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Sample records for prevents macrophage multinucleation

  1. Integrating Phosphoproteome and Transcriptome Reveals New Determinants of Macrophage Multinucleation*

    PubMed Central

    Rotival, Maxime; Ko, Jeong-Hun; Srivastava, Prashant K.; Kerloc'h, Audrey; Montoya, Alex; Mauro, Claudio; Faull, Peter; Cutillas, Pedro R.; Petretto, Enrico; Behmoaras, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage multinucleation (MM) is essential for various biological processes such as osteoclast-mediated bone resorption and multinucleated giant cell-associated inflammatory reactions. Here we study the molecular pathways underlying multinucleation in the rat through an integrative approach combining MS-based quantitative phosphoproteomics (LC-MS/MS) and transcriptome (high-throughput RNA-sequencing) to identify new regulators of MM. We show that a strong metabolic shift toward HIF1-mediated glycolysis occurs at transcriptomic level during MM, together with modifications in phosphorylation of over 50 proteins including several ARF GTPase activators and polyphosphate inositol phosphatases. We use shortest-path analysis to link differential phosphorylation with the transcriptomic reprogramming of macrophages and identify LRRFIP1, SMARCA4, and DNMT1 as novel regulators of MM. We experimentally validate these predictions by showing that knock-down of these latter reduce macrophage multinucleation. These results provide a new framework for the combined analysis of transcriptional and post-translational changes during macrophage multinucleation, prioritizing essential genes, and revealing the sequential events leading to the multinucleation of macrophages. PMID:25532521

  2. A high-content imaging assay for the quantification of the Burkholderia pseudomallei induced multinucleated giant cell (MNGC) phenotype in murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp), a Gram-negative, motile, facultative intracellular bacterium is the causative agent of melioidosis in humans and animals. The Bp genome encodes a repertoire of virulence factors, including the cluster 3 type III secretion system (T3SS-3), the cluster 1 type VI secretion system (T6SS-1), and the intracellular motility protein BimA, that enable the pathogen to invade both phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells. A unique hallmark of Bp infection both in vitro and in vivo is its ability to induce cell-to-cell fusion of macrophages to form multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs), which to date are semi-quantitatively reported following visual inspection. Results In this study we report the development of an automated high-content image acquisition and analysis assay to quantitate the Bp induced MNGC phenotype. Validation of the assay was performed using T6SS-1 (∆hcp1) and T3SS-3 (∆bsaZ) mutants of Bp that have been previously reported to exhibit defects in their ability to induce MNGCs. Finally, screening of a focused small molecule library identified several Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors that inhibited Bp-induced MNGC formation of macrophages. Conclusions We have successfully developed an automated HCI assay to quantitate MNGCs induced by Bp in macrophages. This assay was then used to characterize the phenotype of the Bp mutants for their ability to induce MNGC formation and identify small molecules that interfere with this process. Successful application of chemical genetics and functional reverse genetics siRNA approaches in the MNGC assay will help gain a better understanding of the molecular targets and cellular mechanisms responsible for the MNGC phenotype induced by Bp, by other bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, or by exogenously added cytokines. PMID:24750902

  3. Leaky lysosomes in lung transplant macrophages: azithromycin prevents oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lung allografts contain large amounts of iron (Fe), which inside lung macrophages may promote oxidative lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP), cell death and inflammation. The macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) accumulates 1000-fold inside the acidic lysosomes and may interfere with the lysosomal pool of Fe. Objective Oxidative lysosomal leakage was assessed in lung macrophages from lung transplant recipients without or with AZM treatment and from healthy subjects. The efficiency of AZM to protect lysosomes and cells against oxidants was further assessed employing murine J774 macrophages. Methods Macrophages harvested from 8 transplant recipients (5 without and 3 with ongoing AZM treatment) and 7 healthy subjects, and J774 cells pre-treated with AZM, a high-molecular-weight derivative of the Fe chelator desferrioxamine or ammonium chloride were oxidatively stressed. LMP, cell death, Fe, reduced glutathione (GSH) and H-ferritin were assessed. Results Oxidant challenged macrophages from transplants recipients without AZM exhibited significantly more LMP and cell death than macrophages from healthy subjects. Those macrophages contained significantly more Fe, while GSH and H-ferritin did not differ significantly. Although macrophages from transplant recipients treated with AZM contained both significantly more Fe and less GSH, which would sensitize cells to oxidants, these macrophages resisted oxidant challenge well. The preventive effect of AZM on oxidative LMP and J774 cell death was 60 to 300 times greater than the other drugs tested. Conclusions AZM makes lung transplant macrophages and their lysososomes more resistant to oxidant challenge. Possibly, prevention of obliterative bronchiolitis in lung transplants by AZM is partly due to this action. PMID:23006592

  4. Multinucleated Giant Cells Are Specialized for Complement-Mediated Phagocytosis and Large Target Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Milde, Ronny; Ritter, Julia; Tennent, Glenys A.; Loesch, Andrzej; Martinez, Fernando O.; Gordon, Siamon; Pepys, Mark B.; Verschoor, Admar; Helming, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Summary Multinucleated giant cells (MGCs) form by fusion of macrophages and are presumed to contribute to the removal of debris from tissues. In a systematic in vitro analysis, we show that IL-4-induced MGCs phagocytosed large and complement-opsonized materials more effectively than their unfused M2 macrophage precursors. MGC expression of complement receptor 4 (CR4) was increased, but it functioned primarily as an adhesion integrin. In contrast, although expression of CR3 was not increased, it became functionally activated during fusion and was located on the extensive membrane ruffles created by excess plasma membrane arising from macrophage fusion. The combination of increased membrane area and activated CR3 specifically equips MGCs to engulf large complement-coated targets. Moreover, we demonstrate these features in vivo in the recently described complement-dependent therapeutic elimination of systemic amyloid deposits by MGCs. MGCs are evidently more than the sum of their macrophage parts. PMID:26628365

  5. Nuclear anarchy: asynchronous mitosis in multinucleated fungal hyphae.

    PubMed

    Gladfelter, Amy S

    2006-12-01

    Multinucleated cells are found in diverse contexts and include filamentous fungi, developing insect embryos, skeletal muscle and metastasizing tumor cells. Some multinucleated cells such as those in muscles arise from cell fusion events, but many are formed through specialized cell cycles in which nuclear and cell division are uncoupled. Recent work in the fungus Ashbya gossypii illustrates how unique spatial and temporal regulation of conserved cell cycle regulators directs mitosis in multinucleated cells. PMID:17045513

  6. IFN-γ Prevents Adenosine Receptor (A2bR) Upregulation To Sustain the Macrophage Activation Response.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Heather B; Ward, Amanda; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Ravid, Katya; Mosser, David M

    2015-10-15

    The priming of macrophages with IFN-γ prior to TLR stimulation results in enhanced and prolonged inflammatory cytokine production. In this study, we demonstrate that, following TLR stimulation, macrophages upregulate the adenosine 2b receptor (A2bR) to enhance their sensitivity to immunosuppressive extracellular adenosine. This upregulation of A2bR leads to the induction of macrophages with an immunoregulatory phenotype and the downregulation of inflammation. IFN-γ priming of macrophages selectively prevents the induction of the A2bR in macrophages to mitigate sensitivity to adenosine and to prevent this regulatory transition. IFN-γ-mediated A2bR blockade leads to a prolonged production of TNF-α and IL-12 in response to TLR ligation. The pharmacologic inhibition or the genetic deletion of the A2bR results in a hyperinflammatory response to TLR ligation, similar to IFN-γ treatment of macrophages. Conversely, the overexpression of A2bR on macrophages blunts the IFN-γ effects and promotes the development of immunoregulatory macrophages. Thus, we propose a novel mechanism whereby IFN-γ contributes to host defense by desensitizing macrophages to the immunoregulatory effects of adenosine. This mechanism overcomes the transient nature of TLR activation, and prolongs the antimicrobial state of the classically activated macrophage. This study may offer promising new targets to improve the clinical outcome of inflammatory diseases in which macrophage activation is dysregulated. PMID:26355158

  7. MicroRNA 21 Is a Homeostatic Regulator of Macrophage Polarization and Prevents Prostaglandin E2-Mediated M2 Generation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuo; Brandt, Stephanie; Medeiros, Alexandra; Wang, Soujuan; Wu, Hao; Dent, Alexander; Serezani, C. Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages dictate both initiation and resolution of inflammation. During acute inflammation classically activated macrophages (M1) predominate, and during the resolution phase alternative macrophages (M2) are dominant. The molecular mechanisms involved in macrophage polarization are understudied. MicroRNAs are differentially expressed in M1 and M2 macrophages that influence macrophage polarization. We identified a role of miR-21 in macrophage polarization, and found that cross-talk between miR-21 and the lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a determining factor in macrophage polarization. miR-21 inhibition impairs expression of M2 signature genes but not M1 genes. PGE2 and its downstream effectors PKA and Epac inhibit miR-21 expression and enhance expression of M2 genes, and this effect is more pronounced in miR-21-/- cells. Among potential targets involved in macrophage polarization, we found that STAT3 and SOCS1 were enhanced in miR-21-/- cells and further enhanced by PGE2. We found that STAT3 was a direct target of miR-21 in macrophages. Silencing the STAT3 gene abolished PGE2-mediated expression of M2 genes in miR-21-/- macrophages. These data shed light on the molecular brakes involved in homeostatic macrophage polarization and suggest new therapeutic strategies to prevent inflammatory responses. PMID:25706647

  8. Usefulness of oral administration of lipopolysaccharide for disease prevention through the induction of priming in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Inagawa, Hiroyuki; Kohchi, Chie; Soma, Gen-Ichiro

    2014-08-01

    Many publications show that macrophages are closely involved in etiology of diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies show that waste products (e.g. dead cells, denatured proteins, oxidized lipids, and advanced glycation end-products) are the real causative agents of lifestyle-associated diseases. From the standpoint of health maintenance, macrophages eliminate foreign objects and waste products from an animal's body and appear to be quite important for maintaining homeostasis. There are two stages of activation of macrophages: one is priming and the other is the triggering stage with cytokine secretion. The priming stage of macrophages is an ostensibly functional stage without characteristic morphological changes and secretion of cytokines, but it functionally promotes clearance of waste products. In this review, we discuss the usefulness of oral administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a macrophage-priming agent for prevention/treatment of several diseases, including cancer. Moreover, the oral administration of LPS is safe. These observations suggest that LPS may be considered a vitamin-like substance with therapeutic properties. PMID:25075092

  9. Depletion of Alveolar Macrophages Does Not Prevent Hantavirus Disease Pathogenesis in Golden Syrian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Hammerbeck, Christopher D.; Brocato, Rebecca L.; Bell, Todd M.; Schellhase, Christopher W.; Mraz, Steven R.; Queen, Laurie A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Andes virus (ANDV) is associated with a lethal vascular leak syndrome in humans termed hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). The mechanism for the massive vascular leakage associated with HPS is poorly understood; however, dysregulation of components of the immune response is often suggested as a possible cause. Alveolar macrophages are found in the alveoli of the lung and represent the first line of defense to many airborne pathogens. To determine whether alveolar macrophages play a role in HPS pathogenesis, alveolar macrophages were depleted in an adult rodent model of HPS that closely resembles human HPS. Syrian hamsters were treated, intratracheally, with clodronate-encapsulated liposomes or control liposomes and were then challenged with ANDV. Treatment with clodronate-encapsulated liposomes resulted in significant reduction in alveolar macrophages, but depletion did not prevent pathogenesis or prolong disease. Depletion also did not significantly reduce the amount of virus in the lung of ANDV-infected hamsters but altered neutrophil recruitment, MIP-1α and MIP-2 chemokine expression, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in hamster bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid early after intranasal challenge. These data demonstrate that alveolar macrophages may play a limited protective role early after exposure to aerosolized ANDV but do not directly contribute to hantavirus disease pathogenesis in the hamster model of HPS. IMPORTANCE Hantaviruses continue to cause disease worldwide for which there are no FDA-licensed vaccines, effective postexposure prophylactics, or therapeutics. Much of this can be attributed to a poor understanding of the mechanism of hantavirus disease pathogenesis. Hantavirus disease has long been considered an immune-mediated disease; however, by directly manipulating the Syrian hamster model, we continue to eliminate individual immune cell types. As the most numerous immune cells present in the respiratory tract

  10. IL-10 producing intestinal macrophages prevent excessive anti-bacterial innate immunity by limiting IL-23 synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Petra; Morris, Venetia; Greenbaum, Jason A.; Park, Yoon; Bjoerheden, Unni; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Muffley, Tracy; Shui, Jr-Wen; Kim, Gisen; Cheroutre, Hilde; Liu, Yun- Cai; Peters, Bjoern; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Murai, Masako

    2015-01-01

    Innate immune responses are regulated in the intestine to prevent excessive inflammation. Here we show that a subset of mouse colonic macrophages constitutively produce the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. In mice infected with Citrobacter rodentium, a model for enteropathogenic Escherichia coli infection in humans, these macrophages are required to prevent intestinal pathology. IL-23 is significantly increased in infected mice with a myeloid cell-specific deletion of IL-10, and the addition of IL-10 reduces IL-23 production by intestinal macrophages. Furthermore, blockade of IL-23 leads to reduced mortality in the context of macrophage IL-10 deficiency. Transcriptome and other analyses indicate that IL-10-expressing macrophages receive an autocrine IL-10 signal. Interestingly, only transfer of the IL-10 positive macrophages could rescue IL-10 deficient infected mice. Therefore, these data indicate a pivotal role for intestinal macrophages that constitutively produce IL-10, in controlling excessive innate immune activation and preventing tissue damage after an acute bacterial infection. PMID:25959063

  11. Biomimetic Concealing of PLGA Microspheres in a 3D Scaffold to Prevent Macrophage Uptake.

    PubMed

    Minardi, Silvia; Corradetti, Bruna; Taraballi, Francesca; Sandri, Monica; Martinez, Jonathan O; Powell, Sebastian T; Tampieri, Anna; Weiner, Bradley K; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2016-03-01

    Scaffolds functionalized with delivery systems for the release of growth factors is a robust strategy to enhance tissue regeneration. However, after implantation, macrophages infiltrate the scaffold, eventually initiating the degradation and clearance of the delivery systems. Herein, it is hypothesized that fully embedding the poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide acid) microspheres (MS) in a highly structured collagen-based scaffold (concealing) can prevent their detection, preserving the integrity of the payload. Confocal laser microscopy reveals that non-embedded MS are easily internalized; when concealed, J774 and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) cannot detect them. This is further demonstrated by flow cytometry, as a tenfold decrease is found in the number of MS engulfed by the cells, suggesting that collagen can cloak the MS. This correlates with the amount of nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α produced by J774 and BMDM in response to the concealed MS, comparable to that found for non-functionalized collagen scaffolds. Finally, the release kinetics of a reporter protein is preserved in the presence of macrophages, only when MS are concealed. The data provide detailed strategies for fabricating three dimensional (3D) biomimetic scaffolds able to conceal delivery systems and preserve the therapeutic molecules for release. PMID:26797709

  12. Streptolysin O and NAD-Glycohydrolase Prevent Phagolysosome Acidification and Promote Group A Streptococcus Survival in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bastiat-Sempe, Benedicte; Love, John F.; Lomayesva, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Group A Streptococcus (GAS, Streptococcus pyogenes) is an ongoing threat to human health as the agent of streptococcal pharyngitis, skin and soft tissue infections, and life-threatening conditions such as necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. In animal models of infection, macrophages have been shown to contribute to host defense against GAS infection. However, as GAS can resist killing by macrophages in vitro and induce macrophage cell death, it has been suggested that GAS intracellular survival in macrophages may enable persistent infection. Using isogenic mutants, we now show that the GAS pore-forming toxin streptolysin O (SLO) and its cotoxin NAD-glycohydrolase (NADase) mediate GAS intracellular survival and cytotoxicity for macrophages. Unexpectedly, the two toxins did not inhibit fusion of GAS-containing phagosomes with lysosomes but rather prevented phagolysosome acidification. SLO served two essential functions, poration of the phagolysosomal membrane and translocation of NADase into the macrophage cytosol, both of which were necessary for maximal GAS intracellular survival. Whereas NADase delivery to epithelial cells is mediated by SLO secreted from GAS bound to the cell surface, in macrophages, the source of SLO and NADase is GAS contained within phagolysosomes. We found that transfer of NADase from the phagolysosome to the macrophage cytosol occurs not by simple diffusion through SLO pores but rather by a specific translocation mechanism that requires the N-terminal translocation domain of NADase. These results illuminate the mechanisms through which SLO and NADase enable GAS to defeat macrophage-mediated killing and provide new insight into the virulence of a major human pathogen. PMID:25227466

  13. The Lineage-Specific Transcription Factor PU.1 Prevents Polycomb-Mediated Heterochromatin Formation at Macrophage-Specific Genes.

    PubMed

    Tagore, Mohita; McAndrew, Michael J; Gjidoda, Alison; Floer, Monique

    2015-08-01

    Lineage-specific transcription factors (TFs) are important determinants of cellular identity, but their exact mode of action has remained unclear. Here we show using a macrophage differentiation system that the lineage-specific TF PU.1 keeps macrophage-specific genes accessible during differentiation by preventing Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) binding to transcriptional regulatory elements. We demonstrate that the distal enhancer of a gene becomes bound by PRC2 as cells differentiate in the absence of PU.1 binding and that the gene is wrapped into heterochromatin, which is characterized by increased nucleosome occupancy and H3K27 trimethylation. This renders the gene inaccessible to the transcriptional machinery and prevents induction of the gene in response to an external signal in mature cells. In contrast, if PU.1 is bound at the transcriptional regulatory region of a gene during differentiation, PRC2 is not recruited, nucleosome occupancy is kept low, and the gene can be induced in mature macrophages. Similar results were obtained at the enhancers of other macrophage-specific genes that fail to bind PU.1 as an estrogen receptor fusion (PUER) in this system. These results show that one role of PU.1 is to exclude PRC2 and to prevent heterochromatin formation at macrophage-specific genes. PMID:26012552

  14. Naloxone treatment prevents prenatal stress effects on peritoneal macrophage activity in mice offspring.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Evelise S M; Sakai, Monica; Carvalho-Freitas, Maria Isabel R; Palermo Neto, João

    2005-01-01

    The present study analyzed the effects of maternal stress (PS) and/or naloxone treatment on the activity of peritoneal macrophage in male and female Swiss mice offspring. Pregnant female rats received a daily footshock (0.2 mA) and/or a naloxone injection from gestational day 15 to 19. Experiments were performed on postnatal day 30 on male and female pups. The following results were obtained in male offspring: (1) PS decreased both the index and the percentage of phagocytosis, this decrement being reversed by naloxone treatment, and (2) naloxone alone decreased the percentage of phagocytosis. The following results were obtained in female offspring: (1) PS decreased spontaneous and phorbol myristate acetate-induced macrophage oxidative burst, this decrement being reversed by naloxone pretreatment, and (2) PS decreased both the index and percentage of the phagocytosis, this effect was prevented by naloxone treatment. These data are discussed focussing on a putative neuroimmune interaction involving opioidergic systems during the ontogeny of the central nervous and immune systems. PMID:16210866

  15. Dynamics of the Establishment of Multinucleate Compartments in Fusarium oxysporum

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Shermineh; Beerens, Bas; Manders, Erik M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear dynamics can vary widely between fungal species and between stages of development of fungal colonies. Here we compared nuclear dynamics and mitotic patterns between germlings and mature hyphae in Fusarium oxysporum. Using fluorescently labeled nuclei and live-cell imaging, we show that F. oxysporum is subject to a developmental transition from a uninucleate to a multinucleate state after completion of colony initiation. We observed a special type of hypha that exhibits a higher growth rate, possibly acting as a nutrient scout. The higher growth rate is associated with a higher nuclear count and mitotic waves involving 2 to 6 nuclei in the apical compartment. Further, we found that dormant nuclei of intercalary compartments can reenter the mitotic cycle, resulting in multinucleate compartments with up to 18 nuclei in a single compartment. PMID:25398376

  16. Dynamics of the establishment of multinucleate compartments in Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Shermineh; Beerens, Bas; Manders, Erik M M; Rep, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear dynamics can vary widely between fungal species and between stages of development of fungal colonies. Here we compared nuclear dynamics and mitotic patterns between germlings and mature hyphae in Fusarium oxysporum. Using fluorescently labeled nuclei and live-cell imaging, we show that F. oxysporum is subject to a developmental transition from a uninucleate to a multinucleate state after completion of colony initiation. We observed a special type of hypha that exhibits a higher growth rate, possibly acting as a nutrient scout. The higher growth rate is associated with a higher nuclear count and mitotic waves involving 2 to 6 nuclei in the apical compartment. Further, we found that dormant nuclei of intercalary compartments can reenter the mitotic cycle, resulting in multinucleate compartments with up to 18 nuclei in a single compartment. PMID:25398376

  17. Unsaturated fatty acids prevent activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes/macrophages[S

    PubMed Central

    L'homme, Laurent; Esser, Nathalie; Riva, Laura; Scheen, André; Paquot, Nicolas; Piette, Jacques; Legrand-Poels, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in many obesity-associated diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and gouty arthritis, through its ability to induce interleukin (IL)-1β release. The molecular link between obesity and inflammasome activation is still unclear, but free fatty acids have been proposed as one triggering event. Here we reported opposite effects of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) compared with unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) on NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes/macrophages. Palmitate and stearate, both SFAs, triggered IL-1β secretion in a caspase-1/ASC/NLRP3-dependent pathway. Unlike SFAs, the UFAs oleate and linoleate did not lead to IL-1β secretion. In addition, they totally prevented the IL-1β release induced by SFAs and, with less efficiency, by a broad range of NLRP3 inducers, including nigericin, alum, and monosodium urate. UFAs did not affect the transcriptional effect of SFAs, suggesting a specific effect on the NLRP3 activation. These results provide a new anti-inflammatory mechanism of UFAs by preventing the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and, therefore, IL-1β processing. By this way, UFAs might play a protective role in NLRP3-associated diseases. PMID:24006511

  18. Targeting macrophage activation for the prevention and treatment of S. aureus biofilm infections†

    PubMed Central

    Hanke, Mark L.; Heim, Cortney E.; Angle, Amanda; Sanderson, Sam D.; Kielian, Tammy

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm infections often lead to significant morbidity due to their chronicity and recalcitrance to antibiotics. We have demonstrated that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) biofilms can evade macrophage antibacterial effector mechanisms by skewing macrophages towards an alternatively activated M2 phenotype. To overcome this immune evasion, we have utilized two complementary approaches. In the first, a proinflammatory milieu was elicited by local administration of classically-activated M1 macrophages and second, by treatment with the C5a receptor (CD88) agonist EP67, which invokes macrophage proinflammatory activity. Early administration of M1-activated macrophages or EP67 significantly attenuated biofilm formation in a mouse model of MRSA catheter-associated infection. Several proinflammatory mediators were significantly elevated in biofilm infected tissues from macrophage- and EP67-treated animals, revealing effective reprogramming of the biofilm environment to a proinflammatory milieu. A requirement for macrophage proinflammatory activity was demonstrated by the fact that transfer of MyD88-deficient macrophages had minimal impact on biofilm growth. Likewise, neutrophil administration had no effect on biofilm formation. Treatment of established biofilm infections with M1-activated macrophages also significantly reduced catheter-associated biofilm burdens compared to antibiotic treatment. Collectively, these results demonstrate that targeting macrophage proinflammatory activity can overcome the local immune inhibitory environment created during biofilm infections and represents a novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:23365077

  19. Leishmania inhibitor of serine peptidase prevents TLR4 activation by neutrophil elastase promoting parasite survival in murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Marilia S.; Reis, Flavia C. G.; Azevedo-Pereira, Ricardo L.; Morrison, Lesley S.; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Lima, Ana Paula C. A.

    2011-01-01

    Leishmania major is a protozoan parasite that causes skin ulcerations in cutaneous leishmaniasis. In the mammalian host, the parasite resides in professional phagocytes and has evolved to avoid killing by macrophages. We identified L. major genes encoding inhibitors of serine peptidases, ISPs, which are orthologues of bacterial ecotins and found that ISP2 inhibits trypsin-fold S1A family peptidases. Here we show that L. major mutants deficient in ISP2 and ISP3 (Δisp2/3) trigger higher phagocytosis by macrophages through a combined action of the complement type-3 receptor (CR3), toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and unregulated activity of neutrophil elastase (NE), leading to parasite killing. While all three components are required to mediate enhanced parasite uptake, only TLR4 and NE are necessary to promote parasite killing after infection. We found that the production of superoxide by macrophages in the absence of ISP2 is the main mechanism controlling the intracellular infection. Furthermore, we show that NE modulates macrophage infection in vivo, and that the lack of ISP leads to reduced parasite burdens at later stages of the infection. Our findings support the hypothesis that ISPs function to prevent the activation of TLR4 by NE during the Leishmania-macrophage interaction in order to promote parasite survival and growth. PMID:21098233

  20. FleA Expression in Aspergillus fumigatus Is Recognized by Fucosylated Structures on Mucins and Macrophages to Prevent Lung Infection.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Sheena C; Fischer, Gregory J; Sinha, Meenal; McCabe, Orla; Palmer, Jonathan M; Choera, Tsokyi; Lim, Fang Yun; Wimmerova, Michaela; Carrington, Stephen D; Yuan, Shaopeng; Lowell, Clifford A; Oscarson, Stefan; Keller, Nancy P; Fahy, John V

    2016-04-01

    The immune mechanisms that recognize inhaled Aspergillus fumigatus conidia to promote their elimination from the lungs are incompletely understood. FleA is a lectin expressed by Aspergillus fumigatus that has twelve binding sites for fucosylated structures that are abundant in the glycan coats of multiple plant and animal proteins. The role of FleA is unknown: it could bind fucose in decomposed plant matter to allow Aspergillus fumigatus to thrive in soil, or it may be a virulence factor that binds fucose in lung glycoproteins to cause Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. Our studies show that FleA protein and Aspergillus fumigatus conidia bind avidly to purified lung mucin glycoproteins in a fucose-dependent manner. In addition, FleA binds strongly to macrophage cell surface proteins, and macrophages bind and phagocytose fleA-deficient (∆fleA) conidia much less efficiently than wild type (WT) conidia. Furthermore, a potent fucopyranoside glycomimetic inhibitor of FleA inhibits binding and phagocytosis of WT conidia by macrophages, confirming the specific role of fucose binding in macrophage recognition of WT conidia. Finally, mice infected with ΔfleA conidia had more severe pneumonia and invasive aspergillosis than mice infected with WT conidia. These findings demonstrate that FleA is not a virulence factor for Aspergillus fumigatus. Instead, host recognition of FleA is a critical step in mechanisms of mucin binding, mucociliary clearance, and macrophage killing that prevent Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. PMID:27058347

  1. FleA Expression in Aspergillus fumigatus Is Recognized by Fucosylated Structures on Mucins and Macrophages to Prevent Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Meenal; McCabe, Orla; Palmer, Jonathan M.; Choera, Tsokyi; Yun Lim, Fang; Wimmerova, Michaela; Carrington, Stephen D.; Yuan, Shaopeng; Lowell, Clifford A.; Oscarson, Stefan; Keller, Nancy P.; Fahy, John V.

    2016-01-01

    The immune mechanisms that recognize inhaled Aspergillus fumigatus conidia to promote their elimination from the lungs are incompletely understood. FleA is a lectin expressed by Aspergillus fumigatus that has twelve binding sites for fucosylated structures that are abundant in the glycan coats of multiple plant and animal proteins. The role of FleA is unknown: it could bind fucose in decomposed plant matter to allow Aspergillus fumigatus to thrive in soil, or it may be a virulence factor that binds fucose in lung glycoproteins to cause Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. Our studies show that FleA protein and Aspergillus fumigatus conidia bind avidly to purified lung mucin glycoproteins in a fucose-dependent manner. In addition, FleA binds strongly to macrophage cell surface proteins, and macrophages bind and phagocytose fleA-deficient (∆fleA) conidia much less efficiently than wild type (WT) conidia. Furthermore, a potent fucopyranoside glycomimetic inhibitor of FleA inhibits binding and phagocytosis of WT conidia by macrophages, confirming the specific role of fucose binding in macrophage recognition of WT conidia. Finally, mice infected with ΔfleA conidia had more severe pneumonia and invasive aspergillosis than mice infected with WT conidia. These findings demonstrate that FleA is not a virulence factor for Aspergillus fumigatus. Instead, host recognition of FleA is a critical step in mechanisms of mucin binding, mucociliary clearance, and macrophage killing that prevent Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. PMID:27058347

  2. Glutathione prevents preterm parturition and fetal death by targeting macrophage-induced reactive oxygen species production in the myometrium.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Tarik; Bardou, Marc; Mace, Guillaume; Sicard, Pierre; Wendremaire, Maeva; Barrichon, Marina; Richaud, Sarah; Demidov, Oleg; Sagot, Paul; Garrido, Carmen; Lirussi, Frédéric

    2015-06-01

    Preterm birth is an inflammatory process resulting from the massive infiltration of innate immune cells and the production of proinflammatory cytokines in the myometrium. However, proinflammatory cytokines, which induce labor in vivo, fail to induce labor-associated features in human myometrial cells (MCs). We thus aimed to investigate if reactive oxygen species (ROS) production could be the missing step between immune cell activation and MC response. Indeed, we found that ROS production is increased in the human preterm laboring myometrium (27% ROS producing cells, respectively, versus 2% in nonlaboring controls), with 90% ROS production in macrophages. Using LPS-stimulated myometrial samples and cell coculture experiments, we demonstrated that ROS production is required for labor onset. Furthermore, we showed that ROS are required first in the NADPH oxidase (NADPHox)-2/NF-κB-dependent macrophage response to inflammatory stimuli but, more importantly, to trigger macrophage-induced MCs transactivation. Remarkably, in a murine model of LPS-induced preterm labor (inducing delivery within 17 hours, with no pup survival), cotreatment with glutathione delayed labor onset up to 94 hours and prevented in utero fetal distress, allowing 46% pups to survive. These results suggest that targeting ROS production with the macrophage-permeable antioxidant glutathione could constitute a promising strategy to prevent preterm birth. PMID:25757563

  3. Platelets Direct Monocyte Differentiation Into Epithelioid-Like Multinucleated Giant Foam Cells With Suppressive Capacity Upon Mycobacterial Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yonghong; Dorhoi, Anca; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Yin, Hongyun; Dong, Zhengwei; Mao, Ling; Zhou, Jun; Bi, Aixiao; Weber, Stephan; Maertzdorf, Jeroen; Chen, Gang; Chen, Yang; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Epithelioid, foam, and multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs) are characteristics of tuberculosis granulomas, yet the precise genesis and functions of these transformed macrophages are unclear. We evaluated the role of platelets as drivers of macrophage transformation in mycobacterial infection. Methods. We employed flow cytometry and microscopy to assess cellular phenotype and phagocytosis. Immune assays allowed quantification of cytokines and chemokines, whereas gene microarray technology was applied to estimate global transcriptome alterations. Immunohistochemical investigations of tuberculosis granulomas substantiated our findings at the site of infection. Results. Monocytes differentiated in presence of platelets (MP-Macs) acquired a foamy, epithelioid appearance and gave rise to MNGCs (MP-MNGCs). MP-Macs up-regulated activation markers, phagocytosed mycobacteria, and released abundant interleukin 10. Upon extended culture, MP-Macs shared transcriptional features with epithelioid cells and M2 macrophages and up-regulated CXCL5 transcripts. In line with this, CXCL5 concentrations were significantly increased in airways of active tuberculosis patients. The platelet-specific CD42b antigen was detected in MP-Macs, likewise in macrophages, MNGCs, and epithelioid cells within tuberculosis granulomas, along with the platelet aggregation-inducing factor PDPN. Conclusions. Platelets drive macrophage differentiation into MNGCs with characteristics of epithelioid, foam, and giant cells observed in tuberculosis granulomas. Our data define platelets as novel participants in tuberculosis pathogenesis. PMID:24987031

  4. Metformin prevents cancer metastasis by inhibiting M2-like polarization of tumor associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ling; Liang, Guikai; Yao, Zhangting; Zhang, Jieqiong; Liu, Ruiyang; Chen, Huihui; Zhou, Yulu; Wu, Honghai; Yang, Bo; He, Qiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests that M2-like polarized tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) plays an important role in cancer progression and metastasis, establishing TAMs, especially M2-like TAMs as an appealing target for therapy intervention. Here we found that metformin significantly suppressed IL-13 induced M2-like polarization of macrophages, as illustrated by reduced expression of CD206, down-regulation of M2 marker mRNAs, and inhibition of M2-like macrophages promoted migration of cancer cells and endothelial cells. Metformin triggered AMPKα1 activation in macrophage and silencing of AMPKα1 partially abrogated the inhibitory effect of metformin in IL-13 induced M2-like polarization. Administration of AICAR, another activator of AMPK, also blocked the M2-like polarization of macrophages. Metformin greatly reduced the number of metastases of Lewis lung cancer without affecting tumor growth. In tumor tissues, the percentage of M2-like macrophage was decreased and the area of pericyte-coated vessels was increased. Further, the anti-metastatic effect of metformin was abolished when the animals were treated with macrophages eliminating agent clodronate liposome. These findings suggest that metformin is able to block the M2-like polarization of macrophages partially through AMPKα1, which plays an important role in metformin inhibited metastasis of Lewis lung cancer. PMID:26497364

  5. Ploidy variation in multinucleate cells changes under stress

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Cori A.; Roberts, Samantha; Zhang, Huaiying; Kelly, Courtney M.; Kendall, Alexxy; Lee, ChangHwan; Gerstenberger, John; Koenig, Aaron B.; Kabeche, Ruth; Gladfelter, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Ploidy variation is found in contexts as diverse as solid tumors, drug resistance in fungal infection, and normal development. Altering chromosome or genome copy number supports adaptation to fluctuating environments but is also associated with fitness defects attributed to protein imbalances. Both aneuploidy and polyploidy can arise from multinucleate states after failed cytokinesis or cell fusion. The consequences of ploidy variation in syncytia are difficult to predict because protein imbalances are theoretically buffered by a common cytoplasm. We examined ploidy in a naturally multinucleate fungus, Ashbya gossypii. Using integrated lac operator arrays, we found that chromosome number varies substantially among nuclei sharing a common cytoplasm. Populations of nuclei range from 1N to >4N, with different polyploidies in the same cell and low levels of aneuploidy. The degree of ploidy variation increases as cells age. In response to cellular stress, polyploid nuclei diminish and haploid nuclei predominate. These data suggest that mixed ploidy is tolerated in these syncytia; however, there may be costs associated with variation as stress homogenizes the genome content of nuclei. Furthermore, the results suggest that sharing of gene products is limited, and thus there is incomplete buffering of ploidy variation despite a common cytosol. PMID:25631818

  6. Exercise enhances wound healing and prevents cancer progression during aging by targeting macrophage polarity.

    PubMed

    Goh, Jorming; Ladiges, Warren C

    2014-07-01

    Physical activity, which can include regular and repetitive exercise training, has been shown to decrease the incidence of age-related diseases. Aging is characterized by aberrant immune responses, including impaired wound healing and increased cancer risk. The behavior and polarized phenotype of tissue macrophages are distinct between young and old organisms. The balance of M1 and M2 macrophages is altered in the aged tissue microenvironment, with a tilt towards an M2-dominant macrophage population, as well as its associated signaling pathways. These M2-type responses may result in unresolved inflammation and create an environment that impairs wound healing and is favorable for cancer growth. We discuss the concept that exercise training can improve the regulation of macrophage polarization and normalize the inflammatory process, and thereby exert anticancer effects and enhance wound healing in older humans. PMID:24932991

  7. Grape Cells (Multinucleated Keratinocytes) in Noninfectious Dermatoses: Case Series and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sulit, Daryl J.; Adams, Erin G.; Shvartsman, Katerina R.; Rapini, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Multinucleated keratinocytes (also known as multinucleated epidermal giant cells) are a frequently overlooked histological finding in noninfectious inflammatory dermatoses. They are sometimes found in conditions characterized by chronic rubbing and pruritus, such as lichen simplex chronicus or prurigo nodularis, and may be a helpful clue in making the clinical diagnosis. This finding must be differentiated from other conditions characterized by multinucleated keratinocytes on histopathology, specifically herpes simplex, varicella zoster, or measles viral infections. The authors present a case series of 2 patients with unique clinical noninfectious diagnoses but similar histopathologic findings on biopsy. The histopathologic findings on both cases demonstrated multinucleated keratinocytes, which were related to manipulation of the epidermis. PMID:26588345

  8. PER1 prevents excessive innate immune response during endotoxin-induced liver injury through regulation of macrophage recruitment in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, T; Wang, Z; Yang, P; Xia, L; Zhou, M; Wang, S; Du, Jie; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    The severity of acute liver failure (ALF) induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is associated with the hepatic innate immune response. The core circadian molecular clock modulates the innate immune response by controlling rhythmic pathogen recognition by the innate immune system and daily variations in cytokine gene expression. However, the molecular link between circadian genes and the innate immune system has remained unclear. Here, we showed that mice lacking the clock gene Per1 (Period1) are more susceptible to LPS/d-galactosamine (LPS/GalN)-induced macrophage-dependent ALF compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Per1 deletion caused a remarkable increase in the number of Kupffer cells (KCs) in the liver, resulting in an elevation of the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines after LPS treatment. Loss of Per1 had no effect on the proliferation or apoptosis of macrophages; however, it enhanced the recruitment of macrophages, which was associated with an increase in CC chemokine receptor 2 (Ccr2) expression levels in monocytes/macrophages. Deletion of Ccr2 rescued d-GalN/LPS-induced liver injury in Per1−/− mice. We demonstrated that the upregulation of Ccr2 expression by Per1 deletion could be reversed by the synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) antagonist GW9662. Further analysis indicated that PER1 binds to PPAR-γ on the Ccr2 promoter and enhanced the inhibitory effect of PPAR-γ on Ccr2 expression. These results reveal that Per1 reduces hepatic macrophage recruitment through interaction with PPAR-γ and prevents an excessive innate immune response in endotoxin-induced liver injury. PMID:27054331

  9. Surfactant Protein A Prevents IFN-γ/IFN-γ Receptor Interaction and Attenuates Classical Activation of Human Alveolar Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Minutti, Carlos M; García-Fojeda, Belén; Sáenz, Alejandra; de Las Casas-Engel, Mateo; Guillamat-Prats, Raquel; de Lorenzo, Alba; Serrano-Mollar, Anna; Corbí, Ángel L; Casals, Cristina

    2016-07-15

    Lung surfactant protein A (SP-A) plays an important function in modulating inflammation in the lung. However, the exact role of SP-A and the mechanism by which SP-A affects IFN-γ-induced activation of alveolar macrophages (aMϕs) remains unknown. To address these questions, we studied the effect of human SP-A on rat and human aMϕs stimulated with IFN-γ, LPS, and combinations thereof and measured the induction of proinflammatory mediators as well as SP-A's ability to bind to IFN-γ or IFN-γR1. We found that SP-A inhibited (IFN-γ + LPS)-induced TNF-α, iNOS, and CXCL10 production by rat aMϕs. When rat macrophages were stimulated with LPS and IFN-γ separately, SP-A inhibited both LPS-induced signaling and IFN-γ-elicited STAT1 phosphorylation. SP-A also decreased TNF-α and CXCL10 secretion by ex vivo-cultured human aMϕs and M-CSF-derived macrophages stimulated by either LPS or IFN-γ or both. Hence, SP-A inhibited upregulation of IFN-γ-inducible genes (CXCL10, RARRES3, and ETV7) as well as STAT1 phosphorylation in human M-CSF-derived macrophages. In addition, we found that SP-A bound to human IFN-γ (KD = 11 ± 0.5 nM) in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner and prevented IFN-γ interaction with IFN-γR1 on human aMϕs. We conclude that SP-A inhibition of (IFN-γ + LPS) stimulation is due to SP-A attenuation of both inflammatory agents and that the binding of SP-A to IFN-γ abrogates IFN-γ effects on human macrophages, suppressing their classical activation and subsequent inflammatory response. PMID:27271568

  10. Depletion of resident alveolar macrophages does not prevent Fas-mediated lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Bem, R A; Farnand, A W; Wong, V; Koski, A; Rosenfeld, M E; van Rooijen, N; Frevert, C W; Martin, T R; Matute-Bello, G

    2008-08-01

    Activation of the Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) system in the lungs results in a form of injury characterized by alveolar epithelial apoptosis and neutrophilic inflammation. Studies in vitro show that Fas activation induces apoptosis in alveolar epithelial cells and cytokine production in alveolar macrophages. The main goal of this study was to determine the contribution of alveolar macrophages to Fas-induced lung inflammation in mice, by depleting alveolar macrophages using clodronate-containing liposomes. Liposomes containing clodronate or PBS were instilled by intratracheal instillation. After 24 h, the mice received intratracheal instillations of the Fas-activating monoclonal antibody Jo2 or an isotype control antibody and were studied 18 h later. The Jo2 MAb induced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) total neutrophils, lung caspase-3 activity, and BALF total protein and worsened histological lung injury in the macrophage-depleted mice. Studies in vitro showed that Fas activation induced the release of the cytokine KC in a mouse lung epithelial cell line, MLE-12. These results suggest that the lung inflammatory response to Fas activation is not primarily dependent on resident alveolar macrophages and may instead depend on cytokine release by alveolar epithelial cells. PMID:18556802

  11. Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acids Regulate Macrophage Polarization and Prevent LPS-Induced Cardiac Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Meiyan; Wu, Lujin; He, Zuowen; Zhang, Shasha; Chen, Chen; Xu, Xizhen; Wang, Peihua; Gruzdev, Artiom; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Wang, Dao Wen

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages, owning tremendous phenotypic plasticity and diverse functions, were becoming the target cells in various inflammatory, metabolic and immune diseases. Cytochrome P450 epoxygenase 2J2 (CYP2J2) metabolizes arachidonic acid to form epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), which possess various beneficial effects on cardiovascular system. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of EETs treatment on macrophage polarization and recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated CYP2J2 expression on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cardiac dysfunction, and sought to investigate the underlying mechanisms. In vitro studies showed that EETs (1μmol/L) significantly inhibited LPS-induced M1 macrophage polarization and diminished the proinflammatory cytokines at transcriptional and post-transcriptional level; meanwhile it preserved M2 macrophage related molecules expression and upregulated antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10. Furthermore, EETs down-regulated NF-κB activation and up-regulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARα/γ) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression, which play important roles in regulating M1 and M2 polarization. In addition, LPS treatment in mice induced cardiac dysfunction, heart tissue damage and infiltration of M1 macrophages, as well as the increase of inflammatory cytokines in serum and heart tissue, but rAAV-mediated CYP2J2 expression increased EETs generation in heart and significantly attenuated the LPS-induced harmful effects, which mechanisms were similar as the in vitro study. Taken together, the results indicate that CYP2J2/EETs regulates macrophage polarization by attenuating NF-κB signaling pathway via PPARα/γ and HO-1 activation and its potential use in treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25626689

  12. Curcumin retunes cholesterol transport homeostasis and inflammation response in M1 macrophage to prevent atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang-Yuan; Zhou, Juan; Guo, Ning; Ma, Wang-Ge; Huang, Xin; Wang, Huan; Yuan, Zu-Yi

    2015-11-27

    Lipoprotein cholesterol metabolism dysfunction in the arterial wall is a major contributor to atherosclerosis, and excessive lipid intake and failed cholesterol homeostasis may accelerate the atherogenic process. Curcumin exerts multiple effects by alleviating inflammation, hyperlipidemia, and atherosclerosis; however, its role in cholesterol transport homeostasis and its underlying impact on inflammatory M1 macrophages are poorly understood. This work aimed to investigate the effect of curcumin on cholesterol transport, the inflammatory response and cell apoptosis in M1 macrophages. RAW264.7 macrophages (M0) were induced with LPS plus IFN-γ for 12 h to develop a M1 subtype and were then incubated with curcumin at different concentrations (6.25 and 12.5 μmol/L) in the presence or absence of oxLDL. Then, cholesterol influx/efflux and foam cell formation as well as inflammation and apoptosis were evaluated. It was found that curcumin increased cholesterol uptake measured by the Dil-oxLDL binding assay, and simultaneously increased cholesterol efflux carried out by Apo-A1 and HDL in M1 cells. Curcumin further reinforced ox-LDL-induced cholesterol esterification and foam cell formation as determined by Oil Red O and BODIPY staining. Moreover, curcumin dramatically reduced ox-LDL-induced cytokine production such as IL-1β, IL-6 as well as TNF-α and M1 cell apoptosis. We also found that curcumin upregulated CD36 and ABCA1 in M1 macrophages. Curcumin increased PPARγ expression, which in turn promoted CD36 and ABCA1 expression. In conclusion, curcumin may increase the ability of M1 macrophages to handle harmful lipids, thus promoting lipid processing, disposal and removal, which may support cholesterol homeostasis and exert an anti-atherosclerotic effect. PMID:26471308

  13. Vitamin E prevents NRF2-suppression by allergen in asthmatic alveolar macrophages in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dworski, Ryszard; Han, Wei; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Hoskins, Aimee; Freeman, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease associated with increased generation of reactive oxidant species and disturbed antioxidant defenses. NRF2 is the master transcription factor that regulates the expression of Phase II antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes. Disruption of NRF2 augments oxidative stress and inflammation in a mouse model of asthma suggesting a protective role of NRF2 in the lungs in vivo. Yet, little is known about the regulation and function of NRF2 in human asthmatics. Using segmental allergen challenge, a well established experimental model of IgE-mediated asthma exacerbation in human atopic asthmatics, we investigated the effect of a specific allergen and the modulatory role of vitamin E on NRF2 and a NRF2-target gene, superoxide dismutase, in alveolar macrophages recovered from the airways at 24h after allergen instillation in vivo. Allergen-provoked airway inflammation in sensitive asthmatics caused a profound inhibition of macrophage NRF2 activity and superoxide dismutase, rendering them incapable of responding to the NRF2 inducers. Prolonged treatment with high doses of the antioxidant vitamin E lessened this allergen-induced drop in alveolar macrophage NRF2. These results are the first to demonstrate that NRF2 expression in human asthmatics is compromised upon allergen challenge but can be rescued by vitamin E in vivo. PMID:21605660

  14. Blockade of prostaglandin production increases cachectin synthesis and prevents depression of macrophage functions after hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed Central

    Ertel, W; Morrison, M H; Ayala, A; Perrin, M M; Chaudry, I H

    1991-01-01

    Although hemorrhage severely depresses macrophage functions, it is not known whether the increased TNF-alpha or PGE2 production is responsible for it. To study this C3H/HeN mice were bled to mean blood pressure of 35 mmHg for 60 minutes, resuscitated, and treated with either ibuprofen (1.0 mg/kg body weight) or vehicle (saline). Hemorrhage increased plasma prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels by 151.7% +/- 40.0% (p less than 0.05) and significantly decreased peritoneal macrophage (pM phi) antigen presentation (AP) by 60.5% +/- 7.3%, Ia expression by 52.3% +/- 7.6%, and interleukin-1 (IL-1) synthesis by 60.5% +/- 12.3% compared to shams. However ibuprofen treatment reduced PGE2 plasma levels by 61.3% +/- 12.1% and significantly increased AP (+237.0% +/- 95.3%), Ia expression (+72.8% +/- 27.5%), IL-1 synthesis (+235.7% +/- 134.7%), and cachectin synthesis (+485.8% +/- 209.0%) compared to vehicle-treated animals. These results indicate that prostaglandins but not cachectin are involved in the suppression of pM phi functions following hemorrhage because blockade of prostaglandin synthesis improved depressed macrophage functions despite enhanced cachectin synthesis. PMID:1998408

  15. Unsaturated FAs prevent palmitate-induced LOX-1 induction via inhibition of ER stress in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ishiyama, Junichi; Taguchi, Ryoko; Akasaka, Yunike; Shibata, Saiko; Ito, Minoru; Nagasawa, Michiaki; Murakami, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Palmitic acid (PA) upregulates oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), a scavenger receptor responsible for uptake of oxidized LDL (oxLDL), and enhances oxLDL uptake in macrophages. However, the precise underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. PA is known to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in various cell types. Therefore, we investigated whether ER stress is involved in PA-induced LOX-1 upregulation. PA induced ER stress, as determined by phosphorylation of PERK, eIF2α, and JNK, as well as induction of CHOP in macrophage-like THP-1 cells. Inhibitors [4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA), sodium tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDCA), and salubrinal] and small interfering RNA (siRNA) for the ER stress response decreased PA-induced LOX-1 upregulation. Thapsigargin, an ER stress inducer, upregulated LOX-1, which was decreased by PBA and TUDCA. We next examined whether unsaturated FAs could counteract the effect of PA. Both oleic acid (OA) and linoleic acid (LA) suppressed PA-induced LOX-1. Activation of the ER stress response observed in the PA-treated cells was markedly attenuated when the cells were cotreated with OA or LA. In addition, OA and LA suppressed thapsigargin-induced LOX-1 upregulation with reduced activation of ER stress markers. Our results indicate that activation of ER stress is involved in PA-induced LOX-1 upregulation in macrophages, and that OA and LA inhibit LOX-1 induction through suppression of ER stress. PMID:21078775

  16. Formation of solid tumors by a single multinucleated cancer cel

    PubMed Central

    Weihua, Zhang; Lin, Qingtang; Ramoth, Asa J.; Fan, Dominic; Fidler, Isaiah J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Large multinucleated cells (MNC) commonly exist in tumorigenic cancer cell lines widely used in research, but their contributions to tumorigenesis are unknown. METHODS In this study, we characterized MNCs in the murine fibrosarcoma cell line UV-2237 in vitro and in vivo at a single cell level. RESULTS We observed that MNCs originated from a rare subpopulation of mononuclear cells; MNCs were positive for a senescent marker, β-galacosidase (SA-β-Gal); MNCs were responsible for the majority of clonogenic activity when cultured in hard agar; MNCs were more resistant to chemotherapeutic agents than were mononuclear cells; MNCs could undergo asymmetric division (producing mononuclear cells) and self-renewal in vitro and in vivo; and, most importantly a single MNC produced orthotopic subcutaneous tumors (composed mainly of mononuclear cells) that gave rise to spontaneous lung metastases in nude mice. CONCLUSIONS MNCs can be growth-arrested under stress, are highly resistant to chemotherapy, and can generate clonal orthotopic metastatic tumors PMID:21365635

  17. Emergence of antibiotic resistance from multinucleated bacterial filaments

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Julia; Zhang, Qiucen; Vyawahare, Saurabh; Rogers, Elizabeth; Rosenberg, Susan M.; Austin, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria can rapidly evolve resistance to antibiotics via the SOS response, a state of high-activity DNA repair and mutagenesis. We explore here the first steps of this evolution in the bacterium Escherichia coli. Induction of the SOS response by the genotoxic antibiotic ciprofloxacin changes the E. coli rod shape into multichromosome-containing filaments. We show that at subminimal inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin the bacterial filament divides asymmetrically repeatedly at the tip. Chromosome-containing buds are made that, if resistant, propagate nonfilamenting progeny with enhanced resistance to ciprofloxacin as the parent filament dies. We propose that the multinucleated filament creates an environmental niche where evolution can proceed via generation of improved mutant chromosomes due to the mutagenic SOS response and possible recombination of the new alleles between chromosomes. Our data provide a better understanding of the processes underlying the origin of resistance at the single-cell level and suggest an analogous role to the eukaryotic aneuploidy condition in cancer. PMID:25492931

  18. Mutations in Citron Kinase Cause Recessive Microlissencephaly with Multinucleated Neurons.

    PubMed

    Harding, Brian N; Moccia, Amanda; Drunat, Séverine; Soukarieh, Omar; Tubeuf, Hélène; Chitty, Lyn S; Verloes, Alain; Gressens, Pierre; El Ghouzzi, Vincent; Joriot, Sylvie; Di Cunto, Ferdinando; Martins, Alexandra; Passemard, Sandrine; Bielas, Stephanie L

    2016-08-01

    Primary microcephaly is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is caused by a reduction in brain size as a result of defects in the proliferation of neural progenitor cells during development. Mutations in genes encoding proteins that localize to the mitotic spindle and centrosomes have been implicated in the pathogenicity of primary microcephaly. In contrast, the contractile ring and midbody required for cytokinesis, the final stage of mitosis, have not previously been implicated by human genetics in the molecular mechanisms of this phenotype. Citron kinase (CIT) is a multi-domain protein that localizes to the cleavage furrow and midbody of mitotic cells, where it is required for the completion of cytokinesis. Rodent models of Cit deficiency highlighted the role of this gene in neurogenesis and microcephaly over a decade ago. Here, we identify recessively inherited pathogenic variants in CIT as the genetic basis of severe microcephaly and neonatal death. We present postmortem data showing that CIT is critical to building a normally sized human brain. Consistent with cytokinesis defects attributed to CIT, multinucleated neurons were observed throughout the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of an affected proband, expanding our understanding of mechanisms attributed to primary microcephaly. PMID:27453579

  19. Protocatechuic Acid Prevents oxLDL-Induced Apoptosis by Activating JNK/Nrf2 Survival Signals in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Varì, Rosaria; Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Santangelo, Carmela; Filesi, Carmelina; Galvano, Fabio; D'Archivio, Massimo; Masella, Roberta; Giovannini, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Protocatechuic acid (PCA), one of the main metabolites of complex polyphenols, exerts numerous biological activities including antiapoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherosclerotic effects. Oxidised LDL have atherogenic properties by damaging arterial wall cells and inducing p53-dependent apoptosis in macrophages. This study was aimed at defining the molecular mechanism responsible for the protective effects of PCA against oxidative and proapoptotic damage exerted by oxLDL in J774 A.1 macrophages. We found that the presence of PCA in cells treated with oxLDL completely inhibited the p53-dependent apoptosis induced by oxLDL. PCA decreased oxLDL-induced ROS overproduction and in particular prevented the early increase of ROS. This decrease seemed to be the main signal responsible for maintaining the intracellular redox homeostasis hindering the activation of p53 induced by ROS, p38MAPK, and PKCδ. Consequently the overexpression of the proapoptotic p53-target genes such as p66Shc protein did not occur. Finally, we demonstrated that PCA induced the activation of JNK, which, in turn, determined the increase of nuclear Nrf2, leading to inhibition of the early ROS overproduction. We concluded that the antiapoptotic mechanism of PCA was most likely related to the activation of the JNK-mediated survival signals that strengthen the cellular antioxidant defences rather than to the PCA antioxidant power. PMID:26180584

  20. Protocatechuic Acid Prevents oxLDL-Induced Apoptosis by Activating JNK/Nrf2 Survival Signals in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Varì, Rosaria; Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Santangelo, Carmela; Filesi, Carmelina; Galvano, Fabio; D'Archivio, Massimo; Masella, Roberta; Giovannini, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Protocatechuic acid (PCA), one of the main metabolites of complex polyphenols, exerts numerous biological activities including antiapoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherosclerotic effects. Oxidised LDL have atherogenic properties by damaging arterial wall cells and inducing p53-dependent apoptosis in macrophages. This study was aimed at defining the molecular mechanism responsible for the protective effects of PCA against oxidative and proapoptotic damage exerted by oxLDL in J774 A.1 macrophages. We found that the presence of PCA in cells treated with oxLDL completely inhibited the p53-dependent apoptosis induced by oxLDL. PCA decreased oxLDL-induced ROS overproduction and in particular prevented the early increase of ROS. This decrease seemed to be the main signal responsible for maintaining the intracellular redox homeostasis hindering the activation of p53 induced by ROS, p38MAPK, and PKCδ. Consequently the overexpression of the proapoptotic p53-target genes such as p66Shc protein did not occur. Finally, we demonstrated that PCA induced the activation of JNK, which, in turn, determined the increase of nuclear Nrf2, leading to inhibition of the early ROS overproduction. We concluded that the antiapoptotic mechanism of PCA was most likely related to the activation of the JNK-mediated survival signals that strengthen the cellular antioxidant defences rather than to the PCA antioxidant power. PMID:26180584

  1. Chelation of dietary iron prevents iron accumulation and macrophage infiltration in the type I diabetic kidney.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tatsuyori; Nakano, Daisuke; Kitada, Kento; Morimoto, Satoshi; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Shiojima, Ichiro; Nishiyama, Akira

    2015-06-01

    We previously reported that the functional deletion of p21, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, in mice attenuated renal cell senescence in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetic mice. In the present study, we investigated the effect of iron chelation on renal cell senescence and inflammation in the type 1 diabetic kidney. STZ-treated mice showed increase in iron accumulation, tubular cell senescence and macrophage infiltration at week 28 in the kidney. Administering deferasirox, which removes only dietary iron, significantly attenuated iron accumulation in proximal tubules and the number of infiltrating F4/80-positive cells without effecting blood glucose, hematocrit or hemoglobin levels. In contrast however, deferasirox did not influence renal cell senescence. The lack of p21 decreased the renal tubular iron accumulation and did not change tubular cell senescence. Interestingly, the STZ-treated animals showed an increase in p16, another cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. The results suggest that type 1 diabetes increases renal tubular iron accumulation and macrophage infiltration through a p21-dependent mechanism, and that the chelation of dietary iron attenuates these responses. PMID:25820160

  2. Structural Interactions Dictate the Kinetics of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Inhibition by Different Cancer-Preventive Isothiocyanates

    PubMed Central

    Crichlow, Gregg V.; Fan, Chengpeng; Keeler, Camille; Hodsdon, Michael; Lolis, Elias J.

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of cellular processes by dietary nutrients is known to affect the likelihood of cancer development. One class of cancer preventive nutrients, isothiocyanates (ITCs) derived from consumption of cruciferous vegetables, is known to have various effects on cellular biochemistry. One target of ITCs is macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a widely expressed protein with known inflammatory, pro-tumorigenic, pro-angiogenic, and anti-apoptotic properties. MIF is covalently inhibited by a variety of ITCs, which in part, may explain how they exert their cancer-preventive effects. We report the crystallographic structures of human MIF bound to phenethylisothiocyanate and to L-sulforaphane (dietary isothiocyanates derived from watercress and broccoli, respectively), and correlate structural features of these two isothiocyanates with their second-order rate constants for MIF inactivation. We also characterize changes in the MIF structure using NMR HSQC spectra of these complexes and observe many changes at the subunit interface. While a number of chemical shifts do not change, many of those that change do not have similar features in magnitude or direction for the two isothiocyanates. The difference in the binding modes of these two ITCs provides a means of using structure-activity relationships to reveal insights into MIF biological interactions. The results of this study provide a framework for the development of therapeutics that target MIF. PMID:22931430

  3. Structural interactions dictate the kinetics of macrophage migration inhibitory factor inhibition by different cancer-preventive isothiocyanates.

    PubMed

    Crichlow, Gregg V; Fan, Chengpeng; Keeler, Camille; Hodsdon, Michael; Lolis, Elias J

    2012-09-25

    Regulation of cellular processes by dietary nutrients is known to affect the likelihood of cancer development. One class of cancer-preventive nutrients, isothiocyanates (ITCs), derived from the consumption of cruciferous vegetables, is known to have various effects on cellular biochemistry. One target of ITCs is macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a widely expressed protein with known inflammatory, pro-tumorigenic, pro-angiogenic, and anti-apoptotic properties. MIF is covalently inhibited by a variety of ITCs, which in part may explain how they exert their cancer-preventive effects. We report the crystallographic structures of human MIF bound to phenethylisothiocyanate and to l-sulforaphane (dietary isothiocyanates derived from watercress and broccoli, respectively) and correlate structural features of these two isothiocyanates with their second-order rate constants for MIF inactivation. We also characterize changes in the MIF structure using nuclear magnetic resonance heteronuclear single-quantum coherence spectra of these complexes and observe many changes at the subunit interface. While a number of chemical shifts do not change, many of those that change do not have features similar in magnitude or direction for the two isothiocyanates. The difference in the binding modes of these two ITCs provides a means of using structure-activity relationships to reveal insights into MIF biological interactions. The results of this study provide a framework for the development of therapeutics that target MIF. PMID:22931430

  4. Multinucleate Giant Cells in FNAC of Benign Breast Lesions: Its Significance

    PubMed Central

    R, Kalyani; Murthy V, Srinivasa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Multinucleate giant cells are described in breast aspirates. However, due to its rarity very few cases have been described cytologically. Hence recognition and correct interpretation of their presence is difficult, yet crucial for accurate diagnosis. Materials and Methods: The prospective study of FNAC (fine needle aspirate cytology) of breast lumps was conducted for a period of six months. Direct smears were prepared from the material aspirated. In case of fluid aspirates, centrifuge done and cell sediment was used for making smears. Smears were alcohol fixed and stained with PAP/H&E or air dried smears were stained with Leishman stain. Further smears were subjected to immunocytochemistry using vimentin and CD34 markers to know the origin of multinucleate giant cells. Results: We have reported 11 cases of breast lesions, which showed multinucleate giant cells on FNAC. Out of the 11 cases, Cytologically six cases showed granuloma debris with relative proportion of epithelioid histiocytes, lymphocytes, neutrophils and multinucleate giant cells. Two cases were diagnosed as acute suppurative granulomatous mastitis. Two cases of fibroadenoma and one case of fat necrosis showed multinucleate giant cells. Immunocytochemistry showed vimentin positivity in both stromal and histiocytic type of multinucleate giant cells and in isolated histiocytes. CD34 was focally positive in histiocytic type of giant cells. Conclusion: An effort is made to distinguish between the stromal and histiocytic type giant cells in non-neoplastic breast lesions. Further molecular studies have to be done to know the exact histogenesis and role of these multinucleate giant cells in benign lesions. PMID:25653953

  5. Methods to Prevent or Treat Refractory Diseases by Focusing on Intestinal Microbes Using LPS and Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Soma, Gen-Ichiro; Inagawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Intestinal microbes are known to influence host homeostasis by producing various substances. Recently, the presence of a diverse range of intestinal microbiota has been shown to play a key role in the maintenance of health, along with influencing the host's innate immunity towards various diseases. For example, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) from healthy individuals was remarkably effective in cases of refractory Clostridium difficile colitis. Conversely, decreased number of intestinal microbes resulting from the oral administration of antibiotics reportedly suppressed the antitumor effects of immunotherapy or anticancer drugs. Furthermore, it has been shown that a change in the intestinal environment triggered by oral administration of antibiotics resulted in increased number of drug-resistant microbes causing nosocomial infections. Intestinal microbes are also shown to be effective in cancer treatment as they activate macrophages at the site of cancer. One of the effects of intestinal microbes on hosts that has been gaining increasing attention is the biological regulation caused by the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) produced by Gram-negative bacteria. Among the intestinal microbiota present in the host, Gram-negative bacteria form the most dominant flora. The administration of antibiotics leads to a decreased number of intestinal microbes, as well as to suppression of cancer immunotherapy effects or anticancer drug effects, and this deterioration has been shown to be improved by oral administration of LPS. In this article, we discuss the functions of intestinal microbiota, that is currently undergoing a paradigm shift in relation to maintenance of health and the validity of LPS as a possible target for bio-treatment in the future. PMID:26168477

  6. Dermatitis during radiation for vulvar carcinoma: prevention and treatment with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor impregnated gauze.

    PubMed

    Kouvaris, J R; Kouloulias, V E; Plataniotis, G A; Balafouta, E J; Vlahos, L J

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) impregnated gauze in preventing or healing radiation-induced dermatitis. Sixty-one patients were irradiated for vulvar carcinoma. Thirty-seven applied steroid cream at irradiated areas throughout radiotherapy (Group A) and 24 patients applied additionally GM-CSF impregnated gauze (40 micrcog/cm2 of skin-irradiated area, twice per day) in addition to the steroid cream, after 20 Gy of irradiation (Group B). The score of skin reactions (P=0.008, chi2 test) and the time interval of radiotherapy interruption (P=0.037, Mann-Whitney U test) were statistically significantly reduced in Group B patients. Multivariate analysis of variance showed for this group not only a significant reduction in the Sum of Gross Dermatitis Scoring (P<0.001, adjusted for Duration of Dermatitis) but also a significant reduction of the healing time (P=0.02, adjusted for Sum of Gross Dermatitis Scoring). The pain grading was less (P=0.014, chi2 test) and pain reduction was noticed sooner after the application of GM-CSF impregnated gauze (P=0.0017, Mann-Whitney U test). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the only significant effect on dermatitis score is due to Body Mass Index (P=0.034) and the application of GM-CSF (P=0.008). GM-CSF impregnated gauze can be effective in preventing and healing radiation-induced dermatitis and in reducing the interruption intervals of radiotherapy for vulvar carcinomas. PMID:11472614

  7. Inhibition of NOS-NO System Prevents Autoimmune Orchitis Development in Rats: Relevance of NO Released by Testicular Macrophages in Germ Cell Apoptosis and Testosterone Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Jarazo Dietrich, Sabrina; Fass, Mónica Irina; Jacobo, Patricia Verónica; Sobarzo, Cristian Marcelo Alejandro; Lustig, Livia; Theas, María Susana

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the testis is considered an immunoprivileged organ it can orchestrate immune responses against pathological insults such as infection and trauma. Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) is a model of chronic inflammation whose main histopathological features it shares with human orchitis. In EAO an increased number of macrophages infiltrate the interstitium concomitantly with progressive germ cell degeneration and impaired steroidogenesis. Up-regulation of nitric oxide (NO)-NO synthase (NOS) system occurs, macrophages being the main producers of NO. Objective The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of NO-NOS system in orchitis development and determine the involvement of NO released by testicular macrophages on germ cell apoptosis and testosterone secretion. Method and Results EAO was induced in rats by immunization with testicular homogenate and adjuvants (E group) and a group of untreated normal rats (N) was also studied. Blockage of NOS by i.p. injection of E rats with a competitive inhibitor of NOS, L-NAME (8mg/kg), significantly reduced the incidence and severity of orchitis and lowered testicular nitrite content. L-NAME reduced germ cell apoptosis and restored intratesticular testosterone levels, without variations in serum LH. Co-culture of N testicular fragments with testicular macrophages obtained from EAO rats significantly increased germ cell apoptosis and testosterone secretion, whereas addition of L-NAME lowered both effects and reduced nitrite content. Incubation of testicular fragments from N rats with a NO donor DETA-NOnoate (DETA-NO) induced germ cell apoptosis through external and internal apoptotic pathways, an effect prevented by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). DETA-NO inhibited testosterone released from Leydig cells, whereas NAC (from 2.5 to 15 mM) did not prevent this effect. Conclusions We demonstrated that NO-NOS system is involved in the impairment of testicular function in orchitis. NO secreted mainly by testicular

  8. CD163 Identifies Perivascular Macrophages in Normal and Viral Encephalitic Brains and Potential Precursors to Perivascular Macrophages in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woong-Ki; Alvarez, Xavier; Fisher, Jeanne; Bronfin, Benjamin; Westmoreland, Susan; McLaurin, JoAnne; Williams, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Perivascular macrophages are uniquely situated at the intersection between the nervous and immune systems. Although combined myeloid marker detection differentiates perivascular from resident brain macrophages (parenchymal microglia), no single marker distinguishes perivascular macrophages in humans and mice. Here, we present the macrophage scavenger receptor CD163 as a marker for perivascular macrophages in humans, monkeys, and mice. CD163 was primarily confined to perivascular macrophages and populations of meningeal and choroid plexus macrophages in normal brains and in brains of humans and monkeys with human immunodeficiency virus or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) encephalitis. Scattered microglia in SIV encephalitis lesions and multinucleated giant cells were also CD163 positive. Consistent with prior findings that perivascular macrophages are primary targets of human immunodeficiency virus and SIV, all SIV-infected cells in the brain were CD163 positive. Using fluorescent dyes that definitively and selectively label perivascular macrophages in vivo, we confirmed that dye-labeled simian perivascular macrophages were CD163 positive and able to repopulate the central nervous system within 24 hours. Flow cytometric studies demonstrated a subset of monocytes (CD163+CD14+CD16+) that were immunophenotypically similar to brain perivascular macrophages. These findings recognize CD163+ blood monocytes/macrophages as a source of brain perivascular macrophages and underscore the utility of this molecule in studying the biology of perivascular macrophages and their precursors in humans, monkeys, and mice. PMID:16507898

  9. Modulation of Osteoclastogenesis with Macrophage M1- and M2-Inducing Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Jeganathan, Sujeeve; Fiorino, Cara; Naik, Urja; Sun, He song; Harrison, Rene E.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are generated through the differentiation of monocytes in tissues and they have important functions in innate and adaptive immunity. In addition to their roles as phagocytes, macrophages can be further differentiated, in the presence of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), into osteoclasts (multinucleated giant cells that are responsible for bone resorption). In this work, we set out to characterize whether various inflammatory stimuli, known to induce macrophage polarization, can alter the type of multinucleated giant cell obtained from RANKL differentiation. Following a four-day differentiation protocol, along with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon gamma (IFNγ) as one stimulus, and interleukin-4 (IL-4) as the other, three types of multinucleated cells were generated. Using various microscopy techniques (bright field, epifluorescence and scanning electron), functional assays, and western blotting for osteoclast markers, we found that, as expected, RANKL treatment alone resulted in osteoclasts, whereas the addition of LPS/IFNγ to RANKL pre-treated macrophages generated Langhans-type giant cells, while IL-4 led to giant cells resembling foreign body giant cells with osteoclast-like characteristics. Finally, to gain insight into the modulation of osteoclastogenesis, we characterized the formation and morphology of RANKL and LPS/IFNγ-induced multinucleated giant cells. PMID:25101660

  10. The evo-devo of multinucleate cells, tissues, and organisms, and an alternative route to multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Niklas, Karl J; Cobb, Edward D; Crawford, David R

    2013-01-01

    Multinucleate cells, tissues, or organisms occur in 60 families of land plants and in five otherwise diverse algal lineages (Rhodophyceae, Xanthophyceae, Chlorophyceae, Ulvophyceae, and Charophyceae). Inspection of a morphospace constructed out of eight developmental processes reveals a large number of possible variants of multinucleate cells and organisms that, with two exceptions, are represented by one or more plant species in one or more clades. Thus, most of these permutations of developmental processes exist in nature. Inspection of the morphospace also shows how the siphonous body plan (a multinucleate cell with the capacity for indeterminate growth in size) can theoretically serve as the direct progenitor of a multicellular organism by a process similar to segregative cell division observed in siphonocladean algae. Using molecular phylogenies of algal clades, different evolutionary scenarios are compared to see how the multicellular condition may have evolved from a multinucleate unicellular progenitor. We also show that the siphonous progenitor of a multicellular organism has previously passed through the alignment-of-fitness phase (in which genetic similarity among cells/nuclei minimizes internal genomic conflict) and the export-of-fitness phase (in which genetically similar cells/nuclei collaborate to achieve a reproductively integrated multicellular organism). All that is theoretically required is the evolutionary acquisition of the capacity to compartmentalize its cytoplasm. PMID:24261447

  11. Epidermal multinucleated giant cells are not always a histopathologic clue to a herpes virus infection: multinucleated epithelial giant cells in the epidermis of lesional skin biopsies from patients with acantholytic dermatoses can histologically mimic a herpes virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R.; Paravar, Taraneh; Lee, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Multinucleated giant cells in the epidermis can either be epithelial or histiocytic. Epithelial multinucleated giant cells are most often associated with herpes virus infections. Purpose: To review the histologic differential diagnosis of conditions with epithelial and histiocytic multinucleated giant cells—since multinucleated giant cells in the epidermis are not always pathognomonic of a cutaneous herpes virus infection—and to summarize dermatoses in which herpes virus infection has been observed to coexist. Methods: Two individuals with acantholytic dermatoses whose initial lesional skin biopsies showed multinucleated epithelial giant cells suggestive of a herpes virus infection are reported. Using the PubMed database, an extensive literature search was performed on multinucleated giant cell (and epidermis, epithelial, and histiocytic) and herpes virus infection. Relevant papers were reviewed to discover the skin conditions with either multinucleated giant cells in the epidermis or coincident cutaneous herpes virus infection. Results: Initial skin biopsies from patients with either pemphigus vulgaris or transient acantholytic dermatosis mimicked herpes virus infection; however, laboratory studies and repeat biopsies established the correct diagnosis of their acantholytic dermatosis. Hence, epidermal multinucleated giant cells are not always a histopathologic clue to a herpes virus infection. Indeed, epithelial multinucleated giant cells in the epidermis can be observed not only in the presence of infection (herpes virus), but also acantholytic dermatoses and tumors (trichoepithelioma and pleomorphic basal cell carcinoma). Histiocytic multinucleated giant cells in the epidermis can be observed in patients with either giant cell lichenoid dermatitis or lichen nitidus of the palms. Conclusions: Epithelial and histiocytic multinucleated giant cell can occur in the epidermis. Keratinocyte-derived multinucleated giant cells are most commonly associated

  12. Cross-Regulation of Proinflammatory Cytokines by Interleukin-10 and miR-155 in Orientia tsutsugamushi-Infected Human Macrophages Prevents Cytokine Storm.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Tsai, Rong-Kung; Hong, Yi-Ren; Chuang, Tsung-Hsien; Fan, Kan-Tang; Peng, Chi-Wen; Wu, Ching-Ying; Hsu, Wen-Li; Wang, Lih-Shinn; Chen, Li-Kuang; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2016-07-01

    Scrub typhus is caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Orientia tsutsugamushi. Macrophages are host cells for its replication and clearance. Severe complications in patients are mainly caused by a cytokine storm resulting from overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines; nevertheless, the molecular mechanism for the occurrence remains obscure. Herein, we investigate the interactive regulation of cytokines and micro-RNA (miR) in human macrophages infected with low and high doses of O. tsutsugamushi. During low dose infection, macrophages produce high levels of IL-10 through extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, which inhibits proinflammatory cytokine production and facilitates pathogen replication. Increasing levels of pathogen results in reduced levels of IL-10, and macrophages begin to generate high levels of proinflammatory cytokines through NF-κB activation. However, during a high dose infection, macrophages produce high levels of miR-155 to slow the proinflammatory response. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/IL-10 axis suppresses the NF-κB/tumor necrosis factor alpha axis via activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. Both IL-10 and miR-155 inhibit the NF-κB signaling pathway. Furthermore, IL-10 is a potent inhibitor of miR-155. Patients susceptible to a cytokine storm, peripheral blood mononuclear cells showed significantly lower IL-10 and miR-155 responses to O. tsutsugamushi challenge. Thus, IL-10 and miR-155 operate inhibitory mechanisms to achieve a proper defense mechanism and prevent a cytokine storm. PMID:26921773

  13. The Alternative Faces of Macrophage Generate Osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Lampiasi, N; Russo, R; Zito, F

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of how osteoclasts are generated and whether they can be altered by inflammatory stimuli is a topic of particular interest for osteoclastogenesis. It is known that the monocyte/macrophage lineage gives rise to osteoclasts (OCs) by the action of macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand (RANKL), which induce cell differentiation through their receptors, c-fms and RANK, respectively. The multinucleated giant cells (MGCs) generated by the engagement of RANK/RANKL are typical OCs. Nevertheless, very few studies have addressed the question of which subset of macrophages generates OCs. Indeed, two main subsets of macrophages are postulated, the inflammatory or classically activated type (M1) and the anti-inflammatory or alternatively activated type (M2). It has been proposed that macrophages can be polarized in vitro towards a predominantly M1 or M2 phenotype with the addition of granulocyte macrophage- (GM-) CSF or M-CSF, respectively. Various inflammatory stimuli known to induce macrophage polarization, such as LPS or TNF-α, can alter the type of MGC obtained from RANKL-induced differentiation. This review aims to highlight the role of immune-related stimuli and factors in inducing macrophages towards the osteoclastogenesis choice. PMID:26977415

  14. Stabilin-1 expression defines a subset of macrophages that mediate tissue homeostasis and prevent fibrosis in chronic liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Rantakari, Pia; Patten, Daniel A.; Valtonen, Joona; Karikoski, Marika; Gerke, Heidi; Dawes, Harriet; Laurila, Juha; Ohlmeier, Steffen; Elima, Kati; Hübscher, Stefan G.; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Adams, David H.; Salmi, Marko; Shetty, Shishir

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are key regulators of fibrosis development and resolution. Elucidating the mechanisms by which they mediate this process is crucial for establishing their therapeutic potential. Here, we use experimental models of liver fibrosis to show that deficiency of the scavenger receptor, stabilin-1, exacerbates fibrosis and delays resolution during the recovery phase. We detected a subset of stabilin-1+ macrophages that were induced at sites of cellular injury close to the hepatic scar in mouse models of liver fibrosis and in human liver disease. Stabilin-1 deficiency abrogated malondialdehyde-LDL (MDA-LDL) uptake by hepatic macrophages and was associated with excess collagen III deposition. Mechanistically, the lack of stabilin-1 led to elevated intrahepatic levels of the profibrogenic chemokine CCL3 and an increase in GFAP+ fibrogenic cells. Stabilin-1−/− macrophages demonstrated a proinflammatory phenotype during liver injury and the normal induction of Ly6Clo monocytes during resolution was absent in stabilin-1 knockouts leading to persistence of fibrosis. Human stabilin-1+ monocytes efficiently internalized MDA-LDL and this suppressed their ability to secrete CCL3, suggesting that loss of stabilin-1 removes a brake to CCL3 secretion. Experiments with cell-lineage–specific knockouts revealed that stabilin-1 expression in myeloid cells is required for the induction of this subset of macrophages and that increased fibrosis occurs in their absence. This study demonstrates a previously unidentified regulatory pathway in fibrogenesis in which a macrophage scavenger receptor protects against organ fibrosis by removing fibrogenic products of lipid peroxidation. Thus, stabilin-1+ macrophages shape the tissue microenvironment during liver injury and healing. PMID:27474165

  15. Kid depletion in mouse oocytes associated with multinucleated blastomere formation and inferior embryo development.

    PubMed

    Egashira, Akiyoshi; Yamauchi, Nobuhiko; Islam, Md Rashedul; Yamagami, Kazuki; Tanaka, Asami; Suyama, Hikaru; El-Sayed, El-Sharawy Mohamed; Tabata, Shoji; Kuramoto, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the knockdown (KD) of Kid on maturation developmental competence and multinucleation of mouse germinal vesicle (GV) oocytes after parthenogenetic activation. Data revealed that Kid messenger RNA (mRNA) was expressed in GV and MII stage oocyte and 1- and 2-cell embryos. Additionally, Kid mRNA expression in the Kid KD group decreased by nearly 46% compared to the control small interfering RNA (siRNA) groups. The rate of multinucleated embryos in the Kid KD group (52.4%) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than the control siRNA group (4.7%). Finally, the developmental rates were significantly lower in the Kid siRNA group at > 4-cell stage (28.6% vs. 53.5%) and the blastocyst stage (2.4% vs. 23.3%) compared to the control siRNA groups. Suppression of Kid using siRNA caused multinucleation in early embryos with high frequency and it may increase 2- to 4-cell arrested embryos and reduce the developmental competence to blastocyst. PMID:26890962

  16. Paclitaxel stimulates chromosomal fusion and instability in cells with dysfunctional telomeres: Implication in multinucleation and chemosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeong-Eun; Woo, Seon Rang; Kang, Chang-Mo; Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Ju, Yeun-Jin; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Park, Eun Ran; Park, In-chul; Hong, Sung Hee; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Lee, Jung-Kee; Kim, Hae Kwon; Cho, Myung-Haing; Park, Gil Hong; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} Paclitaxel serves as a stimulator of chromosomal fusion in cells in which telomeres are dysfunctional. {yields} Typical fusions involve p-arms, but paclitaxel-induced fusions occur between both q- and p-arms. {yields} Paclitaxel-stimulated fusions in cells in which telomeres are dysfunctional evoke prolonged G2/M cell cycle arrest and delay multinucleation. {yields} Upon telomere erosion, paclitaxel promotes chromosomal instability and subsequent apoptosis. {yields} Chromosomal fusion enhances paclitaxel chemosensitivity under telomere dysfunction. -- Abstract: The anticancer effect of paclitaxel is attributable principally to irreversible promotion of microtubule stabilization and is hampered upon development of chemoresistance by tumor cells. Telomere shortening, and eventual telomere erosion, evoke chromosomal instability, resulting in particular cellular responses. Using telomerase-deficient cells derived from mTREC-/-p53-/- mice, here we show that, upon telomere erosion, paclitaxel propagates chromosomal instability by stimulating chromosomal end-to-end fusions and delaying the development of multinucleation. The end-to-end fusions involve both the p- and q-arms in cells in which telomeres are dysfunctional. Paclitaxel-induced chromosomal fusions were accompanied by prolonged G2/M cell cycle arrest, delayed multinucleation, and apoptosis. Telomere dysfunctional cells with mutlinucleation eventually underwent apoptosis. Thus, as telomere erosion proceeds, paclitaxel stimulates chromosomal fusion and instability, and both apoptosis and chemosensitization eventually develop.

  17. Heme Oxygenase-1 Induction Prevents Autoimmune Diabetes in Association With Pancreatic Recruitment of M2-Like Macrophages, Mesenchymal Cells, and Fibrocytes.

    PubMed

    Husseini, Mahmoud; Wang, Gen-Sheng; Patrick, Christopher; Crookshank, Jennifer A; MacFarlane, Amanda J; Noel, J Ariana; Strom, Alexander; Scott, Fraser W

    2015-11-01

    Immunoregulatory and regenerative processes are activated in the pancreas during the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D) but are insufficient to prevent the disease. We hypothesized that the induction of cytoprotective heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) by cobalt protophoryrin (CoPP) would prevent T1D by promoting anti-inflammatory and pro-repair processes. Diabetes-prone BioBreeding rats received ip CoPP or saline twice per week for 3 weeks, starting at 30 days and were monitored for T1D. Immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, quantitative RT-PCR, and microarrays were used to evaluate postinjection pancreatic changes at 51 days, when islet inflammation is first visible. T1D was prevented in CoPP-treated rats (29% vs 73%). Pancreatic Hmox1 was up-regulated along with islet-associated CD68(+)HO-1(+) cells, which were also observed in a striking peri-lobular interstitial infiltrate. Most interstitial cells expressed the mesenchymal marker vimentin and the hematopoietic marker CD34. Spindle-shaped, CD34(+)vimentin(+) cells coexpressed collagen V, characteristic of fibrocytes. M2 macrophage factors Krüppel-like factor 4, CD163, and CD206 were expressed by interstitial cells, consistent with pancreatic upregulation of several M2-associated genes. CoPP upregulated islet-regenerating REG genes and increased neogenic REG3β(+) and insulin(+) clusters. Thus, short-term induction of HO-1 promoted a protective M2-like milieu in the pancreas and recruited mesenchymal cells, M2 macrophages, and fibrocytes that imparted immunoregulatory and pro-repair effects, preventing T1D. PMID:26252059

  18. 18-HEPE, an n-3 fatty acid metabolite released by macrophages, prevents pressure overload-induced maladaptive cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Endo, Jin; Sano, Motoaki; Isobe, Yosuke; Fukuda, Keiichi; Kang, Jing X; Arai, Hiroyuki; Arita, Makoto

    2014-07-28

    N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have potential cardiovascular benefit, although the mechanisms underlying this effect remain poorly understood. Fat-1 transgenic mice expressing Caenorhabditis elegans n-3 fatty acid desaturase, which is capable of producing n-3 PUFAs from n-6 PUFAs, exhibited resistance to pressure overload-induced inflammation and fibrosis, as well as reduced cardiac function. Lipidomic analysis revealed selective enrichment of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in fat-1 transgenic bone marrow (BM) cells and EPA-metabolite 18-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid (18-HEPE) in fat-1 transgenic macrophages. BM transplantation experiments revealed that fat-1 transgenic BM cells, but not fat-1 transgenic cardiac cells, contributed to the antiremodeling effect and that the 18-HEPE-rich milieu in the fat-1 transgenic heart was generated by BM-derived cells, most likely macrophages. 18-HEPE inhibited macrophage-mediated proinflammatory activation of cardiac fibroblasts in culture, and in vivo administration of 18-HEPE reproduced the fat-1 mice phenotype, including resistance to pressure overload-induced maladaptive cardiac remodeling. PMID:25049337

  19. Novel grooved substrata stimulate macrophage fusion, CCL2 and MMP-9 secretion.

    PubMed

    Moon, Haisle; Cremmel, Clément V M; Kulpa, Alina; Jaeger, Nicolas A F; Kappelhoff, Reinhild; Overall, Christopher M; Waterfield, J Douglas; Brunette, Donald M

    2016-09-01

    Rough surface topographies on implants attract macrophages but the influence of topography on macrophage fusion to produce multinucleated giant cells (MGC) and foreign body giant cells (FBGC) is unclear. Two rough novel grooved substrata, G1 and G2, fabricated by anisotropic etching of Silicon <110> crystals without the use of photolithographic patterning, and a control smooth surface (Pol) were produced and replicated in epoxy. The surfaces were compared for their effects on RAW264.7 macrophage morphology, gene expression, cyto/chemokine secretion, and fusion for one and five days. Macrophages on grooved surfaces exhibited an elongated morphology similar to M2 macrophages and increased cell alignment with surface directionality, roughness and cell culture time. Up-regulated expression of macrophage chemoattractants at gene and protein level was observed on both grooved surfaces relative to Pol. Grooved surfaces showed time-dependent increase in soluble mediators involved in cell fusion, CCL2 and MMP-9, and an increased proportion of multinucleated cells at Day 5. Collectively, this study demonstrated that a rough surface with surface directionality produced changes in macrophage shape and macrophage attractant chemokines and soluble mediators involved in cell fusion. These in vitro results suggest a possible explanation for the observed accumulation of macrophages and MGCs on rough surfaced implants in vivo. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2243-2254, 2016. PMID:27102570

  20. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide induces osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Shamima; Hassan, Ferdaus; Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Koide, Naoki; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Mori, Isamu; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi . E-mail: yokochi@aichi-med-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-24

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a potent bone resorbing factor. The effect of LPS on osteoclast formation was examined by using murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. LPS-induced the formation of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) in RAW 264.7 cells 3 days after the exposure. MGCs were positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity. Further, MGC formed resorption pits on calcium-phosphate thin film that is a substrate for osteoclasts. Therefore, LPS was suggested to induce osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. LPS-induced osteoclast formation was abolished by anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} antibody, but not antibodies to macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL). TNF-{alpha} might play a critical role in LPS-induced osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. Inhibitors of NF-{kappa}B and stress activated protein kinase (SAPK/JNK) prevented the LPS-induced osteoclast formation. The detailed mechanism of LPS-induced osteoclast formation is discussed.

  1. Glutamine Modulates Macrophage Lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    He, Li; Weber, Kassandra J.; Schilling, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are associated with excessive inflammation and impaired wound healing. Increasing evidence suggests that macrophage dysfunction is responsible for these inflammatory defects. In the setting of excess nutrients, particularly dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs), activated macrophages develop lysosome dysfunction, which triggers activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and cell death. The molecular pathways that connect lipid stress to lysosome pathology are not well understood, but may represent a viable target for therapy. Glutamine uptake is increased in activated macrophages leading us to hypothesize that in the context of excess lipids glutamine metabolism could overwhelm the mitochondria and promote the accumulation of toxic metabolites. To investigate this question we assessed macrophage lipotoxicity in the absence of glutamine using LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages exposed to the SFA palmitate. We found that glutamine deficiency reduced lipid induced lysosome dysfunction, inflammasome activation, and cell death. Under glutamine deficient conditions mTOR activation was decreased and autophagy was enhanced; however, autophagy was dispensable for the rescue phenotype. Rather, glutamine deficiency prevented the suppressive effect of the SFA palmitate on mitochondrial respiration and this phenotype was associated with protection from macrophage cell death. Together, these findings reveal that crosstalk between activation-induced metabolic reprogramming and the nutrient microenvironment can dramatically alter macrophage responses to inflammatory stimuli. PMID:27077881

  2. Sertoli cells and various types of multinucleates in the rat seminiferous tubules following temporary ligation of the testicular artery.

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, M

    1986-01-01

    The effects of temporary ligation of the testicular artery have been analysed in rats with respect to Sertoli cells and multinucleated spermatogenic cells. The first cells to show ultrastructural changes are the Sertoli cells which progressively degenerate, leading to complete necrosis as the duration of ligation and post-ligation survival interval increases. The degree of degeneration of spermatogenic cells depends on the severity of Sertoli cell destruction. Temporary ligation of the testicular artery causes the formation of various types of multinucleated spermatogenic cells in the seminiferous epithelium. The mechanisms involved in the multinucleate formation are cell fusion, karyokinesis devoid of cytokinesis and phagocytosis. The variety of noxious agents causing formation of multinucleated spermatogenic cells in the seminiferous tubules of a number of species including man implies that the occurrence of multinucleated spermatogenic cells is not a specific response of the testis to a particular type of agent. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 PMID:3693041

  3. Cell-Instructive Graphene-Containing Nanocomposites Induce Multinucleated Myotube Formation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Akhil; Xue, Yingfei; Mukundan, Shilpaa; Rohan, Lisa C; Sant, Vinayak; Stolz, Donna B; Sant, Shilpa

    2016-06-01

    Myoblast differentiation is a key step in myogenesis and has long been considered to be controlled mainly by biochemical cues such as growth factors. However, the tissue engineering approaches based on biochemical cues demonstrate low reproducibility as a precise spatial control over their bioactivity is challenging. Recently, substrate micro/nano-structure and electro-responsive properties are recognized for their important roles in myoblast differentiation. In this study, we hypothesized that engineering biophysical features such as nano/micro-fibrous structure and conductive properties into a single biomaterial scaffold will instruct the myoblasts to differentiate into multinucleated myotubes even in the absence of differentiation media. We fabricated nanocomposite scaffolds composed of conductive graphene nanosheets and polycaprolactone (PCL), a widely used biocompatible material. The resulting graphene-PCL scaffolds possess excellent conductivity due to graphene nanosheets and great processability, biodegradability and elastic mechanical properties conferred by PCL. Additionally, physicochemical and mechanical properties of nanocomposite scaffolds can be tuned by varying graphene concentration. Further, graphene-PCL nanocomposites and their 8-week degradation products exhibited remarkable cytocompatibility and promoted adhesion and proliferation of C2C12 mouse myoblast cells. Importantly, these nanocomposite scaffolds induced graphene concentration-dependent differentiation of C2C12 cells into multinucleated myotubes even in normal growth media suggesting their cell-instructive potential. Thus, graphene-PCL nanocomposite scaffolds can serve as a strategy to promote skeletal muscle regeneration without biochemical cues. PMID:26983841

  4. Retinal pigment epithelial cell multinucleation in the aging eye - a mechanism to repair damage and maintain homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Rajapakse, Dinusha; Fraczek, Monika; Luo, Chang; Forrester, John V; Xu, Heping

    2016-06-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are central to retinal health and homoeostasis. Dysfunction or death of RPE cells underlies many age-related retinal degenerative disorders particularly age-related macular degeneration. During aging RPE cells decline in number, suggesting an age-dependent cell loss. RPE cells are considered to be postmitotic, and how they repair damage during aging remains poorly defined. We show that RPE cells increase in size and become multinucleate during aging in C57BL/6J mice. Multinucleation appeared not to be due to cell fusion, but to incomplete cell division, that is failure of cytokinesis. Interestingly, the phagocytic activity of multinucleate RPE cells was not different from that of mononuclear RPE cells. Furthermore, exposure of RPE cells in vitro to photoreceptor outer segment (POS), particularly oxidized POS, dose-dependently promoted multinucleation and suppressed cell proliferation. Both failure of cytokinesis and suppression of proliferation required contact with POS. Exposure to POS also induced reactive oxygen species and DNA oxidation in RPE cells. We propose that RPE cells have the potential to proliferate in vivo and to repair defects in the monolayer. We further propose that the conventionally accepted 'postmitotic' status of RPE cells is due to a modified form of contact inhibition mediated by POS and that RPE cells are released from this state when contact with POS is lost. This is seen in long-standing rhegmatogenous retinal detachment as overtly proliferating RPE cells (proliferative vitreoretinopathy) and more subtly as multinucleation during normal aging. Age-related oxidative stress may promote failure of cytokinesis and multinucleation in RPE cells. PMID:26875723

  5. Overexpression of hnRNPC2 induces multinucleation by repression of Aurora B in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, DA-Quan; Wang, Ying; Liu, Ding-Gan

    2013-04-01

    Heterogeneous ribonuclear protein C2 (hnRNPC2), an RNA binding protein, is a component of hnRNPC which is upregulated in many tumors. Multinucleation exists in many tumors and is positively correlated with tumor grade. To uncover the correlation between hnRNPC2 and multi-nucleation in hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells, we constructed a pEGFP-hnRNPC2 vector and transfected it into cancer cells. Our results revealed that overexpression of hnRNPC2 induced multinucleation in SMMC-7721 cells. Tracking tests indicated that the induced multinucleated cells were unable to recover to mononuclear cells and finally died as a result of defects in cell division. Furthermore, Aurora B, which was localized at the midbody and plays a role in cytokinesis, was repressed in hnRNPC2-overexpressing cells, whose knockdown by RNA interference also induced multinucleation in SMMC-7721 cells. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and mRNA-protein co-immunoprecipitation results revealed that Aurora B mRNA did not decrease in hnRNPC2-overexpressing cells, instead it bound more hnRNPC2 and less eIF4E, an mRNA cap binding protein and translational initiation factor. Moreover, hnRNPC2 bound more eIF4E in hnRNPC2-overexpressing cells. These results indicate that hnRNPC2 repressed Aurora B binding with eIF4F, which must bind with Aurora B mRNA in order to initiate its translation. This induced multinucleation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. In addition, hnRNPC2 accelerated hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation. Collectively, these data suggest that hnRNPC2 may be a potential target for hepatocellular carcinoma cell diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23599772

  6. Prevention of asbestos-induced cell death in rat lung fibroblasts and alveolar macrophages by scavengers of active oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Shatos, M.A.; Doherty, J.M.; Marsh, J.P.; Mossman, B.T.

    1987-10-01

    The possible modulation of asbestos-related cell death using antioxidants in both target and effector cells of asbestosis was investigated. After exposure to crocidolite asbestos at a range of concentrations (2.5-25 ..mu..gcm/sup 2/ dish), the viability of a normal rat lung fibroblast line and freshly isolated alveolar macrophages (AM) was determined. In comparison to fibroblasts, AM were more resistant to the cytotoxic effects of asbestos. Cytotoxic concentrations of asbestos then were added to both cell types in combination with the antioxidants, superoxide dismutase (SOD), a scavenger of superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -./), and catalase, an enzyme scavenging H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. Dimethylthiourea (DMTU), a scavenger of the hydroxyl radical (OH/sup ./) and deferoxamine, an iron chelator, also were evaluated in similar studies. Results showed significant dosage-dependent reduction of asbestos-associated cell death with all agents. In contrast, asbestos-induced toxicity was not ameliorated after addition of chemically inactivated SOD and catalase or bovine serum albumin. Results above suggest asbestos-induced cell damage is mediated by active oxygen species. In this regard, the iron associated with the fiber andor its interaction with cell membranes might be critical in deriving a modified Haber-Weiss (Fenton-type) reaction resulting in production of OH/sup ./.

  7. Human suction blister interstitial fluid prevents metal ion-dependent oxidation of low density lipoprotein by macrophages and in cell-free systems.

    PubMed Central

    Dabbagh, A J; Frei, B

    1995-01-01

    LDL in the circulation is well protected against oxidation by the highly efficient antioxidant defense mechanisms of human plasma. LDL oxidation contributing to atherosclerosis, therefore, has been hypothesized to take place in the interstitial fluid of the arterial wall. We investigated the antioxidant composition and the capacity to inhibit LDL oxidation of human suction blister interstitial fluid (SBIF), a suitable representative of interstitial fluid. We found that the concentrations in SBIF of the aqueous small-molecule antioxidants ascorbate and urate were, respectively, significantly higher (P < 0.05) and identical to plasma concentrations. In contrast, lipoprotein-associated lipids and lipid-soluble antioxidants (alpha-tocopherol, ubiquinol-10, lycopene, and beta-carotene) were present at only 8-23% of the concentrations in plasma. No lipid hydroperoxides could be detected ( < 5 nM) in either fluid. The capacity of serum and SBIF to protect LDL from oxidation was investigated in three metal ion-dependent systems: copper, iron, and murine macrophages in Ham's F-10 medium. In all three systems, addition of > or = 6% (vol/vol) of either serum or SBIF inhibited LDL oxidation by > 90%. The concentration that inhibited macrophage-mediated LDL oxidation by 50% was as low as 0.3% serum and 0.7% SBIF. The enzymatic or physical removal of ascorbate or urate and other low molecular weight components did not affect the ability of either fluid to prevent LDL oxidation, and the high molecular weight fraction was as protective as whole serum or SBIF. These data demonstrate that both serum and SBIF very effectively protect LDL from metal ion-dependent oxidation, most probably because of a cumulative metal-binding effect of several proteins. Our data suggest that LDL in the interstitial fluid of the arterial wall is very unlikely to get modified by metal ion-mediated oxidation. Images PMID:7560088

  8. Pulmonary Macrophage Transplantation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takuji; Arumugam, Paritha; Sakagami, Takuro; Lachmann, Nico; Chalk, Claudia; Sallese, Anthony; Abe, Shuichi; Trapnell, Cole; Carey, Brenna; Moritz, Thomas; Malik, Punam; Lutzko, Carolyn; Wood, Robert E.; Trapnell, Bruce C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bone marrow transplantation is an effective cell therapy but requires myeloablation, which increases infection-risk and mortality. Recent lineage-tracing studies documenting that resident macrophage populations self-maintain independent of hematologic progenitors prompted us to consider organ-targeted, cell-specific therapy. Here, using GM-CSF receptor-β deficient (Csf2rb−/−) mice that develop a myeloid cell disorder identical to hereditary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (hPAP) in children with CSF2RA/CSF2RB mutations, we show that pulmonary macrophage transplantation (PMT) of either wild-type or Csf2rb-gene-corrected macrophages without myeloablation was safe, well-tolerated, and that one administration corrected the lung disease, secondary systemic manifestations, normalized disease-related biomarkers, and prevented disease-specific mortality. PMT-derived alveolar macrophages persisted for at least one year as did therapeutic effects. Results identify mechanisms regulating alveolar macrophage population size in health and disease, indicate that GM-CSF is required for phenotypic determination of alveolar macrophages, and support translation of PMT as the first specific therapy for children with hPAP. PMID:25274301

  9. Cadmium stimulates osteoclast-like multinucleated cell formation in mouse bone marrow cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Miyahara, Tatsuro; Takata, Masakazu; Miyata, Masaki; Nagai, Miyuki; Sugure, Akemi; Kozuka, Hiroshi; Kuze, Shougo )

    1991-08-01

    Most of cadmium (Cd)-treated animals have been reported to show osteoporosis-like changes in bones. This suggests that Cd may promote bone loss by a direct action on bone. It was found that Cd stimulated prostaglandin E{sub 2}(PGE{sub 2}) production in the osteoblast-like cell, MC3T3-E1. Therefore, Cd stimulates bone resorption by increasing PGE{sub 2} production. Recently, several bone marrow cell culture systems have been developed for examining the formation of osteoclast-like multinucleated cells in vitro. As osteoblasts produce PGE{sub 2} by Cd-induced cyclooxygenase and may play an important role in osteoclast formation, the present study was undertaken to clarify the possibility that Cd might stimulate osteoclast formation in a mouse bone marrow culture system.

  10. Filter Paper Degrading Ability of a Trichoderma Strain With Multinucleate Conidia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyama, Hideo; Yano, Makiko; Hotta, Takeshi; Toyama, Nobuo

    The multinucleate conidia were produced from the green mature conidia of Trichoderma reesei Rut C-30 strain by colchicine treatment. The strain with higher Filter paper degrading ability was selected among those conidia using a double layer selection medium. The selected strain, JS-2 was able to collapse the filter paper within 15 min but the original strain took 25 min to collapse it completely. Moreover, the amount of reducing sugar in the L-type glass tube of the strain, JS-2, was greater than that of the original strain. The Avicel, CMC-Na, and Salicin hydrolyzing activity of the strain, JS-2, increased 2.1 times, 1.2 times, and 3.6 times higher than that of the original strain.

  11. The unique low-Reynolds-number spinning hydrodynamics of release of a giant multinucleate multiflagellate zoospore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urzay, Javier; Ott, Donald; Prakash, Manu

    2014-11-01

    Asexual reproduction in aquatic algal species of Vaucheria occurs by the formation of large multinucleate zoospores formed within elongated club-shaped zoosporangia at the tips of young branches. During development, the zoosporangia are separated from the rest of the thallus by membranes, resulting in multiple chambers hosting zoospores which will be released and dispersed in the surrounding aqueous environment. The apical gelatinization of the zoosporangial tip, together with the turgor pressure in the segregated portion of the filament, lead to a narrow aperture through which the zoospore escapes. However ordinary this may seem, Vaucheria zoospores have a unique multiflagellated patterned surface that warrants helicoidal flow entrainment at relatively high speeds, and which enables them to undergo a spinning motion that elastohydrodynamically assists the rather unfavorable escape maneuver. Experimental observations of this phenomenon, together with quantitative interpretations, are provided in this talk.

  12. Multinucleation and Polykaryon Formation is Promoted by the EhPC4 Transcription Factor in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Hernández de la Cruz, Olga; Marchat, Laurence A; Guillén, Nancy; Weber, Christian; López Rosas, Itzel; Díaz-Chávez, José; Herrera, Luis; Rojo-Domínguez, Arturo; Orozco, Esther; López-Camarillo, César

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the intestinal parasite responsible for human amoebiasis that is a leading cause of death in developing countries. In this protozoan, heterogeneity in DNA content, polyploidy and genome plasticity have been associated to alterations in mechanisms controlling DNA replication and cell division. Studying the function of the transcription factor EhPC4, we unexpectedly found that it is functionally related to DNA replication, and multinucleation. Site-directed mutagenesis on the FRFPKG motif revealed that the K127 residue is required for efficient EhPC4 DNA-binding activity. Remarkably, overexpression of EhPC4 significantly increased cell proliferation, DNA replication and DNA content of trophozoites. A dramatically increase in cell size resulting in the formation of giant multinucleated trophozoites (polykaryon) was also found. Multinucleation event was associated to cytokinesis failure leading to abortion of ongoing cell division. Consistently, genome-wide profiling of EhPC4 overexpressing trophozoites revealed the up-regulation of genes involved in carbohydrates and nucleic acids metabolism, chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. Forced overexpression of one of these genes, EhNUDC (nuclear movement protein), led to alterations in cytokinesis and partially recapitulated the multinucleation phenotype. These data indicate for the first time that EhPC4 is associated with events related to polyploidy and genome stability in E. histolytica. PMID:26792358

  13. Multinucleation and Polykaryon Formation is Promoted by the EhPC4 Transcription Factor in Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Olga Hernández de la; Marchat, Laurence A.; Guillén, Nancy; Weber, Christian; Rosas, Itzel López; Díaz-Chávez, José; Herrera, Luis; Rojo-Domínguez, Arturo; Orozco, Esther; López-Camarillo, César

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the intestinal parasite responsible for human amoebiasis that is a leading cause of death in developing countries. In this protozoan, heterogeneity in DNA content, polyploidy and genome plasticity have been associated to alterations in mechanisms controlling DNA replication and cell division. Studying the function of the transcription factor EhPC4, we unexpectedly found that it is functionally related to DNA replication, and multinucleation. Site-directed mutagenesis on the FRFPKG motif revealed that the K127 residue is required for efficient EhPC4 DNA-binding activity. Remarkably, overexpression of EhPC4 significantly increased cell proliferation, DNA replication and DNA content of trophozoites. A dramatically increase in cell size resulting in the formation of giant multinucleated trophozoites (polykaryon) was also found. Multinucleation event was associated to cytokinesis failure leading to abortion of ongoing cell division. Consistently, genome-wide profiling of EhPC4 overexpressing trophozoites revealed the up-regulation of genes involved in carbohydrates and nucleic acids metabolism, chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. Forced overexpression of one of these genes, EhNUDC (nuclear movement protein), led to alterations in cytokinesis and partially recapitulated the multinucleation phenotype. These data indicate for the first time that EhPC4 is associated with events related to polyploidy and genome stability in E. histolytica. PMID:26792358

  14. Alveolar macrophage abnormalities in rabbits exposed to low concentrations of trivalent chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, A.; Robertson,, B.; Curstedt, T.; Camner, P.

    1987-12-01

    Rabbits were exposed by inhalation to a trivalent chromium compound (Cr(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/) at a mean chromium concentration of 0.6 or 2.3 mg/m/sup 3/ for about 4 months, 5 days/week and 6 hr/day. Light microscopic examination of the lungs revealed that both chromium levels induced a nodular intraalveolar accumulation of enlarged macrophages with granular, eosinophilic cytoplasm. Some macrophages were multinucleated and some showed advanced degenerative changes with disruption of cellular borders and nuclear pyknosis. The changes were most prominent in rabbits exposed to the high concentration and were in some areas associated with a mild interstitial infiltrations of lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils. Electron microscopic examination of macrophages lavaged from the lungs revealed numerous enlarged lysosomes with membranous structures, distinct rounded inclusions, which by X-ray microanalysis were found to contain high amounts of chromium and increased numbers of laminated inclusions probably representing ingested surfactant. The number of macrophages with a smooth surface was significantly increased. The macrophages in the lung tissue showed the same changes and in addition nodules of multinucleated giant cells were found. In spite of the elevated number of laminated structures in the macrophages the amounts of phosphatidylcholine and 1,2-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine were not significantly increased in the lung.

  15. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Type 1 Signaling Prevents Delayed Wound Healing in Diabetes by Attenuating the Production of IL-1β by Recruited Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Okizaki, Shin-Ichiro; Ito, Yoshiya; Hosono, Kanako; Oba, Kazuhito; Ohkubo, Hirotoki; Kojo, Ken; Nishizawa, Nobuyuki; Shibuya, Masabumi; Shichiri, Masayoshi; Majima, Masataka

    2016-06-01

    The persistence of proinflammatory macrophages, which are recruited to the granulation tissue, impairs the healing of diabetic wounds. Herein, we examined the role of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 1 (VEGFR1) signaling in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic wound healing. Angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, and the healing of full-thickness skin wounds were impaired in STZ-treated wild-type (WT) mice compared with vehicle-treated WT mice, with attenuated recruitment of VEGFR1-positive macrophages expressing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, VEGF-C, and VEGF-D to the wound granulation tissue. These phenomena were even more prevalent in STZ-treated VEGFR1 tyrosine kinase knockout mice (VEGFR1 TK(-/-) mice). STZ-treated WT mice, but not STZ-treated VEGFR1 TK(-/-) mice, showed accelerated wound healing when treated with placenta growth factor. Compared with that of STZ-treated WT mice, the wound granulation tissue of STZ-treated VEGFR1 TK(-/-) mice contained more VEGFR1-positive cells expressing IL-1β [a classic (M1) activated macrophage marker] and fewer VEGFR1-positive cells expressing the mannose receptor [CD206; an alternatively activated (M2) macrophage marker]. Treatment of STZ-treated VEGFR1 TK(-/-) mice with an IL-1β-neutralizing antibody restored impaired wound healing and angiogenesis/lymphangiogenesis and induced macrophages in the wound granulation tissue to switch to an M2 phenotype. Taken together, these results suggest that VEGFR1 signaling plays a role in regulating the balance between macrophage phenotypes in STZ-induced diabetic wounds, prevents impaired diabetic wound healing, and promotes angiogenesis/lymphangiogenesis. PMID:27085138

  16. Quantitative spatial analysis of transcripts in multinucleate cells using single-molecule FISH.

    PubMed

    Lee, ChangHwan; Roberts, Samantha E; Gladfelter, Amy S

    2016-04-01

    mRNA positioning in the cell is important for diverse cellular functions and proper development of multicellular organisms. Single-molecule RNA FISH (smFISH) enables quantitative investigation of mRNA localization and abundance at the level of individual molecules in the context of cellular features. Details about spatial mRNA patterning at various times, in different genetic backgrounds, at different developmental stages, and under varied environmental conditions provide invaluable insights into the mechanisms and functions of spatial regulation. Here, we describe detailed methods for performing smFISH along with immunofluorescence for two large, multinucleate cell types: the fungus Ashbya gossypii and cultured mouse myotubes. We also put forward a semi-automated image processing tool that systematically detects mRNAs from smFISH data and statistically analyzes the spatial pattern of mRNAs using a customized MATLAB code. These protocols and image analysis tools can be adapted to a wide variety of transcripts and cell types for systematically and quantitatively analyzing mRNA distribution in three-dimensional space. PMID:26690072

  17. Developmental capacity and implantation potential of the embryos with multinucleated blastomeres

    PubMed Central

    EGASHIRA, Akiyoshi; YAMAUCHI, Nobuhiko; TANAKA, Keiko; MINE, Chihiro; OTSUBO, Hitomi; MURAKAMI, Masao; ISLAM, Md. Rashedul; OHTSUKA, Misako; YOSHIOKA, Naomi; KURAMOTO, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The presence of multinucleated blastomeres (MNBs) in embryos is associated with poor developmental competence in assisted reproductive technologies. This phenomenon is observed not only in humans but also in other animal species. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the characteristics of embryos with MNBs (MNB embryos) that could be utilized in embryo transfer. The developmental rate of MNB embryos to the blastocyst stage (50.8%) was significantly lower than that of normal embryos (73.3%) (P < 0.05). The clinical pregnancy rates of fresh embryo transfer (ET) using day 2 or day 3 embryos were significantly lower in MNB embryos (5.1%) compared with normal embryos (24.0%) (P < 0.05). In the case of frozen-thawed ET using a single vitrified/warmed blastocyst, however, the clinical pregnancy rate of MNB embryos was close to that of normal embryos (59.1% vs. 52.8%). Thus, the findings of the present study suggest that the frozen-thawed ET of MNB embryos might improve the potential for implantation followed by successful pregnancy. PMID:26346255

  18. Detection of AIDS Virus in Macrophages in Brain Tissue from AIDS Patients with Encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Scott; Gendelman, Howard E.; Orenstein, Jan M.; Canto, Mauro C.; Pezeshkpour, Gholam H.; Yungbluth, Margaret; Janotta, Frank; Aksamit, Allen; Martin, Malcolm A.; Fauci, Anthony S.

    1986-09-01

    One of the common neurological complications in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a subacute encephalopathy with progressive dementia. By using the techniques of cocultivation for virus isolation, in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy, the identity of an important cell type that supports replication of the AIDS retrovirus in brain tissue was determined in two affected individuals. These cells were mononucleated and multinucleated macrophages that actively synthesized viral RNA and produced progeny virions in the brains of the patients. Infected brain macrophages may serve as a reservoir for virus and as a vehicle for viral dissemination in the infected host.

  19. Amelioration of Hyperglycemia with a Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitor Prevents Macrophage-Driven Atherosclerosis through Macrophage Foam Cell Formation Suppression in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Michishige; Hiromura, Munenori; Mori, Yusaku; Kohashi, Kyoko; Nagashima, Masaharu; Kushima, Hideki; Watanabe, Takuya; Hirano, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Direct associations between hyperglycemia and atherosclerosis remain unclear. We investigated the association between the amelioration of glycemia by sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2is) and macrophage-driven atherosclerosis in diabetic mice. We administered dapagliflozin or ipragliflozin (1.0 mg/kg/day) for 4-weeks to apolipoprotein E-null (Apoe-/-) mice, streptozotocin-induced diabetic Apoe-/- mice, and diabetic db/db mice. We then determined aortic atherosclerosis, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-induced foam cell formation, and related gene expression in exudate peritoneal macrophages. Dapagliflozin substantially decreased glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glucose tolerance without affecting body weight, blood pressure, plasma insulin, and lipids in diabetic Apoe-/- mice. Aortic atherosclerotic lesions, atheromatous plaque size, and macrophage infiltration in the aortic root increased in diabetic Apoe-/- mice; dapagliflozin attenuated these changes by 33%, 27%, and 20%, respectively. Atherosclerotic lesions or foam cell formation highly correlated with HbA1c. Dapagliflozin did not affect atherosclerosis or plasma parameters in non-diabetic Apoe-/- mice. In db/db mice, foam cell formation increased by 4-fold compared with C57/BL6 mice, whereas ipragliflozin decreased it by 31%. Foam cell formation exhibited a strong correlation with HbA1c. Gene expression of lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 and acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase 1 was upregulated, whereas that of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 was downregulated in the peritoneal macrophages of both types of diabetic mice. SGLT2i normalized these gene expressions. Our study is the first to demonstrate that SGLT2i exerts anti-atherogenic effects by pure glucose lowering independent of insulin action in diabetic mice through suppressing macrophage foam cell formation, suggesting that foam cell formation is highly sensitive to glycemia ex vivo. PMID:26606676

  20. Amelioration of Hyperglycemia with a Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitor Prevents Macrophage-Driven Atherosclerosis through Macrophage Foam Cell Formation Suppression in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, Michishige; Hiromura, Munenori; Mori, Yusaku; Kohashi, Kyoko; Nagashima, Masaharu; Kushima, Hideki; Watanabe, Takuya; Hirano, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Direct associations between hyperglycemia and atherosclerosis remain unclear. We investigated the association between the amelioration of glycemia by sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2is) and macrophage-driven atherosclerosis in diabetic mice. We administered dapagliflozin or ipragliflozin (1.0 mg/kg/day) for 4-weeks to apolipoprotein E-null (Apoe−/−) mice, streptozotocin-induced diabetic Apoe−/− mice, and diabetic db/db mice. We then determined aortic atherosclerosis, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-induced foam cell formation, and related gene expression in exudate peritoneal macrophages. Dapagliflozin substantially decreased glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glucose tolerance without affecting body weight, blood pressure, plasma insulin, and lipids in diabetic Apoe−/− mice. Aortic atherosclerotic lesions, atheromatous plaque size, and macrophage infiltration in the aortic root increased in diabetic Apoe−/− mice; dapagliflozin attenuated these changes by 33%, 27%, and 20%, respectively. Atherosclerotic lesions or foam cell formation highly correlated with HbA1c. Dapagliflozin did not affect atherosclerosis or plasma parameters in non-diabetic Apoe−/− mice. In db/db mice, foam cell formation increased by 4-fold compared with C57/BL6 mice, whereas ipragliflozin decreased it by 31%. Foam cell formation exhibited a strong correlation with HbA1c. Gene expression of lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 and acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase 1 was upregulated, whereas that of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 was downregulated in the peritoneal macrophages of both types of diabetic mice. SGLT2i normalized these gene expressions. Our study is the first to demonstrate that SGLT2i exerts anti-atherogenic effects by pure glucose lowering independent of insulin action in diabetic mice through suppressing macrophage foam cell formation, suggesting that foam cell formation is highly sensitive to glycemia ex vivo. PMID:26606676

  1. Novel non-peptide small molecules preventing IKKβ/NEMO association inhibit NF-κB activation in LPS-stimulated J774 macrophages.

    PubMed

    De Falco, Francesca; Di Giovanni, Carmen; Cerchia, Carmen; De Stefano, Daniela; Capuozzo, Antonella; Irace, Carlo; Iuvone, Teresa; Santamaria, Rita; Carnuccio, Rosa; Lavecchia, Antonio

    2016-03-15

    Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) is a transcription factor regulating several genes involved in important physiological and pathological processes. NF-κB has been found constitutively activated in many inflammatory/immune diseases. In addition, a positive correlation between persistent activation of NF-κB and tumor promotion has been demonstrated. Since the IKK (IκB kinase) activation is an indispensable component of all pro-inflammatory signaling pathways leading to NF-κB activation, considerable efforts have been done in order to develop novel anti-inflammatory therapeutics targeting IKK. Association of the IKK complex relies on critical interactions between the C-terminus NBD (NEMO binding domain) of the catalytic subunits IKKα and IKKβ, and the regulatory subunit NEMO (NF-κB Essential Modulator). Thus, this IKK/NEMO interacting region provides an attractive target to prevent the IKK complex formation and NF-κB activation. In this regard, we have identified non-peptide small molecule disruptors of IKKβ/NEMO complex through a structure-based virtual screening (SBVS) of the NCI chemical library. Phenothiazine 22 and its close analogues (22.2, 22.4 and 22.10) were able to reduce nitrite production and iNOS mRNA expression in J774 murine macrophages stimulated with LPS for 24h. These effects were associated with a reduced NF-κB/DNA binding activity as well as a decreased expression of phosphorylated IKKβ, IκBα and NF-κB/p65 in these cells. These observations suggest that compound 22 and its three structural analogues by inhibiting IKKβ/NEMO association mediate the blockage of NF-κB signaling pathway and may prove effective in treatment of diseases in which the IKK/NF-κB pathway is dysregulated. PMID:26776306

  2. Wear particles derived from metal hip implants induce the generation of multinucleated giant cells in a 3-dimensional peripheral tissue-equivalent model.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debargh K; Potnis, Pushya A; Rhodes, Kelly; Wood, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    Multinucleate giant cells (MGCs) are formed by the fusion of 5 to 15 monocytes or macrophages. MGCs can be generated by hip implants at the site where the metal surface of the device is in close contact with tissue. MGCs play a critical role in the inflammatory processes associated with adverse events such as aseptic loosening of the prosthetic joints and bone degeneration process called osteolysis. Upon interaction with metal wear particles, endothelial cells upregulate pro-inflammatory cytokines and other factors that enhance a localized immune response. However, the role of endothelial cells in the generation of MGCs has not been completely investigated. We developed a three-dimensional peripheral tissue-equivalent model (PTE) consisting of collagen gel, supporting a monolayer of endothelial cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) on top, which mimics peripheral tissue under normal physiological conditions. The cultures were incubated for 14 days with Cobalt chromium alloy (CoCr ASTM F75, 1-5 micron) wear particles. PBMC were allowed to transit the endothelium and harvested cells were analyzed for MGC generation via flow cytometry. An increase in forward scatter (cell size) and in the propidium iodide (PI) uptake (DNA intercalating dye) was used to identify MGCs. Our results show that endothelial cells induce the generation of MGCs to a level 4 fold higher in 3-dimentional PTE system as compared to traditional 2-dimensional culture plates. Further characterization of MGCs showed upregulated expression of tartrate resistant alkaline phosphatase (TRAP) and dendritic cell specific transmembrane protein, (DC-STAMP), which are markers of bone degrading cells called osteoclasts. In sum, we have established a robust and relevant model to examine MGC and osteoclast formation in a tissue like environment using flow cytometry and RT-PCR. With endothelial cells help, we observed a consistent generation of metal wear particle- induced MGCs, which heralds

  3. Mitotic Stress Is an Integral Part of the Oncogene-Induced Senescence Program that Promotes Multinucleation and Cell Cycle Arrest.

    PubMed

    Dikovskaya, Dina; Cole, John J; Mason, Susan M; Nixon, Colin; Karim, Saadia A; McGarry, Lynn; Clark, William; Hewitt, Rachael N; Sammons, Morgan A; Zhu, Jiajun; Athineos, Dimitris; Leach, Joshua D G; Marchesi, Francesco; van Tuyn, John; Tait, Stephen W; Brock, Claire; Morton, Jennifer P; Wu, Hong; Berger, Shelley L; Blyth, Karen; Adams, Peter D

    2015-09-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a tumor suppression mechanism that blocks cell proliferation in response to oncogenic signaling. OIS is frequently accompanied by multinucleation; however, the origin of this is unknown. Here, we show that multinucleate OIS cells originate mostly from failed mitosis. Prior to senescence, mutant H-RasV12 activation in primary human fibroblasts compromised mitosis, concordant with abnormal expression of mitotic genes functionally linked to the observed mitotic spindle and chromatin defects. Simultaneously, H-RasV12 activation enhanced survival of cells with damaged mitoses, culminating in extended mitotic arrest and aberrant exit from mitosis via mitotic slippage. ERK-dependent transcriptional upregulation of Mcl1 was, at least in part, responsible for enhanced survival and slippage of cells with mitotic defects. Importantly, mitotic slippage and oncogene signaling cooperatively induced senescence and key senescence effectors p21 and p16. In summary, activated Ras coordinately triggers mitotic disruption and enhanced cell survival to promote formation of multinucleate senescent cells. PMID:26299965

  4. Leishmania donovani prevents oxidative burst-mediated apoptosis of host macrophages through selective induction of suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins.

    PubMed

    Srivastav, Supriya; Basu Ball, Writoban; Gupta, Purnima; Giri, Jayeeta; Ukil, Anindita; Das, Pijush K

    2014-01-10

    One of the mechanisms for establishment of infection employed by intra-macrophage pathogen-like Leishmania is inhibition of oxidative burst-mediated macrophage apoptosis to protect their niche for survival and replication. We tried to elucidate the underlying mechanism for this by using H2O2 for induction of apoptosis. Leishmania donovani-infected macrophages were much more resistant to H2O2-mediated apoptosis compared with control. Although infected cells were capable of comparable reactive oxygen species production, there was less activation of the downstream cascade consisting of caspase-3 and -7 and cleaved poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase. Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 1 and 3 proteins and reactive oxygen species scavenging enzyme thioredoxin, known to be involved in stabilization of protein-tyrosine phosphatases, were found to be induced during infection. Induction of SOCS proteins may be mediated by Egr1, and silencing of Socs1 and -3 either alone or in combination resulted in reduced thioredoxin levels, enhanced activation of caspases, and increased apoptosis of infected macrophages. The induction of protein-tyrosine phosphatases, thioredoxin, SOCS, and Egr1 in L. donovani-infected macrophages was found to be unaffected by H2O2 treatment. SOCS knocked down cells also displayed decreased parasite survival thus marking reduction in disease progression. Taken together, these results suggest that L. donovani may exploit SOCS for subverting macrophage apoptotic machinery toward establishing its replicative niche inside the host. PMID:24275663

  5. Macrophages in Langerhans cell histiocytosis are differentiated toward M2 phenotype: their possible involvement in pathological processes.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Koji; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Sakashita, Naomi; Iyama, Ken-Ichi; Murayama, Toshihiko; Takeya, Motohiro

    2010-01-01

    Although numerous macrophages are found in the lesions of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), their activation phenotypes and their roles in the disease process have not been clarified. Paraffin-embedded LCH samples were examined on immunohistochemistry and it was found that CD163 can be used to distinguish infiltrated macrophages from neoplastic Langerhans cells (LC). The number of CD163-positve macrophages was positively correlated with the number of multinucleated giant cells (MGC), indicating that most MGC are derived from infiltrated macrophages. A significant number of CD163-positive macrophages were positive for interleukin (IL)-10 and phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (pSTAT3), an IL-10-induced signal transduction molecule. This indicates that these macrophages are polarized to anti-inflammatory macrophages of M2 phenotype. Tumor-derived macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) was considered to responsible for inducing M2 differentiation of infiltrated macrophages. The number of CD163-positive macrophages in different cases of LCH varied, and interestingly the density of CD163-positive macrophages was inversely correlated with the Ki-67-positivity of LC. Although the underlying mechanism is not fully elucidated, macrophage-derived IL-10 was considered to be involved in the suppression of tumor cell proliferation via activation of STAT3. PMID:20055949

  6. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Prevention Basic Facts & Information Some factors that affect your ... control of the things that you can change. Preventive Recommendations for Adults Aged 65 and Older The ...

  7. SIV Encephalitis Lesions Are Composed of CD163+ Macrophages Present in the Central Nervous System during Early SIV Infection and SIV-Positive Macrophages Recruited Terminally with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Nowlin, Brian T.; Burdo, Tricia H.; Midkiff, Cecily C.; Salemi, Marco; Alvarez, Xavier; Williams, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage recruitment to the central nervous system (CNS) during AIDS pathogenesis is poorly understood. We measured the accumulation of brain perivascular (CD163+) and inflammatory (MAC387+) macrophages in SIV-infected monkeys. Monocyte progenitors were 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeled in bone marrow, and CNS macrophages were labeled serially with fluorescent dextrans injected into the cisterna magna. MAC387+ macrophages accumulated in the meninges and choroid plexus in early inflammation and in the perivascular space and SIV encephalitis (SIVE) lesions late. CD163+ macrophages accumulated in the perivascular space and SIVE lesions with late inflammation. Most of the BrdU+ cells were MAC387+; however, CD163+BrdU+ macrophages were present in the meninges and choroid plexus with AIDS. Most (81.6% ± 1.8%) of macrophages in SIVE lesions were present in the CNS before SIVE lesion formation. There was a 2.9-fold increase in SIVp28+ macrophages entering the CNS late compared with those entering early (P < 0.05). The rate of CD163+ macrophage recruitment to the CNS inversely correlated with time to death (P < 0.03) and increased with SIVE. In SIVE animals, soluble CD163 correlated with CD163+ macrophage recruitment (P = 0.02). Most perivascular macrophages that comprise SIVE lesions and multinucleated giant cells are present in the CNS early, before SIVE lesions are formed. Most SIV-infected macrophages traffic to the CNS terminally with AIDS. PMID:25963554

  8. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma with a syncytial-type multinucleated giant tumor cell component: implications for differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Sean R; Kum, Jennifer B; Goheen, Michael P; Cheng, Liang; Grignon, David J; Idrees, Muhammad T

    2014-04-01

    A component of syncytial-type multinucleated tumor giant cells is uncommon in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, and the histogenesis, incidence, and clinical implications of this finding are not well understood. We retrieved 13 such tumors from our pathology archives in patients with a median age of 60years, comprising 1.5% of clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Stage was typically pT4 or pT3 (each 38%). Microscopically, all tumors included a component of low-grade clear cell renal cell carcinoma with usual features. Syncytial-type giant tumor cells possessed voluminous cytoplasm, usually granular and eosinophilic, and numerous nuclei similar to those of the mononuclear tumor cells. Transition between areas of mononuclear and multinucleated cells was sometimes abrupt. Other findings included necrosis (77%), hyaline globules (46%), emperipolesis (46%), and intranuclear cytoplasmic invaginations (23%). Immunohistochemical staining typically revealed both mononuclear and multinucleated cells to be positive for carbonic anhydrase IX, CD10, epithelial membrane antigen, vimentin, and cytokeratin AE1/AE3 and negative for β human chorionic gonadotropin, TFE3, cathepsin K, cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 20, HMB45, CD68, smooth muscle actin, and S100. Most patients with available information (7/9) were alive with metastatic disease at the most recent follow-up. Syncytial-type giant cells are an uncommon finding associated with aggressive clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Despite the unusual appearance of this tumor component, its immunoprofile supports an epithelial lineage and argues against trophoblastic, osteoclast-like, or histiocytic differentiation. Reactivity for typical clear cell renal cell carcinoma antigens facilitates discrimination from giant cells of epithelioid angiomyolipoma or other tumors, particularly in a biopsy specimen or a metastatic tumor. PMID:24499686

  9. Primary Urinary Bladder Angiosarcoma with Osteoclast-Like Multinucleated Giant Cells: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Nawar, Nariman A.; Olsen, Jamie; Jelic, Tomislav M.; He, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 68 Final Diagnosis: Urinary bladder angiosarcoma Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: TURBT Specialty: Diagnostics, Laboratory Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Angiosarcoma is a fatal and aggressive mesenchymal tumor. It occurs in skin, breast, and parenchymal organs. It rarely arises primarily in the urinary bladder. Only 13 cases of primary urinary bladder angiosarcoma have been reported in the English literature. Case Report: The patient was a 68-year-old man who presented to the Emergency Department with inability to void. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed a urinary bladder mass. Surgical excision of the mass was performed. Pathological examination results were consistent with angiosarcoma. In addition to the unusual location of this tumor, the pathology was different from the previously reported cases in that this case was rich with osteoclast-like multinucleated giant cells. Conclusions: The pathological diagnosis of primary urinary bladder angiosarcoma is challenging. Histological patterns and immunophenotypes are variable. Here, we review all reported cases of primary urinary bladder angiosarcoma, highlight the clinical and morphological features of this malignant neoplasm, and report a unique case of primary urinary bladder angiosarcoma with osteoclast-like multinucleated giant cells. PMID:26947436

  10. Post-slippage multinucleation renders cytotoxic variation in anti-mitotic drugs that target the microtubules or mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanting; Zhou, Yuan; Shi, Jue

    2014-01-01

    One common cancer chemotherapeutic strategy is to perturb cell division with anti-mitotic drugs. Paclitaxel, the classic microtubule-targeting anti-mitotic drug, so far still outperforms the newer, more spindle-specific anti-mitotics in the clinic, but the underlying cellular mechanism is poorly understood. In this study we identified post-slippage multinucleation, which triggered extensive DNA damage and apoptosis after drug-induced mitotic slippage, contributes to the extra cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in comparison to the spindle-targeting drug, Kinesin-5 inhibitor. Based on quantitative single-cell microscopy assays, we showed that attenuation of the degree of post-slippage multinucleation significantly reduced DNA damage and apoptosis in response to paclitaxel, and that post-slippage apoptosis was likely mediated by the p53-dependent DNA damage response pathway. Paclitaxel appeared to act as a double-edge sword, capable of killing proliferating cancer cells both during mitotic arrest and after mitotic slippage by inducing DNA damage. Our results thus suggest that to predict drug response to paclitaxel and anti-mitotics in general, 2 distinct sets of bio-markers, which regulate mitotic and post-slippage cytotoxicity, respectively, may need to be considered. Our findings provide important new insight not only for elucidating the cytotoxic mechanisms of paclitaxel, but also for understanding the variable efficacy of different anti-mitotic chemotherapeutics. PMID:24694730

  11. Switch-like reprogramming of gene expression after fusion of multinucleate plasmodial cells of two Physarum polycephalum sporulation mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Pauline; Hoffmann, Xenia-Katharina; Ebeling, Britta; Haas, Markus; Marwan, Wolfgang

    2013-05-24

    Highlights: •We investigate reprogramming of gene expression in multinucleate single cells. •Cells of two differentiation control mutants are fused. •Fused cells proceed to alternative gene expression patterns. •The population of nuclei damps stochastic fluctuations in gene expression. •Dynamic processes of cellular reprogramming can be observed by repeated sampling of a cell. -- Abstract: Nonlinear dynamic processes involving the differential regulation of transcription factors are considered to impact the reprogramming of stem cells, germ cells, and somatic cells. Here, we fused two multinucleate plasmodial cells of Physarum polycephalum mutants defective in different sporulation control genes while being in different physiological states. The resulting heterokaryons established one of two significantly different expression patterns of marker genes while the plasmodial halves that were fused to each other synchronized spontaneously. Spontaneous synchronization suggests that switch-like control mechanisms spread over and finally control the entire plasmodium as a result of cytoplasmic mixing. Regulatory molecules due to the large volume of the vigorously streaming cytoplasm will define concentrations in acting on the population of nuclei and in the global setting of switches. Mixing of a large cytoplasmic volume is expected to damp stochasticity when individual nuclei deliver certain RNAs at low copy number into the cytoplasm. We conclude that spontaneous synchronization, the damping of molecular noise in gene expression by the large cytoplasmic volume, and the option to take multiple macroscopic samples from the same plasmodium provide unique options for studying the dynamics of cellular reprogramming at the single cell level.

  12. Myosin-II inhibition and soft 2D matrix maximize multinucleation and cellular projections typical of platelet-producing megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae-Won; Swift, Joe; Spinler, Kyle R; Discher, Dennis E

    2011-07-12

    Cell division, membrane rigidity, and strong adhesion to a rigid matrix are all promoted by myosin-II, and so multinucleated cells with distended membranes--typical of megakaryocytes (MKs)--seem predictable for low myosin activity in cells on soft matrices. Paradoxically, myosin mutations lead to defects in MKs and platelets. Here, reversible inhibition of myosin-II is sustained over several cell cycles to produce 3- to 10-fold increases in polyploid MK and a number of other cell types. Even brief inhibition generates highly distensible, proplatelet-like projections that fragment readily under shear, as seen in platelet generation from MKs in vivo. The effects are maximized with collagenous matrices that are soft and 2D, like the perivascular niches in marrow rather than 3D or rigid, like bone. Although multinucleation of other primary hematopoietic lineages helps to generalize a failure-to-fission mechanism, lineage-specific signaling with increased polyploidy proves possible and novel with phospho-regulation of myosin-II heavy chain. Label-free mass spectrometry quantitation of the MK proteome uses a unique proportional peak fingerprint (ProPF) analysis to also show upregulation of the cytoskeletal and adhesion machinery critical to platelet function. Myosin-inhibited MKs generate more platelets in vitro and also in vivo from the marrows of xenografted mice, while agonist stimulation activates platelet spreading and integrin αIIbβ3. Myosin-II thus seems a central, matrix-regulated node for MK-poiesis and platelet generation. PMID:21709232

  13. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Treatment 2003 U.S. Outbreak African Rodent Importation Ban For Clinicians Clinical Recognition Specimen Collection Treatment Smallpox ... Examining Animals with Suspected Monkeypox African Rodent Importation Ban Resources Related Links Poxvirus Molluscum Contagiosum Orf Virus ( ...

  14. Macrophage Polarization in Virus-Host Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Yongming; Miller, Laura C; Blecha, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage involvement in viral infections and antiviral states is common. However, this involvement has not been well-studied in the paradigm of macrophage polarization, which typically has been categorized by the dichotomy of classical (M1) and alternative (M2) statuses. Recent studies have revealed the complexity of macrophage polarization in response to various cellular mediators and exogenous stimuli by adopting a multipolar view to revisit the differential process of macrophages, especially those re-polarized during viral infections. Here, through examination of viral infections targeting macrophages/monocytic cells, we focus on the direct involvement of macrophage polarization during viral infections. Type I and type III interferons (IFNs) are critical in regulation of viral pathogenesis and host antiviral infection; thus, we propose to incorporate IFN-mediated antiviral states into the framework of macrophage polarization. This view is supported by the multifunctional properties of type I IFNs, which potentially elicit and regulate both M1- and M2-polarization in addition to inducing the antiviral state, and by the discoveries of viral mechanisms to adapt and modulate macrophage polarization. Indeed, several recent studies have demonstrated effective prevention of viral diseases through manipulation of macrophage immune statuses. PMID:26213635

  15. Endocytosis of indium-tin-oxide nanoparticles by macrophages provokes pyroptosis requiring NLRP3-ASC-Caspase1 axis that can be prevented by mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Naji, Abderrahim; Muzembo, Basilua André; Yagyu, Ken-ichi; Baba, Nobuyasu; Deschaseaux, Frédéric; Sensebé, Luc; Suganuma, Narufumi

    2016-01-01

    The biological effects of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) are of considerable importance because workers exposed to indium compounds have been diagnosed with interstitial lung disease or pulmonary alveolar proteinosis; however, the pathophysiology of these diseases is undefined. Here, mice intraperitoneally inoculated with ITO-nanoparticles (ITO-NPs) resulted in peritonitis dependent in NLRP3 inflammasome, with neutrophils recruitment and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production. Withal peritoneal macrophages exposed ex vivo to ITO-NPs caused IL-1β secretion and cytolysis. Further, alveolar macrophages exposed to ITO-NPs in vitro showed ITO-NP endocytosis and production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and IL-1β, ensued cell death by cytolysis. This cell death was RIPK1-independent but caspase1-dependent, and thus identified as pyroptosis. Endocytosis of ITO-NPs by activated THP-1 cells induced pyroptosis with IL-1β/TNF-α production and cytolysis, but not in activated THP-1 cells with knockdown of NLRP3, ASC, or caspase1. However, exposing activated THP-1 cells with NLRP3 or ASC knockdown to ITO-NPs resulted in cell death but without cytolysis, with deficiency in IL-1β/TNF-α, and revealing features of apoptosis. While, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) co-cultured with macrophages impaired both inflammation and cell death induced by ITO-NPs. Together, our findings provide crucial insights to the pathophysiology of respiratory diseases caused by ITO particles, and identify MSCs as a potent therapeutic. PMID:27194621

  16. Endocytosis of indium-tin-oxide nanoparticles by macrophages provokes pyroptosis requiring NLRP3-ASC-Caspase1 axis that can be prevented by mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Naji, Abderrahim; Muzembo, Basilua André; Yagyu, Ken-Ichi; Baba, Nobuyasu; Deschaseaux, Frédéric; Sensebé, Luc; Suganuma, Narufumi

    2016-01-01

    The biological effects of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) are of considerable importance because workers exposed to indium compounds have been diagnosed with interstitial lung disease or pulmonary alveolar proteinosis; however, the pathophysiology of these diseases is undefined. Here, mice intraperitoneally inoculated with ITO-nanoparticles (ITO-NPs) resulted in peritonitis dependent in NLRP3 inflammasome, with neutrophils recruitment and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production. Withal peritoneal macrophages exposed ex vivo to ITO-NPs caused IL-1β secretion and cytolysis. Further, alveolar macrophages exposed to ITO-NPs in vitro showed ITO-NP endocytosis and production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and IL-1β, ensued cell death by cytolysis. This cell death was RIPK1-independent but caspase1-dependent, and thus identified as pyroptosis. Endocytosis of ITO-NPs by activated THP-1 cells induced pyroptosis with IL-1β/TNF-α production and cytolysis, but not in activated THP-1 cells with knockdown of NLRP3, ASC, or caspase1. However, exposing activated THP-1 cells with NLRP3 or ASC knockdown to ITO-NPs resulted in cell death but without cytolysis, with deficiency in IL-1β/TNF-α, and revealing features of apoptosis. While, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) co-cultured with macrophages impaired both inflammation and cell death induced by ITO-NPs. Together, our findings provide crucial insights to the pathophysiology of respiratory diseases caused by ITO particles, and identify MSCs as a potent therapeutic. PMID:27194621

  17. VIP treatment prevents embryo resorption by modulating efferocytosis and activation profile of maternal macrophages in the CBAxDBA resorption prone model

    PubMed Central

    Gallino, Lucila; Calo, Guillermina; Hauk, Vanesa; Fraccaroli, Laura; Grasso, Esteban; Vermeulen, Mónica; Leirós, Claudia Pérez; Ramhorst, Rosanna

    2016-01-01

    Successful embryo implantation occurs followed by a local pro-inflammatory response subsequently shifted toward a tolerogenic one. VIP (vasoactive intestinal peptide) has embryotrofic, anti-inflammatory and tolerogenic effects. In this sense, we investigated whether the in vivo treatment with VIP contributes to an immunosuppressant local microenvironment associated with an improved pregnancy outcome in the CBA/J × DBA/2 resorption prone model. Pregnancy induced the expression of VIP, VPAC1 and VPAC2 in the uterus from CBA/J × DBA/2 mating females on day 8.5 of gestation compared with non-pregnant mice. VIP treatment (2 nmol/mouse i.p.) on day 6.5 significantly increased the number of viable implantation sites and improved the asymmetric distribution of implanted embryos. This effect was accompanied by a decrease in RORγt and an increase in TGF-β and PPARγ expression at the implantation sites. Moreover, VIP modulated the maternal peritoneal macrophages efferocytosis ability, tested using latex beads-FITC or apoptotic thymocytes, displaying an increased frequency of IL-10-producer F4/80 cells while did not modulate TNF-α and IL-12 secretion. The present data suggest that VIP treatment increases the number of viable embryos associated with an increase in the efferocytic ability of maternal macrophages which is related to an immunosuppressant microenvironment. PMID:26733206

  18. MCT-1 expression and PTEN deficiency synergistically promote neoplastic multinucleation through the Src/p190B signaling activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, M-H; Chen, Y-A; Chen, H-H; Chang, K-W; Chang, I-S; Wang, L-H; Hsu, H-L

    2014-10-23

    Multinucleation is associated with malignant neoplasms; however, the molecular mechanism underlying the nuclear abnormality remains unclear. Loss or mutation of PTEN promotes the development of malignant tumors. We now demonstrate that increased expression of the oncogene MCT-1 (multiple copies in T-cell malignancy 1) antagonizes PTEN gene presentation, PTEN protein stability and PTEN functional activity, thereby further promoting phosphoinositide 3 kinase/AKT signaling, survival rate and malignancies of the PTEN-deficient cells. In the PTEN-null cancer cells, MCT-1 interacts with p190B and Src in vivo, supporting that they are in proximity of the signaling complexes. MCT-1 overexpression and PTEN loss synergistically augments the Src/p190B signaling function that leads to inhibition of RhoA activity. Under such a condition, the incidence of mitotic catastrophes including spindle multipolarity and cytokinesis failure is enhanced, driving an Src/p190B/RhoA-dependent neoplastic multinucleation. Targeting MCT-1 by the short hairpin RNA markedly represses the Src/p190B function, improves nuclear structures and suppresses xenograft tumorigenicity of the PTEN-null breast cancer cells. Consistent with the oncogenic effects in vitro, clinical evidence has confirmed that MCT-1 gene stimulation is correlated with p190B gene promotion and PTEN gene suppression in human breast cancer. Accordingly, MCT-1 gene induction is recognized as a potential biomarker of breast tumor development. Abrogating MCT-1 function may be a promising stratagem for management of breast cancer involving Src hyperactivation and/or PTEN dysfunction. PMID:24858043

  19. Origin of osteoclasts: Mature monocytes and macrophages are capable of differentiating into osteoclasts under a suitable microenvironment prepared by bone marrow-derived stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Akatsu, Takuhiko; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Takahisa; Suda, Tatsuo ); Nishihara, Tatsuji; Koga, Toshihiko ); Martin, T.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The authors previously reported that osteoclast-like cells were formed in cocultures of a mouse marrow-derived stromal cell line (ST2) with mouse spleen cells in the presence of 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} and dexamethasone. In this study, they developed a new coculture system to determine the origin of osteoclasts. When relatively small numbers of mononuclear cells obtained from mouse bone marrow, spleen, thymus, or peripheral blood were cultured for 12 days on the ST2 cell layers, they formed colonies with a linear relationship between the number of colonies formed and the number of hemopoietic cells inoculated. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAPase)-positive monoculear and multinucleated cells appeared in the colonies (TRAPase-positive colonies) in response to 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} and dexamethasone. When hemopoietic cells suspended in a collagen-gel solution were cultured on the ST2 cell layers to prevent their movement, TRAPase-positive colonies were similarly formed, indicating that each colony originated from a single cell. Salmon {sup 125}I-labeled calcitonin specifically bound to the TRAPase-positive cells. Resorption lacunae were formed on dentine slices on which cocultures were performed. These results indicate that osteoclasts are also derived from the mature monocytes and macrophages when a suitable microenvironment is provided by bone marrow-derived stromal cells.

  20. Susceptibility of bone marrow-derived macrophages to influenza virus infection is dependent on macrophage phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Gillian M.; Nicol, Marlynne Q.; Dransfield, Ian; Shaw, Darren J.; Nash, Anthony A.

    2015-01-01

    The role of the macrophage in influenza virus infection is complex. Macrophages are critical for resolution of influenza virus infections but implicated in morbidity and mortality in severe infections. They can be infected with influenza virus and consequently macrophage infection is likely to have an impact on the host immune response. Macrophages display a range of functional phenotypes, from the prototypical pro-inflammatory classically activated cell to alternatively activated anti-inflammatory macrophages involved in immune regulation and wound healing. We were interested in how macrophages of different phenotype respond to influenza virus infection and therefore studied the infection of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) of classical and alternative phenotype in vitro. Our results show that alternatively activated macrophages are more readily infected and killed by the virus than classically activated. Classically activated BMDMs express the pro-inflammatory markers inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and TNF-α, and TNF-α expression was further upregulated following infection. Alternatively activated macrophages express Arginase-1 and CD206; however, following infection, expression of these markers was downregulated whilst expression of iNOS and TNF-α was upregulated. Thus, infection can override the anti-inflammatory state of alternatively activated macrophages. Importantly, however, this results in lower levels of pro-inflammatory markers than those produced by classically activated cells. Our results showed that macrophage phenotype affects the inflammatory macrophage response following infection, and indicated that modulating the macrophage phenotype may provide a route to develop novel strategies to prevent and treat influenza virus infection. PMID:26297234

  1. Susceptibility of bone marrow-derived macrophages to influenza virus infection is dependent on macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Gillian M; Nicol, Marlynne Q; Dransfield, Ian; Shaw, Darren J; Nash, Anthony A; Dutia, Bernadette M

    2015-10-01

    The role of the macrophage in influenza virus infection is complex. Macrophages are critical for resolution of influenza virus infections but implicated in morbidity and mortality in severe infections. They can be infected with influenza virus and consequently macrophage infection is likely to have an impact on the host immune response. Macrophages display a range of functional phenotypes, from the prototypical pro-inflammatory classically activated cell to alternatively activated anti-inflammatory macrophages involved in immune regulation and wound healing. We were interested in how macrophages of different phenotype respond to influenza virus infection and therefore studied the infection of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) of classical and alternative phenotype in vitro. Our results show that alternatively activated macrophages are more readily infected and killed by the virus than classically activated. Classically activated BMDMs express the pro-inflammatory markers inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and TNF-α, and TNF-α expression was further upregulated following infection. Alternatively activated macrophages express Arginase-1 and CD206; however, following infection, expression of these markers was downregulated whilst expression of iNOS and TNF-α was upregulated. Thus, infection can override the anti-inflammatory state of alternatively activated macrophages. Importantly, however, this results in lower levels of pro-inflammatory markers than those produced by classically activated cells. Our results showed that macrophage phenotype affects the inflammatory macrophage response following infection, and indicated that modulating the macrophage phenotype may provide a route to develop novel strategies to prevent and treat influenza virus infection. PMID:26297234

  2. Anthemis wiedemanniana essential oil prevents LPS-induced production of NO in RAW 264.7 macrophages and exerts antiproliferative and antibacterial activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Filomena; Menichini, Federica; Formisano, Carmen; Rigano, Daniela; Senatore, Felice; Bruno, Maurizio; Rosselli, Sergio; Celik, Sezgin

    2012-01-01

    Anthemis wiedemanniana is known in folk medicine for the treatment of microbial infections, cancer and also urinary and pulmonary problems. In this study, the chemical composition of the essential oil from A. wiedemanniana was evaluated and its antibacterial activity was tested against 10 bacterial strains. The oil was also tested for its potentiality to inhibit nitric oxide production in RAW 264.7 macrophages and for its cytotoxicity against four human cancer cell lines. A. wiedemanniana oil, rich of oxygenated monoterpenes (25.4%), showed a good antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria and a good activity against the two Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli and Proteus vulgaris. Besides that, it exhibited a high inhibitory effect on the LPS-induced nitrite production and a strong cytotoxic activity, especially against amelanotic melanoma (C32) and large lung cell carcinoma (COR-L23) cell lines. PMID:22124231

  3. The human alveolar macrophage: isolation, cultivation in vitro, and studies of morphologic and functional characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cohen, A B; Cline, M J

    1971-07-01

    Human alveolar macrophages were lavaged from surgically resected lungs and from lungs of normal subjects. Macrophages that had been purified by glass adherence were maintained in tissue culture for as long as 54 days. After 3-4 wk in vitro they underwent transformation into multinucleated giant cells. These aged cells had more than 30 times the phagocytic capacity that the same group of cells had had after 1 day in vitro. Phagocytosis of heat-killed Candida albicans was inhibited by iodoacetate, sodium fluoride, potassium cyanide, and low partial pressures of oxygen, suggesting that these cells require both oxidative and glycolytic energy sources for maximal particle ingestion. Alveolar macrophages and monocyte-derived macrophages killed Listeria monocytogenes with similar efficiency, but neutrophils were more efficient than either of the other cell types. Bacterial killing is probably not dependent upon myeloperoxidase in the monocyte-derived macrophage or in the alveolar macrophage since histochemical stains for peroxidase do not stain either cell type. C. albicans blastospores, which are killed by neutrophils and monocytes that contain myeloperoxidase, were not killed by human alveolar macrophages during the 4 hr of observation. Large cells with supernormal phagocytic capacity were recovered from patients with postobstructive pheumonia and from one patient with recurrent bacterial pneumonia, indicating that macrophage function can be altered in certain disease states. Human alveolar macrophages are unique human phagocytes in their dependence on an oxygen tension greater than 25 mm HG for maximal phagocytosis. Carbon dioxide tensions as high as 70 mm Hg did not alter phagocytosis when the pH of the medium was held constant. These data suggest that the increased susceptibility to pneumonia of patients with chronic bronchitis or atelectasis may be in part related to suboptimal phagocytosis by macrophages in areas of the lung with depressed oxygen tension. PMID

  4. Effects of acute radon progeny exposure on rat alveolar macrophage number and function

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.F.; Newton, G.J.; Guilmette, R.A.

    1992-12-31

    Alveolar macrophages play a key role in removal and translocation of inhaled particles and have been shown to influence proliferation of Alveolar Type II cells and fibroblasts. The effect of radon progeny on alveolar macrophage number and function is not documented. Functional impairment of alveolar macrophages may be an ancillary event in the induction of pulmonary lesions and may also indicate dose to the peripheral lung. In our study, rats were exposed to 1000 working level months (WLM) of radon progeny over a 3- to 5-h period, with a vector aerosol of environmental tobacco smoke. Groups of animals were sacrificed, and the lungs were lavaged immediately after exposure and on days 2, 18, 16, 21 and 29 after exposure. The numbers and viabilities of the lavaged macrophages were determined. Cytological preparations were made to determine the number of binucleated/multinucleated macrophages and macrophages containing micronuclei. The DNA content was measured flow-cytometrically using Hoechst 33342, and phagocytosis was assayed by determining the uptake of fluorescent microspheres. The numbers and viabilities of macrophages recovered from exposed animals were similar to the values measured for control animals. There was no evidence of an inflammatory reaction during any period after radon progeny exposure. Nuclear atypia, evidenced by increases in the number of binucleated cells and cells with micronuclei, occurred in animals 8 days after exposure, and this response peaked at 21 days after exposure. The phagocytic capability of the alveolar macrophages was not significantly affected at any time point after exposure. These results show that there was little functional impairment of alveolar macrophages in rats after acute radon-progeny exposure; however, there was long-standing interference with cell division, resulting in binucleated and micronucleated macrophages.

  5. A novel isolation method for macrophage-like cells from mixed primary cultures of adult rat liver cells.

    PubMed

    Kitani, Hiroshi; Takenouchi, Takato; Sato, Mitsuru; Yoshioka, Miyako; Yamanaka, Noriko

    2010-08-31

    We report a simple and efficient method to obtain macrophage-like cells from the mixed primary cultures of adult rat liver cells. A parenchymal hepatocyte enriched fraction was prepared from adult rat livers and seeded into culture flasks. After 7 to 10 days of culture, when most hepatocytes were degenerated or transformed into fibroblastic cells, macrophage-like cells vigorously proliferated on the cell sheet. By shaking the flasks, macrophage-like cells were readily detached. Subsequent transfer and incubation in plastic dishes resulted in quick and selective adhesion of macrophage-like cells, while other contaminating cells remained suspended in the medium. After rinsing with saline, attached macrophage-like cells were harvested with 95 to 99% purity, as evaluated by flow cytometry or immunocytochemistry. These cells showed typical macrophage morphology and were strongly positive for markers of rat macrophages, such as ED-1, ED-3, and OX-41, but negative for cytokeratins and alpha-smooth muscle actin. They possessed functional properties of typical macrophages, including active phagocytosis of latex beads, proliferative response to recombinant GM-CSF, secretion of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines upon stimulation with LPS, and formation of multinucleated giant cells. As more than 10(6) cells can be recovered repeatedly from a T75 culture flask at two to three day intervals for more than two weeks, our procedure might implicate a novel alternative to obtain Kupffer cells in sufficient number and purity without complex equipment and skills. PMID:20600081

  6. Macrophage phenotypes in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Colin, Sophie; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Staels, Bart

    2014-11-01

    Initiation and progression of atherosclerosis depend on local inflammation and accumulation of lipids in the vascular wall. Although many cells are involved in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, macrophages are fundamental contributors. For nearly a decade, the phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity of macrophages has been studied. In atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages are submitted to a large variety of micro-environmental signals, such as oxidized lipids and cytokines, which influence the phenotypic polarization and activation of macrophages resulting in a dynamic plasticity. The macrophage phenotype spectrum is characterized, at the extremes, by the classical M1 macrophages induced by T-helper 1 (Th-1) cytokines and by the alternative M2 macrophages induced by Th-2 cytokines. M2 macrophages can be further classified into M2a, M2b, M2c, and M2d subtypes. More recently, additional plaque-specific macrophage phenotypes have been identified, termed as Mox, Mhem, and M4. Understanding the mechanisms and functional consequences of the phenotypic heterogeneity of macrophages will contribute to determine their potential role in lesion development and plaque stability. Furthermore, research on macrophage plasticity could lead to novel therapeutic approaches to counteract cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The present review summarizes our current knowledge on macrophage subsets in atherosclerotic plaques and mechanism behind the modulation of the macrophage phenotype. PMID:25319333

  7. Mulberry fruit prevents LPS-induced NF-κB/pERK/MAPK signals in macrophages and suppresses acute colitis and colorectal tumorigenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zhengjiang; Wu, Zhiqin; Huang, Lian; Qiu, Huiling; Wang, Liyan; Li, Li; Yao, Lijun; Kang, Kang; Qu, Junle; Wu, Yonghou; Luo, Jun; Liu, Johnson J.; Yang, Yi; Yang, Wancai; Gou, Deming

    2015-01-01

    Here, we investigated the impact of mulberry fruit (MBF) extracts on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in RAW 264.7 macrophages, and the therapeutic efficacy of MBF diet in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced acute colitis and MUC2−/− mice with colorectal cancer. In vitro, LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production was significantly inhibited by MBF extracts via suppressing the expression of proinflammatory molecules, including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-1 beta (IL-β) and IL-6. Particularly, a dose-dependent inhibition on LPS-induced inflammatory responses was observed following treatment with MBF dichloromethane extract (MBF-DE), in which linoleic acid and ethyl linolenate were identified as two active compounds. Moreover, we elucidated that MBF-DE attenuated LPS-induced inflammatory responses by blocking activation of both NF-κB/p65 and pERK/MAPK pathways. In vivo, DSS-induced acute colitis was significantly ameliorated in MBF-fed mice as gauged by weight loss, colon morphology and histological damage. In addition, MBF-fed MUC2−/− mice displayed significant decrease in intestinal tumor and inflammation incidence compared to control diet-fed group. Overall, our results demonstrated that MBF suppressed the development of intestinal inflammation and tumorgenesis both in vitro and in vivo, and supports the potential of MBF as a therapeutic functional food for testing in human clinical trials. PMID:26615818

  8. Mulberry fruit prevents LPS-induced NF-κB/pERK/MAPK signals in macrophages and suppresses acute colitis and colorectal tumorigenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhengjiang; Wu, Zhiqin; Huang, Lian; Qiu, Huiling; Wang, Liyan; Li, Li; Yao, Lijun; Kang, Kang; Qu, Junle; Wu, Yonghou; Luo, Jun; Liu, Johnson J; Yang, Yi; Yang, Wancai; Gou, Deming

    2015-01-01

    Here, we investigated the impact of mulberry fruit (MBF) extracts on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in RAW 264.7 macrophages, and the therapeutic efficacy of MBF diet in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced acute colitis and MUC2(-/-) mice with colorectal cancer. In vitro, LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production was significantly inhibited by MBF extracts via suppressing the expression of proinflammatory molecules, including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-1 beta (IL-β) and IL-6. Particularly, a dose-dependent inhibition on LPS-induced inflammatory responses was observed following treatment with MBF dichloromethane extract (MBF-DE), in which linoleic acid and ethyl linolenate were identified as two active compounds. Moreover, we elucidated that MBF-DE attenuated LPS-induced inflammatory responses by blocking activation of both NF-κB/p65 and pERK/MAPK pathways. In vivo, DSS-induced acute colitis was significantly ameliorated in MBF-fed mice as gauged by weight loss, colon morphology and histological damage. In addition, MBF-fed MUC2(-/-) mice displayed significant decrease in intestinal tumor and inflammation incidence compared to control diet-fed group. Overall, our results demonstrated that MBF suppressed the development of intestinal inflammation and tumorgenesis both in vitro and in vivo, and supports the potential of MBF as a therapeutic functional food for testing in human clinical trials. PMID:26615818

  9. Murine macrophage behavior on peptide-grafted polyethyleneglycol-containing networks.

    PubMed

    Kao, W J; Hubbell, J A

    1998-07-01

    Polyethyleneglycol-based networks were employed as substrates to graft bioactive peptides to study macrophage interactions with materials. Our overall objective was to utilize biologically active factors to stimulate certain macrophage function on materials suitable for implantation in connective tissues. In this study, we sought to explore the bioactivity of several peptides derived from extracellular matrix adhesion proteins and macrophage-active proteins that are normally soluble. The candidate peptides examined corresponded to residues 63 to 77 of complement component C3a (C3a(63-77)), residues 178 to 207 of interleukin-1 beta (IL1beta(178-207)), residues 1615 to 1624 of fibronectin (FN(1615-1624)), endothelial-macrophage activating polypeptide II, complement component C5a inhibitory sequence, macrophage inhibitory peptide, and YRGDG; materials lacking peptides were used as negative controls. An established murine cell-line IC-21 was employed as a macrophage model, and human dermal fibroblasts were used for comparison. Our results showed that the substrates without grafted peptides were free from artifactual cell adhesion associated with the adsorption of serum or cellularly secreted proteins for long duration of culture. Of all grafted samples, IL1beta(178-207)- and C3a(63-77)-grafted surfaces supported higher adherent macrophage densities. C3a(63-77)- and FN(1615-1624)-grafted surfaces supported higher adherent fibroblast densities. From competitive inhibition studies, cell adhesion was determined to occur in a receptor-peptide specific manner. The presence of grafted YRGDG in addition to IL1beta(178-207), C3a(63-77), or FN(1615-1624) synergistically increased macrophage and fibroblast adhesion. Materials grafted with IL1beta(178-207) or C3a(63-77) co-grafted with or without YRGDG did not support the formation of multinucleated giant cells from the fusion of adherent macrophages in vitro. PMID:10099308

  10. Multinucleate neurons with neurohaemal and synapsing axons at the heart and alary muscles of the butterfly Caligo beltrao Illiger (Lepidoptera).

    PubMed

    Wasserthal, W; Wasserthal, L T

    1980-01-01

    The segmental heart nerves of Caligo beltrao Illiger (Brassolidae) were examined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Heart and alary muscles are innervated by branching processes of single multinucleate neurons (MNNs). There is one MNN situated at each segmental fan-shaped group of alary muscles. The main nerve of the MNN consists of a bundle of processes. This nerve extends centripetally toward the CNS and corresponds to the dorsal portion of the transverse nerve. However, neither axo-somatic nor axo-axonic synapses were found, the presence of which might suggest that this nerve contains axons of different neuronal origin. The synaptic contacts of the MNN with axons originating from the CNS are therefore assumed to be established beyond the spiracular region. In addition to the neuro-muscular junctions of the smaller centrifugal axon branches there are neurohaemal release sites along the entire length of all MNN axon bundles. Axon terminals are packed with either dense-cored or multigranular vesicles. Both morphological types of vesicles are, however, found side by side in the large axons and in the perikaryon, often at the same golgi element. These morphological findings may support the concept that more than one transmitter is produced in a single neuron. Questions that arise in reference to dual or polyfunctional neurons and to the control of cardiac activity are discussed. PMID:7459984

  11. Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia with multinucleated stromal giant cells is neither exceptional in gynecomastia nor characteristic of neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Pižem, Jože; Velikonja, Mojca; Matjašič, Alenka; Jerše, Maja; Glavač, Damjan

    2015-04-01

    Six cases of gynecomastia with pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) and multinucleated stromal giant cells (MSGC) associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) have been reported, and finding MSGC within PASH in gynecomastia has been suggested as being a characteristic of NF1. The frequency of PASH with MSGC in gynecomastia and its specificity for NF1 have not, however, been systematically studied. A total of 337 gynecomastia specimens from 215 patients, aged from 8 to 78 years (median, 22 years) were reevaluated for the presence of PASH with MSGC. Breast tissue samples of 25 patients were analyzed for the presence of an NF1 gene mutation using next generation sequencing. Rare MSGC, usually in the background of PASH, were noted at least unilaterally in 27 (13 %) patients; and prominent MSGC, always in the background of PASH, were noted in 8 (4 %) patients. The NF1 gene was mutated in only 1 (an 8-year-old boy with known NF1 and prominent MSGC) of the 25 tested patients, including 6 patients with prominent MSGC and 19 patients with rare MSGC. MSGC, usually in the background of PASH, are not characteristic of NF1. PMID:25586494

  12. HDAC inhibition prevents white matter injury by modulating microglia/macrophage polarization through the GSK3β/PTEN/Akt axis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guohua; Shi, Yejie; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Leak, Rehana K; Hu, Xiaoming; Wu, Yun; Pu, Hongjian; Li, Wei-Wei; Tang, Bo; Wang, Yun; Gao, Yanqin; Zheng, Ping; Bennett, Michael V L; Chen, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) elicits destruction of both gray and white matter, which is exacerbated by secondary proinflammatory responses. Although white matter injury (WMI) is strongly correlated with poor neurological status, the maintenance of white matter integrity is poorly understood, and no current therapies protect both gray and white matter. One candidate approach that may fulfill this role is inhibition of class I/II histone deacetylases (HDACs). Here we demonstrate that the HDAC inhibitor Scriptaid protects white matter up to 35 d after TBI, as shown by reductions in abnormally dephosphorylated neurofilament protein, increases in myelin basic protein, anatomic preservation of myelinated axons, and improved nerve conduction. Furthermore, Scriptaid shifted microglia/macrophage polarization toward the protective M2 phenotype and mitigated inflammation. In primary cocultures of microglia and oligodendrocytes, Scriptaid increased expression of microglial glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β), which phosphorylated and inactivated phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN), thereby enhancing phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K)/Akt signaling and polarizing microglia toward M2. The increase in GSK3β in microglia and their phenotypic switch to M2 was associated with increased preservation of neighboring oligodendrocytes. These findings are consistent with recent findings that microglial phenotypic switching modulates white matter repair and axonal remyelination and highlight a previously unexplored role for HDAC activity in this process. Furthermore, the functions of GSK3β may be more subtle than previously thought, in that GSK3β can modulate microglial functions via the PTEN/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and preserve white matter homeostasis. Thus, inhibition of HDACs in microglia is a potential future therapy in TBI and other neurological conditions with white matter destruction. PMID:25691750

  13. [The biological activity of macrophages in health and disease].

    PubMed

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Bryniarski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages are involved in immune response as phagocytes, antigen presenting cells and as effector cells of delayed-type hypersensitivity. Moreover, the activity of macrophages is associated with modulation of many biological processes during the whole life and depends on the actual macrophage phenotype induced under the influence of various microenvironmental stimuli. In pregnancy, placental macrophages induce the development of maternal tolerance to fetal antigens, while fetal macrophages are responsible for proper formation of tissues and organs. Residual macrophages play a very important role in tissue homeostasis, apoptotic cell clearance to prevent autoimmunization and first defense in infections. The inflammatory response of macrophages may be modulated by pathogens. Their suppressive activity is observed in immunologically privileged organs such as testes. In pathologies, macrophages are responsible for tissue damage in a case of nonspecific activation followed by overproduction of proinflammatory factors. Suppression of a specific immune response against tumors is mainly the effect of tumor associated macrophage (TAM) action. On the other hand, presentation of allergens or self-antigens by macrophages and their nonspecific activation by necrotic adipocytes leads to the induction of a chronic inflammatory response and impairment of immunity. Therefore, modulation of macrophage functions may be the key for improvement of therapy of cancer and allergic, autoimmune, metabolic, cardiovascular and Alzheimer's diseases. PMID:22922151

  14. A cell line with multinucleated giant cell formation established from a human giant cell tumor of tendon sheath--preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, M; Hatori, M; Smith, R A; Kokubun, S

    2001-01-01

    We first established a cell line with unique giant cell formation properties from a human giant cell tumor of tendon sheath (GCTTS) arising in the right ankle of a 7-year-old girl. The specimen for cell culture taken from the tumor was heterotransplanted into the back of a BALB/c (nu/nu) nude mouse. An in-vitro cell line was established from a tumor that grew after this heterotransplantation. Only mononuclear cells were observed in the primary culture, and these remained constant in growth. Multinucleated giant cells appeared at passage 3 and were constantly observed thereafter. The fusion of mononuclear cells into giant cells was verified by light and phase-contrast microscopy. This cell line was confirmed to be derived from a human by karyotype analysis and DNA fingerprinting. The cell-doubling time was 150 h. This cell line should be useful for studies of the mechanism of multinucleation in giant cell tumors. PMID:11845350

  15. The plant cell inhibitor KRP6 is involved in multinucleation and cytokinesis disruption in giant-feeding cells induced by root-knot nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Paulo; Engler, Janice de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    The plant cell cycle inhibitor gene KRP6 has been investigated in roots infected by plant-parasitic root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). Unexpectedly, KRP6 overexpressing lines revealed a distinct role for this specific KRP as an activator of the mitotic cell cycle. This function was confirmed in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cultures ectopically expressing KRP6. A blockage in the mitotic exit was observed in cell suspensions and in giant cells resulted in the appearance of multi-nucleated cells. KRP6 expression during nematode infection and the similarity in phenotypes among KRP6 overexpressing cell cultures and giant-cell morphology strongly suggest that KRP6 is involved in multinucleation and acytokinesis occurring in giant-cells. Once again nematodes have been shown to manipulate the plant cell cycle machinery in order to promote gall establishment. PMID:25915833

  16. Lotus leaf (Nelumbo nucifera) and its active constituents prevent inflammatory responses in macrophages via JNK/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shing-Hwa; Lu, Tien-Hui; Su, Chin-Chuan; Lay, Ing-Shiow; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fang, Kai-Min; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Chen, Kuo-Liang; Su, Yi-Chang; Chiang, Wen-Chang; Chen, Ya-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a serious health issue worldwide that induces many diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), sepsis, acute pancreatitis and lung injury. Thus, there is a great deal of interest in new methods of limiting inflammation. In this study, we investigated the leaves of Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn, an aquatic perennial plant cultivated in eastern Asia and India, in anti-inflammatory pharmacological effects in the murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7. Results showed that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased the protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and COX-2, as well as the mRNA expression and level of IL-6 and TNF-α, while NNE significantly reduced these effects of LPS. LPS also induced phospho-JNK protein expression. The JNK-specific inhibitor SP600125 decreased the proteins expression of phospho-JNK, iNOS, COX-2, and the mRNAs expression and levels of IL-6 and TNF-α. Further, NNE reduced the protein expression of phospho-JNK. LPS was also found to promote the translocation of NF-κB from the cytosol to the nucleus and to decrease the expression of cytosolic IκB. NNE and SP600125 treatment recovered the LPS-induced expression of NF-κB and IκB. While phospho-ERK and phospho-p38 induced by LPS, could not be reversed by NNE. To further investigate the major components of NNE in anti-inflammatory effects, we determined the quercetin and catechin in inflammatory signals. Results showed that quercetin and catechin significantly decreased the proteins expression of iNOS, COX-2 and phospho-JNK. Besides, the mRNAs and levels of IL-6 and TNF-α also decreased by quercetin and catechin treatment in LPS-induced RAW264.7 cells. These results showed that NNE and its major components quercetin and catechin exhibit anti-inflammatory activities by inhibiting the JNK- and NF-κB-regulated pathways and could therefore be an useful anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:25004880

  17. CpG ODN enhances uptake of bacteria by mouse macrophages

    PubMed Central

    UTAISINCHAROEN, P; KESPICHAYAWATTANA, W; ANUNTAGOOL, N; CHAISURIYA, P; PICHYANGKUL, S; KRIEG, A M; SIRISINHA, S

    2003-01-01

    Unmethylated CpG motif in synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG ODN) or bacterial DNA is well recognized for its role in innate immunity, including enhancing production of NO and cytokines by macrophages. In the present study, we demonstrated the effect of CpG ODN on the phagocytic uptake of bacteria by macrophages. Flow cytometric analysis of mouse macrophages (RAW 264·7) incubated with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labelled Burkholderia pseudomallei, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi or Escherichia coli showed that CpG ODN increased the uptake of these bacteria by mouse macrophages. The enhancement of bacterial uptake by CpG ODN was concentration-dependent. The increase of bacterial uptake by CpG ODN-activated macrophages shown above is consistent with the result of bacteria internalization study using a standard antibiotic protection assay. There was also an increase in the rate and degree of multi-nucleated giant cell formation, phenomena which have been shown previously to be unique when the cells were infected with B. pseudomallei. These observations may provide significant insights for future investigation into host cell–pathogen interaction. PMID:12653838

  18. Multi-nucleate retinal pigment epithelium cells of the human macula exhibit a characteristic and highly specific distribution

    PubMed Central

    Starnes, Austin C; Huisingh, Carrie; McGwin, Gerald; Sloan, Kenneth R; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Smith, R. Theodore; Curcio, Christine A; Ach, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is reportedly 3% bi-nucleated. The importance to human vision of multi-nucleated (MN)-RPE cells could be clarified with more data about their distribution in central retina. Methods Nineteen human RPE-flatmounts (9≤51years, 10>80 years) were imaged at 12 locations: 3 eccentricities (fovea, perifovea, near periphery) in 4 quadrants (superior, inferior, temporal, nasal). Image stacks of lipofuscin-attributable autofluorescence and phalloidin labeled F-actin cytoskeleton were obtained using a confocal fluorescence microscope. Nuclei were devoid of autofluorescence and were marked using morphometric software. Cell areas were approximated by Voronoi regions. Mean number of nuclei per cell among eccentricity/quadrant groups and by age were compared using Poisson and binominal regression models. Results A total of 11403 RPE cells at 200 locations were analyzed: 94.66 % mono-, 5.31% bi-, 0.02% tri-nucleate, and 0.01% with 5 nuclei. Age had no effect on number of nuclei. There were significant regional differences: highest frequencies of MN-cells were found at the perifovea (9.9%) and near periphery (6.8%). The fovea lacked MN-cells almost entirely. The nasal quadrant had significantly more MN-cells compared to other quadrants, at all eccentricities. Conclusion This study demonstrates MN-RPE cells in human macula. MN-cells may arise due to endoreplication, cell fusion, or incomplete cell division. The topography of MN-RPE cells follows the topography of photoreceptors; with near-absence at the fovea (cones only) and high frequency at perifovea (highest rod density). This distribution might reflect specific requirements of retinal metabolism or other mechanisms addressable in further studies. PMID:26923500

  19. Di-n-Butyl Phthalate Induces Multinucleated Germ Cells in the Rat Fetal Testis Through a Nonproliferative Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Spade, Daniel J; Hall, Susan J; Wilson, Shelby; Boekelheide, Kim

    2015-11-01

    In utero exposure to some phthalate esters adversely affects the development of the rat seminiferous cord, causing germ cell loss and increasing the number of multinucleated germ cells (MNGs). To understand the timing of MNG formation and determine whether it requires nuclear division, timed pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to 500 mg/kg di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) or corn oil vehicle by oral gavage on Gestational Day (GD) 17 or 18 (0 h) and euthanized after 2, 4, 6, or 24 h or given a second dose at 24 h and euthanized 48 h after the initial dose. Dams were simultaneously exposed to 0.3 M 5-bromo-2'-deoxycitidine (BrdC; converted to 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridylate [BrdU] in vivo) through a subcutaneous micro-osmotic pump implanted at -2 h. In the testes of male fetuses, DBP induced MNGs significantly beginning at 4-6 h and dramatically by 24 h when exposure began on GD 18 but not GD 17. Seminiferous cord diameter was significantly elevated in testes of rats treated with DBP at 24 and 48 h, and cell death, measured by TUNEL assay, was significantly elevated by DBP only at 48 h, when treatment began on GD 18. TUNEL-labeled MNGs were rare. Overall BrdU labeling rate in the testis was unaffected by DBP. Only one of 606 MNGs in BrdU-labeled sections had a strongly positive nucleus, confirming a nonproliferative mechanism of MNG formation, which is a degenerative process with the potential to adversely affect testis development. PMID:26400400

  20. Macrophages are required for host survival in experimental urogenital schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Odegaard, Justin I.; Hsieh, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Urogenital schistosomiasis, Schistosoma haematobium worm infection, afflicts millions of people with egg-triggered, fibrotic bladder granulomata. Despite the significant global impact of urogenital schistosomiasis, the mechanisms of bladder granulomogenesis and fibrosis are ill defined due to the prior lack of tractable animal models. We combined a mouse model of urogenital schistosomiasis with macrophage-depleting liposomal clodronate (LC) to define how macrophages mediate bladder granulomogenesis and fibrosis. Mice were injected with eggs purified from infected hamsters or vehicle prepared from uninfected hamster tissues (xenoantigen and injection trauma control). Empty liposomes were controls for LC: 1) LC treatment resulted in fewer bladder egg granuloma-infiltrating macrophages, eosinophils, and T and B cells, lower bladder and serum levels of eotaxin, and higher bladder concentrations of IL-1α and chemokines (in a time-dependent fashion), confirming that macrophages orchestrate leukocyte infiltration of the egg-exposed bladder; 2) macrophage-depleted mice exhibited greater weight loss and bladder hemorrhage postegg injection; 3) early LC treatment postegg injection resulted in profound decreases in bladder fibrosis, suggesting differing roles for macrophages in fibrosis over time; and 4) LC treatment also led to egg dose-dependent mortality, indicating that macrophages prevent death from urogenital schistosomiasis. Thus, macrophages are a potential therapeutic target for preventing or treating the bladder sequelae of urogenital schistosomiasis.—Fu, C.-L., Odegaard, J. I., Hsieh, M. H. Macrophages are required for host survival in experimental urogenital schistosomiasis. PMID:25351984

  1. Tumor-associated macrophages: from mechanisms to therapy

    PubMed Central

    Noy, Roy; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex ecology of cells that evolves with and provides support to tumor cells during the transition to malignancy. Among the innate and adaptive immune cells recruited to the tumor site, macrophages are particularly abundant and are present at all stages of tumor progression. Clinical studies and experimental mouse models indicate these macrophages generally play a pro-tumoral role. In the primary tumor, macrophage can stimulate angiogenesis and enhance tumor cell invasion, motility and intravasation. During metastasis, macrophages prime the pre-metastatic site and promote tumor cell extravasation, survival and persistent growth. Macrophages are also immunosuppressive preventing tumor cell attack by natural killer and T cells during tumor progression and after recovery from chemo- or immuno-therapy. Therapeutic success in targeting these pro-tumoral roles in pre-clinical models and in early clinical trials suggests that macrophages are attractive targets as part of combination therapy in cancer treatment. PMID:25035953

  2. MFR, a Putative Receptor Mediating the Fusion of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Saginario, Charles; Sterling, Hyacinth; Beckers, Cornelius; Kobayashi, Ruji; Solimena, Michele; Ullu, Elisabetta; Vignery, Agnès

    1998-01-01

    We had previously identified a macrophage surface protein whose expression is highly induced, transient, and specific, as it is restricted to actively fusing macrophages in vitro and in vivo. This protein is recognized by monoclonal antibodies that block macrophage fusion. We have now purified this protein and cloned its corresponding cDNA. This protein belongs to the superfamily of immunoglobulins and is similar to immune antigen receptors such as the T-cell receptor, B-cell receptor, and viral receptors such as CD4. We have therefore named this protein macrophage fusion receptor (MFR). We show that the extracellular domain of MFR prevents fusion of macrophages in vitro and therefore propose that MFR belongs to the fusion machinery of macrophages. MFR is identical to SHPS-1 and BIT and is a homologue of P84, SIRPα, and MyD-1, all of which have been recently cloned and implicated in cell signaling and cell-cell interaction events. PMID:9774638

  3. T Cell–Macrophage Interactions and Granuloma Formation in Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Hilhorst, Marc; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Berry, Gerald; Goronzy, Jörg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2014-01-01

    Granuloma formation, bringing into close proximity highly activated macrophages and T cells, is a typical event in inflammatory blood vessel diseases, and is noted in the name of several of the vasculitides. It is not known whether specific properties of the microenvironment in the blood vessel wall or the immediate surroundings of blood vessels contribute to granuloma formation and, in some cases, generation of multinucleated giant cells. Granulomas provide a specialized niche to optimize macrophage–T cell interactions, strongly activating both cell types. This is mirrored by the intensity of the systemic inflammation encountered in patients with vasculitis, often presenting with malaise, weight loss, fever, and strongly upregulated acute phase responses. As a sophisticated and highly organized structure, granulomas can serve as an ideal site to induce differentiation and maturation of T cells. The granulomas possibly seed aberrant Th1 and Th17 cells into the circulation, which are known to be the main pathogenic cells in vasculitis. Through the induction of memory T cells, aberrant innate immune responses can imprint the host immune system for decades to come and promote chronicity of the disease process. Improved understanding of T cell–macrophage interactions will redefine pathogenic models in the vasculitides and provide new avenues for immunomodulatory therapy. PMID:25309534

  4. Macrophage Autophagy in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Grassia, Gianluca; Platt, Andrew M.; Carnuccio, Rosa; Ialenti, Armando; Maffia, Pasquale

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages play crucial roles in atherosclerotic immune responses. Recent investigation into macrophage autophagy (AP) in atherosclerosis has demonstrated a novel pathway through which these cells contribute to vascular inflammation. AP is a cellular catabolic process involving the delivery of cytoplasmic contents to the lysosomal machinery for ultimate degradation and recycling. Basal levels of macrophage AP play an essential role in atheroprotection during early atherosclerosis. However, AP becomes dysfunctional in the more advanced stages of the pathology and its deficiency promotes vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, and plaque necrosis. In this paper, we will discuss the role of macrophages and AP in atherosclerosis and the emerging evidence demonstrating the contribution of macrophage AP to vascular pathology. Finally, we will discuss how AP could be targeted for therapeutic utility. PMID:23401644

  5. Chemical and physical effects on the adhesion, maturation, and survival of monocytes, macrophages, and foreign body giant cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Terry Odell, III

    Injury caused by biomedical device implantation initiates inflammatory and wound healing responses. Cells migrate to the site of injury to degrade bacteria and toxins, create new vasculature, and form new and repair injured tissue. Blood-proteins rapidly adsorb onto the implanted material surface and express adhesive ligands which mediate cell adhesion on the material surface. Monocyte-derived macrophages and multi-nucleated foreign body giant cells adhere to the surface and degrade the surface of the material. Due to the role of macrophage and foreign body giant cell on material biocompatibility and biostability, the effects of surface chemistry, surface topography and specific proteins on the maturation and survival of monocytes, macrophages and foreign body giant cells has been investigated. Novel molecularly designed materials were used to elucidate the dynamic interactions which occur between inflammatory cells, proteins and surfaces. The effect of protein and protein adhesion was investigated using adhesive protein depleted serum conditions on RGD-modified and silane modified surfaces. The effects of surface chemistry were investigated using temperature responsive surfaces of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) and micropatterned surfaces of N-(2 aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane regions on an interpenetrating polymer network of polyacrylamide and poly(ethylene glycol). The physical effects were investigated using polyimide scaffold materials and polyurethane materials with surface modifying end groups. The depletion of immunoglobulin G caused decreased levels of macrophage adhesion, foreign body giant cell formation and increased levels of apoptosis. The temporal nature of macrophage adhesion was observed with changing effectiveness of adherent cell detachment with time, which correlated to increased expression of beta1 integrin receptors on detached macrophages with time. The limited ability of the micropatterned surface, polyimide scaffold and surface

  6. Selective differences in macrophage populations and monokine production in resolving pulmonary granuloma and fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, I.

    1991-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) and their production of interleukin-1-like activity (IL-1) and macrophage-derived growth factor for fibroblasts (MDGF) were examined during chronic inflammatory reactions leading to either granuloma formation or fibrosis. Groups of five rats each received, respectively, a single transtracheal injection of xonotlite, attapulgite, short chrysotile 4T30, UICC chrysotile B asbestos, or saline. One month later, such treatments induced either no change (xonotlite), granuloma formation (attapulgite and short chrysotile 4T30), or fibrosis (UICC chrysotile B). By 8 months, however, the granulomatous reactions had resolved or greatly diminished, whereas the fibrosis persisted irreversibly. Parallel examination of cell populations obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage revealed that multinucleated giant macrophages (MGC) were present in lavage fluids of animals with resolving granulomatous reactions but absent in those obtained from animals with lung fibrosis. Evaluation of monokine production by inflammatory macrophages also revealed significant differences. Enhanced production of IL-1-like activity was seen in both types of lung injury, although especially during the early stage (1 month) and decreased thereafter (8 months). By contrast, augmentation of MDGF production was observed in animals with lung fibrosis only and persisted up to 9 months. Taken together, these data indicate that production of selected cytokines, as well as AM differentiation along a given pathway, may modulate the outcome of a chronic inflammatory response. PMID:1992772

  7. Spontaneous cell fusion in macrophage cultures expressing high levels of the P2Z/P2X7 receptor.

    PubMed

    Chiozzi, P; Sanz, J M; Ferrari, D; Falzoni, S; Aleotti, A; Buell, G N; Collo, G; Di Virgilio, F

    1997-08-11

    Mouse and human macrophages express a plasma membrane receptor for extracellular ATP named P2Z/P2X7. This molecule, recently cloned, is endowed with the intriguing property of forming an aqueous pore that allows transmembrane fluxes of hydrophylic molecules of molecular weight below 900. The physiological function of this receptor is unknown. In a previous study we reported experiments suggesting that the P2Z/P2X7 receptor is involved in the formation of macrophage-derived multinucleated giant cells (MGCs; Falzoni, S., M. Munerati, D. Ferrari, S. Spisani, S. Moretti, and F. Di Virgilio. 1995. J. Clin. Invest. 95:1207- 1216). We have selected several clones of mouse J774 macrophages that are characterized by either high or low expression of the P2Z/P2X7 receptor and named these clones P2Zhyper or P2Zhypo, respectively. P2Zhyper, but not P2Zhypo, cells grown to confluence in culture spontaneously fuse to form MGCs. As previously shown for human macrophages, fusion is inhibited by the P2Z/P2X7 blocker oxidized ATP. MGCs die shortly after fusion through a dramatic process of cytoplasmic sepimentation followed by fragmentation. These observations support our previous hypothesis that the P2Z/P2X7 receptor is involved in macrophage fusion. PMID:9245796

  8. Macrophage Inflammatory Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ylostalo, Joni H.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent a widely distributed and functionally diverse population of innate myeloid cells involved in inflammatory response to pathogens, tissue homeostasis and tissue repair (Murray and Wynn, 2011). Macrophages can be broadly grouped into two subpopulations with opposing activites: M1 or pro-inflammatory macrophages that promote T-helper type 1 (Th1) cell immunity and tissue damage, and M2 or anti-inflammatory/alternatively activated macrophages implicated in Th2 response and resolution of inflammation. Here we describe a rapid assay we used previously to monitor changes in pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages in response to therapeutic paracrine factors produced by adult stem cells (Bartosh et al., 2010; Ylostalo et al., 2012; Bartosh et al., 2013). The assay can be adapted appropriately to test macrophage response to other agents as well that will be referred to herein as ‘test reagents’ or ‘test compounds’. In this protocol, the mouse macrophage cell line J774A.1 is expanded as an adherent monolayer on petri dishes allowing for the cells to be harvested easily without enzymes or cell scrapers that can damage the cells. The macropahges are then stimulated in suspension with LPS and seeded into 12-well cell culture plates containing the test reagents. After 16–18 h, the medium conditioned by the macrophages is harvested and the cytokine profile in the medium determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). We routinely measure levels of the pro-inflammtory cytokine TNF-alpha and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10).

  9. The Elusive Antifibrotic Macrophage.

    PubMed

    Adhyatmika, Adhyatmika; Putri, Kurnia S S; Beljaars, Leonie; Melgert, Barbro N

    2015-01-01

    Fibrotic diseases, especially of the liver, the cardiovascular system, the kidneys, and the lungs, account for approximately 45% of deaths in Western societies. Fibrosis is a serious complication associated with aging and/or chronic inflammation or injury and cannot be treated effectively yet. It is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins by myofibroblasts and impaired degradation by macrophages. This ultimately destroys the normal structure of an organ, which leads to loss of function. Most efforts to develop drugs have focused on inhibiting ECM production by myofibroblasts and have not yielded many effective drugs yet. Another option is to stimulate the cells that are responsible for degradation and uptake of excess ECM, i.e., antifibrotic macrophages. However, macrophages are plastic cells that have many faces in fibrosis, including profibrotic behavior-stimulating ECM production. This can be dependent on their origin, as the different organs have tissue-resident macrophages with different origins and a various influx of incoming monocytes in steady-state conditions and during fibrosis. To be able to pharmacologically stimulate the right kind of behavior in fibrosis, a thorough characterization of antifibrotic macrophages is necessary, as well as an understanding of the signals they need to degrade ECM. In this review, we will summarize the current state of the art regarding the antifibrotic macrophage phenotype and the signals that stimulate its behavior. PMID:26618160

  10. Macrophage polarization in pathology.

    PubMed

    Sica, Antonio; Erreni, Marco; Allavena, Paola; Porta, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages are cells of the innate immunity constituting the mononuclear phagocyte system and endowed with remarkable different roles essential for defense mechanisms, development of tissues, and homeostasis. They derive from hematopoietic precursors and since the early steps of fetal life populate peripheral tissues, a process continuing throughout adult life. Although present essentially in every organ/tissue, macrophages are more abundant in the gastro-intestinal tract, liver, spleen, upper airways, and brain. They have phagocytic and bactericidal activity and produce inflammatory cytokines that are important to drive adaptive immune responses. Macrophage functions are settled in response to microenvironmental signals, which drive the acquisition of polarized programs, whose extremes are simplified in the M1 and M2 dichotomy. Functional skewing of monocyte/macrophage polarization occurs in physiological conditions (e.g., ontogenesis and pregnancy), as well as in pathology (allergic and chronic inflammation, tissue repair, infection, and cancer) and is now considered a key determinant of disease development and/or regression. Here, we will review evidence supporting a dynamic skewing of macrophage functions in disease, which may provide a basis for macrophage-centered therapeutic strategies. PMID:26210152

  11. The Elusive Antifibrotic Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Adhyatmika, Adhyatmika; Putri, Kurnia S. S.; Beljaars, Leonie; Melgert, Barbro N.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrotic diseases, especially of the liver, the cardiovascular system, the kidneys, and the lungs, account for approximately 45% of deaths in Western societies. Fibrosis is a serious complication associated with aging and/or chronic inflammation or injury and cannot be treated effectively yet. It is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins by myofibroblasts and impaired degradation by macrophages. This ultimately destroys the normal structure of an organ, which leads to loss of function. Most efforts to develop drugs have focused on inhibiting ECM production by myofibroblasts and have not yielded many effective drugs yet. Another option is to stimulate the cells that are responsible for degradation and uptake of excess ECM, i.e., antifibrotic macrophages. However, macrophages are plastic cells that have many faces in fibrosis, including profibrotic behavior-stimulating ECM production. This can be dependent on their origin, as the different organs have tissue-resident macrophages with different origins and a various influx of incoming monocytes in steady-state conditions and during fibrosis. To be able to pharmacologically stimulate the right kind of behavior in fibrosis, a thorough characterization of antifibrotic macrophages is necessary, as well as an understanding of the signals they need to degrade ECM. In this review, we will summarize the current state of the art regarding the antifibrotic macrophage phenotype and the signals that stimulate its behavior. PMID:26618160

  12. Macrophage Polarization in Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan-Cun; Zou, Xian-Biao; Chai, Yan-Fen; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Diversity and plasticity are two hallmarks of macrophages. M1 macrophages (classically activated macrophages) are pro-inflammatory and have a central role in host defense against infection, while M2 macrophages (alternatively activated macrophages) are associated with responses to anti-inflammatory reactions and tissue remodeling, and they represent two terminals of the full spectrum of macrophage activation. Transformation of different phenotypes of macrophages regulates the initiation, development, and cessation of inflammatory diseases. Here we reviewed the characters and functions of macrophage polarization in infection, atherosclerosis, obesity, tumor, asthma, and sepsis, and proposed that targeting macrophage polarization and skewing their phenotype to adapt to the microenvironment might hold great promise for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:24910531

  13. Mycobacteria, Metals, and the Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Niederweis, Michael; Wolschendorf, Frank; Mitra, Avishek; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that thrives inside host macrophages. A key trait of M. tuberculosis is to exploit and manipulate metal cation trafficking inside infected macrophages to ensure survival and replication inside the phagosome. Here we describe the recent fascinating discoveries that the mammalian immune system responds to infections with M. tuberculosis by overloading the phagosome with copper and zinc, two metals which are essential nutrients in small quantities but are toxic in excess. M. tuberculosis has developed multi-faceted resistance mechanisms to protect itself from metal toxicity including control of uptake, sequestration inside the cell, oxidation, and efflux. The host response to infections combines this metal poisoning strategy with nutritional immunity mechanisms that deprive M. tuberculosis from metals such as iron and manganese to prevent bacterial replication. Both immune mechanisms rely on the translocation of metal transporter proteins to the phagosomal membrane during the maturation process of the phagosome. This review summarizes these recent findings and discusses how metal-targeted approaches might complement existing TB chemotherapeutic regimens with novel anti-infective therapies. PMID:25703564

  14. Tfe3 expression is closely associated to macrophage terminal differentiation of human hematopoietic myeloid precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Zanocco-Marani, Tommaso; Vignudelli, Tatiana; Gemelli, Claudia; Pirondi, Sara; Testa, Anna; Montanari, Monica; Parenti, Sandra; Tenedini, Elena; Grande, Alexis; Ferrari, Sergio . E-mail: sergio@unimo.it

    2006-12-10

    The MItf-Tfe family of basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) transcription factors encodes four family members: MItf, Tfe3, TfeB and TfeC. In vitro, each protein of the family binds DNA in a homo- or heterodimeric form with other family members. Tfe3 is involved in chromosomal translocations recurrent in different tumors and it has been demonstrated, by in vivo studies, that it plays, redundantly with MItf, an important role in the process of osteoclast formation, in particular during the transition from mono-nucleated to multi-nucleated osteoclasts. Since mono-nucleated osteoclasts derive from macrophages we investigated whether Tfe3 might play a role upstream during hematopoietic differentiation. Here we show that Tfe3 is able to induce mono-macrophagic differentiation of U937 cells, in association with a decrease of cell proliferation and an increase of apoptosis. We also show that Tfe3 does not act physiologically during commitment of CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), since it is not able to direct HSCs toward a specific lineage as observed by clonogenic assay, but is a strong actor of terminal differentiation since it allows human primary myeloblasts' maturation toward the macrophage lineage.

  15. Stress induced by premature chromatin condensation triggers chromosome shattering and chromothripsis at DNA sites still replicating in micronuclei or multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis.

    PubMed

    Terzoudi, Georgia I; Karakosta, Maria; Pantelias, Antonio; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Karachristou, Ioanna; Pantelias, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Combination of next-generation DNA sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and bioinformatics has revealed the striking phenomenon of chromothripsis, described as complex genomic rearrangements acquired in a single catastrophic event affecting one or a few chromosomes. Via an unproven mechanism, it is postulated that mechanical stress causes chromosome shattering into small lengths of DNA, which are then randomly reassembled by DNA repair machinery. Chromothripsis is currently examined as an alternative mechanism of oncogenesis, in contrast to the present paradigm that considers a stepwise development of cancer. While evidence for the mechanism(s) underlying chromosome shattering during cancer development remains elusive, a number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain chromothripsis, including ionizing radiation, DNA replication stress, breakage-fusion-bridge cycles, micronuclei formation and premature chromosome compaction. In the present work, we provide experimental evidence on the mechanistic basis of chromothripsis and on how chromosomes can get locally shattered in a single catastrophic event. Considering the dynamic nature of chromatin nucleoprotein complex, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding, we first show that chromatin condensation at repairing or replicating DNA sites induces the mechanical stress needed for chromosome shattering to ensue. Premature chromosome condensation is then used to visualize the dynamic nature of interphase chromatin and demonstrate that such mechanical stress and chromosome shattering can also occur in chromosomes within micronuclei or asynchronous multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis. Following an aberrant mitosis, chromosomes could find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time so that they may undergo massive DNA breakage and rearrangement in a single catastrophic event. Specifically, our results support the hypothesis that premature chromosome

  16. Kharon1 Null Mutants of Leishmania mexicana Are Avirulent in Mice and Exhibit a Cytokinesis Defect within Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Marco A.; Valli, Jessica; Gluenz, Eva; Landfear, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    In a variety of eukaryotes, flagella play important roles both in motility and as sensory organelles that monitor the extracellular environment. In the parasitic protozoan Leishmania mexicana, one glucose transporter isoform, LmxGT1, is targeted selectively to the flagellar membrane where it appears to play a role in glucose sensing. Trafficking of LmxGT1 to the flagellar membrane is dependent upon interaction with the KHARON1 protein that is located at the base of the flagellar axoneme. Remarkably, while Δkharon1 null mutants are viable as insect stage promastigotes, they are unable to survive as amastigotes inside host macrophages. Although Δkharon1 promastigotes enter macrophages and transform into amastigotes, these intracellular parasites are unable to execute cytokinesis and form multinucleate cells before dying. Notably, extracellular axenic amastigotes of Δkharon1 mutants replicate and divide normally, indicating a defect in the mutants that is only exhibited in the intra-macrophage environment. Although the flagella of Δkharon1 amastigotes adhere to the phagolysomal membrane of host macrophages, the morphology of the mutant flagella is often distorted. Additionally, these null mutants are completely avirulent following injection into BALB/c mice, underscoring the critical role of the KHARON1 protein for viability of intracellular amastigotes and disease in the animal model of leishmaniasis. PMID:26266938

  17. Macrophage responses to implants: prospects for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Gudima, Alexandru; Riabov, Vladimir; Dollinger, Camille; Lavalle, Philippe; Vrana, Nihal Engin

    2015-12-01

    Implants, transplants, and implantable biomedical devices are mainstream solutions for a wide variety of human pathologies. One of the persistent problems around nondegradable metallic and polymeric implants is failure of macrophages to resolve the inflammation and their tendency to stay in a state, named "frustrated phagocytosis." During the initial phase, proinflammatory macrophages induce acute reactions to trauma and foreign materials, whereas tolerogenic anti-inflammatory macrophages control resolution of inflammation and induce the subsequent healing stage. However, implanted materials can induce a mixed pro/anti-inflammatory phenotype, supporting chronic inflammatory reactions accompanied by microbial contamination and resulting in implant failure. Several materials based on natural polymers for improved interaction with host tissue or surfaces that release anti-inflammatory drugs/bioactive agents have been developed for implant coating to reduce implant rejection. However, no definitive, long-term solution to avoid adverse immune responses to the implanted materials is available to date. The prevention of implant-associated infections or chronic inflammation by manipulating the macrophage phenotype is a promising strategy to improve implant acceptance. The immunomodulatory properties of currently available implant coatings need to be improved to develop personalized therapeutic solutions. Human primary macrophages exposed to the implantable materials ex vivo can be used to predict the individual's reactions and allow selection of an optimal coating composition. Our review describes current understanding of the mechanisms of macrophage interactions with implantable materials and outlines the prospects for use of human primary macrophages for diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to personalized implant therapy. PMID:26168797

  18. Wormhole Travel for Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Yasutaka; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2016-04-21

    Leukocyte recruitment is generally achieved by rapid migration of inflammatory cells out of circulation, through modified blood vessels, and into affected tissues. Now, Wang and Kubes show that macrophages can be rapidly recruited from body cavities to the liver, via a non-vascular route, where they help to coordinate tissue repair. PMID:27104973

  19. Are Macrophages in Tumors Good Targets for Novel Therapeutic Approaches?

    PubMed Central

    Alahari, Samthosh V; Dong, Shengli; Alahari, Suresh K

    2015-01-01

    The development of cancer has been an extensively researched topic over the past few decades. Although great strides have been made in cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment, there is still much to be learned about cancer’s micro-environmental mechanisms that contribute to cancer formation and aggressiveness. Macrophages, lymphocytes which originate from monocytes, are involved in the inflammatory response and often dispersed to areas of infection to fight harmful antigens and mutated cells in tissues. Macrophages have a plethora of roles including tissue development and repair, immune system functions, and inflammation. We discuss various pathways by which macrophages get activated, various approaches that can regulate the function of macrophages, and how these approaches can be helpful in developing new cancer therapies.

  20. Transcriptional Regulation and Macrophage Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A; Summers, Kim M; Rehli, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are professional phagocytes that occupy specific niches in every tissue of the body. Their survival, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled by signals from the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R) and its two ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin-34. In this review, we address the developmental and transcriptional relationships between hematopoietic progenitor cells, blood monocytes, and tissue macrophages as well as the distinctions from dendritic cells. A huge repertoire of receptors allows monocytes, tissue-resident macrophages, or pathology-associated macrophages to adapt to specific microenvironments. These processes create a broad spectrum of macrophages with different functions and individual effector capacities. The production of large transcriptomic data sets in mouse, human, and other species provides new insights into the mechanisms that underlie macrophage functional plasticity. PMID:27337479

  1. Macrophage infection models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benjamin K; Abramovitch, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis colonizes, survives, and grows inside macrophages. In vitro macrophage infection models, using both primary macrophages and cell lines, enable the characterization of the pathogen response to macrophage immune pressure and intracellular environmental cues. We describe methods to propagate and infect primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and J774 and THP-1 macrophage-like cell lines. We also present methods on the characterization of M. tuberculosis intracellular survival and the preparation of infected macrophages for imaging. PMID:25779326

  2. Gene delivery of the elastase inhibitor elafin protects macrophages from neutrophil elastase-mediated impairment of apoptotic cell recognition.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Peter A; Devitt, Andrew; Kotelevtsev, Yuri; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2004-09-10

    The resolution of inflammation is dependent on recognition and phagocytic removal of apoptotic cells by macrophages. Receptors for apoptotic cells are sensitive to degradation by human neutrophil elastase (HNE). We show in the present study that HNE cleaves macrophage cell surface CD14 and in so doing, reduces phagocytic recognition of apoptotic lymphocytic cells (Mutu 1). Using an improved method of adenovirus-mediated transfection of macrophages with the HNE inhibitor elafin, we demonstrate that elafin overexpression prevents CD14 cleavage and restores apoptotic cell recognition by macrophages. This approach of genetic modification of macrophages could be used to restore apoptotic cell recognition in inflammatory conditions. PMID:15358543

  3. Early hematopoiesis and macrophage development.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Kathleen E; Frame, Jenna M; Palis, James

    2015-12-01

    The paradigm that all blood cells are derived from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has been challenged by two findings. First, there are tissue-resident hematopoietic cells, including subsets of macrophages that are not replenished by adult HSCs, but instead are maintained by self-renewal of fetal-derived cells. Second, during embryogenesis, there is a conserved program of HSC-independent hematopoiesis that precedes HSC function and is required for embryonic survival. The presence of waves of HSC-independent hematopoiesis as well as fetal HSCs raises questions about the origin of fetal-derived adult tissue-resident macrophages. In the murine embryo, historical examination of embryonic macrophage and monocyte populations combined with recent reports utilizing genetic lineage-tracing approaches has led to a model of macrophage ontogeny that can be integrated with existing models of hematopoietic ontogeny. The first wave of hematopoiesis contains primitive erythroid, megakaryocyte and macrophage progenitors that arise in the yolk sac, and these macrophage progenitors are the source of early macrophages throughout the embryo, including the liver. A second wave of multipotential erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMPs) also arises in the yolk sac. EMPs colonize the fetal liver, initiating myelopoiesis and forming macrophages. Lineage tracing indicates that this second wave of macrophages are distributed in most fetal tissues, although not appreciably in the brain. Thus, fetal-derived adult tissue-resident macrophages, other than microglia, appear to predominately derive from EMPs. While HSCs emerge at midgestation and colonize the fetal liver, the relative contribution of fetal HSCs to tissue macrophages at later stages of development is unclear. The inclusion of macrophage potential in multiple waves of hematopoiesis is consistent with reports of their functional roles throughout development in innate immunity, phagocytosis, and tissue morphogenesis and remodeling

  4. Imaging macrophages with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Pittet, Mikael J.

    2014-02-01

    Nanomaterials have much to offer, not only in deciphering innate immune cell biology and tracking cells, but also in advancing personalized clinical care by providing diagnostic and prognostic information, quantifying treatment efficacy and designing better therapeutics. This Review presents different types of nanomaterial, their biological properties and their applications for imaging macrophages in human diseases, including cancer, atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, aortic aneurysm, diabetes and other conditions. We anticipate that future needs will include the development of nanomaterials that are specific for immune cell subsets and can be used as imaging surrogates for nanotherapeutics. New in vivo imaging clinical tools for noninvasive macrophage quantification are thus ultimately expected to become relevant to predicting patients' clinical outcome, defining treatment options and monitoring responses to therapy.

  5. Replication-induced DNA damage after PARP inhibition causes G2 delay, and cell line-dependent apoptosis, necrosis and multinucleation

    PubMed Central

    Dale Rein, Idun; Solberg Landsverk, Kirsti; Micci, Francesca; Patzke, Sebastian; Stokke, Trond

    2015-01-01

    PARP inhibitors have been approved for treatment of tumors with mutations in or loss of BRCA1/2. The molecular mechanisms and particularly the cellular phenotypes resulting in synthetic lethality are not well understood and varying clinical responses have been observed. We have investigated the dose- and time-dependency of cell growth, cell death and cell cycle traverse of 4 malignant lymphocyte cell lines treated with the PARP inhibitor Olaparib. PARP inhibition induced a severe growth inhibition in this cell line panel and increased the levels of phosphorylated H2AX-associated DNA damage in S phase. Repair of the remaining replication related damage caused a G2 phase delay before entry into mitosis. The G2 delay, and the growth inhibition, was more pronounced in the absence of functional ATM. Further, Olaparib treated Reh and Granta-519 cells died by apoptosis, while U698 and JVM-2 cells proceeded through mitosis with aberrant chromosomes, skipped cytokinesis, and eventually died by necrosis. The TP53-deficient U698 cells went through several rounds of DNA replication and mitosis without cytokinesis, ending up as multinucleated cells with DNA contents of up to 16c before dying. In summary, we report here for the first time cell cycle-resolved DNA damage induction, and cell line-dependent differences in the mode of cell death caused by PARP inhibition. PMID:26312527

  6. Transcriptomic Analysis of Streptomyces coelicolor Differentiation in Solid Sporulating Cultures: First Compartmentalized and Second Multinucleated Mycelia Have Different and Distinctive Transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Yagüe, Paula; Rodríguez-García, Antonio; López-García, María T.; Martín, Juan F.; Rioseras, Beatriz; Sánchez, Jesús; Manteca, Angel

    2013-01-01

    Streptomycetes are very important industrial bacteria, which produce two thirds of all clinically relevant secondary metabolites. They have a complex developmental-cycle in which an early compartmentalized mycelium (MI) differentiates to a multinucleated mycelium (MII) that grows inside the culture medium (substrate mycelium) until it starts to growth into the air (aerial mycelium) and ends up forming spores. Streptomyces developmental studies have focused mainly on the later stages of MII differentiation (aerial mycelium and sporulation), with regulation of pre-sporulation stages (MI/MII transition) essentially unknown. This work represents the first study of the Streptomyces MI transcriptome, analyzing how it differs from the MII transcriptome. We have used a very conservative experimental approach to fractionate MI from MII and quantify gene expressions. The expression of well characterized key developmental/metabolic genes involved in bioactive compound production (actinorhodin, undecylprodigiosin, calcium-dependent antibiotic, cpk, geosmin) or hydrophobic cover formation-sporulation (bld, whi, wbl, rdl, chp, ram) was correlated with MII differentiation. Additionally, 122 genes conserved in the Streptomyces genus, whose biological function had not been previously characterized, were found to be differentially expressed (more than 4-fold) in MI or MII. These genes encoded for putative regulatory proteins (transcriptional regulators, kinases), as well as hypothetical proteins. Knowledge about differences between the MI (vegetative) and MII (reproductive) transcriptomes represents a huge advance in Streptomyces biology that will make future experiments possible aimed at characterizing the biochemical pathways controlling pre-sporulation developmental stages and activation of secondary metabolism in Streptomyces. PMID:23555999

  7. Replication-induced DNA damage after PARP inhibition causes G2 delay, and cell line-dependent apoptosis, necrosis and multinucleation.

    PubMed

    Dale Rein, Idun; Solberg Landsverk, Kirsti; Micci, Francesca; Patzke, Sebastian; Stokke, Trond

    2015-01-01

    PARP inhibitors have been approved for treatment of tumors with mutations in or loss of BRCA1/2. The molecular mechanisms and particularly the cellular phenotypes resulting in synthetic lethality are not well understood and varying clinical responses have been observed. We have investigated the dose- and time-dependency of cell growth, cell death and cell cycle traverse of 4 malignant lymphocyte cell lines treated with the PARP inhibitor Olaparib. PARP inhibition induced a severe growth inhibition in this cell line panel and increased the levels of phosphorylated H2AX-associated DNA damage in S phase. Repair of the remaining replication related damage caused a G2 phase delay before entry into mitosis. The G2 delay, and the growth inhibition, was more pronounced in the absence of functional ATM. Further, Olaparib treated Reh and Granta-519 cells died by apoptosis, while U698 and JVM-2 cells proceeded through mitosis with aberrant chromosomes, skipped cytokinesis, and eventually died by necrosis. The TP53-deficient U698 cells went through several rounds of DNA replication and mitosis without cytokinesis, ending up as multinucleated cells with DNA contents of up to 16c before dying. In summary, we report here for the first time cell cycle-resolved DNA damage induction, and cell line-dependent differences in the mode of cell death caused by PARP inhibition. PMID:26312527

  8. Transcriptomic analysis of Streptomyces coelicolor differentiation in solid sporulating cultures: first compartmentalized and second multinucleated mycelia have different and distinctive transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Yagüe, Paula; Rodríguez-García, Antonio; López-García, María T; Martín, Juan F; Rioseras, Beatriz; Sánchez, Jesús; Manteca, Angel

    2013-01-01

    Streptomycetes are very important industrial bacteria, which produce two thirds of all clinically relevant secondary metabolites. They have a complex developmental-cycle in which an early compartmentalized mycelium (MI) differentiates to a multinucleated mycelium (MII) that grows inside the culture medium (substrate mycelium) until it starts to growth into the air (aerial mycelium) and ends up forming spores. Streptomyces developmental studies have focused mainly on the later stages of MII differentiation (aerial mycelium and sporulation), with regulation of pre-sporulation stages (MI/MII transition) essentially unknown. This work represents the first study of the Streptomyces MI transcriptome, analyzing how it differs from the MII transcriptome. We have used a very conservative experimental approach to fractionate MI from MII and quantify gene expressions. The expression of well characterized key developmental/metabolic genes involved in bioactive compound production (actinorhodin, undecylprodigiosin, calcium-dependent antibiotic, cpk, geosmin) or hydrophobic cover formation-sporulation (bld, whi, wbl, rdl, chp, ram) was correlated with MII differentiation. Additionally, 122 genes conserved in the Streptomyces genus, whose biological function had not been previously characterized, were found to be differentially expressed (more than 4-fold) in MI or MII. These genes encoded for putative regulatory proteins (transcriptional regulators, kinases), as well as hypothetical proteins. Knowledge about differences between the MI (vegetative) and MII (reproductive) transcriptomes represents a huge advance in Streptomyces biology that will make future experiments possible aimed at characterizing the biochemical pathways controlling pre-sporulation developmental stages and activation of secondary metabolism in Streptomyces. PMID:23555999

  9. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition attenuates hypoxic cancer cells induced m2-polarization of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dubey, P; Shrivastava, R; Tripathi, C; Jain, N K; Tewari, B N; Lone, M-U-D; Baghel, K S; Kumar, V; Misra, S; Bhadauria, S; Bhatt, M L B

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), represent a major subpopulation of tumor infiltrating immune cells. These alternatively activated M2-polarized macrophages are well known for their pro-tumor functions. Owing to their established role in potentiating tumor-neovasculogenesis and metastasis, TAMs have emerged as promising target for anti-cancer immunotherapy. One of the key TAMs related phenomenon that is amenable to therapeutic intervention is their phenotype switching into alternatively activated M2-polarized macrophages. Hindering macrophage polarization towards a pro-tumor M2 phenotype, or better still reprogramming the M2 like TAMs towards M1 subtype is being considered a beneficial anti-cancer strategy. Hypoxic tumor milieu has been proposed as one of the most plausible factor governing M2-polarization of macrophages. We recently demonstrated that hypoxic tumor cells imparted a pro—angiogenic M2 skewed phenotype to macrophages. Furthermore, sizeable body of data indicates for participation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in macrophage polarization. Concordantly, inhibition of COX-2 is associated with impaired macrophage polarization. Prompted by this in the current study we decided to explore if inhibition of COX-2 activity via chemical inhibitors may prevent hypoxic cancer cell induced M2-polarization of macrophages. We observed that treatment with Flunixin meglumine, an established preferential inhibitor of COX-2 activity markedly inhibited hypoxic cancer cell induced of M2-polarization of macrophages thereby indicating for usage of COX-2 inhibition as possible anti-cancer treatment modality. PMID:25210855

  10. The macrophages in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Laria, Antonella; Lurati, Alfredomaria; Marrazza, Mariagrazia; Mazzocchi, Daniela; Re, Katia Angela; Scarpellini, Magda

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages belong to the innate immune system giving us protection against pathogens. However it is known that they are also involved in rheumatic diseases. Activated macrophages have two different phenotypes related to different stimuli: M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). M1 macrophages release high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates killing microorganisms and tumor cells; while M2 macrophages are involved in resolution of inflammation through phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils, reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and increased synthesis of mediators important in tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, and wound repair. The role of macrophages in the different rheumatic diseases is different according to their M1/M2 macrophages phenotype. PMID:26929657

  11. Macrophage immunoregulatory pathways in tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rajaram, Murugesan V.S.; Ni, Bin; Dodd, Claire E.; Schlesinger, Larry S.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages, the major host cells harboring Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), are a heterogeneous cell type depending on their tissue of origin and host they are derived from. Significant discord in macrophage responses to M.tb exists due to differences in M.tb strains and the various types of macrophages used to study tuberculosis (TB). This review will summarize current concepts regarding macrophage responses to M.tb infection, while pointing out relevant differences in experimental outcomes due to the use of divergent model systems. A brief description of the lung environment is included since there is increasing evidence that the alveolar macrophage (AM) has immunoregulatory properties that can delay optimal protective host immune responses. In this context, this review focuses on selected macrophage immunoregulatory pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), cytokines, negative regulators of inflammation, lipid mediators and microRNAs (miRNAs). PMID:25453226

  12. Nicotinamide: a vitamin able to shift macrophage differentiation toward macrophages with restricted inflammatory features.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Ronald; Schilling, Erik; Grahnert, Anja; Kölling, Valeen; Dorow, Juliane; Ceglarek, Uta; Sack, Ulrich; Hauschildt, Sunna

    2015-11-01

    The differentiation of human monocytes into macrophages is influenced by environmental signals. Here we asked in how far nicotinamide (NAM), a vitamin B3 derivative known to play a major role in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-mediated signaling events, is able to modulate monocyte differentiation into macrophages developed in the presence of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-MØ) or macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-MØ). We found that GM-MØ undergo biochemical, morphological and functional modifications in response to NAM, whereas M-MØ were hardly affected. GM-MØ exposed to NAM acquired an M-MØ-like structure while the LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and COX-derived eicosanoids were down-regulated. In contrast, NAM had no effect on the production of IL-10 or the cytochrome P450-derived eicosanoids. Administration of NAM enhanced intracellular NAD concentrations; however, it did not prevent the LPS-mediated drain on NAD pools. In search of intracellular molecular targets of NAM known to be involved in LPS-induced cytokine and eicosanoid synthesis, we found NF-κB activity to be diminished. In conclusion, our data show that vitamin B3, when present during the differentiation of monocytes into GM-MØ, interferes with biochemical pathways resulting in strongly reduced pro-inflammatory features. PMID:26385774

  13. PHD2 regulates arteriogenic macrophages through TIE2 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, Alexander; Veschini, Lorenzo; Takeda, Yukiji; Costa, Sandra; Delamarre, Estelle; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; Henze, Anne-Theres; Wenes, Mathias; Serneels, Jens; Pucci, Ferdinando; Roncal, Carmen; Anisimov, Andrey; Alitalo, Kari; De Palma, Michele; Mazzone, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    Occlusion of the main arterial route redirects blood flow to the collateral circulation. We previously reported that macrophages genetically modified to express low levels of prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2) display an arteriogenic phenotype, which promotes the formation of collateral vessels and protects the skeletal muscle from ischaemic necrosis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that femoral artery occlusion induces a switch in macrophage phenotype through angiopoietin-1 (ANG1)-mediated Phd2 repression. ANG blockade by a soluble trap prevented the downregulation of Phd2 expression in macrophages and their phenotypic switch, thus inhibiting collateral growth. ANG1-dependent Phd2 repression initiated a feed-forward loop mediated by the induction of the ANG receptor TIE2 in macrophages. Gene silencing and cell depletion strategies demonstrate that TIE2 induction in macrophages is required to promote their proarteriogenic functions, enabling collateral vessel formation following arterial obstruction. These results indicate an indispensable role for TIE2 in sustaining in situ programming of macrophages to a proarteriogenic, M2-like phenotype, suggesting possible new venues for the treatment of ischaemic disorders. PMID:23616286

  14. Macrophage functions are regulated by the substratum of murine decidual stromal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Redline, R W; McKay, D B; Vazquez, M A; Papaioannou, V E; Lu, C Y

    1990-01-01

    Because of their paternal antigens, the fetus and placenta may be considered an allograft in the maternal host. Local properties of the maternal-fetal interface, the placenta and decidua basalis, are important in preventing maternal immunologic rejection of the fetoplacental allograft. However, the exact nature of these local properties remains a fundamental unsolved problem in immunology. We now report that three macrophage functions were inhibited by the substratum formed by monolayers of decidual stromal cells via a novel pathway. Solid-phase inhibitors blocked macrophage adhesion, spreading, and lysis of tumor necrosis factor-alpha-resistant P815 mastocytoma tumor cells. Inhibition was not solely attributable to an inability of macrophages to adhere to decidual substratum because there were differences in macrophage functions on this surface versus polyhema where no adherence occurred. Because macrophages play a central role in cell-mediated immunity, including allograft rejection, inhibiting their function in the decidua basalis may help prevent maternal antifetal responses. Images PMID:2347918

  15. Macrophages in homeostatic immune function.

    PubMed

    Jantsch, Jonathan; Binger, Katrina J; Müller, Dominik N; Titze, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are not only involved in inflammatory and anti-infective processes, but also play an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. In this review, we summarize recent evidence investigating the role of macrophages in controlling angiogenesis, metabolism as well as salt and water balance. Particularly, we summarize the importance of macrophage tonicity enhancer binding protein (TonEBP, also termed nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 [NFAT5]) expression in the regulation of salt and water homeostasis. Further understanding of homeostatic macrophage function may lead to new therapeutic approaches to treat ischemia, hypertension and metabolic disorders. PMID:24847274

  16. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells’ resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine.

  17. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells’ resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine. PMID:26869018

  18. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells' resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine. PMID:26869018

  19. Macrophages in homeostatic immune function

    PubMed Central

    Jantsch, Jonathan; Binger, Katrina J.; Müller, Dominik N.; Titze, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are not only involved in inflammatory and anti-infective processes, but also play an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. In this review, we summarize recent evidence investigating the role of macrophages in controlling angiogenesis, metabolism as well as salt and water balance. Particularly, we summarize the importance of macrophage tonicity enhancer binding protein (TonEBP, also termed nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 [NFAT5]) expression in the regulation of salt and water homeostasis. Further understanding of homeostatic macrophage function may lead to new therapeutic approaches to treat ischemia, hypertension and metabolic disorders. PMID:24847274

  20. MicroRNA-155 facilitates skeletal muscle regeneration by balancing pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nie, M; Liu, J; Yang, Q; Seok, H Y; Hu, X; Deng, Z-L; Wang, D-Z

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has remarkable regeneration capacity and regenerates in response to injury. Muscle regeneration largely relies on muscle stem cells called satellite cells. Satellite cells normally remain quiescent, but in response to injury or exercise they become activated and proliferate, migrate, differentiate, and fuse to form multinucleate myofibers. Interestingly, the inflammatory process following injury and the activation of the myogenic program are highly coordinated, with myeloid cells having a central role in modulating satellite cell activation and regeneration. Here, we show that genetic deletion of microRNA-155 (miR-155) in mice substantially delays muscle regeneration. Surprisingly, miR-155 does not appear to directly regulate the proliferation or differentiation of satellite cells. Instead, miR-155 is highly expressed in myeloid cells, is essential for appropriate activation of myeloid cells, and regulates the balance between pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages during skeletal muscle regeneration. Mechanistically, we found that miR-155 suppresses SOCS1, a negative regulator of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway, during the initial inflammatory response upon muscle injury. Our findings thus reveal a novel role of miR-155 in regulating initial immune responses during muscle regeneration and provide a novel miRNA target for improving muscle regeneration in degenerative muscle diseases. PMID:27277683

  1. Lymph Node Macrophages Restrict Murine Cytomegalovirus Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Helen E.; Davis-Poynter, Nick; Bruce, Kimberley; Lawler, Clara; Dolken, Lars; Mach, Michael

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) establish chronic infections that spread from a primary entry site to secondary vascular sites, such as the spleen, and then to tertiary shedding sites, such as the salivary glands. Human CMV (HCMV) is difficult to analyze, because its spread precedes clinical presentation. Murine CMV (MCMV) offers a tractable model. It is hypothesized to spread from peripheral sites via vascular endothelial cells and associated monocytes. However, viral luciferase imaging showed footpad-inoculated MCMV first reaching the popliteal lymph nodes (PLN). PLN colonization was rapid and further spread was slow, implying that LN infection can be a significant bottleneck. Most acutely infected PLN cells were CD169+ subcapsular sinus macrophages (SSM). Replication-deficient MCMV also reached them, indicating direct infection. Many SSM expressed viral reporter genes, but few expressed lytic genes. SSM expressed CD11c, and MCMV with a cre-sensitive fluorochrome switch showed switched infected cells in PLN of CD11c-cre mice but yielded little switched virus. SSM depletion with liposomal clodronate or via a CD169-diphtheria toxin receptor transgene shifted infection to ER-TR7+ stromal cells, increased virus production, and accelerated its spread to the spleen. Therefore, MCMV disseminated via LN, and SSM slowed this spread by shielding permissive fibroblasts and poorly supporting viral lytic replication. IMPORTANCE HCMV chronically infects most people, and it can cause congenital disability and harm the immunocompromised. A major goal of vaccination is to prevent systemic infection. How this is established is unclear. Restriction to humans makes HCMV difficult to analyze. We show that peripheral MCMV infection spreads via lymph nodes. Here, MCMV infected filtering macrophages, which supported virus replication poorly. When these macrophages were depleted, MCMV infected susceptible fibroblasts and spread faster. The capacity of filtering macrophages to limit

  2. Macrophages in Collateral Arteriogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Erik; Helisch, Armin

    2012-01-01

    Arteriosclerotic vascular disease is the most common cause of death and a major cause of disability in the developed world. Adverse outcomes of arteriosclerotic vascular disease are related to consequences of tissue ischemia and necrosis affecting the heart, brain, limbs, and other organs. Collateral artery growth or arteriogenesis occurs naturally and can help restore perfusion to ischemic tissues. Understanding the mechanisms of collateral artery growth may provide therapeutic options for patients with ischemic vascular disease. In this review, we examine the evidence for a role of monocytes and macrophages in collateral arteriogenesis. PMID:23055975

  3. Phosphatase regulation of macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Kozicky, Lisa K; Sly, Laura M

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that play critical roles in tissue homeostasis and the immune response to invading pathogens or tumor cells. A hallmark of macrophages is their "plasticity," that is, their ability to respond to cues in their local microenvironment and adapt their activation state or phenotype to mount an appropriate response. During the inflammatory response, macrophages may be required to mount a profound anti-bacterial or anti-tumor response, an anti-inflammatory response, an anti-parasitic response, or a wound healing response. To do so, macrophages express cell surface receptors for growth factors, chemokines and cytokines, as well pathogen and danger associated molecular patterns. Downstream of these cell surface receptors, cell signalling cascades are activated and deactivated by reversible and competing activities of lipid and protein kinases and phosphatases. While kinases drive the activation of cell signalling pathways critical for macrophage activation, the strength and duration of the signalling is regulated by phosphatases. Hence, gene knockout mouse models have revealed critical roles for lipid and protein phosphatases in macrophage activation. Herein, we describe our current understanding and the key roles of specific cellular phosphatases in the regulation of the quality of macrophage polarization as well as the quantity of cytokines produced by activated macrophages. PMID:26216598

  4. Biology of Bony Fish Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Jordan W.; Grayfer, Leon; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are found across all vertebrate species, reside in virtually all animal tissues, and play critical roles in host protection and homeostasis. Various mechanisms determine and regulate the highly plastic functional phenotypes of macrophages, including antimicrobial host defenses (pro-inflammatory, M1-type), and resolution and repair functions (anti-inflammatory/regulatory, M2-type). The study of inflammatory macrophages in immune defense of teleosts has garnered much attention, and antimicrobial mechanisms of these cells have been extensively studied in various fish models. Intriguingly, both similarities and differences have been documented for the regulation of lower vertebrate macrophage antimicrobial defenses, as compared to what has been described in mammals. Advances in our understanding of the teleost macrophage M2 phenotypes likewise suggest functional conservation through similar and distinct regulatory strategies, compared to their mammalian counterparts. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing teleost macrophage functional heterogeneity, including monopoetic development, classical macrophage inflammatory and antimicrobial responses as well as alternative macrophage polarization towards tissues repair and resolution of inflammation. PMID:26633534

  5. An M1-like Macrophage Polarization in Decidual Tissue during Spontaneous Preterm Labor That Is Attenuated by Rosiglitazone Treatment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi; Romero, Roberto; Miller, Derek; Kadam, Leena; Mial, Tara N; Plazyo, Olesya; Garcia-Flores, Valeria; Hassan, Sonia S; Xu, Zhonghui; Tarca, Adi L; Drewlo, Sascha; Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy

    2016-03-15

    Decidual macrophages are implicated in the local inflammatory response that accompanies spontaneous preterm labor/birth; however, their role is poorly understood. We hypothesized that decidual macrophages undergo a proinflammatory (M1) polarization during spontaneous preterm labor and that PPARγ activation via rosiglitazone (RSG) would attenuate the macrophage-mediated inflammatory response, preventing preterm birth. In this study, we show that: 1) decidual macrophages undergo an M1-like polarization during spontaneous term and preterm labor; 2) anti-inflammatory (M2)-like macrophages are more abundant than M1-like macrophages in decidual tissue; 3) decidual M2-like macrophages are reduced in preterm pregnancies compared with term pregnancies, regardless of the presence of labor; 4) decidual macrophages express high levels of TNF and IL-12 but low levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) during spontaneous preterm labor; 5) decidual macrophages from women who underwent spontaneous preterm labor display plasticity by M1↔M2 polarization in vitro; 6) incubation with RSG reduces the expression of TNF and IL-12 in decidual macrophages from women who underwent spontaneous preterm labor; and 7) treatment with RSG reduces the rate of LPS-induced preterm birth and improves neonatal outcomes by reducing the systemic proinflammatory response and downregulating mRNA and protein expression of NF-κB, TNF, and IL-10 in decidual and myometrial macrophages in C57BL/6J mice. In summary, we demonstrated that decidual M1-like macrophages are associated with spontaneous preterm labor and that PPARγ activation via RSG can attenuate the macrophage-mediated proinflammatory response, preventing preterm birth and improving neonatal outcomes. These findings suggest that the PPARγ pathway is a new molecular target for future preventative strategies for spontaneous preterm labor/birth. PMID:26889045

  6. Peroxidatic activity distinct from myeloperoxidase in human monocytes cultured in vitro and in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Breton-Gorius, J; Vildé, J L; Guichard, J; Vainchenker, W; Basset, F

    1982-01-01

    Human monocytes develop a peroxidatic activity (PA) in rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) after adherence or after culture in semi-solid medium. This enzyme activity disappears after three days of culture in the majority of macrophages derived from adult monocytes but persists for one week in macrophages derived from neonatal monocytes. The PA is due to an enzyme distinct from myeloperoxidase (MPO), since monocytes from a patient with MPO deficiency develop the same PA as that of normal monocytes after adherence. By its localization and other characteristics, PA of adherent monocytes resembles that of rodent macrophages. We therefore investigated whether human alveolar macrophages exhibit PA, using a sensitive cytochemical method which prevents inhibition by aldehyde in adherent monocytes. In various pathological cases, four types of macrophages could be identified: the majority were peroxidase-negative, a small percentage was of exudate type exhibiting a PA in granules as blood monocytes, while few macrophages were intermediate, possessing only PA in RER i.e. of type resident and a smaller proportion had PA in RER and in granules i.e. exudate-resident macrophages. These findings demonstrate that human macrophages and adherent monocytes may exhibit PA in RER as has been reported for rodent macrophages. The true nature and function of the enzyme responsible for this PA, which is distinct from MPO, remains unknown, but some arguments seem to suggest its role in prostaglandin synthesis. PMID:6283838

  7. The role of toll-like receptor 9 in chronic stress-induced apoptosis in macrophage.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yanxiao; Yan, Hui; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Qi; Hanley, Gregory; Caudle, Yi; LeSage, Gene; Zhang, Xiumei; Yin, Deling

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence implied that chronic stress has been exerting detrimental impact on immune system functions in both humans and animals. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been shown to play an essential role in modulating immune responses and cell survival. We have recently shown that TLR9 deficiency protects against lymphocyte apoptosis induced by chronic stress. However, the exact role of TLR9 in stress-mediated change of macrophage function remains unclear. The results of the current study showed that when BALB/c mice were treated with restraint stress (12 h daily for 2 days), the number of macrophages recruited to the peritoneal cavity was obviously increased. Results also demonstrated that the sustained effects of stress elevated cytokine IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-10 production yet diminished IFN-γ production from macrophage, which led to apoptotic cell death. However, TLR9 deficiency prevented the chronic stress-mediated accumulation of macrophages. In addition, knocking out TLR9 significantly abolished the chronic stress-induced imbalance of cytokine levels and apoptosis in macrophage. TLR9 deficiency was also found to reverse elevation of plasma IL-1β, IL-10 and IL-17 levels and decrease of plasma IFN-γ level under the condition of chronic stress. These results indicated that TLR9-mediated macrophage responses were required for chronic stress-induced immunosuppression. Further exploration showed that TLR9 deficiency prevented the increment of p38 MAPK phosphorylation and reduction of Akt/Gsk-3β phosphorylation; TLR9 deficiency also attenuated the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into cytoplasm, caused upregulation of Bcl-2/Bax protein ratio, downregulation of cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP, as well as decreased TUNEL-positive cells in macrophage of stressed mice. Collectively, our studies demonstrated that deficiency of TLR9 maintained macrophage function by modulating macrophage accumulation and attenuating macrophage apoptosis, thus preventing

  8. Puerarin Inhibits oxLDL-Induced Macrophage Activation and Foam Cell Formation in Human THP1 Macrophage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Zhai, Zhenhua; Zhou, Hongyu; Li, Yao; Li, Xiaojie; Lin, Yuhan; Li, Weihong; Shi, Yueping; Zhou, Ming-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Puerarin, an isoflavone derived from Kudzu roots, has been widely used for treatment of cardiovascular and cerebral vascular diseases in China and other Asian countries. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. The present study investigated whether puerarin inhibited atherogenic lipid oxLDL-mediated macrophage activation and foam cell formation in human THP1 macrophage. Treatment with oxLDL significantly increased the mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, 160%) and interleukin (IL) 1β (13 fold) accompanied by upregulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, 165%) and the ratio of phospho-IκBα/IκBα in THP1 macrophage. Puerarin dose-dependently prevented an increase in oxLDL-induced proinflammatory gene expression with downregulation of TLR4 and the ratio of phospho-IκBα/IκBα. Furthermore, puerarin prevented oxLDL-mediated lipid deposition and foam cell formation associated with downregulation of scavenger receptor CD36. Flow cytometry analysis showed that puerarin reduced the number of early apoptotic cells of macrophages induced by oxLDL. Our results show that puerarin has anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic effects in vitro; the underlying mechanisms may involve the inhibition of TLR4/NFκB pathway and downregulation of CD36 expression. The results from the present study provide scientific evidence and may expand our armamentarium to use puerarin for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular and atherosclerotic diseases. PMID:26576421

  9. Nuclear autonomy in multinucleate fungi.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Samantha E; Gladfelter, Amy S

    2015-12-01

    Within many fungal syncytia, nuclei behave independently despite sharing a common cytoplasm. Creation of independent nuclear zones of control in one cell is paradoxical considering random protein synthesis sites, predicted rapid diffusion rates, and well-mixed cytosol. In studying the surprising fungal nuclear autonomy, new principles of cellular organization are emerging. We discuss the current understanding of nuclear autonomy, focusing on asynchronous cell cycle progression where most work has been directed. Mechanisms underlying nuclear autonomy are diverse including mRNA localization, ploidy variability, and nuclear spacing control. With the challenges fungal syncytia face due to cytoplasmic size and shape, they serve as powerful models for uncovering new subcellular organization modes, variability sources among isogenic uninucleate cells, and the evolution of multicellularity. PMID:26379197

  10. Local Delivery of Polarized Macrophages Improves Reperfusion Recovery in a Mouse Hind Limb Ischemia Model

    PubMed Central

    Jetten, Nadine; Donners, Marjo M. P. C.; Wagenaar, Allard; Cleutjens, Jack P. M.; van Rooijen, Nico; de Winther, Menno P. J.; Post, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Enhancement of collateral development in coronary or peripheral artery disease is a therapeutic target, but it has proven difficult to achieve. Macrophages are key players in collateral remodeling, yet the effect of different macrophage subsets on arteriogenesis has not been investigated. Methods and Results Murine macrophages were cultured from bone marrow and polarized into M1 (IFNγ), M2a (IL-4) or M2c (IL-10) subsets. C57BL/6 mice underwent femoral artery ligation followed by intramuscular injection of macrophage subsets. Using eGFP expressing macrophages, cells could be detected at least 6 days after ligation and were located in the perivascular space of collateral vessels. After 14 days, perfusion ratio was increased in animals treated with M1 as well as M2a and M2c macrophages compared to control. Depletion of circulating monocytes by clodronate liposome injections did not hamper reperfusion recovery, however, treatment with exogenous polarized macrophages improved perfusion ratio after 14 days again. We used IL10Rfl/fl/LysMCre+ mice to study the effect of inhibition of endogenous polarization towards specifically M2c macrophages on arteriogenesis. Deletion of the IL10-receptor (IL10R) in the myeloid lineage did not affect reperfusion recovery, yet the pro-arteriogenic effect of exogenously injected M2c macrophages was still present. Conclusions Local injection of polarized macrophages promotes reperfusion recovery after femoral artery ligation and is not influenced by depletion of circulatory monocytes. Preventing endogenous M2c polarization did not affect reperfusion recovery suggesting that M2c’s are not required for collateralization, but are sufficient to induce collateral formation upon exogenous administration. This is the first study using local injection of macrophage subsets showing the pro-arteriogenic effect of polarized macrophages. PMID:23894348

  11. The Tuberculosis Necrotizing Toxin kills macrophages by hydrolyzing NAD

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jim; Siroy, Axel; Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Speer, Alexander; Doornbos, Kathryn S.; Cingolani, Gino; Niederweis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) induces necrosis of infected cells to evade immune responses. Recently, we found that Mtb utilizes the protein CpnT to kill human macrophages by secreting its C-terminal domain, named tuberculosis necrotizing toxin (TNT) that induces necrosis by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that TNT gains access to the cytosol of Mtb-infected macrophages, where it hydrolyzes the essential co-enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). Expression or injection of a non-catalytic TNT mutant showed no cytotoxicity in macrophages or zebrafish zygotes, respectively, demonstrating that the NAD+-glycohydrolase activity is required for TNT-induced cell death. To prevent self-poisoning, Mtb produces an immunity factor for TNT (IFT) that binds TNT and inhibits its activity. The crystal structure of the TNT-IFT complex revealed a novel NAD+-glycohydrolase fold of TNT, which constitutes the founding member of a toxin family wide-spread in pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:26237511

  12. The tuberculosis necrotizing toxin kills macrophages by hydrolyzing NAD.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jim; Siroy, Axel; Lokareddy, Ravi K; Speer, Alexander; Doornbos, Kathryn S; Cingolani, Gino; Niederweis, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) induces necrosis of infected cells to evade immune responses. Recently, we found that Mtb uses the protein CpnT to kill human macrophages by secreting its C-terminal domain, named tuberculosis necrotizing toxin (TNT), which induces necrosis by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that TNT gains access to the cytosol of Mtb-infected macrophages, where it hydrolyzes the essential coenzyme NAD(+). Expression or injection of a noncatalytic TNT mutant showed no cytotoxicity in macrophages or in zebrafish zygotes, respectively, thus demonstrating that the NAD(+) glycohydrolase activity is required for TNT-induced cell death. To prevent self-poisoning, Mtb produces an immunity factor for TNT (IFT) that binds TNT and inhibits its activity. The crystal structure of the TNT-IFT complex revealed a new NAD(+) glycohydrolase fold of TNT, the founding member of a toxin family widespread in pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:26237511

  13. Macrophages and the Viral Dissemination Super Highway

    PubMed Central

    Klepper, Arielle; Branch, Andrea D

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are key components of the innate immune system yet they are often the victims of attack by infectious agents. This review examines the significance of viral infection of macrophages. The central hypothesis is that macrophage tropism enhances viral dissemination and persistence, but these changes may come at the cost of reduced replication in cells other than macrophages. PMID:26949751

  14. Macrophage-secreted factors induce adipocyte inflammation and insulin resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Permana, Paska A. . E-mail: Paska.Permana@med.va.gov; Menge, Christopher; Reaven, Peter D.

    2006-03-10

    Macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue increases with obesity, a condition associated with low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance. We investigated the direct effects of macrophage-secreted factors on adipocyte inflammation and insulin resistance. 3T3-L1 adipocytes incubated with media conditioned by RAW264.7 macrophages (RAW-CM) showed dramatically increased transcription of several inflammation-related genes, greater nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity, and enhanced binding of U937 monocytes. All of these effects were prevented by co-incubation with pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate, an NF-{kappa}B inhibitor. Adipocytes incubated with RAW-CM also released more non-esterified fatty acids and this increased lipolysis was not suppressed by insulin. In addition, RAW-CM treatment decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes. Taken together, these results indicate that macrophage-secreted factors induce inflammatory responses and reduce insulin responsiveness in adipocytes. These effects of macrophage-secreted factors on adipocytes may contribute significantly to the systemic inflammation and insulin resistance associated with obesity.

  15. Staphylococcal enterotoxins bind H-2Db molecules on macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beharka, A. A.; Iandolo, J. J.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We screened a panel of monoclonal antibodies against selected macrophage cell surface molecules for their ability to inhibit enterotoxin binding to major histocompatibility complex class II-negative C2D (H-2b) macrophages. Two monoclonal antibodies, HB36 and TIB126, that are specific for the alpha 2 domain of major histocompatibility complex class I, blocked staphylococcal enterotoxins A and B (SEA and SEB, respectively) binding to C2D macrophages in a specific and concentration-dependent manner. Inhibitory activities were haplotype-specific in that SEA and SEB binding to H-2k or H-2d macrophages was not inhibited by either monoclonal antibody. HB36, but not TIB126, inhibited enterotoxin-induced secretion of cytokines by H-2b macrophages. Lastly, passive protection of D-galactosamine-sensitized C2D mice by injection with HB36 antibody prevented SEB-induced death. Therefore, SEA and SEB binding to the alpha 2 domain of the H-2Db molecule induces biological activity and has physiological consequences.

  16. Lipopolysaccharide Attenuates the Cytotoxicity of Resveratrol in Transformed Mouse Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Achy-Brou, Christelle A Adiabouah; Billack, Blase

    2016-09-01

    Resveratrol and pterostilbene are natural products that are present in plants and have been incorporated into various dietary supplements. Numerous beneficial pharmacologic effects have been reported for these stilbenes; however, the mechanism by which these compounds exert a cytotoxic effect in RAW 264.7 macrophages has not been well characterized. We have previously described that resveratrol is toxic to these tumor-derived macrophages and that stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduces resveratrol toxicity via a mechanism that involves activation of toll like receptor 4. In the present work, we examined the cellular and molecular effects of resveratrol and the related compound pterostilbene by determining cell viability and caspase 3 activity in control and LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages incubated with these stilbenes for 24 h. We found that LPS stimulation reduced the cytotoxicity of resveratrol but not of pterostilbene in these cells. When examined for effects on caspase 3 activation after a 24 h incubation, resveratrol and pterostilbene were each found to separately and significantly increase caspase 3 activity in these cells. LPS stimulation prevented caspase 3 activation by pterostilbene and reduced caspase 3 activation by resveratrol in RAW 264.7 macrophages. The data presented here indicate that LPS induces a phenotype switch in tumor-derived RAW 264.7 macrophages in which cells experiencing LPS in the presence of resveratrol or pterostilbene become less likely to activate the pro-apoptotic factor caspase 3. PMID:27277074

  17. [Biological effect of fine atmospheric dust extracts. IX. Quantitative cytologic study of the cytotoxic effect of fine atmospheric dust extracts on macrophages].

    PubMed

    Sugiri, D; Behrendt, H; Seemayer, N H

    1985-12-01

    Macrophages of cell line IC-21 were exposed to extracts and fractions of two samples of city smog (CSE 16 and 17) from the heavy industrialized Rhine-Ruhr-area. Cytotoxic effects of extracts and fractions were analysed in various concentrations and periods of incubation. As cytotoxic parameters were determined frequencies of mitosis and pycnosis of nuclei as well as occurrence of multinucleated giant cells. An increasing dosage of noxae showed a reduction of mitotic rate, a rise of pycnosis of nuclei and of multinucleated giant cells. For both city smog extracts these effects depended on incubation period and concentration of noxae. While the global extract of city smog no. 16 was always more effective than its fractions, with city smog no. 17 the strongest alterations were demonstrable by its cyclohexane-fraction and partly by its methanol-fraction. Based on air volume of collection both samples of city smog revealed a comparable cytotoxic effect. In relation to benzo(a)pyrene-content, however, city smog no. 17 was considerable more cytotoxic than city smog no. 16. These results confirm again cytotoxicity of city smog. It can be assumed that both samples of city smog impair defense mechanisms of the lung. PMID:4096144

  18. Macrophages as cell-based delivery systems for nanoshells in photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Steen J; Baek, Seung-Kuk; Makkouk, Amani R; Krasieva, Tatiana; Hirschberg, Henry

    2012-02-01

    Site-specific delivery of nanoparticles poses a significant challenge, especially in the brain where the blood-brain barrier prevents the entry of most therapeutic compounds including nanoparticle-based anti-cancer agents. In this context, the use of macrophages as vectors for the delivery of gold-silica nanoshells to infiltrating gliomas will be reviewed in this article. Gold-silica nanoshells are readily phagocytosed by macrophages without any apparent toxic effects, and the results of in vitro studies have demonstrated the migratory potential of nanoshell-loaded macrophages in human glioma spheroids. Of particular interest is the observation that, after near-infrared exposure of spheroids containing nanoshell-loaded macrophages, sufficient heat was generated to suppress spheroid growth. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the potential of macrophages as nanoshell delivery vectors for photothermal therapy of gliomas, and they certainly provide the basis for future animal studies. PMID:21979168

  19. Use of enzymatic assay to evaluate UV-induced DNA repair in human and embryonic chick fibroblasts and multinucleate heterokaryons derived from both.

    PubMed

    Paterson, M C; Lohman, P H

    1975-01-01

    A sensitive enzymatic assay has been utilized to monitor repair of UV-induced damage to DNA in primary human and embryonic chick cells and in multinucleate heterokaryons artificially derived from both. The assay exploits the unique ability of a purified repair endonuclease to attack UV-irradiated DNA at sites containing pyrimidine dimers. These nuclease-susceptible sites are subsequently observed as single-strand scissions by velocity sedimentation in alkaline sucrose gradients. Incubation of UV-damaged cultures followed by extraction and enzymatic analysis of the radioactively labeled DNA enables one to trace the disappearance of such sites in vivo and hence to monitor endogenous repair activity. When UV-irradiated human cells are incubated in the dark, the curve for site removal exhibits a two-phase exponetial decline; i.e. there exists a fast component responsible for elimination of 60% of the initial damage and a second one approximately 7 times slower in rate. The removal of sites is not further enhanced by exposing cells to blacklight during post-UV incubation. Conversely, UV-damaged chick cells rid their DNA of all nuclease-susceptible sites rapidly (i.e. at an exponential rate approximately 13 times faster than the fast component of site removal in human cells) when incubated under blacklight but not when kept in the dark. These data indicate the presence in human and embryonic chick cells of distinct enzymatic mechanisms for the elimination of dimer-containing sites. Wheneras human fibroblasts rely heavily on a light-independent process, excision-repair, chick fibroblasts possess a light-dependent mechanism, presumably photoenzymatic repair. Advantage has been taken of the contrasting repair properties of the human and embryonic chick fibroblasts to evaluate the extent to which each can assist the other in the removal of UV-induced damage from its DNA. The two cell types were fused to form giant human/chick heterokaryons containing a number of intact

  20. PPARs in alveolar macrophage biology.

    PubMed

    Smith, Monica R; Standiford, Theodore J; Reddy, Raju C

    2007-01-01

    PPARs, most notably PPAR-gamma, play a crucial role in regulating the activation of alveolar macrophages, which in turn occupy a pivotal place in the immune response to pathogens and particulates drawn in with inspired air. In this review, we describe the dual role of the alveolar macrophage as both a first-line defender through its phagocytotic activity and a regulator of the immune response. Depending on its state of activation, the alveolar macrophage may either enhance or suppress different aspects of immune function in the lung. We then review the role of PPAR-gamma and its ligands in deactivating alveolar macrophages-thus limiting the inflammatory response that, if unchecked, could threaten the essential respiratory function of the alveolus-while upregulating the cell's phagocytotic activity. Finally, we examine the role that inadequate or inappropriate PPAR-gamma responses play in specific lung diseases. PMID:18000531

  1. Micronuclei in human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    D'Agostini, F; Bonatti, S; Oddera, S; De Flora, S

    1992-01-01

    Occurrence of micronuclei was monitored in pulmonary alveolar macrophages collected from 31 individuals undergoing diagnostic bronchoalveolar lavage. The overall frequency of micronucleated cells was 3.88 +/- 1.84/1000, without any significant difference attributable to sex, age, pathology, occupation, or smoking habits. The lack of influence of cigarette smoke on this clastogenicity index presumably reflects the very low rate of mitoses of macrophages in the alveolar lumen. PMID:1579732

  2. Burkholderia pseudomallei type III secretion system mutants exhibit delayed vacuolar escape phenotypes in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Burtnick, Mary N; Brett, Paul J; Nair, Vinod; Warawa, Jonathan M; Woods, Donald E; Gherardini, Frank C

    2008-07-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a facultative intracellular pathogen capable of surviving and replicating within eukaryotic cells. Recent studies have shown that B. pseudomallei Bsa type III secretion system 3 (T3SS-3) mutants exhibit vacuolar escape and replication defects in J774.2 murine macrophages. In the present study, we characterized the interactions of a B. pseudomallei bsaZ mutant with RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. Following uptake, the mutant was found to survive and replicate within infected RAW 264.7 cells over an 18-h period. In addition, high levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and RANTES, but not IL-1alpha and IL-1beta, were detected in culture supernatants harvested from infected monolayers. The subcellular location of B. pseudomallei within infected RAW 264.7 cells was determined, and as expected, the bsaZ mutant demonstrated early-vacuolar-escape defects. Interestingly, however, experiments also indicated that this mutant was capable of delayed vacuolar escape. Consistent with this finding, evidence of actin-based motility and multinucleated giant cell formation were observed between 12 and 18 h postinfection. Further studies demonstrated that a triple mutant defective in all three B. pseudomallei T3SSs exhibited the same phenotype as the bsaZ mutant, indicating that functional T3SS-1 and T3SS-2 did not appear to be responsible for the delayed escape phenotype in RAW 264.7 cells. Based upon these findings, it appears that B. pseudomallei may not require T3SS-1, -2, and -3 to facilitate survival, delayed vacuolar escape, and actin-based motility in activated RAW 264.7 macrophages. PMID:18443088

  3. Novel Action of Carotenoids on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Macrophage Polarization and Liver Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yinhua; Zhuge, Fen; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease. It is characterized by a wide spectrum of hepatic changes, which may progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome; however, mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of NAFLD are still unclear. Resident and recruited macrophages are key players in the homeostatic function of the liver and in the progression of NAFLD to NASH. Progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the polarized activation of macrophages. New NAFLD therapies will likely involve modification of macrophage polarization by restraining M1 activation or driving M2 activation. Carotenoids are potent antioxidants and anti-inflammatory micronutrients that have been used to prevent and treat NAFLD. In addition to their antioxidative action, carotenoids can regulate macrophage polarization and thereby halt the progression of NASH. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanisms of macrophage polarization and the function of liver macrophages/Kupffer cells in NAFLD. From our review, we propose that dietary carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin and astaxanthin, be used to prevent or treat NAFLD through the regulation of macrophage polarization and liver homeostasis. PMID:27347998

  4. Novel Action of Carotenoids on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Macrophage Polarization and Liver Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yinhua; Zhuge, Fen; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease. It is characterized by a wide spectrum of hepatic changes, which may progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome; however, mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of NAFLD are still unclear. Resident and recruited macrophages are key players in the homeostatic function of the liver and in the progression of NAFLD to NASH. Progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the polarized activation of macrophages. New NAFLD therapies will likely involve modification of macrophage polarization by restraining M1 activation or driving M2 activation. Carotenoids are potent antioxidants and anti-inflammatory micronutrients that have been used to prevent and treat NAFLD. In addition to their antioxidative action, carotenoids can regulate macrophage polarization and thereby halt the progression of NASH. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanisms of macrophage polarization and the function of liver macrophages/Kupffer cells in NAFLD. From our review, we propose that dietary carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin and astaxanthin, be used to prevent or treat NAFLD through the regulation of macrophage polarization and liver homeostasis. PMID:27347998

  5. DNMT1-PPARγ pathway in macrophages regulates chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis development in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Qiu, Youzhu; Yang, Jie; Bian, Shizhu; Chen, Guozhu; Deng, Mengyang; Kang, Huali; Huang, Lan

    2016-01-01

    The DNA methyltransferase-mediated proinflammatory activation of macrophages is causally linked to the development of atherosclerosis (AS). However, the role of DNMT1, a DNA methylation maintenance enzyme, in macrophage polarization and AS development remains obscure. Here, we established transgenic mice with macrophage-specific overexpression of DNMT1 (Tg(DNMT1)) or PPAR-γ (Tg(PPAR-γ)) to investigate their effects on AS progression in ApoE-knockout mice fed an atherogenic diet. Primary macrophages were extracted to study the role of the DNMT1/PPAR-γ pathway in regulating inflammatory cytokine production. We demonstrated that Tg(DNMT1) significantly increased proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and plasma, and it accelerated the progression of AS in the atherogenic diet-treated ApoE-knockout mice. Further, we found that the DNA methylation status of the proximal PPAR-γ promoter was regulated by DNMT1 in macrophages. Notably, additional Tg(PPAR-γ) or pharmacological activation of PPAR-γ effectively prevented Tg(DNMT1)-induced proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and AS development in the mouse model. Finally, we demonstrated that elevated DNMT1 was correlated with decreased PPAR-γ, and increased proinflammatory cytokine production in the peripheral blood monocytes isolated from the patients with AS, compared to those of healthy donors. Our findings shed light on a novel strategy for the prevention and therapy of AS. PMID:27530451

  6. DNMT1-PPARγ pathway in macrophages regulates chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jie; Qiu, Youzhu; Yang, Jie; Bian, Shizhu; Chen, Guozhu; Deng, Mengyang; Kang, Huali; Huang, Lan

    2016-01-01

    The DNA methyltransferase-mediated proinflammatory activation of macrophages is causally linked to the development of atherosclerosis (AS). However, the role of DNMT1, a DNA methylation maintenance enzyme, in macrophage polarization and AS development remains obscure. Here, we established transgenic mice with macrophage-specific overexpression of DNMT1 (TgDNMT1) or PPAR-γ (TgPPAR-γ) to investigate their effects on AS progression in ApoE-knockout mice fed an atherogenic diet. Primary macrophages were extracted to study the role of the DNMT1/PPAR-γ pathway in regulating inflammatory cytokine production. We demonstrated that TgDNMT1 significantly increased proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and plasma, and it accelerated the progression of AS in the atherogenic diet-treated ApoE-knockout mice. Further, we found that the DNA methylation status of the proximal PPAR-γ promoter was regulated by DNMT1 in macrophages. Notably, additional TgPPAR-γ or pharmacological activation of PPAR-γ effectively prevented TgDNMT1-induced proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and AS development in the mouse model. Finally, we demonstrated that elevated DNMT1 was correlated with decreased PPAR-γ, and increased proinflammatory cytokine production in the peripheral blood monocytes isolated from the patients with AS, compared to those of healthy donors. Our findings shed light on a novel strategy for the prevention and therapy of AS. PMID:27530451

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of human macrophages modulates the cytokine response to Pneumocystis carinii.

    PubMed Central

    Kandil, O; Fishman, J A; Koziel, H; Pinkston, P; Rose, R M; Remold, H G

    1994-01-01

    The present studies examined production of the cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), and IL-6 by human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to Pneumocystis carinii in vitro and the impact of concurrent macrophage infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on these cytokine responses. Macrophages were infected with the HIV-1 BaL monocytotropic strain for 10 to 14 days and then exposed to P. carinii. At various times following P. carinii treatment, culture supernatants were harvested to assess the cytokine profile. Addition of P. carinii to HIV-uninfected macrophages resulted in augmented production of IL-6, TNF-alpha, and IL-1 beta protein. By contrast, in HIV-infected macrophages exposed to P. carinii, only the release of IL-6 was increased compared with that for HIV-uninfected macrophages, while the levels of TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta decreased. This altered response was confirmed at the molecular level for TNF-alpha mRNA. Preventing physical contact between P. carinii and macrophages by a membrane filter inhibited all cytokine release. Substituting P. carinii with a preparation of P. carinii 95- to 115-kDa major membrane glycoprotein A yielded a response similar to that obtained by addition of intact P. carinii. These results suggest that HIV-1 infection of human macrophages modulates cytokine responses to P. carinii. Images PMID:8300221

  8. Pdcd4 deficiency enhances macrophage lipoautophagy and attenuates foam cell formation and atherosclerosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Jiang, Y; Song, X; Guo, C; Zhu, F; Wang, X; Wang, Q; Shi, Y; Wang, J; Gao, F; Zhao, W; Chen, Y H; Zhang, L

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage foam cells, a major component of the atherosclerotic lesion, have vital roles in the development of atherosclerosis. Lipoautophagy, a type of autophagy characterized by selective delivery of lipid droplet for lysosomal degradation, may impact atherosclerosis by regulating macrophage foam cell formation. Previously, we reported that programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4), a tumor suppressor, negatively regulated autophagy in tumor cells. However, its roles in macrophage lipoautophagy, foam cell formation and atherosclerosis remain to be established. Here we found that Pdcd4 deficiency clearly improved oxidized low-density lipoproteins-impaired autophagy efflux, promoted autophagy-mediated lipid breakdown in murine macrophages and thus prevented macrophage conversion into foam cells. Importantly, Pdcd4 deficiency in mice significantly upregulated macrophage autophagy in local plaques along with attenuated lipid accumulation and atherosclerotic lesions in high-fat-fed Apolipoprotein E knockout mice. Bone marrow transplantation experiment demonstrated that PDCD4-mediated autophagy in hematopoietic cells contributed to the development of atherosclerosis. These results indicate that endogenous PDCD4 promotes for macrophage foam cell formation and atherosclerosis development via inhibiting autophagy and provides new insights into atherogenesis, suggesting that promoting macrophage autophagy through downregulating PDCD4 expression may be beneficial for treating atherosclerosis. PMID:26775706

  9. Listeria species escape from the phagosomes of interleukin-4-deactivated human macrophages independent of listeriolysin.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Katja; Eppler, Elisabeth; Filgueira, Luis; Groscurth, Peter; Gasal, Eduard; Schaffner, Andreas; Schoedon, Gabriele; Schneemann, Markus

    2003-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of infections like sepsis and meningitis, especially in immunocompromised hosts. Human macrophages are able to phagocytose and digest L. monocytogenes but IL-4 prevents human macrophages from killing the bacteria, the mechanisms of which are unknown. In the present study, we examined various listeria species and strains including wild-type and deletion mutants in human macrophages pretreated with IL-4. To analyse the IL-4-mediated deactivation process, we combined quantitative infection assays with various morphologic methods. IL-4 facilitates survival and escape of the pathogenic L. monocytogenes wild-type strain 10403S from the macrophage phagosomes. In untreated macrophages, the isogenic listeriolysin deletion mutant strain DP-L2161 was killed and did not escape from the phagolysosomes. However, after macrophage deactivation with IL-4 DP-L2161 survived and escaped from the phagosomes. This was also the case, but to a lesser extent, even for the naturally avirulent L. innocua. As detected by confocal laser-scanning fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy, IL-4 permitted the escape of all listeria species tested, including DP-L2161 and L. innocua from the phagosomal compartment of the macrophages. We conclude that escape from the phagosome and survival of the listeria species tested in IL-4-deactivated human macrophages is independent of the virulence factor listeriolysin. PMID:14636240

  10. Pdcd4 deficiency enhances macrophage lipoautophagy and attenuates foam cell formation and atherosclerosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, L; Jiang, Y; Song, X; Guo, C; Zhu, F; Wang, X; Wang, Q; Shi, Y; Wang, J; Gao, F; Zhao, W; Chen, Y H; Zhang, L

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage foam cells, a major component of the atherosclerotic lesion, have vital roles in the development of atherosclerosis. Lipoautophagy, a type of autophagy characterized by selective delivery of lipid droplet for lysosomal degradation, may impact atherosclerosis by regulating macrophage foam cell formation. Previously, we reported that programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4), a tumor suppressor, negatively regulated autophagy in tumor cells. However, its roles in macrophage lipoautophagy, foam cell formation and atherosclerosis remain to be established. Here we found that Pdcd4 deficiency clearly improved oxidized low-density lipoproteins-impaired autophagy efflux, promoted autophagy-mediated lipid breakdown in murine macrophages and thus prevented macrophage conversion into foam cells. Importantly, Pdcd4 deficiency in mice significantly upregulated macrophage autophagy in local plaques along with attenuated lipid accumulation and atherosclerotic lesions in high-fat-fed Apolipoprotein E knockout mice. Bone marrow transplantation experiment demonstrated that PDCD4-mediated autophagy in hematopoietic cells contributed to the development of atherosclerosis. These results indicate that endogenous PDCD4 promotes for macrophage foam cell formation and atherosclerosis development via inhibiting autophagy and provides new insights into atherogenesis, suggesting that promoting macrophage autophagy through downregulating PDCD4 expression may be beneficial for treating atherosclerosis. PMID:26775706

  11. Simultaneous Addition of Shikonin and Its Derivatives with Lipopolysaccharide Induces Rapid Macrophage Death.

    PubMed

    Koike, Atsushi; Shibano, Makio; Mori, Hideya; Kohama, Kiyoko; Fujimori, Ko; Amano, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play pivotal roles in inflammatory responses. Previous studies showed that various natural products exert antiinflammatory effects by regulating macrophage activation. Recent studies have shown that shikonin (SHK) and its derivatives (β-hydroxyisovalerylshikonin, acetylshikonin, and isobutylshikonin), which are 1,4-naphthoquinone pigments extracted from the roots of Lithospermum erythrorhizon, have various pharmacological, including antiinflammatory and antitumor, effects. Even though there have been many studies on the antiinflammatory activities of SHK derivatives, only a few have described their direct effects on macrophages. We investigated the effects of SHK derivatives on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated macrophages. Low doses of SHK derivatives induced significant macrophage cytotoxicity (mouse macrophage-like J774.1/JA-4 cells and mouse peritoneal macrophages) in the presence of LPS. SHK activated caspases-3 and -7, which led to DNA fragmentation, but this cytotoxicity was prevented through a pan-caspase inhibitor in LPS-treated JA-4 cells. Maximal cytotoxic effects were achieved when SHK was added immediately before LPS addition. These results indicate that SHK derivatives induce caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death of LPS-treated macrophages and suggest that SHK acts during an early stage of LPS signaling. PMID:27251498

  12. Prognostic Significance of CD169+ Lymph Node Sinus Macrophages in Patients with Malignant Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoichi; Ohnishi, Koji; Miyashita, Azusa; Nakahara, Satoshi; Fujiwara, Yukio; Horlad, Hasita; Motoshima, Takanobu; Fukushima, Satoshi; Jinnin, Masatoshi; Ihn, Hironobu; Takeya, Motohiro; Komohara, Yoshihiro

    2015-12-01

    CD169 (sialoadhesin) is a sialic acid receptor that is specifically expressed on macrophages, including lymph node sinus macrophages. Animal studies suggest that CD169(+) macrophages in lymph nodes have properties in preventing cancers. In order to determine the significance of CD169(+) macrophages in patients with malignant melanoma, we evaluated tissue samples from 93 patients to investigate CD169 expression in regional lymph nodes (RLN) and determine the relationship of this expression with overall survival and various clinicopathologic factors. Higher densities of CD169(+) cells were significantly associated with longer overall survival (P = 0.001). A multivariate analysis showed that the density of CD169(+) cells was an independent prognostic factor, with higher densities correlating with higher density of CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells within tumor sites. High CD169 expression in macrophages could be stimulated by IFNα in vitro, and in RLNs, IFNα-producing macrophages and CD303(+) plasmacytoid dendritic cells were identified surrounding CD169(+) macrophages. These data suggest that IFNα-stimulated CD169(+) macrophages in RLNs are closely involved in T-cell-mediated antitumor immunity and may be a useful marker for assessing the clinical prognosis and monitoring antitumor immunity in patients with malignant melanoma. PMID:26297710

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid macrophage response to experimental cryptococcal meningitis: relationship between in vivo and in vitro measurements of cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Perfect, J R; Hobbs, M M; Granger, D L; Durack, D T

    1988-01-01

    The functional abilities of macrophages from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) have so far been little studied. We examined the acquisition of activation characteristics by CSF macrophages during the course of experimental cryptococcal meningitis. CSF macrophages developed the ability for increased reactive oxidative intermediate (H2O2) production and tumor and fungal cytotoxicity. Despite having been activated, CSF macrophages could not inhibit the growth of Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro. Immunosuppression with cyclosporine, which eliminates the natural resistance of rabbits to cryptococcal meningitis, did not prevent or diminish H2O2 production by CSF macrophages but did reduce their tumoricidal activity. Activation of CSF macrophages appears to be an integral part of the central nervous system immune response to C. neoformans in this model, but alone is insufficient to eliminate C. neoformans from the central nervous system. PMID:3346075

  14. ULTRASTRUCTURED AND X-RAY MICROANAYLSIS OF MACROPHAGES EXPOSED TO NON-CRITERIA POLLUTANTS, WITH EMPHASIS ON CERTAIN METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rabbit alveolar macrophages (RAMs) and cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHOs) were exposed in vitro to the noncriteria pollutants manganese, cadmium, vanadium, nickel, lead, copper and cobalt, in either soluble or particulate form. To prevent the redistribution of soluble io...

  15. Developmental derivation of embryonic and adult macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shepard, J L; Zon, L I

    2000-01-01

    The macrophage cell lineage continually arises from hematopoietic stem cells during embryonic, fetal, and adult life. Previous theories proposed that macrophages are the recent progeny of bone marrow-derived monocytes and that they function primarily in phagocytosis. More recently, however, observations have shown that the ontogeny of macrophages in early mouse and human embryos is different from that occurring during adult development, and that the embryonic macrophages do not follow the monocyte pathway. Fetal macrophages are thought to differentiate from yolk sac-derived primitive macrophages before the development of adult monocytes. Further support for a separate lineage of fetal macrophages has come from studies of several species, including chicken, zebrafish, Xenopus, Drosophila, and C. elegans. The presence of fetal macrophages in PU.1-null mice indicates their independence from monocyte precursors and their existence as an alternative macrophage lineage. PMID:10608497

  16. Hepatic recruitment of macrophages promotes nonalcoholic steatohepatitis through CCR2.

    PubMed

    Miura, Kouichi; Yang, Ling; van Rooijen, Nico; Ohnishi, Hirohide; Seki, Ekihiro

    2012-06-01

    Inflammatory cell infiltration in the liver is a hallmark of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The chemokine-chemokine receptor interaction induces inflammatory cell recruitment. CC-chemokine receptor (CCR)2 is expressed on hepatic macrophages and hepatic stellate cells. This study aims to investigate the therapeutic potential of CCR2 to NASH. Twenty-two weeks on a choline-deficient amino acid-defined (CDAA) diet induced steatosis, inflammatory cell infiltration, and liver fibrosis with increased CCR2 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 expression in the wild-type livers. The infiltrated macrophages expressed CD68, CCR2, and a marker of bone marrow-derived monocytes, Ly6C. CCR2(-/-) mice had less steatosis, inflammatory cell infiltration, and fibrosis, and hepatic macrophages expressing CD68 and Ly6C were decreased. Toll-like receptor (TLR)4(-/-), TLR9(-/-), and MyD88(-/-) mice had reduced hepatic macrophage infiltration with decreased MCP-1 and CCR2 expression because TLR signaling is a potent inducer of MCP-1. To assess the role of Kupffer cells at the onset of NASH, Kupffer cells were depleted by liposomal clodronate. The Kupffer cell depletion ameliorated steatohepatitis with a decrease in the MCP-1 expression and recruitment of Ly6C-expressing macrophages at the onset of NASH. Finally, to test the therapeutic potential of targeting CCR2, a CCR2 inhibitor was administered to mice on a CDAA diet. The pharmaceutical inhibition of CCR2 prevented infiltration of the Ly6C-positive macrophages, resulting in an inhibition of liver inflammation and fibrosis. We concluded that CCR2 and Kupffer cells contribute to the progression of NASH by recruiting bone marrow-derived monocytes. PMID:22442158

  17. Oral Inflammatory Diseases and Systemic Inflammation: Role of the Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Hasturk, Hatice; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex reaction to injurious agents and includes vascular responses, migration, and activation of leukocytes. Inflammation starts with an acute reaction, which evolves into a chronic phase if allowed to persist unresolved. Acute inflammation is a rapid process characterized by fluid exudation and emigration of leukocytes, primarily neutrophils, whereas chronic inflammation extends over a longer time and is associated with lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, blood vessel proliferation, and fibrosis. Inflammation is terminated when the invader is eliminated, and the secreted mediators are removed; however, many factors modify the course and morphologic appearance as well as the termination pattern and duration of inflammation. Chronic inflammatory illnesses such as diabetes, arthritis, and heart disease are now seen as problems that might have an impact on the periodontium. Reciprocal effects of periodontal diseases are potential factors modifying severity in the progression of systemic inflammatory diseases. Macrophages are key cells for the inflammatory processes as regulators directing inflammation to chronic pathological changes or resolution with no damage or scar tissue formation. As such, macrophages are involved in a remarkably diverse array of homeostatic processes of vital importance to the host. In addition to their critical role in immunity, macrophages are also widely recognized as ubiquitous mediators of cellular turnover and maintenance of extracellular matrix homeostasis. In this review, our objective is to identify macrophage-mediated events central to the inflammatory basis of chronic diseases, with an emphasis on how control of macrophage function can be used to prevent or treat harmful outcomes linked to uncontrolled inflammation. PMID:22623923

  18. Inhibitors for cholesterol ester accumulation in macrophages from Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Takamoto, Haruka; Eguchi, Keisuke; Kawabata, Tetsuro; Fujiwara, Yukio; Takeya, Motohiro; Tsukamoto, Sachiko

    2015-01-01

    The cholesterol ester accumulates in macrophages in the early stage of atherosclerotic lesions, leading to the formation of foam cells. We examined the inhibitory effects of the crude extracts of 22 edible plants on foam cell formation and isolated nine chlorophyll derivatives as potent inhibitors from Chinese cabbage. The results of the present study suggest that the chlorophyll derivatives contained in edible plants may be useful for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:25776101

  19. Macrophage-epithelial interactions in pulmonary alveoli.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Jahar; Westphalen, Kristin

    2016-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages have been investigated for years by approaches involving macrophage extraction from the lung by bronchoalveolar lavage, or by cell removal from lung tissue. Since extracted macrophages are studied outside their natural milieu, there is little understanding of the extent to which alveolar macrophages interact with the epithelium, or with one another to generate the lung's innate immune response to pathogen challenge. Here, we review new evidence of macrophage-epithelial interactions in the lung, and we address the emerging understanding that the alveolar epithelium plays an important role in orchestrating the macrophage-driven immune response. PMID:27170185

  20. Macrophage Heterogeneity in Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boorsma, Carian E.; Draijer, Christina; Melgert, Barbro N.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are among the most abundant cells in the respiratory tract, and they can have strikingly different phenotypes within this environment. Our knowledge of the different phenotypes and their functions in the lung is sketchy at best, but they appear to be linked to the protection of gas exchange against microbial threats and excessive tissue responses. Phenotypical changes of macrophages within the lung are found in many respiratory diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and pulmonary fibrosis. This paper will give an overview of what macrophage phenotypes have been described, what their known functions are, what is known about their presence in the different obstructive and restrictive respiratory diseases (asthma, COPD, pulmonary fibrosis), and how they are thought to contribute to the etiology and resolution of these diseases. PMID:23533311

  1. Cyclodextrin promotes atherosclerosis regression via macrophage reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Sebastian; Grebe, Alena; Bakke, Siril S.; Bode, Niklas; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulas, Thomas; Skjelland, Mona; De Nardo, Dominic; Labzin, Larisa I.; Kerksiek, Anja; Hempel, Chris; Heneka, Michael T.; Hawxhurst, Victoria; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Trebicka, Jonel; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Westerterp, Marit; Tall, Alan R.; Wright, Samuel D.; Espevik, Terje; Schultze, Joachim L.; Nickenig, Georg; Lütjohann, Dieter; Latz, Eicke

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease linked to elevated blood cholesterol levels. Despite ongoing advances in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Continuous retention of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in the subendothelial space causes a local overabundance of free cholesterol. Since cholesterol accumulation and deposition of cholesterol crystals (CCs) triggers a complex inflammatory response, we tested the efficacy of the cyclic oligosaccharide 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (CD), a compound that increases cholesterol solubility, in preventing and reversing atherosclerosis. Here we show that CD treatment of murine atherosclerosis reduced atherosclerotic plaque size and CC load, and promoted plaque regression even with a continued cholesterol-rich diet. Mechanistically, CD increased oxysterol production in both macrophages and human atherosclerotic plaques, and promoted liver X receptor (LXR)-mediated transcriptional reprogramming to improve cholesterol efflux and exert anti-inflammatory effects. In vivo, this CD-mediated LXR agonism was required for the anti-atherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory effects of CD as well as for augmented reverse cholesterol transport. Since CD treatment in humans is safe and CD beneficially affects key mechanisms of atherogenesis, it may therefore be used clinically to prevent or treat human atherosclerosis. PMID:27053774

  2. Cyclodextrin promotes atherosclerosis regression via macrophage reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Sebastian; Grebe, Alena; Bakke, Siril S; Bode, Niklas; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulas, Thomas; Skjelland, Mona; De Nardo, Dominic; Labzin, Larisa I; Kerksiek, Anja; Hempel, Chris; Heneka, Michael T; Hawxhurst, Victoria; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Trebicka, Jonel; Björkhem, Ingemar; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Westerterp, Marit; Tall, Alan R; Wright, Samuel D; Espevik, Terje; Schultze, Joachim L; Nickenig, Georg; Lütjohann, Dieter; Latz, Eicke

    2016-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease linked to elevated blood cholesterol concentrations. Despite ongoing advances in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Continuous retention of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in the subendothelial space causes a local overabundance of free cholesterol. Because cholesterol accumulation and deposition of cholesterol crystals (CCs) trigger a complex inflammatory response, we tested the efficacy of the cyclic oligosaccharide 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (CD), a compound that increases cholesterol solubility in preventing and reversing atherosclerosis. We showed that CD treatment of murine atherosclerosis reduced atherosclerotic plaque size and CC load and promoted plaque regression even with a continued cholesterol-rich diet. Mechanistically, CD increased oxysterol production in both macrophages and human atherosclerotic plaques and promoted liver X receptor (LXR)-mediated transcriptional reprogramming to improve cholesterol efflux and exert anti-inflammatory effects. In vivo, this CD-mediated LXR agonism was required for the antiatherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory effects of CD as well as for augmented reverse cholesterol transport. Because CD treatment in humans is safe and CD beneficially affects key mechanisms of atherogenesis, it may therefore be used clinically to prevent or treat human atherosclerosis. PMID:27053774

  3. microRNA-150 inhibits the formation of macrophage foam cells through targeting adiponectin receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Suhua

    2016-08-01

    Transformation of macrophages into foam cells plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to determine the expression and biological roles of microRNA (miR)-150 in the formation of macrophage foam cells and to identify its functional target(s). Exposure to 50 μg/ml oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) led to a significant upregulation of miR-150 in THP-1 macrophages. Overexpression of miR-150 inhibited oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation in THP-1 macrophages, while knockdown of miR-150 enhanced lipid accumulation. apoA-I- and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux was increased by 66% and 43%, respectively, in miR-150-overexpressing macrophages relative to control cells. In contrast, downregulation of miR-150 significantly reduced cholesterol efflux from oxLDL-laden macrophages. Bioinformatic analysis and luciferase reporter assay revealed adiponectin receptor 2 (AdipoR2) as a direct target of miR-150. Small interfering RNA-mediated downregulation of AdipoR2 phenocopied the effects of miR-150 overexpression, reducing lipid accumulation and facilitating cholesterol efflux in oxLDL-treated THP-1 macrophages. Knockdown of AdipoR2 induced the expression of proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), liver X receptor alpha (LXRα), ABCA1, and ABCG1. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of PPARγ or LXRα impaired AdipoR2 silencing-induced upregulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1. Taken together, our results indicate that miR-150 can attenuate oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation in macrophages via promotion of cholesterol efflux. The suppressive effects of miR-150 on macrophage foam cell formation are mediated through targeting of AdipoR2. Delivery of miR-150 may represent a potential approach to prevent macrophage foam cell formation in atherosclerosis. PMID:27216461

  4. Cisplatin stimulates protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Shrivastava, A; Sodhi, A

    1995-03-01

    Cisplatin [cis-dichlorodiamine platinum (II)], a potent anti-tumor compound, stimulates immune responses by activating monocyte-macrophages and other cells of the immune system. The mechanism by which cisplatin activates these cells is poorly characterized. Since protein tyrosine phosphorylation appears to be a major intracellular signalling event that mediates cellular responses, we examined whether cisplatin alters tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages. We found that cisplatin increased tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins in peritoneal macrophages and in P388D1 and IC-21 macrophage cell lines. Treatment of macrophages with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, genestein and lavendustin A, inhibited cisplatin-stimulated protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages. Macrophages treated with cisplatin also exhibit increased fluorescence with anti-phosphotyrosine-FITC antibody. These data indicate that protein tyrosine phosphorylation plays a role in cisplatin-induced activation of macrophages. PMID:7539662

  5. Origin and Functions of Tissue Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Epelman, Slava; Lavine, Kory J.; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are distributed in tissues throughout the body and contribute to both homeostasis and disease. Recently, it has become evident that most adult tissue macrophages originate during embryonic development and not from circulating monocytes. Each tissue has its own composition of embryonically derived and adult-derived macrophages, but it is unclear whether macrophages of distinct origins are functionally interchangeable or have unique roles at steady state. This new understanding also prompts reconsideration of the function of circulating monocytes. Classical Ly6chi monocytes patrol the extravascular space in resting organs, and Ly6clo nonclassical monocytes patrol the vasculature. Inflammation triggers monocytes to differentiate into macrophages, but whether resident and newly recruited macrophages possess similar functions during inflammation is unclear. Here, we define the tools used for identifying the complex origin of tissue macrophages and discuss the relative contributions of tissue niche versus ontological origin to the regulation of macrophage functions during steady state and inflammation. PMID:25035951

  6. Apocynin suppresses the progression of atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice by inactivation of macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Takeshi; Ishii, Norio; Fukuda, Kazuki; Senokuchi, Takafumi; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Tatsuya; Taketa, Kayo; Kawasaki, Shuji; Hanatani, Satoko; Takeya, Motohiro; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Araki, Eiichi

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► We examined the anti-athrogenic effect of apocynin in atherosclerotic model mice. ► Apocynin prevented atherosclerotic lesion formation. ► Apocynin suppressed ROS production in aorta and in macrophages. ► Apocynin suppressed cytokine expression and cell proliferation in macrophages. ► Apocynin may be beneficial compound for the prevention of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other proinflammatory substances by macrophages plays an important role in atherogenesis. Apocynin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-acetophenone), which is well known as a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, has anti-inflammatory effects including suppression of the generation of ROS. However, the suppressive effects of apocynin on the progression of atherosclerosis are not clearly understood. Thus, we investigated anti-atherosclerotic effects of apocynin using apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE{sup –/–}) mice in vivo and in mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. In atherosclerosis-prone apoE{sup –/–} mice, apocynin suppressed the progression of atherosclerosis, decreased 4-hydroxynonenal-positive area in atherosclerotic lesions, and mRNA expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in aorta. In mouse peritoneal macrophages, apocynin suppressed the Ox-LDL-induced ROS generation, mRNA expression of MCP-1, IL-6 and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and cell proliferation. Moreover, immunohistochemical studies revealed that apocynin decreased the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions of apoE{sup –/–} mice. These results suggested that apocynin suppressed the formation of atherosclerotic lesions, at least in part, by inactivation of macrophages. Therefore, apocynin may be a potential therapeutic material to prevent the progression of atherosclerosis.

  7. DC-SIGN(+) Macrophages Control the Induction of Transplantation Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Conde, Patricia; Rodriguez, Mercedes; van der Touw, William; Jimenez, Ana; Burns, Matthew; Miller, Jennifer; Brahmachary, Manisha; Chen, Hui-ming; Boros, Peter; Rausell-Palamos, Francisco; Yun, Tae Jin; Riquelme, Paloma; Rastrojo, Alberto; Aguado, Begoña; Stein-Streilein, Joan; Tanaka, Masato; Zhou, Lan; Zhang, Junfeng; Lowary, Todd L; Ginhoux, Florent; Park, Chae Gyu; Cheong, Cheolho; Brody, Joshua; Turley, Shannon J; Lira, Sergio A; Bronte, Vincenzo; Gordon, Siamon; Heeger, Peter S; Merad, Miriam; Hutchinson, James; Chen, Shu-Hsia; Ochando, Jordi

    2015-06-16

    Tissue effector cells of the monocyte lineage can differentiate into different cell types with specific cell function depending on their environment. The phenotype, developmental requirements, and functional mechanisms of immune protective macrophages that mediate the induction of transplantation tolerance remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that costimulatory blockade favored accumulation of DC-SIGN-expressing macrophages that inhibited CD8(+) T cell immunity and promoted CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cell expansion in numbers. Mechanistically, that simultaneous DC-SIGN engagement by fucosylated ligands and TLR4 signaling was required for production of immunoregulatory IL-10 associated with prolonged allograft survival. Deletion of DC-SIGN-expressing macrophages in vivo, interfering with their CSF1-dependent development, or preventing the DC-SIGN signaling pathway abrogated tolerance. Together, the results provide new insights into the tolerogenic effects of costimulatory blockade and identify DC-SIGN(+) suppressive macrophages as crucial mediators of immunological tolerance with the concomitant therapeutic implications in the clinic. PMID:26070485

  8. HIV-1 assembly in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly of newly synthesized Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) particles are poorly understood. Most of the work on HIV-1 assembly has been performed in T cells in which viral particle budding and assembly take place at the plasma membrane. In contrast, few studies have been performed on macrophages, the other major target of HIV-1. Infected macrophages represent a viral reservoir and probably play a key role in HIV-1 physiopathology. Indeed macrophages retain infectious particles for long periods of time, keeping them protected from anti-viral immune response or drug treatments. Here, we present an overview of what is known about HIV-1 assembly in macrophages as compared to T lymphocytes or cell lines. Early electron microscopy studies suggested that viral assembly takes place at the limiting membrane of an intracellular compartment in macrophages and not at the plasma membrane as in T cells. This was first considered as a late endosomal compartment in which viral budding seems to be similar to the process of vesicle release into multi-vesicular bodies. This view was notably supported by a large body of evidence involving the ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport) machinery in HIV-1 budding, the observation of viral budding profiles in such compartments by immuno-electron microscopy, and the presence of late endosomal markers associated with macrophage-derived virions. However, this model needs to be revisited as recent data indicate that the viral compartment has a neutral pH and can be connected to the plasma membrane via very thin micro-channels. To date, the exact nature and biogenesis of the HIV assembly compartment in macrophages remains elusive. Many cellular proteins potentially involved in the late phases of HIV-1 cycle have been identified; and, recently, the list has grown rapidly with the publication of four independent genome-wide screens. However, their respective roles in infected cells

  9. Macrophage Heterogeneity and Plasticity: Impact of Macrophage Biomarkers on Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Joselyn; Salazar, Juan; Martínez, María Sofía; Palmar, Jim; Bautista, Jordan; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Gómez, Alexis; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a global epidemic, currently representing the worldwide leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Atherosclerosis is the fundamental pathophysiologic component of CVD, where the immune system plays an essential role. Monocytes and macrophages are key mediators in this aspect: due to their heterogeneity and plasticity, these cells may act as either pro- or anti-inflammatory mediators. Indeed, monocytes may develop heterogeneous functional phenotypes depending on the predominating pro- or anti-inflammatory microenvironment within the lesion, resulting in classic, intermediate, and non-classic monocytes, each with strikingly differing features. Similarly, macrophages may also adopt heterogeneous profiles being mainly M1 and M2, the former showing a proinflammatory profile while the latter demonstrates anti-inflammatory traits; they are further subdivided in several subtypes with more specialized functions. Furthermore, macrophages may display plasticity by dynamically shifting between phenotypes in response to specific signals. Each of these distinct cell profiles is associated with diverse biomarkers which may be exploited for therapeutic intervention, including IL-10, IL-13, PPAR-γ, LXR, NLRP3 inflammasomes, and microRNAs. Direct modulation of the molecular pathways concerning these potential macrophage-related targets represents a promising field for new therapeutic alternatives in atherosclerosis and CVD. PMID:26491604

  10. Extracellular polysaccharide from Bacillus sp. strain LBP32 prevents LPS-induced inflammation in RAW 264.7 macrophages by inhibiting NF-κB and MAPKs activation and ROS production.

    PubMed

    Diao, Ying; Xin, Yinqiang; Zhou, Yi; Li, Na; Pan, Xiaolong; Qi, Shimei; Qi, Zhilin; Xu, Yimiao; Luo, Lan; Wan, Honggui; Lan, Lei; Yin, Zhimin

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs) are high-molecular weight sugar-based polymers that are synthesized and secreted by many microorganisms. Recently, EPSs have attracted particular attention due to their multiple biological functions including anti-inflammation. However, studies rarely reported the molecular mechanisms underlying their functions. We previously purified an EPS from an oligotrophic bacteria (Bacillus sp. LBP32) found in Lop Nur Desert, which possesses a potent antioxidant activity, while the anti-inflammatory effects of EPS and signaling mechanisms underlying its action have not been clarified. In this study, we demonstrated that EPS significantly inhibited the LPS-induced release of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO), IL-6 and TNF-α, without any significant cytotoxicity. EPS also downregulated the expression of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) induced by LPS. Furthermore, activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) was abrogated by EPS through inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB kinase (IKK). Activations of Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), including p38 MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), were also found to be inhibited by EPS. In addition, the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was also significantly decreased with the treatment of EPS. In vivo experiments were conducted and showed that EPS could greatly improve the outcome of mice with LPS-induced endotoxic shock. Taken together, our data indicate that EPS prevents LPS-induced inflammatory response by inhibiting NF-κB and MAPKs activation and ROS production. PMID:24201081

  11. DHA Suppresses Primary Macrophage Inflammatory Responses via Notch 1/ Jagged 1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mehboob; Heyob, Kathryn; Rogers, Lynette K.

    2016-01-01

    Persistent macrophages were observed in the lungs of murine offspring exposed to maternal LPS and neonatal hyperoxia. Maternal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation prevented the accumulation of macrophages and improved lung development. We hypothesized that these macrophages are responsible for pathologies observed in this model and the effects of DHA supplementation. Primary macrophages were isolated from adult mice fed standard chow, control diets, or DHA supplemented diets. Macrophages were exposed to hyperoxia (O2) for 24 h and LPS for 6 h or 24 h. Our data demonstrate significant attenuation of Notch 1 and Jagged 1 protein levels in response to DHA supplementation in vivo but similar results were not evident in macrophages isolated from mice fed standard chow and supplemented with DHA in vitro. Co-culture of activated macrophages with MLE12 epithelial cells resulted in the release of high mobility group box 1 and leukotriene B4 from the epithelial cells and this release was attenuated by DHA supplementation. Collectively, our data indicate that long term supplementation with DHA as observed in vivo, resulted in deceased Notch 1/Jagged 1 protein expression however, DHA supplementation in vitro was sufficient to suppress release LTB4 and to protect epithelial cells in co-culture. PMID:26940787

  12. Specific calcineurin targeting in macrophages confers resistance to inflammation via MKP-1 and p38

    PubMed Central

    Escolano, Amelia; Martínez-Martínez, Sara; Alfranca, Arántzazu; Urso, Katia; Izquierdo, Helena M; Delgado, Mario; Martín, Francisco; Sabio, Guadalupe; Sancho, David; Gómez-del Arco, Pablo; Redondo, Juan Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages contribute to tissue homeostasis and influence inflammatory responses by modulating their phenotype in response to the local environment. Understanding the molecular mechanisms governing this plasticity would open new avenues for the treatment for inflammatory disorders. We show that deletion of calcineurin (CN) or its inhibition with LxVP peptide in macrophages induces an anti-inflammatory population that confers resistance to arthritis and contact hypersensitivity. Transfer of CN-targeted macrophages or direct injection of LxVP-encoding lentivirus has anti-inflammatory effects in these models. Specific CN targeting in macrophages induces p38 MAPK activity by downregulating MKP-1 expression. However, pharmacological CN inhibition with cyclosporin A (CsA) or FK506 did not reproduce these effects and failed to induce p38 activity. The CN-inhibitory peptide VIVIT also failed to reproduce the effects of LxVP. p38 inhibition prevented the anti-inflammatory phenotype of CN-targeted macrophages, and mice with defective p38-activation were resistant to the anti-inflammatory effect of LxVP. Our results identify a key role for CN and p38 in the modulation of macrophage phenotype and suggest an alternative treatment for inflammation based on redirecting macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory status. PMID:24596247

  13. Specific calcineurin targeting in macrophages confers resistance to inflammation via MKP-1 and p38.

    PubMed

    Escolano, Amelia; Martínez-Martínez, Sara; Alfranca, Arántzazu; Urso, Katia; Izquierdo, Helena M; Delgado, Mario; Martín, Francisco; Sabio, Guadalupe; Sancho, David; Gómez-del Arco, Pablo; Redondo, Juan Miguel

    2014-05-16

    Macrophages contribute to tissue homeostasis and influence inflammatory responses by modulating their phenotype in response to the local environment. Understanding the molecular mechanisms governing this plasticity would open new avenues for the treatment for inflammatory disorders. We show that deletion of calcineurin (CN) or its inhibition with LxVP peptide in macrophages induces an anti-inflammatory population that confers resistance to arthritis and contact hypersensitivity. Transfer of CN-targeted macrophages or direct injection of LxVP-encoding lentivirus has anti-inflammatory effects in these models. Specific CN targeting in macrophages induces p38 MAPK activity by downregulating MKP-1 expression. However, pharmacological CN inhibition with cyclosporin A (CsA) or FK506 did not reproduce these effects and failed to induce p38 activity. The CN-inhibitory peptide VIVIT also failed to reproduce the effects of LxVP. p38 inhibition prevented the anti-inflammatory phenotype of CN-targeted macrophages, and mice with defective p38-activation were resistant to the anti-inflammatory effect of LxVP. Our results identify a key role for CN and p38 in the modulation of macrophage phenotype and suggest an alternative treatment for inflammation based on redirecting macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory status. PMID:24596247

  14. Beta2-adrenergic receptor stimulation inhibits nitric oxide generation by Mycobacterium avium infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Boomershine, C S; Lafuse, W P; Zwilling, B S

    1999-11-01

    Catecholamine regulation of nitric oxide (NO) production by IFNgamma-primed macrophages infected with Mycobacterium avium was investigated. Epinephrine treatment of IFNgamma-primed macrophages at the time of M. avium infection inhibited the anti-mycobacterial activity of the cells. The anti-mycobacterial activity of macrophages correlated with NO production. Using specific adrenergic receptor agonists, the abrogation of mycobacterial killing and decreased NO production by catecholamines was shown to be mediated via the beta2-adrenergic receptor. Elevation of intracellular cAMP levels mimicked the catecholamine-mediated inhibition of NO in both M. avium infected and LPS stimulated macrophages. Specific inhibitors of both adenylate cyclase and protein kinase A prevented the beta2-adrenoceptor-mediated inhibition of nitric oxide production. Beta2-adrenoreceptor stimulation at the time of M. avium infection of IFNgamma-primed macrophages also inhibited expression of iNOS mRNA. These observations show that catecholamine hormones can affect the outcome of macrophage-pathogen interactions and suggest that one result of sympathetic nervous system activation is the suppression of the capacity of macrophages to produce anti-microbial effector molecules. PMID:10580815

  15. Identification of Neutral Cholesterol Ester Hydrolase, a Key Enzyme Removing Cholesterol from Macrophages*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Hiroaki; Igarashi, Masaki; Nishi, Makiko; Sekiya, Motohiro; Tajima, Makiko; Takase, Satoru; Takanashi, Mikio; Ohta, Keisuke; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Sachiko; Yahagi, Naoya; Ohashi, Ken; Amemiya-Kudo, Michiyo; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Nagai, Ryozo; Kadowaki, Takashi; Osuga, Jun-ichi; Ishibashi, Shun

    2008-01-01

    Unstable lipid-rich plaques in atherosclerosis are characterized by the accumulation of macrophage foam cells loaded with cholesterol ester (CE). Although hormone-sensitive lipase and cholesteryl ester hydrolase (CEH) have been proposed to mediate the hydrolysis of CE in macrophages, circumstantial evidence suggests the presence of other enzymes with neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase (nCEH) activity. Here we show that the murine orthologue of KIAA1363, designated as neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase (NCEH), is a microsomal nCEH with high expression in murine and human macrophages. The effect of various concentrations of NaCl on its nCEH activity resembles that on endogenous nCEH activity of macrophages. RNA silencing of NCEH decreases nCEH activity at least by 50%; conversely, its overexpression inhibits the CE formation in macrophages. Immunohistochemistry reveals that NCEH is expressed in macrophage foam cells in atherosclerotic lesions. These data indicate that NCEH is responsible for a major part of nCEH activity in macrophages and may be a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of atherosclerosis. PMID:18782767

  16. Macrophage targeting contributes to the inhibitory effects of embelin on colitis-associated cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ting; Dai, Yun; Wang, Weihong; Teng, Guigen; Jiao, Hongmei; Shuai, Xiaowei; Zhang, Rongxin; Zhao, Peng; Qiao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are a major component of inflammatory and tumor microenvironment. We previously reported that embelin suppresses colitis-associated tumorigenesis. Here, the role of macrophage targeting in the anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor properties of embelin was investigated. By using colitis-associated cancer (CAC) model, we demonstrated that embelin significantly depleted colon macrophages by blocking their recruitment. Moreover, embelin attenuated M2-like polarization of macrophages within the tumor microenvironment and eliminated their tumor-promoting functions during the development of CAC. Embelin potently inhibited NF-κB signaling in macrophages and decreased the production of key pro-inflammatory cytokines and tumorigenic factors involved in CAC, such as TNFα, IL-6 and COX-2. In addition, embelin directly reduced the polarization of M2 macrophages in vitro even in the presence of Th2 cytokines. These results suggested that targeting macrophages is, at least in part, responsible for the anti-tumor activity of embelin in CAC. Our observations strengthen the rationale for future validation of embelin in the prevention and treatment of CAC PMID:26799669

  17. The Axl receptor tyrosine kinase is a discriminator of macrophage function in the inflamed lung

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manminder; Bell, Thomas J; Fujino, Naoya; Cook, Peter C; Svedberg, Freya R; MacDonald, Andrew S; Maciewicz, Rose A; Singh, Dave; Hussell, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Much of the biology surrounding macrophage functional specificity has arisen through examining inflammation-induced polarising signals, but this also occurs in homeostasis, requiring tissue-specific environmental triggers that influence macrophage phenotype and function. The TAM receptor family of receptor tyrosine kinases (Tyro3, Axl and MerTK) mediates the non-inflammatory removal of apoptotic cells by phagocytes through the bridging phosphatidylserine-binding molecules Gas6 or Protein S. We show that one such TAM receptor (Axl) is exclusively expressed on mouse airway macrophages, but not interstitial macrophages and other lung leukocytes, under homeostatic conditions and is constitutively ligated to Gas6. Axl expression is potently induced by GM-CSF expressed in the healthy and inflamed airway, and by type I interferon or TLR3 stimulation on human and mouse macrophages, indicating potential involvement of Axl in apoptotic cell removal under inflammatory conditions. Indeed, an absence of Axl does not cause sterile inflammation in health, but leads to exaggerated lung inflammatory disease upon influenza infection. These data imply that Axl allows specific identification of airway macrophages, and that its expression is critical for macrophage functional compartmentalisation in the airspaces or lung interstitium. We propose that this may be a critical feature to prevent excessive inflammation due to secondary necrosis of apoptotic cells that have not been cleared by efferocytosis. PMID:25603826

  18. Apoptotic CD8 T-lymphocytes disable macrophage-mediated immunity to Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    Cabral-Piccin, M P; Guillermo, L V C; Vellozo, N S; Filardy, A A; Pereira-Marques, S T; Rigoni, T S; Pereira-Manfro, W F; DosReis, G A; Lopes, M F

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. CD8 T-lymphocytes help to control infection, but apoptosis of CD8 T cells disrupts immunity and efferocytosis can enhance parasite infection within macrophages. Here, we investigate how apoptosis of activated CD8 T cells affects M1 and M2 macrophage phenotypes. First, we found that CD8 T-lymphocytes and inflammatory monocytes/macrophages infiltrate peritoneum during acute T. cruzi infection. We show that treatment with anti-Fas ligand (FasL) prevents lymphocyte apoptosis, upregulates type-1 responses to parasite antigens, and reduces infection in macrophages cocultured with activated CD8 T cells. Anti-FasL skews mixed M1/M2 macrophage profiles into polarized M1 phenotype, both in vitro and following injection in infected mice. Moreover, inhibition of T-cell apoptosis induces a broad reprogramming of cytokine responses and improves macrophage-mediated immunity to T. cruzi. The results indicate that disposal of apoptotic CD8 T cells increases M2-macrophage differentiation and contributes to parasite persistence. PMID:27195678

  19. Apoptotic CD8 T-lymphocytes disable macrophage-mediated immunity to Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Cabral-Piccin, M P; Guillermo, L V C; Vellozo, N S; Filardy, A A; Pereira-Marques, S T; Rigoni, T S; Pereira-Manfro, W F; DosReis, G A; Lopes, M F

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. CD8 T-lymphocytes help to control infection, but apoptosis of CD8 T cells disrupts immunity and efferocytosis can enhance parasite infection within macrophages. Here, we investigate how apoptosis of activated CD8 T cells affects M1 and M2 macrophage phenotypes. First, we found that CD8 T-lymphocytes and inflammatory monocytes/macrophages infiltrate peritoneum during acute T. cruzi infection. We show that treatment with anti-Fas ligand (FasL) prevents lymphocyte apoptosis, upregulates type-1 responses to parasite antigens, and reduces infection in macrophages cocultured with activated CD8 T cells. Anti-FasL skews mixed M1/M2 macrophage profiles into polarized M1 phenotype, both in vitro and following injection in infected mice. Moreover, inhibition of T-cell apoptosis induces a broad reprogramming of cytokine responses and improves macrophage-mediated immunity to T. cruzi. The results indicate that disposal of apoptotic CD8 T cells increases M2-macrophage differentiation and contributes to parasite persistence. PMID:27195678

  20. Cryptococcus neoformans-induced macrophage lysosome damage crucially contributes to fungal virulence1

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Michael J.; Eastman, Alison J.; Qiu, Yafeng; Gregorka, Brian; Kozel, Thomas R.; Osterholzer, John J.; Curtis, Jeffrey L.; Swanson, Joel A.; Olszewski, Michal A.

    2015-01-01

    Upon ingestion by macrophages, Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) can survive and replicate intracellularly unless the macrophages become classically activated. The mechanism enabling intracellular replication is not fully understood; neither are the mechanisms which allow classical activation to counteract replication. Cn-induced lysosome damage was observed in infected murine bone marrow-derived macrophages, increased with time and required yeast viability. To demonstrate lysosome damage in the infected host, we developed a novel flow-cytometric method for measuring lysosome damage. Increased lysosome damage was found in Cn-containing lung cells compared to Cn–free cells. Among Cn-containing myeloid cells, recently recruited cells displayed lower damage than resident cells, consistent with the protective role of recruited macrophages. The magnitude of lysosome damage correlated with increased Cn replication. Experimental induction of lysosome damage increased Cn replication. Activation of macrophages with IFN-γ abolished macrophage lysosome damage and enabled increased killing of Cn. We conclude that induction of lysosome damage is an important Cn survival strategy and that classical activation of host macrophages counters replication by preventing damage. Thus, therapeutic strategies which decrease lysosomal damage, or increase resistance to such damage, could be valuable in treating cryptococcal infections. PMID:25637026

  1. Effects of inhibitors of tumoricidal activity upon schistosomulum killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    James, S L; Glaven, J A

    1987-12-01

    Larvae of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni are efficiently killed in vitro by lymphokine-activated macrophages, leading to the hypothesis that these cells may participate in the effector mechanism of protective immunity against schistosomiasis. Larvacidal activity has also been demonstrated in the IC-21 macrophage cell line in the absence of a demonstrable respiratory burst, indicating that macrophages possess nonoxidative mechanisms of schistosomulum killing. In this study, we demonstrated that IC-21 larval killing was most effective when contact was allowed between cells and target. Nonoxidative larvacidal activity was prevented by protein synthesis inhibitors, by the inhibition of microtubule polymerization, and by tosyllysylchloromethylketone but not by other inhibitors or substrates of tryptic or chymotryptic protease activity. The addition of excess iron to the culture also prevented IC-21-mediated larval killing, suggesting that the production of an iron-binding molecule may be involved. In contrast, the addition of excess thymidine or arginine did not reverse macrophage larvacidal activity, nor did lysosomotropic agents that depress the activity of acid hydrolases. Under appropriate conditions of activation and surface membrane stimulation, IC-21 cells could be induced to release soluble cytotoxic factors retaining larvacidal activity. These observations provide insight into the mechanism of macrophage-mediated schistosome killing, in comparison to the cytotoxic mechanisms described in the better-studied tumoricidal models, and supply a basis for further biochemical investigation of macrophage function against a multicellular target. PMID:3119500

  2. Effects of inhibitors of tumoricidal activity upon schistosomulum killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    James, S L; Glaven, J A

    1987-01-01

    Larvae of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni are efficiently killed in vitro by lymphokine-activated macrophages, leading to the hypothesis that these cells may participate in the effector mechanism of protective immunity against schistosomiasis. Larvacidal activity has also been demonstrated in the IC-21 macrophage cell line in the absence of a demonstrable respiratory burst, indicating that macrophages possess nonoxidative mechanisms of schistosomulum killing. In this study, we demonstrated that IC-21 larval killing was most effective when contact was allowed between cells and target. Nonoxidative larvacidal activity was prevented by protein synthesis inhibitors, by the inhibition of microtubule polymerization, and by tosyllysylchloromethylketone but not by other inhibitors or substrates of tryptic or chymotryptic protease activity. The addition of excess iron to the culture also prevented IC-21-mediated larval killing, suggesting that the production of an iron-binding molecule may be involved. In contrast, the addition of excess thymidine or arginine did not reverse macrophage larvacidal activity, nor did lysosomotropic agents that depress the activity of acid hydrolases. Under appropriate conditions of activation and surface membrane stimulation, IC-21 cells could be induced to release soluble cytotoxic factors retaining larvacidal activity. These observations provide insight into the mechanism of macrophage-mediated schistosome killing, in comparison to the cytotoxic mechanisms described in the better-studied tumoricidal models, and supply a basis for further biochemical investigation of macrophage function against a multicellular target. PMID:3119500

  3. Macrophage TNF-α mediates parathion-induced airway hyperreactivity in guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Bruun, Donald A.; Jacoby, David B.; van Rooijen, Nico; Lein, Pamela J.; Fryer, Allison D.

    2013-01-01

    Organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) are implicated in human asthma. We previously demonstrated that, at concentrations that do not inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity, the OP parathion causes airway hyperreactivity in guinea pigs as a result of functional loss of inhibitory M2 muscarinic receptors on parasympathetic nerves. Because macrophages are associated with asthma, we investigated whether macrophages mediate parathion-induced M2 receptor dysfunction and airway hyperreactivity. Airway physiology was measured in guinea pigs 24 h after a subcutaneous injection of parathion. Pretreatment with liposome-encapsulated clodronate induced alveolar macrophage apoptosis and prevented parathion-induced airway hyperreactivity in response to electrical stimulation of the vagus nerves. As determined by qPCR, TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA levels were increased in alveolar macrophages isolated from parathion-treated guinea pigs. Parathion treatment of alveolar macrophages ex vivo did not significantly increase IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA but did significantly increase TNF-α protein release. Consistent with these data, pretreatment with the TNF-α inhibitor etanercept but not the IL-1β receptor inhibitor anakinra prevented parathion-induced airway hyperreactivity and protected M2 receptor function. These data suggest a novel mechanism of OP-induced airway hyperreactivity in which low-level parathion activates macrophages to release TNF-α-causing M2 receptor dysfunction and airway hyperreactivity. These observations have important implications regarding therapeutic approaches for treating respiratory disease associated with OP exposures. PMID:23377347

  4. Modulating macrophage response to biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaveri, Toral

    Macrophages recruited to the site of biomaterial implantation are the primary mediators of the chronic foreign body response to implanted materials. Since foreign body response limits performance and functional life of numerous implanted biomaterials/medical devices, various approaches have been investigated to modulate macrophage interactions with biomaterial surfaces to mitigate this response. In this work we have explored two independent approaches to modulate the macrophage inflammatory response to biomaterials. The first approach targets surface integrins, cell surface receptors that mediate cell adhesion to biomaterials through adhesive proteins spontaneously adsorbed on biomaterial surfaces. The second approach involves surface modification of biomaterials using nanotopographic features since nanotopography has been reported to modulate cell adhesion and viability in a cell type-dependent manner. More specifically, Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanorod surface was investigated for its role in modulating macrophage adhesion and survival in vitro and foreign body response in vivo. For the first approach, we have investigated the role of integrin Mac-1 and RGD-binding integrins in the in-vivo osteolysis response and macrophage inflammatory processes of phagocytosis as well as inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to particulate biomaterials. We have also investigated the in vivo foreign body response (FBR) to subcutaneously implanted biomaterials by evaluating the thickness of fibrous capsule formed around the implants after 2 weeks of implantation. The role of Mac-1 integrin was isolated using a Mac-1 KO mouse and comparing it to a WT control. The role of RGD binding integrins in FBR was investigated by coating the implanted biomaterial with ELVAX(TM) polymer loaded with Echistatin which contains the RGD sequence. For the in-vivo osteolysis study and to study the in-vitro macrophage response to particulate biomaterials, we used the RGD peptide encapsulated in ELVAX

  5. Antimicrobial proteins of murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, P S; Eisenhauer, P B; Harwig, S S; van den Barselaar, M T; van Furth, R; Lehrer, R I

    1993-01-01

    Three murine microbicidal proteins (MUMPs) were purified from cells of the murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 that had been activated by gamma interferon. Similar proteins were also present in nonactivated RAW264.7 cells, in cells of the murine macrophage cell line J774A.1, and in resident and activated murine peritoneal macrophages. MUMP-1, MUMP-2, and MUMP-3 killed Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium fortuitum, and Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro. MUMP-1 resembled an H1 histone but was unusual because its N-terminal residue (serine) was not N acetylated. Although MUMP-2 was N terminally blocked, its high lysine/arginine ratio and its reactivity with an antibody to H1 histones suggested that it also belonged to the H1 histone family. MUMP-3 was identical to histone H2B in 30 of 30 amino-terminal residues. Although the antimicrobial properties of histones have been recognized for decades, this is the first evidence that such proteins may endow the lysosomal apparatus of macrophages with nonoxidative antimicrobial potential. Other MUMPs, including some with a more restricted antimicrobial spectrum and one that appeared to be induced in RAW264.7 cells after gamma interferon stimulation, were noted but remain to be characterized. Images PMID:8514411

  6. Yolk Sac Macrophages, Fetal Liver, and Adult Monocytes Can Colonize an Empty Niche and Develop into Functional Tissue-Resident Macrophages.

    PubMed

    van de Laar, Lianne; Saelens, Wouter; De Prijck, Sofie; Martens, Liesbet; Scott, Charlotte L; Van Isterdael, Gert; Hoffmann, Eik; Beyaert, Rudi; Saeys, Yvan; Lambrecht, Bart N; Guilliams, Martin

    2016-04-19

    Tissue-resident macrophages can derive from yolk sac macrophages (YS-Macs), fetal liver monocytes (FL-MOs), or adult bone-marrow monocytes (BM-MOs). The relative capacity of these precursors to colonize a niche, self-maintain, and perform tissue-specific functions is unknown. We simultaneously transferred traceable YS-Macs, FL-MOs, and BM-MOs into the empty alveolar macrophage (AM) niche of neonatal Csf2rb(-/-) mice. All subsets produced AMs, but in competition preferential outgrowth of FL-MOs was observed, correlating with their superior granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) reactivity and proliferation capacity. When transferred separately, however, all precursors efficiently colonized the alveolar niche and generated AMs that were transcriptionally almost identical, self-maintained, and durably prevented alveolar proteinosis. Mature liver, peritoneal, or colon macrophages could not efficiently colonize the empty AM niche, whereas mature AMs could. Thus, precursor origin does not affect the development of functional self-maintaining tissue-resident macrophages and the plasticity of the mononuclear phagocyte system is largest at the precursor stage. PMID:26992565

  7. Macrophage Diversity Enhances Tumor Progression and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Binzhi; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    There is persuasive clinical and experimental evidence that macrophages promote cancer initiation and malignant progression. During tumor initiation they create an inflammatory environment that is mutagenic and which promotes growth. As tumors progress to malignancy, macrophages stimulate angiogenesis, enhance tumor cell migration, invasion, and suppress anti-tumor immunity. At metastatic sites macrophages prepare the target tissue for arrival of tumor cells and then a different subpopulation of macrophages promotes tumor cell extravasation, survival, and subsequent growth. Specialized subpopulations of macrophages may represent important new therapeutic targets. PMID:20371344

  8. The journey from stem cell to macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Pittet, Mikael J.; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Swirski, Filip K.

    2014-01-01

    Essential protectors against infection and injury, macrophages can also contribute to many common and fatal diseases. Here we discuss the mechanisms that control different types of macrophage activities in mice. We follow the cells’ maturational pathways over time and space, and elaborate on events that influence the type of macrophage eventually settling a particular destination. The nature of the precursor cells, developmental niches, tissues, environmental cues, and other connecting processes appear to contribute to the identity of macrophage type. Together, the spatial and developmental relationships of macrophages comprise a topo-ontogenic map that can guide our understanding of their biology. PMID:24673186

  9. Preventing stroke

    MedlinePlus

    Stroke - prevention; CVA - prevention; cerebral vascular accident - prevention; TIA - prevention, transient ischemic attack - prevention ... Clinical Cardiology; Council on Functional Genomics and ... Council on Hypertension. Guidelines for the primary prevention ...

  10. Macrophage Polarization during Murine Lyme Borreliosis

    PubMed Central

    Lasky, Carrie E.; Olson, Rachel M.

    2015-01-01

    Infection of C3H mice with Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, reliably produces an infectious arthritis and carditis that peak around 3 weeks postinfection and then spontaneously resolve. Macrophage polarization has been suggested to drive inflammation, the clearance of bacteria, and tissue repair and resolution in a variety of infectious disease models. During Lyme disease it is clear that macrophages are capable of clearing Borrelia spirochetes and exhausted neutrophils; however, the role of macrophage phenotype in disease development or resolution has not been studied. Using classical (NOS2) and alternative (CD206) macrophage subset-specific markers, we determined the phenotype of F4/80+ macrophages within the joints and heart throughout the infection time course. Within the joint, CD206+ macrophages dominated throughout the course of infection, and NOS2+ macrophage numbers became elevated only during the peak of inflammation. We also found dual NOS2+ CD206+ macrophages which increased during resolution. In contrast to findings for the ankle joints, numbers of NOS2+ and CD206+ macrophages in the heart were similar at the peak of inflammation. 5-Lipoxygenase-deficient (5-LOX−/−) mice, which display a failure of Lyme arthritis resolution, recruited fewer F4/80+ cells to the infected joints and heart, but macrophage subset populations were unchanged. These results highlight differences in the inflammatory infiltrates during Lyme arthritis and carditis and demonstrate the coexistence of multiple macrophage subsets within a single inflammatory site. PMID:25870230

  11. Macrophages and cellular immunity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Gold, Katrina S; Brückner, Katja

    2015-12-01

    The invertebrate Drosophila melanogaster has been a powerful model for understanding blood cell development and immunity. Drosophila is a holometabolous insect, which transitions through a series of life stages from embryo, larva and pupa to adulthood. In spite of this, remarkable parallels exist between Drosophila and vertebrate macrophages, both in terms of development and function. More than 90% of Drosophila blood cells (hemocytes) are macrophages (plasmatocytes), making this highly tractable genetic system attractive for studying a variety of questions in macrophage biology. In vertebrates, recent findings revealed that macrophages have two independent origins: self-renewing macrophages, which reside and proliferate in local microenvironments in a variety of tissues, and macrophages of the monocyte lineage, which derive from hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells. Like vertebrates, Drosophila possesses two macrophage lineages with a conserved dual ontogeny. These parallels allow us to take advantage of the Drosophila model when investigating macrophage lineage specification, maintenance and amplification, and the induction of macrophages and their progenitors by local microenvironments and systemic cues. Beyond macrophage development, Drosophila further serves as a paradigm for understanding the mechanisms underlying macrophage function and cellular immunity in infection, tissue homeostasis and cancer, throughout development and adult life. PMID:27117654

  12. Cellular Prion Protein Promotes Brucella Infection into Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Watarai, Masahisa; Kim, Suk; Erdenebaatar, Janchivdorj; Makino, Sou-ichi; Horiuchi, Motohiro; Shirahata, Toshikazu; Sakaguchi, Suehiro; Katamine, Shigeru

    2003-01-01

    The products of the Brucella abortus virB gene locus, which are highly similar to conjugative DNA transfer system, enable the bacterium to replicate within macrophage vacuoles. The replicative phagosome is thought to be established by the interaction of a substrate of the VirB complex with macrophages, although the substrate and its host cellular target have not yet been identified. We report here that Hsp60, a member of the GroEL family of chaperonins, of B. abortus is capable of interacting directly or indirectly with cellular prion protein (PrPC) on host cells. Aggregation of PrPC tail-like formation was observed during bacterial swimming internalization into macrophages and PrPC was selectively incorporated into macropinosomes containing B. abortus. Hsp60 reacted strongly with serum from human brucellosis patients and was exposed on the bacterial surface via a VirB complex–associated process. Under in vitro and in vivo conditions, Hsp60 of B. abortus bound to PrPC. Hsp60 of B. abortus, expressed on the surface of Lactococcus lactis, promoted the aggregation of PrPC but not PrPC tail formation on macrophages. The PrPC deficiency prevented swimming internalization and intracellular replication of B. abortus, with the result that phagosomes bearing the bacteria were targeted into the endocytic network. These results indicate that signal transduction induced by the interaction between bacterial Hsp60 and PrPC on macrophages contributes to the establishment of B. abortus infection. PMID:12847134

  13. Coronary Intraplaque Hemorrhage Evokes a Novel Atheroprotective Macrophage Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Joseph J.; Harrington, Heather A.; Piper, Emma; Elderfield, Kay; Stark, Jaroslav; Landis, Robert C.; Haskard, Dorian O.

    2009-01-01

    Intraplaque hemorrhage accelerates atherosclerosis via oxidant stress and contributes to lesion development and destabilization. Normally, macrophages scavenge hemoglobin-haptoglobin (HbHp) complexes via CD163, and this process provokes the secretion of the anti-inflammatory atheroprotective cytokine interleukin (IL)-10. We therefore tested the hypothesis that HbHp complexes may drive monocyte differentiation to an atheroprotective phenotype. Examination of the macrophage phenotype in hemorrhaged atherosclerotic plaques revealed a novel hemorrhage-associated macrophage population (HA-mac), defined by high levels of CD163, but low levels of human leukocyte antigen-DR. HA-mac contained more iron, a pro-oxidant catalyst, but paradoxically had less oxidative injury, measured by 8-oxo-guanosine content. Differentiating monocytes with HbHp complexes reproduced the CD163high human leukocyte antigen-DRlow HA-mac phenotype in vitro. These in vitro HA-mac cells cleared Hb more quickly, and consistently showed less hydrogen peroxide release, highly reactive oxygen species and oxidant stress, and increased survival. Differentiation to HA-mac was prevented by neutralizing IL-10 antibodies, indicating that IL-10 mediates an autocrine feedback mechanism in this system. Nonlinear dynamic modeling showed that an IL-10/CD163-positive feedback loop drove a discrete HA-mac lineage. Simulations further indicated an all-or-none switch to HA-mac at threshold levels of HbHp, and this conversion was experimentally verified. These data demonstrate the creation of a novel atheroprotective (HA-mac) macrophage subpopulation in response to intraplaque hemorrhage and raise the possibility that therapeutically reproducing this macrophage phenotype may be cardio-protective in cases of atherosclerosis. PMID:19234137

  14. Proinflammatory caspase-2-mediated macrophage cell death induced by a rough attenuated Brucella suis strain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Ding, Xicheng; Ding, Ying; Xiang, Zuoshuang; Li, Xinna; Ghosh, Debashis; Schurig, Gerhardt G; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M; He, Yongqun

    2011-06-01

    Brucella spp. are intracellular bacteria that cause an infectious disease called brucellosis in humans and many domestic and wildlife animals. B. suis primarily infects pigs and is pathogenic to humans. The macrophage-Brucella interaction is critical for the establishment of a chronic Brucella infection. Our studies showed that smooth virulent B. suis strain 1330 (S1330) prevented programmed cell death of infected macrophages and rough attenuated B. suis strain VTRS1 (a vaccine candidate) induced strong macrophage cell death. To further investigate the mechanism of VTRS1-induced macrophage cell death, microarrays were used to analyze temporal transcriptional responses of murine macrophage-like J774.A1 cells infected with S1330 or VTRS1. In total 17,685 probe sets were significantly regulated based on the effects of strain, time and their interactions. A miniTUBA dynamic Bayesian network analysis predicted that VTRS1-induced macrophage cell death was mediated by a proinflammatory gene (the tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α] gene), an NF-κB pathway gene (the IκB-α gene), the caspase-2 gene, and several other genes. VTRS1 induced significantly higher levels of transcription of 40 proinflammatory genes than S1330. A Mann-Whitney U test confirmed the proinflammatory response in VTRS1-infected macrophages. Increased production of TNF-α and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) were also detected in the supernatants in VTRS1-infected macrophage cell culture. Hyperphosphorylation of IκB-α was observed in macrophages infected with VTRS1 but not S1330. The important roles of TNF-α and IκB-α in VTRS1-induced macrophage cell death were further confirmed by individual inhibition studies. VTRS1-induced macrophage cell death was significantly inhibited by a caspase-2 inhibitor but not a caspase-1 inhibitor. The role of caspase-2 in regulating the programmed cell death of VTRS1-infected macrophages was confirmed in another study using caspase-2-knockout mice. In summary, VTRS1

  15. Inhibiting macrophage proliferation suppresses atherosclerotic plaque inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jun; Lobatto, Mark E.; Hassing, Laurien; van der Staay, Susanne; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Calcagno, Claudia; Braza, Mounia S.; Baxter, Samantha; Fay, Francois; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Sager, Hendrik B.; Astudillo, Yaritzy M.; Leong, Wei; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Storm, Gert; Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Reiner, Thomas; Cormode, David P.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Swirski, Filip K.; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation drives atherosclerotic plaque progression and rupture, and is a compelling therapeutic target. Consequently, attenuating inflammation by reducing local macrophage accumulation is an appealing approach. This can potentially be accomplished by either blocking blood monocyte recruitment to the plaque or increasing macrophage apoptosis and emigration. Because macrophage proliferation was recently shown to dominate macrophage accumulation in advanced plaques, locally inhibiting macrophage proliferation may reduce plaque inflammation and produce long-term therapeutic benefits. To test this hypothesis, we used nanoparticle-based delivery of simvastatin to inhibit plaque macrophage proliferation in apolipoprotein E–deficient mice (Apoe−/−) with advanced atherosclerotic plaques. This resulted in the rapid reduction of plaque inflammation and favorable phenotype remodeling. We then combined this short-term nanoparticle intervention with an 8-week oral statin treatment, and this regimen rapidly reduced and continuously suppressed plaque inflammation. Our results demonstrate that pharmacologically inhibiting local macrophage proliferation can effectively treat inflammation in atherosclerosis. PMID:26295063

  16. Inhibition of mast cell-dependent conversion of cultured macrophages into foam cells with antiallergic drugs.

    PubMed

    Ma, H; Kovanen, P T

    2000-12-01

    Degranulation of isolated, rat peritoneal mast cells in the presence of low density lipoprotein (LDL) induces cholesteryl ester accumulation in cocultured macrophages with ensuing foam cell formation. This event occurs when the macrophages phagocytose LDL particles that have been bound to the heparin proteoglycans of exocytosed granules. In an attempt to inhibit such foam cell formation pharmacologically, rat peritoneal mast cells that had been passively sensitized with anti-ovalbumin-IgE were treated with 2 mast cell-stabilizing antianaphylactic drugs, MY-1250 or disodium cromoglycate (DSCG). Both drugs were found to inhibit antigen (ovalbumin)-triggered release of histamine from the mast cells, revealing mast cell stabilization. In cocultures of rat peritoneal macrophages and passively sensitized mast cells, addition of MY-1250 before addition of the antigen resulted in parallel reductions in histamine release from mast cells, uptake of [(14)C]sucrose-LDL, and accumulation of LDL-derived cholesteryl esters in the cocultured macrophages. Similarly, when passively sensitized mast cells were stimulated with antigen in the presence of DSCG and the preconditioned media containing all substances released from the drug-treated mast cells were collected and added to macrophages cultured in LDL-containing medium, uptake and esterification of LDL cholesterol by the macrophages were inhibited. The inhibitory effects of both drugs were mast cell-specific because neither drug inhibited the ability of macrophages to take up and esterify LDL cholesterol. Analysis of heparin proteoglycan contents of the incubation media revealed that both drugs had inhibited mast cells from expelling their granule remnants. Thus, both MY-1250 and DSCG prevent mast cells from releasing the heparin proteoglycan-containing vehicles that bind LDL and carry it into macrophages. This study suggests that antiallergic pharmacological agents could be used in animal models to prevent mast cell

  17. The effect of local anesthetic on pro-inflammatory macrophage modulation by mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Gray, Andrea; Marrero-Berrios, Ileana; Weinberg, Jonathan; Manchikalapati, Devasena; SchianodiCola, Joseph; Schloss, Rene S; Yarmush, Joel

    2016-04-01

    Administering local anesthetics (LAs) peri- and post-operatively aims to prevent or mitigate pain in surgical procedures and after tissue injury in cases of osteoarthritis (OA) and other degenerative diseases. Innovative tissue protective and reparative therapeutic interventions such as mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are likely to be exposed to co-administered drugs such as LAs. Therefore, it is important to determine how this exposure affects the therapeutic functions of MSCs and other cells in their target microenvironment. In these studies, we measured the effect of LAs, lidocaine and bupivacaine, on macrophage viability and pro-inflammatory secretion. We also examined their effect on modulation of the macrophage pro-inflammatory phenotype in an in vitro co-culture system with MSCs, by quantifying macrophage tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion and MSC prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production. Our studies indicate that both LAs directly attenuated macrophage TNF-α secretion, without significantly affecting viability, in a concentration- and potency-dependent manner. LA-mediated attenuation of macrophage TNF-α was sustained in co-culture with MSCs, but MSCs did not further enhance this anti-inflammatory effect. Concentration- and potency-dependent reductions in macrophage TNF-α were concurrent with decreased PGE2 levels in the co-cultures further indicating MSC-independent macrophage attenuation. MSC functional recovery from LA exposure was assessed by pre-treating MSCs with LAs prior to co-culture with macrophages. Both MSC attenuation of TNF-α and PGE2 secretion were impaired by pre-exposure to the more potent bupivacaine and high dose of lidocaine in a concentration-dependent manner. Therefore, LAs can affect anti-inflammatory function by both directly attenuating macrophage inflammation and MSC secretion and possibly by altering the local microenvironment which can secondarily reduce MSC function. Furthermore, the LA effect on MSC function may persist

  18. Requirement for non-regulated, constitutive calcium influx in macrophage survival signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Tano, Jean-Yves; Vazquez, Guillermo

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} We examine the role of constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx in macrophage survival. {yields} Survival signaling exhibits a mandatory requirement for constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx. {yields} CAM/CAMKII couples constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx to survival signaling. -- Abstract: The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT axis and the Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B) pathway play critical roles in macrophage survival. In cells other than macrophages proper operation of those two pathways requires Ca{sup 2+} influx into the cell, but if that is the case in macrophages remains unexplored. In the present work we used THP-1-derived macrophages and a pharmacological approach to examine for the first time the role of constitutive, non-regulated Ca{sup 2+} influx in PI3K/AKT and NF{kappa}B signaling. Blocking constitutive function of Ca{sup 2+}-permeable channels with the organic channel blocker SKF96365 completely prevented phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, AKT and its downstream target BAD in TNF{alpha}-treated macrophages. A similar effect was observed upon treating macrophages with the calmodulin (CAM) inhibitor W-7 or the calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII) inhibitor KN-62. In addition, pre-treating macrophages with SKF96365 significantly enhanced TNF{alpha}-induced apoptosis. Our findings suggest that in THP-1-derived macrophages survival signaling depends, to a significant extent, on constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx presumably through a mechanism that involves the CAM/CAMKII axis as a coupling component between constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx and activation of survival signaling.

  19. Neuron-macrophage crosstalk in the intestine: a “microglia” perspective

    PubMed Central

    Verheijden, Simon; Schepper, Sebastiaan De; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal macrophages are strategically located in different layers of the intestine, including the mucosa, submucosa and muscularis externa, where they perform complex tasks to maintain intestinal homeostasis. As the gastrointestinal tract is continuously challenged by foreign antigens, macrophage activation should be tightly controlled to prevent chronic inflammation and tissue damage. Unraveling the precise cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the tissue-specific control of macrophage activation is crucial to get more insight into intestinal immune regulation. Two recent reports provide unanticipated evidence that the enteric nervous system (ENS) acts as a critical regulator of macrophage function in the myenteric plexus. Both studies clearly illustrate that enteric neurons reciprocally interact with intestinal macrophages and are actively involved in shaping their phenotype. This concept has striking parallels with the central nervous system (CNS), where neuronal signals maintain microglia, the resident macrophages of the CNS, in a quiescent, anti-inflammatory state. This inevitably evokes the perception that the ENS and CNS share mechanisms of neuroimmune interaction. In line, intestinal macrophages, both in the muscularis externa and (sub)mucosa, express high levels of CX3CR1, a feature that was once believed to be unique for microglia. CX3CR1 is the sole receptor of fractalkine (CX3CL1), a factor mainly produced by neurons in the CNS to facilitate neuron-microglia communication. The striking parallels between resident macrophages of the brain and intestine might provide a promising new line of thought to get more insight into cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling macrophage activation in the gut. PMID:26528133

  20. HIF-1α-PDK1 axis-induced active glycolysis plays an essential role in macrophage migratory capacity

    PubMed Central

    Semba, Hiroaki; Takeda, Norihiko; Isagawa, Takayuki; Sugiura, Yuki; Honda, Kurara; Wake, Masaki; Miyazawa, Hidenobu; Yamaguchi, Yoshifumi; Miura, Masayuki; Jenkins, Dana M. R.; Choi, Hyunsung; Kim, Jung-whan; Asagiri, Masataka; Cowburn, Andrew S.; Abe, Hajime; Soma, Katsura; Koyama, Katsuhiro; Katoh, Manami; Sayama, Keimon; Goda, Nobuhito; Johnson, Randall S.; Manabe, Ichiro; Nagai, Ryozo; Komuro, Issei

    2016-01-01

    In severely hypoxic condition, HIF-1α-mediated induction of Pdk1 was found to regulate glucose oxidation by preventing the entry of pyruvate into the tricarboxylic cycle. Monocyte-derived macrophages, however, encounter a gradual decrease in oxygen availability during its migration process in inflammatory areas. Here we show that HIF-1α-PDK1-mediated metabolic changes occur in mild hypoxia, where mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity is unimpaired, suggesting a mode of glycolytic reprogramming. In primary macrophages, PKM2, a glycolytic enzyme responsible for glycolytic ATP synthesis localizes in filopodia and lammelipodia, where ATP is rapidly consumed during actin remodelling processes. Remarkably, inhibition of glycolytic reprogramming with dichloroacetate significantly impairs macrophage migration in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, inhibition of the macrophage HIF-1α-PDK1 axis suppresses systemic inflammation, suggesting a potential therapeutic approach for regulating inflammatory processes. Our findings thus demonstrate that adaptive responses in glucose metabolism contribute to macrophage migratory activity. PMID:27189088

  1. HIF-1α-PDK1 axis-induced active glycolysis plays an essential role in macrophage migratory capacity.

    PubMed

    Semba, Hiroaki; Takeda, Norihiko; Isagawa, Takayuki; Sugiura, Yuki; Honda, Kurara; Wake, Masaki; Miyazawa, Hidenobu; Yamaguchi, Yoshifumi; Miura, Masayuki; Jenkins, Dana M R; Choi, Hyunsung; Kim, Jung-Whan; Asagiri, Masataka; Cowburn, Andrew S; Abe, Hajime; Soma, Katsura; Koyama, Katsuhiro; Katoh, Manami; Sayama, Keimon; Goda, Nobuhito; Johnson, Randall S; Manabe, Ichiro; Nagai, Ryozo; Komuro, Issei

    2016-01-01

    In severely hypoxic condition, HIF-1α-mediated induction of Pdk1 was found to regulate glucose oxidation by preventing the entry of pyruvate into the tricarboxylic cycle. Monocyte-derived macrophages, however, encounter a gradual decrease in oxygen availability during its migration process in inflammatory areas. Here we show that HIF-1α-PDK1-mediated metabolic changes occur in mild hypoxia, where mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity is unimpaired, suggesting a mode of glycolytic reprogramming. In primary macrophages, PKM2, a glycolytic enzyme responsible for glycolytic ATP synthesis localizes in filopodia and lammelipodia, where ATP is rapidly consumed during actin remodelling processes. Remarkably, inhibition of glycolytic reprogramming with dichloroacetate significantly impairs macrophage migration in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, inhibition of the macrophage HIF-1α-PDK1 axis suppresses systemic inflammation, suggesting a potential therapeutic approach for regulating inflammatory processes. Our findings thus demonstrate that adaptive responses in glucose metabolism contribute to macrophage migratory activity. PMID:27189088

  2. The M2 macrophages induce autophagic vascular disorder and promote mouse sensitivity to urethane-related lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, G-G; Guo, Z-Z; Ma, X-F; Cao, N; Geng, S-N; Zheng, Y-Q; Meng, M-J; Lin, H-H; Han, G; Du, G-J

    2016-06-01

    Tumor vessels are known to be abnormal, with typically aberrant, leaky and disordered vessels. Here, we investigated whether polarized macrophage phenotypes are involved in tumor abnormal angiogenesis and what is its mechanism. We found that there was no difference in chemotaxis of polarized M1 and M2 macrophages to lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells and that either M1 or M2 macrophage-conditioned media had no effect on LLC cell proliferation. Unexpectedly, the M2 but not M1 macrophage-conditioned media promoted the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and simultaneously increased endothelial cell permeability in vitro and angiogenic index in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). The treatment with M2 but not M1 macrophage-conditioned media increased autophagosomes as well as microtubule-associated protein light chain 3B (LC3-B) expression (a robust marker of autophagosomes) but decreased p62 protein expression (a selective autophagy substrate) in HUVECs, the treatment with chloroquine that blocked autophagy abrogated the abnormal angiogenic efficacy of M2 macrophage-conditioned media. These results were confirmed in urethane-induced lung carcinogenic progression. Urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis led to more M2 macrophage phenotype and increased abnormal angiogenesis concomitant with the upregulation of LC3-B and the downregulation of p62. Clodronate liposome-induced macrophage depletion, chloroquine-induced autophagic prevention or salvianolic acid B-induced vascular protection decreased abnormal angiogenesis and lung carcinogenesis. In addition, we found that the tendency of age-related M2 macrophage polarization also promoted vascular permeability and carcinogenesis in urethane carcinogenic progression. These findings indicate that the M2 macrophages induce autophagic vascular disorder to promote lung cancer progression, and the autophagy improvement represents an efficacious strategy for abnormal angiogenesis and cancer

  3. Macrophages and Alcohol-Related Liver Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Cynthia; Mandrekar, Pranoti

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that macrophages have a critical role in the development of alcohol-induced inflammation in the liver. To define the precise pathogenic function of these cells during alcoholic liver disease (ALD), it is extremely important to conduct extensive studies in clinical settings that further elucidate the phenotypic diversity of macrophages in the context of ALD. Research to date already has identified several characteristics of macrophages that underlie the cells’ actions, including macrophage polarization and their phenotypic diversity. Other analyses have focused on the contributions of resident versus infiltrating macrophages/monocytes, as well as on the roles of macrophage mediators, in the development of ALD. Findings point to the potential of macrophages as a therapeutic target in alcoholic liver injury. Future studies directed toward understanding how alcohol affects macrophage phenotypic switch in the liver and other tissues, whether the liver microenvironment determines macrophage function in ALD, and if targeting of macrophages alleviates alcoholic liver injury, will provide promising strategies to manage patients with alcoholic hepatitis. PMID:26717583

  4. Macrophages: Their Emerging Roles in Bone.

    PubMed

    Sinder, Benjamin P; Pettit, Allison R; McCauley, Laurie K

    2015-12-01

    Macrophages are present in nearly all tissues and are critical for development, homeostasis, and regeneration. Resident tissue macrophages of bone, termed osteal macrophages, are recently classified myeloid cells that are distinct from osteoclasts. Osteal macrophages are located immediately adjacent to osteoblasts, regulate bone formation, and play diverse roles in skeletal homeostasis. Genetic or pharmacological modulation of macrophages in vivo results in significant bone phenotypes, and these phenotypes depend on which macrophage subsets are altered. Macrophages are also key mediators of osseous wound healing and fracture repair, with distinct roles at various stages of the repair process. A central function of macrophages is their phagocytic ability. Each day, billions of cells die in the body and efferocytosis (phagocytosis of apoptotic cells) is a critical process in both clearing dead cells and recruitment of replacement progenitor cells to maintain homeostasis. Recent data suggest a role for efferocytosis in bone biology and these new mechanisms are outlined. Finally, although macrophages have an established role in primary tumors, emerging evidence suggests that macrophages in bone support cancers which preferentially metastasize to the skeleton. Collectively, this developing area of osteoimmunology raises new questions and promises to provide novel insights into pathophysiologic conditions as well as therapeutic and regenerative approaches vital for skeletal health. PMID:26531055

  5. Storage xyloglucans: potent macrophages activators.

    PubMed

    do Rosário, Marianna Maia Taulois; Kangussu-Marcolino, Mônica Mendes; do Amaral, Alex Evangelista; Noleto, Guilhermina Rodrigues; Petkowicz, Carmen Lúcia de Oliveira

    2011-01-15

    Storage xyloglucans from the seeds of Copaifera langsdorffii, Hymenaea courbaril and Tamarindus indica were obtained by aqueous extraction from the milled and defatted cotyledons, XGC, XGJ and XGT, respectively. The resulting fractions showed similar monosaccharide composition with Glc:Xyl:Gal molar ratios of 2.4:1.5:1.0, 3.8:1.5:1,0 and 3.6:2.4:1.0 for XGC, XGJ and XGT, respectively. High-performance size-exclusion chromatography of the polysaccharides showed unimodal profiles, and the average molar mass (M(w)) was obtained for XGC (9.6 × 10⁵ g/mol), XGJ (9.1 × 10⁵ g/mol) and XGT (7.3 × 10⁵ g/mol). The immunomodulatory effects of the xyloglucans on peritoneal macrophages were evaluated. Phagocytic activity was observed in macrophages treated with XGT. The effect of XGT was tested on the production of O₂(.-) and NO. At 25 μg/ml XGT caused a 100% increase in NO production when compared to the control group; however, it did not affect O₂(.-) production in the absence of PMA. The production of TNF-α, interleukins 1β and 6 by macrophages in the presence of the xyloglucans was evaluated. The polysaccharides affected the production of the cytokines by macrophages to different degrees. XGC caused an enhancement of IL-1β and TNF-α production, compared to the other xyloglucans. For IL-6 production, XGT gave greater stimulation than XGC and XGJ, reaching 87% at 50 μg/ml. XGJ promoted a statistically significant effect on all cytokine productions tested. The results indicate that the xyloglucans from C. langsdorffii, H. courbaril and T. indica can be classified as biological response modifiers (BRM). PMID:20888807

  6. Adipocyte-derived lipids increase angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) expression and modulate macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kohlstedt, Karin; Trouvain, Caroline; Namgaladze, Dmitry; Fleming, Ingrid

    2011-03-01

    Human monocytes/macrophages express the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) but nothing is known about its role under physiological conditions. As adipose tissue contains resident macrophages that have been implicated in the generation of insulin resistance in expanding fat mass, we determined whether adipocytes release factors that affect ACE expression and function in monocytes. Incubation of human monocyte-derived macrophages with conditioned medium from freshly isolated human adipocytes (BMI = 25.4 ± 0.96) resulted in a 4-fold increase in ACE expression. The effect was insensitive to denaturation and different proteases but abolished after lipid extraction. mRNA levels of the major histocompatibility complex class II protein increased in parallel with ACE, whereas the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin (IL)-6, and cyclooxygenase-2 decreased. As a consequence of the reduction in MCP-1, monocyte recruitment was also attenuated. Moreover, adipocyte-conditioned medium prevented the interferon (IFN)-γ induced formation of TNF-α, IL-6, and MCP-1, all markers of classically-activated (M1 type) macrophages. The decrease in cytokine expression in adipocyte-conditioned medium-treated macrophages was sensitive to ACE silencing by small interfering RNA (siRNA). Accordingly, ACE overexpression in THP-1 cells mimicked the effect of adipocyte-conditioned medium. In both cell types, ACE inhibition failed to affect the changes induced by adipocyte conditioned-medium treatment and ACE overexpression. Thus, the modulation of macrophage polarization by ACE appears to be mediated independently of enzyme activity, probably via intracellular signaling. Interestingly, human macrophage ACE expression was also upregulated by IL-4 and IL-13, which promote the "alternative" activation of macrophages and decreased by LPS and IFN-γ. Mechanistically, adipocyte-conditioned medium stimulated the phosphorylation of

  7. Macrophages in resistance to candidiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Torres, A; Balish, E

    1997-01-01

    Candida albicans, an increasingly common opportunistic pathogenic fungus, frequently causes disease in immunodeficient but not immunocompetent hosts. Clarifying the role of the phagocytic cells that participate in resistance to candidiasis not only is basic to understanding how the host copes with this dimorphic pathogen but also will expedite the development of innovative prophylactic and therapeutic approaches for treating the multiple clinical presentations that candidiasis encompasses. In this review, we present evidence that a diverse population of mononuclear phagocytes, in different states of activation and differentiation and from a variety of host species, can phagocytize C. albicans blastoconidia via an array of opsonic and nonopsonic mechanisms and can kill C. albicans blastoconidia and hyphae by means of oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Reactive nitrogen intermediates should now be added to the well-established candidacidal reactive oxygen intermediates of macrophages. Furthermore, what were thought to be two independent pathways, i.e., nitric oxide and superoxide anion, have now been shown to combine to form a potent macrophage candidacidal molecule, peroxynitrite. In contrast to monocytes and neutrophils, which are important in resistance to early stages of C. albicans infections, more differentiated macrophages activated by cytokines such as gamma interferon participate in the acquired resistance of hosts with C. albicans-specific, cell-mediated immunity. Evidence presented in this review demonstrates that mononuclear phagocytes, in some instances in the absence of other professional phagocytes such as neutrophils, play an import role in resistance to systemic and mucosal candidiasis. PMID:9184009

  8. Interferon-γ inhibits nonopsonized phagocytosis of macrophages via an mTORC1-c/EBPβ pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zengfu; Zhou, Shuping; Sun, Chenming; Lei, Tong; Peng, Jianxia; Li, Weiguo; Ding, Pengbo; Lu, Jun; Zhao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infection often follows virus infection due to pulmonary interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production during virus infection, which down-regulates macrophage phagocytosis. The molecular mechanisms for this process are still poorly understood. In the present study, IFN-γ treatment significantly inhibited the ability of mouse macrophages to phagocytize nonopsonized chicken red blood cells (cRBCs), bacteria and beads in vitro, while it enhanced IgG- and complement-opsonized phagocytosis. IFN-γ treatment decreased the expression of MARCO (macrophage receptor with collagenous structure) in macrophages. Macrophages showed lower binding to and phagocytic ability of cRBCs when MARCO was blocked with antibody. In addition, IFN-γ induced high activity of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and decreased the expression of c/EBPβ (CCAAT enhancer-binding protein β) in macrophages. Rapamycin, a specific mTOR inhibitor, significantly reversed the inhibitory effect of IFN-γ on nonopsonized phagocytosis of macrophages and restored c/EBPβ and MARCO expression. Biochemical assays showed that c/EBPβ directly bound to the MARCO gene promoter. Rapamycin significantly hampered the viral-bacterial synergy and protected influenza-infected mice from subsequent bacterial infection. Thus, IFN-γ inhibited the nonopsonized phagocytosis of macrophages through the mTOR-c/EBPβ-MARCO pathway. The present study offered evidence indicating that mTOR may be one of the key target molecules for the prevention of secondary bacterial infection caused by primary virus infection. PMID:25277143

  9. Early differential molecular response of a macrophage cell line to yeast and hyphal forms of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Blasi, E; Pitzurra, L; Puliti, M; Lanfrancone, L; Bistoni, F

    1992-01-01

    The dimorphic transition of Candida albicans from the yeast (Y-Candida) to the hyphal (H-Candida) form is a complex event; the relevance of this transition in fungal pathogenicity is still poorly understood. By using a cloned macrophage cell line (ANA-1), we questioned whether the interaction between macrophages and Y-Candida or H-Candida could affect specific cell functions, i.e., tumor necrosis factor and lysozyme production. We found that ANA-1 macrophages selectively responded to H-Candida with increased tumor necrosis factor and downregulated lysozyme, as assessed by measurement of relative mRNA levels and secreted biological activities. The H-Candida-mediated effects were (i) dependent upon the ratio between ANA-1 macrophages and H-Candida, (ii) detectable after 1 h of coincubation, and (iii) accomplished without fungal ingestion. Conversely, Y-Candida, which was found inside the ANA-1 macrophages, did not affect tumor necrosis factor and lysozyme production, nor did it prevent the macrophage response to other stimuli. Overall, these results indicate that a macrophage can distinguish between Y-Candida and H-Candida and that only the latter is able to modulate specific functions. H-Candida is recognized and probably processed as an extracellular target. The possible implication of macrophages as autocrine and paracrine regulatory cells during Candida infections is discussed. Images PMID:1541557

  10. Multianalyte Microphysiometry of Macrophage Responses to Phorbol Myristate Acetate, Lipopolysaccharide, and Lipoarabinomannan

    PubMed Central

    Kimmel, Danielle W.; Meschievitz, Mika E.; Hiatt, Leslie A.; Cliffel, David E.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the hypothesis that mycobacterial antigens generate different metabolic responses in macrophages as compared to gram-negative effectors and macrophage activators. The metabolic activation of macrophages by PMA is a useful tool for studying virulent agents and can be compared to other effectors. While phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) is commonly used to study macrophage activation, the concentration used to create this physiological response varies. The response of RAW-264.7 macrophages is concentration-dependent, where the metabolic response to high concentrations of PMA decreases suggesting deactivation. The gram-negative effector, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), was seen to promote glucose and oxygen production which were used to produce a delayed onset of oxidative burst. Pre-incubation with interferon-γ (IFN-γ) increased the effect on cell metabolism, where the synergistic effects of IFN-γ and LPS immediately initiated oxidative burst. These studies exhibited a stark contrast with lipoarabinomannan (LAM), an antigenic glycolipid component associated with the bacterial genus Mycobacterium. The presence of LAM effectively inhibits any metabolic response preventing consumption of glucose and oxygen for the promotion of oxidative burst and to ensure pathogenic proliferation. This study demonstrates for the first time the immediate inhibitory metabolic effects LAM has on macrophages, suggesting implications for future intervention studies with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:25798034