as to the underlying aetiologies. Several different mechanisms leading to adhesion formation and re-formation have been proposed. These include abnormal modulations in inflammatory status, fibrinolytic pathways and matrix remodelling. A number of preventative strategies have been designed accordingly. However, although each individual model offers specific insights into the aetiology of adhesion formation, none have been shown to provide the basis for a highly effective clinical intervention. A unifying fundamental mechanism remains elusive. In this article we propose that such a mechanism can be found within the molecular control of circadian rhythms and "Clock" gene biology. A number of physiological processes demonstrating circadian variation have been shown to involve 'Clock genes' in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which then entrains a similar set of Clock genes in peripheral tissues such as the heart, brain, spleen, lung, liver, skeletal muscle and kidney. The intrinsic time-keeping system influences activity, such as sleep, temperature regulation, rates of metabolism, immune responses, blood pressure and hormone secretion. The function and availability of mediators involved in the inflammatory response, fibrinolytic and anti-coagulation pathways are all under the tight control of the molecular Clock system. These include IL-6, PAI-1, fibrinogen, fibroblasts and TNF-α. We hypothesise that

  14. Optical adhesive property study

    SciTech Connect

    Sundvold, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Tests were performed to characterize the mechanical and thermal properties of selected optical adhesives to identify the most likely candidate which could survive the operating environment of the Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) program. The DOI system consists of a high power laser and an optical module used to split the beam into a number of channels to initiate the system. The DOI requirements are for a high shock environment which current military optical systems do not operate. Five candidate adhesives were selected and evaluated using standardized test methods to determine the adhesives` physical properties. EC2216, manufactured by 3M, was selected as the baseline candidate adhesive based on the test results of the physical properties.

  15. Adhesives for Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    The industry is hereby challenged to integrate adhesive technology with the total structure requirements in light of today's drive into automation/mechanization. The state of the art of adhesive technology is fairly well meeting the needs of the structural designers, the processing engineer, and the inspector, each on an individual basis. The total integration of these needs into the factory of the future is the next collective hurdle to be achieved. Improved processing parameters to fit the needs of automation/mechanization will necessitate some changes in the adhesive forms, formulations, and chemistries. Adhesives have, for the most part, kept up with the needs of the aerospace industry, normally leading the rest of the industry in developments. The wants of the aerospace industry still present a challenge to encompass all elements, achieving a totally integrated joined and sealed structural system. Better toughness with hot-wet strength improvements is desired. Lower cure temperatures, longer out times, and improved corrosion inhibition are desired.

  16. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-04-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  17. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  18. Leucocyte cellular adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Yong, K; Khwaja, A

    1990-12-01

    Leucocytes express adhesion promoting receptors which mediate cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. These adhesive interactions are crucial to the regulation of haemopoiesis and thymocyte maturation, the direction and control of leucocyte traffic and migration through tissues, and in the development of immune and non-immune inflammatory responses. Several families of adhesion receptors have been identified (Table). The leucocyte integrin family comprises 3 alpha beta heterodimeric membrane glycoproteins which share a common beta subunit, designated CD18. The alpha subunits of each of the 3 members, lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), macrophage antigen-1 (Mac-1) and p150,95 are designated CD11a, b and c respectively. These adhesion molecules play a critical part in the immune and inflammatory responses of leucocytes. The leucocyte integrin family is, in turn, part of the integrin superfamily, members of which are evolutionally, structurally and functionally related. Another Integrin subfamily found on leucocytes is the VLA group, so-called because the 'very late activation antigens' VLA-1 and VLA-2 were originally found to appear late in T-cell activation. Members of this family function mainly as extracellular matrix adhesion receptors and are found both on haemopoietic and non-haemopoietic cells. They play a part in diverse cellular functions including tissue organisation, lymphocyte recirculation and T-cell immune responses. A third integrin subfamily, the cytoadhesins, are receptors on platelets and endothelial cells which bind extracellular matrix proteins. A second family of adhesion receptors is the immunoglobulin superfamily, members of which include CD2, LFA-3 and ICAM-1, which participate in T-cell adhesive interactions, and the antigen-specific receptors of T and B cells, CD4, CD8 and the MHC Class I and II molecules. A recently recognised family of adhesion receptors is the selectins, characterised by a common lectin domain. Leucocyte

  19. High temperature adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, Terry L.

    1991-01-01

    The aerospace and electronics industries have an ever increasing need for higher performance materials. In recent years, linear aromatic polyimides have been proven to be a superior class of materials for various applications in these industries. The use of this class of polymers as adhesives is continuing to increase. Several NASA Langley developed polyimides show considerable promise as adhesives because of their high glass transition temperatures, thermal stability, resistance to solvents/water, and their potential for cost effective manufacture.

  20. Bacterial Adhesion at Synthetic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cunliffe, D.; Smart, C. A.; Alexander, C.; Vulfson, E. N.

    1999-01-01

    A systematic investigation into the effect of surface chemistry on bacterial adhesion was carried out. In particular, a number of physicochemical factors important in defining the surface at the molecular level were assessed for their effect on the adhesion of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli. The primary experiments involved the grafting of groups varying in hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity, chain length, and chemical functionality onto glass substrates such that the surfaces were homogeneous and densely packed with functional groups. All of the surfaces were found to be chemically well defined, and their measured surface energies varied from 15 to 41 mJ · m−2. Protein adsorption experiments were performed with 3H-labelled bovine serum albumin and cytochrome c prior to bacterial attachment studies. Hydrophilic uncharged surfaces showed the greatest resistance to protein adsorption; however, our studies also showed that the effectiveness of poly(ethyleneoxide) (PEO) polymers was not simply a result of its hydrophilicity and molecular weight alone. The adsorption of the two proteins approximately correlated with short-term cell adhesion, and bacterial attachment for L. monocytogenes and E. coli also correlated with the chemistry of the underlying substrate. However, for S. aureus and S. typhimurium a different pattern of attachment occurred, suggesting a dissimilar mechanism of cell attachment, although high-molecular-weight PEO was still the least-cell-adsorbing surface. The implications of this for in vivo attachment of cells suggest that hydrophilic passivating groups may be the best method for preventing cell adsorption to synthetic substrates provided they can be grafted uniformly and in sufficient density at the surface. PMID:10543814

  1. Testicular torsion: A surgical emergency

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, J.M.; Overdorf, B.S. )

    1991-09-01

    Testicular torsion is caused by twisting of the spermatic cord, which results in compromised testicular blood flow. The degree of ischemic injury is determined by the severity of arterial compression and the interval between the onset of symptoms and surgical intervention. Torsion usually occurs at puberty, and an anatomic defect known as bell-clapper deformity is usually present. Typical symptoms include acute scrotal pain with associated nausea and vomiting. Up to one-half of patients report previous similar episodes. On examination, the testis is high-riding, tender, swollen and firm. Testicular scan or Doppler ultrasound examination can be helpful in distinguishing torsion from acute epididymitis. Prompt surgical treatment is indicated to reduce the torsion, and bilateral orchiopexy is performed to prevent recurrence. Exocrine function, as determined by semen analysis, is often abnormal after unilateral torsion. 25 references.

  2. Polymer adhesion at surfaces: biological adhesive proteins and their synthetic mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messersmith, Phillip

    2008-03-01

    Mussels are famous for their ability to permanently adhere to a wide variety of wet surfaces, such as rocks, metal and polymer ship hulls, and wood structures. They accomplish this through specialized proteins collectively referred to as mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs). The biophysical aspects of MAP adhesion is being revealed through the use of single molecule force measurements. The results provide insight into the adhesive roles of key amino acids found in these proteins, including the magnitude of adhesive forces, cooperative effects, and their self-healing properties. This molecular-level information is being incorporated into designs of biomimetic polymer coatings for a variety of applications. Our biomimetic approach to polymer design will be illustrated by a few examples where adhesive constituents found in MAPs are exploited to make wet-adhesive polymer coatings. In addition, small molecule analogs of MAPs can be used to apply thin functional films onto virtually any material surface using a facile approach. These coatings have a variety of potential uses in microelectronics, water treatment, prevention of environmental biofouling, and for control of biointerfacial phenomena at the surfaces of medical/diagnostic devices.

  3. Postoperative Complications Leading to Death after Coagulum Pyelolithotomy in a Tetraplegic Patient: Can We Prevent Prolonged Ileus, Recurrent Intestinal Obstruction due to Adhesions Requiring Laparotomies, Chest Infection Warranting Tracheostomy, and Mechanical Ventilation?

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Soni, Bakul; Singh, Gurpreet; Hughes, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A 22-year-old male sustained C-6 tetraplegia in 1992. In 1993, intravenous pyelography revealed normal kidneys. Suprapubic cystostomy was performed. He underwent open cystolithotomy in 2004 and 2008. In 2009, computed tomography revealed bilateral renal calculi. Coagulum pyelolithotomy of left kidney was performed. Pleura and peritoneum were opened. Peritoneum could not be closed. Following surgery, he developed pulmonary atelectasis; he required tracheostomy and mechanical ventilation. He did not tolerate nasogastric feeding. CT of abdomen revealed bilateral renal calculi and features of proximal small bowel obstruction. Laparotomy revealed small bowel obstruction due to dense inflammatory adhesions involving multiple small bowel loops which protruded through the defect in sigmoid mesocolon and fixed posteriorly over the area of previous intervention. All adhesions were divided. The wide defect in mesocolon was not closed. In 2010, this patient again developed vomiting and distension of abdomen. Laparotomy revealed multiple adhesions. He developed chest infection and required ventilatory support again. He developed pressure sores and depression. Later abdominal symptoms recurred. This patient's general condition deteriorated and he expired in 2011. Conclusion. Risk of postoperative complications could have been reduced if minimally invasive surgery had been performed instead of open surgery to remove stones from left kidney. Suprapubic cystostomy predisposed to repeated occurrence of stones in urinary bladder and kidneys. Spinal cord physicians should try to establish intermittent catheterisation regime in tetraplegic patients. PMID:23533931

  4. Atrial natriuretic peptide prevents cancer metastasis through vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Nojiri, Takashi; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Tokudome, Takeshi; Miura, Koichi; Ishikane, Shin; Otani, Kentaro; Kishimoto, Ichiro; Shintani, Yasushi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Kimura, Toru; Sawabata, Noriyoshi; Minami, Masato; Nakagiri, Tomoyuki; Funaki, Soichiro; Takeuchi, Yukiyasu; Maeda, Hajime; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shioi, Go; Arai, Yuji; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Hori, Megumi; Ohno, Yuko; Miyazato, Mikiya; Mochizuki, Naoki; Okumura, Meinoshin; Kangawa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Most patients suffering from cancer die of metastatic disease. Surgical removal of solid tumors is performed as an initial attempt to cure patients; however, surgery is often accompanied with trauma, which can promote early recurrence by provoking detachment of tumor cells into the blood stream or inducing systemic inflammation or both. We have previously reported that administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) during the perioperative period reduces inflammatory response and has a prophylactic effect on postoperative cardiopulmonary complications in lung cancer surgery. Here we demonstrate that cancer recurrence after curative surgery was significantly lower in ANP-treated patients than in control patients (surgery alone). ANP is known to bind specifically to NPR1 [also called guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) receptor]. In mouse models, we found that metastasis of GC-A–nonexpressing tumor cells (i.e., B16 mouse melanoma cells) to the lung was increased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A knockout mice and decreased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A transgenic mice compared with control mice. We examined the effect of ANP on tumor metastasis in mice treated with lipopolysaccharide, which mimics systemic inflammation induced by surgical stress. ANP inhibited the adhesion of cancer cells to pulmonary arterial and micro-vascular endothelial cells by suppressing the E-selectin expression that is promoted by inflammation. These results suggest that ANP prevents cancer metastasis by inhibiting the adhesion of tumor cells to inflamed endothelial cells. PMID:25775533

  5. Surgical options in ICH including decompressive craniectomy.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Patrick; Gregson, Barbara A; Vindlacheruvu, Raghu R; Mendelow, A David

    2007-10-15

    Intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) accounts for 15 to 20% of strokes. The condition carries a higher morbidity and mortality than occlusive stroke. Despite considerable research effort, no therapeutic modality either medical or surgical has emerged with clear evidence of benefit other than in rare aneurysmal cases. Intracerebral haemorrhages can be divided into those that arise from pre-existing macroscopic vascular lesions - so called "ictohaemorrhagic lesions", and those that do not; the latter being the commoner. Most of the research that has been done on the benefits of surgery has been in this latter group. Trial data available to date precludes a major benefit from surgical evacuation in a large proportion of cases however there are hypotheses of benefit still under investigation, specifically superficial lobar ICH treated by open surgical evacuation, deeper ICH treated with minimally invasive surgical techniques, and decompressive craniectomy. When an ICH arises from an ictohaemorrhagic lesion, therapy has two goals: to treat the effects of the acute haemorrhage and to prevent a recurrence. Three modalities are available for treating lesions to prevent recurrence: stereotactic radiosurgery, endovascular embolisation, and open surgical resection. As with ICH without an underlying lesion there is no evidence to support surgical removal of the haemorrhage in most cases. An important exception is ICHs arising from intracranial aneurysms where there is good evidence to support evacuation of the haematoma as well as repair of the aneurysm. PMID:17543995

  6. Adhesions and Healing of Intestinal Anastomoses: The Effect of Anti-Adhesion Barriers.

    PubMed

    Ntourakis, Dimitrios; Katsimpoulas, Michail; Tanoglidi, Anna; Barbatis, Calypso; Karayannacos, Panayotis E; Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Kostomitsopoulos, Nikolaos; Machairas, Anastasios

    2016-06-01

    Background Postoperative adhesions are the result of aberrant peritoneal healing. As they are the leading cause of postoperative bowel obstruction, anti-adherence barriers are advocated for their prevention. This study looks into the effect of these biomaterials on the healing of intestinal anastomoses. Materials and Methods Thirty-three New Zealand White rabbits underwent laparotomy, transection of the terminal ileum, and creation of an end-to-end anastomosis. Animals were randomized into 3 groups: the Control group (n = 11); the Icodextrin group, receiving icodextrin 4% intraperitonealy (n = 11); and the HA/CMC group, having the anastomosis wrapped with a hyaluronic acid/carboxymethylcellulose film (n = 11). All animals were sacrificed on the seventh postoperative day. Macroscopic adhesions were graded and anastomotic strength was tested by the burst pressure. Histological healing was assessed in a semiquantitative way for the presence of ulceration, reepithelization, granulation tissue, inflammation, eosinophilic infiltration, serosal inflammation, and microscopic adhesions. Univariate and multivariate analysis was used. Results are given as medians with interquartile range. Results The median adhesion scores were the following: Control 1 (0-3), Icodextrin 0 (0-1), HA/CMC 0 (0-0), P = .017. The burst pressure did not differ between the groups; however, all except one bowel segments tested burst away from the anastomosis. The macroscopic and histological anastomotic healing was comparable in all 3 groups. A poor histological anastomotic healing score was associated with a higher adhesion grade (odds ratio = 1.92; 95% confidence interval = 1.06-3.47; P = .032). Conclusion Adhesion formation was inhibited by the materials tested without direct detrimental effects on anastomotic healing. Poor anastomotic healing provokes adhesions even in the presence of anti-adhesion barriers. PMID:26474604

  7. Cell adhesion molecules mediate radiation-induced leukocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Hallahan, D; Kuchibhotla, J; Wyble, C

    1996-11-15

    The predominant early histological changes in irradiated tissues are edema and leukocyte infiltration. Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are required for the extravasation of leukocytes from the circulation. To study the role of CAMs in the pathogenesis of radiation-mediated inflammation, we quantified the expression of P-selectin, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 glycoproteins on the surface of irradiated human endothelial cells. We found that E-selectin and ICAM-1 expression increased after irradiation, whereas there was no increased expression of other cytokine-inducible adhesion molecules (P-selectin or vascular cell adhesion molecule-1). We found a dose- and time-dependent increase in radiation-induced expression of both E-selectin and ICAM-1. Furthermore, the threshold dose for E-selectin expression was 1 Gy, whereas the threshold dose for ICAM-1 synthesis was 5 Gy of X-rays. Northern blot analysis of RNA from irradiated endothelial cells demonstrated that ICAM-1 is expressed at 3-6 h following irradiation. No de novo protein synthesis was required for increased ICAM-1 mRNA expression. The 1.1-kb segment of the 5' untranslated region of the ICAM-1 gene was sufficient for X-ray induction of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene expression. We measured whether ICAM-1 mediates adhesion of leukocyte to the irradiated endothelium and found that leukocyte adhesion occurred concurrently with ICAM-1 induction. Radiation-mediated leukocyte adhesion was prevented by anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibodies. These data indicate that ICAM-1 participates in the inflammatory response to ionizing radiation. Moreover, radiation induction of these CAMs occurs in the absence of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 production. PMID:8912850

  8. Removal of adhesive wound dressing and its effects on the stratum corneum of the skin: comparison of eight different adhesive wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hajime; Imai, Ryutaro; Ahmatjan, Niyaz; Ida, Yukiko; Gondo, Masahide; Shibata, Dai; Wanatabe, Katsueki

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, adhesive wound dressings have been increasingly applied postoperatively because of their ease of use as they can be kept in place without having to cut and apply surgical tapes and they can cover a wound securely. However, if a wound dressing strongly adheres to the wound, a large amount of stratum corneum is removed from the newly formed epithelium or healthy periwound skin. Various types of adhesives are used on adhesive wound dressings and the extent of skin damage depends on how much an adhesive sticks to the wound or skin surface. We quantitatively determined and compared the amount of stratum corneum removed by eight different wound dressings including polyurethane foam using acrylic adhesive, silicone-based adhesive dressing, composite hydrocolloid and self-adhesive polyurethane foam in healthy volunteers. The results showed that wound dressings with silicone adhesive and self-adhesive polyurethane foam removed less stratum corneum, whereas composite hydrocolloid and polyurethane foam using acrylic adhesive removed more stratum corneum. PMID:22883604

  9. Adhesive capsulitis of the ankle (frozen ankle).

    PubMed

    van Moppes, F I; van den Hoogenband, C R; Greep, J M

    1979-09-01

    Adhesive capsulitis or "frozen ankle" is a syndrome resulting from repeated ankle sprains, or perhaps following immobilization after trauma. Ankle arthrography is a useful and safe diagnostic procedure in this syndrome. Typical arthrographic features are described together with case histories of two patients with frozen ankle. We suggest that early mobilization of the patient following trauma is particularly important in preventing the development of a forzen ankle syndrome. PMID:508071

  10. Flexibilized copolyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1988-01-01

    Two copolyimides, LARC-STPI and STPI-LARC-2, with flexible backbones were processed and characterized as adhesives. The processability and adhesive properties were compared to those of a commercially available form of LARC-TPI. Lap shear specimens were fabricated using adhesive tape prepared from each of the three polymers. Lap shear tests were performed at room temperature, 177 C, and 204 C before and after exposure to water-boil and to thermal aging at 204 C for up to 1000 hours. The three adhesive systems possess exceptional lap shear strengths at room temperature and elevated temperatures both before and after thermal exposure. LARC-STPI, because of its high glass transition temperature provided high lap shear strengths up to 260 C. After water-boil, LARC-TPI exhibited the highest lap shear strengths at room temperature and 177 C, whereas the LARC-STPI retained a higher percentage of its original strength when tested at 204 C. These flexible thermoplastic copolyimides show considerable potential as adhesives based on this study and because of the ease of preparation with low cost, commercially available materials.

  11. Platelet Adhesion under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2011-01-01

    Platelet adhesive mechanisms play a well-defined role in hemostasis and thrombosis, but evidence continues to emerge for a relevant contribution to other pathophysiological processes including inflammation, immune-mediated responses to microbial and viral pathogens, and cancer metastasis. Hemostasis and thrombosis are related aspects of the response to vascular injury, but the former protects from bleeding after trauma while the latter is a disease mechanism. In either situation, adhesive interactions mediated by specific membrane receptors support the initial attachment of single platelets to cellular and extracellular matrix constituents of the vessel wall and tissues. In the subsequent steps of thrombus growth and stabilization, adhesive interactions mediate platelet to platelet cohesion (aggregation) and anchoring to the fibrin clot. A key functional aspect of platelets is their ability to circulate in a quiescent state surveying the integrity of the inner vascular surface, coupled to a prompt reaction wherever alterations are detected. In many respects, therefore, platelet adhesion to vascular wall structures, to one another or to other blood cells are facets of the same fundamental biological process. The adaptation of platelet adhesive functions to the effects of blood flow is the main focus of this review. PMID:19191170

  12. Effect of osteopontin on the initial adhesion of dental bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Meyer, Rikke L; Sutherland, Duncan S; Städler, Brigitte

    2012-12-28

    Bacterial biofilms are involved in numerous infections of the human body, including dental caries. While conventional therapy of biofilm diseases aims at eradication and mechanical removal of the biofilms, recent therapeutic approaches target the mechanisms of biofilm formation and bacterial adhesion in particular. The effect of bovine milk osteopontin, a highly phosphorylated whey protein, on adhesion of Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus sanguinis, and Actinomyces naeslundii, three prominent colonizers in dental biofilms, to saliva-coated surfaces was investigated. While adhesion of A. naeslundii was not affected by osteopontin, a strong, dose-dependent reduction in the number of adhering S. mitis was shown. No difference in bacterial adhesion was observed for caseinoglycomacropeptide, another phosphorylated milk protein. Osteopontin did not affect bacterial viability, but changed bacterial surface hydrophobicity, and may be suggested to prevent the adhesins of S. mitis from interacting with their salivary receptors. The antiadhesive effect of osteopontin may be useful for caries prevention. PMID:23167781

  13. Activation of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway enhances monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong Kun . E-mail: leedk@memorialhealthsource.com; Nathan Grantham, R.; Trachte, Aaron L.; Mannion, John D.; Wilson, Colleen L.

    2006-08-18

    Monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium has been reported to be one of the early processes in the development of atherosclerosis. In an attempt to develop strategies to prevent or delay atherosclerosis progression, we analyzed effects of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway on monocyte adhesion to various human endothelial cells. Adhesion of fluorescein-labeled monocytes to various human endothelial cells was analyzed under a fluorescent microscope. Unlike sodium chloride, lithium chloride enhanced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. We further demonstrated that inhibitors for glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3{beta} or proteosome enhanced monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. Results of semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) indicated that activation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway did not change expression levels of mRNA for adhesion molecules. In conclusion, the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway enhanced monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion without changing expression levels of adhesion molecules.

  14. Protein mediated membrane adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Andreas; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-05-01

    Adhesion in the context of mechanical attachment, signaling, and movement in cellular dynamics is mediated by the kinetic interactions between membrane-embedded proteins in an aqueous environment. Here, we present a minimal theoretical framework for the dynamics of membrane adhesion that accounts for the kinetics of protein binding, the elastic deformation of the membrane, and the hydrodynamics of squeeze flow in the membrane gap. We analyze the resulting equations using scaling estimates to characterize the spatiotemporal features of the adhesive patterning and corroborate them using numerical simulations. In addition to characterizing aspects of cellular dynamics, our results might also be applicable to a range of phenomena in physical chemistry and materials science where flow, deformation, and kinetics are coupled to each other in slender geometries.

  15. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  16. Surgical management of breast cancer liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Cassera, Maria A; Hammill, Chet W; Ujiki, Michael B; Wolf, Ronald F; Swanström, Lee L; Hansen, Paul D

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Selected patients with isolated breast cancer liver metastases (BCLM) may benefit from surgical management; however, indications remain unclear and the risks may outweigh the benefits in patients with a generally poor prognosis. Methods Between 1998 and 2006, 17 patients diagnosed with BCLM were considered for surgical management (<4 tumours, tumour <4 cm in diameter and no/stable extrahepatic metastases). Peri-operative and outcomes data were analysed and compared. Results Eight patients were found to have extensive or untreatable disease on staging laparoscopy and intra-operative ultrasound (SL/IOUS). The remaining nine patients underwent surgical management [seven laparoscopic radiofrequency ablations (RFA) and two hepatic resections]. Median length of follow-up for patients treated surgically was 40.0 months, median disease-free survival (DFS) was 32.2 months and median time to disease progression was 17.7 months. Of the eight patients not amenable to surgery, median length of follow-up was 21.8 months. Conclusion SL/IOUS prevented unnecessary laparotomy in half of the patients taken to the operating room for surgical treatment of BCLM. In patients with BCLM, SL/IOUS should be considered standard of care before surgical intervention. The small number of patients and short follow-up may be inadequate to determine the true value of surgical management in this group of patients with BCLM. PMID:21418133

  17. Elastomer toughened polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A rubber-toughened addition-type polyimide composition is disclosed which has excellent high temperature bonding characteristics in the fully cured state, and improved peel strength and adhesive fracture resistance physical property characteristics. The process for making the improved adhesive involves preparing the rubber containing amic acid prepolymer by chemically reacting an amine-terminated elastomer and an aromatic diamine with an aromatic dianhydride with which a reactive chain stopper anhydride was mixed, and utilizing solvent or mixture of solvents for the reaction.

  18. Metallic Adhesion and Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Although metallic adhesion has played a central part in much tribological speculation, few quantitative theoretical calculations are available. This is in part because of the difficulties involved in such calculations and in part because the theoretical physics community is not particularly involved with tribology. The calculations currently involved in metallic adhesion are summarized and shown that these can be generalized into a scaled universal relationship. Relationships exist to other types of covalent bonding, such as cohesive, chemisorptive, and molecular bonding. A simple relationship between surface energy and cohesive energy is offered.

  19. Timer cover adhesive optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Carleton, J.J. II.

    1992-03-17

    The implementation of PROCODE as the data acquisition system for processing timers has required some modifications to the method of identifying timer assemblies. PROCODE requires machine-readable labelling of the assemblies. This report describes a series of experiments to find an adhesive that would keep labels attached to timers regardless of the condition of their surface when the label was applied and regardless of the heat, vibration, and shock they endured afterwards. The effect of the variation of these experimental factors on the performance of the adhesive was determined by using a Taguchi experimental design.

  20. Talus fractures: surgical principles.

    PubMed

    Rush, Shannon M; Jennings, Meagan; Hamilton, Graham A

    2009-01-01

    Surgical treatment of talus fractures can challenge even the most skilled foot and ankle surgeon. Complicated fracture patterns combined with joint dislocation of variable degrees require accurate assessment, sound understanding of principles of fracture care, and broad command of internal fixation techniques needed for successful surgical care. Elimination of unnecessary soft tissue dissection, a low threshold for surgical reduction, liberal use of malleolar osteotomy to expose body fracture, and detailed attention to fracture reduction and joint alignment are critical to the success of treatment. Even with the best surgical care complications are common and seem to correlate with injury severity and open injuries. PMID:19121756

  1. American Pediatric Surgical Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Curricula Membership + Members Join APSA Careers Surgical Practice Management In Memoriam About APSA + APSA Mission Awards APSA Leadership Committees Alliances APSA Foundation Third-Party Advertising Disclaimer ...

  2. Molecular mechanics of mussel adhesion proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J.

    2014-01-01

    Mussel foot protein (mfp), a natural glue produced by marine mussel, is an intriguing material because of its superior ability for adhesion in various environments. For example, a very small amount of this material is sufficient to affix a mussel to a substrate in water, providing structural support under extreme forces caused by the dynamic effects of waves. Towards a more complete understanding of its strength and underwater workability, it is necessary to understand the microscropic mechanisms by which the protein structure interacts with various substrates. However, none of the mussel proteins' structure is known, preventing us from directly using atomistic modeling to probe their structural and mechanical properties. Here we use an advanced molecular sampling technique to identify the molecular structures of two mussel foot proteins (mfp-3 and mfp-5) and use those structures to study their mechanics of adhesion, which is then incorporated into a continuum model. We calculate the adhesion energy of the mussel foot protein on a silica substrate, compute the adhesion strength based on results obtained from molecular modeling, and compare with experimental data. Our results show good agreement with experimental measurements, which validates the multiscale model. We find that the molecular structure of the folded mussel foot protein (ultimately defined by its genetic sequence) favors strong adhesion to substrates, where L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (or DOPA) protein subunits work in a cooperative manner to enhance adhesion. Our experimental data suggests a peak attachment force of 0.4±0.1 N, which compares favorably with the prediction from the multiscale model of Fc=0.21-0.33 N. The principles learnt from those results could guide the fabrication of new interfacial materials (e.g. composites) to integrate organic with inorganic surfaces in an effective manner.

  3. Shear lag sutures: Improved suture repair through the use of adhesives.

    PubMed

    Linderman, Stephen W; Kormpakis, Ioannis; Gelberman, Richard H; Birman, Victor; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Genin, Guy M; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2015-09-01

    Suture materials and surgical knot tying techniques have improved dramatically since their first use over five millennia ago. However, the approach remains limited by the ability of the suture to transfer load to tissue at suture anchor points. Here, we predict that adhesive-coated sutures can improve mechanical load transfer beyond the range of performance of existing suture methods, thereby strengthening repairs and decreasing the risk of failure. The mechanical properties of suitable adhesives were identified using a shear lag model. Examination of the design space for an optimal adhesive demonstrated requirements for strong adhesion and low stiffness to maximize the strength of the adhesive-coated suture repair construct. To experimentally assess the model, we evaluated single strands of sutures coated with highly flexible cyanoacrylates (Loctite 4903 and 4902), cyanoacrylate (Loctite QuickTite Instant Adhesive Gel), rubber cement, rubber/gasket adhesive (1300 Scotch-Weld Neoprene High Performance Rubber & Gasket Adhesive), an albumin-glutaraldehyde adhesive (BioGlue), or poly(dopamine). As a clinically relevant proof-of-concept, cyanoacrylate-coated sutures were then used to perform a clinically relevant flexor digitorum tendon repair in cadaver tissue. The repair performed with adhesive-coated suture had significantly higher strength compared to the standard repair without adhesive. Notably, cyanoacrylate provides strong adhesion with high stiffness and brittle behavior, and is therefore not an ideal adhesive for enhancing suture repair. Nevertheless, the improvement in repair properties in a clinically relevant setting, even using a non-ideal adhesive, demonstrates the potential for the proposed approach to improve outcomes for treatments requiring suture fixation. Further study is necessary to develop a strongly adherent, compliant adhesive within the optimal design space described by the model. PMID:26022966

  4. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  5. [Median incisional hernias and coexisting parastomal hernias : new surgical strategies and an algorithm for simultaneous repair].

    PubMed

    Köhler, G

    2014-08-01

    The co-occurrence of incisional and parastomal hernias (PSH) remains a surgical challenge. Standardized treatment guidelines are missing, and the patients concerned require an individualized surgical approach. The laparoscopic techniques can be performed with incised and/or stoma-lateralizing flat meshes with intraperitoneal onlay placement. The purely laparoscopic and laparoscopic-assisted approaches with 3-D meshes offer advantages regarding the complete coverage of the edges of the stomal areas and the option of equilateral or contralateral stoma relocation in cases of PSH, which are difficult to handle due to scarring, adhesions, and large fascial defects > 5 cm with intestinal hernia sac contents. A relevant stoma prolapse can be relocated by tunnel-like preformed 3-D meshes and shortening the stoma bowel. The positive effect on prolapse prevention arises from the dome of the 3-D mesh, which is directed toward the abdominal cavity and tightly fits to the bowel. In cases of large incisional hernias (> 8-10 cm in width) or young patients with higher physical demands, an open abdominal wall reconstruction in sublay technique is required. Component separation techniques that enable tension-free ventral fascial closure should be preferred to mesh-supported defect bridging methods. The modified posterior component separation with transversus abdominis release (TAR) and the minimally invasive anterior component separation are superior to the original Ramirez technique with respect to wound morbidity. By using 3-D textile implants, which were specially designed for parastomal hernia prevention, the stoma can be brought out through the lateral abdominal wall without increased risk of parastomal hernia or prolapse development. An algorithm for surgical treatment, in consideration of the complexity of combined hernias, is introduced for the first time. PMID:24823998

  6. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects. PMID:26457864

  7. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm2 provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects. PMID:26457864

  8. Insertion of Flexible Neural Probes Using Rigid Stiffeners Attached with Biodissolvable Adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Sarah H.; Shah, Kedar G.; Tolosa, Vanessa M.; Sheth, Heeral J.; Tooker, Angela C.; Delima, Terri L.; Jadhav, Shantanu P.; Frank, Loren M.; Pannu, Satinderpall S.

    2013-01-01

    Microelectrode arrays for neural interface devices that are made of biocompatible thin-film polymer are expected to have extended functional lifetime because the flexible material may minimize adverse tissue response caused by micromotion. However, their flexibility prevents them from being accurately inserted into neural tissue. This article demonstrates a method to temporarily attach a flexible microelectrode probe to a rigid stiffener using biodissolvable polyethylene glycol (PEG) to facilitate precise, surgical insertion of the probe. A unique stiffener design allows for uniform distribution of the PEG adhesive along the length of the probe. Flip-chip bonding, a common tool used in microelectronics packaging, enables accurate and repeatable alignment and attachment of the probe to the stiffener. The probe and stiffener are surgically implanted together, then the PEG is allowed to dissolve so that the stiffener can be extracted leaving the probe in place. Finally, an in vitro test method is used to evaluate stiffener extraction in an agarose gel model of brain tissue. This approach to implantation has proven particularly advantageous for longer flexible probes (>3 mm). It also provides a feasible method to implant dual-sided flexible probes. To date, the technique has been used to obtain various in vivo recording data from the rat cortex. PMID:24121443

  9. Wood Composite Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Bueso, Jose; Haupt, Robert

    The global environment, in which phenolic resins are being used for wood composite manufacture, has changed significantly during the last decade. This chapter reviews trends that are driving the use and consumption of phenolic resins around the world. The review begins with recent data on volume usage and regional trends, followed by an analysis of factors affecting global markets. In a section on environmental factors, the impact of recent formaldehyde emission regulations is discussed. The section on economics introduces wood composite production as it relates to the available adhesive systems, with special emphasis on the technical requirement to improve phenolic reactivity. Advances in composite process technology are introduced, especially in regard to the increased demands the improvements place upon adhesive system performance. The specific requirements for the various wood composite families are considered in the context of adhesive performance needs. The results of research into current chemistries are discussed, with a review of recent findings regarding the mechanisms of phenolic condensation and acceleration. Also, the work regarding alternate natural materials, such as carbohydrates, lignins, tannins, and proteinaceous materials, is presented. Finally, new developments in alternative adhesive technologies are reported.

  10. Adept Adhesion Reduction Solution

    MedlinePlus

    ... icodextrin. The fluid is used during or after laparoscopic gynecological surgery to separate and protect tissues and decrease the number of new adhesions after surgery. Adept® is supplied sterile, in a single-use bag. How does it work? During surgery, ...

  11. Adhesion molecules and receptors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adhesion molecules are necessary for leukocyte trafficking and differentiation. They serve to initiate cell-cell interactions under conditions of shear, and they sustain the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions needed for cellular locomotion. They also can serve directly as signaling molecules act...

  12. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  13. Resistance heating releases structural adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glemser, N. N.

    1967-01-01

    Composite adhesive package bonds components together for testing and enables separation when testing is completed. The composite of adhesives, insulation and a heating element separate easily when an electrical current is applied.

  14. Adhesion testing of aircraft tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobo, S. N.

    1983-01-01

    Adhesion testing appeared to offer a less burdensome alternative to replace some of the dynamometer tests. Accordingly, test results and data were requested from retreaders who had used adhesion testing.

  15. 3-D foam adhesive deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.; Salmassy, O. K.

    1976-01-01

    Bonding method, which reduces amount and weight of adhesive, is applicable to foam-filled honeycomb constructions. Novel features of process include temperature-viscosity control and removal of excess adhesive by transfer to cellophane film.

  16. Interceed and Estrogen Reduce Uterine Adhesions and Fibrosis and Improve Endometrial Receptivity in a Rabbit Model of Intrauterine Adhesions.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huihua; Li, Huijuan; He, Yuanli

    2016-09-01

    Intrauterine adhesions (IUA) remain a major cause of infertility. Interceed, a regenerated cellulose adhesion barrier, is used to prevent adhesions in abdominal cavity. This study aimed to determine whether Interceed could reduce adhesions and tissue fibrosis and improve endometrial receptivity (ER) in rabbit. Rabbits were randomized into 6 groups: sham operation, Interceed control, IUA model, Interceed therapy, estrogen therapy, and combination therapy. Four rabbits per group were euthanized to evaluate adhesion severity on the day before intervention and day 7, 14, and 28 after intervention. Number of endometrial glands and degree of endometrial fibrosis acted as markers for adhesion severity. Pseudopregnancy was induced in the remainder, and 8 rabbits per group were killed for assessing ER on days 6, 7, and 8 of pseudopregnancy by ανβ3 integrin and pinopode. We found that Interceed or estrogen therapy led to significant improvement in the adhesion severity on day 28 after intervention, respectively, compared to IUA model group (all P < .05). However, after combination therapy, such improvement achieved comparable to sham operation group as early as day 14 after intervention (glands, P = .711, fibrosis, P = .154). Among the IUA models treated, ER was highest after combination therapy on day 7 of pseudopregnancy, similar to sham operation group (integrin, P = .352, pinopode, P = .154). In conclusion, Interceed and estrogen reduce adhesions and tissue fibrosis and improve ER in a rabbit model and may be novel therapeutic approaches for infertility resulting from IUA. PMID:26895816

  17. Deriving DICOM surgical extensions from surgical workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgert, O.; Neumuth, T.; Gessat, M.; Jacobs, S.; Lemke, H. U.

    2007-03-01

    The generation, storage, transfer, and representation of image data in radiology are standardized by DICOM. To cover the needs of image guided surgery or computer assisted surgery in general one needs to handle patient information besides image data. A large number of objects must be defined in DICOM to address the needs of surgery. We propose an analysis process based on Surgical Workflows that helps to identify these objects together with use cases and requirements motivating for their specification. As the first result we confirmed the need for the specification of representation and transfer of geometric models. The analysis of Surgical Workflows has shown that geometric models are widely used to represent planned procedure steps, surgical tools, anatomical structures, or prosthesis in the context of surgical planning, image guided surgery, augmented reality, and simulation. By now, the models are stored and transferred in several file formats bare of contextual information. The standardization of data types including contextual information and specifications for handling of geometric models allows a broader usage of such models. This paper explains the specification process leading to Geometry Mesh Service Object Pair classes. This process can be a template for the definition of further DICOM classes.

  18. Inadvertant hypothermia and active warming for surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Judith

    Inadvertant hypothermia is common among surgical patients and can result in serious complications. This article describes active warming systems which can be used preoperatively and intraoperatively to prevent hypothermia and maintain normothermia (normal body temperature). PMID:22067488

  19. Surgical Technology Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This surgical technology program guide presents the standard curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum addresses the minimum competencies for a surgical technology program. The program guide is designed to relate primarily to the development of those skills needed by individuals in the field to provide services in the…

  20. Surgical Treatment of Posttraumatic Radioulnar Synostosis

    PubMed Central

    Bigazzi, P.; Casini, C.; De Angelis, C.; Ceruso, M.

    2016-01-01

    Radioulnar synostosis is a rare complication of forearm fractures. The formation of a bony bridge induces functional disability due to limitation of the pronosupination. Although the etiology of posttraumatic synostosis is unknown, it seems that the incidence is higher in patients who have suffered a concomitant neurological or burn trauma, and extensive soft tissue injury, mainly due to high-energy impact. Surgical treatment, such as reinsertion of distal biceps tendon into the radius, seems to be another possible factor. The aim of the surgical treatment is to remove the bony bridge and restore complete range of movement (ROM), thus preventing recurrence. Literature does not indicate a preferred type of surgical procedure for the aforementioned complication; however, it has been shown that surgical interposition of inert material reduces the formation rate of recurrent bony bridge. We describe a surgical technique in two cases in which the radius and ulna were wrapped with allogenic, cadaver fascia lata graft to prevent bony bridge formation. The data from 2 years of follow-up are reported, indicating full restoration of ROM and no recurrence of synostosis. PMID:26977328

  1. Mechanically robust, negative-swelling, mussel-inspired tissue adhesives.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Devin G; Bushnell, Grace G; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2013-05-01

    Most synthetic polymer hydrogel tissue adhesives and sealants swell considerably in physiologic conditions, which can result in mechanical weakening and adverse medical complications. This paper describes the synthesis and characterization of mechanically tough zero- or negative-swelling mussel-inspired surgical adhesives based on catechol-modified amphiphilic poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) block copolymers. The formation, swelling, bulk mechanical, and tissue adhesive properties of the resulting thermosensitive gels were characterized. Catechol oxidation at or below room temperature rapidly resulted in a chemically cross-linked network, with subsequent warming to physiological temperature inducing a thermal hydrophobic transition in the PPO domains and providing a mechanism for volumetric reduction and mechanical toughening. The described approach can be easily adapted for other thermally sensitive block copolymers and cross-linking strategies, representing a general approach that can be employed to control swelling and enhance mechanical properties of polymer hydrogels used in a medical context. PMID:23184616

  2. Small-bowel enema in the diagnosis of adhesive obstructions.

    PubMed

    Caroline, D F; Herlinger, H; Laufer, I; Kressel, H Y; Levine, M S

    1984-06-01

    The small-bowel enema was evaluated in 60 patients in whom a final diagnosis of adhesive obstruction was made by surgery or on the basis of clinical findings. Distinctive radiographic and clinical features were found with single versus multiple bands. While 72% of 32 single-band obstructions were graded as severe, this grading was given to only 34% of 18 obstructions by multiple bands. Extensive adhesions were demonstrated in 10 patients and presented varied radiographic features. The radiographic diagnosis of adhesive obstruction was found to be correct in 36 (87.8%) of 41 patients in whom a surgical diagnosis could subsequently be made. However, an incorrect radiologic diagnosis of obstruction by metastases was made in five patients. They form the basis for a discussion of the differential diagnosis. PMID:6609596

  3. Focal Adhesion Kinase-Dependent Regulation of Adhesive Force Involves Vinculin Recruitment to Focal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Hanks, Steven K.; García, Andrés J.

    2016-01-01

    Background information Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), an essential non-receptor tyrosine kinase, plays pivotal roles in migratory responses, adhesive signaling, and mechanotransduction. FAK-dependent regulation of cell migration involves focal adhesion turnover dynamics as well as actin cytoskeleton polymerization and lamellipodia protrusion. Whereas roles for FAK in migratory and mechanosensing responses have been established, the contributions of FAK to the generation of adhesive forces are not well understood. Results Using FAK-null cells expressing wild-type and mutant FAK under an inducible tetracycline promoter, we analyzed the role of FAK in the generation of steady-state adhesive forces using micropatterned substrates and a hydrodynamic adhesion assay. FAK expression reduced steady-state strength by 30% compared to FAK-null cells. FAK expression reduced vinculin localization to focal adhesions by 35% independently from changes in integrin binding and localization of talin and paxillin. RNAi knockdown of vinculin abrogated the FAK-dependent differences in adhesive force. FAK-dependent changes in vinculin localization and adhesive force were confirmed in human primary fibroblasts with FAK knocked down by RNAi. The autophosphorylation Y397 and kinase domain Y576/Y577 sites were differentially required for FAK-mediated adhesive responses. Conclusions We demonstrate that FAK reduces steady-state adhesion strength by modulating vinculin recruitment to focal adhesions. These findings provide insights into the role of FAK in mechanical interactions between a cell and the extracellular matrix. PMID:19883375

  4. [APPLICATION OF FISTULA PLUG WITH THE FIBRIN ADHESIVE IN TREATMENT OF RECTAL FISTULAS].

    PubMed

    Aydinova, P R; Aliyev, E A

    2015-05-01

    Results of surgical treatment of 21 patients, suffering high transsphincteric and extrasphincteric rectal fistulas, were studied. In patients of Group I the fistula passage was closed, using fistula plug obturator; and in patients of Group II--by the same, but preprocessed by fibrin adhesive. The fistula aperture germeticity, prophylaxis of rude cicatrices development in operative wound zone, promotion of better fixation of bioplastic material were guaranteed, using fistula plug obturator with preprocessing, using fibrin adhesive. PMID:26419026

  5. Adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huan; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2014-04-18

    The adhesion behaviors of superhydrophobic surfaces have become an emerging topic to researchers in various fields as a vital step in the interactions between materials and organisms/materials. Controlling the chemical compositions and topological structures via various methods or technologies is essential to fabricate and modulate different adhesion properties, such as low-adhesion, high-adhesion and anisotropic adhesion on superhydrophobic surfaces. We summarize the recent developments in both natural superhydrophobic surfaces and artificial superhydrophobic surfaces with various adhesions and also pay attention to superhydrophobic surfaces switching between low- and high-adhesion. The methods to regulate or translate the adhesion of superhydrophobic surfaces can be considered from two perspectives. One is to control the chemical composition and change the surface geometric structure on the surfaces, respectively or simultaneously. The other is to provide external stimulations to induce transitions, which is the most common method for obtaining switchable adhesions. Additionally, adhesion behaviors on solid-solid interfaces, such as the behaviors of cells, bacteria, biomolecules and icing on superhydrophobic surfaces are also noticeable and controversial. This review is aimed at giving a brief and crucial overview of adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces. PMID:24575424

  6. Acute Kidney Injury in the Surgical Patient.

    PubMed

    Hobson, Charles; Singhania, Girish; Bihorac, Azra

    2015-10-01

    Perioperative acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common, morbid, and costly surgical complication. Current efforts to understand and manage AKI in surgical patients focus on prevention, mitigation of further injury when AKI has occurred, treatment of associated conditions, and facilitation of renal recovery. Lesser severity AKI is now understood to be much more common, and more morbid, than was previously thought. The ability to detect AKI within hours of onset would be helpful in protecting the kidney and in preserving renal function, and several imaging and biomarker modalities are currently being evaluated. PMID:26410139

  7. Multiscale Surgical Telerobots

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, R R; Seward, K P; Benett, W J; Tendick, F; Bentley, L; Stephan, P L

    2002-01-23

    A project was undertaken to improve robotic surgical tools for telerobotic minimally invasive surgery. The major objectives were to reduce the size of the tools to permit new surgical procedures in confined spaces such as the heart and to improve control of surgical tools by locating positional sensors and actuators at the end effector rather than external to the patient as is currently the state of the technology. A new compact end-effector with wrist-like flexibility was designed. Positional sensors based on MEMS microfabrication techniques were designed.

  8. Clinical Recommendation: Labial Adhesions.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Janice L; Romano, Mary E; Quint, Elisabeth H

    2015-10-01

    Labial adhesions, also known as labial agglutination, are a common finding in prepubertal adolescents. They are defined as fusion of the labia minora in the midline or are termed vulvar adhesions when they occur below the labia minora (inner labia). Patients are often asymptomatic but might present with genitourinary complaints. The decision for treatment is based on symptoms. The mainstay of treatment in asymptomatic patients is conservative, with careful attention to vulvar hygiene and reassurance to parents. In symptomatic patients, topical treatment with estrogen and/or steroid cream is often curative. Less often, corrective surgery is necessary. Recurrence is common until a patient goes through puberty. These recommendations are intended for pediatric and gynecologic health care providers who care for pediatric and adolescent girls to facilitate diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26162697

  9. Environmentally compliant adhesive joining technology

    SciTech Connect

    Tira, J.S.

    1996-08-01

    Adhesive joining offers one method of assembling products. Advantages of adhesive joining/assembly include distribution of applied forces, lighter weight, appealing appearance, etc. Selecting environmentally safe adhesive materials and accompanying processes is paramount in today`s business climate if a company wants to be environmentally conscious and stay in business. Four areas of adhesive joining (adhesive formulation and selection, surface preparation, adhesive bonding process, waste and pollution generation/cleanup/management) all need to be carefully evaluated before adhesive joining is selected for commercial as well as military products. Designing for six sigma quality must also be addressed in today`s global economy. This requires material suppliers and product manufacturers to work even closer together.

  10. Surgical progress: surgical management of infective endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, S A

    1982-01-01

    Infective endocarditis of bacterial or fungal origin may arise in either the left or the right heart and can involve both natural and prosthetic valves. The diagnosis is based primarily upon clinical criteria and positive blood cultures, but serial electrocardiograms, fluoroscopy, and two-dimensional echocardiograms may also be helpful. The initial treatment should consist of antibiotic therapy and is itself often adequate in effecting cure. However, careful observation during antibiotic treatment is mandatory, since the development of congestive heart failure due to valvular obstruction or destruction can be an indication for surgical intervention. Other surgical indications include a failure to respond to antibiotic therapy, pulmonary or systemic emboli, evidence of abscess involving the valvular ring (particularly prevalent with prosthetic valve endocarditis), Brucella infection, and the onset of conduction disturbances. The goals of surgical treatment are removal of infective tissue, restoration of valve function, and correction of associated mechanical disorders. The results are surprisingly good, especially for a condition of this severity. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:7065743

  11. Ceramic microstructure and adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a ceramic, a polymer, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. The bonding forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between a ceramic and another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to interface resulting from solid state contact. Surface properties of ceramics correlated with adhesion include, orientation, reconstruction and diffusion as well as the chemistry of the surface specie. Where a ceramic is in contact with a metal their interactive chemistry and bond strength is considered. Bulk properties examined include elastic and plastic behavior in the surficial regions, cohesive binding energies, crystal structures and crystallographic orientation. Materials examined with respect to interfacial adhesive interactions include silicon carbide, nickel zinc ferrite, manganese zinc ferrite, and aluminum oxide. The surfaces of the contacting solids are studied both in the atomic or molecularly clean state and in the presence of selected surface contaminants.

  12. Development of phosphorylated adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.; Jenkins, R. K.; Campbell, P. L.

    1983-01-01

    The synthesis of epoxy prepolymers containing phosphorus was carried out in such a manner as to provide adhesives containing at least 5 percent of this element. The purpose of this was to impart fire retardant properties to the adhesive. The two epoxy derivatives, bis(4-glycidyl-oxyphenyl)phenylphosphine oxide and bis(4-glycidyl-2-methoxyphenyl)phenylphosphonate, and a curing agent, bis(3-aminophenyl)methylphosphine oxide, were used in conjunction with one another and along with conventional epoxy resins and curing agents to bond Tedlar and Polyphenylethersulfone films to Kerimid-glass syntactic foam-filled honeycomb structures. Elevated temperatures are required to cure the epoxy resins with the phosphorus-contaning diamine; however, when Tedlar is being bonded, lower curing temperatures must be used to avoid shrinkage and the concomitant formation of surface defects. Thus, the phosphorus-containing aromatic amine curing agent cannot be used alone, although it is possible to use it in conjunction with an aliphatic amine which would allow lower cure temperatures to be used. The experimental epoxy resins have not provided adhesive bonds quite as strong as those provided by Epon 828 when compared in peel tests, but the differences are not very significant. It should be noted, if optimum properties are to be realized. In any case the fire retardant characteristics of the neat resin systems obtained are quite pronounced, since in most cases the self-extinguishing properties are evident almost instantly when specimens are removed from a flame.

  13. Introduction to the adhesive bonding session. [foam system for attaching thermal insulation on space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Space shuttle unique requirements call for the development of a specific adhesive system to reliable attach reusable surface insulation. A low density foam system has been developed that provides strain isolation from the support structure and remains structurally stable in space shuttle thermal environment. Surface preparation and its stabilization by an adhesive primer system are the most important factors in preventing corrosion from reducing the reliability and durability of the adhesive bonding component.

  14. Biocompatibility of surgical implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaelble, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Method of selecting biocompatible materials for surgical implants uses fracture mechanic relationships and surface energies of candidate materials in presence of blood plasma. Technique has been used to characterize 190 materials by parameters that reflect their biocompatibility.

  15. Guide to Surgical Specialists

    MedlinePlus

    ... may also deal with the liver, urinary, and female reproductive systems if they are involved with primary intestinal disease. ... The focus for this specialty is on the female reproductive system, including performing surgical procedures, managing the care of ...

  16. Hernia Surgical Mesh Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgical Clinics of North America; 83(5):1045-51, v-vi. 2 . http://www.facs.org/public_ ... FDA Contact FDA Browse by Product Area Product Areas back Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products ...

  17. Surgical Treatments for Fibroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Surgical Treatments for Fibroids Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... If you have moderate or severe symptoms of fibroids, surgery may be the best treatment for you. ...

  18. Urogynecologic Surgical Mesh Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Boston Scientific's urogynecologic surgical mesh may contain counterfeit raw material. We are examining these allegations to determine any ... are currently not aware that the alleged counterfeit raw material contributes to adverse events associated with these products. ...

  19. Immobilized antibiotics to prevent orthopedic implant infections

    PubMed Central

    Hickok, Noreen J.; Shapiro, Irving M.

    2012-01-01

    Many surgical procedures require the placement of an inert or tissue-derived implant deep within the body cavity. While the majority of these implants do not become colonized by bacteria, a small percentage develops a biofilm layer that harbors invasive microorganisms. In orthopaedic surgery, unresolved periprosthetic infections can lead to implant loosening, arthrodeses, amputations and sometimes death. The focus of this review is to describe development of an implant in which an antibiotic tethered to the metal surface is used to prevent bacterial colonization and biofilm formation. Building on well-established chemical syntheses, studies show that antibiotics can be linked to titanium through a self-assembled monolayer of siloxy amines. The stable metal-antibiotic construct resists bacterial colonization and biofilm formation while remaining amenable to osteoblastic cell adhesion and maturation. In an animal model, the antibiotic modified implant resists challenges by bacteria that are commonly present in periprosthetic infections. While the long-term efficacy and stability is still to be established, ongoing studies support the view that this novel type of bioactive surface has a real potential to mitigate or prevent the devastating consequences of orthopaedic infection. PMID:22512927

  20. Immobilized antibiotics to prevent orthopaedic implant infections.

    PubMed

    Hickok, Noreen J; Shapiro, Irving M

    2012-09-01

    Many surgical procedures require the placement of an inert or tissue-derived implant deep within the body cavity. While the majority of these implants do not become colonized by bacteria, a small percentage develops a biofilm layer that harbors invasive microorganisms. In orthopaedic surgery, unresolved periprosthetic infections can lead to implant loosening, arthrodeses, amputations and sometimes death. The focus of this review is to describe development of an implant in which an antibiotic tethered to the metal surface is used to prevent bacterial colonization and biofilm formation. Building on well-established chemical syntheses, studies show that antibiotics can be linked to titanium through a self-assembled monolayer of siloxy amines. The stable metal-antibiotic construct resists bacterial colonization and biofilm formation while remaining amenable to osteoblastic cell adhesion and maturation. In an animal model, the antibiotic modified implant resists challenges by bacteria that are commonly present in periprosthetic infections. While the long-term efficacy and stability is still to be established, ongoing studies support the view that this novel type of bioactive surface has a real potential to mitigate or prevent the devastating consequences of orthopaedic infection. PMID:22512927

  1. A Chitosan-Based Sinus Sealant for Reduction of Adhesion Formation in Rabbit and Sheep Models

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Jennifer G.; Steinke, John W.; Das, Subinoy

    2013-01-01

    Objective Chronic sinusitis is the most prevalent chronic disease in the United States in adults aged 18 to 44 years, with approximately 250,000 operations performed annually. Although often successful, sinus surgery fails in greater than 15% of patients. Adhesion formation is a common complication and cause for subsequent revision surgery. Here, the authors evaluate a sprayable chitosan/starch-based sinus sealant and demonstrate its ability to reduce adhesion formation both in vitro and in 2 animal models. Study Design Randomized, controlled, animal trials. Setting Academic medical center (fibroblast experiments) and animal laboratories (sheep and rabbit studies). Subjects and Methods This sinus sealant was applied to human cultured fibroblasts obtained from surgically removed polyps to examine its ability to inhibit fibroblast migration and proliferation. The sinus sealant was applied to New Zealand White rabbits (n = 20) in an established cecal-sidewall abrasion model and to sheep (n = 10) in a sinus surgical adhesion model to examine its ability to reduce adhesion formation. Results This sinus sealant inhibited migration and proliferation of human cultured fibroblasts and reduced the total adhesion score from 4.9 to 0.3 for a total reduction of 94% (95th percentile confidence interval [CI], 78%, 100%; P < .001) in a well-established rabbit cecal-sidewall model commonly used for adhesion testing. Moreover, this sealant reduced adhesion formation from 80% to 10% for a total reduction of 70% (95th percentile CI, 57%, 93%; P = .003) in a sheep sinus adhesion surgical model. Conclusion This chitosan-based sealant demonstrates promise for reducing adhesion formation in sinus surgery. PMID:22492298

  2. Smart surgical tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei; Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian

    2015-02-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) guided smart surgical tool using a femtosecond fiber laser is developed. This system provides real-time material identification by processing and analyzing the peak intensity and ratio of atomic emissions of LIBS signals. Algorithms to identify emissions of different tissues and metals are developed and implemented into the real-time control system. This system provides a powerful smart surgical tool for precise robotic microsurgery applications with real-time feedback and control.

  3. Surgical outcome in cystic vestibular schwannomas

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Suresh; Baldawa, Sachin S.; Gopalakrishnan, Chittur Viswanathan; Menon, Girish; Vikas, Vazhayil; Sudhir, Jayanand B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cystic vestibular schwannomas (VS) form a rare subgroup that differs from the solid variant clinically, radiologically, and histopathologically. These tumors also vary in their surgical outcome and carry a different risk of post-operative complications. We analyzed our series of 64 patients with cystic VS and discuss the technical difficulties related to total excision of these tumors and focus on complication avoidance. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of cystic VS surgically managed over a span of 11 years. The case records were evaluated to record the clinical symptoms and signs, imaging findings, surgical procedure, complications, and follow-up data. Post-operative facial nerve palsy was analyzed with respect to tumor size and tumor type. Results: Progressive hearing impairment was the most common initial symptom (76.6%). Atypical initial symptoms were present in 15 patients (23.4%). Preoperatively, 78% patients had good facial nerve function (HB grade 1, 2) and 22% had intermediate (HB grade 3, 4) to poor (HB grade 5 and 6) function. Mean tumor size was 4.1 cm. Complete tumor removal was achieved in 53 patients (83%). The facial nerve was anatomically intact but thinned out after tumor excision in 38 patients (59.4%). Ninety percent patients had either intermediate or poor facial nerve function at follow-up. Poor facial nerve outcome was associated with giant tumors and peripherally located, thin-walled cystic tumors. Conclusion: Resection of cystic VS is complicated by peritumoral adhesions of the capsule to the nerve. Extensive manipulation of the nerve in order to dissect the tumor–nerve barrier results in worse facial nerve outcome. The outcome is worse in peripherally located, thin-walled cystic VS as compared to centrally located, thick-walled cystic tumors. Subtotal excision may be justified, especially in tumors with dense adhesion of the cyst wall to the facial nerve in order to preserve nerve integrity. PMID:27366248

  4. [Surgical oncology: historical development and current status].

    PubMed

    Granados García, Martín; Beltrán Ortega, Arturo; Soto Sánchez, Beatriz Lucero; León Takahashi, Alberto Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    The surgical oncology remains an essential part in the multidisciplinary management for patients with cancer, even though the current progress in field of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, systemic therapies, including therapies directed to molecular targets. Their role impact in several moments during the management of an oncological patient: prevention, diagnosis, assessment of the spread of the disease, curative treatment, management of the sequels, complications by the treatment and not less important, the palliation. The current state of the surgical oncology as a result of a constant development, inspired by skillful hands with creative and restless minds, have achieved to mark the history of the medicine in an area which currently has a great transcendence and an accelerated growth in a short period of time. Under this argument, we have decided to present an updated overview about the role of the surgical oncology, from the evolution through the history until all their applications in the different areas of the oncology. PMID:22116189

  5. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions were performed using a surgical cut-and-sew approach that ensured transmurality. The Cox-Maze IV is the most currently accepted iteration. It achieves the same lesion set of the Cox- maze III but uses alternative energy sources to create the transmural lesions, potentially in a minimally invasive approach on the beating heart. High-frequency ultrasound, microwave, and laser energy have all been used with varying success in the past. Today, bipolar radiofrequency heat or cryotherapy cooling are the most accepted sources for creating linear lesions with consistent safety and transmurality. The robust and reliable nature of these energy delivery methods has yielded a success rate reaching 90% freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12 months. Such approaches offer a significant long-term advantage over catheter-based ablation, especially in patients having longstanding, persistent atrial fibrillation with characteristics such as dilated left atrial dimensions, poor ejection fraction, and failed catheter ablation. Based on these improved results, there currently is significant interest in developing a hybrid ablation strategy that incorporates the superior transmural robust lesions of surgical ablation, the reliable stroke prevention potential of epicardial left atrial appendage exclusion, and sophisticated mapping and confirmatory catheter-based ablation technology. Such a minimally invasive hybrid strategy for ablation may lead to the development of multidisciplinary "Afib teams" to

  6. Bacterial adhesion to diamond-like carbon as compared to stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Soininen, Antti; Tiainen, Veli-Matti; Konttinen, Yrjö T; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J; Sharma, Prashant K

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are suitable candidates for application on biomedical devices and implants, due to their high hardness, low friction, high wear and corrosion resistance, chemical inertness, smoothness, and tissue and blood compatibility. However, most studies have neglected the potential susceptibility of DLC coatings to bacterial adhesion, which is the first step in the development of implant-related infections. This study compares adhesion of seven bacterial strains, commonly implicated in implant-related infections, to tetrahedral amorphous carbon, with their adhesion to AISI 316L surgical steel. The results show that bacterial adhesion to DLC was similar to the adhesion to commonly used stainless steel. This suggests that DLC coating can be advantageously used on implants made of AISI 316L or other materials without increasing the risk to implant-related infections. PMID:19353566

  7. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  8. JKR adhesion in cylindrical contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Narayan; Farris, T. N.; Chandrasekar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Planar JKR adhesive solutions use the half-plane assumption and do not permit calculation of indenter approach or visualization of adhesive force-displacement curves unless the contact is periodic. By considering a conforming cylindrical contact and using an arc crack analogy, we obtain closed-form indenter approach and load-contact size relations for a planar adhesive problem. The contact pressure distribution is also obtained in closed-form. The solutions reduce to known cases in both the adhesion-free and small-contact solution ( Barquins, 1988) limits. The cylindrical system shows two distinct regimes of adhesive behavior; in particular, contact sizes exceeding the critical (maximum) size seen in adhesionless contacts are possible. The effects of contact confinement on adhesive behavior are investigated. Some special cases are considered, including contact with an initial neat-fit and the detachment of a rubbery cylinder from a rigid cradle. A comparison of the cylindrical solution with the half-plane adhesive solution is carried out, and it indicates that the latter typically underestimates the adherence force. The cylindrical adhesive system is novel in that it possesses stable contact states that may not be attained even on applying an infinite load in the absence of adhesion.

  9. The Human Microbiome and Surgical Disease

    PubMed Central

    Morowitz, Michael J.; Babrowski, Trissa; Carlisle, Erica M.; Olivas, Andrea; Romanowski, Kathleen S.; Seal, John B.; Liu, Donald C.; Alverdy, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this review article is to summarize what is currently known about microbes associated with the human body and to provide examples of how this knowledge impacts the care of surgical patients. Background Pioneering research over the past decade has demonstrated that human beings live in close, constant contact with dynamic communities of microbial organisms. This new reality has wide-ranging implications for the care of surgical patients. Methods and Results Recent advances in the culture-independent study of the human microbiome are reviewed. To illustrate the translational relevance of these studies to surgical disease, we discuss in detail what is known about the role of microbes in the pathogenesis of obesity, gastrointestinal malignancies, Crohn disease, and perioperative complications including surgical site infections and sepsis. The topics of mechanical bowel preparation and perioperative antibiotics are also discussed. Conclusions Heightened understanding of the microbiome in coming years will likely offer opportunities to refine the prevention and treatment of a wide variety of surgical conditions. PMID:21422915

  10. Poldip2 controls vascular smooth muscle cell migration by regulating focal adhesion turnover and force polarization

    PubMed Central

    Datla, Srinivasa Raju; McGrail, Daniel J.; Vukelic, Sasa; Huff, Lauren P.; Lyle, Alicia N.; Pounkova, Lily; Lee, Minyoung; Seidel-Rogol, Bonnie; Khalil, Mazen K.; Hilenski, Lula L.; Terada, Lance S.; Dawson, Michelle R.; Lassègue, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Polymerase-δ-interacting protein 2 (Poldip2) interacts with NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) and regulates migration; however, the precise underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we investigated the role of Poldip2 in focal adhesion turnover, as well as traction force generation and polarization. Poldip2 overexpression (AdPoldip2) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) impairs PDGF-induced migration and induces a characteristic phenotype of long cytoplasmic extensions. AdPoldip2 also prevents the decrease in spreading and increased aspect ratio observed in response to PDGF and slightly impairs cell contraction. Moreover, AdPoldip2 blocks focal adhesion dissolution and sustains H2O2 levels in focal adhesions, whereas Poldip2 knockdown (siPoldip2) significantly decreases the number of focal adhesions. RhoA activity is unchanged when focal adhesion dissolution is stimulated in control cells but increases in AdPoldip2-treated cells. Inhibition of RhoA blocks Poldip2-mediated attenuation of focal adhesion dissolution, and overexpression of RhoA or focal adhesion kinase (FAK) reverses the loss of focal adhesions induced by siPoldip2, indicating that RhoA and FAK mediate the effect of Poldip2 on focal adhesions. Nox4 silencing prevents focal adhesion stabilization by AdPoldip2 and induces a phenotype similar to siPoldip2, suggesting a role for Nox4 in Poldip2-induced focal adhesion stability. As a consequence of impaired focal adhesion turnover, PDGF-treated AdPoldip2 cells are unable to reduce and polarize traction forces, a necessary first step in migration. These results implicate Poldip2 in VSMC migration via regulation of focal adhesion turnover and traction force generation in a Nox4/RhoA/FAK-dependent manner. PMID:25063792

  11. Poldip2 controls vascular smooth muscle cell migration by regulating focal adhesion turnover and force polarization.

    PubMed

    Datla, Srinivasa Raju; McGrail, Daniel J; Vukelic, Sasa; Huff, Lauren P; Lyle, Alicia N; Pounkova, Lily; Lee, Minyoung; Seidel-Rogol, Bonnie; Khalil, Mazen K; Hilenski, Lula L; Terada, Lance S; Dawson, Michelle R; Lassègue, Bernard; Griendling, Kathy K

    2014-10-01

    Polymerase-δ-interacting protein 2 (Poldip2) interacts with NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) and regulates migration; however, the precise underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we investigated the role of Poldip2 in focal adhesion turnover, as well as traction force generation and polarization. Poldip2 overexpression (AdPoldip2) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) impairs PDGF-induced migration and induces a characteristic phenotype of long cytoplasmic extensions. AdPoldip2 also prevents the decrease in spreading and increased aspect ratio observed in response to PDGF and slightly impairs cell contraction. Moreover, AdPoldip2 blocks focal adhesion dissolution and sustains H2O2 levels in focal adhesions, whereas Poldip2 knockdown (siPoldip2) significantly decreases the number of focal adhesions. RhoA activity is unchanged when focal adhesion dissolution is stimulated in control cells but increases in AdPoldip2-treated cells. Inhibition of RhoA blocks Poldip2-mediated attenuation of focal adhesion dissolution, and overexpression of RhoA or focal adhesion kinase (FAK) reverses the loss of focal adhesions induced by siPoldip2, indicating that RhoA and FAK mediate the effect of Poldip2 on focal adhesions. Nox4 silencing prevents focal adhesion stabilization by AdPoldip2 and induces a phenotype similar to siPoldip2, suggesting a role for Nox4 in Poldip2-induced focal adhesion stability. As a consequence of impaired focal adhesion turnover, PDGF-treated AdPoldip2 cells are unable to reduce and polarize traction forces, a necessary first step in migration. These results implicate Poldip2 in VSMC migration via regulation of focal adhesion turnover and traction force generation in a Nox4/RhoA/FAK-dependent manner. PMID:25063792

  12. Poly(vinyl alcohol) acetoacetate-based tissue adhesives are non-cytotoxic and non-inflammatory.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Sujata K; Arthur, Samuel D

    2008-08-01

    Polymer-based tissue adhesives composed of poly(vinyl alcohol) acetoacetate (PVOH acac) and cross-linking amines were investigated for their effects on cell survival and inflammatory cell activation using in vitro mouse cell cultures. Cytotoxicity of tissue adhesives was evaluated by placing adhesives in direct contact with 3T3 fibroblast cells. Tissue adhesives formulated from PVOH acac and 3-aminopropyltrialkoxysilane (APS) were non-cytotoxic to fibroblasts; adhesives formulated from PVOH acac and aminated poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVOH amine) were also non-cytotoxic to fibroblasts. In contrast, a commercial adhesive composed of 2-octyl cyanoacrylate was highly cytotoxic to fibroblasts. The inflammatory potential of tissue adhesives was evaluated by exposing J774 macrophage cells to adhesives, and measuring TNF-alpha release from macrophages. PVOH acac-based tissue adhesives did not elicit inflammatory TNF-alpha release from macrophages. These results suggest that PVOH acac-based tissue adhesives are non-cytotoxic and non-inflammatory. Such tissue adhesives represent a promising technology for a variety of medical applications, including surgical wound closure and tissue engineering, and the results are also significant in the design of in vitro cell culture systems to study biomaterials. PMID:18414803

  13. Stickiness--some fundamentals of adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gay, Cyprien

    2002-12-01

    We review some adhesion mechanisms that have been understood in the field of synthetic adhesives, and more precisely for adhesives that adhere instantaneously (a property named tackiness) and whose adhesive strength usually depends on the applied pressure (pressure-sensitive adhesives). The discussion includes effects of surface roughness, elasticity, cavitation, viscous and elastic fingering, substrate flexibility. PMID:21680396

  14. Surgical prosthetic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Carulli, Christian; Matassi, Fabrizio; Civinini, Roberto; Villano, Marco; Innocenti, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Fragility fractures typically occur in elderly patients related principally to osteoporosis. A significative percentage of these fractures have to be treated surgically but comorbilities are often present, and need to be grossly stabilized before surgery. However, there is for these fractures a high rate of morbidity and mortality at short-term. Moreover, patients affected by a fragility fracture are at risk for another fragility fracture later in life. The Authors present an overview of the main patterns of proximal femoral fractures, underlining the peculiar features and choices of surgical treatment, and relating to specific indications and results of each treatment. PMID:22461289

  15. [Pulmonary Echinococcosis: Surgical Aspects].

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, M E; Hoffmann, H; Dienemann, H

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary cystic echinococcosis is a very rare disease in Germany. It is caused by the larvae of the dog tapeworm (echinococcus granulosus). The liver is the most affected organ, followed by the lungs. Surgery remains the main therapeutic approach for pulmonary CE. Whenever possible, parenchyma-preserving lung surgery should be preferred over anatomic lung resections. To ensure best therapeutic results, surgery needs to be performed under precise consideration of important infectiological aspects and patients should be treated in specialised centres based on interdisciplinary consensus. In addition to surgical aspects, this review summarises special infectiological features of this disease, which are crucial to the surgical approach. PMID:26351761

  16. Surgical forceps techniques.

    PubMed

    Malden, N

    2001-01-01

    This paper considers two new elevator and dental forceps techniques for the atraumatic removal of teeth to avoid a surgical procedure where possible. The techniques described should be applicable in relatively well defined but commonly occurring situations. The two techniques involve the unconventional use of conventional dental extraction forceps, with the aim of facilitating removal of the retained roots of certain teeth: the first for incisors, canines and premolars and the second for lower first molars. The term 'surgical forceps technique's is tentatively put forward as a description of these hybrid procedures. PMID:11819949

  17. Improved Adhesion and Compliancy of Hierarchical Fibrillar Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Li, Yasong; Gates, Byron D; Menon, Carlo

    2015-08-01

    The gecko relies on van der Waals forces to cling onto surfaces with a variety of topography and composition. The hierarchical fibrillar structures on their climbing feet, ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale, are hypothesized to be key elements for the animal to conquer both smooth and rough surfaces. An epoxy-based artificial hierarchical fibrillar adhesive was prepared to study the influence of the hierarchical structures on the properties of a dry adhesive. The presented experiments highlight the advantages of a hierarchical structure despite a reduction of overall density and aspect ratio of nanofibrils. In contrast to an adhesive containing only nanometer-size fibrils, the hierarchical fibrillar adhesives exhibited a higher adhesion force and better compliancy when tested on an identical substrate. PMID:26167951

  18. Effect of adhesive thickness on adhesively bonded T-joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, A. R.; Afendi, Mohd; Majid, M. S. Abdul

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of adhesive thickness on tensile strength of adhesively bonded stainless steel T-joint. Specimens were made from SUS 304 Stainless Steel plate and SUS 304 Stainless Steel perforated plate. Four T-joint specimens with different adhesive thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were made. Experiment result shows T-joint specimen with adhesive thickness of 1.0 mm yield highest maximum load. Identical T-joint specimen jointed by spot welding was also tested. Tensile test shows welded T-Joint had eight times higher tensile load than adhesively bonded T-joint. However, in low pressure application such as urea granulator chamber, high tensile strength is not mandatory. This work is useful for designer in fertilizer industry and others who are searching for alternative to spot welding.

  19. Holospinal epidural abscess of the spinal axis: two illustrative cases with review of treatment strategies and surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gabriel A; Kochar, Arshneel S; Manjila, Sunil; Onwuzulike, Kaine; Geertman, Robert T; Anderson, James S; Steinmetz, Michael P

    2014-08-01

    Despite the increasing prevalence of spinal infections, the subcategory of holospinal epidural abscesses (HEAs) is extremely infrequent and requires unique management. Panspinal imaging (preferably MRI), modern aggressive antibiotic therapy, and prompt surgical intervention remain the standard of care for all spinal axis infections including HEAs; however, the surgical decision making on timing and extent of the procedure still remain ill defined for HEAs. Decompression including skip laminectomies or laminoplasties is described, with varied clinical outcomes. In this review the authors present the illustrative cases of 2 patients with HEAs who were treated using skip laminectomies and epidural catheter irrigation techniques. The discussion highlights different management strategies including the role of conservative (nonsurgical) management in these lesions, especially with an already identified pathogen and the absence of mass effect on MRI or significant neurological defects. Among fewer than 25 case reports of HEA published in the past 25 years, the most important aspect in deciding a role for surgery is the neurological examination. Nearly 20% were treated successfully with medical therapy alone if neurologically intact. None of the reported cases had an associated cranial infection with HEA, because the dural adhesion around the foramen magnum prevented rostral spread of infection. Traditionally a posterior approach to the epidural space with irrigation is performed, unless an extensive focal ventral collection is causing cord compression. Surgical intervention for HEA should be an adjuvant treatment strategy for all acutely deteriorating patients, whereas aspiration of other infected sites like a psoas abscess can determine an infective pathogen, and appropriate antibiotic treatment may avoid surgical intervention in the neurologically intact patient. PMID:25081960

  20. Treatment to Control Adhesion of Silicone-Based Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Puleo, Bernadette J.; Waters, Deborah L.

    2013-01-01

    Seals are used to facilitate the joining of two items, usually temporarily. At some point in the future, it is expected that the items will need to be separated. This innovation enables control of the adhesive properties of silicone-based elastomers. The innovation may also be effective on elastomers other than the silicone-based ones. A technique has been discovered that decreases the level of adhesion of silicone- based elastomers to negligible levels. The new technique causes less damage to the material compared to alternative adhesion mitigation techniques. Silicone-based elastomers are the only class of rubber-like materials that currently meet NASA s needs for various seal applications. However, silicone-based elastomers have natural inherent adhesive properties. This stickiness can be helpful, but it can frequently cause problems as well, such as when trying to get items apart. In the past, seal adhesion was not always adequately addressed, and has caused in-flight failures where seals were actually pulled from their grooves, preventing subsequent spacecraft docking until the seal was physically removed from the flange via an extravehicular activity (EVA). The primary method used in the past to lower elastomer seal adhesion has been the application of some type of lubricant or grease to the surface of the seal. A newer method uses ultraviolet (UV) radiation a mixture of UV wavelengths in the range of near ultraviolet (NUV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) wavelengths.

  1. Dietary indicaxanthin from cactus pear (Opuntia ficus-indica L. Mill) fruit prevents eryptosis induced by oxysterols in a hypercholesterolaemia-relevant proportion and adhesion of human erythrocytes to endothelial cell layers.

    PubMed

    Tesoriere, Luisa; Attanzio, Alessandro; Allegra, Mario; Livrea, Maria A

    2015-08-14

    Toxic oxysterols in a hypercholesterolaemia-relevant proportion cause suicidal death of human erythrocytes or eryptosis. This process proceeds through early production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), release of prostaglandin (PGE2) and opening of PGE2-dependent Ca channels, membrane phosphatidylserine (PS) externalisation, and cell shrinkage. The present study was the first to reveal that a bioavailable phytochemical, indicaxanthin (Ind) from cactus pear fruit, in a concentration range (1.0-5.0 μM) consistent with its plasma level after a fruit meal, prevents PS externalisation and cell shrinkage in a dose-dependent manner when incubated with isolated healthy human erythrocytes exposed to an oxysterol mixture for 48 h. Dietary Ind inhibited ROS production, glutathione (GSH) depletion, PGE2 release and Ca2+ entry. Ind alone did not modify the erythrocyte redox environment or affect other parameters. Ex vivo spiking of normal human blood with the oxysterol mixture for 48 h induced eryptosis, resulting in the production of ROS and decreased levels of GSH, which was prevented by concurrent exposure to 5 μm-Ind. The adherence of eryptotic erythrocytes to the endothelium causes vascular tissue injury. Erythrocytes isolated from blood incubated with the oxysterol mixture plus 5 μm-Ind did not adhere to endothelial cell monolayers. Eryptotic erythrocytes may contribute to thrombotic complications in hypercholesterolaemia. Our findings suggest the positive effects of diets containing Ind on erythrocytes in hypercholesterolaemic subjects. PMID:26169206

  2. Platelet adhesiveness in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, S.; Pegrum, G. D.; Wolff, Sylvia; Ashton, W. L.

    1967-01-01

    Platelet adhesiveness has been assessed on whole blood from a series of 34 diabetics and 50 control subjects using adenosine diphosphate (A.D.P.) and by adherence to glass microspherules (ballotini). Using both techniques it was possible to demonstrate a significant increase in platelet adhesiveness in the diabetic patients. PMID:5614070

  3. Measuring Adhesion And Friction Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1991-01-01

    Cavendish balance adapted to new purpose. Apparatus developed which measures forces of adhesion and friction between specimens of solid materials in vacuum at temperatures from ambient to 900 degrees C. Intended primarily for use in studying adhesion properties of ceramics and metals, including silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and iron-base amorphous alloys.

  4. Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy Utilizing a Robotic Surgical System

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Keith H.; Daucher, James A.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the use of a robotic surgical system for total laparoscopic hysterectomy. Methods: We report a series of laparoscopic hysterectomies performed using the da Vinci Robotic Surgical System. Participants were women eligible for hysterectomy by standard laparoscopy. Operative times and complications are reported. Results: We completed 10 total laparoscopic hysterectomies between November 2001 and December 2002 with the use of the da Vinci Robotic Surgical System. Operative results were similar to those of standard laparoscopic hysterectomy. Operative time varied from 2 hours 28 minutes to 4 hours 37 minutes. Blood loss varied from 25 mL to 350 mL. Uterine weights varied from 49 g to 227 g. A cystotomy occurred in a patient with a history of a prior cystotomy unrelated to the robotic system. Conclusion: Total laparoscopic hysterectomy is a complex surgical procedure requiring advanced laparoscopic skills. Tasks like lysis of adhesions, suturing, and knot tying were enhanced with the robotic surgical system, thus providing unique advantages over existing standard laparoscopy. Total laparoscopic hysterectomy can be performed using robotic surgical systems. PMID:15791963

  5. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  6. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  7. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  8. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  9. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  10. Surgical Instrument Restraint in Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Mark R.; Dawson, David L.; Melton, Shannon; Hooker, Dona; Cantu, Hilda

    2000-01-01

    Performing a surgical procedure during spaceflight will become more likely with longer duration missions in the near future. Minimal surgical capability has been present on previous missions as the definitive medical care time was short and the likelihood of surgical events too low to justify surgical hardware availability. Early demonstrations of surgical procedures in the weightlessness of parabolic flight indicated the need for careful logistical planning and restraint of surgical hardware. The consideration of human ergonomics also has more impact in weightlessness than in the conventionall-g environment. Three methods of surgical instrument restraint - a Minor Surgical Kit (MSK), a Surgical Restraint Scrub Suit (SRSS), and a Surgical Tray (ST) were evaluated in parabolic flight surgical procedures. The Minor Surgical Kit was easily stored, easily deployed, and demonstrated the best ability to facilitate a surgical procedure in weightlessness. Important factors in this surgical restraint system include excellent organization of supplies, ability to maintain sterility, accessibility while providing secure restraint, ability to dispose of sharp items and biological trash, and ergonomical efficiency.

  11. Surgical Technician Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    This curriculum guide, developed for 10-month postsecondary programs in Connecticut, outlines a program for training surgical technicians. The program is divided into two components, didactic and clinical. Following a list of six general objectives of the program, the guide provides a curriculum outline by major areas with the number of hours…

  12. Surgical Technology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford. Div. of Vocational-Technical Schools.

    This curriculum guide contains materials for a 10-month postsecondary program to educate qualified adults to function as surgical technicians in association with surgeons and nurses in operating rooms and delivery rooms. The program provides for both a didactic and a clinical component. Contents include general information, a listing of major…

  13. Improving surgical weekend handover

    PubMed Central

    Culwick, Caroline; Devine, Chris; Coombs, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Effective handovers are vital to patient safety and continuity of care, and this is recognised by several national bodies including the GMC. The existing model at Great Western Hospital (GWH) involved three general surgical teams and a urology team placing their printed patient lists, complete with weekend jobs, in a folder for the on-call team to collect at the weekend. We recognised a need to reduce time searching for patients, jobs and reviews, and to streamline weekend ward rounds. A unified weekend list ordering all surgical patients by ward and bed number was introduced. Discrepancies in the layout of each team's weekday list necessitated the design of a new weekday list to match the weekend list to facilitate the easy transfer of information between the two lists. A colour coding system was also used to highlight specific jobs. Prior to this improvement project only 7.1% of those polled were satisfied with the existing system, after a series of interventions satisfaction increased to 85.7%. The significant increase in overall satisfaction with surgical handover following the introduction of the unified weekend list is promising. Locating patients and identifying jobs is easier and weekend ward rounds can conducted in a more logical and timely fashion. It has also helped facilitate the transition to consultant ward rounds of all surgical inpatients at the weekends with promising feedback from a recent consultants meeting. PMID:26734294

  14. Surgical wound care - open

    MedlinePlus

    Surgical incision care; Open wound care ... your wound again with sutures, you need to care for it at home, since it may take ... Your health care provider will tell you how often to change your dressing . To prepare for the dressing change: Clean your ...

  15. Tests to Determine the Adhesive Power of Passenger-Car Tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foerster, B.

    1956-01-01

    The concept of the adhesive power of a tire with respect to the road involves several properties which result from the purpose of the tire; namely, connecting link between vehicle and road: (1) The tire must transfer the tractive and braking forces acting in the direction of travel (tractive and braking adhesion); (2) The tire is to prevent lateral deviations of the vehicle from the desired direction of travel (track adhesion). Moreover, the rubber tire provides part of the springing of the vehicle. Above all, it has to level out the minor road irregularities; thus it smoothes, as it were, the road and simultaneously reduces the noise of driving. The springing properties of the tire affect the adhesive power. The tests described below comprise a determination of the braking and track adhesion of individual tires. The adhesion of driven wheels has not been investigated so far.

  16. Hyaluronan-mediated cellular adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Jennifer

    2005-03-01

    Many cells surround themselves with a cushioning halo of polysaccharides that is further strengthened and organized by proteins. In fibroblasts and chrondrocytes, the primary component of this pericellular matrix is hyaluronan, a large linear polyanion. Hyaluronan production is linked to a variety of disease, developmental, and physiological processes. Cells manipulate the concentration of hyaluronan and hyaluronan receptors for numerous activities including modulation of cell adhesion, cell motility, and differentiation. Recent investigations by identify hyaluronan's role in mediating early-stage cell adhesion. An open question is how the cell removes the 0.5-10 micron thick pericellular matrix to allow for further mature adhesion events requiring nanometer scale separations. In this investigation, holographic optical tweezers are used to study the adhesion and viscoelastic properties of chondrocytes' pericellular matrix. Ultimately, we aim to shed further light on the spatial and temporal details of the dramatic transition from micron to nanometer gaps between the cell and its adhesive substrate.

  17. Adhesion testing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPeyronnie, Glenn M. (Inventor); Huff, Charles M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a testing apparatus and method for testing the adhesion of a coating to a surface. The invention also includes an improved testing button or dolly for use with the testing apparatus and a self aligning button hook or dolly interface on the testing apparatus. According to preferred forms, the apparatus and method of the present invention are simple, portable, battery operated rugged, and inexpensive to manufacture and use, are readily adaptable to a wide variety of uses, and provide effective and accurate testing results. The device includes a linear actuator driven by an electric motor coupled to the actuator through a gearbox and a rotatable shaft. The electronics for the device are contained in the head section of the device. At the contact end of the device, is positioned a self aligning button hook, attached below the load cell located on the actuator shaft.

  18. Epidural lysis of adhesions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Frank; Jamison, David E; Hurley, Robert W; Cohen, Steven P

    2014-01-01

    As our population ages and the rate of spine surgery continues to rise, the use epidural lysis of adhesions (LOA) has emerged as a popular treatment to treat spinal stenosis and failed back surgery syndrome. There is moderate evidence that percutaneous LOA is more effective than conventional ESI for both failed back surgery syndrome, spinal stenosis, and lumbar radiculopathy. For cervical HNP, cervical stenosis and mechanical pain not associated with nerve root involvement, the evidence is anecdotal. The benefits of LOA stem from a combination of factors to include the high volumes administered and the use of hypertonic saline. Hyaluronidase has been shown in most, but not all studies to improve treatment outcomes. Although infrequent, complications are more likely to occur after epidural LOA than after conventional epidural steroid injections. PMID:24478895

  19. Epidural Lysis of Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Frank; Jamison, David E.; Hurley, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    As our population ages and the rate of spine surgery continues to rise, the use epidural lysis of adhesions (LOA) has emerged as a popular treatment to treat spinal stenosis and failed back surgery syndrome. There is moderate evidence that percutaneous LOA is more effective than conventional ESI for both failed back surgery syndrome, spinal stenosis, and lumbar radiculopathy. For cervical HNP, cervical stenosis and mechanical pain not associated with nerve root involvement, the evidence is anecdotal. The benefits of LOA stem from a combination of factors to include the high volumes administered and the use of hypertonic saline. Hyaluronidase has been shown in most, but not all studies to improve treatment outcomes. Although infrequent, complications are more likely to occur after epidural LOA than after conventional epidural steroid injections. PMID:24478895

  20. [Retention of adhesive bridges].

    PubMed

    Raes, F; De Boever, J

    1994-04-01

    Since the development of adhesive bridges in the early seventies, the retention and therefore the durability of these bridges has been tremendously improved. Conditioning of the non-precious metal by silanisation, careful acid etching of the enamel and the use of the appropriate composite resin are of prime importance. Furthermore, the meticulous preparation with enough interproximal embrace, occlusal rests, interocclusal clearance and cingulum stops is equally important. Including more teeth in the design does not necessarily lead to an improved retention. Besides the material and technical aspects, the whole clinical procedure needs much attention. The retention does not depend on one single factor, but on the precision of all the necessary clinical steps and on a well-defined selection of the material. In this way a five-year survival rate of close to 80% can be obtained. PMID:11830965

  1. Preventing stroke

    MedlinePlus

    Stroke - prevention; CVA - prevention; cerebral vascular accident - prevention; TIA - prevention, transient ischemic attack - prevention ... Clinical Cardiology; Council on Functional Genomics and ... Council on Hypertension. Guidelines for the primary prevention ...

  2. Guideline implementation: surgical instrument cleaning.

    PubMed

    Cowperthwaite, Liz; Holm, Rebecca L

    2015-05-01

    Cleaning, decontaminating, and handling instructions for instruments vary widely based on the type of instrument and the manufacturer. Processing instruments in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions can help prevent damage and keep devices in good working order. Most importantly, proper cleaning and disinfection may prevent transmission of pathogenic organisms from a contaminated device to a patient or health care worker. The updated AORN "Guideline for cleaning and care of surgical instruments" provides guidance on cleaning, decontaminating, transporting, inspecting, and storing instruments. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel implement appropriate instrument care protocols in their practice settings. The key points address timely cleaning and decontamination of instruments after use; appropriate heating, ventilation, and air conditioning parameters for the decontamination area; processing of ophthalmic instruments and laryngoscopes; and precautions to take with instruments used in cases of suspected prion disease. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. PMID:25946180

  3. Effect of fibril shape on adhesive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Daniel; Hill, Ginel; Parness, Aaron; Esparza, Noé; Cutkosky, Mark; Kenny, Tom

    2010-08-01

    Research into the gecko's adhesive system revealed a unique architecture for adhesives using tiny hairs. By using a stiff material (β-keratin) to create a highly structured adhesive, the gecko's system demonstrates properties not seen in traditional pressure-sensitive adhesives which use a soft, unstructured planar layer. In contrast to pressure sensitive adhesives, the gecko adhesive displays frictional adhesion, in which increased shear force allows it to withstand higher normal loads. Synthetic fibrillar adhesives have been fabricated but not all demonstrate this frictional adhesion property. Here we report the dual-axis force testing of single silicone rubber pillars from synthetic adhesive arrays. We find that the shape of the adhesive pillar dictates whether frictional adhesion or pressure-sensitive behavior is observed. This work suggests that both types of behavior can be achieved with structures much larger than gecko terminal structures. It also indicates that subtle differences in the shape of these pillars can significantly influence their properties.

  4. Tunicate-mimetic nanofibrous hydrogel adhesive with improved wet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dongyeop X; Kim, Sangsik; Lee, Dohoon; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2015-07-01

    The main impediment to medical application of biomaterial-based adhesives is their poor wet adhesion strength due to hydration-induced softening and dissolution. To solve this problem, we mimicked the wound healing process found in tunicates, which use a nanofiber structure and pyrogallol group to heal any damage on its tunic under sea water. We fabricated a tunicate-mimetic hydrogel adhesive based on a chitin nanofiber/gallic acid (a pyrogallol acid) composite. The pyrogallol group-mediated cross-linking and the nanofibrous structures improved the dissolution resistance and cohesion strength of the hydrogel compared to the amorphous polymeric hydrogels in wet condition. The tunicate-mimetic adhesives showed higher adhesion strength between fully hydrated skin tissues than did fibrin glue and mussel-mimetic adhesives. The tunicate mimetic hydrogels were produced at low cost from recyclable and abundant raw materials. This tunicate-mimetic adhesive system is an example of how natural materials can be engineered for biomedical applications. PMID:25841348

  5. Factors Predicting Adhesion between Renal Capsule and Perinephric Adipose Tissue in Partial Nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Kurahashi, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Yuko; Wada, Koichiro; Sasaki, Katsumi; Araki, Motoo; Ebara, Shin; Watanabe, Toyohiko; Nasu, Yasutomo

    2016-04-01

    In minimally invasive partial nephrectomy (MIPN), it is important to preoperatively predict the degree of difficulty of tumor resection. When severe adhesions occur between the renal capsule and perinephric adipose tissue, detachment can be difficult. Preoperative prediction of adhesion is thought to be useful in the selection of surgical procedure. Subjects were 63 patients of a single surgeon who had received MIPN between April 2008 and August 2013 at Okayama University Hospital. Of these patients, this study followed 47 in whom the presence or absence of adhesions between the renal capsule and perinephric adipose tissue was confirmed using intraoperative videos. Data collected included: sex, BMI, CT finding (presence of fi broids in perinephric adipose tissue), comorbidities and lifestyle. Adhesion was observed in 7 patients (14.9%). The mean operative time was 291.6 min in the adhesion group, and 226.3 min in the group without. The increased time in the adhesions group was significant (p<0.05). Predictive factors were a positive CT finding for fibroid structure and comorbidity of hypertension (p<0.05). In MIPN, difficulty of surgery can be affected by the presence of adhesion of the perinephric adipose tissue. Predicting such adhesion from preoperative CT is thus important. PMID:27094831

  6. [Laparoscopic diagnosis and treatment of early adhesive small bowel obstruction after gynecological surgery].

    PubMed

    Timofeev, M E; Breusenko, V G; Shapoval'iants, S G; Fedorov, E D; Larichev, S E; Kretsu, V N

    2015-01-01

    It is presented the results of diagnostic and curative laparoscopic interventions in 33 patients with acute early adhesive small bowel obstruction. Ileus developed after surgical treatment (laparotomy) of different gynecological diseases. Laparoscopy appeared as the most informative diagnostic method to confirm diagnosis in all patients, to estimate state of abdominal cavity and small pelvis organs what can help to determine method of surgical treatment. Contraindications for laparoscopic surgery were identified in 12 (36.4%) patients and conversion to laparotomy was applied in this group. Postoperative complications were diagnosed in 1 (8.3%) patient. 2 (16.6%) patients died. Early adhesive ileus was resolved laparoscopically in 21 (63.6%) of 33 patients. Recurrent acute early adhesive ileus was detected in 1 (4.7%) patient. PMID:26031952

  7. Evaluation of the motion of surgical instruments during intraocular surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hubschman, J-P; Son, J; Allen, B; Schwartz, S D; Bourges, J-L

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Robot assistance in ocular microsurgery could improve precision, dexterity, save time or prevent complications by task automation, and provide access to ocular surgery in undeserved countries by teleoperation. However, to design robotic devices, the range of motion of surgical instruments needs to be precisely quantified. Methods An electromagnetic tracking system was developed for intraocular surgery in order to quantify the movements of ophthalmic surgeons. Kinematics of surgical steps during phacoemulsification and pars plana vitrectomy procedures were determined by measuring the maximum translation and angular range of motion of intraocular surgical tools in the three planes. Conclusion Important variations in amplitudes of rotation and translation were measured between both hands and between surgical tasks. These parameters may be used to develop a robotic intraocular surgical system or to improve training. PMID:21527954

  8. Current Management of Surgical Oncologic Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Bosscher, Marianne R. F.; van Leeuwen, Barbara L.; Hoekstra, Harald J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives For some oncologic emergencies, surgical interventions are necessary for dissolution or temporary relieve. In the absence of guidelines, the most optimal method for decision making would be in a multidisciplinary cancer conference (MCC). In an acute setting, the opportunity for multidisciplinary discussion is often not available. In this study, the management and short term outcome of patients after surgical oncologic emergency consultation was analyzed. Method A prospective registration and follow up of adult patients with surgical oncologic emergencies between 01-11-2013 and 30-04-2014. The follow up period was 30 days. Results In total, 207 patients with surgical oncologic emergencies were included. Postoperative wound infections, malignant obstruction, and clinical deterioration due to progressive disease were the most frequent conditions for surgical oncologic emergency consultation. During the follow up period, 40% of patients underwent surgery. The median number of involved medical specialties was two. Only 30% of all patients were discussed in a MCC within 30 days after emergency consultation, and only 41% of the patients who underwent surgery were discussed in a MCC. For 79% of these patients, the surgical procedure was performed before the MCC. Mortality within 30 days was 13%. Conclusion In most cases, surgery occurred without discussing the patient in a MCC, regardless of the fact that multiple medical specialties were involved in the treatment process. There is a need for prognostic aids and acute oncology pathways with structural multidisciplinary management. These will provide in faster institution of the most appropriate personalized cancer care, and prevent unnecessary investigations or invasive therapy. PMID:25933135

  9. Cranioplasty Results after Application of Anti-adhesive Films (OrthoWrap™) in Traumatic Decompressive Craniectomy

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Hosseinali; Omidvar, Aydin; Ghaffarpasand, Fariborz; Yadollahikhales, Golnaz

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of application of anti-adhesive films (OrthoWrap™) in traumatic decompressive craniectomy on prevention of adhesion formation and facilitation of subsequent cranioplasty. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study being performed in ShahidRajaei hospital (Shiraz Level I trauma center) during a 12-month period (from March 2012 to April 2013) including 93 patients undergoing traumatic decompressivecraniectomy.Patients who received OrthoWrap™ during the initial craniectomy (n=44) were compared to those who did not (n=49). Two study groups were matched regarding the baseline characteristics. The perioperative indices including the surgical time, amount of bleeding, transfusion and 6-month Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) were compared between two study groups. Results: There was no significant difference between two study groups regarding the baseline characteristics. We found that the cranioplasty duration (113.3±33.2 vs. 146.9±34.9 minutes; p<0.001) and amount of intraoperative bleeding (182.1±98.3 vs. 270.6±77.6 mL; p=0.043) was significantly lower in those who had OrthoWrap™ compared to control group. The final GCS (p=0.052) as well as GOSE (p=0.653) was comparable between groups. The infection rate was comparable between two study groups (p=0.263). Conclusion: Application of OrthoWrap™ during decompressive craniectomy in those with severe traumatic brain injury is associated with shorter duration of operation and less intraoperative bleeding in subsequent cranioplasty. Infection rate and neurologic outcome was comparable between study groups. PMID:27162923

  10. A new adhesive technique for internal fixation in midfacial surgery

    PubMed Central

    Endres, Kira; Marx, Rudolf; Tinschert, Joachim; Wirtz, Dieter Christian; Stoll, Christian; Riediger, Dieter; Smeets, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    Background The current surgical therapy of midfacial fractures involves internal fixation in which bone fragments are fixed in their anatomical positions with osteosynthesis plates and corresponding screws until bone healing is complete. This often causes new fractures to fragile bones while drilling pilot holes or trying to insert screws. The adhesive fixation of osteosynthesis plates using PMMA bone cement could offer a viable alternative for fixing the plates without screws. In order to achieve the adhesive bonding of bone cement to cortical bone in the viscerocranium, an amphiphilic bone bonding agent was created, analogous to the dentin bonding agents currently on the market. Methods The adhesive bonding strengths were measured using tension tests. For this, metal plates with 2.0 mm diameter screw holes were cemented with PMMA bone cement to cortical bovine bone samples from the femur diaphysis. The bone was conditioned with an amphiphilic bone bonding agent prior to cementing. The samples were stored for 1 to 42 days at 37 degrees C, either moist or completely submerged in an isotonic NaCl-solution, and then subjected to the tension tests. Results Without the bone bonding agent, the bonding strength was close to zero (0.2 MPa). Primary stability with bone bonding agent is considered to be at ca. 8 MPa. Moist storage over 42 days resulted in decreased adhesion forces of ca. 6 MPa. Wet storage resulted in relatively constant bonding strengths of ca. 8 MPa. Conclusion A new amphiphilic bone bonding agent was developed, which builds an optimizied interlayer between the hydrophilic bone surface and the hydrophobic PMMA bone cement and thus leads to adhesive bonding between them. Our in vitro investigations demonstrated the adhesive bonding of PMMA bone cement to cortical bone, which was also stable against hydrolysis. The newly developed adhesive fixing technique could be applied clinically when the fixation of osteosynthesis plates with screws is impossible. With

  11. Wet Adhesion and Adhesive Locomotion of Snails on Anti-Adhesive Non-Wetting Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J.; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces. PMID:22693563

  12. Solvent-based to waterbased adhesive-coated substrate retrofit. Volume 4. Film and label manufacturing case study, Flexcon Company, Incorporated. Final report, November 1992-June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    McMinn, B.W.; Snow, W.S.; Bowman, D.T.

    1995-12-01

    This volume discusses a visit to a site operated by Flexcon Company Incorporated, a pressure-sensitive adhesive coater, to collect information on the pollution prevention opportunities and barriers associated with waterbased adhesives. Chapter 2 includes the market profile and overall plant description. Chapter 3 provides a general process description. Chapter 4 discusses environmental issues associated with process conversion. Chapter 5 describes Flexcon`s waterbased adhesive formulation experience. Chapter 6 identifies the opportunities for future use waterbased and other adhesives at Flexcon.

  13. Marine Bioinspired Underwater Contact Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Sean K; Sodano, Antonio; Cunningham, Dylan J; Huang, Sharon S; Zalicki, Piotr J; Shin, Seunghan; Ahn, B Kollbe

    2016-05-01

    Marine mussels and barnacles are sessile biofouling organisms that adhere to a number of surfaces in wet environments and maintain remarkably strong bonds. Previous synthetic approaches to mimic biological wet adhesive properties have focused mainly on the catechol moiety, present in mussel foot proteins (mfps), and especially rich in the interfacial mfps, for example, mfp-3 and -5, found at the interface between the mussel plaque and substrate. Barnacles, however, do not use Dopa for their wet adhesion, but are instead rich in noncatecholic aromatic residues. Due to this anomaly, we were intrigued to study the initial contact adhesion properties of copolymerized acrylate films containing the key functionalities of barnacle cement proteins and interfacial mfps, for example, aromatic (catecholic or noncatecholic), cationic, anionic, and nonpolar residues. The initial wet contact adhesion of the copolymers was measured using a probe tack testing apparatus with a flat-punch contact geometry. The wet contact adhesion of an optimized, bioinspired copolymer film was ∼15.0 N/cm(2) in deionized water and ∼9.0 N/cm(2) in artificial seawater, up to 150 times greater than commercial pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tapes (∼0.1 N/cm(2)). Furthermore, maximum wet contact adhesion was obtained at ∼pH 7, suggesting viability for biomedical applications. PMID:27046671

  14. Adhesion molecules in cutaneous inflammation.

    PubMed

    Barker, J N

    1995-01-01

    As in other organs, leukocyte adhesion molecules and their ligands play a major role in cutaneous inflammatory events both by directing leukocyte trafficking and by their effects on antigen presentation. Skin biopsies of inflamed skin from patients with diseases such as as psoriasis or atopic dermatitis reveal up-regulation of endothelial cell expression of P- and E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1. Studies of evolving lesions following UVB irradiation, Mantoux reaction or application of contact allergen, demonstrate that expression of these adhesion molecules parallels leukocyte infiltration into skin. When cutaneous inflammation is widespread (e.g. in erythroderma), soluble forms of these molecules are detectable in serum. In vitro studies predict that peptide mediators are important regulatory factors for endothelial adhesion molecules. Intradermal injection of the cytokines interleukin 1, tumour necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma into normal human skin leads to induction of endothelial adhesion molecules with concomitant infiltration of leukocytes. In addition, neuropeptides rapidly induce P-selectin translocation to the cell membrane and expression of E-selectin. Adhesion molecules also play a crucial role as accessory molecules in the presentation of antigen to T lymphocytes by Langerhans' cells. Expression of selectin ligands by Langerhans' cells is up-regulated by various inflammatory stimuli, suggesting that adhesion molecules may be important in Langerhans' cell migration. The skin, because of its accessibility, is an ideal organ in which to study expression of adhesion molecules and their relationship to inflammatory events. Inflammatory skin diseases are common and inhibition of lymphocyte accumulation in skin is likely to prove of great therapeutic benefit. PMID:7587640

  15. Focal adhesion kinases in adhesion structures and disease.

    PubMed

    Eleniste, Pierre P; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases. PMID:22888421

  16. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Eleniste, Pierre P.; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases. PMID:22888421

  17. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K.

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions were performed using a surgical cut-and-sew approach that ensured transmurality. The Cox-Maze IV is the most currently accepted iteration. It achieves the same lesion set of the Cox- maze III but uses alternative energy sources to create the transmural lesions, potentially in a minimally invasive approach on the beating heart. High-frequency ultrasound, microwave, and laser energy have all been used with varying success in the past. Today, bipolar radiofrequency heat or cryotherapy cooling are the most accepted sources for creating linear lesions with consistent safety and transmurality. The robust and reliable nature of these energy delivery methods has yielded a success rate reaching 90% freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12 months. Such approaches offer a significant long-term advantage over catheter-based ablation, especially in patients having longstanding, persistent atrial fibrillation with characteristics such as dilated left atrial dimensions, poor ejection fraction, and failed catheter ablation. Based on these improved results, there currently is significant interest in developing a hybrid ablation strategy that incorporates the superior transmural robust lesions of surgical ablation, the reliable stroke prevention potential of epicardial left atrial appendage exclusion, and sophisticated mapping and confirmatory catheter-based ablation technology. Such a minimally invasive hybrid strategy for ablation may lead to the development of multidisciplinary “Afib teams

  18. Spacecraft surgical scrub system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbate, M.

    1980-01-01

    Ease of handling and control in zero gravity and minimizing the quantity of water required were prime considerations. The program tasks include the selection of biocidal agent from among the variety used for surgical scrub, formulation of a dispensing system, test, and delivery of flight dispensers. The choice of an iodophore was based on effectiveness on single applications, general familiarity among surgeons, and previous qualification for space use. The delivery system was a choice between the squeeze foamer system and impregnated polyurethane foam pads. The impregnated foam pad was recommended because it is a simpler system since the squeeze foamer requires some applicator to effectively clean the skin surfaces, whereas the form pad is the applicator and agent combined. Testing demonstrated that both systems are effective for use as surgical scrubs.

  19. Postthrombotic Syndrome: Surgical Possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Ajay K.; Singh, Shivanshu

    2012-01-01

    Postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) is a late outcome of deep vein thrombosis characterized by cramping pain, swelling, hyperpigmentation, eczema, lipodermatosclerosis, and ulceration in the leg due to increased venous outflow resistance and reflux venous flow. Newer surgical and endovascular interventions have a promising result in the management of postthrombotic syndrome. Early surgical or endovascular interventions in appropriately selected patients may decrease the incidence of recurrent ulceration and skin changes and provide a better quality of life. Duplex and IVUS (intravenous ultrasound) along with venography serve as cornerstone investigative tools for assessment of reflux and obstruction. Venous obstruction, if present, should be addressed earlier than reflux. It requires endovenous stenting, endophlebectomy, or open bypass procedures. Venous stripping, foam sclerotherapy, radiofrequency, or laser ablation are used to abolish superficial venous reflux. Valvuloplasty procedures are useful for incompetent but intact deep venous valves, while transposition or axillary vein autotransplantation is done for completely destroyed valves. PMID:22084674

  20. Mentoring in surgical training.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Prem; Narra, Maruthi; Woo, Henry

    2015-04-01

    Surgical mentors have helped trainees develop fulfilling and academically productive careers, while supervisors are formally assigned to impart skills and oversee training. This paper reviews the comparative roles of the supervisor and mentor and how they overlap, while exploring the impact of the 'unknown' mentor. While the supervisor's role in directing the student is formally recognized, the mentee will personally select a mentor who successfully models the career and life balance to which the mentee aspires. The unknown mentor is known only to the mentee. The mentee's commitment to communicating with both mentor and supervisor is crucial to success. Better processes can be used to guide the mentor relationship. Confusion between the two roles - mentor and supervisor - is due to their complementary nature as well as an overlap in roles. Both remain essential to the growth and development of the surgical trainee. The unknown mentor could give detached advice and guidance to the student, while acting as a positive role model. PMID:25649003

  1. Interfacial adhesion of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, Willard D.

    1987-01-01

    Relative adhesion strengths between AS4, AS1, and XAS carbon fibers and thermoplastic polymers were determined using the embedded single filament test. Polymers studied included polycarbonate, polyphenylene oxide, polyetherimide, polysulfone, polyphenylene oxide blends with polystyrene, and polycarbonate blends with a polycarbonate polysiloxane block copolymer. Fiber surface treatments and sizings improved adhesion somewhat, but adhesion remained well below levels obtained with epoxy matrices. An explanation for the differences between the Hercules and Grafil fibers was sought using X ray photon spectroscopy, wetting, scanning electron microscopy and thermal desorption analysis.

  2. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  3. Photovoltaic module with adhesion promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, Grace

    2013-10-08

    Photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters and methods for fabricating photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters are described. A photovoltaic module includes a solar cell including a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a plurality of interspaced back-side contacts. A first glass layer is coupled to the first surface by a first encapsulating layer. A second glass layer is coupled to the second surface by a second encapsulating layer. At least a portion of the second encapsulating layer is bonded directly to the plurality of interspaced back-side contacts by an adhesion promoter.

  4. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  5. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Susan; Wang, Donghai; Zhong, Zhikai; Yang, Guang

    2008-08-26

    The, present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  6. Wear mechanism based on adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    Various concepts concerning wear mechanisms and deformation behavior observed in the sliding wear track are surveyed. The mechanisms for wear fragment formation is discussed on the basis of adhesion. The wear process under unlubricated sliding conditions is explained in relation to the concept of adhesion at the interface during the sliding process. The mechanism for tearing away the surface layer from the contact area and forming the sliding track contour is explained by assuming the simplified process of material removal based on the adhesion theory.

  7. Advances in light curing adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Andy

    2001-11-01

    This paper describes the development of a new family of light curing adhesives containing a new reactive additive previously not used in optical grade light curing adhesives are obtained with the addition of functionalized cellulositics. Outgassing as low as 10-6 grams/gram has been observed based on headspace sampling. Other additives have lowered the shrinkage rates of positioning adhesives from near 1 percent to less than 0.1 percent with fractional, percentage movements over thermal range of -40 degrees C to +200 degrees C.

  8. Liquid Adhesive Contact Dermatitis After Bunionectomy: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hood, Christopher R; Cornell, Rhonda S; Greenfield, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to the skin adherents used in postoperative dressings are an uncommon but unfavorable complication that can result in poor wound healing, increased scarring, and surgical wound infections. This unexpected and unforeseen complication is not well documented in the current published data. We present the case of a 39-year-old female who had undergone a bunionectomy procedure and developed allergic contact dermatitis postoperatively. We discuss the clinical findings and treatments administered after application of a commonly used liquid skin adhesive applied intraoperatively. Through the use of topical and oral steroids and foot soaks in astringent solutions, over the course of several months, the patient's skin returned to the expected postoperative appearance. With the increased consciousness to minimize surgical scarring to improve cosmesis, one of these causes of the reaction might have been the liquid adhesive used in the surgical closure and dressing application. Therefore, we additionally reviewed the adhesive compound's chemical makeup and any potential cross-reactivity to help surgeons make an informed decision of whether to use a liquid adhesive. The various ingredients in liquid adhesives contain known allergen compounds that can cause a reaction, such as balsam of Peru and colophony or rosin, both of which are reviewed in our report. We also present a treatment algorithm developed from the compiled data in the case of a patient developing an allergic reaction. From our literature review and considering the percentage of incidence, if a surgeon desires to use a liquid adhesive product, Mastisol(®) should be chosen because of its lower reactivity and greater adhesive properties compared with the compound tincture of benzoin. PMID:26472569

  9. Open re-rupture of the Achilles tendon after surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Mitsuru; Takahashi, Masaaki; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2011-09-28

    The rate of re-rupture of Achilles tendon after surgical treatment were reported to 1.7-5.6% previously. Re-rupture of Achilles tendon generally occurs subcutaneously. We experienced two rare cases of the open re-ruptures of Achilles tendon with a transverse wound perpendicular to the primary surgical incision. Re-rupture occurred 4 and 13 weeks after surgical treatment. We suggest that open re-rupture correlates more closely with skin scaring and shortening. Another factor may be adhesion between the subcutaneous scar and the suture of the paratenon and Achilles tendon with post-operative immobilization. PMID:24765375

  10. Open re-rupture of the Achilles tendon after surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hanada, Mitsuru; Takahashi, Masaaki; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2011-01-01

    The rate of re-rupture of Achilles tendon after surgical treatment were reported to 1.7–5.6% previously. Re-rupture of Achilles tendon generally occurs subcutaneously. We experienced two rare cases of the open re-ruptures of Achilles tendon with a transverse wound perpendicular to the primary surgical incision. Re-rupture occurred 4 and 13 weeks after surgical treatment. We suggest that open re-rupture correlates more closely with skin scaring and shortening. Another factor may be adhesion between the subcutaneous scar and the suture of the paratenon and Achilles tendon with post-operative immobilization. PMID:24765375

  11. Immune T lymphocyte to tumor cell adhesion. Magnesium sufficient, calcium insufficient

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The prelytic adhesion of immune cytolytic thymus-derived lymphocytes to specific antigen-bearing ascites tumor target cells has been studied. A new assay was used in which adhesions are permitted to form for 2.5 min; the cells are then dispersed to prevent further adhesion, and the predispersion adhesions are quantitated by subsequent 51Cr release from the tumor cells as a result of cytolytic activity of the adhering lymphocytes. There were the following new findings: (a) magnesium is sufficient to support optimal adhesion formation even when EGTA is added to remove contaminating traces of calcium; (b) calcium supports no adhesion formation when traces of contaminating magnesium are removed by pretreating the medium with a chelating ion exchange resin; (c) calcium synergizes with suboptimal magnesium, increasing the apparent adhesion-supporting potency of magnesium 20-fold in the presence of 50 microM calcium; (d) in the presence of optimal magnesium (2--4 mM), calcium has not effect on the properties of the adhesion by any of six criteria; and (e) manganese supports adhesion better than magnesium, and strontium is ineffective. A survey of previous literature indicates that these results are remarkably similar to the predominant pattern for nonimmunologic cell adhesion (e.g., fibroblasts) involving cells from a variety of tissues in late embryonic and adult avians and mammals. This suggests that a "magnesium sufficient, calcium insufficient" mechanism may be found among the latter types of cell adhesions when appropriately examined. Moreover, it seems that the present lymphocyte-tumor cell adhesion, although evoked by specific receptor-antigen recognition, relies predominantly on mechanisms common to nonimmunologic intercellular adhesion processes. PMID:6766945

  12. Guideline implementation: Surgical attire.

    PubMed

    Cowperthwaite, Liz; Holm, Rebecca L

    2015-02-01

    Surgical attire helps protect patients from microorganisms that may be shed from the hair and skin of perioperative personnel. The updated AORN "Guideline for surgical attire" provides guidance on scrub attire, shoes, head coverings, and masks worn in the semirestricted and restricted areas of the perioperative setting, as well as how to handle personal items (eg, jewelry, backpacks, cell phones) that may be taken into the perioperative suite. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel adhere to facility policies and regulatory requirements for attire. The key points address the potential benefits of wearing scrub attire made of antimicrobial fabric, covering the arms when in the restricted area of the surgical suite, removing or confining jewelry when wearing scrub attire, disinfecting personal items that will be taken into the perioperative suite, and sending reusable attire to a health care-accredited laundry facility after use. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. PMID:25645036

  13. Robotic surgical training.

    PubMed

    Ben-Or, Sharon; Nifong, L Wiley; Chitwood, W Randolph

    2013-01-01

    In July 2000, the da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Inc) received Food and Drug Administration approval for intracardiac applications, and the first mitral valve repair was done at the East Carolina Heart Institute in May 2000. The system is now approved and used in many surgical specialties. With this disruptive technology and accepted use, surgeons and hospitals are seeking the most efficacious training pathway leading to safe use and responsible credentialing.One of the most important issues related to safe use is assembling the appropriate team of professionals involved with patient care. Moreover, proper patient selection and setting obtainable goals are also important.Creation and maintenance of a successful program are discussed in the article focusing on realistic goals. This begins with a partnership between surgeon leaders, hospital administrators, and industry support. Through this partnership, an appropriate training pathway and clinical pathway for success can be outlined. A timeline can then be created with periods of data analysis and adjustments as necessary. A successful program is attainable by following this pathway and attending to every detail along the journey. PMID:23528718

  14. Allergy to Surgical Implants.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Karin A

    2015-01-01

    Surgical implants have a wide array of therapeutic uses, most commonly in joint replacements, but also in repair of pes excavatum and spinal disorders, in cardiac devices (stents, patches, pacers, valves), in gynecological implants, and in dentistry. Many of the metals used are immunologically active, as are the methacrylates and epoxies used in conjunction with several of these devices. Allergic responses to surgical components can present atypically as failure of the device, with nonspecific symptoms of localized pain, swelling, warmth, loosening, instability, itching, or burning; localized rash is infrequent. Identification of the specific metal and cement components used in a particular implant can be difficult, but is crucial to guide testing and interpretation of results. Nickel, cobalt, and chromium remain the most common metals implicated in implant failure due to metal sensitization; methacrylate-based cements are also important contributors. This review will provide a guide on how to assess and interpret the clinical history, identify the components used in surgery, test for sensitization, and provide advice on possible solutions. Data on the pathways of metal-induced immune stimulation are included. In this setting, the allergist, the dermatologist, or both have the potential to significantly improve surgical outcomes and patient care. PMID:26362550

  15. Random pinning limits the size of membrane adhesion domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, Thomas; Vink, Richard L. C.

    2012-09-01

    Theoretical models describing specific adhesion of membranes predict (for certain parameters) a macroscopic phase separation of bonds into adhesion domains. We show that this behavior is fundamentally altered if the membrane is pinned randomly due to, e.g., proteins that anchor the membrane to the cytoskeleton. Perturbations which locally restrict membrane height fluctuations induce quenched disorder of the random-field type. This rigorously prevents the formation of macroscopic adhesion domains following the Imry-Ma argument [Imry and Ma, Phys. Rev. Lett.10.1103/PhysRevLett.35.1399 35, 1399 (1975)]. Our prediction of random-field disorder follows from analytical calculations and is strikingly confirmed in large-scale Monte Carlo simulations. These simulations are based on an efficient composite Monte Carlo move, whereby membrane height and bond degrees of freedom are updated simultaneously in a single move. The application of this move should prove rewarding for other systems also.

  16. [Retention of adhesive bridges].

    PubMed

    Raes, F; De Boever, J

    1990-01-01

    Since the development of adhesive bridges in the early seventies, the retention and therefore the durability of these bridges has been tremendously improved. To ensure an adequate retention over a number of years different factors have to be considered. Conditioning of the non-precious metal by silanisation, careful acid etching of the enamel and the use of the appropriate composite resin (Panavia Ex) are of prime importance. Furthermore, the meticulous preparation with enough interproximal embrace, occlusal rets, interocclusal clearance of 0.4 mm and cingulum stops is equally important. Care should be taken not to remove all the enamel in the cervical region in preparing a mini chamfer. Including more teeth in the design does not necessarily lead to an improved retention. Teeth with a different mobility should not be included in the same bridge. Besides the material and technical aspects, the whole clinical procedure needs much attention. Only an exact impression, a precise model and a reliable casting technique will provide a metal frame with an optimal marginal adaptation and a close fit. The retention does not depend on one single factor but on the precision of all the necessary clinical steps and on a well-defined selection of the material. In this way a five-year survival rate of close to 90% can be obtained. PMID:2077574

  17. Compressive Cervicothoracic Adhesive Arachnoiditis following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Rahmathulla, Gazanfar; Kamian, Kambiz

    2014-08-01

    We present the case of a 55-year-old woman with diffuse adhesive arachnoiditis in the posterior fossa and cervicothoracic spine following posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). She underwent aneurysm clipping with subsequent gradual neurologic decline associated with sensory disturbances, gait ataxia, and spastic paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse adhesive arachnoiditis in the posterior fossa and cervicothoracic spine, syringobulbia, and multiple arachnoid cysts in the cervicothoracic spine along with syringohydromyelia. Early surgical intervention with microlysis of the adhesions and duraplasty at the clinically relevant levels resulted in clinical improvement. Although adhesive arachnoiditis, secondary arachnoid cysts, and cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities resulting in syrinx are rare following aneurysmal SAH, early recognition and appropriate intervention lead to good clinical outcomes. PMID:25083391

  18. Bovicin HC5 and nisin reduce Staphylococcus aureus adhesion to polystyrene and change the hydrophobicity profile and Gibbs free energy of adhesion.

    PubMed

    Pimentel-Filho, Natan de Jesus; Martins, Mayra Carla de Freitas; Nogueira, Guilherme Bicalho; Mantovani, Hilário Cuquetto; Vanetti, Maria Cristina Dantas

    2014-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen often multidrug-resistant that not only causes a variety of human diseases, but also is able to survive on biotic and abiotic surfaces through biofilm communities. The best way to inhibit biofilm establishment is to prevent cell adhesion. In the present study, subinhibitory concentrations of the bacteriocins bovicin HC5 and nisin were tested for their capability to interfere with the adhesion of S. aureus to polystyrene. Subinhibitory dosages of the bacteriocins reduced cell adhesion and this occurred probably due to changes in the hydrophobicity of the bacterial cell and polystyrene surfaces. After treatment with bovicin HC5 and nisin, the surfaces became more hydrophilic and the free energy of adhesion (∆G(adhesion)) between bacteria and the polystyrene surface was unfavorable. The transcriptional level of selected genes was assessed by RT-qPCR approach, revealing that the bacteriocins affected the expression of some important biofilm associated genes (icaD, fnbA, and clfB) and rnaIII, which is involved in the quorum sensing mechanism. The conditioning of food-contact surfaces with bacteriocins can be an innovative and powerful strategy to prevent biofilms in the food industry. The results are relevant for food safety as they indicate that bovicin HC5 and nisin can inhibit bacterial adhesion and consequent biofilm establishment, since cell adhesion precedes biofilm formation. PMID:25173449

  19. Seafood delicacy makes great adhesive

    ScienceCinema

    Idaho National Laboratory - Frank Roberto, Heather Silverman

    2010-01-08

    Technology from Mother Nature is often hard to beat, so Idaho National Laboratory scientistsgenetically analyzed the adhesive proteins produced by blue mussels, a seafood delicacy. Afterobtaining full-length DNA sequences encoding these proteins, reprod

  20. Seafood delicacy makes great adhesive

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho National Laboratory - Frank Roberto, Heather Silverman

    2008-03-26

    Technology from Mother Nature is often hard to beat, so Idaho National Laboratory scientistsgenetically analyzed the adhesive proteins produced by blue mussels, a seafood delicacy. Afterobtaining full-length DNA sequences encoding these proteins, reprod

  1. Clinical, functional, and surgical findings in chronic bilateral otitis media with effusion in childhood.

    PubMed

    Diacova, Svetlana; McDonald, Thomas J; Ababii, Ion

    2016-08-01

    We conducted a prospective, observational study over a 3-year period to compare the clinical, functional, and surgical findings in children with chronic bilateral otitis media with effusion who underwent one of three different types of treatment. Our study population was made up of 150 patients-79 boys and 71 girls aged 24 to 84 months-who were randomly assigned to one of the three treatment groups of 50 patients each. One group was treated with myringotomy, tympanostomy tube insertion, and adenoidectomy (T+A group); another with a combination of physical conservative treatment and adenoidectomy (P+A group); and the third with physical conservative treatment alone (P-only group). Hearing levels and tympanogram trends were evaluated during a follow-up of 12 months. In the T+A group, we noted a stable normalization of hearing in 95 of the 100 ears. Treatment with the P+A combination resulted in an improvement of hearing in 79 ears, but the improvement was maintained in only 27 ears during 12 months of follow-up. In the group with the P-only regimen, an amelioration of hearing was registered in 76 ears, but it was unstable in all cases. A type A tympanogram was maintained during the follow-up period for 2 ears in the P+A group and for 4 ears in the P-only group. Myringotomy with a detailed examination of the tympanic cavity in all ears with prolonged abnormal audiologic results revealed that types C and B tympanograms, which were found in most ears in the P+A and P-only groups, corresponded to middle ear chronic inflammatory changes (retraction pockets, granulations, adhesions, etc.) Based on our findings, we conclude that the use of a physical conservative treatment with or without an adenoidectomy does not prevent the development of chronic adhesive and purulent otitis media. PMID:27551851

  2. Novel protein-repellent dental adhesive containing 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Melo, Mary Anne S.; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Biofilms at tooth-restoration margins can produce acids and cause secondary caries. A protein-repellent adhesive resin can potentially inhibition bacteria attachment and biofilm growth. However, there has been no report on protein-repellent dental resins. The objectives of this study were to develop a protein-repellent bonding agent incorporating 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), and to investigate its resistance to protein adsorption and biofilm growth for the first time. Methods MPC was incorporated into Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) at 0%, 3.75%, 7.5%, 11.25%, and 15% by mass. Extracted human teeth were used to measure dentin shear bond strengths. Protein adsorption onto resins was determined by a micro bicinchoninic acid (BCA) method. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to measure biofilm metabolic activity and colony-forming unit (CFU) counts. Results Adding 7.5% MPC into primer and adhesive did not decrease the dentin bond strength, compared to control (p > 0.1). Incorporation of 7.5% of MPC achieved the lowest protein adsorption, which was 20-fold less than that of control. Incorporation of 7.5% of MPC greatly reduced bacterial adhesion, yielding biofilm total microorganism, total streptococci, and mutans streptococci CFU that were an order of magnitude less than control. Conclusions A protein-repellent dental adhesive resin was developed for the first time. Incorporation of MPC into primer and adhesive at 7.5% by mass greatly reduced the protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion, without compromising the dentin bond strength. The novel protein-repellent primer and adhesive are promising to inhibit biofilm formation and acid production, to protect the tooth-restoration margins and prevent secondary caries. PMID:25234652

  3. Suppression of Surgeons' Bacterial Hand Flora during Surgical Procedures with a New Antimicrobial Surgical Glove

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Axel; Ouriel, Kenneth; Suchomel, Miranda; McLaws, Mary-Louise; Rottman, Martin; Leaper, David; Assadian, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Perforations of surgical gloves are common and increase with the duration of glove wear. Skin flora, re-grown after pre-operative disinfection of the hands, may contaminate a surgical site. An antimicrobial surgical glove with chlorhexidine on its inner surface has been developed. We hypothesized that by suppressing the re-growth of skin flora during the complete course of a surgical procedure, antimicrobial gloves may reduce the risk of surgical site contamination in the event of an intra-operative glove breach. Methods: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, single-center trial, to measure any differences in the bacterial skin populations of surgeons' hands during surgical procedures done with antimicrobial and non-antimicrobial surgical gloves [ISRCTN71391952]. In this study, 25 pairs of gloves were retrieved from 14 surgeons who donned them randomly on their dominant or non-dominant hand. The number of bacteria retrieved from glove fluid was measured and expressed as colony forming units (CFU)/mL. Results: The median cfu/mL of antimicrobial gloves was 0.00 (LQ: 0.00 CFU/mL; UQ: 0.00 cfu/mL), with a mean log10 cfu/mL=0.02 (range: 0.00–0.30). The median CFU/mL of non-antimicrobial gloves was 54.00 (LQ: 3.00 cfu/mL; UQ: 100.00 cfu/mL) with a mean log10 CFU/mL=1.32 (range: 0.00–2.39). After a mean operating time of 112 min, the difference in the log10 CFU/mL was 1.30 (p<0.001). Conclusions: A new antimicrobial surgical glove suppressed surgeons' hand flora during operative procedures. In the event of a glove breach, the use of such a glove may have the potential to prevent bacterial contamination of a sterile surgical site, thereby decreasing the risk of surgical site infection (SSI) and increasing patient safety. Further clinical studies are needed to confirm this concept. PMID:24116857

  4. Fibrillar Adhesive for Climbing Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamess, Aaron; White, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    A climbing robot needs to use its adhesive patches over and over again as it scales a slope. Replacing the adhesive at each step is generally impractical. If the adhesive or attachment mechanism cannot be used repeatedly, then the robot must carry an extra load of this adhesive to apply a fresh layer with each move. Common failure modes include tearing, contamination by dirt, plastic deformation of fibers, and damage from loading/ unloading. A gecko-like fibrillar adhesive has been developed that has been shown useful for climbing robots, and may later prove useful for grasping, anchoring, and medical applications. The material consists of a hierarchical fibrillar structure that currently contains two levels, but may be extended to three or four levels in continuing work. The contacting level has tens of thousands of microscopic fibers made from a rubberlike material that bend over and create intimate contact with a surface to achieve maximum van der Waals forces. By maximizing the real area of contact that these fibers make and minimizing the bending energy necessary to achieve that contact, the net amount of adhesion has been improved dramatically.

  5. Back to basics: implementing the surgical checklist.

    PubMed

    Spruce, Lisa

    2014-11-01

    Surgery is complex and technically demanding for all team members. Surgical checklists have been implemented with different degrees of success in the perioperative setting. There is a wealth of evidence that they are effective at preventing patient safety events and helping team members master the complexities of modern health care. Implementation is key to successful use of the surgical checklist in all invasive procedural settings. Key strategies for successful checklist implementation include establishing a multidisciplinary team to implement the checklist, involving surgeon leaders, pilot testing the checklist, incorporating feedback from team members to improve the process, recognizing and addressing barriers to implementation, and offering coaching and continuous feedback to team members who use the checklist. Using these strategies will give the perioperative nurse, department leaders, and surgeons the tools to implement a successful checklist. PMID:25443117

  6. Surgical Management of Pediatric Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Hope T.; Kane, Timothy D.

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is common in the pediatric population. Most cases represent physiologic GER and as the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) matures and a solid diet is introduced, many of these patients (>65%) experience spontaneous resolution of symptoms by two years of age. Those who continue to have symptoms and develop complications such as failure to thrive, secondary respiratory disease, and others are classified as having gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Goals of GERD treatment include the resolution of symptoms and prevention of complications. Treatment options to achieve these goals include dietary or behavioral modifications, pharmacologic intervention, and surgical therapy. This paper will review the clinical presentation of GERD and discuss options for surgical management and outcomes in these patients. PMID:23762041

  7. Frog tongue acts as muscle-powered adhesive tape.

    PubMed

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2015-09-01

    Frogs are well known to capture fast-moving prey by flicking their sticky tongues out of the mouth. This tongue projection behaviour happens extremely fast which makes frog tongues a biological high-speed adhesive system. The processes at the interface between tongue and prey, and thus the mechanism of adhesion, however, are completely unknown. Here, we captured the contact mechanics of frog tongues by filming tongue adhesion at 2000 frames per second through an illuminated glass. We found that the tongue rolls over the target during attachment. However, during the pulling phase, the tongue retractor muscle acts perpendicular to the target surface and thus prevents peeling during tongue retraction. When the tongue detaches, mucus fibrils form between the tongue and the target. Fibrils commonly occur in pressure-sensitive adhesives, and thus frog tongues might be a biological analogue to these engineered materials. The fibrils in frog tongues are related to the presence of microscopic papillae on the surface. Together with a layer of nanoscale fibres underneath the tongue epithelium, these surface papillae will make the tongue adaptable to asperities. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, we are able to integrate anatomy and function to explain the processes during adhesion in frog tongues. PMID:26473054

  8. Frog tongue acts as muscle-powered adhesive tape

    PubMed Central

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2015-01-01

    Frogs are well known to capture fast-moving prey by flicking their sticky tongues out of the mouth. This tongue projection behaviour happens extremely fast which makes frog tongues a biological high-speed adhesive system. The processes at the interface between tongue and prey, and thus the mechanism of adhesion, however, are completely unknown. Here, we captured the contact mechanics of frog tongues by filming tongue adhesion at 2000 frames per second through an illuminated glass. We found that the tongue rolls over the target during attachment. However, during the pulling phase, the tongue retractor muscle acts perpendicular to the target surface and thus prevents peeling during tongue retraction. When the tongue detaches, mucus fibrils form between the tongue and the target. Fibrils commonly occur in pressure-sensitive adhesives, and thus frog tongues might be a biological analogue to these engineered materials. The fibrils in frog tongues are related to the presence of microscopic papillae on the surface. Together with a layer of nanoscale fibres underneath the tongue epithelium, these surface papillae will make the tongue adaptable to asperities. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, we are able to integrate anatomy and function to explain the processes during adhesion in frog tongues. PMID:26473054

  9. Apicobasal polarity controls lymphocyte adhesion to hepatic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Reglero-Real, Natalia; Alvarez-Varela, Adrián; Cernuda-Morollón, Eva; Feito, Jorge; Marcos-Ramiro, Beatriz; Fernández-Martín, Laura; Gómez-Lechón, Maria José; Muntané, Jordi; Sandoval, Pilar; Majano, Pedro L; Correas, Isabel; Alonso, Miguel A; Millán, Jaime

    2014-09-25

    Loss of apicobasal polarity is a hallmark of epithelial pathologies. Leukocyte infiltration and crosstalk with dysfunctional epithelial barriers are crucial for the inflammatory response. Here, we show that apicobasal architecture regulates the adhesion between hepatic epithelial cells and lymphocytes. Polarized hepatocytes and epithelium from bile ducts segregate the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) adhesion receptor onto their apical, microvilli-rich membranes, which are less accessible by circulating immune cells. Upon cell depolarization, hepatic ICAM-1 becomes exposed and increases lymphocyte binding. Polarized hepatic cells prevent ICAM-1 exposure to lymphocytes by redirecting basolateral ICAM-1 to apical domains. Loss of ICAM-1 polarity occurs in human inflammatory liver diseases and can be induced by the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). We propose that adhesion receptor polarization is a parenchymal immune checkpoint that allows functional epithelium to hamper leukocyte binding. This contributes to the haptotactic guidance of leukocytes toward neighboring damaged or chronically inflamed epithelial cells that expose their adhesion machinery. PMID:25242329

  10. Enhanced adhesion of diamond coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhido

    Diamond coatings are of interest for a wide range of applications due to the unique properties of crystalline diamond. Many applications require that the coating adhere strongly to metallic substrates which may have a large difference in thermal expansion coefficient with diamond. These substrates may also have undesirable chemical interactions with carbon during the deposition of the coatings. Intermediate layers are a possible solution to both of these problems. Such layers can act as diffusion barriers preventing the deleterious chemical interactions, and may help to accommodate the thermal expansion mismatch strains. Several aspects of these issues are addressed in this work. The mechanics of the interface for a coating-substrate system loaded by thermal expansion mismatch is modeled. Both continuous coatings and coatings containing a through-thickness hole surrounded by an annular delamination crack are examined. Analytic expressions for the stress distribution in the film and in the substrate are derived by representing the thermal expansion mismatch loads as tractions and moments acting along the outer free edge of the specimen and along the tip of the annular crack. The loads near the center hole are found to vary with the size of the delamination crack, and hence constitute a driving force for growth of such a delamination. The strain energy release rate for the growth of the annular crack surrounding the central hole is derived, and expressed in terms of the thermal expansion misfit between film and substrate; their thickness, elastic moduli and Poisson's ratios; and the characteristic dimensions of the film-substrate system. The crack driving force is found to decrease as the delamination crack surrounding the hole propagates, and hence a relationship between crack length and crack driving force is established. The requirements for an effective intermediate layer between diamond films and Fe-group containing substrate materials are described, and two

  11. Investigation of organic adhesives for hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, K. L.; Licari, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    The properties of organic adhesives were investigated to acquire information for a guideline document regarding the selection of adhesives for use in high reliability hybrid microcircuits. Specifically, investigations were made of (1) alternate methods for determining the outgassing of cured adhesives, (2) effects of long term aging at 150 C on the electrical properties of conductive adhesives, (3) effects of shelf life age on adhesive characteristics, (4) bond strengths of electrically conductive adhesives on thick film gold metallization, (5) a copper filled adhesive, (6) effects of products outgassed from cured adhesives on device electrical parameters, (7) metal migration from electrically conductive adhesives, and (8) ionic content of electrically insulative adhesives. The tests performed during these investigations are described, and the results obtained are discussed.

  12. The retained surgical sponge.

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, C W; Friedman, S; Spurling, K P; Slowick, T; Kaiser, H A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. A review was performed to investigate the frequency of occurrence and outcome of patients who have retained surgical sponges. METHODS. Closed case records from the files of the Medical Professional Mutual Insurance Company (ProMutual, Boston, MA) involving a claim of retained surgical sponges were reviewed for a 7-year period. RESULTS. Retained sponges occurred in 40 patients, comprising 48% of all closed claims for retained foreign bodies. A falsely correct sponge count after an abdominal procedure was documented in 76% of these claims. Ten percent of claims involved vaginal deliveries and minor non-body cavity procedures, for which no sponge count was performed. Total indemnity payments were $2,072,319, and defense costs were $572,079. In three cases, the surgeon was deemed responsible by the court despite the nursing staff's admitting liability and evidence presented that the surgeon complied completely with the standard of care. A wide range of indemnity payments was made despite a remarkable similarity of outcome in the patients studied. CONCLUSIONS. Despite the rarity of the reporting of a retained surgical sponge, this occurrence appears to be encountered more commonly than generally is appreciated. Operating teams should ensure that sponges be counted for all vaginal and any incisional procedures at risk for retaining a sponge. In addition, the surgeon should not unquestioningly accept correct count reports, but should develop the habit of performing a brief but thorough routine postprocedure wound/body cavity exploration before wound closure. The strikingly similar outcome for most patients would argue for a standardized indemnity payment being made without the need for adversarial legal procedures. PMID:8678622

  13. Surgical Simulation and Competency.

    PubMed

    Kim-Fine, Shunaha; Brennand, Erin A

    2016-09-01

    Simulation in surgical training is playing an increasingly important role as postgraduate medical education programs navigate an environment of increasing costs of education, increased attention on patient safety, and new duty hour restrictions. In obstetrics and gynecology, simulation has been used to teach many procedures; however, it lacks a standardized curriculum. Several different simulators exist for teaching various routes and aspects of hysterectomy. This article describes how a formal framework of increasing levels of competencies can be applied to simulation in teaching the procedure of hysterectomy. PMID:27521885

  14. Dynamic loading of surgical knots.

    PubMed

    Brouwers, J E; Oosting, H; de Haas, D; Klopper, P J

    1991-12-01

    Lately, many suture materials have been introduced. Their physical characteristics in combination with knots are not well known. In this study, seven knots (square--1=1, 2=1, 2=1-S and 1=1=1--and sliding--SxSxS, S=S parallel S and 1-S parallel S parallel S) made in seven suture materials (plain catgut, Dexon [polyglycolic acid)] Maxon [polyglyconate], PDS [polydiaxone], Vicryl [polyglactine 910], Mersilene [polyester fiber], Prolene [polypropylene] were tested dynamically to ascertain tensile strength. The knots were classified as "predominantly breaking" (PB) and "predominantly slipping" (PS). A new method for statistical analysis, the Kaplan-Meier survival estimate, was introduced. Square knots provided good mechanical results but did not prevent slippage completely. Most sliding knots were weak. The 1=1=1 knot was superior. PS knots (1=1, 2=1, SxSxS and S=S parallel S) were unsuitable for surgical practice in monofilament or coated multifilament suture materials. The classification PB and PS knots gave an easy impression of the knot holding capacities. Application of the Kaplan-Meier estimate resulted in a more realistic analysis than classical methods. PMID:1948600

  15. Plasma polymerization for cell adhesive/anti-adhesive implant coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meichsner, Juergen; Testrich, Holger; Rebl, Henrike; Nebe, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Plasma polymerization of ethylenediamine (C2H8N2, EDA) and perfluoropropane (C3F8, PFP) with admixture of argon and hydrogen, respectively, was studied using an asymmetric 13.56 MHz CCP. The analysis of the plasma chemical gas phase processes for stable molecules revealed consecutive reactions: C2H8N2 consumption, intermediate product NH3, and main final product HCN. In C3F8- H2 plasma the precursor molecule C3F8 and molecular hydrogen are consumed and HF as well as CF4 and C2F6 are found as main gaseous reaction products. The deposited plasma polymer films on the powered electrode are strongly cross-linked due to ion bombardment. The stable plasma polymerized films from EDA are characterized by high content of nitrogen with N/C ratio of about 0.35. The plasma polymerized fluorocarbon film exhibit a reduced F/C ratio of about 1.2. Adhesion tests with human osteoblast cell line MG-63 on coated Ti6Al4V samples (polished) compared with uncoated reference sample yielded both, the enhanced cell adhesion for plasma polymerized EDA and significantly reduced cell adhesion for fluorocarbon coating, respectively. Aging of the plasma polymerized EDA film, in particular due to the reactions with oxygen from air, showed no significant change in the cell adhesion. The fluorocarbon coating with low cell adhesion is of interest for temporary implants. Funded by the Campus PlasmaMed.

  16. Optimizing Adhesive Design by Understanding Compliance.

    PubMed

    King, Daniel R; Crosby, Alfred J

    2015-12-23

    Adhesives have long been designed around a trade-off between adhesive strength and releasability. Geckos are of interest because they are the largest organisms which are able to climb utilizing adhesive toepads, yet can controllably release from surfaces and perform this action over and over again. Attempting to replicate the hierarchical, nanoscopic features which cover their toepads has been the primary focus of the adhesives field until recently. A new approach based on a scaling relation which states that reversible adhesive force capacity scales with (A/C)(1/2), where A is the area of contact and C is the compliance of the adhesive, has enabled the creation of high strength, reversible adhesives without requiring high aspect ratio, fibrillar features. Here we introduce an equation to calculate the compliance of adhesives, and utilize this equation to predict the shear adhesive force capacity of the adhesive based on the material components and geometric properties. Using this equation, we have investigated important geometric parameters which control force capacity and have shown that by controlling adhesive shape, adhesive force capacity can be increased by over 50% without varying pad size. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that compliance of the adhesive far from the interface still influences shear adhesive force capacity. Utilizing this equation will allow for the production of adhesives which are optimized for specific applications in commercial and industrial settings. PMID:26618537

  17. Surgical treatments for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    de l'Escalopier, Nicolas; Anract, Philippe; Biau, David

    2016-06-01

    There are two main surgical treatments for osteoarthritis: conservative treatments, where the damaged cartilage is left in place, and radical treatments, where the cartilage is replaced by an artificial endoprosthesis; this latter procedure is termed joint arthroplasty. These treatments are only offered to symptomatic patients. Arthrodesis is yet another surgical intervention in cases of osteoarthritis. It will sacrifice the joint's articular function and is performed on small osteoarthritic joints, such as wrists and ankles, for instance. Osteoarthritis symptoms are usually the consequence of an imbalance between the load applied to a joint and the surface available to support that load. Therefore, conservative treatments will either tend to decrease the load exerted on the joint, such as in a tibial valgus osteotomy for instance, or to improve the articular surface supporting that load. Sometimes, both can be provided at the same time; the peri-acetabular osteotomy for hip dysplasia is an example of such a procedure. Conservative treatments are usually offered to young patients in order to delay, if not avoid, the need for a joint prosthesis. They are usually performed before osteoarthritis appears or at an early stage. Joint arthroplasties have overwhelmingly excellent functional results and today's research is directed towards providing rapid recovery, very long-term stability, and the assurance of a good functionality in extreme conditions. However, complications with joint arthroplasties can be serious with little, if any, reasonable salvage solution. Therefore, these procedures are offered to patients who have failed adequate medical treatment measures. PMID:27185463

  18. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Tom; Macleod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Williams, Scott; McCoy, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA gripper pad surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and

  19. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, L.; Bryan, T.; Williams, S.; McCoy, B.; MacLeod, T.

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and development

  20. Elastocapilllarity in insect adhesion: the case of beetle adhesive hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gernay, Sophie; Gilet, Tristan; Lambert, Pierre; Federle, Walter

    2014-11-01

    The feet of many insects are covered with dense arrays of hair-like structures called setae. Liquid capillary bridges at the tip of these micrometric structures are responsible for the controlled adhesion of the insect on a large variety of substrates. The resulting adhesion force can exceed several times the body weight of the insect. The high aspect-ratio of setae suggests that flexibility is a key ingredient in this capillary-based adhesion mechanism. There is indeed a strong coupling between their elastic deformation and the shape of the liquid meniscus. In this experimental work, we observe and quantify the local deflection of dock beetle seta tips under perpendicular loading using interference microscopy. Our results are then interpreted in the light of an analytic model of elastocapillarity. This research has been funded by the FRIA/FNRS and the Interuniversity Attraction Poles Programme (IAP 7/38 MicroMAST) initiated by the Belgian Science Policy Office.

  1. Evidence for a material gradient in the adhesive tarsal setae of the ladybird beetle Coccinella septempunctata.

    PubMed

    Peisker, Henrik; Michels, Jan; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2013-01-01

    For an insect to be able to efficiently attach to surfaces, the adhesive pads on the distal parts of its legs must establish large contact areas. In case of hairy adhesive pads this requires flexibility of the contact-forming bristles, called adhesive tarsal setae. However, too flexible setae would have a low mechanical stability resulting in a decreased attachment ability of the pads. Here we show that the adhesive tarsal setae of the ladybird beetle Coccinella septempunctata feature pronounced gradients in the material composition and properties along their length. The Young's modulus ranges from 1.2 MPa at the tips, where we found the incorporation of high proportions of the elastic protein resilin, to 6.8 GPa at the bases of the setae. These gradients likely represent an evolutionary optimization, which increases the performance of the adhesive system by enabling effective adaptation to rough surfaces while simultaneously preventing lateral collapse of the setae. PMID:23552076

  2. Evidence for a material gradient in the adhesive tarsal setae of the ladybird beetle Coccinella septempunctata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peisker, Henrik; Michels, Jan; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2013-04-01

    For an insect to be able to efficiently attach to surfaces, the adhesive pads on the distal parts of its legs must establish large contact areas. In case of hairy adhesive pads this requires flexibility of the contact-forming bristles, called adhesive tarsal setae. However, too flexible setae would have a low mechanical stability resulting in a decreased attachment ability of the pads. Here we show that the adhesive tarsal setae of the ladybird beetle Coccinella septempunctata feature pronounced gradients in the material composition and properties along their length. The Young’s modulus ranges from 1.2 MPa at the tips, where we found the incorporation of high proportions of the elastic protein resilin, to 6.8 GPa at the bases of the setae. These gradients likely represent an evolutionary optimization, which increases the performance of the adhesive system by enabling effective adaptation to rough surfaces while simultaneously preventing lateral collapse of the setae.

  3. Interstitial Ectopic Pregnancy: Conservative Surgical Management

    PubMed Central

    Warda, Hussein; Mamik, Mamta M.; Ashraf, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Interstitial pregnancy is a rare and life-threatening condition. Diagnosis and appropriate management are critical in preventing morbidity and death. Case Description: Four cases of interstitial pregnancy are presented. Diagnostic laparoscopy followed by laparotomy and cornuostomy with removal of products of conception was performed in 1 case. Laparoscopic cornuostomy and removal of products of conception were performed in the subsequent 3 cases with some modifications of the technique. Subsequent successful reproductive outcomes are also presented. Discussion: Progressively conservative surgical measures are being used to treat interstitial pregnancy successfully, with no negative impact on subsequent pregnancies. PMID:24960482

  4. High performance Cu adhesion coating

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.W.; Viehbeck, A.; Chen, W.R.; Ree, M.

    1996-12-31

    Poly(arylene ether benzimidazole) (PAEBI) is a high performance thermoplastic polymer with imidazole functional groups forming the polymer backbone structure. It is proposed that upon coating PAEBI onto a copper surface the imidazole groups of PAEBI form a bond with or chelate to the copper surface resulting in strong adhesion between the copper and polymer. Adhesion of PAEBI to other polymers such as poly(biphenyl dianhydride-p-phenylene diamine) (BPDA-PDA) polyimide is also quite good and stable. The resulting locus of failure as studied by XPS and IR indicates that PAEBI gives strong cohesive adhesion to copper. Due to its good adhesion and mechanical properties, PAEBI can be used in fabricating thin film semiconductor packages such as multichip module dielectric (MCM-D) structures. In these applications, a thin PAEBI coating is applied directly to a wiring layer for enhancing adhesion to both the copper wiring and the polymer dielectric surface. In addition, a thin layer of PAEBI can also function as a protection layer for the copper wiring, eliminating the need for Cr or Ni barrier metallurgies and thus significantly reducing the number of process steps.

  5. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1988-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  6. Flexible backbone aromatic polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St. Clair, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    Continuing research at Langley Research Center on the synthesis and development of new inexpensive flexible aromatic polyimides as adhesives has resulted in a material identified as LARC-F-SO2 with similarities to polyimidesulfone, PISO2, and other flexible backbone polyimides recently reported by Progar and St. Clair. Also prepared and evaluated was an endcapped version of PISO2. These two polymers were compared with LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI, polyimides research in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The adhesive evaluation, primarily based on lap shear strength (LSS) tests at RT, 177 C and 204 C, involved preparing adhesive tapes, conducting bonding studies and exposing lap shear specimens to 204 C air for up to 1000 hrs and to a 72-hour water boil. The type of adhesive failure as well as the Tg was determined for the fractured specimens. The results indicate that LARC-TPI provides the highest LSSs. LARC-F-SO2, LARC-TPI and LARC-STPI all retain their strengths after thermal exposure for 1000 hrs and PISO2 retains greater than 80 percent of its control strengths. After a 72-hr water boil exposure, most of the four adhesive systems showed reduced strengths for all test temperatures although still retaining a high percentage of their original strength (greater than 60 percent) except for one case. The predominant failure type was cohesive with no significant change in the Tgs.

  7. Capillarity-based switchable adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Michael J.; Steen, Paul H.

    2010-01-01

    Drawing inspiration from the adhesion abilities of a leaf beetle found in nature, we have engineered a switchable adhesion device. The device combines two concepts: The surface tension force from a large number of small liquid bridges can be significant (capillarity-based adhesion) and these contacts can be quickly made or broken with electronic control (switchable). The device grabs or releases a substrate in a fraction of a second via a low-voltage pulse that drives electroosmotic flow. Energy consumption is minimal because both the grabbed and released states are stable equilibria that persist with no energy added to the system. Notably, the device maintains the integrity of an array of hundreds to thousands of distinct interfaces during active reconfiguration from droplets to bridges and back, despite the natural tendency of the liquid toward coalescence. We demonstrate the scaling of adhesion strength with the inverse of liquid contact size. This suggests that strengths approaching those of permanent bonding adhesives are possible as feature size is scaled down. In addition, controllability is fast and efficient because the attachment time and required voltage also scale down favorably. The device features compact size, no solid moving parts, and is made of common materials. PMID:20133725

  8. Tranexamic Acid in Anesthetic Management of Surgical Procedures.

    PubMed

    Mayeux, Jessica; Alwon, Kathy; Collins, Shawn; Hewer, Ian

    2016-06-01

    Blood loss during surgical procedures poses a grave risk to the patient, but transfusion is costly and associated with adverse outcomes. Antifibrinolytics, however, offer an economical and effective means of decreasing blood loss associated with surgical procedures. Tranexamic acid (TXA) is an antifibrinolytic that blocks lysine-binding sites of fibrinogen and fibrin, preventing the breakdown of existing clots. This journal course reviews extensive research demonstrating that antifibrinolytics such as TXA decrease blood loss and in some studies reduce allogeneic transfusion requirements. In addition, this journal course addresses concerns that use of antifibrinolytics increases embolic events, reviews research that demonstrates TXA does not increase the incidence of vascular occlusive events, and describes methods of TXA use in cardiac and orthopedic surgical procedures, neurosurgery, and obstetrics. The Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist should consider the possibility, on a case-by-case basis, of using TXA in surgical procedures to reduce blood loss with minimal adverse effects. PMID:27501656

  9. TAPE: A Biodegradable Hemostatic Glue Inspired by a Ubiquitous Compound in Plants for Surgical Application.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keumyeon; Lee, Haeshin; Hong, Seonki

    2016-01-01

    This video describes the simplest protocol for preparing biodegradable surgical glue that has an effective hemostatic ability and greater water-resistant adhesion strength than commercial tissue adhesives. Medical adhesives have attracted great attention as potential alternative tools to sutures and staples due to their convenience in usage with minimal invasiveness. Although there are several protocols for developing tissue adhesives including those commercially available such as fibrin glues and cyanoacrylate-based materials, mostly they require a series of chemical syntheses of organic molecules, or complicated protein-purification methods, in the case of bio-driven materials (i.e., fibrin glue). Also, the development of surgical glues exhibiting high adhesive properties while maintaining biodegradability is still a challenge due to difficulties in achieving good performance in the wet environment of the body. We illustrate a new method to prepare a medical glue, known as TAPE, by the weight-based separation of a water-immiscible supramolecular aggregate formed after a physical mixing of a plant-derived, wet-resistant adhesive molecule, Tannic Acid (TA), and a well-known biopolymer, Poly(Ethylene) glycol (PEG). With our approach, TAPE shows high adhesion strength, which is 2.5-fold more than commercial fibrin glue in the presence of water. Furthermore, TAPE is biodegradable in physiological conditions and can be used as a potent hemostatic glue against tissue bleeding. We expect the widespread use of TAPE in a variety of medical settings and drug delivery applications, such as polymers for muco-adhesion, drug depots, and others. PMID:27341544

  10. Management of surgical instruments with radio frequency identification tags.

    PubMed

    Kusuda, Kaori; Yamashita, Kazuhiko; Ohnishi, Akiko; Tanaka, Kiyohito; Komino, Masaru; Honda, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shinichi; Okubo, Takashi; Tripette, Julien; Ohta, Yuji

    2016-03-14

    Purpose - To prevent malpractices, medical staff has adopted inventory time-outs and/or checklists. Accurate inventory and maintenance of surgical instruments decreases the risk of operating room miscounting and malfunction. In our previous study, an individual management of surgical instruments was accomplished using Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate a new management method of RFID-tagged instruments. Design/methodology/approach - The management system of RFID-tagged surgical instruments was used for 27 months in clinical areas. In total, 13 study participants assembled surgical trays in the central sterile supply department. Findings - While using the management system, trays were assembled 94 times. During this period, no assembly errors occurred. An instrument malfunction had occurred after the 19th, 56th, and 73th uses, no malfunction caused by the RFID tags, and usage history had been recorded. Additionally, the time it took to assemble surgical trays was recorded, and the long-term usability of the management system was evaluated. Originality/value - The system could record the number of uses and the defective history of each surgical instrument. In addition, the history of the frequency of instruments being transferred from one tray to another was recorded. The results suggest that our system can be used to manage instruments safely. Additionally, the management system was acquired of the learning effect and the usability on daily maintenance. This finding suggests that the management system examined here ensures surgical instrument and tray assembly quality. PMID:26959900

  11. Effects of natural antimicrobials on bacterial cell hydrophobicity, adhesion, and zeta potential / Vpliv naravnih protimikrobnih snovi na bakterijsko hidrofobnost, adhezijo in zeta potencial.

    PubMed

    Kurinčič, Marija; Jeršek, Barbara; Klančnik, Anja; Možina, Sonja Smole; Fink, Rok; Dražić, Goran; Raspor, Peter; Bohinc, Klemen

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between bacterial cells and contact materials play an important role in food safety and technology. As bacterial strains become ever more resistant to antibiotics, the aim of this study was to analyse adhesion of selected foodborne bacterial strains on polystyrene surface and to evaluate the effects of natural antimicrobials on bacterial cell hydrophobicity, adhesion, and zeta potential as strategies of adhesion prevention. The results showed strain-specific adhesion rate on polystyrene. The lowest and the highest adhesion were found for two B. cereus lines. Natural antimicrobials ferulic and rosmarinic acid substantially decreased adhesion, whereas the effect of epigallocatechin gallate was neglectful. Similar results were found for the zeta potential, indicating that natural antimicrobials reduce bacterial adhesion. Targeting bacterial adhesion using natural extracts we can eliminate potential infection at an early stage. Future experimental studies should focus on situations that are as close to industrial conditions as possible. PMID:27092638

  12. Use of adhesion-defective mutants of Staphylococcus aureus to define the role of specific plasma proteins in promoting bacterial adhesion to canine arteriovenous shunts.

    PubMed Central

    Vaudaux, P E; François, P; Proctor, R A; McDevitt, D; Foster, T J; Albrecht, R M; Lew, D P; Wabers, H; Cooper, S L

    1995-01-01

    We used an ex vivo canine arteriovenous shunt model, previously developed to study plasma protein adsorption and thrombogenesis on polymeric biomaterials, to define the role of host proteins in promoting adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus. Either polyethylene or polyvinyl chloride tubings were exposed to canine blood for 5, 15, or 60 min at a flow rate of 300 ml/min and then were flushed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), cut into 1.5-cm segments, and stored at -70 degrees C. After thawing, each segment was preincubated in 0.5% albumin in PBS to prevent nonspecific staphylococcal attachment to surfaces that were not exposed to blood. Each segment was then incubated with 4 x 10(6) CFU of [3H]thymidine-labelled S. aureus per ml for 60 min at 37 degrees C in an in vitro adhesion assay. Two site-specific mutants of S. aureus were tested: one specifically defective in adhesion to surface-bound fibronectin (FnAd-def) and the other defective in adhesion to fibrinogen (FgAD-def) [corrected]. Compared with their respective parental strains, the FgAd-def, but not the FnAd-def, mutant of S. aureus showed a strong (> 80%) decrease in attachment to ex vivo tubings. The adhesion of each strain of S. aureus onto polyethylene was consistently more than twofold higher than the adhesion onto polyvinyl chloride segments exposed to flowing blood for 5 or 15 min, but adhesion became similar to that on polyvinyl chloride after 60 min of exposure. In conclusion, the specific adhesion-defective mutants of S. aureus suggested that fibrinogen was the most active adhesion-promoting protein in a short-term blood-material interaction. The experimental approach described in this study should prove useful for screening materials thought to be resistant to protein-mediated staphylococcal adhesion and colonization. PMID:7822026

  13. Intraoperative clinical use of low-power laser irradiation following surgical treatment of the tethered spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochkind, S.; Alon, M.; Ouaknine, G. E.; Weiss, S.; Avram, J.; Razon, Nisim; Lubart, Rachel; Friedmann, Harry

    1991-05-01

    Based on previous experimental investigations which indicated that low-power laser irradiation has a significant therapeutic effect and treatment potential on the injured nerve tissue, the authors began using this method in clinical practice. This data represents the first clinical results in the treatment of four patients with tethered spinal cord resulting from fibrous adhesions at the site of previous myelomeningocele and lypomyelomeningocele repair, thickened filum terminale and spinal lipoma. After surgical release of the tethered spinal cord, stable evoked responses were recorded and the conus medullaris was subjected to direct laser irradiation (CW He-Ne laser, 632.8nm, 7Jcm2). The findings show intraoperative laser treatment increases evoked responses from 15-52% (mean 26.7%). In a previous work, it was shown that direct laser irradiation promotes restoration of the electrophysiological activity of the severely injured peripheral nerve, prevents degenerative changes in neurons of the spinal cord and induces proliferation of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. This suggested a higher metabolism in neurons and improved ability for myelin production under the influence of laser treatment. It is well known that tethering of the spinal cord causes mechanical damage to neuronal cell membranes leading to metabolic disturbances in the neurons. For this reason, the authors believe that using low-power laser irradiation may improve neuronal metabolism, prevent neuronal degeneration and promote improved spinal cord function and repair.

  14. UV curable pressure sensitive adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Glotfelter, C.A.

    1995-12-01

    Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSA`s) have become a ubiquitous element in our society, so much so, that the relative status of a society can be determined by the per capita consumption of PSA`s. We discuss new monomers as components of PSA formulations which enable adhesion to be achieved on a variety of substrates. Since solventless coating systems are desirable, the UV PSA market is of utmost importance to meeting the strict environmental guidelines now being imposed worldwide. In addition, highly ethoxylated monomers have shown promise in water dispersed PSA formulations, and a self-emulsifying acrylate monomer has been developed to offer dispersive abilities without using traditional emulsifying agents. This talk will focus on the effects of the materials described on properties of adhesive strength and shear strength in UV PSA formulations.

  15. A novel addition polyimide adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.; Progar, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    An addition polyimide adhesive, LARC 13, was developed which shows promise for bonding both titanium and composites for applications which require service temperatures in excess of 533 K. The LARC 13 is based on an oligomeric bis nadimide containing a meta linked aromatic diamine. The adhesive melts prior to polymerization due to its oligomeric nature, thereby allowing it to be processed at 344 kPa or less. Therefore, LARC 13 is ideal for the bonding of honeycomb sandwich structures. After melting, the resin thermosets during the cure of the nadic endcaps to a highly crosslinked system. Few volatiles are evolved, thus allowing large enclosed structures to be bonded. Preparation of the adhesive as well as bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear and honeycomb samples are discussed.

  16. Liposome adhesion generates traction stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murrell, Michael P.; Voituriez, Raphaël; Joanny, Jean-François; Nassoy, Pierre; Sykes, Cécile; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2014-02-01

    Mechanical forces generated by cells modulate global shape changes required for essential life processes, such as polarization, division and spreading. Although the contribution of the cytoskeleton to cellular force generation is widely recognized, the role of the membrane is considered to be restricted to passively transmitting forces. Therefore, the mechanisms by which the membrane can directly contribute to cell tension are overlooked and poorly understood. To address this, we directly measure the stresses generated during liposome adhesion. We find that liposome spreading generates large traction stresses on compliant substrates. These stresses can be understood as the equilibration of internal, hydrostatic pressures generated by the enhanced membrane tension built up during adhesion. These results underscore the role of membranes in the generation of mechanical stresses on cellular length scales and that the modulation of hydrostatic pressure due to membrane tension and adhesion can be channelled to perform mechanical work on the environment.

  17. Interfacial adhesion - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Banerjea, Amitava; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along with recommendations for future progress and needs.

  18. Interfacial adhesion: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.; Banerjea, Amitava

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along wiith recommendations for future progress and needs.

  19. Neuronavigation. Principles. Surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Marcel; Ciurea, Alexandru Vlad

    2009-01-01

    Neuronavigation and stereotaxy are techniques designed to help neurosurgeons precisely localize different intracerebral pathological processes by using a set of preoperative images (CT, MRI, fMRI, PET, SPECT etc.). The development of computer assisted surgery was possible only after a significant technological progress, especially in the area of informatics and imagistics. The main indications of neuronavigation are represented by the targeting of small and deep intracerebral lesions and choosing the best way to treat them, in order to preserve the neurological function. Stereotaxis also allows lesioning or stimulation of basal ganglia for the treatment of movement disorders. These techniques can bring an important amount of confort both to the patient and to the neurosurgeon. Neuronavigation was introduced in Romania around 2003, in four neurosurgical centers. We present our five-years experience in neuronavigation and describe the main principles and surgical techniques. PMID:20108488

  20. Some Observations on Veterinary Undergraduate Training in Surgical Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittick, William G.

    1978-01-01

    The undergraduate surgery course of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Universiti Pertanian Malaysia, is described with focus on its experential method of teaching surgical techniques. Also discussed are the benefits of veterinary school cooperation with a large city Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA). (JMD)

  1. Update on medical and surgical gloves.

    PubMed

    Cleenewerck, Marie-Bernadette

    2010-01-01

    Occupational dermatitis to personal protective equipment (PPE), particularly to gloves, mainly occurs in healthcare workers. They are all irritant and/or allergic contact dermatitis (eczema and contact urticaria). Prolonged glove wearing by healthcare workers favours skin irritation of the hands and wrists. It is very important to consider characteristics and materials of gloves used in the medical field. Rubber additives are the main allergens in gloves. Latex or natural rubber remains by far the most frequent cause for occupational contact urticaria from gloves. The problem of prevention of infections risks in the health environment and the choice of medico-surgical gloves is described. In a surgical environment (in ORS), double gloving is recommended. Today, it appears as the best protection, even if in France it is far from being systematically used. Choosing the appropriate medical or surgical gloves requires having sufficient preliminary information on the assets, drawbacks and use limits of each of them. In cases of known contact allergic dermatitis, advice from dermatologists or allergologists is essential when it comes to suggesting substitution gloves. PMID:20522415

  2. Dual-Mode Adhesive Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartz, Leslie

    1994-01-01

    Tool helps worker grip and move along large, smooth structure with no handgrips or footholds. Adheres to surface but easily released by actuating simple mechanism. Includes handle and segmented contact-adhesive pad. Bulk of pad made of soft plastic foam conforming to surface of structure. Each segment reinforced with rib. In sticking mode, ribs braced by side catches. In peeling mode, side catches retracted, and segmented adhesive pad loses its stiffness. Modified versions useful in inspecting hulls of ships and scaling walls in rescue operations.

  3. Adhesive, elastomeric gel impregnating composition

    DOEpatents

    Shaw, David Glenn; Pollard, John Randolph; Brooks, Robert Aubrey

    2002-01-01

    An improved capacitor roll with alternating film and foil layers is impregnated with an adhesive, elastomeric gel composition. The gel composition is a blend of a plasticizer, a polyol, a maleic anhydride that reacts with the polyol to form a polyester, and a catalyst for the reaction. The impregnant composition is introduced to the film and foil layers while still in a liquid form and then pressure is applied to aid with impregnation. The impregnant composition is cured to form the adhesive, elastomeric gel. Pressure is maintained during curing.

  4. Preventing oil adhesion to pipe walls in heavy crude transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Rivero, M.; Guevara, E.; Joseph, D.

    1995-12-31

    During the transportation of heavy, extra heavy, and bitumen with water in carbon steel pipelines, the crude sticks to the internal pipe wall, reducing the flow area and as a consequence increasing the pressure drop in time. The situation may become worse if an unplanned shut down occurs, due to the phase separation by gravity. The problem. is resolved using a cement lined pipeline, with a cement composition that creates a permanent oleophobic and hydrophilic surface. These surfaces repel oil when they are hydrated in water, avoiding the occurrence of fouling at stationary and restart conditions.

  5. Adhesion of Silicone Elastomer Seals for NASA's Crew Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Miller, Sharon K. R.; Smith, Ian M.; Daniels, Christopher C.; Steinetz, Bruce M

    2008-01-01

    Silicone rubber seals are being considered for a number of interfaces on NASA's Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). Some of these joints include the docking system, hatches, and heat shield-to-back shell interface. A large diameter molded silicone seal is being developed for the Low Impact Docking System (LIDS) that forms an effective seal between the CEV and International Space Station (ISS) and other future Constellation Program spacecraft. Seals between the heat shield and back shell prevent high temperature reentry gases from leaking into the interface. Silicone rubber seals being considered for these locations have inherent adhesive tendencies that would result in excessive forces required to separate the joints if left unchecked. This paper summarizes adhesion assessments for both as-received and adhesion-mitigated seals for the docking system and the heat shield interface location. Three silicone elastomers were examined: Parker Hannifin S0899-50 and S0383-70 compounds, and Esterline ELA-SA-401 compound. For the docking system application various levels of exposure to atomic oxygen (AO) were evaluated. Moderate AO treatments did not lower the adhesive properties of S0899-50 sufficiently. However, AO pretreatments of approximately 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm did lower the adhesion of S0383-70 and ELA-SA-401 to acceptable levels. For the heat shield-to-back shell interface application, a fabric covering was also considered. Molding Nomex fabric into the heat shield pressure seal appreciably reduced seal adhesion for the heat shield-to-back shell interface application.

  6. Integrin-dependent force transmission to the extracellular matrix by α-actinin triggers adhesion maturation

    PubMed Central

    Roca-Cusachs, Pere; del Rio, Armando; Puklin-Faucher, Eileen; Gauthier, Nils C.; Biais, Nicolas; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Focal adhesions are mechanosensitive elements that enable mechanical communication between cells and the extracellular matrix. Here, we demonstrate a major mechanosensitive pathway in which α-actinin triggers adhesion maturation by linking integrins to actin in nascent adhesions. We show that depletion of the focal adhesion protein α-actinin enhances force generation in initial adhesions on fibronectin, but impairs mechanotransduction in a subsequent step, preventing adhesion maturation. Expression of an α-actinin fragment containing the integrin binding domain, however, dramatically reduces force generation in depleted cells. This behavior can be explained by a competition between talin (which mediates initial adhesion and force generation) and α-actinin for integrin binding. Indeed, we show in an in vitro assay that talin and α-actinin compete for binding to β3 integrins, but cooperate in binding to β1 integrins. Consistently, we find opposite effects of α-actinin depletion and expression of mutants on substrates that bind β3 integrins (fibronectin and vitronectin) versus substrates that only bind β1 integrins (collagen). We thus suggest that nascent adhesions composed of β3 integrins are initially linked to the actin cytoskeleton by talin, and then α-actinin competes with talin to bind β3 integrins. Force transmitted through α-actinin then triggers adhesion maturation. Once adhesions have matured, α-actinin recruitment correlates with force generation, suggesting that α-actinin is the main link transmitting force between integrins and the cytoskeleton in mature adhesions. Such a multistep process enables cells to adjust forces on matrices, unveiling a role of α-actinin that is different from its well-studied function as an actin cross-linker. PMID:23515331

  7. Brucella abortus Exposure during an Orthopedic Surgical Procedure—New Mexico, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Megin; Thompson, Deborah; Carothers, Joshua T.; Klauber, Judy; Stoddard, Robyn A.; Guerra, Marta A.; Benoit, Tina J.; Traxler, Rita M.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a periprosthetic Brucella abortus infection in a case-patient undergoing hip replacement revision surgery, and the subsequent investigation of laboratory and surgical staff exposures. Although exposures are rare, it is important to have infection prevention recommendations for surgical procedures among patients with suspected or unidentified Brucella spp. infection. PMID:25026630

  8. Training of breast surgical oncologists.

    PubMed

    Teshome, Mediget; Kuerer, Henry M

    2016-06-01

    Breast surgical oncology is a defined sub-specialty of general surgery with focus on the surgical management of breast disease and malignancy within a multidisciplinary context. Much of the training of breast surgical oncologists in the United States exists within a fellowship training structure with oversight and approval by the Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO). Rapid continuous changes in breast oncology practice have further substantiated dedicated expertise in breast surgical oncology. Training programs are structured to develop proficiency in fellows for advanced surgical techniques and clinical decision-making as well as exposure to the multidisciplinary aspects of breast cancer management. Components of a successful program include an intense multidisciplinary curriculum, engagement in clinical research and attention to strong mentorship. National curriculum and training requirements as well as supplemental resources assist in standardizing the fellowship experience. As surgical training and the field of breast oncology continues to evolve, so do fellowship training programs to ensure high quality breast surgical oncologists equipped to deliver high quality evidence based patient care while continuing to drive future research and trainee education. PMID:27197510

  9. Candida biofilms: is adhesion sexy?

    PubMed

    Soll, David R

    2008-08-26

    The development of Candida albicans biofilms requires two types of adhesion molecule - the Als proteins and Hwp1. Mutational analyses have recently revealed that these molecules play complementary roles, and their characteristics suggest that they may have evolved from primitive mating agglutinins. PMID:18727911

  10. Fluorescence Reveals Contamination From Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolia, William

    1992-01-01

    Contamination of nearby surfaces from ingredients in some adhesive materials detected by ultraviolet illumination and observation of resulting fluorescence. Identification of contaminants via telltale fluorescence not new; rather, significance lies in method of implementation and potential extension to wider variety of materials and applications.

  11. New adhesive withstands temperature extremes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. J.; Seidenberg, B.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive, developed for high-temperature components aboard satellites, is useful at both high and low temperatures and exhibits low-vacuum volatility and low shrinkage. System uses polyfunctional epoxy with high aromatic content, low equivalent weight, and more compact polymer than conventional bisphenol A tape.

  12. Computational Chemistry of Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation is intended to determine the electrical mechanical, and chemical properties of adhesive bonds at the molecular level. The initial determinations will be followed by investigations of the effects of environmental effects on the chemistry and properties of the bond layer.

  13. Photoresist substrate having robust adhesion

    DOEpatents

    Dentinger, Paul M.

    2005-07-26

    A substrate material for LIGA applications w hose general composition is Ti/Cu/Ti/SiO.sub.2. The SiO.sub.2 is preferably applied to the Ti/Cu/Ti wafer as a sputtered coating, typically about 100 nm thick. This substrate composition provides improved adhesion for epoxy-based photoresist materials, and particularly the photoresist material SU-8.

  14. Surgical procedures for voice restoration

    PubMed Central

    Nawka, Tadeus; Hosemann, Werner

    2005-01-01

    Surgical procedures for voice restoration serve to improve oral communication by better vocal function. They comprise of phonomicrosurgery, with direct and indirect access to the larynx; laryngoplasty; laryngeal injections; and surgical laryngeal reinnervation. The basis for modern surgical techniques for voice disorders is the knowledge about the ultrastructure of the vocal folds and the increasing experience of surgeons in voice surgery, while facing high social and professional demands on the voice. Vocal activity limitation and participation restriction has become more important in the artistic and social areas. A number of surgical methods that have been developed worldwide for this reason, are presented in this article. Functional oriented surgery has to meet high standards. The diagnostics of vocal function has to be multi-dimensional in order to determine the indication and the appropriate surgical intervention. PMID:22073062

  15. Tackifier Dispersions to Make Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    Development of new processes for tackifier dispersion could improve the production of pressure sensitive adhesives. Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) have the ability to adhere to different surfaces with manual or finger pressure.

  16. Microfluidic adhesion induced by subsurface microstructures.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Abhijit; Ghatak, Animangsu; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2007-10-12

    Natural adhesives in the feet of different arthropods and vertebrates show strong adhesion as well as excellent reusability. Whereas the hierarchical structures on the surface are known to have a substantial effect on adhesion, the role of subsurface structures such as the network of microchannels has not been studied. Inspired by these bioadhesives, we generated elastomeric layers with embedded air- or oil-filled microchannels. These adhesives showed remarkable enhancement of adhesion ( approximately 30 times), which results from the crack-arresting properties of the microchannels, together with the surface stresses caused by the capillary force. The importance of the thickness of the adhesive layer, channel diameter, interchannel spacing, and vertical position within the adhesive has been examined for developing an optimal design of this microfluidic adhesive. PMID:17932295

  17. Alterations in cell adhesion proteins and cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jifen

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesive junction is specialized intercellular structure composed of cell adhesion proteins. They are essential to connect adjacent heart muscle cell and make heart contraction effectively and properly. Clinical and genetic studies have revealed close relationship between cell adhesive proteins and the occurrence of various cardiomyopathies. Here we will review recent development on the disease phenotype, potential cellular and molecular mechanism related to cell adhesion molecules, with particular disease pathogenesis learned from genetic manipulated murine models. PMID:24944760

  18. Therapeutic Targeting of Eosinophil Adhesion and Accumulation in Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Baiula, Monica; Bedini, Andrea; Carbonari, Gioia; Dattoli, Samantha Deianira; Spampinato, Santi

    2012-01-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that eosinophils are important effectors of ocular allergy. Increased worldwide prevalence of allergic eye pathologies has stimulated the identification of novel drug targets, including eosinophils and adhesion molecules. Accumulation of eosinophils in the eye is a key event in the onset and maintenance of allergic inflammation and is mediated by different adhesion molecules. Antihistamines with multiple mechanisms of action can be effective during the early and late phases of allergic conjunctivitis by blocking the interaction between β1 integrins and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1. Small molecule antagonists that target key elements in the process of eosinophil recruitment have been identified and reinforce the validity of α4β1 integrin as a therapeutic target. Glucocorticoids are among the most effective drugs for ocular allergy, but their use is limited by adverse effects. Novel dissociated glucocorticoids can prevent eosinophil accumulation and induce apoptosis of eosinophils, making them promising candidates for ophthalmic drugs. This article reviews recent understanding of the role of adhesion molecules in eosinophil recruitment in the inflamed conjunctiva along with effective treatments for allergic conjunctivitis. PMID:23271999

  19. Platelet adhesion signalling and the regulation of thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Gibbins, Jonathan M

    2004-07-15

    Platelets perform a central role in haemostasis and thrombosis. They adhere to subendothelial collagens exposed at sites of blood vessel injury via the glycoprotein (GP) Ib-V-IX receptor complex, GPVI and integrin alpha(2)beta(1). These receptors perform distinct functions in the regulation of cell signalling involving non-receptor tyrosine kinases (e.g. Src, Fyn, Lyn, Syk and Btk), adaptor proteins, phospholipase C and lipid kinases such as phosphoinositide 3-kinase. They are also coupled to an increase in cytosolic calcium levels and protein kinase C activation, leading to the secretion of paracrine/autocrine platelet factors and an increase in integrin receptor affinities. Through the binding of plasma fibrinogen and von Willebrand Factor to integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3), a platelet thrombus is formed. Although increasing evidence indicates that each of the adhesion receptors GPIb-V-IX and GPVI and integrins alpha(2)beta(1) and alpha(IIb)beta(3) contribute to the signalling that regulates this process, the individual roles of each are only beginning to be dissected. By contrast, adhesion receptor signalling through platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) is implicated in the inhibition of platelet function and thrombus formation in the healthy circulation. Recent studies indicate that understanding of platelet adhesion signalling mechanisms might enable the development of new strategies to treat and prevent thrombosis. PMID:15252124

  20. Tuning hydrophobicity and water adhesion by electrospinning and silanization.

    PubMed

    Pisuchpen, Thanarath; Chaim-ngoen, Navarun; Intasanta, Narupol; Supaphol, Pitt; Hoven, Voravee P

    2011-04-01

    Electrospinning and silanization were synergistically employed to fabricate poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and PVA/silica mixtures into flexible and chemically modifiable nanostructured surfaces with varying degrees of hydrophobicity and water adhesion. Surfaces possessing the greatest advancing water contact angle yet exhibiting a high level of water adhesion (θ(A)/θ(R) ≈ 168°/0°) were achieved by the reaction of PVA fiber mats with multiple cycles of SiCl(4)/H(2)O treatment, followed by silanization with (1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyl)trichlorosilane. It is postulated that the strong pinning effect and hence the water adhesion originated from the collapse of the underlying fibrous structures and the removal of air pockets. The addition of silica to the PVA matrix improved the rigidity and thus prevented the fibers from collapsing, allowing air to remain trapped within the fibrous structure and giving the surface greater water repellency. Throughout the investigation, the three wetting models--Wenzel's, Cassie-Baxter's, and the Cassie-impregnating--were regularly referred to as a conceptual framework. The hydrophobic surface that exhibited strong water adhesion, or the so-called "Petal effect", was elucidated in correlation with the fibrous structure of the film, as reviewed by microscopic analysis. In summary, electrospinning as a facile and cost-effective method provides promising opportunities for investigating the mechanistic character of nanowetting, nanoprinting, and nanocoating where the precise control of the dynamical three-phase contact line is of paramount importance. PMID:21401064