Science.gov

Sample records for preventive hiv vaccine

  1. Local Knowledge and Experiences of Vaccination: Implications for HIV-Preventive Vaccine Trials in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindegger, Graham; Quayle, Michael; Ndlovu, Moses

    2007-01-01

    This study forms part of the preparation of communities for HIV-preventive vaccine trials in South Africa. On the basis of the assumption that attitudes to any HIV vaccine or vaccine trials will partly be influenced by experiences of vaccination in general, this study aimed to investigate knowledge of, attitudes to, and experiences of vaccination

  2. Risk Compensation in HIV Prevention: Implications for Vaccines, Microbicides, and Other Biomedical HIV Prevention Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Lisa A.; Kalichman, Seth C.

    2010-01-01

    Studies investigating the effects of biological HIV prevention technologies have been reported with promising results for slowing the spread of HIV. Although prevention technologies can reduce the rate of HIV transmission at varying levels of efficaciousness, it is vital to anticipate the impact of HIV prevention technologies on subsequent sexual behaviors. Risk homeostasis theory posits that decreases in perceived risk, which will occur with access to HIV prevention technologies, will correspond with increases in risk taking behavior. Here we review the literature on risk compensation in response to HIV vaccines, topical microbicides, antiretroviral medications, and male circumcision. Behavioral risk compensation is evident in response to prevention technologies that are used in advance of HIV exposure and at minimal personal cost. We conclude that behavioral risk compensation be addressed by implementing adjunct behavioral risk reduction interventions to avoid negating the preventive benefits of biomedical HIV prevention technologies. PMID:18366947

  3. Local Knowledge and Experiences of Vaccination: Implications for HIV-Preventive Vaccine Trials in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindegger, Graham; Quayle, Michael; Ndlovu, Moses

    2007-01-01

    This study forms part of the preparation of communities for HIV-preventive vaccine trials in South Africa. On the basis of the assumption that attitudes to any HIV vaccine or vaccine trials will partly be influenced by experiences of vaccination in general, this study aimed to investigate knowledge of, attitudes to, and experiences of vaccination…

  4. A review of vaccines for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Mwau, Matilu; McMichael, Andrew J

    2003-01-01

    HIV/AIDS has become the most devastating pandemic in recorded history. It has killed 40 million people in the last 20 years and the World Health Organisation estimated that at least 14,000 new infections occurred daily in 2001. There will be up to 100 million new infections in the next 10 years (for current updates, visit http://www.unaids.org/epidemic_update/). Most HIV infections occur in the developing world, and the adverse social and economic impact of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, particularly in the developing world, is unprecedented. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has had significant effects on HIV/AIDS in the developed world. The drugs have acted to prolong survival, reduce the viral load, and to alleviate suffering. However, the incidence of side effects and resistance is high and the drugs are unaffordable and unavailable in the developing world. HAART regimens are difficult to comply with. Public health efforts to modify the behaviour, attitude and culture that accelerate the spread of HIV/AIDS have had only modest success. There is urgent need for a prophylactic and/or therapeutic HIV vaccine. This is a review of the obstacles and current trends in HIV vaccine development. PMID:12516046

  5. Challenges to conducting HIV preventative vaccine trials with adolescents.

    PubMed

    McClure, Cori A; Gray, Glenda; Rybczyk, G Kyle; Wright, Peter F

    2004-06-01

    It is estimated that 10.3 million people aged 15-24 are living with HIV infection/AIDS worldwide, with 7000 new infections occurring each day. Many of these infections occur during the adolescent years. These rates of infection make adolescents an important target for research in primary prevention. Currently, preparations are under way by the National Institutes of Health-supported HIV networks--the Adolescent Trials Network, the Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group, and the HIV Vaccines Trials Network--for phase 1/2 HIV vaccine trials involving adolescents in the United States. Identifying the challenges to conducting HIV vaccine trials with this population is a crucial component of these preparations. Challenges to HIV vaccine trials with adolescents were identified by reviewing previous vaccine research for adolescents and HIV infection in adolescents and speaking with experts in HIV/AIDS and adolescent medicine. Adolescents (typically those younger than 18 years of age) are minors and fall under ethical and regulatory safeguards for their participation in clinical research including parental permission. Adolescents may not appropriately perceive personal risk, posing challenges for informed consent as well as prevention counseling during a trial. Safety and immunogenicity studies of adolescents are likely to be required by the US Food and Drug Administration before vaccine approval for this population. Early identification and subsequent follow-up of high-risk adolescents are problematic. Vaccine-induced seropositivity may present potential barriers to military service, employment, marriage, and acquiring health insurance. The age at optimal immunization, particularly for girls in some countries, may be during preadolescence. The successful completion of HIV vaccine trials with adolescents must address these challenges both in the United States and internationally. This report addresses relevant background information, identifies the issues surrounding HIV vaccine trials with adolescents, discusses what progress has been made, and addresses plans and implications for the implementation of these trials. PMID:15167292

  6. Challenges in HIV Vaccine Research for Treatment and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Ensoli, Barbara; Cafaro, Aurelio; Monini, Paolo; Marcotullio, Simone; Ensoli, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Many attempts have been made or are ongoing for HIV prevention and HIV cure. Many successes are in the list, particularly for HIV drugs, recently proposed also for prevention. However, no eradication of infection has been achieved so far with any drug. Further, a residual immune dysregulation associated to chronic immune activation and incomplete restoration of B and T cell subsets, together with HIV DNA persistence in reservoirs, are still unmet needs of the highly active antiretroviral therapy, causing novel "non-AIDS related" diseases that account for a higher risk of death even in virologically suppressed patients. These "ART unmet needs" represent a problem, which is expected to increase by ART roll out. Further, in countries such as South Africa, where six millions of individuals are infected, ART appears unable to contain the epidemics. Regretfully, all the attempts at developing a preventative vaccine have been largely disappointing. However, recent therapeutic immunization strategies have opened new avenues for HIV treatment, which might be exploitable also for preventative vaccine approaches. For example, immunization strategies aimed at targeting key viral products responsible of virus transmission, activation, and maintenance of virus reservoirs may intensify drug efficacy and lead to a functional cure providing new perspectives also for prevention and future virus eradication strategies. However, this approach imposes new challenges to the scientific community, vaccine developers, and regulatory bodies, such as the identification of novel immunological and virological biomarkers to assess efficacy end-points, taking advantage from the natural history of infection and exploiting lessons from former trials. This review will focus first on recent advancement of therapeutic strategies, then on the progresses made in preventative approaches, discussing concepts, and problems for the way ahead for the development of vaccines for HIV treatment and prevention. PMID:25250026

  7. Preventive HIV-1 vaccines: where are we going?

    PubMed

    Kent, S J

    1998-12-01

    As more than 15,000 new HIV infections occur daily, mainly in developing countries, social and political will is growing to develop a safe and effective vaccine against the virus and subsequent AIDS disease. The worldwide successes in developing and disseminating vaccines against smallpox and polio raise hopes of the possibility of developing vaccines capable of blocking the transmission of HIV-1. Early attempts to develop HIV-1 vaccines, HIV-1 efficacy trials, immune correlates of protection from HIV-1, live vector-based vaccines, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) vaccines, and live attenuated vaccines are discussed. Enthusiasm was renewed at the recent world AIDS conference in Geneva for ongoing research towards a HIV-1 vaccine. However, the polarity of the HIV-1 epidemic, generally affecting countries which cannot afford more than basic health care, has forced the re-examination of research priorities. Many western governments have made at least a verbal commitment to increase funding for HIV-1 vaccine research. Funding agencies such as the World Bank are considering ways to fund and deliver a vaccine if and when one becomes available, and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative in the US is increasing awareness of the urgent importance of the issue. An AIDS vaccine is still many years away. PMID:9874116

  8. HIV Epidemic in Asia: Implications for HIV Vaccine and Other Prevention Trials.

    PubMed

    Phanuphak, Nittaya; Lo, Ying-Ru; Shao, Yiming; Solomon, Sunil Suhas; O'Connell, Robert J; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Chang, David; Kim, Jerome H; Excler, Jean Louis

    2015-11-01

    An overall decrease of HIV prevalence is now observed in several key Asian countries due to effective prevention programs. The decrease in HIV prevalence and incidence may further improve with the scale-up of combination prevention interventions. The implementation of future prevention trials then faces important challenges. The opportunity to identify heterosexual populations at high risk such as female sex workers may rapidly wane. With unabating HIV epidemics among men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender (TG) populations, an effective vaccine would likely be the only option to turn the epidemic. It is more likely that efficacy trials will occur among MSM and TG because their higher HIV incidence permits smaller and less costly trials. The constantly evolving patterns of HIV-1 diversity in the region suggest close monitoring of the molecular HIV epidemic in potential target populations for HIV vaccine efficacy trials. CRF01_AE remains predominant in southeast Asian countries and MSM populations in China. This relatively steady pattern is conducive to regional efficacy trials, and as efficacy warrants, to regional licensure. While vaccines inducing nonneutralizing antibodies have promise against HIV acquisition, vaccines designed to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies and cell-mediated immune responses of greater breadth and depth in the mucosal compartments should be considered for testing in MSM and TG. The rationale and design of efficacy trials of combination prevention modalities such as HIV vaccine and preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) remain hypothetical, require high adherence to PrEP, are more costly, and present new regulatory challenges. The prioritization of prevention interventions should be driven by the HIV epidemic and decided by the country-specific health and regulatory authorities. Modeling the impact and cost-benefit may help this decision process. PMID:26107771

  9. Social impact of preventive HIV vaccine clinical trial participation: a model of prevention, assessment and intervention.

    PubMed

    Allen, Mary; Lau, Chuen-Yen

    2008-02-01

    Preventive HIV vaccine trial participants may experience problems related to trial participation, including difficulties with personal relationships, employment, education, health care, housing, health insurance, disability insurance, life insurance, travel or immigration. During the 19 years that the U.S.-based National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) has conducted preventive HIV vaccine trials, we have developed a model to prevent and resolve social impact related to study participation and assist study participants who report such events. Key elements of the model include: informing potential volunteers of risks prior to enrollment; standardizing data collection methods on social impact events; reviewing and following-up on reported social impact events; assisting participants, including provision of free HIV testing to differentiate HIV infection from vaccine-induced HIV antibody; implementing broad-based and targeted community education programs for achieving community support; communicating with scientific and health care communities; and working with government agencies, non-government agencies and industry on mechanisms to address SI. This approach, established in collaboration with NIAID-funded clinical trial groups, serves as a model for prevention, assessment, monitoring, and intervention for social impact related to preventive HIV vaccine clinical trial participation. Although further research is necessary, this model could be adapted for use in different clinical trials. PMID:18162272

  10. Seroprevalence and vaccination coverage of vaccine-preventable diseases in perinatally HIV-1-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Sticchi, Laura; Bruzzone, Bianca; Caligiuri, Patrizia; Rappazzo, Emanuela; Lo Casto, Michele; De Hoffer, Laura; Gustinetti, Giulia; Viscoli, Claudio; Di Biagio, Antonio

    2014-08-27

    Background Even in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), HIV-infected subjects are at higher risk of complications from vaccine-preventable diseases than those uninfected. The current international guidelines strongly recommend that these patients should receive all the routine childhood vaccinations. Although these children represent an appropriate target for immunization, the available data indicate suboptimal coverage rates. Methods To evaluate seroprotection/seropositivity rates and vaccination coverage against the common vaccine-preventable diseases, all patients with vertically transmitted HIV-1 infection who attended San Martino Hospital were enrolled. Blood samples were collected for testing antibodies against diphtheria, tetanus, hepatitis A and B viruses by Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay and polioviruses by microneutralization test. In order to assess immunization coverage, retrospectively was recorded the vaccination history collecting data from Regional Immunization Database. Results A total of 39 perinatally HIV-1 infected patients were included in the study. At the time of serum was obtained, the mean age was 18,1 years (range: 6-28). The median CD4+ T-lymphocyte count was 702 cells/mm (3) (2-1476 cells/mm (3)). Twenty-nine (74.4%) patients were found with HIV RNA load<50 copies/mL. The proportion of subjects with protective anti-tetanus and anti-HBs were 43.6% and 30.8%, respectively. Seroprotection rates about 20% against rubella and measles were found, less than 20% against all the other antigens investigated. In particular, all patients resulted susceptible to mumps. High immunization rates were observed for polio and HBV (100% and 92.3%, respectively) and suboptimal for diphtheria-tetanus (84.6%). For the other recommended vaccines the rates were generally low. None of the patients received varicella vaccine doses. Conclusions As in the HAART era the vertically acquired HIV infection has become a chronic treatable disease, the vaccine-induced long-term protection plays an increasingly significant role; despite good initial response to primary vaccination, subsequent decline and loss of detectable antibodies may be prevented by additional strategies for booster doses of vaccines in adolescents and young adults. PMID:25184243

  11. New prospects for a preventive HIV-1 vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jeffrey; Excler, Jean-Louis; Kim, Jerome H

    2015-01-01

    The immune correlates of risk analysis and recent non-human primate (NHP) challenge studies have generated hypotheses that suggest HIV-1 envelope may be essential and, perhaps, sufficient to induce protective antibody responses against HIV-1 acquisition at the mucosal entry. New prime-boost mosaic and conserved-sequence, together with replicating vector immunisation strategies aiming at inducing immune responses or greater breadth, as well as the development of immunogens inducing broadly neutralising antibodies and mucosal responses, should be actively pursued and tested in humans. Whether the immune correlates of risk identified in RV144 can be extended to other vaccines, other populations, or different modes and intensity of transmission, and against increasing HIV-1 genetic diversity, remains to be demonstrated. Although NHP challenge studies may guide vaccine development, human efficacy trials remain key for answering the critical questions leading to the development of a global HIV-1 vaccine for licensure. PMID:26523292

  12. Social Justice and HIV Vaccine Research in the Age of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis and Treatment as Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Theodore C.; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    The advent of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and treatment as prevention (TasP) as means of HIV prevention raises issues of justice concerning how most fairly and equitably to apportion resources in support of the burgeoning variety of established HIV treatment and prevention measures and further HIV research, including HIV vaccine research. We apply contemporary approaches to social justice to assess the ethical justification for allocating resources in support of HIV vaccine research given competing priorities to support broad implementation of HIV treatment and prevention measures, including TasP and PrEP. We argue that there is prima facie reason to believe that a safe and effective preventive HIV vaccine would offer a distinct set of ethically significant benefits not provided by current HIV treatment or prevention methods. It is thereby possible to justify continued support for HIV vaccine research despite tension with priorities for treatment, prevention, and other research. We then consider a counter-argument to such a justification based on the uncertainty of successfully developing a safe and effective preventive HIV vaccine. Finally, we discuss how HIV vaccine research might now be ethically designed and conducted given the new preventive options of TasP and PrEP, focusing on the ethically appropriate standard of prevention for HIV vaccine trials. PMID:24033297

  13. Social justice and HIV vaccine research in the age of pre-exposure prophylaxis and treatment as prevention.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Theodore C; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2013-09-01

    The advent of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and treatment as prevention (TasP) as means of HIV prevention raises issues of justice concerning how most fairly and equitably to apportion resources in support of the burgeoning variety of established HIV treatment and prevention measures and further HIV research, including HIV vaccine research. We apply contemporary approaches to social justice to assess the ethical justification for allocating resources in support of HIV vaccine research given competing priorities to support broad implementation of HIV treatment and prevention measures, including TasP and PrEP. We argue that there is prima facie reason to believe that a safe and effective preventive HIV vaccine would offer a distinct set of ethically significant benefits not provided by current HIV treatment or prevention methods. It is thereby possible to justify continued support for HIV vaccine research despite tension with priorities for treatment, prevention, and other research. We then consider a counter-argument to such a justification based on the uncertainty of successfully developing a safe and effective preventive HIV vaccine. Finally, we discuss how HIV vaccine research might now be ethically designed and conducted given the new preventive options of TasP and PrEP, focusing on the ethically appropriate standard of prevention for HIV vaccine trials. PMID:24033297

  14. Effect of a preventive vaccine on the dynamics of HIV transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumel, A. B.; Moghadas, S. M.; Mickens, R. E.

    2004-12-01

    A deterministic mathematical model for the transmission dynamics of HIV infection in the presence of a preventive vaccine is considered. Although the equilibria of the model could not be expressed in closed form, their existence and threshold conditions for their stability are theoretically investigated. It is shown that the disease-free equilibrium is locally-asymptotically stable if the basic reproductive number R<1 (thus, HIV disease can be eradicated from the community) and unstable if R>1 (leading to the persistence of HIV within the community). A robust, positivity-preserving, non-standard finite-difference method is constructed and used to solve the model equations. In addition to showing that the anti-HIV vaccine coverage level and the vaccine-induced protection are critically important in reducing the threshold quantity R, our study predicts the minimum threshold values of vaccine coverage and efficacy levels needed to eradicate HIV from the community.

  15. Contemporary HIV Vaccines: Tissue Resident T-Cells and Strategies to Prevent Mucosal Infection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hyon-Xhi; Kent, Stephen J; De Rose, Robert

    2016-01-01

    HIV is primarily transmitted to women via the cervicovaginal mucosa, with the infection remaining localized for several days prior to systemic dissemination and irreversible damage to the immune system. The early phase during which HIV infection is localized and exhibits little or no viral diversity presents a vantage point for HIV vaccines that stimulate T-cell mediated clearance. CD(8+) resident memory T-cells (TRM) are positioned at mucosal entry sites and are established upon resolution of infection by mucosal pathogens. TRM cells are long-lived and locally patrol mucosal tissues. Upon antigenic reactivation, the sentinel-like functions of TRM cells mediate rapid clearance of subsequent infection by recruitment of additional immune cells from circulation and initiate a tissue-wide antiviral state, thus preventing the recurrence of disease. These properties are ideally suited for an HIV vaccine aimed at halting the infection cycle of HIV during the earliest phases. In this review, we summarize recent vaccine developments from parallel research areas incorporating the use of live mucosal vectors complemented with chemokine-regulating compounds, which can induce the seeding of the vaginal mucosa with TRM cells. We present the proposition that similar novel vaccine regimens can be translated into approaches for future HIV vaccines aimed at inducing heightened immunity in vaginal tissues against HIV. PMID:26324042

  16. Ensuring Access to HIV Prevention Services in South African HIV Vaccine Trials: Correspondence Between Guidelines and Practices

    PubMed Central

    Essack, Zaynab

    2014-01-01

    Researchers and sponsors are required to assist HIV prevention trial participants to remain HIV-uninfected by ensuring access to prevention services. Ethics guidelines require that these HIV risk-reduction services be state of the art. This and related ethics recommendations have been intensely debated. This descriptive study aimed to identify actual HIV prevention practices for two HIV vaccine trials at five South African sites, to explore whether actual practices meet guideline recommendations and to discuss implications for practices and ethics guidelines. Practices were examined through a review of site documents and interviews with site staff and network representatives, as well as community advisory board and research ethics committee representatives. A thematic analysis of HIV prevention practices, perspectives and perceived challenges was undertaken. Findings indicated that there was a high degree of correspondence between actual practices in South African HIV vaccine trials and guideline recommendations. Key challenges for implementing prevention services were identified as partnerships, provider-promotion of services and participant uptake of services. Practices deviated most from guidelines with regard to the description of prevention plans in informed consent forms. Recommendations are made for both practices and ethics guidelines. PMID:25031609

  17. Effect of race/ethnicity on participation in HIV vaccine trials and comparison to other trials of biomedical prevention

    PubMed Central

    Dhalla, Shayesta; Poole, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Racial/ethnic minorities are underrepresented in actual HIV vaccine trials in North America, and willingness to participate (WTP) and retention in an HIV vaccine trial may differ from that in Whites. Methods In this review, the authors identified HIV vaccine preparedness studies (VPS) in North America in high-risk populations that examined the relationship between race/ethnicity and WTP in a preventive phase 3 HIV vaccine trial, and the relationship to retention. Studies were categorized by risk group, and comparison group (Whites vs. non-Whites). Other types of trials of biomedical prevention were also identified, and WTP and retention rates were compared and contrasted to actual HIV vaccine trials. Results In the studies identified, WTP in a hypothetical trial HIV vaccine trial did not differ by race/ethnicity. In contrast, actual HIV vaccine trials, an HIV acquisition trial, and a phase 2B preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) trial have enrolled a large percentage of White men. Human papilloma virus (HPV) privately-funded trials have also enrolled a large number of Whites, due to convenience sampling. Retention in the HIV acquisition trial was lower in African-Americans compared with Whites. Conclusion Strategies to increase WTP and enhanced retention (ER) strategies may help in recruiting and retaining minority participants in actual HIV vaccine trials and other trials of biomedical prevention. PMID:25424807

  18. Social vaccine for HIV prevention: a study on truck drivers in South India.

    PubMed

    Ubaidullah, M

    2004-01-01

    Nearly everywhere that AIDS has been found, HIV infection is fast spreading. No one is known to have recovered from HIV infection. There is no vaccine to cure AIDS (Population Reports, 1989 and The Hindu, dated 9.3.2000). Until a cure or vaccine for HIV infection is found, the only way to prevent the spread of the disease is by changing people's behaviour through AIDS education programmes (Population Reports, 1986). Many national governments are using broadcast, print media, personal contact, counselling methods, etc., to educate people on AIDS and safer sex. Thus, the best vaccine is the 'Social Vaccine.' Social vaccine involves spreading education on how to protect oneself, hundred percent condom use, and changing sexual behaviour. In fact, the social vaccine was so successful in Thailand that the infection rate has come down by 50 per cent (The Hindu, dated 9.3.2000). Truck drivers, prostitutes, and young adults are considered high risk groups for HIV/AIDS in India. An action research study was conducted in Chittoor District of Andhra Pradesh (India) among truck drivers. As part of this study, different strategies, namely mass media, personal contact, group discussion, folk media, and counselling, were adopted to provide AIDS education, to encourage increase in condom use for safer sex, and bring changes in their sexual behaviour. The strategies adopted in this study greatly enhanced the knowledge of the truck drivers on AIDS, changed their attitudes on sex, increased the use of condoms, and modified their sexual behaviour. Thus, the social vaccine would help spread education on AIDS, bring changes in the sexual behaviour of the people, increase condom use, and thus help to prevent the AIDS scourge throughout the world. The social vaccine suggested in this study can also be extended to all the high risk group population for successful prevention of this dreadful disease in the world. PMID:15774403

  19. Ethical considerations in HIV prevention and vaccine research in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Garner, Samual A; Anude, Chuka J; Adams, Elizabeth; Dawson, Liza

    2014-09-01

    HIV prevention research has been facing increasing ethical and operational challenges. Factors influencing the design and conduct of HIV prevention trials include a rapidly changing evidence base, new biomedical prevention methods and modalities being tested, a large diversity of countries, sites and populations affected by HIV and participating in trials, and challenges of developing and making available products that will be feasible and affordable for at-risk populations. To discuss these challenges, a meeting, Ethical considerations around novel combination prevention modalities in HIV prevention and vaccine trials in resource-limited settings, was convened by NIH/NIAID/Division of AIDS on April 22-23, 2013. Several themes emerged from the meeting: (1) because of both trial design and ethical complexities, choosing prevention packages and designing combination prevention research trials will need to be evaluated on a case by case basis in different clinical trials, countries, and health systems; (2) multilevel stakeholder engagement from the beginning is vital to a fair and transparent process and also to designing ethical and relevant trials; (3) research should generally be responsive to a host country's needs, and sponsors and stakeholders should work together to address potential barriers to future access; and finally, (4) another meeting including a broader group of stakeholders is needed to address many of the outstanding ethical issues raised by this meeting. We offer an overview of the meeting and the key discussion points and recommendations to help guide the design and conduct of future HIV prevention and vaccine research in resource-limited settings. PMID:25117930

  20. Stakeholder views of ethical guidance regarding prevention and care in HIV vaccine trials

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background South Africa is a major hub of HIV prevention trials, with plans for a licensure trial to start in 2015. The appropriate standards of care and of prevention in HIV vaccine trials are complex and debated issues and ethical guidelines offer some direction. However, there has been limited empirical exploration of South African stakeholders’ perspectives on ethical guidance related to prevention and care in HIV vaccine trials. Methods Site staff, Community Advisory Board members and Research Ethics Committee members involved with current HIV vaccine trials in South Africa were invited to participate in an exploration of their views. A questionnaire listed 10 care and 10 prevention recommendations drawn from two widely available sets of ethical guidelines for biomedical HIV prevention trials. Respondents (n = 98) rated each recommendation on five dimensions: “Familiarity with”, “Ease of Understanding”, “Ease of Implementing”, “Perceived Protection”, and “Agreement with” each ethical recommendation. The ratings were used to describe stakeholder perspectives on dimensions for each recommendation. Dimension ratings were averaged across the five dimensions and used as an indication of overall merit for each recommendation. Differences were explored across dimensions, between care-oriented and prevention-oriented recommendations, and between stakeholder groups. Results Both care and prevention recommendations were rated highly overall, with median ratings well above the scale midpoint. In general, informed consent recommendations were most positively rated. Care-related recommendations were rated significantly more positively than prevention-related recommendations, with the five lowest-rated recommendations being prevention-related. The most problematic dimension across all recommendations was “Ease of Implementing,” and the least problematic was “Agreement with,” suggesting the most pressing stakeholder concerns are practical rather than theoretical; that is, respondents agree with but see barriers to the attainment of these recommendations. Conclusions We propose that prevention recommendations be prioritized for refinement, especially those assigned bottom-ranking scores for “Ease of Implementing”, and/ or “Ease of Understanding” in order to assist vaccine stakeholders to better comprehend and implement these recommendations. Further qualitative research could also assist to better understand nuances in stakeholder reservations about implementing such recommendations. PMID:24981027

  1. The Potential Impact of Preventive HIV Vaccines in China: Results and Benefits of a Multi-Province Modeling Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Thomas; Guo, Wei; Stover, John; Wu, Zunyou; Kaufman, Joan; Schneider, Kammerle; Liu, Li; Feng, Liao; Schwartländer, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    China’s commitment to implementing established and emerging HIV/AIDS prevention and control strategies has led to substantial gains in terms of access to antiretroviral treatment and prevention services, but the evolving and multifaceted HIV/AIDS epidemic in China highlights the challenges of maintaining that response. This study presents modeling results exploring the potential impact of HIV vaccines in the Chinese context at varying efficacy and coverage rates, while further exploring the potential implications of vaccination programs aimed at reaching populations at highest risk of HIV infection. A preventive HIV vaccine would add a powerful tool to China’s response, even if not 100% efficacious or available to the full population. PMID:26344945

  2. Macaque studies of vaccine and microbicide combinations for preventing HIV-1 sexual transmission

    PubMed Central

    Barouch, Dan H.; Klasse, Per Johan; Dufour, Jason; Veazey, Ronald S.; Moore, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination and the application of a vaginal microbicide have traditionally been considered independent methods to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV-1 to women. Both techniques can be effective in macaque models, and limited efficacy has been observed in clinical trials for each. Here, we have addressed whether vaccines and microbicides can be used together to provide reinforced protection against virus challenge of rhesus macaques. In two separate experiments, four groups of animals were vaccinated with a T-cellbased adenovirus (Ad) vectored vaccine aimed at reducing postinfection viral loads and/or a partially effective dose of a vaginal microbicide aimed at blocking infection of a high-dose vaginal challenge with SIVmac251 or SHIV-162P3. In the first study, the only two protected animals were in the group that received Ad26/Ad5HVR48 vaccine vectors combined with the fusion inhibitor T-1249 as the vaginal microbicide before SIVmac251 challenge. In the second study, vaccination with Ad35/Ad26 vectors combined with the CCR5 inhibitor maraviroc as the vaginal microbicide led to significant reductions of both acquisition of infection and postinfection viral loads following SHIV-SF162P3 challenge. As expected, the vaccine by itself reduced viral loads but had no acquisition effect, whereas the microbicide had a partial acquisition effect but minimal impact on viral loads. For both measures of protective efficacy, the vaccinemicrobicide combination differed more from controls than did either separate intervention. Overall, the data suggest that vaccines and microbicides are complementary techniques that may protect better when used together than separately. PMID:22586094

  3. Vaccination in HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Vaccines are critical components for protecting HIV-infected adults from an increasing number of preventable diseases. However, missed opportunities for vaccination among HIV-infected persons persist, likely due to concerns regarding the safety and efficacy of vaccines, as well as the changing nature of vaccine guidelines. In addition, the optimal timing of vaccination among HIV-infected adults in regards to HIV stage and receipt of antiretroviral therapy remain important questions. This article provides a review of the current recommendations regarding vaccines among HIV-infected adults and a comprehensive summary of the evidence-based literature of the benefits and risks of vaccines among this vulnerable population. PMID:25029589

  4. Information Vaccine: Using Graphic Novels as an HIV/AIDS Prevention Resource for Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albright, Kendra S.; Gavigan, Karen

    2014-01-01

    HIV/AIDS infections are growing at an alarming rate for young adults. In 2009, youth, ages 13-29, accounted for 39% of all new HIV infections in the U.S. (Division of HIV/ AIDS Prevention, Centers for Disease Control (CDC), 2011). South Carolina ranks eighth in the nation for new HIV cases, while the capital city of Columbia ranks seventh…

  5. Effect of rAd5-Vector HIV-1 Preventive Vaccines on HIV-1 Acquisition: A Participant-Level Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yunda; Follmann, Dean; Nason, Martha; Zhang, Lily; Huang, Ying; Mehrotra, Devan V.; Moodie, Zoe; Metch, Barbara; Janes, Holly; Keefer, Michael C.; Churchyard, Gavin; Robb, Merlin L.; Fast, Patricia E.; Duerr, Ann; McElrath, M. Juliana; Corey, Lawrence; Mascola, John R.; Graham, Barney S.; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E.; Kublin, James G.; Robertson, Michael; Hammer, Scott M.; Gray, Glenda E.; Buchbinder, Susan P.; Gilbert, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Three phase 2b, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized efficacy trials have tested recombinant Adenovirus serotype-5 (rAd5)-vector preventive HIV-1 vaccines: MRKAd5 HIV-1 gag/pol/nef in Step and Phambili, and DNA/rAd5 HIV-1 env/gag/pol in HVTN505. Due to efficacy futility observed at the first interim analysis in Step and HVTN505, participants of all three studies were unblinded to their vaccination assignments during the study but continued follow–up. Rigorous meta-analysis can provide crucial information to advise the future utility of rAd5-vector vaccines. Methods We included participant-level data from all three efficacy trials, and three Phase 1–2 trials evaluating the HVTN505 vaccine regimen. We predefined two co-primary analysis cohorts for assessing the vaccine effect on HIV-1 acquisition. The modified-intention-to-treat (MITT) cohort included all randomly assigned participants HIV-1 uninfected at study entry, who received at least the first vaccine/placebo, and the Ad5 cohort included MITT participants who received at least one dose of rAd5-HIV vaccine or rAd5-placebo. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of HIV-1 infection (vaccine vs. placebo) and evaluate HR variation across vaccine regimens, time since vaccination, and subgroups using interaction tests. Findings Results are similar for the MITT and Ad5 cohorts; we summarize MITT cohort results. Pooled across the efficacy trials, over all follow-up time 403 (n = 224 vaccine; n = 179 placebo) of 6266 MITT participants acquired HIV-1, with a non-significantly higher incidence in vaccine recipients (HR 1.21, 95% CI 0.99–1.48, P = 0.06). The HRs significantly differed by vaccine regimen (interaction P = 0.03; MRKAd5 HR 1.41, 95% CI 1.11–1.78, P = 0.005 vs. DNA/rAd5 HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.61–1.26, P = 0.48). Results were similar when including the Phase 1–2 trials. Exploratory analyses based on the efficacy trials supported that the MRKAd5 vaccine-increased risk was concentrated in Ad5-positive or uncircumcised men early in follow-up, and in Ad5-negative or circumcised men later. Overall, MRKAd5 vaccine-increased risk was evident across subgroups except in circumcised Ad5-negative men (HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.58−1.63, P = 0.91); there was little evidence that the DNA/rAd5 vaccine, that was tested in this subgroup, increased risk (HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.61–1.26, P = 0.48). When restricting the analysis of Step and Phambili to follow-up time before unblinding, 114 (n = 65 vaccine; n = 49 placebo) of 3770 MITT participants acquired HIV-1, with a non-significantly higher incidence in MRKAd5 vaccine recipients (HR 1.30, 95% CI 0.89–1.14, P = 0.18). Interpretation and Significance The data support increased risk of HIV-1 infection by MRKAd5 over all follow-up time, but do not support increased risk of HIV-1 infection by DNA/rAd5. This study provides a rationale for including monitoring plans enabling detection of increased susceptibility to infection in HIV-1 at-risk populations. PMID:26332672

  6. HIV Vaccine Research and Discovery in the NHP model: a unified theory inacquisition prevention and control of SIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Rebecca; Yamamoto, Takuya; McDermott, Adrian B

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the review Here we highlight the latest advances in HIV vaccine concepts that will expand our knowledge on how to elicit effective acquisition-prevention and/or control of SIV replication in the NHP model. Recent findings In the context of the promising analyses from the RV144 Thai Trial and the effective control of SIV replication exerted by rhCMV-(SIV) elicited EM CD8 T cells, the HIV field has recently shifted toward vaccine concepts that combine protection from acquisition with effective control of SIV replication. Current studies in the NHP model have demonstrated the efficacy of HIV-neutralizing antibodies via passive transfer, the potential importance of the CD4 Tfh subset, the ability to effectively model the RV144 vaccine trial and the capacity of an Ad26 prime and MVA boost to elicit Env-specific antibody and cellular responses that both limit acquisition and control heterologous SIVmac251 challenge. Summary The latest work in the NHP model suggests that the next generation HIV-1 vaccines should aim to provoke a comprehensive adaptive immune response for both prevention of SIV acquisition as well as control of replication in break through infection. PMID:23666390

  7. Global Efforts against HIV Epidemic and HIV Vaccine Development.

    PubMed

    Tanuma, Junko

    2014-06-01

    Although the tremendous effort has been paid by scientists for creating HIV vaccine over the past three decades since the discovery of HIV-1, the HIV vaccine development still has a long way to go. Only one HIV vaccine, RV144, has been proved to be moderately effective by the clinical trials, but there has been much debate about its usefulness. The difficulties of HIV vaccine development includes the attacks to host's immune system by HIV and the emergence of various escape mutants. The necessity of large clinical trials for the proof of efficacy also makes HIV vaccine development difficult. One the other hand, Treatment as Prevention (TasP) or Preexposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) has revealed to be highly effective for HIV prevention. Those preventive strategies using antiretroviral therapy is one of the recent main stream of HIV policy worldwide. However, it is believed that a sustained end of the HIV pandemic is guaranteed by the combination of nonvaccine prevention and the development of a safe and effective HIV vaccine. The continuous efforts are needed for the HIV vaccine development. PMID:25425957

  8. HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... visit Healthmap Vaccine Finder . HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... percentage is less than 15%. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  9. HIV/AIDS and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fauci's Ending AIDS — Is an HIV Vaccine Necessary? What’s the Latest on Hiv Vaccine Research? Scientists are continuing to create and test HIV vaccines—in the lab, in animals, and even in human subjects. These vaccine trials ...

  10. Intentions to use pre-exposure prophylaxis among current phase 2B preventive HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial participants

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Jonathan D.; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E.; Madenwald, Tamra; Grove, Doug; Karuna, Shelly T.; Andrasik, Michele; Sherwat, Adam; Broder, Gail; Mayer, Kenneth; Koblin, Beryl; Hammer, Scott

    2013-01-01

    In November 2010, the iPrEx study reported that pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with daily tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine reduced HIV infections by 44% among men who have sex with men and subsequent trials corroborated efficacy among heterosexual men and women. During regularly scheduled follow-up visits from January-March 2011, participants in an ongoing phase 2b vaccine efficacy trial completed an anonymous web survey about PrEP. Among 376 respondents, 17% reported they were very likely to use PrEP in the next year. Non-white participants were more likely to use PrEP. Among those with some level of interest, intent to use PrEP was greatest if the drug were available through the clinical trial or health insurance. Most (91%) believed taking PrEP would not change their willingness to stay in the vaccine trial and few thought it would affect recruitment. As key stakeholders, currently enrolled trial participants can offer vital input about emerging prevention technologies that may affect the design of future HIV vaccine and non-vaccine prevention trials. PMID:23614998

  11. Differences in HIV vaccine acceptability between genders.

    PubMed

    Kakinami, Lisa; Newman, Peter A; Lee, Sung-Jae; Duan, Naihua

    2008-05-01

    The development of safe and efficacious preventive HIV vaccines offers the best long-term hope of controlling the AIDS pandemic. Nevertheless, suboptimal uptake of safe and efficacious vaccines that already exist suggest that HIV vaccine acceptability cannot be assumed, particularly among communities most vulnerable to HIV. The present study aimed to identify barriers and motivators to future HIV vaccine acceptability among low socioeconomic, ethnically diverse men and women in Los Angeles County. Participants completed a cross-sectional survey assessing their attitudes and beliefs regarding future HIV vaccines. Hypothetical HIV vaccine scenarios were administered to determine HIV vaccine acceptability. Two-sided t-tests were performed, stratified by gender, to examine the association between vaccine acceptability and potential barriers and motivators. Barriers to HIV vaccine acceptability differed between men and women. For women, barriers to HIV vaccine acceptability were related to their intimate relationships (p<0.05), negative experiences with health care providers (p<0.05) and anticipated difficulties procuring insurance (p<0.01). Men were concerned that the vaccine would weaken the immune system (p<0.005) or would affect their HIV test results (p<0.05). Motivators for women included the ability to conceive a child without worrying about contracting HIV (p<0.10) and support from their spouse/significant other for being vaccinated (p<0.10). Motivators for men included feeling safer with sex partners (p<0.05) and social influence from friends to get vaccinated (p<0.005). Family support for HIV immunization was a motivator for both men and women (p<0.10). Gender-specific interventions may increase vaccine acceptability among men and women at elevated risk for HIV infection. Among women, interventions need to focus on addressing barriers due to gendered power dynamics in relationships and discrimination in health care. Among men, education that addresses fears and misconceptions about adverse effects of HIV vaccination on health and the importance of vaccination as one component of integrated HIV prevention may increase vaccine acceptability. PMID:18484322

  12. How can we design better vaccines to prevent HIV infection in women?

    PubMed Central

    Rafferty, Hannah; Sibeko, Sengeziwe; Rowland-Jones, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) burden in women continues to increase, and heterosexual contact is now the most common route of infection worldwide. Effective protection of women against HIV-1 infection may require a vaccine specifically targeting mucosal immune responses in the female genital tract (FGT). To achieve this goal, a much better understanding of the immunology of the FGT is needed. Here we review the architecture of the immune system of the FGT, recent studies of potential methods to achieve the goal of mucosal protection in women, including systemic-prime, mucosal-boost, FGT-tropic vectors and immune response altering adjuvants. Advances in other fields that enhance our understanding of female genital immune correlates and the interplay between hormonal and immunological systems may also help to achieve protection of women from HIV infection. PMID:25408686

  13. Intentions to use preexposure prophylaxis among current phase 2B preventive HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial participants.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Jonathan D; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E; Madenwald, Tamra; Grove, Doug; Karuna, Shelly T; Andrasik, Michele; Sherwat, Adam; Broder, Gail; Mayer, Kenneth; Koblin, Beryl; Hammer, Scott

    2013-07-01

    In November 2010, the iPrEx study reported that preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with daily tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine reduced HIV infections by 44% among men who have sex with men and subsequent trials corroborated efficacy among heterosexual men and women. During regularly scheduled follow-up visits from January to March 2011, participants in an ongoing phase 2b vaccine efficacy trial completed an anonymous Web survey about PrEP. Among 376 respondents, 17% reported they were very likely to use PrEP in the next year. Nonwhite participants were more likely to use PrEP. Among those with some level of interest, intent to use PrEP was greatest if the drug were available through the clinical trial or health insurance. Most (91%) believed taking PrEP would not change their willingness to stay in the vaccine trial and few thought it would affect recruitment. As key stakeholders, currently enrolled trial participants can offer vital input about emerging prevention technologies that may affect the design of future HIV vaccine and nonvaccine prevention trials. PMID:23614998

  14. An HIV vaccine: how and when?

    PubMed Central

    Esparza, J.

    2001-01-01

    The best long-term hope for controlling the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) pandemic is a safe, effective and affordable preventive vaccine, but its development has encountered unprecedented scientific challenges. The first phase I trial of an HIV vaccine was conducted in 1987. Subsequently, more than 30 candidate vaccines have been tested in over 60 phase I/II trials, involving approximately 10 000 healthy volunteers. Most of these trials have been conducted in the USA and Europe, but several have also been conducted in developing countries. The first phase III trials began in the USA in 1998 and in Thailand in 1999 to assess the efficacy of the first generation of HIV vaccines (based on the HIV envelope protein, gp120); the results will be available within the next 1-2 years. To accelerate the development of an HIV vaccine, additional candidate vaccines must be evaluated in parallel in both industrialized and developing countries. This will require international collaboration and coordination and critical ethical issues will need to be addressed. To ensure that future HIV vaccines contribute to the overall HIV/AIDS prevention effort, we should begin planning now on how best to use them. PMID:11799445

  15. Preventing HIV with Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... information in Spanish ( en español ) Preventing HIV with medicine Get medicine right after you are exposed to ... to top More information on Preventing HIV with medicine Explore other publications and websites National HIV and ...

  16. Pharmacologic Opportunities for HIV Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Nicol, MR; Kashuba, ADM

    2013-01-01

    Innovations in antiretroviral (ARV) treatment strategies have resulted in treated HIV-infected patients having life expectancies similar to those of uninfected individuals. Yet the number of individuals capable of HIV transmission is increasing—for every person in whom ARV treatment is initiated, four others are becoming newly infected with HIV. The limited progress with microbicides and vaccines for HIV prevention reinforce the need for a concentrated exploration of the utility of ARVs. Preliminary animal studies with topical and systemic ARVs show promising results. However, current clinical trials were designed without a comprehensive understanding of ARV pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic relationships in HIV prevention. This review focuses on current strategies for the prevention of HIV infection and on the ways in which the tools of pharmacology can be a valuable resource for determining pharmacodynamic targets, providing interspecies scaling of exposures, identifying the optimal drugs/drug combinations, doses, and dosing regimens, and designing efficient clinical trials. PMID:20881955

  17. Answers about HIV Vaccine Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... do? • Let others know you support HIV vaccine research. • Educate others about the need for an HIV vaccine and the importance of trial participation by people of all races/ethnicities, genders and socioeconomic backgrounds. • Support vaccine volunteers and/or volunteer yourself. • Get ...

  18. Lessons Learned from HIV Vaccine Clinical Efficacy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Day, Tracey A.; Kublin, James G.

    2014-01-01

    The past few years have witnessed many promising advances in HIV prevention strategies involving pre-exposure prophylaxis approaches. Some may now wonder whether an HIV vaccine is still needed, and whether developing one is even possible. The partial efficacy reported in the RV144 trial and the encouraging results of the accompanying immune correlates analysis suggest that an effective HIV vaccine is achievable. These successes have provided a large impetus and guidance for conducting more HIV vaccine trials. A key lesson learned from RV144 is that assessment of HIV acquisition is now a feasible and valuable primary objective for HIV preventive vaccine trials. In this article we review how RV144 and other HIV vaccine efficacy trials have instructed the field and highlight some of the HIV vaccine concepts in clinical development. After a long and significant investment, HIV vaccine clinical research is paying off in the form of valuable lessons that, if applied effectively, will accelerate the path toward a safe and effective vaccine. Together with other HIV prevention approaches, preventive and therapeutic HIV vaccines will be invaluable tools in bringing the epidemic to an end. PMID:24033299

  19. Scientific considerations for the regulation and clinical evaluation of HIV/AIDS preventive vaccines: report from a WHO-UNAIDS Consultation 13-15 March 2001, Geneva, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    2002-07-01

    The consultation was jointly organized by the WHO-UNAIDS HIV Vaccine Initiative and the Quality Assurance and Safety of Biologicals Team of the World Health Organization (WHO). Thirty-four experts from 16 developed and developing countries attended the meeting, bringing together expertise from academic institutions, clinical trial centres, national and international regulatory authorities. Representatives of major pharmaceutical companies were also invited. The primary objective of the meeting was to identify gaps that need to be addressed from regulatory perspective to ensure appropriate progress of HIV vaccine development from basic research to human trials, licensing and future application, with a special focus on needs of developing countries. As a result of discussions, the following priority needs were identified and recommendations were made in order to establish an appropriate regulatory framework for the development and evaluation of preventive HIV/AIDS vaccines, which were divided in two main areas: (a) standardization and control of candidate HIV/AIDS vaccines, and (b) approaches to the conduct of clinical trials of candidate HIV/AIDS vaccines. PMID:12131232

  20. HIV vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Watkins, David I

    2010-01-01

    Updates on the Thai clinical vaccine trial, the discovery of additional neutralizing antibodies, and several new, nonhuman primate vaccine studies were presented at the 17th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections this year. Interestingly, the vaccine effect observed in the Thai trial diminished with time and was most effective in individuals who reported low-risk behavior. Two new neutralizing monoclonal antibodies were reported that were more potent and broadly reactive than the previously described monoclonal antibodies, giving the neutralization field an important boost. New studies were presented in macaques showing that a DNA prime modified vaccinia virus Ankara boost regimen can reduce acquisition of infection after a low-dose mucosal challenge with a heterologous pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strain. Data suggesting that attenuated SIV vaccines can induce cellular immune responses that control viral replication were also discussed. Finally, and perhaps most encouragingly, vaccination with cytomegalovirus-expressing SIV antigens provided robust levels of protection against the highly pathogenic SIVmac239 viral isolate. All of these promising results should serve to energize the HIV vaccine field. PMID:20516522

  1. HIV Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... and other STDs when used by men or women for anal sex. But we do know that HIV can’t travel through the nitrile barrier. It is safe to use any kind of lubricant with nitrile female condoms. Even if you use condoms the right way every time you have sex, there’s still ...

  2. Nanotechnology Applications to HIV Vaccines and Microbicides

    PubMed Central

    Boyapalle, Sandhya; Mohapatra, Subhra; Mohapatra, Shyam

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) remains one of the most serious threats to global health. Today there are no HIV vaccines which can prevent HIV infection. All of the candidates being studied are in the experimental stage. Preventive vaccine candidates are being tested in HIV-negative people to see if they can prevent infection. With of the development of a safe and effective vaccine still likely to be years away, topical microbicide formulations that are applied vaginally and rectally are receiving greater interest as an effective alternative to slow down the global spread of HIV. Current microbicide trials that aim to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV are using gels, creams, rings, films and there is also work underway to explore other types of delivery systems. There have been numerous reports on safety and lack of toxicity of the application of nanotechnology for targeted delivery and slow, sustained release of drugs, proteins, peptides or nucleic acids by any route to maximize effectiveness and minimize adverse effects. The application of nanotechnology for targeting drugs and macromolecules to specific tissues or cells is one of the most important areas in nanomedicine research. Thus far nanoparticles provide a strong platform to combine protein and DNA based vaccines/microbicides and will facilitate the production, preclinical evaluation and clinical testing in the future. PMID:22529630

  3. Preventive HIV Vaccine Acceptability and Behavioral Risk Compensation among a Random Sample of High-Risk Adults in Los Angeles (LA VOICES)

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Peter A; Lee, Sung-Jae; Duan, Naihua; Rudy, Ellen; Nakazono, Terry K; Boscardin, John; Kakinami, Lisa; Shoptaw, Steven; Diamant, Allison; Cunningham, William E

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess HIV vaccine acceptability among high-risk adults in Los Angeles. Study Setting Sexually transmitted disease clinics, needle/syringe exchange programs, Latino community health/HIV prevention programs. Study Design Cross-sectional survey using conjoint analysis. Participants were randomly selected using three-stage probability sampling. Data Collection Sixty-minute structured interviews. Participants rated acceptability of eight hypothetical vaccines, each with seven dichotomous attributes, and reported post-vaccination risk behavior intentions. Principal Findings Participants (n=1164; 55.7 percent male, 82.4 percent ethnic minority, mean age=37.4 years) rated HIV vaccine acceptability from 28.4 to 88.6; mean=54.5 (SD=18.8; 100-point scale). Efficacy had the greatest impact on acceptability, followed by side effects and out-of-pocket cost. Ten percent would decrease condom use after vaccination. Conclusions Findings support development of social marketing interventions to increase acceptability of “partial efficacy” vaccines, behavioral interventions to mitigate risk compensation, and targeted cost subsidies. PMID:19780857

  4. Ending the Global HIV/AIDS Pandemic: The Critical Role of an HIV Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Fauci, Anthony S.; Folkers, Gregory K.; Marston, Hilary D.

    2014-01-01

    While the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS pandemic continues, the incidence of HIV infections has fallen because of the deployment of antiretroviral drugs and multiple prevention modalities. To achieve a durable end to the pandemic, a vaccine remains essential. Recent advances in vaccinology offer new promise for an effective HIV vaccine. PMID:25151483

  5. Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG as an HIV Vaccine Vector

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Rosamund; Chege, Gerald; Shephard, Enid; Stutz, Helen; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 has resulted in a devastating AIDS pandemic. An effective HIV/AIDS vaccine that can be used to either, prevent HIV infection, control infection or prevent progression of the disease to AIDS is needed. In this review we discuss the use of Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the tuberculosis vaccine, as a vaccine vector for an HIV vaccine. Numerous features make BCG an attractive vehicle to deliver HIV antigens. It has a good safety profile, elicits long-lasting cellular immune responses and in addition manufacturing costs are affordable, a necessary consideration for developing countries. In this review we discuss the numerous factors that influence generation of a genetically stable recombinant BCG vaccine for HIV. PMID:20353397

  6. Future HIV Vaccine Acceptability among Young Adults in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayles, Jennifer N.; Macphail, Catherine L.; Newman, Peter A.; Cunningham, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Developing and disseminating a preventive HIV vaccine is a primary scientific and public health objective. However, little is known about HIV vaccine acceptability in the high-prevalence setting of South Africa--where young adults are likely to be targeted in early dissemination efforts. This study reports on six focus groups (n = 42) conducted in…

  7. Future HIV Vaccine Acceptability among Young Adults in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayles, Jennifer N.; Macphail, Catherine L.; Newman, Peter A.; Cunningham, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Developing and disseminating a preventive HIV vaccine is a primary scientific and public health objective. However, little is known about HIV vaccine acceptability in the high-prevalence setting of South Africa--where young adults are likely to be targeted in early dissemination efforts. This study reports on six focus groups (n = 42) conducted in

  8. Vaccinations for Adults with HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccinations for Adults with HIV Infection The table below shows which vaccinations you should have to protect your health if ... sure you and your healthcare provider keep your vaccinations up to date. Vaccine Do you need it? ...

  9. Organizing the HIV Vaccine Development Effort

    PubMed Central

    Voronin, Yegor; Snow, William

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review Describe and compare the diverse organizational structures and funding mechanisms applied to advance HIV preventive vaccine research and development, to help explain and inform evolving infrastructures and collaborative funding models. Recent Findings Based on models that have been tried, improved or abandoned over three decades, the field seems to have settled into a relatively stable set of diverse initiatives, each with its own organizational signature. At the same time, this set of organizations is forging cross-organizational collaborations, which promise to acquire newly emergent beneficial properties. Summary Strong motivation to expedite HIV vaccine R&D has driven a diversity of customized and inventive organizational approaches, largely government and foundation funded. While no one approach has proven a panacea, the field has evolved into a constellation of often overlapping organizations that complement or reinforce one another. The Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise, a responsive, rapidly evolving loose infrastructure, is an innovative collaboration to catalyze that evolution. PMID:23924997

  10. Global HIV vaccines: economic considerations.

    PubMed

    Petricciani, J C

    1994-01-01

    Information and education programs have had only very limited success in modifying sex behavior. It may therefore be that the development and widespread dissemination of an HIV vaccine through a global immunization program is the world's best hope for controlling the spread of HIV infection and AIDS. It is conservatively estimated that there would be 100 million initial recipients worldwide of an HIV vaccine. Even under the most optimistic circumstances, the cost of procuring and delivering the drug or drugs would be at least several billion dollars, the majority of which would be spent upon immunizing people in the developing world. Annual per capita financial resources allocated to medical care in developing countries are, however, often less than $10. Developed countries will most likely have to cover a substantial proportion of the costs of any eventual global HIV immunization strategy. Strategies must be developed now to deal with the issues of accessibility and use of HIV vaccines throughout the world. Policymakers in developed countries should therefore begin to give serious consideration to how to finance the procurement and distribution of HIV vaccines so that one or more systems can be put into place in anticipation of the approval of HIV vaccines. PMID:7865321

  11. Recent progress in HIV vaccines inducing mucosal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Pavot, Vincent; Rochereau, Nicolas; Lawrence, Philip; Girard, Marc P; Genin, Christian; Verrier, Bernard; Paul, Stéphane

    2014-07-31

    In spite of several attempts over many years at developing a HIV vaccine based on classical strategies, none has convincingly succeeded to date. As HIV is transmitted primarily by the mucosal route, particularly through sexual intercourse, understanding antiviral immunity at mucosal sites is of major importance. An ideal vaccine should elicit HIV-specific antibodies and mucosal CD8⁺ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) as a first line of defense at a very early stage of HIV infection, before the virus can disseminate into the secondary lymphoid organs in mucosal and systemic tissues. A primary focus of HIV preventive vaccine research is therefore the induction of protective immune responses in these crucial early stages of HIV infection. Numerous approaches are being studied in the field, including building upon the recent RV144 clinical trial. In this article, we will review current strategies and briefly discuss the use of adjuvants in designing HIV vaccines that induce mucosal immune responses. PMID:25009956

  12. Vaccinations and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Do not measure your viral load within 4 weeks of any vaccination. Flu shots have been studied ... live” vaccination in the past 2 or 3 weeks. Still, the “MMR” vaccine against measles, mumps and ...

  13. Vaccines to prevent leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajiv; Engwerda, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease that encompasses a range of clinical manifestations affecting people in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Epidemiological and experimental data indicate that protection from disease can be achieved in most people. In addition, we know how the host immune system must respond to infection in order to control parasite growth. However, there is still no vaccine for use in humans. Here, we review our understanding of host immunity following Leishmania infection and also discuss recent advances in the development of vaccines to prevent leishmaniasis, highlighting a new promising approach that targets the parasite hemoglobin receptor. PMID:25505961

  14. Vaccines to prevent leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajiv; Engwerda, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease that encompasses a range of clinical manifestations affecting people in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Epidemiological and experimental data indicate that protection from disease can be achieved in most people. In addition, we know how the host immune system must respond to infection in order to control parasite growth. However, there is still no vaccine for use in humans. Here, we review our understanding of host immunity following Leishmania infection and also discuss recent advances in the development of vaccines to prevent leishmaniasis, highlighting a new promising approach that targets the parasite hemoglobin receptor. PMID:25505961

  15. Socioecological Influences on Community Involvement in HIV Vaccine Research

    PubMed Central

    Frew, Paula M.; Archibald, Matthew; Hixson, Brooke; del Rio, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study investigated socioecological factors influencing HIV vaccine research participation among communities living in geographic areas with high HIV prevalence and high poverty rates. Methods We surveyed a sample of 453 adults ≥ 18 years from areas of high poverty and high HIV prevalence in metro Atlanta and differentiated the effects of individual-, social/organizational-, and community-level characteristics on participation in HIV vaccine research via multilevel modeling techniques that incorporated questionnaire, program, and census data. Results Models that adjusted for both individual-level covariates (such as race, gender, attitudes, and beliefs concerning HIV research), social/organizational- and community-level factors such as local HIV prevalence rates, revealed that the extent of HIV prevention-related programs and services in census tracts contributed to individuals’ likelihood of participation in an HIV vaccine study. Additionally, neighborhood-based organizations offering HIV medical and treatment programs, support groups, and services (e.g., food, shelter, and clothing) encourage greater HIV vaccine research participation. Conclusions The findings support the hypothesis that community-level factors facilitate participation in HIV vaccine research independent of both individual- and social/organizational-level factors. PMID:21722689

  16. Potential live vaccines for HIV.

    PubMed

    Burnett, M S; Wang, N; Hofmann, M; Barrie Kitto, G

    2000-11-22

    Potential live vaccines for HIV were developed using an Lpp-OmpA system to target an HIV antigen, reverse transcriptase, or an immunodominant epitope of this enzyme, to the outer membrane of an attenuated strain of Salmonella SL3261. These live vaccines were administered orally to mice, and fecal IgA and helper T cell responses were measured. Results indicated a fecal IgA response specific to HIV reverse transcriptase, as well as a reverse transcriptase-specific helper T cell response, as measured by proliferation assays. Additionally, tests with the epitope vaccines showed a selective cytotoxic CD8 T cell response. These results suggest that this method of antigen targeting to the outer membrane of attenuated bacterial vectors is very promising not only for HIV vaccine development, but also for antigens from other viral or bacterial pathogens, which could be inserted into the Lpp-OmpA protein construct, to elicit mucosal IgA and T cell responses. PMID:11115694

  17. Risk Behavior among Women enrolled in a Randomized Controlled Efficacy Trial of an Adenoviral Vector Vaccine to Prevent HIV Acquisition: the Step Study

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Richard M.; Metch, Barbara; Buchbinder, Susan; Cabello, Robinson; Donastorg, Yeycy; Figoroa, John-Peter; Adbul-Jauwad, Hend; Joseph, Patrice; Koenig, Ellen; Metzger, David; Sobieszycz, Magda; Tyndall, Mark; Zorilla, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Report of risk behavior, HIV incidence, and pregnancy rates among women participating in the Step Study, a phase IIB trial of MRKAd5 HIV-1 gag/pol/nef vaccine in HIV-negative individuals who were at high risk of HIV-1. Design Prospective multicenter, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial Methods Women were from North American (NA) and Caribbean and South America (CSA) sites. Risk behavior was collected at screening and 6-month intervals. Differences in characteristics between groups were tested with Chi-square, two-sided Fisher’s exact tests, and Wilcoxon rank sum tests. Generalized estimating equation models were used to assess behavioral change. Results Among 1134 enrolled women, the median number of male partners was 18; 73.8% reported unprotected vaginal sex, 15.9% unprotected anal sex and 10.8% evidence of a sexually transmitted infection in the 6 months prior to baseline. With 3344 person-years (p–y) of follow up, there were 15 incident HIV infections: incidence rate was 0.45 per 100/p-y (95% CI 0.25, 0.74). Crack cocaine use in both regions (relative risk [RR]=2.4 [1.7,3.3]) and in CSA, unprotected anal sex (RR=6.4 [3.8. 10.7]) and drug use (RR=4.1 [2.1, 8.0]) were baseline risk behaviors associated with HIV acquisition. There was a marked reduction in risk behaviors after study enrollment with some recurrence in unprotected vaginal sex. Of 963 non-sterilized women, 304 (31.6%) became pregnant. Conclusions Crack cocaine use and unprotected anal sex are important risk criteria to identify high-risk women for HIV efficacy trials. Pregnancy during the trial was a common occurrence and needs to be considered in trial planning for prevention trials in women. PMID:23807272

  18. Recent update in HIV vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite the tremendous efforts to develop a successful human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine, the quest for a safe and effective HIV vaccine seems to be remarkably long and winding. Disappointing results from previous clinical trials of VaxGen's AIDSVAXgp120 vaccine and MRKAd5 HIV-1 Gag/Pol/Nef vaccine emphasize that understanding the correlates of immune protection in HIV infection is the key to solve the puzzle. The modest vaccine efficacy from RV144 trial and the successive results obtained from the correlate of risk analysis have reinvigorated the HIV vaccine research field leading to various novel strategies. This paper will review the brief history and recent advances in HIV vaccine development. PMID:26866018

  19. Understanding HIV infection for the design of a therapeutic vaccine. Part II: Vaccination strategies for HIV.

    PubMed

    de Goede, A L; Vulto, A G; Osterhaus, A D M E; Gruters, R A

    2015-05-01

    HIV infection leads to a gradual loss CD4(+) T lymphocytes comprising immune competence and progression to AIDS. Effective treatment with combined antiretroviral drugs (cART) decreases viral load below detectable levels but is not able to eliminate the virus from the body. The success of cART is frustrated by the requirement of expensive lifelong adherence, accumulating drug toxicities and chronic immune activation resulting in increased risk of several non-AIDS disorders, even when viral replication is suppressed. Therefore, there is a strong need for therapeutic strategies as an alternative to cART. Immunotherapy, or therapeutic vaccination, aims to increase existing immune responses against HIV or induce de novo immune responses. These immune responses should provide a functional cure by controlling viral replication and preventing disease progression in the absence of cART. The key difficulty in the development of an HIV vaccine is our ignorance of the immune responses that control of viral replication, and thus how these responses can be elicited and how they can be monitored. Part one of this review provides an extensive overview of the (patho-) physiology of HIV infection. It describes the structure and replication cycle of HIV, the epidemiology and pathogenesis of HIV infection and the innate and adaptive immune responses against HIV. Part two of this review discusses therapeutic options for HIV. Prevention modalities and antiretroviral therapy are briefly touched upon, after which an extensive overview on vaccination strategies for HIV is provided, including the choice of immunogens and delivery strategies. PMID:25528627

  20. A social vaccine? Social and structural contexts of HIV vaccine acceptability among most-at-risk populations in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Newman, Peter A; Roungprakhon, Surachet; Tepjan, Suchon; Yim, Suzy; Walisser, Rachael

    2012-01-01

    A safe and efficacious preventive HIV vaccine would be a tremendous asset for low- and middle-income country (LMIC) settings, which bear the greatest global impact of AIDS. Nevertheless, substantial gaps between clinical trial efficacy and real-world effectiveness of already licensed vaccines demonstrate that availability does not guarantee uptake. In order to advance an implementation science of HIV vaccines centred on LMIC settings, we explored sociocultural and structural contexts of HIV vaccine acceptability among most-at-risk populations in Thailand, the site of the largest HIV vaccine trial ever conducted. Cross-cutting challenges for HIV vaccine uptake - social stigma, discrimination in healthcare settings and out-of-pocket vaccine cost - emerged in addition to population-specific barriers and opportunities. A 'social vaccine' describes broad sociocultural and structural interventions - culturally relevant vaccine promotion galvanised by communitarian norms, mitigating anti-gay, anti-injecting drug user and HIV-related stigma, combating discrimination in healthcare, decriminalising adult sex work and injecting drug use and providing vaccine cost subsidies - that create an enabling environment for HIV vaccine uptake among most-at-risk populations. By approaching culturally relevant social and structural interventions as integral mechanisms to the success of new HIV prevention technologies, biomedical advances may be leveraged in renewed opportunities to promote and optimise combination prevention. PMID:22780324

  1. HIV vaccine development: strategies for preclinical and clinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Stuart Z

    2013-11-01

    This article discusses HIV vaccine discovery and candidate vaccine testing in the context of current realities of funding and clinical trial practice. Lacking perfect animal models for testing candidate HIV vaccines, clinical investigators have proposed a strategy of iterative exploratory clinical trials in the model of cancer chemotherapy development. Problems with the appropriateness of this model to HIV vaccine development are discussed. Also, the future feasibility of this strategy in the context of increasing clinical trial costs and emerging new, efficacious prevention modalities is questioned. Strategies for making better use of animal models are presented as an alternative to iterative exploratory clinical efficacy testing. Some ways in which better data from preclinical studies can refine clinical product development are described. Finally, development of an HIV vaccine under the FDA's "Animal Rule" pathway to licensure when human efficacy studies are not feasible is discussed as a fall-back approach. Not making a preventive vaccine against HIV infection is simply not an option because eradication of AIDS will require a preventive vaccine. PMID:23379343

  2. Patent data mining: a tool for accelerating HIV vaccine innovation.

    PubMed

    Clark, K; Cavicchi, J; Jensen, K; Fitzgerald, R; Bennett, A; Kowalski, S P

    2011-05-31

    Global access to advanced vaccine technologies is challenged by the interrelated components of intellectual property (IP) management strategies, technology transfer (legal and technical) capabilities and the capacity necessary for accelerating R&D, commercialization and delivery of vaccines. Due to a negative association with the management of IP, patents are often overlooked as a vast resource of freely available, information akin to scientific journals as well as business and technological information and trends fundamental for formulating policies and IP management strategies. Therefore, a fundamental step towards facilitating global vaccine access will be the assembly, organization and analysis of patent landscapes, to identify the amount of patenting, ownership (assignees) and fields of technology covered. This is critical for making informed decisions (e.g., identifying licensees, building research and product development collaborations, and ascertaining freedom to operate). Such information is of particular interest to the HIV vaccine community where the HIV Vaccine Enterprise, have voiced concern that IP rights (particularly patents and trade secrets) may prevent data and materials sharing, delaying progress in research and development of a HIV vaccine. We have compiled and analyzed a representative HIV vaccine patent landscape for a prime-boost, DNA/adenoviral vaccine platform, as an example for identifying obstacles, maximizing opportunities and making informed IP management strategy decisions towards the development and deployment of an efficacious HIV vaccine. PMID:21496469

  3. HIV treatment for prevention.

    PubMed

    Ambrosioni, Juan; Calmy, Alexandra; Hirschel, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    "No virus, no transmission." Studies have repeatedly shown that viral load (the quantity of virus present in blood and sexual secretions) is the strongest predictor of HIV transmission during unprotected sex or transmission from infected mother to child. Effective treatment lowers viral load to undetectable levels. If one could identify and treat all HIV-infected people immediately after infection, the HIV/AIDS epidemic would eventually disappear.Such a radical solution is currently unrealistic. In reality, not all people get tested, especially when they fear stigma and discrimination. Thus, not all HIV-infected individuals are known. Of those HIV-positive individuals for whom the diagnosis is known, not all of them have access to therapy, agree to be treated, or are taking therapy effectively. Some on effective treatment will stop, and in others, the development of resistance will lead to treatment failure. Furthermore, resources are limited: should we provide drugs to asymptomatic HIV-infected individuals without indication for treatment according to guidelines in order to prevent HIV transmission at the risk of diverting funding from sick patients in urgent need? In fact, the preventive potential of anti-HIV drugs is unknown. Modellers have tried to fill the gap, but models differ depending on assumptions that are strongly debated. Further, indications for antiretroviral treatments expand; in places like Vancouver and San Francisco, the majority of HIV-positive individuals are now under treatment, and the incidence of new HIV infections has recently fallen. However, correlation does not necessarily imply causation. Finally, studies in couples where one partner is HIV-infected also appear to show that treatment reduces the risk of transmission.More definite studies, where a number of communities are randomized to either receive the "test-and-treat" approach or continue as before, are now in evaluation by funding agencies. Repeated waves of testing would precisely measure the incidence of HIV infection. Such trials face formidable logistical, practical and ethical obstacles. However, without definitive data, the intuitive appeal of "test-and-treat" is unlikely to translate into action on a global scale. In the meantime, based on the available evidence, we must strive to provide treatment to all those in medical need under the current medical guidelines. This will lead to a decrease in HIV transmission while "test-and-treat" is fully explored in prospective clinical trials. PMID:21612619

  4. A Polyvalent Clade B Virus-Like Particle HIV Vaccine Combined with Partially Protective Oral Preexposure Prophylaxis Prevents Simian–Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Macaques and Primes for Virus-Amplified Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Ted M.; Pereira, Lara E.; Luckay, Amara; McNicholl, Janet M.; García-Lerma, J. Gerardo; Heneine, Walid; Eugene, Hermancia S.; Pierce-Paul, Brooke R.; Zhang, Jining; Hendry, R. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Vaccination and preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with antiretrovirals have shown only partial protection from HIV-1 infection in human trials. Oral Truvada (emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate) is FDA approved as PrEP but partial adherence reduces efficacy. If combined as biomedical preventions (CBP), an HIV vaccine could protect when PrEP adherence is low and PrEP could prevent vaccine breakthroughs. The efficacy of combining oral PrEP with an HIV vaccine has not been evaluated in humans. We determined the efficacy of combining a DNA/virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine with partially effective intermittent PrEP in Indian rhesus macaques (RM). Eight RM received intramuscular inoculations of five DNA plasmids encoding four HIV-1 Clade B primary isolate Envs and SIVmac239 Gag (at weeks 0 and 4), followed by intramuscular and intranasal inoculations of homologous Gag VLPs and four Env VLPs (at weeks 12, 16, and 53). At week 61, we initiated weekly rectal exposures with heterologous SHIV162p3 (10 TCID50) along with oral Truvada (TDF, 22 mg/kg; FTC 20 mg/kg) dosing 2 h before and 22 h after each exposure. This PrEP regimen previously demonstrated 50% efficacy. Five controls (no vaccine, no PrEP) received weekly SHIV162p3. All controls were infected after a median of four exposures; the mean peak plasma viral load (VL) was 3.9×107 vRNA copies/ml. CBP protected seven of eight (87.5%) RM. The one infected CBP RM had a reduced peak VL of 8.8×105 copies/ml. SHIV exposures during PrEP amplified Gag and Env antibody titers in protected RM. These results suggest that combining oral PrEP with HIV vaccines could enhance protection against HIV-1 infection. PMID:24914761

  5. Preventing HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Coates, T J; Collins, C

    1998-07-01

    The primary way of preventing HIV infections is to change behaviors that enable transmission of the virus, specifically those behaviors relating to sex and drug injection. Realistic public health workers have focused on encouraging adoption of safer sexual practices, primarily condom use. The fundamental way to persuade people to engage in preventive practices is through targeted education aimed at particularly at-risk communities. Other effective behavioral interventions against HIV infections are: testing and follow-up counseling; comprehensive sex education; peer influence and community action; advertising and marketing; easing access to condoms; physician-patient dialogue; drug treatment; access to clean needles; and direct outreach. On the contrary, interventions that do not work are the following: one-time exposure to information; delivering a single message; abstinence-only programs; and coercive measures to identify people with HIV or their sexual partners. PMID:9648304

  6. HIV vaccine-induced sero-reactivity: a challenge for trial participants, researchers, and physicians.

    PubMed

    Voronin, Yegor; Zinszner, Helene; Karg, Carissa; Brooks, Katie; Coombs, Robert; Hural, John; Holt, Renee; Fast, Pat; Allen, Mary

    2015-03-01

    Antibody-inducing vaccines are a major focus in the preventive HIV vaccine field. Because the most common tests for HIV infection rely on detecting antibodies to HIV, they may also detect antibodies induced by a candidate HIV vaccine. The detection of vaccine-induced antibodies to HIV by serological tests is most commonly referred to as vaccine-induced sero-reactivity (VISR). VISR can be misinterpreted as a sign of HIV infection in a healthy study participant. In a participant who has developed vaccine-induced antibodies, accurate diagnosis of HIV infection (or lack thereof) may require specialized tests and algorithms (differential testing) that are usually not available in community settings. Organizations sponsoring clinical testing of preventive HIV vaccine candidates have an ethical obligation not only to inform healthy volunteers about the potential problems associated with participating in a clinical trial but also to help manage any resulting issues. This article explores the scope of VISR-related issues that become increasingly prevalent as the search for an effective HIV vaccine continues and will be paramount once a preventive vaccine is deployed. We also describe ways in which organizations conducting HIV vaccine trials have addressed these issues and outline areas where more work is needed. PMID:25649349

  7. How Should HIV Vaccine Efficacy Trials Be Conducted? Diverse U.S. Communities Speak Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kegeles, Susan M.; Johnson, Mallory O.; Strauss, Ronald P.; Ralston, Brady; Hays, Robert B.; Metzger, David S.; McLellan-Lemal, Eleanor; MacQueen, Kathleen M.

    2006-01-01

    Developing an effective vaccine remains a critical long-term approach to HIV prevention. Every efficacy trial should be responsive to the concerns of participating communities because the successful development of an HIV preventive vaccine will require long-term involvement of people who have been marginalized and who distrust the government and…

  8. How Should HIV Vaccine Efficacy Trials Be Conducted? Diverse U.S. Communities Speak Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kegeles, Susan M.; Johnson, Mallory O.; Strauss, Ronald P.; Ralston, Brady; Hays, Robert B.; Metzger, David S.; McLellan-Lemal, Eleanor; MacQueen, Kathleen M.

    2006-01-01

    Developing an effective vaccine remains a critical long-term approach to HIV prevention. Every efficacy trial should be responsive to the concerns of participating communities because the successful development of an HIV preventive vaccine will require long-term involvement of people who have been marginalized and who distrust the government and

  9. HIV vaccine: Can it be developed in the 21st century?

    PubMed

    Verma, Ramesh; Khanna, Pardeep; Chawla, Suraj; Dhankar, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection is a major public health problem especially in the developing countries. Once a person infects with HIV, it remained infected for lifelong. The advanced stage developed after 10-15 y of HIV infection that stage is called acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). From 1990 to 2000 the number of people living with HIV rose from 8 million to 27 million; since the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, AIDS has claimed almost 39million lives so far. Till now, there is no cure for HIV infection; however, after the introduction of effective treatment with antiretroviral (ARV) drugs the HIV individual can enjoy healthy and productive lives. Vaccine is safe and cost-effective to prevent illness, impairment, disability and death. Like other vaccines, a preventive HIV vaccine could help save millions of lives. All vaccines work the same way i.e. the antigen stimulate the immune system and develop antibodies. The ultimate goal is to develop a safe and effective vaccine that protects people worldwide from getting infected with HIV. However, some school of thought that vaccine may protects only some HIV people, it could have a major impact on the rates of transmission of HIV and this will help in control of epidemic, especially in populations where high rate of HIV transmission. In the past, some scientist doubted on the development of an effective polio vaccine, but now we are near to eradicate the polio from the world this is possible because of successful vaccination programmes. HIV vaccine research is aided by the not-for-profit International AIDS/HIV vaccine Initiative (IAVI), which helps to support and coordinate vaccine research, development, policy and advocacy around the world. Although the challenges for scientist are intimidating but scientists remain hopeful that they can develop safe and effective HIV vaccines for patients in future. PMID:26212081

  10. The Case for Adolescent HIV Vaccination in South Africa: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Nishila; Gray, Glenda; Bertram, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Despite comprising 0.7% of the world population, South Africa is home to 18% of the global human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence. Unyielding HIV subepidemics among adolescents threaten national attempts to curtail the disease burden. Should an HIV vaccine become available, establishing its point of entry into the health system becomes a priority. This study assesses the impact of school-based HIV vaccination and explores how variations in vaccine characteristics affect cost-effectiveness.The cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained associated with school-based adolescent HIV vaccination services was assessed using Markov modeling that simulated annual cycles based on national costing data. The estimation was based on a life expectancy of 70 years and employs the health care provider perspective.The simultaneous implementation of HIV vaccination services with current HIV management programs would be cost-effective, even at relatively higher vaccine cost. At base vaccine cost of US$ 12, the incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) was US$ 43 per QALY gained, with improved ICER values yielded at lower vaccine costs. The ICER was sensitive to duration of vaccine mediated protection and variations in vaccine efficacy. Data from this work demonstrate that vaccines offering longer duration of protection and at lower cost would result in improved ICER values.School-based HIV vaccine services of adolescents, in addition to current HIV prevention and treatment health services delivered, would be cost-effective. PMID:26825890

  11. “If It’s Not Working, Why Would They Be Testing It?”: mental models of HIV vaccine trials and preventive misconception among men who have sex with men in India

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Informed consent based on comprehension of potential risks and benefits is fundamental to the ethical conduct of clinical research. We explored mental models of candidate HIV vaccines and clinical trials that may impact on the feasibility and ethics of biomedical HIV prevention trials among men who have sex with men (MSM) in India. Methods A community-based research project was designed and implemented in partnership with community-based organizations serving MSM in Chennai and Mumbai. We conducted 12 focus groups (n = 68) with diverse MSM and 14 key informant interviews with MSM community leaders/service providers using a semi-structured interview guide to explore knowledge and beliefs about HIV vaccines and clinical trials. Focus groups (60–90 minutes) and interviews (45–60 minutes) were conducted in participants’ native language (Tamil in Chennai; Marathi or Hindi in Mumbai), audio-taped, transcribed and translated into English. We explored focus group and interview data using thematic analysis and a constant comparative method, with a focus on mental models of HIV vaccines and clinical trials. Results A mental model of HIV vaccine-induced seropositivity as “having HIV” resulted in fears of vaccine-induced infection and HIV stigma. Some participants feared inactivated vaccines might “drink blood” and “come alive”. Pervasive preventive misconception was based on a mental model of prevention trials as interventions, overestimation of likely efficacy of candidate vaccines and likelihood of being assigned to the experimental group, with expectations of protective benefits and decreased condom use. Widespread misunderstanding and lack of acceptance of placebo and random assignment supported perceptions of clinical trials as “cheating”. Key informants expressed concerns that volunteers from vulnerable Indian communities were being used as “experimental rats” to benefit high-income countries. Conclusions Evidence-informed interventions that engage with shared mental models among potential trial volunteers, along with policies and funding mechanisms that ensure local access to products that demonstrate efficacy in trials, may support the safe and ethical implementation of HIV vaccine trials in India. PMID:23919283

  12. Scientists Piggyback Experimental HIV Vaccine on Cold Viruses

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Scientists Piggyback Experimental HIV Vaccine on Cold Viruses Vaccine was well-tolerated, elicited 'moderate' response in ... study, Harvard researchers said they successfully used cold viruses to deliver an experimental HIV vaccine to humans. ...

  13. HIV-Host Interactions: Implications for Vaccine Design.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Barton F; Shaw, George M; Korber, Bette; Kelsoe, Garnett; Sodroski, Joseph; Hahn, Beatrice H; Borrow, Persephone; McMichael, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    Development of an effective AIDS vaccine is a global priority. However, the extreme diversity of HIV type 1 (HIV-1), which is a consequence of its propensity to mutate to escape immune responses, along with host factors that prevent the elicitation of protective immune responses, continue to hinder vaccine development. Breakthroughs in understanding of the biology of the transmitted virus, the structure and nature of its envelope trimer, vaccine-induced CD8 T cell control in primates, and host control of broadly neutralizing antibody elicitation have given rise to new vaccine strategies. Despite this promise, emerging data from preclinical trials reinforce the need for additional insight into virus-host biology in order to facilitate the development of a successful vaccine. PMID:26922989

  14. Modeling HIV Vaccines in Brazil: Assessing the Impact of a Future HIV Vaccine on Reducing New Infections, Mortality and Number of People Receiving ARV

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Maria Goretti P.; Forsythe, Steven; Menezes, Alexandre; Vuthoori, Shilpa; Possas, Cristina; Veloso, Valdiléa; de Fátima Lucena, Francisca; Stover, John

    2010-01-01

    Background The AIDS epidemic in Brazil remains concentrated in populations with high vulnerability to HIV infection, and the development of an HIV vaccine could make an important contribution to prevention. This study modeled the HIV epidemic and estimated the potential impact of an HIV vaccine on the number of new infections, deaths due to AIDS and the number of people receiving ARV treatment, under various scenarios. Methods and Findings The historical HIV prevalence was modeled using Spectrum and projections were made from 2010 to 2050 to study the impact of an HIV vaccine with 40% to 70% efficacy, and 80% coverage of adult population, specific groups such as MSM, IDU, commercial sex workers and their partners, and 15 year olds. The possibility of disinhibition after vaccination, neglecting medium- and high-risk groups, and a disease-modifying vaccine were also considered. The number of new infections and deaths were reduced by 73% and 30%, respectively, by 2050, when 80% of adult population aged 15–49 was vaccinated with a 40% efficacy vaccine. Vaccinating medium- and high-risk groups reduced new infections by 52% and deaths by 21%. A vaccine with 70% efficacy produced a great decline in new infections and deaths. Neglecting medium- and high-risk population groups as well as disinhibition of vaccinated population reduced the impact or even increased the number of new infections. Disease-modifying vaccine also contributed to reducing AIDS deaths, the need for ART and new HIV infections. Conclusions Even in a country with a concentrated epidemic and high levels of ARV coverage, such as Brazil, moderate efficacy vaccines as part of a comprehensive package of treatment and prevention could have a major impact on preventing new HIV infections and AIDS deaths, as well as reducing the number of people on ARV. Targeted vaccination strategies may be highly effective and cost-beneficial. PMID:20668523

  15. HIV prevention risks for Black women in Canada.

    PubMed

    Williams, Charmaine C; Newman, Peter A; Sakamoto, Izumi; Massaquoi, Notisha A

    2009-01-01

    The future availability of HIV vaccines can increase options available to Canadian Black women for risk reduction. However, current conceptual frameworks do not adequately address barriers to HIV prevention for this population, and may be inadequate to address challenges with vaccines. This study explored knowledge and attitudes regarding HIV vaccines and associated prevention methods to inform appropriate conceptual frameworks for their dissemination to Canadian Black women. We completed four 90-min focus groups with women (n=26) of African or Caribbean origins, and six interviews with key informants providing health and social services in the Black communities of Toronto. The participants suggested that there were significant risks associated with seeking prevention information and attempting to reduce exposure to HIV infection. They described individual, familial, community and institutional domains of risk and predicted the same spectrum of risk for HIV vaccines. Participants advocated for education, empowerment and institutional change to create a supportive environment for vaccines and other HIV prevention methods. They further indicated that preparation for vaccine dissemination will need to prioritize building trust between women of the Black communities and institutions in the research, health and government sectors. PMID:18952342

  16. Novel vaccine vectors for HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Picker, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    The ultimate solution to the global HIV-1 epidemic will probably require the development of a safe and effective vaccine. Multiple vaccine platforms have been evaluated in both preclinical and clinical trials, but, given the disappointing results of the clinical efficacy studies so far, novel vaccine approaches are needed. In this Opinion article, we discuss the scientific basis and clinical potential of novel adenovirus and cytomegalovirus vaccine vectors for HIV-1 as two contrasting, but potentially complementary, vector approaches. Both of these vector platforms have demonstrated partial protection against stringent simian immunodeficiency virus challenges in rhesus monkeys using different immunological mechanisms. PMID:25296195

  17. Are Clade Specific HIV Vaccines a Necessity? An Analysis Based on Mathematical Models

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, Dobromir; Kublin, James G.; Ramsey, Scott; Corey, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    As HIV-1 envelope immune responses are critical to vaccine related protection, most candidate HIV vaccines entering efficacy trials are based upon a clade specific design. This need for clade specific vaccine prototypes markedly reduces the implementation of potentially effective HIV vaccines. We utilized a mathematical model to determine the effectiveness of immediate roll-out of a non-clade matched vaccine with reduced efficacy compared to constructing clade specific vaccines, which would take considerable time to manufacture and test in safety and efficacy trials. We simulated the HIV epidemic in San Francisco (SF) and South Africa (SA) and projected effectiveness of three vaccination strategies: i) immediate intervention with a 2040% vaccine efficacy (VE) non-matched vaccine, ii) delayed intervention by developing a 50% VE clade-specific vaccine, and iii) immediate intervention with a non-matched vaccine replaced by a clade-specific vaccine when developed. Immediate vaccination with a non-clade matched vaccine, even with reduced efficacy, would prevent thousands of new infections in SF and millions in SA over 30years. Vaccination with 50% VE delayed for five years needs six and 12years in SA to break-even with immediate 20 and 30% VE vaccination, respectively, while not able to surpass the impact of immediate 40% VE vaccination over 30years. Replacing a 30% VE with a 50% VE vaccine after 5years reduces the HIV acquisition by 5% compared to delayed vaccination. The immediate use of an HIV vaccine with reduced VE in high risk communities appears desirable over a short time line but higher VE should be the pursued to achieve strong long-term impact. Our analysis illustrates the importance of developing surrogate markers (correlates of protection) to allow bridging types of immunogenicity studies to support more rapid assessment of clade specific vaccines. PMID:26844286

  18. Preventing Cervical Cancer with HPV Vaccines

    Cancer.gov

    Cervical cancer can be prevented with HPV vaccines. NCI-supported researchers helped establish HPV as a cause of cervical cancer. They also helped create the first HPV vaccines, were involved in the vaccine trials, and contribute to ongoing studies.

  19. [Routine vaccinations in children and adults infected with HIV].

    PubMed

    Dabis, F; Lepage, P; Msellati, P; Van de Perre, P; Nsengumuremyi, F; Hitimana, D G; Ladner, J; Leroy, V

    1994-01-01

    Five questions were raised in 1986 regarding routine immunization of children infected by the HIV: do vaccines protect these children, both in terms of immunogenicity and clinical efficacy? is immunization, particularly with live attenuated vaccines associated with an increased risk of adverse events? could the stimulation by vaccine antigens precipitate the course of paediatric HIV infection and therefore be dangerous? what are the clinical and epidemiological features of vaccine preventable diseases among HIV-infected children? what is the risk of nosocomial transmission of HIV associated with immunization practices? Based on the best available information, the WHO formulated recommendations in 1987 and updated them in 1989. These recommendations are in general agreement with those proposed during the same period in the USA and in France (table 1). This paper provides an update on the scientific knowledge in this field, focusing on routine childhood immunization in the context of HIV infection, especially in developing countries. The cases of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), measles vaccine, diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis and poliomyelitis vaccines are reviewed. For each of these antigens, the experience of the authors in Kigali, the capital city of Rwanda, is used as an example. A brief overview of the issue of adult immunization in the context of HIV infection concludes this review. Paediatric HIV infection should not be considered as a limiting factor in the implementation and the progression of the EPI worldwide. Experience accumulated over the last seven years, particularly in Africa, indicates that the WHO recommendations should not be modified. PMID:7921682

  20. In “Step” with HIV Vaccines? A Content Analysis of Local Recruitment Campaigns for an International HIV Vaccine Study

    PubMed Central

    Frew, Paula M.; Macias, Wendy; Chan, Kayshin; Harding, Ashley C.

    2009-01-01

    During the past two decades of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, several recruitment campaigns were designed to generate community involvement in preventive HIV vaccine clinical trials. These efforts utilized a blend of advertising and marketing strategies mixed with public relations and community education approaches to attract potential study participants to clinical trials (integrated marketing communications). Although more than 30,000 persons worldwide have participated in preventive HIV vaccine studies, no systematic analysis of recruitment campaigns exists. This content analysis study was conducted to examine several United States and Canadian recruitment campaigns for one of the largest-scale HIV vaccine trials to date (the “Step Study”). This study examined persuasive features consistent with the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM) including message content, personal relevance of HIV/AIDS and vaccine research, intended audiences, information sources, and other contextual features. The results indicated variation in messages and communication approaches with gay men more exclusively targeted in these regions. Racial/ethnic representations also differed by campaign. Most of the materials promote affective evaluation of the information through heuristic cueing. Implications for subsequent campaigns and research directions are discussed. PMID:19609373

  1. In "Step" with HIV Vaccines? A Content Analysis of Local Recruitment Campaigns for an International HIV Vaccine Study.

    PubMed

    Frew, Paula M; Macias, Wendy; Chan, Kayshin; Harding, Ashley C

    2009-01-01

    During the past two decades of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, several recruitment campaigns were designed to generate community involvement in preventive HIV vaccine clinical trials. These efforts utilized a blend of advertising and marketing strategies mixed with public relations and community education approaches to attract potential study participants to clinical trials (integrated marketing communications). Although more than 30,000 persons worldwide have participated in preventive HIV vaccine studies, no systematic analysis of recruitment campaigns exists. This content analysis study was conducted to examine several United States and Canadian recruitment campaigns for one of the largest-scale HIV vaccine trials to date (the "Step Study"). This study examined persuasive features consistent with the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM) including message content, personal relevance of HIV/AIDS and vaccine research, intended audiences, information sources, and other contextual features. The results indicated variation in messages and communication approaches with gay men more exclusively targeted in these regions. Racial/ethnic representations also differed by campaign. Most of the materials promote affective evaluation of the information through heuristic cueing. Implications for subsequent campaigns and research directions are discussed. PMID:19609373

  2. HIV-1 Tat B-cell epitope vaccination was ineffectual in preventing viral rebound after ART cessation: HIV rebound with current ART appears to be due to infection with new endogenous founder virus and not to resurgence of pre-existing Tat-dependent viremia.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Gideon; Damiano, Eve; Donikyan, Mardik; Pasha, Malika; Beckwith, Erik; Chicca, John

    2012-10-01

    CD4 T cell activation, essential for productive HIV infection, is provided initially in acute HIV infection by innate immune system secretion of activating cytokines. This cytokine response wanes with time and long-term activation of CD4 cells is maintained by HIV Tat protein secreted by HIV infected cells. Structured treatment interruption (STI) in well-controlled antiretroviral-treated (ART) subjects was explored a decade ago with a consensus finding that, in most subjects, HIV levels rebounded within four weeks to pre-ART levels. Based on these observations we initiated a randomized placebo-controlled study of a universal anti-Tat epitope vaccine, TUTI-16, to determine if immunological blockade of Tat would prevent HIV rebound after ART cessation. TUTI-16 immunization was safe, with predominantly mild local and systemic injection-related adverse reactions. TUTI-16 was also immunogenic, with high levels of anti-Tat antibodies compared with levels previously shown to reduce HIV replication in vivo. Of 21 subjects analyzed, 13 (62%) had HIV rebounds vs. 8 (38%) that remained aviremia, but this distribution was not vaccine-related (p = 0.61 log-rank (Mantel-Cox) test), nullifying our hypothesis that anti-Tat antibodies would block rebound of Tat-dependent set-point HIV viremia after ART cessation. Our present findings are consistent with recent molecular findings that rebounding virus following STI is homogeneous and unrelated to previous circulating HIV, suggesting that rebounding HIV represents new founder virus, akin to the original acute HIV infection. We propose, therefore, that STI may have potential as a practical and economical approach to testing the safety and efficacy of candidate prophylactic HIV vaccines. PMID:23095869

  3. Human papillomavirus vaccination in HIV-infected women: need for increased coverage.

    PubMed

    Kojic, Erna Milunka; Rana, Aadia I; Cu-Uvin, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women carry a significant burden on human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and associated diseases. As HIV-infected individuals are living longer, the prevalence of HPV infection is rising and HPV-associated cytological abnormalities remain high despite successful treatments of HIV infection. Several HPV vaccines are currently available and recommended for adolescents and adults up to age 26. The vaccines are safe, immunogenic and effective in preventing diseases due to HPV types included in the vaccines, particularly among persons without prior HPV exposure. This review summarizes available data on the use of the HPV vaccines among HIV-infected women. The immunogenicity and safety of the vaccines are highlighted and in particular, barriers to vaccination among HIV-infected women are discussed. PMID:26599305

  4. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination in HIV-infected Women: Need for Increased Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Kojic, Erna Milunka; Rana, Aadia I.; Cu-Uvin, Susan

    2016-01-01

    HIV-infected women carry a significant burden on HPV infection and associated diseases. As HIV-infected individuals are living longer, the prevalence of HPV infection is rising and HPV-associated cytologic abnormalities remain high despite successful treatments of HIV infection. Several HPV vaccines are currently available and recommended for adolescents and adults up to age 26. The vaccine is safe, immunogenic and effective in preventing diseases due to HPV types included in the vaccines, particularly among persons without prior HPV exposure. This review summarizes available data on the use of the HPV vaccines among HIV infected women. The immunogenicity and safety of the vaccine is highlighted and in particular, barriers to vaccination among HIV infected women are discussed. PMID:26599305

  5. HIV vaccine acceptability among immigrant Thai residents in Los Angeles: a mixed-method approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Jae; Brooks, Ronald A; Newman, Peter A; Seiden, Danielle; Sangthong, Rassamee; Duan, Naihua

    2008-11-01

    This study examined HIV vaccine acceptability among immigrant Thai residents in Los Angeles, California. We combined a qualitative research method (focus groups) with an innovative market research method (conjoint analysis). Focus groups explored social issues, concerns, barriers and motivators associated with HIV vaccine acceptability. Conjoint analysis was used to assess preferences among eight hypothetical HIV vaccines with varying attribute profiles and the impact of various attributes on acceptability. Five main themes were identified in the focus groups regarding acceptance and utilization of preventive HIV vaccines: (1) vaccine characteristics, such as efficacy, physical side-effects and cost, (2) fear of a vaccine, (3) vaccine acceptability and optimism, (4) social and family responses and (5) behavioral disinhibition. Conjoint analysis revealed HIV vaccine acceptability ranging from 7.4 (SD = 19.4) to 85.2 (SD = 24.3) across eight hypothetical vaccines. The vaccine with the highest acceptability had the following attributes: 99% efficacy, no side-effects, 10 years of protection, protects against one sub-type, free, one dose and given by injection. Vaccine efficacy had the greatest impact on acceptability (51.4, p=.005), followed by side-effects (11.1, p=.005) and duration of protection (8.3, p=.005). Despite some apprehensions and concerns, Thai residents perceived an HIV vaccine as making an important contribution to society and to protecting oneself and one's family from HIV infection. Nevertheless, acceptability of a partially efficacious vaccine may be low, suggesting the need for tailored social marketing interventions that might emphasize a collectivistic rather than an individualistic focus. Assessing HIV vaccine acceptability using a mixed-method approach is feasible with Thai residents and should lend itself to HIV vaccine research with other Asian Pacific Islander populations in the US. PMID:18608068

  6. Safety of licensed vaccines in HIV-infected persons: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Safety of vaccines remains a cornerstone of building public trust on the use of these cost-effective and life-saving public health interventions. In some settings, particularly Sub-Saharan Africa, there is a high prevalence of HIV infection and a high burden of vaccine-preventable diseases. There is evidence suggesting that the immunity induced by some commonly used vaccines is not durable in HIV-infected persons, and therefore, repeated vaccination may be considered to ensure optimal vaccine-induced immunity in this population. However, some vaccines, particularly the live vaccines, may be unsafe in HIV-infected persons. There is lack of evidence on the safety profile of commonly used vaccines among HIV-infected persons. We are therefore conducting a systematic review to assess the safety profile of routine vaccines administered to HIV-infected persons. Methods/Design We will select studies conducted in any setting where licensed and effective vaccines were administered to HIV-infected persons. We will search for eligible studies in PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Scopus, Africa-Wide, PDQ-Evidence and CINAHL as well as reference lists of relevant publications. We will screen search outputs, select studies and extract data in duplicate, resolving discrepancies by discussion and consensus. Discussion Globally, immunisation is a major public health strategy to mitigate morbidity and mortality caused by various infectious disease-causing agents. In general, there are efforts to increase vaccination coverage worldwide, and for these efforts to be successful, safety of the vaccines is paramount, even among people living with HIV, who in some situations may require repeated vaccination. Results from this systematic review will be discussed in the context of the safety of routine vaccines among HIV-infected persons. From the safety perspective, we will also discuss whether repeat vaccination strategies may be feasible among HIV-infected persons. Systematic review registration PROSPERO CRD42014009794. PMID:25212760

  7. Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination in HIV-negative men who have sex with men to prevent recurrent high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Ashish A; Chiao, Elizabeth Y; Das, Prajnan; Cantor, Scott B

    2014-12-01

    We examined the long-term clinical and economic benefits of quadrivalent human papillomavirus (qHPV) vaccine as a secondary/adjunct prevention strategy in the prevention of recurrent high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN) in HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM) and are 27 years or older. We constructed a Markov model to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of two strategies: (1) no qHPV vaccine after treatment for HGAIN versus (2) qHPV vaccine after treatment for HGAIN. Model parameters, including natural history of anal cancer, vaccine efficacy measured in terms of hazard ratio (HR) (decrease in the risk of recurrent HGAIN), HGAIN treatment efficacy, utilities, and costs, were obtained from the literature. The outcomes were measured in terms of lifetime risk of anal cancer, lifetime cost, quality-adjusted life years, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). Sensitivity analysis was conducted on all model parameters. We found that vaccinating HIV-negative MSM reduced the lifetime risk of anal cancer by 60.77% at an ICER of US$87,240 per quality-adjusted life-year. The results were highly sensitive to vaccine efficacy, transition of HGAIN to anal cancer, cost of treatment for HGAIN, vaccine degree of protection over time, and the vaccine duration of protection and less sensitive to HPV clearance, cost of qHPV vaccine, and the transitions from normal to low-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (LGAIN) and normal to HGAIN. With an HR of 0.3, the ICER was well below a $50,000 willingness-to-pay threshold; with an HR of 0.5, the ICER was still below a threshold of $100,000. The most critical disease-related factor influencing the cost-effectiveness was the progression of HGAIN to anal cancer. At an annual transition probability below 0.001, the ICER was below $50,000. Vaccinating HIV-negative MSM treated for HGAIN decreases the lifetime risk of anal cancer and is likely to be a cost-effective intervention. PMID:25444820

  8. Vaccine Preventable Disease on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bart, Kenneth J.

    1984-01-01

    While morbidity and mortality from vaccine preventable diseases have declined, some college students remain susceptible to measles, rubella, diptheria, tetanus, or polio. Colleges and universities have the opportunity to ensure protection of students, faculty, and employees by establishing and enforcing immunization requirements. (Author/DF)

  9. Dendritic cell based vaccines for HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Garca, Felipe; Plana, Montserrat; Climent, Nuria; Len, Agathe; Gatell, Jose M; Gallart, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells have a central role in HIV infection. On one hand, they are essential to induce strong HIV-specific CD4+ helper T-cell responses that are crucial to achieve a sustained and effective HIV-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte able to control HIV replication. On the other hand, DCs contribute to virus dissemination and HIV itself could avoid a correct antigen presentation. As the efficacy of immune therapy and therapeutic vaccines against HIV infection has been modest in the best of cases, it has been hypothesized that ex vivo generated DC therapeutic vaccines aimed to induce effective specific HIV immune responses might overcome some of these problems. In fact, DC-based vaccine clinical trials have yielded the best results in this field. However, despite these encouraging results, functional cure has not been reached with this strategy in any patient. In this Commentary, we discuss new approaches to improve the efficacy and feasibility of this type of therapeutic vaccine. PMID:23912672

  10. HIV-1 Prevention for HIV-1 Serodiscordant Couples

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Kathryn; Baeten, Jared M.; Coates, Thomas J.; Kurth, Ann; Mugo, Nelly R.

    2013-01-01

    A substantial proportion of HIV-1-infected individuals in sub-Saharan Africa are in stable relationships with HIV-1-uninfected partners, and HIV-1 serodiscordant couples thus represent an important target population for HIV-1 prevention. Couple-based HIV-1 testing and counseling facilitates identification of HIV-1 serodiscordant couples, counseling about risk reduction, and referrals to HIV-1 treatment, reproductive health services, and support services. Maximizing HIV-1 prevention for HIV-1 serodiscordant couples requires a combination of strategies, including counseling about condoms, sexual risk, fertility, contraception, and the clinical and prevention benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for the HIV-1-infected partner; provision of clinical care and ART for the HIV-1-infected partner; antenatal care and services to prevent mother to child transmission for HIV-1- infected pregnant women; male circumcision for HIV-1-uninfected men; and, pending guidelines and demonstration projects, oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV-1-uninfected partners. PMID:22415473

  11. Enhancing dendritic cell activation and HIV vaccine effectiveness through nanoparticle vaccination.

    PubMed

    Glass, Joshua J; Kent, Stephen J; De Rose, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Novel vaccination approaches are needed to prevent and control human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. A growing body of literature demonstrates the potential of nanotechnology to modulate the human immune system and generate targeted, controlled immune responses. In this Review, we summarize important advances in how 'nanovaccinology' can be used to develop safe and effective vaccines for HIV. We highlight the central role of dendritic cells in the immune response to vaccination and describe how nanotechnology can be used to enhance delivery to and activation of these important antigen-presenting cells. Strategies employed to improve biodistribution are discussed, including improved lymph node delivery and mucosal penetration concepts, before detailing methods to enhance the humoral and/or cellular immune response to vaccines. We conclude with a commentary on the current state of nanovaccinology. PMID:26783186

  12. HIV Vaccine: Recent Advances, Current Roadblocks, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Rubens, Muni; Ramamoorthy, Venkataraghavan; Saxena, Anshul; Shehadeh, Nancy; Appunni, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    HIV/AIDS is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. In spite of successful interventions and treatment protocols, an HIV vaccine would be the ultimate prevention and control strategy. Ever since identification of HIV/AIDS, there have been meticulous efforts for vaccine development. The specific aim of this paper is to review recent vaccine efficacy trials and associated advancements and discuss the current challenges and future directions. Recombinant DNA technologies greatly facilitated development of many viral products which were later incorporated into vectors for effective vaccines. Over the years, a number of scientific approaches have gained popularity and include the induction of neutralizing antibodies in late 1980s, induction of CD8 T cell in early 1990s, and combination approaches currently. Scientists have hypothesized that stimulation of right sequences of somatic hypermutations could induce broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) capable of effective neutralization and viral elimination. Studies have shown that a number of host and viral factors affect these processes. Similarly, eliciting specific CD8 T cells immune responses through DNA vaccines hold future promises. In summary, future studies should focus on the continuous fight between host immune responses and ever-evasive viral factors for effective vaccines. PMID:26579546

  13. HIV-Host Interactions: Implications for Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Barton F.; Shaw, George M.; Korber, Bette; Kelsoe, Garnett; Sodroski, Joseph; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Borrow, Persephone; McMichael, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Development of an effective AIDS vaccine is a global priority. However, the extreme diversity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), which is a consequence of its propensity to mutate to escape immune responses, along with host factors that prevent the elicitation of protective immune responses, continue to hinder vaccine development. Breakthroughs in understanding of the biology of the transmitted virus, the structure and nature of its envelope trimer, vaccine-induced CD8 T cell control in primates, and host control of broadly neutralizing antibody elicitation have given rise to new vaccine strategies. Despite this promise, emerging data from preclinical trials reinforce the need for gaining additional insight into virus – host biology in order to facilitate the development of a successful vaccine. PMID:26922989

  14. Incentives and disincentives to participate in prophylactic HIV vaccine research.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, R A; Temoshok, L R; Virochsiri, K

    1995-05-01

    An anonymous cross-sectional paper-and-pencil survey was used to assess incentives and disincentives to participate in a Phase I preventive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine trial in a potential Thai target population. A total of 255 persons employed in health care service and research settings completed questionnaires after attending informational briefings regarding the proposed vaccine product and the planned trial procedures. Willingness to participate was related to self-perceived benefits from joining a preventive vaccine trial, as well as to concerns about product safety and social discrimination that might result from participation. The distinction between positive results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay from vaccine administration and positivity from HIV infection was unclear for many participants. Men were more willing to participate than women, and there was a trend toward greater willingness to participate in those who were less educated. Preparations for preventive vaccine trials may be more successful if they emphasize personal benefits of trial participation, clearly address safety issues, and consider ways to prevent social discrimination against participants. PMID:7712233

  15. Prevention of HIV among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Rotheram-Borus, M J; O'Keefe, Z; Kracker, R; Foo, H H

    2000-03-01

    Adolescents are at risk for HIV primarily through their sexual behavior. A comprehensive prevention strategy includes a national HIV campaign based on social marketing principles; targeted social marketing, intensive skill building, and sexually transmitted disease control programs for youth at high risk; programs targeting institutions (e.g., school health clinics), providers, and parents; and interventions to identify and reduce risk acts among seropositive youth. The U.S. focus for HIV prevention has been single-session educational classes (an ineffective strategy) or intensive multi-session, small-group interventions for youth at high risk (demonstrated to increase condom use by about 30%). There is a need to expand the range, modalities, and dissemination of HIV prevention programs nationally, to recognize (especially by policymakers) limitations of abstinence programs, and to increase early detection of HIV among youth. PMID:11507791

  16. Creating an African HIV Clinical Research and Prevention Trials Network: HIV Prevalence, Incidence and Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Anatoli; Price, Matt A.; Lakhi, Shabir; Karita, Etienne; Inambao, Mubiana; Sanders, Eduard J.; Anzala, Omu; Latka, Mary H.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Asiki, Gershim; Ssetaala, Ali; Ruzagira, Eugene; Allen, Susan; Farmer, Paul; Hunter, Eric; Mutua, Gaudensia; Makkan, Heeran; Tichacek, Amanda; Brill, Ilene K.; Fast, Pat; Stevens, Gwynn; Chetty, Paramesh; Amornkul, Pauli N.; Gilmour, Jill

    2015-01-01

    HIV epidemiology informs prevention trial design and program planning. Nine clinical research centers (CRC) in sub-Saharan Africa conducted HIV observational epidemiology studies in populations at risk for HIV infection as part of an HIV prevention and vaccine trial network. Annual HIV incidence ranged from below 2% to above 10% and varied by CRC and risk group, with rates above 5% observed in Zambian men in an HIV-discordant relationship, Ugandan men from Lake Victoria fishing communities, men who have sex with men, and several cohorts of women. HIV incidence tended to fall after the first three months in the study and over calendar time. Among suspected transmission pairs, 28% of HIV infections were not from the reported partner. Volunteers with high incidence were successfully identified and enrolled into large scale cohort studies. Over a quarter of new cases in couples acquired infection from persons other than the suspected transmitting partner. PMID:25602351

  17. Creating an African HIV clinical research and prevention trials network: HIV prevalence, incidence and transmission.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Anatoli; Price, Matt A; Lakhi, Shabir; Karita, Etienne; Inambao, Mubiana; Sanders, Eduard J; Anzala, Omu; Latka, Mary H; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Asiki, Gershim; Ssetaala, Ali; Ruzagira, Eugene; Allen, Susan; Farmer, Paul; Hunter, Eric; Mutua, Gaudensia; Makkan, Heeran; Tichacek, Amanda; Brill, Ilene K; Fast, Pat; Stevens, Gwynn; Chetty, Paramesh; Amornkul, Pauli N; Gilmour, Jill

    2015-01-01

    HIV epidemiology informs prevention trial design and program planning. Nine clinical research centers (CRC) in sub-Saharan Africa conducted HIV observational epidemiology studies in populations at risk for HIV infection as part of an HIV prevention and vaccine trial network. Annual HIV incidence ranged from below 2% to above 10% and varied by CRC and risk group, with rates above 5% observed in Zambian men in an HIV-discordant relationship, Ugandan men from Lake Victoria fishing communities, men who have sex with men, and several cohorts of women. HIV incidence tended to fall after the first three months in the study and over calendar time. Among suspected transmission pairs, 28% of HIV infections were not from the reported partner. Volunteers with high incidence were successfully identified and enrolled into large scale cohort studies. Over a quarter of new cases in couples acquired infection from persons other than the suspected transmitting partner. PMID:25602351

  18. Clinical Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness of Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccination in HIV-Negative Men Who Have Sex with Men to Prevent Recurrent High-Grade Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Ashish A.; Chiao, Elizabeth Y.; Das, Prajnan; Cantor, Scott B.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the long-term clinical and economic benefits of quadrivalent human papillomavirus (qHPV) vaccine as a secondary/adjunct prevention strategy in the prevention of recurrent high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN) in HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM) and are 27 years or older. We constructed a Markov model to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of two strategies: (1) no qHPV vaccine after treatment for HGAIN versus (2) qHPV vaccine after treatment for HGAIN. Model parameters, including natural history of anal cancer, vaccine efficacy measured in terms of hazard ratio (HR) (risk of recurrent HGAIN), HGAIN treatment efficacy, utilities, and costs, were obtained from the literature. The outcomes were measured in terms of lifetime risk of anal cancer, lifetime cost, quality-adjusted life years, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). Sensitivity analysis was conducted on all model parameters. We found that vaccinating HIV-negative MSM reduced the lifetime risk of anal cancer by 60.77% at an ICER of US$87,240 (95% CI, $22,301–$144,187) per quality-adjusted life-year. The results were highly sensitive to vaccine efficacy, transition of HGAIN to anal cancer, cost of treatment for HGAIN, vaccine degree of protection over time, and the vaccine duration of protection and less sensitive to HPV clearance, cost of qHPV, and the transitions from normal to low-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (LGAIN) and normal to HGAIN. With an HR of 0.3, the ICER was well below a $50,000 willingness-to-pay threshold; with an HR of 0.5, the ICER was still below a threshold of $100,000. The most critical disease-related factor influencing the cost-effectiveness was the progression of HGAIN to anal cancer. At an annual transition probability below 0.001, the ICER was below $50,000. Vaccinating HIV-negative MSM treated for HGAIN decreases the lifetime risk of anal cancer and is likely to be a cost-effective intervention. PMID:25444820

  19. A Small Dose of HIV? HIV Vaccine Mental Models and Risk Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Peter A.; Seiden, Danielle S.; Roberts, Kathleen J.; Kakinami, Lisa; Duan, Naihua

    2009-01-01

    Existing knowledge and beliefs related to HIV vaccines provide an important basis for the development of risk communication messages to support future HIV vaccine dissemination. This study explored HIV vaccine mental models among adults from segments of the population disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS. Nine focus groups were conducted with…

  20. A Small Dose of HIV? HIV Vaccine Mental Models and Risk Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Peter A.; Seiden, Danielle S.; Roberts, Kathleen J.; Kakinami, Lisa; Duan, Naihua

    2009-01-01

    Existing knowledge and beliefs related to HIV vaccines provide an important basis for the development of risk communication messages to support future HIV vaccine dissemination. This study explored HIV vaccine mental models among adults from segments of the population disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS. Nine focus groups were conducted with

  1. Pneumococcal vaccination in people living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Thornhill, John; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Orkin, Chloe

    2015-06-22

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading bacterial opportunistic infection (OI) in HIV positive individuals. Anti-retroviral treatment (ART) reduces their risk of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease (IPD), however, it remains 20- to 40-fold greater than that of the general population. In HIV-infected adults, pneumococcal vaccination (PCV) induces more durable and functional antibody responses in individuals on ART at the time of vaccination than in ART-naive adults, independently of the baseline CD4+ cell count. National guidelines in the UK recommend vaccination in HIV-infected adults with CD4 count >200cells/mL and advise that it be considered for those with CD4 count <200cells/mL(3). We report data on IPD from a London HIV cohort of 3500 north-east London patients from 2009 to 2012. IPD was defined as a positive pneumococcal culture from blood, CSF, joint aspirate or pericardial fluid. HIV positive cases were identified by cross-referencing hospital identifiers with a positive HIV Ab/Ag test result or HIV viral load test result on the virology database. There were a total 189 cases of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease identified over the three years. 4.8% (n=9) were known to be HIV positive at the time of their Invasive Pneumococcal infection. The serotypes of S. pneumoniae in the HIV positive cases included 3, 7F, 10F, 19A (n=2), 19F and 31. The estimated incidence of IPD in our HIV cohort was 85.7 per 100,000, (based on an overall HIV cohort size of 3500) which is significantly higher when compared to the general population in London (local epidemiological data reported the incidence rate for IPD at 7.5 per 100,000 in London). Given the higher burden of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in this cohort, low levels of vaccination, and the predominance of vaccine sensitive strains in our cases, vaccination and strategies to improve vaccine uptake is a priority in this at risk group. PMID:25128803

  2. Setting government priorities in preventing HIV / AIDS.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, M

    1998-03-01

    Since no cure has yet been found for AIDS and an effective vaccine is far off, preventing HIV infection by changing individual behavior is the key to stopping the AIDS epidemic in developing countries. People who have many sex partners and do not use condoms, and people who inject drugs and share unsterilized injecting equipment have the greatest risk of contracting HIV and infecting others. How quickly and extensively an HIV/AIDS epidemic spreads in a given population depends largely upon the extent to which people with many sex partners mix with people with fewer partners. A World Bank research report has, however, found that people who engage in high-risk behavior act to reduce their risk of contracting and spreading HIV when they have the knowledge and means to do so and a supportive community. The report highlights the following strategies to reduce risky behavior: providing information, lowering the costs of safer behavior, and raising the costs of risky behavior. Governments' main responsibilities in preventing the spread of HIV/AIDS are reducing the negative externalities of high-risk behavior and producing public goods. Without government action, individuals and firms will not have the incentives to do what is necessary. The need to act now and mobilizing political support are discussed. PMID:12293446

  3. Vaccine-Preventable Disease Photos

    MedlinePlus

    Home | About | A-Z | Contact | Follow Vaccine Information You Need VACCINE BASICS Evaluating Online Health Information FAQs How Vaccines Work Importance of Vaccines Paying for Vaccines State Immunization Programs ...

  4. Postexposure Management of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases.

    PubMed

    Woo, Teri Moser

    2016-01-01

    Because some parents are choosing to not vaccinate or only partially vaccinate their children, vaccine-preventable diseases that once were rarely seen in pediatric practice must now be considered part of the differential diagnosis when caring for these children. Measles, mumps, varicella, meningococcal disease, pertussis, and influenza are reviewed. Recommendations for prevention and treatment of these vaccine-preventable diseases are discussed. PMID:26896379

  5. Project VOGUE: A partnership for increasing HIV knowledge and HIV vaccine trial awareness among House Ball leaders in Western New York

    PubMed Central

    Alio, Amina P.; Fields, Sheldon D.; Humes, Damon L.; Bunce, Catherine A.; Wallace, Stephaun E.; Lewis, Cindi; Elder, Heather; Wakefield, Steven; Keefer, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Men who sleep with men (MSM) and transgender individuals of color, the largest demographic in the House Ball community (HBC) are amongst the group at highest risk for HIV infection in the United States. The HBC have limited access to culturally appropriate HIV education. This study aimed to develop a partnership with HBC leaders to uncover strategies for increasing HIV prevention knowledge, including participation in HIV vaccine trials. To this end a research institution-community-HBC partnership was established. In-depth qualitative and quantitative data were collected from the 14 HBC leaders in western New York, revealing that knowledge of HIV and related vaccine trials was limited. Barriers to increasing HIV knowledge included fear of peer judgment, having inaccurate information about HIV, and lack of education. Among the HBC, community partnerships will further aid in the development of future HIV prevention programs and increase individuals’ willingness to participate in future HIV vaccine trials. PMID:25642120

  6. Overview of the landscape of HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Haase, Ashley T

    2014-06-01

    In this introductory essay on the landscape of HIV prevention, my intent is to provide context for the subsequent topics discussed at the Symposium on Hormone Regulation of the Mucosal Environment in the female reproductive tract (FRT) and the Prevention of HIV infection: FRT immunity, mucosal microenvironment and HIV prevention, and the risk and impact of hormonal contraceptives on HIV transmission. PMID:24702688

  7. Mucosal HIV transmission and vaccination strategies through oral compared to vaginal and rectal routes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mingke; Vajdy, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field There are currently over thirty million people infected with HIV and there are no vaccines available to prevent HIV infections or disease. The genitourinary, rectal and oral mucosa are the mucosal HIV transmission routes. An effective vaccine that can induce both systemic and local mucosal immunity is generally accepted as a major means of protection against mucosal HIV transmission and AIDS. What the reader will gain Structure and cells that comprise the oral, vaginal and rectal mucosa pertaining to HIV transmission and vaccination strategies through each mucosal route to prevent mucosal and systemic infection will be discussed. Areas covered in this review Covering publications from 1980’s through 2010, mucosal transmission of HIV and current and previous approaches to vaccinations are discussed. Take home message Although oral transmission of HIV is far less common than vaginal and rectal transmissions, infections through this route do occur through oral sex as well as vertically from mother to child. Mucosal vaccination strategies against oral and other mucosal HIV transmissions are under intense research but the lack of consensus on immune correlates of protection and lack of safe and effective mucosal adjuvants and delivery systems hamper progress towards a licensed vaccine. PMID:20624114

  8. Vaccine-Preventable Childhood Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Education Programs and Tools VTrckS (Vaccine Tracking System) Immunization Registries (IIS) Vaccines for Children (VFC) Stop Transmission of Polio (STOP) Vaccine Management Business Improvement Project (VMBIP) Global Immunizations & Vaccinations Immunization Program ...

  9. HIV vaccine acceptability among high-risk drug users in Appalachia: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A vaccine could substantially impact the HIV epidemic, but inadequate uptake is a serious concern. Unfortunately, people who use drugs, particularly those residing in rural communities, have been underrepresented in previous research on HIV vaccine acceptability. This study examined HIV vaccine acceptability among high-risk drug users in a rural community in the United States. Methods Interviewer-administered questionnaires included questions about risk behavior and attitudes toward HIV vaccination from 433 HIV-negative drug users (76% with history of injection) enrolled in a cohort study in Central Appalachia. HIV vaccine acceptability was measured on a 4-point Likert scale. Generalized linear mixed models were used to determine correlates to self-report of being “very likely” to receive a 90% effective HIV vaccine (i.e. “maximum vaccine acceptability”, or MVA). Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) are reported. Results Most (91%) reported that they would accept a preventive HIV vaccine, but concerns about cost, dosing, transportation constraints, vaccine-induced seropositivity, and confidentiality were expressed. Cash incentives, oral-administration, and peer/partner encouragement were anticipated facilitators of uptake. In multivariate analysis, men were significantly less likely to report MVA (AOR: 0.33, CI: 0.21 – 0.52). MVA was more common among participants who believed that they were susceptible to HIV (AOR: 2.31, CI: 1.28 – 4.07), that an HIV vaccine would benefit them (AOR: 2.80, CI: 1.70 – 4.64), and who had positive experiential attitudes toward HIV vaccination (AOR: 1.85, CI: 1.08 – 3.17). MVA was also more common among participants who believed that others would encourage them to get vaccinated and anticipated that their behavior would be influenced by others' encouragement (AOR: 1.81, 95% 1.09 – 3.01). Conclusions To our knowledge, this study was among the first to explore and provide evidence for feasibility of HIV vaccination in a rural, high-risk population in the United States. This study provides preliminary evidence that gender-specific targeting in vaccine promotion may be necessary to promoting vaccine uptake in this setting, particularly among men. The data also underscore the importance of addressing perceived risks and benefits, social norms, and logistical constraints in efforts to achieve widespread vaccine coverage in this high-risk population. PMID:24885970

  10. Combination HIV Prevention Interventions: The Potential of Integrated Behavioral and Biomedical Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jennifer L.; Sales, Jessica M.; DiClemente, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Combination HIV prevention interventions that integrate efficacious behavioral and biomedical strategies offer the potential to reduce new HIV infections. Purpose We overview the efficacy data for three biomedical HIV prevention approaches: microbicides, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), and an HIV vaccination, review factors associated with differential acceptability and uptake of these methods, and suggest strategies to optimize the effectiveness and dissemination of combination HIV prevention approaches. Methods A narrative review was conducted highlighting key efficacy data for microbicides, PrEP, and an HIV vaccination and summarizing acceptability data for each of the three biomedical HIV prevention approaches. Recommendations for the integration and dissemination of combined behavioral and biomedical HIV prevention approaches are provided. Results To date, microbicides and an HIV vaccination have demonstrated limited efficacy for the prevention of HIV. However, PrEP has demonstrated efficacy in reducing HIV incident infections. A diverse array of factors influences both hypothetical willingness and actual usage of each biomedical prevention method. Conclusions Strategies to effectively integrate and evaluate combination HIV prevention interventions are urgently needed. PMID:25216985

  11. College Student Invulnerability Beliefs and HIV Vaccine Acceptability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravert, Russell D.; Zimet, Gregory D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine behavioral history, beliefs, and vaccine characteristics as predictors of HIV vaccine acceptability. Methods: Two hundred forty-five US under graduates were surveyed regarding their sexual history, risk beliefs, and likelihood of accepting hypothetical HIV vaccines. Results: Multivariate regression analysis indicated that

  12. College Student Invulnerability Beliefs and HIV Vaccine Acceptability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravert, Russell D.; Zimet, Gregory D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine behavioral history, beliefs, and vaccine characteristics as predictors of HIV vaccine acceptability. Methods: Two hundred forty-five US under graduates were surveyed regarding their sexual history, risk beliefs, and likelihood of accepting hypothetical HIV vaccines. Results: Multivariate regression analysis indicated that…

  13. HPV Vaccine Awareness and Knowledge Among Women Living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Wigfall, L T; Bynum, S A; Brandt, H M; Hébert, J R

    2016-03-01

    Cervical cancer risk is increased among women living with HIV (WLH). Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination has been shown to be safe and immunogenic among WLH. We examined HPV vaccine awareness and HPV knowledge among WLH. This cross-sectional study collected data from 145 WLH between March 2011 and April 2012. An interviewer-administered survey assessed HPV vaccine awareness and knowledge. Stata/IC 13 was used to perform chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Our sample was 90 % non-Hispanic black and 64 % earned <$10,000/year. Few (38 %) had heard of the HPV vaccine. Half (50 %) knew that HPV caused cervical cancer. HPV vaccine awareness was ten times higher among WLH who knew HPV caused cervical cancer (OR = 10.17; 95 % CI 3.82-27.06). HPV vaccine awareness is low among WLH. Cancer prevention efforts aimed at raising awareness about the HPV vaccine and increasing knowledge about HPV are necessary first steps in reducing cervical cancer disparities among WLH. PMID:26561426

  14. Human papillomavirus vaccines: where do they fit in HIV-infected individuals?

    PubMed

    Firnhaber, Cynthia; Wilkin, Timothy

    2012-09-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the etiological agent for cervical cancer and a large majority of anal cancers worldwide. In 2006 two preventive vaccines against the HPV were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and have since been approved in over 100 countries. HIV-infected populations are at an increased risk for HPV-related cancers. None of the efficacy trials for these vaccines included HIV-infected populations. However, studies in HIV-infected children and adult men show that the vaccine is safe and highly immunogenic. Studies evaluating the vaccine in HIV-infected women are in progress. Based on these studies, the American Council on Immunization Practices recommends HPV vaccination for all HIV-infected children and young adults up to age 26 years. HPV vaccine policies in resource-limited countries, many of which have a high prevalence of HIV infection, are still being developed. Future studies should examine the role of HPV vaccination for older HIV-infected adults who likely have ongoing HPV infection. PMID:22744002

  15. Continued Follow-Up of Phambili Phase 2b Randomized HIV-1 Vaccine Trial Participants Supports Increased HIV-1 Acquisition among Vaccinated Men

    PubMed Central

    Moodie, Zoe; Metch, Barbara; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Churchyard, Gavin; Nchabeleng, Maphoshane; Mlisana, Koleka; Laher, Fatima; Roux, Surita; Mngadi, Kathryn; Innes, Craig; Mathebula, Matsontso; Allen, Mary; Bentley, Carter; Gilbert, Peter B.; Robertson, Michael; Kublin, James; Corey, Lawrence; Gray, Glenda E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Phase 2b double-blinded, randomized Phambili/HVTN 503 trial evaluated safety and efficacy of the MRK Ad5 gag/pol/nef subtype B HIV-1 preventive vaccine vs placebo in sexually active HIV-1 seronegative participants in South Africa. Enrollment and vaccinations stopped and participants were unblinded but continued follow-up when the Step study evaluating the same vaccine in the Americas, Caribbean, and Australia was unblinded for non-efficacy. Final Phambili analyses found more HIV-1 infections amongst vaccine than placebo recipients, impelling the HVTN 503-S recall study. Methods HVTN 503-S sought to enroll all 695 HIV-1 uninfected Phambili participants, provide HIV testing, risk reduction counseling, physical examination, risk behavior assessment and treatment assignment recall. After adding HVTN 503-S data, HIV-1 infection hazard ratios (HR vaccine vs. placebo) were estimated by Cox models. Results Of the 695 eligible, 465 (67%) enrolled with 230 from the vaccine group and 235 from the placebo group. 38% of the 184 Phambili dropouts were enrolled. Enrollment did not differ by treatment group, gender, or baseline HSV-2. With the additional 1286 person years of 503-S follow-up, the estimated HR over Phambili and HVTN 503-S follow-up was 1.52 (95% CI 1.08–2.15, p = 0.02, 82 vaccine/54 placebo infections). The HR was significant for men (HR = 2.75, 95% CI 1.49, 5.06, p = 0.001) but not for women (HR = 1.12, 95% CI 0.73, 1.72, p = 0.62). Conclusion The additional follow-up from HVTN 503-S supported the Phambili finding of increased HIV-1 acquisition among vaccinated men and strengthened the evidence of lack of vaccine effect among women. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT00413725 SA National Health Research Database DOH-27-0207-1539 PMID:26368824

  16. Intranasal delivery of vaccines against HIV.

    PubMed

    Vajdy, Michael; Singh, Manmohan

    2006-03-01

    HIV poses a serious health threat in the world. Mucosal transmission of HIV through the genitourinary tract may be the most important route of transmission. Intranasal immunisations induce vaginal and systemic immune responses. Various protein-, DNA- and RNA-based immunopotentiating adjuvants/delivery systems and live bacterial and viral vectors are available for intranasal immunisations, and these systems may differ in their ability to induce a specific type of immune response (e.g., a cytotoxic T cell versus an antibody response). As the protection against HIV may require both cytotoxic T cell and antibodies, a combination of adjuvants/delivery systems for combinations of mucosal and parenteral immunisations may be required in order to develop a protective anti-HIV vaccine. PMID:16506951

  17. Seven challenges in modeling vaccine preventable diseases.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, C J E; Andreasen, V; Bjørnstad, O N; Eames, K; Edmunds, W J; Funk, S; Hollingsworth, T D; Lessler, J; Viboud, C; Grenfell, B T

    2015-03-01

    Vaccination has been one of the most successful public health measures since the introduction of basic sanitation. Substantial mortality and morbidity reductions have been achieved via vaccination against many infections, and the list of diseases that are potentially controllable by vaccines is growing steadily. We introduce key challenges for modeling in shaping our understanding and guiding policy decisions related to vaccine preventable diseases. PMID:25843375

  18. [Pneumococcal vaccination for prevention of pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Kwetkat, A; Hagel, S; Forstner, C; Pletz, M W

    2015-10-01

    Aging of the immune system, so-called immunosenescence, is well documented as the cause of increased infection rates and severe, often complicated courses of infections in older adults. This is particularly true for pneumococcal pneumonia in older adults; therefore, the standing committee on vaccination of the Robert Koch Institute (STIKO) recommends a once only vaccination with 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine for all persons aged 60 years and over. Furthermore, the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is also available for administration in adults and is recommended by the STIKO for particular indications. The advantage of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is the additional induction of a T-cell dependent immune response that leads to good immunogenicity despite immunosenescence. Initial data from a recent randomized controlled trial, so far only presented at conferences, confirm that the conjugate vaccine also provides protection against non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia, which is not provided by the polysaccharide vaccine. Thus, there are two vaccines for prevention of pneumococcal diseases: one with a broader range of serotype coverage but with an uncertain protection against non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia and another one with less serotype coverage but more effective protection. Vaccination of children with the conjugate vaccine also leads to a rapid decrease of infections by the 13 vaccine serotypes even in adults because of herd protection effects. For prevention of pneumonia in older adults the additional benefit of a concurrent application of influenza vaccine and pneumococcal vaccine should be considered. PMID:25877774

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Interferes with HIV Vaccination in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ignatowicz, Lech; Mazurek, Jolanta; Leepiyasakulchai, Chaniya; Sköld, Markus; Hinkula, Jorma; Källenius, Gunilla; Pawlowski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has emerged as the most prominent bacterial disease found in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals worldwide. Due to high prevalence of asymptomatic Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infections, the future HIV vaccine in areas highly endemic for TB will often be administrated to individuals with an ongoing Mtb infection. The impact of concurrent Mtb infection on the immunogenicity of a HIV vaccine candidate, MultiHIV DNA/protein, was investigated in mice. We found that, depending on the vaccination route, mice infected with Mtb before the administration of the HIV vaccine showed impairment in both the magnitude and the quality of antibody and T cell responses to the vaccine components p24Gag and gp160Env. Mice infected with Mtb prior to intranasal HIV vaccination exhibited reduced p24Gag-specific serum IgG and IgA, and suppressed gp160Env-specific serum IgG as compared to respective titers in uninfected HIV-vaccinated controls. Importantly, in Mtb-infected mice that were HIV-vaccinated by the intramuscular route the virus neutralizing activity in serum was significantly decreased, relative to uninfected counterparts. In addition mice concurrently infected with Mtb had fewer p24Gag-specific IFN-γ-expressing T cells and multifunctional T cells in their spleens. These results suggest that Mtb infection might interfere with the outcome of prospective HIV vaccination in humans. PMID:22848444

  20. HIV Vaccine Trial Exploits a Dual and Central Role for Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Richert-Spuhler, Laura E.

    2014-01-01

    Limited understanding of correlates of protection from HIV transmission hinders development of an efficacious vaccine. D. J. M. Lewis and colleagues (J. Virol. 88:1164811657, 2014, doi:10.1128/JVI.01621-14) now report that vaginal immunization with an HIVgp140 vaccine linked to the 70-kDa heat shock protein downregulated the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coreceptor CCR5 (chemokine [C-C motif] receptor 5) and increased expression of the HIV resistance factor APOBEC3G (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing, enzyme-catalytic, polypeptide-like 3G), in women. These effects correlated with HIV suppression ex vivo. Thus, vaccine-induced innate responses not only facilitate adaptive immunitythey may prove to be critical for preventing HIV transmission. PMID:25122775

  1. Vaccine preventable disease incidence as a complement to vaccine efficacy for setting vaccine policy

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, Bradford D.; Feikin, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, vaccines have been evaluated in clinical trials that establish vaccine efficacy (VE) against etiology-confirmed disease outcomes, a measure important for licensure. Yet, VE does not reflect a vaccines public health impact because it does not account for relative disease incidence. An additional measure that more directly establishes a vaccines public health value is the vaccine preventable disease incidence (VPDI), which is the incidence of disease preventable by vaccine in a given context. We describe how VE and VPDI can vary, sometimes in inverse directions, across disease outcomes and vaccinated populations. We provide examples of how VPDI can be used to reveal the relative public health impact of vaccines in developing countries, which can be masked by focus on VE alone. We recommend that VPDI be incorporated along with VE into the analytic plans of vaccine trials, as well as decisions by funders, ministries of health, and regulatory authorities. PMID:24731817

  2. Perspectives for Preventive and Therapeutic HPV Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ken; Doolan, Kimberley; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2010-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of female cancer death worldwide. Persistent infection with `high risk' HPV genotypes is the major etiological factor in cervical cancer and thus effective vaccination against HPV provides an opportunity to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with HPV. The FDA has approved two preventive vaccines to limit the spread of HPV. However, these are unlikely to impact upon HPV prevalence and cervical cancer rates for many years. Furthermore, preventive vaccines do not exert therapeutic effects on pre-existing HPV infections and HPV-associated lesions. In order to further impact upon the burden of HPV infections worldwide, therapeutic vaccines are being developed. These vaccines aim to generate a cell-mediated immune response to infected cells. This review discusses current preventive and therapeutic HPV vaccines and their future directions. PMID:20123582

  3. Endorsement of Compulsory HIV Vaccination Policy among Populations at High Risk of HIV Exposure (LA VOICES)

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Peter A.; Lee, Sung-Jae; Rudy, Ellen T.; Diamant, Allison; Duan, Naihua; Nakazano, Terry; Cunningham, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Compulsory vaccination is a frequently implemented policy option for ensuring comprehensive vaccine coverage. Ongoing controversies around human papillomavirus vaccine dissemination, and suboptimal coverage, suggest the value of assessing acceptability of compulsory vaccinations—particularly among likely target populations—in advance of their public availability to support evidence-informed interventions. With the first HIV vaccine to demonstrate partial efficacy in a large-scale clinical trial, we examined individual characteristics and attitudes associated with support for compulsory HIV vaccination policy among a diverse, representative sample of adults attending probable HIV vaccine dissemination venues in a large urban county. Participants were recruited using three-stage probability sampling from likely venues for future HIV vaccine dissemination. We used Audio-CASI to administer a 60-minute structured questionnaire. Items included endorsement of compulsory HIV vaccination policy, sociodemographic characteristics, injecting drug use, vaccine attitudes and perceived HIV risk. Among 1225 participants (mean age = 36.8 years; 55.6% males, 37.6% non-English speaking Hispanic, 78.8% heterosexual, 25.7% injection drug users), almost half (48.2%) endorsed a compulsory HIV vaccination policy. Non-English speaking Hispanics compared to whites, participants with less than high school education, higher positive vaccine attitude scores and higher perceived HIV risk were significantly more likely, and people who inject drugs significantly less likely to endorse compulsory HIV vaccination. Public health interventions to promote positive vaccine attitudes and accurate perceptions of HIV risk among vulnerable populations, and strategies tailored for people who inject drugs, may build support for compulsory HIV vaccination policy and promote broad HIV vaccine coverage. PMID:24464325

  4. What Has 30 Years of HIV Vaccine Research Taught Us?

    PubMed Central

    Esparza, José

    2013-01-01

    When HIV was discovered and established as the cause of AIDS in 1983–1984, many people believed that a vaccine would be rapidly developed. However, 30 years have passed and we are still struggling to develop an elusive vaccine. In trying to achieve that goal, different scientific paradigms have been explored. Although major progress has been made in understanding the scientific basis for HIV vaccine development, efficacy trials have been critical in moving the field forward. Major lessons learned are: the development of an HIV vaccine is an extremely difficult challenge; the temptation of just following the fashion should be avoided; clinical trials are critical, especially large-scale efficacy trials; HIV vaccine research will require long-term commitment; and sustainable collaborations are needed to accelerate the development of an HIV vaccine. Concrete actions must be implemented with the sense of urgency imposed by the severity of the AIDS epidemic. PMID:26344345

  5. Prospects for a Globally Effective HIV-1 Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H

    2015-12-01

    A globally effective vaccine strategy must cope with the broad genetic diversity of HIV and contend with multiple transmission modalities. Understanding correlates of protection and the role of diversity in limiting protective vaccines with those correlates is key. RV144 was the first HIV-1 vaccine trial to demonstrate efficacy against HIV-1 infection. A correlates analysis comparing vaccine-induced immune responses in vaccinated-infected and vaccinated-uninfected volunteers suggested that IgG specific for the V1V2 region of gp120 was associated with reduced risk of HIV-1 infection and that plasma Env IgA was directly correlated with infection risk. RV144 and recent non-human primate (NHP) challenge studies suggest that Env is essential and perhaps sufficient to induce protective antibody responses against mucosally acquired HIV-1. Whether RV144 immune correlates can apply to different HIV vaccines, to populations with different modes and intensity of transmission, or to divergent HIV-1 subtypes remains unknown. Newer prime-boost mosaic and conserved sequence immunization strategies aiming at inducing immune responses of greater breadth and depth as well as the development of immunogens inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies should be actively pursued. Efficacy trials are now planned in heterosexual populations in southern Africa and men who have sex with men in Thailand. Although NHP challenge studies may guide vaccine development, human efficacy trials remain key to answer the critical questions leading to the development of a global HIV-1 vaccine for licensure. PMID:26590431

  6. Preventing HIV infection in Women – a Global Health Imperative!

    PubMed Central

    Karim Quarraisha, Abdool; Sengeziwe, Sibeko; Cheryl, Baxter

    2011-01-01

    Women account for about half of all HIV infections globally. Sexual transmission is the dominant mode of HIV transmission to women and there is a concomitant, associated epidemic of transmission to infants. The majority of HIV infections in women are in sub-Saharan Africa with a disproportionate burden in young women under 25 years old. HIV acquisition and prevention in women is complex and influenced by biological, behavioral and structural factors. Efforts to reduce HIV infection in women in sub-Saharan African could play a substantial role in altering global HIV trajectories. Increasing access to sexual and reproductive health services, addressing gender based violence and social instability , reducing poverty and sex for survival, and encouraging greater male responsibility are critical short-to medium term interventions. Efforts to find a microbicide and HIV vaccine need to be matched with efforts to deepen understanding of HIV acquisition in the female genital tract to inform development of targeted molecules for HIV prevention. PMID:20397940

  7. Immunotherapy with Canarypox Vaccine and Interleukin-2 for HIV-1 Infection: Termination of a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kendall A; Andjelic, Sofija; Popmihajlov, Zoran; Kelly-Rossini, Liza; Sass, Aquanette; Lesser, Martin; Benkert, Steven; Waters, Cory; Ruitenberg, Joyce; Bellman, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether immunotherapy of chronic HIV-1 infection can prevent or attenuate viremia upon antiviral discontinuation. Design: This was a Phase II randomized, partially double blinded, 2×2 factorial study of three steps of 12 wk/step. Step I involved four groups: (1) vaccine placebo, (2) vaccine (ALVAC, vCP1452), (3) placebo + interleukin 2 (IL-2), and (4) vaccine + IL-2. Step II involved a 12-wk diagnostic treatment interruption (DTI). Step III involved an extension of the DTI for an additional 12 wk. Setting: The Weill-Cornell General Clinical Research Center. Participants: Chronically infected HIV-1 positive adults with undetectable HIV-1 levels and > 400 CD4+ T cells/μl. Interventions An HIV canarypox vaccine (vCP1452) and vaccine placebo, administered every 4 wk for four doses, and low-dose IL-2 administered daily for 12–24 wk. Outcome measures: Primary endpoints: (1) Proportion of participants with undetectable plasma HIV RNA during trial Step II, (2) mean log10 HIV RNA copies/ml ([HIV]) from weeks 21–25, and (3) proportion of individuals eligible for trial Step III. Results: 44 participants were randomized, but 16 withdrew or were withdrawn before completing Step II. As all participants underwent viral relapse in Step II, the study was terminated after 28 participants completed Step II. Among the four groups, there was no difference in mean [HIV] or the proportion of individuals with < log10 4.48 HIV; no difference between the mean [HIV] of the two groups that received ALVAC (n = 17) versus placebo (n = 11); and no significant difference between the mean [HIV] of the two groups that received IL-2 (n = 11) versus placebo (n = 17). Conclusions: Neither ALVAC (vCP1452) nor low-dose daily IL-2 nor their combination prevented the relapse of viremia upon discontinuation of antiviral therapy. PMID:17260026

  8. HIV / AIDS: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV / AIDS: Symptoms , Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment Past Issues / Summer ... and have resulted in a dramatic decrease in AIDS deaths in the U.S. NIH Research to Results ...

  9. HIV Vaccines: A Magic Bullet in the Fight against AIDS?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkerton, Steven D.; Abramson, Paul R.

    1993-01-01

    Biomedical, logistic, economic, social, and psychosocial issues related to the successful distribution and use of a vaccine for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are reviewed. A mathematical model is introduced as an aid in conceptualizing these issues. The HIV vaccine should be seen as an adjunct to behavioral modification. (SLD)

  10. HIV-1 Diversity, Drug-Resistant Mutations, and Viral Evolution among High-Risk Individuals in Phase II HIV Vaccine Trial Sites in Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Haiyan; Zhao, Ke; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Xuzhao; Zhang, Zhiyong; Yang, Li; Li, Chunling; Liang, Xu; Guo, Weigui; Chen, Shihai; Liu, Zhihao; Zhang, Wenyan; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 prevalence in Guangxi, China, has been growing since 1996, when the first case was reported. Over half of HIV-1 positive patients in Guangxi Province were injecting drug users (IDUs), possibly because of the province’s location near drug-trafficking routes. Since a phase II HIV vaccine trial is ongoing there, a current characterization of the subtypes of HIV-1 among IDUs in Guangxi would provide critical information for future HIV vaccine trials, as well as further control and prevention of HIV-1 transmission. Thus, we conducted a molecular epidemiological investigation of HIV-1 samples from 2008–2010 among IDUs in multiple cities in Guangxi Province. Our results, based on the gag/pol fragment, indicated a very high proportion (78.47%) of HIV-1 CRF08_BC recombinants, some CRF01_AE (15.38%) recombinants, and a low proportion of CRF07_BC (6.15%) recombinants among the IDUs. The high proportion of CRF08 HIV-1 strains among recent IDUs matches the vaccine candidate constructs. However, future vaccine development should also incorporate CRF01-targeted vaccine candidates. Distinct Env sequence evolution patterns were observed for CRF08_BC and CRF01_AE, indicating that different local selection pressures have been exerted on these two HIV-1 subtypes. Unique drug-resistant mutations were also detected, and our data indicate that HIV treatment programs should consider pre-existing drug-resistant mutations. PMID:23869225

  11. HIV prevention transformed: the new prevention research agenda

    PubMed Central

    Padian, Nancy S.; McCoy, Sandra I.; Karim, Salim Abdool; Hasen, Nina; Kim, Julia; Bartos, Michael; Katabira, Elly; Bertozzi, Stefano; Schwartländer, Bernhard; Cohen, Myron S.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY We have entered a new era in HIV prevention whereby priorities have expanded from biomedical discovery to include implementation, effectiveness, and the effect of combination prevention at the population level. However, gaps in knowledge and implementation challenges remain. In this Review we analyse trends in the rapidly changing landscape of HIV prevention, and chart a new path for HIV prevention research that focuses on the implementation of effective and efficient combination prevention strategies to turn the tide on the HIV pandemic. PMID:21763938

  12. Knowledge of cervical cancer prevention and human papillomavirus among women with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Massad, L. Stewart; Evans, Charlesnika T.; Wilson, Tracey E.; Goderre, Johanna L.; Hessol, Nancy A.; Henry, Donna; Colie, Christine; Strickler, Howard D.; Levine, Alexandra M.; Watts, D. Heather; Weber, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess knowledge of and attitudes towards human papillomavirus (HPV), Pap testing, and the HPV vaccine. Methods In a multicenter U.S. cohort study, women with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and at-risk comparison women completed 44-item standardized self-report questionnaires exploring their knowledge of cervical cancer prevention, HPV, and HPV vaccination. Results were correlated with demographic variables, measures of education and attention, and medical factors. Data were clustered using principal component analysis. Significant associations were assessed in multivariable models. Results Among 1588 women, HIV seropositive women better understood facts about cervical cancer prevention and HPV than seronegative women, but both had substantial knowledge deficits. Almost all women considered Pap testing important, although 53% of HIV seropositive and 48% of seronegative women considered cervical cancer not preventable (P=0.21). Only 44% of HIV seropositive women knew Paps assess the cervix, versus 42% of HIV seronegative women (P=0.57). Both groups understood that HPV causes genital warts and cervical cancer (67% of HIV seropositive vs. 55% of seronegative women, P=0.002). About half of both groups considered HPV vaccination extremely important for cervical cancer prevention. HIV seronegative women were more likely to report learning of HPV vaccination through advertising than from clinicians (81% vs. 64%, P<0.0001). Conclusion High risk women need effective education about cervical cancer prevention, HPV, and HPV vaccination. PMID:20106513

  13. Primary prevention and vaccination for penile cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barod, Ravi; Hegarty, Paul K.; Minhas, Suks

    2013-01-01

    The outcome of penile cancer is proportional to the stage at presentation. Strategies aimed at primary prevention would have a clear advantage, both for the individual and in terms of health economics. A number of preventative measures could be employed, including circumcision, smoking cessation, education on hygiene and human papillomavirus (HPV) prevention. There is a high prevalence of HPV infection associated with penile cancer worldwide. The recent development of HPV vaccines has facilitated interest in their use for the prevention of penile cancer. In this article we review the literature surrounding penile cancer prevention and HPV vaccination in men. PMID:23730331

  14. Inclusion of South African adolescents in HIV vaccine trials

    PubMed Central

    Adler, David H.

    2013-01-01

    South Africa has more people living with HIV than any other nation. The HIV epidemic in South Africa is being driven by new infections among adolescents. Inclusion of adolescents in HIV vaccine trials is essential for successful vaccine development, however, recruitment and retention of at-risk South African adolescents into these trials poses a number of legal, ethical and operational challenges. This article discusses the South African ethico-legal context in which future adolescent HIV vaccine trials would be conducted followed by a review of available data regarding strategies for recruitment into these trials and retention of trial participants. PMID:24729929

  15. Recent developments in clinical trial designs for HIV vaccine research

    PubMed Central

    Richert, Laura; Lhomme, Edouard; Fagard, Catherine; Lévy, Yves; Chêne, Geneviève; Thiébaut, Rodolphe

    2015-01-01

    HIV vaccine strategies are expected to be a crucial component for controlling the HIV epidemic. Despite the large spectrum of potential candidate vaccines for both prophylactic and therapeutic use, the overall development process of an efficacious HIV vaccine strategy is lengthy. The design of clinical trials and the progression of a candidate strategy through the different clinical development stages remain methodologically challenging, mainly due to the lack of validated correlates of protection. In this review, we describe recent advances in clinical trial designs to increase the efficiency of the clinical development of candidate HIV vaccine strategies. The methodological aspects of the designs for early- (phase I and II) and later –stage (phase IIB and III) development are discussed, taking into account the specificities of both prophylactic and therapeutic HIV vaccine development. PMID:25751670

  16. Recent developments in clinical trial designs for HIV vaccine research.

    PubMed

    Richert, Laura; Lhomme, Edouard; Fagard, Catherine; Lvy, Yves; Chne, Genevive; Thibaut, Rodolphe

    2015-01-01

    HIV vaccine strategies are expected to be a crucial component for controlling the HIV epidemic. Despite the large spectrum of potential candidate vaccines for both prophylactic and therapeutic use, the overall development process of an efficacious HIV vaccine strategy is lengthy. The design of clinical trials and the progression of a candidate strategy through the different clinical development stages remain methodologically challenging, mainly due to the lack of validated correlates of protection. In this review, we describe recent advances in clinical trial designs to increase the efficiency of the clinical development of candidate HIV vaccine strategies. The methodological aspects of the designs for early- (phase I and II) and later -stage (phase IIB and III) development are discussed, taking into account the specificities of both prophylactic and therapeutic HIV vaccine development. PMID:25751670

  17. Hepatitis B and A vaccination in HIV-infected adults: A review.

    PubMed

    Mena, G; García-Basteiro, A L; Bayas, J M

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B and A account for considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. Immunization is the most effective means of preventing hepatitis B and A. However, the immune response to both hepatitis vaccines seems to be reduced in HIV-infected subjects. The aim of this review was to analyze the immunogenicity, safety, long-term protection and current recommendations of hepatitis B and A vaccination among HIV-infected adults. The factors most frequently associated with a deficient level of anti-HBs or IgG anti-HAV after vaccination are those related to immunosuppression (CD4 level and HIV RNA viral load) and to the frequency of administration and/or the amount of antigenic load per dose. The duration of the response to both HBV and HAV vaccines is associated with suppression of the viral load at vaccination and, in the case of HBV vaccination, with a higher level of antibodies after vaccination. In terms of safety, there is no evidence of more, or different, adverse effects compared with HIV-free individuals. Despite literature-based advice on the administration of alternative schedules, revaccination after the failure of primary vaccination, and the need for periodic re-evaluation of antibody levels, few firm recommendations are found in the leading guidelines. PMID:26208678

  18. Hepatitis B and A vaccination in HIV-infected adults: A review

    PubMed Central

    Mena, G; García-Basteiro, AL; Bayas, JM

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B and A account for considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. Immunization is the most effective means of preventing hepatitis B and A. However, the immune response to both hepatitis vaccines seems to be reduced in HIV-infected subjects. The aim of this review was to analyze the immunogenicity, safety, long-term protection and current recommendations of hepatitis B and A vaccination among HIV-infected adults. The factors most frequently associated with a deficient level of anti-HBs or IgG anti-HAV after vaccination are those related to immunosuppression (CD4 level and HIV RNA viral load) and to the frequency of administration and/or the amount of antigenic load per dose. The duration of the response to both HBV and HAV vaccines is associated with suppression of the viral load at vaccination and, in the case of HBV vaccination, with a higher level of antibodies after vaccination. In terms of safety, there is no evidence of more, or different, adverse effects compared with HIV-free individuals. Despite literature-based advice on the administration of alternative schedules, revaccination after the failure of primary vaccination, and the need for periodic re-evaluation of antibody levels, few firm recommendations are found in the leading guidelines. PMID:26208678

  19. [Preventive vaccination strategy during the perinatal period].

    PubMed

    Pinquier, Didier; Gagneur, Amaud; Gaudelus, Jol; Marret, Stphane

    2010-12-20

    Preventive vaccination strategy around the birth is a global approach requiring the coordination of several actors. To be efficacious, general practitioners are in the front line to provide preventive care and health education. The perinatal period represents a privileged situation from listening to this approach of vaccine prevention. The raising awareness around the birth contains several additional steps to bring to the future mother and child the best protection against infectious diseases with vaccine prevention. By being vaccinated, parents and other family members indirectly provide protection to very young infants until they are old enough to be vaccinated and so directly protected themselves. Numerous opportunities exist to make sensitive the parents in this preventive way, for them and their child, whether it is from the adolescence in the adulthood above all parental project, on the occasion of a pregnancy, at birth, during the stay in maternity hospital, or along the first weeks of the postpartum. The general practitioner is the key actor to coordinate this global approach in perinatal health around the mother, his child and his family. The arrival of the newborn will be the opportunity to update vaccinations of the whole family particularly according chicken pox, measles, rubella, whooping cough and flu vaccines. PMID:21425528

  20. Emerging nanotechnology approaches for HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Mamo, Tewodros; Moseman, E Ashley; Kolishetti, Nagesh; Salvador-Morales, Carolina; Shi, Jinjun; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Langer, Robert; von Andrian, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Currently, there is no cure and no preventive vaccine for HIV/AIDS. Combination antiretroviral therapy has dramatically improved treatment, but it has to be taken for a lifetime, has major side effects and is ineffective in patients in whom the virus develops resistance. Nanotechnology is an emerging multidisciplinary field that is revolutionizing medicine in the 21st century. It has a vast potential to radically advance the treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS. In this review, we discuss the challenges with the current treatment of the disease and shed light on the remarkable potential of nanotechnology to provide more effective treatment and prevention for HIV/AIDS by advancing antiretroviral therapy, gene therapy, immunotherapy, vaccinology and microbicides. PMID:20148638

  1. Vaccine preventable disease incidence as a complement to vaccine efficacy for setting vaccine policy.

    PubMed

    Gessner, Bradford D; Feikin, Daniel R

    2014-05-30

    Traditionally, vaccines have been evaluated in clinical trials that establish vaccine efficacy (VE) against etiology-confirmed disease outcomes, a measure important for licensure. Yet, VE does not reflect a vaccine's public health impact because it does not account for relative disease incidence. An additional measure that more directly establishes a vaccine's public health value is the vaccine preventable disease incidence (VPDI), which is the incidence of disease preventable by vaccine in a given context. We describe how VE and VPDI can vary, sometimes in inverse directions, across disease outcomes and vaccinated populations. We provide examples of how VPDI can be used to reveal the relative public health impact of vaccines in developing countries, which can be masked by focus on VE alone. We recommend that VPDI be incorporated along with VE into the analytic plans of vaccine trials, as well as decisions by funders, ministries of health, and regulatory authorities. PMID:24731817

  2. eHealth interventions for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Noar, Seth M; Willoughby, Jessica Fitts

    2012-01-01

    The rapidly changing media landscape and proliferation of new technologies creates vast new opportunities for HIV prevention. The fast growth of the relatively new eHealth field is a testament to the excitement and promise of these new technologies. eHealth interventions in HIV prevention tested to date include computer- and Internet-based interventions; chat room interventions; text messaging interventions; and social media. The current article provides a brief review of these types of interventions in HIV prevention, including their unique advantages and evidence of efficacy. Implications for future research in the eHealth HIV prevention field are discussed. PMID:22519523

  3. HIV Prevention Readiness in Undergraduates and Inmates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonio, Michael E.; And Others

    Prevention of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) transmission is increasingly an international priority. Education of high-risk populations, such as incarcerated individuals, is particularly important in thwarting the spread of HIV. To address this concern, the attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge of inmates concerning HIV and AIDS related issues are…

  4. The influence of delivery vectors on HIV vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Ondondo, Beatrice O

    2014-01-01

    Development of an effective HIV/AIDS vaccine remains a big challenge, largely due to the enormous HIV diversity which propels immune escape. Thus novel vaccine strategies are targeting multiple variants of conserved antibody and T cell epitopic regions which would incur a huge fitness cost to the virus in the event of mutational escape. Besides immunogen design, the delivery modality is critical for vaccine potency and efficacy, and should be carefully selected in order to not only maximize transgene expression, but to also enhance the immuno-stimulatory potential to activate innate and adaptive immune systems. To date, five HIV vaccine candidates have been evaluated for efficacy and protection from acquisition was only achieved in a small proportion of vaccinees in the RV144 study which used a canarypox vector for delivery. Conversely, in the STEP study (HVTN 502) where human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) was used, strong immune responses were induced but vaccination was more associated with increased risk of HIV acquisition than protection in vaccinees with pre-existing Ad5 immunity. The possibility that pre-existing immunity to a highly promising delivery vector may alter the natural course of HIV to increase acquisition risk is quite worrisome and a huge setback for HIV vaccine development. Thus, HIV vaccine development efforts are now geared toward delivery platforms which attain superior immunogenicity while concurrently limiting potential catastrophic effects likely to arise from pre-existing immunity or vector-related immuno-modulation. However, it still remains unclear whether it is poor immunogenicity of HIV antigens or substandard immunological potency of the safer delivery vectors that has limited the success of HIV vaccines. This article discusses some of the promising delivery vectors to be harnessed for improved HIV vaccine efficacy. PMID:25202303

  5. The influence of delivery vectors on HIV vaccine efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Ondondo, Beatrice O.

    2014-01-01

    Development of an effective HIV/AIDS vaccine remains a big challenge, largely due to the enormous HIV diversity which propels immune escape. Thus novel vaccine strategies are targeting multiple variants of conserved antibody and T cell epitopic regions which would incur a huge fitness cost to the virus in the event of mutational escape. Besides immunogen design, the delivery modality is critical for vaccine potency and efficacy, and should be carefully selected in order to not only maximize transgene expression, but to also enhance the immuno-stimulatory potential to activate innate and adaptive immune systems. To date, five HIV vaccine candidates have been evaluated for efficacy and protection from acquisition was only achieved in a small proportion of vaccinees in the RV144 study which used a canarypox vector for delivery. Conversely, in the STEP study (HVTN 502) where human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) was used, strong immune responses were induced but vaccination was more associated with increased risk of HIV acquisition than protection in vaccinees with pre-existing Ad5 immunity. The possibility that pre-existing immunity to a highly promising delivery vector may alter the natural course of HIV to increase acquisition risk is quite worrisome and a huge setback for HIV vaccine development. Thus, HIV vaccine development efforts are now geared toward delivery platforms which attain superior immunogenicity while concurrently limiting potential catastrophic effects likely to arise from pre-existing immunity or vector-related immuno-modulation. However, it still remains unclear whether it is poor immunogenicity of HIV antigens or substandard immunological potency of the safer delivery vectors that has limited the success of HIV vaccines. This article discusses some of the promising delivery vectors to be harnessed for improved HIV vaccine efficacy. PMID:25202303

  6. HIV Vaccine Trials Network: activities and achievements of the first decade and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Kublin, James G; Morgan, Cecilia A; Day, Tracey A; Gilbert, Peter B; Self, Steve G; McElrath, M Juliana; Corey, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    The HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN) is an international collaboration of scientists and educators facilitating the development of HIV/AIDS preventive vaccines. The HVTN conducts all phases of clinical trials, from evaluating experimental vaccines for safety and immunogenicity, to testing vaccine efficacy. Over the past decade, the HVTN has aimed to improve the process of designing, implementing and analyzing vaccine trials. Several major achievements include streamlining protocol development while maintaining input from diverse stakeholders, establishing a laboratory program with standardized assays and systems allowing for reliable immunogenicity assessments across trials, setting statistical standards for the field and actively engaging with site communities. These achievements have allowed the HVTN to conduct over 50 clinical trials and make numerous scientific contributions to the field. PMID:23243491

  7. Selectively willing and conditionally able: HIV vaccine trial participation among women at “high risk” of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Voytek, Chelsea D.; Jones, Kevin T.; Metzger, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Efficacy studies of investigational HIV vaccines require enrollment of individuals at ‘high risk’ for HIV. This paper examines participation in HIV vaccine trials among women at ‘high risk’ for HIV acquisition. In-depth interviews were conducted with 17 African-American women who use crack cocaine and/or exchange sex for money/drugs to elicit attitudes toward medical research and motivators and deterrents to HIV vaccine trial participation. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed; data were coded and compiled into themes. Most women expressed favorable attitudes toward medical research in general. Motivators for trial participation included compensation; personal benefits including information, social services, and the possibility that the trial vaccine could prevent HIV; and altruism. Deterrents included: dislike of needles; distrust; concern about future consequences of participating. In addition, contingencies, caregiving responsibilities, and convenience issues constituted barriers which could impede participation. Respondents described varied, complex perspectives, and individual cases illustrate how these themes played out as women contemplated trial participation. Understanding factors which influence vaccine research participation among women at ‘high risk’ can aid sites to tailor recruitment procedures to local contexts. Concerns about future reactions can be addressed through sustained community education. Convenience barriers can be ameliorated by providing rides to study visits when necessary, and/or conducting study visits in accessible neighborhood locations. Women in this sample thought carefully about enrolling in HIV vaccine trials given the structural constraints within which they lived. Further research is needed regarding structural factors which influence personal agency and individuals’ thinking about research participation. PMID:21704110

  8. Selectively willing and conditionally able: HIV vaccine trial participation among women at "high risk" of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Voytek, Chelsea D; Jones, Kevin T; Metzger, David S

    2011-08-18

    Efficacy studies of investigational HIV vaccines require enrollment of individuals at 'high risk' for HIV. This paper examines participation in HIV vaccine trials among women at 'high risk' for HIV acquisition. In-depth interviews were conducted with 17 African-American women who use crack cocaine and/or exchange sex for money/drugs to elicit attitudes toward medical research and motivators and deterrents to HIV vaccine trial participation. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed; data were coded and compiled into themes. Most women expressed favorable attitudes toward medical research in general. Motivators for trial participation included compensation; personal benefits including information, social services, and the possibility that the trial vaccine could prevent HIV; and altruism. Deterrents included: dislike of needles; distrust; concern about future consequences of participating. In addition, contingencies, care-giving responsibilities, and convenience issues constituted barriers which could impede participation. Respondents described varied, complex perspectives, and individual cases illustrate how these themes played out as women contemplated trial participation. Understanding factors which influence vaccine research participation among women at 'high risk' can aid sites to tailor recruitment procedures to local contexts. Concerns about future reactions can be addressed through sustained community education. Convenience barriers can be ameliorated by providing rides to study visits when necessary, and/or conducting study visits in accessible neighborhood locations. Women in this sample thought carefully about enrolling in HIV vaccine trials given the structural constraints within which they lived. Further research is needed regarding structural factors which influence personal agency and individuals' thinking about research participation. PMID:21704110

  9. Paying for Prevention: Challenges to Health Insurance Coverage for Biomedical HIV Prevention in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    Reducing the incidence of HIV infection continues to be a crucial public health priority in the United States, especially among populations at elevated risk such as men who have sex with men, transgender women, people who inject drugs, and racial and ethnic minority communities. Although most HIV prevention efforts to date have focused on changing risky behaviors, the past decade has yielded efficacious new biomedical technologies designed to prevent infection, such as the prophylactic use of antiretroviral drugs and the first indications of an efficacious vaccine. Access to prevention technologies will be a significant part of the next decade’s response to HIV, and advocates are mobilizing to achieve more widespread use of these interventions. These breakthroughs, however, arrive at a time of escalating healthcare costs; health insurance coverage therefore raises pressing new questions about priority-setting and the allocation of responsibility for public health. The goals of this Article are to identify legal challenges and potential solutions for expanding access to biomedical HIV prevention through health insurance coverage. This Article discusses the public policy implications of HIV prevention coverage decisions, assesses possible legal grounds on which insurers may initially deny coverage for these technologies, and evaluates the extent to which these denials may survive external and judicial review. Because several of these legal grounds may be persuasive, particularly denials on the basis of medical necessity, this Article also explores alternative strategies for financing biomedical HIV prevention efforts. PMID:23356098

  10. Tuberculosis Vaccines and Prevention of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Day, Tracey A.; Scriba, Thomas J.; Hatherill, Mark; Hanekom, Willem A.; Evans, Thomas G.; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Kublin, James G.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Self, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Tuberculosis (TB) is a leading cause of death worldwide despite the availability of effective chemotherapy for over 60 years. Although Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination protects against active TB disease in some populations, its efficacy is suboptimal. Development of an effective TB vaccine is a top global priority that has been hampered by an incomplete understanding of protective immunity to TB. Thus far, preventing TB disease, rather than infection, has been the primary target for vaccine development. Several areas of research highlight the importance of including preinfection vaccines in the development pipeline. First, epidemiology and mathematical modeling studies indicate that a preinfection vaccine would have a high population-level impact for control of TB disease. Second, immunology studies support the rationale for targeting prevention of infection, with evidence that host responses may be more effective during acute infection than during chronic infection. Third, natural history studies indicate that resistance to TB infection occurs in a small percentage of the population. Fourth, case-control studies of BCG indicate that it may provide protection from infection. Fifth, prevention-of-infection trials would have smaller sample sizes and a shorter duration than disease prevention trials and would enable opportunities to search for correlates of immunity as well as serve as a criterion for selecting a vaccine product for testing in a larger TB disease prevention trial. Together, these points support expanding the focus of TB vaccine development efforts to include prevention of infection as a primary goal along with vaccines or other interventions that reduce the rate of transmission and reactivation. PMID:25428938

  11. Advances in HIV Prevention for Serodiscordant Couples

    PubMed Central

    Muessig, Kathryn E.; Cohen, Myron S.

    2014-01-01

    Serodiscordant couples play an important role in maintaining the global HIV epidemic. This review summarizes biobehavioral and biomedical HIV prevention options for serodiscordant couples focusing on advances in 2013 and 2014, including World Health Organization guidelines and best-evidence for couples counseling, couples-based interventions, and the use of antiviral agents for prevention. In the past few years marked advances have been made in HIV prevention for serodiscordant couples and numerous ongoing studies are continuously expanding HIV prevention tools, especially in the area of pre-exposure prophylaxis. Uptake and adherence to antiviral therapy remains a key challenge. Additional research is needed to develop evidence-based interventions for couples, and especially for male-male couples. Randomized trials have demonstrated the prevention benefits of antiretroviral-based approaches among serodiscordant couples; however, residual transmission observed in recognized serodiscordant couples represents an important and resolvable challenge in HIV prevention. PMID:25145645

  12. HIV DNA Vaccine: Stepwise Improvements Make a Difference

    PubMed Central

    Felber, Barbara K.; Valentin, Antonio; Rosati, Margherita; Bergamaschi, Cristina; Pavlakis, George N.

    2014-01-01

    Inefficient DNA delivery methods and low expression of plasmid DNA have been major obstacles for the use of plasmid DNA as vaccine for HIV/AIDS. This review describes successful efforts to improve DNA vaccine methodology over the past ~30 years. DNA vaccination, either alone or in combination with other methods, has the potential to be a rapid, safe, and effective vaccine platform against AIDS. Recent clinical trials suggest the feasibility of its translation to the clinic. PMID:26344623

  13. Polyvinylpyrrolidone-Poly(ethylene glycol) Modified Silver Nanorods Can Be a Safe, Noncarrier Adjuvant for HIV Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye; Balachandran, Yekkuni L; Li, Dan; Shao, Yiming; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-03-22

    One of the biggest obstacles for the development of HIV vaccines is how to sufficiently trigger crucial anti-HIV immunities via a safe manner. We herein integrated surface modification-dependent immunostimulation against HIV vaccine and shape-dependent biosafety and designed a safe noncarrier adjuvant based on silver nanorods coated by both polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and polyethylene glycol (PEG). Such silver nanorods can significantly elevate crucial immunities of HIV vaccine and overcome the toxicity, which is a big problem for other existing adjuvants. This study thus provided a principle for designing a safe and high-efficacy material for an adjuvant and allow researchers to really have a safe and effective prophylaxis against HIV. We expect this material approach to be applicable to other types of vaccines, whether they are preventative or therapeutic. PMID:26844372

  14. HIV/AIDS epidemiology, pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Viviana; Ho, David D; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool

    2010-01-01

    The HIV-1 pandemic is a complex mix of diverse epidemics within and between countries and regions of the world, and is undoubtedly the defining public-health crisis of our time. Research has deepened our understanding of how the virus replicates, manipulates, and hides in an infected person. Although our understanding of pathogenesis and transmission dynamics has become more nuanced and prevention options have expanded, a cure or protective vaccine remains elusive. Antiretroviral treatment has transformed AIDS from an inevitably fatal condition to a chronic, manageable disease in some settings. This transformation has yet to be realised in those parts of the world that continue to bear a disproportionate burden of new HIV-1 infections and are most a% ected by increasing morbidity and mortality. This Seminar provides an update on epidemiology, pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention interventions pertinent to HIV-1. PMID:16890836

  15. HIV/AIDS Prevention Program Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaro, Hortensia; Barker, Marybeth; Cassisy, Theresa; Hardy-Fanta, Carol; Hereen, Tim; Levenson, Suzette; McCloskey, Lois; Melendez, Michael

    This report addresses the four research objectives that were established by the Massachusetts Primary Prevention Group (MPPG) and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health's HIV/AIDS Bureau. The objectives were to: (1) review and summarize literature that formally evaluated HIV prevention interventions; (2) describe how currently funded…

  16. HIV/AIDS/STD. Education for Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayes, Jane Ruthven, Ed.

    The contents of this booklet come from contributions to the 1995 Global Conference on School Health and HIV/AIDS Prevention. The objectives of the booklet are: (1) to strengthen the awareness of teachers and education personnel regarding the importance of developing school health and HIV/AIDS prevention curricula; (2) to show the specific roles of…

  17. Pilot study assessing HIV vaccine trial readiness among female sex workers, injection and non-injection drug users, and men who have sex with men in Spain.

    PubMed

    Etcheverry, María Florencia; de Lazzari, Elisa; Fuchs, Jonathan D; Meroño, Mercé; Sierra, Ernesto; Del Romero, Jorge; Evans, Jennifer L; Mendez-Arancibia, Eva; Jacques, Constanza; Rojas, Daniela; Segú, Marta; Gatell, José María; Joseph, Joan

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess HIV risk and willingness to participate in HIV vaccine trials in three high risk populations in Spain. Eight hundred and forty-four participants, comprising female sex workers, injection and non-injection drug users (IDUs and NIDUs, respectively), and men who have sex with men were tested for HIV and surveyed for risk and willingness to participate in future preventive HIV vaccine trials. HIV seroprevalence was 3.8% (95% CI: 2-11). HIV infection was associated with transgender identification, IDU in the past year, and sex with an IDU or other drug-using partner. The majority (82%) expressed their willingness to participate in HIV vaccine trials. Substantial sexual and parenteral risk in all groups and concomitant willingness to participate in vaccine trials was found, particularly among women and IDUs. Additional longitudinal cohort studies in Spain are needed to plan future vaccine efficacy trials. PMID:19037720

  18. STD patients' preferences for HIV prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Castro, Jose G; Jones, Deborah L; Weiss, Stephen M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to explore the knowledge of and preferences regarding effective biomedical interventions among high risk individuals attending a sexually transmitted diseases clinic, and to examine the effect of a brief information intervention on preference. Participants completed a baseline assessment, attended a presentation on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention methods, and completed a postintervention assessment. Outcome measures included: demographics and sexual risk factors, self-perceived HIV risk, and knowledge and attitudes regarding new biomedical methods of HIV prevention. After the baseline evaluation, participants were provided with information on new biomedical prevention strategies. Participants were given the option to review the information by reading a pamphlet or by viewing a brief video containing the same information. Participants (n=97) were female (n=51) and male (n=46). At baseline, only a small minority of participants were aware of the newer biomedical strategies to prevent HIV infection. Postintervention, 40% endorsed having heard about the use of HIV medications to prevent HIV infection; 72% had heard that male circumcision can decrease the risk of acquiring HIV infection in men; and 73% endorsed knowledge of the potential role of microbicides in decreasing the risk of acquiring HIV. Following the intervention, the most preferred prevention method was male condoms, followed by preexposure prophylaxis, and microbicides. The least preferred methods were male circumcision and female condoms. This study provides preliminary information on knowledge and attitudes regarding newer biomedical interventions to protect against HIV infection. PMID:25540597

  19. STD patients’ preferences for HIV prevention strategies

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Jose G; Jones, Deborah L; Weiss, Stephen M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to explore the knowledge of and preferences regarding effective biomedical interventions among high risk individuals attending a sexually transmitted diseases clinic, and to examine the effect of a brief information intervention on preference. Participants completed a baseline assessment, attended a presentation on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention methods, and completed a postintervention assessment. Outcome measures included: demographics and sexual risk factors, self-perceived HIV risk, and knowledge and attitudes regarding new biomedical methods of HIV prevention. After the baseline evaluation, participants were provided with information on new biomedical prevention strategies. Participants were given the option to review the information by reading a pamphlet or by viewing a brief video containing the same information. Participants (n=97) were female (n=51) and male (n=46). At baseline, only a small minority of participants were aware of the newer biomedical strategies to prevent HIV infection. Postintervention, 40% endorsed having heard about the use of HIV medications to prevent HIV infection; 72% had heard that male circumcision can decrease the risk of acquiring HIV infection in men; and 73% endorsed knowledge of the potential role of microbicides in decreasing the risk of acquiring HIV. Following the intervention, the most preferred prevention method was male condoms, followed by preexposure prophylaxis, and microbicides. The least preferred methods were male circumcision and female condoms. This study provides preliminary information on knowledge and attitudes regarding newer biomedical interventions to protect against HIV infection. PMID:25540597

  20. Understanding HIV infection for the design of a therapeutic vaccine. Part I: Epidemiology and pathogenesis of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    de Goede, A L; Vulto, A G; Osterhaus, A D M E; Gruters, R A

    2015-03-01

    HIV infection leads to a gradual loss CD4+ T lymphocytes comprising immune competence and progression to AIDS. Effective treatment with combined antiretroviral drugs (cART) decreases viral load below detectable levels but is not able to eliminate the virus from the body. The success of cART is frustrated by the requirement of expensive life-long adherence, accumulating drug toxicities and chronic immune activation resulting in increased risk of several non-AIDS disorders, even when viral replication is suppressed. Therefore there is a strong need for therapeutic strategies as an alternative to cART. Immunotherapy, or therapeutic vaccination, aims to increase existing immune responses against HIV or induce de novo immune responses. These immune responses should provide a functional cure by controlling viral replication and preventing disease progression in the absence of cART. The key difficulty in the development of an HIV vaccine is our ignorance of the immune responses that control of viral replication, and thus how these responses can be elicited and how they can be monitored. Part one of this review provides an extensive overview of the (patho-) physiology of HIV infection. It describes the structure and replication cycle of HIV, the epidemiology and pathogenesis of HIV infection and the innate and adaptive immune responses against HIV. Part two of this review discusses therapeutic options for HIV. Prevention modalities and antiretroviral therapy are briefly touched upon, after which an extensive overview on vaccination strategies for HIV is provided, including the choice of immunogens and delivery strategies. PMID:25496723

  1. Interventions to prevent sexually transmitted infections, including HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Marrazzo, Jeanne M; Cates, Willard

    2011-12-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) Treatment Guidelines were last updated in 2006. To update the "Clinical Guide to Prevention Services" section of the 2010 CDC STD Treatment Guidelines, we reviewed the recent science with reference to interventions designed to prevent acquisition of STDs, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Major interval developments include (1) licensure and uptake of immunization against genital human papillomavirus, (2) validation of male circumcision as a potent prevention tool against acquisition of HIV and some other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), (3) failure of a promising HIV vaccine candidate to afford protection against HIV acquisition, (4) encouragement about the use of antiretroviral agents as preexposure prophylaxis to reduce risk of HIV and herpes simplex virus acquisition, (5) enhanced emphasis on expedited partner management and rescreening for persons infected with Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, (6) recognition that behavioral interventions will be needed to address a new trend of sexually transmitted hepatitis C among men who have sex with men, and (7) the availability of a modified female condom. A range of preventive interventions is needed to reduce the risks of acquiring STI, including HIV infection, among sexually active people, and a flexible approach targeted to specific populations should integrate combinations of biomedical, behavioral, and structural interventions. These would ideally involve an array of prevention contexts, including (1) communications and practices among sexual partners, (2) transactions between individual clients and their healthcare providers, and (3) comprehensive population-level strategies for prioritizing prevention research, ensuring accurate outcome assessment, and formulating health policy. PMID:22080271

  2. Vaccine preventable diseases and vaccination policy for indigenous populations.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Robert; McIntyre, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Compared with nonindigenous people, indigenous people in first-world countries have experienced much higher rates of many vaccine preventable diseases. This systematic review of published scientific literature, government reports, and immunization guidelines from Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States compares pre- and postvaccination disease rates and vaccination policy for indigenous people in these four countries. Nationally funded universal vaccination programs are clearly the most effective way of reducing disease in indigenous populations. Most successful have been programs for viral diseases in which strain variations are not important and herd immunity is high, such as measles and hepatitis B. For bacterial infections, strain variations (pneumococcal disease), heavy nasopharyngeal colonization of young infants (pneumococcal and Haemophilus influenzae type b disease), low vaccine effectiveness in adults with a high prevalence of risk factors (polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine), and waning immunity (pertussis) have been associated with continuing or widening disparities between indigenous and nonindigenous populations. However, universal vaccination programs are not always possible. Geographic targeting of all persons in certain regions with high disease rates has been successful, as has targeting of indigenous populations in regions where they constitute larger proportions of the population. In national programs targeting only indigenous people, it has been difficult to achieve high coverage, particularly in urban areas. Innovative program approaches are particularly needed in these situations. PMID:16763071

  3. Cancer prevention in HIV-infected populations.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Priscila H; Montezuma-Rusca, Jairo M; Yarchoan, Robert; Uldrick, Thomas S

    2016-02-01

    People living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are living longer since the advent of effective combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). While cART substantially decreases the risk of developing some cancers, HIV-infected individuals remain at high risk for Kaposi sarcoma, lymphoma, and several solid tumors. Currently HIV-infected patients represent an aging group, and malignancies have become a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Tailored cancer-prevention strategies are needed for this population. In this review we describe the etiologic agents and pathogenesis of common malignancies in the setting of HIV, as well as current evidence for cancer prevention strategies and screening programs. PMID:26970136

  4. Low tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccination coverage among HIV infected individuals in Austria.

    PubMed

    Grabmeier-Pfistershammer, K; Herkner, H; Touzeau-Roemer, V; Rieger, A; Burgmann, H; Poeppl, W

    2015-07-31

    Current management guidelines of HIV infected adults include recommendation to immunization against common vaccine preventable diseases. This effort is hindered by the scarce knowledge regarding the immunization status of this especially vulnerable patient group. This study analyzed the serostatus for pertussis, diphtheria and tetanus of more than 700 HIV infected individuals residing in Austria. These individuals were representative for the Austrian HIV cohort regarding sex, age, transmission risk and HIV progression markers. Overall, 73.6% were on suppressive HAART, mean CD4 cell count was 603c/μl. Seropositivity was 84% for diphtheria, 51% for tetanus and 1% for pertussis. Migrants had a lower chance of tetanus seropositivity (OR 0.30 (CI 0.21 to 0.43)). Increase in CDC classification were associated with increased diphtheria seropositivity (OR 1.42 (CI 1.02 to 1.98)) and a CD4 nadir<200c/μl was associated with increased pertussis seropositivity (OR 12.2, 95% CI 1.2 to 121). Importantly due to the well preserved immune status of nearly all participants vaccination would be feasible in the majority of the seronegative patients. In patients with a CD4 count>200c/μl, 95% lacked seroprotection to at least one of the antigens included in the triple vaccine Tdap and could be vaccinated. Thus, a proactive approach would largely reduce the number of patients at risk for these vaccine-preventable diseases. PMID:26102535

  5. An HIV-Preventive Intervention for Youth Living with HIV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightfoot, Marguerita; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Tevendale, Heather

    2007-01-01

    As the number of youth infected with HIV rises, secondary prevention programs are needed to help youth living with HIV meet three goals: (1) increase self-care behaviors, medical adherence, and health-related interactions; (2) reduce transmission acts; and (3) enhance their quality of life. This article describes an intervention program for youth…

  6. HIV-1 VACCINES. Diversion of HIV-1 vaccine-induced immunity by gp41-microbiota cross-reactive antibodies.

    PubMed

    Williams, Wilton B; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B; Alam, S Munir; Gao, Feng; Wiehe, Kevin; Trama, Ashley M; Jones, Kathryn; Zhang, Ruijun; Song, Hongshuo; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Sawatzki, Kaitlin; Hua, Axin; Liu, Pinghuang; Tay, Matthew Z; Seaton, Kelly E; Shen, Xiaoying; Foulger, Andrew; Lloyd, Krissey E; Parks, Robert; Pollara, Justin; Ferrari, Guido; Yu, Jae-Sung; Vandergrift, Nathan; Montefiori, David C; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E; Hammer, Scott; Karuna, Shelly; Gilbert, Peter; Grove, Doug; Grunenberg, Nicole; McElrath, M Juliana; Mascola, John R; Koup, Richard A; Corey, Lawrence; Nabel, Gary J; Morgan, Cecilia; Churchyard, Gavin; Maenza, Janine; Keefer, Michael; Graham, Barney S; Baden, Lindsey R; Tomaras, Georgia D; Haynes, Barton F

    2015-08-14

    An HIV-1 DNA prime vaccine, with a recombinant adenovirus type 5 (rAd5) boost, failed to protect from HIV-1 acquisition. We studied the nature of the vaccine-induced antibody (Ab) response to HIV-1 envelope (Env). HIV-1-reactive plasma Ab titers were higher to Env gp41 than to gp120, and repertoire analysis demonstrated that 93% of HIV-1-reactive Abs from memory B cells responded to Env gp41. Vaccine-induced gp41-reactive monoclonal antibodies were non-neutralizing and frequently polyreactive with host and environmental antigens, including intestinal microbiota (IM). Next-generation sequencing of an immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region repertoire before vaccination revealed an Env-IM cross-reactive Ab that was clonally related to a subsequent vaccine-induced gp41-reactive Ab. Thus, HIV-1 Env DNA-rAd5 vaccine induced a dominant IM-polyreactive, non-neutralizing gp41-reactive Ab repertoire response that was associated with no vaccine efficacy. PMID:26229114

  7. Targeting dendritic cells for improved HIV-1 vaccines.

    PubMed

    Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Loré, Karin

    2013-01-01

    As dendritic cells (DCs) have the unique capacity to activate antigen-naive T cells they likely play a critical role in eliciting immune responses to vaccines. DCs are therefore being explored as attractive targets for vaccines, but understanding the interaction of DCs and clinically relevant vaccine antigens and adjuvants is a prerequisite. The HIV-1/AIDS epidemic continues to be a significant health problem, and despite intense research efforts over the past 30 years a protective vaccine has not yet been developed. A common challenge in vaccine design is to find a vaccine formulation that best shapes the immune response to protect against and/or control the given pathogen. Here, we discuss the importance of understanding the diversity, anatomical location and function of different human DC subsets in order to identify the optimal target cells for an HIV-1 vaccine. We review human DC interactions with some of the HIV-1 vaccine antigen delivery vehicles and adjuvants currently utilized in preclinical and clinical studies. Specifically, the effects of distinctly different vaccine adjuvants in terms of activation of DCs and improving DC function and vaccine efficacy are discussed. The susceptibility and responses of DCs to recombinant adenovirus vectors are reviewed, as well as the strategy of directly targeting DCs by using DC marker-specific monoclonal antibodies coupled to an antigen. PMID:22975879

  8. Advances in dendritic cell-based vaccines for HIV.

    PubMed

    Patham, B; Simmons, G L; Subramanya, S

    2011-01-01

    HIV remains one of the most important deadly infections today, due to the lack of a preventive vaccine and limited access to medical care in developing countries. In developed countries antiretroviral therapy is available but the regime is unable to eliminate the virus, implying that life-long therapy is necessary. Dendritic cells (DCs) are important mediators of cellular and humoral immune responses and hence offer a promising therapeutic vaccination strategy to attenuate disease progression. The current knowledge in DC subsets and their functional plasticity are prominent determinants in harnessing the full immunostimulatory potential of dendritic cells. Type of antigen, immunogen delivery method, optimal interaction of antigenic peptide and T cells, and avoidance of tolerogenic responses are some of the elements that need to be considered to develop an efficient immunotherapy. Novel strategies that modulate DC functions that eventually trigger a robust cellular response against a broad T cell repertoire are needed. This review focuses on current DC-based vaccine strategies for optimal induction of immune responses. PMID:21824092

  9. Prospects for Vaccine Prevention of Meningococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Lee H.

    2006-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in the United States and worldwide. A serogroup A/C/W-135/Y polysaccharide meningococcal vaccine has been licensed in the United States since 1981 but has not been used universally outside of the military. On 14 January 2005, a polysaccharide conjugate vaccine that covers meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y was licensed in the United States for 11- to 55-year-olds and is now recommended for the routine immunization of adolescents and other high-risk groups. This review covers the changing epidemiology of meningococcal disease in the United States, issues related to vaccine prevention, and recommendations on the use of the new vaccine. PMID:16418528

  10. HIV gp120 vaccine - VaxGen: AIDSVAX, AIDSVAX B/B, AIDSVAX B/E, HIV gp120 vaccine - Genentech, HIV gp120 vaccine AIDSVAX - VaxGen, HIV vaccine AIDSVAX - VaxGen.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    VaxGen is developing prophylactic vaccines against HIV-1 consisting of two recombinant gp120 surface proteins from different HIV-1 strains.This profile has been selected from R&D Insight, a pharmaceutical intelligence database produced by Adis International Ltd. The bivalent vaccines [AIDSVAX B/B and AIDSVAX B/E] are being evaluated in two phase III trials. The first multicentre phase III trial of AIDSVAX B/B, was conducted principally in Canada and the US but also at some sites in the Netherlands and Puerto Rico. The trial was completed at the end of 2002. The second phase III trial is being conducted in Thailand with the AIDSVAX B/E vaccine. VaxGen announced in July 2002 that it would be delaying its Biologics License Application (BLA) for AIDSVAX until 2004 to enable the company to fulfil pre-approval manufacturing requirements. AIDSVAX is based on an earlier monovalent gp120 vaccine developed by Genentech that was shown to be safe in humans. VaxGen (formerly Genenvax) was formed as a spin-off company from Genentech with the sole purpose of developing the gp120 vaccine. VaxGen announced in July 2002 that the original License and Supply agreement with Genentech, signed in May 1997, had been amended. Under the revised agreement, Genentech maintains its right to market and sell AIDSVAX in North America, but has relinquished its options to commercialise the vaccine candidate in the rest of the world. Genentech's earlier decision to waive its option to manufacture AIDSVAX has also been formalised in this agreement. Additionally, VaxGen's royalty payments to Genentech for sales to the WHO or UN for underdeveloped nations have also been reduced by up to 50% and Genentech has extended the milestone date associated with VaxGen submitting an NDA. A $US120 million joint venture (Celltrion) has been formed between VaxGen and South Korean investors to manufacture more than 200 million doses of AIDSVAX a year. Celltrion will build and operate two biotechnology manufacturing facilities: a pilot plant in South San Francisco and a larger plant in Incheon, South Korea. VaxGen will retain a 44% interest in the new company, as well as any profit generated by the AIDS vaccine. If AIDSVAX wins regulatory approval, VaxGen is committed to purchasing a minimum of 87 million doses a year. Celltrion announced in July 2002 that it had acquired 24 acres of land in Incheon, South Korea, for the site of its major biologics manufacturing facility. The facility is scheduled to be ready for commercial operation by 2005. The US FDA granted fast-track designations to the two vaccines AIDSVAX B/B and AIDSVAX B/E in December 2002. The study volunteers included 5108 men who have sex with men and 309 at-risk women, all of whom were meant to be HIV negative when they joined the trial. During the 36-month trial, a total of seven injections were administered at months 0, 1, 6, 12, 18, 24 and 30. The ratio of vaccine to placebo recipients was 2:1. On February 24 2003, VaxGen announced that AIDSVAX B/B did not prove effective in the trials conducted in North America and Europe. The study did not show a statistically significant reduction of HIV infection within the study population as a whole, which was the primary endpoint of the trial. However, the study did show a statistically significant reduction of HIV infection in certain vaccinated groups. Trial data indicate that black and Asian volunteers appeared to produce higher levels of antibodies against HIV. White and Hispanic volunteers appeared to develop consistently lower levels of protective antibodies following vaccination. VaxGen intends to conduct additional analyses to confirm if there was a direct correlation between the level of antibodies and the prevention of infection. The company intends to continue development of the vaccine through licensure, including any studies necessary to evaluate the protective riticism in the media about the statistical analysis of the non-Caucasian data, VaxGen issued a statement on 27 February 2003 claiming that the analysis of data from the trial followed a statistical analysis plan that was agreed on in advance with the US FDA. The plan included analyses of various subgroups, including racial backgrounds. Subsequently, VaxGen presented further analyses of the phase III data at the Keystone Symposia on 31 March 2003, and stated that the differences in vaccine efficacy observed between the Caucasian and non-Caucasian (Black, Asian and other) vaccinees could not have been due solely to chance. In May 2003, VaxGen stated that it would only continue developing AIDSVAX if government agencies and philanthropic organisations provide the necessary funding. AIDSVAX B/E is designed to protect against strains of HIV-1 prevalent in Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Taiwan and Thailand. Like the North American study, this trial also includes an interim efficacy analysis, set for 24 months after completion of enrolment. Results from this trial are expected to be announced in the second half of 2003. This trial received its final favourable review from the DSMB in October 2002. Based on this result, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) has decided to pursue only one of the two previously planned phase III trials involving immunisation with vCP1452 and AIDSVAX B/B. The NIAID will not conduct the North and South American phase III trial. It will, however, proceed with the planned 'prime-boost' phase III trial in Thailand, to evaluate the efficacy of a similar vaccine combination, ALVAC-HIV-vCP1521 and AIDSVAX B/E, both of which incorporate envelope antigens from the predominant circulating HIV (CRF_AE_01) in Thailand. The trial is expected to begin enrolling volunteers in March 2003. VaxGen was a awarded $US3.3 million contract to supply AIDSVAX B/E for the trial, which will be funded by the NIH and conducted by the US Army. NIAID and the HIV Trials Network (HVTN) are conducting a phase II trial (HVTN 026), testing the immunogenicity of vCP1452 alone and in combination with AIDSVAX among populations in Brazil, Haiti, Peru and Trinidad and Tobago. PMID:12848591

  11. Long-term follow-up of study participants from prophylactic HIV vaccine clinical trials in Africa.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Claudia; Jaoko, Walter; Omosa-Manyonyi, Gloria; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Mpendo, Juliet; Nanvubya, Annet; Karita, Etienne; Bayingana, Roger; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Chomba, Elwyn; Kilembe, William; Nchabeleng, Maphoshane; Nyombayire, Julien; Stevens, Gwynn; Chetty, Paramesh; Lehrman, Jennifer; Cox, Josephine; Allen, Susan; Dally, Len; Smith, Carol; Fast, Patricia E

    2014-01-01

    Long-term safety is critical for the development and later use of a vaccine to prevent HIV/AIDS. Likewise, the persistence of vaccine-induced antibodies and their impact on HIV testing must be established. IAVI has sponsored several Phase I and IIA HIV vaccine trials enrolling healthy, HIV-seronegative African volunteers. Plasmid DNA and viral vector based vaccines were tested. No vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported. After completion of vaccine trials conducted between 2001-2007, both vaccine and placebo recipients were offered enrolment into an observational long-term follow-up study (LTFU) to monitor potential late health effects and persistence of immune responses. At scheduled 6-monthly clinic visits, a health questionnaire was administered; clinical events were recorded and graded for severity. Blood was drawn for HIV testing and cellular immune assays. 287 volunteers were enrolled; total follow-up after last vaccination was 1463 person years (median: 5.2 years). Ninety-three (93)% of volunteers reported good health at their last LTFU visit. Infectious diseases and injuries accounted for almost 50% of the 175 reported clinical events, of which over 95% were mild or moderate in severity. There were 30 six pregnancies, six incident HIV infections and 14 volunteers reported cases of social harm. Persistence of immune responses was rare. No safety signal was identified. No potentially vaccine-related medical condition, no immune mediated disease, or malignancy was reported. HIV vaccines studied in these trials had a low potential of induction of persisting HIV antibodies. PMID:24374365

  12. Long-term follow-up of study participants from prophylactic HIV vaccine clinical trials in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Claudia; Jaoko, Walter; Omosa-Manyonyi, Gloria; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Mpendo, Juliet; Nanvubya, Annet; Karita, Etienne; Bayingana, Roger; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Chomba, Elwyn; Kilembe, William; Nchabeleng, Maphoshane; Nyombayire, Julien; Stevens, Gwynn; Chetty, Paramesh; Lehrman, Jennifer; Cox, Josephine; Allen, Susan; Dally, Len; Smith, Carol; Fast, Patricia E

    2014-01-01

    Long-term safety is critical for the development and later use of a vaccine to prevent HIV/AIDS. Likewise, the persistence of vaccine-induced antibodies and their impact on HIV testing must be established. IAVI has sponsored several Phase I and IIA HIV vaccine trials enrolling healthy, HIV-seronegative African volunteers. Plasmid DNA and viral vector based vaccines were tested. No vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported. After completion of vaccine trials conducted between 2001–2007, both vaccine and placebo recipients were offered enrolment into an observational long-term follow-up study (LTFU) to monitor potential late health effects and persistence of immune responses. At scheduled 6-monthly clinic visits, a health questionnaire was administered; clinical events were recorded and graded for severity. Blood was drawn for HIV testing and cellular immune assays. 287 volunteers were enrolled; total follow-up after last vaccination was 1463 person years (median: 5.2 years). Ninety-three (93)% of volunteers reported good health at their last LTFU visit. Infectious diseases and injuries accounted for almost 50% of the 175 reported clinical events, of which over 95% were mild or moderate in severity. There were 30 six pregnancies, six incident HIV infections and 14 volunteers reported cases of social harm. Persistence of immune responses was rare. No safety signal was identified. No potentially vaccine-related medical condition, no immune mediated disease, or malignancy was reported. HIV vaccines studied in these trials had a low potential of induction of persisting HIV antibodies. PMID:24374365

  13. The Promise of Preventive Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lollini, Pier-Luigi; Cavallo, Federica; Nanni, Patrizia; Quaglino, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Years of unsuccessful attempts at fighting established tumors with vaccines have taught us all that they are only able to truly impact patient survival when used in a preventive setting, as would normally be the case for traditional vaccines against infectious diseases. While true primary cancer prevention is still but a long-term goal, secondary and tertiary prevention are already in the clinic and providing encouraging results. A combination of immunopreventive cancer strategies and recently approved checkpoint inhibitors is a further promise of forthcoming successful cancer disease control, but prevention will require a considerable reduction of currently reported toxicities. These considerations summed with the increased understanding of tumor antigens allow space for an optimistic view of the future. PMID:26343198

  14. HIV vaccine trial willingness among injection and non-injection drug users in two urban centres, Barcelona and San Francisco.

    PubMed

    Etcheverry, M Florencia; Lum, Paula J; Evans, Jennifer L; Sanchez, Emilia; de Lazzari, Elisa; Mendez-Arancibia, Eva; Sierra, Ernesto; Gatell, José M; Page, Kimberly; Joseph, Joan

    2011-02-24

    Being able to recruit high-risk volunteers who are also willing to consider future participation in vaccine trials are critical features of vaccine preparedness studies. We described data from two cohorts of injection- and non-injection drug users in Barcelona, Spain [Red Cross centre] and in San Francisco, USA, [UFO-VAX study] at high risk of HIV/HCV infection to assess behaviour risk exposure and willingness to participate in future preventive HIV vaccine trials. We successfully identified drug-using populations that would be eligible for future HIV vaccine efficacy trials, based on reported levels of risk during screening and high levels of willingness to participate. In both groups, Red Cross and UFO-VAX respectively, HCV infection was highly prevalent at baseline (41% and 34%), HIV baseline seroprevalence was 4.2% and 1.5%, and high levels of willingness were seen (83% and 78%). PMID:21241735

  15. HIV vaccine trial willingness among injection and non-injection drug users in two urban centres, Barcelona and San Francisco

    PubMed Central

    Etcheverry, M. Florencia; Lum, Paula J.; Evans, Jennifer L.; Sanchez, Emilia; de Lazzari, Elisa; Mendez-Arancibia, Eva; Sierra, Ernesto; Gatell, José M.; Page, Kimberly; Joseph, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Being able to recruit high-risk volunteers who are also willing to consider future participation in vaccine trials are critical features of vaccine preparedness studies. We described data from two cohorts of injection- and non-injection drug users in Barcelona, Spain [Red Cross centre] and in San Francisco, USA, [UFO-VAX study] at high risk of HIV/HCV infection to assess behaviour risk exposure and willingness to participate in future preventive HIV vaccine trials. We successfully identified drug-using populations that would be eligible for future HIV vaccine efficacy trials, based on reported levels of risk during screening and high levels of willingness to participate. In both groups, Red Cross and UFO-VAX respectively, HCV infection was highly prevalent at baseline (41% and 34%), HIV baseline seroprevalence was 4.2% and 1.5%, and high levels of willingness were seen (83% and 78%). PMID:21241735

  16. DIFFERENTIAL IMMUNOGENICITY OF VACCINIA AND HIV-1 COMPONENTS OF A HUMAN RECOMBINANT VACCINE IN MUCOSAL AND BLOOD COMPARTMENTS

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Peter A.; Ibarrondo, F Javier; Boscardin, W. John; Zhou, Ying; Schwartz, Elissa J.; Ng, Hwee L.; Hausner, Mary Ann; Shih, Roger; Elliott, Julie; Hultin, Patricia M.; Hultin, Lance E.; Price, Charles; Fuerst, Marie; Adler, Amy; Wong, Johnson T.; Yang, Otto O.; Jamieson, Beth D.

    2008-01-01

    Mucosal immune responses induced by HIV-1 vaccines are likely critical for prevention. We report a Phase 1 safety and immunogenicity trial in 8 participants using the vaccinia-based TBC-3B vaccine given subcutaneously to determine the relationship between HIV-1 specific systemic and gastrointestinal mucosal responses. Across all subjects, detectable levels of blood vaccinia- and HIV-1-specific antibodies were elicited but none were seen mucosally. While the vaccinia component was immunogenic for CD8+ T lymphocyte (CTL) responses in both blood and mucosa, it was greater in blood. The HIV-1 component of the vaccine was poorly immunogenic in both blood and mucosa. Although only 8 volunteers were studied intensively, the discordance between mucosal and blood responses may highlight mechanisms contributing to recent vaccine failures. PMID:18621451

  17. Effectiveness of 7-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Against Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in HIV-Infected and -Uninfected Children in South Africa: A Matched Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Cheryl; von Mollendorf, Claire; de Gouveia, Linda; Naidoo, Nireshni; Meiring, Susan; Quan, Vanessa; Nokeri, Vusi; Fortuin-de Smit, Melony; Malope-Kgokong, Babatyi; Moore, David; Reubenson, Gary; Moshe, Mamokgethi; Madhi, Shabir A.; Eley, Brian; Hallbauer, Ute; Kularatne, Ranmini; Conklin, Laura; O'Brien, Katherine L.; Zell, Elizabeth R.; Klugman, Keith; Whitney, Cynthia G.; von Gottberg, Anne; Moore, David; Verwey, Charl; Varughese, Sheeba; Archary, Moherndran; Naby, Fathima; Dawood, Khathija; Naidoo, Ramola; Elliott, Gene; Hallbauer, Ute; Eley, Brian; Nuttall, James; Cooke, Louise; Finlayson, Heather; Rabie, Helena; Whitelaw, Andrew; Perez, Dania; Jooste, Pieter; Naidoo, Dhamiran; Kularatne, Ranmini; Reubenson, Gary; Cohen, Cheryl; de Gouveia, Linda; du Plessis, Mignon; Govender, Nevashan; Meiring, Susan; Quan, Vanessa; von Mollendorf, Claire; Fortuin-de Smidt, Melony; Naidoo, Nireshni; Malope-Kgokong, Babatyi; Nokeri, Vusi; Ncha, Relebohile; Lindani, Sonwabo; von Gottberg, Anne; Spies, Barry; Sono, Lino; Maredi, Phasweni; Hamese, Ken; Moshe, Mamokgethi; Nchabeleng, Maphosane; Ngcobo, Ntombenhle; van den Heever, Johann; Madhi, Shabir; Conklin, Laura; Verani, Jennifer; Whitney, Cynthia; Zell, Elizabeth; Loo, Jennifer; Nelson, George; Klugman, Keith; O'Brien, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Background.?South Africa introduced 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) in April 2009 using a 2 + 1 schedule (6 and 14 weeks and 9 months). We estimated the effectiveness of ?2 PCV7 doses against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)infected and -uninfected children. Methods.?IPD (pneumococcus identified from a normally sterile site) cases were identified through national laboratory-based surveillance. Specimens were serotyped by Quellung or polymerase chain reaction. Four controls, matched for age, HIV status, and hospital were sought for each case. Using conditional logistic regression, we calculated vaccine effectiveness (VE) as 1 minus the adjusted odds ratio for vaccination. Results.?From March 2010 through November 2012, we enrolled 187 HIV-uninfected (48 [26%] vaccine serotype) and 109 HIV-infected (43 [39%] vaccine serotype) cases and 752 HIV-uninfected and 347 HIV-infected controls aged ?16 weeks. Effectiveness of ?2 PCV7 doses against vaccine-serotype IPD was 74% (95% confidence interval [CI], 25%91%) among HIV-uninfected and ?12% (95% CI, ?449% to 77%) among HIV-infected children. Effectiveness of ?3 doses against vaccine-serotype IPD was 90% (95% CI, 14%99%) among HIV-uninfected and 57% (95% CI, ?371% to 96%) among HIV-infected children. Among HIV-exposed but -uninfected children, effectiveness of ?2 doses was 92% (95% CI, 47%99%) against vaccine-serotype IPD. Effectiveness of ?2 doses against all-serotype multidrug-resistant IPD was 96% (95% CI, 62%100%) among HIV-uninfected children. Conclusions.?A 2 + 1 PCV7 schedule was effective in preventing vaccine-serotype IPD in HIV-uninfected and HIV-exposed, uninfected children. This finding supports the World Health Organization recommendation for this schedule as an alternative to a 3-dose primary series among HIV-uninfected individuals. PMID:24917657

  18. COGNITIVE FACTORS AND WILLINGNESS TO PARTICIPATE IN AN HIV VACCINE TRIAL AMONG HIV-NEGATIVE INJECTION DRUG USERS

    PubMed Central

    Dhalla, Shayesta; Poole, Gary; Singer, Joel; Patrick, David M.; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional study involving a cohort of injection drug users (IDU) examined the relationship between cognitive factors (HIV treatment optimism, self-efficacy and knowledge of vaccine trial concepts) as well as risk factors for seroconversion, and willingness to participate (WTP) in a preventive phase 3 HIV vaccine trial. Willingness to participate overall was 56%. In a multivariate analysis, for a 20-unit increase in a 100-point composite scale, self-efficacy was positively related to WTP (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.40–2.70). HIV treatment optimism and knowledge of vaccine trial concepts were unrelated to WTP. Aboriginal ethnicity (AOR = 3.47, 95% CI = 1.68–7.18) and a higher educational level (≥high school) (AOR = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.07–3.59) were positively related to WTP. This study provides information on WTP for an HIV vaccine trial. Limitations and future directions are also discussed. PMID:20044049

  19. Tilapia Vaccines: Important Disease Prevention, Biosecurity Tools

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Minimizing the effects of disease is crucial to prevent mortality, morbidity and to promote rapid growth and optimal feed conversion of tilapia cultured in fresh, estuarine and marine waters. Vaccination, a valuable biosecurity safeguard, can protect tilapia against infectious diseases. Vaccinat...

  20. HIV prevention by oral preexposure prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Heneine, Walid; Kashuba, Angela

    2012-03-01

    The impressive advances in antiretroviral (ARV) therapy of chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections during the last decade and the availability of potent ARV drugs have fueled interest in using chemoprophylaxis as a novel HIV prevention strategy. Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) refers to the use of ARV drugs in HIV-negative persons to prevent HIV infection. The rationale for PrEP builds on the success of ARV prophylaxis in preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV and on a large body of animal studies that show the efficacy of PrEP against mucosal and parenteral infection. We focus on oral administration of ARV drugs for prevention of HIV infection. Identifying an effective prophylactic pill that individuals can take outside the setting of sexual intercourse precludes the necessity to disclose such use to their partners, thereby empowering those who might not be in a position to negotiate with their partners. Several human clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of daily regimens of the HIV reverse-transcriptase (RT) inhibitors tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) or Truvada (TDF and emtricitabine [FTC]) are under way among high-risk populations. The results of one trial among men who have sex with men showed that daily Truvada was safe and effective, providing the first support for oral PrEP as a prevention strategy. Here we outline the preclinical and clinical research on oral PrEP, pharmacologic considerations, and future directions and challenges. PMID:22393535

  1. The Past, Present, and Future of HIV Prevention: Integrating Behavioral, Biomedical, and Structural Intervention Strategies for the Next Generation of HIV Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Swendeman, Dallas; Chovnick, Gary

    2010-01-01

    In the past 25 years, the field of HIV prevention research has been transformed repeatedly. Today, effective HIV prevention requires a combination of behavioral, biomedical, and structural intervention strategies. Risk of transmitting or acquiring HIV is reduced by consistent male and female-condom use, reductions in concurrent and/or sequential sexual and needle-sharing partners, male circumcision, and treatment with antiretroviral medications. At least 144 behavioral prevention programs have been found effective in reducing HIV transmission acts; however, scale up of these programs has not occurred outside of the United States. A series of recent failures of HIV-prevention efficacy trials for biomedical innovations such as HIV vaccines, treating herpes simplex 2 and other sexually transmitted infections, and diaphragm and microbicide barriers highlights the need for behavioral strategies to accompany biomedical strategies. This challenges prevention researchers to reconceptualize how cost-effective, useful, realistic, and sustainable prevention programs will be designed, delivered, tested, and diffused. The next generation of HIV prevention science must draw from the successes of existing evidence-based interventions and the expertise of the market sector to integrate preventive innovations and behaviors into everyday routines. PMID:19327028

  2. HIV/STD/TB PREVENTION NEWS DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The CDC National Prevention Information Network (NPIN) is the U.S. reference, referral, and distribution service for information on HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and tuberculosis (TB). NPIN produces, collects, catalogs, processes, stocks, and disseminates materi...

  3. HPV vaccination for prevention of skin cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vinzón, Sabrina E; Rösl, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous papillomaviruses are associated with specific skin diseases, such as extensive wart formation and the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), especially in immunosuppressed patients. Hence, clinical approaches are required that prevent such lesions. Licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines confer type-restricted protection against HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18, responsible of 90% of genital warts and 70% of cervical cancers, respectively. However, they do not protect against less prevalent high-risk types or cutaneous HPVs. Over the past few years, several studies explored the potential of developing vaccines targeting cutaneous papillomaviruses. These vaccines showed to be immunogenic and prevent skin tumor formation in certain animal models. Furthermore, under conditions mimicking the ones found in the intended target population (i.e., immunosuppression and in the presence of an already established infection before vaccination), recent preclinical data shows that immunization can still be effective. Strategies are currently focused on finding vaccine formulations that can confer protection against a broad range of papillomavirus-associated diseases. The state-of-the-art of these approaches and the future directions in the field will be presented. PMID:25692212

  4. Developing Combined HIV Vaccine Strategies for a Functional Cure.

    PubMed

    Noto, Alessandra; Trautmann, Lydie

    2013-01-01

    Increasing numbers of HIV-infected individuals have access to potent antiretroviral drugs that control viral replication and decrease the risk of transmission. However, there is no cure for HIV and new strategies have to be developed to reach an eradication of the virus or a natural control of viral replication in the absence of drugs (functional cure). Therapeutic vaccines against HIV have been evaluated in many trials over the last 20 years and important knowledge has been gained from these trials. However, the major obstacle to HIV eradication is the persistence of latent proviral reservoirs. Different molecules are currently tested in ART-treated subjects to reactivate these latent reservoirs. Such anti-latency agents should be combined with a vaccination regimen in order to control or eradicate reactivated latently-infected cells. New in vitro assays should also be developed to assess the success of tested therapeutic vaccines by measuring the immune-mediated killing of replication-competent HIV reservoir cells. This review provides an overview of the current strategies to combine HIV vaccines with anti-latency agents that could act as adjuvant on the vaccine-induced immune response as well as new tools to assess the efficacy of these approaches. PMID:26344343

  5. Developing Combined HIV Vaccine Strategies for a Functional Cure

    PubMed Central

    Noto, Alessandra; Trautmann, Lydie

    2013-01-01

    Increasing numbers of HIV-infected individuals have access to potent antiretroviral drugs that control viral replication and decrease the risk of transmission. However, there is no cure for HIV and new strategies have to be developed to reach an eradication of the virus or a natural control of viral replication in the absence of drugs (functional cure). Therapeutic vaccines against HIV have been evaluated in many trials over the last 20 years and important knowledge has been gained from these trials. However, the major obstacle to HIV eradication is the persistence of latent proviral reservoirs. Different molecules are currently tested in ART-treated subjects to reactivate these latent reservoirs. Such anti-latency agents should be combined with a vaccination regimen in order to control or eradicate reactivated latently-infected cells. New in vitro assays should also be developed to assess the success of tested therapeutic vaccines by measuring the immune-mediated killing of replication-competent HIV reservoir cells. This review provides an overview of the current strategies to combine HIV vaccines with anti-latency agents that could act as adjuvant on the vaccine-induced immune response as well as new tools to assess the efficacy of these approaches. PMID:26344343

  6. The immune response to HIV: implications for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, D P

    1993-06-01

    HIV infection is accompanied by a vigorous immune response to the virus consisting of humoral and cellular elements that effectively neutralize virus infectivity and lyse infected cells when analyzed in cell culture models. However, this immune response shows no evidence of being able to eliminate the infection. The inability to clear this infection places HIV in a category of viruses for which vaccines have yet to be successfully developed. Indeed, effective vaccines have emerged only for viruses where natural immunity is part of the pathogenic process; it is such immunity that became the guiding principle for the development of the respective vaccines. It follows that the unique features of HIV infection and pathogenesis are issues to consider carefully in formulating vaccine strategies, particularly those that relate to its susceptibility to immune attack on the one hand, and its mechanisms of immune escape on the other. PMID:8347841

  7. Predictors of HVTN 503 MRK-AD5 HIV-1 gag/pol/nef Vaccine Induced Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Kathryn L.; Laher, Fatima; Otwombe, Kennedy; Churchyard, Gavin; Bekker, Linda-Gail; DeRosa, Stephen; Nchabeleng, Maphoshane; Mlisana, Koleka; Kublin, James; Gray, Glenda

    2014-01-01

    Background Phambili, the Merck (MRK)-Adenovirus Type 5 (Ad5) HIV-1 gag/pol/nef subtype B vaccine study, conducted in South Africa, suspended enrollment and vaccination when companion study, Step, was found non-efficacious. Although the vaccine did not prevent HIV-1 infection or lower viral-load setpoint, immune responses recognized clades B and C HIV-1 subtypes. We investigated predictors of the vaccine-induced antigen-specific immune responses. Methods Vaccine-induced immunogenicity was ascertained by interferon-? ELISpot assays on the first 186 enrolled participants receiving two vaccinations. Analyses, stratified by study arm/sex, were performed on baseline demographics [sex, age, Body Mass Index (BMI), site, Adenovirus Type-5 (Ad5) titer, Herpes Simplex Virus Type-2 (HSV2) status, heavy drinking]. Multivariate logistic regression determined predictors. Results Of the 186 participants, 53.7% (n?=?100) were female, median BMI was 22.5 [IQR: 20.427.0], 85.5% (n?=?159) were Ad5 seropositive, and 18.8% (n?=?35) drank heavily. All vaccine recipients responded to both clade B (n?=?87; 47%) and/or C (n?=?74; 40%), p?=?0.17. In multivariate analysis, female sex [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR): 6.478; p?=?0.0159], overweight/obese BMI (AOR: 0.186; p?=?0.0452), and heavy drinking (AOR: 0.270; p?=?0.048) significantly predicted immune response to clade C for any antigens. A marginally significant predictor of clade C-pol antigen was female sex (AOR: 3.182; p?=?0.0500). Conclusions Sex, BMI, and heavy drinking affected vaccine-induced HIV-1 specific immune responses to clade C antigens. The role of female sex and overweight/obese BMI boosting and suppressing vaccine-induced HIV-1 specific immune responses, respectively, requires elucidation, including any effect on HIV vaccine efficacy, especially in the era of colliding epidemics (HIV and obesity). PMID:25090110

  8. Preliminary Report on HIV-1 Vaccine Preparedness in Nigeria: Advantages of Recruiting University Students.

    PubMed

    Edubio, Abigail; Agwale, Simon; Bulterys, Marc; Jelpe, Dadik; Idoko, John; Isichei, Chris; Guyit, Ruth; Abimiku, Alash'le

    2010-01-01

    The national HIV seroprevalence in Nigeria has risen steeply from about 3% in 1993 to 5-8% in 2001 and now stands at 4.4%. HIV epidemic continues to be a serious threat to the most populous country in Africa with a population of 140 million, with limited use of antiviral drugs that is taken for life since it only suppresses the virus without completely eliminating the virus or leading to cure. Only a change in social behavior and an affordable vaccine can halt the epidemic in Africa. We report here results of a pilot study on the recruitment strategies, sociodemographic aspects and HIV risk behavior of a cohort of normal volunteers recruited at the University of Jos, Nigeria. Our study recorded a high degree of interest and zeal to participate in HIV vaccine studies by volunteers, and demonstrated the superiority of snowballing over invitation by mail, as a recruitment strategy. A cohort of university students may be particularly suitable for conducting HIV vaccine trials because of the assurance of prospective follow-up for up to four years (time to graduation), and a good understanding of the risks and benefits of participation as outlined in the informed consent. We had 100% retention during a follow-up period of two years. Most importantly, the cohort reflected a relatively low HIV seroprevalence, which gives preventive programs the potential to blunt or halt the epidemic. PMID:21994601

  9. Conference Report: Functional Glycomics in HIV Type 1 Vaccine Design Workshop Report, Bethesda, Maryland, April 30May 1, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Brenda S.; Dell, Anne; Alter, Galit

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A vital part of the renewed hope for a vaccine against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) is based on recent studies that have highlighted major sites of HIV-1 vulnerability that could be effectively targeted by a preventive vaccine. One of these potential vulnerabilities includes the dense cluster of carbohydrates surrounding HIV-1's envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41, typically referred to as the glycan shield. Recent data from several laboratories have shown that glycans on the HIV-1 envelope form key epitopes for broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAb). Moreover, HIV-1 envelope glycans play an important role in viral transmission, antigenicity, and immunogenicity. The recent availability of novel tools and technologies has now allowed investigators to leverage glycomic structurefunction relationships in the design of candidate HIV-1 vaccines. Additionally, glycans modulate the immune response, playing an essential role in Fc receptor and complement activity. To promote cross-disciplinary collaboration and promote synergistic HIV-1- glycomics research, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) cosponsored and convened a 1.5-day workshop entitled Functional Glycomics in HIV-1 Vaccine Design. The meeting focused on the role of glycan interactions with neutralizing antibodies, the influence of immunoglobulin G (IgG) Fc receptor glycosylation, newly available glycomics technologies, and how new information on the role of glycans could be applied in HIV-1 immunogen design strategies. This report summarizes the discussions of this workshop. PMID:23767872

  10. An HIV-preventive intervention for youth living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Lightfoot, Marguerita; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Tevendale, Heather

    2007-05-01

    As the number of youth infected with HIV rises, secondary prevention programs are needed to help youth living with HIV meet three goals: (a) increase self-care behaviors, medical adherence, and health-related interactions; (b) reduce transmission acts; and (c) enhance their quality of life. This article describes an intervention program for youth living with HIV. Youth engage in small-group activities with other infected peers to modify their behavioral patterns. The intervention aims to (a) reduce substance use and sexual behaviors that may transmit or enhance transmission of the HIV virus; (b) reduce negative impacts of substance use on seeking and utilizing health care, assertiveness, and adherence to health regimens; and (c) enhance the quality of life to maintain behavior changes over time. Interventions that target youth living with HIV are warranted. A variety of delivery strategies are discussed for secondary interventions. PMID:17438347

  11. HIV vaccine efficacy and immune correlates of risk.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Robert J; Excler, Jean-Louis

    2013-09-01

    Although immune correlates of protection for HIV vaccines have remained an intractable question, RV144 provided the first evidence that an HIV vaccine could provide protective efficacy against HIV acquisition. The study of correlates of risk has opened large and unforeseen avenues of exploration and hope for the most exciting time of HIV vaccine development. Several elements in the RV144 post-hoc analysis and recent macaque challenge studies suggest that antibodies directed against the V2 loop of gp120 are functional and may have played a protective role against virus acquisition. Several protective mechanisms against sexual transmission of HIV are evoked including blocking the gp120- α4β7 interaction and ADCC although possibly mitigated by high levels of Env-specific IgA, both mechanisms contributing at least partially to the protective effect. Several questions remain unanswered that will deserve intensive assessments, in particular, IgG and IgA Env antibodies in mucosal secretions, Env-specific IgG subclasses, cross-reaction of V2 antibodies, role of T-follicular helper cells, and B-cell memory. Whether RV144 correlates of risk are universal and apply at least partially to other populations at higher risk for HIV acquisition and other modes of transmission (rectal, injecting drug users) is unknown and remains to be explored. Future efficacy trials using the same vaccine concept tested in high-risk heterosexual populations and in men having sex with men may answer this question. In addition, the determination of early events in the pathogenesis among HIV-infected vaccine recipients based on current correlates knowledge would offer unprecedented information about correlates biomarkers in the peripheral blood and gut mucosa during early acute HIV infection. PMID:24033301

  12. DNA/MVA Vaccines for HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Smita S.; Amara, Rama R.

    2014-01-01

    Since the initial proof-of-concept studies examining the ability of antigen-encoded plasmid DNA to serve as an immunogen, DNA vaccines have evolved as a clinically safe and effective platform for priming HIV-specific cellular and humoral responses in heterologous prime-boost vaccination regimens. Direct injection of plasmid DNA into the muscle induces T- and B-cell responses against foreign antigens. However, the insufficient magnitude of this response has led to the development of approaches for enhancing the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. The last two decades have seen significant progress in the DNA-based vaccine platform with optimized plasmid constructs, improved delivery methods, such as electroporation, the use of molecular adjuvants and novel strategies combining DNA with viral vectors and subunit proteins. These innovations are paving the way for the clinical application of DNA-based HIV vaccines. Here, we review preclinical studies on the DNA-prime/modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA)-boost vaccine modality for HIV. There is a great deal of interest in enhancing the immunogenicity of DNA by engineering DNA vaccines to co-express immune modulatory adjuvants. Some of these adjuvants have demonstrated encouraging results in preclinical and clinical studies, and these data will be examined, as well. PMID:26344473

  13. Faith and HIV prevention: the conceptual framing of HIV prevention among Pentecostal Batswana teenagers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a huge interest by faith-based organizations (FBOs) in sub-Saharan Africa and elsewhere in HIV prevention interventions that build on the religious aspects of being. Successful partnerships between the public health services and FBOs will require a better understanding of the conceptual framing of HIV prevention by FBOS to access for prevention intervention, those concepts the churches of various denominations and their members would support or endorse. This study investigated the conceptual framing of HIV prevention among church youths in Botswana; - a country with one of the highest HIV prevalence in the world. Method Participants were 213 Pentecostal church members (67% female; age range 12 to 23years; median age?=?19years). We engaged the participants in a mixed-method inductive process to collect data on their implicit framing of HIV prevention concepts, taking into account the centrality of religion concepts to them and the moderating influences of age, gender and sexual experience. After, we analysed the data using multi-dimensional scaling (MDS) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) to map the ways the church youths framed HIV prevention. Results The findings suggest the church youth to conceptually frame their HIV prevention from both faith-oriented and secular-oriented perspectives, while prioritizing the faith-oriented concepts based on biblical teachings and future focus. In their secular-oriented framing of HIV prevention, the church youths endorsed the importance to learn the facts about HIV and AIDS, understanding of community norms that increased risk for HIV and prevention education. However, components of secular-oriented framing of HIV prevention concepts were comparatively less was well differentiated among the youths than with faith-oriented framing, suggesting latent influences of the church knowledge environment to undervalue secular oriented concepts. Older and sexually experienced church youths in their framing of HIV prevention valued future focus and prevention education less than contrasting peer cohorts, suggesting their greater relative risk for HIV infection. Conclusion A prospective HIV prevention intervention with the Pentecostal church youths would combine both faith and secular informed concepts. It also would need to take into account the ways in which these youth interpret secular-oriented health concepts in the context of their religious beliefs. PMID:24593140

  14. Challenges for HIV vaccine dissemination and clinical trial recruitment: if we build it, will they come?

    PubMed

    Newman, Peter A; Duan, Naihua; Rudy, Ellen T; Anton, Peter A

    2004-12-01

    HIV vaccine availability does not guarantee uptake. Given suboptimal uptake of highly efficacious and already accessible vaccines in the United States, low vaccine coverage in the developing world, and the expectation that initial HIV vaccines will be only partially efficacious, the public health community will face formidable challenges in disseminating U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved HIV vaccines. HIV/AIDS stigma, fear of vaccine- induced HIV infection, social side effects of testing HIV-positive, and mistrust of government and research present additional obstacles to HIV vaccine dissemination. Increased risk behaviors because of HIV vaccine availability can undermine the effectiveness of partially efficacious vaccines in reducing HIV incidence. HIV vaccine efficacy trials also face significant challenges in recruitment of sufficient volunteers and possible increases in risk behaviors due to trial participation. Planning and designing interventions to facilitate successful recruitment for large-scale phase 3 efficacy trials is a vital step towards U.S. FDA-approved HIV vaccines. Rather than despair in the face of momentous HIV vaccine dissemination challenges, or presume unrealistically that vaccine uptake will ensue automatically and that risk behavior increases will not occur, let us deem the estimated 10-year window to an approved HIV vaccine as an opportunity to investigate and confront these challenges. A consumer research agenda founded on social marketing principles is needed to facilitate the design of empirically-based interventions tailored to the unique needs and preferences of specific segments of consumers. Social marketing interventions may increase future HIV vaccine uptake and clinical trial participation, and mitigate increases in HIV risk behaviors. PMID:15659880

  15. Prevention of HIV infection in developing countries.

    PubMed

    d'Cruz-Grote, D

    1996-10-19

    The HIV/AIDS epidemic continues to spread rapidly in developing countries. Heterosexual transmission accounts for almost three-quarters of infections. Current strategies have been effective in the prevention of HIV spread within certain groups but they have had limited impact on the general spread of the epidemic. There is a need to complement these strategies with approaches that will influence the social and environmental determinants of risk to enable those vulnerable to infection to protect themselves. PMID:8874461

  16. Strategies for optimizing targeting and delivery of mucosal HIV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ahlers, Jeffrey D; Belyakov, Igor M

    2009-10-01

    Effective frontline defenses against HIV-1 will require targeting vaccines to mucosal tissue in order to induce alphabeta CD8(+) lymphocytes in mucosal effector sites (lamina propria and intraepithelial compartment) as well as antibody secreting plasma cells that can neutralize and limit free virus. A concerted second wave of assault against the virus will require the activation and recruitment of antigen specific memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in mesenteric lymph nodes and distal secondary lymphoid organs. New delivery strategies targeting the "right" DC subsets in combination with delivery of mucosal adjuvants and innate signals for activating DC will be essential for mucosal vaccines in order to circumvent the naturally tolerogenic environment and the induction of Tregs. Mucosal delivery of antigen in combination with inflammatory signals has been shown to empower systemic immunization by directing responses to mucosal sites for imprinting optimum mucosal memory. Here, we discuss novel vaccine strategies and adjuvants for optimizing mucosal delivery of HIV vaccines. PMID:19609978

  17. Justification for the inclusion of Gag in HIV vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Anna-Lise; Rybicki, Edward P

    2016-05-01

    It is widely accepted that effective human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccines need to elicit a range of responses, including neutralising antibodies and T-cells. In natural HIV infections, immune responses to Gag are associated with lower viral load in infected individuals, and these responses can be measured against infected cells before the replication of HIV. Priming immune responses to Gag with DNA or recombinant Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccines, and boosting with Gag virus-like particles as subunit vaccines or Gag produced in vivo by other vaccine vectors, elicits high-magnitude, broad polyfunctional responses, with memory T-cell responses appropriate for virus control. This review provides justification for the inclusion of HIV Gag in vaccine regimens, either as a transgene expressing protein that may assemble to form budded particles, or as purified virus-like particles. Possible benefits would include early control via CD8(+) T-cells at the site of infection, control of spread from the entry portal, and control of viraemia if infection is established. PMID:26645951

  18. FAQs about Vaccines and Diseases They Prevent

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Education Programs and Tools VTrckS (Vaccine Tracking System) Immunization Registries (IIS) Vaccines for Children (VFC) Stop Transmission of Polio (STOP) Vaccine Management Business Improvement Project (VMBIP) Global Immunizations & Vaccinations Immunization Program ...

  19. List of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Education Programs and Tools VTrckS (Vaccine Tracking System) Immunization Registries (IIS) Vaccines for Children (VFC) Stop Transmission of Polio (STOP) Vaccine Management Business Improvement Project (VMBIP) Global Immunizations & Vaccinations Immunization Program ...

  20. Socially-Integrated Transdisciplinary HIV Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Downing, Martin J.; Smyrnov, Pavlo; Nikolopoulos, Georgios; Schneider, John A.; Livak, Britt; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Slobodianyk, Liudmyla; Vasylyeva, Tetyana I.; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Psichogiou, Mina; Sypsa, Vana; Malliori, Melpomeni M.; Hatzakis, Angelos

    2013-01-01

    Current ideas about HIV prevention include a mixture of primarily biomedical interventions, sociomechanical interventions such as sterile syringe and condom distribution, and behavioral interventions. This article presents a framework for socially-integrated transdisciplinary HIV prevention that may improve current prevention efforts. It first describes one socially-integrated transdisciplinary intervention project, the Transmission Reduction Intervention Project. We focus on how social aspects of the intervention integrate its component parts across disciplines and processes at different levels of analysis. We then present socially-integrated perspectives about how to improve combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) processes at the population level in order to solve the problems of the treatment cascade and make “treatment as prevention” more effective. Finally, we discuss some remaining problems and issues in such a social transdisciplinary intervention in the hope that other researchers and public health agents will develop additional socially-integrated interventions for HIV and other diseases. PMID:24165983

  1. Hepatitis A vaccination and immunological parameters in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Kourkounti, Sofia; Papaizos, Vassilios; Leuow, Kirsten; Kordosis, Theodoros; Antoniou, Christina

    2013-10-01

    Vaccination against hepatitis A is an important intervention to prevent disease in HIV-patients. There are insufficient data on the association of the response to hepatitis A vaccine with immunological parameters, including subpopulations of T-cells. We studied HIV-infected adults with CD4 T-cells>200 cells/mm(3) who received two doses of hepatitis A vaccine (Havrix or Vaqta). The counts of CD3, CD4, CD8, CD4+T-cells, NK, NK CD8+, NK CD8 - cells, and HIV RNA were measured at the time of first dose administration and one month after the end of the vaccination period. The geometric mean titer of antibodies to hepatitis A virus (anti-HAV) and factors affecting response were evaluated. 113 patients (50 antiretroviral treatment-naïve and 63 treatment-experienced) were enrolled in the study. There was no change in the immunological parameters and in the HIV-RNA post-vaccination, except for a decrease in CD8 and in double positive CD4+CD8+t-cell count. The immune response and geometric mean titer of anti-HAV were similar among treated and naïve patients (78% vs. 76% and 237 mIU/mL vs. 158 mIU/mL). Vaccine response was achieved in 71% of patients with CD4=200-499 cells/mm(3) compared with 80% of participants with CD4 ≥500 cells/mm(3) (p>0.05). Logistic regression revealed that immunological cells tested do not affect response differently in treatment-naïve vs. experienced patients. The only factor affecting response is the CD4 T-cell count at vaccination (OR 1.320; 95% CI 1.052-1.656; p=0.016). Patients with CD4 T-cell count ≥500 cells/mm(3) were 4.3 times more likely to respond to the vaccine than patients with CD4 T-cell count 200-499 cells/mm(3) (p=0.005). In conclusion, successful vaccination is associated with CD4 T-cells. The count of other immune cells or the administration of antiretroviral therapy does not predict response to hepatitis A vaccine in HIV patient with baseline CD4 T-cell>200 cells/mm(3). PMID:24044625

  2. Can money prevent the spread of HIV? A review of cash payments for HIV prevention

    PubMed Central

    Pettifor, Audrey; MacPhail, Catherine; Nguyen, Nadia; Rosenberg, Molly

    2013-01-01

    Cash payments to improve health outcomes have been used for many years, however, their use for HIV prevention is new and the impact not yet well understood. We provide a brief background on the rationale behind using cash to improve health outcomes, review current studies completed or underway using cash for prevention of sexual transmission of HIV, and outline some key considerations on the use of cash payments to prevent HIV infections. We searched the literature for studies that implemented cash transfer programs and measured HIV or HIV-related outcomes. We identified 16 studies meeting our criteria; 10 are completed. The majority of studies have been conducted with adolescents in developing countries and payments are focused on addressing structural risk factors such as poverty. Most have seen reductions in sexual behavior and one large trial has documented a difference in HIV prevalence between young women getting cash transfers and those not. Cash transfer programs focused on changing risky sexual behaviors to reduce HIV risk suggest promise. The context in which programs are situated, the purpose of the cash transfer, and the population will all affect the impact of such programs; ongoing RCTs with HIV incidence endpoints will shed more light on the efficacy of cash payments as strategy for HIV prevention. PMID:22760738

  3. Can money prevent the spread of HIV? A review of cash payments for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Pettifor, Audrey; MacPhail, Catherine; Nguyen, Nadia; Rosenberg, Molly

    2012-10-01

    Cash payments to improve health outcomes have been used for many years; however, their use for HIV prevention is new and the impact not yet well understood. We provide a brief background on the rationale behind using cash to improve health outcomes, review current studies completed or underway using cash for prevention of sexual transmission of HIV, and outline some key considerations on the use of cash payments to prevent HIV infections. We searched the literature for studies that implemented cash transfer programs and measured HIV or HIV-related outcomes. We identified 16 studies meeting our criteria; 10 are completed. The majority of studies have been conducted with adolescents in developing countries and payments are focused on addressing structural risk factors such as poverty. Most have seen reductions in sexual behavior and one large trial has documented a difference in HIV prevalence between young women getting cash transfers and those not. Cash transfer programs focused on changing risky sexual behaviors to reduce HIV risk suggest promise. The context in which programs are situated, the purpose of the cash transfer, and the population will all affect the impact of such programs; ongoing RCTs with HIV incidence endpoints will shed more light on the efficacy of cash payments as strategy for HIV prevention. PMID:22760738

  4. “Speaking the Dialect”: Understanding Public Discourse in the Aftermath of an HIV Vaccine Trial Shutdown

    PubMed Central

    Logie, Carmen; James, LLana; Charles, Tamicka; Maxwell, John; Salam, Khaled; Woodford, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated how persons from key populations at higher risk of HIV exposure interpreted the process and outcomes of the Step Study HIV-1 vaccine trial, which was terminated early, and implications for willingness to participate in and community support for HIV vaccine research. Methods. We used qualitative methods and a community-based approach in 9 focus groups (n = 72) among ethnically and sexually diverse populations and 6 semistructured key informant interviews in Ontario, Canada, in 2007 to 2008. Results. Participants construed social meaning from complex clinical and biomedical phenomena. Social representations and mental models emerged in fears of vaccine-induced infection, conceptualizations of unfair recruitment practices and increased risk behaviors among trial participants, and questioning of informed consent. Narratives of altruism and the common good demonstrated support for future trials. Conclusions. Public discourse on HIV vaccine trials is a productive means of interpreting complex clinical trial processes and outcomes in the context of existing beliefs and experiences regarding HIV vaccines, medical research, and historical disenfranchisement. Strategic engagement with social representations and mental models may promote meaningful community involvement in biomedical HIV prevention research. PMID:21778490

  5. An Automated HIV-1 Env-Pseudotyped Virus Production for Global HIV Vaccine Trials

    PubMed Central

    Fuss, Martina; Mazzotta, Angela S.; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella; Ozaki, Daniel A.; Montefiori, David C.; von Briesen, Hagen; Zimmermann, Heiko; Meyerhans, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Background Infections with HIV still represent a major human health problem worldwide and a vaccine is the only long-term option to fight efficiently against this virus. Standardized assessments of HIV-specific immune responses in vaccine trials are essential for prioritizing vaccine candidates in preclinical and clinical stages of development. With respect to neutralizing antibodies, assays with HIV-1 Env-pseudotyped viruses are a high priority. To cover the increasing demands of HIV pseudoviruses, a complete cell culture and transfection automation system has been developed. Methodology/Principal Findings The automation system for HIV pseudovirus production comprises a modified Tecan-based Cellerity system. It covers an area of 5×3 meters and includes a robot platform, a cell counting machine, a CO2 incubator for cell cultivation and a media refrigerator. The processes for cell handling, transfection and pseudovirus production have been implemented according to manual standard operating procedures and are controlled and scheduled autonomously by the system. The system is housed in a biosafety level II cabinet that guarantees protection of personnel, environment and the product. HIV pseudovirus stocks in a scale from 140 ml to 1000 ml have been produced on the automated system. Parallel manual production of HIV pseudoviruses and comparisons (bridging assays) confirmed that the automated produced pseudoviruses were of equivalent quality as those produced manually. In addition, the automated method was fully validated according to Good Clinical Laboratory Practice (GCLP) guidelines, including the validation parameters accuracy, precision, robustness and specificity. Conclusions An automated HIV pseudovirus production system has been successfully established. It allows the high quality production of HIV pseudoviruses under GCLP conditions. In its present form, the installed module enables the production of 1000 ml of virus-containing cell culture supernatant per week. Thus, this novel automation facilitates standardized large-scale productions of HIV pseudoviruses for ongoing and upcoming HIV vaccine trials. PMID:23300558

  6. An Outdated Notion of Antibody Specificity is One of the Major Detrimental Assumptions of the Structure-Based Reverse Vaccinology Paradigm, Which Prevented It from Helping to Develop an Effective HIV-1 Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Van Regenmortel, Marc H. V.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of paradigms for guiding scientific research is explained with reference to the seminal work of Karl Popper and Thomas Kuhn. A prevalent paradigm, followed for more than a decade in HIV-1 vaccine research, which gave rise to the strategy known as structure-based reverse vaccinology is described in detail. Several reasons why this paradigm did not allow the development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine are analyzed. A major reason is the belief shared by many vaccinologists that antibodies possess a narrow specificity for a single epitope and are not polyspecific for a diverse group of potential epitopes. When this belief is abandoned, it becomes obvious that the one particular epitope structure observed during the crystallographic analysis of a neutralizing antibody–antigen complex does not necessarily reveal, which immunogenic structure should be used to elicit the same type of neutralizing antibody. In the physical sciences, scientific explanations are usually presented as logical deductions derived from a relevant law of nature together with certain initial conditions. In immunology, causal explanations in terms of a single cause acting according to a law of nature are not possible because numerous factors always play a role in bringing about an effect. The implications of this state of affairs for the rational design of HIV vaccines are outlined. An alternative approach to obtain useful scientific understanding consists in intervening empirically in the immune system and it is suggested that manipulating the system experimentally is needed to learn to control it and achieve protective immunity by vaccination. PMID:25477882

  7. Current Advances in Virus-Like Particles as a Vaccination Approach against HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chongbo; Ao, Zhujun; Yao, Xiaojian

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 virus-like particles (VLPs) are promising vaccine candidates against HIV-1 infection. They are capable of preserving the native conformation of HIV-1 antigens and priming CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses efficiently via cross presentation by both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules. Progress has been achieved in the preclinical research of HIV-1 VLPs as prophylactic vaccines that induce broadly neutralizing antibodies and potent T cell responses. Moreover, the progress in HIV-1 dendritic cells (DC)-based immunotherapy provides us with a new vision for HIV-1 vaccine development. In this review, we describe updates from the past 5 years on the development of HIV-1 VLPs as a vaccine candidate and on the combined use of HIV particles with HIV-1 DC-based immunotherapy as efficient prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination strategies. PMID:26805898

  8. Current Advances in Virus-Like Particles as a Vaccination Approach against HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chongbo; Ao, Zhujun; Yao, Xiaojian

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 virus-like particles (VLPs) are promising vaccine candidates against HIV-1 infection. They are capable of preserving the native conformation of HIV-1 antigens and priming CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses efficiently via cross presentation by both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules. Progress has been achieved in the preclinical research of HIV-1 VLPs as prophylactic vaccines that induce broadly neutralizing antibodies and potent T cell responses. Moreover, the progress in HIV-1 dendritic cells (DC)-based immunotherapy provides us with a new vision for HIV-1 vaccine development. In this review, we describe updates from the past 5 years on the development of HIV-1 VLPs as a vaccine candidate and on the combined use of HIV particles with HIV-1 DC-based immunotherapy as efficient prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination strategies. PMID:26805898

  9. Inferences on relative failure rates in stratified mark-specific proportional hazards models with missing marks, with application to HIV vaccine efficacy trials

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Peter B.; Sun, Yanqing

    2014-01-01

    This article develops hypothesis testing procedures for the stratified mark-specific proportional hazards model in the presence of missing marks. The motivating application is preventive HIV vaccine efficacy trials, where the mark is the genetic distance of an infecting HIV sequence to an HIV sequence represented inside the vaccine. The test statistics are constructed based on two-stage efficient estimators, which utilize auxiliary predictors of the missing marks. The asymptotic properties and finite-sample performances of the testing procedures are investigated, demonstrating double-robustness and effectiveness of the predictive auxiliaries to recover efficiency. The methods are applied to the RV144 vaccine trial. PMID:25641990

  10. HIV Prevention Education for Exceptional Youth: Why HIV Prevention Education Is Important. ERIC Digest #E507.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA.

    This digest summarizes available information on the importance of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) prevention education efforts for students with disabilities. The digest notes these students' increased risk of HIV infection due to their lack of knowledge, misinformation, poor social skills, low self-esteem, poor judgement, and tendency to let…

  11. HIV vaccine knowledge and beliefs among communities at elevated risk: conspiracies, questions and confusion.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Kathleen Johnston; Newman, Peter A.; Duan, Naihua; Rudy, Ellen T.

    2005-01-01

    HIV vaccines offer the best long-term hope of controlling the AIDS pandemic. We explored HIV vaccine knowledge and beliefs among communities at elevated risk for HIV/AIDS. Participants (N=99; median age=33 years; 48% female; 22% African-American; 44% Latino; 28% white; 6% other) were recruited from seven high-risk venues in Los Angeles, California, using purposive, venue-based sampling. Results from nine focus groups revealed: 1) mixed beliefs and conspiracy theories about the existence of HIV vaccines; 2) hopefulness and doubts about future HIV vaccine availability; 3) lack of information about HIV vaccines; and 4) confusion about vaccines and how they work. Tailored HIV vaccine education that addresses the current status of HIV vaccine development and key vaccine concepts is warranted among communities at risk. Ongoing dialogue among researchers, public health practitioners and communities at risk may provide a vital opportunity to dispel misinformation and rumors and to cultivate trust, which may facilitate HIV vaccine trial participation and uptake of future HIV vaccines. PMID:16396058

  12. Future of phylogeny in HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Bluma G; Wainberg, Mark A

    2013-07-01

    The success of the HIV Prevention Trials Network 052 trial has led to revisions in HIV-1 treatment guidelines. Antiretroviral therapy may reduce the risk of HIV-1 transmissions at the population level. The design of successful treatment as prevention interventions will be predicated on a comprehensive understanding of the spatial, temporal, and biological dynamics of heterosexual men who have sex with men and intravenous drug user epidemics. Viral phylogenetics can capture the underlying structure of transmission networks based on the genetic interrelatedness of viral sequences and cluster networks that could not be otherwise identified. This article describes the phylogenetic expansion of the Montreal men who have sex with men epidemic over the last decade. High rates of coclustering of primary infections are associated with 1 infection leading to 13 onward transmissions. Phylogeny substantiates the role of primary and recent stage infection in transmission dynamics, underlying the importance of timely diagnosis and immediate antiretroviral therapy initiation to avert transmission cascades. PMID:23764643

  13. HIV Prevention and AIDS Education: Resources for Special Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrom, Elizabeth, Ed.; Katz, Ginger, Ed.

    This guide was developed out of a 5-year project aimed at preventing the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by promoting HIV prevention and AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) education in school health programs. This document includes recommendations of a January, 1989 forum which addressed HIV prevention education for…

  14. Extended Follow-up Confirms Early Vaccine-Enhanced Risk of HIV Acquisition and Demonstrates Waning Effect Over Time Among Participants in a Randomized Trial of Recombinant Adenovirus HIV Vaccine (Step Study)

    PubMed Central

    Duerr, Ann; Huang, Yunda; Buchbinder, Susan; Coombs, Robert W.; Sanchez, Jorge; del Rio, Carlos; Casapia, Martin; Santiago, Steven; Gilbert, Peter; Corey, Lawrence; Robertson, Michael N.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The Step Study tested whether an adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)–vectored human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine could prevent HIV acquisition and/or reduce viral load set-point after infection. At the first interim analysis, nonefficacy criteria were met. Vaccinations were halted; participants were unblinded. In post hoc analyses, more HIV infections occurred in vaccinees vs placebo recipients in men who had Ad5-neutralizing antibodies and/or were uncircumcised. Follow-up was extended to assess relative risk of HIV acquisition in vaccinees vs placebo recipients over time. Methods. We used Cox proportional hazard models for analyses of vaccine effect on HIV acquisition and vaccine effect modifiers, and nonparametric and semiparametric methods for analysis of constancy of relative risk over time. Results. One hundred seventy-two of 1836 men were infected. The adjusted vaccinees vs placebo recipients hazard ratio (HR) for all follow-up time was 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03–1.92; P = .03). Vaccine effect differed by baseline Ad5 or circumcision status during first 18 months, but neither was significant for all follow-up time. The HR among uncircumcised and/or Ad5-seropositive men waned with time since vaccination. No significant vaccine-associated risk was seen among circumcised, Ad5-negative men (HR, 0.97; P = 1.0) over all follow-up time. Conclusions. The vaccine-associated risk seen in interim analysis was confirmed but waned with time from vaccination. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00095576. PMID:22561365

  15. HPV in HIV-Infected Women: Implications for Primary Prevention

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Nathalie Dauphin; Kobetz, Erin N.; Ganjei-Azar, Parvin; Rosa-Cunha, Isabella; Potter, JoNell E.; Morishita, Atsushi; Lucci, Joseph A.; Guettouche, Toumy; Hnatyszyn, James H.; Koru-Sengul, Tulay

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women might have a different human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution in cervical dysplasia specimens as compared to the general population. This has implications for primary prevention. Objective: We aimed to obtain preliminary data on the HPV genotypes prevalent in histological samples of HIV-infected women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 3/CIS of the cervix in Miami, FL, USA. Methods: Retrospective data were collected on HIV-infected women referred to the University of Miami-Jackson Memorial Hospital colposcopy clinic between years 2000 and 2008. The histology slides of CIN 3/CIS biopsies underwent pathological review and sections were cut from these archived specimens for HPV DNA extraction. HPV genotyping was then performed using the GeneSquare HPV genotyping assay. We report on our first set of 23 samples. Results: Eight high-risk HPV types were detected. Types in decreasing order of frequency were 16, 35, 45, 52, 59, 31, 58, and 56. Most cases had multiple infections. HPV type 16 was the most common (45%) followed by HPV-35 and -45 with equal frequency (40%). No samples contained HPV-18. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest that cervical dysplasia specimens of HIV-infected women more likely (55%) contain non-16 and -18 high-risk HPV types. We show that this held true for histologically confirmed severe dysplasia and carcinoma-in situ. Epidemiological studies guide vaccine development, therefore HPV type prevalence in CIS and invasive cervical cancer among HIV-infected women should be more rigorously explored to ensure that this highly vulnerable population receives appropriate primary prevention. PMID:25161956

  16. Harnessing CD4+ T cell responses in HIV vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Streeck, Hendrik; DSouza, M Patricia; Littman, Dan R; Crotty, Shane

    2013-01-01

    CD4+ T cells can perform a panoply of tasks to shape an effective response against a pathogen. Limited attention has been paid to the potential importance of functional CD4+ T cell responses in the context of the development of next-generation vaccines, including HIV vaccines. Many CD4+ T cell functions are newly appreciated and only partially understood. A workshop was held as a forum to bring together a small group of experts to exchange ideas on the role of CD4+ T cells in developing durable functional antibody responses, via follicular helper T cells, as well as on the roles of CD4+ T cells in other aspects of protective immunity. Here we discuss whether CD4+ T cell responses may represent a beneficial component of an efficacious HIV vaccine. PMID:23389614

  17. Delivery systems and adjuvants for vaccination against HIV.

    PubMed

    Velin, D; Hopkins, S; Kraehenbuhl, J

    1998-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have revealed that HIV-1 infections occur through contact with contaminated blood or during unprotected vaginal or anal intercourse. Hence, to protect against HIV infection, vaccines should induce both mucosal and systemic immune responses. We present a brief review of the different delivery systems and adjuvants which can be used to elicit mucosal immune responses. Oral or nasal administration of recombinant Salmonella vaccines can induce both mucosal and systemic immune responses against the carried antigen. The oral delivery of mucosal adjuvants (such as cholera toxin) in association with antigens has been shown to enhance mucosal and systemic immune responses against them. Recently developed vaccination strategies using naked DNA or recombinant adenovirus are also discussed. PMID:9693320

  18. An HIV Vaccine for South-East Asia—Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; O’Connell, Robert J.; Kim, Jerome H.; Excler, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in HIV vaccine development along with a better understanding of the immune correlates of risk have emerged from the RV144 efficacy trial conducted in Thailand. Epidemiological data suggest that CRF01_AE is still predominant in South-East Asia and is spreading in China with a growing number of circulating recombinant forms due to increasing human contact, particularly in large urban centers, tourist locations and in sites of common infrastructure. A vaccine countering CRF01_AE is a priority for the region. An Asia HIV vaccine against expanding B/E or BCE recombinant forms should be actively pursued. A major challenge that remains is the conduct of efficacy trials in heterosexual populations in this region. Men who have sex with men represent the main target population for future efficacy trials in Asia. Coupling HIV vaccines with other prevention modalities in efficacy trials might also be envisaged. These new avenues will only be made possible through the conduct of large-scale efficacy trials, interdisciplinary teams, international collaborations, and strong political and community commitments. PMID:26344118

  19. Prevention of pneumococcal disease through vaccination.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Angela; Bazán, Virginia

    2011-09-14

    The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), adopted by world leaders in the year 2000 with an aim to accomplish them by 2015, provide concrete benchmarks for tackling extreme poverty in its many dimensions. One aim is to reduce by two thirds the mortality rate among children <5 years of age. The deaths of nearly 3 million children under 5 each year worldwide can be attributed to diarrhea and pneumonia. Pneumonia, one form of pneumococcal disease, causes almost 1 in 5 deaths of children under 5 worldwide-more than 1.6 million children each year. Pneumococcal disease is preventable by vaccination; because antibiotic resistance is a growing problem worldwide, there is a great need to promote effective pneumococcal vaccines. Vaccines differ from other types of drugs, because they are administered to healthy individuals. Therefore, a good safety profile is required, there is a large governmental regulatory role, and low efficacy is unacceptable. Other important considerations are as follows: vaccines are often used in infants, are typically given in multiple doses, the manufacturing is a larger part of cost, requires high regulatory and quality control burden and minimization of costs. From a biological standpoint, the induction of vaccine-mediated protection is a complex procedure. Long-term protection typically requires the persistence of anti-microbial antibodies and/or the generation of immune memory cells capable of rapid and effective reactivation after microbial re-exposure. Appreciation of the predominant role of B cells in the efficacy of current vaccines should not minimize the importance of generating a T cell response, as this is essential for the induction of high affinity antibodies and immune memory. Pneumococcal capsular polysaccharides typically elicit B cell responses in a T-independent manner. Because of this, capsular polysaccharides are poorly immunogenic in children below 2 years of age and will generate an IgM isotype-based primary response with only short-lived protection. The conjugation of capsular polysaccharides to a protein carrier provides an antigenic complex in a form that can be presented to the immune system and thus recruit antigen specific CD4⁺ cells (T-dependent antibody). Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs), comprising pneumococcal polysaccharides conjugated to a protein carrier, not only induce antibodies but also prime the immune system for protective memory response. These vaccines provide protection in children below 2 years of age, generate long-term protection (highly specific IgG antibodies), generate herd immunity (indirect protection of nonimmunized individuals) and have demonstrated effectiveness in regions that have incorporated them into the national immunization schedules. Global implementation of PCVs has contributed to substantial progress toward reducing childhood mortality, but increased vaccine uptake in developing regions such as Latin America and the Caribbean is necessary to continue toward accomplishing the goals outline in the MDGs. PMID:21896348

  20. Inactivated- or killed-virus HIV/AIDS vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Haynes W

    2005-06-01

    Inactivated or "killed" virus (KV) is a "classical" approach that has produced safe and effective human and veterinary vaccines but has received relatively little attention in the effort to develop an HIV/AIDS vaccine. Initially, KV and rgp120 subunit vaccines were the two most obvious approaches but, unfortunately, rgp120 has not been efficacious and the KV approach has been limited by a variety of scientific, technical, and sociological factors. For example, when responses to cellular antigens, present on SIV grown in human cells, proved to be largely responsible for efficacy, the KV approach was widely discounted. Similarly, when lab-adapted HIV-1 appeared to lose envelope glycoprotein during preparation (not the case for primary isolates), this was viewed as a fundamental barrier to the KV concept. Also, a preference for "safer", genetically-engineered vaccines, and emphasis on cellular immunity, have left KV low on the priority list for funding agencies and investigators. The recent suggestion that "native" trimeric gp120 displays conserved conformational neutralization epitopes, along with the failure of rgp120, and difficulties in raising strong cellular responses with DNA or vectored vaccines, has restored some interest in the KV concept. In the past 15 years, several groups have initiated pre-clinical development of KV candidates for SIV or HIV and promising, albeit limited, information has been produced. In this chapter we discuss the rationale (including pros and cons) for producing and testing killed-HIV vaccines, the prospects for success, the nature and scope of research needed to test the KV concept, what has been learned to date, and what remains undone. PMID:15975019

  1. Gauging the Acceptability of HIV Vaccines: An Exploratory Study Examining Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs among Injecting Drug Users in Viet Nam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, France

    2007-01-01

    In contrast to other countries in Southeast Asia, the HIV/ AIDS epidemic is in the initial stages in Viet Nam, although the rates have increased notably since 1997. This study examined attitudes towards the use of an HIV vaccine (when one becomes available) as a means for preventing the disease. Since injecting drug users are the great majority of…

  2. Gauging the Acceptability of HIV Vaccines: An Exploratory Study Examining Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs among Injecting Drug Users in Viet Nam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, France

    2007-01-01

    In contrast to other countries in Southeast Asia, the HIV/ AIDS epidemic is in the initial stages in Viet Nam, although the rates have increased notably since 1997. This study examined attitudes towards the use of an HIV vaccine (when one becomes available) as a means for preventing the disease. Since injecting drug users are the great majority of

  3. Can a pill prevent HIV? Negotiating the biomedicalisation of HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Young, Ingrid; Flowers, Paul; McDaid, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    This article examines how biomedicalisation is encountered, responded to and negotiated within and in relation to new biomedical forms of HIV prevention. We draw on exploratory focus group discussions on pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and treatment as prevention (TasP) to examine how the processes of biomedicalisation are affected by and affect the diverse experiences of communities who have been epidemiologically framed as 'vulnerable' to HIV and towards whom PrEP and TasP will most likely be targeted. We found that participants were largely critical of the perceived commodification of HIV prevention as seen through PrEP, although this was in tension with the construction of being medical consumers by potential PrEP candidates. We also found how deeply entrenched forms of HIV stigma and homophobia can shape and obfuscate the consumption and management of HIV-related knowledge. Finally, we found that rather than seeing TasP or PrEP as 'liberating' through reduced levels of infectiousness or risk of transmission, social and legal requirements of responsibility in relation to HIV risk reinforced unequal forms of biomedical self-governance. Overall, we found that the stratifying processes of biomedicalisation will have significant implications in how TasP, PrEP and HIV prevention more generally are negotiated. PMID:26498141

  4. A proposal to use iterative, small clinical trials to optimize therapeutic HIV vaccine immunogens to launch therapeutic HIV vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Stuart Z

    2015-01-01

    The HIV cure agenda has rekindled interest in the development of a therapeutic HIV vaccine. An iterative clinical trial strategy that proved successful for the development of effective cancer chemotherapies in the 1960s may be applicable to the development of a CD8 T lymphocyte-based therapeutic HIV vaccine. However, while cancer chemotherapy development could begin with iterative clinical trials to improve the use of active drugs, the first step in therapeutic HIV vaccine design should be discovery of immunogen constructs with potential for activity and their optimization to meet the challenges of HIV-1 sequence diversity and human polymorphism in T cell antigen presentation. A strategy for doing this is discussed in this article. The proposed strategy relies on a major commitment by funding organizations to fund organized and coordinated manufacture and clinical testing of a series of first- and second-generation constructs to test basic concepts in product design. This is presented as an alternative to funding a more traditional competition among private manufacturers and product champions of individual, already designed products. PMID:25286142

  5. Safety and Immunogenicity of a CTL Multiepitope Peptide Vaccine for HIV with or without GM-CSF in a Phase I Trial

    PubMed Central

    Spearman, Paul; Kalams, Spyros; Elizaga, Marnie; Metch, Barbara; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Allen, Mary; Weinhold, Kent J.; Ferrari, Guido; Parker, Scott D.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Frey, Sharon E.; Fuchs, Jonathan D.; Keefer, Michael C.; Lubeck, Michael D.; Egan, Michael; Braun, Ralph; Eldridge, John H.; Haynes, Barton F.; Corey, Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    There is an urgent need for a vaccine capable of preventing HIV infection or the development of HIV-related disease. A number of approaches designed to stimulate HIV-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cell responses together with helper responses are presently under evaluation. In this phase 1, multi-center, placebo-controlled trial, we tested the ability of a novel multi-epitope peptide vaccine to elicit HIV-specific immunity. To enhance the immunogenicity of the peptide vaccine, half of the vaccine recipients received recombinant GM-CSF protein as a co-adjuvant. The vaccine was safe; tolerability was moderate, with a number of adverse events related to local injection site reactogenicity. Anti-GM-CSF antibody responses developed in the majority of GM-CSF recipients but were not associated with adverse hematologic events. The vaccine was only minimally immunogenic. Six of 80 volunteers who received vaccine developed HIV-specific responses as measured by interferon-gamma ELISPOT assay, and measurable responses were transient. This study failed to demonstrate that GM-CSF can substantially improve the overall weak immunogenicity of a multiepitope peptide-based HIV vaccine. PMID:18996425

  6. Ecodevelopmental HIV Prevention Programs for Hispanic Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Pantin, Hilda; Schwartz, Seth J.; Sullivan, Summer; Prado, Guillermo; Szapocznik, José

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate how an ecodevelopmental perspective on risk and protection can be applied to the study and prevention of unsafe sexual behavior in Hispanic immigrant adolescents. Special attention is given to culturally based ecodevelopmental risk and protective processes that may influence unsafe sexual behavior among Hispanic adolescents. Principles for designing prevention programs to offset these risks are offered on the basis of an ecodevelopmental HIV prevention program that has been developed and is currently being tested. PMID:15554814

  7. A Neonatal Fc Receptor-Targeted Mucosal Vaccine Strategy Effectively Induces HIV-1 Antigen-Specific Immunity to Genital Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Li; Palaniyandi, Senthilkumar; Zeng, Rongyu; Bai, Yu; Liu, Xindong; Wang, Yunsheng; Pauza, C. David; Roopenian, Derry C.; Zhu, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Strategies to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV include vaccines that elicit durable, protective mucosal immune responses. A key to effective mucosal immunity is the capacity for antigens administered locally to cross epithelial barriers. Given the role of neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) in transferring IgG across polarized epithelial cells which line mucosal surfaces, FcRn might be useful for delivering HIV vaccine antigens across mucosal epithelial barriers to the underlying antigen-presenting cells. Chimeric proteins composed of HIV Gag (p24) fused to the Fc region of IgG (Gag-Fc) bind efficiently to airway mucosa and are transported across this epithelial surface. Mice immunized intranasally with Gag-Fc plus CpG adjuvant developed local and systemic immunity, including durable B and T cell memory. Gag-specific immunity was sufficiently potent to protect against an intravaginal challenge with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the HIV Gag protein. Intranasal administration of a Gag-Fc/CpG vaccine protected at a distal mucosal site. Our data suggest that targeting of FcRn with chimeric immunogens may be an important strategy for mucosal immunization and should be considered a new approach for preventive HIV vaccines. PMID:21849464

  8. Pneumococcal Vaccines: Understanding Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Schraufnagel, Dean E.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infection is a common and serious health problem that is best prevented by the pneumococcal vaccine. The first vaccine approved by the U.S. Federal Drug Administration in 1977 contained 14 polysaccharide antigens. An improved vaccine introduced in 1983 included 23 polysaccharide antigens. Both vaccines were effective for immunocompetent adults; however, young children and immunocompromised adults remained susceptible. A pediatric vaccine was developed consisting of the capsular antigens of seven pneumococcal serotypes commonly found in children. The antigens in this preparation are covalently conjugated to diphtheria protein to make them more antigenic. The conjugate vaccine was expanded to include 13 serotypes by 2010. Although more immunogenic, the conjugate vaccine has fewer serotypes than the older 23-valent vaccine. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that children at risk for pneumococcal pneumonia as defined by the presence of chronic disease should receive the 13-valent conjugated vaccine. Adults at risk for pneumococcal pneumonia, which includes those over 65 years of age and those who have a chronic disease, should receive the 23-polysaccharide vaccine. Immunosuppressed patients of any age should receive both vaccines. Adults should be revaccinated once at age 65 years or older with the 23-polysaccharide vaccine provided that at least 5 years have elapsed since the previous vaccination. PMID:25032872

  9. Vaccine-preventable diseases and their prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Herman, Joanna S; Hill, David R

    2012-09-01

    Global uptake of new vaccines shapes the epidemiology of infections, and in turn this changing epidemiology guides vaccine development. Once introduced, surveillance and monitoring of the impact of vaccines on disease and adverse events is vital for further development. This article reviews the use of vaccines as part of routine health care, vaccines that may be required for entry into a destination country, and vaccines that are recommended because of risk during travel. Considerations and advances in the vaccination of travelers are addressed. PMID:22963772

  10. Induction of Potent and Long-Lived Antibody and Cellular Immune Responses in the Genitorectal Mucosa Could be the Critical Determinant of HIV Vaccine Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Chanzu, Nadia; Ondondo, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    The field of HIV prevention has indeed progressed in leaps and bounds, but with major limitations of the current prevention and treatment options, the world remains desperate for an HIV vaccine. Sadly, this continues to be elusive, because more than 30 years since its discovery there is no licensed HIV vaccine. Research aiming to define immunological biomarkers to accurately predict vaccine efficacy have focused mainly on systemic immune responses, and as such, studies defining correlates of protection in the genitorectal mucosa, the primary target site for HIV entry and seeding are sparse. Clearly, difficulties in sampling and analysis of mucosal specimens, as well as their limited size have been a major deterrent in characterizing the type (mucosal antibodies, cytokines, chemokines, or CTL), threshold (magnitude, depth, and breadth) and viral inhibitory capacity of HIV-1-specific immune responses in the genitorectal mucosa, where they are needed to immediately block HIV acquisition and arrest subsequent virus dissemination. Nevertheless, a few studies document the existence of HIV-specific immune responses in the genitorectal mucosa of HIV-infected aviremic and viremic controllers, as well as in highly exposed persistently seronegative (HEPS) individuals with natural resistance to HIV-1. Some of these responses strongly correlate with protection from HIV acquisition and/or disease progression, thus providing significant clues of the ideal components of an efficacious HIV vaccine. In this study, we provide an overview of the key features of protective immune responses found in HEPS, elite and viremic controllers, and discuss how these can be achieved through mucosal immunization. Inevitably, HIV vaccine development research will have to consider strategies that elicit potent antibody and cellular immune responses within the genitorectal mucosa or induction of systemic immune cells with an inherent potential to home and persist at mucosal sites of HIV entry. PMID:24847327

  11. Bicistronic DNA Vaccines Simultaneously Encoding HIV, HSV and HPV Antigens Promote CD8+ T Cell Responses and Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Vinicius C.; Diniz, Mariana O.; Cariri, Francisco A. M. O.; Ventura, Armando M.; Cunha-Neto, Edécio; Almeida, Rafael R.; Campos, Marco A.; Lima, Graciela K.; Ferreira, Luís C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Millions of people worldwide are currently infected with human papillomavirus (HPV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). For this enormous contingent of people, the search for preventive and therapeutic immunological approaches represents a hope for the eradication of latent infection and/or virus-associated cancer. To date, attempts to develop vaccines against these viruses have been mainly based on a monovalent concept, in which one or more antigens of a virus are incorporated into a vaccine formulation. In the present report, we designed and tested an immunization strategy based on DNA vaccines that simultaneously encode antigens for HIV, HSV and HPV. With this purpose in mind, we tested two bicistronic DNA vaccines (pIRES I and pIRES II) that encode the HPV-16 oncoprotein E7 and the HIV protein p24 both genetically fused to the HSV-1 gD envelope protein. Mice i.m. immunized with the DNA vaccines mounted antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses, including in vivo cytotoxic responses, against the three antigens. Under experimental conditions, the vaccines conferred protective immunity against challenges with a vaccinia virus expressing the HIV-derived protein Gag, an HSV-1 virus strain and implantation of tumor cells expressing the HPV-16 oncoproteins. Altogether, our results show that the concept of a trivalent HIV, HSV, and HPV vaccine capable to induce CD8+ T cell-dependent responses is feasible and may aid in the development of preventive and/or therapeutic approaches for the control of diseases associated with these viruses. PMID:23951135

  12. Evolving T-cell vaccine strategies for HIV, the virus with a thousand faces

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, Bette

    2009-01-01

    HIV's rapid global spread and the human suffering it has left in its wake have made AIDS a global heath priority for the 25 years since its discovery. Yet its capacity to rapidly evolve has made combating this virus a tremendous challenge. The obstacles to creating an effective HIV vaccine are formidable, but there are advances in the field on many fronts, in terms of novel vectors, adjuvants, and antigen design strategies. SIV live attenuated vaccine models are able to confer protection against heterologous challenge, and this continues to provide opportunities to explore the biological underpinnings of a protective effect (9). More indirect, but equally important, is new understanding regarding the biology of acute infection (43), the role of immune response in long-term non-progression (6,62, 81), and defining characteristics of broadly neutralizing antibodies (4). In this review we will focus on summarizing strategies directed towards a single issue, that of contending with HIV variation in terms of designing aT-cell vaccine. The strategies that prove most effective in this area can ultimately be combined with the best strategies under development in other areas, with the hope of ultimately converging on a viable vaccine candidate. Only two large HIV vaccine efficacy trials have been completed and both have failed to prevent infection or confer a benefit to infected individual (23,34), but there is ample reason to continue our efforts. A historic breakthrough came in 1996, when it was realized that although the virus could escape from a single antiretroviral (ARV) therapy, it could be thwarted by a combination of medications that simultaneously targeted different parts of the virus (HAART) (38). This revelation came after 15 years of research, thought, and clinical testing; to enable that vital progress the research and clinical communities had to first define and understand, then develop a strategy to counter, the remarkable evolutionary potential of the virus. HAART, for the first time, provided an effective treatment to help those with living with HIV stay healthy. Nonetheless, the treatment has limitations. People with HIV face a lifetime of expensive daily multi-drug regimens, often with side effects; drug resistance at the individual and population level are issues (56); and universal access, despite substantial progress, is a dream not yet realized for many of the millions of the world's poor who are living with HIV (68). These issues, combined with the growing numbers of people infected globally and impact of HIV on society, make the development of an HIV vaccine or a prophylactic prevention strategy a crucial if elusive goal. In some ways, the history of HIV vaccine deVelopment has paralleled the early stages of designing effective therapy. We had to test the simple strategies first, but meanwhile the story of the impact of diversity from an immunological perspective is still unfolding, and novel ideas countermeasures are being explored.

  13. PD1-based DNA vaccine amplifies HIV-1 GAG-specific CD8+ T cells in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jingying; Cheung, Allen K.L.; Tan, Zhiwu; Wang, Haibo; Yu, Wenbo; Du, Yanhua; Kang, Yuanxi; Lu, Xiaofan; Liu, Li; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Chen, Zhiwei

    2013-01-01

    Viral vector–based vaccines that induce protective CD8+ T cell immunity can prevent or control pathogenic SIV infections, but issues of preexisting immunity and safety have impeded their implementation in HIV-1. Here, we report the development of what we believe to be a novel antigen-targeting DNA vaccine strategy that exploits the binding of programmed death-1 (PD1) to its ligands expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) by fusing soluble PD1 with HIV-1 GAG p24 antigen. As compared with non–DC-targeting vaccines, intramuscular immunization via electroporation (EP) of the fusion DNA in mice elicited consistently high frequencies of GAG-specific, broadly reactive, polyfunctional, long-lived, and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells and robust anti-GAG antibody titers. Vaccination conferred remarkable protection against mucosal challenge with vaccinia GAG viruses. Soluble PD1–based vaccination potentiated CD8+ T cell responses by enhancing antigen binding and uptake in DCs and activation in the draining lymph node. It also increased IL-12–producing DCs and engaged antigen cross-presentation when compared with anti-DEC205 antibody-mediated DC targeting. The high frequency of durable and protective GAG-specific CD8+ T cell immunity induced by soluble PD1–based vaccination suggests that PD1-based DNA vaccines could potentially be used against HIV-1 and other pathogens. PMID:23635778

  14. The Community Liaison Program: a health education pilot program to increase minority awareness of HIV and acceptance of HIV vaccine trials.

    PubMed

    Kelley, R T; Hannans, A; Kreps, G L; Johnson, K

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes a 16-month health education pilot program based on diffusion of innovation and social network theories. The program was implemented by volunteer community liaisons for the purposes of increasing awareness of and support for HIV vaccine research in minority populations. This theoretically driven pilot program allowed the liaisons to integrate delivery of the HIV vaccine research messages created for the program into their existing activities and routines. Through training in participatory engagement, volunteers were able to tailor and adapt an HIV prevention message for their communities. Process evaluation data showed that the acceptance of participatory engagement and HIV vaccine message dissemination far exceeded expectations. The anticipated number of community members to receive the message was estimated at 500 with 10 volunteer liaisons or 50 per person. However, the actual number of people reached was 644, with only 7 volunteer liaisons, or an average of 92 persons per liaison, almost double the original number. Further research is recommended to analyze the specific behavioral changes that can come from the use of social networks in HIV vaccine research awareness within minority populations. PMID:22327809

  15. The Community Liaison Program: a health education pilot program to increase minority awareness of HIV and acceptance of HIV vaccine trials

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, R. T.; Hannans, A.; Kreps, G. L.; Johnson, K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a 16-month health education pilot program based on diffusion of innovation and social network theories. The program was implemented by volunteer community liaisons for the purposes of increasing awareness of and support for HIV vaccine research in minority populations. This theoretically driven pilot program allowed the liaisons to integrate delivery of the HIV vaccine research messages created for the program into their existing activities and routines. Through training in participatory engagement, volunteers were able to tailor and adapt an HIV prevention message for their communities. Process evaluation data showed that the acceptance of participatory engagement and HIV vaccine message dissemination far exceeded expectations. The anticipated number of community members to receive the message was estimated at 500 with 10 volunteer liaisons or 50 per person. However, the actual number of people reached was 644, with only 7 volunteer liaisons, or an average of 92 persons per liaison, almost double the original number. Further research is recommended to analyze the specific behavioral changes that can come from the use of social networks in HIV vaccine research awareness within minority populations. PMID:22327809

  16. Enhanced non-inflammasome mediated immune responses by mannosylated zwitterionic-based cationic liposomes for HIV DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chenmeng; Liu, Jiandong; Yang, Jun; Li, Yan; Weng, Jie; Shao, Yiming; Zhang, Xin

    2016-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA vaccine can induce cellular and humoral immunity. A safe and effective HIV DNA vaccine is urgent need to prevent the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). The major drawback of DNA vaccines is the low immunogenicity, which is caused by the poor delivery to antigen presenting cells and insufficient antigen expression. Sparked by the capability of endosomal/lysosomal escape of the zwitterionic lipid distearoyl phosphoethanol-amine-polycarboxybetaine (DSPE-PCB), we attempted to develop a zwitterionic-based cationic liposome with enhanced immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. The mannosylated zwitterionic-based cationic liposome (man-ZCL) was constructed as a DNA vaccine adjuvant for HIV vaccination. Man-ZCL could complex with DNA antigens to form a tight structure and protect them from nuclei enzyme degradation. Benefited from the capability of the specific mannose receptor mediated antigen processing cells targeting and enhanced endosomal/lysosomal escape, the man-ZCL lipoplexes were supposed to promote antigen presentation and the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. In vitro and in vivo results revealed that man-ZCL lipoplexes showed enhanced anti-HIV immune responses and lower toxicity compared with CpG/DNA and Lipo2k/DNA, and triggered a Th1/Th2 mixed immunity. An antigen-depot effect was observed in the administration site, and this resulted in enhanced retention of DNA antigens in draining lymph nodes. Most importantly, the man-ZCL could assist to activate T cells through a non-inflammasome pathway. These findings suggested that the man-ZCL could be potentially applied as a safe and efficient DNA adjuvant for HIV vaccines. PMID:26851653

  17. Prevention of HIV/AIDS Education in Rural Communities III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torabi, Mohammad R., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This third special issue of the Health Education Monograph Series on HIV/AIDS Prevention in Rural Communities presents 9 articles on: "Rural Adolescent Views of HIV Prevention: Focus Groups at Two Indiana Rural 4-H Clubs" (William L. Yarber and Stephanie A. Sanders); "Implementing HIV Education: Beyond Curriculum" (Susan Frelick Wooley);…

  18. Immune-based interventions to prevent postnatal HIV-1 transmission.

    PubMed

    Fouda, Genevieve G; Permar, Sallie R

    2014-08-01

    Despite global scale-up in antiretroviral-based prevention of mother-to-child transmission services, more than 250 000 infants become infected with HIV-1 each year. Breast milk transmission is responsible for almost half of these infections. The development of alternative strategies to prevent postnatal HIV-1 transmission is imperative to achieve a generation free of HIV-1. PMID:25086471

  19. Prevention of HIV/AIDS Education in Rural Communities II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torabi, Mohammad R., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This second special issue of the Health Education Monograph Series on HIV/AIDS Prevention in Rural Communities presents seven articles: (1) "Preventing Maternal-Infant Transmission of HIV: Social and Ethical Issues" (James G. Anderson, Marilyn M. Anderson, and Tara Booth); (2) "HIV Infection in Diverse Rural Population: Migrant Farm Workers in…

  20. Coping with viral diversity in HIV vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Nickle, David C; Rolland, Morgane; Jensen, Mark A; Pond, Sergei L Kosakovsky; Deng, Wenjie; Seligman, Mark; Heckerman, David; Mullins, James I; Jojic, Nebojsa

    2007-04-27

    The ability of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to develop high levels of genetic diversity, and thereby acquire mutations to escape immune pressures, contributes to the difficulties in producing a vaccine. Possibly no single HIV-1 sequence can induce sufficiently broad immunity to protect against a wide variety of infectious strains, or block mutational escape pathways available to the virus after infection. The authors describe the generation of HIV-1 immunogens that minimizes the phylogenetic distance of viral strains throughout the known viral population (the center of tree [COT]) and then extend the COT immunogen by addition of a composite sequence that includes high-frequency variable sites preserved in their native contexts. The resulting COT(+) antigens compress the variation found in many independent HIV-1 isolates into lengths suitable for vaccine immunogens. It is possible to capture 62% of the variation found in the Nef protein and 82% of the variation in the Gag protein into immunogens of three gene lengths. The authors put forward immunogen designs that maximize representation of the diverse antigenic features present in a spectrum of HIV-1 strains. These immunogens should elicit immune responses against high-frequency viral strains as well as against most mutant forms of the virus. PMID:17465674

  1. Recombinant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium as a Vaccine Vector for HIV-1 Gag

    PubMed Central

    Chin’ombe, Nyasha

    2013-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS epidemic remains a global health problem, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. An effective HIV-1 vaccine is therefore badly required to mitigate this ever-expanding problem. Since HIV-1 infects its host through the mucosal surface, a vaccine for the virus needs to trigger mucosal as well as systemic immune responses. Oral, attenuated recombinant Salmonella vaccines offer this potential of delivering HIV-1 antigens to both the mucosal and systemic compartments of the immune system. So far, a number of pre-clinical studies have been performed, in which HIV-1 Gag, a highly conserved viral antigen possessing both T- and B-cell epitopes, was successfully delivered by recombinant Salmonella vaccines and, in most cases, induced HIV-specific immune responses. In this review, the potential use of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a live vaccine vector for HIV-1 Gag is explored. PMID:23989890

  2. Cytokine production and dysregulation in HIV pathogenesis: Lessons for development of therapeutics and vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Morgan A.; Pombo, Carolina; Betts, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have characterized the cytokine modulation observed in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals, from initial infection through chronic disease. Progressive and non-progressive HIV infection models show the cytokine milieu differs in terms of production and responsiveness in these two groups, suggesting an understanding of the role cytokines play during infection is necessary for directing the immune response toward viral control. This review will cover cytokine induction and dysfunction during HIV pathogenesis, with a focus on the interplay between cytokines and transcription factors, T cell activation, and exhaustion. We highlight cytokines that have either vaccine adjuvant or therapeutic potential and discuss the need to identify key factors required for prevention of progression, clearance of infection, or protection from acquisition. PMID:22743036

  3. Why Do We Need New Drug Classes for HIV Treatment and Prevention?

    PubMed

    Waheed, Abdul A; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2016-01-01

    The biomedical intervention that has had a major impact on the natural history of HIV and on the global HIV epidemic is antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, the emergence of drug-resistant HIV, an inevitable consequence of increasing use of antiretroviral drugs, poses a major threat to ART success. At the turn of this century, access to life-saving ART was accelerated in low and middle-income countries with the Millennium Development Goal of 15 million individuals receiving ART by 2015 expected to be achieved. However, ART access needs to continue to expand to help bring HIV under control by 2030. The standard of care for people living with HIV in resource- limited settings differs dramatically compared to high-income countries, and not unexpectedly, ART rollout in these settings has resulted in an increase in acquired and transmitted drug resistance. Also of concern, the same drug classes used for ART have been approved or are being progressed for HIV prevention and drug resistance could mitigate their effectiveness for treatment and prevention. In the absence of an effective HIV vaccine and cure, it is imperative that the antiretroviral drug pipeline contains new classes of HIV inhibitors that are active against circulating drug-resistant strains. Studies to advance our fundamental understanding of HIV replication needs to continue, including the interplay between virus and host cell factors, to identify and characterize new drug targets for chemotherapeutic intervention. PMID:26459806

  4. Delivery systems and adjuvants for vaccination against HIV.

    PubMed

    Velin, D; Kraehenbuhl, J P

    2000-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have revealed that HIV-1 infections occur through contact with contaminated blood or during unprotected vaginal or anal intercourse. Hence, to protect against HIV infection, vaccines should ideally induce both mucosal and systemic immune responses. We present a brief review of the different delivery systems and adjuvants which can be used to elicit mucosal immune responses. Oral or nasal administration of recombinant attenuated bacteria or viruses can induce both mucosal and systemic immune responses against the carried antigen. The oral delivery of mucosal adjuvants (such as cholera toxin) in association with antigens has been shown to enhance mucosal and systemic immune responses against them. Recently developed vaccination strategies using naked DNA or other antigen delivery systems are also discussed. PMID:10997292

  5. Clinical development of microbicides for the prevention of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    D'Cruz, Osmond J; Uckun, Fatih M

    2004-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS pandemic continues its spread at a rate of over 15,000 new infections every day. Sexual transmission of HIV-1 is the dominant mode of this pandemic spread. For the first time since the disease emerged in the early 1980s, about half the 42 million people now living with HIV/AIDS worldwide are women. Worldwide, more than 90 percent of all adolescent and adult HIV infections have resulted from heterosexual intercourse. The "feminization" of the pandemic largely driven by the social, economic, and biological factors warrants urgent attention particularly for the adolescent female population. In the absence of an effective prophylactic anti-HIV therapy or vaccine, current efforts are aimed at developing intravaginal/intrarectal topical formulations of anti-HIV agents or microbicides to curb the mucosal and perinatal HIV transmission. Microbicides would provide protection by directly inactivating HIV or preventing HIV from attaching, entering or replicating in susceptible target cells as well as dissemination from target cells present in semen or the host cells that line the vaginal/rectal wall. Thus, ideally, anti-HIV microbicides should be capable of attacking HIV from different angles. In addition, a contraceptive microbicide could help prevent unintended pregnancies worldwide. To be a microbicide, these agents must be safe, effective following vaginal or rectal administration, and should cause minimal or no genital symptoms following long-term repeated usage. A safe and efficacious anti-HIV microbicide is not yet available despite the fact that more than 60 candidate agents have been identified to have in vitro activity against HIV, 18 of which have advanced to clinical testing. Targeting HIV entry has been a favored approach because it is the first step in the process of infection and several readily available anionic polymeric products seem to variably interfere with these processes are the primary candidates for potential microbicides. Formulations of some anionic polymeric antiviral agents have been tested at various doses and various durations for safety, tolerability, and acceptability in Phase I/II clinical trials (vaginal, rectal, or penile studies) in HIV-uninfected and/or HIV-infected populations. Current multicenter Phase I/II safety and Phase II/III efficacy studies that are being conducted or planned in different geographical locations by various special interest groups are designed for rapid clinical development of candidate products. The currently marketed detergent-type spermicide, nonoxynol-9 (N-9), has failed in Phase III clinical trials, due to the drug-induced formation of localized genital lesions that might in fact actually promote virus transmission. Alternative "first-generation" microbicides that have undergone Phase I/II safety and tolerability studies in HIV-uninfected and/or HIV-infected volunteers include polymeric viral fusion inhibitors (dextrin sulfate/Emmelle, carrageenans [PC-213, PC-503, PC-515/Carraguard], cellulose sulfate/Ushercell, polystyrene sulfonate, naphthalene sulfonate [PIC 024-4/PRO 2000/5], acidifying gel [Carbomer 974P/BufferGel], Lactobacillus (L. crispatus) suppository/CTV-05, detergent-type dual-function barriers [ACIDFORM, GEDA Plus, SURETE, Glyminox/C31G/Savvy, Invisible Condom], herbal extracts [Praneem], and viral replication inhibitors [PMPA/Tenofovir]. For majority of these products, no information is available regarding their long-term mucosal safety, carcinogenicity potential, bioavailability, or efficacy following their extended vaginal or rectal exposure. The irritative genitourinary symptoms reported for a number of these first-generation products in Phase I clinical trials implies that the "soft" preclinical endpoints for mucosal safety established for the use and development of vaginal spermicides may not be rigorous enough for vaginal and rectal microbicides because of the efficient sexual tra virus diversity, and genetic environment. It is now apparent that sexually transmitted R5 HIV-1 viruses have less positive charge on their surface compared with the R4 HIV-1 viruses, which may limit the anionic polymers as topical microbicides despite extensive clinical trials. Nevertheless, their ongoing clinical trials, reviewed here, using optimized formulations, and special populations in various geographic locations are paving the way for future rigorous clinical testing of "mechanism-based" broad-spectrum anti-HIV microbicides that are currently under intense development. It is anticipated that future microbicide trials will focus on combination of products capable of attacking HIV life cycle at multiple steps intended to increase efficacy, limit cross-resistance as well as minimize microbicide-induced host toxicity. PMID:14754390

  6. Phylodynamics of HIV-1 from a Phase III AIDS Vaccine Trial in Bangkok, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Jobes, David V.; Sinangil, Faruk; Crandall, Keith A.; Arenas, Miguel; Posada, David; Berman, Phillip W.

    2011-01-01

    Background In 2003, a phase III placebo-controlled trial (VAX003) was completed in Bangkok, Thailand. Of the 2,546 individuals enrolled in the trial based on high risk for infection through injection drug use (IDU), we obtained clinical samples and HIV-1 sequence data (envelope glycoprotein gene gp120) from 215 individuals who became infected during the trial. Here, we used these data in combination with other publicly available gp120 sequences to perform a molecular surveillance and phylodynamic analysis of HIV-1 in Thailand. Methodology and Findings Phylogenetic and population genetic estimators were used to assess HIV-1 gp120 diversity as a function of vaccination treatment, viral load (VL) and CD4+ counts, to indentify transmission clusters and to investigate the timescale and demographics of HIV-1 in Thailand. Three HIV-1 subtypes were identified: CRF01_AE (85% of the infections), subtype B (13%) and CRF15_AE (2%). The Bangkok IDU cohort showed more gp120 diversity than other Asian IDU cohorts and similar diversity to that observed in sexually infected individuals. Moreover, significant differences (P<0.02) in genetic diversity were observed in CRF01_AE IDU with different VL and CD4+ counts. No phylogenetic structure was detected regarding any of the epidemiological and clinical factors tested, although high proportions (35% to 50%) of early infections fell into clusters, which suggests that transmission chains associated with acute infection play a key role on HIV-1 spread among IDU. CRF01_AE was estimated to have emerged in Thailand in 1984.5 (1983–1986), 3–6 years before the first recognition of symptomatic patients (1989). The relative genetic diversity of the HIV-1 population has remained high despite decreasing prevalence rates since the mid 1990s. Conclusions Our study and recent epidemiological reports indicate that HIV-1 is still a major threat in Thailand and suggest that HIV awareness and prevention needs to be strengthened to avoid AIDS resurgence. PMID:21423744

  7. Vaccines for Prevention of Group B Meningococcal Disease: Not Your Father's Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Lee H

    2015-12-01

    For decades, there was no licensed vaccine for prevention of endemic capsular group B meningococcal disease, despite the availability of vaccines for prevention of the other most common meningococcal capsular groups. Recently, however, two new vaccines have been licensed for prevention of group B disease. Although immunogenic and considered to have an acceptable safety profile, there are many scientific unknowns about these vaccines, including effectiveness against antigenically diverse endemic meningococcal strains; duration of protection; whether they provide any herd protection; and whether there will be meningococcal antigenic changes that will diminish effectiveness over time. In addition, these vaccines present societal dilemmas that could influence how they are used in the U.S., including high vaccine cost in the face of a historically low incidence of meningococcal disease. These issues are discussed in this review. PMID:26590434

  8. Vaccines for prevention of group B meningococcal disease: Not your father's vaccines.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Lee H

    2015-11-27

    For decades, there was no licensed vaccine for prevention of endemic capsular group B meningococcal disease, despite the availability of vaccines for prevention of the other most common meningococcal capsular groups. Recently, however, two new vaccines have been licensed for prevention of group B disease. Although immunogenic and considered to have an acceptable safety profile, there are many scientific unknowns about these vaccines, including effectiveness against antigenically diverse endemic meningococcal strains; duration of protection; whether they provide any herd protection; and whether there will be meningococcal antigenic changes that will diminish effectiveness over time. In addition, these vaccines present societal dilemmas that could influence how they are used in the U.S., including high vaccine cost in the face of a historically low incidence of meningococcal disease. These issues are discussed in this review. PMID:26116255

  9. Reasons for Declining to Enroll in a Phase I and II HIV Vaccine Trial after Randomization among Eligible Volunteers in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Tarimo, Edith A. M.; Thorson, Anna; Kohi, Thecla W.; Bakari, Muhammad; Mhalu, Fred; Kulane, Asli

    2011-01-01

    Background Recruitment, enrollment and retention of volunteers in an HIV vaccine trial is important in the efforts to ultimately develop a vaccine that can prevent new HIV infections. Following recruitment, some randomized individuals decline to be enrolled in an HIV vaccine trial. The reasons for such a decision are not well known. This article describes why individuals who were randomized in a phase I and II HIV vaccine trial in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania declined to be enrolled. Methods Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 14 individuals (7 men and 7 women). Repeated readings of the 14 interview transcripts to look for reasons for declining to enroll in the trial were performed. Data was analyzed using the content analysis approach. Results Informants expressed fear of the outcome of an experimental HIV vaccine in their lives. Unlike women, some men were concerned over the effect of the vaccine on their reproduction intentions. Women were concerned about the unknown effects of the vaccine in their bodies. Also, to a large extent, informants faced resistance from significant others such as fiancées, parents, relatives, and friends. Women were influenced by their potential intimate sexual partners; men were forbidden by their parents, and mothers had the most influential opinion. Conclusions Fear of the negative outcome of an experimental vaccine and resistance from significant others are the main reasons for declining to enroll in the HIV vaccine trial among eligible volunteers after randomization. The resistance from the significant others provides valuable guidance for designing future trials in Tanzania; for example, expanding the HIV vaccine trial education to the general population from the onset of the trial design. PMID:21358826

  10. Safety and immunogenicity of influenza vaccination in individuals infected with HIV.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Alessandro R; Amendola, Antonella; Besana, Silvia; Boschini, Antonio; Tanzi, Elisabetta

    2002-12-20

    Influenza can cause severe complications in HIV infected individuals leading to increases in hospitalisation and mortality. Vaccination is recommended for such individuals, but some studies reported that immunisation against influenza may stimulate an increase of HIV viral load and decrease of CD4+ cells count. A review of published studies, including our study carried out in HIV former drug addicts, indicates that vaccination against influenza is well tolerated in both children and adult individuals with HIV, but response to vaccination is lower than that observed in immunocompetent individuals. Most studies, including our own, show that vaccination does not induce significant changes in viral load and CD4+ cell counts. In studies reporting modifications of such parameters there is a general agreement that the increased viral replication is usually transient and unable to determine a clear, measurable progression of the underlying HIV disease. Therefore, vaccination against influenza can be safely administered to HIV infected people. PMID:12477415

  11. Vaccine-preventable diseases in Europe: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Wicker, Sabine; Maltezou, Helena C

    2014-08-01

    During the second half of the 20th century, vaccinations led to the control or even eradication of several vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs) in Europe. However, outbreaks of VPDs continue to occur even in countries with well-established vaccination programs. Reasons include the existence of under-vaccinated populations, the increasing anti-vaccination movement and the increasing movement of populations across borders. Ensuring adequate levels of herd immunity is the only reliable method for preventing epidemics and a re-emergence of VPDs. In order to achieve this, more flexible vaccine delivery platforms are needed targeting the less-privileged people, especially in the context of the current economic crisis. Healthcare personnel and healthcare systems should be prepared to address these challenges in the following years. PMID:24958075

  12. Dose-dependent inhibition of Gag cellular immunity by Env in SIV/HIV DNA vaccinated macaques

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Antonio; Li, Jinyao; Rosati, Margherita; Kulkarni, Viraj; Patel, Vainav; Jalah, Rashmi; Alicea, Candido; Reed, Steven; Sardesai, Niranjan; Berkower, Ira; Pavlakis, George N; Felber, Barbara K

    2015-01-01

    The induction of a balanced immune response targeting the major structural proteins, Gag and Env of HIV, is important for the development of an efficacious vaccine. The use of DNA plasmids expressing different antigens offers the opportunity to test in a controlled manner the influence of different vaccine components on the magnitude and distribution of the vaccine-induced cellular and humoral immune responses. Here, we show that increasing amounts of env DNA results in greatly enhanced Env antibody titers without significantly affecting the levels of anti-Env cellular immune responses. Co-immunization with Env protein further increased antibody levels, indicating that vaccination with DNA only is not sufficient for eliciting maximal humoral responses against Env. In contrast, under high env:gag DNA plasmid ratio, the development of Gag cellular responses was significantly reduced by either SIV or HIV Env, whereas Gag humoral responses were not affected. Our data indicate that a balanced ratio of the 2 key HIV/SIV vaccine components, Gag and Env, is important to avoid immunological interference and to achieve both maximal humoral responses against Env to prevent virus acquisition and maximal cytotoxic T cell responses against Gag to prevent virus spread. PMID:26125521

  13. HIV/AIDS vaccines for Africa: scientific opportunities, challenges and strategies

    PubMed Central

    Chin'ombe, Nyasha; Ruhanya, Vurayai

    2015-01-01

    More than decades have already elapsed since human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was identified as the causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The HIV has since spread to all parts of the world with devastating effects. In sub-saharan Africa, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has reached unprecedented proportions. Safe, effective and affordable HIV/AIDS vaccines for Africans are therefore urgently needed to contain this public health problem. Although, there are challenges, there are also scientific opportunities and strategies that can be exploited in the development of HIV/AIDS vaccines for Africa. The recent RV144 Phase III trial in Thailand has demonstrated that it is possible to develop a vaccine that can potentially elicit modest protective immunity against HIV infection. The main objective of this review is to outline the key scientific opportunities, challenges and strategies in HIV/AIDS vaccine development in Africa. PMID:26185576

  14. Prison privatization and HIV prevention in Australia.

    PubMed

    Cregan, J

    Prison privatization is being increasingly discussed as an alternative that might help drive down the cost of corrections in Canada. An Australian conference recently addressed prison privatization. Australia has a long history with privatizing corrections and historically being the site of private penal colonies. Private and State-owned corporations own and manage Australian prisons and the balance of private and public sector activity within the prisons is discussed. HIV/AIDS care and prevention programs provide bleach distribution, education programs for staff and inmates, and safety training. Moral issues debating how much time and money is allocated to HIV/AIDS are addressed. Private operators of prisons have no financial incentive to educate, rehabilitate, or release prisoners. PMID:11365293

  15. Future of Phylogeny in HIV Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Bluma G.; Wainberg, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    The success of the HPTN 052 trial has led to revisions in HIV-1 treatment guidelines. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) may reduce the risk of HIV-1 transmissions at the population-level. The design of successful Treatment as Prevention interventions will be predicated on a comprehensive understanding of the spatial, temporal, and biological dynamics of heterosexual (HET), men having sex with men (MSM), and intravenous drug user (IDU) epidemics. Viral phylogenetics can capture the underlying structure of transmission networks based on the genetic interrelatedness of viral sequences and cluster networks that could not be otherwise identified. This article describes the phylogenetic expansion of the Montreal MSM epidemic over the last decade. High rates of co-clustering of primary infections are associated with one infection leading to 13 onward transmissions. Phylogeny substantiates the role of primary and recent stage infection in transmission dynamics, underlying the importance of timely diagnosis and immediate ART initiation to avert transmission cascades. PMID:23764643

  16. Why vaccines are not the answer - the failure of V520 and the importance of cell-mediated immunity in the fight against HIV.

    PubMed

    White, Aaron

    2008-12-01

    The recent failure of Merck's HIV vaccine, V520, left the future of HIV vaccine research in question. The current article offers a possible explanation for the failure of V520 and explores a potential alternative to the vaccine approach. Vaccines prior to V520 were designed to evoke strong antibody-mediated immune responses to HIV; that is, the generation of antibodies to attach to and disable the HIV virus before it infiltrates host cells. V520 represents a misguided, though well-intentioned, effort to evoke a cell-mediated immune response to HIV; that is, immune activity aimed at identifying proteins associated with HIV after it infiltrates host cells. In the body, these two immune responses, antibody-mediated (for extracellular infections) and cell-mediated (primarily for intracellular infections), operate in a teeter-totter fashion. When one is activated the other is suppressed. Because HIV quickly infects host cells near entrances to the body, it requires a strong cell-mediated response to defeat, not an antibody-mediated response. The driving hypothesis of this article is that the antibody-mediated immune response triggered by V520 suppressed the ability of the body to mount the cell-mediated immune response necessary to protect against HIV and created a window of opportunity for HIV infection, particularly in subjects previously exposed to the adenovirus vector used in the vaccine. While the immune system uses antibodies to identify extracellular pathogens, it uses transfer factors to label infected host cells. Hundred of papers indicate that pathogen-specific transfer factors can be used to stimulate cell-mediated immunity against a wide variety of viruses. The available research, reviewed in this manuscript, suggests that HIV-specific transfer factors could prove extremely useful, far more useful than vaccines, in preventing and treating HIV infections. PMID:18768264

  17. Antiretroviral Therapy as HIV Prevention: Status and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Kartik K.

    2010-01-01

    As antiretroviral treatment of HIV infection has become increasingly accessible, attention has focused on whether these drugs can used for prevention because of increased tolerability of newer medications, decreased cost, and the limitations of other approaches. We review the status of antiretroviral HIV prevention, including chemoprophylaxis, as well as the effects of treatment of infected individuals on prevention. It is possible that the life-saving agents that have transformed the natural history of AIDS can be a critical component of HIV prevention efforts, but their ultimate role in affecting HIV transmission dynamics remains to be defined. PMID:20724682

  18. Preventing Sin: The Ethics of Vaccines against Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Lieber, Sarah R.; Millum, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Advances in immunotherapy are paving the way toward vaccines that target unhealthy behaviors, such as a vaccine that blocks the action of nicotine, reducing the pleasure caused by smoking. Such a tool could prove to be an effective tool for preventing children from taking up smoking. Would it be permissible? PMID:23650065

  19. Willingness of Kenyan HIV-1 serodiscordant couples to use antiretroviral based HIV-1 prevention strategies

    PubMed Central

    Heffron, Renee; Ngure, Kenneth; Mugo, Nelly; Celum, Connie; Kurth, Ann; Curran, Kathryn; Baeten, Jared M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral treatment (ART) and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) have demonstrated efficacy as new HIV-1 prevention approaches for HIV-1 serodiscordant couples. Methods Among Kenyan HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual couples participating in a clinical trial of PrEP, we conducted a cross-sectional study and used descriptive statistical methods to explore couples' willingness to use antiretrovirals for HIV-1 prevention. The study was conducted prior to July 2011, when studies among heterosexual populations reported that ART and PrEP reduced HIV-1 risk. Results For 181 couples in which the HIV-1 infected partner had a CD4 count ≥350 cells/μL and had not yet initiated ART (and thus did not qualify for ART under Kenyan guidelines), 60.2% of HIV-1 infected partners (69.4% of men and 57.9% of women) were willing to use early ART (at CD4 ≥350 cells/μL) for HIV-1 prevention. Among HIV-1 uninfected partners, 92.7% (93.8% of men and 86.1% of women) reported willingness to use PrEP. When given a hypothetical choice of early ART or PrEP for HIV-1 prevention, 52.5% of HIV-1 infected participants would prefer to initiate ART early and 56.9% of HIV-1 uninfected participants would prefer to use PrEP. Conclusions Nearly 40% of Kenyan HIV-1 infected individuals in known HIV-1 serodiscordant partnerships reported reservations about early ART initiation for HIV-1 prevention. PrEP interest in this PrEP-experienced population was high. Strategies to achieve high uptake and sustained adherence to ART and PrEP for HIV-1 prevention in HIV-1 serodiscordant couples will require responding to couples' preferences for prevention strategies. PMID:22595872

  20. A review of factors affecting vaccine preventable disease in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Norimitsu; Ching, Michael S L

    2014-12-01

    Japan is well known as a country with a strong health record. However its incidence rates of vaccine preventable diseases (VPD) such as hepatitis B, measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella remain higher than other developed countries. This article reviews the factors that contribute to the high rates of VPD in Japan. These include historical and political factors that delayed the introduction of several important vaccines until recently. Access has also been affected by vaccines being divided into government-funded "routine" (eg, polio, pertussis) and self-pay "voluntary" groups (eg, hepatitis A and B). Routine vaccines have higher rates of administration than voluntary vaccines. Administration factors include differences in well child care schedules, the approach to simultaneous vaccination, vaccination contraindication due to fever, and vaccination spacing. Parental factors include low intention to fully vaccinate their children and misperceptions about side effects and efficacy. There are also provider knowledge gaps regarding indications, adverse effects, interval, and simultaneous vaccination. These multifactorial issues combine to produce lower population immunization rates and a higher incidence of VPD than other developed countries. This article will provide insight into the current situation of Japanese vaccinations, the issues to be addressed and suggestions for public health promotion. PMID:25628969

  1. An Extended Model of Reasoned Action to Understand the Influence of Individual- and Network-Level Factors on African Americans’ Participation in HIV Vaccine Research

    PubMed Central

    Frew, Paula M.; Archibald, Matthew; Diallo, Dazon Dixon; Hou, Su-I; Horton, Takeia; Chan, Kayshin; Mulligan, Mark J.; del Rio, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    In the United States, the number and proportion of HIV/AIDS cases among black/African Americans continue to highlight the need for new biomedical prevention interventions, including an HIV vaccine, microbicide, or new antiretroviral (ARV) prevention strategies such as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to complement existing condom usage, harm reduction methods, and behavioral change strategies to stem the HIV epidemic. Although black/African Americans are disproportionately impacted by HIV/AIDS, their participation in HIV clinical research continues to have unique challenges. We theorize that interaction among multilevel factors creates ideal alignment for minority participation in HIV clinical studies. Thus, we initially set out to test an extended model of reasoned action with 362 participants to understand the interplay of sociopsychological and network-level considerations influencing minority participation in HIV prevention research efforts. In this study, we linked the intrapersonal dimensions of attitudes, beliefs, and normative concerns to community-level components, appraisal of involvement with the clinical research organization, an entity which operates within a networked structure of community partner agencies, and identification with coalition advocacy aims. Various participatory outcomes were explored including involvement in future HIV vaccine community functions, participation in community promotion of HIV vaccine research, and community mobilization. Three-stage least squares estimates indicated similar findings across three models. Significant effects demonstrate the importance of positive attitudes toward HIV vaccine research, favorable health research beliefs, perceived social support for participation, HIV/AIDS issue engagement, and perceived relevance of the clinical research site’s mission and values. Identification of these nuanced pathway effects provides implications for tailored community program development. PMID:20012200

  2. HIV in Indian prisons: Risk behaviour, prevalence, prevention & treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Kate; Larney, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Background & Objectives: HIV is a major health challenge for prison authorities. HIV in prisons has implications for HIV in the general community. The aim of this paper was to gather information on HIV risk, prevalence, prevention and treatment in prisons in India. Methods: Relevant published and unpublished reports and information were sought in order to provide a coherent picture of the current situation relating to HIV prevention, treatment and care in prisons in India. Information covered prison management and population statistics, general conditions in prisons, provision of general medical care and the HIV situation in prison. Results: No data on drug injection in prison were identified. Sex between men was reported to be common in some Indian prisons. A national study found that 1.7 per cent of inmates were HIV positive. Some prisons provided HIV education. Condom provision was considered illegal. A few prisoners received drug treatment for drug use, HIV infection or co-infection with sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Interpretation & conclusions: HIV prevalence in prisons in India was higher than that in the general community. Regular monitoring of information on HIV risk behaviours and prevalence in Indian prisons is strongly recommended. Evidence based treatment for drug injectors and nation-wide provision of HIV prevention strategies are urgently required. Voluntary counselling, testing and treatment for HIV and STIs should be provided. PMID:21245617

  3. Reputationally Strong HIV Prevention Programs: Lessons from the Front Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eke, Agatha N.; Mezoff, Jane S.; Duncan, Ted; Sogolow, Ellen D.

    2006-01-01

    Although HIV prevention researchers have conducted numerous controlled outcome studies to evaluate the effectiveness of theory-based interventions aimed at reducing HIV risk behaviors, many HIV risk reduction interventions are conducted not by researchers but by staff in local health departments or community-based organizations (CBOs). Despite…

  4. CDC Vital Signs: Daily Pill Can Prevent HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... prescribe PrEP, more HIV infections could be prevented. Health care providers can: Test patients for HIV as a regular part of ... Helping to monitor PrEP use and its effects. Health care providers can Test patients for HIV as a regular part of ...

  5. Efficacy of a Preventive Intervention for Youths Living with HIV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Lee, Martha B.; Murphy, Debra A.; Futterman, Donna; Duan, Naihua; Birnbaum, Jeffrey M.; Lightfoot, Marguerita

    2001-01-01

    Examined HIV transmission behaviors and health practices among HIV-infected youths over 15 months following participation in a preventive intervention that emphasized coping with HIV and reducing risky behaviors. The intervention resulted in increases in social support coping and reductions in risky sexual and lifestyle behaviors specifically…

  6. Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics: News

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M.

    2013-01-01

    GSK`s Synflorix: Highly effective at preventing invasive pneumococcal disease Positive phase 1 interim results for killed whole-virus HIV vaccine Therapeutic HBV vaccine drives immune responses in liver New tuberculosis vaccine candidate to enter the clinic Novartis receives positive CHMP opinion for MenB vaccine Bexsero New research points way to faster flu vaccines New Meth vaccine shows promise in animals RTS,S malaria vaccine reduces malaria by approximately one-third in African infants PMID:23442582

  7. A Phase IIa Trial of the New Tuberculosis Vaccine, MVA85A, in HIV- and/or Mycobacterium tuberculosis–infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tameris, Michele; Smit, Erica; van der Merwe, Linda; Hughes, E. Jane; Kadira, Blessing; Mauff, Katya; Moyo, Sizulu; Brittain, Nathaniel; Lawrie, Alison; Mulenga, Humphrey; de Kock, Marwou; Makhethe, Lebohang; Janse van Rensburg, Esme; Gelderbloem, Sebastian; Veldsman, Ashley; Hatherill, Mark; Geldenhuys, Hendrik; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Hawkridge, Anthony; Hussey, Gregory D.; Hanekom, Willem A.; McShane, Helen; Mahomed, Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Novel tuberculosis (TB) vaccines should be safe and effective in populations infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) and/or HIV for effective TB control. Objective: To determine the safety and immunogenicity of MVA85A, a novel TB vaccine, among M.tb- and/or HIV-infected persons in a setting where TB and HIV are endemic. Methods: An open-label, phase IIa trial was conducted in 48 adults with M.tb and/or HIV infection. Safety and immunogenicity were analyzed up to 52 weeks after intradermal vaccination with 5 × 107 plaque-forming units of MVA85A. Specific T-cell responses were characterized by IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot and whole blood intracellular cytokine staining assays. Measurements and Main Results: MVA85A was well tolerated and no vaccine-related serious adverse events were recorded. MVA85A induced robust and durable response of mostly polyfunctional CD4+ T cells, coexpressing IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL-2. Magnitudes of pre- and postvaccination T-cell responses were lower in HIV-infected, compared with HIV-uninfected, vaccinees. No significant effect of antiretroviral therapy on immunogenicity of MVA85A was observed. Conclusions: MVA85A was safe and immunogenic in persons with HIV and/or M.tb infection. These results support further evaluation of safety and efficacy of this vaccine for prevention of TB in these target populations. PMID:22281831

  8. [Vaccination of children born from HIV-infected mothers against Haemophilus influenzae type b infection].

    PubMed

    Kostinov, M P; Pakhomov, D V; Snegova, N F; Nikitina, T N; Zinkina, T N

    2008-01-01

    Course of postvaccinal period after injection of vaccine against Haemophilus influenzae type b administered simultaneously with vaccines of Russian national immunization schedule was studied in children born from HIV-infected mothers. Good tolerability of the vaccine administered concomitantly with diphtheria-tetanus-whole cell pertussis and inactivated polio vaccines (Imovax Polio), which is comparable with tolerability in healthy children, was demonstrated. Prevaccination titers of antibodies and their dynamics during immunization process were described. Increase of levels of antibodies was detected both in the group of children with perinatal contact with HIV infection and in the group of HIV-infected children. PMID:18822498

  9. A vaccine for HIV type 1: the antibody perspective.

    PubMed

    Burton, D R

    1997-09-16

    Antibodies that bind well to the envelope spikes of immunodeficiency viruses such as HIV type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) can offer protection or benefit if present at appropriate concentrations before viral exposure. The challenge in antibody-based HIV-1 vaccine design is to elicit such antibodies to the viruses involved in transmission in humans (primary viruses). At least two major obstacles exist. The first is that very little of the envelope spike surface of primary viruses appears accessible for antibody binding (low antigenicity), probably because of oligomerization of the constituent proteins and a high degree of glycosylation of one of the proteins. The second is that the mature oligomer constituting the spikes appears to stimulate only weak antibody responses (low immunogenicity). Viral variation is another possible obstacle that appears to present fewer problems than anticipated. Vaccine design should focus on presentation of an intact mature oligomer, increasing the immunogenicity of the oligomer and learning from the antibodies available that potently neutralize primary viruses. PMID:9294155

  10. Preferential infection of human Ad5-specific CD4 T cells by HIV in Ad5 naturally exposed and recombinant Ad5-HIV vaccinated individuals.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haitao; Eller, Michael A; Zafar, Shah; Zhou, Yu; Gu, Mengnan; Wei, Zhi; Currier, Jeffrey R; Marovich, Mary A; Kibuuka, Hannah N; Bailer, Robert T; Koup, Richard A; Robb, Merlin L; Michael, Nelson L; Kim, Jerome H; Ratto-Kim, Silvia

    2014-09-16

    Efficacy trials of adenovirus 5-vectored candidate HIV vaccines [recombinant Ad5 (rAd5)-HIV] were halted for futility due to lack of vaccine efficacy and unexpected excess HIV infections in the vaccine recipients. The potential immunologic basis for these observations is unclear. We comparatively evaluated the HIV susceptibility and phenotypes of human CD4 T cells specific to Ad5 and CMV, two viruses that have been used as HIV vaccine vectors. We show that Ad5-specific CD4 T cells, either induced by natural Ad5 exposure or expanded by rAd5 vaccination, are highly susceptible to HIV in vitro and are preferentially lost in HIV-infected individuals compared with CMV-specific CD4 T cells. Further investigation demonstrated that Ad5-specific CD4 T cells selectively display a proinflammatory Th17-like phenotype and express macrophage inflammatory protein 3α and α4β7 integrin, suggestive of gut mucosa homing potential of these cells. Analysis of HIV p24 and cytokine coexpression using flow cytometry revealed preferential infection of IL-17- and IL-2-producing, Ad5-specific CD4 T cells by HIV in vitro. Our data suggest a potential mechanism explaining the excess HIV infections in vaccine recipients after rAd5-HIV vaccination and highlight the importance of testing the HIV susceptibility of vaccine-generated, vector and insert-specific CD4 T cells in future HIV vaccine studies. PMID:25197078

  11. Measurements of Immune Responses for Establishing Correlates of Vaccine Protection Against HIV

    PubMed Central

    Burgers, Wendy A.; Manrique, Amapola; McKinnon, Lyle R.; Reynolds, Matthew R.; Rolland, Morgane; Blish, Catherine; Chege, Gerald K.; Curran, Rhonda; Fischer, William; Herrera, Carolina; Sather, D. Noah

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Well-defined correlates of protective immunity are an essential component of rational vaccine development. Despite years of basic science and three HIV vaccine efficacy trials, correlates of immunological protection from HIV infection remain undefined. In December 2010, a meeting of scientists engaged in basic and translational work toward developing HIV-1 vaccines was convened. The goal of this meeting was to discuss current opportunities and optimal approaches for defining correlates of protection, both for ongoing and future HIV-1 vaccine candidates; specific efforts were made to engage young scientists. We discuss here the highlights from the meeting regarding the progress made and the way forward for a protective HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:21861777

  12. Broad Immunogenicity of a Multigene, Multiclade HIV-1 DNA Vaccine Boosted with Heterologous HIV-1 Recombinant Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara

    PubMed Central

    Sandström, Eric; Nilsson, Charlotta; Hejdeman, Bo; Bråve, Andreas; Bratt, Göran; Robb, Merlin; Cox, Josephine; VanCott, Thomas; Marovich, Mary; Stout, Richard; Aboud, Said; Bakari, Muhammad; Pallangyo, Kisali; Ljungberg, Karl; Moss, Bernard; Earl, Patricia; Michael, Nelson; Birx, Deborah; Mhalu, Fred; Wahren, Britta; Biberfeld, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Background A human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine that limits disease and transmission is urgently needed. This clinical trial evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of an HIV vaccine that combines a plasmid-DNA priming vaccine and a modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) boosting vaccine. Methods Forty healthy volunteers were injected with DNA plasmids containing gp160 of HIV-1 subtypes A, B, and C; rev B; p17/p24 gag A and B, and RTmut B by use of a needle-free injection system. The vaccine was administered intradermally or intramuscularly, with or without recombinant granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and boosted with a heterologous MVA containing env, gag, and pol of CRF01A_E. Immune responses were monitored with HIV-specific interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)–2 ELISpot and lymphoproliferative assays (LPAs). Results Vaccine-related adverse events were mild and tolerable. After receipt of the DNA priming vaccine, 11 (30%) of 37 vaccinees had HIV-specific IFN-γ responses. After receipt of the MVA boosting vaccine, ELISpot assays showed that 34 (92%) of 37 vaccinees had HIV-specific IFN-γ responses, 32 (86%) to Gag and 24 (65%) to Env. IFN-γ production was detected in both the CD8+ T cell compartment (5 of 9 selected vaccinees) and the CD4+ T cell compartment (9 of 9). ELISpot results showed that 25 (68%) of 37 vaccinees had a positive IL-2 response and 35 (92%) of 38 had a positive LPA response. Of 38 subjects, a total of 37 (97%) were responders. One milligram of HIV-1 DNA administered intradermally was as effective as 4 mg administered intramuscularly in priming for the MVA boosting vaccine. Conclusion This HIV-DNA priming–MVA boosting approach is safe and highly immunogenic. Trials registration International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial number: ISRCTN32604572. PMID:18808335

  13. Prevention of sexual transmission of HIV: real results, science progressing, societies remaining behind.

    PubMed

    Laga, Marie; Piot, Peter

    2012-06-19

    HIV spread has reached a turning point following decades of increasing and sustained incidence. An effective vaccine has not been developed, but critical breakthroughs with prevention based on antiretroviral treatment are promising. The new prevention technologies will have to be combined with condoms and incorporated into the mixes of combination prevention approaches that are tailored to the local epidemic and context. To address the implementation gap, more political will and leadership will be needed to overcome the socio-cultural, legal or religious barriers to prevention. We have learned that the generation of demand for HIV prevention is not easy, as for health promotion in general. Despite optimism about treatment as prevention, many western countries are facing an increase in new HIV cases, and HIV is no longer a collective concern. If we manage to find common ground on combination prevention, customize approaches to people's needs and exercise technical and political leadership, our decade may see the beginning of the end of the epidemic. PMID:22706008

  14. 76 FR 6484 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Pretesting of NIAID's Biomedical HIV Prevention...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-04

    ... NIAID's Biomedical HIV Prevention Research Communication Messages SUMMARY: Under the provisions of...: Title: Pretesting of NIAID's Biomedical HIV Prevention Research Communication Messages. Type of... biomedical HIV prevention research. The primary objectives of the pretests are to (1) assess...

  15. Preventing HIV infection: educating the general public.

    PubMed

    Kroger, F

    1991-01-01

    This essay discusses the rationale for targeting HIV prevention programs to the general public, as opposed to focusing strictly on high-risk populations. The author first considers varying definitions of the term "general public," then explains the goal of general public education programs. Additionally, the author lays down the theoretical foundations of general audience education programs and weights related research findings. Finally, he offers recommendations for future practice. Noting the complex socioecological elements involved in health behavior, the author argues in favor of a broad definition for the general public. This broad outlook allows programs to still target high-risk population while not bypassing low-risk persons, who are sometimes treated as irrelevant because they do not contribute to excess morbidity or mortality. When it comes to HIV educational programs for the general public, their goals should be to instruct the public on how the virus is transmitted, to allay unfounded fears, and to increase the level of support for AIDS prevention and control. Such a program would require a theoretical basis drawn from multiple sources: health education, health communication, clinical and social psychology, and social marketing. The author concludes by proving recommendations designed to reinforce existing programs: 1) strengthen efforts to ensure that all people are educated about HIV and to encourage people to treat AIDS patients with compassion; 2) continue to explore for the most effective communication channels; 3) strengthen the communication infrastructure for those who are disenfranchised from health education; and 4) strengthen evaluation efforts of health communication programs. PMID:12317020

  16. HIV prevention and low-income Chilean women

    PubMed Central

    CIANELLI, ROSINA; FERRER, LILIAN; MCELMURRY, BEVERLY J.

    2008-01-01

    Socio-cultural factors and HIV-related misinformation contribute to the increasing number of Chilean women living with HIV. In spite of this, and to date, few culturally specific prevention activities have been developed for this population. The goal of the present study was to elicit the perspectives of low-income Chilean women regarding HIV and relevant socio-cultural factors, as a forerunner to the development of a culturally appropriate intervention. As part of a mixed-methods study, fifty low-income Chilean women participated in a survey and twenty were selected to participate in prevention, in-depth interviews. Results show evidence of widespread misinformation and misconceptions related to HIV/AIDS. Machismo and marianismo offer major barriers to prevention programme development. Future HIV prevention should stress partner communication, empowerment and improving the education of women vulnerable to HIV. PMID:18432428

  17. Personalized Biobehavioral HIV Prevention for Women and Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    Teitelman, Anne M.; Bevilacqua, Amanda W.; Jemmott, Loretta Sweet

    2013-01-01

    Background: Women and adolescent girls bear a significant burden of the global HIV pandemic. Both behavioral and biomedical prevention approaches have been shown to be effective. In order to foster the most effective combination HIV-prevention approaches for women and girls, it is imperative to understand the unique biological, social, and structural considerations that increase vulnerability to acquiring HIV within this population. Primary Study Objective: The purpose of this article is to propose novel ideas for personalized biobehavioral HIV prevention for women and adolescent girls. The central argument is that we must transcend unilevel solutions for HIV prevention toward comprehensive, multilevel combination HIV prevention packages to actualize personalized biobehavioral HIV prevention. Our hope is to foster transnational dialogue among researchers, practitioners, educators, and policy makers toward the actualization of the proposed recommendations. Methods: We present a commentary organized to review biological, social, and structural factors that increase vulnerability to HIV acquisition among women and adolescent girls. The overview is followed by recommendations to curb HIV rates in the target population in a sustainable manner. Results: The physiology of the lower female reproductive system biologically increases HIV risk among women and girls. Social (eg, intimate partner violence) and structural (eg, gender inequality) factors exacerbate this risk by increasing the likelihood of viral exposure. Our recommendations for personalized biobehavioral HIV prevention are to (1) create innovative mechanisms for personalized HIV risk—reduction assessments; (2) develop mathematical models of local epidemics; (3) prepare personalized, evidence-based combination HIV risk—reduction packages; (4) structure gender equity into society; and (5) eliminate violence (both physical and structural) against women and girls. Conclusions: Generalized programs and interventions may not have universal, transnational, and crosscultural implications. Personalized biobehavioral strategies are needed to comprehensively address vulnerabilities at biological, social, and structural levels. PMID:24416702

  18. Exploring the Potential Health Impact and Cost-Effectiveness of AIDS Vaccine within a Comprehensive HIV/AIDS Response in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Thomas M.; Fisher, Kevin A.; McGlynn, Margaret G.; Stover, John; Warren, Mitchell J.; Teng, Yu; Näveke, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Background The Investment Framework Enhanced (IFE) proposed in 2013 by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) explored how maximizing existing interventions and adding emerging prevention options, including a vaccine, could further reduce new HIV infections and AIDS-related deaths in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). This article describes additional modeling which looks more closely at the potential health impact and cost-effectiveness of AIDS vaccination in LMICs as part of UNAIDS IFE. Methods An epidemiological model was used to explore the potential impact of AIDS vaccination in LMICs in combination with other interventions through 2070. Assumptions were based on perspectives from research, vaccination and public health experts, as well as observations from other HIV/AIDS interventions and vaccination programs. Sensitivity analyses varied vaccine efficacy, duration of protection, coverage, and cost. Results If UNAIDS IFE goals were fully achieved, new annual HIV infections in LMICs would decline from 2.0 million in 2014 to 550,000 in 2070. A 70% efficacious vaccine introduced in 2027 with three doses, strong uptake and five years of protection would reduce annual new infections by 44% over the first decade, by 65% the first 25 years and by 78% to 122,000 in 2070. Vaccine impact would be much greater if the assumptions in UNAIDS IFE were not fully achieved. An AIDS vaccine would be cost-effective within a wide range of scenarios. Interpretation Even a modestly effective vaccine could contribute strongly to a sustainable response to HIV/AIDS and be cost-effective, even with optimistic assumptions about other interventions. Higher efficacy would provide even greater impact and cost-effectiveness, and would support broader access. Vaccine efficacy and cost per regimen are critical in achieving cost-effectiveness, with cost per regimen being particularly critical in low-income countries and at lower efficacy levels. PMID:26731116

  19. HIV Susceptibility of human antigen-specific CD4 T cells in AIDS pathogenesis and vaccine response.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haitao; Liu, Fengliang; Kim, Jerome; Ratto-Kim, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    HIV causes infection and progressive depletion of human CD4 T cells. Emerging data have shown that antigen-specific CD4 T-cell subsets manifest differential susceptibility to HIV, potentially leading to pathogen-specific immune failure and opportunistic infections. This concept was recently explored in context of vectors utilized in HIV vaccine trials, and the data suggest that adenovirus type 5(Ad5)-specific CD4 T cells elicited by Ad5-HIV vaccine may be particularly susceptible to HIV, potentially rendering Ad5 vaccine recipients susceptible to HIV acquisition. We here examined recent data regarding the HIV susceptibility of antigen-specific CD4 T cells induced during infection or HIV vaccination and discussed its potential impact on HIV acquisition risk posed by HIV vaccination. PMID:26814372

  20. Getting Personal: Progress and Pitfalls in HIV Prevention among Latinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaro, Hortensia; Raj, Anita; Reed, Elizabeth; Ulibarri, Monica

    2011-01-01

    This article first presents the political, personal, and epidemiological context of Hortensia Amaro's 1988 publication in "Psychology of Women Quarterly" ("PWQ"), "Considerations for Prevention of HIV Infection Among Hispanic Women" (Amaro, 1988). Second, it provides a brief summary of progress in HIV prevention with Latinas. The third section…

  1. Making the Connections: Why Literacy Matters for HIV Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medel-Anonuevo, Carolyn; Cheick, Diarra Mahamadou

    2007-01-01

    This issue in the "Literacy Matters" looks at the relationship between literacy and HIV prevention education. It is the result of the UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning's work on examining the contribution of non-formal education (NFE) to HIV prevention, carried out in collaboration with the Association for the Development of Education in…

  2. Evaluation of the Positive Prevention HIV/STD Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaChausse, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of Positive Prevention, a theory-based, HIV/STD prevention education curriculum for high school youth. Three hundred fifty-three students participated in a longitudinal experimental design to determine the impact of the curriculum on HIV/AIDS knowledge, self-efficacy to abstain from sex, self-efficacy of…

  3. Substance Use and HIV Prevention for Youth in Correctional Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouttapa, Michele; Watson, Donnie W.; McCuller, William J.; Reiber, Chris; Tsai, Winnie

    2009-01-01

    Evidence-based programs for substance use and HIV prevention (SUHIP) were adapted for high-risk juveniles detained at 24-hour secure correctional facilities. In this pilot study, comparisons were made between adolescents who received the SUHIP intervention and a control group on changes in: (1) knowledge of HIV prevention behaviors, (2) attitudes…

  4. The Impact of War on Vaccine Preventable Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Obradovic, Zarema; Balta, Snjezana; Obradovic, Amina; Mesic, Salih

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: During the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina, which lasted from 1992-1995, the functioning of all sectors was disturbed, including the health sector. The priority of the heath sector was treatment and less attention was paid to prevention, and this applies also to the Program of implementation of obligatory immunization, as one of the most important prevention measures. This program was conducted with difficulty and sometimes was completely interrupted because of the lack of necessary vaccines and the inability of adequate maintenance of the cold chain. It was difficult and sometimes completely impossible to bring children to vaccination. Because of these problems, a great number of children stayed unvaccinated so they suffered from vaccine-preventable diseases several years after the war. Materials and methods: This is a retrospective epidemiological study. We analyzed data from January 1994 to July 2014 in Canton Sarajevo, and data about measles outbreak in 2014. Results: In the period from January 1994 to July 2014, 3897 vaccine-preventable diseases were registered in Canton Sarajevo. Among them measles, rubella and mumps were the most frequent. In March 2014, measles outbreak was registered. Almost all cases are unvaccinated (99%) and 43% of all cases are connected with failure of vaccination during the war. Conclusion: During the war, routine immunization program was disrupted in Bosnia and Herzegovina (also in Canton Sarajevo). The consequences are presented as vaccine preventable diseases cases. PMID:25685082

  5. EFFECT OF HIV PREVENTION AND TREATMENT PROGRAM ON HIV AND HCV TRANSMISSION AND HIV MORTALITY AT AN INDONESIAN NARCOTIC PRISON.

    PubMed

    Nelwan, Erni J; Indrati, Agnes K; Isa, Ahmad; Triani, Nurlita; Alam, Nisaa Nur; Herlan, Maria S; Husen, Wahid; Pohan, Herdiman T; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Meheus, Andre; Van Crevel, Reinout; van der Ven, Andre Jam

    2015-09-01

    Validated data regarding HIV-transmission in prisons in developing countries is scarce. We examined sexual and injecting drug use behavior and HIV and HCV transmission in an Indonesian narcotic prison during the implementation of an HIV prevention and treatment program during 2004-2007 when the Banceuy Narcotic Prison in Indonesia conducted an HIV transmission prevention program to provide 1) HIV education, 2) voluntary HIV testing and counseling, 3) condom supply, 4) prevention of rape and sexual violence, 5) antiretroviral treatment for HIV-positive prisoners and 6) methadone maintenance treatment. During a first survey that was conducted between 2007 and 2009, new prisoners entered Banceuy Narcotics Prison were voluntary tested for HIV and HCV-infection after written informed consent was obtained. Information regarding sexual and injecting risk behavior and physical status were also recorded at admission to the prison. Participants who tested negative for both HIV and HCV during the first survey were included in a second survey conducted during 2008-2011. During both surveys, data on mortality among HIV-seropositive patients were also recorded. All HIV-seropositive participants receive treatment for HIV. HIV/ AIDS-related deaths decreased: 43% in 2006, 18% in 2007, 9% in 2008 and 0% in 2009. No HIV and HCV seroconversion inside Banceuy Narcotic Prison were found after a median of 23 months imprisonment (maximum follow-up: 38 months). Total of 484.8 person-years observation was done. Participants reported HIV transmission risk-behavior in Banceuy Prison during the second survey was low. After implementation of HIV prevention and treatment program, no new HIV or HCV cases were detected and HIV-related mortality decreased. PMID:26863859

  6. Intranasal Vaccination against HIV-1 with Adenoviral Vector-Based Nanocomplex Using Synthetic TLR-4 Agonist Peptide as Adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Jiang, Yuhong; Gong, Tao; Zhang, Zhirong; Sun, Xun

    2016-03-01

    Recombinant type 5 adenovirus (rAd5) vaccines hold the promise to prevent HIV-1 infections. Intranasal vaccination not only stimulates systemic immunity but also elicits mucosal immunity that provides first defense for mucosally transmitted diseases like HIV-1. Adjuvants such as TLR agonists are usually codelivered with antigens to enhance the immunogenicity of vaccines. Here, we present a rAd5 vaccine delivery system using DEG-PEI as the carrier. Adenovirus encoding HIV gag was used as antigen, and was complexed with DEG-PEI polymer via electrostatic interaction. A novel synthetic TLR-4 agonist, RS09, was either chemically linked with DEG-PEI (DP-RS09) or physically mixed with it(DP/RS09) to enhance the immunogenticity of rAd5 vaccine. After intranasal immunization, the systemic antigen-specific immune responses and cytotoxicity T lymphocytes responses induced by DP-RS09-rAd5 and DP/RS09-rAd5 were analyzed. The mucosal secretory IgA level was detected in both nasal and vaginal washes to determine the mucosal immunity. Furthermore, cytokine productions on RAW264.7 cells were tested after preincubation with TLR-4 pathway inhibitors. The results indicated that DEG-PEI could facilitate the intranasal delivery of rAd5 vaccine. Both chemically linked (DP-RS09) and physically mixed RS09 (DP/RS09) could further enhance the mucosal immunity of rAd5 vaccine via TLR-4 pathway. This RS09 adjuvanted DEG-PEI polymer represents a potential intranasal vaccine delivery system and may have a wider application for other viral vectors. PMID:26824411

  7. Antiviral agents and HIV prevention: controversies, conflicts, and consensus

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Myron S.; Muessig, Kathryn E.; Smith, M. Kumi; Powers, Kimberly A.; Kashuba, Angela D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Antiviral agents can be used to prevent HIV transmission before exposure as preexpo-sure prophylaxis (PrEP), after exposure as postexposure prophylaxis, and as treatment of infected people for secondary prevention. Considerable research has shed new light on antiviral agents for PrEP and for prevention of secondary HIV transmission. While promising results have emerged from several PrEP trials, the challenges of poor adherence among HIV-negative clients and possible increase in sexual risk behaviors remain a concern. In addition, a broader pipeline of antiviral agents for PrEP that focuses on genital tract pharmacology and safety and resistance issues must be developed. Antiretroviral drugs have also been used to prevent HIV transmission from HIV-infected patients to their HIV-discordant sexual partners. The HIV Prevention Trials Network 052 trial demonstrated nearly complete prevention of HIV transmission by early treatment of infection, but the generalizability of the results to other risk groups – including intravenous drug users and MSM – has not been determined. Most importantly, the best strategy for use of antiretroviral agents to reduce the spread of HIV at either the individual level or the population level has not been developed, and remains the ultimate goal of this area of investigation. PMID:22507927

  8. Immunogenicity and sustainability of the immune response in Brazilian HIV-1-infected individuals vaccinated with inactivated triple influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Souza, Thiago Moreno L; Santini-Oliveira, Marilia; Martorelli, Andressa; Luz, Paula M; Vasconcellos, Mauricio T L; Giacoia-Gripp, Carmem B W; Morgado, Mariza; Nunes, Estevão P; Lemos, Alberto S; Ferreira, Ana C G; Moreira, Ronaldo I; Veloso, Valdiléa G; Siqueira, Marilda; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Camacho, Luiz A B

    2016-03-01

    HIV-infected individuals have a higher risk of serious illnesses following infection by infection with influenza. Although anti-influenza vaccination is recommended, immunosuppression may limit their response to active immunization. We followed-up a cohort of HIV-infected individuals vaccinated against influenza to assess the immunogenicity and sustainability of the immune response to vaccination. Individuals were vaccinated 2011 with inactivated triple influenza vaccine (TIV), and they had received in 2010 the monovalent anti-A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine. The sustainability of the immune response to A(H1N1)pdm09 at 12 months after monovalent vaccination fell, both in individuals given two single or two double doses. For these individuals, A(H1N1)pdm09 component from TIV acted as a booster, raising around 40% the number of seroprotected individuals. Almost 70% of the HIV-infected individuals were already seroprotected to A/H3N2 at baseline. Again, TIV boosted over 90% the seroprotection to A/H3N2. Anti-A/H3N2 titers dropped by 20% at 6 months after vaccination. Pre-vaccination seroprotection rate to influenza B (victoria lineage) was the lowest among those tested, seroconversion rates were higher after vaccination. Seroconversion/protection after TIV vaccination did not differ significantly across categories of clinical and demographic variables. Anti-influenza responses in Brazilian HIV-infected individuals reflected both the previous history of virus circulation in Brazil and vaccination. J. Med. Virol. 88:426-436, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26267817

  9. Pneumonia Can Be Prevented -- Vaccines Can Help

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Pneumonia Can Be Prevented—Vaccines Can Help Language: English ... of an adult patient with pneumonia. What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs that ...

  10. Multiple Approaches for Increasing the Immunogenicity of an Epitope-Based Anti-HIV Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Daniela Santoro; Ribeiro, Susan Pereira; Fonseca, Simone Gonçalves; Almeida, Rafael Ribeiro; Santana, Vinicius Canato; Apostólico, Juliana de Souza; Kalil, Jorge; Cunha-Neto, Edecio

    2015-11-01

    The development of a highly effective vaccine against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) will likely be based on rational vaccine design, since traditional vaccine approaches have failed so far. In recent years, an understanding of what type of immune response is protective against infection and/or disease facilitated vaccine design. T cell-based vaccines against HIV have the goal of limiting both transmission and disease progression by inducing broad and functionally relevant T cell responses. In this context, CD4(+) T cells play a direct cytotoxic role and are also important for the generation and maintenance of functional CD8(+) T and B cell responses. The use of MHC-binding algorithms has allowed the identification of novel CD4(+) T cell epitopes that could be used in vaccine design, the so-called epitope-driven vaccine design. Epitope-based vaccines have the ability to focus the immune response on highly antigenic, conserved epitopes that are fully recognized by the target population. We have recently mapped a set of conserved multiple HLA-DR-binding HIV-1 CD4 epitopes and observed interferon (IFN)-γ-producing CD4(+) T cells when we tested these peptides in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HIV-infected individuals. We then designed multiepitopic DNA vaccines that induced broad and polyfunctional T cell responses in immunized mice. In this review we will focus on alternative strategies to increase the immunogenicity of an epitope-based vaccine against HIV infection. PMID:26149745

  11. Short communication: rapid preparation of preventive and therapeutic whole-killed retroviral vaccines using the microbicide taurine chloramine.

    PubMed

    Dudani, A K; Martyres, A; Fliss, H

    2008-04-01

    A current urgent priority is to develop microbicides and vaccines to combat retroviruses like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We show that the cysteine-selective natural compound, taurine chloramine (T-NCl), can be effective in this task. A number of proteins in all retroviruses contain highly conserved cysteine-rich regions that are essential for infection and replication. Our data show that by targeting these essential cysteine residues, T-NCl (2 or 5 mM) acts as a highly effective and safe microbicide that fully blocks the infectivity of high HIV-1 titers (10(6) TCID(50) units/ml) but is not injurious to eukaryotic cells. We also demonstrate that T-NCl can be used to prepare a highly effective whole-killed vaccine against murine AIDS (MAIDS) that shows both preventive and therapeutic efficacy. The vaccine consists of a T-NCl-inactivated retrovirus suspension in host cell lysate. The novelty of our approach lies in the ease and speed of vaccine preparation and its avoidance of harsh inactivation or purification steps that can alter native viral conformation. Our approach is therefore likely to overcome a number of intractable obstacles to the preparation of an effective whole-killed HIV vaccine, such as surviving infective viral particles, rapid viral mutation rates, numerous viral strains, and harsh purification steps. Our approach may also permit the rapid preparation of autologous, or custom-made, vaccines for individual patients. PMID:18366297

  12. The economics of HIV prevention strategies in NSW.

    PubMed

    Hales, James R

    2010-01-01

    HIV in Australia was first diagnosed in NSW in the early 1980s, and has had a significant effect on public health. The NSW Government commenced its investment in HIV/AIDS in 1984 and the investment now encompasses research, primary and secondary prevention, and care, treatment and support for people living with HIV/AIDS. A recent study examined the historical impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and projected its future impact in NSW. The analysis indicates that the NSW HIV/AIDS investment program has been highly effective in reducing HIV transmission, and has also been cost effective in: avoiding future health-care costs; life years saved; and quality of life benefits. The analysis also indicates that any scaling back of prevention initiatives would result in an increase in the number of people living with HIV. PMID:20513302

  13. Frontiers of occupational health. New vaccines, new prophylactic regimens, and management of the HIV-infected worker.

    PubMed

    Beekmann, S E; Doebbeling, B N

    1997-06-01

    New prophylactic or treatment options are available for a number of infectious diseases that may be transmitted in the health care setting. Infectious diseases that can now be prevented by vaccination of the employee include hepatitis A, pertussis, hepatitis B, and primary varicella. New prophylactic or treatment regimens are available for Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Bordetella pertussis; treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is also discussed. Finally, management of the HIV-infected health care worker is reviewed. PMID:9187949

  14. Induction of HIV-1-specific immunity after vaccination with apoptotic HIV-1/murine leukemia virus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Spetz, Anna-Lena; Sörensen, Anna Smed; Walther-Jallow, Lilian; Wahren, Britta; Andersson, Jan; Holmgren, Lars; Hinkula, Jorma

    2002-11-15

    Ag-presenting dendritic cells present viral Ags to T cells after uptake of apoptotic bodies derived from virus-infected cells in vitro. However, it is unclear whether apoptotic virus-infected cells are capable of generating immunity in vivo. In this study, we show that inoculation of mice with apoptotic HIV-1/murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-infected cells induces HIV-1-specific immunity. Immunization with apoptotic HIV-1/MuLV-infected syngeneic splenocytes resulted in strong Nef-specific CD8(+) T cell proliferation and p24-induced CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell proliferation as well as IFN-gamma production. In addition, systemic IgG and IgA as well as mucosa-associated IgA responses were generated. Moreover, mice vaccinated with apoptotic HIV-1/MuLV cells were protected against challenge with live HIV-1/MuLV-infected cells, whereas mice vaccinated with apoptotic noninfected or MuLV-infected splenocytes remained susceptible to HIV-1/MuLV. These data show that i.p. immunization with apoptotic HIV-1-infected cells induces high levels of HIV-1-specific systemic immunity, primes for mucosal immunity, and induces protection against challenge with live HIV-1-infected cells in mice. These findings may have implications for the development of therapeutic and prophylactic HIV-1 vaccines. PMID:12421957

  15. Pregnancy Incidence and Correlates during the HVTN 503 Phambili HIV Vaccine Trial Conducted among South African Women

    PubMed Central

    Latka, Mary H.; Fielding, Katherine; Gray, Glenda E.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Nchabeleng, Maphoshane; Mlisana, Koleka; Nielson, Tanya; Roux, Surita; Mkhize, Baningi; Mathebula, Matsontso; Naicker, Nivashnee; de Bruyn, Guy; Kublin, James; Churchyard, Gavin J.

    2012-01-01

    Background HIV prevention trials are increasingly being conducted in sub-Saharan Africa. Women at risk for HIV are also at risk of pregnancy. To maximize safety, women agree to avoid pregnancy during trials, yet pregnancies occur. Using data from the HVTN 503/“Phambili” vaccine trial, we report pregnancy incidence during and after the vaccination period and identify factors, measured at screening, associated with incident pregnancy. Methods To enrol in the trial, women agreed and were supported to avoid pregnancy until 1 month after their third and final vaccination (“vaccination period”), corresponding to the first 7 months of follow-up. Unsterilized women, pooled across study arms, were analyzed. Poisson regression compared pregnancy rates during and after the vaccination period. Cox proportional hazards regression identified associations with first pregnancy. Results Among 352 women (median age 23 yrs; median follow-up 1.5 yrs), pregnancy incidence was 9.6/100 women-years overall and 6.8/100 w-yrs and 11.3/100 w-yrs during and after the vaccination period, respectively [Rate Ratio = 0.60 (0.32–1.14), p = 0.10]. In multivariable analysis, pregnancy was reduced among women who: enrolled at sites providing contraception on-site [HR = 0.43, 95% CI (0.22–0.86)]; entered the trial as injectable contraceptive users [HR = 0.37 (0.21–0.67)] or as consistent condom users (trend) [HR = 0.54 (0.28–1.04)]. Compared with women with a single partner of HIV-unknown status, pregnancy rates were increased among women with: a single partner whose status was HIV-negative [HR = 2.34(1.16–4.73)] and; 2 partners both of HIV-unknown status [HR = 4.42(1.59–12.29)]. Women with 2 more of these risk factors: marijuana use, heavy drinking, or use of either during sex, had increased pregnancy incidence [HR = 2.66 (1.24–5.72)]. Conclusions It is possible to screen South African women for pregnancy risk at trial entry. Providing injectable contraception for free on-site and supporting consistent condom use may reduce incident pregnancy. Screening should determine the substance use, partnering, and HIV status of both members of the couple for both pregnancy and HIV prevention. Trial Registration SA National Health Research Database DOH-27-0207-1539; Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00413725 PMID:22532824

  16. Getting to zero the biomedical way in Africa: outcomes of deliberation at the 2013 Biomedical HIV Prevention Forum in Abuja, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Over the last few decades, biomedical HIV prevention research had engaged multiple African stakeholders. There have however been few platforms to enable regional stakeholders to engage with one another. In partnership with the World AIDS Campaign International, the Institute of Public Health of Obafemi Awolowo University, and the National Agency for the Control of AIDS in Nigeria, the New HIV Vaccine and Microbicide Advocacy Society hosted a forum on biomedical HIV prevention research in Africa. Stakeholders’ present explored evidences related to biomedical HIV prevention research and development in Africa, and made recommendations to inform policy, guidelines and future research agenda. Discussion The BHPF hosted 342 participants. Topics discussed included the use of antiretrovirals for HIV prevention, considerations for biomedical HIV prevention among key populations; HIV vaccine development; HIV cure; community and civil society engagement; and ethical considerations in implementation of biomedical HIV prevention research. Participants identified challenges for implementation of proven efficacious interventions and discovery of other new prevention options for Africa. Concerns raised included limited funding by African governments, lack of cohesive advocacy and policy agenda for biomedical HIV prevention research and development by Africa, varied ethical practices, and limited support to communities’ capacity to actively engaged with clinical trial conducts. Participants recommended that the African Government implement the Abuja +12 declaration; the civil society build stronger partnerships with diverse stakeholders, and develop a coherent advocacy agenda that also enhances community research literacy; and researchers and sponsors of trials on the African continent establish a process for determining appropriate standards for trial conduct on the continent. Conclusion By highlighting key considerations for biomedical HIV prevention research and development in Africa, the forum has helped identify key advocacy issues that Civil Society can expend efforts on so as to strengthen support for future biomedical HIV prevention research on the continent. PMID:26636825

  17. Getting PrEPared for HIV Prevention Navigation: Young Black Gay Men Talk About HIV Prevention in the Biomedical Era.

    PubMed

    Mutchler, Matt G; McDavitt, Bryce; Ghani, Mansur A; Nogg, Kelsey; Winder, Terrell J A; Soto, Juliana K

    2015-09-01

    Biomedical HIV prevention strategies, such as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), represent new opportunities to reduce critically high HIV infection rates among young black men who have sex with men (YBMSM). We report results of 24 dyadic qualitative interviews (N=48), conducted in Los Angeles, CA, exploring how YBMSM and their friends view PrEP and PEP. Interviews were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Participants had widely divergent levels of knowledge about these prevention methods. Misconceptions and mistrust regarding PrEP were common, and concerns were expressed about PrEP-related stigma and the potential for gossip among peers who might assume a person on PrEP was HIV-positive. Yet participants also framed PrEP and PEP as valuable new options within an expanded "tool kit" of HIV prevention strategies that created possibilities for preventing new HIV infections, dating men with a different HIV status, and decreased anxiety about exposure to HIV. We organized themes around four main areas: (1) information and misinformation about biomedical HIV prevention; (2) expectations about PrEP, sexual behavior, and stigma; (3) gossip, disclosure, and "spreading the word" about PrEP and PEP; and (4) the roles of PrEP and PEP in an expanded HIV prevention tool kit. The findings suggest a need for guidance in navigating the increasingly complex array of HIV-prevention options available to YBMSM. Such "prevention navigation" could counter misconceptions and address barriers, such as stigma and mistrust, while helping YBMSM make informed selections from among expanded HIV prevention options. PMID:26121564

  18. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-14

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth of IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research.

  19. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-14

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth ofmore » IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research.« less

  20. [Vaccines and preventive activities in patients with inflammatory arthritis].

    PubMed

    Casals-Sánchez, J L; Casals Vázquez, C; Vázquez Sánchez, M Á; Giménez Basallote, S

    2013-10-01

    Patients with inflammatory arthritis and eligible for immunosuppressive therapy account for more than 1% of general population, and represents a significant workload on family doctors. They are prone to other comorbidities, with an increased cardiovascular risk and a higher incidence of infections than the general population, especially skin infections and pneumonitis. This comorbidity can be considered vulnerable to a prevention program-prevention of cardiovascular risk, cancer screening, vaccination schedule for adults. As for prevention through vaccination, importance should be given to pneumococcal infection - significant in adults aged 50 or over, especially amongst immunosuppressed patients. The 13-valent conjugate vaccine, which has been recently approved for adults, must be considered. An attempt has been made to write a simple, applicable document on preventive measures that should be implemented both at primary and secondary care level for those adults. PMID:24095166

  1. Recent advances in research of HIV infection: implications of viral and host genetics on treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Haaland, R E; Johnson, J A; Tang, J

    2013-01-01

    The genetic diversity among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) subtypes as well as the variability of viral sequences found in HIV-infected individuals presents a number of difficult obstacles for the development of universally effective HIV treatment and prevention methods. Here, we present a brief summary of recent developments in the analysis of viral genetics and human genomics to provide insight into future methods for HIV treatment and prevention. Recent studies have mined viral sequences found in newly infected individuals to identify common features of all transmitted viruses that could provide potential targets for HIV vaccine development. Analysis of human immunogenetics has identified specific alleles associated with reduced virus loads in HIV-infected individuals providing valuable information that may influence individual responses to treatment and prevention methods. Increased sensitivity of antiretroviral drug resistance testing has improved the detection of hidden drug resistant virus but also highlighted the potential for drug resistant viruses to reduce the effectiveness of clinical treatment regimens. The rapidly expanding amount of data generated by studies of viral genetics and human immunogenetics will provide valuable information to guide the design of new strategies to improve clinical treatment and enhance HIV vaccine development. PMID:23548715

  2. The Future of HIV Prevention: STI control and Circumcision Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Prevention and control of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) has proven effective in reducing HIV infection when treatment is available promptly for symptomatic persons in conditions of an emerging infection. Biologically, it is assumed that reduced genital tract inflammation reduces infectiousness for HIV as well as reducing susceptibility in HIV-uninfected persons. Other strategies may not work however, such as periodic mass chemotherapy for STIs. Male circumcision has been demonstrated effective in reducing risk for HIV infection in three separate trials from South Africa, Kenya, and Uganda. Global expansion of STI treatment and male circumcision programs is a vital tool for control of HIV infection; current research priorities are presented. PMID:17502238

  3. Influence of HIV and HCV on T cell antigen presentation and challenges in the development of vaccines.

    PubMed

    John, Mina; Gaudieri, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Some of the central challenges for developing effective vaccines against HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are similar. Both infections are caused by small, highly mutable, rapidly replicating RNA viruses with the ability to establish long-term chronic pathogenic infection in human hosts. HIV has caused 60 million infections globally and HCV 180 million and both viruses may co-exist among certain populations by virtue of common blood-borne, sexual, or vertical transmission. Persistence of both pathogens is achieved by evasion of intrinsic, innate, and adaptive immune defenses but with some distinct mechanisms reflecting their differences in evolutionary history, replication characteristics, cell tropism, and visibility to mucosal versus systemic and hepatic immune responses. A potent and durable antibody and T cell response is a likely requirement of future HIV and HCV vaccines. Perhaps the single biggest difference between the two vaccine design challenges is that in HCV, a natural model of protective immunity can be found in those who resolve acute infection spontaneously. Such spontaneous resolvers exhibit durable and functional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses (Diepolder et al., 1995; Cooper et al., 1999; Thimme et al., 2001; Grakoui et al., 2003; Lauer et al., 2004; Schulze Zur Wiesch et al., 2012). However, frequent re-infection suggests partial or lack of protective immunity against heterologous HCV strains, possibly indicative of the degree of genetic diversity of circulating HCV genotypes and subtypes. There is no natural model of protective immunity in HIV, however, studies of "elite controllers," or individuals who have durably suppressed levels of plasma HIV RNA without antiretroviral therapy, has provided the strongest evidence for CD8(+) T cell responses in controlling viremia and limiting reservoir burden in established infection. Here we compare and contrast the specific mechanisms of immune evasion used by HIV and HCV, which subvert adaptive human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-restricted T cell immunity in natural infection, and the challenges these pose for designing effective preventative or therapeutic vaccines. PMID:25352836

  4. Partnering for Care in HIV Prevention Trials

    PubMed Central

    MacQueen, Kathleen M.; McLoughlin, Kerry; Alleman, Patty; Burke, Holly McClain; Mack, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative Case Studies Were conducted at seven international sites conducting HIV prevention research in Africa, Asia, and the Americas to identify strategies for ensuring that health needs of research participants identified in the course of research are adequately addressed. Key factors were identified that contribute to the balance between direct care and healthcare referrals at a research site, as well as the overall quality of the healthcare made available to research participants. The case studies exemplify the concept of “moral negotiation” in research (Weijer & LeBlanc, 2006), that is, a process where researchers and sponsors negotiate with increasingly empowered local communities and host countries to achieve meaningful and substantive benefits from biomedical research for all stakeholders. PMID:19385753

  5. Epidemiology of HIV-1 infection in agricultural plantation residents in Kericho, Kenya: preparation for vaccine feasibility studies.

    PubMed

    Sateren, Warren B; Foglia, Ginamarie; Renzullo, Philip O; Elson, Lynne; Wasunna, Monique; Bautista, Christian T; Birx, Deborah L

    2006-09-01

    A cross-sectional study was performed to determine the prevalence and risk factors for HIV-1 infection among agricultural plantation residents in Kericho, Kenya. Volunteers were recruited, interviewed, and phlebotomized for HIV-1 serologic testing. Sex-specific adjusted odds ratios were estimated using logistic regression. The overall HIV-1 prevalence was 9.9% (81/820), with prevalence in women more than twice that in men (17.4% vs 8.0%, P=0.001). Among men, elevated HIV-1 prevalence was seen with increasing age, peaking in those older than 30 years (10.3%), marriage (10.4%), Luo tribe affiliation (23.5%), employment (8.9%), travel (11.0%), and being uncircumcised (29.2%). Among women, elevated HIV-1 prevalence was seen in those with no formal education (36.8%) and those who received goods in exchange for sex (36.0%). More than 97% of volunteers expressed a willingness to participate in future HIV-1 studies requiring semiannual visits. HIV prevention efforts have been implemented, along with further research to characterize this population for future cohort feasibility studies and HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trials. PMID:16885773

  6. New South Wales annual vaccine-preventable disease report, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Rosewell, Alexander; Spokes, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Aim To describe the epidemiology of selected vaccine-preventable diseases in New South Wales, Australia for 2013. Methods Data from the New South Wales Notifiable Conditions Information Management System were analysed by local health district of residence, age, Aboriginality, vaccination status and organism. Risk factor and vaccination status data were collected by public health units. Results Pertussis notification rates in infants were low, and no infant pertussis deaths were reported. Despite a high number of imported measles cases, there was limited secondary transmission. The invasive meningococcal disease notification rate declined, and disease due to serogroup C remained low and stable. Conclusion Vaccine-preventable diseases were relatively well controlled in New South Wales in 2013, with declining or stable notification rates in most diseases compared with the previous year. PMID:26306215

  7. Pneumococcal vaccination among HIV-infected adult patients in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuan-Yeh; Tsai, Mao-Song; Kuo, Kuang-Che; Tsai, Jen-Chih; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Cheng, Aristine C; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2014-01-01

    HIV-infected patients remain at higher risk for pneumococcal disease than the general population despite immune reconstitution and suppression of HIV replication with combination antiretroviral therapy. Vaccination with 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) composed of T-cell-independent antigens has been recommended to reduce the risk of pneumococcal disease in HIV-infected adults. However, given the heterogeneity of study design, execution and subjects enrolled, studies examining serological responses to PPV23 yielded conflicting results and observational studies of clinical effectiveness only provided moderate evidence to support the routine use of PPV23 in HIV-infected adults. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), with conjugation of the capsular polysaccharide to a protein carrier, is more immunogenic than PPV23 and has been demonstrated to protect against pneumococcal disease in HIV-infected children and recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in HIV-infected adolescents and adults. Guidelines have recently been revised to recommend that HIV-infected patients aged 19 y or older receive one dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) followed by a booster vaccination with PPV23. In this paper, we review the studies using different vaccination strategies to improve immunogenicity among HIV-infected adult patients. PMID:25483681

  8. HIV prevention and low-income Chilean women: machismo, marianismo and HIV misconceptions.

    PubMed

    Cianelli, Rosina; Ferrer, Lilian; McElmurry, Beverly J

    2008-04-01

    Socio-cultural factors and HIV-related misinformation contribute to the increasing number of Chilean women living with HIV. In spite of this, and to date, few culturally specific prevention activities have been developed for this population. The goal of the present study was to elicit the perspectives of low-income Chilean women regarding HIV and relevant socio-cultural factors, as a forerunner to the development of a culturally appropriate intervention. As part of a mixed-methods study, fifty low-income Chilean women participated in a survey and twenty were selected to participate in prevention, in-depth interviews. Results show evidence of widespread misinformation and misconceptions related to HIV/AIDS. Machismo and marianismo offer major barriers to prevention programme development. Future HIV prevention should stress partner communication, empowerment and improving the education of women vulnerable to HIV. PMID:18432428

  9. Adherence to hepatitis A virus vaccination in HIV-infected men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Kourkounti, Sofia; Paparizos, Vassilios; Leuow, Kirsten; Paparizou, Eleni; Antoniou, Christina

    2015-10-01

    Although vaccination against hepatitis A virus (HAV) is essential for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, the uptake of HAV vaccine is reported to be very low. From 2007 to 2012, 912 HIV-infected men in Athens, Greece were screened for exposure to HAV. Two doses of an HAV vaccine were recommended to 569 eligible patients. Reminder cards with scheduled vaccination visits were given to each patient. Among eligible patients, 62.2% (354/569) received both doses. Patients who were fully vaccinated compared with non-adherent patients were natives, older, had undetectable HIV viral load, higher CD4 T cell counts and lower nadir CD4 T cell counts. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that the patient's country of origin (p = 0.024; OR = 2.712; 95% CI, 1.139-6.457), CD4 T cell count (p < 0.001) and nadir CD4 T cell count (p < 0.001) were factors directly associated with adherence. In conclusion, adherence to HAV vaccination was better than in previously published data. Because many of the factors related to vaccination completion are parameters of HIV infection, it appears that physician interest in HIV care and vaccination planning is crucial to enhancing vaccine uptake. PMID:25411352

  10. The immunological underpinnings of vaccinations to prevent cytomegalovirus disease.

    PubMed

    McCormick, A Louise; Mocarski, Edward S

    2015-03-01

    A universal cytomegalovirus (CMV) vaccination promises to reduce the burden of the developmental damage that afflicts up to 0.5% of live births worldwide. An effective vaccination that prevents transplacental transmission would reduce CMV congenital disease and CMV-associated still births and leave populations less susceptible to opportunistic CMV disease. Thus, a vaccination against this virus has long been recognized for the potential of enormous health-care savings because congenital damage is life-long and existing anti-viral options are limited. Vaccine researchers, industry leaders, and regulatory representatives have discussed the challenges posed by clinical efficacy trials that would lead to a universal CMV vaccine, reviewing the links between infection and disease, and identifying settings where disrupting viral transmission might provide a surrogate endpoint for disease prevention. Reducing the complexity of such trials would facilitate vaccine development. Children and adolescents are the targets for universal vaccination, with the expectation of protecting the offspring of immunized women. Given that a majority of females worldwide experience CMV infection during childhood, a universal vaccine must boost natural immunity and reduce transmission due to reactivation and re-infection as well as primary infection during pregnancy. Although current vaccine strategies recognize the value of humoral and cellular immunity, the precise mechanisms that act at the placental interface remain elusive. Immunity resulting from natural infection appears to limit rather than prevent reactivation of latent viruses and susceptibility to re-infection, leaving a challenge for universal vaccination to improve upon natural immunity levels. Despite these hurdles, early phase clinical trials have achieved primary end points in CMV seronegative subjects. Efficacy studies must be expanded to mixed populations of CMV-naive and naturally infected subjects to understand the overall efficacy and potential. Together with CMV vaccine candidates currently in clinical development, additional promising preclinical strategies continue to come forward; however, these face limitations due to the insufficient understanding of host defense mechanisms that prevent transmission, as well as the age-old challenges of reaching the appropriate threshold of immunogenicity, efficacy, durability and potency. This review focuses on the current understanding of natural and CMV vaccine-induced protective immunity. PMID:25544503

  11. Enhanced Estimates of the Influenza Vaccination Effect in Preventing Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Castilla, Jesús; Guevara, Marcela; Martínez-Baz, Iván; Ezpeleta, Carmen; Delfrade, Josu; Irisarri, Fátima; Moreno-Iribas, Conchi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mortality is a major end-point in the evaluation of influenza vaccine effectiveness. However, this effect is not well known, since most previous studies failed to show good control of biases. We aimed to estimate the effectiveness of influenza vaccination in preventing all-cause mortality in community-dwelling seniors. Since 2009, a population-based cohort study using healthcare databases has been conducted in Navarra, Spain. In 2 late influenza seasons, 2011/2012 and 2012/2013, all-cause mortality in the period January to May was compared between seniors (65 years or over) who received the trivalent influenza vaccine and those who were unvaccinated, adjusting for demographics, major chronic conditions, dependence, previous hospitalization, and pneumococcal vaccination. The cohort included 103,156 seniors in the 2011/2012 season and 105,140 in the 2012/2013 season (58% vaccinated). Seniors vaccinated in the previous season who discontinued vaccination (6% of the total) had excess mortality and were excluded to prevent frailty bias. The final analysis included 80,730 person-years and 2778 deaths. Vaccinated seniors had 16% less all-cause mortality than those unvaccinated (adjusted rate ratio [RR] = 0.84; 95% confidence interval 0.76–0.93). This association disappeared in the post-influenza period (adjusted RR = 0.96; 95% confidence interval 0.85–1.09). A similar comparison did not find an association in January to May of the 2009/2010 pandemic season (adjusted RR = 0.98; 95% confidence interval 0.84–1.14), when no effect of the seasonal vaccine was expected. On average, 1 death was prevented for every 328 seniors vaccinated: 1 for every 649 in the 65 to 74 year age group and 1 for every 251 among those aged 75 and over. These results suggest a moderate preventive effect and a high potential impact of the seasonal influenza vaccine against all-cause mortality. This reinforces the recommendation of annual influenza vaccination in seniors. PMID:26222861

  12. The immunological underpinnings of vaccinations to prevent cytomegalovirus disease

    PubMed Central

    Louise McCormick, A.; Mocarski, Edward S.

    2015-01-01

    A universal cytomegalovirus (CMV) vaccination promises to reduce the burden of the developmental damage that afflicts up to 0.5% of live births worldwide. An effective vaccination that prevents transplacental transmission would reduce CMV congenital disease and CMV-associated still births and leave populations less susceptible to opportunistic CMV disease. Thus, a vaccination against this virus has long been recognized for the potential of enormous health-care savings because congenital damage is life-long and existing anti-viral options are limited. Vaccine researchers, industry leaders, and regulatory representatives have discussed the challenges posed by clinical efficacy trials that would lead to a universal CMV vaccine, reviewing the links between infection and disease, and identifying settings where disrupting viral transmission might provide a surrogate endpoint for disease prevention. Reducing the complexity of such trials would facilitate vaccine development. Children and adolescents are the targets for universal vaccination, with the expectation of protecting the offspring of immunized women. Given that a majority of females worldwide experience CMV infection during childhood, a universal vaccine must boost natural immunity and reduce transmission due to reactivation and re-infection as well as primary infection during pregnancy. Although current vaccine strategies recognize the value of humoral and cellular immunity, the precise mechanisms that act at the placental interface remain elusive. Immunity resulting from natural infection appears to limit rather than prevent reactivation of latent viruses and susceptibility to re-infection, leaving a challenge for universal vaccination to improve upon natural immunity levels. Despite these hurdles, early phase clinical trials have achieved primary end points in CMV seronegative subjects. Efficacy studies must be expanded to mixed populations of CMV-naive and naturally infected subjects to understand the overall efficacy and potential. Together with CMV vaccine candidates currently in clinical development, additional promising preclinical strategies continue to come forward; however, these face limitations due to the insufficient understanding of host defense mechanisms that prevent transmission, as well as the age-old challenges of reaching the appropriate threshold of immunogenicity, efficacy, durability and potency. This review focuses on the current understanding of natural and CMV vaccine-induced protective immunity. PMID:25544503

  13. Dissecting Polyclonal Vaccine-Induced Humoral Immunity against HIV Using Systems Serology.

    PubMed

    Chung, Amy W; Kumar, Manu P; Arnold, Kelly B; Yu, Wen Han; Schoen, Matthew K; Dunphy, Laura J; Suscovich, Todd J; Frahm, Nicole; Linde, Caitlyn; Mahan, Alison E; Hoffner, Michelle; Streeck, Hendrik; Ackerman, Margaret E; McElrath, M Juliana; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Pau, Maria G; Baden, Lindsey R; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Barouch, Dan H; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Alter, Galit

    2015-11-01

    While antibody titers and neutralization are considered the gold standard for the selection of successful vaccines, these parameters are often inadequate predictors of protective immunity. As antibodies mediate an array of extra-neutralizing Fc functions, when neutralization fails to predict protection, investigating Fc-mediated activity may help identify immunological correlates and mechanism(s) of humoral protection. Here, we used an integrative approach termed Systems Serology to analyze relationships among humoral responses elicited in four HIV vaccine trials. Each vaccine regimen induced a unique humoral "Fc fingerprint." Moreover, analysis of case:control data from the first moderately protective HIV vaccine trial, RV144, pointed to mechanistic insights into immune complex composition that may underlie protective immunity to HIV. Thus, multi-dimensional relational comparisons of vaccine humoral fingerprints offer a unique approach for the evaluation and design of novel vaccines against pathogens for which correlates of protection remain elusive. PMID:26544943

  14. Protective Efficacy of a Global HIV-1 Mosaic Vaccine Against Heterologous SHIV Challenges in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Barouch, Dan H.; Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Borducchi, Erica N.; Smith, Kaitlin; Stanley, Kelly; McNally, Anna G.; Liu, Jinyan; Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Seaman, Michael S.; Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Alter, Galit; Ferguson, Melissa; Li, Wenjun; Earl, Patricia L.; Moss, Bernard; Giorgi, Elena E.; Szinger, James J.; Eller, Leigh Anne; Billings, Erik A.; Rao, Mangala; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Weijtens, Mo; Pau, Maria G.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Robb, Merlin L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Korber, Bette T.; Michael, Nelson L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The global diversity of HIV-1 represents a critical challenge facing HIV-1 vaccine development. HIV-1 mosaic antigens are bioinformatically optimized immunogens designed for improved coverage of HIV-1 diversity. However, the protective efficacy of global HIV-1 vaccine antigens has not previously been evaluated. Here we demonstrate the capacity of bivalent HIV-1 mosaic antigens to protect rhesus monkeys against acquisition of heterologous challenges with the difficult-to-neutralize simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV-SF162P3. Adenovirus/poxvirus and adenovirus/adenovirus vector-based vaccines expressing HIV-1 mosaic Env, Gag, and Pol afforded a significant reduction in the per-exposure acquisition risk following repetitive, intrarectal SHIV-SF162P3 challenges. Protection against acquisition of infection was correlated with vaccine-elicited binding, neutralizing, and functional non-neutralizing antibodies. These data demonstrate the protective efficacy of HIV-1 mosaic antigens and suggest a potential strategy towards the development of a global HIV-1 vaccine. Moreover, our findings suggest that the coordinated activity of multiple antibody functions may contribute to protection against difficult-to-neutralize viruses. PMID:24243013

  15. HIV Prevention Altruism and Sexual Risk Behavior in HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    O’Dell, Brennan L.; Rosser, B.R. Simon; Miner, Michael H.; Jacoby, Scott M.

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of men’s motivations to avoid risk behavior is needed to create efficacious HIV prevention programs for HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). This study investigates the relationship between sexual risk behavior and HIV prevention altruism, which is defined as the values, motivations, and practices of caretaking towards one’s sexual partners to prevent the transmission of HIV. In a sample of 637 HIV-positive MSM, HIV prevention altruism significantly protects against serodiscordant unprotected anal intercourse (SDUAI) in crude analysis, but not after adjustment for drug use and compulsive sexual behavior. HIV prevention altruism is also related to avoidance of anal sex, but is not related to serodisclosure to secondary partners. Lack of altruism appears related to sexual risk behavior in HIV-positive MSM, although other psychological and contextual factors play significant roles. The promotion of HIV prevention altruism may provide a formidable new direction for HIV prevention programs. PMID:17985229

  16. Overexpression of recombinant HIV-1 Subtype C Tat and Nef in a Salmonella vaccine vector.

    PubMed

    Chin'ombe, Nyasha; Lebeko, Maribanyana; Kgatle, Mankgopo

    2013-01-01

    Tat and Nef are very important regulatory proteins of HIV-1. They enhance viral replication and down-regulate expression of MHC Class I molecules, respectively. The antigens are now considered to be targets for HIV vaccine development. The expression of Tat and Nef in Salmonella vaccines has not previously been investigated. In this study, HIV-1 Subtype C tat and nef genes were cloned into an expression plasmid and their expression investigated in Salmonella. Very high-level expression of the two HIV-1 antigens was demonstrated in the recombinant Salmonella. The antigens were also successfully purified in bulk from the bacterium.Salmonella can therefore potentially be used to overexpress HIV-1 antigens and used as a possible delivery system in HIV-1 vaccine development. PMID:24498468

  17. New South Wales annual vaccine-preventable disease report, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Spokes, Paula; Gilmour, Robin

    2014-01-01

    We aim to describe the epidemiology of selected vaccine-preventable diseases in New South Wales (NSW) for 2012. Data from the NSW Notifiable Conditions Information Management System were analysed by: local health district of residence, age, Aboriginality, vaccination status and organism, where available. Risk factor and vaccination status data were collected by public health units for cases following notification under the NSW Public Health Act 2010. The largest outbreak of measles since 1998 was reported in 2012. Pacific Islander and Aboriginal people were at higher risk as were infants less than 12 months of age. Notifications of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children less than five years declined; however, the overall number of notifications for IPD increased. Mumps case notifications were also elevated. There were no Haemophilus influenzae type b case notifications in children less than five years of age for the first time since the vaccine was introduced. Invasive meningococcal disease case notifications were at their lowest rates since case notification began in 1991. Case notification rates for other selected vaccine-preventable diseases remained stable. Vaccine-preventable disease control is continually strengthening in NSW with notable successes in invasive bacterial infections. However, strengthening measles immunization in Pacific Islander and Aboriginal communities remains essential to maintain measles elimination. PMID:25077033

  18. Telling stories of vaccine-preventable diseases: why it works.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Rachel M; Boom, Julie A

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the benefits of storytelling in health communication and, in particular, immunization education. During the mid-20th century polio epidemic, both personal stories and scientific information abounded in the media. However, as rates of vaccine-preventable diseases declined, narratives about the dangers of such diseases faded as did the public fear of them. Meanwhile, anti-vaccine advocates flooded the media and Internet with stories of injured children and tied those injuries, such as autism, to vaccines. Medical experts often counter anti-vaccine concerns with scientific information which can fail to persuade parents. Furthermore, evidence suggests that many people misunderstand quantitative information resulting in a misinterpretation of risk. Compared to scientific information, stories relate life lessons and values. They are effective because they are memorable and relatable. Evidence also suggests that storytelling can effectively improve health knowledge and behaviors. Inspired by In Harm's Way--True Stories of Uninsured Texas Children by the Children's Defense Fund and Faces of Influenza by the American Lung Association, we published Vaccine-Preventable Disease: The Forgotten Story, a collection of photographs and personal stories of families affected by vaccine-preventable diseases. We have found that the stories included in our booklet capture all the benefits of storytelling. Given the many benefits of storytelling, providers should strive to include stories along with medical facts in their daily practice. PMID:23444587

  19. New South Wales annual vaccine-preventable disease report, 2012.

    PubMed

    Rosewell, Alexander; Spokes, Paula; Gilmour, Robin

    2014-01-01

    We aim to describe the epidemiology of selected vaccine-preventable diseases in New South Wales (NSW) for 2012. Data from the NSW Notifiable Conditions Information Management System were analysed by: local health district of residence, age, Aboriginality, vaccination status and organism, where available. Risk factor and vaccination status data were collected by public health units for cases following notification under the NSW Public Health Act 2010. The largest outbreak of measles since 1998 was reported in 2012. Pacific Islander and Aboriginal people were at higher risk as were infants less than 12 months of age. Notifications of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children less than five years declined; however, the overall number of notifications for IPD increased. Mumps case notifications were also elevated. There were no Haemophilus influenzae type b case notifications in children less than five years of age for the first time since the vaccine was introduced. Invasive meningococcal disease case notifications were at their lowest rates since case notification began in 1991. Case notification rates for other selected vaccine-preventable diseases remained stable. Vaccine-preventable disease control is continually strengthening in NSW with notable successes in invasive bacterial infections. However, strengthening measles immunization in Pacific Islander and Aboriginal communities remains essential to maintain measles elimination. PMID:25077033

  20. The Use of Technology to Advance HIV Prevention for Couples.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jason W

    2015-12-01

    The majority of HIV prevention studies and programs have targeted individuals or operated at the community level. This has also been the standard approach when incorporating technology (e.g., web-based, smartphones) to help improve HIV prevention efforts. The tides have turned for both approaches: greater attention is now focusing on couple-based HIV prevention and using technology to help improve these efforts for maximizing reach and potential impact. To assess the extent that technology has been used to help advance HIV prevention with couples, a literature review was conducted using four databases and included studies that collected data from 2000 to early 2015. Results from this review suggest that technology has primarily been used to help advance HIV prevention with couples as a tool for (1) recruitment and data collection and (2) intervention development. Challenges and limitations of conducting research (e.g., validity of dyadic data) along with future directions for how technology (e.g., mHealth, wearable sensors) can be used to advance HIV prevention with couples are then discussed. Given the growing and near ubiquitous use of the Internet and smartphones, further efforts in the realm of mHealth (e.g., applications or "apps") and eHealth are needed to develop novel couple-focused HIV-preventive interventions. PMID:26412083

  1. Developing family interventions for adolescent HIV prevention in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Caroline; Atujuna, Millicent; Mathews, Catherine; Stein, Dan J; Hoare, Jacqueline; Beardslee, William; Operario, Don; Cluver, Lucie; K Brown, Larry

    2016-03-01

    Adolescents and young people account for 40% of all new HIV infections each year, with South Africa one of the hardest hit countries, and having the largest population of people living with HIV. Although adolescent HIV prevention has been delivered through diverse modalities in South Africa, and although family-based approaches for adolescent HIV prevention have great potential for highly affected settings such as South Africa, there is a scarcity of empirically tested family-based adolescent HIV preventive interventions in this setting. We therefore conducted focus groups and in-depth interviews with key informants including clinicians, researchers, and other individuals representing organizations providing HIV and related health services to adolescents and parents (N = 82). We explored family perspectives and interactions around topics such as communication about sex, HIV, and relationships. Participants described aspects of family interactions that presented both challenges and opportunities for family-based adolescent HIV prevention. Parent-child communication on sexual topics were taboo, with these conversations perceived by some adults as an invitation for children to engage in HIV risk behavior. Parents experienced social sanctions for discussing sex and adolescents who asked about sex were often viewed as disrespectful and needing discipline. However, participants also identified context-appropriate strategies for addressing family challenges around HIV prevention including family meetings, communal parenting, building efficacy around parent-adolescent communication around sexual topics, and the need to strengthen family bonding and positive parenting. Findings indicate the need for a family intervention and identify strategies for development of family-based interventions for adolescent HIV prevention. These findings will inform design of a family intervention to be tested in a randomized pilot trial (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT02432352). PMID:26916841

  2. Developing family interventions for adolescent HIV prevention in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Caroline; Atujuna, Millicent; Mathews, Catherine; Stein, Dan J.; Hoare, Jacqueline; Beardslee, William; Operario, Don; Cluver, Lucie; K. Brown, Larry

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adolescents and young people account for 40% of all new HIV infections each year, with South Africa one of the hardest hit countries, and having the largest population of people living with HIV. Although adolescent HIV prevention has been delivered through diverse modalities in South Africa, and although family-based approaches for adolescent HIV prevention have great potential for highly affected settings such as South Africa, there is a scarcity of empirically tested family-based adolescent HIV preventive interventions in this setting. We therefore conducted focus groups and in-depth interviews with key informants including clinicians, researchers, and other individuals representing organizations providing HIV and related health services to adolescents and parents (N = 82). We explored family perspectives and interactions around topics such as communication about sex, HIV, and relationships. Participants described aspects of family interactions that presented both challenges and opportunities for family-based adolescent HIV prevention. Parent–child communication on sexual topics were taboo, with these conversations perceived by some adults as an invitation for children to engage in HIV risk behavior. Parents experienced social sanctions for discussing sex and adolescents who asked about sex were often viewed as disrespectful and needing discipline. However, participants also identified context-appropriate strategies for addressing family challenges around HIV prevention including family meetings, communal parenting, building efficacy around parent–adolescent communication around sexual topics, and the need to strengthen family bonding and positive parenting. Findings indicate the need for a family intervention and identify strategies for development of family-based interventions for adolescent HIV prevention. These findings will inform design of a family intervention to be tested in a randomized pilot trial (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT02432352). PMID:26916841

  3. Achieving an HIV vaccine: the need for an accelerated national campaign.

    PubMed

    Marlink, R

    1997-11-01

    The development of an effective HIV vaccine has become a crucial national healthcare goal. To develop a worldwide AIDS vaccine, an international collaboration with developing countries is needed. The global approach rationale is threefold: millions of lives can be saved, a vaccine preparation can be tested more rapidly and economically among populations with high rates of infections; and the HIV epidemic comprises at least ten different subtypes. Although a number of barriers to the successful development of an HIV vaccine exist, the polio vaccine can be used as an example to show researchers how to overcome the obstacles. Jonas Salk, the polio vaccine developer, used killed whole virus in a technique that critics argued would not be fully effective. However, the Salk vaccine reduced polio-related paralysis by 72 percent, while the more effective Sabin oral vaccine did not become available until several years later. The lesson to be learned is that any percent of effectiveness is better than nothing, and researchers should not abandon uncertain HIV vaccine development efforts because they believe a better solution may develop in the future. The existence of traditional research should not preclude the development of new solutions that might prove more effective. For example, in the case of polio, the March of Dimes campaign pushed both the Salk and Sabin vaccines despite the skepticism of many academic research groups. PMID:11364812

  4. Conceptualizing Community Mobilization for HIV Prevention: Implications for HIV Prevention Programming in the African Context

    PubMed Central

    Lippman, Sheri A.; Maman, Suzanne; MacPhail, Catherine; Twine, Rhian; Peacock, Dean; Kahn, Kathleen; Pettifor, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Community mobilizing strategies are essential to health promotion and uptake of HIV prevention. However, there has been little conceptual work conducted to establish the core components of community mobilization, which are needed to guide HIV prevention programming and evaluation. Objectives We aimed to identify the key domains of community mobilization (CM) essential to change health outcomes or behaviors, and to determine whether these hypothesized CM domains were relevant to a rural South African setting. Method We studied social movements and community capacity, empowerment and development literatures, assessing common elements needed to operationalize HIV programs at a community level. After synthesizing these elements into six essential CM domains, we explored the salience of these CM domains qualitatively, through analysis of 10 key informant in-depth-interviews and seven focus groups in three villages in Bushbuckridge. Results CM domains include: 1) shared concerns, 2) critical consciousness, 3) organizational structures/networks, 4) leadership (individual and/or institutional), 5) collective activities/actions, and 6) social cohesion. Qualitative data indicated that the proposed domains tapped into theoretically consistent constructs comprising aspects of CM processes. Some domains, extracted from largely Western theory, required little adaptation for the South African context; others translated less effortlessly. For example, critical consciousness to collectively question and resolve community challenges functioned as expected. However, organizations/networks, while essential, operated differently than originally hypothesized - not through formal organizations, but through diffuse family networks. Conclusions To date, few community mobilizing efforts in HIV prevention have clearly defined the meaning and domains of CM prior to intervention design. We distilled six CM domains from the literature; all were pertinent to mobilization in rural South Africa. While some adaptation of specific domains is required, they provide an extremely valuable organizational tool to guide CM programming and evaluation of critically needed mobilizing initiatives in Southern Africa. PMID:24147121

  5. Safety and Immunogenicity of a Recombinant Adenovirus Serotype 35-Vectored HIV-1 Vaccine in Adenovirus Serotype 5 Seronegative and Seropositive Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Jonathan D; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Frahm, Nicole; Morgan, Cecilia; Gilbert, Peter B; Kochar, Nidhi; DeRosa, Stephen C; Tomaras, Georgia D; Wagner, Theresa M; Baden, Lindsey R; Koblin, Beryl A; Rouphael, Nadine G; Kalams, Spyros A; Keefer, Michael C; Goepfert, Paul A; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E; Mayer, Kenneth H; Swann, Edith; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Graham, Barney S; McElrath, M Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Background Recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5)-vectored HIV-1 vaccines have not prevented HIV-1 infection or disease and pre-existing Ad5 neutralizing antibodies may limit the clinical utility of Ad5 vectors globally. Using a rare Ad serotype vector, such as Ad35, may circumvent these issues, but there are few data on the safety and immunogenicity of rAd35 directly compared to rAd5 following human vaccination. Methods HVTN 077 randomized 192 healthy, HIV-uninfected participants into one of four HIV-1 vaccine/placebo groups: rAd35/rAd5, DNA/rAd5, and DNA/rAd35 in Ad5-seronegative persons; and DNA/rAd35 in Ad5-seropositive persons. All vaccines encoded the HIV-1 EnvA antigen. Antibody and T-cell responses were measured 4 weeks post boost immunization. Results All vaccines were generally well tolerated and similarly immunogenic. As compared to rAd5, rAd35 was equally potent in boosting HIV-1-specific humoral and cellular immunity and responses were not significantly attenuated in those with baseline Ad5 seropositivity. Like DNA, rAd35 efficiently primed rAd5 boosting. All vaccine regimens tested elicited cross-clade antibody responses, including Env V1/V2-specific IgG responses. Conclusions Vaccine antigen delivery by rAd35 is well-tolerated and immunogenic as a prime to rAd5 immunization and as a boost to prior DNA immunization with the homologous insert. Further development of rAd35-vectored prime-boost vaccine regimens is warranted. PMID:26587311

  6. Conjugate and polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccines do not improve initial response of the polysaccharide vaccine in HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Peñaranda, Maria; Payeras, Antoni; Cambra, Ana; Mila, Joan; Riera, Melcior

    2010-05-15

    This is a randomized trial to compare the immunoglobulin G response and the antibody avidity after two pneumococcal vaccinations, conjugated pneumococcal vaccine (CPV) and polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPV) 4 weeks after vs. PPV alone in 202 HIV-infected adults. There were no differences in the two strategies, either in the percentage of immunoglobulin G two-fold increase for the CPV included serotypes or immunoglobulin G two-fold increase, reaching the level of 1 microg/ml except for serotype 23F (26% responded after conjugated pneumococcal vaccine + PPV vs. 14% after PPV). No avidity increases were seen in any strategy. PMID:20299956

  7. Scientific and regulatory challenges in evaluating clinical trial protocols for HIV-1/AIDS vaccines - A review from a regulatory perspective.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Rebecca L; Zhou, TieQun; Knezevic, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    Clinical development of prophylactic HIV/AIDS vaccines presents many scientific challenges that result in challenges for regulators reviewing clinical trial applications (CTAs). The World Health Organization (WHO) has the responsibility to provide technical support to these regulators. The search for an HIV/AIDS vaccine will only succeed through well-designed, -conducted and -controlled human efficacy studies reviewed and approved by regulators in countries worldwide, particularly in countries where the epidemic has hit hardest, such as in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. This review summarizes the current candidates in development and focuses on challenges regulators face when reviewing CTAs, such as the evolving landscape of "standard of prevention," trials in adolescents, adaptive trial designs, correlates of protection and their analysis, and access to successful vaccines. There are many unknowns in the field of HIV/AIDS vaccine development and often, there is not a clear right or wrong approach because of the scientific challenges described in this review. Consequently, regulators should not feel that decisions need be made in isolation, when there are many available international collaborative efforts and opportunities to seek expert advice. The WHO provides many such opportunities and support to regulators across the globe. PMID:26732973

  8. Is Sex Like Driving? HIV Prevention and Risk Compensation*

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Nicholas L.; Xiong, Wentao; Mattson, Christine L.

    2015-01-01

    Risk compensation has been called the “Achilles’ heel” of HIV prevention policies (Cassell et al 2006). This paper examines the behavioral response to male circumcision, a major HIV prevention policy currently being implemented throughout much of Sub-Saharan Africa. Contrary to the presumption of risk compensation, we find that the response due to the perceived reduction in HIV transmission appears to have been a reduction in risky sexual behavior. We suggest a mechanism for this finding: circumcision may reduce fatalism about acquiring HIV/AIDS and increase the salience of the tradeoff between engaging in additional risky behavior and avoiding acquiring HIV. We also find what appears to be a competing effect that does not operate through the circumcision recipient’s belief about the reduction in the risk of acquiring HIV. PMID:26997745

  9. Regional Differences in Prevalence of HIV-1 Discordance in Africa and Enrollment of HIV-1 Discordant Couples into an HIV-1 Prevention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lingappa, Jairam R.; Lambdin, Barrot; Bukusi, Elizabeth Ann; Ngure, Kenneth; Kavuma, Linda; Inambao, Mubiana; Kanweka, William; Allen, Susan; Kiarie, James N.; Makhema, Joseph; Were, Edwin; Manongi, Rachel; Coetzee, David; de Bruyn, Guy; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Magaret, Amalia; Mugo, Nelly; Mujugira, Andrew; Ndase, Patrick; Celum, Connie

    2008-01-01

    Background Most HIV-1 transmission in Africa occurs among HIV-1-discordant couples (one partner HIV-1 infected and one uninfected) who are unaware of their discordant HIV-1 serostatus. Given the high HIV-1 incidence among HIV-1 discordant couples and to assess efficacy of interventions for reducing HIV-1 transmission, HIV-1 discordant couples represent a critical target population for HIV-1 prevention interventions and prevention trials. Substantial regional differences exist in HIV-1 prevalence in Africa, but regional differences in HIV-1 discordance among African couples, has not previously been reported. Methodology/Principal Findings The Partners in Prevention HSV-2/HIV-1 Transmission Trial (“Partners HSV-2 Study”), the first large HIV-1 prevention trial in Africa involving HIV-1 discordant couples, completed enrollment in May 2007. Partners HSV-2 Study recruitment data from 12 sites from East and Southern Africa were used to assess HIV-1 discordance among couples accessing couples HIV-1 counseling and testing, and to correlate with enrollment of HIV-1 discordant couples. HIV-1 discordance at Partners HSV-2 Study sites ranged from 8–31% of couples tested from the community. Across all study sites and, among all couples with one HIV-1 infected partner, almost half (49%) of couples were HIV-1 discordant. Site-specific monthly enrollment of HIV-1 discordant couples into the clinical trial was not directly associated with prevalence of HIV-1 discordance, but was modestly correlated with national HIV-1 counseling and testing rates and access to palliative care/basic health care (r = 0.74, p = 0.09). Conclusions/Significance HIV-1 discordant couples are a critical target for HIV-1 prevention in Africa. In addition to community prevalence of HIV-1 discordance, national infrastructure for HIV-1 testing and healthcare delivery and effective community outreach strategies impact recruitment of HIV-1 discordant couples into HIV-1 prevention trials. PMID:18183292

  10. Historical and Cultural Influences on HIV Prevention in Swaziland.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Rachel Lynne

    2011-01-01

    Most who work in international development recognize the importance of implementing locally driven, grassroots initiatives for achieving positive outcomes. Yet, when it comes to HIV prevention strategies in Swaziland, there is a lack of understanding for the cultural and historical influences that determine group and individual behaviour. As a result, prevention efforts have failed to have a major impact on the world's highest prevalence rate of HIV. Greater understanding and observance of historical influences, local norms and beliefs, and the ongoing processes of adaptation must be incorporated into all efforts if any HIV prevention strategies are to be effective. PMID:22543416

  11. Masculine ideology, norms, and HIV prevention among young Black men

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Naomi M.; Applewhite, Sheldon

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between masculine ideology, adherence to norms, and HIV prevention among young Black heterosexual and gay men on the campus of a historically Black college/university. The data from four focus groups and nine individual interviews (N = 35) were aggregated and two recurring themes emerged: sexual communication, and mate availability. Additional themes related to HIV prevention were stigma, protection, and testing. The importance of investigating masculinity with young men is highlighted and implications for professionals working with college students to prevent the transmission of HIV are included. PMID:25525415

  12. Considering individual differences in the design of preventive interventions: HIV primary prevention as an example.

    PubMed

    Wagner, E F; Brown, L K; Brenman, A J

    1995-12-01

    This study examined how individual differences in personality style influenced children's receptivity to HIV primary prevention. Prior to taking part in a HIV prevention program, 123 fifth graders from an ethnically diverse inner city school district were administered the Weinberger Adjustment Inventory (WAI) and scales measuring HIV-related beliefs, attitudes, and knowledge. The HIV scales were readministered at the conclusion of the program. WAI groups (formed by contrasting dimensions of restraint and distress) were found to differ significantly on measures of knowledge about HIV, HIV-related fears, safe behavior attitudes, and risk behavior at pre-test. The intervention's impact, as reflected in scale change scores, did not show significant differences among WAI groups. Although subtle differences were evident among groups, findings suggest that HIV primary prevention programs may be equally effective among children with differing degrees of self-restraint and distress. PMID:24254753

  13. Factors That Influence HIV Risk among Hispanic Female Immigrants and Their Implications for HIV Prevention Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Amy M.; Zule, William A.; Karg, Rhonda S.; Browne, Felicia A.; Wechsberg, Wendee M.

    2012-01-01

    Hispanics are the fastest growing minority group in North Carolina with increasing incidence of HIV infection. Gender roles, cultural expectations, and acculturation of women may explain some of Hispanic women's risks. The perspectives of Hispanic female immigrants and community-based providers were sought to identify services they offer, understand HIV risk factors, and support the adaptation of a best-evidence HIV behavioural intervention for Hispanic women. Two sets of focus groups were conducted to explicate risks and the opportunities to reach women or couples and the feasibility to conduct HIV prevention in an acceptable manner. Salient findings were that Hispanic female immigrants lacked accurate HIV/AIDS and STI knowledge and that traditional gender roles shaped issues surrounding sexual behaviour and HIV risks, as well as condom use, partner communication, and multiple sexual partnerships. Intervention implications are discussed such as developing and adapting culturally appropriate HIV prevention interventions for Hispanics that address gender roles and partner communication. PMID:22518308

  14. Back to the future: covalent epitope-based HIV vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sudhir; Planque, Stephanie; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Escobar, Miguel; Hanson, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Traditional HIV vaccine approaches have proved ineffective because the immunodominant viral epitopes are mutable and the conserved epitopes necessary for infection are not sufficiently immunogenic. The CD4 binding site expressed by the HIV envelope protein of glycoprotein 120 is essential for viral entry into host cells. In this article, we review the B-cell superantigenic character of the CD4 binding site as the cause of its poor immunogenicity. We summarize evidence supporting development of covalent immunization as the first vaccine strategy with the potential to induce an antibody response to a conserved HIV epitope that neutralizes genetically divergent HIV strains. PMID:20822346

  15. A New Scientific Paradigm may be Needed to Finally Develop an HIV Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Esparza, José

    2015-01-01

    The bulk of current HIV vaccine research is conducted within the infectious disease paradigm that has been very successful in developing vaccines against many other viral diseases. Different HIV vaccine concepts, based on the induction of neutralizing antibodies and/or cell mediated immunity, have been developed and clinically tested over the last 30 years, resulting in a few small successes and many disappointments. As new scientific knowledge is obtained, HIV vaccine concepts are constantly modified with the hope that the newly introduced tweaks (or paradigm drifts) will provide the solution to one of the most difficult challenges that modern biomedical research is confronting. Efficacy trials have been critical in guiding HIV vaccine development. However, from the five phase III efficacy trials conducted to date, only one (RV144) resulted in modest efficacy. The results from RV144 were surprising in many ways, including the identified putative correlates of protection (or risk), which did not include neutralizing antibodies or cytotoxic T-cells. The solution to the HIV vaccine challenge may very well come from approaches based on the current paradigm. However, at the same time, out-of-the-paradigm ideas should be systematically explored to complement the current efforts. New mechanisms are needed to identify and support the innovative research that will hopefully accelerate the development of an urgently needed HIV vaccine. PMID:25852692

  16. A New Scientific Paradigm may be Needed to Finally Develop an HIV Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Esparza, José

    2015-01-01

    The bulk of current HIV vaccine research is conducted within the infectious disease paradigm that has been very successful in developing vaccines against many other viral diseases. Different HIV vaccine concepts, based on the induction of neutralizing antibodies and/or cell mediated immunity, have been developed and clinically tested over the last 30 years, resulting in a few small successes and many disappointments. As new scientific knowledge is obtained, HIV vaccine concepts are constantly modified with the hope that the newly introduced tweaks (or paradigm drifts) will provide the solution to one of the most difficult challenges that modern biomedical research is confronting. Efficacy trials have been critical in guiding HIV vaccine development. However, from the five phase III efficacy trials conducted to date, only one (RV144) resulted in modest efficacy. The results from RV144 were surprising in many ways, including the identified putative correlates of protection (or risk), which did not include neutralizing antibodies or cytotoxic T-cells. The solution to the HIV vaccine challenge may very well come from approaches based on the current paradigm. However, at the same time, out-of-the-paradigm ideas should be systematically explored to complement the current efforts. New mechanisms are needed to identify and support the innovative research that will hopefully accelerate the development of an urgently needed HIV vaccine. PMID:25852692

  17. A typology of structural approaches to HIV prevention

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Alexander C.

    2012-01-01

    Renewed enthusiasm for biomedical HIV prevention strategies has followed the recent publication of several high-profile HIV antiretroviral therapy-based HIV prevention trials. In a recent article, Roberts & Matthews (2012) accurately note some of the shortcomings of these individually targeted approaches to HIV prevention and advocate for increased emphasis on structural interventions that have more fundamental effects on the population distribution of HIV. However, they make some implicit assumptions about the extent to which structural interventions are user-independent and more sustainable than biomedical or behavioral interventions. In this article, I elaborate a simple typology of structural interventions along these two axes and suggest that they may be neither user-independent nor sustainable and therefore subject to the same sustainability concerns, costs, and potential unintended consequences as biomedical and behavioral interventions. PMID:22877933

  18. HIV Prevention Messages Targeting Young Latino Immigrant MSM.

    PubMed

    Solorio, Rosa; Norton-Shelpuk, Pamela; Forehand, Mark; Martinez, Marcos; Aguirre, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Young Latino immigrant men who have sex with men (MSM) are at risk for HIV and for delayed diagnosis. A need exists to raise awareness about HIV prevention in this population, including the benefits of timely HIV testing. This project was developed through collaboration between University of WA researchers and Entre Hermanos, a community-based organization serving Latinos. Building from a community-based participatory research approach, the researchers developed a campaign that was executed by Activate Brands, based in Denver, Colorado. The authors (a) describe the development of HIV prevention messages through the integration of previously collected formative data; (b) describe the process of translating these messages into PSAs, including the application of a marketing strategy; (c) describe testing the PSAs within the Latino MSM community; and (c) determine a set of important factors to consider when developing HIV prevention messages for young Latino MSM who do not identify as gay. PMID:24864201

  19. HIV Prevention Messages Targeting Young Latino Immigrant MSM

    PubMed Central

    Solorio, Rosa; Forehand, Mark; Aguirre, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Young Latino immigrant men who have sex with men (MSM) are at risk for HIV and for delayed diagnosis. A need exists to raise awareness about HIV prevention in this population, including the benefits of timely HIV testing. This project was developed through collaboration between University of WA researchers and Entre Hermanos, a community-based organization serving Latinos. Building from a community-based participatory research approach, the researchers developed a campaign that was executed by Activate Brands, based in Denver, Colorado. The authors (a) describe the development of HIV prevention messages through the integration of previously collected formative data; (b) describe the process of translating these messages into PSAs, including the application of a marketing strategy; (c) describe testing the PSAs within the Latino MSM community; and (c) determine a set of important factors to consider when developing HIV prevention messages for young Latino MSM who do not identify as gay. PMID:24864201

  20. HIV prevention for Black women: structural barriers and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Newman, Peter A; Williams, Charmaine C; Massaquoi, Notisha; Brown, Marsha; Logie, Carmen

    2008-08-01

    Black women bear a disproportionate burden of HIV/AIDS in North America. The purpose of this investigation was to explore Black Canadian women's perspectives on HIV risk and prevention. Four 90-minute focus groups (n=26) and six key informant interviews were conducted in Toronto with Black women of African and Caribbean descent and low socioeconomic status. Data analysis revealed a number of potent barriers to existing HIV preventive interventions: stigma, cultural disconnections, lack of engagement of Black religious institutions, and multiple intersecting forms of discrimination. Recommended HIV prevention opportunities included the Black church, mainstreaming, health care providers, and ethno-specific agencies. HIV prevention strategies for North American Black women, rather than focusing on HIV and individual risk behaviors, may benefit from a primary focus on social and structural factors (e.g., promoting gender equality, economic opportunity, women-controlled prevention technologies and combating racism in health care) thereby integrating HIV prevention into the larger context of community health and survival. PMID:18677073

  1. HIV risk and preventive interventions in transgender women sex workers.

    PubMed

    Poteat, Tonia; Wirtz, Andrea L; Radix, Anita; Borquez, Annick; Silva-Santisteban, Alfonso; Deutsch, Madeline B; Khan, Sharful Islam; Winter, Sam; Operario, Don

    2015-01-17

    Worldwide, transgender women who engage in sex work have a disproportionate risk for HIV compared with natal male and female sex workers. We reviewed recent epidemiological research on HIV in transgender women and show that transgender women sex workers (TSW) face unique structural, interpersonal, and individual vulnerabilities that contribute to risk for HIV. Only six studies of evidence-based prevention interventions were identified, none of which focused exclusively on TSW. We developed a deterministic model based on findings related to HIV risks and interventions. The model examines HIV prevention approaches in TSW in two settings (Lima, Peru and San Francisco, CA, USA) to identify which interventions would probably achieve the UN goal of 50% reduction in HIV incidence in 10 years. A combination of interventions that achieves small changes in behaviour and low coverage of biomedical interventions was promising in both settings, suggesting that the expansion of prevention services in TSW would be highly effective. However, this expansion needs appropriate sustainable interventions to tackle the upstream drivers of HIV risk and successfully reach this population. Case studies of six countries show context-specific issues that should inform development and implementation of key interventions across heterogeneous settings. We summarise the evidence and knowledge gaps that affect the HIV epidemic in TSW, and propose a research agenda to improve HIV services and policies for this population. PMID:25059941

  2. HIV risk and preventive interventions in transgender women sex workers

    PubMed Central

    Poteat, Tonia; Wirtz, Andrea L; Radix, Anita; Borquez, Annick; Silva-Santisteban, Alfonso; Deutsch, Madeline B; Khan, Sharful Islam; Winter, Sam; Operario, Don

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, transgender women who engage in sex work have a disproportionate risk for HIV compared with natal male and female sex workers. We reviewed recent epidemiological research on HIV in transgender women and show that transgender women sex workers (TSW) face unique structural, interpersonal, and individual vulnerabilities that contribute to risk for HIV. Only six studies of evidence-based prevention interventions were identified, none of which focused exclusively on TSW. We developed a deterministic model based on findings related to HIV risks and interventions. The model examines HIV prevention approaches in TSW in two settings (Lima, Peru and San Francisco, CA, USA) to identify which interventions would probably achieve the UN goal of 50% reduction in HIV incidence in 10 years. A combination of interventions that achieves small changes in behaviour and low coverage of biomedical interventions was promising in both settings, suggesting that the expansion of prevention services in TSW would be highly effective. However, this expansion needs appropriate sustainable interventions to tackle the upstream drivers of HIV risk and successfully reach this population. Case studies of six countries show context-specific issues that should inform development and implementation of key interventions across heterogeneous settings. We summarise the evidence and knowledge gaps that affect the HIV epidemic in TSW, and propose a research agenda to improve HIV services and policies for this population. PMID:25059941

  3. [Vaccine for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)--relevance of these days].

    PubMed

    Laiskonis, Alvydas; Pukenyte, Evelina

    2005-01-01

    Since 1980 more than 25 million people have died from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), which results from infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Number of new cases increases very threateningly. One and the most effective method to stop the progress of epidemic is the development of the vaccine for HIV. There is the presentation of the first stage of the vaccine for HIV testing (structure, methodology), which is now on trial in St. Pierre hospital, Brussels University. HIV characteristics which inflame the process of the vaccine development, historical facts and facts about vaccines on trial in these days are reviewed in this article. More than 10,000 volunteers have been participating in various clinical trials since 1987. The development of the vaccine is a very difficult, long-terming (about 8-10 years) and costly process. The process of the vaccine testing is very difficult in developing countries where the infection spreads the most rapidly. Available data confirm that the vaccine must be multi-componential, inducing cellular, humoral immunity against various subtypes of HIV. The vaccine cannot protect fully but the changes of the natural infection course could decrease virulence, distance the stage of AIDS, and retard the spread of the epidemic. PMID:15758574

  4. HIV Prevention for Adolescents: Where Do We Go from Here?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightfoot, Marguerita

    2012-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that 50% of the 30 million HIV infections worldwide occurred in young people between the ages of 15 and 24 years. In the United States, national statistics estimate that almost 40% of new HIV cases occur in youth ages 13-29 (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2011). Therefore, a focus on preventing…

  5. Just Say Maybe: Working with Uncertainties in HIV Prevention Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankham, Jo

    2003-01-01

    The article focuses on a key aspect of the experiences of young gay men and considers how their responses might inform HIV prevention education for all young people. The article first outlines key representations of same-sex desire and of HIV/AIDS through which young gay men learn various certainties about gay men, gay sex and AIDS. As a…

  6. Asserting a Positive Role: HIV-Positive People in Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Brent; Leonard, William

    2005-01-01

    The best HIV prevention programs--those that effect change on a multiplicity of levels by changing knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors and that are sustained over time--are also those that place HIV-positive people at the center of program design, implementation, and evaluation.

  7. School-Based HIV Prevention: A Multidisciplinary Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Dianne L.; And Others

    This manual was written to help school-based professionals implement school health education programs to prevent the spread of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The manual provides a framework and plan to promote an interdisciplinary approach to HIV education in schools. The manual begins with a review of basic facts about acquired immune…

  8. Vaccine Poliovirus Shedding and Immune Response to Oral Polio Vaccine in HIV-Infected and -Uninfected Zimbabwean Infants

    PubMed Central

    Troy, Stephanie B.; Musingwini, Georgina; Halpern, Meira S.; Huang, ChunHong; Stranix-Chibanda, Lynda; Kouiavskaia, Diana; Shetty, Avinash K.; Chumakov, Konstantin; Nathoo, Kusum; Maldonado, Yvonne A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. With prolonged replication, attenuated polioviruses used in oral polio vaccine (OPV) can mutate into vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV) and cause poliomyelitis outbreaks. Individuals with primary humoral immunodeficiencies can become chronically infected with vaccine poliovirus, allowing it to mutate into immunodeficiency-associated VDPV (iVDPV). It is unclear if children perinatally infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), who have humoral as well as cellular immunodeficiencies, might be sources of iVDPV. Methods. We conducted a prospective study collecting stool and blood samples at multiple time points from Zimbabwean infants receiving OPV according to the national schedule. Nucleic acid extracted from stool was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction for OPV serotypes. Results. We analyzed 825 stool samples: 285 samples from 92 HIV-infected children and 540 from 251 HIV-uninfected children. Poliovirus shedding was similar after 0–2 OPV doses but significantly higher in the HIV-infected versus uninfected children after ≥3 OPV doses, particularly within 42 days of an OPV dose, independent of seroconversion status. HIV infection was not associated with prolonged or persistent poliovirus shedding. HIV infection was associated with significantly lower polio seroconversion rates. Conclusions. HIV infection is associated with decreased mucosal and humoral immune responses to OPV but not the prolonged viral shedding required to form iVDPV. PMID:23661792

  9. Vaccine refusal, mandatory immunization, and the risks of vaccine-preventable diseases.

    PubMed

    Omer, Saad B; Salmon, Daniel A; Orenstein, Walter A; deHart, M Patricia; Halsey, Neal

    2009-05-01

    Vaccines are among the most effective prevention tools available to clinicians. However, the success of an immunization program depends on high rates of acceptance and coverage. There is evidence of an increase in vaccine refusal in the United States and of geographic clustering of refusals that results in outbreaks. Children with exemptions from school immunization requirements (a measure of vaccine refusal) are at increased risk for measles and pertussis and can infect others who are too young to be vaccinated, cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons, or were vaccinated but did not have a sufficient immunologic response. Clinicians can play a crucial role in parental decision making. Health care providers are cited as the most frequent source of immunization information by parents, including parents of unvaccinated children. Although some clinicians have discontinued or have considered discontinuing their provider relationship with patients who refuse vaccines, the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Bioethics advises against this and recommends that clinicians address vaccine refusal by respectfully listening to parental concerns and discussing the risks of nonvaccination. PMID:19420367

  10. Time will tell: community acceptability of HIV vaccine research before and after the Step Study vaccine discontinuation

    PubMed Central

    Frew, Paula M; Mulligan, Mark J; Hou, Su-I; Chan, Kayshin; del Rio, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study examines whether men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM) and transgender (TG) persons attitudes, beliefs, and risk perceptions toward human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine research have been altered as a result of the negative findings from a phase 2B HIV vaccine study. Design We conducted a cross-sectional survey among MSM and TG persons (N = 176) recruited from community settings in Atlanta from 2007 to 2008. The first group was recruited during an active phase 2B HIV vaccine trial in which a candidate vaccine was being evaluated (the Step Study), and the second group was recruited after product futility was widely reported in the media. Methods Descriptive statistics, t tests, and chi-square tests were conducted to ascertain differences between the groups, and ordinal logistic regressions examined the influences of the above-mentioned factors on a critical outcome, future HIV vaccine study participation. The ordinal regression outcomes evaluated the influences on disinclination, neutrality, and inclination to study participation. Results Behavioral outcomes such as future recruitment, event attendance, study promotion, and community mobilization did not reveal any differences in participants intentions between the groups. However, we observed greater interest in HIV vaccine study screening (t = 1.07, P < 0.05) and enrollment (t = 1.15, P < 0.05) following negative vaccine findings. Means on perceptions, attitudes, and beliefs did not differ between the groups. Before this development, only beliefs exhibited a strong relationship on the enrollment intention (? = 2.166, P = 0.002). However, the effect disappeared following negative trial results, with the positive assessment of the study-site perceptions being the only significant contributing factor on enrollment intentions (? = 1.369, P = 0.011). Conclusion Findings show greater enrollment intention among this population in the wake of negative efficacy findings from the Step Study. The resolve of this community to find an HIV vaccine is evident. Moreover, any exposure to information disseminated in the public arena did not appear to negatively influence the potential for future participation in HIV vaccine studies among this population. The results suggest that subsequent studies testing candidate vaccines could be conducted in this population. PMID:21152413

  11. Cellular Immune Responses in Asymptomatic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Infection and Effects of Vaccination with Recombinant Envelope Glycoprotein of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Gorse, Geoffrey J.; Simionescu, Ramona E.; Patel, Gira B.

    2006-01-01

    Effects of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) recombinant envelope glycoprotein vaccines on cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were assessed in HIV-1-infected patients. Asymptomatic, antiretroviral-treatment-naïve, HIV-1-infected patients with CD4+ T-cell counts greater than 400/μl received multiple intramuscular injections of HIV-1 IIIB recombinant envelope glycoprotein (rgp160) vaccine or HIV-1 MN recombinant envelope glycoprotein (rgp120) vaccine (eight patients, referred to as the HIV-1 vaccinees) or placebo or hepatitis B vaccine (three patients, referred to as the controls). Lymphocyte proliferation in response to HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins, both homologous and heterologous to the HIV-1 immunogens, was absent prior to study treatment in all patients but increased significantly during the vaccination series and after the final vaccination in HIV-1 vaccinees (P < 0.05) and remained absent in control patients. In flow cytometric analyses of intracellular cytokines, T-cell receptor stimulation with an anti-CD3 antibody induced gamma interferon (IFN-γ) expression by activated CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes at greater frequencies than did stimulation with recombinant envelope glycoprotein and p24 of HIV-1 (P < 0.05). Mean frequencies of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein-stimulated, activated intracellularIFN-γ-producing CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes and of interleukin-2-producing CD4+ lymphocytes did not increase after vaccination, but cytokine-producing cells were detectable in some patients. Comparing pre- to post-HIV-1 vaccination time points, changes in frequencies of activated, IFN-γ-producing CD4+ cells correlated inversely with changes in lymphocyte proliferation in response to recombinant envelope glycoprotein in HIV-1 vaccinees (P < 0.05). Increased CMI responses to HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein measured by lymphocyte proliferation were associated with HIV-1 recombinant envelope glycoprotein vaccines. PMID:16425996

  12. Screening for genital and anorectal sexually transmitted infections in HIV prevention trials in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Grijsen, ML; Graham, SM; Mwangome, M; Githua, P; Mutimba, S; Wamuyu, L; Okuku, H; Price, MA; McClelland, RS; Smith, AD; Sanders, EJ

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To demonstrate the value of routine, basic sexually transmitted infection (STI) screening at enrolment into an HIV-1 vaccine feasibility cohort study and to highlight the importance of soliciting a history of receptive anal intercourse (RAI) in adults identified as ‘high risk’. Methods Routine STI screening was offered to adults at high risk for HIV-1 upon enrolment into a cohort study in preparation for HIV-1 vaccine trials. Risk behaviors and STI prevalence were summarized, and the value of microscopy assessed. Associations between prevalent HIV-1 infection and RAI or prevalent STIs were evaluated with multiple logistic regression. Results Participants had a high burden of untreated STIs. Symptom-directed management would have missed 67% of urethritis cases in men and 59% of cervicitis cases in women. RAI was reported by 36% of male and 18% of female participants. RAI was strongly associated with HIV-1 in men (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.8, 95% CI 2.0 – 6.9), and independently associated with syphilis in women (aOR 12.9, 95% CI 3.4 – 48.7). Conclusions High-risk adults recruited for HIV-1 prevention trials carry a high STI burden. Symptom-directed treatment may miss many cases, and simple laboratory-based screening can be done with little cost. Risk assessment should include questions about anal intercourse and whether condoms were used. STI screening, including specific assessment for anorectal disease, should be offered in African research settings recruiting participants at high risk for HIV-1 acquisition. PMID:18375645

  13. HIV Vaccine Trial participation in South Africa - an ethical assessment.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Keymanthri

    2002-04-01

    Trial participation in the proposed HIV Vaccine Trials in South Africa is discussed in the context of the ethical tension that exists between international ethical research standards and local standards of care and cultural norms in the Third World. The important concepts of informed consent, risk-benefit ratio and fair treatment of trial participants are interpreted differently in traditional, rural African communities, where a moderate form of communitarianism referred to as "Ubuntu" or "communalism" is still prevalent. Research is an altruistic endeavor that benefits communities and societies as a result of risks taken by individuals. Universal ethical guidelines that are highly individualistic and fail to emphasize communalism may represent serious problems for the sort of research needed in Africa today. PMID:11961697

  14. HIV Vaccine Trial participation in South Africa - an ethical assessment.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Moodley K

    2002-04-01

    Trial participation in the proposed HIV Vaccine Trials in South Africa is discussed in the context of the ethical tension that exists between international ethical research standards and local standards of care and cultural norms in the Third World. The important concepts of informed consent, risk-benefit ratio and fair treatment of trial participants are interpreted differently in traditional, rural African communities, where a moderate form of communitarianism referred to as "Ubuntu" or "communalism" is still prevalent. Research is an altruistic endeavor that benefits communities and societies as a result of risks taken by individuals. Universal ethical guidelines that are highly individualistic and fail to emphasize communalism may represent serious problems for the sort of research needed in Africa today.

  15. Informing Comprehensive HIV Prevention: A Situational Analysis of the HIV Prevention and Care Context, North West Province South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Lippman, Sheri A.; Treves-Kagan, Sarah; Gilvydis, Jennifer M.; Naidoo, Evasen; Khumalo-Sakutukwa, Gertrude; Darbes, Lynae; Raphela, Elsie; Ntswane, Lebogang; Barnhart, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Objective Building a successful combination prevention program requires understanding the community’s local epidemiological profile, the social community norms that shape vulnerability to HIV and access to care, and the available community resources. We carried out a situational analysis in order to shape a comprehensive HIV prevention program that address local barriers to care at multiple contextual levels in the North West Province of South Africa. Method The situational analysis was conducted in two sub-districts in 2012 and guided by an adaptation of WHO’s Strategic Approach, a predominantly qualitative method, including observation of service delivery points and in-depth interviews and focus groups with local leaders, providers, and community members, in order to recommend context-specific HIV prevention strategies. Analysis began during fieldwork with nightly discussions of findings and continued with coding original textual data from the fieldwork notebooks and a select number of recorded interviews. Results We conducted over 200 individual and group interviews and gleaned four principal social barriers to HIV prevention and care, including: HIV fatalism, traditional gender norms, HIV-related stigma, and challenges with communication around HIV, all of which fuel the HIV epidemic. At the different levels of response needed to stem the epidemic, we found evidence of national policies and programs that are mitigating the social risk factors but little community-based responses that address social risk factors to HIV. Conclusions Understanding social and structural barriers to care helped shape our comprehensive HIV prevention program, which address the four ‘themes’ identified into each component of the program. Activities are underway to engage communities, offer community-based testing in high transmission areas, community stigma reduction, and a positive health, dignity and prevention program for stigma reduction and improve communication skills. The situational analysis process successfully shaped key programmatic decisions and cultivated a deeper collaboration with local stakeholders to support program implementation. PMID:25028976

  16. Evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic HIV vaccines through analytical treatment interruptions

    PubMed Central

    Graziani, Gina M; Angel, Jonathan B

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The development of an effective therapeutic HIV vaccine that induces immunologic control of viral replication, thereby eliminating or reducing the need for antiretroviral therapy (ART), would be of great value. Besides the obvious challenges of developing a therapeutic vaccine that would generate effective, sustained anti-HIV immunity in infected individuals is the issue of how to best assess the efficacy of vaccine candidates. Discussion This review discusses the various outcome measures assessed in therapeutic HIV vaccine clinical trials involving individuals receiving suppressive ART, with a particular focus on the role of analytical treatment interruption (ATI) as a way to assess the virologic control induced by an immunotherapy. This strategy is critical given that there are otherwise no readily available measures to determine the ability of a vaccine-induced immune response to effectively control HIV replication. The various outcome measures that have been used to assess vaccine efficacy in published therapeutic HIV vaccine clinical trials will also be discussed. Outcome measures have included the kinetics of viral rebound, the new viral set point and changes in the size of the viral reservoir. Clinically relevant outcomes such as the CD4 decline, the time to resume therapy or the time to meet the criterion to resume therapy, the proportion of participants who resume therapy and/or the development of clinical symptoms such as acute retroviral syndrome are also measures of vaccine efficacy. Conclusions Given the lack of consistency between therapeutic HIV vaccine trials in how efficacy is assessed, comparing vaccines has been difficult. It would, therefore, be beneficial to determine the most clinically relevant measure for use in future studies. Other recommendations for future clinical trials also include studying compartments in addition to blood and replacing ATIs with single-copy assays in situations in which the use of an ATI is not ideal. PMID:26561337

  17. Whooping Cough and the Vaccine (Shot) to Prevent It: Information for Parents

    MedlinePlus

    ... PARENT S | DISEASES and the VACCINES THAT PREVENT THEM | Whooping Cough and the Vaccine (Shot) to Prevent It Last ... July 2015 The best way to protect against whooping cough is by getting the diphther ia-tetanus-per ...

  18. [Complications after preventive mumps vaccination in West Germany (including multiple preventive vaccinations)].

    PubMed

    Ehrengut, W; Zastrow, K

    1989-07-01

    Since the introduction of mumps vaccination in the Federal Republic of Germany 34 untoward vaccinal reactions were collected. In 2 cases of aseptic meningitis after mumps immunisation mumps virus was isolated from the CSF. The final investigation showed mumps virus (wild type) in one case; in the other a mumps vaccine-like strain (Jeryl-Lynn) was identified. Both patients recovered completely. These complications do not outweigh the enormous benefits of mumps immunisation. PMID:2571926

  19. Will HIV Vaccination Reshape HIV Risk Behavior Networks? A Social Network Analysis of Drug Users' Anticipated Risk Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Young, April M.; Halgin, Daniel S.; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Sterk, Claire E.; Havens, Jennifer R.

    2014-01-01

    Background An HIV vaccine could substantially impact the epidemic. However, risk compensation (RC), or post-vaccination increase in risk behavior, could present a major challenge. The methodology used in previous studies of risk compensation has been almost exclusively individual-level in focus, and has not explored how increased risk behavior could affect the connectivity of risk networks. This study examined the impact of anticipated HIV vaccine-related RC on the structure of high-risk drug users' sexual and injection risk network. Methods A sample of 433 rural drug users in the US provided data on their risk relationships (i.e., those involving recent unprotected sex and/or injection equipment sharing). Dyad-specific data were collected on likelihood of increasing/initiating risk behavior if they, their partner, or they and their partner received an HIV vaccine. Using these data and social network analysis, a "post-vaccination network" was constructed and compared to the current network on measures relevant to HIV transmission, including network size, cohesiveness (e.g., diameter, component structure, density), and centrality. Results Participants reported 488 risk relationships. Few reported an intention to decrease condom use or increase equipment sharing (4% and 1%, respectively). RC intent was reported in 30 existing risk relationships and vaccination was anticipated to elicit the formation of five new relationships. RC resulted in a 5% increase in risk network size (n = 142 to n = 149) and a significant increase in network density. The initiation of risk relationships resulted in the connection of otherwise disconnected network components, with the largest doubling in size from five to ten. Conclusions This study demonstrates a new methodological approach to studying RC and reveals that behavior change following HIV vaccination could potentially impact risk network connectivity. These data will be valuable in parameterizing future network models that can determine if network-level change precipitated by RC would appreciably impact the vaccine's population-level effectiveness. PMID:24992659

  20. Toward a cure for HIV--Seeking effective therapeutic vaccine strategies.

    PubMed

    Autran, Brigitte

    2015-12-01

    This review article focuses on the rationale and evaluation of therapeutic vaccines against HIV. This strategy has been developed in order to restore or restimulate HIV-specific immunity in patients treated with antiretroviral therapies. Despite the lack of good candidate vaccines against HIV, two objectives have been targeted during the past 15 years. Therapeutic immunization was first proposed to help control virus relapses during treatment interruptions. More recently, the concept of therapeutic immunization has been boosted by efforts to reach HIV remission or cure, in combination to HIV reactivating agents, to help purge HIV reservoirs in a "shock and kill" strategy. This review analyses the rationales for these strategies and the results of the most widely therapeutic vaccines designed to generate T-cell immunity, i.e. recombinant viral vectors and dendritic cell-based strategies, while extremely few strategies targeted HIV-specific Abs. Only marginal control of HIV was obtained with cellular-based strategies, suggesting that approaches targeting or using broadly neutralizing Abs, should be of benefit for future efforts of therapeutic immunization against HIV in the quest toward a cure for HIV. PMID:26542079

  1. Preventive vaccination against cervical cancer: Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology Guideline.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyung Jin; Kwon, Sang Hoon; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Hyun Jung; Seong, Seok Ju; Song, Yong Jung; Shin, Jin Woo; Lee, Keun Ho; Lim, Myong Cheol; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Ju, Woong; Hong, Jin Hwa; Lee, Jeong Won; Kim, Jae Weon; Bae, Duk Soo; Lee, Jae Kwan

    2016-05-01

    After human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine guidelines published by Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology (KSGO) in 2011, new studies have been published, leading to additional data regarding efficacy, safety, number of vaccination rounds, and ideal age of vaccine administration. We searched and reviewed the literatures focused on the efficacy of 2-dose schedule vaccination, the efficacy of 3-dose schedule vaccination in middle-aged women, the ideal age of 3-dose schedule vaccination, the safety of HPV preventive vaccine, and the ability of cross-protection of each HPV preventive vaccine. The KSGO has revised the previous guideline based on the results of the above studies. PMID:27029751

  2. Sources of Racial/Ethnic Differences in Awareness of HIV Vaccine Trials

    PubMed Central

    Andrasik, Michele; Landers, Stewart; Karuna, Shelly; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Wakefield, Steven; Mayer, Kenneth; Buchbinder, Susan; Koblin, Beryl A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We explored the relative effects of 2 awareness components—exposure and attention—on racial/ethnic differences in HIV vaccine trial awareness among men who have sex with men (MSM). Methods. Surveys assessing awareness of and attitudes toward HIV vaccine trials were administered to 1723 MSM in 6 US cities. Proxy measures of exposure included use of HIV resources and other health care services, community involvement, income, and residence. Attention proxy measures included research attitudes, HIV susceptibility, and HIV message fatigue. Using logistic regression models, we assessed the extent to which these proxies accounted for racial/ethnic differences in vaccine trial awareness. Results. White MSM reported significantly (P < .01) higher rates of HIV vaccine trial awareness (22%) compared with Latino (17%), Black (13%) and “other” (13%) MSM. Venue-based exposure proxies and research-directed attitudinal attention proxies were significantly associated with awareness, but only accounted for the White-Latino disparity in awareness. No proxies accounted for the White-Black or White-“other” differentials in awareness. Conclusions. Sources of disparities in awareness of HIV vaccine trials remain to be explained. Future trials seeking to promote diverse participation should explore additional exposure and attention mediators. PMID:24922153

  3. AIDS Exceptionalism: On the Social Psychology of HIV Prevention Research

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, William A.; Kohut, Taylor; Fisher, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    The current analysis considers the HIV prevention research record in the social sciences. We do so with special reference to what has been termed “AIDS Exceptionalism”— departures from standard public health practice and prevention research priorities in favor of alternative approaches to prevention that, it has been argued, emphasize individual rights at the expense of public health protection. In considering this issue, we review the historical context of the HIV epidemic; empirically demonstrate a pattern of prevention research characterized by systematic neglect of prevention interventions for HIV-infected persons; and articulate a rationale for “Prevention for Positives,” supportive prevention efforts tailored to the needs of HIV+ individuals. We then propose a social psychological conceptualization of processes that appear to have influenced developments in HIV prevention research and directed its focus to particular target populations. Our concluding section considers whether there are social and research policy lessons to be learned from the record of HIV prevention research that might improve our ability to addresses effectively, equitably, and in timely fashion future epidemics that play out, as HIV does, at the junction of biology and behavior. At the first quarter century of the AIDS epidemic, it is important to weigh our accomplishments against our failures in the fight against AIDS…Future historians will conclude that we cannot escape responsibility for our failure to use effective, scientifically proven strategies to control the AIDS epidemic…They will also likely regard as tragic those instances when we allowed scarce resources to be used to support ideologically driven “prevention” that only served a particular political agenda. Editorial: A Quarter Century of AIDS. American Journal of Public Health. (Stall & Mills, 2006, p. 961) PMID:23667386

  4. HIV-1 transmission linkage in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Thomas; Campbell, Mary S; Mullins, James I; Hughes, James P; Wong, Kim G; Raugi, Dana N; Scrensen, Stefanie

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 sequencing has been used extensively in epidemiologic and forensic studies to investigate patterns of HIV-1 transmission. However, the criteria for establishing genetic linkage between HIV-1 strains in HIV-1 prevention trials have not been formalized. The Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study (ClinicaITrials.gov NCT00194519) enrolled 3408 HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual African couples to determine the efficacy of genital herpes suppression with acyclovir in reducing HIV-1 transmission. The trial analysis required laboratory confirmation of HIV-1 linkage between enrolled partners in couples in which seroconversion occurred. Here we describe the process and results from HIV-1 sequencing studies used to perform transmission linkage determination in this clinical trial. Consensus Sanger sequencing of env (C2-V3-C3) and gag (p17-p24) genes was performed on plasma HIV-1 RNA from both partners within 3 months of seroconversion; env single molecule or pyrosequencing was also performed in some cases. For linkage, we required monophyletic clustering between HIV-1 sequences in the transmitting and seroconverting partners, and developed a Bayesian algorithm using genetic distances to evaluate the posterior probability of linkage of participants sequences. Adjudicators classified transmissions as linked, unlinked, or indeterminate. Among 151 seroconversion events, we found 108 (71.5%) linked, 40 (26.5%) unlinked, and 3 (2.0%) to have indeterminate transmissions. Nine (8.3%) were linked by consensus gag sequencing only and 8 (7.4%) required deep sequencing of env. In this first use of HIV-1 sequencing to establish endpoints in a large clinical trial, more than one-fourth of transmissions were unlinked to the enrolled partner, illustrating the relevance of these methods in the design of future HIV-1 prevention trials in serodiscordant couples. A hierarchy of sequencing techniques, analysis methods, and expert adjudication contributed to the linkage determination process.

  5. Experience in international clinical research: the HIV Prevention Trials Network

    PubMed Central

    Sista, Nirupama Deshmane; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Hinson, Kathy; Donnell, Deborah; Eshleman, Susan H; Vermund, Sten H

    2012-01-01

    The HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) is supported by the NIH to conduct randomized clinical trials to assess the efficacy of HIV prevention strategies and technologies to reduce HIV transmission between adults. A special focus of attention is on the use of antiretroviral drugs to prevent HIV transmission, both by reducing infectiousness among HIV-infected persons taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and also by reducing susceptibility among HIV-uninfected persons taking antiretrovirals for pre-exposure prophylaxis. Studies may be developmental in nature to assess novel ideas for interventions or for assessing trial feasibility. However, pivotal efficacy trials to test HIV-specific prevention strategies and technologies are the main HPTN priority. Examples include a major protocol investigating the impact of expanded testing and linkage to care on HIV surveillance indicators in the USA (HPTN 065). Another protocol is addressing similar issues while also investigating how combinations of prevention approaches are best deployed to make a community-level impact in southern Africa (HPTN 071). HPTN 068 is evaluating a novel conditional cash transfer structural intervention to increase school completion rates in young girls and thereby reduce their HIV risk. Studies outside the US address the epidemic in most at-risk populations and include an assessment of opiate agonist therapy to reduce risk of HIV seroconversion among injection drug users (HTPN 058), methods to increase HIV testing rates (HTPN 043), as well as methods for reducing high-risk behaviors, and increasing adherence to cART in HIV-infected individuals (HPTN 062 and HPTN 063, respectively). The recent HPTN 052 study demonstrated that a 96% reduction in HIV transmission could be achieved between serodiscordant sexual partners by providing the infected partners with cART at a CD4+ cell count (350–550/µl) above the level that would usually qualify them for therapy in low- and middle-income countries. The immediate relevance to public health policy showcased in these trials is a paradigm for the HPTN: design and conduct of clinical trials using available licensed tools that can be rapidly translated for implementation (‘Prevention NOW!’). PMID:22348195

  6. Civil society perspectives on negative biomedical HIV prevention trial results and implications for future trials.

    PubMed

    Essack, Zaynab; Koen, Jennifer; Slack, Catherine; Lindegger, Graham; Newman, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Community engagement is crucial to ongoing development and testing of sorely needed new biomedical HIV prevention technologies. Yet, negative trial results raise significant challenges for community engagement in HIV prevention trials, including the early termination of the Cellulose Sulfate microbicide trial and two Phase IIb HIV vaccine trials (STEP and Phambili). The present study aimed to explore the perspectives and experiences of civil society organization (CSO) representatives regarding negative HIV prevention trial results and perceived implications for future trials. We conducted in-depth interviews with 14 respondents from a broad range of South African and international CSOs, and analyzed data using thematic analysis. CSO representatives reported disappointment in response to negative trial results, but acknowledged such outcomes as inherent to clinical research. Respondents indicated that in theory negative trial results seem likely to impact on willingness to participate in future trials, but that in practice people in South Africa have continued to volunteer. Negative trial results were described as having contributed to improving ethical standards, and to a re-evaluation of the scientific agenda. Such negative results were identified as potentially impacting on funding for trials and engagement activities. Our findings indicate that trial closures may be used constructively to support opportunities for reflection and renewed vigilance in strategies for stakeholder engagement, communicating trial outcomes, and building research literacy among communities; however, these strategies require sustained resources for community engagement and capacity-building. PMID:22360605

  7. Preventing rheumatic fever: M-protein based vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Rajendra

    2014-01-01

    Group A beta hemolytic streptococcus (GAS), the organism which initiates rheumatic fever (RF) continues to be sensitive to penicillin. However, penicillin cannot prevent RF if the preceding sore throat is asymptomatic in more than 70 percent children. Prevention of rheumatic fever (RF) may be possible only with the use of a vaccine. Efforts to design a vaccine based on emm gene identification of GAS, M-protein going on for more than 40 years, is unlikely to succeed. M-protein is strain specific. Infection with one strain does not provide immunity from infection with another strain. Based on the emm gene identification, of 250 or more identified strains of GAS, the distribution is heterogenous and keeps changing. The M-protein gene sequence of the organism tends to mutate. A vaccine prepared from available strains may not be effective against a strain following mutation. Lethal toxic shock syndrome due to GAS infection has been described with organisms without identifiable or functional M-protein. M-protein has been excluded as the antigen responsible for acute glomerulonephritis (GN). Therefore M-protein plays no role in one suppurative (toxic shock syndrome) and one non-suppurative (acute GN) manifestation due to GAS infection. Lastly there is no direct evidence to indicate that M-protein is involved in inducing RF. The role of M-protein and the GAS component resulting in the suppurative manifestations of GAS infections like pyoderma, septic arthritis or necrotizing fasciitis etc is unknown. For a vaccine to be effective, an epitope of the streptococcus which is stable and uniformly present in all strains, needs to be identified and tested for its safety and efficacy. The vaccine if and when available is expected to prevent GAS infection. Preventing GAS infection will prevent all the suppurative as well as non-suppurative manifestations including RF. PMID:24581098

  8. Preventing rheumatic fever: M-protein based vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Rajendra

    2014-01-01

    Group A beta hemolytic streptococcus (GAS), the organism which initiates rheumatic fever (RF) continues to be sensitive to penicillin. However, penicillin cannot prevent RF if the preceding sore throat is asymptomatic in more than 70 percent children. Prevention of rheumatic fever (RF) may be possible only with the use of a vaccine. Efforts to design a vaccine based on emm gene identification of GAS, M-protein going on for more than 40 years, is unlikely to succeed. M-protein is strain specific. Infection with one strain does not provide immunity from infection with another strain. Based on the emm gene identification, of 250 or more identified strains of GAS, the distribution is heterogenous and keeps changing. The M-protein gene sequence of the organism tends to mutate. A vaccine prepared from available strains may not be effective against a strain following mutation. Lethal toxic shock syndrome due to GAS infection has been described with organisms without identifiable or functional M-protein. M-protein has been excluded as the antigen responsible for acute glomerulonephritis (GN). Therefore M-protein plays no role in one suppurative (toxic shock syndrome) and one non-suppurative (acute GN) manifestation due to GAS infection. Lastly there is no direct evidence to indicate that M-protein is involved in inducing RF. The role of M-protein and the GAS component resulting in the suppurative manifestations of GAS infections like pyoderma, septic arthritis or necrotizing fasciitis etc is unknown. For a vaccine to be effective, an epitope of the streptococcus which is stable and uniformly present in all strains, needs to be identified and tested for its safety and efficacy. The vaccine if and when available is expected to prevent GAS infection. Preventing GAS infection will prevent all the suppurative as well as non-suppurative manifestations including RF. PMID:24581098

  9. Preventive medicines: vaccination, prophylaxis of infectious diseases, disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Heininger, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Immunizations belong to the most successful interventions in medicine. Like other drugs, vaccines undergo long periods of pre-clinical development, followed by careful clinical testing through study Phases I, II, and III before they receive licensure. A successful candidate vaccine will move on to be an investigational vaccine to undergo three phases of pre-licensure clinical trials in a stepwise fashion before it can be considered for approval, followed by an optional fourth phase of post-marketing assessment. The overall risk-benefit assessment of a candidate vaccine is very critical in making the licensure decision for regulatory authorities, supported by their scientific committees. It includes analyses of immunogenicity, efficacy, reactogenicity or tolerability, and safety of the vaccine. Public trust in vaccines is a key to the success of immunization programs worldwide. Maintaining this trust requires knowledge of the benefits and scientific understanding of real or perceived risks of immunizations. Under certain circumstances, pre- or post-exposure passive immunization can be achieved by administration of immunoglobulines. In terms of prevention of infectious diseases, disinfection can be applied to reduce the risk of transmission of pathogens from patient to patient, health-care workers to patients, patients to health-care workers, and objects or medical devices to patients. PMID:21882119

  10. Primary prevention of cervical cancer: prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mandic, A

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases worldwide. Cervical and anal intraepithelial neoplasia, genital warts, and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis such as cervical and other anogenital cancers, are HPV-associated diseases. Prophylactic HPV vaccines are composed of HPV L1 capsid protein that self-assembles into virus-like particles (VLPs) when expressed in recombinant systems. The two types of prophylactic vaccines are designed a bivalent vaccine to protect against high-risk HPV types 16 and 18 and a quadrivalent vaccine designed to protect against HPV 16 and 18, and low-risk, genital wart-causing HPV 6 and 11. Proof-of-principle trials have suggested that intramuscular injections of VLPs result in strong adaptive immune responses that are capable of neutralizing subsequent natural infections. Recent research on the safety and efficacy of candidate prophylactic vaccines against HPV have shown very promising results with nearly 100% efficacy in preventing the development of persistent infections and cervical precancerous lesions in vaccinated individuals. PMID:23033276

  11. Acceptability and preferences for vaginal dosage forms intended for prevention of HIV or HIV and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Woodsong, Cynthia; Holt, Jonathon D S

    2015-09-15

    This paper reviews key issues found to affect acceptability and preferences for vaginal products to prevent HIV infection or HIV and pregnancy. We focus on the interplay between the biological and physico-chemical aspects of formulation and the social and behavioral issues that may affect use. The need for an HIV prevention product that women can use is driven by women's increased biological and social vulnerability to HIV infection, and thus social and behavioral research on microbicide acceptability has been conducted alongside, as well as separate from, the earliest product development efforts. Some acceptability and preference issues are specific to a product's dosage form, use-requirements, and/or use indications, while others pertain to any vaginal product used for prevention of HIV or pregnancy. Although most of the work cited here was published since 2010, it draws on a much longer trajectory of research. PMID:25703190

  12. Prevention and control of influenza and dengue through vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, David P; Robertson, Corwin A; Gordon, Daniel M

    2013-08-01

    Influenza and dengue are viral illnesses of global public health importance, especially among children. Accordingly, these diseases have been the focus of efforts to improve their prevention and control. Influenza vaccination offers the best protection against clinical disease caused by strains contained within the specific year's formulation. It is not uncommon for there to be a mismatch between vaccine strains and circulating strains, particularly with regards to the B lineages. For more than a decade, two distinct lineages of influenza B (Yamagata and Victoria) have co-circulated in the US with varying frequencies, but trivalent influenza vaccines contain only one B-lineage strain and do not offer adequate protection against the alternate B-lineage. Quadrivalent influenza vaccines (QIVs), containing two A strains (H1N1 and H3N2) and two B strains (one from each lineage) have been developed to help protect against the four strains predicted to be the most likely to be circulating. The QIV section of this article discusses epidemiology of pediatric influenza, importance of influenza B in children, potential benefits of QIV, and new quadrivalent vaccines. In contrast to influenza, a vaccine against dengue is not yet available in spite of many decades of research and development. A global increase in reports of dengue fever (DF) and its more severe presentations, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS), suggest that US physicians will increasingly encounter patients with this disease. Similarities of the early signs and symptoms of influenza and dengue and the differences in disease management necessitates a better understanding of the epidemiology, clinical presentation, management, and prevention of DF by US physicians, including pediatricians. The article also provides a brief overview of dengue and discusses dengue vaccine development. PMID:23910031

  13. HIV Treatment as Prevention: Contradictory Perspectives from Dynamic Mathematical Models

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Jessie L.; Jia, Yujiang; Wang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The preventative effects of antiretroviral therapy for people with HIV have been debated since they were first raised. Models commenced studying the preventive effects of treatment in the 1990s, prior to initial public reports. However, the outcomes of the preventive effects of antiretroviral use were not consistent. Some outcomes of dynamic models were based on unfeasible assumptions, such as no consideration of drug resistance, behavior disinhibition, or economic inputs in poor countries, and unrealistic input variables, for example, overstated initiation time, adherence, coverage, and efficacy of treatment. This paper reviewed dynamic mathematical models to ascertain the complex effects of ART on HIV transmission. This review discusses more conservative inputs and outcomes relative to antiretroviral use in HIV infections in dynamic mathematical models. ART alone cannot eliminate HIV transmission. PMID:25580461

  14. Translation of biomedical prevention strategies for HIV: Prospects and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Vermund, Sten H.; Tique, José A.; Cassell, Holly M.; Johnson, Megan E.; Ciampa, Philip J.; Audet, Carolyn M.

    2013-01-01

    Early achievements in biomedical approaches for HIV prevention included physical barriers (condoms), clean injection equipment (both for medical use and for injection drug users), blood and blood product safety, and prevention of mother to child transmission. In recent years, antiretroviral drugs to reduce risk of transmission (when the infected person takes the medicines; treatment as prevention or TasP) or reduce risk of acquisition (when the seronegative person takes them; pre-exposure prophylaxis or PrEP) have proven efficacious. Circumcision of men has also been a major tool relevant for higher prevalence regions such as sub-Saharan Africa. Well-established prevention strategies in the control of sexually transmitted diseases and tuberculosis are highly relevant for HIV (i.e., screening, linkage to care, early treatment, and contact tracing). Unfortunately, only slow progress is being made in some available HIV prevention strategies such as family planning for HIV-infected women who do not want more children and prevention mother-to-child HIV transmission. Current studies seek to integrate strategies into approaches that combine biomedical, behavioral, and structural methods to achieve prevention synergies. This review identifies the major biomedical approaches demonstrated to be efficacious that are now available. We also highlight the need for behavioral risk reduction and adherence as essential components of any biomedical approach. PMID:23673881

  15. A Network-Individual-Resource Model for HIV Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Blair T.; Redding, Colleen A.; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Mustanski, Brian S.; Dodge, Brian M.; Sheeran, Paschal; Warren, Michelle R.; Zimmerman, Rick S.; Fisher, William A.; Conner, Mark T.; Carey, Michael P.; Fisher, Jeffrey D.; Stall, Ronald D.; Fishbein, Martin

    2014-01-01

    HIV is transmitted through dyadic exchanges of individuals linked in transitory or permanent networks of varying sizes. To optimize prevention efficacy, a complementary theoretical perspective that bridges key individual level elements with important network elements can be a foundation for developing and implementing HIV interventions with outcomes that are more sustainable over time and have greater dissemination potential. Toward that end, we introduce a Network-Individual-Resource (NIR) model for HIV prevention that recognizes how exchanges of resources between individuals and their networks underlies and sustains HIV-risk behaviors. Individual behavior change for HIV prevention, then, may be dependent on increasing the supportiveness of that individual's relevant networks for such change. Among other implications, an NIR model predicts that the success of prevention efforts depends on whether the prevention efforts (1) prompt behavior changes that can be sustained by the resources the individual or their networks possess; (2) meet individual and network needs and are consistent with the individual's current situation/developmental stage; (3) are trusted and valued; and (4) target high HIV-prevalence networks. PMID:20862606

  16. AIDS vaccine: Intranasal immunization using inactivated HIV-1-capturing core-corona type polymeric nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Takami; Ueno, Masamichi; Hiraishi, Katsuya; Baba, Masanori; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2005-12-01

    Polymeric nanospheres have been widely used in biomedical applications, such as drug, gene and vaccine delivery systems. Nanospheres with entrapped antigens have recently been shown to possess significant potential as vaccine delivery systems and adjuvants. We previously reported that concanavalin A-immobilized polystyrene nanospheres (Con A-NS) could efficiently capture HIV-1 particles and intranasal immunization with inactivated HIV-1-capturing nanospheres (HIV-NS) induced vaginal anti-HIV-1 IgA antibody responses in mice. In addition, vaginal washes from intranasally immunized mice were capable of neutralizing HIV-1. Moreover, simian/human immunodeficiency virus KU-2-capturing nanospheres (SHIV-NS) immunized macaques exhibited partial protection when vaginally and systemically challenged with pathogenic viruses. HIV-NS is suggested to be particularly suitable to enhance antigen delivery to dendritic cells (DCs). In this study, we investigated the mucosal antibody response in mice after the intravaginal or intranasal immunization in detail with using different sized (360, 660, 940 and 1230 nm) HIV-NS. The amount of immobilized Con A to NS was dependent on the surface area of the particle. Moreover, Con A-NS with different sizes could equally capture inactivated HIV-1. Intravaginal or intranasal immunization by HIV-NS with diameters ranging 360 to 1230 nm significantly induced vaginal antibody responses. However, significant differences on vaginal anti-HIV-1 gp120 IgA and IgG antibodies were not found after intravaginal or intranasal immunization with different sized HIV-NS. These results suggest that HIV-NS provides an efficient vaccine delivery system for the induction of a mucosal immune response and the development of a mucosal vaccine. PMID:16256237

  17. 77 FR 23733 - CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV and STD Prevention and Treatment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ...) Enhancing Hepatitis Prevention Treatment and Care in the United States; (2) Integrating HIV Prevention and..., CDC, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road,...

  18. Toward Effective HIV Vaccination INDUCTION OF BINARY EPITOPE REACTIVE ANTIBODIES WITH BROAD HIV NEUTRALIZING ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Planque, Stephanie; Mitsuda, Yukie; Nitti, Giovanni; Taguchi, Hiroaki; Jin, Lei; Symersky, Jindrich; Boivin, Stephane; Sienczyk, Marcin; Salas, Maria; Hanson, Carl V.; Paul, Sudhir

    2009-11-23

    We describe murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised by immunization with an electrophilic gp120 analog (E-gp120) expressing the rare ability to neutralize genetically heterologous human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) strains. Unlike gp120, E-gp120 formed covalent oligomers. The reactivity of gp120 and E-gp120 with mAbs to reference neutralizing epitopes was markedly different, indicating their divergent structures. Epitope mapping with synthetic peptides and electrophilic peptide analogs indicated binary recognition of two distinct gp120 regions by anti-E-gp120 mAbs, the 421-433 and 288-306 peptide regions. Univalent Fab and single chain Fv fragments expressed the ability to recognize both peptides. X-ray crystallography of an anti-E-gp120 Fab fragment revealed two neighboring cavities, the typical antigen-binding cavity formed by the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) and another cavity dominated by antibody heavy chain variable (VH) domain framework (FR) residues. Substitution of the FR cavity VH Lys-19 residue by an Ala residue resulted in attenuated binding of the 421-433 region peptide probe. The CDRs and VH FR replacement/silent mutation ratios exceeded the ratio for a random mutation process, suggesting adaptive development of both putative binding sites. All mAbs studied were derived from VH1 family genes, suggesting biased recruitment of the V gene germ line repertoire by E-gp120. The conserved 421-433 region of gp120 is essential for HIV binding to host CD4 receptors. This region is recognized weakly by the FR of antibodies produced without exposure to HIV, but it usually fails to induce adaptive synthesis of neutralizing antibodies. We present models accounting for improved CD4-binding site recognition and broad HIV neutralizing activity of the mAbs, long sought goals in HIV vaccine development.

  19. Fostering prevention and care delivery services capability on HIV pandemic and Ebola outbreak symbiosis in Africa.

    PubMed

    Tambo, Ernest; Yah, Clarence S; Ugwu, Chidiebere E; Olalubi, Oluwasogo A; Wurie, Isatta; Jonhson, Jeannetta K; Ngogang, Jeanne Y

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the re-emerging Ebola virus disease (EVD) are closely intertwined and remain a persistent public health threat and global challenge. Their origin and rapid transmission and spread have similar boundaries and share overlapping impact characteristics, including related symptoms and other interactions. The controversies and global threat of these viruses require rapid response policy and evidence-based implementation findings. The constraints and dual burden inflicted by Ebola and HIV infections are highly characterized by similar socio-demographics, socio-economic and political factors. EVD has similar effects and burdens to HIV infection. This study seeks to understand EVD in the context of HIV epidemic despite the challenges in developing an effective vaccine against HIV and EVD. Our findings show that early understanding, prevention and treatment of these diseases a global health threat mainly in Africa is important and valuable. The lessons learned so far from HIV and Ebola epidemics are crucial in health programming and execution of rapid response interventions and continued vigilance against EVD before it become another worldwide health menace. Therefore, the current regional West Africa EVD requires strengthening healthcare systems and building preparedness and response capacity. Importantly, appropriate community participation, health education and resilience coupled with deployment of effective novel diagnostic approaches in early warning and surveillance of threats and emerging diseases. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop novel key strategies are crucial in curbing the constant viral resurgence, persistence transmission dynamics and spread, as well in accelerating Ebola vaccines regimen (immunization) development and national implementation plans in achieving sustained control, and eventual elimination. PMID:26829532

  20. The difference in self-reported and biological measured HIV prevalence: implications for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Pedrana, Alisa E; Hellard, Margaret E; Guy, Rebecca; Wilson, Kim; Stoove, Mark

    2012-08-01

    In Australia, HIV prevalence estimates among gay men have been mainly based on self-reported HIV status collected in annual behavioural surveys. We measured biological HIV prevalence among gay men in Melbourne, Australia, using a facility based sampling method. We calculated HIV prevalence and used logistic regression to assess correlates of a positive HIV test. A total of 639 gay men were recruited completed a survey and provided oral fluid for HIV testing from seven venues in 2008. The median age of the participants was 35 years (range 18-75 years). Overall biological HIV prevalence was 9.5% (95% CI 7.5-12.0%) compared with 6.3% (95% CI 4.5-8.4%) for self-reported HIV positive status. We found a significant discrepancy between test detected biological and self-report HIV status in our study, with 19 men (31.1%) unaware of their HIV infection. These results highlight the importance of repeatable biological estimates to inform and evaluate HIV prevention strategies. PMID:22205325

  1. Recruitment of urban US women at risk for HIV infection and willingness to participate in future HIV vaccine trials

    PubMed Central

    Metch, Barbara; Frank, Ian; Novak, Richard; Swann, Edith; Metzger, David; Morgan, Cecilia; Lucy, Debbie; Dunbar, Debora; Graham, Parrie; Madenwald, Tamra; Escamilia, Gina; Koblin, Beryl

    2012-01-01

    Enrollment of US women with sufficient risk of HIV infection into HIV vaccine efficacy trials has proved challenging. A cohort of 799 HIV-negative women, aged 18-45, recruited from three US cities was enrolled to assess recruitment strategies based on geographic risk pockets, social and sexual networks and occurrence of sexual concurrency and to assess HIV seroincidence during follow-up (to be reported later). Among enrolled women, 90% lived or engaged in risk behaviors within a local risk pocket, 64% had a male partner who had concurrent partners and 50% had a male partner who had been recently incarcerated. Nearly half (46%) were recruited through peer referral. At enrollment, 86% of women said they were willing to participate in a vaccine efficacy trial. Results indicate that participant and partner risk behaviors combined with a peer referral recruitment strategy may best identify an at-risk cohort willing to participate in future trials. PMID:23090677

  2. Immunogenicity and safety of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in HIV-infected individuals naive to pneumococcal vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Bhorat, As’ad E.; Madhi, Shabir A.; Laudat, France; Sundaraiyer, Vani; Gurtman, Alejandra; Jansen, Kathrin U.; Scott, Daniel A.; Emini, Emilio A.; Gruber, William C.; Schmoele-Thoma, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Immunocompromised individuals are at an increased risk of pneumococcal disease. Vaccination is recommended as an important strategy to reduce risk of pneumococcal disease in HIV-infected individuals. This study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of three 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) doses followed by one dose of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) at 1-month intervals in pneumococcal vaccine-naive, HIV-infected individuals. Design: This was a phase 3, open-label, single-arm study. Methods: Pneumococcal vaccine-naive, HIV-infected individuals at least 6 years of age with CD4+ T-cell count at least 200 cells/μl and viral load less than 50 000 copies/ml received three doses of PCV13 followed by one dose of PPSV23 at 1-month intervals. Serotype-specific antipneumococcal immune responses were assessed by IgG geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) and opsonophagocytic activity (OPA) assay geometric mean titres (GMTs) after each dose. Local reactions at the PCV13 injection site, systemic and other adverse events were collected. Results: Three hundred and one individuals were enrolled and vaccinated; 279 completed the study. Statistically significant increases in IgG GMCs and OPA GMTs were observed for all serotypes after dose 1 of PCV13 compared with prevaccine levels. GMCs and GMTs were comparable or only modestly increased for all serotypes after PCV13 doses 2 and 3 and after PPSV23. The majority of local reactions and systemic events were mild to moderate in severity. Conclusion: A three-dose regimen of PCV13 was well tolerated in pneumococcal vaccine-naive, HIV-infected individuals. Significant immune responses to all serotypes were observed following the first dose of PCV13, with only modest increases in antibody titres following subsequent PCV13 or PPSV23 administration. PMID:25888646

  3. MTV's "Staying Alive" global campaign promoted interpersonal communication about HIV and positive beliefs about HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Geary, Cynthia Waszak; Burke, Holly McClain; Castelnau, Laure; Neupane, Shailes; Sall, Yacine Ba; Wong, Emily; Tucker, Heidi Toms

    2007-02-01

    In 2002 MTV launched a global multicomponent HIV prevention campaign, "Staying Alive," reaching over 166 countries worldwide. An evaluation of this campaign focused on three diverse sites: Kathmandu, Nepal; So Paulo, Brazil; and Dakar, Senegal. Data were collected before and after campaign implementation through population-based household surveys. Using linear regression techniques, our evaluation examined the effects of campaign exposure on interpersonal communication about HIV and the effects of campaign exposure and interpersonal communication on beliefs about HIV prevention. We found a consistent positive effect of exposure on interpersonal communication across all sites, though there were differences among sites with regard to whom the respondent talked about HIV. We also found a consistent positive effect of exposure on HIV prevention beliefs across sites when interpersonal communication was simultaneously entered into the model. Finally, in two sites we found a relationship between interpersonal communication and HIV prevention beliefs, controlling for exposure, though again, the effects differed by the type of person the communication was with. These similar findings in three diverse sites provide ecological validity of the findings that "Staying Alive" promoted interpersonal communication and influenced young people's beliefs about HIV prevention in a positive way, evidence for the potential of a global media campaign to have an impact on social norms. PMID:17411389

  4. Vaccines for other neonatal infections: vaccination strategies for the prevention of neonatal pertussis.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Peter

    2004-08-01

    Current progress in the use of vaccines against a range of infectious agents, both bacterial (pertussis, pneumococcus and group B streptococcus) and mycobacterial (bacille Calmette-Guérin), to prevent neonatal infection are reviewed by Professors Gilbert, Britton and McIntyre and Dr Peter Richmond. PMID:15270638

  5. Vaccine-elicited Human T Cells Recognizing Conserved Protein Regions Inhibit HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Borthwick, Nicola; Ahmed, Tina; Ondondo, Beatrice; Hayes, Peter; Rose, Annie; Ebrahimsa, Umar; Hayton, Emma-Jo; Black, Antony; Bridgeman, Anne; Rosario, Maximillian; Hill, Adrian VS; Berrie, Eleanor; Moyle, Sarah; Frahm, Nicole; Cox, Josephine; Colloca, Stefano; Nicosia, Alfredo; Gilmour, Jill; McMichael, Andrew J; Dorrell, Lucy; Hanke, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Virus diversity and escape from immune responses are the biggest challenges to the development of an effective vaccine against HIV-1. We hypothesized that T-cell vaccines targeting the most conserved regions of the HIV-1 proteome, which are common to most variants and bear fitness costs when mutated, will generate effectors that efficiently recognize and kill virus-infected cells early enough after transmission to potentially impact on HIV-1 replication and will do so more efficiently than whole protein-based T-cell vaccines. Here, we describe the first-ever administration of conserved immunogen vaccines vectored using prime-boost regimens of DNA, simian adenovirus and modified vaccinia virus Ankara to uninfected UK volunteers. The vaccine induced high levels of effector T cells that recognized virus-infected autologous CD4+ cells and inhibited HIV-1 replication by up to 5.79 log10. The virus inhibition was mediated by both Gag- and Pol- specific effector CD8+ T cells targeting epitopes that are typically subdominant in natural infection. These results provide proof of concept for using a vaccine to target T cells at conserved epitopes, showing that these T cells can control HIV-1 replication in vitro. PMID:24166483

  6. Challenges in the Design of a T Cell Vaccine in the Context of HIV-1 Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Tongo, Marcel; Burgers, Wendy A.

    2014-01-01

    The extraordinary variability of HIV-1 poses a major obstacle to vaccine development. The effectiveness of a vaccine is likely to vary dramatically in different populations infected with different HIV-1 subtypes, unless innovative vaccine immunogens are developed to protect against the range of HIV-1 diversity. Immunogen design for stimulating neutralizing antibody responses focuses on “breadth” – the targeting of a handful of highly conserved neutralizing determinants on the HIV-1 Envelope protein that can recognize the majority of viruses across all HIV-1 subtypes. An effective vaccine will likely require the generation of both broadly cross-neutralizing antibodies and non-neutralizing antibodies, as well as broadly cross-reactive T cells. Several approaches have been taken to design such broadly-reactive and cross-protective T cell immunogens. Artificial sequences have been designed that reduce the genetic distance between a vaccine strain and contemporary circulating viruses; “mosaic” immunogens extend this concept to contain multiple potential T cell epitope (PTE) variants; and further efforts attempt to focus T cell immunity on highly conserved regions of the HIV-1 genome. Thus far, a number of pre-clinical and early clinical studies have been performed assessing these new immunogens. In this review, the potential use of these new immunogens is explored. PMID:25341662

  7. Vaccine Focusing to Cross-Subtype HIV-1 gp120 Variable Loop Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Cardozo, Timothy; Wang, Shixia; Jiang, Xunqing; Kong, Xiang-Peng; Hioe, Catarina; Krachmarov, Chavdar

    2014-01-01

    We designed synthetic, epitope-focused immunogens that preferentially display individual neutralization epitopes targeted by cross-subtype anti-HIV V3 loop neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Vaccination of rabbits with these immunogens resulted in the elicitation of distinct polyclonal serum Abs that exhibit cross-subtype neutralization specificities mimicking the mAbs that guided the design. Our results prove the principle that a predictable range of epitope-specific polyclonal cross-subtype HIV-1 neutralizing Abs can be intentionally elicited in mammals by vaccination. The precise boundaries of the epitopes and conformational flexibility in the presentation of the epitopes in the immunogen appeared to be important for successful elicitation. This work may serve as a starting point for translating the activities of human broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies (bNAbs) into matched immunogens that can contribute to an efficacious HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:25045827

  8. DNA Vaccine Molecular Adjuvants SP-D-BAFF and SP-D-APRIL Enhance Anti-gp120 Immune Response and Increase HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody Titers

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin; Clark, Emily S.; Termini, James M.; Boucher, Justin; Kanagavelu, Saravana; LeBranche, Celia C.; Abraham, Sakhi; Montefiori, David C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) specific for conserved epitopes on the HIV-1 envelope (Env) are believed to be essential for protection against multiple HIV-1 clades. However, vaccines capable of stimulating the production of bNAbs remain a major challenge. Given that polyreactivity and autoreactivity are considered important characteristics of anti-HIV bNAbs, we designed an HIV vaccine incorporating the molecular adjuvants BAFF (B cell activating factor) and APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand) with the potential to facilitate the maturation of polyreactive and autoreactive B cells as well as to enhance the affinity and/or avidity of Env-specific antibodies. We designed recombinant DNA plasmids encoding soluble multitrimers of BAFF and APRIL using surfactant protein D as a scaffold, and we vaccinated mice with these molecular adjuvants using DNA and DNA-protein vaccination strategies. We found that immunization of mice with a DNA vaccine encoding BAFF or APRIL multitrimers, together with interleukin 12 (IL-12) and membrane-bound HIV-1 Env gp140, induced neutralizing antibodies against tier 1 and tier 2 (vaccine strain) viruses. The APRIL-containing vaccine was particularly effective at generating tier 2 neutralizing antibodies following a protein boost. These BAFF and APRIL effects coincided with an enhanced germinal center (GC) reaction, increased anti-gp120 antibody-secreting cells, and increased anti-gp120 functional avidity. Notably, BAFF and APRIL did not cause indiscriminate B cell expansion or an increase in total IgG. We propose that BAFF and APRIL multitrimers are promising molecular adjuvants for vaccines designed to induce bNAbs against HIV-1. IMPORTANCE Recent identification of antibodies that neutralize most HIV-1 strains has revived hopes and efforts to create novel vaccines that can effectively stimulate HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies. However, the multiple immune evasion properties of HIV have hampered these efforts. These include the instability of the gp120 trimer, the inaccessibility of the conserved sequences, highly variable protein sequences, and the loss of HIV-1-specific antibody-producing cells during development. We have shown previously that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily ligands, including BAFF and APRIL, can be multitrimerized using the lung protein SP-D (surfactant protein D), enhancing immune responses. Here we show that DNA or DNA-protein vaccines encoding BAFF or APRIL multitrimers, IL-12p70, and membrane-bound HIV-1 Env gp140 induced tier 1 and tier 2 neutralizing antibodies in a mouse model. BAFF and APRIL enhanced the immune reaction, improved antibody binding, and increased the numbers of anti-HIV-1 antibody-secreting cells. Adaptation of this vaccine design may prove useful in designing preventive HIV-1 vaccines for humans. PMID:25631080

  9. Multiple factors affect immunogenicity of DNA plasmid HIV vaccines in human clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xia; Morgan, Cecilia; Yu, Xuesong; DeRosa, Stephen; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Montefiori, David C.; Kublin, James; Corey, Larry; Keefer, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmid DNA vaccines have been licensed for use in domesticated animals because of their excellent immunogenicity, but none have yet been licensed for use in humans. Here we report a retrospective analysis of 1218 healthy human volunteers enrolled in 10 phase I clinical trials in which DNA plasmids encoding HIV antigens were administered. Elicited T-cell immune responses were quantified by validated intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) stimulated with HIV peptide pools. HIV-specific binding and neutralizing antibody activities were also analyzed using validated assays. Results showed that, in the absence of adjuvants and boosting with alternative vaccines, DNA vaccines elicited CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell responses in an average of 13.3% (95% CI: 9.8% to 17.8%) and 37.7% (95% CI: 31.9% to 43.8%) of vaccine recipients, respectively. Three vaccinations (versus 2) improved the proportion of subjects with antigen-specific CD8+ responses (p=0.02), as did increased DNA dosage (p=0.007). Furthermore, female gender and participants having a lower Body Mass Index were independently associated with higher CD4+ T-cell response rate (p=0.001 and p=0.008, respectively). These vaccines elicited minimal neutralizing and binding antibody responses. These findings of the immunogenicity of HIV DNA vaccines in humans can provide guidance for future clinical trials. PMID:25820067

  10. AIDS in rural Africa: a paradigm for HIV-1 prevention.

    PubMed

    Hudson, C P

    1996-07-01

    Networks of concurrent sexual partnerships may be the primary cause of epidemic spread of HIV-1 in parts of sub-Saharan Africa. This pattern of sexual behaviour increases the likelihood that individuals experiencing primary HIV-1 infection transmit the virus to other persons. Networks of concurrent partnerships are likely to be important in both the early ('epidemic') and late ('endemic') phases of HIV-1 transmission. Interventions should aim to break the sexual networks, whatever the stage of the epidemic. However, prevention of transmission in the endemic phase also requires a greater awareness of early clinical manifestations of HIV-1 infection in the general population. Such awareness, coupled with the availability of condoms and access to HIV-1 testing facilities, may reduce transmission in discordant couples. PMID:8876353

  11. Heterosexual HIV transmission dynamics: implications for prevention and control.

    PubMed

    Chin, James; Bennett, Anthony

    2007-08-01

    Understanding the epidemiologic definition of epidemic versus non-epidemic spread of an infectious disease agent and the different patterns of heterosexual HIV transmission are needed to fully understand the low potential for heterosexual HIV epidemics in most heterosexual populations. Epidemic sexual HIV transmission can occur only in populations where there are large numbers of persons who have unprotected sex with multiple and concurrent sex partners. How high HIV prevalence may reach in these populations depends on the size and overlap of sex networks, and the prevalence of facilitating and protective factors that can greatly increase or limit the amount of infected blood and sexual fluids exchanged during intercourse. The wide difference in potentials for heterosexual HIV epidemics that exists within and between countries must be recognized, accepted and monitored in order to design and focus prevention strategies where they are most needed and most effective. PMID:17686210

  12. HIV/AIDS prevention: knowledge, attitudes and education practices of secondary school health personnel in 14 cities of China.

    PubMed

    Chen, J Q; Dunne, M P; Zhao, D C

    2004-01-01

    This study assessed the preparedness of school health personnel to develop and deliver HIV/AIDS prevention education programmes for young people in China. A survey of 653 personnel working in secondary schools in 14 cities was conducted. More than 90% had basic knowledge of ways in which HIV can be transmitted, but knowledge of ways in which the virus is not transmitted needs improvement. Substantial numbers of teachers were not sure whether there was an effective preventive vaccine (42%) or did not know whether AIDS was a curable illness or not (32%). The great majority approved of AIDS prevention programmes in universities (98%) and secondary schools (91%), although fewer (58%) agreed that the topic was appropriate for primary schools. Currently, most classroom activities focuses on teaching facts about HIV/AIDS transmission, while less than half are taught about HIV/AIDS related discrimination and life skills to reduce peer pressure. Personnel with some prior training on HIV/ AIDS education (53%) had better factual knowledge, more tolerant attitudes and more confidence in teaching about HIV/AIDS than those without training. The majority of teachers indicated a need for more resource books, audiovisual products, expert guidance, school principal support and dissemination of national AIDS prevention education guidelines to schools. PMID:18839862

  13. Vaccines to prevent severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-induced disease

    PubMed Central

    Enjuanes, Luis; DeDiego, Marta L.; Álvarez, Enrique; Deming, Damon; Sheahan, Tim; Baric, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    An important effort has been performed after the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in 2003 to diagnose and prevent virus spreading. Several types of vaccines have been developed including inactivated viruses, subunit vaccines, virus-like particles (VLPs), DNA vaccines, heterologous expression systems, and vaccines derived from SARS-CoV genome by reverse genetics. This review describes several aspects essential to develop SARS-CoV vaccines, such as the correlates of protection, virus serotypes, vaccination side effects, and bio-safeguards that can be engineered into recombinant vaccine approaches based on the SARS-CoV genome. The production of effective and safe vaccines to prevent SARS has led to the development of promising vaccine candidates, in contrast to the design of vaccines for other coronaviruses, that in general has been less successful. After preclinical trials in animal models, efficacy and safety evaluation of the most promising vaccine candidates described has to be performed in humans. PMID:17416434

  14. Couple-oriented prenatal HIV counseling for HIV primary prevention: an acceptability study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A large proportion of the 2.5 million new adult HIV infections that occurred worldwide in 2007 were in stable couples. Feasible and acceptable strategies to improve HIV prevention in a conjugal context are scarce. In the preparatory phase of the ANRS 12127 Prenahtest multi-site HIV prevention trial, we assessed the acceptability of couple-oriented post-test HIV counseling (COC) and men's involvement within prenatal care services, among pregnant women, male partners and health care workers in Cameroon, Dominican Republic, Georgia and India. Methods Quantitative and qualitative research methods were used: direct observations of health services; in-depth interviews with women, men and health care workers; monitoring of the COC intervention and exit interviews with COC participants. Results In-depth interviews conducted with 92 key informants across the four sites indicated that men rarely participated in antenatal care (ANC) services, mainly because these are traditionally and programmatically a woman's domain. However men's involvement was reported to be acceptable and needed in order to improve ANC and HIV prevention services. COC was considered by the respondents to be a feasible and acceptable strategy to actively encourage men to participate in prenatal HIV counseling and testing and overall in reproductive health services. Conclusions One of the keys to men's involvement within prenatal HIV counseling and testing is the better understanding of couple relationships, attitudes and communication patterns between men and women, in terms of HIV and sexual and reproductive health; this conjugal context should be taken into account in the provision of quality prenatal HIV counseling, which aims at integrated PMTCT and primary prevention of HIV. PMID:20403152

  15. Antibody persistence and T-cell balance: Two key factors confronting HIV vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, George K.; DeVico, Anthony L.; Gallo, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    The quest for a prophylactic AIDS vaccine is ongoing, but it is now clear that the successful vaccine must elicit protective antibody responses. Accordingly, intense efforts are underway to identify immunogens that elicit these responses. Regardless of the mechanism of antibody-mediated protection, be it neutralization, Fc-mediated effector function, or both, antibody persistence and appropriate T-cell help are significant problems confronting the development of a successful AIDS vaccine. Here, we discuss the evidence illustrating the poor persistence of antibody responses to Env, the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1, and the related problem of CD4+ T-cell responses that compromise vaccine efficacy by creating excess cellular targets of HIV-1 infection. Finally, we propose solutions to both problems that are applicable to all Env-based AIDS vaccines regardless of the mechanism of antibody-mediated protection. PMID:25349379

  16. Economic benefits of inactivated influenza vaccines in the prevention of seasonal influenza in children

    PubMed Central

    Salleras, Luis; Navas, Encarna; Torner, Nuria; Prat, Andreu A.; Garrido, Patricio; Soldevila, Núria; Domínguez, Angela

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review published studies that evaluated the efficiency of inactivated influenza vaccination in preventing seasonal influenza in children. The vaccine evaluated was the influenza-inactivated vaccine in 10 studies and the virosomal inactivated vaccine in 3 studies. The results show that yearly vaccination of children with the inactivated influenza vaccine saves money from the societal and family perspectives but not from the public or private provider perspective. When vaccination does not save money, the cost-effectiveness ratios were very acceptable. It can be concluded, that inactivated influenza vaccination of children is a very efficient intervention. PMID:23295894

  17. Collective efficacy and HIV prevention in South African townships.

    PubMed

    Cain, Demetria; Pitpitan, Eileen V; Eaton, Lisa; Carey, Kate B; Carey, Michael P; Mehlomakulu, Vuyelwa; Harel, Ofer; Simbayi, Leickness C; Mwaba, Kelvin; Kalichman, Seth C

    2013-10-01

    South African townships have high HIV prevalence and a strong need for collective action to change normative sexual risk behaviors. This study investigated the relationship between perceptions of individuals about collective efficacy in the community's ability to prevent HIV and their personal HIV risk behaviors. Men (n = 1,581) and women (n = 718) completed anonymous surveys within four Black African Townships in Cape Town, South Africa from June 2008 to December 2010. Measures included demographics, alcohol use, attitudinal and behavioral norms, sexual health communications, and sexual risk behaviors. In multivariate logistic regressions, men were more likely to endorse collective efficacy if they were married, drank less often in alcohol serving establishments, believed that fewer men approve of HIV risk behaviors, talk more with others about HIV/AIDS, and had more sex partners in the past month. Women were more likely to endorse collective efficacy if they drank alcohol less often, talked more with others about HIV/AIDS, had more sex partners in the past month, but reported fewer unprotected sex acts in the past month. Community level interventions that strengthen collective efficacy beliefs will have to consider both protective and risk behaviors associated with believing that the community is ready and capable of preventing HIV. PMID:23660646

  18. Collective efficacy and HIV prevention in South African townships

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Demetria; Pitpitan, Eileen V.; Eaton, Lisa; Carey, Kate B.; Carey, Michael P.; Mehlomakulu, Vuyelwa; Harel, Ofer; Simbayi, Leickness C.; Mwaba, Kelvin; Kalichman, Seth C.

    2013-01-01

    South African townships have high HIV prevalence and a strong need for collective action to change normative sexual risk behaviors. This study investigated the relationship between perceptions of individuals about collective efficacy in the community’s ability to prevent HIV and their personal HIV risk behaviors. Men (n=1581) and women (n=718) completed anonymous surveys within four Black African Townships in Cape Town, South Africa from June 2008 to December 2010. Measures included demographics, alcohol use, attitudinal and behavioral norms, sexual health communications, and sexual risk behaviors. In multivariate logistic regressions, men were more likely to endorse collective efficacy if they were married, drank less often in alcohol serving establishments, believed that fewer men approve of HIV risk behaviors, talk more with others about HIV/AIDS, and had more sex partners in the past month. Women were more likely to endorse collective efficacy if they drank alcohol less often, talked more with others about HIV/AIDS, had more sex partners in the past month, but reported fewer unprotected sex acts in the past month. Community level interventions that strengthen collective efficacy beliefs will have to consider both protective and risk behaviors associated with believing that the community is ready and capable of preventing HIV. PMID:23660646

  19. HIV prevention in the Hispanic community: sex, culture, and empowerment.

    PubMed

    Marín, Barbara VanOss

    2003-07-01

    To address the serious HIV epidemic in the Hispanic community in the United States, the underlying causes of the epidemic must be addressed. Marginalization, including homophobia, poverty, and racism, as well as cultural factors such as machismo and sexual silence disempower people, making HIV prevention difficult. This article reviews evidence for the impact of marginalization and cultural factors on HIV risk and proposes a cycle of disempowerment. Three examples of empowerment interventions developed specifically for Hispanics (targeting heterosexuals, women, and gay men) are presented, and how these interventions address disempowerment is discussed. One intervention is used to illustrate principles of developing culturally appropriate interventions. PMID:12861921

  20. Compendium of HIV Prevention Interventions with Evidence of Effectiveness. From CDC's HIV/AIDS Prevention Research Synthesis Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (DHHS/PHS), Atlanta, GA.

    This publication was developed in response to requests by prevention service providers and planners, for science-based interventions that work in HIV/AIDS prevention. All interventions came from behavioral or social studies that had both intervention and control/comparison groups and positive results for behavioral or health outcomes. The document…

  1. Willingness to participate in HIV vaccine efficacy trials among high risk men and women from fishing communities along Lake Victoria in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Asiki, Gershim; Abaasa, Andrew; Ruzagira, Eugene; Kibengo, Freddie; Bahemuka, Ubaldo; Mulondo, Jerry; Seeley, Janet; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Delany, Sinead; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kamali, Anatoli

    2013-01-01

    Introduction HIV vaccine efficacy trials conducted in suitable populations are anticipated in sub-Saharan Africa. We assessed the willingness to participate in future vaccine trials among individuals from fishing communities along Lake Victoria, Uganda. Methods From July to October 2012, we described a hypothetical vaccine trial to 328 (62.2% men) adults (18–49 years), at risk of HIV infection within 6 months of enrolment in a cohort and assessed their willingness to participate in the trial. Chi-square and logistic regression models were fitted to assess associations between vaccine trial attributes, participants’ characteristics and willingness to participate. Results Overall, 99.4% expressed willingness to participate in the hypothetical HIV vaccine trial. This decreased marginally with introduction of particular vaccine trial attributes. Delaying pregnancy for 10 months and large blood draw had the largest effects on reducing willingness to participate to 93.5% (p=0.02) and 94.5% (p=0.01) respectively. All the vaccine trial attributes in combination reduced willingness to participate to 90.6%. This overall reduction in willingness to participate was significantly associated with gender and exchange of gifts for sex in multivariable analysis; women were more than three times as likely to have expressed unwillingness to participate in future vaccine trials as men (aOR = 3.4, 95% CI: 1.55, 7.33) and participants who never received gifts in exchange for sex were more than four times as likely to have expressed unwillingness as those who received gifts for sex (aOR=4.5; 95%CI 1.30, 16.70). The main motivators of participation were access to HIV counselling and testing services (31.9%), HIV education (18.0%), hope of being prevented from acquiring HIV (16.6%) and health care (12.5%). Conclusion Our study identifies an important population for inclusion in future HIV prevention trials and provides important insights into acceptability of trial procedures, differences in decisions of women and men and areas for further participant education. PMID:24021306

  2. Use of preventive interventions by persons infected with type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The Pulmonary Complications of HIV Study Group.

    PubMed

    Glassroth, J; Jordan, M; Wallace, J M; Kvale, P A; Follmann, D A; Rosen, M J; Reichman, L B; Mossar, M; Hopewell, P C

    1994-01-01

    Measures aimed at preventing complications and slowing progression of type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) can potentially reduce morbidity. Although little is known about the use of such measures, such data are critical for program planning. This study was performed to quantify the frequency and patterns of use for such interventions. We enrolled 1,171 persons infected with HIV, but without an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) defining diagnosis, in a multicenter prospective study of the pulmonary complications of HIV infection. Participants were homosexual/bisexual men, injection drug users (IDUs), or female sexual contacts of HIV-infected men. Centers were university-based and geographically dispersed across the United States. Standardized questionnaires were administered on entry and at three-month or six-month intervals; we correlated use of general and HIV-related preventive measures before entry and during the first three years in study with clinical/epidemiologic characteristics. Overall use of preventive interventions was low; only one third of study entrants had used such measures. Use was greatest among those with advanced HIV infection, but only half used preventive measures on entry; IDUs were less likely than homosexuals to use these services. Although use of interventions such as anti-Pneumocystis and antiretroviral agents increased during study participation, general measures such as pneumococcal vaccine and tuberculosis prophylaxis were used by less than 30% of those eligible for use. Among IDUs, cumulative use of these measures remained below 20% during the first three years of this study. We conclude that HIV-infected persons underuse preventive interventions, particularly general measures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7848668

  3. The Global HIV Archive: Facilitating the Transition from Science to Practice of Efficacious HIV Prevention Interventions*

    PubMed Central

    Card, Josefina J.; Newman, Emily N.; Golden, Rachel E.; Kuhn, Tamara; Lomonaco, Carmela

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development, content, and capabilities of the online Global HIV Archive (GHA). With the goal of facilitating widespread adaptation and appropriate use of efficacious HIV prevention programs throughout the globe, GHA has: first, expanded and updated the search for HIV prevention programs originating in low-resource countries; second, identified those meritorious HIV prevention programs meeting established efficacy criteria of technical merit, replicability, and positive outcomes; third, prepared both implementation and evaluation materials from the efficacious programs for public use; fourth, developed interactive wizards or capacity-building tools to facilitate appropriate program selection, implementation, and adaptation; and, fifth, made the efficacious programs and accompanying wizards available to health practitioners throughout the globe in both printed and online formats. PMID:24563820

  4. Building collaborative networks for HIV/AIDS vaccine development: the AVIP experience.

    PubMed

    Ferrantelli, Flavia; Buttò, Stefano; Cafaro, Aurelio; Wahren, Britta; Ensoli, Barbara

    2006-11-01

    The need for an effective HIV/AIDS vaccine is imperative to halt a pandemic that involves more than 40 million individuals worldwide as of 2005 and is causing enormous socio-economic losses, especially in developing countries (DC). The overall failure of more than two decades of HIV vaccine research justifies the demands for a concerted effort for the rapid development of new and efficacious vaccines against HIV/AIDS. In this context, building international collaborative networks is a must for speeding up scientific research and optimizing the use of funding in a synergistic fashion, as resources for HIV/AIDS are limited and do not involve most of the biggest Pharmas that are more interested in drug discovery. The AIDS Vaccine Integrated Project (AVIP) consortium is an example of synergistic partnership of international European Union and DC experts with a common research goal. AVIP is a European Commission-funded (FP-6), consortium-based, 5-year program directed to the fast development of new HIV/AIDS vaccine candidates to be tested in phase I clinical trials in Europe for future advancement to phase II/III testing in DC. To ensure their rapid development, AVIP novel combined vaccines include both regulatory and structural HIV antigens, which have already been tested, as single components, in phase I clinical trials. In particular, such combination vaccines may be superior to earlier vaccine candidates, the vast majority of which are based only on either structural or regulatory HIV products. In fact, the generation of immune responses to both types of viral antigens expressed either early (regulatory products) or late (structural products) during the viral life cycle can maximize immune targeting of both primary or chronic viral infection. Further, the rational design of combined vaccines allows exploitation of immunomodulatory functions of HIV regulatory proteins, which can improve immunity against structural vaccine components. The building of the AVIP consortium and its scientific strategy will be reviewed in this paper as an example of the establishment of a consortium regulated by a specific intellectual property agreement. PMID:16983452

  5. Study designs for identifying risk compensation behavior among users of biomedical HIV prevention technologies: Balancing methodological rigor and research ethics

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    The growing evidence base for biomedical HIV prevention interventions – such as oral pre-exposure prophylaxis, microbicides, male circumcision, treatment as prevention, and eventually prevention vaccines – has given rise to concerns about the ways in which users of these biomedical products may adjust their HIV risk behaviors based on the perception that they are prevented from infection. Known as risk compensation, this behavioral adjustment draws on the theory of “risk homeostasis,” which has previously been applied to phenomena as diverse as Lyme disease vaccination, insurance mandates, and automobile safety. Little rigorous evidence exists to answer risk compensation concerns in the biomedical HIV prevention literature, in part because the field has not systematically evaluated the study designs available for testing these behaviors. The goals of this Commentary are to explain the origins of risk compensation behavior in risk homeostasis theory, to reframe risk compensation as a testable response to the perception of reduced risk, and to assess the methodological rigor and ethical justification of study designs aiming to isolate risk compensation responses. Although the most rigorous methodological designs for assessing risk compensation behavior may be unavailable due to ethical flaws, several strategies can help investigators identify potential risk compensation behavior during Phase II, Phase III, and Phase IV testing of new technologies. Where concerns arise regarding risk compensation behavior, empirical evidence about the incidence, types, and extent of these behavioral changes can illuminate opportunities to better support the users of new HIV prevention strategies. This Commentary concludes by suggesting a new way to conceptualize risk compensation behavior in the HIV prevention context. PMID:23597916

  6. Study designs for identifying risk compensation behavior among users of biomedical HIV prevention technologies: balancing methodological rigor and research ethics.

    PubMed

    Underhill, Kristen

    2013-10-01

    The growing evidence base for biomedical HIV prevention interventions - such as oral pre-exposure prophylaxis, microbicides, male circumcision, treatment as prevention, and eventually prevention vaccines - has given rise to concerns about the ways in which users of these biomedical products may adjust their HIV risk behaviors based on the perception that they are prevented from infection. Known as risk compensation, this behavioral adjustment draws on the theory of "risk homeostasis," which has previously been applied to phenomena as diverse as Lyme disease vaccination, insurance mandates, and automobile safety. Little rigorous evidence exists to answer risk compensation concerns in the biomedical HIV prevention literature, in part because the field has not systematically evaluated the study designs available for testing these behaviors. The goals of this Commentary are to explain the origins of risk compensation behavior in risk homeostasis theory, to reframe risk compensation as a testable response to the perception of reduced risk, and to assess the methodological rigor and ethical justification of study designs aiming to isolate risk compensation responses. Although the most rigorous methodological designs for assessing risk compensation behavior may be unavailable due to ethical flaws, several strategies can help investigators identify potential risk compensation behavior during Phase II, Phase III, and Phase IV testing of new technologies. Where concerns arise regarding risk compensation behavior, empirical evidence about the incidence, types, and extent of these behavioral changes can illuminate opportunities to better support the users of new HIV prevention strategies. This Commentary concludes by suggesting a new way to conceptualize risk compensation behavior in the HIV prevention context. PMID:23597916

  7. Expanded breadth of the T-cell response to mosaic HIV-1 envelope DNA vaccination

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, Bette; Fischer, William; Wallstrom, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    An effective AIDS vaccine must control highly diverse circulating strains of HIV-1. Among HIV -I gene products, the envelope (Env) protein contains variable as well as conserved regions. In this report, an informatic approach to the design of T-cell vaccines directed to HIV -I Env M group global sequences was tested. Synthetic Env antigens were designed to express mosaics that maximize the inclusion of common potential Tcell epitope (PTE) 9-mers and minimize the inclusion of rare epitopes likely to elicit strain-specific responses. DNA vaccines were evaluated using intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in inbred mice with a standardized panel of highly conserved 15-mer PTE peptides. I, 2 and 3 mosaic sets were developed that increased theoretical epitope coverage. The breadth and magnitude ofT-cell immunity stimulated by these vaccines were compared to natural strain Env's; additional comparisons were performed on mutant Env's, including gpl60 or gpl45 with or without V regions and gp41 deletions. Among them, the 2 or 3 mosaic Env sets elicited the optimal CD4 and CD8 responses. These responses were most evident in CD8 T cells; the 3 mosaic set elicited responses to an average of 8 peptide pools compared to 2 pools for a set of3 natural Env's. Synthetic mosaic HIV -I antigens can therefore induce T-cell responses with expanded breadth and may facilitate the development of effective T -cell-based HIV -1 vaccines.

  8. Broadly Neutralizing Antibody-Guided Carbohydrate-Based HIV Vaccine Design: Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-Cheng; Zheng, Xiu-Jing; Ye, Xin-Shan

    2016-02-01

    The HIV envelope (Env) is heavily glycosylated, facilitating the spread and survival of HIV in many ways. Some potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) such as 2G12, PG9, PG16, and PGTs can recognize the conserved glycan residues on Env. The bnAbs, which often emerge after many years of chronic infection, provide insight into the vulnerability of HIV and can therefore guide the design of vaccines. Many carbohydrate-conjugated vaccines have been designed to induce bnAb-like antibodies, but none have yet been successful. The low antigenicity of these vaccines is one possible explanation. New strategies have been applied to obtain high-affinity antigens of glycan-dependent and other bnAbs. However, when used as immunogens in vivo, high-affinity antigens are still insufficient in eliciting bnAb-like antibodies. bnAbs generally possess some unusual features and may therefore be suppressed by the host immune system. In view of this situation, some immunization regimens based on the affinity maturation of antibodies have been tested. Herein we summarize recent studies into the design of carbohydrate-based HIV vaccines and some valuable experiences gained in work with other bnAb-based HIV vaccines. PMID:26762799

  9. 77 FR 36550 - Office of Clinical and Preventive Services Funding Opportunity: National HIV Program for Enhanced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ...: National HIV Program for Enhanced HIV/AIDS Screening and Engagement in Care Announcement Type: New. Funding... applications for the Office of Clinical and Preventive Services: National HIV Program for Enhanced HIV/AIDS... Syndrome (HIV/ AIDS) Program serves as the primary source for national advocacy, policy development,...

  10. A Review of HIV Prevention Interventions for Juvenile Offenders

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Angela; Fasciano, John; Brown, Larry K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To conduct a critical review of all HIV prevention intervention studies conducted with adolescents in juvenile justice settings to inform future intervention development. Method PubMed and PsycInfo database searches were conducted for peer-reviewed, published HIV prevention intervention studies with juvenile offenders. Results Sixteen studies were identified (N = 3,700 adolescents). Half of the projects utilized rigorous methodologies to determine intervention effect on behavior change, such as conducting a randomized controlled trial (n = 8). Nine studies reported behaviors at least 3 months post-intervention and five out of nine showed decreases in sexual risk behavior. Conclusions Several HIV prevention programs with juvenile offenders have led to sexual risk reduction, although effect sizes are modest. Most existing programs have neglected to address the impact of family, mental health, and substance use on HIV risk. More work is needed to develop evidence-based interventions that include HIV prevention strategies relevant and appropriate for the juvenile justice setting. PMID:19741021

  11. Framing the social in biomedical HIV prevention trials: a 20-year retrospective

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical research is critical to identifying effective and safe interventions, such as vaccines, microbicides, male circumcision and antiretrovirals, for prevention. Funding for clinical prevention trials is highly competitive and the benchmarks of success ultimately reduce to quickly enrolling a select group of people at risk, keeping them enrolled, and inducing them to be compliant with trial requirements - all at the lowest cost possible. Juxtaposed with this reality is the fact that HIV is situated with poverty, exploitation, assaults on human dignity, and human rights abuses. The result is a complex web of ethical challenges that are socially constructed along lines of wealth and power. While social science research methods are commonly employed to examine such topics, they have played a marginal role in biomedical HIV prevention research. Why? To answer this question, a core set of persistent interlocking social, behavioural and ethical challenges to biomedical HIV prevention research are described. A critique is offered on how the social has been framed relative to the behavioural, ethical and biomedical components. Examples of how this framing has devalued social knowledge are provided, including the conflation of qualitative research with anecdotal reporting, a bias toward brevity and accuracy over external validity, and difficulties in distinguishing between a moral understanding of social norms and achieving a moral outcome when confronted with ethical challenges in research. Lastly, opportunities are identified for enhancing the success of biomedical HIV prevention research through development of a coherent programme of social science research. Recommendations are offered for reframing the social as a valid domain of scientific inquiry in this highly applied and interdisciplinary context. PMID:21968079

  12. Inhibition of Heat Shock Protein 90 Prevents HIV Rebound.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Pheroze; Maidji, Ekaterina; Stoddart, Cheryl A

    2016-05-01

    HIV evades eradication because transcriptionally dormant proviral genomes persist in long-lived reservoirs of resting CD4(+) T cells and myeloid cells, which are the source of viral rebound after cessation of antiretroviral therapy. Dormant HIV genomes readily produce infectious virus upon cellular activation because host transcription factors activated specifically by cell stress and heat shock mediate full-length HIV transcription. The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is overexpressed during heat shock and activates inducible cellular transcription factors. Here we show that heat shock accelerates HIV transcription through induction of Hsp90 activity, which activates essential HIV-specific cellular transcription factors (NF-κB, NFAT, and STAT5), and that inhibition of Hsp90 greatly reduces gene expression mediated by these factors. More importantly, we show that Hsp90 controls virus transcription in vivo by specific Hsp90 inhibitors in clinical development, tanespimycin (17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin) and AUY922, which durably prevented viral rebound in HIV-infected humanized NOD scid IL-2Rγ(-/-) bone marrow-liver-thymus mice up to 11 weeks after treatment cessation. Despite the absence of rebound viremia, we were able to recover infectious HIV from PBMC with heat shock. Replication-competent virus was detected in spleen cells from these nonviremic Hsp90 inhibitor-treated mice, indicating the presence of a tissue reservoir of persistent infection. Our novel findings provide in vivo evidence that inhibition of Hsp90 activity prevents HIV gene expression in replication-competent cellular reservoirs that would typically cause rebound in plasma viremia after antiretroviral therapy cessation. Alternating or supplementing Hsp90 inhibitors with current antiretroviral therapy regimens could conceivably suppress rebound viremia from persistent HIV reservoirs. PMID:26957545

  13. Inhibition of Heat Shock Protein 90 Prevents HIV Rebound*

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Pheroze; Maidji, Ekaterina; Stoddart, Cheryl A.

    2016-01-01

    HIV evades eradication because transcriptionally dormant proviral genomes persist in long-lived reservoirs of resting CD4+ T cells and myeloid cells, which are the source of viral rebound after cessation of antiretroviral therapy. Dormant HIV genomes readily produce infectious virus upon cellular activation because host transcription factors activated specifically by cell stress and heat shock mediate full-length HIV transcription. The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is overexpressed during heat shock and activates inducible cellular transcription factors. Here we show that heat shock accelerates HIV transcription through induction of Hsp90 activity, which activates essential HIV-specific cellular transcription factors (NF-κB, NFAT, and STAT5), and that inhibition of Hsp90 greatly reduces gene expression mediated by these factors. More importantly, we show that Hsp90 controls virus transcription in vivo by specific Hsp90 inhibitors in clinical development, tanespimycin (17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin) and AUY922, which durably prevented viral rebound in HIV-infected humanized NOD scid IL-2Rγ−/− bone marrow-liver-thymus mice up to 11 weeks after treatment cessation. Despite the absence of rebound viremia, we were able to recover infectious HIV from PBMC with heat shock. Replication-competent virus was detected in spleen cells from these nonviremic Hsp90 inhibitor-treated mice, indicating the presence of a tissue reservoir of persistent infection. Our novel findings provide in vivo evidence that inhibition of Hsp90 activity prevents HIV gene expression in replication-competent cellular reservoirs that would typically cause rebound in plasma viremia after antiretroviral therapy cessation. Alternating or supplementing Hsp90 inhibitors with current antiretroviral therapy regimens could conceivably suppress rebound viremia from persistent HIV reservoirs. PMID:26957545

  14. Development of Topical Microbicides to Prevent the Sexual Transmission of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Buckheit, Robert W.; Watson, Karen M.; Morrow, Kathleen M.; Ham, Anthony S.

    2009-01-01

    Women comprise almost 50% of the population of people living with HIV and the majority of these women contracted the virus through sexual transmission in monogamous relationships in the developing world. In these environments, where women are not empowered to protect themselves through the negotiation of condom use, effective means of preventing HIV transmission are urgently needed. In the absence of an approved and effective vaccine, microbicides have become the strategy of choice to provide women with the ability to prevent HIV transmission from their infected partners. Topical microbicides are agents specifically developed and formulated for use in either the vaginal or rectal environment that prevent infection by sexually transmitted infectious organisms, including pathogenic viruses, bacteria and fungi. Although a microbicidal product will have many of the same properties as other anti-infective agents and would be similarly developed through human clinical trials, microbicide development bears its own challenges related to formulation and delivery and the unique environment in which the product must act, as well as the requirement to develop a product that is acceptable to the user. Herein, perspectives based on preclinical and clinical microbicide development experience, which have led to an evolving microbicide development algorithm, will be discussed. This article forms part of a special issue of Antiviral Research marking the 25th anniversary of antiretroviral drug discovery and development, Vol 85, issue 1, 2010”. PMID:19874851

  15. A Qualitative Study Among Injection Drug Using Women in Rhode Island: Attitudes Toward Testing, Treatment, and Vaccination for Hepatitis and HIV

    PubMed Central

    LALLY, MICHELLE A.; MONTSTREAM-QUAS, SYDNEY A.; TANAKA, SARA; TEDESCHI, SARA K.; MORROW, KATHLEEN M.

    2012-01-01

    HIV and hepatitis C virus infection are serious and prevalent health conditions among many women who inject drugs. Qualitative interviews with 20 injection drug using women at a short term drug treatment center in Rhode Island revealed six primary barriers and facilitators for testing and receiving results and treatment for hepatitis and HIV, as well as for hepatitis vaccination. The primary barriers were prioritization of drug use; low level of diseases-pecific knowledge; stigmatization; accessibility of testing, results and treatment; and psychological factors. The primary facilitator was interest in promoting one’s health. Our findings indicate that injection drug using women experience multiple barriers to HIV and hepatitis testing, results, treatment and vaccination. Methods for improving the motivators for health, facilitating infectious disease prevention, and decreasing unnecessary disease complications of injection drug using women need to be utilized. These methods should include strategies that minimize stigma and facilitate accessibility of health care. PMID:18095839

  16. Recent advances in humanized mice: accelerating the development of an HIV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tager, Andrew M; Pensiero, Michael; Allen, Todd M

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in the development of humanized mice hold great promise to advance our understanding of protective immunity to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and to aid in the design of an effective HIV vaccine. This supplement of the Journal of Infectious Diseases summarizes work in the humanized mouse model presented at an HIV Humanized Mouse workshop in Boston, Massachusetts, in November 2012, including recent advances in the development of humanized mice, the trafficking of human immune cells following mucosal HIV transmission, the role of immune activation and Toll-like receptor agonists in the control of HIV, the induction and efficacy of HIV-specific cellular and humoral immune responses, and the preclinical modeling of novel anti-HIV therapeutics. Many gaps remain in our understanding of how to design an effective HIV vaccine and novel therapeutics to eliminate the viral reservoir. Promising early results from studies in humanized mice suggest great potential and enthusiasm for this model to accelerate these critical areas of HIV research. PMID:24151317

  17. Multipurpose prevention technologies: the future of HIV and STI protection.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Romero, José A; Deal, Carolyn; Herold, Betsy C; Schiller, John; Patton, Dorothy; Zydowsky, Thomas; Romano, Joe; Petro, Christopher D; Narasimhan, Manjulaa

    2015-07-01

    Every day, more than 1 million people are newly infected with sexually transmitted infections (STIs) that can lead to morbidity, mortality, and an increased risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition. Existing prevention and management strategies, including behavior change, condom promotion, and therapy have not reduced the global incidence and prevalence, pointing to the need for novel innovative strategies. This review summarizes important issues raised during a satellite session at the first HIV Research for Prevention (R4P) conference, held in Cape Town, on October 31, 2014. We explore key STIs that are challenging public health today, new biomedical prevention approaches including multipurpose prevention technologies (MPTs), and the scientific and regulatory hurdles that must be overcome to make combination prevention tools a reality. PMID:25759332

  18. Adherence challenges with drugs for pre-exposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Gengiah, Tanuja N.; Moosa, Atika; Naidoo, Anushka; Mansoor, Leila E.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are 34 million people living with HIV worldwide and each year this number increases. Until a vaccine is discovered, the prevention of new HIV infections remains an urgent priority. Several trials studying the use of oral and topical agents for the prevention of HIV infection have already been completed. Adherence has proved to be a major challenge in achieving product efficacy. Aim of the review To provide the clinical pharmacist with an understanding of the oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and topical microbicide product pipeline whilst emphasizing the critical importance of adherence to these drugs to avert HIV infection. Methods PubMed/Medline and the web-based clinical trials registry (ClinTrials.gov) were searched using appropriate key words. For the time period 1992 to 2013 - all phase II and phase III safety and effectiveness studies - testing agents for prevention of HIV infection were included in the review., Efficacy estimates, adherence estimates and reported challenges with adherence were extracted. Results Twenty four phase II and III clinical trials were found during review. Of these, 20 trials have been completed, and six trials show effectiveness in preventing HIV infection. The majority of the successful trials were to oral PrEP and to date only one microbicide trial of a vaginal antiretroviral microbicide gel has showed effectiveness. Adherence to study product played a major role in trial outcomes and there are several reasons for non-adherence. These include high on-trial pregnancy rates, low trial retention rates, low participant perception of risk, participant characteristics such as age<25 years, single status, migratory partners and trial fatigue. Study product characteristics such as dosage form, dosing interval, as well as associated adverse events may also influence adherence. Conclusion Moderate to high adherence is critical to demonstrate efficacy of drugs for HIV prevention. For topical agents, intermittent use associated with coitus is more effective than daily use, particularly if sex is infrequent or partners migrant. For oral agents, daily use is effective but the motivation to use the drug and high risk perception is important. In serodiscordant couples, early initiation of HAART in the infected partner affords almost complete protection to the negative partner. Drugs need to be tailored to the population at risk and availability of multiple drug options are important. PMID:24129582

  19. HIV & AIDS Prevention Guide for Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerro, Marc

    This guide is intended to help parents of adolescents and adults with mental retardation to teach their sons and daughters about HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). An official resolution on AIDS adopted by The Arc, an organization for citizens with mental retardation, begins the guide. This…

  20. Campus HIV Prevention Strategies: Planning for Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoban, Mary T.; Ottenritter, Nan W.; Gascoigne, Jan L.; Kerr, Dianne L.

    This document presents the results of the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey (NCHRBS) conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) that pertain to HIV transmission. These results include sexual assault, alcohol and other drug use, and sexual behaviors. The survey was administered to a nationally representative random sample of…

  1. Influence of HIV and HCV on T cell antigen presentation and challenges in the development of vaccines

    PubMed Central

    John, Mina; Gaudieri, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Some of the central challenges for developing effective vaccines against HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are similar. Both infections are caused by small, highly mutable, rapidly replicating RNA viruses with the ability to establish long-term chronic pathogenic infection in human hosts. HIV has caused 60 million infections globally and HCV 180 million and both viruses may co-exist among certain populations by virtue of common blood-borne, sexual, or vertical transmission. Persistence of both pathogens is achieved by evasion of intrinsic, innate, and adaptive immune defenses but with some distinct mechanisms reflecting their differences in evolutionary history, replication characteristics, cell tropism, and visibility to mucosal versus systemic and hepatic immune responses. A potent and durable antibody and T cell response is a likely requirement of future HIV and HCV vaccines. Perhaps the single biggest difference between the two vaccine design challenges is that in HCV, a natural model of protective immunity can be found in those who resolve acute infection spontaneously. Such spontaneous resolvers exhibit durable and functional CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses (Diepolder et al., 1995; Cooper et al., 1999; Thimme et al., 2001; Grakoui et al., 2003; Lauer et al., 2004; Schulze Zur Wiesch et al., 2012). However, frequent re-infection suggests partial or lack of protective immunity against heterologous HCV strains, possibly indicative of the degree of genetic diversity of circulating HCV genotypes and subtypes. There is no natural model of protective immunity in HIV, however, studies of “elite controllers,” or individuals who have durably suppressed levels of plasma HIV RNA without antiretroviral therapy, has provided the strongest evidence for CD8+ T cell responses in controlling viremia and limiting reservoir burden in established infection. Here we compare and contrast the specific mechanisms of immune evasion used by HIV and HCV, which subvert adaptive human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-restricted T cell immunity in natural infection, and the challenges these pose for designing effective preventative or therapeutic vaccines. PMID:25352836

  2. Managing System-Wide Change in HIV Prevention Programs: A CDC Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdiserri, Ronald O.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the impact of decentralized decision making for HIV prevention from the Centers for Disease Control to the state and local level. Reviews change management strategies necessary to make the transition to community planning for HIV prevention. (SK)

  3. A single dose of live oral cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR is safe and immunogenic in HIV-infected and HIV-noninfected adults in Mali.

    PubMed Central

    Perry, R. T.; Plowe, C. V.; Koumaré, B.; Bougoudogo, F.; Kotloff, K. L.; Losonsky, G. A.; Wasserman, S. S.; Levine, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    Despite considerable experience with single-dose, live, oral cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR in Asia, Europe, and the Americas, the vaccine had not been evaluated in sub-Saharan Africa or on individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We therefore conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over clinical trial in 38 HIV-seropositive (without clinical acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)) and 387 HIV-seronegative adults in Mali to assess its safety and immunogenicity. Adverse reactions (fever, diarrhoea and vomiting) were observed with similar frequency among vaccine and placebo recipients. The vaccine strain was not isolated from the coprocultures of any subject. The baseline geometric mean titre (GMT) of serum vibriocidal antibody was significantly lower in HIV-seropositives (1:23) than in HIV-seronegatives (1:65) (P = 0.002). Significant rises in vibriocidal antibody were observed in 71% of HIV-seronegatives and 58% of HIV-seropositives, and in 40% of HIV-seropositives with CD4+ counts below 500 per microliter. Following immunization, the peak vibriocidal GMT in HIV-seronegatives was 1:584 versus 1:124 in HIV-seropositives (P = 0.0006); in HIV-seropositives with CD4+ counts < 500 per microliter, the peak vibriocidal GMT was 1:40 (P = 0.03 versus other HIV-seropositives). CVD 103-HgR was safe in HIV-infected Malian adults, although serological responses were significantly attenuated among HIV-seropositives (particularly in those with CD4+ counts < 500 per microliter) relative to HIV-seronegatives. These results encourage further evaluations of this single-dose, oral cholera vaccine in high-risk populations such as refugees in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:9615498

  4. Human Papillomavirus neutralizing and cross-reactive antibodies induced in HIV-positive subjects after vaccination with quadrivalent and bivalent HPV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Faust, Helena; Toft, Lars; Sehr, Peter; Müller, Martin; Bonde, Jesper; Forslund, Ola; Østergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Dillner, Joakim

    2016-03-18

    Ninety-one HIV-infected individuals (61 men and 30 women) were randomized to vaccination either with quadrivalent (Gardasil™) or bivalent (Cervarix™) HPV vaccine. Neutralizing and specific HPV-binding serum antibodies were measured at baseline and 12 months after the first vaccine dose. Presence of neutralizing and binding antibodies had good agreement (average Kappa for HPV types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33 and 45 was 0.65). At baseline, 88% of subjects had antibodies against at least one genital HPV. Following vaccination with Cervarix™, all subjects became seropositive for HPV16 and 18. After Gardasil™ vaccination, 96% of subjects seroconverted for HPV16 and 73% for HPV18. Levels of HPV16-specific antibodies were <1 international unit (IU) in 87% of study subjects before vaccination but >10IU in 85% of study subjects after vaccination. Antibodies against non-vaccine HPV types appeared after Gardasil™ vaccination for >50% of vaccinated females for HPV 31, 35 and 73 and for >50% of Cervarix™-vaccinated females for HPV 31, 33, 35, 45, 56 and 58. Cross-reactivity with non-genital HPV types was also detected. In conclusion, HIV-infected subjects responded to HPV vaccination with induction of neutralizing antibodies against both vaccine and non-vaccine types. PMID:26896686

  5. Antigen-based vaccination and prevention of type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Leonard C; Wentworth, John M; Zhang, Yuxia; Bandala-Sanchez, Esther; Bhmer, Ralph M; Neale, Alana M; Stone, Natalie L; Naselli, Gaetano; Bosco, Julian J; Auyeung, Priscilla; Rashidi, Maryam; Augstein, Petra; Morahan, Grant

    2013-10-01

    Insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a paradigm for prevention of autoimmune disease: Pancreatic ?-cell autoantigens are defined, at-risk individuals can be identified before the onset of symptoms, and autoimmune diabetes is preventable in rodent models. Intervention in asymptomatic individuals before or after the onset of subclinical islet autoimmunity places a premium on safety, a requirement met only by lifestyle-dietary approaches or autoantigen-based vaccination to induce protective immune tolerance. Insulin is the key driver of autoimmune ?-cell destruction in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of T1D and is an early autoimmune target in children at risk for T1D. In the NOD mouse, mucosal administration of insulin induces regulatory T cells that protect against diabetes. The promise of autoantigen-specific vaccination in humans has yet to be realized, but recent trials of oral and nasal insulin vaccination in at-risk humans provide grounds for cautious optimism. PMID:23888323

  6. Sexual behavior, risk perception, and HIV transmission can respond to HIV antiviral drugs and vaccines through multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Tully, Stephen; Cojocaru, Monica; Bauch, Chris T

    2015-01-01

    There has been growing use of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) for HIV and significant progress in developing prophylactic HIV vaccines. The simplest theories of counterproductive behavioral responses to such interventions tend to focus on single feedback mechanisms: for instance, HAART optimism makes infection less scary and thus promotes risky sexual behavior. Here, we develop an agent based, age-structured model of HIV transmission, risk perception, and partner selection in a core group to explore behavioral responses to interventions. We find that interventions can activate not one, but several feedback mechanisms that could potentially influence decision-making and HIV prevalence. In the model, HAART increases the attractiveness of unprotected sex, but it also increases perceived risk of infection and, on longer timescales, causes demographic impacts that partially counteract HAART optimism. Both HAART and vaccination usually lead to lower rates of unprotected sex on the whole, but intervention effectiveness depends strongly on whether individuals over- or under-estimate intervention coverage. Age-specific effects cause sexual behavior and HIV prevalence to change in opposite ways in old and young age groups. For complex infections like HIV-where interventions influence transmission, demography, sexual behavior and risk perception-we conclude that evaluations of behavioral responses should consider multiple feedback mechanisms. PMID:26507957

  7. Social and Structural HIV Prevention in Alcohol-Serving Establishments

    PubMed Central

    Kalichman, Seth C.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol use is associated with risks for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV/AIDS. People meet new sex partners at bars and other places where alcohol is served, and drinking venues facilitate STI transmission through sexual relationships within closely knit sexual networks. This paper reviews HIV prevention interventions conducted in bars, taverns, and informal drinking venues. Interventions designed to reduce HIV risk by altering the social interactions within drinking environments have demonstrated mixed results. Specifically, venue-based social influence models have reduced community-level risk in U.S. gay bars, but these effects have not generalized to gay bars elsewhere or to other populations. Few interventions have sought to alter the structural and physical environments of drinking places for HIV prevention. Uncontrolled program evaluations have reported promising approaches to bar-based structural interventions with gay men and female sex workers. Finally, a small number of studies have examined multilevel approaches that simultaneously intervene at both social and structural levels with encouraging results. Multilevel interventions that take environmental factors into account are needed to guide future HIV prevention efforts delivered within alcohol-serving establishments. PMID:23584060

  8. Willingness to Participate in HIV Vaccine Trials among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Chennai and Mumbai, India: A Social Ecological Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chakrapani, Venkatesan; Newman, Peter A.; Singhal, Neeti; Jerajani, Jhalak; Shunmugam, Murali

    2012-01-01

    Background Recruitment of low- and middle-income country volunteers from most-at-risk populations in HIV vaccine trials is essential to vaccine development. In India, men who have sex with men (MSM) are at disproportionately high risk for HIV infection and an important population for trial recruitment. Investigations of willingness to participate (WTP) in HIV vaccine trials have focused predominantly on individual-level determinants. We explored multi-level factors associated with WTP among MSM in India. Methods We conducted 12 focus groups (n = 68) with low socioeconomic MSM in Chennai and Mumbai, and 14 key informant interviews with MSM community leaders and service providers. Focus groups/interviews were recorded, transcribed and translated into English. Two bilingual investigators conducted thematic analysis using line-by-line coding and a constant comparative method, with member-checking by community representatives. Results Factors associated with WTP were evidenced across the social ecology of MSM–social-structural: poverty, HIV-, sexual- and gender non-conformity stigma, institutionalized discrimination and government sponsorship of trials; community-level: endorsement by MSM community leaders and organizations, and fear of within-group discrimination; interpersonal: anticipated family discord, partner rejection, having financially-dependent family members and disclosure of same-sex sexuality; and individual-level: HIV vaccine trial knowledge and misconceptions, safety concerns, altruism and preventive misconception. Conclusion Pervasive familial, community and social-structural factors characteristic of the Indian sociocultural context may complicate individual-focused approaches to WTP and thereby constrain the effectiveness of interventions to support recruitment and retention in HIV vaccine trials. Interventions to reduce stigma and discrimination against MSM and people living with HIV, capacity-building of MSM community organizations and transparent communications tailored to the knowledge and educational level of local communities may support meaningful engagement of MSM in HIV vaccine trials. Vigilance in providing fair but not excessive compensation and healthcare benefits and in mitigating preventive misconception are warranted to support ethical conduct of trials among MSM in India. PMID:23226560

  9. A novel non-integrative single-cycle chimeric HIV lentivector DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Maha; Arrode-Brusés, Géraldine; Manoylov, Iliyan; Malogolovkin, Alexander; Mompelat, Dimitri; Ishimwe, Honorine; Smaoune, Amel; Ouzrout, Bilel; Gagnon, Jean; Chebloune, Yahia

    2015-05-01

    Novel HIV vaccine vectors and strategies are needed to control HIV/AIDS epidemic in humans and eradicate the infection. DNA vaccines alone failed to induce immune responses robust enough to control HIV-1. Development of lentivirus-based DNA vaccines deficient for integration and with a limited replication capacity is an innovative and promising approach. This type of vaccine mimics the early stages of virus infection/replication like the live-attenuated viruses but lacks the inconvenient integration and persistence associated with disease. We developed a novel lentivector DNA vaccine "CAL-SHIV-IN(-)" that undergoes a single round of replication in the absence of integration resulting in augmented expression of vaccine antigens in vivo. Vaccine gene expression is under control of the LTRs of a naturally attenuated lentivirus, Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) the natural goat lentivirus. The safety of this vaccine prototype was increased by the removal of the integrase coding sequences from the pol gene. We examined the functional properties of this lentivector DNA in cell culture and the immunogenicity in mouse models. Viral proteins were expressed in transfected cells, assembled into viral particles that were able to transduce once target permissive cells. Unlike the parental replication-competent SHIV-KU2 that was detected in DNA samples from any of the serial passage infected cells, CAL-SHIV-IN(-) DNA was detected only in target cells of the first round of infection, hence demonstrating the single cycle replication of the vaccine. A single dose DNA immunization of humanized NOD/SCID/β2 mice showed a substantial increase of IFN-γ-ELISPOT in splenocytes compared to the former replication and integration defective Δ4SHIV-KU2 DNA vaccine. PMID:25825333

  10. Effective HIV prevention: the indispensable role of social science

    PubMed Central

    Kippax, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the ways in which HIV prevention is understood including “biomedical”, “behavioural”, “structural”, and “combination” prevention. In it I argue that effective prevention entails developing community capacity and requires that public health addresses people not only as individuals but also as connected members of groups, networks and collectives who interact (talk, negotiate, have sex, use drugs, etc.) together. I also examine the evaluation of prevention programmes or interventions and argue that the distinction between efficacy and effectiveness is often glossed and that, while efficacy can be evaluated by randomized controlled trials, the evaluation of effectiveness requires long-term descriptive strategies and/or modelling. Using examples from a number of countries, including a detailed account of the Australian HIV prevention response, effectiveness is shown to be dependent not only on the efficacy of the prevention technology or tool but also on the responses of people – individuals, communities and governments – to those technologies. Whether a particular HIV prevention technology is adopted and its use sustained depends on a range of social, cultural and political factors. The paper concludes by calling on biomedical and social scientists to work together and describes a “social public health”. PMID:22713254

  11. Superior Control of HIV-1 Replication by CD8+ T Cells Targeting Conserved Epitopes: Implications for HIV Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Kunwar, Pratima; Hawkins, Natalie; Dinges, Warren L.; Liu, Yi; Gabriel, Erin E.; Swan, David A.; Stevens, Claire E.; Maenza, Janine; Collier, Ann C.; Mullins, James I.; Hertz, Tomer; Yu, Xuesong; Horton, Helen

    2013-01-01

    A successful HIV vaccine will likely induce both humoral and cell-mediated immunity, however, the enormous diversity of HIV has hampered the development of a vaccine that effectively elicits both arms of the adaptive immune response. To tackle the problem of viral diversity, T cell-based vaccine approaches have focused on two main strategies (i) increasing the breadth of vaccine-induced responses or (ii) increasing vaccine-induced responses targeting only conserved regions of the virus. The relative extent to which set-point viremia is impacted by epitope-conservation of CD8+ T cell responses elicited during early HIV-infection is unknown but has important implications for vaccine design. To address this question, we comprehensively mapped HIV-1 CD8+ T cell epitope-specificities in 23 ART-nave individuals during early infection and computed their conservation score (CS) by three different methods (prevalence, entropy and conseq) on clade-B and group-M sequence alignments. The majority of CD8+ T cell responses were directed against variable epitopes (p<0.01). Interestingly, increasing breadth of CD8+ T cell responses specifically recognizing conserved epitopes was associated with lower set-point viremia (r?=?- 0.65, p?=?0.009). Moreover, subjects possessing CD8+ T cells recognizing at least one conserved epitope had 1.4 log10 lower set-point viremia compared to those recognizing only variable epitopes (p?=?0.021). The association between viral control and the breadth of conserved CD8+ T cell responses may be influenced by the method of CS definition and sequences used to determine conservation levels. Strikingly, targeting variable versus conserved epitopes was independent of HLA type (p?=?0.215). The associations with viral control were independent of functional avidity of CD8+ T cell responses elicited during early infection. Taken together, these data suggest that the next-generation of T-cell based HIV-1 vaccines should focus on strategies that can elicit CD8+ T cell responses to multiple conserved epitopes of HIV-1. PMID:23741326

  12. HIV-1 vaccine-specific responses induced by Listeria vector vaccines are maintained in mice subsequently infected with a model helminth parasite, Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Shollenberger, Lisa M; Bui, Cac T; Paterson, Yvonne; Nyhoff, Lindsay; Harn, Donald A

    2013-11-19

    In areas co-endemic for helminth parasites and HIV/AIDS, infants are often administered vaccines prior to infection with immune modulatory helminth parasites. Systemic Th2 biasing and immune suppression caused by helminth infection reduces cell-mediated responses to vaccines such as tetanus toxoid and BCG. Therefore, we asked if infection with helminthes post-vaccination, alters already established vaccine induced immune responses. In our model, mice are vaccinated against HIV-1 Gag using a Listeria vaccine vector (Lm-Gag) in a prime-boost manner, then infected with the human helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni. This allows us to determine if established vaccine responses are maintained or altered after helminth infection. Our second objective asked if helminth infection post-vaccination alters the recipient's ability to respond to a second boost. Here we compared responses between uninfected mice, schistosome infected mice, and infected mice that were given an anthelminthic, which occurred coincident with the boost or four weeks prior, as well as comparing to un-boosted mice. We report that HIV-1 vaccine-specific responses generated by Listeria vector HIV-1 vaccines are maintained following subsequent chronic schistosome infection, providing further evidence that Listeria vector vaccines induce potent vaccine-specific responses that can withstand helminth infection. We also were able to demonstrate that administration of a second Listeria boost, which markedly enhanced the immune response, was minimally impacted by schistosome infection, or anthelminthic therapy. Surprisingly, we also observed enhanced antibody responses to HIV Gag in vaccinated mice subsequently infected with schistosomes. PMID:24120546

  13. Enteroviruses, hygiene and type 1 diabetes: toward a preventive vaccine.

    PubMed

    Drescher, Kristen M; von Herrath, Matthias; Tracy, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Enteroviruses and humans have long co-existed. Although recognized in ancient times, poliomyelitis and type 1 diabetes (T1D) were exceptionally rare and not epidemic, due in large part to poor sanitation and personal hygiene which resulted in repeated exposure to fecal-oral transmitted viruses and other infectious agents and viruses and the generation of a broad protective immunity. As a function of a growing acceptance of the benefits of hygienic practices and microbiologically clean(er) water supplies, the likelihood of exposure to diverse infectious agents and viruses declined. The effort to vaccinate against poliomyelitis demonstrated that enteroviral diseases are preventable by vaccination and led to understanding how to successfully attenuate enteroviruses. Type 1 diabetes onset has been convincingly linked to infection by numerous enteroviruses including the group B coxsackieviruses (CVB), while studies of CVB infections in NOD mice have demonstrated not only a clear link between disease onset but an ability to reduce the incidence of T1D as well: CVB infections can suppress naturally occurring autoimmune T1D. We propose here that if we can harness and develop the capacity to use attenuated enteroviral strains to induce regulatory T cell populations in the host through vaccination, then a vaccine could be considered that should function to protect against both autoimmune as well as virus-triggered T1D. Such a vaccine would not only specifically protect from certain enterovirus types but more importantly, also reset the organism's regulatory rheostat making the further development of pathogenic autoimmunity less likely. PMID:25430610

  14. Integrating HIV prevention and care services: the Seattle "Collaboration Project".

    PubMed

    Natter, Jeff; Fiano, Theresa; Gamble, Barb; Wood, Robert W

    2002-11-01

    The "Collaboration Project" explored whether human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention providers in Seattle-King County refer their HIV+ clients into care services and whether HIV care service providers discuss sex and drug use risk reduction or make referrals for clients with ongoing risk reduction needs. Data uncovered demographic disparities between provider populations that may impact cross-system collaboration, particularly regarding provider demographic reflectiveness of the consumers being served. Ninety percent of prevention providers referred clients to care services; only one quarter discussed sexual risk reduction, while half discussed drug use risk reduction. Knowledge of cross-system resources was generally high, although gaps emerged between providers in several resource areas. Based on these findings, several key changes have been implemented. PMID:12463046

  15. [Antiretroviral therapy: useful from prevention to HIV treatment].

    PubMed

    Tshikung, Olivier Nawej; Calmy, Alexandra

    2016-01-13

    In 2015, the publication of important studies allowed the development of new guidelines, notably by WHO and the European AIDS ClinicalSociety (EACS), for HIV preventive treatment (pre-exposure prophylaxis), as well as for the start of antiretroviral treatment. The START and TEMPRANO studies have extended the treatment to all HIV-infected patients, irrespective of the level of immunosuppression and therefore the CD4 count. In addition, innovative screening methods, such as self-tests, are now available in all French pharmacies since 15 September 2015. The latest developments in 2015 concerning the prevention, screening, and treatment of HIV are discussed in this article and will certainly have an impact on the care of patients in Switzerland. PMID:26946715

  16. HIV prevention cost-effectiveness: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background After more than 25 years, public health programs have not been able to sufficiently reduce the number of new HIV infections. Over 7,000 people become infected with HIV every day. Lack of convincing evidence of cost-effectiveness (CE) may be one of the reasons why implementation of effective programs is not occurring at sufficient scale. This paper identifies, summarizes and critiques the CE literature related to HIV-prevention interventions in low- and middle-income countries during 2005-2008. Methods Systematic identification of publications was conducted through several methods: electronic databases, internet search of international organizations and major funding/implementing agencies, and journal browsing. Inclusion criteria included: HIV prevention intervention, year for publication (2005-2008), setting (low- and middle-income countries), and CE estimation (empirical or modeling) using outcomes in terms of cost per HIV infection averted and/or cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) or quality-adjusted life year (QALY). Results We found 21 distinct studies analyzing the CE of HIV-prevention interventions published in the past four years (2005-2008). Seventeen CE studies analyzed biomedical interventions; only a few dealt with behavioral and environmental/structural interventions. Sixteen studies focused on sub-Saharan Africa, and only a handful on Asia, Latin America and Eastern Europe. Many HIV-prevention interventions are very cost effective in absolute terms (using costs per DALY averted), and also in country-specific relative terms (in cost per DALY measured as percentage of GDP per capita). Conclusion There are several types of interventions for which CE studies are still not available or insufficient, including surveillance, abstinence, school-based education, universal precautions, prevention for positives and most structural interventions. The sparse CE evidence available is not easily comparable; thus, not very useful for decision making. More than 25 years into the AIDS epidemic and billions of dollars of spending later, there is still much work to be done both on costs and effectiveness to adequately inform HIV prevention planning. PMID:19922689

  17. Challenges in Mucosal HIV Vaccine Development: Lessons from Non-Human Primate Models

    PubMed Central

    Tuero, Iskra; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2014-01-01

    An efficacious HIV vaccine is urgently needed to curb the AIDS pandemic. The modest protection elicited in the phase III clinical vaccine trial in Thailand provided hope that this goal might be achieved. However, new approaches are necessary for further advances. As HIV is transmitted primarily across mucosal surfaces, development of immunity at these sites is critical, but few clinical vaccine trials have targeted these sites or assessed vaccine-elicited mucosal immune responses. Pre-clinical studies in non-human primate models have facilitated progress in mucosal vaccine development by evaluating candidate vaccine approaches, developing methodologies for collecting and assessing mucosal samples, and providing clues to immune correlates of protective immunity for further investigation. In this review we have focused on non-human primate studies which have provided important information for future design of vaccine strategies, targeting of mucosal inductive sites, and assessment of mucosal immunity. Knowledge gained in these studies will inform mucosal vaccine design and evaluation in human clinical trials. PMID:25196380

  18. Rational design of HIV vaccines and microbicides: report of the EUROPRISE annual conference 2011.

    PubMed

    Ruffin, Nicolas; Borggren, Marie; Euler, Zelda; Fiorino, Fabio; Grupping, Katrijn; Hallengärd, David; Javed, Aneele; Mendonca, Kevin; Pollard, Charlotte; Reinhart, David; Saba, Elisa; Sheik-Khalil, Enas; Sköld, Annette; Ziglio, Serena; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Gotch, Frances; Wahren, Britta; Shattock, Robin J

    2012-01-01

    Europrise is a Network of Excellence supported by the European Commission within the 6th Framework programme from 2007 to 2012. The Network has involved over 50 institutions from 13 European countries together with 3 industrial partners and 6 African countries. The Network encompasses an integrated program of research, training, dissemination and advocacy within the field of HIV vaccines and microbicides. A central and timely theme of the Network is the development of the unique concept of co-usage of vaccines and microbicides. Training of PhD students has been a major task, and some of these post-graduate students have here summarized novel ideas emanating from presentations at the last annual Europrise meeting in Prague. The latest data and ideas concerning HIV vaccine and microbicide studies are included in this review; these studies are so recent that the majority have yet to be published. Data were presented and discussed concerning novel immunisation strategies; microbicides and PrEP (alone and in combination with vaccines); mucosal transmission of HIV/SIV; mucosal vaccination; novel adjuvants; neutralizing antibodies; innate immune responses; HIV/SIV pathogenesis and disease progression; new methods and reagents. These - necessarily overlapping topics - are comprehensively summarised by the Europrise students in the context of other recent exciting data. PMID:22784600

  19. An open-ended plea for the development of a global database of HIV vaccine responses

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Peter; Filali-Mouhim, Abdelali; Li, Shuzhao; Ahlers, Jeffrey; Schatzle, John; Pulendran, Bali; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Cameron, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this review is to describe a critical need of the HIV research community for a globally accessible database of HIV vaccine responses that stores data from multiple assay platforms in the form of lists of correlates of immune protection and vaccine efficacy. This is not a detailed review but a first step toward developing a dialogue among investigators and funding organizations to build upon existing resources to efficiently develop a HIV vaccine response and correlates database. We also discuss examples of databases that complement our needs and could be integrated into our proposed database requirements. Recent findings Several vaccine-related databases that store information at the study level currently exist, however, at the present time, a correlates of immune protection database does not exist. Summary Here, we discuss the scientific climate surrounding HIV vaccine development with the evolution of systems biology approaches, the problems at hand for analyzing and harmonizing datasets generated from preclinical and clinical studies, and the curation and accessibility of useful information to model outcomes. We also compare key database requirements of a few existing globally accessible databases and provide several illustrative correlate database submission and utilization examples. PMID:22156846

  20. Induction of Intestinal Immunity by Mucosal Vaccines As a Means of Controlling HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Poles, Jordan; Alvarez, Yelina

    2014-01-01

    Abstract CD4+ T cells in the mucosa of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are preferentially targeted and depleted by HIV. As such, the induction of an effective anti-HIV immune response in the mucosa of the GI tract—through vaccination—could protect this vulnerable population of cells. Mucosal vaccination provides a promising means of inducing robust humoral and cellular responses in the GI tract. Here we review data from the literature about the effectiveness of various mucosal vaccination routes—oral (intraintestinal/tonsilar/sublingual), intranasal, and intrarectal—with regard to the induction of immune responses mediated by cytotoxic T cells and antibodies in the GI mucosa, as well as protective efficacy in challenge models. We present data from the literature indicating that mucosal routes have the potential to effectively elicit GI mucosal immunity and protect against challenge. Given their capacity for the induction of anti-HIV immune responses in the GI mucosa, we propose that mucosal routes, including the nonconventional sublingual, tonsilar, and intrarectal routes, be considered for the delivery of the next generation HIV vaccines. However, further studies are necessary to determine the ideal vectors and vaccination regimens for these routes of immunization and to validate their efficacy in controlling HIV infection. PMID:25354023

  1. High grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia among HIV-1-infected men screening for a multi-center clinical trial of a human papillomavirus vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Wilkin, Timothy; Lee, Jeannette Y.; Lensing, Shelly Y.; Stier, Elizabeth A.; Goldstone, Stephen E.; Berry, J. Michael; Jay, Naomi; Aboulafia, David M.; Einstein, Mark H.; Saah, Alfred; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T.; Palefsky, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN) is the precursor lesion to invasive anal cancer. HPV vaccination holds great promise for preventing anal cancer. Methods We examined 235 HIV-1-infected men screening for participation in a multi-site clinical trial of a quadrivalent HPV vaccine. All participants had anal swabs obtained for HPV testing and cytology, and high resolution anoscopy with biopsies of visible lesions to assess for HGAIN. Results HPV 16 and 18 were detected in 23% and 10%, respectively; abnormal anal cytology was found in 56% and HGAIN in 30%. HGAIN prevalence was significantly higher in those with HPV 16 detection compared to those without (38% vs. 17%, P=.01). Use of antiretroviral therapy, nadir and current CD4+ cell count were not associated with abnormal anal cytology or HGAIN. Conclusion HGAIN is highly prevalent in HIV-infected men. Further studies are needed on treatment and prevention of HGAIN. PMID:23611828

  2. Nowhere to Run: HIV Prevention for Runaway and Homeless Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Marc

    This volume is a guide to providing effective Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and substance abuse prevention services to runaway and homeless youth. The guide is based on current research and the best programs in this field. Chapters 1 and 2 summarize what is known about runaway and homeless youth, the services these youth require if they are…

  3. Client Preferences for STD/HIV Prevention Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessy, Michael; Mercier, Michele M.; Williams, Samantha P.; Arno, Janet N.

    2002-01-01

    Conducted a formative research study designed to elicit preferences for sexually transmitted disease (STD)/HIV prevention programs from clients at a midwestern STD clinic. Responses of 126 participants show preferences for mixed group or individual meetings with counselors, with extensive intervention less favored than single sessions. Discusses…

  4. Engaging Community Businesses in HIV Prevention: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Rovniak, Liza S.; Hovell, Melbourne F.; Hofstetter, C. Richard; Blumberg, Elaine J.; Sipan, Carol L.; Batista, Marcia F.; Martinez-Donate, Ana P.; Mulvihill, Mary M.; Ayala, Guadalupe X.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To explore the feasibility of engaging community businesses in HIV prevention. Design Randomly selected business owners/managers were asked to display discreetly wrapped condoms and brochures provided free-of-charge for 3 months. Assessments were conducted at baseline, mid-, and post-program. Customer feedback was obtained through an online survey. Setting San Diego, California neighborhood with a high rate of AIDS. Subjects Fifty-one business owners/managers representing 10 retail categories, and 52 customers. Measures Participation rates, descriptive characteristics, number of condoms and brochures distributed, customer feedback, business owners'/managers' program satisfaction and willingness to provide future support for HIV prevention. Analysis Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, Fisher's exact, and McNemar's tests were used to analyze data. Results The 20 business owners/managers (39%) who agreed to distribute condoms and brochures reported fewer years in business and more employees than those who agreed only to distribute brochures (20%) or refused to participate (41%), p <.05. Bars were the easiest of ten retail categories to recruit. Businesses with more employees and customers distributed more condoms and brochures, p < .05. More than 90% of customers supported distributing condoms and brochures in businesses and 96% of business owners/managers described their program experience as “positive.” Conclusion Businesses are willing to distribute condoms and brochures to prevent HIV. Policies to increase business participation in HIV prevention should be developed and tested. PMID:20465150

  5. HIV Prevention in Schools: A Tool Kit for Education Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Surgeon General (DHHS/PHS), Washington, DC.

    This packet of materials is Phase 1 of a toolkit designed to enlighten education leaders about the need for HIV prevention for youth, especially in communities of color. One element of the toolkit is a VHS videotape that features a brief message from former Surgeon General, Dr. David Satcher. The toolkit also includes a copy of a letter sent to…

  6. Evaluation of HIV Prevention and Comprehensive Health Education Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Gloria; And Others

    This study was undertaken to evaluate Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) prevention and comprehensive health activities in public secondary schools in Mississippi. The Comprehensive School Health Curriculum (CSHC), for implementation in junior, middle, and senior high schools, was designed to promote improved knowledge and behaviors related to the

  7. Youth-Initiated HIV Risk and Substance Use Prevention Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goggin, K.; Metcalf, K.; Wise, D.; Kennedy, S.; Murray, T.; Burgess, D.; Reese-Smith, J.; Terhune, N.; Broadus, K.; Downes, A.; Buckendahl, H.

    This study evaluates the first year of a novel HIV and substance use prevention program for inner city youth (Offering New Youth eXperiences--ONYX). Baseline and follow-up measures of knowledge, attitudes, and risk behaviors were administered seven months apart to 441 youth participating in the ONYX program. Youth (n=71) who provided data at both…

  8. Peer Programs for HIV Prevention by and for Incarcerated Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horan, Patricia F.; Barthlow, Diana J.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a peer helping program that targets prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among incarcerated youth within the context of the National Peer Helper Association's Standards for Peer Programs. The program emphasizes the relative and reciprocal influences among behavioral, personal, and environmental variables hypothesized to…

  9. A fresh perspective from immunologists and vaccine researchers: active vaccination strategies to prevent and reverse Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Agadjanyan, Michael G; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Ghochikyan, Anahit

    2015-10-01

    Traditional vaccination against infectious diseases relies on generation of cellular and humoral immune responses that act to protect the host from overt disease even though they do not induce sterilizing immunity. More recently, attempts have been made with mixed success to generate therapeutic vaccines against a wide range of noninfectious diseases including neurodegenerative disorders. After the exciting first report of successful vaccine prevention of progression of an Alzheimer's disease (AD) animal model in 1999, various epitope-based vaccines targeting amyloid beta (Aβ) have proceeded to human clinical trials, with varied results. More recently, AD vaccines based on tau protein have advanced into clinical testing too. This review seeks to put perspective to the mixed results obtained so far in clinical trials of AD vaccines and discusses the many pitfalls and misconceptions encountered on the path to a successful AD vaccine, including better standardization of immunologic efficacy measures of antibodies, immunogenicity of platform/carrier and adjuvants. PMID:26192465

  10. Current progress in the development of a prophylactic vaccine for HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Lena J; Matthews, Qiana L

    2011-01-01

    Since its discovery and characterization in the early 1980s as a virus that attacks the immune system, there has been some success for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection. However, due to the overwhelming public health impact of this virus, a vaccine is needed urgently. Despite the tireless efforts of scientist and clinicians, there is still no safe and effective vaccine that provides sterilizing immunity. A vaccine that provides sterilizing immunity against HIV infection remains elusive in part due to the following reasons: 1) degree of diversity of the virus, 2) ability of the virus to evade the hosts’ immunity, and 3) lack of appropriate animal models in which to test vaccine candidates. There have been several attempts to stimulate the immune system to provide protection against HIV-infection. Here, we will discuss attempts that have been made to induce sterilizing immunity, including traditional vaccination attempts, induction of broadly neutralizing antibody production, DNA vaccines, and use of viral vectors. Some of these attempts show promise pending continued research efforts. PMID:21267356

  11. Immunogenicity of sequences around HIV-1 protease cleavage sites: potential targets and population coverage analysis for a HIV vaccine targeting protease cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ma; Capina, Rupert; Daniuk, Christina; Tuff, Jeff; Peters, Harold; Kimani, Makubo; Wachihi, Charles; Kimani, Joshua; Ball, Terry Blake; Plummer, Francis A

    2013-06-24

    Developing an effective preventative vaccine against HIV-1 has proved to be a great challenge. The classical and proven vaccine approach has failed so far or produced a modest effect, new approaches are needed. In this study we evaluated the immunogenicity of the sequences around the protease cleavage sites (PCS) and the population coverage of a vaccine targeting HIV-1 PCS. The sequence conservation was evaluated by comparing entropy score of sequences around PCS with Gag and Pol. The immunogenicity of sequences around the 12 PCS (+10/-10 amino acids) was analyzed by identifying epitopes of HLA class I alleles in PCS region using four approaches: (1) identification of previously reported HLA class I allele epitopes around PCS region; (2) screening and validating epitopes of 8 HLA class I alleles common to most world populations using iTopia Epitope Discovery system and IFN-γ ELISpot assays; (3) screening of 151 patients of Pumwani cohort for PBMC IFN-γ ELISPOT responses to the subtype A and D consensus around PCS region; and (4) prediction of HLA alleles with epitopes around the PCS using NetMHCpan. Population coverage was calculated using the web-based analysis tool of the Immune Epitope Database based on HLA class I genotype frequencies from dbMHC database. The results showed that many HLA class I alleles have multiple epitopes in the 12 PCS regions, indicating sequence immunogenicity around PCS. Multiple epitopes of many HLA class I alleles common to >95% world populations have been identified around the 12 PCS region. Targeting these sites is a feasible vaccine approach. PMID:23664989

  12. Response to Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccination in Newly Diagnosed HIV-Positive Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Leggat, David J; Iyer, Anita S; Ohtola, Jennifer A; Kommoori, Sneha; Duggan, Joan M; Georgescu, Claudiu A; Khuder, Sadik A; Khaskhely, Noor M; Westerink, MA Julie

    2015-01-01

    Background Newly diagnosed HIV-positive individuals are 35 to 100-fold more susceptible to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection compared to non-infected individuals. Therefore, the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) has previously been recommended, though efficacy and effectiveness of vaccination remains controversial. Early severe B cell dysfunction is a central feature of HIV infection. The specific nature of the immune cells involved in the production of protective antigen-specific antibodies in HIV-positive individuals remains to be elucidated. Objectives Evaluate the antibody and antigen-specific B cell response to the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine in newly diagnosed HIV-positive patients. Moreover, determine if newly diagnosed patients with CD4<200 cells/μl benefit from 6–12 months of HAART, allowing partial viral suppression and immune reconstitution, prior to immunization. Methods Newly diagnosed HIV-positive patients with CD4>200 cells/μl and CD4<200 cells/μl were immunized with PPV23. Patients with CD4<200 cells/μl received either immediate or delayed immunization following 6–12 months of HAART. Antibody responses, opsonophagocytic activity and phenotypic analysis of pneumococcal polysaccharide-specific B cells were studied. Results Newly diagnosed HIV-positive patients demonstrated CD4-dependent increases in antibody and opsonophagocytic titers thought to be commensurate with protection. Functional opsonophagocytic titers of patients with CD4<200 cells/μl immunized immediately compared to patients with CD4<200 cells/μl receiving HAART for 6–12 months were not significantly different. Pneumococcal polysaccharide-specific B cells were distributed evenly between IgM memory and switched memory B cells for all groups, but IgM memory B cells were significantly lower than in HIV-negative individuals. Conclusions Despite CD4-dependent pneumococcal polysaccharide-specific deficiencies in newly diagnosed HIV-positive patients, vaccination was beneficial based on opsonophagocytic titers for all newly diagnosed HIV-positive groups. In HIV-positive patients with CD4<200 cells/μl, 6–12 months of HAART did not improve opsonophagocytic titers or antibody concentrations. Based on these findings, immunization with the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine should not be delayed in newly diagnosed HIV-positive patients with CD4<200 cells/μl. PMID:25908995

  13. New ways of preventing HIV infection: thinking simply, simply thinking

    PubMed Central

    Short, R.V

    2006-01-01

    HIV infection is the greatest health crisis in human history. It continues to spread unchecked among the poor in the developing world because we have failed to design simple preventative methods that are available and affordable to those living on under $2 a day. Five new methods are discussed. (i) A natural microbicide. Intravaginal lime or lemon juice has been used for centuries as a traditional contraceptive. The juice can also kill HIV in the laboratory, but clinical trials are needed to see if vaginal application is acceptable, safe and effective. (ii) Intravaginal oestrogen. Monkeys can be protected from Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection by keratinizing the vagina with topical oestrogen. If women take the oral contraceptive pill vaginally it retains its contraceptive efficacy, and the oestrogen it contains should thicken the vagina and protect against HIV infection. Clinical trials are needed. (iii) Male circumcision. Removal of the inner foreskin removes the main site of HIV entry into the penis, resulting in a sevenfold reduction in susceptibility to infection. The practice needs to be promoted. (iv) Post-coital penile hygiene. Wiping the penis immediately after intercourse with lime or lemon juice or vinegar should kill the virus before it has had a chance to infect. A clinical trial of efficacy is needed. (v) PhotoVoice. Asking schoolchildren in developing countries to photograph their impressions of HIV/AIDS is a powerful way of getting them to discuss the subject openly, and develop their own preventative strategies. PMID:16627296

  14. The effectiveness of HIV prevention and the epidemiological context.

    PubMed Central

    Grassly, N. C.; Garnett, G. P.; Schwartländer, B.; Gregson, S.; Anderson, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    Planning an intervention to prevent infections with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) should be guided by local epidemiological and socioeconomic conditions. The socioeconomic setting and existing public service capacity determine whether an intervention can have a significant outcome in terms of a reduction in a defined risk. The epidemiological context determines whether such risk reduction translates into a measurable impact on HIV incidence. Measurement of variables describing the epidemiological context can be used to determine the local suitability of interventions, thereby guiding planners and policy-makers in their choice of intervention. Such measurements also permit the retrospective analysis of the impact of interventions where HIV incidence was not recorded. The epidemiological context is defined for four different categories of intervention, shown to be effective in lower-income countries by randomized controlled trials. Appropriate indicators for the epidemiological context and methodological guidelines for their measurement are proposed. Their use in the transfer of a successful intervention from one context to another and in scaling up the effort to control HIV infection is explored. These indicators should provide a useful resource for those involved in planning HIV prevention interventions. PMID:11799444

  15. Antiretroviral therapy for prevention of HIV transmission: implications for Europe.

    PubMed

    Cambiano, V; O'Connor, J; Phillips, A N; Rodger, A; Lodwick, R; Pharris, A; Lampe, F; Nakagawa, F; Smith, C; van de Laar, M J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarise the evidence on the population-level effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in preventing HIV infections, and to discuss potential implications in the European context of recommending starting ART when the CD4 count is above 350 cells/mm3. The ability of ART to reduce the risk of HIV transmission has been reported in observational studies and in a randomised controlled trial (HPTN 052), in which ART initiation reduced HIV transmission by 96% within serodiscordant couples. As yet, there is no direct evidence for such an effect among men having sex with men or people who inject drugs. HPTN 052 led international organisations to develop recommendations with a higher CD4 threshold for ART initiation. However, there remains a lack of strong evidence of clinical benefit for HIV-positive individuals starting ART with CD4 count above 350 cells/mm3. The main goal of ART provision should be to increase ART coverage for all those in need, based on the current guidelines, and the offer of ART to those who wish to reduce infectivity; increased HIV testing is therefore a key requirement. Other proven prevention means such as condom use and harm reduction for people who inject drugs remain critical. PMID:24308982

  16. Structural Interventions for HIV Prevention in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Adimora, Adaora A.; Auerbach, Judith D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Structural interventions change the environment in which people act, in order to influence their health behaviors. Most structural interventions research for HIV infection has focused on developing countries, with the United States receiving substantially less attention. This article identifies some social determinants of HIV vulnerability in the United States and structural interventions to address them. Methods Review of the medical, public health, and social science literature. Results Evidence supports widespread implementation of a number of structural interventions in the United States clearly proximate to HIV, including comprehensive sex education, universal condom availability, expanded syringe access for drug users, health care coverage, and stable housing. Sociological plausibility supports evaluation and implementation of other interventions that target social determinants more distal but of relevance to HIV, such as initiatives to eliminate racial and ethnic disparities in criminal sentencing, to promote early childhood education, and to decrease poverty. Conclusion Structural interventions that address social determinants of HIV infection may be among the most cost effective methods of preventing HIV infection in the United States over the long term. PMID:21406983

  17. Technologies for HIV prevention and care: challenges for health services.

    PubMed

    Maksud, Ivia; Fernandes, Nilo Martinez; Filgueiras, Sandra Lucia

    2015-09-01

    This article aims to consider some relevant challenges to the provision of "new prevention technologies" in health services in a scenario where the "advances" in the global response to AIDS control are visible. We take as material for analysis the information currently available on the HIV post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), treatment as prevention (TASP) and over the counter. The methodology consisted of the survey and analysis of the Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (BVS: MEDLINE, LILACS, WHOLIS, PAHO, SciELO) articles that addressed the issue of HIV prevention and care in the context of so-called new prevention technologies. The results of the studies show that there is assistance on the ground of clinics for the treatment of disease responses, but there are several challenges related to the sphere of prevention. The articles list some challenges regarding to management, organization of services and the attention given by health professionals to users. The current context shows evidence of the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy in reducing the risk of HIV transmission, but the challenges for the provision of preventive technologies in health services permeate health professionals and users in their individual dimensions and health services in organizational and structural dimension. Interventions should be made available in a context of community mobilization; there should be no pressure on people to make HIV testing, antiretroviral treatment or for prevention. In the management is responsible for the training of health professionals to inform, clarify and make available to users, partners and family information about the new antiretroviral use strategies. PMID:26630301

  18. Greater ethnic diversity correlates with lower HIV prevalence in Africa: justification for an alloimmunity vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Christopher; Elzey, Jared D; Hildreth, James EK

    2013-01-01

    Purpose After decades of research, AIDS continues to be a major pandemic and to date, adaptive immunity vaccine designs have had little to no success. Data indicate the alloimmune response is a potent mitigator of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, for which experiments of nature should be demonstrable to justify pursuit of an alloimmune vaccine strategy. We sought to determine if large-scale alloimmune diversity correlates with lower HIV infection rates. Methods Using published data of African linguistic groups to determine sub-Saharan country ethnicity profiles as a proxy for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) diversity, a correlation analysis was performed against respective sub-Saharan country HIV infection rates. Ethnicity data from 37 sub-Saharan nations in 2003 and from 38 nations in 2005 were used to calculate the Meyers-Macintosh ethnic diversity score for each nation as the independent variable. World Health Organization data on HIV infection rates for the same countries were used as the dependent variable. The main outcome measure was the correlation coefficient of ethnic diversity versus HIV infection rate. Results A significant negative correlation was shown between ethnic diversity and HIV infection: for 2003 data, −0.4586 (two-tailed P-value of 0.0043); and, for 2005 data, −0.3866 (two-tailed P-value of 0.0165). Conclusion In conjunction with substantial evidence that alloimmunity confers protection against HIV transmission and recent work identifying specific anti-HIV mechanisms, this analysis strongly justifies an HLA-based alloimmune vaccine strategy against HIV. PMID:23610530

  19. Sexual behavior, risk perception, and HIV transmission can respond to HIV antiviral drugs and vaccines through multiple pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tully, Stephen; Cojocaru, Monica; Bauch, Chris T.

    2015-01-01

    There has been growing use of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) for HIV and significant progress in developing prophylactic HIV vaccines. The simplest theories of counterproductive behavioral responses to such interventions tend to focus on single feedback mechanisms: for instance, HAART optimism makes infection less scary and thus promotes risky sexual behavior. Here, we develop an agent based, age-structured model of HIV transmission, risk perception, and partner selection in a core group to explore behavioral responses to interventions. We find that interventions can activate not one, but several feedback mechanisms that could potentially influence decision-making and HIV prevalence. In the model, HAART increases the attractiveness of unprotected sex, but it also increases perceived risk of infection and, on longer timescales, causes demographic impacts that partially counteract HAART optimism. Both HAART and vaccination usually lead to lower rates of unprotected sex on the whole, but intervention effectiveness depends strongly on whether individuals over- or under-estimate intervention coverage. Age-specific effects cause sexual behavior and HIV prevalence to change in opposite ways in old and young age groups. For complex infections like HIV—where interventions influence transmission, demography, sexual behavior and risk perception—we conclude that evaluations of behavioral responses should consider multiple feedback mechanisms. PMID:26507957

  20. FCGR2C polymorphisms associate with HIV-1 vaccine protection in RV144 trial

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuying S.; Gilbert, Peter B.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Kijak, Gustavo; Ferrari, Guido; Thomas, Rasmi; Pyo, Chul-Woo; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Montefiori, David; Liao, Hua-Xin; Nabel, Gary; Pinter, Abraham; Evans, David T.; Gottardo, Raphael; Dai, James Y.; Janes, Holly; Morris, Daryl; Fong, Youyi; Edlefsen, Paul T.; Li, Fusheng; Frahm, Nicole; Alpert, Michael D.; Prentice, Heather; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Robb, Merlin L.; O’Connell, Robert J.; Haynes, Barton F.; Michael, Nels