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Sample records for prevents progressive dopamine

  1. MEASURING POLLUTION PREVENTION PROGRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The workshop, "Measuring Pollution Prevention Progress," was held in Salem, MA, March 31 - April 2, 1993. he purpose of this workshop was to present the latest significant research and practical findings related to pollution prevention measurement from ongoing and recently comple...

  2. Genetic Variation in Dopamine Pathways Differentially Associated with Smoking Progression in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laucht, Manfred; Becker, Katja; Frank, Josef; Schmidt, Martin H.; Esser, Gunter; Treutlein, Jens; Skowronek, Markus H.; Schumann, Gunter

    2008-01-01

    A study examines whether genetic variation in dopamine pathways differentially associate with smoking progression in adolescence. Results indicate the influence of specific dopamine genes in different stages of smoking progression in adolescents.

  3. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of ... inhibitor, can do an even better job of preventing breast cancer than the SERMs. Aromatase inhibitors stop an enzyme ...

  4. Metformin Prevents Nigrostriatal Dopamine Degeneration Independent of AMPK Activation in Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bayliss, Jacqueline A.; Lemus, Moyra B.; Santos, Vanessa V.; Deo, Minh; Davies, Jeffrey S.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Elsworth, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Metformin is a widely prescribed drug used to treat type-2 diabetes, although recent studies show it has wide ranging effects to treat other diseases. Animal and retrospective human studies indicate that Metformin treatment is neuroprotective in Parkinson’s Disease (PD), although the neuroprotective mechanism is unknown, numerous studies suggest the beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis may be through AMPK activation. In this study we tested whether or not AMPK activation in dopamine neurons was required for the neuroprotective effects of Metformin in PD. We generated transgenic mice in which AMPK activity in dopamine neurons was ablated by removing AMPK beta 1 and beta 2 subunits from dopamine transporter expressing neurons. These AMPK WT and KO mice were then chronically exposed to Metformin in the drinking water then exposed to MPTP, the mouse model of PD. Chronic Metformin treatment significantly attenuated the MPTP-induced loss of Tyrosine Hydroxylase (TH) neuronal number and volume and TH protein concentration in the nigrostriatal pathway. Additionally, Metformin treatment prevented the MPTP-induced elevation of the DOPAC:DA ratio regardless of genotype. Metformin also prevented MPTP induced gliosis in the Substantia Nigra. These neuroprotective actions were independent of genotype and occurred in both AMPK WT and AMPK KO mice. Overall, our studies suggest that Metformin’s neuroprotective effects are not due to AMPK activation in dopaminergic neurons and that more research is required to determine how metformin acts to restrict the development of PD. PMID:27467571

  5. Progress toward a Prevention Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stagner, Matthew W.; Lansing, Jiffy

    2009-01-01

    Matthew Stagner and Jiffy Lansing chart developments in the field of child maltreatment and propose a new framework for preventing child abuse and neglect. They begin by describing the concept of investment-prevention as it has been applied recently in fields such as health care and welfare. They then explain how the new framework applies to…

  6. Occupational injury prevention research: progress and priorities.

    PubMed

    Stout, N A; Linn, H I

    2002-12-01

    The twentieth century witnessed remarkable reductions in the number and rate of occupational fatalities and injuries. However, many preventable injuries and deaths still occur. Barriers to progress in occupational injury prevention are discussed, along with strategies for overcoming them. In mining, the frequency of death has dramatically declined over the century. The latest figures from the BLS indicate that less than 6000 worker deaths from injury occurred in 2000. Catastrophic events have prompted increased attention, resources, and action on workplace hazards and risks, resulting in sweeping changes, including new protective laws. Science based approaches to prevention have contributed to progress. Multidisciplinary collaboration among injury prevention researchers, and collaboration and cooperation among multiple sectors, have improved the relevance and application of injury prevention research and development. Barriers to further progress include lack of evaluation of the effectiveness of prevention strategies and technologies, including cost effectiveness; lack of widespread implementation of known, effective prevention; and lack of efficient transfer and implementation of prevention knowledge and products to the workplace. Evaluation and implementation of prevention efforts are most successfully achieved in partnership between researchers and the industry at risk, which requires outreach efforts on the part of the occupational research community. PMID:12460949

  7. Hanford Site pollution prevention progress report

    SciTech Connect

    BETSCH, M.D.

    1999-10-05

    The Richland Operations Office (RL) and Office of River Protection (ORP) are pleased to issue the attached Pollution Prevention Progress Report. We have just met the most aggressive waste reduction and A recycling goals to date and are publishing this report to recognize A the site's progress, and to ensure it will sustain success beyond 1 Fiscal Year 2000. This report was designed to inform the been made by RL and ORP in Waste Minimization (WMin) and Pollution Prevention (P2). RL, ORP and their contractors are committed to protecting the environment, and we reiterate pollution prevention should continue to be at the forefront of the environmental cleanup and research efforts. As you read the attached report, we believe you will see a clear demonstration of RL and ORP's outstanding performance as it has been responsible and accountable to the nation, its employees, and the community in which we live and work. commitment that all employees have for environmental stewardship. The report provides useful information about the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) environmental policy and programs, and contains countless examples of waste minimization projects. This year was the first year our site received the White House Closing the Circle in the category of Affirmative Procurement. This Award recognizes our site for designing a comprehensive strategy for achieving 100 percent purchases of the U.S.Environmenta1 Protection Agency designated recycled items. DOE-Headquarters also acknowledged the site in 1999 for its public outreach efforts in communicating pollution prevention to Hanford Site employees and the community. Our site is truly a recognized leader in outreach as it has kept this title for two consecutive years. In previous years, we received the White House Closing the Circle Honorable Mention in Affirmative Procurement and several other National DOE Awards. Through partnership with the local community and stakeholders, the site and its contractors have a clear

  8. Outcomes of assisted reproduction treatment after dopamine agonist -cabergoline- for prevention of ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Movahedi, Shohreh; Safdarian, Leili; Agahoseini, Marzieh; Aleyasin, Ashraf; Khodaverdi, Sepideh; Asadollah, Sara; Kord Valeshabad, Ali; Fallahi, Parvin; Rezaeeian, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by ovaries in response to HCG administration is one of the main mechanisms of ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome. Since Dopamine/dopamine receptor2 (Dp-r2) pathway activity -mediated by VEGF/ Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR- 2) signaling-, is associated with angiogenic events, dopamine agonists were used for the management of severe forms of OHSS. In order to assess the effects of Cabergoline on angiogenesis in the human endometrium, and subsequently its impacts on the implantation rate this study was conducted. Methods: This historical cohort study was conducted based on existing data of 115 patients (20-40 years) whom underwent assisted reproductive treatment (ART) and with a high probability for developing OHSS between March 2007 and September 2008. Forty five cases received Cabergoline were compared to 70 control subjects. The statistical methods used were: Unpaired t-test for continuous variables and the chi-square test (or Fisher’s exact test if required) for categorical variables. Results: None of the patients (treatment or control group) developed OHSS. The etiologies of infertility and administration of GnRH agonist or antagonist protocols were similar in two groups (p>0.2). Number of transferred embryos and zygote intra-fallopian transfer (ZIFT) did not differ between the two groups (p≥0.06). Implantation rate in treatment (3.1%) and control (6.6%) subjects was similar (p=0.4). No significant difference was observed in fertilization rate, chemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancies between the two groups (p>0.5). Conclusion: Cabergoline can be safely administered in ART protocols to prevent OHSS, without compromising ART outcomes. PMID:27493915

  9. A measurement method for pollution prevention progress

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, D.G.; Knodel, R.M.; Bridges, J.S.

    1995-10-01

    A software program (P2P) has been developed for measuring progress P2 resulting from product redesign, product reformulation, or product replacement. The program compares the pollution generated by the original product with that from the modified or replacement product. It can take into account the various lifecycle stages of the product if desired. The pollution prevented (or sometimes increased) as a consequence of the redesign can be delineated with respect to the media affected. Reports can also be generated that show on which EPA regulatory lists the {open_quotes}prevented{close_quotes} or the {open_quotes}increased{close_quotes} pollutants appear. In the initial version of P2P (released in January 1995), pollution prevented is indicated simply in terms of mass. In a subsequent version now being developed, the relative {open_quote}potency{close_quotes} of various pollutants within a class will be considered. Also, the method will be extended for application to P2 projects of all types, not just product changes.

  10. LRRK2 BAC transgenic rats develop progressive, L-DOPA-responsive motor impairment, and deficits in dopamine circuit function

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Max; Alegre-Abarrategui, Javier; Potgieter, Dawid; Kaufmann, Anna-Kristin; Exley, Richard; Deltheil, Thierry; Threlfell, Sarah; Connor-Robson, Natalie; Brimblecombe, Katherine; Wallings, Rebecca; Cioroch, Milena; Bannerman, David M.; Bolam, J. Paul; Magill, Peter J.; Cragg, Stephanie J.; Dodson, Paul D.; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) lead to late-onset, autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease, characterized by the degeneration of dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta, a deficit in dopamine neurotransmission and the development of motor and non-motor symptoms. The most prevalent Parkinson's disease LRRK2 mutations are located in the kinase (G2019S) and GTPase (R1441C) encoding domains of LRRK2. To better understand the sequence of events that lead to progressive neurophysiological deficits in vulnerable neurons and circuits in Parkinson's disease, we have generated LRRK2 bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic rats expressing either G2019S or R1441C mutant, or wild-type LRRK2, from the complete human LRRK2 genomic locus, including endogenous promoter and regulatory regions. Aged (18–21 months) G2019S and R1441C mutant transgenic rats exhibit L-DOPA-responsive motor dysfunction, impaired striatal dopamine release as determined by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, and cognitive deficits. In addition, in vivo recordings of identified substantia nigra pars compacta dopamine neurons in R1441C LRRK2 transgenic rats reveal an age-dependent reduction in burst firing, which likely results in further reductions to striatal dopamine release. These alterations to dopamine circuit function occur in the absence of neurodegeneration or abnormal protein accumulation within the substantia nigra pars compacta, suggesting that nigrostriatal dopamine dysfunction precedes detectable protein aggregation and cell death in the development of Parkinson's disease. In conclusion, our longitudinal deep-phenotyping provides novel insights into how the genetic burden arising from human mutant LRRK2 manifests as early pathophysiological changes to dopamine circuit function and highlights a potential model for testing Parkinson's therapeutics. PMID:26744332

  11. LRRK2 BAC transgenic rats develop progressive, L-DOPA-responsive motor impairment, and deficits in dopamine circuit function.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Max; Alegre-Abarrategui, Javier; Potgieter, Dawid; Kaufmann, Anna-Kristin; Exley, Richard; Deltheil, Thierry; Threlfell, Sarah; Connor-Robson, Natalie; Brimblecombe, Katherine; Wallings, Rebecca; Cioroch, Milena; Bannerman, David M; Bolam, J Paul; Magill, Peter J; Cragg, Stephanie J; Dodson, Paul D; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) lead to late-onset, autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease, characterized by the degeneration of dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta, a deficit in dopamine neurotransmission and the development of motor and non-motor symptoms. The most prevalent Parkinson's disease LRRK2 mutations are located in the kinase (G2019S) and GTPase (R1441C) encoding domains of LRRK2. To better understand the sequence of events that lead to progressive neurophysiological deficits in vulnerable neurons and circuits in Parkinson's disease, we have generated LRRK2 bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic rats expressing either G2019S or R1441C mutant, or wild-type LRRK2, from the complete human LRRK2 genomic locus, including endogenous promoter and regulatory regions. Aged (18-21 months) G2019S and R1441C mutant transgenic rats exhibit L-DOPA-responsive motor dysfunction, impaired striatal dopamine release as determined by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, and cognitive deficits. In addition, in vivo recordings of identified substantia nigra pars compacta dopamine neurons in R1441C LRRK2 transgenic rats reveal an age-dependent reduction in burst firing, which likely results in further reductions to striatal dopamine release. These alterations to dopamine circuit function occur in the absence of neurodegeneration or abnormal protein accumulation within the substantia nigra pars compacta, suggesting that nigrostriatal dopamine dysfunction precedes detectable protein aggregation and cell death in the development of Parkinson's disease. In conclusion, our longitudinal deep-phenotyping provides novel insights into how the genetic burden arising from human mutant LRRK2 manifests as early pathophysiological changes to dopamine circuit function and highlights a potential model for testing Parkinson's therapeutics. PMID:26744332

  12. Concise Review: Using Stem Cells to Prevent the Progression of Myopia – A Concept

    PubMed Central

    Janowski, Miroslaw; Bulte, Jeff W.M.; Handa, James T.; Rini, David; Walczak, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of myopia has increased in modern society due to the educational load of children. This condition is growing rapidly, especially in Asian countries where it has already reached a pandemic level. Typically, the younger the child’s age at the onset of myopia, the more rapidly the condition will progress and the greater the likelihood that it will develop the known sight-threatening complications of high myopia. This rise in incidence of severe myopia has contributed to an increased frequency of eye diseases in adulthood, which often complicate therapeutic procedures. Currently, no treatment is available to prevent myopia progression. Stem cell therapy can potentially address two components of myopia. Regardless of the exact etiology, myopia is always associated with scleral weakness. In this context, a strategy aimed at scleral reinforcement by transplanting connective tissue-supportive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is an attractive approach that could yield effective and universal therapy. Sunlight exposure appears to have a protective effect against myopia. It is postulated that this effect is mediated via local ocular production of dopamine. With a variety of dopamine-producing cells already available for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, stem cells engineered for dopamine production could be utilized for the treatment of myopia. In this review, we further explore these concepts and present evidence from the literature to support the use of stem cell therapy for the treatment of myopia. PMID:25752937

  13. Concise Review: Using Stem Cells to Prevent the Progression of Myopia-A Concept.

    PubMed

    Janowski, Miroslaw; Bulte, Jeff W M; Handa, James T; Rini, David; Walczak, Piotr

    2015-07-01

    The prevalence of myopia has increased in modern society due to the educational load of children. This condition is growing rapidly, especially in Asian countries where it has already reached a pandemic level. Typically, the younger the child's age at the onset of myopia, the more rapidly the condition will progress and the greater the likelihood that it will develop the known sight-threatening complications of high myopia. This rise in incidence of severe myopia has contributed to an increased frequency of eye diseases in adulthood, which often complicate therapeutic procedures. Currently, no treatment is available to prevent myopia progression. Stem cell therapy can potentially address two components of myopia. Regardless of the exact etiology, myopia is always associated with scleral weakness. In this context, a strategy aimed at scleral reinforcement by transplanting connective tissue-supportive mesenchymal stem cells is an attractive approach that could yield effective and universal therapy. Sunlight exposure appears to have a protective effect against myopia. It is postulated that this effect is mediated via local ocular production of dopamine. With a variety of dopamine-producing cells already available for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, stem cells engineered for dopamine production could be used for the treatment of myopia. In this review, we further explore these concepts and present evidence from the literature to support the use of stem cell therapy for the treatment of myopia. PMID:25752937

  14. Sufficiency of Mesolimbic Dopamine Neuron Stimulation for the Progression to Addiction.

    PubMed

    Pascoli, Vincent; Terrier, Jean; Hiver, Agnès; Lüscher, Christian

    2015-12-01

    The factors causing the transition from recreational drug consumption to addiction remain largely unknown. It has not been tested whether dopamine (DA) is sufficient to trigger this process. Here we use optogenetic self-stimulation of DA neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) to selectively mimic the defining commonality of addictive drugs. All mice readily acquired self-stimulation. After weeks of abstinence, cue-induced relapse was observed in parallel with a potentiation of excitatory afferents onto D1 receptor-expressing neurons of the nucleus accumbens (NAc). When the mice had to endure a mild electric foot shock to obtain a stimulation, some stopped while others persevered. The resistance to punishment was associated with enhanced neural activity in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) while chemogenetic inhibition of the OFC reduced compulsivity. Together, these results show that stimulating VTA DA neurons induces behavioral and cellular hallmarks of addiction, indicating sufficiency for the induction and progression of the disease. PMID:26586182

  15. Acetaldehyde sequestering prevents ethanol-induced stimulation of mesolimbic dopamine transmission.

    PubMed

    Enrico, Paolo; Sirca, Donatella; Mereu, Maddalena; Peana, Alessandra Tiziana; Lintas, Alessandra; Golosio, Angela; Diana, Marco

    2009-03-01

    Acetaldehyde (ACD) has been postulated to mediate some of the neurobehavioral effects of ethanol (EtOH). In this study we sought to evaluate whether the stimulatory effects of EtOH on mesolimbic dopamine (DA) transmission are affected by the administration of ACD-sequestering agent D-penicillamine (Dp). To this end we studied the effect of EtOH and ACD in the rat mesoaccumbens pathway by in vivo microdialysis in the nucleus accumbens shell (NAccs), and by single cell extracellular recordings from antidromically identified mesoaccumbens DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Both EtOH (1g/kg) and ACD (20mg/kg) administration increased DA levels in the NAccs and increased the activity of mesoaccumbens DA neurons. Pretreatment with Dp (50mg/kg i.p. 1h before drug challenge) prevented both EtOH- and ACD-induced stimulation of the DA mesolimbic system without affecting morphine stimulatory actions. These observations add further support to the notion that EtOH-derived ACD stimulates the mesolimbic DA system and is essential in EtOH-induced stimulation of the DA mesoaccumbens system. We conclude that modulation of ACD bioavailability may influence the addictive profile of EtOH by decreasing its psychotropic effects and possibly leading the way to new pharmacological treatments of alcoholism. PMID:19070441

  16. Conjugation of Hyaluronic Acid onto Surfaces via the Interfacial Polymerization of Dopamine to Prevent Protein Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Huang, Renliang; Liu, Xia; Ye, Huijun; Su, Rongxin; Qi, Wei; Wang, Libing; He, Zhimin

    2015-11-10

    A versatile, convenient, and cost-effective method that can be used for grafting antifouling materials onto different surfaces is highly desirable in many applications. Here, we report the one-step fabrication of antifouling surfaces via the polymerization of dopamine and the simultaneous deposition of anionic hyaluronic acid (HA) on Au substrates. The water contact angle of the Au surfaces decreased from 84.9° to 24.8° after the attachment of a highly uniform polydopamine (PDA)/HA hybrid film. The results of surface plasmon resonance analysis showed that the Au-PDA/HA surfaces adsorbed proteins from solutions of bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, β-lactoglobulin, fibrinogen, and soybean milk in ultralow or low amounts (4.8-31.7 ng/cm(2)). The hydrophilicity and good antifouling performance of the PDA/HA surfaces is attributable to the HA chains that probably attached onto their upper surface via hydrogen bonding between PDA and HA. At the same time, the electrostatic repulsion between PDA and HA probably prevents the aggregation of PDA, resulting in the formation of a highly uniform PDA/HA hybrid film with the HA chains (with a stretched structure) on the upper surface. We also developed a simple method for removing this PDA/HA film and recycling the Au substrates by using an aqueous solution of NaOH as the hydrolyzing agent. The Au surface remained undamaged, and a PDA/HA film could be redeposited on the surface, with the surface exhibiting good antifouling performance even after 10 such cycles. Finally, it was found that this grafting method is applicable to other substrates, including epoxy resins, polystyrene, glass, and steel, owing to the strong adhesion of PDA with these substrates. PMID:26488547

  17. Progress in Neuroprotective Strategies for Preventing Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Munjal M.; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shetty, Ashok K.

    2008-01-01

    Neuroprotection is increasingly considered as a promising therapy for preventing and treating temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The development of chronic TLE, also termed as epileptogenesis, is a dynamic process. An initial precipitating injury (IPI) such as the status epilepticus (SE) leads to neurodegeneration, abnormal reorganization of the brain circuitry and a significant loss of functional inhibition. All of these changes likely contribute to the development of chronic epilepsy, characterized by spontaneous recurrent motor seizures (SRMS) and learning and memory deficits. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current state of knowledge pertaining to neuroprotection in epileptic conditions, and to highlight the efficacy of distinct neuroprotective strategies for preventing or treating chronic TLE. Although the administration of certain conventional and new generation antiepileptic drugs is effective for primary neuroprotection such as reduced neurodegeneration after acute seizures or the SE, their competence for preventing the development of chronic epilepsy after an IPI is either unknown or not promising. On the other hand, alternative strategies such as the ketogenic diet therapy, administration of distinct neurotrophic factors, hormones or antioxidants seem useful for preventing and treating chronic TLE. However, long term studies on the efficacy of these approaches introduced at different time-points after the SE or an IPI are lacking. Additionally, grafting of fetal hippocampal cells at early time-points after an IPI holds considerable promise for preventing TLE, though issues regarding availability of donor cells, ethical concerns, timing of grafting after SE, and durability of graft-mediated seizure suppression need to be resolved for further advances with this approach. Overall, from the studies performed so far, there is consensus that neuroprotective strategies need to be employed as quickly as possible after the onset of the SE or an IPI for

  18. Getting Personal: Progress and Pitfalls in HIV Prevention among Latinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaro, Hortensia; Raj, Anita; Reed, Elizabeth; Ulibarri, Monica

    2011-01-01

    This article first presents the political, personal, and epidemiological context of Hortensia Amaro's 1988 publication in "Psychology of Women Quarterly" ("PWQ"), "Considerations for Prevention of HIV Infection Among Hispanic Women" (Amaro, 1988). Second, it provides a brief summary of progress in HIV prevention with Latinas. The third section…

  19. Dopamine D2 receptor agonists inhibit lung cancer progression by reducing angiogenesis and tumor infiltrating myeloid derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Hoeppner, Luke H; Wang, Ying; Sharma, Anil; Javeed, Naureen; Van Keulen, Virginia P; Wang, Enfeng; Yang, Ping; Roden, Anja C; Peikert, Tobias; Molina, Julian R; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2015-01-01

    We sought to determine whether Dopamine D2 Receptor (D2R) agonists inhibit lung tumor progression and identify subpopulations of lung cancer patients that benefit most from D2R agonist therapy. We demonstrate D2R agonists abrogate lung tumor progression in syngeneic (LLC1) and human xenograft (A549) orthotopic murine models through inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and reduction of tumor infiltrating myeloid derived suppressor cells. Pathological examination of human lung cancer tissue revealed a positive correlation between endothelial D2R expression and tumor stage. Lung cancer patients with a smoking history exhibited greater levels of D2R in lung endothelium. Our results suggest D2R agonists may represent a promising individualized therapy for lung cancer patients with high levels of endothelial D2R expression and a smoking history. PMID:25226814

  20. Dopamine D2 Receptor Agonists Inhibit Lung Cancer Progression by Reducing Angiogenesis and Tumor Infiltrating Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoeppner, Luke H.; Wang, Ying; Sharma, Anil; Javeed, Naureen; Van Keulen, Virginia P.; Wang, Enfeng; Yang, Ping; Roden, Anja C.; Peikert, Tobias; Molina, Julian R.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2014-01-01

    We sought to determine whether Dopamine D2 Receptor (D2R) agonists inhibit lung tumor progression and identify subpopulations of lung cancer patients that benefit most from D2R agonist therapy. We demonstrate D2R agonists abrogate lung tumor progression in syngeneic (LLC1) and human xenograft (A549) orthotopic murine models through inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and reduction of tumor infiltrating myeloid derived suppressor cells. Pathological examination of human lung cancer tissue revealed a positive correlation between endothelial D2R expression and tumor stage. Lung cancer patients with a smoking history exhibited greater levels of D2R in lung endothelium. Our results suggest D2R agonists may represent a promising individualized therapy for lung cancer patients with high levels of endothelial D2R expression and a smoking history. PMID:25226814

  1. Hanford site pollution prevention plan progress report, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkendall, J.R.

    1996-08-26

    This report tracks progress made during 1995 against the goals stated in DOE/RL-92-62, Executive Summary, Hanford Site Pollution Prevention Plan. The Executive Summary of the plan was submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in September 1992. The plan, Executive Summary, and the progress reports are elements of a pollution prevention planning program that is required by WAC 173-307,`Plans,` for all hazardous substance users and/or all hazardous waste generators regulated by Ecology. These regulations implement RCW 70.95C, `Waste Reduction,` an act relating to hazardous waste reduction. The act encourages voluntary efforts to redesign industrial processes to help reduce or eliminate hazardous substances and hazardous waste byproducts, and to maximize the in- process reuse or reclamation of valuable spent material.

  2. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This Report summarizes the waste generation and pollution prevention activities of the major operational sites in the Department of Energy (DOE). We are witnessing progress in waste reduction from routine operations that are the focus of Department-wide reduction goals set by the Secretary on May 3,1996. The goals require that by the end of 1999, we reduce, recycle, reuse, and otherwise avoid waste generation to achieve a 50 percent reduction over 1993 levels. This Report provides the first measure of our progress in waste reduction and recycling against our 1993 waste generation baseline. While we see progress in reducing waste from our normal operations, we must begin to focus attention on waste generated by cleanup and facilities stabilization activities that are the major functions of the Office of Environmental Management. Reducing the generation of waste is one of the seven principles that I have established for the Office of Environmental Management Ten Year Plan. As part of our vision to complete a major portion of the environmental cleanup at DOE sites over the next ten years, we must utilize the potential of the pollution prevention program to reduce the cost of our cleanup program. We have included the Secretarial goals as part of the performance measures for the Ten Year Plan, and we are committed to implementing pollution prevention ideas. Through the efforts of both Federal and contractor employees, our pollution prevention program has reduced waste and the cost of our operations. I applaud their efforts and look forward to reporting further waste reduction progress in the next annual update of this Report.

  3. Cabergoline, Dopamine D2 Receptor Agonist, Prevents Neuronal Cell Death under Oxidative Stress via Reducing Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Odaka, Haruki; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Adachi, Naoki; Ooshima, Yoshiko; Nakajima, Shingo; Katanuma, Yusuke; Inoue, Takafumi; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence demonstrate that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease. Potent antioxidants may therefore be effective in the treatment of such diseases. Cabergoline, a dopamine D2 receptor agonist and antiparkinson drug, has been studied using several cell types including mesencephalic neurons, and is recognized as a potent radical scavenger. Here, we examined whether cabergoline exerts neuroprotective effects against oxidative stress through a receptor-mediated mechanism in cultured cortical neurons. We found that neuronal death induced by H2O2 exposure was inhibited by pretreatment with cabergoline, while this protective effect was eliminated in the presence of a dopamine D2 receptor inhibitor, spiperone. Activation of ERK1/2 by H2O2 was suppressed by cabergoline, and an ERK signaling pathway inhibitor, U0126, similarly protected cortical neurons from cell death. This suggested the ERK signaling pathway has a critical role in cabergoline-mediated neuroprotection. Furthermore, increased extracellular levels of glutamate induced by H2O2, which might contribute to ERK activation, were reduced by cabergoline, while inhibitors for NMDA receptor or L-type Ca2+ channel demonstrated a survival effect against H2O2. Interestingly, we found that cabergoline increased expression levels of glutamate transporters such as EAAC1. Taken together, these results suggest that cabergoline has a protective effect on cortical neurons via a receptor-mediated mechanism including repression of ERK1/2 activation and extracellular glutamate accumulation induced by H2O2. PMID:24914776

  4. 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone prevents while methylone enhances methamphetamine-induced damage to dopamine nerve endings: β-ketoamphetamine modulation of neurotoxicity by the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Anneken, John H; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M

    2015-04-01

    Methylone, 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), and mephedrone are psychoactive ingredients of 'bath salts' and their abuse represents a growing public health care concern. These drugs are cathinone derivatives and are classified chemically as β-ketoamphetamines. Because of their close structural similarity to the amphetamines, methylone, MDPV, and mephedrone share most of their pharmacological, neurochemical, and behavioral properties. One point of divergence in their actions is the ability to cause damage to the CNS. Unlike methamphetamine, the β-ketoamphetamines do not damage dopamine (DA) nerve endings. However, mephedrone has been shown to significantly accentuate methamphetamine neurotoxicity. Bath salt formulations contain numerous different psychoactive ingredients, and individuals who abuse bath salts also coabuse other illicit drugs. Therefore, we have evaluated the effects of methylone, MDPV, mephedrone, and methamphetamine on DA nerve endings. The β-ketoamphetamines alone or in all possible two-drug combinations do not result in damage to DA nerve endings but do cause hyperthermia. MDPV completely protects against the neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine while methylone accentuates it. Neither MDPV nor methylone attenuates the hyperthermic effects of methamphetamine. The potent neuroprotective effects of MDPV extend to amphetamine-, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-, and MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. These results indicate that β-ketoamphetamine drugs that are non-substrate blockers of the DA transporter (i.e., MDPV) protect against methamphetamine neurotoxicity, whereas those that are substrates for uptake by the DA transporter and which cause DA release (i.e., methylone, mephedrone) accentuate neurotoxicity. METH (a) enters DA nerve endings via the DAT, causes leakage of DA into the cytoplasm and then into the synapse via DAT-mediated reverse transport. Methylone (METHY) and mephedrone (MEPH; b), like METH, are substrates for the DAT but release

  5. Preventing the progression of prehypertension to hypertension: role of antihypertensives.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Flávio Danni; de Mello, Renato Bandeira; Fuchs, Sandra Costa

    2015-01-01

    Recent guidelines for the diagnosis and management of hypertension reversed the historical trend to recommend lower blood pressure (BP) thresholds to diagnose hypertension in high-risk individuals, such as patients with diabetes and elderly patients. The decision to raise the BP thresholds for diagnosis of hypertension in patients with diabetes was mostly based on the findings of the ACCORD trial. Nonetheless, the results of the ACCORD trial are within the predicted benefit to prevent coronary artery disease and stroke by meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCT), particularly in regard to the prevention of stroke. The Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC 8) did not address prehypertension. There are many RCT done in individuals with prehypertension and concomitant cardiovascular disease showing the benefit of treatment of these patients. Trials exploring the efficacy of interventions to prevent cardiovascular disease in individuals with prehypertension free of cardiovascular disease would be hardly feasible in face of the low absolute risk of these individuals. Considering the risks of prehypertension for cardiovascular disease and the fast progression to hypertension of a large proportion of individuals with prehypertension, it is worth to consider drug treatment for individuals with prehypertension. RCT showed that the progression to hypertension can be partially halted by BP-lowering agents. These and ongoing clinical trials are herein revised. Prehypertension may be a window of opportunity to prevent hypertension and its cardiovascular consequences. PMID:25432897

  6. Effect of dopamine-related drugs on duodenal ulcer induced by cysteamine or propionitrile: prevention and aggravation may not be mediated by gastrointestinal secretory changes in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, G.; Brown, A.; Szabo, S.

    1987-03-01

    Dose- and time-response studies have been performed with dopamine agonists and antagonists using the cysteamine and propionitrile duodenal ulcer models in the rat. The experiments demonstrate that the chemically induced duodenal ulcer is prevented by bromocriptine, lergotrile and reduced by apomorphine or L-dopa. Aggravation of cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer was seen especially after (-)-butaclamol, (-)-sulpiride, haloperidol and, less effectively, after other dopaminergic antagonists. The duodenal antiulcerogenic action of dopamine agonists was more prominent after chronic administration than after a single dose, whereas the opposite was found concerning the proulcerogenic effect of dopamine antagonists. In the chronic gastric fistula rat, both the antiulcerogens bromocriptine or lergotrile and the proulcerogens haloperidol, pimozide or (-)-N-(2-chlorethyl)-norapomorphine decreased the cysteamine- or propionitrile-induced gastric secretion. No correlation was apparent between the influence of these drugs on duodenal ulcer development and gastric and duodenal (pancreatic/biliary) secretions. In the chronic duodenal fistula rat, decreased acid content was measured in the proximal duodenum after haloperidol, and diminished duodenal pepsin exposure was recorded after bromocriptine. Furthermore, the aggravation by dopamine antagonists of experimental duodenal ulcer probably involves a peripheral component. The site of dopamine receptors and physiologic effects which modulate experimental duodenal ulcer remain to be identified, but their elucidation may prove to be an important element in the pathogenesis and treatment of duodenal ulcer.

  7. Hanford Site Pollution Prevention Plan Progress report, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This report tracks progress against the goals stated in the Hanford Site 5-year Pollution Prevention Plan. The executive summary of the plan was submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in September 1992. The plan, executive summary, and the progress reports are elements of a pollution prevention planning program that is required by Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-307 for all hazardous substance users and/or all hazardous waste generators regulated by Ecology. These regulations implement Chapter 70.95C, Revised Code of Washington, an act relating to hazardous waste reduction. The act encourages voluntary efforts to redesign industrial processes to help reduce or eliminate hazardous substances and hazardous waste byproducts, and to maximize the inprocess reuse or reclamation of valuable spent material. Although the Hanford Site is exempt, it is voluntarily complying with this state regulatory-mandated program. This is the first year the Hanford Site is submitting a progress report. It covers calendar year 1993 plus the last quarter of 1992. What is reported, in accordance with WAC 173-307, are reductions in hazardous substance use and hazardous waste generated. A system of Process Waste Assessments (PWA) was chosen to meet the requirements of the program. The PWAs were organized by a physical facility or company organization. Each waste-generating facility/organization performed PWAs to identify, screen, and analyze their own reduction options. Each completed PWA identified any number of reduction opportunities, that are listed individually in the plan and summarized by category in the executive summary. These opportunities were to be implemented or evaluated further over the duration of the 5-year plan. The basis of this progress report is to track action taken on these PWA reduction opportunities in relationship to achieving the goals stated in the Pollution Prevention Plan.

  8. Activation of postsynaptic D2 dopamine receptors in the rat dorsolateral striatum prevents the amnestic effect of systemically administered neuroleptics.

    PubMed

    Boschen, Suelen Lucio; Andreatini, Roberto; da Cunha, Claudio

    2015-03-15

    Systemically administered antipsychotics bind to dopamine (DA) D2 receptors expressed in both pre- and postsynaptic neurons of different striatal sites and present an amnestic effect on learning and memory of conditioned avoidance responses (CAR). The aim of this study was to test whether blockade of the pre- or post-synaptic D2 receptors of the dorsolateral striatum of rats is the mechanism by which systemically administered antipsychotics present this amnestic effect. CAR learning and memory was evaluated in rats that received i.p. administrations of pre- or postsynaptic doses of the antipsychotic sulpiride combined with intra-DLS infusion of the D2 agonist quinpirole. Intra-DLS quinpirole itself was not amnestic and this effect was prevented by co-administration of presynaptic dose of sulpiride. However, sulpiride was amnestic when administered systemically in a post- but not presynaptic dose. This amnestic effect of sulpiride was prevented by the co-administration of quinpirole into the DLS. These results show that a blockade of postsynaptic D2 receptors in the DLS is necessary and sufficient to produce the amnestic effect of neuroleptics on CARs. PMID:25546724

  9. Single exposure of dopamine D1 antagonist prevents and D2 antagonist attenuates methylphenidate effect

    PubMed Central

    Claussen, Catherine M; Witte, Lindsey J; Dafny, Nachum

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPD) is a readily prescribed drug for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and moreover is used illicitly by youths for its cognitive-enhancing effects and recreation. MPD exposure in rodents elicits increased locomotor activity. Repetitive MPD exposure leads to further augmentation of their locomotor activity. This behavioral response is referred to as behavioral sensitization. Behavioral sensitization is used as an experimental marker for a drug’s ability to elicit dependence. There is evidence that dopamine (DA) is a key player in the acute and chronic MPD effect; however, the role of DA in the effects elicited by MPD is still debated. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of D1 and/or D2 DA receptors in the acute and chronic effect of MPD on locomotor activity. The study lasted for 12 consecutive days. Seven groups of male Sprague Dawley® rats were used. A single D1 or D2 antagonist was given before and after acute and chronic MPD administration. Single injection of D1 DA antagonist was able to significantly attenuate the locomotor activity when given prior to the initial MPD exposure and after repetitive MPD exposure, while the D2 DA antagonist partially attenuated the locomotor activity only when given before the second MPD exposure. The results show the role, at least in part, of the D1 DA receptor in the mechanism of behavioral sensitization, whereas the D2 DA receptor only partially modulates the response to acute and chronic MPD. PMID:27186140

  10. Research progress of cardioprotective agents for prevention of anthracycline cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Cui, Xiaohai; Yan, Yan; Li, Min; Yang, Ya; Wang, Jiansheng; Zhang, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Anthracyclines, including doxorubicin, epirubicin, daunorubicin and aclarubicin, are widely used as chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of hematologic and solid tumor, including acute leukemia, lymphoma, breast cancer, gastric cancer, soft tissue sarcomas and ovarian cancer. In the cancer treatment, anthracyclines also can be combined with other chemotherapies and molecular-targeted drugs. The combination of anthracyclines with other therapies is usually the first-line treatment. Anthracyclines are effective and potent agents with a broad antitumor spectrum, but may cause adverse reactions, including hair loss, myelotoxicity, as well as cardiotoxicity. We used hematopoietic stimulating factors to control the myelotoxicity, such as G-CSF, EPO and TPO. However, the cardiotoxicity is the most serious side effect of anthracyclines. Clinical research and practical observations indicated that the cardiotoxicity of anthracyclines is commonly progressive and irreversible. Especially to those patients who have the first time use of anthracyclines, the damage is common. Therefore, early detection and prevention of anthracyclines induced cardiotoxicity are particularly important and has already aroused more attention in clinic. By literature review, we reviewed the research progress of cardioprotective agents for prevention of anthracycline cardiotoxicity. PMID:27508008

  11. Hanford Site Pollution Prevention Plan progress report, 1994. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This report tracks progress made during 1994 against the goals stated in DOE/RL-92-62, Executive Summary, Hanford Site Pollution Prevention Plan. The Executive Summary of the plan was submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in September 1992. The plan, Executive Summary, and the progress reports are elements of a pollution prevention planning program that is required by WAC 173-307, ``Plans,`` for all hazardous substance users and/or all hazardous waste generators regulated by Ecology. These regulations implement RCW 70.95C, ``Waste Reduction,`` an act relating to hazardous waste reduction. The act encourages voluntary efforts to redesign industrial processes to help reduce or eliminate hazardous substances and hazardous waste byproducts, and to maximize the in-process reuse or reclamation of valuable spent material. The Hanford Site is voluntarily complying with this state regulatory-mandated program. All treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facilities are exempt from participating; the Hanford Site is classified as a TSD.

  12. Adenovirus capsid-based anti-cocaine vaccine prevents cocaine from binding to the nonhuman primate CNS dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Maoz, Anat; Hicks, Martin J; Vallabhjosula, Shankar; Synan, Michael; Kothari, Paresh J; Dyke, Jonathan P; Ballon, Douglas J; Kaminsky, Stephen M; De, Bishnu P; Rosenberg, Jonathan B; Martinez, Diana; Koob, George F; Janda, Kim D; Crystal, Ronald G

    2013-10-01

    Cocaine addiction is a major problem for which there is no approved pharmacotherapy. We have developed a vaccine to cocaine (dAd5GNE), based on the cocaine analog GNE linked to the capsid proteins of a serotype 5 adenovirus, designed to evoke anti-cocaine antibodies that sequester cocaine in the blood, preventing access to the CNS. To assess the efficacy of dAd5GNE in a large animal model, positron emission tomography (PET) and the radiotracer [(11)C]PE2I were used to measure cocaine occupancy of the dopamine transporter (DAT) in nonhuman primates. Repeat administration of dAd5GNE induced high anti-cocaine titers. Before vaccination, cocaine displaced PE2I from DAT in the caudate and putamen, resulting in 62±4% cocaine occupancy. In contrast, dAd5GNE-vaccinated animals showed reduced cocaine occupancy such that when anti-cocaine titers were >4 × 10(5), the cocaine occupancy was reduced to levels of <20%, significantly below the 47% threshold required to evoke the subjective 'high' reported in humans. PMID:23660705

  13. Paediatric HIV: Progress on Prevention, Treatment and Cure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Maria H; Ahmed, Saeed; Abrams, Elaine J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This review provides an update on current developments with prevention, treatment and cure strategies in the field of pediatric HIV. Recent findings/Summary There has been tremendous progress in the prevention and treatment of pediatric HIV infection. With new strategies for prevention of mother-to-child transmission, we are growing ever closer towards elimination of pediatric HIV, though challenges with retention of pregnant woman and their HIV-exposed infants remain. Ongoing vigilance regarding the potential hazards of in utero ART exposure to infants continues with no significant alarms yet identified. Though cure has not been achieved, evidence of the impact of early treatment on reducing HIV-1 reservoir size with subsequent prolonged remission has enlivened efforts to rapidly identify and treat HIV-infected newborns. There is an increasing array of treatment options for pediatric patients and reassuring evidence regarding long-term complications of ART. Unfortunately, despite evidence suggesting the benefit of early treatment, timely identification and treatment of children remains a challenge. Better strategies for effective case-finding and engagement in care are urgently needed in addition to an improved understanding of how to retain HIV-positive children and adolescents on treatment. However, further emboldened by recent international commitments and robust global support, the future is hopeful. PMID:26709366

  14. A single dopamine pathway underlies progressive locomotor deficits in a Drosophila model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Riemensperger, Thomas; Issa, Abdul-Raouf; Pech, Ulrike; Coulom, Hélène; Nguyễn, Mỹ-Vân; Cassar, Marlène; Jacquet, Mélanie; Fiala, André; Birman, Serge

    2013-11-27

    Expression of the human Parkinson-disease-associated protein α-synuclein in all Drosophila neurons induces progressive locomotor deficits. Here, we identify a group of 15 dopaminergic neurons per hemisphere in the anterior medial region of the brain whose disruption correlates with climbing impairments in this model. These neurons selectively innervate the horizontal β and β' lobes of the mushroom bodies, and their connections to the Kenyon cells are markedly reduced when they express α-synuclein. Using selective mushroom body drivers, we show that blocking or overstimulating neuronal activity in the β' lobe, but not the β or γ lobes, significantly inhibits negative geotaxis behavior. This suggests that modulation of the mushroom body β' lobes by this dopaminergic pathway is specifically required for an efficient control of startle-induced locomotion in flies. PMID:24239353

  15. Oxidative stress, progressive damage in the substantia nigra and plasma dopamine oxidation, in rats chronically exposed to ozone.

    PubMed

    Santiago-López, D; Bautista-Martínez, J A; Reyes-Hernandez, C I; Aguilar-Martínez, M; Rivas-Arancibia, S

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of our work was to determine the effects of oxidative stress on the neurodegeneration process in the substantia nigra, and to evaluate dopamine-oxidation metabolites in the plasma using a cyclic voltammetry (CV) technique. We have also studied the correlation between the increases in oxidized dopamine-species levels with the severity of lipid-peroxidation in the plasma. Sixty-four male Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups and received air (Group I, control) or ozone (0.25 ppm) daily by inhalation for 4h for 15 (Group II), 30 (Group III), and 60 (Group IV) days. The brains were processed for immunohistochemical location of dopamine and p53 in the substantia nigra. Plasma collected from these animals was assayed for oxidized dopamine products using CV and lipid-peroxidation levels were measured. Our results indicate that chronic exposure to low O(3) doses causes that the number of dopaminergic neurons decreased, and p53-immunoreactive cells increases until 30 days; which was a function of the time of exposure to ozone. Oxidative stress produces a significant increase in the levels of the dopamine quinones (DAQs) that correlated well (r=0.962) with lipid peroxides in the plasma during the study period. These results suggest that DAQ could be a reliable, peripheral oxidative indicator of nigral dopaminergic damage in the brain. PMID:20541596

  16. 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone prevents while methylone enhances methamphetamine-induced damage to dopamine nerve endings: β-ketoamphetamine modulation of neurotoxicity by the dopamine transporter

    PubMed Central

    Anneken, John H.; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    Methylone, 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), and mephedrone are psychoactive ingredients of ‘bath salts’ and their abuse represents a growing public health care concern. These drugs are cathinone derivatives and are classified chemically as β-ketoamphetamines. Because of their close structural similarity to the amphetamines, methylone, MDPV, and mephedrone share most of their pharmacological, neurochemical, and behavioral properties. One point of divergence in their actions is the ability to cause damage to the CNS. Unlike methamphetamine, the β-ketoamphetamines do not damage dopamine (DA) nerve endings. However, mephedrone has been shown to significantly accentuate methamphetamine neurotoxicity. Bath salt formulations contain numerous different psychoactive ingredients, and individuals who abuse bath salts also coabuse other illicit drugs. Therefore, we have evaluated the effects of methylone, MDPV, mephedrone, and methamphetamine on DA nerve endings. The β-ketoamphetamines alone or in all possible two-drug combinations do not result in damage to DA nerve endings but do cause hyperthermia. MDPV completely protects against the neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine while methylone accentuates it. Neither MDPV nor methylone attenuates the hyperthermic effects of methamphetamine. The potent neuroprotective effects of MDPV extend to amphetamine-, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-, and MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. These results indicate that β-ketoamphetamine drugs that are non-substrate blockers of the DA transporter (i.e., MDPV) protect against methamphetamine neurotoxicity, whereas those that are substrates for uptake by the DA transporter and which cause DA release (i.e., methylone, mephedrone) accentuate neurotoxicity. PMID:25626880

  17. Paraoxonase-1 overexpression prevents experimental abdominal aortic aneurysm progression.

    PubMed

    Burillo, Elena; Tarin, Carlos; Torres-Fonseca, Monica-Maria; Fernandez-García, Carlos-Ernesto; Martinez-Pinna, Roxana; Martinez-Lopez, Diego; Llamas-Granda, Patricia; Camafeita, Emilio; Lopez, Juan Antonio; Vega de Ceniga, Melina; Aviram, Michael; Egido, Jesus; Blanco-Colio, Luis-Miguel; Martín-Ventura, Jose-Luis

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a permanent dilation of the aorta due to excessive proteolytic, oxidative and inflammatory injury of the aortic wall. We aimed to identify novel mediators involved in AAA pathophysiology, which could lead to novel therapeutic approaches. For that purpose, plasma from four AAA patients and four controls were analysed by a label-free proteomic approach. Among identified proteins, paraoxonase-1 (PON1) was decreased in plasma of AAA patients compared with controls, which was further validated in a bigger cohort of samples by ELISA. The phenylesterase enzymatic activity of PON1 was also decreased in serum of AAA patients compared with controls. To address the potential role of PON1 as a mediator of AAA, experimental AAA was induced by aortic elastase perfusion in wild-type (WT) mice and human transgenic PON1 (HuTgPON1) mice. Similar to humans, PON1 activity was also decreased in serum of elastase-induced AAA mice compared with healthy mice. Interestingly, overexpression of PON1 was accompanied by smaller aortic dilation and higher elastin and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) content in the AAA of HuTgPON1 compared with WT mice. Moreover, HuTgPON1 mice display decreased oxidative stress and apoptosis, as well as macrophage infiltration and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP1) expression, in elastase-induced AAA. In conclusion, decreased circulating PON1 activity is associated with human and experimental AAA. PON1 overexpression in mice protects against AAA progression by reducing oxidative stress, apoptosis and inflammation, suggesting that strategies aimed at increasing PON1 activity could prevent AAA. PMID:26993251

  18. Dopamine and binge eating behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Nicholas T.; Hajnal, Andras

    2010-01-01

    Central dopaminergic mechanisms are involved in the motivational aspects of eating and food choices. This review focuses on human and animal data examining the importance of dopamine on binge eating behaviors. Early works examining dopamine metabolites in the cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of bulimic individuals suggested decreased dopamine turnover during the active phase of the illness. While neuroimaging studies of dopamine mechanisms in bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED) are limited, genetic studies in humans have implicated an increased frequency of dopamine transporter and associated D2 receptor polymorphisms with binge pathology. Recent examinations of rodent models of dietary-induced binge eating (DIBE) have investigated plausible dopamine mechanisms involved in sustaining binge eating behaviors. In DIBE models, highly palatable foods (fats, sugars and their combination), as well as restricted access conditions appear to promote ingestive responses and result in sustained dopamine stimulation within the nucleus accumbens. Taken together with studies examining the comorbidity of illicit drug use and eating disorders, the data reviewed here support a role for dopamine in perpetuating the compulsive feeding patterns of BN and BED. As such, we propose that sustained stimulation of the dopamine systems by bingeing promoted by preexisting conditions (e.g., genetic traits, dietary restraint, stress, etc.) results in progressive impairments of dopamine signaling. To disrupt this vicious cycle, novel research-based treatment options aiming at the neural substrates of compulsive eating patterns are necessary. PMID:20417658

  19. Prevention Service Programs for Infants of Mentally-Ill Mothers. Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnellan, Gerard J.; And Others

    This paper reports the progress of an ongoing clinical research project on prevention services for at risk infants of mentally ill mothers. This project extends the prevention focus of early education programs into the mental health field. Previous research findings indicate that maximum preventive effects are achieved when programs (a) begin…

  20. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1999

    SciTech Connect

    2000-09-01

    This Annual Report summarizes and highlights waste generation, waste reduction, pollution prevention accomplishments, and cost avoidance for 44 U.S. Department of Energy reporting sites for Calendar Year 1999. This section summarizes Calendar Year 1999 Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention accomplishments.

  1. Drug Education and Prevention: Has Progress Been Made?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coggans, Niall

    2006-01-01

    Ten years after publication of the UK Government's strategy for drug misuse in 1995, Tackling Drugs Together, the impact of drug education and prevention programmes remains less than desired. The 1995 strategy envisaged a new emphasis on education and prevention and there have been developments since then in drug education, especially with…

  2. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 2000 [USDOE] [9th edition

    SciTech Connect

    2001-06-01

    This ninth edition of the Annual Report of Waste Generation and Pollution Prevention Progress highlights waste reduction, pollution prevention accomplishments, and cost savings/avoidance for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pollution Prevention Program for Fiscal Year 2000. This edition marks the first time that progress toward meeting the 2005 Pollution Prevention Goals, issued by the Secretary of Energy in November 1999, is being reported. In addition, the Annual Report has a new format, and now contains information on a fiscal year basis, which is consistent with other DOE reports.

  3. "MARK I" MEASUREMENT METHODOLOGY FOR POLLUTION PREVENTION PROGRESS OCCURRING AS A RESULT OF PRODUCT DECISIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A methodology for assessing progress in pollution prevention resulting from product redesign, reformulation or replacement is described. The method compares the pollution generated by the original product with that from the modified or replacement product, taking into account, if...

  4. Joint Group on Pollution Prevention: Partnering for Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, R.

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation outlines the Joint Group on Pollution Prevention (JG-PP) partnership. Details are given on what groups comprise JG-PP, the proven methodology for what JG-PP can accomplish, the common problems, joint solutions, and shared efforts, and some of the JG-PP projects.

  5. Progression of changes in dopamine transporter binding site density as a result of cocaine self-administration in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Letchworth, S R; Nader, M A; Smith, H R; Friedman, D P; Porrino, L J

    2001-04-15

    The present study examined the time course of alterations in levels of dopamine transporter (DAT) binding sites that accompany cocaine self-administration using quantitative in vitro receptor autoradiography with [(3)H]WIN 35,428. The density of dopamine transporter binding sites in the striatum of rhesus monkeys with 5 d, 3.3 months, or 1.5 years of cocaine self-administration experience was compared with DAT levels in cocaine-naive control monkeys. Animals in the long-term (1.5 years) exposure group self-administered cocaine at 0.03 mg/kg per injection, whereas the initial (5 d) and chronic (3.3 months) treatment groups were each divided into lower dose (0.03 mg/kg per injection) and higher dose (0.3 mg/kg per injection) groups. Initial cocaine exposure led to moderate decreases in [(3)H]WIN 35,428 binding sites, with significant changes in the dorsolateral caudate (-25%) and central putamen (-19%) at the lower dose. Longer exposure, in contrast, resulted in elevated levels of striatal binding sites. The increases were most pronounced in the ventral striatum at the level of the nucleus accumbens shell. At the lower dose of the chronic phase, for example, significant increases of 21-42% were measured at the caudal level of the ventral caudate, ventral putamen, olfactory tubercle, and accumbens core and shell. Systematic variation of cocaine dose and drug exposure time demonstrated the importance of these factors in determining the intensity of increased DAT levels. With self-administration of higher doses especially, increases were more intense and included dorsal portions of the striatum so that every region at the caudal level exhibited a significant increase in DAT binding sites (20-54%). The similarity of these findings to previous studies in human cocaine addicts strongly suggest that the increased density of dopamine transporters observed in studies of human drug abusers are the result of the neurobiological effects of cocaine, ruling out confounds such as

  6. A favorable view: progress in cancer prevention and screening.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Clifton Leaf, in his article "Why We're Losing the War on Cancer," presents criticisms of past research approaches and the small impact of this research thus far on producing cures or substantially extending the life of many cancer patients. It is true that gains in long-term survival for people with advanced cancers have been modest, hindered in part by the heterogeneity of tumors, which allows the cancers to persist using alternate molecular pathways and so evade many cancer therapeutics. In contrast, clinical trials have demonstrated that it is possible to reduce the incidence or improve cancer survival through prevention and early detection. Strides have been made in preventing or detecting early the four deadliest cancers in the United States (i.e., lung, breast, prostate, and colorectal). For example, 7-year follow-up data from the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial (BCPT) provides evidence that tamoxifen reduces the occurrence of invasive breast tumors by more than 40%; recent studies using aromatase inhibitors and raloxifene are also promising. The Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT) showed that finasteride reduced prostate cancer incidence by 25%, and the ongoing Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) is investigating selenium and vitamin E for prostate cancer prevention based on encouraging results from earlier studies. Living a healthy lifestyle, including regular physical activity, avoiding obesity, and eating primarily a plant-based diet has been associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer. In addition, noninvasive stool DNA tests for early detection are being studied, which may lessen the reluctance of people to be screened for colorectal polyps and cancer. Behavioral and medical approaches for smoking prevention are ways to reduce the incidence of lung cancer, with antinicotine vaccines on the horizon that may help former smokers to avoid relapse. The US National Lung Screening Trial is testing whether early detection via

  7. Smart Coating for Corrosion Indication and Prevention: Recent Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Hintze, Paul; Calle, Luz M.; Buhrow, Jerry; Curran, Jerry; Muehlberg, A. J.; Gelling, V. J.; Webster, D. C.; Croll, S. G.; Contu, F.; Taylor, S. R.

    2009-01-01

    The authors are developing a smart coating system based on pH-triggered release microcapsules. These microcapsules can be incorporated into various coating systems for corrosion detection, protection and self-repair of mechanical coating damage. This paper will present the results from progress made to date in the controlled release properties of these microcapsules as well as in their corrosion indication and corrosion inhibition function.

  8. Burn prevention in Zambia: a work in progress.

    PubMed

    Heard, Jason P; Latenser, Barbara A; Liao, Junlin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess both burn prevention knowledge and the effectiveness of educational intervention in alleviating the current knowledge deficit in Zambian youth. In one rural Zambian district, a burn prevention program was implemented in June 2011. Children at two elementary schools completed a 10-question survey that aimed to assess knowledge regarding burn injuries. After completing the survey, children received a burn and fire safety presentation and a burn prevention coloring book. Children were reassessed in May 2012 using the same survey to determine program efficacy and knowledge retention. Burn knowledge assessments were also completed for children at other schools who did not receive the burn prevention program in 2011. Logistic regression analysis was used for statistical adjustment for confounding variables. Between June 2011 and May 2012, 2747 children from six schools were assessed for their burn knowledge, with 312 of them resurveyed after educational intervention since initial survey. Reassessed children performed significantly better on three questions after controlling for confounders. They did better on five questions but their performance on these failed to achieve statistical significance. Children performed significantly worse on one concept about first aid treatment of a burn. A majority of the children demonstrated knowledge deficit in three concepts, even after educational intervention. There is a large variation in first burn knowledge survey performance of children from different schools, with inconsistency between concepts. With half the questions, knowledge deficit did not improve with advancement in school grade. Low- and moderate-income countries (LMICs) face the largest burns burden. With the lack of adequate burn care facing LMICs, burn injury prevention is of particular importance in those countries. This study shows that burn educational intervention could be effective in reducing burn knowledge deficit; however

  9. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    This fourth Annual Report presents and analyzes 1995 DOE complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention activities at 40 reporting sites in 25 States, and trends DOE waste generation from 1991 through 1995. DOE has established a 50% reduction goal (relative to the 1993 baseline) for routine operations radioactive and hazardous waste generation, due by December 31, 1999. Routine operations waste generation decreased 37% from 1994 to 1995, and 43% overall from 1993--1995.

  10. Primary prevention for rheumatic Fever: progress, obstacles, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Zühlke, Liesl J; Karthikeyan, Ganesan

    2013-09-01

    Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease are noninfectious sequelae of group A streptococcal pharyngeal infection. These diseases represent a huge public health burden in developing countries with significant mortality and morbidity. Early diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic treatment with group A streptococcal pharyngitis provides an opportunity for prevention of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease. The use of locally adapted clinical algorithms for diagnosing group A streptococcal pharyngitis has great potential in resource-poor settings for earlier diagnosis and early treatment. Intramuscular penicillin is the drug of choice in developing country settings. Recent work has demonstrated the cost-effectiveness of a treat-all strategy with intramuscular penicillin, whereas incorporating a clinical decision rule remains the preferred strategy. We strongly support the adoption of a comprehensive prevention and control program for acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease, incorporating primary prevention, as critical to underpinning the efforts in many parts of the world to stem the tide of this devastating disease. PMID:25690499

  11. Upregulation of lymphocyte apoptosis as a strategy for preventing and treating autoimmune disorders: a role for whole-food vegan diets, fish oil and dopamine agonists.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    2001-08-01

    Induced apoptosis of autoreactive T-lymphocyte precursors in the thymus is crucial for the prevention of autoimmune disorders. IGF-I and prolactin, which are lymphocyte growth factors, may have the potential to suppress apoptosis in thymocytes and thus encourage autoimmunity; conversely, dietary fish oil rich in omega-3 fats appears to upregulate apoptosis in lymphocytes. Since whole-food vegan diets may downregulate systemic IGF-I activity, it is proposed that such a diet, in conjunction with fish oil supplementation and treatment with dopamine agonists capable of suppressing prolactin secretion, may have utility for treating and preventing autoimmune disorders. This prediction is consistent with the extreme rarity of autoimmune disorders among sub-Saharan black Africans as long as they followed their traditional quasi-vegan lifestyles, and with recent ecologic studies correlating risks for IDDM and for multiple sclerosis mortality with animal product and/or saturated fat consumption. Moreover, there is evidence that vegan or quasi-vegan diets are useful in the management of rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and possibly SLE. The dopamine agonist bromocryptine exerts anti-inflammatory effects in rodent models of autoimmunity, and there is preliminary evidence that this drug may be clinically useful in several human autoimmune diseases; better tolerated D2-specific agonists such as cabergoline may prove to be more practical for use in therapy. The moderate clinical utility of supplemental fish oil in rheumatoid arthritis and certain other autoimmune disorders is documented. It is not unlikely that extra-thymic anti-inflammatory effects contribute importantly to the clinical utility of vegan diets, bromocryptine, and fish oil in autoimmunity. The favorable impact of low latitude or high altitude on autoimmune risk may be mediated by superior vitamin D status, which is associated with decreased secretion of parathyroid hormone; there are theoretical grounds

  12. Recent Progress in Cancer-Related Lymphedema Treatment and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Shaitelman, Simona F.; Cromwell, Kate D.; Rasmussen, John C.; Stout, Nicole L.; Armer, Jane M.; Lasinski, Bonnie B.; Cormier, Janice N.

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the recent developments in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cancer-related lymphedema. Lymphedema incidence by tumor site is evaluated. Measurement techniques and trends in patient education and treatment are also summarized to include current trends in therapeutic and surgical treatment options as well as longer-term management. Finally, an overview of the policies related to insurance coverage and reimbursement will give the clinician an overview of important trends in the diagnosis, treatment, and management of cancer-related lymphedema. PMID:25410402

  13. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-09-01

    This seventh Annual Report presents and analyzes DOE Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention activities at 45 reporting sites from 1993 through 1998. This section summarizes Calendar Year 1998 Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention accomplishments. More detailed information follows this section in the body of the Report. In May 1996, the Secretary of Energy established a 50 percent Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goal (relative to the 1993 baseline) for routine operations radioactive, mixed, and hazardous waste generation, to be achieved by December31, 1999. DOE has achieved its Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goals for routine operations based upon a comparison of 1998 waste generation to the 1993 baseline. Excluding sanitary waste, routine operations waste generation decreased 67 percent overall from 1993 to 1998. However, for the first time since 1994, the total amount of materials recycled by the Complex decreased from 109,600 metric tons in 1997 to 92,800 metric tons in 1998. This decrease is attributed to the fact that in 1997, several large ''one-time only'' recycling projects were conducted throughout the Complex. In order to demonstrate commitment to DOE's Complex-wide recycling goal, it is important for sites to identify all potential large-scale recycling/reuse opportunities.

  14. A perspective on progress and gaps in HIV prevention science.

    PubMed

    Kiser, Patrick F; Mesquita, Pedro M M; Herold, Betsy C

    2012-11-01

    In the past few years, the transdisciplinary field of HIV prevention has reached several milestones. Topically applied tenofovir gel provided significant protection from sexual transmission of HIV in a large-scale clinical trial and oral Truvada (emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate) was recently approved for preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) following two successful clinical trials in men and women. These achievements are tempered by the disappointing results of other clinical trials, which highlight the complexities of prevention research. In this perspective, we discuss scientific and developmental gaps for topical chemoprophylaxis of the sexual transmission of HIV, which depends on the complex interactions between the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs, formulation and delivery systems, anatomic site of transmission, and host mucosal immune defenses. Despite the considerable time and resources devoted to unraveling the initial steps in sexual transmission of HIV, current knowledge is based on animal models and human explanted tissue, which may not fully recapitulate what happens clinically. Understanding these events, including the role that sex hormones, semen, and mucosal secretions play in transmission, and the interplay between innate immunity, the mucosal environment, and drug efficacy is paramount. This drives some of the most pressing questions in the field. PMID:22966871

  15. Rh immunization in Manitoba: progress in prevention and management.

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, J. M.; Pollock, J.

    1983-01-01

    For two decades the perinatal mortality caused by erythroblastosis has been decreasing in Manitoba. The improved management of Rh-immunized pregnancies has lowered the death rate among affected infants from 10.8% to 3.4%, while the prevention of Rh immunization has reduced its incidence from 9.1 to 2.2 per 1000 total births. In its first 6 years and 8 months Manitoba's antenatal prophylaxis program, in which immunoglobulin is administered to Rh-negative women at 28 weeks' gestation, reduced the incidence of Rh immunization during pregnancy by 93%. In combination with post-abortion and postpartum prophylaxis the antenatal treatment has provided a protection rate of 98.6% among primigravidas at risk. Further improvements are expected. PMID:6409390

  16. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This sixth Annual Report presents and analyzes DOE Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention activities at 36 reporting sites from 1993 through 1997. In May 1996, the Secretary of Energy established a 50 percent Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goal (relative to the 1993 baseline) for routine operations radioactive and hazardous waste generation, to be achieved by December 31, 1999. Excluding sanitary waste, routine operations waste generation increased three percent from 1996 to 1997, and decreased 61 percent overall from 1993 to 1997. DOE has achieved its Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goals for routine operations based upon a comparison of 1997 waste generation to the 1993 baseline. However, it is important to note that increases in low-level radioactive and low-level mixed waste generation could reverse this achievement. From 1996 to 1997, low-level radioactive waste generation increased 10 percent, and low-level mixed waste generation increased slightly. It is critical that DOE sites continue to reduce routine operations waste generation for all waste types, to ensure that DOE`s Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goals are achieved by December 31, 1999.

  17. POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS IN ORGANOTYPIC CO-CULTURES: EXPERIMENTAL DOPAMINE DEPLETION PREVENTS REDUCTIONS IN GABA

    PubMed Central

    Lyng, Gregory D.; Seegal, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants that have been demonstrated to be toxic to the dopamine (DA) systems of the central nervous system. One proposed mechanism for PCB-induced DA neurotoxicity is inhibition of the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT); such inhibition results in increased levels of unsequestered DA and DA metabolism leading to oxidative stress. We have used an organotypic co-culture system of developing rat striatum and ventral mesencephalon (VM) to determine whether alterations in the vesicular storage of DA, resulting from PCB exposure and consequent induction of oxidative stress, leads to GABA and DA neuronal dysfunction. 24 hr exposure to an environmentally relevant mixture of PCBs reduced tissue DA and GABA concentrations, increased medium levels of DA and measures of oxidative stress in both the striatum and VM. Alterations in neurochemistry and increases in measures of oxidative stress were blocked in the presence of n-acetylcysteine (NAC). Although NAC treatment did not alter PCB-induced changes in DA neurochemistry, it did protect against reductions in GABA concentration. To determine whether alterations in the vesicular storage of DA were responsible for PCB-induced oxidative stress and consequent reductions in GABA levels, we depleted DA from the co-cultures using α-methyl-p-tyrosine (AMPT). AMPT reduced striatal and VM DA levels by 90% and 70%, respectively. PCB exposure, following DA depletion, neither increased levels of oxidative stress nor resulted in GABA depletion. These results suggest that PCB-induced alterations in the vesicular storage of DA, resulting in increased levels of unsequestered DA, leads to increased oxidative stress, depletion of tissue glutathione, and consequent reductions in tissue GABA concentrations. PMID:18262273

  18. The non-ergot derived dopamine agonist quinagolide in prevention of early ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome in IVF patients: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial†

    PubMed Central

    Busso, Cristiano; Fernández-Sánchez, Manuel; García-Velasco, Juan Antonio; Landeras, José; Ballesteros, Augustín; Muñoz, Elkin; González, Sandra; Simón, Carlos; Arce, Joan-Carles; Pellicer, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) seems to be induced by the ovarian release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which increases vascular permeability. Dopamine agonists inhibit VEGF receptor phosphorylation and thereby decrease vascular permeability. METHODS A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre study assessing three oral doses (50, 100, 200 µg/day) of the non-ergot derived dopamine agonist quinagolide started on the day of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) and continued for 17–21 days without dose-titration in comparison to placebo in preventing moderate/severe early OHSS (onset ≤9 days after hCG administration) in 182 IVF patients with ≥20 but less than 30 follicles ≥10 mm. RESULTS The incidence of moderate/severe early OHSS was 23% (12/53) in the placebo group and 12% (6/51), 13% (7/52) and 4% (1/26) in the quinagolide 50, 100 and 200 µg/day groups, respectively. The moderate/severe early OHSS rate was significantly lower with all quinagolide groups combined compared with placebo [P = 0.019; OR = 0.28 (0.09–0.81)]. The incidence of ultrasound evidence of ascites among patients with no clinical pregnancy was significantly reduced from 31% (8/26) with placebo to 11% (8/70) with all quinagolide groups combined [P = 0.033; OR = 0.29 (0.10–0.88)], although there was no difference for those with clinical pregnancy. Quinagolide did not have a detrimental effect on pregnancy or live birth rates. The incidence of gastrointestinal and central nervous system adverse events increased with increasing doses of quinagolide. CONCLUSIONS Quinagolide appears to prevent moderate/severe early OHSS while not affecting treatment outcome. The effect is more marked in patients who did not achieve a clinical pregnancy. Quinagolide administered in high doses without dose-titration is associated with poor tolerability. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00329693. PMID:20139430

  19. Progress in the Development of Effective Vaccines to Prevent Selected Gram Positive Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bronze, Michael S.; Dale, James B.

    2010-01-01

    Infections due to virulent gram positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, group B streptococci and group A streptococci remain significant causes of morbidity and mortality despite progress in antimicrobial therapy. Despite significant advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of infection due to these organisms, there are only limited strategies to prevent infection. In this paper, we review efforts to develop safe and effective vaccines that would prevent infections due to these 3 pathogens. PMID:20697258

  20. Ketogenic diet prevents epileptogenesis and disease progression in adult mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Lusardi, Theresa A; Akula, Kiran K; Coffman, Shayla Q; Ruskin, David N; Masino, Susan A; Boison, Detlev

    2015-12-01

    Epilepsy is a highly prevalent seizure disorder which tends to progress in severity and become refractory to treatment. Yet no therapy is proven to halt disease progression or to prevent the development of epilepsy. Because a high fat low carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) augments adenosine signaling in the brain and because adenosine not only suppresses seizures but also affects epileptogenesis, we hypothesized that a ketogenic diet might prevent epileptogenesis through similar mechanisms. Here, we tested this hypothesis in two independent rodent models of epileptogenesis. Using a pentylenetetrazole kindling paradigm in mice, we first show that a KD, but not a conventional antiepileptic drug (valproic acid), suppressed kindling-epileptogenesis. Importantly, after treatment reversal, increased seizure thresholds were maintained in those animals kindled in the presence of a KD, but not in those kindled in the presence of valproic acid. Next, we tested whether a KD can halt disease progression in a clinically relevant model of progressive epilepsy. Epileptic rats that developed spontaneous recurrent seizures after a pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus were treated with a KD or control diet (CD). Whereas seizures progressed in severity and frequency in the CD-fed animals, KD-fed animals showed a prolonged reduction of seizures, which persisted after diet reversal. KD-treatment was associated with increased adenosine and decreased DNA methylation, the latter being maintained after diet discontinuation. Our findings demonstrate that a KD prevented disease progression in two mechanistically different models of epilepsy, and suggest an epigenetic mechanism underlying the therapeutic effects. PMID:26256422

  1. Dopamine: burning the candle at both ends.

    PubMed

    Pearson, John M; Platt, Michael L

    2013-09-01

    Dopamine neurons are well known for signaling reward-prediction errors. In this issue, Matsumoto and Takada (2013) show that some dopamine neurons also signal salient events during progression through a visual search task requiring working memory and sustained attention. PMID:24011998

  2. Imaging of the dopamine transporter predicts pattern of disease progression and response to levodopa in patients with schizophrenia and parkinsonism: a 2-year follow-up multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Tinazzi, Michele; Morgante, Francesca; Matinella, Angela; Bovi, Tommaso; Cannas, Antonino; Solla, Paolo; Marrosu, Francesco; Nicoletti, Alessandra; Zappia, Mario; Luca, Antonina; Di Stefano, Angela; Morgante, Letterio; Pacchetti, Claudio; Minafra, Brigida; Sciarretta, Massimo; Dallocchio, Carlo; Rossi, Simone; Ulivelli, Monica; Ceravolo, Roberto; Frosini, Daniela; Cipriani, Andrea; Barbui, Corrado

    2014-02-01

    Similarly to subjects with degenerative parkinsonism, (123)I-FP-CIT SPECT has been reported either normal or abnormal in patients with drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP), challenging the notion that parkinsonism might be entirely due to post-synaptic D2-receptors blockade by antipsychotic drugs. In a previous multicenter cross-sectional study conducted on a large sample of patients with schizophrenia, we identified 97 patients who developed parkinsonism with a similar bi-modal distribution of DAT-SPECT. In this longitudinal study, we reported clinical and imaging features associated with progression of motor disability over 2-year follow-up in 60 out of those 97 patients with schizophrenia and parkinsonism who underwent (123)I-FP-CIT SPECT at baseline evaluation (normal SPECT=33; abnormal SPECT=27). As second end-point, chronic response to levodopa over a 3-month period was tested in a subgroup of subjects. Motor Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) at follow-up significantly increased in patients with abnormal SPECT. Specifically, a 6-point worsening was demonstrated in 18.5% of the subjects with abnormal SPECT and in none of the subjects with normal SPECT. Levodopa treatment improved motor UPDRS only in the group with abnormal SPECT. After adjustment for possible confounders, linear regression analysis demonstrated that abnormal SPECT findings at baseline were the only predictor of motor disability progression and of better outcome of levodopa treatment. Our results support the notion that a degenerative disease might underlie parkinsonism in a minority of schizophrenic patients chronically exposed to antipsychotics. Functional imaging of the dopamine transporter can be helpful to select this patient sub-group that might benefit from levodopa therapy. PMID:24369987

  3. Progress in the prevention of cytomegalovirus infection after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Devergie, A; Traineau, R; Esperou-Bourdeau, H; Ribaud, P; Socié, G; Richard, P; Selimi, F; Hirsch, I; Gluckman, E

    1994-01-01

    There has been substantial progress in preventing and treating CMV infection. Prophylaxis with CMV screened blood products, IVIG and antiviral drugs (high dose acyclovir and/or Ganciclovir) considerably reduce the incidence of CMV disease and nearly eliminate CMV pneumonia after allogeneic BMT. PMID:8177726

  4. Accelerating Progress in Eating Disorders Prevention: A Call for Policy Translation Research and Training.

    PubMed

    Austin, S Bryn

    2016-01-01

    The public health burden of eating disorders is well documented, and over the past several decades, researchers have made important advances in the prevention of eating disorders and related problems with body image. Despite these advances, however, several critical limitations to the approaches developed to date leave the field far from achieving the large-scale impact that is needed. This commentary provides a brief review of what achievements in prevention have been made and identifies the gaps that limit the potential for greater impact on population health. A plan is then offered with specific action steps to accelerate progress in high-impact prevention, most compellingly by promoting a shift in priorities to policy translation research and training for scholars through the adoption of a triggers-to-action framework. Finally, the commentary provides an example of the application of the triggers-to-action framework as practiced at the Strategic Training Initiative for the Prevention of Eating Disorders, a program based at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health and Boston Children's Hospital. Much has been achieved in the nearly 30 years of research carried out for the prevention of eating disorders and body image problems, but several critical limitations undermine the field's potential for meaningful impact. Through a shift in the field's priorities to policy translation research and training with an emphasis on macro-environmental influences, the pace of progress in prevention can be accelerated and the potential for large-scale impact substantially improved. PMID:25880718

  5. Differential patterns of dopamine transporter loss in the basal ganglia of progressive supranuclear palsy and Parkinson's disease: analysis with [(123)I]IPT single photon emission computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Im, Joo-Hyuk; Chung, Sun J; Kim, Jae-Seung; Lee, Myoung C

    2006-05-15

    We evaluated the patterns of dopamine transporter loss in the striatum of ten controls, twenty patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), and nine with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) using (123)I-IPT single photon emission tomography (SPECT). Four ROIs in the striatum correspond to the head of caudate nucleus (ROI 1), a transitional region between head of caudate and putamen (ROI 2), anterior putamen (ROI 3), and posterior putamen (ROI 4). A striatal ratio of specific to nondisplaceable uptake (V3'') was calculated normalizing the activity of the ROIs to that of occipital cortex. V3'' values were significantly reduced in all ROIs of PD and PSP patients, compared with controls (p=0.001). V3'' value in ROI 2 was significantly lower in PSP group, compared with PD group (p=0.02). The percent reductions of striatal uptake in ROI 1, ROI 2, ROI 3 and ROI 4 were 56%, 53%, 64% and 78% in PD patients, whereas 75%, 72%, 75% and 77% in PSP patients, respectively. The reduction patterns of uptake were significantly different between PD and PSP groups (p=0.001). In PD patients, the percent reductions of (123)I-IPT uptake were significantly greater in ROI 3 and 4 compared with ROI 1 or 2, whereas those were similar in all ROIs of PSP patients. In addition, PD patients showed a significantly higher posterior putamen/caudate ratio of reduced (123)I-IPT uptake than the anterior putamen/caudate ratio (p=0.005). Our results implicate that (123)I-IPT SPECT is a relatively simple and reliable technique that may be useful in differentiating PD from PSP. PMID:16473371

  6. Dietary long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids prevent impaired social behaviour and normalize brain dopamine levels in food allergic mice.

    PubMed

    de Theije, Caroline G M; van den Elsen, Lieke W J; Willemsen, Linette E M; Milosevic, Vanja; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien A H; Lopes da Silva, Sofia; Broersen, Laus M; Korte, S Mechiel; Olivier, Berend; Garssen, Johan; Kraneveld, Aletta D

    2015-03-01

    Allergy is suggested to exacerbate impaired behaviour in children with neurodevelopmental disorders. We have previously shown that food allergy impaired social behaviour in mice. Dietary fatty acid composition may affect both the immune and nervous system. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFA) on food allergy-induced impaired social behaviour and associated deficits in prefrontal dopamine (DA) in mice. Mice were fed either control or n-3 LCPUFA-enriched diet before and during sensitization with whey. Social behaviour, acute allergic skin response and serum immunoglobulins were assessed. Monoamine levels were measured in brain and intestine and fatty acid content in brain. N-3 LCPUFA prevented impaired social behaviour of allergic mice. Moreover, n-3 LCPUFA supplementation increased docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) incorporation into the brain and restored reduced levels of prefrontal DA and its metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, 3-methoxytyramine and homovanillic acid in allergic mice. In addition to these brain effects, n-3 LCPUFA supplementation reduced the allergic skin response and restored decreased intestinal levels of serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in allergic mice. N-3 LCPUFA may have beneficial effects on food allergy-induced deficits in social behaviour, either indirectly by reducing the allergic response and restoring intestinal 5-HT signalling, or directly by DHA incorporation into neuronal membranes, affecting the DA system. Therefore, it is of interest to further investigate the relevance of food allergy-enhanced impairments in social behaviour in humans and the potential benefits of dietary n-3 LCPUFA supplementation. PMID:25445491

  7. The dual roles of NRF2 in tumor prevention and progression: possible implications in cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eui Jung; Giaccia, Amato

    2015-01-01

    The Cap’N’Collar (CNC) family serves as cellular sensors of oxidative and electrophilic stresses and shares structural similarities including basic leucine zipper (bZIP) and CNC domains,. They form heterodimers with small MAF proteins to regulate antioxidant and phase II enzymes through antioxidant response element (ARE)-mediated transactivation. Among the CNC family members, NRF2 is required for systemic protection against redox-mediated injury and carcinogenesis. On the other hand, NRF2 is activated by oncogenic pathways, metabolism, and hypoxia. Constitutive NRF2 activation is observed in a variety of human cancers and it is highly correlated with tumor progression and aggressiveness. In this review, we will discuss how NRF2 plays dual roles in cancer prevention and progression depending on the cellular context and environment. Therefore, a better understanding of NRF2 will be necessary to exploit this complex network of balancing antioxidant pathways to inhibit tumor progression. PMID:25458917

  8. The 1990 objectives for the nation for injury prevention: a progress review.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, H F; Schletty, A V; Ing, R T; Wiesner, P J

    1984-01-01

    Unintentional injuries are the principal cause of preventable early death. Beyond terms of human suffering and death, injuries place enormous burdens on this country's economic and health care resources. Demographic, sociological, environmental, and behavioral factors that influence our society contribute to the complexity and scope of the injury problem. Progress in injury prevention will be achieved only through the combined efforts of individuals, organizations, and government at every level of our society. The Federal Government is an important contributor to this process through its role of leading, catalyzing, and providing strategic support. Within the Department of Health and Human Services, numerous agencies have major injury prevention components with a broad range of responsibilities, including the direct delivery of services, establishment of safety standards, sponsorship of education and information efforts, building of the capacity of other sectors, basic and applied research, and surveillance. The Centers for Disease Control, as the lead agency, assists State and local health departments in their injury prevention efforts and coordinates activities undertaken jointly by Federal agencies, State and local governments, and private-sector organizations. To meet the 1990 Objectives for the Nation with respect to injury prevention, both the public health and private-sector providers must recognize the injury problem of the 1980s. Without the support and involvement of the public health and provider communities and of the private sector, injuries and their costs will continue at their present alarming rates. The opportunity is great for promoting health, preventing injuries, and reducing associated costs to society. Making the best of this opportunity is our challenge during this decade. PMID:6422489

  9. CB2 receptor activation prevents glial-derived neurotoxic mediator production, BBB leakage and peripheral immune cell infiltration and rescues dopamine neurons in the MPTP model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Young C; Shin, Won-Ho; Baek, Jeong Y; Cho, Eun J; Baik, Hyung H; Kim, Sang R; Won, So-Yoon; Jin, Byung K

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoid (CB2) receptor type 2 has been proposed to prevent the degeneration of dopamine neurons in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated mice. However, the mechanisms underlying CB2 receptor-mediated neuroprotection in MPTP mice have not been elucidated. The mechanisms underlying CB2 receptor-mediated neuroprotection of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) were evaluated in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD) by immunohistochemical staining (tyrosine hydroxylase, macrophage Ag complex-1, glial fibrillary acidic protein, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and CD3 and CD68), real-time PCR and a fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled albumin assay. Treatment with the selective CB2 receptor agonist JWH-133 (10 μg kg−1, intraperitoneal (i.p.)) prevented MPTP-induced degeneration of dopamine neurons in the SN and of their fibers in the striatum. This JWH-133-mediated neuroprotection was associated with the suppression of blood–brain barrier (BBB) damage, astroglial MPO expression, infiltration of peripheral immune cells and production of inducible nitric oxide synthase, proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by activated microglia. The effects of JWH-133 were mimicked by the non-selective cannabinoid receptor WIN55,212 (10 μg kg−1, i.p.). The observed neuroprotection and inhibition of glial-mediated neurotoxic events were reversed upon treatment with the selective CB2 receptor antagonist AM630, confirming the involvement of the CB2 receptor. Our results suggest that targeting the cannabinoid system may be beneficial for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as PD, that are associated with glial activation, BBB disruption and peripheral immune cell infiltration.

  10. Cytochrome P450 CYP1A1: wider roles in cancer progression and prevention

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    CYP1A1 is one of the main cytochrome P450 enzymes, examined extensively for its capacity to activate compounds with carcinogenic properties. Continuous exposure to inhalation chemicals and environmental carcinogens is thought to increase the level of CYP1A1 expression in extrahepatic tissues, through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Although the latter has long been recognized as a ligand-induced transcription factor, which is responsible for the xenobiotic activating pathway of several phase I and phase II metabolizing enzymes, recent evidence suggests that the AhR is involved in various cell signaling pathways critical to cell cycle regulation and normal homeostasis. Disregulation of these pathways is implicated in tumor progression. In addition, it is becoming increasingly evident that CYP1A1 plays an important role in the detoxication of environmental carcinogens, as well as in the metabolic activation of dietary compounds with cancer preventative activity. Ultimately the contribution of CYP1A1 to cancer progression or prevention may depend on the balance of procarcinogen activation/detoxication and dietary natural product extrahepatic metabolism. PMID:19531241

  11. Dopamine autoreceptors and the effects of drugs on locomotion and dopamine synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, F.; Campbell, W.; Mitchell, P. J.; Randall, K.

    1985-01-01

    Criteria for distinguishing dopamine autoreceptor agonism from other mechanisms of inhibiting locomotion were examined, together with the relationship between inhibition of locomotion and dopamine synthesis. ED50 potencies to inhibit locomotion of mice were established for drugs from a number of categories. Spiperone 0.02 mg kg-1 significantly (P less than 0.05) reversed inhibition of locomotion by known dopamine agonists but not that by the other types of drug. Idazoxan antagonized inhibition of locomotion due to alpha 2-agonists but not dopamine agonists. RU 24926 (N-propyl-N,N-di[2-(3-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl]amine) was antagonized by both spiperone and idazoxan. Only for dopamine agonists was there good correlation (r = 0.97) between potencies to inhibit locomotion in mice and L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) accumulation in the nucleus accumbens of rats treated with gamma-butyrolactone and 3-hydroxybenzylhydrazine. The specific dopamine D1-agonist, SK&F 38393 (2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-7,8-dihydroxy-1-phenyl-1H-3-benzazepine), was inactive in both tests at doses up to 10 mg kg-1. The mixed dopamine agonist/antagonist, (-)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine, commonly known as (-)-3-PPP, acted as a dopamine agonist in both tests but inhibited locomotion more potently than L-DOPA accumulation. The inhibitory effects of dopamine agonists on locomotion were not prevented by alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine pretreatment. The data suggest that spiperone-reversible inhibition of locomotion in mice is a good criterion for dopamine autoreceptor agonists. The receptors involved are affected by low doses of both dopamine agonists and antagonists and seem similar to those involved in the autoreceptor mediated inhibition of dopamine synthesis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4005487

  12. GP-1447, an inhibitor of aldose reductase, prevents the progression of diabetic cataract in rats.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Ken; Mori, Asami; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effects of GP-1447 (3-[(4,5,7-trifluorobenzothiazol-2-yl)methyl]-5-methylphenyl acetic acid) on existing cataracts and sorbitol content in the lens in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. GP-1447 is an inhibitor of aldose reductase, which is the first enzyme in the polyol pathway. Cataracts in the central region of the lens were observed in 7 of 14 eyes (50%) by the fifth week after induction of diabetes, and development of mature cataracts was observed in most lenses by the ninth week. In diabetic rats that received GP-1447 treatment beginning in the fifth week after induction of diabetes, progression of cataracts was observed for 1 week after initiation of treatment. Thereafter, the severity of cataracts did not change substantially. Sorbitol levels in the lens peaked during the first week of diabetes, and this increase was maintained during the 9-week observation period. Elevated sorbitol levels in the lenses of diabetic rats gradually declined after GP-1447 treatment was started on the fifth week after induction of diabetes. Cataracts and sorbitol elevation were not observed in the lenses of controls or diabetic rats treated with GP-1447 immediately after induction of diabetes. These results suggest that the polyol pathway plays an important role in both the appearance and progression of cataracts in diabetic rats. Inhibition of aldose reductase could significantly prevent progression of existing cataracts. PMID:22687477

  13. Neuropharmacology of dopamine receptors:

    PubMed Central

    Tarazi, Frank I.

    2001-01-01

    There has been an extraordinary recent accumulation of information concerning the neurobiology and neuropharmacology of dopamine (DA) receptors in the mammalian central nervous system. Many new DA molecular entities have been cloned, their gene, peptide sequences and structures have been identified, their anatomical distributions in the mammalian brain described, and their pharmacology characterized. Progress has been made toward developing selective ligands and drug-candidates for different DA receptors. The new discoveries have greatly stimulated preclinical and clinical studies to explore the neuropharmacology of DA receptors and their implications in the neuropathophysiology of different neuropsychiatric diseases including schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Accordingly, it seems timely to review the salient aspects of this specialized area of preclinical neuropharmacology and its relevance to clinical neuropsychiatry. PMID:24019715

  14. Oral health information systems--towards measuring progress in oral health promotion and disease prevention.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Bratthall, Douglas; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the essential components of oral health information systems for the analysis of trends in oral disease and the evaluation of oral health programmes at the country, regional and global levels. Standard methodology for the collection of epidemiological data on oral health has been designed by WHO and used by countries worldwide for the surveillance of oral disease and health. Global, regional and national oral health databanks have highlighted the changing patterns of oral disease which primarily reflect changing risk profiles and the implementation of oral health programmes oriented towards disease prevention and health promotion. The WHO Oral Health Country/Area Profile Programme (CAPP) provides data on oral health from countries, as well as programme experiences and ideas targeted to oral health professionals, policy-makers, health planners, researchers and the general public. WHO has developed global and regional oral health databanks for surveillance, and international projects have designed oral health indicators for use in oral health information systems for assessing the quality of oral health care and surveillance systems. Modern oral health information systems are being developed within the framework of the WHO STEPwise approach to surveillance of noncommunicable, chronic disease, and data stored in the WHO Global InfoBase may allow advanced health systems research. Sound knowledge about progress made in prevention of oral and chronic disease and in health promotion may assist countries to implement effective public health programmes to the benefit of the poor and disadvantaged population groups worldwide. PMID:16211160

  15. Dopamine: the rewarding years

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Charles A

    2006-01-01

    Dopamine has moved from being an insignificant intermediary in the formation of noradrenaline in 1957 to its present-day position as a major neurotransmitter in the brain. This neurotransmitter is involved in the control of movement and Parkinson's disease, the neurobiology and symptoms of schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. It is also considered an essential element in the brain reward system and in the action of many drugs of abuse. This evolution reflects the ability of several famous names in neuropharmacology, neurology and psychiatry to apply new techniques to ask and answer the right questions. There is now excellent knowledge about the metabolism of dopamine, dopamine receptor systems and the structural organisation of dopamine pathways in the brain. Less is known about the function of the different receptors and how the various dopamine pathways are organised to produce normal behaviour, which exhibits disruption in the disease states mentioned. In particular, we have very limited information as to why and how the dopamine system dies or becomes abnormal in Parkinson's disease or a neurodevelopmental disorder such as schizophrenia. Dopamine neurones account for less than 1% of the total neuronal population of the brain, but have a profound effect on function. The future challenge is to understand how dopamine is involved in the integration of information to produce a relevant response rather than to study dopamine in isolation from other transmission systems. This integrated approach should lead to greater understanding and improved treatment of diseases involving dopamine. PMID:16402097

  16. Dopamine-dependent neurodegeneration in rats induced by viral vector-mediated overexpression of the parkin target protein, CDCrel-1

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhizhong; Ferger, Boris; Paterna, Jean-Charles; Vogel, Denise; Furler, Sven; Osinde, Maribel; Feldon, Joram; Büeler, Hansruedi

    2003-01-01

    Mutations in the parkin gene are linked to autosomal-recessive juvenile parkinsonism (AR-JP). Parkin functions as a ubiquitin protein ligase in the degradation of several proteins, including the neuron-specific septin CDCrel-1. AR-JP-associated parkin mutations inhibit ubiquitination and degradation of CDCrel-1 and other parkin target proteins. Here we show that recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated CDCrel-1 gene transfer to the substantia nigra of rats results in a rapid onset (6-10 days) of nigral and striatal CDCrel-1 expression that is followed by a progressive loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons and a decline of the striatal dopamine levels. In contrast, neurons of the globus pallidus are spared from CDCrel-1 toxicity. Furthermore, CDCrel-1 inhibits the release of dopamine from stably-transfected PC12 cells, and pharmacological inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine synthesis in rats prevents CDCrel-1-induced nigral neurodegeneration. These results show that CDCrel-1 overexpression exerts dopamine-dependent neurotoxicity and suggest that inhibition of dopamine secretion by CDCrel-1 may contribute to the development of AR-JP. PMID:14530399

  17. Progress towards hepatitis B prevention through vaccination in the Western Pacific, 1990-2014.

    PubMed

    Wiesen, Eric; Diorditsa, Sergey; Li, Xi

    2016-05-27

    Hepatitis B infections are responsible for more than 300 thousand deaths per year in the Western Pacific Region. Because of this high burden, the countries and areas of the Region established a goal of reducing hepatitis B chronic infection prevalence among children to less than 1% by 2017. This study was conducted to measure the progress in hepatitis B prevention and assess the status of achievement of the 2017 Regional hepatitis B control goal. A literature review was conducted to identify studies of hepatitis B prevalence in the countries and areas of the region, both before and after vaccine introduction. A mathematical model was applied to assess infections and deaths prevented by hepatitis B vaccination and hepatitis B prevalence in countries without recent empirical data. The majority of countries and areas (22 out of 36) were estimated to have over 8% prevalence of chronic hepatitis B infection among persons born before vaccine introduction. After introduction of hepatitis B vaccine, most countries and areas (24 out of 36) had chronic infection prevalence of less than 1% among children born after vaccine introduction. It was estimated that in the past 25 years immunization programmes in the Western Pacific Region have averted 7,167,128 deaths that would have occurred in the lifetime of children born between 1990 and 2014 if hepatitis B vaccination programmes had not been established. Regional prevalence among children born in 2012 was estimated to be 0.93%, meaning that the Regional hepatitis B control goal was achieved. While additional efforts are needed to further reduce hepatitis B transmission in the region, this study demonstrates the great success of the hepatitis B vaccination efforts in the Western Pacific Region. PMID:27020710

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) Prevented the Progression of Renovascular Hypertension, Improved Renal Function and Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira-Sales, Elizabeth B.; Maquigussa, Edgar; Semedo, Patricia; Pereira, Luciana G.; Ferreira, Vanessa M.; Câmara, Niels O.; Bergamaschi, Cassia T.; Campos, Ruy R.; Boim, Mirian A.

    2013-01-01

    Renovascular hypertension induced by 2 Kidney-1 Clip (2K-1C) is a renin-angiotensin-system (RAS)-dependent model, leading to renal vascular rarefaction and renal failure. RAS inhibitors are not able to reduce arterial pressure (AP) and/or preserve the renal function, and thus, alternative therapies are needed. Three weeks after left renal artery occlusion, fluorescently tagged mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) (2×105 cells/animal) were injected weekly into the tail vein in 2K-1C hypertensive rats. Flow cytometry showed labeled MSC in the cortex and medulla of the clipped kidney. MSC prevented a further increase in the AP, significantly reduced proteinuria and decreased sympathetic hyperactivity in 2K-1C rats. Renal function parameters were unchanged, except for an increase in urinary volume observed in 2K-1C rats, which was not corrected by MSC. The treatment improved the morphology and decreased the fibrotic areas in the clipped kidney and also significantly reduced renal vascular rarefaction typical of 2K-1C model. Expression levels of IL-1β, TNF-α angiotensinogen, ACE, and Ang II receptor AT1 were elevated, whereas AT2 levels were decreased in the medulla of the clipped kidney. MSC normalized these expression levels. In conclusion, MSC therapy in the 2K-1C model (i) prevented the progressive increase of AP, (ii) improved renal morphology and microvascular rarefaction, (iii) reduced fibrosis, proteinuria and inflammatory cytokines, (iv) suppressed the intrarenal RAS, iv) decreased sympathetic hyperactivity in anesthetized animals and v) MSC were detected at the CNS suggesting that the cells crossed the blood-brain barrier. This therapy may be a promising strategy to treat renovascular hypertension and its renal consequences in the near future. PMID:24223811

  19. Meniscal Allograft Transplantation Does Not Prevent or Delay Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Byttebier, Paul; Eeckhoudt, Annelies; Victor, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Meniscal tears are common knee injuries. Meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) has been advocated to alleviate symptoms and delay osteoarthritis (OA) after meniscectomy. We investigated (1) the long-term outcome of MAT as a treatment of symptomatic meniscectomy, (2) most important factors affecting survivorship and (3) OA progression. Methods From 1989 till 2013, 329 MAT were performed in 313 patients. Clinical and radiographic results and MAT survival were evaluated retrospectively. Failure was defined as conversion to knee arthroplasty (KA) or total removal of the MAT. Results Mean age at surgery was 33 years (15–57); 60% were males. No-to-mild cartilage damage was found in 156 cases, moderate-to-severe damage in 130. Simultaneous procedures in 118 patients included cartilage procedures, osteotomy or ACL-reconstruction. At a mean follow-up of 6.8 years (0.2–24.3years), 5 patients were deceased and 48 lost (14.6%), 186 MAT were in situ (56.5%) whilst 90 (27.4%) had been removed, including 63 converted to a KA (19.2%). Cumulative allograft survivorship was 15.1% (95% CI:13.9–16.3) at 24.0 years. In patients <35 years at surgery, survival was significantly better (24.1%) compared to ≥35 years (8.0%) (p = 0.017). In knees with no-to-mild cartilage damage more allografts survived (43.0%) compared to moderate-to-severe damage (6.6%) (p = 0.003). Simultaneous osteotomy significantly deteriorated survival (0% at 24.0 years) (p = 0.010). 61% of patients underwent at least one additional surgery (1–11) for clinical symptoms after MAT. Consecutive radiographs showed significant OA progression at a mean of 3.8 years (p<0.0001). Incremental Kellgren-Lawrence grade was +1,1 grade per 1000 days (2,7yrs). Conclusions MAT did not delay or prevent tibiofemoral OA progression. 19.2% were converted to a knee prosthesis at a mean of 10.3 years. Patients younger than 35 with no-to-mild cartilage damage may benefit from MAT for relief of symptoms (survivorship

  20. Are Substance Use Prevention Programs More Effective in Schools Making Adequate Yearly Progress? A Study of Project ALERT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Heddy Kovach; Ringwalt, Chris L.; Shamblen, Stephen R.; Hanley, Sean M.; Flewelling, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study sought to determine if a popular school-based drug prevention program might be effective in schools that are making adequate yearly progress (AYP). Thirty-four schools with grades 6 through 8 in 11 states were randomly assigned either to receive Project ALERT (n = 17) or to a control group (n = 17); of these, 10 intervention…

  1. Measuring the progress of capacity building in the Alberta Policy Coalition for Cancer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Raine, Kim D; Sosa Hernandez, Cristabel; Nykiforuk, Candace I J; Reed, Shandy; Montemurro, Genevieve; Lytvyak, Ellina; MacLellan-Wright, Mary-Frances

    2014-07-01

    The Alberta Policy Coalition for Cancer Prevention (APCCP) represents practitioners, policy makers, researchers, and community organizations working together to coordinate efforts and advocate for policy change to reduce chronic diseases. The aim of this research was to capture changes in the APCCP's capacity to advance its goals over the course of its operation. We adapted the Public Health Agency of Canada's validated Community Capacity-Building Tool to capture policy work. All members of the APCCP were invited to complete the tool in 2010 and 2011. Responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics and t tests. Qualitative comments were analyzed using thematic content analysis. A group process for reaching consensus provided context to the survey responses and contributed to a participatory analysis. Significant improvement was observed in eight out of nine capacity domains. Lessons learned highlight the importance of balancing volume and diversity of intersectoral representation to ensure effective participation, as well as aligning professional and economic resources. Defining involvement and roles within a coalition can be a challenging activity contingent on the interests of each sector represented. The participatory analysis enabled the group to reflect on progress made and future directions for policy advocacy. PMID:24334541

  2. Dual therapeutic functions of F-5 fragment in burn wounds: preventing wound progression and promoting wound healing in pigs.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Ayesha; O'Brien, Kathryn; Chen, Mei; Wong, Alex; Garner, Warren; Woodley, David T; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity including prolonged hospitalization, disfigurement, and disability. Currently there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved burn therapeutics. A clinical distinction of burn injuries from other acute wounds is the event of the so-called secondary burn wound progression within the first week of the injury, in which a burn expands horizontally and vertically from its initial boundary to a larger area. Therefore, an effective therapeutics for burns should show dual abilities to prevent the burn wound progression and thereafter promote burn wound healing. Herein we report that topically applied F-5 fragment of heat shock protein-90α is a dual functional agent to promote burn wound healing in pigs. First, F-5 prevents burn wound progression by protecting the surrounding cells from undergoing heat-induced caspase 3 activation and apoptosis with increased Akt activation. Accordingly, F-5-treated burn and excision wounds show a marked decline in inflammation. Thereafter, F-5 accelerates burn wound healing by stimulating the keratinocyte migration-led reepithelialization, leading to wound closure. This study addresses a topical agent that is capable of preventing burn wound progression and accelerating burn wound healing. PMID:27382602

  3. Dual therapeutic functions of F-5 fragment in burn wounds: preventing wound progression and promoting wound healing in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Ayesha; O’Brien, Kathryn; Chen, Mei; Wong, Alex; Garner, Warren; Woodley, David T.; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity including prolonged hospitalization, disfigurement, and disability. Currently there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved burn therapeutics. A clinical distinction of burn injuries from other acute wounds is the event of the so-called secondary burn wound progression within the first week of the injury, in which a burn expands horizontally and vertically from its initial boundary to a larger area. Therefore, an effective therapeutics for burns should show dual abilities to prevent the burn wound progression and thereafter promote burn wound healing. Herein we report that topically applied F-5 fragment of heat shock protein-90α is a dual functional agent to promote burn wound healing in pigs. First, F-5 prevents burn wound progression by protecting the surrounding cells from undergoing heat-induced caspase 3 activation and apoptosis with increased Akt activation. Accordingly, F-5–treated burn and excision wounds show a marked decline in inflammation. Thereafter, F-5 accelerates burn wound healing by stimulating the keratinocyte migration-led reepithelialization, leading to wound closure. This study addresses a topical agent that is capable of preventing burn wound progression and accelerating burn wound healing. PMID:27382602

  4. Patchy progress on obesity prevention: emerging examples, entrenched barriers, and new thinking.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Christina A; Swinburn, Boyd; Hawkes, Corinna; Huang, Terry T-K; Costa, Sergio A; Ashe, Marice; Zwicker, Lindsey; Cawley, John H; Brownell, Kelly D

    2015-06-13

    Despite isolated areas of improvement, no country to date has reversed its obesity epidemic. Governments, together with a broad range of stakeholders, need to act urgently to decrease the prevalence of obesity. In this Series paper, we review several regulatory and non-regulatory actions taken around the world to address obesity and discuss some of the reasons for the scarce and fitful progress. Additionally, we preview the papers in this Lancet Series, which each identify high-priority actions on key obesity issues and challenge some of the entrenched dichotomies that dominate the thinking about obesity and its solutions. Although obesity is acknowledged as a complex issue, many debates about its causes and solutions are centred around overly simple dichotomies that present seemingly competing perspectives. Examples of such dichotomies explored in this Series include personal versus collective responsibilities for actions, supply versus demand-type explanations for consumption of unhealthy food, government regulation versus industry self-regulation, top-down versus bottom-up drivers for change, treatment versus prevention priorities, and a focus on undernutrition versus overnutrition. We also explore the dichotomy of individual versus environmental drivers of obesity and conclude that people bear some personal responsibility for their health, but environmental factors can readily support or undermine the ability of people to act in their own self-interest. We propose a reframing of obesity that emphasises the reciprocal nature of the interaction between the environment and the individual. Today's food environments exploit people's biological, psychological, social, and economic vulnerabilities, making it easier for them to eat unhealthy foods. This reinforces preferences and demands for foods of poor nutritional quality, furthering the unhealthy food environments. Regulatory actions from governments and increased efforts from industry and civil society will be

  5. Curcumin delivery from poly(acrylic acid-co-methyl methacrylate) hollow microparticles prevents dopamine-induced toxicity in rat brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Yoncheva, Krassimira; Kondeva-Burdina, Magdalena; Tzankova, Virginia; Petrov, Petar; Laouani, Mohamed; Halacheva, Silvia S

    2015-01-01

    The potential of poly(methyl methacrylate-co-acrylic acid) (PMMA-AA) copolymers to form hollow particles and their further formulation as curcumin delivery system have been explored. The particles were functionalized by crosslinking the acrylic acid groups via bis-amide formation with either cystamine (CYS) or 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid dihydrazide (DTP) which simultaneously incorporated reversibility due to the presence of disulfide bonds within the crosslinker. Optical micrographs showed the formation of spherical hollow microparticles with a size ranging from 1 to 7 μm. Curcumin was loaded by incubation of its ethanol solution with aqueous dispersions of the cross-linked particles and subsequent evaporation of the ethanol. Higher loading was observed in the microparticles with higher content of hydrophobic PMMA units indicating its influence upon the loading of hydrophobic molecules such as curcumin. The in vitro release studies in a phosphate buffer showed no initial burst effect and sustained release of curcumin that correlated with the swelling of the particles under these conditions. The capacity of encapsulated and free curcumin to protect rat brain synaptosomes against dopamine-induced neurotoxicity was examined. The encapsulated curcumin showed greater protective effects in rat brain synaptosomes as measured by synaptosomal viability and increased intracellular levels of glutathione. PMID:25839414

  6. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Prevention Basic Facts & Information Some factors that affect your ... control of the things that you can change. Preventive Recommendations for Adults Aged 65 and Older The ...

  7. Presence and Function of Dopamine Transporter (DAT) in Stallion Sperm: Dopamine Modulates Sperm Motility and Acrosomal Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Alejandra A.; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan Enric; Ramírez-Reveco, Alfredo; Concha, Ilona I.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is a catecholamine with multiple physiological functions, playing a key role in nervous system; however its participation in reproductive processes and sperm physiology is controversial. High dopamine concentrations have been reported in different portions of the feminine and masculine reproductive tract, although the role fulfilled by this catecholamine in reproductive physiology is as yet unknown. We have previously shown that dopamine type 2 receptor is functional in boar sperm, suggesting that dopamine acts as a physiological modulator of sperm viability, capacitation and motility. In the present study, using immunodetection methods, we revealed the presence of several proteins important for the dopamine uptake and signalling in mammalian sperm, specifically monoamine transporters as dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters in equine sperm. We also demonstrated for the first time in equine sperm a functional dopamine transporter using 4-[4-(Dimethylamino)styryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP+), as substrate. In addition, we also showed that dopamine (1 mM) treatment in vitro, does not affect sperm viability but decreases total and progressive sperm motility. This effect is reversed by blocking the dopamine transporter with the selective inhibitor vanoxerine (GBR12909) and non-selective inhibitors of dopamine reuptake such as nomifensine and bupropion. The effect of dopamine in sperm physiology was evaluated and we demonstrated that acrosome integrity and thyrosine phosphorylation in equine sperm is significantly reduced at high concentrations of this catecholamine. In summary, our results revealed the presence of monoamine transporter DAT, NET and SERT in equine sperm, and that the dopamine uptake by DAT can regulate sperm function, specifically acrosomal integrity and sperm motility. PMID:25402186

  8. 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylethanol (Hydroxytyrosol) Mitigates the Increase in Spontaneous Oxidation of Dopamine During Monoamine Oxidase Inhibition in PC12 Cells.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Sullivan, Patti; Holmes, Courtney; Kopin, Irwin J; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2016-09-01

    The catecholaldehyde hypothesis predicts that monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition should slow the progression of Parkinson's disease, by decreasing production of the autotoxic dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL). Inhibiting MAO, however, diverts the fate of cytoplasmic dopamine toward potentially harmful spontaneous oxidation products, indicated by increased 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine (Cys-DA) levels. 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylethanol (hydroxytyrosol) is an abundant anti-oxidant phenol in constituents of the Mediterranean diet. Whether hydroxytyrosol alters enzymatic or spontaneous oxidation of dopamine has been unknown. Rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells were incubated with hydroxytyrosol (10 µM, 180 min) alone or with the MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline (1 nM) or the MAO-B inhibitors rasagiline or selegiline (0.5 µM). Hydroxytyrosol decreased levels of DOPAL by 30 % and Cys-DA by 49 % (p < 0.0001 each). Co-incubation with hydroxytyrosol prevented the increases in Cys-DA seen with all 3 MAO inhibitors. Hydroxytyrosol therefore inhibits both enzymatic and spontaneous oxidation of endogenous dopamine and mitigates the increase in spontaneous oxidation during MAO inhibition. PMID:27220335

  9. Investigation of Chitosan for Prevention of Diabetic Progression Through Gut Microbiota Alteration in Sugar Rich Diet Induced Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Bhumika; Rajput, Parth; Jena, Prasant Kumar; Seshadri, Sriram

    2015-01-01

    Sugar rich diet induces inflammation and insulin resistance mainly through gut microbiota alteration. Gut microflora dysbiosis increases plasma lipopolysaccharide and reduces short chain fatty acids to impair the insulin signaling cascades by different molecular pathways to progress into diabetes. Chitosan based formulations have major significance in insulin delivery system due to their ability to protect the insulin from enzymatic degradation and its efficient inter-epithelial transport. This study was designed to investigate the effect of chitosan administration on gut microflora mediated signaling pathways to prevent the diet induced diabetes. Male wistar rats were divided into non-diabetic group with a normal diet (CD), diabetic group with high sucrose diet (HSD) and treatment group with HSD and chitosan (60 mg/kg). After 8 weeks of the study, significant alterations in two major gut dominant microbial phyla i.e Firmicutes and Bacteroides and four dominant microbial species i.e. Lactobacilli, Bifidobacteria, Escherichia and Clostridia were observed in HSD group compared to CD. This microbial dysbiosis in dominant phyla was significantly prevented in chitosan administrated HSD group. Chitosan administration had also reduced the HSD induced activation of Toll like receptors and Nod like receptors signaling pathways compared to HSD control group to reduce the inflammation. These suggest that chitosan can prevent the progression of Type 2 Diabetes through gut microbiota alteration, reducing endotoxin and microbes mediated inflammation. PMID:26511978

  10. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Treatment 2003 U.S. Outbreak African Rodent Importation Ban For Clinicians Clinical Recognition Specimen Collection Treatment Smallpox ... Examining Animals with Suspected Monkeypox African Rodent Importation Ban Resources Related Links Poxvirus Molluscum Contagiosum Orf Virus ( ...

  11. Real-Time Dopamine Efflux in the Nucleus Accumbens Core During Pavlovian Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Sunsay, Ceyhun; Rebec, George V.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the role of dopamine input to the nucleus accumbens core in anticipatory learning, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry was combined with appetitive Pavlovian conditioning. One group of rats (Paired) received 16 tone-food pairings for at least four daily sessions while the control group (Unpaired) received the same number of unpaired tone and food presentations. Both groups showed transient dopamine responses during food presentation throughout training, confirming dopamine involvement in reward processing. Only the Paired Group, however, showed consistently timed dopamine transients during the 10-s tone presentation. Transients first appeared near the end of the tone period as each animal acquired the tone-food association and then occurred progressively sooner on subsequent sessions. Later sessions also revealed a consistently timed dopamine response soon after food delivery in Paired animals. Collectively, these results implicate phasic dopamine release in the acquisition of Pavlovian learning and also suggest an early dopamine response to the unconditioned stimulus as training continues. PMID:18410174

  12. PE859, a Novel Tau Aggregation Inhibitor, Reduces Aggregated Tau and Prevents Onset and Progression of Neural Dysfunction In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Michiaki; Hijikuro, Ichiro; Fujita, Yuki; Wu, Xiaofeng; Nakayama, Shinichi; Sakata, Yoko; Noguchi, Yuji; Ogo, Makoto; Akasofu, Shigeru; Ito, Yoshimasa; Soeda, Yoshiyuki; Tsuchiya, Nobuhiko; Tanaka, Naoki; Takahashi, Takashi; Sugimoto, Hachiro

    2015-01-01

    In tauopathies, a neural microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) is abnormally aggregated and forms neurofibrillary tangle. Therefore, inhibition of the tau aggregation is one of the key approaches for the treatment of these diseases. Here, we have identified a novel tau aggregation inhibitor, PE859. An oral administration of PE859 resulted in the significant reduction of sarkosyl-insoluble aggregated tau along with the prevention of onset and progression of the motor dysfunction in JNPL3 P301L-mutated human tau transgenic mice. These results suggest that PE859 is useful for the treatment of tauopathies. PMID:25659102

  13. Potential Drugs and Methods for Preventing or Delaying the Progression of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Youssef

    2012-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant inherited and progressive neurodegenerative disorder with motor dysfunction and cognitive deficits. Although, there are no treatments to delay the appearance and the progression of HD, there are potential drugs currently in preclinical and clinical trials that are focused on HD therapy. The signaling pathways involved in HD are not yet clearly elucidated; however, expression of mutant huntingtin protein is considered a key factor in the induction and/or progression of HD. The demonstration that the onset and progression of HD in models of transgenic mice, in particular, are delayed or improved by the application of neurotrophic factors has emphasized their importance in neuroprotection in HD. In addition, other compounds targeting the HD gene or mutant huntingtin protein are currently in preclinical and clinical testing and may show promising neuroprotective effects. There are current patented drugs that are currently being considered as potential therapeutics for HD. These patented drugs may provide promising therapy for HD. PMID:21585328

  14. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Senard, Jean-Michel; Rouet, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DβH) deficiency is a very rare form of primary autonomic failure characterized by a complete absence of noradrenaline and adrenaline in plasma together with increased dopamine plasma levels. The prevalence of DβH deficiency is unknown. Only a limited number of cases with this disease have been reported. DβH deficiency is mainly characterized by cardiovascular disorders and severe orthostatic hypotension. First symptoms often start during a complicated perinatal period with hypotension, muscle hypotonia, hypothermia and hypoglycemia. Children with DβH deficiency exhibit reduced ability to exercise because of blood pressure inadaptation with exertion and syncope. Symptoms usually worsen progressively during late adolescence and early adulthood with severe orthostatic hypotension, eyelid ptosis, nasal stuffiness and sexual disorders. Limitation in standing tolerance, limited ability to exercise and traumatic morbidity related to falls and syncope may represent later evolution. The syndrome is caused by heterogeneous molecular alterations of the DBH gene and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Restoration of plasma noradrenaline to the normal range can be achieved by therapy with the synthetic precursor of noradrenaline, L-threo-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS). Oral administration of 100 to 500 mg DOPS, twice or three times daily, increases blood pressure and reverses the orthostatic intolerance. PMID:16722595

  15. Halfway There: A Prescription for Continued Progress in Preventing Teen Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Campaign To Prevent Teen Pregnancy, Washington, DC.

    This report offers findings and recommendations by the National Campaign To Prevent Teen Pregnancy. Nearly one million teens become pregnant annually. The teen birth rate increased 24 percent between 1986-91 and has fallen 20 percent since then. Overall, too many parents and adult leaders do not take a strong stand against teen pregnancy. Strident…

  16. EPODE approach for childhood obesity prevention: methods, progress and international development

    PubMed Central

    Borys, J-M; Le Bodo, Y; Jebb, S A; Seidell, J C; Summerbell, C; Richard, D; De Henauw, S; Moreno, L A; Romon, M; Visscher, T L S; Raffin, S; Swinburn, B

    2012-01-01

    Summary Childhood obesity is a complex issue and needs multistakeholder involvement at all levels to foster healthier lifestyles in a sustainable way. ‘Ensemble Prévenons l'ObésitéDes Enfants’ (EPODE, Together Let's Prevent Childhood Obesity) is a large-scale, coordinated, capacity-building approach for communities to implement effective and sustainable strategies to prevent childhood obesity. This paper describes EPODE methodology and its objective of preventing childhood obesity. At a central level, a coordination team, using social marketing and organizational techniques, trains and coaches a local project manager nominated in each EPODE community by the local authorities. The local project manager is also provided with tools to mobilize local stakeholders through a local steering committee and local networks. The added value of the methodology is to mobilize stakeholders at all levels across the public and the private sectors. Its critical components include political commitment, sustainable resources, support services and a strong scientific input – drawing on the evidence-base – together with evaluation of the programme. Since 2004, EPODE methodology has been implemented in more than 500 communities in six countries. Community-based interventions are integral to childhood obesity prevention. EPODE provides a valuable model to address this challenge. PMID:22106871

  17. Installing the Communities that Care Prevention System: Implementation Progress and Fidelity in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinby, Rose K.; Hanson, Koren; Brooke-Weiss, Blair; Arthur, Michael W.; Hawkins, J. David; Fagan, Abigail A.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the degree to which high fidelity implementation of the Communities That Care (CTC) prevention operating system was reached during the first 18 months of intervention in 12 communities in the Community Youth Development Study, a 5-year group randomized controlled trial designed to test the efficacy of the CTC system. CTC…

  18. Contributions of Peer Support to Health, Health Care, and Prevention: Papers from Peers for Progress

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Edwin B.; Ayala, Guadalupe X.; Ibarra, Leticia; Cherrington, Andrea L.; Elder, John P.; Tang, Tricia S.; Heisler, Michele; Safford, Monika M.; Simmons, David

    2015-01-01

    SUBSTANTIAL evidence documents the benefits of peer support provided by community health workers, lay health advisors, promotores de salud, and others. The papers in this supplement, all supported by the Peers for Progress program of the American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation, contribute to the growing body of literature addressing the efficacy, effectiveness, feasibility, reach, sustainability, and adoption of peer support for diabetes self-management. They and additional papers supported by Peers for Progress contribute to understanding how peer support can be implemented in real world settings. Topics include examination of the peers who provide peer support, reaching the hardly reached, success factors in peer support interventions, proactive approaches, attention to emotions, peer support in behavioral health, dissemination models and their application in China, peer support in the patient-centered medical home, research challenges, and policy implications. PMID:26304968

  19. Prevention of early episodes of otitis media by pneumococcal vaccines might reduce progression to complex disease.

    PubMed

    Dagan, Ron; Pelton, Stephen; Bakaletz, Lauren; Cohen, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Otitis media is a common childhood infection of the middle ear and a major cause of morbidity. This multifactorial disease manifests as a spectrum of clinical syndromes from uncomplicated acute otitis media to more complex recurrent and chronic cases (frequently polymicrobial), with the major pathogens involved being Streptococcus pneumoniae and non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) target only a few serotypes that cause otitis media; however, results from studies suggest that existing PCVs can prevent early episodes of disease associated with vaccine serotypes, resulting in a reduction of subsequent complex cases caused by non-vaccine serotypes and other otopathogens, which contribute considerably to the disease burden. In this Review, we discuss the role of pneumococcus in the disease continuum and assess clinical evidence showing the effect of prevention of early episodes on the complex interplay between bacterial species implicated in otitis media. PMID:27036355

  20. A health promotion logic model to review progress in HIV prevention in China.

    PubMed

    Nutbeam, Don; Padmadas, Sabu S; Maslovskaya, Olga; Wu, Zhiwei

    2015-06-01

    Using the theory and concepts of health promotion, this paper proposes a logic model for HIV/AIDS prevention and control which provides a structure for describing planned actions and predicted impacts/outcomes from comprehensive HIV prevention interventions. The potential usefulness of the model is examined by reviewing the evolution of HIV prevention and management in China, drawing on evidence from interventions reported from a mixture of study designs and formats. It reports that HIV interventions in China can be considered in two distinctive phases, before and after 2003 when China commenced its 'official' response to the HIV epidemic. The logic model was useful in comparing actions taken over these two periods highlighting the importance of political leadership in distinguishing between the two phases, and the continuing importance of systematic and broadly based public education and communication. We conclude that the logic model can not only be used as a planning model, but can also be applied retrospectively to assess successes and failures in national and local responses to HIV in complex social settings. PMID:23753059

  1. Pharmacological targeting of CSF1R inhibits microglial proliferation and prevents the progression of Alzheimer’s-like pathology

    PubMed Central

    Olmos-Alonso, Adrian; Schetters, Sjoerd T. T.; Sri, Sarmi; Askew, Katharine; Mancuso, Renzo; Vargas-Caballero, Mariana; Holscher, Christian; Perry, V. Hugh

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation and activation of microglial cells is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative conditions. This mechanism is regulated by the activation of the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R), thus providing a target that may prevent the progression of conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease. However, the study of microglial proliferation in Alzheimer’s disease and validation of the efficacy of CSF1R-inhibiting strategies have not yet been reported. In this study we found increased proliferation of microglial cells in human Alzheimer’s disease, in line with an increased upregulation of the CSF1R-dependent pro-mitogenic cascade, correlating with disease severity. Using a transgenic model of Alzheimer’s-like pathology (APPswe, PSEN1dE9; APP/PS1 mice) we define a CSF1R-dependent progressive increase in microglial proliferation, in the proximity of amyloid-β plaques. Prolonged inhibition of CSF1R in APP/PS1 mice by an orally available tyrosine kinase inhibitor (GW2580) resulted in the blockade of microglial proliferation and the shifting of the microglial inflammatory profile to an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Pharmacological targeting of CSF1R in APP/PS1 mice resulted in an improved performance in memory and behavioural tasks and a prevention of synaptic degeneration, although these changes were not correlated with a change in the number of amyloid-β plaques. Our results provide the first proof of the efficacy of CSF1R inhibition in models of Alzheimer’s disease, and validate the application of a therapeutic strategy aimed at modifying CSF1R activation as a promising approach to tackle microglial activation and the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26747862

  2. Pharmacological targeting of CSF1R inhibits microglial proliferation and prevents the progression of Alzheimer's-like pathology.

    PubMed

    Olmos-Alonso, Adrian; Schetters, Sjoerd T T; Sri, Sarmi; Askew, Katharine; Mancuso, Renzo; Vargas-Caballero, Mariana; Holscher, Christian; Perry, V Hugh; Gomez-Nicola, Diego

    2016-03-01

    The proliferation and activation of microglial cells is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative conditions. This mechanism is regulated by the activation of the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R), thus providing a target that may prevent the progression of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. However, the study of microglial proliferation in Alzheimer's disease and validation of the efficacy of CSF1R-inhibiting strategies have not yet been reported. In this study we found increased proliferation of microglial cells in human Alzheimer's disease, in line with an increased upregulation of the CSF1R-dependent pro-mitogenic cascade, correlating with disease severity. Using a transgenic model of Alzheimer's-like pathology (APPswe, PSEN1dE9; APP/PS1 mice) we define a CSF1R-dependent progressive increase in microglial proliferation, in the proximity of amyloid-β plaques. Prolonged inhibition of CSF1R in APP/PS1 mice by an orally available tyrosine kinase inhibitor (GW2580) resulted in the blockade of microglial proliferation and the shifting of the microglial inflammatory profile to an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Pharmacological targeting of CSF1R in APP/PS1 mice resulted in an improved performance in memory and behavioural tasks and a prevention of synaptic degeneration, although these changes were not correlated with a change in the number of amyloid-β plaques. Our results provide the first proof of the efficacy of CSF1R inhibition in models of Alzheimer's disease, and validate the application of a therapeutic strategy aimed at modifying CSF1R activation as a promising approach to tackle microglial activation and the progression of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26747862

  3. L-Carnitine Prevents Progression of Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis in a Mouse Model with Upregulation of Mitochondrial Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Hisashi; Takaki, Akinobu; Tsuzaki, Ryuichiro; Yasunaka, Tetsuya; Koike, Kazuko; Shimomura, Yasuyuki; Seki, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Hiroshi; Miyake, Yasuhiro; Ikeda, Fusao; Shiraha, Hidenori; Nouso, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a severe form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease characterized by lobular inflammation, hepatocellular ballooning, and fibrosis with an inherent risk for progression to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Mitochondrial dysfunction appears to play a role in the progression from simple steatosis to NASH. L-carnitine (L-b-hydroxy-g-N-trimethylaminobutyric acid), an essential nutrient that converts fat into energy in mitochondria, has been shown to ameliorate liver damage. The aim of the present study was to explore the preventive and therapeutic effect of L-carnitine in NASH model mice. Eight-week-old male STAM mice, a NASH-cirrhosis-hepatocarcinogenic model, were divided into 3 experimental groups and fed as follows: 1) high-fat diet (HFD) (control group); 2) HFD mixed with 0.28% L-carnitine (L-carnitine group); and 3) HFD mixed with 0.01% α-tocopherol (α-tocopherol group). After 4 or 8 weeks, mice were sacrificed. Blood samples and livers were collected, and hepatic tumors were counted and measured. Livers were subjected to histological study, immunohistochemical staining of 4-hydroxynonenal and ferritin, determination of 8-OHdG levels, mRNA and protein expressions for multiple genes, and metabolomic analysis. The intestinal microbiome was also analyzed. L-carnitine increased hepatic expression of genes related to long-chain fatty acid transport, mitochondrial β-oxidation, and antioxidant enzymes following suppression of hepatic oxidative stress markers and inflammatory cytokines in NASH, and mice treated with L-carnitine developed fewer liver tumors. Although α-tocopherol resulted in NASH improvement in the same manner as L-carnitine, it increased periodontitis-related microbiotic changes and hepatic iron transport-related gene expression and led to less effective for anti-hepatocarcinogenesis. Conclusion L-carnitine prevents progression of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in a mouse model by upregulating the

  4. Exon skipping restores dystrophin expression, but fails to prevent disease progression in later stage dystrophic dko mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, B; Cloer, C; Lu, P; Milazi, S; Shaban, M; Shah, SN; Marston-Poe, L; Moulton, HM; Lu, QL

    2014-01-01

    Antisense therapy with both chemistries of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) and 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate has demonstrated the capability to induce dystrophin expression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients in phase II–III clinical trials with benefit in muscle functions. However, potential of the therapy for DMD at different stages of the disease progression is not understood. In this study, we examined the effect of peptide-conjugated PMO (PPMO)-mediated exon skipping on disease progression of utrophin-dystrophin-deficient mice (dko) of four age groups (21–29, 30–39, 40–49 and 50+ days), representing diseases from early stage to advanced stage with severe kyphosis. Biweekly intravenous (i.v.) administration of the PPMO restored the dystrophin expression in nearly 100% skeletal muscle fibers in all age groups. This was associated with the restoration of dystrophin-associated proteins including functional glycosylated dystroglycan and neuronal nitric synthase. However, therapeutic outcomes clearly depended on severity of the disease at the time the treatment started. The PPMO treatment alleviated the disease pathology and significantly prolonged the life span of the mice receiving treatment at younger age with mild phenotype. However, restoration of high levels of dystrophin expression failed to prevent disease progression to the mice receiving treatment when disease was already at advanced stage. The results could be critical for design of clinical trials with antisense therapy to DMD. PMID:24942628

  5. Effect of dopamine on viability of BHK-21 cells.

    PubMed

    Moshkov, D A; Abramova, M B; Shubina, V S; Lavrovskaya, V P; Pavlik, L L; Lezhnev, E I

    2010-09-01

    We studied the effects of dopamine added to culture medium on survival of floating or adherent BHK-21 cells differing by organization of actin cytoskeleton. The viability of floating cells more drastically decreased with increasing dopamine concentration and duration of exposure than that of adherent cells. The cells worse adhered to the substrate and formed a monolayer. The formed monolayer degrades, cell borders become blurred, cells, polygonal in the control, are rounded. Preliminary blockade of dopamine receptors with haloperidol, inessential for cell survival and morphology, does not prevent the destructive effect of dopamine on the cells. Ultrastructural study revealed increased density of filamentous actin threads in deep compartments of cell cytoplasm after dopamine treatment, this increase being more pronounced in cells grown in suspension. Bearing in mind the polymerizing effect of dopamine on globular actin in vitro and the fact that the content of this protein in floating cells is higher than in adherent cells, we can conclude that the decrease in viability of BHK-21 cells is caused by interaction of dopamine with cytoplasmic globular actin. PMID:21246101

  6. Castration of male mice prevents the progression of established angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuan; Thatcher, Sean; Wu, Congqing; Daugherty, Alan; Cassis, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Male sex is a non-modifiable risk factor for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. Similar to humans, male mice are more susceptible to angiotensin II (AngII)-induced AAAs than females. Previous studies demonstrated that castration of males markedly reduced the formation of AngII-induced AAAs. Progression of AAA size is associated with increased risk of aneurysm rupture. In this study, we hypothesized that castration of male mice would reduce the progression of established AngII-induced AAAs. Methods Male apolipoprotein E (ApoE)-/- mice were infused with AngII for 1 month to induce AAA formation. Aortic diameters were measured by ultrasound and mice were stratified into 2 groups that were either sham-operated or castrated. AngII infusions were continued for a further 2 months. Ultrasound was used to quantify lumen diameters, and excised aortas were processed for quantification of AAA size, volume, and tissue characteristics. Results Sham-operated mice exhibited progressive dilation of suprarenal aortic lumen diameters during continued AngII infusion. Castration significantly decreased aortic lumen diameters (study endpoint: 1.88 ± 0.05 mm vs 1.63 ± 0.04 mm; P<.05; sham-operated [n = 15] vs castration [n = 17], respectively). However, maximal external AAA diameters were not significantly different between sham-operated and castrated mice. The vascular volume/lumen volume ratio of excised AAAs imaged by ultrasound was significantly increased by castration (sham-operated, 4.8 ± 0.9; castration, 9.5 ± 2.0 %; n = 11/group; P<.05). Moreover, compared to thin walled AAAs of sham-operated mice, aneurysm sections from castrated mice exhibited increased smooth muscle -actin and collagen. Conclusions Removal of endogenous male hormones by castration selectively reduces aortic lumen expansion while not altering the external AAA dimensions. PMID:24439319

  7. VPS35 in Dopamine Neurons Is Required for Endosome-to-Golgi Retrieval of Lamp2a, a Receptor of Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy That Is Critical for α-Synuclein Degradation and Prevention of Pathogenesis of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Fu-Lei; Erion, Joanna R.; Tian, Yun; Liu, Wei; Yin, Dong-Min; Ye, Jian; Tang, Baisha; Mei, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Vacuolar protein sorting-35 (VPS35) is essential for endosome-to-Golgi retrieval of membrane proteins. Mutations in the VPS35 gene have been identified in patients with autosomal dominant PD. However, it remains poorly understood if and how VPS35 deficiency or mutation contributes to PD pathogenesis. Here we provide evidence that links VPS35 deficiency to PD-like neuropathology. VPS35 was expressed in mouse dopamine (DA) neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and STR (striatum)—regions that are PD vulnerable. VPS35-deficient mice exhibited PD-relevant deficits including accumulation of α-synuclein in SNpc-DA neurons, loss of DA transmitter and DA neurons in SNpc and STR, and impairment of locomotor behavior. Further mechanical studies showed that VPS35-deficient DA neurons or DA neurons expressing PD-linked VPS35 mutant (D620N) had impaired endosome-to-Golgi retrieval of lysosome-associated membrane glycoprotein 2a (Lamp2a) and accelerated Lamp2a degradation. Expression of Lamp2a in VPS35-deficient DA neurons reduced α-synuclein, supporting the view for Lamp2a as a receptor of chaperone-mediated autophagy to be critical for α-synuclein degradation. These results suggest that VPS35 deficiency or mutation promotes PD pathogenesis and reveals a crucial pathway, VPS35-Lamp2a-α-synuclein, to prevent PD pathogenesis. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT VPS35 is a key component of the retromer complex that is essential for endosome-to-Golgi retrieval of membrane proteins. Mutations in the VPS35 gene have been identified in patients with PD. However, if and how VPS35 deficiency or mutation contributes to PD pathogenesis remains unclear. We demonstrated that VPS35 deficiency or mutation (D620N) in mice leads to α-synuclein accumulation and aggregation in the substantia nigra, accompanied with DA neurodegeneration. VPS35-deficient DA neurons exhibit impaired endosome-to-Golgi retrieval of Lamp2a, which may contribute to the reduced α-synuclein degradation through

  8. [Recent progress in application of local drug delivery for preventing restenosis after peripheral arterial revascularization].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingyi; Zhang, Fuxian; Zhang, Huan; Liang, Gangzhu

    2015-03-01

    Restenosis following vascular revascularization remains an important clinical problem. Local drug delivery which can provide enough drug concentration in the lesion location without causing adverse systemic effect is an excellent solution for this question. We conducted a systematic literatory search on PubMed and CKNI through May 2014. After reviewing all related papers, we provided a comprehensive overview of the available drugs and techniques for local drug delivery that have been developed to prevent restenosis after peripheral vascular interventions, including innovations that have been tested only in animals as well as those already approved for clinical use. In brief, anti-proliferative drugs such as paclitaxel and sirolimus are the most used and suitable drugs for local delivery system. Additionally, some promising drugs including anti-inflammatory drugs, antioxidant drugs and drugs inhibiting cell proliferation and migration are already being tested in pre-clinical trials or animal models. At the same time, intraluminal and extraluminal delivery devices have also got a rapid development during the past decades. The efficacy of drug-eluting stent, drug-eluting balloon, porous and microporous balloon and the most recent drug-eluting bioresobable scaffold for preventing of restenosis in peripheral vessels have been demonstrated in humans or in animals, some of them even have received the CE mark in Europe. Endovascular microinfusion catheter and drug-loaded perivascular wraps have only been tested in animal models, more researches are needed. With the development of pharmacology and bioengineering, great strides will be made in the prevention of restenosis in the near future. PMID:26269021

  9. Prevention of Axonal Injury using Calpain Inhibitor in Chronic Progressive Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Hassen, Getaw Worku; Feliberti, Jason; Kesner, Leo; Stracher, Alfred; Mokhtarian, Foroozan

    2011-01-01

    Axonal injury is the major correlate of permanent disability in neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS), especially in secondary-progressive MS following relapsing-remitting disease course. Proteolytic enzyme, calpain, is a potential candidate for causing axonal injury. Most current treatment options only target the inflammatory component of MS. Previous work using calpain inhibitor CYLA in our laboratory showed significant reduction in clinical sign, demyelination and tissue calpain content in acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Here we evaluated markers of axonal injury (amyloid precursor protein, Nav1.6 channels), neuronal calpain content and the effect of CYLA on axonal protection using histological methods in chronic EAE [myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) – induced disease model of MS]. Intraperitoneal application of CYLA (2mg/mouse/day) significantly reduced the clinical signs, tissue calpain content, demyelination and inflammatory infiltration of EAE. Similarly, markers for axonal injury were barely detectable in the treated mice. Thus, this novel drug, which markedly suppresses the disease course, axonal injury and its progression, is a candidate for the treatment of a neurodegenerative disease such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:18725211

  10. Amphetamine paradoxically augments exocytotic dopamine release and phasic dopamine signals.

    PubMed

    Daberkow, D P; Brown, H D; Bunner, K D; Kraniotis, S A; Doellman, M A; Ragozzino, M E; Garris, P A; Roitman, M F

    2013-01-01

    Drugs of abuse hijack brain-reward circuitry during the addiction process by augmenting action potential-dependent phasic dopamine release events associated with learning and goal-directed behavior. One prominent exception to this notion would appear to be amphetamine (AMPH) and related analogs, which are proposed instead to disrupt normal patterns of dopamine neurotransmission by depleting vesicular stores and promoting nonexocytotic dopamine efflux via reverse transport. This mechanism of AMPH action, though, is inconsistent with its therapeutic effects and addictive properties, which are thought to be reliant on phasic dopamine signaling. Here we used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in freely moving rats to interrogate principal neurochemical responses to AMPH in the striatum and relate these changes to behavior. First, we showed that AMPH dose-dependently enhanced evoked dopamine responses to phasic-like current pulse trains for up to 2 h. Modeling the data revealed that AMPH inhibited dopamine uptake but also unexpectedly potentiated vesicular dopamine release. Second, we found that AMPH increased the amplitude, duration, and frequency of spontaneous dopamine transients, the naturally occurring, nonelectrically evoked, phasic increases in extracellular dopamine. Finally, using an operant sugar reward paradigm, we showed that low-dose AMPH augmented dopamine transients elicited by sugar-predictive cues. However, operant behavior failed at high-dose AMPH, which was due to phasic dopamine hyperactivity and the decoupling of dopamine transients from the reward predictive cue. These findings identify upregulation of exocytotic dopamine release as a key AMPH action in behaving animals and support a unified mechanism of abused drugs to activate phasic dopamine signaling. PMID:23303926

  11. Progress on obesity prevention over 20 years in Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Swinburn, B; Wood, A

    2013-11-01

    The lessons learned from over 20 years of obesity prevention efforts in Australia and New Zealand are presented. The obesity epidemic started in the 1980s but poor monitoring systems meant the rise in obesity prevalence initially went undetected. In the 1990 s, experts started advocating for government action; however, it was the rapid increase in media reports on obesity in the early 2000s which created the pressure for action. Several, comprehensive reports produced some programme investment but no regulatory policies were implemented. The powerful food industry lobby ensured this lack of policies on front-of-pack food labelling, restrictions on unhealthy food marketing to children, or taxes on unhealthy foods. The New Zealand government even backpedalled by rescinding healthy school food guidelines and withdrawing funding for the comprehensive national obesity strategy. In 2007, Australian Governments started a major long term-investment in preventive health in order to improve economic productivity. Other positive initiatives, especially in Australia, were: the establishment of several advocacy organizations; successful, long-term, whole-of-community projects reducing childhood obesity; a national knowledge exchange system for practitioners; and some innovative programmes and social marketing. However, despite multiple reports and strong advocacy, key recommended regulatory policies remain unimplemented, largely due to the private sector interests dominating public policy development. PMID:24102746

  12. Politics of science: Progress toward prevention of the dementia-Alzheimer's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khachaturian, Zaven S; Khachaturian, Ara S

    2015-01-01

    There exist many challenges hampering the discovery and development of effective interventions to prevent dementia. Three major trends have now intersected to influence the emerging interest in disease modifying therapies that may delay or halt dementia. The three crucial factors shaping this current focus are: (1) the emergence of the longevity revolution and the impact of a aging society, (2) the effects of the US Federal investment in research in advancing knowledge about the neurobiology of aging and dementia, and (3) the problem of US legislators and health policy makers to balance the allocation of evermore scarce research funding resources. The purpose of this essay is to provide a survey of the politics of science and to describe efforts to correctly manage the high level of expectations of both the patient and research communities. The perspective offered reviews the history and evolution of the ideas to treat or prevent dementia and Alzheimer's disease as a national strategic goal. The aim is to evaluate the interplay between science and formulation of public policy for setting research priority. We use the history of developing US National Institute of Aging's extramural research programs on brain aging and Alzheimer's disease (Khachaturian, 2006; 2007) as an initial case study. PMID:26054567

  13. Engagement, Retention, and Progression to Type 2 Diabetes: A Retrospective Analysis of the Cluster-Randomised "Let's Prevent Diabetes" Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Thomas; Troughton, Jacqui; Khunti, Kamlesh; Davies, Melanie J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a global priority. Let’s Prevent Diabetes is a group-based diabetes prevention programme; it was evaluated in a cluster-randomised trial, in which the primary analysis showed a reduction in T2DM (hazard ratio [HR] 0.74, 95% CI 0.48–1.14, p = 0.18). We examined the association of engagement and retention with the Let’s Prevent Diabetes prevention programme and T2DM incidence. Methods and Findings We used data from a completed cluster-randomised controlled trial including 43 general practices randomised to receive either standard care or a 6-h group structured education programme with an annual refresher course for 2 y. The primary outcome was progression to T2DM at 3 y. The characteristics of those who attended the initial education session (engagers) versus nonengagers and those who attended all sessions (retainers) versus nonretainers were compared. Risk reduction of progression to T2DM by level of attendance was compared to standard care. Eight hundred and eighty participants were recruited, with 447 to the intervention arm, of which 346 (77.4%) were engagers and 130 (29.1%) were retainers. Retainers and engagers were more likely to be older, leaner, and nonsmokers than nonretainers/nonengagers. Engagers were also more likely to be male and be from less socioeconomically deprived areas than nonengagers. Participants who attended the initial session and at least one refresher session were less likely to develop T2DM compared to those in the control arm (30 people of 248 versus 67 people of 433, HR 0.38 [95% CI 0.24–0.62]). Participants who were retained in the programme were also less likely to develop T2DM compared to those in the control arm (7 people of 130 versus 67 people of 433, HR 0.12 [95% CI 0.05–0.28]). Being retained in the programme was also associated with improvements in glucose, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), weight, waist circumference, anxiety, quality of life, and daily step

  14. Amphetamine elevates nucleus accumbens dopamine via an action potential-dependent mechanism that is modulated by endocannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Covey, Dan P; Bunner, Kendra D; Schuweiler, Douglas R; Cheer, Joseph F; Garris, Paul A

    2016-06-01

    The reinforcing effects of abused drugs are mediated by their ability to elevate nucleus accumbens dopamine. Amphetamine (AMPH) was historically thought to increase dopamine by an action potential-independent, non-exocytotic type of release called efflux, involving reversal of dopamine transporter function and driven by vesicular dopamine depletion. Growing evidence suggests that AMPH also acts by an action potential-dependent mechanism. Indeed, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry demonstrates that AMPH activates dopamine transients, reward-related phasic signals generated by burst firing of dopamine neurons and dependent on intact vesicular dopamine. Not established for AMPH but indicating a shared mechanism, endocannabinoids facilitate this activation of dopamine transients by broad classes of abused drugs. Here, using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry coupled to pharmacological manipulations in awake rats, we investigated the action potential and endocannabinoid dependence of AMPH-induced elevations in nucleus accumbens dopamine. AMPH increased the frequency, amplitude and duration of transients, which were observed riding on top of slower dopamine increases. Surprisingly, silencing dopamine neuron firing abolished all AMPH-induced dopamine elevations, identifying an action potential-dependent origin. Blocking cannabinoid type 1 receptors prevented AMPH from increasing transient frequency, similar to reported effects on other abused drugs, but not from increasing transient duration and inhibiting dopamine uptake. Thus, AMPH elevates nucleus accumbens dopamine by eliciting transients via cannabinoid type 1 receptors and promoting the summation of temporally coincident transients, made more numerous, larger and wider by AMPH. Collectively, these findings are inconsistent with AMPH eliciting action potential-independent dopamine efflux and vesicular dopamine depletion, and support endocannabinoids facilitating phasic dopamine signalling as a common action in drug reinforcement

  15. Does increased water intake prevent disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease?

    PubMed Central

    Higashihara, Eiji; Nutahara, Kikuo; Tanbo, Mitsuhiro; Hara, Hidehiko; Miyazaki, Isao; Kobayashi, Kuninori; Nitatori, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Background The clinical effects of increased water intake on autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) progression are unknown. Methods ADPKD patients with creatinine clearance ≧50 mL/min/1.73 m2 were divided into high (H-, n = 18) and free (F-, n = 16) water-intake groups, mainly according to their preference. Prior to the study, 30 patients underwent annual evaluation of total kidney volume (TKV) and 24-h urine for an average of 33 months. During the 1-year study period, TKV and 24-h urine were analyzed at the beginning and end of the study and every 4 months, respectively. Results During the pre-study period, urine volume (UV) in the H-group was higher (P = 0.034), but TKV and kidney function and their slopes were not significantly different between the two groups. After the study commenced, UV further increased (P < 0.001) in the H-group but not in the F-group. During the study period, TKV and kidney function slopes were not significantly different between the two groups (primary endpoint). Plasma copeptin was lower (P = 0.024) in the H-group than in the F-group. TKV and kidney function slopes became worse (P = 0.047 and 0.011, respectively) after high water intake (H-group) but not in the F-group. High UV was associated with increased urine sodium, and urine sodium positively correlated with the % TKV slope (P = 0.014). Conclusions Although the main endpoint was not significant, high water intake enhanced disease progression in the H-group when compared with the pre-study period. These findings necessitate a long-term randomized study before drawing a final conclusion. PMID:24739484

  16. Eflornithine (DFMO) Prevents Progression of Pancreatic Cancer by Modulating Ornithine Decarboxylase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Altaf; Janakiram, Naveena B.; Madka, Venkateshwar; Ritchie, Rebekah L.; Brewer, Misty; Biddick, Laura; Patlolla, Jagan Mohan R.; Sadeghi, Michael; Lightfoot, Stan; Steele, Vernon E.; Rao, Chinthalapally V.

    2015-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is the key rate limiting enzyme in the polyamine synthesis pathway and it is overexpressed in a variety of cancers. We found that polyamine synthesis and modulation of ODC signaling occurs at early stages of pancreatic precursor lesions and increases as the tumor progresses in Kras activated p48Cre/+-LSL-KrasG12D/+ mice. Interest in use of the ODC inhibitor Eflornithine (DFMO) as a cancer chemopreventive agent has increased in recent years since ODC was shown to be transactivated by the c-myc oncogene and to cooperate with the ras oncogene in malignant transformation of epithelial tissues. We tested the effects of DFMO on pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms (PanINs) and their progression to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in genetically engineered Kras mice. The KrasG12D/+ mice fed DFMO at 0.1 and 0.2 % in the diet showed a significant inhibition (p<0.0001) of PDAC incidence compared with mice fed control diet. Pancreatic tumor weights were decreased by 31–43% (p<0.03–0.001) with both doses of DFMO. DFMO at 0.1 and 0.2 % caused a significant suppression (27 and 31%, P<0.02–0.004) of PanIN 3 lesions (carcinoma in situ). DFMO-treated pancreas exhibited modulated ODC pathway components along with decreased proliferation and increased expression of p21/p27 as compared with pancreatic tissues derived from mice fed control diet. In summary, our preclinical data indicate that DFMO has potential for chemoprevention of pancreatic cancer and should be evaluated in other PDAC models and in combination with other drugs in anticipation of future clinical trials. PMID:25248858

  17. Preventing urinary tract infection: progress toward an effective Escherichia coli vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Brumbaugh, Ariel R; Mobley, Harry LT

    2012-01-01

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common, with nearly half of all women experiencing at least one UTI in their lifetime. This high frequency of infection results in huge annual economic costs, decreased workforce productivity and high patient morbidity. At least 80% of these infections are caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). UPEC can reside side by side with commensal strains in the gastrointestinal tract and gain access to the bladder via colonization of the urethra. Antibiotics represent the current standard treatment for UTI; however, even after treatment, patients frequently suffer from recurrent infection with the same or different strains. In addition, successful long-term treatment has been complicated by a rise in both the number of antibiotic-resistant strains and the prevalence of antibiotic-resistance mechanisms. As a result, preventative approaches to UTI, such as vaccination, have been sought. This review summarizes recent advances in UPEC vaccine development and outlines future directions for the field. PMID:22873125

  18. The School Food Environment and Obesity Prevention: Progress Over the Last Decade.

    PubMed

    Welker, Emily; Lott, Megan; Story, Mary

    2016-06-01

    The school food environment-including when and where children obtain food and the types of options available during the school day-plays an important role in children's consumption patterns. Thus, childhood obesity prevention efforts often focus on altering the school food environment as a mechanism for improving student dietary intake. This review examines the role school food programs and policies play in improving children's diet, weight, and health. Overall, research suggests that significant improvements have been made in school nutrition policies and programs. Due to the recent program changes made as a result of the 2010 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, an emphasis was placed on research conducted over the past decade and especially on the evaluation of foods and beverages served and sold since implementation of this national law. This review also examines remaining gaps in the literature and opportunities for further improvements in school food programs and policies. PMID:27066793

  19. Dopamine and anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Södersten, P; Bergh, C; Leon, M; Zandian, M

    2016-01-01

    We have suggested that reduced food intake increases the risk for anorexia nervosa by engaging mesolimbic dopamine neurons, thereby initially rewarding dieting. Recent fMRI studies have confirmed that dopamine neurons are activated in anorexia nervosa, but it is not clear whether this response is due to the disorder or to its resulting nutritional deficit. When the body senses the shortage of nutrients, it rapidly shifts behavior toward foraging for food as a normal physiological response and the mesolimbic dopamine neurons may be involved in that process. On the other hand, the altered dopamine status of anorexics has been suggested to result from a brain abnormality that underlies their complex emotional disorder. We suggest that the outcomes of the treatments that emerge from that perspective remain poor because they target the mental symptoms that are actually the consequences of the food deprivation that accompanies anorexia. On the other hand, a method that normalizes the disordered eating behavior of anorexics results in much better physiological, behavioral, and emotional outcomes. PMID:26608248

  20. Scheie syndrome: enzyme replacement therapy does not prevent progression of cervical myelopathy due to spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Illsinger, S; Lücke, T; Hartmann, H; Mengel, E; Müller-Forell, W; Donnerstag, F; Das, A M

    2009-12-01

    Hurler-Scheie syndrome is caused by alpha-l-iduronidase deficiency. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) can improve physical capacity and reduces organomegaly. However, the effect on bradytrophic connective tissue is limited. As intravenously administered enzyme cannot cross the blood-brain barrier, the therapy of choice for the more severe Hurler syndrome is haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). In the more attenuated Scheie syndrome, neurological impairment is less severe; therefore, ERT may be appropriate to treat these patients. Information on long-term outcome in Scheie patients undergoing ERT is scarce. We report a 38-year-old female Scheie patient who has been on ERT for 8 years. While non-neurological symptoms improved, she developed paresthesias in her hands and feet and progressive pain in her legs. Somatosensory evoked potentials were abnormal, suggesting dysfunction of the dorsal funiculus and lemniscus medialis. After 6 years of ERT, a spinal MRI showed dural thickening at the upper cervical spine. These soft-tissue deposits are presumably due to the accumulation of mucopolysaccharides. Intramedullary hyperintensities at the level of C1/2 revealed cervical myelopathy. An MRI before the start of ERT had shown milder spinal lesions. Cystic lesions in the white matter of the centrum semiovale due to dilated Virchow-Robin spaces were essentially unchanged compared with the MRI scan before ERT. Decompression of the spinal cord resulted in clinical improvement. In an adult patient with Scheie syndrome, ERT failed to prevent progression of cervical myelopathy. Clinical significance of cerebral changes is unclear. Whether early HCT or intrathecal ERT could have prevented these lesions remains speculative. PMID:19894140

  1. Pharmacological GLI2 inhibition prevents myofibroblast cell-cycle progression and reduces kidney fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kramann, Rafael; Fleig, Susanne V.; Schneider, Rebekka K.; Fabian, Steven L.; DiRocco, Derek P.; Maarouf, Omar; Wongboonsin, Janewit; Ikeda, Yoichiro; Heckl, Dirk; Chang, Steven L.; Rennke, Helmut G.; Waikar, Sushrut S.; Humphreys, Benjamin D.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is characterized by interstitial fibrosis and proliferation of scar-secreting myofibroblasts, ultimately leading to end-stage renal disease. The hedgehog (Hh) pathway transcriptional effectors GLI1 and GLI2 are expressed in myofibroblast progenitors; however, the role of these effectors during fibrogenesis is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that GLI2, but not GLI1, drives myofibroblast cell-cycle progression in cultured mesenchymal stem cell–like progenitors. In animals exposed to unilateral ureteral obstruction, Hh pathway suppression by expression of the GLI3 repressor in GLI1+ myofibroblast progenitors limited kidney fibrosis. Myofibroblast-specific deletion of Gli2, but not Gli1, also limited kidney fibrosis, and induction of myofibroblast-specific cell-cycle arrest mediated this inhibition. Pharmacologic targeting of this pathway with darinaparsin, an arsenical in clinical trials, reduced fibrosis through reduction of GLI2 protein levels and subsequent cell-cycle arrest in myofibroblasts. GLI2 overexpression rescued the cell-cycle effect of darinaparsin in vitro. While darinaparsin ameliorated fibrosis in WT and Gli1-KO mice, it was not effective in conditional Gli2-KO mice, supporting GLI2 as a direct darinaparsin target. The GLI inhibitor GANT61 also reduced fibrosis in mice. Finally, GLI1 and GLI2 were upregulated in the kidneys of patients with high-grade fibrosis. Together, these data indicate that GLI inhibition has potential as a therapeutic strategy to limit myofibroblast proliferation in kidney fibrosis. PMID:26193634

  2. Pramipexole increases vesicular dopamine uptake: implications for treatment of Parkinson's neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Truong, Jannine G; Rau, Kristi S; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2003-08-01

    Pramipexole is a dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist used to treat Parkinson's disease. Both human and animal studies suggest that pramipexole may exhibit neuroprotective properties involving dopamine neurons. However, mechanisms underlying its neuroprotective effects remain uncertain. The present results reveal a novel cellular action of this agent. Specifically, pramipexole rapidly increases vesicular dopamine uptake in synaptic vesicles prepared from striata of treated rats. This effect is: (1) associated with a redistribution of vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT-2) immunoreactivity within nerve terminals; and, (2) prevented by pretreatment with the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, eticlopride. The implications of this finding relevant to the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders are discussed. PMID:12921866

  3. Beyond cAMP: The Regulation of Akt and GSK3 by Dopamine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Jean-Martin; Del’Guidice, Thomas; Sotnikova, Tatyana D.; Lemasson, Morgane; Gainetdinov, Raul R.

    2011-01-01

    Brain dopamine receptors have been preferred targets for numerous pharmacological compounds developed for the treatment of various neuropsychiatric disorders. Recent discovery that D2 dopamine receptors, in addition to cAMP pathways, can engage also in Akt/GSK3 signaling cascade provided a new framework to understand intracellular signaling mechanisms involved in dopamine-related behaviors and pathologies. Here we review a recent progress in understanding the role of Akt, GSK3, and related signaling molecules in dopamine receptor signaling and functions. Particularly, we focus on the molecular mechanisms involved, interacting partners, role of these signaling events in the action of antipsychotics, psychostimulants, and antidepressants as well as involvement in pathophysiology of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and Parkinson’s disease. Further understanding of the role of Akt/GSK3 signaling in dopamine receptor functions could provide novel targets for pharmacological interventions in dopamine-related disorders. PMID:22065948

  4. Targeting chemotherapy-induced PTX3 in tumor stroma to prevent the progression of drug-resistant cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Jhih-Ying; Hsiao, Yu-Wei; Li, Chien-Feng; Lo, Yu-Chih; Lin, Zu-Yau; Hong, Jhen-Yi; Liu, Yang-Ming; Han, Xiu; Wang, Shao-Ming; Chen, Ben-Kuen; Tsai, Kelvin K.; Wang, Ju-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment has been suggested to participate in tumorigenesis, but the nature of the communication between cancer cells and the microenvironment, especially in response to anticancer drugs, remains obscure. We determined that activation of the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein delta (CEBPD) response to Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil in cancer-associated macrophages and fibroblasts contributed to the metastasis, invasion, acquired chemoresistance and stemness of cancer cells by in vitro and in vivo assays. Specifically, reporter and in vivo DNA binding assays were used to determine that Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a CEBPD responsive gene and serves a protumor role upon anticancer drug treatment. Finally, a PTX3 peptide inhibitor RI37 was developed and assessed the antitumor effects by in vivo assays. RI37 could function as a promising inhibitor for preventing cancer progression and the metastasis, invasion and progression of drug-resistant cancers. The identification of PTX3 provided a new insight in the interaction between host and tumor and the RI37 peptide showed a great opportunity to largely reduce the risk of invasion and metastasis of cancer and drug-resistant cancers. PMID:26124179

  5. Delayed Treatment with a Small Pigment Epithelium Derived Factor (PEDF) Peptide Prevents the Progression of Diabetic Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Alaa S.; You, Hanning; Gao, Ting; Gvritishvili, Anzor; Cooper, Timothy K.; Tombran-Tink, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Our recent publication showed that a small bioactive pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF) peptide (P78-PEDF) prevents the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN). However, its effects on the progression of established DN were not clear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of P78-PEDF in the progression of DN and to compare the effects of P78-PEDF and an ACE inhibitor (ACEi), a standard of care in DN. Experiments were conducted in Ins2Akita mice treated with P78-PEDF or captopril starting at 6 wks of age for 12 wks (early treatment) or starting at 12 wks of age for 6 wks (late treatment). We first established the optimal dose of the P78-PEDF peptide to ameliorate DN in Ins2Akita mouse for a 6 wk study period and found that the peptide was effective at 0.1- 0.5 µg/g/day. We next showed that early or late treatment with P78-PEDF resulted in protection from DN as indicated by reduced albuminuria, kidney macrophage recruitment, histological changes, inflammatory cytokines and fibrotic markers (kidney TNF-α, fibronectin, VEGFA and EGFR), and restored nephrin expression compared with vehicle-treated Ins2Akita mice. Interestingly, only early but not late treatment with captopril was as effective as P78-PEDF in reducing most DN complications, despite its lack of effect on nephrin, VEGFA and EGFR expression. These findings highlight the importance of P78-PEDF peptide as a potential therapeutic modality in both the development and progression of diabetic renal injury. PMID:26207369

  6. Methyl-donor supplementation in obese mice prevents the progression of NAFLD, activates AMPK and decreases acyl-carnitine levelsa

    PubMed Central

    Dahlhoff, Christoph; Worsch, Stefanie; Sailer, Manuela; Hummel, Björn A.; Fiamoncini, Jarlei; Uebel, Kirsten; Obeid, Rima; Scherling, Christian; Geisel, Jürgen; Bader, Bernhard L.; Daniel, Hannelore

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) results from increased hepatic lipid accumulation and steatosis, and is closely linked to liver one-carbon (C1) metabolism. We assessed in C57BL6/N mice whether NAFLD induced by a high-fat (HF) diet over 8 weeks can be reversed by additional 4 weeks of a dietary methyl-donor supplementation (MDS). MDS in the obese mice failed to reverse NAFLD, but prevented the progression of hepatic steatosis associated with major changes in key hepatic C1-metabolites, e.g. S-adenosyl-methionine and S-adenosyl-homocysteine. Increased phosphorylation of AMPK-α together with enhanced β-HAD activity suggested an increased flux through fatty acid oxidation pathways. This was supported by concomitantly decreased hepatic free fatty acid and acyl-carnitines levels. Although HF diet changed the hepatic phospholipid pattern, MDS did not. Our findings suggest that dietary methyl-donors activate AMPK, a key enzyme in fatty acid β-oxidation control, that mediates increased fatty acid utilization and thereby prevents further hepatic lipid accumulation. PMID:25061561

  7. Optogenetically-induced tonic dopamine release from VTA-nucleus accumbens projections inhibits reward consummatory behaviors.

    PubMed

    Mikhailova, Maria A; Bass, Caroline E; Grinevich, Valentina P; Chappell, Ann M; Deal, Alex L; Bonin, Keith D; Weiner, Jeff L; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Budygin, Evgeny A

    2016-10-01

    Recent optogenetic studies demonstrated that phasic dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens may play a causal role in multiple aspects of natural and drug reward-related behaviors. The role of tonic dopamine release in reward consummatory behavior remains unclear. The current study used a combinatorial viral-mediated gene delivery approach to express ChR2 on mesolimbic dopamine neurons in rats. We used optical activation of this dopamine circuit to mimic tonic dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens and to explore the causal relationship between this form of dopamine signaling within the ventral tegmental area (VTA)-nucleus accumbens projection and consumption of a natural reward. Using a two bottle choice paradigm (sucrose vs. water), the experiments revealed that tonic optogenetic stimulation of mesolimbic dopamine transmission significantly decreased reward consummatory behaviors. Specifically, there was a significant decrease in the number of bouts, licks and amount of sucrose obtained during the drinking session. Notably, activation of VTA dopamine cell bodies or dopamine terminals in the nucleus accumbens resulted in identical behavioral consequences. No changes in water intake were evident under the same experimental conditions. Collectively, these data demonstrate that tonic optogenetic stimulation of VTA-nucleus accumbens dopamine release is sufficient to inhibit reward consummatory behavior, possibly by preventing this circuit from engaging in phasic activity that is thought to be essential for reward-based behaviors. PMID:27421228

  8. Neuronal release of endogenous dopamine from corpus of guinea pig stomach.

    PubMed

    Shichijo, K; Sakurai-Yamashita, Y; Sekine, I; Taniyama, K

    1997-11-01

    Neuronal release of endogenous dopamine was identified in mucosa-free preparations (muscle layer including intramural plexus) from guinea pig stomach corpus by measuring tissue dopamine content and dopamine release and by immunohistochemical methods using a dopamine antiserum. Dopamine content in mucosa-free preparations of guinea pig gastric corpus was one-tenth of norepinephrine content. Electrical transmural stimulation of mucosa-free preparations of gastric corpus increased the release of endogenous dopamine in a frequency-dependent (3-20 Hz) manner. The stimulated release of dopamine was prevented by either removal of external Ca2+ or treatment with tetrodotoxin. Dopamine-immunopositive nerve fibers surrounding choline acetyltransferase-immunopositive ganglion cells were seen in the myenteric plexus of whole mount preparations of gastric corpus even after bilateral transection of the splanchnic nerve proximal to the junction with the vagal nerve (section of nerves between the celiac ganglion and stomach). Domperidone and sulpiride potentiated the stimulated release of acetylcholine and reversed the dopamine-induced inhibition of acetylcholine release from mucosa-free preparations. These results indicate that dopamine is physiologically released from neurons and from possible dopaminergic nerve terminals and regulates cholinergic neuronal activity in the corpus of guinea pig stomach. PMID:9374701

  9. Towards safe injection practices for prevention of hepatitis C transmission in South Asia: Challenges and progress

    PubMed Central

    Janjua, Naveed Zafar; Butt, Zahid Ahmad; Mahmood, Bushra; Altaf, Arshad

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To summarize the available information about injection use and its determinants in the South Asian region. METHODS: We searched published and unpublished literature on injection safety in South Asia published during 1995-2016 using the keywords “injection” “unsafe injection” and “immunization injection” and combined these with each of the countries and/or their respective states or provinces in South Asia. We used a standardized questionnaire to abstract the following data from the articles: the annual number of injections per capita, the proportion of injections administered with a reused syringe or needle, the distribution of injections with respect to prescribers and providers and determinants of injection use. RESULTS: Although information is very limited for certain countries (i.e., Bhutan, Maldives and Sri Lanka), healthcare injection use is very common across South Asia, with cross-country rates ranging from 2.4 to 13.6 injections/person/year. Furthermore, recent studies show that 5% to 50% of these injections are provided with reused syringes, thus creating potential to transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Qualified and unqualified practitioners, especially in the private sector, are the major drivers behind injection use, but patients also prefer injections, especially among the rural, poor or uneducated in certain countries. According to available data, Pakistan and India have recently taken steps towards achieving safe injection. Potential interventions include the introduction of reuse prevention devices, and patient-, community- and patient/community and provider-centered interventions to change population and practitioner behavior. CONCLUSION: Injection use is common in South Asian countries. Multilevel interventions aiming at patients, providers and the healthcare system are needed to reduce injection use and reuse. PMID:27433097

  10. Recent progress toward hydrogen medicine: potential of molecular hydrogen for preventive and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Shigeo

    2011-01-01

    Persistent oxidative stress is one of the major causes of most lifestyle-related diseases, cancer and the aging process. Acute oxidative stress directly causes serious damage to tissues. Despite the clinical importance of oxidative damage, antioxidants have been of limited therapeutic success. We have proposed that molecular hydrogen (H(2)) has potential as a "novel" antioxidant in preventive and therapeutic applications [Ohsawa et al., Nat Med. 2007: 13; 688-94]. H(2) has a number of advantages as a potential antioxidant: H(2) rapidly diffuses into tissues and cells, and it is mild enough neither to disturb metabolic redox reactions nor to affect reactive oxygen species (ROS) that function in cell signaling, thereby, there should be little adverse effects of consuming H(2). There are several methods to ingest or consume H(2), including inhaling hydrogen gas, drinking H(2)-dissolved water (hydrogen water), taking a hydrogen bath, injecting H(2)- dissolved saline (hydrogen saline), dropping hydrogen saline onto the eye, and increasing the production of intestinal H(2) by bacteria. Since the publication of the first H(2) paper in Nature Medicine in 2007, the biological effects of H(2) have been confirmed by the publication of more than 38 diseases, physiological states and clinical tests in leading biological/medical journals, and several groups have started clinical examinations. Moreover, H(2) shows not only effects against oxidative stress, but also various anti-inflammatory and antiallergic effects. H(2) regulates various gene expressions and protein-phosphorylations, though the molecular mechanisms underlying the marked effects of very small amounts of H(2) remain elusive. PMID:21736547

  11. Recent Progress Toward Hydrogen Medicine: Potential of Molecular Hydrogen for Preventive and Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Shigeo

    2011-01-01

    Persistent oxidative stress is one of the major causes of most lifestyle-related diseases, cancer and the aging process. Acute oxidative stress directly causes serious damage to tissues. Despite the clinical importance of oxidative damage, antioxidants have been of limited therapeutic success. We have proposed that molecular hydrogen (H2) has potential as a “novel” antioxidant in preventive and therapeutic applications [Ohsawa et al., Nat Med. 2007: 13; 688-94]. H2 has a number of advantages as a potential antioxidant: H2 rapidly diffuses into tissues and cells, and it is mild enough neither to disturb metabolic redox reactions nor to affect reactive oxygen species (ROS) that function in cell signaling, thereby, there should be little adverse effects of consuming H2. There are several methods to ingest or consume H2, including inhaling hydrogen gas, drinking H2-dissolved water (hydrogen water), taking a hydrogen bath, injecting H2-dissolved saline (hydrogen saline), dropping hydrogen saline onto the eye, and increasing the production of intestinal H2 by bacteria. Since the publication of the first H2 paper in Nature Medicine in 2007, the biological effects of H2 have been confirmed by the publication of more than 38 diseases, physiological states and clinical tests in leading biological/medical journals, and several groups have started clinical examinations. Moreover, H2 shows not only effects against oxidative stress, but also various anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic effects. H2 regulates various gene expressions and protein-phosphorylations, though the molecular mechanisms underlying the marked effects of very small amounts of H2 remain elusive. PMID:21736547

  12. Use of corticosteroids to prevent progression of Graves' ophthalmopathy after radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Bartalena, L.; Marcocci, C.; Bogazzi, F.; Panicucci, M.; Lepri, A.; Pinchera, A. )

    1989-11-16

    We studied the effects of radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease on Graves' ophthalmopathy and the possible protective role of corticosteroids. Between June 1985 and June 1988, 26 patients were randomly assigned to treatment with radioiodine alone (group 1) and 26 to treatment with this agent and concomitant administration of systemic prednisone for four months (group 2). The initial dose of prednisone was 0.4 to 0.5 mg per kilogram of body weight for one month; the drug was gradually withdrawn over the next three months. All patients were evaluated at 3-month intervals for 18 months after they underwent radioiodine therapy. Ocular changes were assessed with the ophthalmopathy index; patients with moderate-to-severe changes (scores greater than or equal to 4) were excluded from the study. Before treatment, 10 patients in group 1 and 5 in group 2 had no evidence of ophthalmopathy: in none of them did ocular symptoms appear after radioiodine therapy. Among the patients in group 1 with an initial ophthalmopathy index greater than or equal to 1, ocular disease worsened in 56 percent (mostly involving soft-tissue changes and extraocular-muscle function) and did not change in 44 percent. In contrast, ophthalmopathy improved in 52 percent and did not change in 48 percent of group 2. The mean ophthalmopathy index increased from 1.5 to 3.0 in group 1 (P less than 0.005) and decreased from 2.2 to 1.3 in group 2 (P less than 0.05). We conclude that systemic corticosteroid treatment prevents the exacerbations of Graves' ophthalmopathy that occur after radioiodine therapy in a substantial proportion of patients with hyperthyroidism who have some degree of ocular involvement before treatment.

  13. Project Energize: intervention development and 10 years of progress in preventing childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Rush, Elaine; Cairncross, Carolyn; Williams, Margaret Hinepo; Tseng, Marilyn; Coppinger, Tara; McLennan, Steph; Latimer, Kasha

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of childhood obesity is a global priority. The school setting offers access to large numbers of children and the ability to provide supportive environments for quality physical activity and nutrition. This article describes Project Energize, a through-school physical activity and nutrition programme that celebrated its 10-year anniversary in 2015 so that it might serve as a model for similar practices, initiatives and policies elsewhere. The programme was envisaged and financed by the Waikato District Health Board of New Zealand in 2004 and delivered by Sport Waikato to 124 primary schools as a randomised controlled trial from 2005 to 2006. The programme has since expanded to include all 242 primary schools in the Waikato region and 70 schools in other regions, including 53,000 children. Ongoing evaluation and development of Project Energize has shown it to be sustainable (ongoing for >10 years), both effective (lower obesity, higher physical fitness) and cost effective (one health related cost quality adjusted life year between $18,000 and $30,000) and efficient ($45/child/year) as a childhood 'health' programme. The programme's unique community-based approach is inclusive of all children, serving a population that is 42% Māori, the indigenous people of New Zealand. While the original nine healthy eating and seven quality physical activity goals have not changed, the delivery and assessment processes has been refined and the health service adapted over the 10 years of the programme existence, as well as adapted over time to other settings including early childhood education and schools in Cork in Ireland. Evaluation and research associated with the programme delivery and outcomes are ongoing. The dissemination of findings to politicians and collaboration with other service providers are both regarded as priorities. PMID:26809555

  14. Sclerostin antibody prevented progressive bone loss in combined ovariectomized and concurrent functional disuse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongye; Hu, Minyi; Chu, Timothy; Lin, Liangjun; Wang, Jingyu; Li, Xiaodong; Ke, Hua Zhu; Qin, Yi-Xian

    2016-06-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mass and compromised trabecular architecture, and is commonly occurred in post-menopausal women with estrogen deficiency. In addition, prolonged mechanical unloading, i.e., long term bed rest, can exaggerate the bone loss. Sclerostin is a Wnt signaling antagonist and acts as a negative regulator for bone formation. A sclerostin-neutralizing antibody (Scl-Ab) increased bone mineral density in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis and healthy men. The objective of this study was to characterize the condition of bone loss in ovariectomized (OVX) rats with concurrent mechanical unloading and evaluate the effect of sclerostin antibody treatment in mitigating the prospective severe bone loss conditions in this model. Four-month-old OVX- or sham-operated female SD rats were used in this study. They were subjected to functional disuse induced by hind-limb suspension (HLS) or free ambulance after 2days of arrival. Subcutaneous injections with either vehicle or Scl-Ab at 25mg/kg were made twice per week for 5weeks from the time of HLS. μCT analyses demonstrated a significant decrease in distal metaphyseal trabecular architecture integrity with HLS, OVX and HLS+OVX (bone volume fraction decreased by 29%, 71% and 87% respectively). The significant improvements of various trabecular bone parameters (bone volume fraction increased by 111%, 229% and 297% respectively as compared with placebo group) with the administration of Scl-Ab are associated with stronger mechanical property and increased bone formation by histomorphometry. These results together indicate that Scl-Ab prevented the loss of trabecular bone mass and cortical bone strength in OVX rat model with concurrent mechanical unloading. The data suggested that monoclonal sclerostin-neutralizing antibody represents a promising therapeutic approach for severe osteoporosis induced by estrogen deficiency with concurrent mechanical unloading. PMID:26868528

  15. Molecular epidemiology in cancer risk assessment and prevention: recent progress and avenues for future research.

    PubMed Central

    Wogan, G N

    1992-01-01

    these changes are known to occur in chemically induced tumors of experimental animals, the possible role of chemical carcinogens in the induction of genetic abnormalities in human cancers has yet to be determined. Continuing investigations employing the methods of molecular epidemiology promise to provide further evidence concerning these relationships. Future investigations employing newly developed molecular biological methods, in particular those based on polymerase chain reaction amplification of DNA, to identify alterations in DNA and chromosomal structure, combined with methods for characterizing exposure to carcinogens and early effects, have great potential for further elucidating the role of genotoxic agents in the etiology of human cancers and also for the development of strategies for their prevention. PMID:1486846

  16. Differential degradation of motor deficits during gradual dopamine depletion with 6-hydroxydopamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Willard, A M; Bouchard, R S; Gittis, A H

    2015-08-20

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a movement disorder whose cardinal motor symptoms arise due to the progressive loss of dopamine. Although this dopamine loss typically progresses slowly over time, currently there are very few animal models that enable incremental dopamine depletion over time within the same animal. This type of gradual dopamine depletion model would be useful in studies aimed at the prodromal phase of PD, when dopamine levels are pathologically low but motor symptoms have not yet presented. Utilizing the highly characterized neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), we have developed a paradigm to gradually deplete dopamine levels in the striatum over a user-defined time course - spanning weeks to months - in C57BL/6 mice. Dopamine depletions were achieved by administration of five low-dose injections (0.75μg) of 6-OHDA through an implanted intracranial bilateral cannula targeting the medial forebrain bundle. Levels of dopamine within the striatum declined linearly with successive injections, quantified using tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining and high-performance liquid chromatography. Behavioral testing was carried out at each time point to study the onset and progression of motor impairments as a function of dopamine loss over time. We found that spontaneous locomotion, measured in an open field, was robust until ∼70% of striatal dopamine was lost. Beyond this point, additional dopamine loss caused a sharp decline in motor performance, reaching a final level comparable to that of acutely depleted mice. Similarly, although rearing behavior was more sensitive to dopamine loss and declined linearly as a function of dopamine levels, it eventually declined to levels similar to those seen in acutely depleted mice. In contrast, motor coordination, measured on a vertical pole task, was only moderately impaired in gradually depleted mice, despite severe impairments observed in acutely depleted mice. These results demonstrate the importance of the temporal

  17. Growth of dopamine crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Vidya; Patki, Mugdha

    2016-05-01

    Many nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals have been identified as potential candidates in optical and electro-optical devices. Use of NLO organic crystals is expected in photonic applications. Hence organic nonlinear optical materials have been intensely investigated due to their potentially high nonlinearities, and rapid response in electro-optic effect compared to inorganic NLO materials. There are many methods to grow organic crystals such as vapor growth method, melt growth method and solution growth method. Out of these methods, solution growth method is useful in providing constraint free crystal. Single crystals of Dopamine have been grown by evaporating the solvents from aqueous solution. Crystals obtained were of the size of orders of mm. The crystal structure of dopamine was determined using XRD technique. Images of crystals were obtained using FEG SEM Quanta Series under high vacuum and low KV.

  18. Dopamine receptors - IUPHAR Review 13.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Jean-Martin; Espinoza, Stefano; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-01-01

    The variety of physiological functions controlled by dopamine in the brain and periphery is mediated by the D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5 dopamine GPCRs. Drugs acting on dopamine receptors are significant tools for the management of several neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and Parkinson's disease. Recent investigations of dopamine receptor signalling have shown that dopamine receptors, apart from their canonical action on cAMP-mediated signalling, can regulate a myriad of cellular responses to fine-tune the expression of dopamine-associated behaviours and functions. Such signalling mechanisms may involve alternate G protein coupling or non-G protein mechanisms involving ion channels, receptor tyrosine kinases or proteins such as β-arrestins that are classically involved in GPCR desensitization. Another level of complexity is the growing appreciation of the physiological roles played by dopamine receptor heteromers. Applications of new in vivo techniques have significantly furthered the understanding of the physiological functions played by dopamine receptors. Here we provide an update of the current knowledge regarding the complex biology, signalling, physiology and pharmacology of dopamine receptors. PMID:25671228

  19. Sleep attacks in patients taking dopamine agonists: review

    PubMed Central

    Homann, Carl Nikolaus; Wenzel, Karoline; Suppan, Klaudia; Ivanic, Gerd; Kriechbaum, Norbert; Crevenna, Richard; Ott, Erwin

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To assess the evidence for the existence and prevalence of sleep attacks in patients taking dopamine agonists for Parkinson's disease, the type of drugs implicated, and strategies for prevention and treatment. Design Review of publications between July 1999 and May 2001 in which sleep attacks or narcoleptic-like attacks were discussed in patients with Parkinson's disease. Results 124 patients with sleep events were found in 20 publications. Overall, 6.6% of patients taking dopamine agonists who attended movement disorder centres had sleep events. Men were over-represented. Sleep events occurred at both high and low doses of the drugs, with different durations of treatment (0-20 years), and with or without preceding signs of tiredness. Sleep attacks are a class effect, having been found in patients taking the following dopamine agonists: levodopa (monotherapy in 8 patients), ergot agonists (apomorphine in 2 patients, bromocriptine in 13, cabergoline in 1, lisuride or piribedil in 23, pergolide in 5,) and non-ergot agonists (pramipexole in 32, ropinirole in 38). Reports suggest two distinct types of events: those of sudden onset without warning and those of slow onset with prodrome drowsiness. Conclusion Insufficient data are available to provide effective guidelines for prevention and treatment of sleep events in patients taking dopamine agonists for Parkinson's disease. Prospective population based studies are needed to provide this information. What is already known on this topicCar crashes in patients with Parkinson's disease have been associated with sleep attacks caused by the dopamine agonists pramipexole and ropiniroleWhether sleep attacks exist, their connection with certain agonists, prevention or treatment, and the justification of legal actions are controversialWhat this study addsSleep attacks as a phenomenon distinct from normal somnolence really do existThey are a class effect of all dopamine drugsEffective prevention and treatment

  20. N-Octanoyl Dopamine, a Non-Hemodyanic Dopamine Derivative, for Cell Protection during Hypothermic Organ Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Grietje; Schnuelle, Peter; Höger, Simone; Wehling, Martin; Yard, Benito A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Although donor dopamine treatment reduces the requirement for post transplantation dialysis in renal transplant recipients, implementation of dopamine in donor management is hampered by its hemodynamic side-effects. Therefore novel dopamine derivatives lacking any hemodynamic actions and yet are more efficacious in protecting tissue from cold preservation injury are warranted. We hypothesized that variation of the molecular structure would yield more efficacious compounds avoid of any hemodynamic effects. Methodology/Principal Findings To this end, we assessed protection against cold preservation injury in HUVEC by the attenuation of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Modification of dopamine by an alkanoyl group increased cellular uptake and significantly improved efficacy of protection. Further variation revealed that only compounds bearing two hydroxy groups in ortho or para position at the benzene nucleus, i.e. strong reductants, were protective. However, other reducing agents like N-acetyl cysteine and ascorbate, or NADPH oxidase inhibition did not prevent cellular injury following cold storage. Unlike dopamine, a prototypic novel compound caused no hemodynamic side-effects. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, we demonstrate that protection against cold preservation injury by catecholamines is exclusively governed by strong reducing capacity and sufficient lipophilicity. The novel dopamine derivatives might be of clinical relevance in donor pre-conditioning as they are completely devoid of hemodynamic action, their increased cellular uptake would reduce time of treatment and therefore also may have a potential use for non-heart beating donors. PMID:20300525

  1. Expression of dopamine D2 receptor in PC-12 cells and regulation of membrane conductances by dopamine.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W H; Conforti, L; Millhorn, D E

    1997-10-01

    PC-12 cells depolarize during hypoxia and release dopamine. The hypoxia-induced depolarization is due to inhibition of an O2-sensitive K+ current. The role of dopamine released during hypoxia is uncertain, but it could act as an autocrine to modulate membrane conductance during hypoxia. The current study was undertaken to investigate this possibility. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis revealed that the D2 isoform of the dopamine receptor is expressed in rat PC-12 cells. Exogenously applied dopamine and the D2 agonist quinpirole elicited inhibition of a voltage-dependent K+ current (I(K)) that was prevented by sulpiride, a D2 receptor antagonist. Dopamine and quinpirole applied during hypoxia potentiated the inhibitory effect of hypoxia on I(K). We also found that quinpirole caused reversible inhibition of a voltage-dependent Ca2+ current (I(Ca)) and attenuation of the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ during hypoxia. Our results indicate that dopamine released from PC-12 cells during hypoxia acts via a D2 receptor to "autoregulate" I(K) and I(Ca). PMID:9357757

  2. Sodium alginate prevents progression of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and liver carcinogenesis in obese and diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Tsuneyuki; Shirakami, Yohei; Kubota, Masaya; Ideta, Takayasu; Kochi, Takahiro; Sakai, Hiroyasu; Tanaka, Takuji; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Shimizu, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and related metabolic abnormalities play a key role in liver carcinogenesis. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which is often complicated with obesity and diabetes mellitus, is associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Sodium alginate (SA), which is extracted from brown seaweeds, is marketed as a weight loss supplement because of its high viscosity and gelling properties. In the present study, we examined the effects of SA on the progression of NASH and related liver carcinogenesis in monosodium glutamate (MSG)-treated mice, which show obesity, diabetes mellitus, and NASH-like histopathological changes. Male MSG-mice were intraperitoneally injected with diethylnitrosamine at 2 weeks of age, and, thereafter, they received a basal diet containing high- or low-molecular-weight SA throughout the experiment (16 weeks). At sacrifice, control MSG-treated mice fed the basal-diet showed significant obesity, hyperinsulinemia, steatosis and hepatic tumor development. SA administration suppressed body weight gain; improved insulin sensitivity, hyperinsulinemia, and hyperleptinemia; attenuated inflammation in the liver and white adipose tissue; and inhibited hepatic lipogenesis and progression of NASH. SA also reduced oxidative stress and increased anti-oxidant enzyme levels in the liver. Development of hepatic tumors, including liver cell adenoma and HCC, and hepatic pre-neoplastic lesions was significantly inhibited by SA supplementation. In conclusion, oral SA supplementation improves liver steatosis, insulin resistance, chronic inflammation, and oxidative stress, preventing the development of liver tumorigenesis in obese and diabetic mice. SA may have ability to suppress steatosis-related liver carcinogenesis in obese and diabetic subjects. PMID:26871288

  3. Alzheimer's disease, amnestic mild cognitive impairment, and age-associated memory impairment: current understanding and progress toward integrative prevention.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Parris M

    2008-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease, AD, is the most common form of dementia. AD initially targets memory and progressively destroys the mind. The brain atrophies as the neocortex suffers neuronal, synaptic, and dendritic losses, and the hallmark amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles proliferate. Pharmacological management, at best, is palliative and transiently effective, with marked adverse effects. Certain nutrients intrinsic to human biochemistry (orthomolecules) match or exceed pharmacological drug benefits in double-blind, randomized, controlled trials, with superior safety. Early intervention is feasible because its heritability is typically minimal and pathological deterioration is detectable years prior to diagnosis. The syndrome amnestic mild cognitive impairment exhibits AD pathology and to date has frustrated attempts at intervention. The condition age-associated memory impairment is a nonpathological extreme of normal brain aging, but with less severe cognitive impairment than amnestic mild cognitive impairment. Age-associated memory impairment is a feasible target for early intervention against AD, beginning with the modifiable AD risk factors - smoking, hypertension, homocysteine, type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, and obesity. Stress reduction, avoidance of toxins, and mental and physical exercise are important aspects of prevention. The diet should emphasize omega-3 fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid; flavonoids and other antioxidant nutrients; and B vitamins, especially folate, B6 and B12. Dietary supplementation is best focused on those proven from randomized, controlled trials: the phospholipids phosphatidylserine and glycerophosphocholine, the energy nutrient acetyl-L-carnitine, vitamins C and E, and other antioxidants. A comprehensive integrative strategy initiated early in cognitive decline is the most pragmatic approach to controlling progression to Alzheimer's disease. PMID:18590347

  4. Sodium alginate prevents progression of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and liver carcinogenesis in obese and diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Tsuneyuki; Shirakami, Yohei; Kubota, Masaya; Ideta, Takayasu; Kochi, Takahiro; Sakai, Hiroyasu; Tanaka, Takuji; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Shimizu, Masahito

    2016-03-01

    Obesity and related metabolic abnormalities play a key role in liver carcinogenesis. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which is often complicated with obesity and diabetes mellitus, is associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Sodium alginate (SA), which is extracted from brown seaweeds, is marketed as a weight loss supplement because of its high viscosity and gelling properties. In the present study, we examined the effects of SA on the progression of NASH and related liver carcinogenesis in monosodium glutamate (MSG)-treated mice, which show obesity, diabetes mellitus, and NASH-like histopathological changes. Male MSG-mice were intraperitoneally injected with diethylnitrosamine at 2 weeks of age, and, thereafter, they received a basal diet containing high- or low-molecular-weight SA throughout the experiment (16 weeks). At sacrifice, control MSG-treated mice fed the basal-diet showed significant obesity, hyperinsulinemia, steatosis and hepatic tumor development. SA administration suppressed body weight gain; improved insulin sensitivity, hyperinsulinemia, and hyperleptinemia; attenuated inflammation in the liver and white adipose tissue; and inhibited hepatic lipogenesis and progression of NASH. SA also reduced oxidative stress and increased anti-oxidant enzyme levels in the liver. Development of hepatic tumors, including liver cell adenoma and HCC, and hepatic pre-neoplastic lesions was significantly inhibited by SA supplementation. In conclusion, oral SA supplementation improves liver steatosis, insulin resistance, chronic inflammation, and oxidative stress, preventing the development of liver tumorigenesis in obese and diabetic mice. SA may have ability to suppress steatosis-related liver carcinogenesis in obese and diabetic subjects. PMID:26871288

  5. Prevention of Simvastatin-Induced Inhibition of Tendon Cell Proliferation and Cell Cycle Progression by Geranylgeranyl Pyrophosphate.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Chung; Yu, Tung-Yang; Lin, Li-Ping; Cheng, Mei-Ling; Chen, Cheng-Lun; Pang, Jong-Hwei S

    2016-02-01

    Statins have been reported to induce tendinopathy and even tendon rupture. The present study was designed to investigate the potential molecular mechanism underlying the adverse effect of simvastatin on tendon cells. An in vitro tendon healing model was performed using tendon cells isolated from rat Achilles tendons. The viability of tendon cells and cell cycle progression were examined by the MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Immunofluorescent staining for Ki-67 was used to assess the proliferation activity of tendon cells. Western blot analysis and coimmunoprecipitation was used to determine the protein expression of cell cycle-related proteins. To investigate the potential mechanism underlying the effect of statins on tendon cells, mevalonate, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP), or geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) was added to simvastatin-treated tendon cells. Simvastatin inhibited the in vitro tendon healing model and tendon cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Immunofluorescent staining demonstrated reduced ki-67 expression in simvastatin-treated tendon cells. Furthermore, simvastatin induced cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. The expression levels of cdk1, cdk2, cyclin A, and cyclin E were downregulated by simvastatin in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of simvastatin was proved to mediate the reduction of mevalonate, and the addition of exogenous GGPP completely prevented the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on tendon cells. The present study demonstrated, for the first time, the molecular mechanism underlying simvastatin-induced tendinopathy or tendon rupture. GGPP was shown to prevent the adverse effect of simvastatin in tendon cells without interfering with its cholesterol-reducing efficacy. PMID:26577051

  6. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity prevents anchorage-independent ovarian carcinoma cell growth and tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Kristy K.; Tancioni, Isabelle; Lawson, Christine; Miller, Nichol L.G.; Jean, Christine; Chen, Xiao Lei; Uryu, Sean; Kim, Josephine; Tarin, David; Stupack, Dwayne G.; Plaxe, Steven C.; Schlaepfer, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Recurrence and spread of ovarian cancer is the 5th leading cause of death for women in the United States. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase located on chromosome 8q24.3 (gene is Ptk2), a site commonly amplified in serous ovarian cancer. Elevated FAK mRNA levels in serous ovarian carcinoma are associated with decreased (logrank P = 0.0007, hazard ratio 1.43) patient overall survival, but how FAK functions in tumor progression remains undefined. We have isolated aggressive ovarian carcinoma cells termed ID8-IP after intraperitoneal (IP) growth of murine ID8 cells in C57Bl6 mice. Upon orthotopic implantation within the periovarian bursa space, ID8-IP cells exhibit greater tumor growth, local and distant metastasis, and elevated numbers of ascites-associated cells compared to parental ID8 cells. ID8-IP cells exhibit enhanced growth under non-adherent conditions with elevated FAK and c-Src tyrosine kinase activation compared to parental ID8 cells. In vitro, the small molecule FAK inhibitor (Pfizer, PF562,271, PF-271) at 0.1 uM selectively prevented anchorage-independent ID8-IP cell growth with the inhibition of FAK tyrosine (Y)397 but not c-Src Y416 phosphorylation. Oral PF-271 administration (30 mg/kg, twice daily) blocked FAK but not c-Src tyrosine phosphorylation in ID8-IP tumors. This was associated with decreased tumor size, prevention of peritoneal metastasis, reduced tumor-associated endothelial cell number, and increased tumor cell-associated apoptosis. FAK knockdown and re-expression assays showed that FAK activity selectively promoted anchorage-independent ID8-IP cell survival. These results support the continued evaluation of FAK inhibitors as a promising clinical treatment for ovarian cancer. PMID:23275034

  7. Creatine supplementation prevents hyperhomocysteinemia, oxidative stress and cancer-induced cachexia progression in Walker-256 tumor-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Deminice, Rafael; Cella, Paola Sanches; Padilha, Camila S; Borges, Fernando H; da Silva, Lilian Eslaine Costa Mendes; Campos-Ferraz, Patrícia L; Jordao, Alceu Afonso; Robinson, Jason Lorne; Bertolo, Robert F; Cecchini, Rubens; Guarnier, Flávia Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate (1) the impact of tumor growth on homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism, liver oxidative stress and cancer cachexia and, (2) the potential benefits of creatine supplementation in Walker-256 tumor-bearing rats. Three experiments were conducted. First, rats were killed on days 5 (D5), 10 (D10) and 14 (D14) after tumor implantation. In experiment 2, rats were randomly assigned to three groups designated as control (C), tumor-bearing (T) and tumor-bearing supplemented with creatine (TCr). A life span experiment was conducted as the third experiment. Creatine was supplied in drinking water for 21 days (8 g/L) in all cases. Tumor implantation consisted of a suspension of Walker-256 cells (8.0 × 10(7) cells in 0.5 mL of PBS). The progressive increase (P < 0.05) in tumor mass coincided with a progressively lower body weight and higher hepatic oxidative stress; plasma Hcy concentration was 80 % higher (P < 0.05) by 10 days of tumor implantation. Impaired Hcy metabolism was evidenced by decreased hepatic betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (Bhmt), glycine N-methyltransferase (Gnmt) and cystathionine beta synthase (CBS) gene expression. In contrast, creatine supplementation promoted a 28 % reduction of tumor weight (P < 0.05). Plasma Hcy (C 6.1 ± 0.6, T 10.3 ± 1.5, TCr 6.3 ± 0.9, µmol/L) and hepatic oxidative stress were lower in the TCr group compared to T. Creatine supplementation was unable to decrease Hcy concentration and to increase SAM/SAH ratio in tumor tissue. These data suggest that creatine effects on hepatic impaired Hcy metabolism promoted by tumor cell inoculation are responsible to decrease plasma Hcy in tumor-bearing rats. In conclusion, Walker-256 tumor growth is associated with progressive hyperhomocysteinemia, body weight loss and liver oxidative stress in rats. Creatine supplementation, however, prevented these tumor-associated perturbations. PMID:26781304

  8. Dopamine release is severely compromised in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Michael A; Rajan, Vignesh; Miller, Charles E; Wightman, R Mark

    2006-05-01

    Recently, alterations in dopamine signaling have been implicated in Huntington's disease. In this work, dopamine release and uptake was measured in striatal slices from the R6/2 transgenic mouse model of Huntington's disease using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry at carbon-fiber microelectrodes. Dopamine release in brain slices from 6-week-old R6/2 mice is substantially reduced (53% of wild type), while dopamine uptake is unaffected. In agreement with this, R6/2 mice injected with the dopamine uptake inhibitor cocaine exhibited a blunted motor activity response (54% of wild type). At 10 weeks of age, an even more dramatic motor activity decrease in response to cocaine injection (21% of wild type) was observed. Moreover, the pre-drug activity of 10-week-old R6/2 mice was significantly reduced (by 37%) compared with 6-week-old R6/2 mice. Striatal dopamine release decreased with age, indicating that progressive alterations in dopaminergic pathways may affect motor activity. The inhibition constants of cocaine and methamphetamine (METH) determined in brain slices differed little between genotype or age group, suggesting that the decreased responses to cocaine and METH arise from compromised dopamine release rather than differences in uptake or drug action. Collectively, these data demonstrate (i) a reduction in the ability of dopamine terminals to release dopamine and (ii) the importance of this attenuation of release on the motor symptoms of Huntington's disease. PMID:16573654

  9. Development and function of the midbrain dopamine system: what we know and what we need to.

    PubMed

    Bissonette, G B; Roesch, M R

    2016-01-01

    The past two decades have seen an explosion in our understanding of the origin and development of the midbrain dopamine system. Much of this work has been focused on the aspects of dopamine neuron development related to the onset of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, with the intent of hopefully delaying, preventing or fixing symptoms. While midbrain dopamine degeneration is a major focus for treatment and research, many other human disorders are impacted by abnormal dopamine, including drug addiction, autism and schizophrenia. Understanding dopamine neuron ontogeny and how dopamine connections and circuitry develops may provide us with key insights into potentially important avenues of research for other dopamine-related disorders. This review will provide a brief overview of the major molecular and genetic players throughout the development of midbrain dopamine neurons and what we know about the behavioral- and disease-related implications associated with perturbations to midbrain dopamine neuron development. We intend to combine the knowledge of two broad fields of neuroscience, both developmental and behavioral, with the intent on fostering greater discussion between branches of neuroscience in the service of addressing complex cognitive questions from a developmental perspective and identifying important gaps in our knowledge for future study. PMID:26548362

  10. Cyclooxygenase-independent neuroprotective effects of aspirin against dopamine quinone-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Masato; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Kikkawa, Yuri; Kimoto, Naotaka; Takeshima, Mika; Murakami, Shinki; Miyoshi, Ko

    2012-09-01

    Prostaglandin H synthase exerts not only cyclooxygenase activity but also peroxidase activity. The latter activity of the enzyme is thought to couple with oxidation of dopamine to dopamine quinone. Therefore, it has been proposed that cyclooxygenase inhibitors could suppress dopamine quinone formation. In the present study, we examined effects of various cyclooxygenase inhibitors against excess methyl L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA)-induced quinoprotein (protein-bound quinone) formation and neurotoxicity using dopaminergic CATH.a cells. The treatment with aspirin inhibited excess methyl L-DOPA-induced quinoprotein formation and cell death. However, acetaminophen did not show protective effects, and indomethacin and meloxicam rather aggravated these methyl L-DOPA-induced changes. Aspirin and indomethacin did not affect the level of glutathione that exerts quenching dopamine quinone in dopaminergic cells. In contrast with inhibiting effects of higher dose in the previous reports, relatively lower dose of aspirin that affected methyl L-DOPA-induced quinoprotein formation and cell death failed to prevent cyclooxygenase-induced dopamine chrome generation in cell-free system. Furthermore, aspirin but not acetaminophen or meloxicam showed direct dopamine quinone-scavenging effects in dopamine-semiquinone generating systems. The present results suggest that cyclooxygenase shows little contribution to dopamine oxidation in dopaminergic cells and that protective effects of aspirin against methyl L-DOPA-induced dopamine quinone neurotoxicity are based on its cyclooxygenase-independent property. PMID:22674083

  11. Pollution Prevention Progress

    EPA Science Inventory

    P2P no longer supported by EPA it has been replaced by TRACI http://cfpub.epa.gov/crem/knowledge_base/crem_report.cfm?deid=74923

    P2P is a pollutant cl...

  12. Strategic Prevention Framework State Incentive Grant Progress Report: Building a Sustainable Substance Abuse Prevention System, State of Hawai'i, 2006-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, S.; Lai, M.C.; Heusel, K.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the Hawai'i State Department of Health (DOH) received the Strategic Prevention Framework State Incentive Grant (SPF-SIG) from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to establish a comprehensive, coordinated, and sustainable substance abuse prevention infrastructure in Hawai'i. The SPF-SIG Project is funded…

  13. Complexity of dopamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) coincides with a dramatic loss of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra. A key player in the loss of dopaminergic neurons is oxidative stress. Dopamine (DA) metabolism itself is strongly linked to oxidative stress as its degradation generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DA oxidation can lead to endogenous neurotoxins whereas some DA derivatives show antioxidative effects. Therefore, DA metabolism is of special importance for neuronal redox-homeostasis and viability. In this review we highlight different aspects of dopamine metabolism in the context of PD and neurodegeneration. Since most reviews focus only on single aspects of the DA system, we will give a broader overview by looking at DA biosynthesis, sequestration, degradation and oxidation chemistry at the metabolic level, as well as at the transcriptional, translational and posttranslational regulation of all enzymes involved. This is followed by a short overview of cellular models currently used in PD research. Finally, we will address the topic from a medical point of view which directly aims to encounter PD. PMID:23683503

  14. In Situ Controlled Release of Dopamine for Treatment of Parkinson's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Tessy; Ortiz, Emma; Kozina, Anna; Esquivel, Dulce; Espinoza, Karla

    2013-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system. The primary symptoms of PD result from greatly reduced activity of dopamine-secreting cells due to cell death in the pars compacta region of the substantia nigra. The loss of dopamine as a result of death of dopamine neurons accounts for most of the movementrelated symptoms of the disease. There is no cure for Parkinson's disease, but medications can provide relief from the symptoms. Since dopamine cannot cross the hemathoencephalic barrier, the drug delivery to the brain remains a big challenge. In this chapter we will discuss a novel way of dopamine release in situ from inorganic nanostructured reservoirs that may be potentially used in PD treatment.

  15. Components and characteristics of the dopamine reward utility signal.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, William R; Lak, Armin; Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Schultz, Wolfram

    2016-06-01

    Rewards are defined by their behavioral functions in learning (positive reinforcement), approach behavior, economic choices, and emotions. Dopamine neurons respond to rewards with two components, similar to higher order sensory and cognitive neurons. The initial, rapid, unselective dopamine detection component reports all salient environmental events irrespective of their reward association. It is highly sensitive to factors related to reward and thus detects a maximal number of potential rewards. It also senses aversive stimuli but reports their physical impact rather than their aversiveness. The second response component processes reward value accurately and starts early enough to prevent confusion with unrewarded stimuli and objects. It codes reward value as a numeric, quantitative utility prediction error, consistent with formal concepts of economic decision theory. Thus, the dopamine reward signal is fast, highly sensitive and appropriate for driving and updating economic decisions. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1699-1711, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26272220

  16. Dopamine Regulates Aversive Contextual Learning and Associated In Vivo Synaptic Plasticity in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Broussard, John I; Yang, Kechun; Levine, Amber T; Tsetsenis, Theodoros; Jenson, Daniel; Cao, Fei; Garcia, Isabella; Arenkiel, Benjamin R; Zhou, Fu-Ming; De Biasi, Mariella; Dani, John A

    2016-03-01

    Dopamine release during reward-driven behaviors influences synaptic plasticity. However, dopamine innervation and release in the hippocampus and its role during aversive behaviors are controversial. Here, we show that in vivo hippocampal synaptic plasticity in the CA3-CA1 circuit underlies contextual learning during inhibitory avoidance (IA) training. Immunohistochemistry and molecular techniques verified sparse dopaminergic innervation of the hippocampus from the midbrain. The long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) underlying the learning of IA was assessed with a D1-like dopamine receptor agonist or antagonist in ex vivo hippocampal slices and in vivo in freely moving mice. Inhibition of D1-like dopamine receptors impaired memory of the IA task and prevented the training-induced enhancement of both ex vivo and in vivo LTP induction. The results indicate that dopamine-receptor signaling during an aversive contextual task regulates aversive memory retention and regulates associated synaptic mechanisms in the hippocampus that likely underlie learning. PMID:26904943

  17. Dopamine-deficient mice are hypersensitive to dopamine receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Kim, D S; Szczypka, M S; Palmiter, R D

    2000-06-15

    Dopamine-deficient (DA-/-) mice were created by targeted inactivation of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene in dopaminergic neurons. The locomotor activity response of these mutants to dopamine D1 or D2 receptor agonists and l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) was 3- to 13-fold greater than the response elicited from wild-type mice. The enhanced sensitivity of DA-/- mice to agonists was independent of changes in steady-state levels of dopamine receptors and the presynaptic dopamine transporter as measured by ligand binding. The acute behavioral response of DA-/- mice to a dopamine D1 receptor agonist was correlated with c-fos induction in the striatum, a brain nucleus that receives dense dopaminergic input. Chronic replacement of dopamine to DA-/- mice by repeated l-DOPA administration over 4 d relieved the hypersensitivity of DA-/- mutants in terms of induction of both locomotion and striatal c-fos expression. The results suggest that the chronic presence of dopaminergic neurotransmission is required to dampen the intracellular signaling response of striatal neurons. PMID:10844009

  18. Iron Storage within Dopamine Neurovesicles Revealed by Chemical Nano-Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Richard; Cloetens, Peter; Devès, Guillaume; Carmona, Asunción; Bohic, Sylvain

    2007-01-01

    Altered homeostasis of metal ions is suspected to play a critical role in neurodegeneration. However, the lack of analytical technique with sufficient spatial resolution prevents the investigation of metals distribution in neurons. An original experimental setup was developed to perform chemical element imaging with a 90 nm spatial resolution using synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence. This unique spatial resolution, combined to a high brightness, enables chemical element imaging in subcellular compartments. We investigated the distribution of iron in dopamine producing neurons because iron-dopamine compounds are suspected to be formed but have yet never been observed in cells. The study shows that iron accumulates into dopamine neurovesicles. In addition, the inhibition of dopamine synthesis results in a decreased vesicular storage of iron. These results indicate a new physiological role for dopamine in iron buffering within normal dopamine producing cells. This system could be at fault in Parkinson's disease which is characterized by an increased level of iron in the substancia nigra pars compacta and an impaired storage of dopamine due to the disruption of vesicular trafficking. The re-distribution of highly reactive dopamine-iron complexes outside neurovesicles would result in an enhanced death of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:17895967

  19. Dopamine reward prediction error coding

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Reward prediction errors consist of the differences between received and predicted rewards. They are crucial for basic forms of learning about rewards and make us strive for more rewards—an evolutionary beneficial trait. Most dopamine neurons in the midbrain of humans, monkeys, and rodents signal a reward prediction error; they are activated by more reward than predicted (positive prediction error), remain at baseline activity for fully predicted rewards, and show depressed activity with less reward than predicted (negative prediction error). The dopamine signal increases nonlinearly with reward value and codes formal economic utility. Drugs of addiction generate, hijack, and amplify the dopamine reward signal and induce exaggerated, uncontrolled dopamine effects on neuronal plasticity. The striatum, amygdala, and frontal cortex also show reward prediction error coding, but only in subpopulations of neurons. Thus, the important concept of reward prediction errors is implemented in neuronal hardware. PMID:27069377

  20. Targeting the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor to prevent progressive dementia and improve cognition in adults with Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Stephen I; Burket, Jessica A; Benson, Andrew D

    2014-10-01

    As persons with Down's syndrome (DS) age into the third decade and beyond, they develop Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like histopathological changes in brain and may manifest progressive worsening of adaptive functions. Increasingly, persons with DS have near-normal to normal life spans; thus, it has become a therapeutic imperative to preserve adaptive functions and ability to live as independently as possible in the least restrictive environment throughout adulthood. Data suggest that these histopathological changes and worsening adaptive functions result, at least in part, from the binding of the amyloidogenic Aβ1-42 peptide to α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChRs) on the surface of neurons, which can lead to the internalization of the tightly-bound complex and cell lysis. Pharmacotherapeutic targeting of the α7nAChR may inhibit the creation of the Aβ1-42-α7nAChR complex, which has been observed both intraneuronally and as a component of the amyloid plaque seen in AD. Additionally, selective α7nAChR agonists may improve memory and cognition independently of their potential ability to attenuate the cytotoxicity of Aβ1-42 and retard the deposition of amyloid plaques in adults with DS. However, there are conflicting data supporting an antagonist strategy to improve cognition in the presence of elevated levels of Aβ amyloidogenic peptides, as well as to prevent emergence of pyramidal neuron hyperexcitability. A major challenge to the implementation of clinical trials of targeted α7nAChR interventions in adults with DS will be the ability to detect medication-induced changes in cognition in the context of intellectual disability. The Review will consider some of the current evidence supporting both the role of the Aβ1-42-α7nAChR complex in the pathogenesis of the AD-like histopathology in adult persons with DS, and pharmacotherapeutic interventions with α7nAChR agonists. PMID:24865150

  1. Mesolimbic dopamine signals the value of work.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Arif A; Pettibone, Jeffrey R; Mabrouk, Omar S; Hetrick, Vaughn L; Schmidt, Robert; Vander Weele, Caitlin M; Kennedy, Robert T; Aragona, Brandon J; Berke, Joshua D

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine cell firing can encode errors in reward prediction, providing a learning signal to guide future behavior. Yet dopamine is also a key modulator of motivation, invigorating current behavior. Existing theories propose that fast (phasic) dopamine fluctuations support learning, whereas much slower (tonic) dopamine changes are involved in motivation. We examined dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens across multiple time scales, using complementary microdialysis and voltammetric methods during adaptive decision-making. We found that minute-by-minute dopamine levels covaried with reward rate and motivational vigor. Second-by-second dopamine release encoded an estimate of temporally discounted future reward (a value function). Changing dopamine immediately altered willingness to work and reinforced preceding action choices by encoding temporal-difference reward prediction errors. Our results indicate that dopamine conveys a single, rapidly evolving decision variable, the available reward for investment of effort, which is employed for both learning and motivational functions. PMID:26595651

  2. A Role for Accumbal Glycine Receptors in Modulation of Dopamine Release by the Glycine Transporter-1 Inhibitor Org25935

    PubMed Central

    Lidö, Helga Höifödt; Ericson, Mia; Marston, Hugh; Söderpalm, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Accumbal glycine modulates basal and ethanol-induced dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens (nAc) as well as voluntary ethanol consumption. Also, systemic administration of the glycine transporter-1 inhibitor Org25935 elevates dopamine levels in nAc, prevents a further ethanol-induced dopamine elevation and robustly and dose-dependently decreases ethanol consumption in rats. Here we investigated whether Org25935 applied locally in nAc modulates dopamine release, and whether accumbal glycine receptors or NMDA receptors are involved in this tentative effect. We also addressed whether Org25935 and ethanol applied locally in nAc interact with dopamine levels, as seen after systemic administration. We used in vivo microdialysis coupled to HPLC-ED in freely moving male Wistar rats to monitor dopamine output in nAc after local perfusion of Org25935 alone, with ethanol, or Org25935-perfusion after pre-treatment with the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine or the NMDA receptor glycine site antagonist L-701.324. Local Org25935 increased extracellular dopamine levels in a subpopulation of rats. Local strychnine, but not systemic L-701.324, antagonized the dopamine-activating effect of Org25935. Ethanol failed to induce a dopamine overflow in the subpopulation responding to Org25935 with a dopamine elevation. The study supports a role for accumbal glycine receptors rather than NMDA receptor signaling in the dopamine-activating effect of Org25935. The results further indicate that the previously reported systemic Org25935–ethanol interaction with regard to accumbal dopamine is localized to the nAc. This adds to the growing evidence for the glycine receptor as an important player in the dopamine reward circuitry and in ethanol's effects within this system. PMID:21556278

  3. Imaging of Brain Dopamine Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.; Thanos, Panayotis K.; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is typically associated with abnormal eating behaviors. Brain imaging studies in humans implicate the involvement of dopamine (DA)-modulated circuits in pathologic eating behavior(s). Food cues increase striatal extracellular DA, providing evidence for the involvement of DA in the nonhedonic motivational properties of food. Food cues also increase metabolism in the orbitofrontal cortex indicating the association of this region with the motivation for food consumption. Similar to drug-addicted subjects, striatal DA D2 receptor availability is reduced in obese subjects, which may predispose obese subjects to seek food as a means to temporarily compensate for understimulated reward circuits. Decreased DA D2 receptors in the obese subjects are also associated with decreased metabolism in prefrontal regions involved in inhibitory control, which may underlie their inability to control food intake. Gastric stimulation in obese subjects activates cortical and limbic regions involved with self-control, motivation, and memory. These brain regions are also activated during drug craving in drug-addicted subjects. Obese subjects have increased metabolism in the somatosensory cortex, which suggests an enhanced sensitivity to the sensory properties of food. The reduction in DA D2 receptors in obese subjects coupled with the enhanced sensitivity to food palatability could make food their most salient reinforcer putting them at risk for compulsive eating and obesity. The results from these studies suggest that multiple but similar brain circuits are disrupted in obesity and drug addiction and suggest that strategies aimed at improving DA function might be beneficial in the treatment and prevention of obesity. PMID:21603099

  4. Gastric mucosal lesions induced by complete dopamine system failure in rats. The effects of dopamine agents, ranitidine, atropine, omeprazole and pentadecapeptide BPC 157.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, P; Separovic, J; Buljat, G; Anic, T; Stancic-Rokotov, D; Mikus, D; Duplancic, B; Marovic, A; Zoricic, I; Prkacin, I; Lovric-Bencic, M; Aralica, G; Ziger, T; Perovic, D; Jelovac, N; Dodig, G; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Seiwerth, S; Turkovic, B; Grabarevic, Z; Petek, M; Rucman, R

    2000-01-01

    Up to now, for gastric lesions potentiation or induction, as well as determination of endogenous dopamine significance, dopamine antagonist or dopamine vesicle depletor were given separately. Therefore, without combination studies, the evidence for dopamine significance remains split on either blockade of dopamine post-synaptic receptor or inhibition of dopamine storage, essentially contrasting with endogenous circumstances, where both functions could be simultaneously disturbed. For this purpose, a co-administration of reserpine and haloperidol, a dopamine granule depletor combined with a dopamine antagonist with pronounced ulcerogenic effect, was tested, and the rats were sacrificed 24 h after injurious agent(s) administration. Haloperidol (5 mg x kg(-1) b.w. i.p.), given alone, produced the lesions in all rats. Reserpine (5 mg x kg(-1) b.w. i.p.), given separately, also produced lesions. When these agents were given together, the lesions were apparently larger than in the groups injured with separate administration of either haloperidol or reserpine alone. Along with our previous results, when beneficial agents were co-administered, all dopaminomimetics (bromocriptine 10 mg, apomophine 1 mg, amphetamine 20 mg x kg(-1) i.p.) apparently attenuated the otherwise consistent haloperidol-gastric lesions. Likewise, an apparent inhibition of the reserpine-lesions was noted as well. However, if they were given in rats injured with combination of haloperidol and reserpine, their otherwise prominent beneficial effects were absent. Ranitidine (10 mg), omeprazole (10 mg), atropine (10 mg), pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (Gly-Glu-Pro-Pro-Pro-Gly-Lys-Pro-Ala-Asp-Asp-Ala-Gly-Leu-Val) (10 microg or 10 ng x kg(-1) i.p.) evidently prevented both haloperidol-gastric lesions and reserpine-gastric lesions. Confronted with potentiated lesions following a combination of haloperidol and reserpine, these agents maintained their beneficial effects, noted in the rats treated with either

  5. Pyrethroid pesticide-induced alterations in dopamine transporter function

    SciTech Connect

    Elwan, Mohamed A.; Richardson, Jason R.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Caudle, W. Michael; Miller, Gary W. . E-mail: gary.miller@emory.edu

    2006-03-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between pesticide exposure and the incidence of PD. Studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that certain pesticides increase levels of the dopamine transporter (DAT), an integral component of dopaminergic neurotransmission and a gateway for dopaminergic neurotoxins. Here, we report that repeated exposure (3 injections over 2 weeks) of mice to two commonly used pyrethroid pesticides, deltamethrin (3 mg/kg) and permethrin (0.8 mg/kg), increases DAT-mediated dopamine uptake by 31 and 28%, respectively. Using cells stably expressing DAT, we determined that exposure (10 min) to deltamethrin and permethrin (1 nM-100 {mu}M) had no effect on DAT-mediated dopamine uptake. Extending exposures to both pesticides for 30 min (10 {mu}M) or 24 h (1, 5, and 10 {mu}M) resulted in significant decrease in dopamine uptake. This reduction was not the result of competitive inhibition, loss of DAT protein, or cytotoxicity. However, there was an increase in DNA fragmentation, an index of apoptosis, in cells exhibiting reduced uptake at 30 min and 24 h. These data suggest that up-regulation of DAT by in vivo pyrethroid exposure is an indirect effect and that longer-term exposure of cells results in apoptosis. Since DAT can greatly affect the vulnerability of dopamine neurons to neurotoxicants, up-regulation of DAT by deltamethrin and permethrin may increase the susceptibility of dopamine neurons to toxic insult, which may provide insight into the association between pesticide exposure and PD.

  6. The ventral tegmentum and dopamine: A new wave of diversity.

    PubMed

    Barrot, M

    2014-12-12

    Projection systems arising from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the substantia nigra (SN) have a critical role in a broad range of functions, as well as in the etiology, symptoms and treatment of neurological and psychiatric diseases. Mostly studied for its dopamine neurons, the ventral tegmentum is in fact heterogeneous at cellular and functional levels. This special issue of Neuroscience gathered some experts in the field to review the connectivity of the ventral mesencephalic dopaminergic complex, its cellular heterogeneity with attention given to glutamate neurons, the D2 autoreceptor and the cholinergic controls of dopamine activity, the influence of neurotrophins, the controls of bursting activity and the heterogeneity of neuronal activity across traits and states, the pedunculopontine tegmental and the sensory controls of dopamine activity, the sex-dependent diversity, the links between circadian and dopamine systems, the functional antero-posterior heterogeneity of the VTA and the role of its GABA tail (tVTA/rostromedial tegmental nucleus (RMTg)), the functional heterogeneity of the VTA outputs, the place of dopamine in cortico-basal ganglia circuitry, the different roles of the D1 and D2 striatal pathways and the role of dopamine in associative learning and memory. Recent progress also highlights the need for molecular markers of functional subpopulations within the ventral tegmentum, for deeper developmental knowledge of this region, and for a single cell level of connectomic. It also raises the question of inter-individual, sex, strain and species heterogeneity, and conversely the question of data generalization in a context of human pathology models, which warrant comparative studies and translational effort. PMID:25453764

  7. Pyrethroid pesticide-induced alterations in dopamine transporter function

    PubMed Central

    Elwan, Mohamed A.; Richardson, Jason R.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Caudle, W. Michael; Miller, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between pesticide exposure and the incidence of PD. Studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that certain pesticides increase levels of the dopamine transporter (DAT), an integral component of dopaminergic neurotransmission and a gateway for dopaminergic neurotoxins. Here, we report that repeated exposure (3 injections over 2 weeks) of mice to two commonly used pyrethroid pesticides, deltamethrin (3 mg/kg) and permethrin (0.8 mg/kg), increases DAT-mediated dopamine uptake by 31 and 28%, respectively. Using cells stably expressing DAT, we determined that exposure (10 min) to deltamethrin and permethrin (1 nM–100 μM) had no effect on DAT-mediated dopamine uptake. Extending exposures to both pesticides for 30 min (10 μM) or 24 h (1, 5, and 10 μM) resulted in significant decrease in dopamine uptake. This reduction was not the result of competitive inhibition, loss of DAT protein, or cytotoxicity. However, there was an increase in DNA fragmentation, an index of apoptosis, in cells exhibiting reduced uptake at 30 min and 24 h. These data suggest that up-regulation of DAT by in vivo pyrethroid exposure is an indirect effect and that longer-term exposure of cells results in apoptosis. Since DAT can greatly affect the vulnerability of dopamine neurons to neurotoxicants, up-regulation of DAT by deltamethrin and permethrin may increase the susceptibility of dopamine neurons to toxic insult, which may provide insight into the association between pesticide exposure and PD. PMID:16005927

  8. Dopamine Receptors and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Coronel, Israel; Florán, Benjamín

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is one of the major neurotransmitters and participates in a number of functions such as motor coordination, emotions, memory, reward mechanism, neuroendocrine regulation etc. DA exerts its effects through five DA receptors that are subdivided in 2 families: D1-like DA receptors (D1 and D5) and the D2-like (D2, D3 and D4). All DA receptors are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and play an important role in not only in physiological conditions but also pathological scenarios. Abnormalities in the DAergic system and its receptors in the basal ganglia structures are the basis Parkinson’s disease (PD), however DA also participates in other neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington disease (HD) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Under pathological conditions reorganization of DAergic system has been observed and most of the times, those changes occur as a mechanism of compensation, but in some cases contributes to worsening the alterations. Here we review the changes that occur on DA transmission and DA receptors (DARs) at both levels expression and signals transduction pathways as a result of neurotoxicity, inflammation and in neurodegenerative processes. The better understanding of the role of DA receptors in neuropathological conditions is crucial for development of novel therapeutic approaches to treat alterations related to neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26425390

  9. Striatal interaction among dopamine, glutamate and ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Morales, Ingrid; Fuentes, Angel; Ballaz, Santiago; Obeso, Jose A; Rodriguez, Manuel

    2012-12-01

    Despite evidence suggesting the interaction among glutamate (GLU), dopamine (DA) and ascorbic acid (AA) in the striatum, their actions are often studied separately. Microdialysis was used here to quantify the extracellular interaction among GLU-DA-AA in the striatum of rats, an interaction which was compared with those studied in the substantia nigra (SN). Perfusion of GLU by reverse microdialysis increased DA and decreased 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) in the extracellular medium of the striatum, but increased both DA and DOPAC in the SN. The increase of extracellular DA-concentration induced by the local DA-perfusion decreased the extracellular level of GLU and glutamine, an effect that, as suggested by the GLU and glutamine increase observed after the haloperidol administration, probably involves the D2 dopamine receptor. Local administration of AA increased the extracellular DA, decreased DOPAC and had no effect on GLU and glutamine. Present data suggest that, in the striatum, GLU-release inhibits DA-uptake, DA-release inhibits GLU-release, and AA-release prevents DA-oxidation increasing its extracellular diffusion. These effects were different in the SN where GLU probably promoted the DA-release instead of inhibiting the DA-uptake as presumably occurred in the striatum. Present data denote a marked GLU-DA-AA interaction in the striatum, which might be relevant for the pharmacological control of basal ganglia disorders. PMID:22959966

  10. Bardoxolone methyl prevents the development and progression of cardiac and renal pathophysiologies in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Camer, Danielle; Yu, Yinghua; Szabo, Alexander; Wang, Hongqin; Dinh, Chi H L; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Obesity caused by the consumption of a high-fat (HF) diet is a major risk factor for the development of associated complications, such as heart and kidney failure. A semi-synthetic triterpenoid, bardoxolone methyl (BM) was administrated to mice fed a HF diet for 21 weeks to determine if it would prevent the development of obesity-associated cardiac and renal pathophysiologies. Twelve week old male C57BL/6J mice were fed a lab chow (LC), HF (40% fat), or a HF diet supplemented with 10 mg/kg/day BM in drinking water. After 21 weeks, the left ventricles of hearts and cortex of kidneys of mice were collected for analysis. Histological analysis revealed that BM prevented HF diet-induced development of structural changes in the heart and kidneys. BM prevented HF diet-induced decreases in myocyte number in cardiac tissue, although this treatment also elevated cardiac endothelin signalling molecules. In the kidneys, BM administration prevented HF diet-induced renal corpuscle hypertrophy and attenuated endothelin signalling. Furthermore, in both the hearts and kidneys of mice fed a HF diet, BM administration prevented HF diet-induced increases in fat accumulation, macrophage infiltration and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) gene expression. These findings suggest that BM prevents HF diet-induced developments of cardiac and renal pathophysiologies in mice fed a chronic HF diet by preventing inflammation. Moreover, these results suggest that BM has the potential as a therapeutic for preventing obesity-induced cardiac and renal pathophysiologies. PMID:26612656

  11. Dopamine use is an indicator for the development of threshold retinopathy of prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, M.; Chu, T.; Murphy, F.; Willits, N.; Morse, L.

    1999-01-01

    AIM—To assess whether treatment of premature infants with dopamine is a risk factor for development of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP).
METHODS—A retrospective case series analysis of two groups was utilised with a minimum follow up of 6 months. Clinical profiles and patient risk factors were identified along with an evaluation of ROP progression and an analysis of clinical outcome. All infants were seen in a single community neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). 41 consecutive high risk infants were identified during a 36 month period whose birth weight was less than 1000 grams and who remained in the NICU without transfer until at least 28 days of age. Dilated indirect ophthalmoscopy fundus examinations were performed on all infants to identify the degree of and progression to threshold ROP.
RESULTS—18 of 41 infants were treated with dopamine for hypotension. The group of infants requiring dopamine differed statistically from the non-dopamine treated group by having a slightly higher birth weight, a greater incidence of hypotension and colloid treatment, and in manifesting more advanced respiratory disease. Within the dopamine treated group, 12 of 18 infants (67%) reached prethreshold ROP and seven infants (39%) reached threshold ROP requiring laser treatment. In contrast, only three of the infants (13%) who did not require dopamine for hypotension progressed to prethreshold (p=0.001) and only one of these infants (4%) progressed to threshold ROP (p = 0.02). Logistic regression analysis among other variables demonstrated that dopamine use and gestational age are important factors in this low birthweight population for predicting the development of threshold ROP (dopamine use: adjusted odds ratio = 119.88, p = 0.0061; gestational age: adjusted odds ratio = 0.061, p = 0.0043).
CONCLUSIONS—Dopamine use in low birthweight infants may therefore be a risk factor for the development of threshold ROP. More vigilant screening of high risk

  12. Dopamine, reward learning, and active inference

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, Thomas H. B.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Friston, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Temporal difference learning models propose phasic dopamine signaling encodes reward prediction errors that drive learning. This is supported by studies where optogenetic stimulation of dopamine neurons can stand in lieu of actual reward. Nevertheless, a large body of data also shows that dopamine is not necessary for learning, and that dopamine depletion primarily affects task performance. We offer a resolution to this paradox based on an hypothesis that dopamine encodes the precision of beliefs about alternative actions, and thus controls the outcome-sensitivity of behavior. We extend an active inference scheme for solving Markov decision processes to include learning, and show that simulated dopamine dynamics strongly resemble those actually observed during instrumental conditioning. Furthermore, simulated dopamine depletion impairs performance but spares learning, while simulated excitation of dopamine neurons drives reward learning, through aberrant inference about outcome states. Our formal approach provides a novel and parsimonious reconciliation of apparently divergent experimental findings. PMID:26581305

  13. Dopamine regulates body size in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Takashi; Oami, Eitaro; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Ishiura, Shoichi; Suo, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    The nervous system plays a critical role in the regulation of animal body sizes. In Caenorhabditis elegans, an amine neurotransmitter, dopamine, is required for the tactile perception of food and food-dependent behavioral changes, while its role in development is unknown. In this study, we show that dopamine negatively regulates body size through a D2-like dopamine receptor, DOP-3, in C. elegans. Dopamine alters body size without affecting food intake or developmental rate. We also found that dopamine promotes egg-laying, although the regulation of body size by dopamine was not solely caused by this effect. Furthermore, dopamine negatively regulates body size through the suppression of signaling by octopamine and Gq-coupled octopamine receptors, SER-3 and SER-6. Our results demonstrate that dopamine and octopamine regulate the body size of C. elegans and suggest a potential role for perception in addition to ingestion of food for growth. PMID:26921458

  14. Missense dopamine transporter mutations associate with adult parkinsonism and ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Freja H.; Skjørringe, Tina; Yasmeen, Saiqa; Arends, Natascha V.; Sahai, Michelle A.; Erreger, Kevin; Andreassen, Thorvald F.; Holy, Marion; Hamilton, Peter J.; Neergheen, Viruna; Karlsborg, Merete; Newman, Amy H.; Pope, Simon; Heales, Simon J.R.; Friberg, Lars; Law, Ian; Pinborg, Lars H.; Sitte, Harald H.; Loland, Claus; Shi, Lei; Weinstein, Harel; Galli, Aurelio; Hjermind, Lena E.; Møller, Lisbeth B.; Gether, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    Parkinsonism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are widespread brain disorders that involve disturbances of dopaminergic signaling. The sodium-coupled dopamine transporter (DAT) controls dopamine homeostasis, but its contribution to disease remains poorly understood. Here, we analyzed a cohort of patients with atypical movement disorder and identified 2 DAT coding variants, DAT-Ile312Phe and a presumed de novo mutant DAT-Asp421Asn, in an adult male with early-onset parkinsonism and ADHD. According to DAT single-photon emission computed tomography (DAT-SPECT) scans and a fluoro-deoxy-glucose-PET/MRI (FDG-PET/MRI) scan, the patient suffered from progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration. In heterologous cells, both DAT variants exhibited markedly reduced dopamine uptake capacity but preserved membrane targeting, consistent with impaired catalytic activity. Computational simulations and uptake experiments suggested that the disrupted function of the DAT-Asp421Asn mutant is the result of compromised sodium binding, in agreement with Asp421 coordinating sodium at the second sodium site. For DAT-Asp421Asn, substrate efflux experiments revealed a constitutive, anomalous efflux of dopamine, and electrophysiological analyses identified a large cation leak that might further perturb dopaminergic neurotransmission. Our results link specific DAT missense mutations to neurodegenerative early-onset parkinsonism. Moreover, the neuropsychiatric comorbidity provides additional support for the idea that DAT missense mutations are an ADHD risk factor and suggests that complex DAT genotype and phenotype correlations contribute to different dopaminergic pathologies. PMID:24911152

  15. Cost-effectiveness of anti-oxidant vitamins plus zinc treatment to prevent the progression of intermediate age-related macular degeneration. A Singapore perspective

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Nakul; George, Pradeep Paul; Heng, Bee Hoon; Lim, Tock Han; Yong, Shao Onn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if providing high dose anti-oxidant vitamins and zinc treatment age-related eye disease study (AREDS formulation) to patients with intermediate age-related macular degeneration (AMD) aged 40–79 years from Singapore is cost-effective in preventing progression to wet AMD. Methods: A hypothetical cohort of category 3 and 4 AMD patients from Singapore was followed for 5 calendar years to determine the number of patients who would progress to wet AMD given the following treatment scenarios: (a) AREDS formulation or placebo followed by ranibizumab (as needed) for wet AMD. (b) AREDS formulation or placebo followed by bevacizumab (monthly) for wet AMD. (c) AREDS formulation or placebo followed by aflibercept (VIEW I and II trial treatment regimen). Costs were estimated for the above scenarios from the providers’ perspective, and cost-effectiveness was measured by cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) averted with a disability weight of 0.22 for wet AMD. The costs were discounted at an annual rate of 3%. Results: Over 5400 patients could be prevented from progressing to wet AMD cumulatively if AREDS formulation were prescribed. AREDS formulation followed by ranibizumab was cost-effective compared to placebo-ranibizumab or placebo-aflibercept combinations (cost per DALY averted: SGD$23,662.3 and SGD$21,138.8, respectively). However, bevacizumab (monthly injections) alone was more cost-effective compared to AREDS formulation followed by bevacizumab. Conclusion: Prophylactic treatment with AREDS formulation for intermediate AMD patients followed by ranibizumab or for patients who progressed to wet AMD was found to be cost-effective. These findings have implications for intermediate AMD screening, treatment and healthcare planning in Singapore. PMID:26265643

  16. Can metronomic maintenance with weekly vinblastine prevent early relapse/progression after bevacizumab-irinotecan in children with low-grade glioma?

    PubMed

    Heng, Marie Amélie; Padovani, Laetitia; Dory-Lautrec, Philippe; Gentet, Jean Claude; Verschuur, Arnaud; Pasquier, Eddy; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Scavarda, Didier; André, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    The association of bevacizumab and irinotecan has been shown to display a quick efficacy in low-grade glioma (LGG), but most patients relapse within months after cessation of therapy. From October 2012 to March 2014, four patients have been treated with irinotecan-bevacizumab followed by a metronomic maintenance with weekly vinblastine to try to prevent relapses. After a median follow-up of 23 months after the end of the bevacizumab-irinotecan induction, no patient relapsed. These observations suggest that maintenance chemotherapy with weekly vinblastine after an induction by irinotecan-bevacizumab can improve progression-free survival in children with LGG. PMID:27037940

  17. Drugs of abuse, dopamine, and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders/HIV-associated dementia.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Vishnudutt; Rapaka, Rao; Shurtleff, David

    2011-08-01

    Although the incidence of HIV-associated dementia (HAD) has declined, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remain a significant health problem despite use of highly active antiretroviral therapy. In addition, the incidence and/or severity of HAND/HAD are increased with concomitant use of drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, marijuana, and methamphetamine. Furthermore, exposure to most drugs of abuse increases brain levels of dopamine, which has been implicated in the pathogenesis of HIV. This review evaluates the potential role of dopamine in the potentiation of HAND/HAD by drugs of abuse. In the brain, multiplication of HIV in infected macrophages/microglia could result in the release of HIV proteins such as gp120 and Tat, which can bind to and impair dopamine transporter (DAT) functions, leading to elevated levels of dopamine in the dopaminergic synapses in the early asymptomatic stage of HIV infection. Exposure of HIV-infected patients to drugs of abuse, especially cocaine and methamphetamine, can further increase synaptic levels of dopamine via binding to and subsequently impairing the function of DAT. This accumulated synaptic dopamine can diffuse out and activate adjacent microglia through binding to dopamine receptors. The activation of microglia may result in increased HIV replication as well as increased production of inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and chemokines. Increased HIV replication can lead to increased brain viral load and increased shedding of HIV proteins, gp120 and Tat. These proteins, as well as TNF-alpha, can induce cell death of adjacent dopaminergic neurons via apoptosis. Autoxidation and metabolism of accumulated synaptic dopamine can lead to generation of reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide), quinones, and semiquinones, which can also induce apoptosis of neurons. Increased cell death of dopaminergic neurons can eventually lead to dopamine deficit that may exacerbate the severity and

  18. [Impact of sleep deprivation on coronary heart disease and progress in prevention and treatment with traditional Chinese medicines].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Rong; Wang, Jie; Guo, Li-li

    2015-05-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) has been taken as an independent predictor for cardiovascular risks, which was closely related to the increased morbidity and mortality in coronary heart disease (CHD). In this article, after reviewing the impact of modern medical method sleep deprivation on CHD and studies on principle method recipe medicines for preventing and treating CHD, the authors observed the autonomic nerve dysfunction, hormonal metabolism dysfunction, endothelial dysfunction and inflammatory responses after sleep deprivation, which can cause or aggravate CHD. On the basis of the traditional Chinese medicine theories of "heart dominating the blood and vessels and the mind", the authors considered that traditional Chinese medicines can tonify heart and soothe the nerves, reducing all of the risk factors through multi-target and multi-pathway, and improve sleep and decrease the risk factors caused by sleep deprivation, which provides a new idea for the prevention and treatment of CHD. PMID:26323126

  19. DOPAMINE DEPLETION SLOWS RETINAL TRANSMISSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In male hooded rats, depletion of norepinephrine and dopamine by a-methyl-paratyrosine (AMT) significantly increased the latencies of early peaks in flash-evoked potentials recorded from the visual cortex, lateral geniculate nucleus, and optic tract. These effects were not produc...

  20. Psychostimulants affect dopamine transmission through both dopamine transporter-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    dela Peña, Ike; Gevorkiana, Ruzanna; Shi, Wei-Xing

    2015-10-01

    The precise mechanisms by which cocaine and amphetamine-like psychostimulants exert their reinforcing effects are not yet fully defined. It is widely believed, however, that these drugs produce their effects by enhancing dopamine neurotransmission in the brain, especially in limbic areas such as the nucleus accumbens, by inducing dopamine transporter-mediated reverse transport and/or blocking dopamine reuptake though the dopamine transporter. Here, we present the evidence that aside from dopamine transporter, non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanisms also participate in psychostimulant-induced dopamine release and contribute to the behavioral effects of these drugs, such as locomotor activation and reward. Accordingly, psychostimulants could increase norepinephrine release in the prefrontal cortex, the latter then alters the firing pattern of dopamine neurons resulting in changes in action potential-dependent dopamine release. These alterations would further affect the temporal pattern of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, thereby modifying information processing in that area. Hence, a synaptic input to a nucleus accumbens neuron may be enhanced or inhibited by dopamine depending on its temporal relationship to dopamine release. Specific temporal patterns of dopamine release may also be required for certain forms of synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens. Together, these effects induced by psychostimulants, mediated through a non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanism involving norepinephrine and the prefrontal cortex, may also contribute importantly to the reinforcing properties of these drugs. PMID:26209364

  1. Rare sugar d-psicose prevents progression and development of diabetes in T2DM model Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Akram; Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Hirose, Kayoko; Matsunaga, Toru; Sui, Li; Hirata, Yuko; Noguchi, Chisato; Katagi, Ayako; Kamitori, Kazuyo; Dong, Youyi; Tsukamoto, Ikuko; Tokuda, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Background The fundamental cause of overweight and obesity is consumption of calorie-dense foods. We have introduced a zero-calorie sweet sugar, d-psicose (d-allulose), a rare sugar that has been proven to have strong antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic effects, and could be used as a replacement of natural sugar for the obese and diabetic subjects. Aim Above mentioned efficacy of d-psicose (d-allulose) has been confirmed in our previous studies on type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) model Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats with short-term treatment. In this study we investigated the long-term effect of d-psicose in preventing the commencement and progression of T2DM with the mechanism of preservation of pancreatic β-cells in OLETF rats. Methods Treated OLETF rats were fed 5% d-psicose dissolved in water and control rats only water. Nondiabetic control rats, Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO), were taken as healthy control and fed water. To follow the progression of diabetes, periodic measurements of blood glucose, plasma insulin, and body weight changes were continued till sacrifice at 60 weeks. Periodic in vivo body fat mass was measured. On sacrifice, pancreas, liver, and abdominal adipose tissues were collected for various staining tests. Results d-Psicose prevented the commencement and progression of T2DM till 60 weeks through the maintenance of blood glucose levels, decrease in body weight gain, and the control of postprandial hyperglycemia, with decreased levels of HbA1c in comparison to nontreated control rats. This improvement in glycemic control was accompanied by the maintenance of plasma insulin levels and the preservation of pancreatic β-cells with the significant reduction in inflammatory markers. Body fat accumulation was significantly lower in the treatment group, with decreased infiltration of macrophages in the abdominal adipose tissue. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the rare sugar d-psicose could be beneficial for the

  2. Serotonin 2B receptor slows disease progression and prevents degeneration of spinal cord mononuclear phagocytes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    El Oussini, Hajer; Bayer, Hanna; Scekic-Zahirovic, Jelena; Vercruysse, Pauline; Sinniger, Jérôme; Dirrig-Grosch, Sylvie; Dieterlé, Stéphane; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Larmet, Yves; Müller, Kathrin; Weishaupt, Jochen H; Thal, Dietmar R; van Rheenen, Wouter; van Eijk, Kristel; Lawson, Roland; Monassier, Laurent; Maroteaux, Luc; Roumier, Anne; Wong, Philip C; van den Berg, Leonard H; Ludolph, Albert C; Veldink, Jan H; Witting, Anke; Dupuis, Luc

    2016-03-01

    Microglia are the resident mononuclear phagocytes of the central nervous system and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). During neurodegeneration, microglial activation is accompanied by infiltration of circulating monocytes, leading to production of multiple inflammatory mediators in the spinal cord. Degenerative alterations in mononuclear phagocytes are commonly observed during neurodegenerative diseases, yet little is known concerning the mechanisms leading to their degeneration, or the consequences on disease progression. Here we observed that the serotonin 2B receptor (5-HT2B), a serotonin receptor expressed in microglia, is upregulated in the spinal cord of three different transgenic mouse models of ALS. In mutant SOD1 mice, this upregulation was restricted to cells positive for CD11b, a marker of mononuclear phagocytes. Ablation of 5-HT2B receptor in transgenic ALS mice expressing mutant SOD1 resulted in increased degeneration of mononuclear phagocytes, as evidenced by fragmentation of Iba1-positive cellular processes. This was accompanied by decreased expression of key neuroinflammatory genes but also loss of expression of homeostatic microglial genes. Importantly, the dramatic effect of 5-HT2B receptor ablation on mononuclear phagocytes was associated with acceleration of disease progression. To determine the translational relevance of these results, we studied polymorphisms in the human HTR2B gene, which encodes the 5-HT2B receptor, in a large cohort of ALS patients. In this cohort, the C allele of SNP rs10199752 in HTR2B was associated with longer survival. Moreover, patients carrying one copy of the C allele of SNP rs10199752 showed increased 5-HT2B mRNA in spinal cord and displayed less pronounced degeneration of Iba1 positive cells than patients carrying two copies of the more common A allele. Thus, the 5-HT2B receptor limits degeneration of spinal cord mononuclear

  3. Recurrence of cervical spine instability in rheumatoid arthritis following previous fusion: can disease progression be prevented by early surgery?

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A K; Peppelman, W C; Kraus, D R; Pollock, B H; Stolzer, B L; Eisenbeis, C H; Donaldson, W F

    1992-09-01

    In a retrospective study, 110 patients with rheumatoid arthritis who had cervical spine fusion were evaluated for recurrence of cervical spine instability and resultant need for further surgery. Recurrence of cervical instability was correlated with initial radiographic abnormality, primary surgical procedure and interval between the 2 surgeries. There were 55 patients who had atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS) and required C1-C2 fusion as primary surgery. Three of these patients (5.5%) developed subaxial subluxation (SAS) and had a second procedure after a mean interval of 9 years. Twenty-two patients had AAS with superior migration of the odontoid (AAS-SMO) and had initial surgery of occiput-C3 fusion. Eight of these patients (36%) developed SAS and had a second surgery after a mean interval of 2.6 years. Of the 19 patients with primary radiographic deformity of SAS, one required further surgery for subluxation of an adjacent superior vertebra after a period of 6 years. Fourteen patients had combined deformity of AAS-SMO-SAS, and one required further surgery for SAS after an interval of 22 months. Recurrence of cervical instability following a previous fusion occurred in 15% of these 110 patients. It was seen in 5.5% of patients with initial deformity of AAS vs 36% of patients with AAS-SMO. No patients with C1-C2 fusion for AAS progressed to develop superior migration of the odontoid. We conclude that early C1-C2 fusion for AAS before development of SMO decreases the risk of further progression of cervical spine instability. The pattern of progression of cervical spine involvement, as discussed in the literature, is reviewed. PMID:1433002

  4. PEPFAR's evolving HIV prevention approaches for key populations--people who inject drugs, men who have sex with men, and sex workers: progress, challenges, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Needle, Richard; Fu, Joe; Beyrer, Chris; Loo, Virginia; Abdul-Quader, Abu S; McIntyre, James A; Li, Zhijun; Mbwambo, Jessie K K; Muthui, Mercy; Pick, Billy

    2012-08-15

    In most countries, the burden of HIV among people who inject drugs, men who have sex with men, and sex workers is disproportionately high compared with that in the general population. Meanwhile, coverage rates of effective interventions among those key populations (KPs) are extremely low, despite a strong evidence base about the effectiveness of currently available interventions. In its first decade, President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) is making progress in responding to HIV/AIDS, its risk factors, and the needs of KPs. Recent surveillance, surveys, and size estimation activities are helping PEPFAR country programs better estimate the HIV disease burden, understand risk behavior trends, and determine coverage and resources required for appropriate scale-up of services for KPs. To expand country planning of programs to further reduce HIV burden and increase coverage among KPs, PEPFAR has developed a strategy consisting of technical documents on the prevention of HIV among people who inject drugs (July 2010) and prevention of HIV among men who have sex with men (May 2011), linked with regional meetings and assistance visits to guide the adoption and scale-up of comprehensive packages of evidence-based prevention services for KPs. The implementation and scaling up of available and targeted interventions adapted for KPs are important steps in gaining better control over the spread and impact of HIV/AIDS among these populations. PMID:22797736

  5. Increased brain dopamine and dopamine receptors in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Mackay, A.V.; Iversen, L.L.; Rossor, M.; Spokes, E.; Bird, E.; Arregui, A.; Creese, I.; Synder, S.H.

    1982-09-01

    In postmortem samples of caudate nucleus and nucleus accumbens from 48 schizophrenic patients, there were significant increases in both the maximum number of binding sites (Bmax) and the apparent dissociation constant (KD) for tritiated spiperone. The increase in apparent KD probably reflects the presence of residual neuroleptic drugs, but changes in Bmax for tritiated spiperone reflect genuine changes in receptor numbers. The increases in receptors were seen only in patients in whom neuroleptic medication had been maintained until the time of death, indicating that they may be entirely iatrogenic. Dopamine measurements for a larger series of schizophrenic and control cases (n greater than 60) show significantly increased concentrations in both the nucleus accumbens and caudate nucleus. The changes in dopamine were not obviously related to neuroleptic medication and, unlike the receptor changes, were most severe in younger patients.

  6. Calpastatin overexpression prevents progression of S-1,2-dichlorovinyl-L-cysteine (DCVC)-initiated acute renal injury and renal failure (ARF) in diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Dnyanmote, Ankur V.; Sawant, Sharmilee P.; Lock, Edward A.; Latendresse, John R.; Warbritton, Alan A.; Mehendale, Harihara M. . E-mail: mehendale@ulm.edu

    2006-09-01

    Previously we have shown that 90% of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type-1 diabetic (DB) mice survive from acute renal failure (ARF) and death induced by a normally LD{sub 9} dose (75 mg/kg, i.p.) of the nephrotoxicant S-1,2-dichlorovinyl-L-cysteine (DCVC). This remarkable protection is due to a combination of slower progression of DCVC-initiated renal injury and increased compensatory nephrogenic tissue repair in the DB kidneys. BRDU immunohistochemistry revealed that the DB condition led to 4-fold higher number of proximal tubular cells (PTC) entering S-phase of cell cycle. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that DB-induced augmentation of PTC into S-phase is accompanied by overexpression of the calpain-inhibitor calpastatin, which endogenously prevents the progression of DCVC-initiated renal injury mediated by the calpain escaping out of damaged PTCs. Immunohistochemical detection of renal calpain and its activity in the urine, over a time course after treatment with the LD{sub 9} dose of DCVC, indicated progressive increase in leakage of calpain into the extracellular spaces of the injured PTCs of the non-diabetic (NDB) kidneys as compared to the DB kidneys. Calpastatin expression was minimally detected in the NDB kidneys, using immunohistochemistry, over the time course. On the other hand, consistently higher number of tubules in the DB kidney showed calpastatin expression over the time course. The lower leakage of calpain in the DB kidneys was commensurate with constitutively higher expression of calpastatin in the S-phase-laden PTCs of these mice. To test the protective role of newly divided/dividing PTCs, DB mice were given the anti-mitotic agent colchicine (CLC) (2 mg/kg and 1.5 mg/kg, i.p., on days 8 and 10 after STZ injection) prior to challenge with a LD{sub 9} dose of DCVC, which led to 100% mortality by 48 h. Mortality was due to rapid progression of DCVC-initiated renal injury, suggesting that newly divided/dividing cells are instrumental

  7. mTORC1/2 targeted by n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the prevention of mammary tumorigenesis and tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Zhang, Y; Jia, C; Wang, Y; Lai, P; Zhou, X; Wang, Y; Song, Q; Lin, Jun; Ren, Z; Gao, Q; Zhao, Z; Zheng, H; Wan, Z; Gao, T; Zhao, A; Dai, Y; Bai, X

    2014-09-11

    Although epidemiological and preclinical studies have shown the preventative effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on breast cancer, inconsistencies still remain in the data and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we identified mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, which plays an essential role in cell proliferation and breast tumorigenesis, as a target of n-3 PUFAs. In breast cancer cell lines, n-3 PUFAs rapidly and efficiently suppress both mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2 and their downstream signaling, and subsequently inhibit cell proliferation and angiogenesis while promoting apoptosis. Further study indicates that stabilization of the mTOR-raptor complex by n-3 PUFAs may contribute to their inhibitory effect on mTORC1. Importantly, four complementary and well-controlled animal models were utilized to identify the role and molecular target of n-3 PUFAs in the prevention of breast carcinogenesis and progression, namely: (1) chemically induced mammary tumor rats with a high dietary intake of n-3 PUFAs; (2) nude mice implanted with mammary tumor cell lines stably expressing fat-1, a desaturase that catalyzes the conversion of n-6 to n-3 PUFAs and produces n-3 PUFAs endogenously; (3) fat-1 transgenic severe combined immune deficiency mice implanted with breast tumor cells; and (4) the fat-1 transgenic mouse mammary tumor virus-polyoma virus middle T oncogene double-hybrid mice, a model of aggressive breast cancer. In summary, dietary and endogenous n-3 PUFAs abrogate the activity of mTORC1/2 pathways in vitro and in vivo and prevent breast carcinogenesis, tumor growth and metastasis. Taken together, our findings convincingly clarify the causal relationship between n-3 PUFAs and breast cancer prevention and establish mTORC1/2 as a target of n-3 PUFAs. PMID:24096482

  8. The role of statins in preventing the progression of congestive heart failure in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Giovanni; Amoroso, Gisella Rita; Barbaro, Giuseppe; Novo, Giuseppina; Novo, Salvatore

    2008-01-01

    Heart Failure (CHF) is a very important public health problem in the world and certainly one of the most common debilitating diseases and cause of mortality. Current knowledge underlines that incidence rates are also influenced by the coexisting pathologic conditions that accelerate the development of disease or increase its severity. Important scientific evidence is emerging to demonstrate a strong correlation between HF and the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Hypolipemia-inducing medication offers the opportunity to discuss the possible existence of pharmacological substances that in addition to their specific targets have several demonstrated pleiotropic effects that could be beneficial in HF. Although several trials investigated statins treatment effects on HF in general, some evidence exists about the role that these drugs can have in the progression of the disease in the specific category of HF patients affected by MetS. In this review the possible positive effects of the statins treatment in this specific subset of patients are discussed. PMID:18991677

  9. "Is dopamine involved in Alzheimer's disease?".

    PubMed

    Martorana, Alessandro; Koch, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive decline and dementia. Recent advances indicate that AD pathogenesis appears more complex than its mere neuropathology. Changes in synaptic plasticity, neuronal disarray and cell death are pathways commonly recognized as pathogenic mechanisms of AD. It is thought that the altered metabolism of certain membrane proteins may lead to the production of amyloid (Aβ) oligomers that are characterized by an highly toxic effect on neurotransmission pathways, such as those mediated by Acetylcholine. The interaction of Aβ oligomers with these neurotansmitters systems would in turn induce cell dysfunction, neurotransmitters signaling imbalance and finally lead to the appearance of neurological signs. In this perspective, it is still debated how and if these mechanisms may also engage the dopaminergic system in AD. Recent experimental work revealed that the dopaminergic system may well be involved in the occurrence of cognitive decline, often being predictive of rapidly progressive forms of AD. However, a clear idea on the role of the dopamine system in AD is still missing. Here we review the more recent evidences supporting the notion that the dopaminergic dysfunction has a pathogenic role in cognitive decline symptoms of AD. PMID:25309431

  10. Recent progress in defining mechanisms and potential targets for prevention of normal tissue injury after radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Anscher, Mitchell S. . E-mail: anscher@radonc.duke.edu; Chen, Liguang; Rabbani, Zahid; Kang Song; Larrier, Nicole; Huang Hong; Samulski, Thaddeus V.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Brizel, David M.; Folz, Rodney J.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2005-05-01

    The ability to optimize treatments for cancer on the basis of relative risks for normal tissue injury has important implications in oncology, because higher doses of radiation might, in some diseases, improve both local control and survival. To achieve this goal, a thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for radiation-induced toxicity will be essential. Recent research has demonstrated that ionizing radiation triggers a series of genetic and molecular events, which might lead to chronic persistent alterations in the microenvironment and an aberrant wound-healing response. Disrupted epithelial-stromal cell communication might also be important. With the application of a better understanding of fundamental biology to clinical practice, new approaches to treating and preventing normal tissue injury can focus on correcting these disturbed molecular processes.

  11. [Injuries: preventive approach and progress of injuries in the construction of the line B1 of the underground of Rome].

    PubMed

    Saggio, G; Conti, E; Valentini, F; De Sio, L; Capano, M Perrone

    2010-01-01

    The line B1 is a branch of the existing Metro line B in Rome. The route is long about 5 km, is completely underground and involves the construction of four new stations: Annibaliano, Libia /Gondar, Conca d'Oro and Jonio. The line will have a capacity of transport of 24,000 people/hour in each direction. The works started in 2006 involve about 500 workers. The report provides a statistical analysis of the events that occurred in the period 2005/2010 and aims to introduce the starting and management of this study, also on the basis of the "Operating procedures" issued by the acquisition of OSHAS 18001 certification from the agent of Metro B) / R.I.M.A.T.I. This analysis aims to provide to supervisors, to social security institutions and to workers, a usefull analysis tool in the prevention of the monitored events. PMID:21438207

  12. Progress toward production of immunologic tolerance with no or minimal toxic immunosuppression for prevention of immunodeficiency and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Good, R A

    2000-07-01

    With donor and recipient matched at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, peripheral lymphoid tissue transplantation can be carried out without producing a graft-versus-host reaction or graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), thus correcting profound T cell immunodeficiencies of neonatally thymectomized mice. This analysis set the stage for clinical application of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) to provide for the first time cure of a human disease. With successful BMT, we cured immunologic deficiencies of a patient with XL severe combined immunodeficiency; thereafter we were the first to employ BMT to cure aplastic anemia. BMT regularly corrects immune and hematologic deficiencies caused by fatal irradiation without producing GVHD if the bone marrow (BM) used for the transplants has been purged of postthymic T cells. Over two decades in conjunction with Ikehara et al., we have shown that lethal total body irradiation (TBI) plus allogeneic BMT prevents or cures many organ-specific and systemic experimental autoimmune diseases. Animal models successfully treated by BMT include type I diabetes in nonobese diabetes (NOD) mice, type II diabetes in insulin-insensitive, glucose intolerant, diabetes mellitus (KK/Ay) mice, and autoimmune lupus erythematosus (LE) and glomerulonephritis in New Zealand Black x New Zealand White first generation hybrid (NZB x NZW)F1 females. El-Badri extended Ildstad's original research showing a high frequency of survival with a normal functioning immune system after stable mixed chimerism is produced by mixed BMT in C57BL/6 (normal long-lived black strain) mice transplanted with T cell-depleted marrow (TCDM) from BALB/c ("normal" long-lived strain) allogeneic donors and C57BL/6 syngeneic donors. We showed that osteoblasts act as facilitator cells for allogeneic BMT and promote engraftment of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells. Wang et al. then showed that the autoimmunities and fulminating renal disease of BXSB (C57BL x SB cross and

  13. Oral Resveratrol Prevents Osteoarthritis Progression in C57BL/6J Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hailun; Li, Keyu; Li, Xingyao; Yu, Xiaolu; Wang, Wei; Ding, Lifeng; Liu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The effects of resveratrol on osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis have been demonstrated in vitro and in animal models employing intra-articular injections. However, the potential for oral resveratrol supplements to mediate protective effects on OA have not been examined. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the potential anti-OA effects of oral resveratrol on mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). C57BL/6J male mice were fed either a standard diet or a HFD, and a subset of the latter also received varying doses of resveratrol. Twelve weeks later, all of the animals were sacrificed and knee joints were evaluated with histological, immunohistochemical, and TUNEL analyses. Mice that received a HFD had significantly greater body weights than the control mice and also exhibited features consistent with knee OA. The mice that received a HFD in combination with low, intermediate, or high doses of resveratrol were only slightly heavier than the control mice at the end of 12 weeks. Quantitative histological assessments indicated that resveratrol treatment partly recovered joint structure in the mice that received a HFD, while high doses of resveratrol prevented the degradation of type II collagen into C-telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II) and retained type II collagen expression in cartilage. Furthermore, TUNEL analyses revealed a reduction in chondrocyte apoptosis in the resveratrol-treated mice compared with the HFD mice. Thus, oral resveratrol appears to exert anti-OA effects in a mouse model of HFD-induced OA, thereby highlighting the potential preventive and therapeutic value of administering resveratrol for obesity-associated OA. PMID:27104565

  14. Oral Resveratrol Prevents Osteoarthritis Progression in C57BL/6J Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hailun; Li, Keyu; Li, Xingyao; Yu, Xiaolu; Wang, Wei; Ding, Lifeng; Liu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The effects of resveratrol on osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis have been demonstrated in vitro and in animal models employing intra-articular injections. However, the potential for oral resveratrol supplements to mediate protective effects on OA have not been examined. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the potential anti-OA effects of oral resveratrol on mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). C57BL/6J male mice were fed either a standard diet or a HFD, and a subset of the latter also received varying doses of resveratrol. Twelve weeks later, all of the animals were sacrificed and knee joints were evaluated with histological, immunohistochemical, and TUNEL analyses. Mice that received a HFD had significantly greater body weights than the control mice and also exhibited features consistent with knee OA. The mice that received a HFD in combination with low, intermediate, or high doses of resveratrol were only slightly heavier than the control mice at the end of 12 weeks. Quantitative histological assessments indicated that resveratrol treatment partly recovered joint structure in the mice that received a HFD, while high doses of resveratrol prevented the degradation of type II collagen into C-telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II) and retained type II collagen expression in cartilage. Furthermore, TUNEL analyses revealed a reduction in chondrocyte apoptosis in the resveratrol-treated mice compared with the HFD mice. Thus, oral resveratrol appears to exert anti-OA effects in a mouse model of HFD-induced OA, thereby highlighting the potential preventive and therapeutic value of administering resveratrol for obesity-associated OA. PMID:27104565

  15. Dopamine neurons control striatal cholinergic neurons via regionally heterogeneous dopamine and glutamate signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chuhma, Nao; Mingote, Susana; Moore, Holly; Rayport, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Summary Midbrain dopamine neurons fire in bursts conveying salient information. Bursts are associated with pauses in tonic firing of striatal cholinergic interneurons. While the reciprocal balance of dopamine and acetylcholine in the striatum is well known, how dopamine neurons control cholinergic neurons has not been elucidated. Here we show that dopamine neurons make direct fast dopaminergic and glutamatergic connections with cholinergic interneurons, with regional heterogeneity. Dopamine neurons drive a burst-pause firing sequence in cholinergic interneurons in the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens, mixed actions in the accumbens core, and a pause in the dorsal striatum. This heterogeneity is due mainly to regional variation in dopamine-neuron glutamate cotransmission. A single dose of amphetamine attenuates dopamine neuron connections to cholinergic interneurons with dose-dependent regional specificity. Overall, the present data indicate that dopamine neurons control striatal circuit function via discrete, plastic connections with cholinergic interneurons. PMID:24559678

  16. Dissociable effects of dopamine on learning and performance within sensorimotor striatum.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Daniel K; Stoetzner, Colin; Abraham, Rohit; Pettibone, Jeff; DeMarco, Kayla; Berke, Joshua D

    2014-06-01

    Striatal dopamine is an important modulator of current behavior, as seen in the rapid and dramatic effects of dopamine replacement therapy in Parkinson Disease (PD). Yet there is also extensive evidence that dopamine acts as a learning signal, modulating synaptic plasticity within striatum to affect future behavior. Disentangling these "performance" and "learning" functions is important for designing effective, long-term PD treatments. We conducted a series of unilateral drug manipulations and dopamine terminal lesions in the dorsolateral striatum of rats highly-trained to perform brief instructed head/neck movements (two-alternative forced choice task). Reaction times and accuracy were measured longitudinally to determine if task behavior changed immediately, progressed over time, and/or persisted after drug withdrawal. Enhanced dopamine signaling with amphetamine caused an immediate, nonprogressive, and bilateral decrease in reaction times (RT). The altered RT distributions were consistent with reduced distance to threshold in the linear approach to threshold with ergodic rate (LATER) model of decision-making. Conversely, the dopamine antagonist flupenthixol caused experience-dependent, persistent changes in RT and accuracy indicative of a "learning" effect. These RT distributions were consistent with a slowed rate of approach to decision threshold. Our results show that dopaminergic signaling makes dissociable contributions to current and future behavior even within a single striatal subregion, and provide important clues for both models of normal decision-making and the design of novel drug therapies in PD. PMID:24949283

  17. PRESYNAPTIC DOPAMINE MODULATION BY STIMULANT SELF ADMINISTRATION

    PubMed Central

    España, Rodrigo A.; Jones, Sara R.

    2013-01-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine system is an essential participant in the initiation and modulation of various forms of goal-directed behavior, including drug reinforcement and addiction processes. Dopamine neurotransmission is increased by acute administration of all drugs of abuse, including the stimulants cocaine and amphetamine. Chronic exposure to these drugs via voluntary self-administration provides a model of stimulant abuse that is useful in evaluating potential behavioral and neurochemical adaptations that occur during addiction. This review describes commonly used methodologies to measure dopamine and baseline parameters of presynaptic dopamine regulation, including exocytotic release and reuptake through the dopamine transporter in the nucleus accumbens core, as well as dramatic adaptations in dopamine neurotransmission and drug sensitivity that occur with acute non-contingent and chronic, contingent self-administration of cocaine and amphetamine. PMID:23277050

  18. PHLPP is a Negative Regulator of RAF1 that Reduces Colorectal Cancer Cell Motility and Prevents Tumor Progression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Stevens, Payton D.; Liu, Jianyu; Yang, Haihua; Wang, Wei; Wang, Chi; Zeng, Zheng; Schmidt, Micheal D.; Yang, Mike; Lee, Eun Y.; Gao, Tianyan

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Hyperactivation of the RAS-RAF signaling pathway in colorectal tumors is associated with metastasis and poor outcomes of patients. Little is known about how RAS–RAF signaling is turned off once activated. We investigated how the pH domain and leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatases (PHLPPs) control RAS–RAF signaling and colorectal cancer (CRC) development. METHODS We used co-immunoprecipitation assays to identify substrates of PHLPP1 and PHLPP2.We studied phosphorylation of RAF1 in CRC cells that express transgenic PHLPP1 or PHLPP2, or lentiviral-based small hairpin (sh)RNAs against their transcripts; we measured effects on cell motility, migration, and invasion in vitro. Tumor progression and survival were analyzed in Phlpp1−/− mice, ApcMin mice, and ApcMin/Phlpp1−/− mice. Microarray data sets of colorectal tumor and non-tumor tissues were analyzed for PHLPP gene expression. RESULTS PHLPP1 and 2 were found to dephosphorylate RAF1 at S338, inhibiting its kinase activity in vitro and in CRC cells. In cells, shRNA knockdown of PHLPP1 or PHLPP2 increased the amplitude and duration of RAF-MEK-ERK signaling downstream of EGFR and KRAS, whereas overexpression had the opposite effect. Knockdown of PHLPP1 or PHLPP2 caused CRC cells to express markers of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and increased migration and invasion in vitro. ApcMin/Phlpp1−/− mice had decreased survival and developed larger intestinal and colon tumors than ApcMin mice, which developed mostly low-grade adenomas; in contrast, 20% of the tumors that developed in ApcMin/Phlpp1−/− mice were invasive adenocarcinomas. Normal villi and adenomas of ApcMin/Phlpp1−/− mice had significantly fewer apoptotic cells than ApcMin mice. Human CRC patient microarray data revealed that the expression of PHLPP1 or PHLPP2 is positively correlated with CDH1. CONCLUSIONS PHLPP1 and 2 dephosphorylate RAF1 to reduce its signaling, increase the invasive and migratory

  19. On the pH-dependent quenching of quantum dot photoluminescence by redox active dopamine.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xin; Palui, Goutam; Avellini, Tommaso; Na, Hyon Bin; Yi, Chongyue; Knappenberger, Kenneth L; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the charge transfer interactions between luminescent quantum dots (QDs) and redox active dopamine. For this, we used pH-insensitive ZnS-overcoated CdSe QDs rendered water-compatible using poly (ethylene glycol)-appended dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA-PEG), where a fraction of the ligands was amine-terminated to allow for controlled coupling of dopamine-isothiocyanate onto the nanocrystal. Using this sample configuration, we probed the effects of changing the density of dopamine and the buffer pH on the fluorescence properties of these conjugates. Using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence, we measured a pronounced pH-dependent photoluminescence (PL) quenching for all QD-dopamine assemblies. Several parameters affect the PL loss. First, the quenching efficiency strongly depends on the number of dopamines per QD-conjugate. Second, the quenching efficiency is substantially increased in alkaline buffers. Third, this pH-dependent PL loss can be completely eliminated when oxygen-depleted buffers are used, indicating that oxygen plays a crucial role in the redox activity of dopamine. We attribute these findings to charge transfer interactions between QDs and mainly two forms of dopamine: the reduced catechol and oxidized quinone. As the pH of the dispersions is changed from acidic to basic, oxygen-catalyzed transformation progressively reduces the dopamine potential for oxidation and shifts the equilibrium toward increased concentration of quinones. Thus, in a conjugate, a QD can simultaneously interact with quinones (electron acceptors) and catechols (electron donors), producing pH-dependent PL quenching combined with shortening of the exciton lifetime. This also alters the recombination kinetics of the electron and hole of photoexcited QDs. Transient absorption measurements that probed intraband transitions supported those findings where a simultaneous pronounced change in the electron and hole relaxation rates was measured when the pH was changed from

  20. Inhibition of TGF-β with neutralizing antibodies prevents radiation-induced acceleration of metastatic cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Swati; Guix, Marta; Rinehart, Cammie; Dugger, Teresa C.; Chytil, Anna; Moses, Harold L.; Freeman, Michael L.; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated whether TGF-β induced by anticancer therapies accelerates tumor progression. Using the MMTV/PyVmT transgenic model of metastatic breast cancer, we show that administration of ionizing radiation or doxorubicin caused increased circulating levels of TGF-β1 as well as increased circulating tumor cells and lung metastases. These effects were abrogated by administration of a neutralizing pan–TGF-β antibody. Circulating polyomavirus middle T antigen–expressing tumor cells did not grow ex vivo in the presence of the TGF-β antibody, suggesting autocrine TGF-β is a survival signal in these cells. Radiation failed to enhance lung metastases in mice bearing tumors that lack the type II TGF-β receptor, suggesting that the increase in metastases was due, at least in part, to a direct effect of TGF-β on the cancer cells. These data implicate TGF-β induced by anticancer therapy as a prometastatic signal in tumor cells and provide a rationale for the simultaneous use of these therapies in combination with TGF-β inhibitors. PMID:17415413

  1. Chenopodium album prevents progression of cell growth and enhances cell toxicity in human breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Khoobchandani, Menka; Ojeswi, BK; Sharma, Bhavna

    2009-01-01

    The present study is aimed to investigate the effects of Chenopodium album (leaves) on the growth of estrogen dependent (MCF-7) and estrogen independent (MDA-MB-468) human breast cancer cell lines. The different solvent extracts (petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and methanol) were assessed for their cytotoxicity using TBE (Trypan blue exclusion) and MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethyl thiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium] bioassay. These cells were cultured in MEM (minimum essential medium) medium and incubated with the dilution series of extracts (10–100 mg/ml) in CO2 incubator at 37°C for 24 h. Among the various extracts studied for two cell lines, methanolic extract of C. album (leaves) exhibited maximum antibreast cancer activity having IC50 (the concentration of an individual compound leading to 50% inhibition) value 27.31 mg/ml against MCF-7 cell line. Significant percent inhibition (94.06%) in the MeOH extract of C. album (leaves) at 48 h of exposure and concentration 100 mg/ml (p < 0.05) against MCF-7 breast cancer cell line, indicates the presence of some structural moiety responsible for this observed antiproliferative effect. In vivo study and structural elucidation of its bioactive principle are in progress. Our findings highlight the potential of this plant for its possible clinical use to counteract malignancy development as antibreast cancer bioagent. PMID:20592771

  2. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of ITK and RLK Impairs Th1 Differentiation and Prevents Colitis Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyoung-Soo; Shin, Hyun Mu; Haberstock-Debic, Helena; Xing, Yan; Owens, Timothy D.; Funk, Jens Oliver; Hill, Ronald J.; Bradshaw, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    In T cells, the Tec kinases IL-2–inducible T cell kinase (ITK) and resting lymphocyte kinase (RLK) are activated by TCR stimulation and are required for optimal downstream signaling. Studies of CD4+ T cells from Itk−/− and Itk−/−Rlk−/− mice have indicated differential roles of ITK and RLK in Th1, Th2, and Th17 differentiation and cytokine production. However, these findings are confounded by the complex T cell developmental defects in these mice. In this study, we examine the consequences of ITK and RLK inhibition using a highly selective and potent small molecule covalent inhibitor PRN694. In vitro Th polarization experiments indicate that PRN694 is a potent inhibitor of Th1 and Th17 differentiation and cytokine production. Using a T cell adoptive transfer model of colitis, we find that in vivo administration of PRN694 markedly reduces disease progression, T cell infiltration into the intestinal lamina propria, and IFN-γ production by colitogenic CD4+ T cells. Consistent with these findings, Th1 and Th17 cells differentiated in the presence of PRN694 show reduced P-selectin binding and impaired migration to CXCL11 and CCL20, respectively. Taken together, these data indicate that ITK plus RLK inhibition may have therapeutic potential in Th1-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:26466958

  3. How dietary patterns could have a role in prevention, progression, or management of diabetes mellitus? Review on the current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Maghsoudi, Zahra; Azadbakht, Leila

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of dietary patterns in prevention and management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: A systematic review of databases which were published in ISI, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases, PubMed, Iran Medex, and MagIran was performed. “Diabetes” and “dietary pattern” were used as the keywords. Results: A total of 58 studies which aimed to focus on diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, dietary pattern, and other related key words were reviewed. More than 47,447 articles were found and 46,709 entries of the extracted studies were excluded on the basis of the title and abstracts. The major dietary patterns were: “Healthy”, “Western”, “Traditional”, “Prudent”, “Unhealthy”, “Mediterranean”, “Modern”, and “Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension” (DASH) diets. Comparison of the effects of different diets revealed that dietary patterns containing fiber-rich foods have a protective role in managing diabetes mellitus. “Healthy”, “Mediterranean”, “Prudent”, and “DASH” dietary patterns were associated with lower risk of hyperglycemia. Conclusions: The adherence to the Mediterranean, Prudent, or DASH diets could control hyperglycemia. The higher intake of vegetables, fruits, nuts, whole grains, and lower intake of red meat could reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:23798934

  4. Preventing the infiltration of leukocytes by monoclonal antibody blocks the development of progressive ischemia in rat burns.

    PubMed

    Choi, M; Rabb, H; Arnaout, M A; Ehrlich, H P

    1995-10-01

    Tissue loss as a consequence of thermal trauma occurs in two stages. There is immediate necrosis in tissues directly killed by the thermal energy, followed by a delayed secondary necrosis in neighboring tissues. The infiltration of neutrophils into traumatized tissues is a hallmark of the inflammatory response. Neutrophils have the machinery to kill invading microorganisms, but these same weapons have the capacity to destroy the host's viable tissues as well. Leukocyte infiltration requires their adherence to the vascular endothelial cell surface. Masking these adhesion sites on neutrophils will block the adhesion of neutrophils to the endothelium. A monoclonal antibody (mAb) was developed to guinea pig leukocyte adhesion sites CD11b/ CD18, and this mAb cross-reacts with rat leukocytes, blocking their adherence. Rats received a "comb burn" composed of four rectangular full-thickness burns placed in a row and separated by three areas left unburned. The four individual burns convert into a single large wound because the blood flow to the interspaces was terminated, blood vessels were occluded, and leukocytes were present in the extravascular space. The systemic administration of the mAb (50 to 150 microliters) immediately following a comb burn promoted the survival of the interspace, demonstrated by the prevention of loss of blood flow by laser Doppler monitoring, maintained patent vessels by latex vascular casts, blocked extravascular migration of neutrophils histologically at 2 hours, and limited the tissue loss to the original four burns. PMID:7568496

  5. 1999 Annual Report on Waste Generation and Pollution Prevention Progress as Required by DOE Order 5400.1

    SciTech Connect

    SEGALL, P.

    2000-03-01

    Hanford's missions are to safely clean-up and manage the site's legacy wastes, and to develop and deploy science and technology. Through these missions Hanford will contribute to economic diversification of the region. Hanford's environmental management or clean-up mission is to protect the health and safety of the public, workers, and the environment; control hazardous materials; and utilize the assets (people, infrastructure, and site) for other missions. Hanford's science and technology mission is to develop and deploy science and technology in the service of the nation including stewardship of the Hanford Site. Pollution Prevention is a key to the success of these missions by reducing the amount of waste to be managed and identifying/implementing cost effective waste reduction projects. Hanford's original mission, the production of nuclear materials for the nation's defense programs, lasted more than 40 years, and like most manufacturing operations, Hanford's operations generated large quantities of waste and pollution. However, the by-products from Hanford operations pose unique problems like radiation hazards, vast volumes of contaminated water and soil, and many contaminated structures including reactors, chemical plants and evaporation ponds. The clean-up activity is an immense and challenging undertaking. Including characterization and decommissioning of 149 single shell storage tanks, treating 28 double shell tanks, safely disposing of over 2,100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel stored on site, removing numerous structures, and dealing with significant solid waste, ground water, and land restoration issues.

  6. Vaccine against MUC1 antigen expressed in inflammatory bowel disease and cancer lessens colonic inflammation and prevents progression to colitis associated colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Pamela L.; Narayanan, Sowmya; Gariépy, Jean; Ranganathan, Sarangarajan; Finn, Olivera J.

    2009-01-01

    Association of chronic inflammation with an increased risk of cancer is well established but the contributions of innate versus adaptive immunity are not fully delineated. There has furthermore been little consideration of the role played by chronic inflammation-associated antigens, including cancer antigens, and the possibility to use them as vaccines to lower the cancer risk. We studied the human tumor antigen MUC1 that is abnormally expressed in colon cancers and also in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that gives rise to colitis associated colon cancer (CACC). Using our new mouse model of MUC1+ IBD that progresses to CACC, IL-10−/− mice crossed with MUC1 transgenic mice, we show that vaccination against MUC1 delays IBD and prevents progression to CAAC. One mechanism is the induction of MUC1-specific adaptive immunity (anti-MUC1 IgG, anti-MUC1 CTL) that appears to eliminate abnormal MUC1+ cells in IBD colons. The other mechanism is the change in the local and the systemic microenvironments. Compared to IBD in vaccinated mice, IBD in control mice is dominated by larger numbers of neutrophils in the colon and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in the spleen, which can compromise adaptive immunity and facilitate tumor growth. This suggests that the tumor-promoting microenvironment of chronic inflammation can be converted to a tumor-inhibiting environment by increasing adaptive immunity against a disease-associated antigen. PMID:20332301

  7. Acceleration of the loss of the first-phase insulin response during the progression to type 1 diabetes in diabetes prevention trial-type 1 participants.

    PubMed

    Sosenko, Jay M; Skyler, Jay S; Beam, Craig A; Krischer, Jeffrey P; Greenbaum, Carla J; Mahon, Jeffrey; Rafkin, Lisa E; Matheson, Della; Herold, Kevan C; Palmer, Jerry P

    2013-12-01

    We studied the change in the first-phase insulin response (FPIR) during the progression to type 1 diabetes (T1D). Seventy-four oral insulin trial progressors to T1D from the Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 with at least one FPIR measurement after baseline and before diagnosis were studied. The FPIR was examined longitudinally in 26 progressors who had FPIR measurements during each of the 3 years before diagnosis. The association between the change from the baseline FPIR to the last FPIR and time to diagnosis was studied in the remainder (n = 48). The 74 progressors had lower baseline FPIR values than nonprogressors (n = 270), with adjustments made for age and BMI. In the longitudinal analysis of the 26 progressors, there was a greater decline in the FPIR from 1.5 to 0.5 years before diagnosis than from 2.5 to 1.5 years before diagnosis. This accelerated decline was also evident in a regression analysis of the 48 remaining progressors in whom the rate of decline became more marked with the approaching diagnosis. The patterns of decline were similar between the longitudinal and regression analyses. There is an acceleration of decline in the FPIR during the progression to T1D, which becomes especially marked between 1.5 and 0.5 years before diagnosis. PMID:23863814

  8. Rapid Recovery of Vesicular Dopamine Levels in Methamphetamine Users in Early Abstinence.

    PubMed

    Boileau, Isabelle; McCluskey, Tina; Tong, Junchao; Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Houle, Sylvain; Kish, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    We previously reported very low levels of dopamine in post-mortem striatum of chronic methamphetamine users, raising the possibility that restoration of normal dopamine levels could help in this addiction and perhaps prevent early relapse. To establish relevance of this finding to the living brain, we tested whether striatal [(11)C]-(+)-dihydrotetrabenazine binding, a vesicular monoamine transporter probe sensitive to changes in (stored) vesicular dopamine, is elevated in methamphetamine users. Chronic methamphetamine users underwent [(11)C]-(+)-dihydrotetrabenazine positron emission tomography scans during early (mean 2.6 days) and later (~10 days) abstinence. Striatal [(11)C]-(+)-dihydrotetrabenazine binding was elevated (suggesting low stored dopamine) in methamphetamine users (n=28; 2.6 days after last use) relative to controls (n=22) (+28%, p<0.0001) and correlated with severity and recency of drug use and with cognitive impairment and withdrawal symptoms. Mean [(11)C]-(+)-dihydrotetrabenazine binding levels in the subgroup of methamphetamine users who could remain abstinent ~10 days following last use (n=17) were normal at the follow-up scan. Our imaging data support post-mortem findings and suggest that chronic methamphetamine users have low brain levels of stored dopamine during very early abstinence from MA, which could contribute to behavioral and cognitive deficits. Findings also suggest a rapid recovery of stored dopamine in some methamphetamine users who become abstinent and who therefore might not benefit from dopamine replacement medication (eg, levodopa). Further study is necessary to establish whether those users who could not maintain abstinence for the second scan might have a more severe and persistent dopamine deficiency and who could benefit from this medication. PMID:26321315

  9. The Transfection of BDNF to Dopamine Neurons Potentiates the Effect of Dopamine D3 Receptor Agonist Recovering the Striatal Innervation, Dendritic Spines and Motor Behavior in an Aged Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Razgado-Hernandez, Luis F.; Espadas-Alvarez, Armando J.; Reyna-Velazquez, Patricia; Sierra-Sanchez, Arturo; Anaya-Martinez, Veronica; Jimenez-Estrada, Ismael; Bannon, Michael J.; Martinez-Fong, Daniel; Aceves-Ruiz, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The progressive degeneration of the dopamine neurons of the pars compacta of substantia nigra and the consequent loss of the dopamine innervation of the striatum leads to the impairment of motor behavior in Parkinson’s disease. Accordingly, an efficient therapy of the disease should protect and regenerate the dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra and the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Nigral neurons express Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF) and dopamine D3 receptors, both of which protect the dopamine neurons. The chronic activation of dopamine D3 receptors by their agonists, in addition, restores, in part, the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Here we explored whether the over-expression of BDNF by dopamine neurons potentiates the effect of the activation of D3 receptors restoring nigrostriatal innervation. Twelve-month old Wistar rats were unilaterally injected with 6-hydroxydopamine into the striatum. Five months later, rats were treated with the D3 agonist 7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propy1-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT) administered i.p. during 4½ months via osmotic pumps and the BDNF gene transfection into nigral cells using the neurotensin-polyplex nanovector (a non-viral transfection) that selectively transfect the dopamine neurons via the high-affinity neurotensin receptor expressed by these neurons. Two months after the withdrawal of 7-OH-DPAT when rats were aged (24 months old), immunohistochemistry assays were made. The over-expression of BDNF in rats receiving the D3 agonist normalized gait and motor coordination; in addition, it eliminated the muscle rigidity produced by the loss of dopamine. The recovery of motor behavior was associated with the recovery of the nigral neurons, the dopamine innervation of the striatum and of the number of dendritic spines of the striatal neurons. Thus, the over-expression of BDNF in dopamine neurons associated with the chronic activation of the D3 receptors appears to be a promising strategy for restoring

  10. Mesolimbic Dopamine Signals the Value of Work

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Arif A.; Pettibone, Jeffrey R.; Mabrouk, Omar S.; Hetrick, Vaughn L.; Schmidt, Robert; Vander Weele, Caitlin M.; Kennedy, Robert T.; Aragona, Brandon J.; Berke, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine cell firing can encode errors in reward prediction, providing a learning signal to guide future behavior. Yet dopamine is also a key modulator of motivation, invigorating current behavior. Existing theories propose that fast (“phasic”) dopamine fluctuations support learning, while much slower (“tonic”) dopamine changes are involved in motivation. We examined dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens across multiple time scales, using complementary microdialysis and voltammetric methods during adaptive decision-making. We first show that minute-by-minute dopamine levels covary with reward rate and motivational vigor. We then show that second-by-second dopamine release encodes an estimate of temporally-discounted future reward (a value function). We demonstrate that changing dopamine immediately alters willingness to work, and reinforces preceding action choices by encoding temporal-difference reward prediction errors. Our results indicate that dopamine conveys a single, rapidly-evolving decision variable, the available reward for investment of effort, that is employed for both learning and motivational functions. PMID:26595651

  11. Grafted dopamine neurons: Morphology, neurochemistry, and electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Strömberg, Ingrid; Bickford, Paula; Gerhardt, Greg A

    2010-02-01

    Grafting of dopamine-rich tissue to counteract the symptoms in Parkinson's disease became a promising tool for future treatment. This article discusses how to improve the functional outcome with respect to graft outgrowth and functions of dopamine release and electrophysiological responses to graft implantation in the host brain striatal target. It has been documented that a subpopulation of the dopamine neurons innervates the host brain in a target-specific manner, while some of the grafted dopamine neurons never project to the host striatum. Neurochemical studies have demonstrated that the graft-induced outgrowth synthesize, store, metabolize and release dopamine and possibly other neurotransmitters such as 5-HT. Furthermore, the released dopamine affects the dopamine-depleted brain in areas that are larger than the graft-derived nerve fibers reach. While stem cells will most likely be the future source of cells to be used in grafting, it is important to find the guiding cues for how to reinnervate the dopamine-depleted striatum in a proper way with respect to the dopamine subpopulations of A9 and A10 to efficiently treat the motor abnormalities seen in Parkinson's disease. PMID:19853009

  12. Imaging dopamine transmission parameters in cannabis dependence.

    PubMed

    Ghazzaoui, Rassil; Abi-Dargham, Anissa

    2014-07-01

    Low striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor (D2/3) availability and low ventrostriatal dopamine release have been observed in alcoholism, cocaine and heroin dependence. Multiple studies to date have examined D2 availability in cannabis dependence and have consistently failed to demonstrate alterations. In addition, the response of the dopamine system to an amphetamine challenge and to a stress challenge has also been examined, and did not show alterations. We review these studies here and conclude that cannabis dependence is an exception among commonly abused drugs in that it is not associated with blunting of the dopamine system. PMID:24513022

  13. Dopamine receptors – IUPHAR Review 13

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Jean-Martin; Espinoza, Stefano; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-01-01

    The variety of physiological functions controlled by dopamine in the brain and periphery is mediated by the D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5 dopamine GPCRs. Drugs acting on dopamine receptors are significant tools for the management of several neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and Parkinson's disease. Recent investigations of dopamine receptor signalling have shown that dopamine receptors, apart from their canonical action on cAMP-mediated signalling, can regulate a myriad of cellular responses to fine-tune the expression of dopamine-associated behaviours and functions. Such signalling mechanisms may involve alternate G protein coupling or non-G protein mechanisms involving ion channels, receptor tyrosine kinases or proteins such as β-arrestins that are classically involved in GPCR desensitization. Another level of complexity is the growing appreciation of the physiological roles played by dopamine receptor heteromers. Applications of new in vivo techniques have significantly furthered the understanding of the physiological functions played by dopamine receptors. Here we provide an update of the current knowledge regarding the complex biology, signalling, physiology and pharmacology of dopamine receptors. PMID:25671228

  14. Methotrexate affects HMGB1 expression in rheumatoid arthritis, and the downregulation of HMGB1 prevents rheumatoid arthritis progression.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Bo; Xu, Peng; Xu, Ke; Cai, Yong-Song; Sun, Meng-Yao; Yang, Le; Sun, Jian; Lu, She-Min

    2016-09-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is associated with the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Recent studies have shown that methotrexate (MTX) may inhibit the expression of HMGB1. This study examined whether HMGB1 might be involved in the treatment of RA using MTX. Synovial tissues were collected from RA patients who were treated with MTX for at least 6 months (RA-MTX group, 7 cases) and from those without MTX treatment (RA-noMTX group, 7 cases). Additionally, patients with osteoarthritis (OA group, 7 cases) were used as controls. The expression and locations of HMGB1 in the tissues were detected using real-time PCR, western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Additionally, OA-fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) and RA-FLSs were isolated and cultured, and the expression of HMGB1 was reduced in these cells by transfection with HMGB1 siRNA. Cell proliferation, migration, and invasion abilities were detected. Furthermore, the effects of HMGB1 on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-13 were measured using western blot analysis. At the tissue level, HMGB1 expression in synovial membrane did not differ significantly between the OA and RA-MTX groups, but was significantly lower in these groups than in the RA-noMTX group. In cell experiments, the cell doubling time in the RA-FLS HMGB1 siRNA group was significantly extended compared with that in the RA-FLS negative control (NC)-siRNA group. The amount of cell migration and invasion in the RA-FLS HMGB1 siRNA group was significantly lower compared with that in the NC-siRNA group; the MMP-2 and MMP-13 expression levels were also lower. These results showed that MTX reduced HMGB1 expression in RA synovial tissues, and through the downregulation of HMGB1 expression in tissues, MTX may slow disease progression of RA. PMID:27522665

  15. Dietary phytochemicals and cancer prevention: Nrf2 signaling, epigenetics, and cell death mechanisms in blocking cancer initiation and progression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Hun; Khor, Tin Oo; Shu, Limin; Su, Zheng-Yuan; Fuentes, Francisco; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2013-01-01

    Reactive metabolites from carcinogens and oxidative stress can drive genetic mutations, genomic instability, neoplastic transformation, and ultimately carcinogenesis. Numerous dietary phytochemicals in vegetables/fruits have been shown to possess cancer chemopreventive effects in both preclinical animal models and human epidemiological studies. These phytochemicals could prevent the initiation of carcinogenesis via either direct scavenging of reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) or, more importantly, the induction of cellular defense detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes. These defense enzymes mediated by Nrf2-antioxidative stress and anti-inflammatory signaling pathways can contribute to cellular protection against ROS/RNS and reactive metabolites of carcinogens. In addition, these compounds would kill initiated/transformed cancer cells in vitro and in in vivo xenografts via diverse anti-cancer mechanisms. These mechanisms include the activation of signaling kinases (e.g., JNK), caspases and the mitochondria damage/cytochrome c pathways. Phytochemicals may also have anti-cancer effects by inhibiting the IKK/NF-κB pathway, inhibiting STAT3, and causing cell cycle arrest. In addition, other mechanisms may include epigenetic alterations (e.g., inhibition of HDACs, miRNAs, and the modification of the CpG methylation of cancer-related genes). In this review, we will discuss: the current advances in the study of Nrf2 signaling; Nrf2-deficient tumor mouse models; the epigenetic control of Nrf2 in tumorigenesis and chemoprevention; Nrf2-mediated cancer chemoprevention by naturally occurring dietary phytochemicals; and the mutation or hyper-expression of the Nrf2–Keap1 signaling pathway in advanced tumor cells. The future development of dietary phytochemicals for chemoprevention must integrate in vitro signaling mechanisms, relevant biomarkers of human diseases, and combinations of different phytochemicals and/or non-toxic therapeutic drugs, including

  16. Rapid determination of dopamine in human plasma using a gold nanoparticle-based dual-mode sensing system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yali; Qi, Suijian; Liu, Zhonggang; Shi, Yupeng; Yue, Wanqing; Yi, Changqing

    2016-04-01

    Dopamine plays a very important role in biological systems and has a direct relationship with the ability of learning and cognition, human desires, feelings and mental state, as well as motor functions. Traditional methods for the detection of dopamine are complicated and time-consuming, therefore it is necessary to explore rapid and accurate detection of dopamine with high sensitivity and specificity. Herein we report a dual-mode system of colorimetric and fluorometric analyses based on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and aptamers specifically targeting dopamine. Aptamers modified with the fluorophore were used as dopamine specific recognition probe and the sensing mechanism is based on the color change of AuNPs and the fluorescence recovery of fluorophore conjugated on the aptamers in the presence of dopamine. The addition of aptamers into AuNPs colloid solution would prevent the AuNPs from aggregation in the high-salt solution. The close distance between AuNPs and fluorophore conjugated on the aptamers would lead to the quenching of fluorescence signal. In the presence of dopamine, the conformation of the aptamers and the inter-particle distance would be changed, leading to the aggregation of AuNPs, which subsequently results in color change from red to blue and fluorescence signal recovery. The dual-mode sensing system demonstrated high specificity towards dopamine with the detection limit as low as 78.7 nM. The sensing system reflects on its simplicity as no surface functionalization is required for the nanoparticles, leading to less laborious and more cost-effective synthesis. The reaction time is only 6 min, demonstrating a simple approach for rapid analysis of dopamine. More importantly, the sensing system allows the detection of dopamine in both aqueous solution and complicated biological sample with sensitive response, illustrating the feasibility and reliability for the potential applications in clinical and biomedical analysis in the future. PMID:26838842

  17. The effects of orally administered Bacillus coagulans and inulin on prevention and progression of rheumatoid arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Abhari, Khadijeh; Shekarforoush, Seyed Shahram; Hosseinzadeh, Saeid; Nazifi, Saeid; Sajedianfard, Javad; Eskandari, Mohammad Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Background Probiotics have been considered as an approach to addressing the consequences of different inflammatory disorders. The spore-forming probiotic strain Bacillus coagulans has demonstrated anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating effects in both animals and humans. The prebiotic inulin also potentially affects the immune system as a result of the change in the composition or fermentation profile of the gastrointestinal microbiota. Objective In the present study, an in vivo model was conducted to investigate the possible influences of probiotic B. coagulans and prebiotic inulin, both in combination and/or separately, on the downregulation of immune responses and the progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), using arthritis-induced rat model. Design Forty-eight healthy male Wistar rats were randomly categorized into six experimental groups as follows: 1) control: normal healthy rats fed with standard diet, 2) disease control (RA): arthritis-induced rats fed with standard diet, 3) prebiotic (PRE): RA+ 5% w/w long-chain inulin, 4) probiotic (PRO): RA+ 109 spores/day B. coagulans by orogastric gavage, 5) synbiotic (SYN): RA+ 5% w/w long-chain inulin and 109 spores/day B. coagulans, and 6) treatment control: (INDO): RA+ 3 mg/kg/day indomethacin by orogastric gavage. Feeding with the listed diets started on day 0 and continued to the end of study. On day 14, rats were injected with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) to induce arthritis. Arthritis activity was evaluated by the biochemical parameters and paw thickness. Biochemical assay for fibrinogen (Fn), serum amyloid A (SAA), and TNF-α and alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (α1AGp) was performed on day 21, 28, and 35 (7, 14 and 21 days post RA induction), respectively. Results Pretreatment with PRE, PRO, and SYN diets significantly inhibits SAA and Fn production in arthritic rats (P < 0.001). A significant decrease in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, was seen in the PRE, PRO, and SYN groups (P

  18. Activation of Dopamine Receptors in the Nucleus Accumbens Promotes Sucrose-Reinforced Cued Approach Behavior

    PubMed Central

    du Hoffmann, Johann; Nicola, Saleem M.

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine receptor activation in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) promotes vigorous environmentally-cued food-seeking in hungry rats. Rats fed ad libitum, however, respond to fewer food-predictive cues, particularly when the value of food reward is low. Here, we investigated whether this difference could be due to differences in the degree of dopamine receptor activation in the NAc. First, we observed that although rats given ad libitum access to chow in their home cages approached a food receptacle in response to reward-predictive cues, the number of such approaches declined as animals accumulated food rewards. Intriguingly, cued approach to food occurred in clusters, with several cued responses followed by successive non-responses. This pattern suggested that behavior was dictated by transitions between two states, responsive and non-responsive. Injection of D1 or D2 dopamine receptor agonists into the NAc dose-dependently increased cue responding by promoting transitions to the responsive state and by preventing transitions to the non-responsive state. In contrast, antagonists of either D1 or D2 receptors promoted long bouts of non-responding by inducing transitions to the non-responsive state and by preventing transitions to the responsive state. Moreover, locomotor behavior during the inter-trial interval was correlated with the responsive state, and was also increased by dopamine receptor agonists. These results suggest that activation of NAc dopamine receptors plays an important role in regulating the probability of approach to food under conditions of normative satiety. PMID:27471453

  19. Disruption of nicotine conditioning by dopamine D(3) receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Le Foll, B; Schwartz, J-C; Sokoloff, P

    2003-02-01

    Tobacco smoking is the first cause of preventable death in modern countries. Nicotine replacement therapy or sustained release bupropion helps smoking cessation, but relapse rates are still very high. Nicotine, like other drugs of abuse, activates the dopamine mesolimbic system, which originates in the ventral tegmental area and projects notably to the nucleus accumbens. Situations or environmental stimuli previously associated with cigarette smoking, for example, smell of cigarette smoke, can elicit craving in abstinent smokers and promote relapse. Reducing the effects of nicotine-associated cues might therefore have potential therapeutic utility for smoking cessation. Such an approach has been validated for cocaine in animals, by using the dopamine D(3) receptor-selective partial agonist BP 897, which inhibits cocaine cue-induced drug-seeking behavior. Here we show that rats repeatedly injected with nicotine in a particular environment develop nicotine-conditioned locomotor responses, accompanied by an increase in D(3) receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens. This conditioned behavior was inhibited by BP 897 or a selective D(3) receptor antagonist, suggesting that antagonizing dopamine selectively at the D(3) receptor disrupts nicotine-conditioned effects and might represent a novel therapeutic approach for smoking cessation. PMID:12610655

  20. On the role of subsecond dopamine release in conditioned avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Oleson, Erik B.; Cheer, Joseph F.

    2013-01-01

    Using shock avoidance procedures to study conditioned behavioral responses has a rich history within the field of experimental psychology. Such experiments led to the formulation of the general concept of negative reinforcement and specific theories attempting to explain escape and avoidance behavior, or why animals choose to either terminate or prevent the presentation of an aversive event. For example, the two-factor theory of avoidance holds that cues preceding an aversive event begin to evoke conditioned fear responses, and these conditioned fear responses reinforce the instrumental avoidance response. Current neuroscientific advances are providing new perspectives into this historical literature. Due to its well-established role in reinforcement processes and behavioral control, the mesolimbic dopamine system presented itself as a logical starting point in the search for neural correlates of avoidance and escape behavior. We recently demonstrated that phasic dopamine release events are inhibited by stimuli associated with aversive events but increased by stimuli preceding the successful avoidance of the aversive event. The latter observation is inconsistent with the second component of the two-factor theory of avoidance and; therefore, led us propose a new theoretical explanation of conditioned avoidance: (1) fear is initially conditioned to the warning signal and dopamine computes this fear association as a decrease in release, (2) the warning signal, now capable of producing a negative emotional state, suppresses dopamine release and behavior, (3) over repeated trials the warning signal becomes associated with safety rather than fear; dopaminergic neurons already compute safety as an increase in release and begin to encode the warning signal as the earliest predictor of safety (4) the warning signal now promotes conditioned avoidance via dopaminergic modulation of the brain's incentive-motivational circuitry. PMID:23759871

  1. Alteration of dopamine receptor sensitivity by opiates and the subsequent effect of this alteration on opiate tolerance and dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether there is an alteration of dopamine receptor sensitivity following opiate administration, and whether this alteration has any influence on the development of opiate tolerance and dependence. Behavioral hypersensitivity to direct-acting dopamine agonists was observed in mice following acute or chronic morphine administration. Acute levorphanol administration also resulted in potentiation of dopamine agonist-induced behaviors. An increase in density of dopamine receptors, as measured by (/sup 3/H)butyrophenone binding accompanied the development of behavioral hypersensitivity. This increase was localized to the striatum, an area important in the mediation of dopamine-agonist induced behaviors. Naloxone or LiCl coadministered with the opiates prevented the development of hypersensitivity and the increase in density of dopamine receptors. Coadministration of lithium enhanced the development of acute and chronic tolerance. Lithium enhanced the development of dependence as determined by naloxone-induced hypothermia in chronically morphine-treated mice. Apomorphine enhanced naloxone-induced withdrawal in acutely dependent mice. This enhancement was blocked by coadministration of lithium with the opiates. These results suggest that dopamine receptor supersensitivity influences the degree of tolerance and dependence.

  2. Microdialysis and Mass Spectrometric Monitoring of Dopamine and Enkephalins in the Globus Pallidus Reveal Reciprocal Interactions that Regulate Movement

    PubMed Central

    Mabrouk, Omar S; Li, Qiang; Song, Peng; Kennedy, Robert T

    2011-01-01

    Pallidal dopamine, GABA and the endogenous opioid peptides enkephalins have independently been shown to be important controllers of sensorimotor processes. Using in vivo microdialysis coupled to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and a behavioral assay, we explored the interaction between these three neurotransmitters in the rat globus pallidus. Amphetamine (3 mg/kg i.p.) evoked an increase in dopamine, GABA and methionine/leucine enkephalin. Local perfusion of the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390 (100 μM) fully prevented amphetamine stimulated enkephalin and GABA release in the globus pallidus and greatly suppressed hyperlocomotion. In contrast, the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist raclopride (100 μM) had only minimal effects suggesting a greater role for pallidal D1 over D2 receptors in the regulation of movement. Under basal conditions, opioid receptor blockade by naloxone perfusion (10 μM) in the globus pallidus stimulated GABA and inhibited dopamine release. Amphetamine-stimulated dopamine release and locomotor activation were attenuated by naloxone perfusion with no effect on GABA. These findings demonstrate a functional relationship between pallidal dopamine, GABA and enkephalin systems in the control of locomotor behavior under basal and stimulated conditions. Moreover, these findings demonstrate the usefulness of LC-MS as an analytical tool when coupled to in vivo microdialysis. PMID:21534957

  3. CHEMICALS IN PROGRESS BULLETIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemicals in Progress Bulletin is a quarterly newsletter which highlights regulatory and program activities of the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics. Regular features and news items include the existing chemicals program, new chemicals program, pollution prevention activi...

  4. Salvianolic Acid a prevents the pathological progression of hepatic fibrosis in high-fat diet-fed and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Guifen; Yang, Xiuying; Xuan, Qi; Shi, Lili; Zhang, Hengai; Chen, Bainian; Li, Xiaoxiu; Zu, Mian; Zhou, Dan; Guo, Jing; Yang, Haiguang; Zhang, Li; Du, Guanhua

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes patients have an increased risk of developing hepatic fibrosis. Salvianolic acid A (SalA) has been reported to be a strong polyphenolic anti-oxidant and free radical scavenger. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of SalA on the pathological progression of hepatic fibrosis in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats and to clarify the underlying mechanisms. Type 2 diabetic animal model with hepatic fibrosis was developed by a high-sucrose, HFD and low-dose STZ injection (i.p.). Diabetic rats were randomly divided into SalA group (0.3 mg/kg/day) and diabetic control groups fed with a HFD. After administration for four months, SalA reversed the hyperlipidemia and reduced hepatic triglyceride (TG). Hematoxylin-Eosin (HE) and Picro acid-Sirius red staining results indicated that SalA significantly alleviated the lesions of hepatic steatosis and fibrosis, with the reduction of type I and III collagens. The expression of α-smooth-muscle-actin (α-SMA) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) in the liver were markedly down-regulated by SalA treatment. TUNEL staining showed that SalA reduced apoptosis in hepatocytes. In addition, SalA improved hepatic mitochondrial respiratory function in diabetic rats. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that SalA could prevent the pathological progression of hepatic fibrosis in HFD-fed and STZ-induced diabetic rats. The underlying mechanisms may be involved in reducing oxidative stress, suppressing α-SMA and TGF-β1 expression, as well as exerting anti-apoptotic and mitochondria-protective effects. PMID:25183303

  5. Long-term omega-3 fatty acid supplementation prevents expression changes in cochlear homocysteine metabolism and ameliorates progressive hearing loss in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Vega, Raquel; Partearroyo, Teresa; Vallecillo, Néstor; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio; Pajares, María A; Varela-Nieto, Isabel

    2015-12-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are essential nutrients well known for their beneficial effects, among others on cognitive development and maintenance, inflammation and oxidative stress. Previous studies have shown an inverse association between high plasma levels of PUFAs and age-related hearing loss, and the relationship between low serum folate and elevated plasma homocysteine levels and hearing loss. Therefore, we used C57BL/6J mice and long-term omega-3 supplementation to evaluate the impact on hearing by analyzing their auditory brainstem response (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) thresholds. The omega-3 group showed significantly lower ABR hearing thresholds (~25 dB sound pressure level) and higher DPOAE amplitudes in mid-high frequencies when compared to the control group. These changes did not correlate with alterations between groups in plasma homocysteine or serum folate levels as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography and a microbiological method, respectively. Aging in the control group was associated with imbalanced cytokine expression toward increased proinflammatory cytokines as determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction; these changes were prevented by omega-3 supplementation. Genes involved in homocysteine metabolism showed decreased expression during aging of control animals, and only alterations in Bhmt and Cbs were significantly prevented by omega-3 feeding. Western blotting showed that omega-3 supplementation precluded the CBS protein increase detected in 10-month-old controls but also produced an increase in BHMT protein levels. Altogether, the results obtained suggest a long-term protective role of omega-3 supplementation on cochlear metabolism and progression of hearing loss. PMID:26321228

  6. Derivation of new human embryonic stem cell lines reveals rapid epigenetic progression in vitro that can be prevented by chemical modification of chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Diaz Perez, Silvia V.; Kim, Rachel; Li, Ziwei; Marquez, Victor E.; Patel, Sanjeet; Plath, Kathrin; Clark, Amander T.

    2012-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are pluripotent cell types derived from the inner cell mass of human blastocysts. Recent data indicate that the majority of established female XX hESC lines have undergone X chromosome inactivation (XCI) prior to differentiation, and XCI of hESCs can be either XIST-dependent (class II) or XIST-independent (class III). XCI of female hESCs precludes the use of XX hESCs as a cell-based model for examining mechanisms of XCI, and will be a challenge for studying X-linked diseases unless strategies are developed to reactivate the inactive X. In order to recover nuclei with two active X chromosomes (class I), we developed a reprogramming strategy by supplementing hESC media with the small molecules sodium butyrate and 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep). Our data demonstrate that successful reprogramming can occur from the XIST-dependent class II nuclear state but not class III nuclear state. To determine whether these small molecules prevent XCI, we derived six new hESC lines under normoxic conditions (UCLA1–UCLA6). We show that class I nuclei are present within the first 20 passages of hESC derivation prior to cryopreservation, and that supplementation with either sodium butyrate or DZNep preserve class I nuclei in the self-renewing state. Together, our data demonstrate that self-renewal and survival of class I nuclei are compatible with normoxic hESC derivation, and that chemical supplementation after derivation provides a strategy to prevent epigenetic progression and retain nuclei with two active X chromosomes in the self-renewing state. PMID:22058289

  7. Urinary dopamine in man and rat: effects of inorganic salts on dopamine excretion.

    PubMed

    Ball, S G; Oats, N S; Lee, M R

    1978-08-01

    1. Plasma and urine free dopamine (3,4-dihydroxyphenethylamine) were measured in six normal male volunteer subjects and the urinary clearance of dopamine was calculated for each subject. 2. The excretion rates for free dopamine in man were greater than could be explained by simple renal clearance. It was concluded that free dopamine must, therefore, be formed in the kidney. 3. Changes in urinary dopamine excretion were studied in four groups of rats initially maintained on low sodium diet and then given equimolar dietary supplements of NaCl, NaHCO3, KCl or NH4Cl, to study the specificity of the previously observed increase in dopamine excretion after increased dietary NaCl. 4. The mean dopamine excretion increased significantly in rats given NaCl, KCl and NH4Cl, whereas dopamine excretion decreased in those given NaHCO3. 5. The failure of dopamine excretion to rise in response to loading with NaHCO3 was unexpected, and argues against a simple effect of volume expansion by the sodium ion. The increase in dopamine excretion with KCl and NH4Cl showed that this response was not specific to the sodium ion. PMID:28196

  8. Pramipexole, a dopamine D2 autoreceptor agonist, decreases the extracellular concentration of dopamine in vivo.

    PubMed

    Carter, A J; Müller, R E

    1991-07-23

    Pramipexole (SND 919) is a dopamine D2 autoreceptor agonist which is structurally related to talipexole (B-HT 920), a potential antipsychotic agent. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pramipexole on the extracellular concentration of dopamine in vivo. Dopamine and its metabolites, 3,4-dihydrophenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid, were measured in the anterior striatum of freely moving rats by microdialysis and high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Pramipexole (30 and 100 micrograms/kg) caused long-lasting decreases in the extracellular concentrations of dopamine and its metabolites. Talipexole (30 micrograms/kg) produced similar effects. Sulpiride (5 mg/kg), a selective dopamine D2 antagonist, caused a transient increase in the concentration of dopamine and long-lasting increases in the concentrations of its metabolites; it also reversed the effects of pramipexole. SCH-23390 (100 micrograms/kg), a selective dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, caused a transient increase in the concentration of dopamine but did not affect the concentrations of the metabolites. SCH-23390 failed to reverse the effects of pramipexole. These results indicate that pramipexole reduces the extracellular concentrations of dopamine and its metabolites in vivo through a reversible interaction with the dopamine D2 receptor. PMID:1685123

  9. Adaptations of presynaptic dopamine terminals induced by psychostimulant self-administration.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Cody A; Calipari, Erin S; Ferris, Mark J; Jones, Sara R

    2015-01-21

    A great deal of research has focused on investigating neurobiological alterations induced by chronic psychostimulant use in an effort to describe, understand, and treat the pathology of psychostimulant addiction. It has been known for several decades that dopamine neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens is integrally involved in the selection and execution of motivated and goal-directed behaviors, and that psychostimulants act on this system to exert many of their effects. As such, a large body of work has focused on defining the consequences of psychostimulant use on dopamine signaling in the striatum as it relates to addictive behaviors. Here, we review presynaptic dopamine terminal alterations observed following self-administration of cocaine and amphetamine, as well as possible mechanisms by which these alterations occur and their impact on the progression of addiction. PMID:25491345

  10. Plausible improvements for selective targeting of dopamine receptors in therapy of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Pratibha Mehta; Kumar, J B Senthil

    2012-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative condition characterized by progressive and profound loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta leading to the formation of eosinophillic, intracytoplamic, proteinacious inclusions termed as lewy bodies. L-dopa remains as a gold standard for the treatment of PD, and is often combined with carbidopa to reduce the dose-limiting side effects. Long-term levodopa treatment is associated with the development of motor fluctuations and peak dose dyskinesias. Dopamine Replacement Therapy (DRT) with dopamine agonists (DAs) (ropinirole and pramipexole) is used to manage complications of L-dopa treatment, however, has been associated with numerous pharmacovigilence reports. The present review attempts to narrate the multiple receptor interaction of DAs followed by the assessment of their side effects during the treatment of PD and possible remedial strategy for selective targeting of dopamine receptors to overcome these affects in therapy of Parkinson's disease. PMID:22697513

  11. Intact-Brain Analyses Reveal Distinct Information Carried by SNc Dopamine Subcircuits.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Talia N; Shilyansky, Carrie; Davidson, Thomas J; Evans, Kathryn E; Beier, Kevin T; Zalocusky, Kelly A; Crow, Ailey K; Malenka, Robert C; Luo, Liqun; Tomer, Raju; Deisseroth, Karl

    2015-07-30

    Recent progress in understanding the diversity of midbrain dopamine neurons has highlighted the importance--and the challenges--of defining mammalian neuronal cell types. Although neurons may be best categorized using inclusive criteria spanning biophysical properties, wiring of inputs, wiring of outputs, and activity during behavior, linking all of these measurements to cell types within the intact brains of living mammals has been difficult. Here, using an array of intact-brain circuit interrogation tools, including CLARITY, COLM, optogenetics, viral tracing, and fiber photometry, we explore the diversity of dopamine neurons within the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). We identify two parallel nigrostriatal dopamine neuron subpopulations differing in biophysical properties, input wiring, output wiring to dorsomedial striatum (DMS) versus dorsolateral striatum (DLS), and natural activity patterns during free behavior. Our results reveal independently operating nigrostriatal information streams, with implications for understanding the logic of dopaminergic feedback circuits and the diversity of mammalian neuronal cell types. PMID:26232229

  12. Polypharmacology of dopamine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Butini, S; Nikolic, K; Kassel, S; Brückmann, H; Filipic, S; Agbaba, D; Gemma, S; Brogi, S; Brindisi, M; Campiani, G; Stark, H

    2016-07-01

    Most neurological diseases have a multifactorial nature and the number of molecular mechanisms discovered as underpinning these diseases is continuously evolving. The old concept of developing selective agents for a single target does not fit with the medical need of most neurological diseases. The development of designed multiple ligands holds great promises and appears as the next step in drug development for the treatment of these multifactorial diseases. Dopamine and its five receptor subtypes are intimately involved in numerous neurological disorders. Dopamine receptor ligands display a high degree of cross interactions with many other targets including G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes and ion channels. For brain disorders like Parkinsońs disease, schizophrenia and depression the dopaminergic system, being intertwined with many other signaling systems, plays a key role in pathogenesis and therapy. The concept of designed multiple ligands and polypharmacology, which perfectly meets the therapeutic needs for these brain disorders, is herein discussed as a general ligand-based concept while focusing on dopaminergic agents and receptor subtypes in particular. PMID:27234980

  13. Histamine H3 receptor activation inhibits dopamine synthesis but not release or uptake in rat nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Aquino-Miranda, Guillermo; Escamilla-Sánchez, Juan; González-Pantoja, Raúl; Bueno-Nava, Antonio; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio

    2016-07-01

    We studied the effect of activating histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) on rat nucleus accumbens (rNAcc) dopaminergic transmission by analyzing [(3)H]-dopamine uptake by synaptosomes, and dopamine synthesis and depolarization-evoked [(3)H]-dopamine release in slices. The uptake of [(3)H]-dopamine by rNAcc synaptosomes was not affected by the H3R agonist RAMH (10(-10)-10(-6) M). In rNAcc slices perfusion with RAMH (1 μM) had no significant effect on [(3)H]-dopamine release evoked by depolarization with 30 mM K(+) (91.4 ± 4.5% of controls). The blockade of dopamine D2 autoreceptors with sulpiride (1 μM) enhanced K(+)-evoked [(3)H]-dopamine release (168.8 ± 15.5% of controls), but under this condition RAMH (1 μM) also failed to affect [(3)H]-dopamine release. Dopamine synthesis was evaluated in rNAcc slices incubated with the l-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) decarboxylase inhibitor NSD-1015 (1 mM). Forskolin-induced DOPA accumulation (220.1 ± 10.4% of controls) was significantly reduced by RAMH (41.1 ± 6.5% and 43.5 ± 9.1% inhibition at 100 nM and 1 μM, respectively), and this effect was prevented by the H3R antagonist ciproxifan (10 μM). DOPA accumulation induced by preventing cAMP degradation with IBMX (iso-butyl-methylxantine, 1 mM) or by activating receptors for the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)/pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) with PACAP-27 (1 μM) was reduced (IBMX) or prevented (PACAP-27) by RAMH (100 nM). In contrast, DOPA accumulation induced by 8-Bromo-cAMP (1 mM) was not affected by RAMH (100 nM). These results indicate that in rNAcc H3Rs do not modulate dopamine uptake or release, but regulate dopamine synthesis by inhibiting cAMP formation and thus PKA activation. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. PMID:26169221

  14. The effect of central and peripheral dopamine-agonists on ventilation in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Olson, L G; Saunders, N A

    1985-09-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of central dopaminergic pathways in ventilatory control in unanaesthetised, chemoreceptor intact mice. Dopamine does not cross the blood-brain barrier and was used to selectively affect peripheral arterial chemoreceptors. Levodopa, the immediate precursor of dopamine, was given alone when it is converted to dopamine mainly in the periphery, and together with carbidopa, which prevents the peripheral conversion of levodopa to dopamine, and enhances central generation of dopamine from levodopa. Dopamine (60-240 mg X kg-1), levodopa (50-300 mg X kg-1), and levodopa with carbidopa in a constant ratio of 10:1 (33/3.3-100/10 mg X kg-1) were given by intraperitoneal injection. Ventilation was measured in 10% O2 and in 7.5% CO2 by a plethysmographic method. Levodopa with carbidopa stimulated ventilation in both 10% O2 and 7.5% CO2. Ventilation in 10% O2 increased from 55.1 +/- 1.43 ml X min-1 (mean +/- SE) to 93.8 +/- 4.75 ml X min-1 with levodopa 100 mg X kg-1/carbidopa 10 mg X kg-1 (P less than 0.01). Ventilation in 7.5% CO2 increased from 101.8 +/- 3.42 ml X min-1 to 138.5 +/- 4.94 ml X min-1 with levodopa 100 mg X kg-1/carbidopa 10 mg X kg-1 (P less than 0.05). In contrast, very high doses of dopamine alone (240 mg X kg-1) and levodopa alone (300 mg X kg-1) depressed hypoxic but not hypercapnic ventilation. Carbidopa alone had no effect of ventilation. It is concluded that dopaminergic transmission within the brain mediates pathways leading to increased ventilation. PMID:4059691

  15. Recent Progress in Therapeutic Treatments and Screening Strategies for the Prevention and Treatment of HPV-Associated Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Whang, Sonia N.; Filippova, Maria; Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope

    2015-01-01

    The rise in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has elicited significant interest in the role of high-risk HPV in tumorigenesis. Because patients with HPV-positive HNSCC have better prognoses than do their HPV-negative counterparts, current therapeutic strategies for HPV+ HNSCC are increasingly considered to be overly aggressive, highlighting a need for customized treatment guidelines for this cohort. Additional issues include the unmet need for a reliable screening strategy for HNSCC, as well as the ongoing assessment of the efficacy of prophylactic vaccines for the prevention of HPV infections in the head and neck regions. This review also outlines a number of emerging prospects for therapeutic vaccines, as well as for targeted, molecular-based therapies for HPV-associated head and neck cancers. Overall, the future for developing novel and effective therapeutic agents for HPV-associated head and neck tumors is promising; continued progress is critical in order to meet the challenges posed by the growing epidemic. PMID:26393639

  16. Dopamine receptor heteromeric complexes and their emerging functions.

    PubMed

    George, Susan R; Kern, Andras; Smith, Roy G; Franco, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine neurotransmission is traditionally accepted as occurring through the five dopamine receptors that transduce its signal. Recent evidence has demonstrated that the range of physiologically relevant dopamine signaling complexes is greatly expanded by the ability of dopamine receptors to interact with other dopamine receptors and with receptors of other endogenous signaling ligands. These novel heteromeric complexes have functional properties distinct from the component receptors or are able to modulate the canonical signaling and function of the cognate receptors. These dopamine receptor heteromers provide new insight into physiological mechanisms and pathophysiological processes involving dopamine. PMID:24968781

  17. TRPV1 on astrocytes rescues nigral dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease via CNTF.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jin H; Park, Eun S; Won, So-Yoon; Lee, Yu A; Kim, Kyoung I; Jeong, Jae Y; Baek, Jeong Y; Cho, Eun J; Jin, Minyoung; Chung, Young C; Lee, Byoung D; Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, Eung-Gook; Byun, Kyunghee; Lee, Bonghee; Woo, Dong Ho; Lee, C Justin; Kim, Sang R; Bok, Eugene; Kim, Yoon-Seong; Ahn, Tae-Beom; Ko, Hyuk Wan; Brahmachari, Saurav; Pletinkova, Olga; Troconso, Juan C; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Jin, Byung K

    2015-12-01

    Currently there is no neuroprotective or neurorestorative therapy for Parkinson's disease. Here we report that transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) on astrocytes mediates endogenous production of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), which prevents the active degeneration of dopamine neurons and leads to behavioural recovery through CNTF receptor alpha (CNTFRα) on nigral dopamine neurons in both the MPP(+)-lesioned or adeno-associated virus α-synuclein rat models of Parkinson's disease. Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis of human post-mortem substantia nigra from Parkinson's disease suggests that this endogenous neuroprotective system (TRPV1 and CNTF on astrocytes, and CNTFRα on dopamine neurons) might have relevance to human Parkinson's disease. Our results suggest that activation of astrocytic TRPV1 activates endogenous neuroprotective machinery in vivo and that it is a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:26490328

  18. Dopamine D2 Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Pancreatic β Cell Mass.

    PubMed

    Sakano, Daisuke; Choi, Sungik; Kataoka, Masateru; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Uesugi, Motonari; Kume, Kazuhiko; Kume, Shoen

    2016-07-12

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate β cell mass and proliferation is important for the treatment of diabetes. Here, we identified domperidone (DPD), a dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) antagonist that enhances β cell mass. Over time, islet β cell loss occurs in dissociation cultures, and this was inhibited by DPD. DPD increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis of β cells through increasing intracellular cAMP. DPD prevented β cell dedifferentiation, which together highly contributed to the increased β cell mass. DRD2 knockdown phenocopied the effects of domperidone and increased the number of β cells. Drd2 overexpression sensitized the dopamine responsiveness of β cells and increased apoptosis. Further analysis revealed that the adenosine agonist 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, a previously identified promoter of β cell proliferation, acted with DPD to increase the number of β cells. In humans, dopamine also modulates β cell mass through DRD2 and exerts an inhibitory effect on adenosine signaling. PMID:27373926

  19. Allelic association of the D2 dopamine receptor gene with receptor-binding characteristics in alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, E.P.; Blum, K.; Ritchie, T.; Montgomery, A.; Sheridan, P.J. )

    1991-07-01

    The allelic association of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene with the binding characteristics of the D2 dopamine receptor was determined in 66 brains of alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects. In a blinded experiment, DNA from the cerebral cortex was treated with the restriction endonuclease Taql and probed with a 1.5-kilobase (kb) digest of a clone (lambda hD2G1) of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene. The binding characteristics (Kd (binding affinity) and Bmax (number of binding sites)) of the D2 dopamine receptor were determined in the caudate nuclei of these brains using tritiated spiperone as the ligand. The adjusted Kd was significantly lower in alcoholic than in nonalcoholic subjects. In subjects with the A1 allele, in whom a high association with alcoholism was found, the Bmax was significantly reduced compared with the Bmax of subjects with the A2 allele. Moreover, a progressively reduced Bmax was found in subjects with A2/A2, A1/A2, and A1/A1 alleles, with subjects with A2/A2 having the highest mean values, and subjects with A1/A1, the lowest. The polymorphic pattern of the D2 dopamine receptor gene and its differential expression of receptors suggests the involvement of the dopaminergic system in conferring susceptibility to at least one subtype of severe alcoholism.

  20. TRH injected into the nucleus accumbens shell releases dopamine and reduces feeding motivation in rats.

    PubMed

    Puga, L; Alcántara-Alonso, V; Coffeen, U; Jaimes, O; de Gortari, P

    2016-06-01

    The thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), an anorexigenic factor that reduces food intake in food-restricted animals, may be involved in motivation for food. Injected centrally, TRH impairs acquisition of food-rewarded behavior. Through the TRH-R1 receptors, TRH injected in the nucleus accumbens increases dopamine content-perhaps the mechanism by which the peptide modulates food motivation. This, however, is still to be demonstrated. We sought to evaluate dopamine release by microdialysis after a TRH injection into the nucleus accumbens shell in free-moving fasted rats. In addition, we assessed dopamine content and turnover by HPLC and the relationship with the motivation for food by analyzing the performance of rats during a progressive-ratio (PR) operant-conditioning test. Finally, we determined serum leptin and triiodothyronine (T3) levels in order to evaluate the animals' metabolic response to food restriction and the impact of intra-accumbal TRH administration on circulating hormones. Intra-accumbal injections of TRH reduced food intake in food-restricted rats-compared to counterparts treated with saline-, without further decreasing T3 or leptin levels, which dropped due to their dietary regime. TRH-injected rats had lower breaking points on the PR schedule, which indicated lower motivation to eat. Accordingly, compared to saline-treated animals, dopamine release and turnover increased in the nucleus accumbens of TRH-injected rats, a finding that suggests a relationship between motivation for food and TRH-induced release of dopamine. PMID:27006143

  1. Mycophenolate mofetil and curcumin provide comparable therapeutic benefit in experimental chronic kidney disease: role of Nrf2-Keap1 and renal dopamine pathways.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Edilia; García-Arroyo, Fernando; Silverio, Octaviano; Rodríguez-Alcocer, Alma N; Jiménez-Flores, Ana B; Cristobal, Magdalena; Arellano, Abraham S; Soto, Virgilia; Osorio-Alonso, Horacio; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Sanchez-Lozada, Laura G

    2016-07-01

    Increased oxidative stress and inflammation have an important role in the pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD). On the other hand, more affordable therapeutic alternatives for treating this disease are urgently needed. Therefore, we compared the therapeutic efficacy of curcumin and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6 Nx) model of CKD. Also, we evaluated whether both compounds provide benefit through the preservation of similar antioxidant mechanisms. Four groups of male Wistar were studied over a period of 4 wk. Control sham group (n= 12), 5/6 Nx (n = 12), 5/6 Nx + MMF (30 mg/k BW/day, n = 11) and 5/6 Nx + Curcumin (120 mg/k BW/day, n = 12). Renal function and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation were evaluated. Also Nrf2-Keap1 and renal dopamine, antioxidant pathways were assessed. 5/6 Nx induced an altered renal autoregulation response, proteinuria, and hypertension; these effects were in association with increased oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction and renal inflammation. The mechanisms associated with these alterations included a reduced nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and hyperphosphorylation of dopamine D1 receptor with a concurrent overactivation of renal NADPH oxidase. Treatments with MMF and curcumin provided equivalent therapeutic efficacy as both prevented functional renal alterations as well as preserved antioxidant capacity and avoided renal inflammatory infiltration. Moreover, both treatments preserved Nrf2-Keap1 and renal dopamine antioxidant pathways. In summary, therapeutic strategies aimed to preserve renal antioxidant pathways can help to retard the progression of CKD. PMID:27050624

  2. Plasmalogen Augmentation Reverses Striatal Dopamine Loss in MPTP Mice.

    PubMed

    Miville-Godbout, Edith; Bourque, Mélanie; Morissette, Marc; Al-Sweidi, Sara; Smith, Tara; Mochizuki, Asuka; Senanayake, Vijitha; Jayasinghe, Dushmanthi; Wang, Li; Goodenowe, Dayan; Di Paolo, Thérèse

    2016-01-01

    Plasmalogens are a class of glycerophospholipids shown to play critical roles in membrane structure and function. Decreased plasmalogens are reported in the brain and blood of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. The present study investigated the hypothesis that augmenting plasmalogens could protect striatal dopamine neurons that degenerate in response to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) treatment in mice, a PD model. First, in a pre-treatment experiment male mice were treated for 10 days with the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-plasmalogen precursor PPI-1011 (10, 50 and 200 mg/kg). On day 5 mice received MPTP and were killed on day 11. Next, in a post-treatment study, male mice were treated with MPTP and then received daily for 5 days PPI-1011 (5, 10 and 50 mg/kg). MPTP treatment reduced serum plasmalogen levels, striatal contents of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, serotonin, DA transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2). Pre-treatment with PPI-1011 (10 and 50 mg/kg) prevented all MPTP-induced effects. Positive correlations were measured between striatal DA contents and serum plasmalogen levels as well as striatal DAT and VMAT2 specific binding. Post-treatment with PPI-1011 prevented all MPTP-induced effects at 50 mg/kg but not at lower doses. Positive correlations were measured between striatal DA contents and serum plasmalogen levels as well as striatal DAT and VMAT2 specific binding in the post-treatment experiment. PPI-1011 treatment (10 days at 5, 10 and 50 mg/kg) of intact mice left unchanged striatal biogenic amine contents. These data demonstrate that treatment with a plasmalogen precursor is capable of protecting striatal dopamine markers in an animal model of PD. PMID:26959819

  3. Plasmalogen Augmentation Reverses Striatal Dopamine Loss in MPTP Mice

    PubMed Central

    Miville-Godbout, Edith; Bourque, Mélanie; Morissette, Marc; Al-Sweidi, Sara; Smith, Tara; Mochizuki, Asuka; Senanayake, Vijitha; Jayasinghe, Dushmanthi; Wang, Li; Goodenowe, Dayan; Di Paolo, Thérèse

    2016-01-01

    Plasmalogens are a class of glycerophospholipids shown to play critical roles in membrane structure and function. Decreased plasmalogens are reported in the brain and blood of Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients. The present study investigated the hypothesis that augmenting plasmalogens could protect striatal dopamine neurons that degenerate in response to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) treatment in mice, a PD model. First, in a pre-treatment experiment male mice were treated for 10 days with the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-plasmalogen precursor PPI-1011 (10, 50 and 200 mg/kg). On day 5 mice received MPTP and were killed on day 11. Next, in a post-treatment study, male mice were treated with MPTP and then received daily for 5 days PPI-1011 (5, 10 and 50 mg/kg). MPTP treatment reduced serum plasmalogen levels, striatal contents of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, serotonin, DA transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2). Pre-treatment with PPI-1011 (10 and 50 mg/kg) prevented all MPTP-induced effects. Positive correlations were measured between striatal DA contents and serum plasmalogen levels as well as striatal DAT and VMAT2 specific binding. Post-treatment with PPI-1011 prevented all MPTP-induced effects at 50 mg/kg but not at lower doses. Positive correlations were measured between striatal DA contents and serum plasmalogen levels as well as striatal DAT and VMAT2 specific binding in the post-treatment experiment. PPI-1011 treatment (10 days at 5, 10 and 50 mg/kg) of intact mice left unchanged striatal biogenic amine contents. These data demonstrate that treatment with a plasmalogen precursor is capable of protecting striatal dopamine markers in an animal model of PD. PMID:26959819

  4. Dopamine receptors in human gastrointestinal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, D.E.; Mason, G.A.; Walker, C.H.; Valenzuela, J.E.

    1987-12-21

    Dopamine is a putative enteric neurotransmitter that has been implicated in exocrine secretory and motility functions of the gastrointestinal tract of several mammalian species including man. This study was designed to determine the presence of dopamine binding sites in human gastric and duodenal mucosa and to describe certain biochemical characteristics of these enteric receptor sites. The binding assay was performed in triplicate with tissue homogenates obtained from healthy volunteers of both sexes using /sup 3/H-dopamine as a ligand. The extent of nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of a 100-fold excess of unlabeled dopamine. Scatchard analysis performed with increasing concentrations of /sup 3/H-dopamine (20-500 nM) revealed a single class of saturable dopamine binding sites in gastric and duodenal mucosa. The results of this report demonstrate the presence of specific dopamine receptors in human gastric and duodenal mucosa. These biochemical data suggest that molecular abnormalities of these receptor sites may be operative in the pathogenesis of important gastrointestinal disorders. 33 references, 2 figures.

  5. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical literature, the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) trial was started in 1998. That study enrolled ... in the BCPT. Studies, such as BCPT and STAR, involve women who have not had breast cancer, ...

  6. Identification of D/sub 1/-like dopamine receptors on human blood platelets

    SciTech Connect

    De Keyser, J.; De Waele, M.; Convents, A.; Ebinger, G.; Vauquelin, G.

    1988-01-01

    Dopamine is able to inhibit the epinephrine-induced aggregation of human blood platelets, but the mechanism of action has not been elucidated. In this study the authors report that membranes from human blood platelets possess high affinity, saturable and stereoselective binding sites for the D/sub 1/ dopamine receptor antagonist (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390. (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 appeared to label a single class of binding sites with a B/sub max/ of 18.6 +- 1.6 fmolmg protein and a K/sub D/ of 0.8 nM. The potencies of different dopaminergic antagonists and agonists in displacing (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 from blood platelet membranes were similar to those obtained for striatal membranes. Unlike the classically defined D/sub 1/ receptors, e.g. those in striatum, the D/sub 1/ receptor sites on platelets appeared no to be coupled to the adenylate cyclase system, hence the term D/sub 1/-like. The D/sub 1/ agonist SKF 38393 was more potent than dopamine in inhibiting platelet aggregation induced by epinephrine, and the effects of dopamine and SKF 38393 were prevented by SCH 23390. These results suggest that the inhibitory action of dopamine on the epinephrine-induced platelet aggregation is mediated through these D/sub 1/-like receptors

  7. Human dopamine receptor and its uses

    DOEpatents

    Civelli, Olivier; Van Tol, Hubert Henri-Marie

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward the isolation, characterization and pharmacological use of the human D4 dopamine receptor. The nucleotide sequence of the gene corresponding to this receptor and alleleic variant thereof are provided by the invention. The invention also includes recombinant eukaryotic expression constructs capable of expressing the human D4 dopamine receptor in cultures of transformed eukaryotic cells. The invention provides cultures of transformed eukaryotic cells which synthesize the human D4 dopamine receptor, and methods for characterizing novel psychotropic compounds using such cultures.

  8. Dopamine-glutamate interactions in the basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, W J

    1998-01-01

    In an attempt to formulate a working hypothesis of basal-ganglia functions, arguments are considered suggesting that the basal ganglia are involved in a process of response selection i.e. in the facilitation of "wanted" and in the suppression of "unwanted" behaviour. The meso-accumbal dopamine-system is considered to mediate natural and drug-induced reward and sensitization. The meso-striatal dopamine-system seems to fulfill similar functions: It may mediate reinforcement which strengthens a given behaviour when elicited subsequently, but which is not experienced as reward or hedonia. Glutamate as the transmitter of the corticofugal projections to the basal ganglia nuclei and of the subthalamic neurons is critically involved in basal ganglia functions and dysfunctions; for example Parkinson's disease can be considered to be a secondary hyperglutamatergic disease. Additionally, glutamate is an essential factor in the plasticity response of the basal-ganglia. However, opposite to previous suggestions, the NMDA-receptor blocker MK-801 does not prevent psychostimulant- nor morphine-induced day to day increase (sensitization) of locomotion. Also the day to day increase of haloperidol-induced catalepsy was not prevented by MK-801. PMID:9871434

  9. Phasic dopamine release in appetitive behaviors and drug abuse

    PubMed Central

    Wanat, Matthew J.; Willuhn, Ingo; Clark, Jeremy J.; Phillips, Paul E. M.

    2010-01-01

    Short phasic bursts of neuronal activity in dopamine neurons produce rapid and transient increases in extracellular dopamine concentrations throughout the mesocorticolimbic system, which are associated with the initiation of goal-directed behaviors. It is well established that acute exposure to many addictive drugs produce increases in tonic dopamine levels that occur on the order of minutes. However, recent studies suggest that abused drugs similarly enhance phasic dopamine release events that occur on a subsecond time scale. Furthermore, drug experience modulates the synaptic and intrinsic properties of dopamine neurons, which could affect dopamine burst firing and phasic dopamine release. This review will provide a general introduction to the mesolimbic dopamine system, as well as the primary methods used to detect dopamine neurons and dopamine release. We present the role of phasic dopamine release in appetitive behaviors in the context of contemporary theories regarding the function of dopamine. Next we discuss the known drug-induced changes to dopamine neurons and phasic release in both in vitro and in vivo preparations. Finally, we offer a simple model that chronic drug experience attenuates tonic/basal dopamine levels but promotes phasic dopamine release, which may result in aberrant goal-directed behaviors contributing to the development of addiction. PMID:19630749

  10. Diagnosing dopamine-responsive dystonias.

    PubMed

    Malek, N; Fletcher, N; Newman, E

    2015-10-01

    The clinical spectrum of dopamine-responsive dystonias (DRDs) has expanded over the last decade to comprise several distinct disorders. At the milder end of the clinical spectrum is the autosomal-dominant guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase deficiency syndrome (GTPCH-DRD), and at the more severe end is the much less common autosomal recessive tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency syndrome (TH-DRD), with intermediate forms in between. Understanding the pathophysiology of DRDs can help in their optimal diagnosis and management. These are conditions with the potential to be either underdiagnosed when not considered or overdiagnosed if there is an equivocal L-dopa (levo-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) response. In this article, we discuss the clinical phenotypes of these disorders, and we outline how investigations can help in confirming the diagnosis. PMID:26045581

  11. Detection of Dopamine Dynamics in the Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wightman, R. Mark; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Explores neurochemical events in the extra cellular space of the brain by use of in vivo voltammetric microelectrodes. Reports dopamine concentrations and pathways, and discusses techniques used for analysis. Recognizes current problems and future directions for research. (ML)

  12. Ouabain inhibits monocyte activation in vitro: prevention of the proinflammatory mCD14+/CD16+ subset appearance and cell-size progression

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Raphael C; Araujo, Elizabeth G; Rumjanek, Vivian M

    2012-01-01

    Classically described as a potent inhibitor of the sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase enzyme, ouabain has been further shown to act as an effective immunomodulator in mammals. Recently, our group showed that this hormone downregulates membrane CD14 (mCD14) in human monocytes, though it is not known whether monocyte activation status could modify ouabain influence. Hence, we aimed to investigate ouabain effect during monocyte activation in vitro, analyzing mCD14, CD16 and CD69 expression in total monocytes after two periods of adhesion (2 hours and 24 hours) or in small and large monocyte subpopulations separately. Ouabain (100 nM) inhibited monocyte-size increase, characteristic of activation, only when added to cells immediately after 2 hours’ adhesion. Moreover, downregulation of both mCD14 and CD16 expression by ouabain was more effective in small monocytes and in cells after 2 hours’ adhesion. Since monocytes after 24 hours’ adhesion showed no lack of ouabain binding and no CD69 upregulation, it seems that ouabain is somehow incapable of triggering an appropriate cell-signaling induction once monocytes become activated. Furthermore, though p38 MAPK activation was crucial for the impairment in cell-size progression induced by ouabain, its inhibition did not alter ouabain-induced CD69 upregulation, suggesting that other molecules may participate in the response to this hormone by monocytes. Our data suggest that ouabain inhibits monocyte activation in vitro, preventing both cell-size increase and the appearance of the proinflammatory mCD14+/CD16+ subpopulation. Thus, the findings suggest that individuals suffering from disorders commonly associated with high ouabain plasma levels, like hypertension, may present defective monocyte activation under inflammation or infection.

  13. Dopamine-oxytocin interactions in penile erection.

    PubMed

    Baskerville, T A; Allard, J; Wayman, C; Douglas, A J

    2009-12-01

    Dopamine and oxytocin have established roles in the central regulation of penile erection in rats; however, the neural circuitries involved in a specific erectile context and the interaction between dopamine and oxytocin mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The medial preoptic area (MPOA), supraoptic nucleus (SON) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus may serve as candidate sites because they contain oxytocin cells, receive dopaminergic inputs and have been implicated in mediating masculine sexual behavior. Double immunofluorescence revealed that substantial numbers of oxytocin cells in the MPOA, SON and PVN possess dopamine D(2), D(3) and D(4) receptors. In anaesthetized rats, using intracavernous pressure as a physiological indicator of erection, blockade of lumbosacral oxytocin receptors (UK, 427843) reduced erectile responses to a nonselective dopamine agonist (apomorphine), suggesting that dopamine recruits a paraventriculospinal oxytocin pathway. In conscious males in the absence of a female, penile erection elicited by a D(2)/D(3) (Quinelorane) but not D(4) (PD168077) agonist was associated with activation of medial parvocellular PVN oxytocin cells. In another experiment where males were given full access to a receptive female, a D(4) (L-745870) but not D(2) or D(3) antagonist (L-741626; nafadotride) inhibited penile erection (intromission), and this was correlated with SON magnocellular oxytocin neuron activation. Together, the data suggest dopamine's effects on hypothalamic oxytocin cells during penile erection are context-specific. Dopamine may act via different parvocellular and magnocellular oxytocin subpopulations to elicit erectile responses, depending upon whether intromission is performed. This study demonstrates the potential existence of interaction between central dopamine and oxytocin pathways during penile erection, with the SON and PVN serving as integrative sites. PMID:20128851

  14. Tonic Dopamine Modulates Exploitation of Reward Learning

    PubMed Central

    Beeler, Jeff A.; Daw, Nathaniel; Frazier, Cristianne R. M.; Zhuang, Xiaoxi

    2010-01-01

    The impact of dopamine on adaptive behavior in a naturalistic environment is largely unexamined. Experimental work suggests that phasic dopamine is central to reinforcement learning whereas tonic dopamine may modulate performance without altering learning per se; however, this idea has not been developed formally or integrated with computational models of dopamine function. We quantitatively evaluate the role of tonic dopamine in these functions by studying the behavior of hyperdopaminergic DAT knockdown mice in an instrumental task in a semi-naturalistic homecage environment. In this “closed economy” paradigm, subjects earn all of their food by pressing either of two levers, but the relative cost for food on each lever shifts frequently. Compared to wild-type mice, hyperdopaminergic mice allocate more lever presses on high-cost levers, thus working harder to earn a given amount of food and maintain their body weight. However, both groups show a similarly quick reaction to shifts in lever cost, suggesting that the hyperdominergic mice are not slower at detecting changes, as with a learning deficit. We fit the lever choice data using reinforcement learning models to assess the distinction between acquisition and expression the models formalize. In these analyses, hyperdopaminergic mice displayed normal learning from recent reward history but diminished capacity to exploit this learning: a reduced coupling between choice and reward history. These data suggest that dopamine modulates the degree to which prior learning biases action selection and consequently alters the expression of learned, motivated behavior. PMID:21120145

  15. Synthesis of hybrid cellulose nanocomposite bonded with dopamine SiO2/TiO2 and its antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Sivalingam; Kim, Gwang-Hoon; Kim, Jaehwan; Kim, Joo-Hyung

    2015-04-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid material based cellulose was synthesized by the sol-gel approach. The explosion of activity in this area in the past decade has made tremendous progress in industry or academic both fundamental understanding of sol-gel process and applications of new functionalized hybrid materials. In this present research work, we focused on cellulose-dopamine functionalized SiO2/TiO2 hybrid nanocomposite by sol-gel process. The cellulose-dopamine hybrid nanocomposite was synthesized via γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (γ-APTES) coupling agent by in-situ sol-gel process. The chemical structure of cellulose-amine functionalized dopamine bonding to cellulose structure with covalent cross linking hybrids was confirmed by FTIR spectral analysis. The morphological analysis of cellulose-dopamine nanoSiO2/TiO2 hybrid nanocomposite materials was characterized by XRD, SEM and TEM. From this different analysis results indicate that the optical transparency, thermal stability, control morphology of cellulose-dopamine-SiO2/TiO2 hybrid nanocomposite. Furthermore cellulose-dopamine-SiO2/TiO2 hybrid nanocomposite was tested against pathogenic bacteria for antimicrobial activity.

  16. Dopamine neurons encode errors in predicting movement trigger occurrence.

    PubMed

    Pasquereau, Benjamin; Turner, Robert S

    2015-02-15

    The capacity to anticipate the timing of events in a dynamic environment allows us to optimize the processes necessary for perceiving, attending to, and responding to them. Such anticipation requires neuronal mechanisms that track the passage of time and use this representation, combined with prior experience, to estimate the likelihood that an event will occur (i.e., the event's "hazard rate"). Although hazard-like ramps in activity have been observed in several cortical areas in preparation for movement, it remains unclear how such time-dependent probabilities are estimated to optimize response performance. We studied the spiking activity of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta of monkeys during an arm-reaching task for which the foreperiod preceding the "go" signal varied randomly along a uniform distribution. After extended training, the monkeys' reaction times correlated inversely with foreperiod duration, reflecting a progressive anticipation of the go signal according to its hazard rate. Many dopamine neurons modulated their firing rates as predicted by a succession of hazard-related prediction errors. First, as time passed during the foreperiod, slowly decreasing anticipatory activity tracked the elapsed time as if encoding negative prediction errors. Then, when the go signal appeared, a phasic response encoded the temporal unpredictability of the event, consistent with a positive prediction error. Neither the anticipatory nor the phasic signals were affected by the anticipated magnitudes of future reward or effort, or by parameters of the subsequent movement. These results are consistent with the notion that dopamine neurons encode hazard-related prediction errors independently of other information. PMID:25411459

  17. Vitamin D status is a determinant of atorvastatin effect on carotid intima medial thickening progression rate in children with lupus: an Atherosclerosis Prevention in Pediatric Lupus Erythematosus (APPLE) substudy

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Angela Byun; Tangpricha, Vin; Yow, Eric; Gurion, Reut; Schanberg, Laura E; McComsey, Grace A

    2014-01-01

    Objective Epidemiological associations suggest that vitamin D status may play a role in inflammation and progression of atherosclerosis. Using frozen serum, carotid intima medial thickness (CIMT) measurements and other existing data from the Atherosclerosis Prevention in Pediatric Lupus Erythematosus (APPLE) trial, we assessed interactions between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), atorvastatin randomisation and CIMT progression rate. Methods Participants in the 3-year APPLE trial were randomised to placebo or atorvastatin and CIMT progression rate was measured. Baseline frozen serum was used to measure 25(OH)D concentrations. Mixed effect longitudinal models for CIMT progression at 3 years were used to evaluate interaction between vitamin D deficiency (serum 25(OH)D <20 ng/mL) at baseline and atorvastatin or placebo treatment, adjusting for key systemic lupus erythematosus disease variables and cardiovascular risk factors. Results 201/221 APPLE participants had available samples and were included in this analysis; 61/201 (30%) had vitamin D deficiency at baseline. In adjusted longitudinal modelling, there was significant interaction between baseline vitamin D deficiency and atorvastatin randomisation in 3-year progression of mean-max CIMT. In four out of six carotid segments, there was a greater decrease in mean-max CIMT progression rate in subjects who were treated with atorvastatin compared with placebo if they had baseline serum 25(OH)D levels ≥20 ng/mL. Conclusions Subjects with serum 25(OH)D ≥20 ng/mL had less mean-max CIMT progression following 3 years of atorvastatin treatment. Results from secondary analyses must be interpreted cautiously, but findings suggest that underlying vitamin D deficiency may be involved in response to atorvastatin in atherosclerosis prevention. Trial registration number NCT00065806. PMID:25396067

  18. Oestrogen Receptors Enhance Dopamine Neurone Survival in Rat Midbrain

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M. L.; Ho, C. C.; Day, A. E.; Walker, Q. D.; Francis, R.; Kuhn, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    Previous findings in our laboratory and elsewhere have shown that ovariectomy of rats in adulthood attenuates cocaine-stimulated locomotor behaviour. Ovarian hormones enhance both cocaine-stimulated behaviour and increase dopamine overflow after psychomotor stimulants. The present study aimed to determine whether ovarian hormones have these effects in part by maintaining dopamine neurone number in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) and to investigate the roles of specific oestrogen receptors (ERs) in the maintenance of mesencephalic dopamine neurones. To accomplish this goal, we used unbiased stereological techniques to estimate the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-IR) cell bodies in midbrain regions of intact, ovariectomised and hormone-replaced female rats and mice. Animals received active or sham gonadectomy on postnatal day 60 and received vehicle, 17β-oestradiol (E2) or selective ER agonists propyl-pyrazole-triol (PPT, ERα) or diarylpropionitrile (DPN, ERβ) for 1 month post-surgery. In both rats and mice, ovariectomy reduced the number of TH-IR cells in the SNpc and VTA. Replacement with E2, PPT or DPN prevented or attenuated the loss observed with ovariectomy in both rats and mice. An additional study using ER knockout mice revealed that adult female mice lacking ERα had fewer TH-IR cells in midbrain regions than wild-type mice, whereas mice lacking ERβ had TH-IR cell counts comparable to wild-type. These findings suggest that, although both ER subtypes play a role in the maintenance of TH-IR cell number in the SNpc and VTA, ERα may play a more significant role. PMID:20136693

  19. Role of the D3 dopamine receptor in nicotine sensitization.

    PubMed

    Smith, Laura N; Bachus, Susan E; McDonald, Craig G; Smith, Robert F

    2015-08-01

    Adolescent cigarette use is associated with reduced quitting success and continued smoking in adulthood. Interestingly, polymorphisms of the dopamine D3 receptor (DRD3) gene have been associated with smoking behavior, and the receptor is expressed in an age- and brain region-dependent manner that suggests relevance to addiction. Here, we investigate the possible role of dopamine-related receptors, including DRD3 and an intriguing splice variant known as D3nf, in nicotine-induced sensitization. In adolescent and adult male rats, we examined (1) alterations occurring in dopamine receptor-related mRNAs (DRD1, DRD2, DRD3 and D3nf) at two time points during a sensitizing regimen of nicotine and (2) whether DRD3 antagonism either during the initial treatment (induction) or at a later challenge exposure (expression) is able to block nicotine sensitization. Nicotine-induced changes were seen for DRD3 and D3nf mRNAs in the nucleus accumbens shell early in repeated exposure in both age groups. DRD3 antagonism only blocked the induction of sensitization in adolescents and did not block the expression of sensitization in either age group. Adolescents and adults showed opposite DRD1 mRNA responses to nicotine treatment, while no age- and nicotine-related changes in DRD2 mRNA were observed. These data reveal important age-dependent regulation of DRD1- and DRD3-related mRNAs during the course of nicotine exposure. Furthermore, they highlight a requirement for DRD3 signaling in the development of adolescent nicotine sensitization, suggesting it may represent an appropriate target in the prevention of nicotine dependence initiated at this age. PMID:25907750

  20. Orbitofrontal Dopamine Depletion Upregulates Caudate Dopamine and Alters Behavior via Changes in Reinforcement Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Cardinal, R. N.; Rygula, R.; Hong, Y. T.; Fryer, T. D.; Sawiak, S. J.; Ferrari, V.; Cockcroft, G.; Aigbirhio, F. I.; Robbins, T. W.; Roberts, A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with upregulation of dopamine (DA) release in the caudate nucleus. The caudate has dense connections with the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) via the frontostriatal loops, and both areas exhibit pathophysiological change in schizophrenia. Despite evidence that abnormalities in dopaminergic neurotransmission and prefrontal cortex function co-occur in schizophrenia, the influence of OFC DA on caudate DA and reinforcement processing is poorly understood. To test the hypothesis that OFC dopaminergic dysfunction disrupts caudate dopamine function, we selectively depleted dopamine from the OFC of marmoset monkeys and measured striatal extracellular dopamine levels (using microdialysis) and dopamine D2/D3 receptor binding (using positron emission tomography), while modeling reinforcement-related behavior in a discrimination learning paradigm. OFC dopamine depletion caused an increase in tonic dopamine levels in the caudate nucleus and a corresponding reduction in D2/D3 receptor binding. Computational modeling of behavior showed that the lesion increased response exploration, reducing the tendency to persist with a recently chosen response side. This effect is akin to increased response switching previously seen in schizophrenia and was correlated with striatal but not OFC D2/D3 receptor binding. These results demonstrate that OFC dopamine depletion is sufficient to induce striatal hyperdopaminergia and changes in reinforcement learning relevant to schizophrenia. PMID:24872570

  1. Cytosolic Sulfotransferase 1A3 Is Induced by Dopamine and Protects Neuronal Cells from Dopamine Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sidharthan, Neelima P.; Minchin, Rodney F.; Butcher, Neville J.

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine neurotoxicity is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases, and neurons utilize several mechanisms, including uptake and metabolism, to protect them from injury. Metabolism of dopamine involves three enzymes: monoamine oxidase, catechol O-methyltransferase, and sulfotransferase. In primates but not lower order animals, a sulfotransferase (SULT1A3) is present that can rapidly metabolize dopamine to dopamine sulfate. Here, we show that SULT1A3 and a closely related protein SULT1A1 are highly inducible by dopamine. This involves activation of the D1 and NMDA receptors. Both ERK1/2 phosphorylation and calcineurin activation are required for induction. Pharmacological agents that inhibited induction or siRNA targeting SULT1A3 significantly increased the susceptibility of cells to dopamine toxicity. Taken together, these results show that dopamine can induce its own metabolism and protect neuron-like cells from damage, suggesting that SULT1A3 activity may be a risk factor for dopamine-dependent neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24136195

  2. Elevated dopamine in the medial prefrontal cortex suppresses cocaine seeking via D1 receptor overstimulation.

    PubMed

    Devoto, Paola; Fattore, Liana; Antinori, Silvia; Saba, Pierluigi; Frau, Roberto; Fratta, Walter; Gessa, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Previous investigations indicate that the dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH) inhibitors disulfiram and nepicastat suppress cocaine-primed reinstatement of cocaine self-administration behaviour. Moreover, both inhibitors increase dopamine release in the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and markedly potentiate cocaine-induced dopamine release in this region. This study was aimed to clarify if the suppressant effect of DBH inhibitors on cocaine reinstatement was mediated by the high extracellular dopamine in the rat mPFC leading to a supra-maximal stimulation of D1 receptors in the dorsal division of mPFC, an area critical for reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behaviour. In line with previous microdialysis studies in drug-naïve animals, both DBH inhibitors potentiated cocaine-induced dopamine release in the mPFC, in the same animals in which they also suppressed reinstatement of cocaine seeking. Similar to the DBH inhibitors, L-DOPA potentiated cocaine-induced dopamine release in the mPFC and suppressed cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behaviour. The bilateral microinfusion of the D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390 into the dorsal mPFC not only prevented cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking but also reverted both disulfiram- and L-DOPA-induced suppression of reinstatement. Moreover, the bilateral microinfusion of the D1 receptor agonist chloro-APB (SKF 82958) into the dorsal mPFC markedly attenuated cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking. These results suggest that stimulation of D1 receptors in the dorsal mPFC plays a crucial role in cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking, whereas the suppressant effect of DBH inhibitors and L-DOPA on drug-induced reinstatement is mediated by a supra-maximal stimulation of D1 receptors leading to their inactivation. PMID:25135633

  3. Endogenous Dopamine Suppresses Initiation of Swimming in Prefeeding Zebrafish Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Thirumalai, Vatsala; Cline, Hollis T.

    2008-01-01

    Dopamine is a key neuromodulator of locomotory circuits, yet the role that dopamine plays during development of these circuits is less well understood. Here, we describe a suppressive effect of dopamine on swim circuits in larval zebrafish. Zebrafish larvae exhibit marked changes in swimming behavior between 3 days postfertilization (dpf) and 5dpf. We found that swim episodes were fewer and of longer durations at 3 than at 5dpf. At 3dpf, application of dopamine as well as bupropion, a dopamine reuptake blocker, abolished spontaneous fictive swim episodes. Blocking D2 receptors increased frequency of occurrence of episodes and activation of adenylyl cyclase, a downstream target inhibited by D2-receptor signaling, blocked the inhibitory effect of dopamine. Dopamine had no effect on motor neuron firing properties, input impedance, resting membrane potential, or the amplitude of spike afterhyperpolarization. Application of dopamine either to the isolated spinal cord or locally within the cord does not decrease episode frequency, whereas dopamine application to the brain silences episodes, suggesting a supraspinal locus of dopaminergic action. Treating larvae with 10 μM MPTP reduced catecholaminergic innervation in the brain and increased episode frequency. These data indicate that dopamine inhibits the initiation of fictive swimming episodes at 3dpf. We found that at 5dpf, exogenously applied dopamine inhibits swim episodes, yet the dopamine reuptake blocker or the D2-receptor antagonist have no effect on episode frequency. These results led us to propose that endogenous dopamine release transiently suppresses swim circuits in developing zebrafish. PMID:18562547

  4. Genetic disruption of dopamine production results in pituitary adenomas and severe prolactinemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dopamine release from tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons into the median eminence activates dopamine-D2 receptors in the pituitary gland where it inhibits lactotroph function. We have previously described genetic dopamine-deficient mouse models which lack the ability to synthesize dopamine. Because...

  5. Addiction: Beyond dopamine reward circuitry

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.-J.; Fowler, J.S.; Tomasi, D.; Telang, F.

    2011-09-13

    Dopamine (DA) is considered crucial for the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, but its role in addiction is much less clear. This review focuses on studies that used PET to characterize the brain DA system in addicted subjects. These studies have corroborated in humans the relevance of drug-induced fast DA increases in striatum [including nucleus accumbens (NAc)] in their rewarding effects but have unexpectedly shown that in addicted subjects, drug-induced DA increases (as well as their subjective reinforcing effects) are markedly blunted compared with controls. In contrast, addicted subjects show significant DA increases in striatum in response to drug-conditioned cues that are associated with self-reports of drug craving and appear to be of a greater magnitude than the DA responses to the drug. We postulate that the discrepancy between the expectation for the drug effects (conditioned responses) and the blunted pharmacological effects maintains drug taking in an attempt to achieve the expected reward. Also, whether tested during early or protracted withdrawal, addicted subjects show lower levels of D2 receptors in striatum (including NAc), which are associated with decreases in baseline activity in frontal brain regions implicated in salience attribution (orbitofrontal cortex) and inhibitory control (anterior cingulate gyrus), whose disruption results in compulsivity and impulsivity. These results point to an imbalance between dopaminergic circuits that underlie reward and conditioning and those that underlie executive function (emotional control and decision making), which we postulate contributes to the compulsive drug use and loss of control in addiction.

  6. Dopamine systems in the forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Cave, John W.; Baker, Harriet

    2009-01-01

    The brain contains a number of distinct regions that share expression of dopamine (DA) and its requisite biosynthetic machinery, but otherwise encompass a diverse array of features and functions. Across the vertebrate family, the olfactory bulb (OB) contains the major DA system in the forebrain. OB DA cells are primarily periglomerular interneurons that define the glomerular structures in which they receive innervation from olfactory receptor neurons as well as mitral and tufted cells, the primary OB output neurons. The OB DA cells are necessary for both discrimination and the dynamic range over which odorant sensory information can be detected. In the embryo, OB DA neurons are derived from the ventricular area of the evaginating telencephalon, the dorsal lateral ganglionic eminence, and the septum. However, most OB DA interneurons are generated post-natally and continue to be produced throughout adult life from neural stem cells in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle and rostral migratory stream. Adult born OB DA neurons are capable of integrating into existing circuits and do not appear to degenerate in Parkinson’s disease. Several genes have been identified that regulate the differentiation of OB DA interneurons from neural stem cells. These include transcription factors that modify the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, the first enzyme in the DA biosynthetic pathway and a reliable marker of the DA phenotype. Elucidation of the molecular genetic pathways of OB DA differentiation may advance the development of strategies to treat neurological disease. PMID:19731547

  7. Dopamine, behavioral economics, and effort.

    PubMed

    Salamone, John D; Correa, Merce; Farrar, Andrew M; Nunes, Eric J; Pardo, Marta

    2009-01-01

    There are numerous problems with the hypothesis that brain dopamine (DA) systems, particularly in the nucleus accumbens, directly mediate the rewarding or primary motivational characteristics of natural stimuli such as food. Research and theory related to the functions of mesolimbic DA are undergoing a substantial conceptual restructuring, with the traditional emphasis on hedonia and primary reward yielding to other concepts and lines of inquiry. The present review is focused upon the involvement of nucleus accumbens DA in behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Viewed from the framework of behavioral economics, the effects of accumbens DA depletions and antagonism on food-reinforced behavior are highly dependent upon the work requirements of the instrumental task, and DA depleted rats are more sensitive to increases in response costs (i.e., ratio requirements). Moreover, interference with accumbens DA transmission exerts a powerful influence over effort-related choice behavior. Rats with accumbens DA depletions or antagonism reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks that have high response requirements, and instead these rats select a less-effortful type of food-seeking behavior. Nucleus accumbens DA and adenosine interact in the regulation of effort-related functions, and other brain structures (anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, ventral pallidum) also are involved. Studies of the brain systems regulating effort-based processes may have implications for understanding drug abuse, as well as energy-related disorders such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia in depression and other neurological disorders. PMID:19826615

  8. β2-Adrenergic Receptor-Dependent Attenuation of Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction Prevents Progression of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Intermittent Hypoxic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Hisashi; Kuwahira, Ichiro; Schwenke, Daryl O.; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Nara, Akina; Inagaki, Tadakatsu; Ogura, Sayoko; Fujii, Yutaka; Umetani, Keiji; Shimosawa, Tatsuo; Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Pearson, James T.; Uemura, Koichi; Shirai, Mikiyasu

    2014-01-01

    In sleep apnea syndrome (SAS), intermittent hypoxia (IH) induces repeated episodes of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) during sleep, which presumably contribute to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, the prevalence of PAH was low and severity is mostly mild in SAS patients, and mild or no right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) was reported in IH-exposed animals. The question then arises as to why PAH is not a universal finding in SAS if repeated hypoxia of sufficient duration causes cycling HPV. In the present study, rats underwent IH at a rate of 3 min cycles of 4–21% O2 for 8 h/d for 6w. Assessment of diameter changes in small pulmonary arteries in response to acute hypoxia and drugs were performed using synchrotron radiation microangiography on anesthetized rats. In IH-rats, neither PAH nor RVH was observed and HPV was strongly reversed. Nadolol (a hydrophilic β1, 2-blocker) augmented the attenuated HPV to almost the same level as that in N-rats, but atenolol (a hydrophilic β1-blocker) had no effect on the HPV in IH. These β-blockers had almost no effect on the HPV in N-rats. Chronic administration of nadolol during 6 weeks of IH exposure induced PAH and RVH in IH-rats, but did not in N-rats. Meanwhile, atenolol had no effect on morphometric and hemodynamic changes in N and IH-rats. Protein expression of the β1-adrenergic receptor (AR) was down-regulated while that of β2AR was preserved in pulmonary arteries of IH-rats. Phosphorylation of p85 (chief component of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)), protein kinase B (Akt), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were abrogated by chronic administration of nadolol in the lung tissue of IH-rats. We conclude that IH-derived activation of β2AR in the pulmonary arteries attenuates the HPV, thereby preventing progression of IH-induced PAH. This protective effect may depend on the β2AR-Gi mediated PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway. PMID:25350545

  9. Alterations of Dopamine D2 Receptors and Related Receptor-Interacting Proteins in Schizophrenia: The Pivotal Position of Dopamine Supersensitivity Psychosis in Treatment-Resistant Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Yasunori; Kanahara, Nobuhisa; Iyo, Masaomi

    2015-01-01

    Although the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) has been a main target of antipsychotic pharmacotherapy for the treatment of schizophrenia, the standard treatment does not offer sufficient relief of symptoms to 20%–30% of patients suffering from this disorder. Moreover, over 80% of patients experience relapsed psychotic episodes within five years following treatment initiation. These data strongly suggest that the continuous blockade of DRD2 by antipsychotic(s) could eventually fail to control the psychosis in some point during long-term treatment, even if such treatment has successfully provided symptomatic improvement for the first-episode psychosis, or stability for the subsequent chronic stage. Dopamine supersensitivity psychosis (DSP) is historically known as a by-product of antipsychotic treatment in the manner of tardive dyskinesia or transient rebound psychosis. Numerous data in psychopharmacological studies suggest that the up-regulation of DRD2, caused by antipsychotic(s), is likely the mechanism underlying the development of the dopamine supersensitivity state. However, regardless of evolving notions of dopamine signaling, particularly dopamine release, signal transduction, and receptor recycling, most of this research has been conducted and discussed from the standpoint of disease etiology or action mechanism of the antipsychotic, not of DSP. Hence, the mechanism of the DRD2 up-regulation or mechanism evoking clinical DSP, both of which are caused by pharmacotherapy, remains unknown. Once patients experience a DSP episode, they become increasingly difficult to treat. Light was recently shed on a new aspect of DSP as a treatment-resistant factor. Clarification of the detailed mechanism of DSP is therefore crucial, and a preventive treatment strategy for DSP or treatment-resistant schizophrenia is urgently needed. PMID:26694375

  10. Alterations of Dopamine D2 Receptors and Related Receptor-Interacting Proteins in Schizophrenia: The Pivotal Position of Dopamine Supersensitivity Psychosis in Treatment-Resistant Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yasunori; Kanahara, Nobuhisa; Iyo, Masaomi

    2015-01-01

    Although the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) has been a main target of antipsychotic pharmacotherapy for the treatment of schizophrenia, the standard treatment does not offer sufficient relief of symptoms to 20%-30% of patients suffering from this disorder. Moreover, over 80% of patients experience relapsed psychotic episodes within five years following treatment initiation. These data strongly suggest that the continuous blockade of DRD2 by antipsychotic(s) could eventually fail to control the psychosis in some point during long-term treatment, even if such treatment has successfully provided symptomatic improvement for the first-episode psychosis, or stability for the subsequent chronic stage. Dopamine supersensitivity psychosis (DSP) is historically known as a by-product of antipsychotic treatment in the manner of tardive dyskinesia or transient rebound psychosis. Numerous data in psychopharmacological studies suggest that the up-regulation of DRD2, caused by antipsychotic(s), is likely the mechanism underlying the development of the dopamine supersensitivity state. However, regardless of evolving notions of dopamine signaling, particularly dopamine release, signal transduction, and receptor recycling, most of this research has been conducted and discussed from the standpoint of disease etiology or action mechanism of the antipsychotic, not of DSP. Hence, the mechanism of the DRD2 up-regulation or mechanism evoking clinical DSP, both of which are caused by pharmacotherapy, remains unknown. Once patients experience a DSP episode, they become increasingly difficult to treat. Light was recently shed on a new aspect of DSP as a treatment-resistant factor. Clarification of the detailed mechanism of DSP is therefore crucial, and a preventive treatment strategy for DSP or treatment-resistant schizophrenia is urgently needed. PMID:26694375

  11. Maternal neglect: oxytocin, dopamine and the neurobiology of attachment.

    PubMed

    Strathearn, L

    2011-11-01

    Maternal neglect, including physical and emotional neglect, is a pervasive public health challenge with serious long-term effects on child health and development. I provide an overview of the neurobiological basis of maternal caregiving, aiming to better understand how to prevent and respond to maternal neglect. Drawing from both animal and human studies, key biological systems are identified that contribute to maternal caregiving behaviour, focusing on the oxytocinergic and dopaminergic systems. Mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal dopamine pathways contribute to the processing of infant-related sensory cues leading to a behavioural response. Oxytocin may activate the dopaminergic reward pathways in response to social cues. Human neuroimaging studies are summarised that demonstrate parallels between animal and human maternal caregiving responses in the brain. By comparing different patterns of human adult attachment, we gain a clearer understanding of how differences in maternal brain and endocrine responses may contribute to maternal neglect. For example, in insecure/dismissing attachment, which may be associated with emotional neglect, we see reduced activation of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine reward system in response to infant face cues, as well as decreased peripheral oxytocin response to mother-infant contact. We are currently testing whether the administration of intranasal oxytocin, as part of a randomised placebo controlled trial, may reverse some of these neurological differences, and potentially augment psychosocial and behavioural interventions for maternal neglect. PMID:21951160

  12. Genetics Home Reference: dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... CONGENITAL Sources for This Page Cubells JF, Zabetian CP. Human genetics of plasma dopamine beta-hydroxylase activity: ... GeneReview: Dopamine Beta-Hydroxylase Deficiency Kim CH, Zabetian CP, Cubells JF, Cho S, Biaggioni I, Cohen BM, Robertson ...

  13. Levodopa Reverses Cytokine-Induced Reductions in Striatal Dopamine Release

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Carla R.; Miller, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies using neuroimaging and in vivo microdialysis in humans and nonhuman primates indicate that inflammatory cytokines such as interferon-alpha reduce dopamine release in the ventral striatum in association with depressive symptoms including anhedonia and psychomotor slowing. Methods: Herein, we examined whether reduced striatal dopamine release in rhesus monkeys chronically treated with interferon-alpha can be restored by administration of the dopamine precursor levodopa via reverse in vivo microdialysis. Results: Levodopa completely reversed interferon-alpha–induced reductions in striatal dopamine release. No changes were found in the 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid to dopamine ratio, which increases when unpackaged dopamine is metabolized via monoamine oxidase. Conclusions: These findings suggest that inflammatory cytokines reduce the availability of dopamine precursors without affecting end-product synthesis or vesicular packaging and/or release and provide the foundation for future studies investigating therapeutic strategies that facilitate availability of dopamine precursors to improve depressive symptoms in patient populations with increased inflammation. PMID:25638816

  14. Brain May Compensate for Dopamine Neuron Loss Early in Parkinson's

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Science News Brain May Compensate for Dopamine Neuron Loss Early in Parkinson’s - May 09 2014 Scientists ... at least 25 percent of the brain’s dopamine neurons already have been lost. So why do symptoms ...

  15. Clinically Combating Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) with Dopamine Agonist Therapy as a Paradigm Shift: Dopamine for Dinner?

    PubMed

    Blum, Kenneth; Febo, Marcelo; Thanos, Panayotis K; Baron, David; Fratantonio, James; Gold, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Everyday, there are several millions of people that are increasingly unable to combat their frustrating and even fatal romance with getting high and/or experiencing "normal" feelings of well-being. In the USA, the FDA has approved pharmaceuticals for drug and alcohol abuse: tobacco and nicotine replacement therapy. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) remarkably continue to provide an increasing understanding of the intricate functions of brain reward circuitry through sophisticated neuroimaging and molecular genetic applied technology. Similar work is intensely investigated on a worldwide basis with enhanced clarity and increased interaction between not only individual scientists but across many disciplines. However, while it is universally agreed that dopamine is a major neurotransmitter in terms of reward dependence, there remains controversy regarding how to modulate its role clinically to treat and prevent relapse for both substance and non-substance-related addictive behaviors. While the existing FDA-approved medications promote blocking dopamine, we argue that a more prudent paradigm shift should be biphasic-short-term blockade and long-term upregulation, enhancing functional connectivity of brain reward circuits. PMID:25750061

  16. Chronic cocaine administration reduces striatal dopamine terminal density and striatal dopamine release which leads to drug-seeking behaviour.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Parish, C L; Tomas, D; Horne, M K

    2011-02-01

    Drug addiction is associated with altered dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the basal ganglia. We have previously shown that chronic stimulation of the dopamine D2 receptor (D(2)R) with cocaine results in reduced striatal DA terminal density. The aims of this study were to establish whether this reduction in DA terminal density results in reduced striatal DA release and increased cocaine-seeking behaviour and whether D(2)R antagonism can restore the cocaine-induced alterations in DA neurotransmission and drug-seeking behaviour. Rats were housed individually and either control, cocaine, haloperidol (D(2)R antagonist), or cocaine and haloperidol was administered in the drinking water for 16 weeks. Chronic cocaine treatment, which reduced striatal DA terminal density by 20%, resulted in a reduction in basal (-34%) and cocaine-evoked (-33%) striatal DA release and increased cocaine-seeking behaviour. These cocaine-mediated effects on striatal DA terminal density, DA release and drug-seeking could be prevented by co-administration with haloperidol. Basal and cocaine-evoked DA release in the striatum directly correlated with DA terminal density and with preference for cocaine. We conclude that striatal DA terminal density and DA release is an important factor in maintaining drug preference and should be considered as a factor in drug-seeking behaviour and relapse. PMID:21129449

  17. Dopamine Gene Profiling to Predict Impulse Control and Effects of Dopamine Agonist Ropinirole.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Hayley J; Stinear, Cathy M; Ren, April; Coxon, James P; Kao, Justin; Macdonald, Lorraine; Snow, Barry; Cramer, Steven C; Byblow, Winston D

    2016-07-01

    Dopamine agonists can impair inhibitory control and cause impulse control disorders for those with Parkinson disease (PD), although mechanistically this is not well understood. In this study, we hypothesized that the extent of such drug effects on impulse control is related to specific dopamine gene polymorphisms. This double-blind, placebo-controlled study aimed to examine the effect of single doses of 0.5 and 1.0 mg of the dopamine agonist ropinirole on impulse control in healthy adults of typical age for PD onset. Impulse control was measured by stop signal RT on a response inhibition task and by an index of impulsive decision-making on the Balloon Analogue Risk Task. A dopamine genetic risk score quantified basal dopamine neurotransmission from the influence of five genes: catechol-O-methyltransferase, dopamine transporter, and those encoding receptors D1, D2, and D3. With placebo, impulse control was better for the high versus low genetic risk score groups. Ropinirole modulated impulse control in a manner dependent on genetic risk score. For the lower score group, both doses improved response inhibition (decreased stop signal RT) whereas the lower dose reduced impulsiveness in decision-making. Conversely, the higher score group showed a trend for worsened response inhibition on the lower dose whereas both doses increased impulsiveness in decision-making. The implications of the present findings are that genotyping can be used to predict impulse control and whether it will improve or worsen with the administration of dopamine agonists. PMID:26942320

  18. The Effects of Acute Dopamine Precursor Depletion on the Reinforcing Value of Exercise in Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Caitlin B.; Keyes, Alexandra; Renwick, Bethany; Leyton, Marco; Campbell, Iain C.; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether dopaminergic systems are involved in the motivation to engage in behaviours associated with anorexia nervosa (AN), specifically, the drive to exercise. Women recovered from AN (AN REC, n = 17) and healthy controls (HC, n = 15) were recruited. The acute phenylalanine/tyrosine depletion (APTD) method was used to transiently decrease dopamine synthesis and transmission. The effect of dopamine precursor depletion on drive to exercise was measured using a progressive ratio (PR) exercise breakpoint task. Both groups worked for the opportunity to exercise, and, at baseline, PR breakpoint scores were higher in AN REC than HC. Compared to values on the experimental control session, APTD did not decrease PR breakpoint scores in AN REC, but significantly decreased scores in HC. These data show that women recovered from AN are more motivated to exercise than HC, although in both groups, activity is more reinforcing than inactivity. Importantly, decreasing dopamine does not reduce the motivation to exercise in people recovered from AN, but in contrast, does so in HC. It is proposed that in AN, drive to exercise develops into a behaviour that is largely independent of dopamine mediated reward processes and becomes dependent on cortico-striatal neurocircuitry that regulates automated, habit- or compulsive-like behaviours. These data strengthen the case for the involvement of reward, learning, habit, and dopaminergic systems in the aetiology of AN. PMID:26808920

  19. The Effects of Acute Dopamine Precursor Depletion on the Reinforcing Value of Exercise in Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Caitlin B; Keyes, Alexandra; Renwick, Bethany; Leyton, Marco; Campbell, Iain C; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether dopaminergic systems are involved in the motivation to engage in behaviours associated with anorexia nervosa (AN), specifically, the drive to exercise. Women recovered from AN (AN REC, n = 17) and healthy controls (HC, n = 15) were recruited. The acute phenylalanine/tyrosine depletion (APTD) method was used to transiently decrease dopamine synthesis and transmission. The effect of dopamine precursor depletion on drive to exercise was measured using a progressive ratio (PR) exercise breakpoint task. Both groups worked for the opportunity to exercise, and, at baseline, PR breakpoint scores were higher in AN REC than HC. Compared to values on the experimental control session, APTD did not decrease PR breakpoint scores in AN REC, but significantly decreased scores in HC. These data show that women recovered from AN are more motivated to exercise than HC, although in both groups, activity is more reinforcing than inactivity. Importantly, decreasing dopamine does not reduce the motivation to exercise in people recovered from AN, but in contrast, does so in HC. It is proposed that in AN, drive to exercise develops into a behaviour that is largely independent of dopamine mediated reward processes and becomes dependent on cortico-striatal neurocircuitry that regulates automated, habit- or compulsive-like behaviours. These data strengthen the case for the involvement of reward, learning, habit, and dopaminergic systems in the aetiology of AN. PMID:26808920

  20. Reducing Ventral Tegmental Dopamine D2 Receptor Expression Selectively Boosts Incentive Motivation

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Johannes W; Roelofs, Theresia J M; Mol, Frédérique M U; Hillen, Anne E J; Meijboom, Katharina E; Luijendijk, Mieneke C M; van der Eerden, Harrie A M; Garner, Keith M; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Adan, Roger A H

    2015-01-01

    Altered mesolimbic dopamine signaling has been widely implicated in addictive behavior. For the most part, this work has focused on dopamine within the striatum, but there is emerging evidence for a role of the auto-inhibitory, somatodendritic dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in addiction. Thus, decreased midbrain D2R expression has been implicated in addiction in humans. Moreover, knockout of the gene encoding the D2R receptor (Drd2) in dopamine neurons has been shown to enhance the locomotor response to cocaine in mice. Therefore, we here tested the hypothesis that decreasing D2R expression in the VTA of adult rats, using shRNA knockdown, promotes addiction-like behavior in rats responding for cocaine or palatable food. Rats with decreased VTA D2R expression showed markedly increased motivation for both sucrose and cocaine under a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement, but the acquisition or maintenance of cocaine self-administration were not affected. They also displayed enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor activity, but no change in basal locomotion. This robust increase in incentive motivation was behaviorally specific, as we did not observe any differences in fixed ratio responding, extinction responding, reinstatement or conditioned suppression of cocaine, and sucrose seeking. We conclude that VTA D2R knockdown results in increased incentive motivation, but does not directly promote other aspects of addiction-like behavior. PMID:25735756

  1. Speech-induced striatal dopamine release is left lateralized and coupled to functional striatal circuits in healthy humans: A combined PET, fMRI and DTI study

    PubMed Central

    Simonyan, Kristina; Herscovitch, Peter; Horwitz, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Considerable progress has been recently made in understanding the brain mechanisms underlying speech and language control. However, the neurochemical underpinnings of normal speech production remain largely unknown. We investigated the extent of striatal endogenous dopamine release and its influences on the organization of functional striatal speech networks during production of meaningful English sentences using a combination of positron emission tomography (PET) with the dopamine D2/D3 receptor radioligand [11C]raclopride and functional MRI (fMRI). In addition, we used diffusion tensor tractography (DTI) to examine the extent of dopaminergic modulatory influences on striatal structural network organization. We found that, during sentence production, endogenous dopamine was released in the ventromedial portion of the dorsal striatum, in its both associative and sensorimotor functional divisions. In the associative striatum, speech-induced dopamine release established a significant relationship with neural activity and influenced the left-hemispheric lateralization of striatal functional networks. In contrast, there were no significant effects of endogenous dopamine release on the lateralization of striatal structural networks. Our data provide the first evidence for endogenous dopamine release in the dorsal striatum during normal speaking and point to the possible mechanisms behind the modulatory influences of dopamine on the organization of functional brain circuits controlling normal human speech. PMID:23277111

  2. Recovery of dopamine transporters with methamphetamine detoxification is not linked to changes in dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Volkow, Nora D; Wang, Gene-Jack; Smith, Lisa; Fowler, Joanna S; Telang, Frank; Logan, Jean; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-11-01

    Methamphetamine's widepread abuse and concerns that it might increase Parkinson's disease led us to assess if the reported loss of dopamine transporters (DAT) in methamphetamine abusers (MA) reflected damage to dopamine neurons. Using PET with [(11)C]cocaine to measure DAT, and with [(11)C]raclopride to measure dopamine release (assessed as changes in specific binding of [(11)C]raclopride between placebo and methylphenidate), which was used as a marker of dopamine neuronal function, we show that MA (n=16), tested during early detoxification, had lower DAT (20-30%) but overall normal DA release in striatum (except for a small decrease in left putamen), when compared to controls (n=15). In controls, DAT were positively correlated with DA release (higher DAT associated with larger DA increases), consistent with DAT serving as markers of DA terminals. In contrast, MA showed a trend for a negative correlation (p=0.07) (higher DAT associated with lower DA increases), consistent with reduced DA re-uptake following DAT downregulation. MA who remained abstinent nine-months later (n=9) showed significant increases in DAT (20%) but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases did not change. In contrast, in controls, DAT did not change when retested 9 months later but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases in ventral striatum were reduced (p=0.05). Baseline D2/D3 receptors in caudate were lower in MA than in controls and did not change with detoxification, nor did they change in the controls upon retest. The loss of DAT in the MA, which was not associated with a concomitant reduction in dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT loss reflected DA terminal degneration; as well as the recovery of DAT after protracted detoxification, which was not associated with increased dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT increases reflected terminal regeneration, indicate that the loss of DAT in these MA does not reflect degeneration of dopamine terminals. PMID

  3. Differential dopamine function in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Daniel S; MacKie, Palmer J; Kareken, David A; Hutchins, Gary D; Chumin, Evgeny J; Christian, Bradley T; Yoder, Karmen K

    2016-09-01

    Approximately 30 % of Americans suffer from chronic pain disorders, such as fibromyalgia (FM), which can cause debilitating pain. Many pain-killing drugs prescribed for chronic pain disorders are highly addictive, have limited clinical efficacy, and do not treat the cognitive symptoms reported by many patients. The neurobiological substrates of chronic pain are largely unknown, but evidence points to altered dopaminergic transmission in aberrant pain perception. We sought to characterize the dopamine (DA) system in individuals with FM. Positron emission tomography (PET) with [(18)F]fallypride (FAL) was used to assess changes in DA during a working memory challenge relative to a baseline task, and to test for associations between baseline D2/D3 availability and experimental pain measures. Twelve female subjects with FM and 11 female controls completed study procedures. Subjects received one FAL PET scan while performing a "2-back" task, and one while performing a "0-back" (attentional control, "baseline") task. FM subjects had lower baseline FAL binding potential (BP) in several cortical regions relative to controls, including anterior cingulate cortex. In FM subjects, self-reported spontaneous pain negatively correlated with FAL BP in the left orbitofrontal cortex and parahippocampal gyrus. Baseline BP was significantly negatively correlated with experimental pain sensitivity and tolerance in both FM and CON subjects, although spatial patterns of these associations differed between groups. The data suggest that abnormal DA function may be associated with differential processing of pain perception in FM. Further studies are needed to explore the functional significance of DA in nociception and cognitive processing in chronic pain. PMID:26497890

  4. Thermal Stability of Dopamine Transporters.

    PubMed

    Kukk, Siim; Stepanov, Vladimir; Järv, Jaak

    2015-08-01

    The thermal stabilities of the rat and mouse dopamine transporter (DAT) proteins were studied within the temperature range of 0-37°C. The inactivation of the protein was followed by monitoring changes in radioligand-specific binding. We found that the process followed a rate equation with first-order kinetics and was characterized by having a single rate constant k inact. The activation energies (E a) that were calculated from the Arrhenius plots (ln k inact vs. 1/T) were 43 ± 5 and 45 ± 6 kJ/mol for the rat (rDAT) and mouse (mDAT) transporters, respectively, and 44 ± 7 kJ/mol for rDAT from PC-6.3 cell line. These E a values were similar to the E a values of thermal inactivation of the muscarinic receptor from rat brain cortex and to the thermal inactivation of other transmembrane proteins. However, all of these activation energy values were significantly lower than the E a values for soluble single-subunit proteins of similar size. These results therefore suggest that the thermal stability of transmembrane proteins may be governed to a significant extent by cell membrane properties and by interactions between the membrane components and the protein. In contrast, the stability of soluble proteins seems to be mostly governed by protein structure and size, which determine the sum of the stabilizing intramolecular interactions within the protein molecule. It is therefore not surprising that cell membrane properties and composition may have significant effects on the functional properties of transmembrane proteins. PMID:25812533

  5. How Addictive Drugs Disrupt Presynaptic Dopamine Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Sulzer, David

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental principle that unites addictive drugs appears to be that each enhances synaptic dopamine by means that dissociate it from normal behavioral control, so that they act to reinforce their own acquisition. This occurs via the modulation of synaptic mechanisms involved in learning, including enhanced excitation or disinhibition of dopamine neuron activity, blockade of dopamine reuptake, and altering the state of the presynaptic terminal to enhance evoked over basal transmission. Amphetamines offer an exception to such modulation in that they combine multiple effects to produce non-exocytic stimulation-independent release of neurotransmitter via reverse transport independent from normal presynaptic function. Questions on the molecular actions of addictive drugs, prominently including the actions of alcohol and solvents, remain unresolved, but their ability to co-opt normal presynaptic functions helps to explain why treatment for addiction has been challenging. PMID:21338876

  6. Theoretical determinations of ionization potentials of dopamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J. F.; Yu, Z. Y.

    2013-04-01

    Adiabatic and vertical ionization potentials (IPs) of nine conformers of dopamine in the gas phase are determined using density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP, B3P86, B3PW91 methods and high level ab initio HF method with 6-311++G** basis set, respectively. And the nine stable cationic states have been found in the ionization process of dopamine. Vertical ionization potentials of nine conformers of dopamine are calculated using the older outer-valence Green's function (OVGF) calculations at 6-311++G** basis set. Vibrational frequencies and infrared spectrum intensities of G1b and G1b+ at B3LYP/6-311++G** level are discussed.

  7. Somatostatin regulates dopamine release in rat striatal slices and cat caudate nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chesselet, M.F.; Reisine, T.D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of somatostatin on the release of tritiated dopamine (DA) formed continuously from tritiated tyrosine were studied in vitro in superfused striatal slices and in vivo in both caudate nuclei and both substantiae nigrae of halothane-anesthetized cats using a push-pull cannula technique. Somatostatin (3 X 10(-10) to 3 X 10(-7) M) increased the spontaneous tritiated dopamine release from rat striatal slices. This effect was dose dependent and was completely prevented by tetrodotoxin (5 X 10(-7) M). When applied for 30 min in one cat caudate nucleus, somatostatin (10(-7) M) immediately increased the local release of tritiated DA, while a gradual inhibition of the tritiated amine's efflux was observed in the contralateral caudate nucleus. No changes in tritiated dopamine were seen in either substantia nigra during or after the peptide's application in the caudate nucleus. These results suggest that somatostatin in the striatum may play a role in the local and the distal control of dopamine release from the terminals of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons.

  8. Dopamine receptors in a songbird brain

    PubMed Central

    Kubikova, Lubica; Wada, Kazuhiro; Jarvis, Erich D

    2010-01-01

    Dopamine is a key neuromodulatory transmitter in the brain. It acts through dopamine receptors to affect changes in neural activity, gene expression, and behavior. In songbirds, dopamine is released into the striatal song nucleus Area X, and the levels depend on social contexts of undirected and directed singing. This differential release is associated with differential expression of activity-dependent genes, such as egr1 (avian zenk), which in mammalian brain are modulated by dopamine receptors. Here we cloned from zebra finch brain cDNAs of all avian dopamine receptors: the D1 (D1A, D1B, D1D) and D2 (D2, D3, D4) families. Comparative sequence analyses of predicted proteins revealed expected phylogenetic relationships, in which the D1 family exists as single exon and the D2 family exists as spliced exon genes. In both zebra finch and chicken, the D1A, D1B, and D2 receptors were highly expressed in the striatum, the D1D and D3 throughout the pallium and within the mesopallium, respectively, and the D4 mainly in the cerebellum. Furthermore, within the zebra finch, all receptors, except for D4, showed differential expression in song nuclei relative to the surrounding regions and developmentally regulated expression that decreased for most receptors during the sensory acquisition and sensorimotor phases of song learning. Within Area X, half of the cells expressed both D1A and D2 receptors, and a higher proportion of the D1A-only-containing neurons expressed egr1 during undirected but not during directed singing. Our findings are consistent with hypotheses that dopamine receptors may be involved in song development and social context-dependent behaviors. J. Comp. Neurol. 518:741–769, 2010. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20058221

  9. D-2 dopamine receptor activation reduces free ( sup 3 H)arachidonate release induced by hypophysiotropic peptides in anterior pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Canonico, P.L. )

    1989-09-01

    Dopamine reduces the stimulation of intracellular ({sup 3}H)arachidonate release produced by the two PRL-stimulating peptides angiotensin-II and TRH. This effect is concentration dependent and is mediated by stimulation of D-2 dopamine receptors. D-2 receptor agonists (bromocriptine, dihydroergocryptine, and dihydroergocristine) inhibit the release of fatty acid induced by angiotensin-II with a potency that parallels their ability to inhibit PRL release in vitro. Conversely, the selective D-2 receptor antagonist L-sulpiride completely prevents dopamine's effect, whereas SCH 23390 (a D-1 receptor antagonist) is ineffective. The inhibitory action of dopamine does not seem to be consequent to an action on the adenylate cyclase-cAMP system, as 8-bromo-cAMP (1 mM) does not affect either basal or dopamine-inhibited ({sup 3}H)arachidonate release. However, a 24-h pertussis toxin pretreatment significantly reduces the action of dopamine on fatty acid release. Collectively, these results suggest that D-2 dopamine receptor-mediated inhibition of intracellular ({sup 3}H)arachidonate release requires the action of a GTP-binding protein, but is not a consequence of an inhibitory action on cAMP levels.

  10. Impact of Dendritic Spine Preservation in Medium Spiny Neurons on Dopamine Graft Efficacy and the Expression of Dyskinesias in Parkinsonian Rats

    PubMed Central

    Soderstrom, Katherine E.; O’Malley, Jennifer A.; Levine, Nathan D.; Sortwell, Caryl E.; Collier, Timothy J.; Steece-Collier, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    Dopamine deficiency associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD) results in numerous changes in striatal transmitter function and neuron morphology. Specifically, there is marked atrophy of dendrites and dendritic spines on striatal medium spiny neurons (MSN), primary targets of inputs from nigral dopamine and cortical glutamate neurons, in advanced PD and rodent models of severe dopamine depletion. Dendritic spine loss occurs via dysregulation of intraspine Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ channels and can be prevented, in animal models, by administration of the calcium channel antagonist, nimodipine. The impact of MSN dendritic spine loss in the parkinsonian striatum on dopamine neuron graft therapy remains unexamined. Using unilaterally parkinsonian Sprague Dawley rats, we tested the hypothesis that MSN dendritic spine preservation through administration of nimodipine would result in improved therapeutic benefit and diminished graft-induced behavioral abnormalities in rats grafted with embryonic ventral midbrain cells. Analysis of rotational asymmetry and spontaneous forelimb use in the cylinder task found no significant effect of dendritic spine preservation in grafted rats. However, analyses of vibrissae-induced forelimb use, levodopa-induced dyskinesias, and graft-induced dyskinesias showed significant improvement in rats with dopamine grafts associated with preserved striatal dendritic spine density. Nimodipine treatment in this model did not impact dopamine graft survival but allowed for increased graft reinnervation of striatum. Taken together, these results demonstrate that even with grafting suboptimal numbers of cells, maintaining normal spine density on target MSNs results in overall superior behavioral efficacy of dopamine grafts. PMID:20105237

  11. Dopamine and synaptic plasticity in the neostriatum

    PubMed Central

    ARBUTHNOTT, G. W.; INGHAM, C. A.; WICKENS, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    After the unilateral destruction of the dopamine input to the neostriatum there are enduring changes in rat behaviour. These have been ascribed to the loss of dopamine and the animals are often referred to as ‘hemiparkinsonian’. In the denervated neostriatum, we have shown that not only are the tyrosine hydroxylase positive boutons missing, but also the medium sized densely spiny output cells have fewer spines. Spines usually have asymmetric synapses on their heads. In a recent stereological study we were able to show that there is a loss of approximately 20% of asymmetric synapses in the lesioned neostriatum by 1 mo after the lesion. Current experiments are trying to establish the specificity of this loss. So far we have evidence suggesting that there is no obvious preferential loss of synapses from either D1 or D2 receptor immunostained dendrites in the neostriatum with damaged dopamine innervation. These experiments suggest that dopamine is somehow necessary for the maintenance of corticostriatal synapses in the neostriatum. In a different series of experiments slices of cortex and neostriatum were maintained in vitro in such a way as to preserve at least some of the corticostriatal connections. In this preparation we have been able to show that cortical stimulation results in robust excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) recorded from inside striatal neurons. Using stimulation protocols derived from the experiments on hippocampal synaptic plasticity we have shown that the usual consequence of trains of high frequency stimulation of the cortex is the depression of the size of EPSPs in the striatal cell. In agreement with similar experiments by others, the effect seems to be influenced by NMDA receptors since the unblocking of these receptors with low Mg++ concentrations in the perfusate uncovers a potentiation of the EPSPs after trains of stimulation. Dopamine applied in the perfusion fluid round the slices has no effect but pulsatile application of

  12. PET evaluation of the dopamine system of the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Gatley, S. |

    1996-07-01

    Dopamine plays a pivotal role in the regulation and control of movement, motivation and cognition. It also is closely linked to reward, reinforcement and addiction. Abnormalities in brain dopamine are associated with many neurological and psychiatric disorders including Parkinson`s disease, schizophrenia and substance abuse. This close association between dopamine and neurological and psychiatric diseases and with substance abuse make it an important topic in research in the neurosciences and an important molecular target in drug development. PET enables the direct measurement of components of the dopamine system in the living human brain. It relies on radiotracers which label dopamine receptors, dopamine transporters, precursors of dopamine or compounds which have specificity for the enzymes which degrade dopamine. Additionally, by using tracers that provide information on regional brain metabolism or blood flow as well as neurochemically specific pharmacological interventions, PET can be used to assess the functional consequences of change in brain dopamine activity. PET dopamine measurements have been used to investigate the normal human brain and its involvement in psychiatric and neurological diseases. It has also been used in psychopharmacological research to investigate dopamine drugs used in the treatment of Parkinson`s disease and of schizophrenia as well as to investigate the effects of drugs of abuse on the dopamine system. Since various functional and neurochemical parameters can be studied in the same subject, PET enables investigation of the functional integrity of the dopamine system in the human brain and investigation of the interactions of dopamine with other neurotransmitters. This paper summarizes the different tracers and experimental strategies developed to evaluate the various elements of the dopamine system in the human brain with PET and their applications to clinical research. 254 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Quadruplex Integrated DNA (QuID) Nanosensors for Monitoring Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Jennifer M.; Skipwith, Christopher G.; Clark, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine is widely innervated throughout the brain and critical for many cognitive and motor functions. Imbalances or loss in dopamine transmission underlie various psychiatric disorders and degenerative diseases. Research involving cellular studies and disease states would benefit from a tool for measuring dopamine transmission. Here we show a Quadruplex Integrated DNA (QuID) nanosensor platform for selective and dynamic detection of dopamine. This nanosensor exploits DNA technology and enzyme recognition systems to optically image dopamine levels. The DNA quadruplex architecture is designed to be compatible in physically constrained environments (110 nm) with high flexibility, homogeneity, and a lower detection limit of 110 µM. PMID:26287196

  14. Dopamine Release in the Nonhuman Primate Caudate and Putamen Depends upon Site of Stimulation in the Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Min, Hoon-Ki; Ross, Erika K.; Jo, Hang Joon; Cho, Shinho; Settell, Megan L.; Jeong, Ju Ho; Duffy, Penelope S.; Chang, Su-Youne; Bennet, Kevin E.; Blaha, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective treatment for medically refractory Parkinson's disease. Although DBS has recognized clinical utility, its biologic mechanisms are not fully understood, and whether dopamine release is a potential factor in those mechanisms is in dispute. We tested the hypothesis that STN DBS-evoked dopamine release depends on the precise location of the stimulation site in the STN and the site of recording in the caudate and putamen. We conducted DBS with miniature, scaled-to-animal size, multicontact electrodes and used functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify the best dopamine recording site in the brains of nonhuman primates (rhesus macaques), which are highly representative of human brain anatomy and circuitry. Real-time stimulation-evoked dopamine release was monitored using in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. This study demonstrates that STN DBS-evoked dopamine release can be reduced or increased by redirecting STN stimulation to a slightly different site. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Electrical stimulation of deep structures of the brain, or deep brain stimulation (DBS), is used to modulate pathological brain activity. However, technological limitations and incomplete understanding of the therapeutic mechanisms of DBS prevent personalization of this therapy and may contribute to less-than-optimal outcomes. We have demonstrated that DBS coincides with changes in dopamine neurotransmitter release in the basal ganglia. Here we mapped relationships between DBS and changes in neurochemical activity. Importantly, this study shows that DBS-evoked dopamine release can be reduced or increased by refocusing the DBS on a slightly different stimulation site. PMID:27251623

  15. Dopamine Transporters, D2 Receptors, and Dopamine Release in Generalized Social Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Schneier, Franklin R.; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Martinez, Diana; Slifstein, Mark; Hwang, Dah-Ren; Liebowitz, Michael R.; Laruelle, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Background Dopamine D2 receptor and dopamine transporter availability in the striatum have each been reported abnormal in generalized social anxiety disorder (GSAD) in studies using single photon computerized tomography (SPECT). D2 receptors and dopamine transporters have not previously been studied within the same GSAD subjects, however, and prior GSAD studies have not assessed dopamine release or subdivided striatum into functional subregions. Methods Unmedicated adults with GSAD (N=17) and matched healthy comparison subjects (HC, N=13) participated in this study. Of these, 15 GSAD and 13 HC subjects completed baseline assessment of D2 receptor availability using positron emission tomography (PET) with the radiotracer [11C] raclopride. Twelve GSAD and 13 HC subjects completed a repeat scan after intravenous administration of D-amphetamine, to study dopamine release. Twelve of the GSAD subjects and 10 of the HC subjects also completed SPECT with the radiotracer [123I] methyl 3ß-(4-iodophenyl) tropane-2ß-carboxylate ([123I] ß-CIT) to assess dopamine transporter availability. Results GSAD and HC groups did not differ significantly in striatal dopamine transporter availability, overall striatal or striatal subregion D2 receptor availability at baseline, or change in D2 receptor availability after D-amphetamine. Receptor availability and change after D-amphetamine were not significantly associated with severity of social anxiety or trait detachment. Conclusions These findings do not replicate previous findings of altered striatal dopamine transporter and D2 receptor availability in GSAD subjects assessed with SPECT. The differences from results of prior studies may be due to differences in imaging methods or characteristics of samples. PMID:19180583

  16. Antagonism of scavenger receptor CD36 by 5A peptide prevents chronic kidney disease progression in mice independent of blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Souza, Ana Carolina P; Bocharov, Alexander V; Baranova, Irina N; Vishnyakova, Tatyana G; Huang, Yuning G; Wilkins, Kenneth J; Hu, Xuzhen; Street, Jonathan M; Alvarez-Prats, Alejandro; Mullick, Adam E; Patterson, Amy P; Remaley, Alan T; Eggerman, Thomas L; Yuen, Peter S T; Star, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    Scavenger receptor CD36 participates in lipid metabolism and inflammatory pathways important for cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Few pharmacological agents are available to slow the progression of CKD. However, apolipoprotein A-I-mimetic peptide 5A antagonizes CD36 in vitro. To test the efficacy of 5A, and to test the role of CD36 during CKD, we compared wild-type to CD36 knockout mice and wild-type mice treated with 5A, in a progressive CKD model that resembles human disease. Knockout and 5A-treated wild-type mice were protected from CKD progression without changes in blood pressure and had reductions in cardiovascular risk surrogate markers that are associated with CKD. Treatment with 5A did not further protect CD36 knockout mice from CKD progression, implicating CD36 as its main site of action. In a separate model of kidney fibrosis, 5A-treated wild-type mice had less macrophage infiltration and interstitial fibrosis. Peptide 5A exerted anti-inflammatory effects in the kidney and decreased renal expression of inflammasome genes. Thus, CD36 is a new therapeutic target for CKD and its associated cardiovascular risk factors. Peptide 5A may be a promising new agent to slow CKD progression. PMID:26994575

  17. Regulation of Dopamine Uptake by Vasoactive Peptides in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Gironacci, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Considering the key role of renal dopamine in tubular sodium handling, we hypothesized that c-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and Ang-(1-7) may regulate renal dopamine availability in tubular cells, contributing to Na+, K+-ATPase inhibition. Present results show that CNP did not affect either 3H-dopamine uptake in renal tissue or Na+, K+-ATPase activity; meanwhile, Ang-(1-7) was able to increase 3H-dopamine uptake and decreased Na+, K+-ATPase activity in renal cortex. Ang-(1-7) and dopamine together decreased further Na+, K+-ATPase activity showing an additive effect on the sodium pump. In addition, hydrocortisone reversed Ang-(1-7)-dopamine overinhibition on the enzyme, suggesting that this inhibition is closely related to Ang-(1-7) stimulation on renal dopamine uptake. Both anantin and cANP (4-23-amide) did not modify CNP effects on 3H-dopamine uptake by tubular cells. The Mas receptor antagonist, A-779, blocked the increase elicited by Ang-(1-7) on 3H-dopamine uptake. The stimulatory uptake induced by Ang-(1-7) was even more pronounced in the presence of losartan, suggesting an inhibitory effect of Ang-(1-7) on AT1 receptors on 3H-dopamine uptake. By increasing dopamine bioavailability in tubular cells, Ang-(1-7) enhances Na+, K+-ATPase activity inhibition, contributing to its natriuretic and diuretic effects.

  18. Dopamine-melanin nanofilms for biomimetic structural coloration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tong-Fei; Hong, Jong-Dal

    2015-02-01

    This article describes the formation of dopamine-melanin thin films (50-200 nm thick) at an air/dopamine solution interface under static conditions. Beneath these films, spherical melanin granules formed in bulk liquid phase. The thickness of dopamine-melanin films at the interface relied mainly on the concentration of dopamine solution and the reaction time. A plausible mechanism underlining dopamine-melanin thin film formation was proposed based on the hydrophobicity of dopamine-melanin aggregates and the mass transport of the aggregates to the air/solution interface as a result of convective flow. The thickness of the interfacial films increased linearly with the dopamine concentration and the reaction time. The dopamine-melanin thin film and granules (formed in bulk liquid phase) with a double-layered structure were transferred onto a solid substrate to mimic the (keratin layer)/(melanin granules) structure present in bird plumage, thereby preparing full dopamine-melanin thin-film reflectors. The reflected color of the thin-film reflectors depended on the film thickness, which could be adjusted according to the dopamine concentration. The reflectance of the resulted reflectors exhibited a maximal reflectance value of 8-11%, comparable to that of bird plumage (∼11%). This study provides a useful, simple, and low-cost approach to the fabrication of biomimetic thin-film reflectors using full dopamine-melanin materials. PMID:25587771

  19. Organization of monosynaptic inputs to the serotonin and dopamine neuromodulatorysystems

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Sachie K.; Cohen, Jeremiah Y.; Hwang, Dabin; Uchida, Naoshige; Watabe-Uchida, Mitsuko

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Serotonin and dopamine are major neuromodulators. Here we used a modified rabies virus to identify monosynaptic inputs to serotonin neurons in the dorsal and median raphe (DR and MR). We found that inputs to DR and MR serotonin neurons are spatially shiftedin the forebrain, with MRserotonin neurons receiving inputs from more medial structures. We then compared these data with inputs to dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantianigra pars compacta (SNc). We found that DR serotonin neurons receive inputs from a remarkably similar set of areas as VTA dopamine neurons, apart from the striatum, which preferentially targets dopamine neurons. Ourresults suggest three majorinput streams: amedial stream regulates MR serotonin neurons, anintermediate stream regulatesDR serotonin and VTA dopamine neurons, and alateral stream regulatesSNc dopamine neurons. These results providefundamental organizational principlesofafferent control forserotonin and dopamine. PMID:25108805

  20. Imaging extrastriatal dopamine D(2) receptor occupancy by endogenous dopamine in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Fujita, M; Verhoeff, N P; Varrone, A; Zoghbi, S S; Baldwin, R M; Jatlow, P A; Anderson, G M; Seibyl, J P; Innis, R B

    2000-01-10

    The effect of endogenous dopamine on in vivo measurement of dopamine D(2) receptors in extrastriatal regions (thalamus and temporal cortex) was evaluated with single photon emission computed tomography and the high affinity ligand [123I]epidepride by comparing the binding potential before and after acute dopamine depletion. Dopamine depletion was achieved by per-oral administration of 5.5 g/70 kg body weight alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine given in 37 h. The alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine treatment increased the binding potential significantly in the temporal cortex (13+/-15%, P=0.036) but not in the thalamus (2+/-9%). The increase of the binding potential in the temporal cortex correlated strongly with the increase of dysphoric mood evaluated by the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS) (rho=0.88, P=0.004). These results imply that [123I]epidepride, coupled with acute dopamine depletion might provide estimates of synaptic dopamine concentration. PMID:10650158

  1. Striatal Dopamine Depletion Patterns and Early Non-Motor Burden in Parkinsons Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Jung; Ham, Jee Hyun; Ye, Byoung Seok; Lee, Phil Hyu; Sohn, Young H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The mechanism underlying non-motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we hypothesized that Parkinson patients with more non-motor symptoms have a different pattern of striatal dopamine depletion, particularly in areas other than the sensorimotor striatum, compared to those with fewer non-motor symptoms. Methods We conducted a prospective survey of the degree of non-motor symptoms (using the Korean version of the Non-Motor Symptoms Scale; K-NMSS) in 151 patients with early-stage Parkinson’s disease who had undergone a dopamine transporter PET scan as an initial diagnostic procedure. We classified the patients into two groups; high non-motor patients (HNM-PD; K-NMSS score ≥ 41) and low non-motor patients (LNM-PD). Results Patients in the HNM-PD group (n = 71) were older, had longer symptom duration, exhibited more severe motor deficits, and had been prescribed higher levodopa-equivalent doses at follow-up than those in the LNM-PD group. However, dopamine transporter binding to the striatal sub-regions and inter-sub-regional binding ratios were comparable between the two groups. A general linear model showed that the HNM-PD group had significantly more severe motor deficits than the LNM-PD group after controlling for age, gender, symptom duration, and dopamine transporter binding to the sensorimotor striatum. Conclusions This study demonstrated that the pattern of striatal dopamine depletion does not contribute to early non-motor burden in Parkinson’s disease. Our results suggest that LNM-PD patients may have a more benign course of motor symptom progression than HNM-PD patients. PMID:27529171

  2. Oscillating from Neurosecretion to Multitasking Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Grattan, David R.; Akopian, Armen N.

    2016-01-01

    In this issue of Cell Reports, Stagkourakis et al. (2016) report that oscillating hypothalamic TIDA neurons, previously thought to be simple neurosecretory neurons controlling pituitary prolactin secretion, control dopamine output via autoregulatory mechanisms and thus could potentially regulate other physiologically important hypothalamic neuronal circuits. PMID:27119847

  3. PSP-CBS with Dopamine Deficiency in a Female with a FMR1 Premutation.

    PubMed

    Paucar, Martin; Beniaminov, Stanislav; Paslawski, Wojciech; Svenningsson, Per

    2016-10-01

    Premutations in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene cause fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) and FMR1-related primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). Female FMR1 premutation carriers rarely develop motor features. Dual pathology is an emerging phenomenon among FMR1 premutation carriers. Here, we describe a family affected by FMR1-related disorders in which the female index case has developed a rapidly progressive and disabling syndrome of atypical parkinsonism. This syndrome consists of early onset postural instability, echolalia, dystonia, and varying types of apraxia like early onset orobuccal apraxia and oculomotor apraxia. She has also developed supranuclear gaze palsy, increased latency of saccade initiation, and slow saccades. These features are compatible with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) of a corticobasal syndrome (CBS) variant. Imaging displays a marked reduction of presynaptic dopaminergic uptake and cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed reduced dopamine metabolism; however, the patient is unresponsive to levodopa. Midbrain atrophy ("hummingbird sign") and mild cerebellar atrophy were found on brain MRI. Her father was affected by a typical FXTAS presentation but also displayed dopamine deficiency along with the hummingbird sign. The mechanisms by which FMR1 premutations predispose to atypical parkinsonism and dopamine deficiency await further elucidation. PMID:27230899

  4. Inhibitory effects of ginseng total saponins on behavioral sensitization and dopamine release induced by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Lee, BomBi; Yang, Chae Ha; Hahm, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Hye-Jung; Han, Seung-Moo; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Shim, Insop

    2008-03-01

    Many studies have suggested that the behavioral and reinforcing effects of cocaine can be mediated by the central dopaminergic systems. It has been shown that repeated injections of cocaine produce an increase in locomotor activity, the expression of the immediate-early gene, c-fos, and the release of dopamine (DA) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), which is one of the main dopaminergic terminal areas. Several studies have shown that behavioral activation and changes in extracellular dopamine levels in the central nervous system induced by psychomotor stimulants are prevented by ginseng total saponins (GTS). In order to investigate the effects of GTS on the repeated cocaine-induced behavioral and neurochemical alterations, we examined the influence of GTS on the cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization and on c-Fos expression in the brain using immunohistochemistry in rats repeatedly treated with cocaine. We also examined the effect of GTS on cocaine-induced dopamine release in the NAc of freely moving rats repeatedly treated with cocaine using an in vivo microdialysis technique. Pretreatment with GTS (100, 200, 400 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min before the daily injections of cocaine (15 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly inhibited the repeated cocaine-induced increase in locomotor activity as well as the c-Fos expression in the core and shell in a dose-dependent manner. Also, pretreatment with GTS significantly decreased the repeated cocaine-induced increase in dopamine release in the NAc. Our data demonstrate that the inhibitory effects of GTS on the repeated cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization were closely associated with the reduction of dopamine release and the postsynaptic neuronal activity. The results of the present study suggest that GTS may be effective for inhibiting the behavioral effects of cocaine by possibly modulating the central dopaminergic system. These results also suggest that GTS may prove to be a useful therapeutic agent for cocaine addiction. PMID:18310906

  5. The Effect of Subchronic Dosing of Ciproxifan and Clobenpropit on Dopamine and Histamine Levels in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, D; Pillai, KK; Khanam, R; Jahan, K; Goswami, D; Akhtar, M

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of once daily for 7-day (subchronic treatment) dosing of histamine H3 receptor antagonists, ciproxifan (CPX) (3 mg/kg, i.p.), and clobenpropit (CBP) (15 mg/kg, i.p), including clozapine (CLZ) (3.0 mg/kg, i.p.) and chlorpromazine (CPZ) (3.0 mg/kg, i.p.), the atypical and typical antipsychotic, respectively, on MK-801(0.2 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced locomotor activity, and dopamine and histamine levels in rats. Dopamine and histamine levels were measured in striatum and hypothalamus, respectively, of rat brain. Atypical and typical antipsychotics were used to serve as clinically relevant reference agents to compare the effects of the H3 receptor antagonists. MK-801-induced increase of horizontal activity was reduced with CPX and CBP. The attenuation of MK-801-induced locomotor hyperactivity produced by CPX and CBP was comparable to CLZ and CPZ. MK-801 raised dopamine levels in the striatum, which was reduced in rats pretreated with CPX and CBP. CPZ also lowered striatal dopamine levels, though the decrease was less robust compared to CLZ, CPX and CBP. MK-801 increased histamine content although to a lesser degree. Subchronic treatment with CPX and CBP exhibited further increase in histamine levels in the hypothalamus compared to the MK-801 treatment alone. Histamine H3 receptor agonist, R-α methylhistamine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) counteracted the effects of CPX and CBP. In conclusion, the subchronic dosing of CPX/CBP suggests some antipsychotic-like activities as CPX/CBP counteracts the modulatory effects of MK-801 on dopamine and histamine levels and prevents MK-801-induced hyperlocomotor behaviors. PMID:26379444

  6. Opposite function of dopamine D1 and NMDA receptors in striatal cannabinoid-mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, Tanya L.; Wetsel, William C.; Caron, Marc G.

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that the cannabinoid and dopamine systems interact at various levels to regulate basal ganglia function. While it is well known that acute administration of cannabinoids to mice can modify dopamine-dependent behaviors, an understanding of the intraneuronal signaling pathways employed by these agents in the striatum is not well understood. Here we use knockout (KO) mouse models to examine the regulation of striatal ERK1/2 signaling by behaviorally relevant doses of cannabinoids. This cellular pathway has been implicated as a central mediator of drug reward and synaptic plasticity. In C57BL/6J mice, acute administration of cannabinoid agonists, HU-210 and Δ9-THC, promotes a dose- and time-dependent decrease in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in dorsal striatum. Co-administration of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) antagonist AM251 with HU-210 prevents ERK1/2 inactivation, indicating a requirement for activation of this receptor. In dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) KO animals treated with HU-210, the magnitude of the HU-210-dependent decrease in striatal ERK1/2 signaling is greater than in wild-type controls. In contrast, the HU-210 administration to NMDA receptor knockdown mice (NR1-Kd) was ineffective at promoting striatal ERK1/2 inactivation. Genetic deletion of other potential ERK1/2 mediators, the dopamine D2 receptors (D2R)s or βarrestin-1 or -2, did not affect HU-210-induced modulation of ERK1/2 signaling in the striatum. These results support the hypothesis that dopamine D1 receptors and NMDA receptors act in an opposite manner to regulate striatal CB1R signal transduction. PMID:22034973

  7. Dopamine in the Brain: Hypothesizing Surfeit or Deficit Links to Reward and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Kenneth; Thanos, Peter K.; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Febo, Marcelo; Baron, David; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D.; Gardner, Eliot; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Fahlke, Claudia; Haberstick, Brett C.; Dushaj, Kristina; Gold, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Recently there has been debate concerning the role of brain dopamine in reward and addiction. David Nutt and associates eloquently proposed that dopamine (DA) may be central to psycho stimulant dependence and some what important for alcohol, but not important for opiates, nicotine or even cannabis. Others have also argued that surfeit theories can explain for example cocaine seeking behavior as well as non-substance-related addictive behaviors. It seems prudent to distinguish between what constitutes “surfeit” compared to” deficit” in terms of short-term (acute) and long-term (chronic) brain reward circuitry responsivity. In an attempt to resolve controversy regarding the contributions of mesolimbic DA systems to reward, we review the three main competing explanatory categories: “liking”, “learning”, and “wanting”. They are (a) the hedonic impact -liking reward, (b) the ability to predict rewarding effects-learning and (c) the incentive salience of reward-related stimuli -wanting. In terms of acute effects, most of the evidence seems to favor the “surfeit theory”. Due to preferential dopamine release at mesolimbic-VTA-caudate-accumbens loci most drugs of abuse and Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) behaviors have been linked to heightened feelings of well-being and hyperdopaminergic states.The “dopamine hypotheses” originally thought to be simple, is now believed to be quite complex and involves encoding the set point of hedonic tone, encoding attention, reward expectancy, and incentive motivation. Importantly, Willuhn et al. shows that in a self-administration paradigm, (chronic) excessive use of cocaine is caused by decreased phasic dopamine signaling in the striatum. In terms of chronic addictions, others have shown a blunted responsivity at brain reward sites with food, nicotine, and even gambling behavior. Finally, we are cognizant of the differences in dopaminergic function as addiction progresses and argue that relapse may be tied

  8. Dopamine dysregulation syndrome: an overview of its epidemiology, mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Sean S; Evans, Andrew H; Lees, Andrew J

    2009-01-01

    Dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS) is a relatively recently described iatrogenic disturbance that may complicate long-term symptomatic therapy of Parkinson's disease. Patients with DDS develop an addictive pattern of dopamine replacement therapy (DRT) use, administering doses in excess of those required to control their motor symptoms. The prevalence of DDS in patients attending specialist Parkinson's disease centres is 3-4%. Amongst the behavioural disturbances associated with DDS are punding, which is a complex stereotyped behaviour, and impulse control disorders (ICDs), such as pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping and compulsive eating. We review the risk factors and potential mechanisms for the development of DDS, including personality traits, potential genetic influences and Parkinson's disease-related cognitive deficits. Impulsive personality traits are prominent in patients developing DDS, and have been previously associated with the development of substance dependence. Candidate genes affecting the dopamine 'D(2)-like' receptor family have been associated with impulsive personality traits in addition to drug and nondrug addictions. Impaired decision making is implicated in addictive behaviours, and decision-making abilities can be influenced by dopaminergic medications. In Parkinson's disease, disruption of the reciprocal loops between the striatum and structures in the prefrontal cortex following dopamine depletion may predispose to DDS. The role of DRT in DDS is discussed, with particular reference to models of addiction, suggesting that compulsive drug use is due to progressive neuroadaptations in dopamine projections to the accumbens-related circuitry. Evidence for neuroadaptations and sensitization occurring in DDS include enhanced levodopa-induced ventral striatal dopamine release. Levodopa is still considered the most potent trigger for DDS in Parkinson's disease, but subcutaneous apomorphine and oral dopamine agonists may

  9. Pharmacological characterization of the dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase in cockroach brain: evidence for a distinct dopamine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, G.L.; Gole, J.W.D.; Notman, H.J.; Downer, R.G.H.

    1987-12-21

    Dopamine increases cyclic AMP production in crude membrane preparations of cockroach brain with plateaus in cyclic AMP production occurring between 1-10 ..mu..M and 10 mM. Maximal production of cyclic AMP is 2.25 fold greater than that of control values. Octopamine also increases cyclic AMP production with a Ka of 1.4 ..mu..M and maximal production 3.5 fold greater than that of control. 5-Hydroxytryptamine does not increase cyclic AMP production. The effects of octopamine and dopamine are fully additive. The vertebrate dopamine agonists ADTN and epinine stimulate the dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase (AC) with Ka values of 4.5 and 0.6 ..mu..M respectively and with maximal effectiveness 1.7 fold greater than that of control. The selective D/sub 2/-dopamine agonist LY-171555 stimulates cyclic AMP production to a similar extent with a Ka of 50 ..mu..M. Other dopamine agonists have no stimulatory effects. With the exception of mianserin, /sup 3/H-piflutixol is displaced from brain membranes by dopamine antagonists with an order of potency similar to that observed for the inhibition of dopamine-sensitive AC. The results indicate that the octopamine- and dopamine-sensitive AC in cockroach brain can be distinguished pharmacologically and the dopamine receptors coupled to AC have pharmacological characteristics distinct from vertebrate D/sup 1/- and D/sup 2/-dopamine receptors. 33 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  10. Treatment to sustain a Th17-type phenotype to prevent skewing toward Treg and to limit premalignant lesion progression to cancer.

    PubMed

    Young, M Rita I; Levingston, Corinne A; Johnson, Sara D

    2016-05-15

    While immune suppression is a hallmark of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HSNCC), the immunological impact of premalignant oral lesions, which often precedes development of HNSCC, is unknown. The present study assessed the changes in splenic and draining lymph node CD4(+) cell populations and their production of select cytokines that occur in mice with carcinogen-induced premalignant oral lesions and the changes that occur as lesions progress to oral cancer. These studies found skewing toward Th1 and Th17-type phenotypes in the spleen and lymph nodes of mice with premalignant oral lesions and a shift to Treg as lesions progress to cancer. Since the role of Th17 cells in the progression from premalignant lesions to cancer is not clear, studies determined the immunological and clinical effect of treating mice bearing premalignant oral lesions with a TGF-β type 1 receptor inhibitor plus IL-23 as an approach to sustain the Th17 phenotype. These studies showed that the treatment approach not only sustained the Th17 phenotype, but also increased distal spleen cell and regional lymph node cell production of other stimulatory/inflammatory mediators and slowed premalignant lesion progression to cancer. PMID:26756968

  11. Preventing stroke

    MedlinePlus

    Stroke - prevention; CVA - prevention; cerebral vascular accident - prevention; TIA - prevention, transient ischemic attack - prevention ... Clinical Cardiology; Council on Functional Genomics and ... Council on Hypertension. Guidelines for the primary prevention ...

  12. THE CANCER PROGRESS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Cancer Progress Report 2001 is about our Nation's progress against cancer. The information was gathered through a collaborative effort with other key agencies and groups, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Cancer Society. Data on this site...

  13. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D and progression to diabetes in patients at risk for diabetes: an ancillary analysis in the diabetes prevention program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the association between vitamin D status, assessed by plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and risk of incident diabetes. The research design and methods were a prospective observational study with a mean follow-up of 2.7 years in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a multi-center trial co...

  14. Dopamine D2/D3 but not dopamine D1 receptors are involved in the rapid antidepressant-like effects of ketamine in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zhu, Zhuo R; Ou, Bao C; Wang, Ya Q; Tan, Zhou B; Deng, Chang M; Gao, Yi Y; Tang, Ming; So, Ji H; Mu, Yang L; Zhang, Lan Q

    2015-02-15

    Major depressive disorder is one of the most prevalent and life-threatening forms of mental illnesses. The traditional antidepressants often take several weeks, even months, to obtain clinical effects. However, recent clinical studies have shown that ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, exerts rapid antidepressant effects within 2h and are long-lasting. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether dopaminergic system was involved in the rapid antidepressant effects of ketamine. The acute administration of ketamine (20 mg/kg) significantly reduced the immobility time in the forced swim test. MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg), the more selective NMDA antagonist, also exerted rapid antidepressant-like effects. In contrast, fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) did not significantly reduced the immobility time in the forced swim test after 30 min administration. Notably, pretreatment with haloperidol (0.15 mg/kg, a nonselective dopamine D2/D3 antagonist), but not SCH23390 (0.04 and 0.1 mg/kg, a selective dopamine D1 receptor antagonist), significantly prevented the effects of ketamine or MK-801. Moreover, the administration of sub-effective dose of ketamine (10 mg/kg) in combination with pramipexole (0.3 mg/kg, a dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist) exerted antidepressant-like effects compared with each drug alone. In conclusion, our results indicated that the dopamine D2/D3 receptors, but not D1 receptors, are involved in the rapid antidepressant-like effects of ketamine. PMID:25449845

  15. Dopamine ups and downs in vulnerability to addictions: a neurodevelopmental model

    PubMed Central

    Leyton, Marco; Vezina, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Addictions are commonly presaged by problems in childhood and adolescence. For many individuals this starts with the early expression of impulsive risk-taking, social gregariousness and oppositional behaviors. We propose here that these early diverse manifestations reflect a heightened ability of emotionally salient stimuli to activate dopamine pathways that foster behavioral approach. If substance use is initiated, these at-risk youth can also develop heightened responses to drug-paired cues. Through conditioning and drug-induced sensitization, these effects strengthen and accumulate, leading to responses that exceed those elicited by other rewards. At the same time, cues not paired with drug become associated with comparatively lower dopamine release, accentuating further the difference between drug and non-drug rewards. Together, these enhancing and inhibiting processes steer a pre-existing vulnerability toward a disproportionate concern for drugs and drug-related stimuli. Implications for prevention and treatment are discussed. PMID:24794705

  16. RASGRF2 regulates alcohol-induced reinforcement by influencing mesolimbic dopamine neuron activity and dopamine release

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, David; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Maroteaux, Matthieu; Jia, Tianye; Easton, Alanna C.; Longueville, Sophie; Nymberg, Charlotte; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J.; Büchel, Christian; Carvalho, Fabiana; Conrod, Patricia J.; Desrivières, Sylvane; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Fernandez-Medarde, Alberto; Flor, Herta; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Bokde, Arun L. W.; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Claire; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Mann, Karl F.; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Palkovits, Miklós; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Ruggeri, Barbara; Santos, Eugenio; Smolka, Michael N.; Staehlin, Oliver; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Elliott, Paul; Sommer, Wolfgang H.; Mameli, Manuel; Müller, Christian P.; Spanagel, Rainer; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Schumann, Gunter

    2012-01-01

    The firing of mesolimbic dopamine neurons is important for drug-induced reinforcement, although underlying genetic factors remain poorly understood. In a recent genome-wide association metaanalysis of alcohol intake, we identified a suggestive association of SNP rs26907 in the ras-specific guanine-nucleotide releasing factor 2 (RASGRF2) gene, encoding a protein that mediates Ca2+-dependent activation of the ERK pathway. We performed functional characterization of this gene in relation to alcohol-related phenotypes and mesolimbic dopamine function in both mice and adolescent humans. Ethanol intake and preference were decreased in Rasgrf2−/− mice relative to WT controls. Accordingly, ethanol-induced dopamine release in the ventral striatum was blunted in Rasgrf2−/− mice. Recording of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area revealed reduced excitability in the absence of Ras-GRF2, likely because of lack of inhibition of the IA potassium current by ERK. This deficit provided an explanation for the altered dopamine release, presumably linked to impaired activation of dopamine neurons firing. Functional neuroimaging analysis of a monetary incentive–delay task in 663 adolescent boys revealed significant association of ventral striatal activity during reward anticipation with a RASGRF2 haplotype containing rs26907, the SNP associated with alcohol intake in our previous metaanalysis. This finding suggests a link between the RASGRF2 haplotype and reward sensitivity, a known risk factor for alcohol and drug addiction. Indeed, follow-up of these same boys at age 16 y revealed an association between this haplotype and number of drinking episodes. Together, these combined animal and human data indicate a role for RASGRF2 in the regulation of mesolimbic dopamine neuron activity, reward response, and alcohol use and abuse. PMID:23223532

  17. Sensitivity of binding of high-affinity dopamine receptor radioligands to increased synaptic dopamine.

    PubMed

    Gatley, S J; Gifford, A N; Carroll, F I; Volkow, N D

    2000-12-15

    PET and SPECT studies have documented that D2 radioligands of moderate affinity, but not radioligands of high affinity, are sensitive to pharmacological challenges that alter synaptic dopamine levels. The objective of this work was to determine whether the brain kinetics of high-affinity radioligands for dopamine D1 ([(3)H]SCH 23390) and D2 ([(123)I]epidepride) receptors were altered by a prolonged elevation of synaptic dopamine induced by the potent cocaine analog RTI-55. Mice were injected intravenously with radioligands either 30 min after or 4 h before intraperitoneal administration of RTI-55 (2 mg/kg). In separate experiments, the pharmacological effects of RTI-55 were assessed biochemically by measuring uptake of dopamine in synaptosomes prepared from RTI-treated mice and behaviorally by monitoring locomotor activity. Consistent with the expected elevation of synaptic dopamine, RTI-55 induced a long-lasting decrement in dopamine uptake measured ex vivo, and a prolonged increase in locomotor activity. RTI-55 injected prior to the radioligands induced a significant (P < 0.05) increase in striatal concentration of [(123)I]epidepride at 15 min, relative to saline-treated controls, but there were no differences between the two groups at later time-points. For [(3)H]SCH 23390, both initial striatal uptake and subsequent clearance were slightly increased by preadministration of RTI-55. Administration of RTI-55 4 h after the radioligands (i.e., when it was presumed that a state of near equilibrium binding of the radioligands had been reached), was associated with a significant reduction of striatal radioactivity for both radiotracers. Our results are consistent with increased competition between dopamine and radioligand for binding to both D1 and D2 receptors after treatment with RTI-55. We suggest that the magnitude of the competition is reduced by failure of the receptor binding of high-affinity radioligands to rapidly attain equilibrium. PMID:11044896

  18. RASGRF2 regulates alcohol-induced reinforcement by influencing mesolimbic dopamine neuron activity and dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Stacey, David; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Maroteaux, Matthieu; Jia, Tianye; Easton, Alanna C; Longueville, Sophie; Nymberg, Charlotte; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Büchel, Christian; Carvalho, Fabiana; Conrod, Patricia J; Desrivières, Sylvane; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Fernandez-Medarde, Alberto; Flor, Herta; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Bokde, Arun L W; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Claire; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Mann, Karl F; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Palkovits, Miklós; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Ruggeri, Barbara; Santos, Eugenio; Smolka, Michael N; Staehlin, Oliver; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Elliott, Paul; Sommer, Wolfgang H; Mameli, Manuel; Müller, Christian P; Spanagel, Rainer; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Schumann, Gunter

    2012-12-18

    The firing of mesolimbic dopamine neurons is important for drug-induced reinforcement, although underlying genetic factors remain poorly understood. In a recent genome-wide association metaanalysis of alcohol intake, we identified a suggestive association of SNP rs26907 in the ras-specific guanine-nucleotide releasing factor 2 (RASGRF2) gene, encoding a protein that mediates Ca(2+)-dependent activation of the ERK pathway. We performed functional characterization of this gene in relation to alcohol-related phenotypes and mesolimbic dopamine function in both mice and adolescent humans. Ethanol intake and preference were decreased in Rasgrf2(-/-) mice relative to WT controls. Accordingly, ethanol-induced dopamine release in the ventral striatum was blunted in Rasgrf2(-/-) mice. Recording of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area revealed reduced excitability in the absence of Ras-GRF2, likely because of lack of inhibition of the I(A) potassium current by ERK. This deficit provided an explanation for the altered dopamine release, presumably linked to impaired activation of dopamine neurons firing. Functional neuroimaging analysis of a monetary incentive-delay task in 663 adolescent boys revealed significant association of ventral striatal activity during reward anticipation with a RASGRF2 haplotype containing rs26907, the SNP associated with alcohol intake in our previous metaanalysis. This finding suggests a link between the RASGRF2 haplotype and reward sensitivity, a known risk factor for alcohol and drug addiction. Indeed, follow-up of these same boys at age 16 y revealed an association between this haplotype and number of drinking episodes. Together, these combined animal and human data indicate a role for RASGRF2 in the regulation of mesolimbic dopamine neuron activity, reward response, and alcohol use and abuse. PMID:23223532

  19. Optical suppression of drug-evoked phasic dopamine release

    PubMed Central

    McCutcheon, James E.; Cone, Jackson J.; Sinon, Christopher G.; Fortin, Samantha M.; Kantak, Pranish A.; Witten, Ilana B.; Deisseroth, Karl; Stuber, Garret D.; Roitman, Mitchell F.

    2014-01-01

    Brief fluctuations in dopamine concentration (dopamine transients) play a key role in behavior towards rewards, including drugs of abuse. Drug-evoked dopamine transients may result from actions at both dopamine cell bodies and dopamine terminals. Inhibitory opsins can be targeted to dopamine neurons permitting their firing activity to be suppressed. However, as dopamine transients can become uncoupled from firing, it is unknown whether optogenetic hyperpolarization at the level of the soma is able to suppress dopamine transients. Here, we used in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to record transients evoked by cocaine and raclopride in nucleus accumbens (NAc) of urethane-anesthetized rats. We targeted halorhodopsin (NpHR) specifically to dopamine cells by injecting Cre-inducible virus into ventral tegmental area (VTA) of transgenic rats that expressed Cre recombinase under control of the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter (TH-Cre+ rats). Consistent with previous work, co-administration of cocaine and raclopride led to the generation of dopamine transients in NAc shell. Illumination of VTA with laser strongly suppressed the frequency of transients in NpHR-expressing rats, but not in control rats. Laser did not have any effect on amplitude of transients. Thus, optogenetics can effectively reduce the occurrence of drug-evoked transients and is therefore a suitable approach for studying the functional role of such transients in drug-associated behavior. PMID:25278845

  20. Heterogeneity of dopamine neuron activity across traits and states

    PubMed Central

    Marinelli, Michela; McCutcheon, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons fire irregularly, with interspersed clusters of high-frequency spikes, commonly called ‘bursts’. In this review we examine such heterogeneity in activity, and provide insight into how it can participate in psychiatric conditions such as drug addiction. We first describe several techniques used to evaluate dopamine neuron activity, and comment on the different measures that each provides. We next describe the activity of dopamine neurons in ‘basal’ conditions. Specifically, we discuss how the use of anesthesia and reduced preparations may alter aspects of dopamine cell activity, and how there is heterogeneity across species and regions. We also describe how dopamine cell firing changes throughout the peri-adolescent period and how dopamine neuron activity differs across the population. In the final section, we discuss how dopamine neuron activity changes in response to life events. First, we focus attention on drugs of abuse. Drugs themselves change firing activity through a variety of mechanisms, with effects on firing while drug is present differing from those seen after drug discontinuation. We then review how stimuli that are rewarding, aversive, or salient can evoke changes in firing rate and discharge pattern of dopamine neurons, and provide behavioral relevance of dopamine signaling. Finally, we discuss how stress can modulate dopamine neuron firing and how this may contribute to the role that stressful experiences play in psychiatric disorders such as addiction and depression. PMID:25084048

  1. Increased local dopamine secretion has growth promoting effects in cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Coufal, Monique; Invernizzi, Pietro; Gaudio, Eugenio; Bernuzzi, Francesca; Frampton, Gabriel A.; Onori, Paolo; Franchitto, Antonio; Carpino, Guido; Ramirez, Jonathan C.; Alvaro, Domenico; Marzioni, Marco; Battisti, Guido; Benedetti, Antonio; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a devastating cancer of biliary origin with limited treatment options. Symptoms are usually evident after blockage of the bile duct by the tumor, and at this late stage, they are relatively resistant to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Therefore, it is imperative that alternative treatment options are explored. We have previously shown that serotonin metabolism is dysregulated in cholangiocarcinoma leading to an increased secretion of serotonin, which has growth-promoting effects. Because serotonin and dopamine share the degradation machinery, we evaluated the secretion of dopamine from cholangiocarcinoma and its effects on cell proliferation. Using 4 cholangiocarcinoma cell lines and human biopsy samples, we demonstrated that there was an increase in mRNA and protein expression of the dopamine synthesis enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase and dopa decarboxylase in cholangiocarcinoma. There was increased dopamine secretion from cholangiocarcinoma cell lines compared to H69 and HIBEC cholangiocytes and increased dopamine immunoreactivity in human biopsy samples. Furthermore, administration of dopamine to all cholangiocarcinoma cell lines studied increased proliferation by up to 30% which could be blocked by the pretreatment of the D2 and D4 dopamine receptor antagonists, whereas blocking dopamine production by α-methyldopa administration suppressed growth by up to 25%. Administration of α-methyldopa to nude mice also suppressed cholangiocarcinoma tumor growth. The data presented here represent the first evidence that dopamine metabolism is dysregulated in cholangiocarcinoma and that modulation of dopamine synthesis may represent an alternative target for the development of therapeutic strategies. PMID:19795457

  2. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  3. Heterogeneity of dopamine neuron activity across traits and states.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, M; McCutcheon, J E

    2014-12-12

    Midbrain dopamine neurons fire irregularly, with interspersed clusters of high-frequency spikes, commonly called 'bursts'. In this review we examine such heterogeneity in activity, and provide insight into how it can participate in psychiatric conditions such as drug addiction. We first describe several techniques used to evaluate dopamine neuron activity, and comment on the different measures that each provides. We next describe the activity of dopamine neurons in 'basal' conditions. Specifically, we discuss how the use of anesthesia and reduced preparations may alter aspects of dopamine cell activity, and how there is heterogeneity across species and regions. We also describe how dopamine cell firing changes throughout the peri-adolescent period and how dopamine neuron activity differs across the population. In the final section, we discuss how dopamine neuron activity changes in response to life events. First, we focus attention on drugs of abuse. Drugs themselves change firing activity through a variety of mechanisms, with effects on firing while drug is present differing from those seen after drug discontinuation. We then review how stimuli that are rewarding, aversive, or salient can evoke changes in firing rate and discharge pattern of dopamine neurons, and provide behavioral relevance of dopamine signaling. Finally, we discuss how stress can modulate dopamine neuron firing and how this may contribute to the role that stressful experiences play in psychiatric disorders such as addiction and depression. PMID:25084048

  4. A neural network model with dopamine-like reinforcement signal that learns a spatial delayed response task.

    PubMed

    Suri, R E; Schultz, W

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated how the simulated response of dopamine neurons to reward-related stimuli could be used as reinforcement signal for learning a spatial delayed response task. Spatial delayed response tasks assess the functions of frontal cortex and basal ganglia in short-term memory, movement preparation and expectation of environmental events. In these tasks, a stimulus appears for a short period at a particular location, and after a delay the subject moves to the location indicated. Dopamine neurons are activated by unpredicted rewards and reward-predicting stimuli, are not influenced by fully predicted rewards, and are depressed by omitted rewards. Thus, they appear to report an error in the prediction of reward, which is the crucial reinforcement term in formal learning theories. Theoretical studies on reinforcement learning have shown that signals similar to dopamine responses can be used as effective teaching signals for learning. A neural network model implementing the temporal difference algorithm was trained to perform a simulated spatial delayed response task. The reinforcement signal was modeled according to the basic characteristics of dopamine responses to novel stimuli, primary rewards and reward-predicting stimuli. A Critic component analogous to dopamine neurons computed a temporal error in the prediction of reinforcement and emitted this signal to an Actor component which mediated the behavioral output. The spatial delayed response task was learned via two subtasks introducing spatial choices and temporal delays, in the same manner as monkeys in the laboratory. In all three tasks, the reinforcement signal of the Critic developed in a similar manner to the responses of natural dopamine neurons in comparable learning situations, and the learning curves of the Actor replicated the progress of learning observed in the animals. Several manipulations demonstrated further the efficacy of the particular characteristics of the dopamine

  5. Revisiting multiple models of progression of β-cell loss of function in type 1 diabetes: Significance for prevention and cure.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Cheng, Jin; Zhou, Zhiguang

    2016-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from a chronic autoimmune process that leads to β-cell destruction and exogenous insulin dependence. The natural history of T1D proposed by Eisenbarth suggested six relatively independent stages over the course of the entire disease process, which was considered to be linear and chronic. Based on this classical theory, immunotherapies aim to prevent or reverse all these periods of β-cell loss. Over the past 30 years, much novel information about the pathogenesis of T1D proved that there are complex metabolic changes occurring throughout the entire disease process. Therefore, new possible models for the natural history of the disease have been proposed; these models, in turn, may help facilitate fresh avenues for the prevention and cure of T1D. Herein, we briefly review recent findings in this field of research, with the aim of providing a better theoretical basis for clinical practice. PMID:26754489

  6. [Predictive indicators for progression to severe complications(hemolytic-uremic syndrome and encephalopathy) and their prevention in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli infection].

    PubMed

    Joh, K

    1997-03-01

    The treatment of infection with enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli(EHEC) aims for early prediction and prevention of severe complications such as hemolytic-uremic syndrome, encephalopathy and/or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Factors related to the complications are divided into three categories; risk factors or predisposition, predictors, and indicators of severity and outcome. Risk factors for complications include two extreme ages, infection with verotoxin 2 producing E. coli, positive stool culture for EHEC, use of antimotility drug, use of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Predictors for complications include severe abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea development of high fever, change of consciousness, urinal protein and/or occult blood, abrupt increase of white blood cell count, urinal NAG, alpha 1 microglobulin, beta 2 microglobulin, low osmolar urine, high thrombomodulin level, marked thickening of intestinal wall, increased brightness of kidney in ultrasound sonography. No preventive treatment for these complications is proven except SYNSORB-pk which is expected to effectively aborb verotoxin in the intestine. PMID:9086784

  7. Recovery of dopamine transporters with methamphetamine detoxification is not linked to changes in dopamine release

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, Nora D.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Smith, Lisa; Fowler, Joanna S.; Telang, Frank; Logan, Jean; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-07-21

    Metamphetamine’s widepread abuse and concerns that it may increase Parkinson’s disease led us to assess if the reported loss of dopamine transporters (DAT) in methamphetamine abusers (MA) reflected damage to dopamine neurons. Using PET with [11C]cocaine to measure DAT, and with [11C]raclopride to measure dopamine release (assessed as changes in specific binding of [11C]raclopride between placebo and methylphenidate), which was used as marker of dopamine neuronal function, we show that MA (n=16), tested during early detoxification, had lower DAT (20-30%) but overall normal DA release in striatum (except for a small decrease in left putamen), when compared to controls (n=15). In controls, DAT were positively correlated with DA release (higher DAT associated with larger DA increases), consistent with DAT serving as markers of DA terminals. In contrast, MA showed a trend for a negative correlation (p=0.07) (higher DAT associated with lower DA increases), consistent with reduced DA re-uptake following DAT downregulation. MA who remained abstinent nine-months later (n=9) showed significant increases in DAT (20%) but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases did not change. In contrast, in controls, DAT did not change when retested 9 months later but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases in ventral striatum were reduced (p=0.05). Baseline D2/D3 receptors in caudate were lower in MA than in controls and did not change with detoxification, nor did they change in the controls upon retest. The loss of DAT in the MA, which was not associated with a concomitant reduction in dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT loss reflected DA terminal degneration; as well as the recovery of DAT after protracted detoxification, which was not associated with increased dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT increases reflected terminal regeneration, indicate that the loss of DAT in these MA does not reflect degeneration of

  8. Recovery of dopamine transporters with methamphetamine detoxification is not linked to changes in dopamine release

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Volkow, Nora D.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Smith, Lisa; Fowler, Joanna S.; Telang, Frank; Logan, Jean; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-07-21

    Metamphetamine’s widepread abuse and concerns that it may increase Parkinson’s disease led us to assess if the reported loss of dopamine transporters (DAT) in methamphetamine abusers (MA) reflected damage to dopamine neurons. Using PET with [11C]cocaine to measure DAT, and with [11C]raclopride to measure dopamine release (assessed as changes in specific binding of [11C]raclopride between placebo and methylphenidate), which was used as marker of dopamine neuronal function, we show that MA (n=16), tested during early detoxification, had lower DAT (20-30%) but overall normal DA release in striatum (except for a small decrease in left putamen), when compared to controls (n=15).more » In controls, DAT were positively correlated with DA release (higher DAT associated with larger DA increases), consistent with DAT serving as markers of DA terminals. In contrast, MA showed a trend for a negative correlation (p=0.07) (higher DAT associated with lower DA increases), consistent with reduced DA re-uptake following DAT downregulation. MA who remained abstinent nine-months later (n=9) showed significant increases in DAT (20%) but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases did not change. In contrast, in controls, DAT did not change when retested 9 months later but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases in ventral striatum were reduced (p=0.05). Baseline D2/D3 receptors in caudate were lower in MA than in controls and did not change with detoxification, nor did they change in the controls upon retest. The loss of DAT in the MA, which was not associated with a concomitant reduction in dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT loss reflected DA terminal degneration; as well as the recovery of DAT after protracted detoxification, which was not associated with increased dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT increases reflected terminal regeneration, indicate that the loss of DAT in these MA does not reflect degeneration of dopamine terminals.« less

  9. Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease: background and update on prevention and management

    PubMed Central

    Leeman, Robert F; Billingsley, Benjamin E; Potenza, Marc N

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Given that impulse control disorders (ICDs) have been identified among a considerable minority of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, these conditions have gained increased clinical and research attention in the past decade. Dopamine-replacement therapies, taken to ameliorate PD symptoms, have been associated with ICDs in PD. Unfortunately, there are relatively sparse empirical data regarding how best to address ICDs in PD patients. Conversely, progress has been made in understanding the clinical, neurobiological and cognitive correlates of ICDs in PD. Some of these findings may inform possible courses of action for care providers working with PD patients with ICDs. The literature on ICDs in non-PD populations may also be informative in this regard. The goals of the present article are to outline important clinical characteristics of ICDs in PD, briefly review relevant neurocognitive and neurobiological studies and discuss possible ways to prevent and manage ICDs in PD. PMID:23606908

  10. Potential Harmful Effects of PM2.5 on Occurrence and Progression of Acute Coronary Syndrome: Epidemiology, Mechanisms, and Prevention Measures.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xu; Zhang, Ying; Yang, Kun-Qi; Yang, Yan-Kun; Zhou, Xian-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The harmful effects of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of <2.5 µm (PM2.5) and its association with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has gained increased attention in recent years. Significant associations between PM2.5 and ACS have been found in most studies, although sometimes only observed in specific subgroups. PM2.5-induced detrimental effects and ACS arise through multiple mechanisms, including endothelial injury, an enhanced inflammatory response, oxidative stress, autonomic dysfunction, and mitochondria damage as well as genotoxic effects. These effects can lead to a series of physiopathological changes including coronary artery atherosclerosis, hypertension, an imbalance between energy supply and demand to heart tissue, and a systemic hypercoagulable state. Effective strategies to prevent the harmful effects of PM2.5 include reducing pollution sources of PM2.5 and population exposure to PM2.5, and governments and organizations publicizing the harmful effects of PM2.5 and establishing air quality standards for PM2.5. PM2.5 exposure is a significant risk factor for ACS, and effective strategies with which to prevent both susceptible and healthy populations from an increased risk for ACS have important clinical significance in the prevention and treatment of ACS. PMID:27463723

  11. Potential Harmful Effects of PM2.5 on Occurrence and Progression of Acute Coronary Syndrome: Epidemiology, Mechanisms, and Prevention Measures

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xu; Zhang, Ying; Yang, Kun-Qi; Yang, Yan-Kun; Zhou, Xian-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The harmful effects of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of <2.5 µm (PM2.5) and its association with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has gained increased attention in recent years. Significant associations between PM2.5 and ACS have been found in most studies, although sometimes only observed in specific subgroups. PM2.5-induced detrimental effects and ACS arise through multiple mechanisms, including endothelial injury, an enhanced inflammatory response, oxidative stress, autonomic dysfunction, and mitochondria damage as well as genotoxic effects. These effects can lead to a series of physiopathological changes including coronary artery atherosclerosis, hypertension, an imbalance between energy supply and demand to heart tissue, and a systemic hypercoagulable state. Effective strategies to prevent the harmful effects of PM2.5 include reducing pollution sources of PM2.5 and population exposure to PM2.5, and governments and organizations publicizing the harmful effects of PM2.5 and establishing air quality standards for PM2.5. PM2.5 exposure is a significant risk factor for ACS, and effective strategies with which to prevent both susceptible and healthy populations from an increased risk for ACS have important clinical significance in the prevention and treatment of ACS. PMID:27463723

  12. D2 dopamine receptor activation of potassium channels is selectively decoupled by Galpha-specific GoLoco motif peptides.

    PubMed

    Webb, Christina K; McCudden, Christopher R; Willard, Francis S; Kimple, Randall J; Siderovski, David P; Oxford, Gerry S

    2005-03-01

    The GoLoco motif is a short polypeptide sequence found in G-protein signaling regulators such as regulator of G-protein signaling proteins type 12 and 14 and activator of G-protein signaling protein type 3. A unique property of the GoLoco motifs from these three proteins is their preferential interaction with guanosine diphosphate (GDP)-bound Galpha(i1), Galpha(i3) and, sometimes, Galpha(i2) subunits over Galpha(o) subunits. This interaction prevents both spontaneous guanine nucleotide release and reassociation of Galpha(i)-GDP with Gbetagamma. We utilized this property of the GoLoco motif to examine dopamine (D2 and D3) and somatostatin receptor coupling to G-protein-regulated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels in mouse AtT20 cells. GoLoco motif peptides had no effect on either basal channel activity or the initial responses to agonists, suggesting that the GoLoco motif cannot disrupt pre-formed G-protein heterotrimers. GoLoco motif peptides did, however, interfere with human D2((short)) receptor coupling to GIRK channels as demonstrated by the progressively diminished responses after repeated agonist application. This behavior is consistent with some form of compartmentalization of D2 receptors and GIRK channels such that Gbetagamma subunits, freed by local receptor activation and prevented from reforming a heterotrimeric complex, are not functionally constrained within the receptor-channel complex and thus are unable to exert a persistent activating effect. In contrast, GoLoco motif peptides had no effect on either D3 or somatostatin coupling to GIRK channels. Our results suggest that GoLoco motif-based peptides will be useful tools in examining the specificity of G-protein-coupled receptor-effector coupling. PMID:15748159

  13. The dopamine β-hydroxylase inhibitor, nepicastat, suppresses chocolate self-administration and reinstatement of chocolate seeking in rats.

    PubMed

    Zaru, Alessandro; Maccioni, Paola; Colombo, Giancarlo; Gessa, Gian Luigi

    2013-10-01

    Craving for chocolate is a common phenomenon, which may evolve to an addictive-like behaviour and contribute to obesity. Nepicastat is a selective dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) inhibitor that suppresses cocaine-primed reinstatement of cocaine seeking in rats. We verified whether nepicastat was able to modify the reinforcing and motivational properties of a chocolate solution and to prevent the reinstatement of chocolate seeking in rats. Nepicastat (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) produced a dose-related inhibition of operant self-administration of the chocolate solution in rats under fixed-ratio 10 (FR10) and progressive-ratio schedules of reinforcement, measures of the reinforcing and motivational properties of the chocolate solution, respectively. The effect of nepicastat on the reinstatement of chocolate seeking was studied in rats in which lever-responding had been extinguished by removing the chocolate solution for approximately 8 d. Nepicastat dose-dependently suppressed the reinstatement of lever-responding triggered by a 'priming' of the chocolate solution together with cues previously associated with the availability of the reward. In a separate group of food-restricted rats trained to lever-respond for regular food pellets, nepicastat reduced FR10 lever-responding with the same potency as for the chocolate solution. Spontaneous locomotor activity was not modified by nepicastat doses that reduced self-administration of the chocolate solution and regular food pellets and suppressed the reinstatement of chocolate seeking. The results indicate that nepicastat reduces motivation to food consumption sustained by appetite or palatability. Moreover, the results suggest that DBH inhibitors may be a new class of pharmacological agents potentially useful in the prevention of relapse to food seeking in human dieters. PMID:23561307

  14. A Physical Interaction between the Dopamine Transporter and DJ-1 Facilitates Increased Dopamine Reuptake

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Beryl; Mohammed, Mohinuddin; Liu, Fang; Lee, Frank J. S.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of the dopamine transporter (DAT) impacts extracellular dopamine levels after release from dopaminergic neurons. Furthermore, a variety of protein partners have been identified that can interact with and modulate DAT function. In this study we show that DJ-1 can potentially modulate DAT function. Co-expression of DAT and DJ-1 in HEK-293T cells leads to an increase in [3H] dopamine uptake that does not appear to be mediated by increased total DAT expression but rather through an increase in DAT cell surface localization. In addition, through a series of GST affinity purifications and co-immunoprecipitations, we provide evidence that the DAT can be found in a complex with DJ-1, which involve distinct regions within both DAT and DJ-1. Using in vitro binding experiments we also show that this complex can be formed in part by a direct interaction between DAT and DJ-1. Co-expression of a mini-gene that can disrupt the DAT/DJ-1 complex appears to block the increase in [3H] dopamine uptake by DJ-1. Mutations in DJ-1 have been linked to familial forms of Parkinson’s disease, yet the normal physiological function of DJ-1 remains unclear. Our study suggests that DJ-1 may also play a role in regulating dopamine levels by modifying DAT activity. PMID:26305376

  15. [Effect of dopamine on the portal pressure].

    PubMed

    Benko, H; Peschl, L; Schüller, J; Neumayr, A

    1975-01-01

    1. An infusion of 3 gamma/kg/min dopamine causes a significant increase in the renal plasma flow and the glomerulum filtration rate. This dosage does not cause a change of the mean systolic and arterial pressure. This effect may also be observed in patients with hepatic cirrhosis. 2. The wedged hepatic vein pressure, an indicator for the portal pressure, only shows a slight increase (9,46 +/- 9,41%) as compared to the initial pressure produced by the mentioned dose. Measurements of the spleen pulpa pressure, which likewise indicates the portal pressure, showed an increase of pressure up to 100% due to pressing or coughing. 3. If in the case of bleeding oesophageal varices acute renal failure might develop, the advantage of the effect of dopamine in stimulating the blood flow through the kidneys may be considered more important than the minute danger of a slight increase of the portal pressure, which might provoke haemorrhage. PMID:1220517

  16. Dopamine neurons share common response function for reward prediction error

    PubMed Central

    Eshel, Neir; Tian, Ju; Bukwich, Michael; Uchida, Naoshige

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine neurons are thought to signal reward prediction error, or the difference between actual and predicted reward. How dopamine neurons jointly encode this information, however, remains unclear. One possibility is that different neurons specialize in different aspects of prediction error; another is that each neuron calculates prediction error in the same way. We recorded from optogenetically-identified dopamine neurons in the lateral ventral tegmental area (VTA) while mice performed classical conditioning tasks. Our tasks allowed us to determine the full prediction error functions of dopamine neurons and compare them to each other. We found striking homogeneity among individual dopamine neurons: their responses to both unexpected and expected rewards followed the same function, just scaled up or down. As a result, we could describe both individual and population responses using just two parameters. Such uniformity ensures robust information coding, allowing each dopamine neuron to contribute fully to the prediction error signal. PMID:26854803

  17. A descending dopamine pathway conserved from basal vertebrates to mammals.

    PubMed

    Ryczko, Dimitri; Cone, Jackson J; Alpert, Michael H; Goetz, Laurent; Auclair, François; Dubé, Catherine; Parent, Martin; Roitman, Mitchell F; Alford, Simon; Dubuc, Réjean

    2016-04-26

    Dopamine neurons are classically known to modulate locomotion indirectly through ascending projections to the basal ganglia that project down to brainstem locomotor networks. Their loss in Parkinson's disease is devastating. In lampreys, we recently showed that brainstem networks also receive direct descending dopaminergic inputs that potentiate locomotor output. Here, we provide evidence that this descending dopaminergic pathway is conserved to higher vertebrates, including mammals. In salamanders, dopamine neurons projecting to the striatum or brainstem locomotor networks were partly intermingled. Stimulation of the dopaminergic region evoked dopamine release in brainstem locomotor networks and concurrent reticulospinal activity. In rats, some dopamine neurons projecting to the striatum also innervated the pedunculopontine nucleus, a known locomotor center, and stimulation of the dopaminergic region evoked pedunculopontine dopamine release in vivo. Finally, we found dopaminergic fibers in the human pedunculopontine nucleus. The conservation of a descending dopaminergic pathway across vertebrates warrants re-evaluating dopamine's role in locomotion. PMID:27071118

  18. Alcohol-induced alterations in dopamine modulation of prefrontal activity.

    PubMed

    Trantham-Davidson, Heather; Chandler, L Judson

    2015-12-01

    Long-term alcohol use leads to persistent cognitive deficits that may be associated with maladaptive changes in the neurocircuitry that mediates executive functions. Impairments caused by these changes can persist well into abstinence and have a negative impact on quality of life and job performance, and can increase the probability of relapse. Many of the changes that affect cognitive function appear to involve dysregulation of the mesocortical dopamine system. This includes changes in dopamine release and alterations in dopamine receptor expression and function in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC). This review summarizes the cellular effects of acute and chronic ethanol exposure on dopamine release and dopamine receptor function in the PFC with the goal of providing greater understanding of the effects of alcohol-use disorders on the dopamine system and how this relates to deficits in the executive function of the PFC. PMID:26558348

  19. Structural studies of dopamine. beta. -hydroxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulos, N.J.

    1985-01-01

    Dopamine ..beta..-hydroxylase catalyzes the conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine, a ..beta..-hydroxylation reaction, utilizing ascorbic acid as reducing agent and molecular oxygen as cosubstrate. Modifications of the previously published purification procedure for D..beta..H have produced findings which show that (1) enzyme is inactivated by ascorbate autooxidation during the isolation procedure, (2) active as well as inactive D..beta..H co-purify throughout the entire purification procedure and (3) beef liver catalase totally protects against this time dependent inactivation. The stoichiometry of copper binding to the active sites of D..beta..H has been investigated using /sup 19/F-NMR and radioactive binding experiments. The data unequivocally show that homogeneous D..beta..H (isolated in the presence of catalase) specifically binds up to approx.8 copper atoms per enzyme tetramer. Distance determinations done using NMR relaxation rate theory show that anion activators of the catalytic reaction are bound at a fairly far distance from the Cu/sup 2 +/ centers. Spin-echo electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy indicates that at least one, possibly two, histidines are bound as equatorial ligands to each Cu/sup 2 +/ ion. The combined data indicate that highly purified dopamine ..beta..-hydroxylase contains a 2 copper atom active site, composed of magnetically non-interacting metal centers. Active site components are distant from the Cu/sup 2 +/ centers, suggesting a possible movement of active site residues or components after reduction of enzyme bound copper in order to achieve the insertion of 1 atom of oxygen into the benzylic C-H bond of dopamine.

  20. Depressive-like effects of the kappa opioid receptor agonist salvinorin A are associated with decreased phasic dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Ebner, Stephanie R.; Roitman, Mitchell F.; Potter, David N.; Rachlin, Anna B.; Chartoff, Elena H.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Kappa opioid receptors (KORs) have been implicated in depressive-like states associated with chronic administration of drugs of abuse and stress. Although KOR agonists decrease dopamine in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), KOR modulation of phasic dopamine release in the core and shell subregions of the NAc—which have distinct roles in reward processing—remains poorly understood. Objectives Studies were designed to examine whether the time course of effects of KOR activation on phasic dopamine release in the NAc core or shell are similar to effects on motivated behavior. Methods The effect of systemic administration of the KOR agonist salvinorin A (salvA)—at a dose (2.0 mg/kg) previously determined to have depressive-like effects—was measured on electrically evoked phasic dopamine release in the NAc core or shell of awake and behaving rats using fast scan cyclic voltammetry. In parallel, the effects of salvA on intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) and sucrose-reinforced responding were assessed. For comparison, a threshold dose of salvA (0.25 mg/kg) was also tested. Results The active, but not threshold, dose of salvA significantly decreased phasic dopamine release without affecting dopamine reuptake in the NAc core and shell. SalvA increased ICSS thresholds and significantly lowered breakpoint on the progressive ratio schedule, indicating a decrease in motivation. The time course of the KOR-mediated decrease in dopamine in the core was qualitatively similar to the effects on motivated behavior. Conclusions These data suggest that the effects of KOR activation on motivation are due, in part, to inhibition of phasic dopamine signaling in the NAc core. PMID:20372879

  1. Action Initiation Shapes Mesolimbic Dopamine Encoding of Future Rewards

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Emilie C.J.; Grima, Laura L.; Magill, Peter J.; Bogacz, Rafal; Brown, Peter; Walton, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    It is widely held that dopamine signaling encodes predictions of future rewards and such predictions are regularly used to drive behavior, but the relationship between these two is poorly defined. Here, we demonstrate in rats that nucleus accumbens dopamine following a reward-predicting cue is attenuated unless movement is correctly initiated. These results demonstrate that dopamine release in this region is contingent upon correct action initiation and not just reward prediction. PMID:26642087

  2. The dopamine transporter: role in neurotoxicity and human disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bannon, Michael J. . E-mail: mbannon@med.wayne.edu

    2005-05-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a plasma membrane transport protein expressed exclusively within a small subset of CNS neurons. It plays a crucial role in controlling dopamine-mediated neurotransmission and a number of associated behaviors. This review focuses on recent data elucidating the role of the dopamine transporter in neurotoxicity and a number of CNS disorders, including Parkinson disease, drug abuse, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

  3. Brain dopamine and kinematics of graphomotor functions.

    PubMed

    Lange, Klaus W; Mecklinger, Lara; Walitza, Susanne; Becker, Georg; Gerlach, Manfred; Naumann, Markus; Tucha, Oliver

    2006-10-01

    Three experiments were performed in an attempt to achieve a better understanding of the effect of dopamine on handwriting. In the first experiment, kinematic aspects of handwriting movements were compared between healthy participants and patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) on their usual dopaminergic treatment and following withdrawal of dopaminergic medication. In the second experiment, the writing performance of healthy participants with a hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra as detected by transcranial sonography (TCS) was compared with the performance of healthy participants with low echogenicity of the substantia nigra. The third experiment examined the effect of central dopamine reduction on kinematic aspects of handwriting movements in healthy adults using acute phenylalanine and tyrosine depletion (APTD). A digitising tablet was used for the assessment of handwriting movements. Participants were asked to perform a simple writing task. Movement time, distance, velocity, acceleration and measures of fluency of handwriting movements were measured. The kinematic analysis of handwriting movements revealed that alterations of central dopaminergic neurotransmission adversely affect movement execution during handwriting. In comparison to the automatic processing of handwriting movements displayed by control participants, participants with an altered dopaminergic neurotransmission shifted from an automatic to a controlled processing of movement execution. Central dopamine appears to be of particular importance with regard to the automatic execution of well-learned movements. PMID:16859791

  4. DOPAMINE AND FOOD ADDICTION: LEXICON BADLY NEEDED

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, John D.; Correa, Mercè

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few years, the concept of food addiction has become a common feature in the scientific literature, as well as the popular press. Nevertheless, the use of the term “addiction” to describe pathological aspects of food intake in humans remains controversial, and even among those who affirm the validity of the concept, there is considerable disagreement about its utility for explaining the increasing prevalence of obesity throughout much of the world. An examination of the literature on food addiction indicates that mesolimbic and nigrostriatal dopamine systems often are cited as mechanisms that contribute to the establishment of food addiction. However, in reviewing this literature, it is important to have a detailed consideration of the complex nature of dopaminergic involvement in motivational processes. For example, although it is often stated that mesolimbic dopamine mediates “reward”, there is no standard or consistent technical meaning of this term. Moreover, there is a persistent tendency to link dopamine transmission with pleasure or hedonia, as opposed to other aspects of motivation or learning. The present paper provides a critical discussion of some aspects of the food addiction literature, viewed through the lens of recent findings and current theoretical views of dopaminergic involvement in food motivation. Furthermore, compulsive food intake and binge eating will be considered from an evolutionary perspective, in terms of the motivational subsystems that are involved in adaptive patterns of food consumption and seeking behaviors, and a consideration of how these could be altered in pathological conditions. PMID:23177385

  5. Dopamine and food addiction: lexicon badly needed.

    PubMed

    Salamone, John D; Correa, Mercè

    2013-05-01

    Over the last few years, the concept of food addiction has become a common feature in the scientific literature, as well as the popular press. Nevertheless, the use of the term addiction to describe pathological aspects of food intake in humans remains controversial, and even among those who affirm the validity of the concept, there is considerable disagreement about its utility for explaining the increasing prevalence of obesity throughout much of the world. An examination of the literature on food addiction indicates that mesolimbic and nigrostriatal dopamine systems often are cited as mechanisms that contribute to the establishment of food addiction. However, in reviewing this literature, it is important to have a detailed consideration of the complex nature of dopaminergic involvement in motivational processes. For example, although it is often stated that mesolimbic dopamine mediates reward, there is no standard or consistent technical meaning of this term. Moreover, there is a persistent tendency to link dopamine transmission with pleasure or hedonia, as opposed to other aspects of motivation or learning. The present article provides a critical discussion of some aspects of the food addiction literature, viewed through the lens of recent findings and current theoretical views of dopaminergic involvement in food motivation. Furthermore, compulsive food intake and binge eating will be considered from an evolutionary perspective, in terms of the motivational subsystems that are involved in adaptive patterns of food consumption and seeking behaviors and a consideration of how these could be altered in pathological conditions. PMID:23177385

  6. Linking unfounded beliefs to genetic dopamine availability

    PubMed Central

    Schmack, Katharina; Rössler, Hannes; Sekutowicz, Maria; Brandl, Eva J.; Müller, Daniel J.; Petrovic, Predrag; Sterzer, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Unfounded convictions involving beliefs in the paranormal, grandiosity ideas or suspicious thoughts are endorsed at varying degrees among the general population. Here, we investigated the neurobiopsychological basis of the observed inter-individual variability in the propensity toward unfounded beliefs. One hundred two healthy individuals were genotyped for four polymorphisms in the COMT gene (rs6269, rs4633, rs4818, and rs4680, also known as val158met) that define common functional haplotypes with substantial impact on synaptic dopamine degradation, completed a questionnaire measuring unfounded beliefs, and took part in a behavioral experiment assessing perceptual inference. We found that greater dopamine availability was associated with a stronger propensity toward unfounded beliefs, and that this effect was statistically mediated by an enhanced influence of expectations on perceptual inference. Our results indicate that genetic differences in dopaminergic neurotransmission account for inter-individual differences in perceptual inference linked to the formation and maintenance of unfounded beliefs. Thus, dopamine might be critically involved in the processes underlying one's interpretation of the relationship between the self and the world. PMID:26483654

  7. Postnatal manganese exposure alters dopamine transporter function in adult rats: Potential impact on nonassociative and associative processes.

    PubMed

    McDougall, S A; Reichel, C M; Farley, C M; Flesher, M M; Der-Ghazarian, T; Cortez, A M; Wacan, J J; Martinez, C E; Varela, F A; Butt, A E; Crawford, C A

    2008-06-23

    In the present study, we examined whether exposing rats to a high-dose regimen of manganese chloride (Mn) during the postnatal period would depress presynaptic dopamine functioning and alter nonassociative and associative behaviors. To this end, rats were given oral supplements of Mn (750 microg/day) on postnatal days (PD) 1-21. On PD 90, dopamine transporter (DAT) immunoreactivity and [3H]dopamine uptake were assayed in the striatum and nucleus accumbens, while in vivo microdialysis was used to measure dopamine efflux in the same brain regions. The effects of postnatal Mn exposure on nigrostriatal functioning were evaluated by assessing rotorod performance and amphetamine-induced stereotypy in adulthood. In terms of associative processes, both cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) and sucrose-reinforced operant responding were examined. Results showed that postnatal Mn exposure caused persistent declines in DAT protein expression and [3H]dopamine uptake in the striatum and nucleus accumbens, as well as long-term reductions in striatal dopamine efflux. Rotorod performance did not differ according to exposure condition, however Mn-exposed rats did exhibit substantially more amphetamine-induced stereotypy than vehicle controls. Mn exposure did not alter performance on any aspect of the CPP task (preference, extinction, or reinstatement testing), nor did Mn affect progressive ratio responding (a measure of motivation). Interestingly, acquisition of a fixed ratio task was impaired in Mn-exposed rats, suggesting a deficit in procedural learning. In sum, these results indicate that postnatal Mn exposure causes persistent declines in various indices of presynaptic dopaminergic functioning. Mn-induced alterations in striatal functioning may have long-term impact on associative and nonassociative behavior. PMID:18485605

  8. Selective Effects of Dopamine Depletion and L-DOPA Therapy on Learning-Related Firing Dynamics of Striatal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Ledia F.; Kubota, Yasuo; Hu, Dan; Howe, Mark W.; Lemaire, Nune; Graybiel, Ann M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite evidence that dopamine neurotransmission in the striatum is critical for learning as well as for movement control, little is yet known about how the learning-related dynamics of striatal activity are affected by dopamine depletion, a condition faced in Parkinson’s disease. We made localized intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions in rats and recorded within the dopamine-depleted sensorimotor striatal zone and its contralateral correspondent as the animals learned a conditional maze task. Rather than producing global, non-specific elevations in firing rate across the task, the dopamine depletion altered striatal projection neuron activity and fast-spiking interneuron activity selectively, with sharply task-specific and cell-type specific effects, and often, with learning-stage selective effects as well. Striatal projection neurons with strong responses during the maze runs had especially elevated responsiveness during the maze runs. Projection neurons that, instead, fired most strongly prior to maze running showed elevated pre-start firing rates, but not during maze running, as learning progressed. The intrastriatal dopamine depletion severely affected the learning-related patterning of fast-spiking interneuron ensembles, especially during maze running and after extended training. Remarkably, L-DOPA treatment almost entirely reversed the depletion-induced elevations in pre-run firing of the projection neurons, and elevated their responses around start and end of maze runs. By contrast, L-DOPA failed to normalize fast-spiking interneuron activity. Thus the effects of striatal dopamine depletion and restoration on striatal activity are highly dependent not only on cell type, as previously shown, but also on the behavioral activity called for and the state of behavioral learning achieved. PMID:23486949

  9. Atypical Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors that Provide Clues About Cocaine's Mechanism at the Dopamine Transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck Newman, Amy; Katz, Jonathan L.

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) has been a primary target for cocaine abuse/addiction medication discovery. However predicted addiction liability and limited clinical evaluation has provided a formidable challenge for development of these agents for human use. The unique and atypical pharmacological profile of the benztropine (BZT) class of dopamine uptake inhibitors, in preclinical models of cocaine effects and abuse, has encouraged further development of these agents. Moreover, in vivo studies have challenged the original DAT hypothesis and demonstrated that DAT occupancy and subsequent increases in dopamine produced by BZT analogues are significantly delayed and long lasting, as compared to cocaine. These important and distinctive elements are critical to the lack of abuse liability among BZT analogues, and improve their potential for development as treatments for cocaine abuse and possibly other neuropsychiatric disorders.

  10. The binding sites for cocaine and dopamine in the dopamine transporter overlap

    PubMed Central

    Beuming, Thijs; Kniazeff, Julie; Bergmann, Marianne L; Shi, Lei; Gracia, Luis; Raniszewska, Klaudia; Newman, Amy Hauck; Javitch, Jonathan A; Weinstein, Harel; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine is a widely abused substance with psychostimulant effects that are attributed to inhibition of the dopamine transporter (DAT). We present molecular models for DAT binding of cocaine and cocaine analogs constructed from the high-resolution structure of the bacterial transporter homolog LeuT. Our models suggest that the binding site for cocaine and cocaine analogs is deeply buried between transmembrane segments 1, 3, 6 and 8, and overlaps with the binding sites for the substrates dopamine and amphetamine, as well as for benztropine-like DAT inhibitors. We validated our models by detailed mutagenesis and by trapping the radiolabeled cocaine analog [3H]CFT in the transporter, either by cross-linking engineered cysteines or with an engineered Zn2+-binding site that was situated extracellularly to the predicted common binding pocket. Our data demonstrate the molecular basis for the competitive inhibition of dopamine transport by cocaine. PMID:18568020

  11. Cloning of the cocaine-sensitive bovine dopamine transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Usdin, T.B.; Chen, C.; Brownstein, M.J.; Hoffman, B.J. ); Mezey, E. )

    1991-12-15

    A cDNA encoding the dopamine transporter from bovine brain substantia nigra was identified on the basis of its structural homology to other, recently cloned, neurotransmitter transporters. The sequence of the 693-amino acid protein is quite similar to those of the rat {gamma}-aminobutyric acid, human norepinephrine, and rat serotonin transporters. Dopamine transporter mRNA was detected by in situ hybridization in the substantia nigra but not in the locus coeruleus, raphe, caudate, or other brain areas. ({sup 3}H)Dopamine accumulation in tissue culture cells transfected with the cDNA was inhibited by amphetamine, cocaine, and specific inhibitors of dopamine transports, including GBR12909.

  12. Dopamine release in rat striatum - Physiological coupling to tyrosine supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    During, Matthew J.; Acworth, Ian N.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    Intracerebral microdialysis was used to monitor dopamine release in rat striatal extracellular fluid following the intraperitoneal administration of dopamine's precursor amino acid, L-tyrosine. Dopamine concentrations in dialysates increased transiently after tyrosine (50-100 mg/kg) administration. Pretreatment with haloperidol or the partial lesioning of nigrostriatal neurons enhanced the effect of tyrosine on dopamine release, and haloperidol also prolonged this effect. These data suggest that nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons are responsive to changes in precursor availability under basal conditions, but that receptor-mediated feedback mechanisms limit the magnitude and duration of this effect.

  13. Optogenetic control of striatal dopamine release in rats

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Caroline E; Grinevich, Valentina P; Vance, Zachary B; Sullivan, Ryan P; Bonin, Keith D; Budygin, Evgeny A

    2010-01-01

    Optogenetic control over neuronal firing has become an increasingly elegant method to dissect the microcircuitry of mammalian brains. To date, examination of these manipulations on neurotransmitter release has been minimal. Here we present the first in-depth analysis of optogenetic stimulation on dopamine neurotransmission in the dorsal striatum of urethane-anesthetized rats. By combining the tight spatial and temporal resolution of both optogenetics and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry we have determined the parameters necessary to control phasic dopamine release in the dorsal striatum of rats in vivo. The kinetics of optically induced dopamine release mirror established models of electrically evoked release, indicating that potential artifacts of electrical stimulation on ion channels and the dopamine transporter are negligible. Furthermore a lack of change in extracellular pH indicates that optical stimulation does not alter blood flow. Optical control over dopamine release is highly reproducible and flexible. We are able to repeatedly evoke concentrations of dopamine release as small as a single dopamine transient (50 nM). A U-shaped frequency response curve exists with maximal stimulation inducing dopamine effluxes exceeding 500 nM. Taken together, these results have obvious implications for understanding the neurobiological basis of dopaminergic-based disorders and provide the framework to effectively manipulate dopamine patterns. PMID:20534006

  14. Cross-hemispheric dopamine projections have functional significance.

    PubMed

    Fox, Megan E; Mikhailova, Maria A; Bass, Caroline E; Takmakov, Pavel; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Budygin, Evgeny A; Wightman, R Mark

    2016-06-21

    Dopamine signaling occurs on a subsecond timescale, and its dysregulation is implicated in pathologies ranging from drug addiction to Parkinson's disease. Anatomic evidence suggests that some dopamine neurons have cross-hemispheric projections, but the significance of these projections is unknown. Here we report unprecedented interhemispheric communication in the midbrain dopamine system of awake and anesthetized rats. In the anesthetized rats, optogenetic and electrical stimulation of dopamine cells elicited physiologically relevant dopamine release in the contralateral striatum. Contralateral release differed between the dorsal and ventral striatum owing to differential regulation by D2-like receptors. In the freely moving animals, simultaneous bilateral measurements revealed that dopamine release synchronizes between hemispheres and intact, contralateral projections can release dopamine in the midbrain of 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats. These experiments are the first, to our knowledge, to show cross-hemispheric synchronicity in dopamine signaling and support a functional role for contralateral projections. In addition, our data reveal that psychostimulants, such as amphetamine, promote the coupling of dopamine transients between hemispheres. PMID:27298371

  15. Dopamine receptor regulating factor, DRRF: a zinc finger transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Hwang, C K; D'Souza, U M; Eisch, A J; Yajima, S; Lammers, C H; Yang, Y; Lee, S H; Kim, Y M; Nestler, E J; Mouradian, M M

    2001-06-19

    Dopamine receptor genes are under complex transcription control, determining their unique regional distribution in the brain. We describe here a zinc finger type transcription factor, designated dopamine receptor regulating factor (DRRF), which binds to GC and GT boxes in the D1A and D2 dopamine receptor promoters and effectively displaces Sp1 and Sp3 from these sequences. Consequently, DRRF can modulate the activity of these dopamine receptor promoters. Highest DRRF mRNA levels are found in brain with a specific regional distribution including olfactory bulb and tubercle, nucleus accumbens, striatum, hippocampus, amygdala, and frontal cortex. Many of these brain regions also express abundant levels of various dopamine receptors. In vivo, DRRF itself can be regulated by manipulations of dopaminergic transmission. Mice treated with drugs that increase extracellular striatal dopamine levels (cocaine), block dopamine receptors (haloperidol), or destroy dopamine terminals (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine) show significant alterations in DRRF mRNA. The latter observations provide a basis for dopamine receptor regulation after these manipulations. We conclude that DRRF is important for modulating dopaminergic transmission in the brain. PMID:11390978

  16. Dysregulation of dopamine-dependent mechanisms as a determinant of hypertension: studies in dopamine receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Chunyu; Armando, Ines; Luo, Yingjin; Eisner, Gilbert M.; Felder, Robin A.; Jose, Pedro A.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension by regulating epithelial sodium transport and by interacting with vasoactive hormones/humoral factors, such as aldosterone, angiotensin, catecholamines, endothelin, oxytocin, prolactin pro-opiomelancortin, reactive oxygen species, renin, and vasopressin. Dopamine receptors are classified into D1-like (D1 and D5) and D2-like (D2, D3, and D4) subtypes based on their structure and pharmacology. In recent years, mice deficient in one or more of the five dopamine receptor subtypes have been generated, leading to a better understanding of the physiological role of each of the dopamine receptor subtypes. This review summarizes the results from studies of various dopamine receptor mutant mice on the role of individual dopamine receptor subtypes and their interactions with other G protein-coupled receptors in the regulation of blood pressure. PMID:18083900

  17. The action of dopamine and vascular dopamine (DA1) receptor agonists on human isolated subcutaneous and omental small arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, A. D.; Sever, P. S.

    1989-01-01

    1. Human small arteries were obtained from surgical specimens and studied in vitro by use of a myograph technique. Following induction of tone with a potassium depolarizing solution, dopamine in the presence of beta-adrenoceptor and catecholamine uptake blockade relaxed isolated omental and subcutaneous arteries. Preincubation of tissues with phentolamine increased the maximum relaxation in response to dopamine. 2. The selective vascular dopamine receptor agonists, fenoldopam and SKF 38393 also relaxed isolated subcutaneous and omental arteries in a concentration-dependent manner. The order of potency for agonists was dopamine greater than fenoldopam greater than SKF 38393. 3. Dopamine-induced relaxation was competitively antagonized by SCH 23390, (R)- and (S)-sulpiride, and fenoldopam induced relaxation by SCH 23390 and (+)- but not (-)-butaclamol. 4. These results indicate the presence of vascular dopamine receptors (DA1 subtype) on human isolated resistance arteries from omental and subcutaneous sites. PMID:2474354

  18. Absence of NMDA receptors in dopamine neurons attenuates dopamine release but not conditioned approach during Pavlovian conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Jones G.; Zweifel, Larry S.; Clark, Jeremy J.; Evans, Scott B.; Phillips, Paul E. M.; Palmiter, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    During Pavlovian conditioning, phasic dopamine (DA) responses emerge to reward-predictive stimuli as the subject learns to anticipate reward delivery. This observation has led to the hypothesis that phasic dopamine signaling is important for learning. To assess the ability of mice to develop anticipatory behavior and to characterize the contribution of dopamine, we used a food-reinforced Pavlovian conditioning paradigm. As mice learned the cue–reward association, they increased their head entries to the food receptacle in a pattern that was consistent with conditioned anticipatory behavior. D1-receptor knockout (D1R-KO) mice had impaired acquisition, and systemic administration of a D1R antagonist blocked both the acquisition and expression of conditioned approach in wild-type mice. To assess the specific contribution of phasic dopamine transmission, we tested mice lacking NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) exclusively in dopamine neurons (NR1-KO mice). Surprisingly, NR1-KO mice learned at the same rate as their littermate controls. To evaluate the contribution of NMDARs to phasic dopamine release in this paradigm, we performed fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in the nucleus accumbens of awake mice. Despite having significantly attenuated phasic dopamine release following reward delivery, KO mice developed cue-evoked dopamine release at the same rate as controls. We conclude that NMDARs in dopamine neurons enhance but are not critical for phasic dopamine release to behaviorally relevant stimuli; furthermore, their contribution to phasic dopamine signaling is not necessary for the development of cue-evoked dopamine or anticipatory activity in a D1R-dependent Pavlovian conditioning paradigm. PMID:20616081

  19. Assessing Progress, Impact, and Next Steps in Rolling Out Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision for HIV Prevention in 14 Priority Countries in Eastern and Southern Africa through 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kripke, Katharine; Samuelson, Julia; Schnure, Melissa; Dalal, Shona; Farley, Timothy; Hankins, Catherine; Thomas, Anne G.; Reed, Jason; Stegman, Peter; Bock, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2007, the World Health Organization and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) identified 14 priority countries across eastern and southern Africa for scaling up voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) services. Several years into this effort, we reflect on progress. Methods Using the Decision Makers’ Program Planning Tool (DMPPT) 2.1, we assessed age-specific impact, cost-effectiveness, and coverage attributable to circumcisions performed through 2014. We also compared impact of actual progress to that of achieving 80% coverage among men ages 15–49 in 12 VMMC priority countries and Nyanza Province, Kenya. We populated the models with age-disaggregated VMMC service statistics and with population, mortality, and HIV incidence and prevalence projections exported from country-specific Spectrum/Goals files. We assumed each country achieved UNAIDS’ 90-90-90 treatment targets. Results More than 9 million VMMCs were conducted through 2014: 43% of the estimated 20.9 million VMMCs required to reach 80% coverage by the end of 2015. The model assumed each country reaches the UNAIDS targets, and projected that VMMCs conducted through 2014 will avert 240,000 infections by the end of 2025, compared to 1.1 million if each country had reached 80% coverage by the end of 2015. The median estimated cost per HIV infection averted was $4,400. Nyanza Province in Kenya, the 11 priority regions in Tanzania, and Uganda have reached or are approaching MC coverage targets among males ages 15–24, while coverage in other age groups is lower. Across all countries modeled, more than half of the projected HIV infections averted were attributable to circumcising 10- to 19-year-olds. Conclusions The priority countries have made considerable progress in VMMC scale-up, and VMMC remains a cost-effective strategy for epidemic impact, even assuming near-universal HIV diagnosis, treatment coverage, and viral suppression. Examining circumcision coverage by five

  20. Brain dopamine-serotonin vesicular transport disease presenting as a severe infantile hypotonic parkinsonian disorder.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Jessie C; Wilson, Callum; Cunningham, Vicki; Glamuzina, Emma; Prosser, Debra O; Love, Donald R; Burgess, Trent; Taylor, Juliet; Swan, Brendan; Hill, Rosamund; Robertson, Stephen P; Snell, Russell G; Lehnert, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Two male siblings from a consanguineous union presented in early infancy with marked truncal hypotonia, a general paucity of movement, extrapyramidal signs and cognitive delay. By mid-childhood they had made little developmental progress and remained severely hypotonic and bradykinetic. They developed epilepsy and had problems with autonomic dysfunction and oculogyric crises. They had a number of orthopaedic problems secondary to their hypotonia. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurotransmitters were initially normal, apart from mildly elevated 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid, and the children did not respond favourably to a trial of levodopa-carbidopa. The youngest died from respiratory complications at 10 years of age. Repeat CSF neurotransmitters in the older sibling at eight years of age showed slightly low homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a novel mutation homozygous in both children in the monoamine transporter gene SLC18A2 (p.Pro237His), resulting in brain dopamine-serotonin vesicular transport disease. This is the second family to be described with a mutation in this gene. Treatment with the dopamine agonist pramipexole in the surviving child resulted in mild improvements in alertness, communication, and eye movements. This case supports the identification of the causal mutation in the original case, expands the clinical phenotype of brain dopamine-serotonin vesicular transport disease and confirms that pramipexole treatment may lead to symptomatic improvement in affected individuals. PMID:26497564

  1. Apathy and Impulse Control Disorders: Yin & Yang of Dopamine Dependent Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Sierra, María; Carnicella, Sébastien; Strafella, Antonio P; Bichon, Amélie; Lhommée, Eugénie; Castrioto, Anna; Chabardes, Stephan; Thobois, Stéphane; Krack, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). Apathy and impulse control disorders (ICD) are two opposite motivational expressions of a continuous behavioural spectrum involving hypo- and hyperdopaminergia. Both syndromes share pathological (decreased vs increased) dopamine receptor stimulation states. Apathy belongs to the spectrum of hypodopaminergic symptoms together with anhedonia, anxiety and depression. Apathy is a key symptom of PD which worsens with disease progression. Animal models, imaging and pharmacological studies concur in pointing out dopaminergic denervation in the aetiology of parkinsonian apathy with a cardinal role of decreased tonic D2/D3 receptor stimulation. ICDs are part of the hyperdopaminergic behavioural spectrum, which also includes punding, and dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS), which are all related to non-physiological dopaminergic stimulation induced by antiparkinsonian drugs. According to clinical data tonic D2/D3 receptor stimulation can be sufficient to induce ICDs. Clinical observations in drug addiction and PD as well as data from studies in dopamine depleted rodents provide hints allowing to argue that both pulsatile D1 and D2 receptor stimulation and the severity of dopaminergic denervation are risk factors to develop punding behavior and DDS. Imaging studies have shown that the brain structures involved in drug addiction are also involved in hyperdopaminergic behaviours with increase of bottom-up appetitive drive and decrease in prefrontal top down behavioural control. PMID:25870025

  2. Dopamine synapse is a neuroligin-2-mediated contact between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures.

    PubMed

    Uchigashima, Motokazu; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-04-12

    Midbrain dopamine neurons project densely to the striatum and form so-called dopamine synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSNs), principal neurons in the striatum. Because dopamine receptors are widely expressed away from dopamine synapses, it remains unclear how dopamine synapses are involved in dopaminergic transmission. Here we demonstrate that dopamine synapses are contacts formed between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures. The presynaptic structure expressed tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter-2, and plasmalemmal dopamine transporter, which are essential for dopamine synthesis, vesicular filling, and recycling, but was below the detection threshold for molecules involving GABA synthesis and vesicular filling or for GABA itself. In contrast, the postsynaptic structure of dopamine synapses expressed GABAergic molecules, including postsynaptic adhesion molecule neuroligin-2, postsynaptic scaffolding molecule gephyrin, and GABAA receptor α1, without any specific clustering of dopamine receptors. Of these, neuroligin-2 promoted presynaptic differentiation in axons of midbrain dopamine neurons and striatal GABAergic neurons in culture. After neuroligin-2 knockdown in the striatum, a significant decrease of dopamine synapses coupled with a reciprocal increase of GABAergic synapses was observed on MSN dendrites. This finding suggests that neuroligin-2 controls striatal synapse formation by giving competitive advantage to heterologous dopamine synapses over conventional GABAergic synapses. Considering that MSN dendrites are preferential targets of dopamine synapses and express high levels of dopamine receptors, dopamine synapse formation may serve to increase the specificity and potency of dopaminergic modulation of striatal outputs by anchoring dopamine release sites to dopamine-sensing targets. PMID:27035941

  3. Lipoxin A4 Prevents the Progression of De Novo and Established Endometriosis in a Mouse Model by Attenuating Prostaglandin E2 Production and Estrogen Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajesh; Clerc, Anne-Catherine; Gori, Ilaria; Russell, Ronan; Pellegrini, Chiara; Govender, Lerisa; Wyss, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Endometriosis, a leading cause of pelvic pain and infertility, is characterized by ectopic growth of endometrial-like tissue and affects approximately 176 million women worldwide. The pathophysiology involves inflammatory and angiogenic mediators as well as estrogen-mediated signaling and novel, improved therapeutics targeting these pathways are necessary. The aim of this study was to investigate mechanisms leading to the establishment and progression of endometriosis as well as the effect of local treatment with Lipoxin A4 (LXA4), an anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipid mediator that we have recently characterized as an estrogen receptor agonist. LXA4 treatment significantly reduced endometriotic lesion size and downregulated the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6, as well as the angiogenic factor VEGF. LXA4 also inhibited COX-2 expression in both endometriotic lesions and peritoneal fluid cells, resulting in attenuated peritoneal fluid Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels. Besides its anti-inflammatory effects, LXA4 differentially regulated the expression and activity of the matrix remodeling enzyme matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 as well as modulating transforming growth factor (TGF)-β isoform expression within endometriotic lesions and in peritoneal fluid cells. We also report for first time that LXA4 attenuated aromatase expression, estrogen signaling and estrogen-regulated genes implicated in cellular proliferation in a mouse model of disease. These effects were observed both when LXA4 was administered prior to disease induction and during established disease. Collectively, our findings highlight potential targets for the treatment of endometriosis and suggest a pleotropic effect of LXA4 on disease progression, by attenuating pro-inflammatory and angiogenic mediators, matrix remodeling enzymes, estrogen metabolism and signaling, as well as downstream proliferative pathways. PMID:24587003

  4. Prevention of Graves' ophthalmopathy.

    PubMed

    Bartalena, Luigi

    2012-06-01

    Smoking is the most important risk factor for the occurrence/progression of Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO), as well as for its lower/slower response to immunosuppression. Accordingly, refrain from smoking should be urged, both as primary prevention (removal of risk factors in Graves' patients without GO), secondary prevention (early detection and treatment of asymptomatic/very mild GO) and tertiary prevention (reduction of complications/disability of overt GO). A 6-month course of 200 μg/day sodium selenite can prevent progression of mild GO to more severe GO and is, therefore, a form of secondary prevention and, probably, primary prevention. Correction of thyroid dysfunction and stable maintenance of euthyroidism are important preventive measures. The optimal treatment for hyperthyroidism in patients with GO is uncertain, because evidence demonstrating the superiority of antithyroid drugs over thyroid ablation (radioiodine, thyroidectomy, or both) is lacking. If radioiodine is used, low-dose steroid prophylaxis is recommended, particularly in smokers, to prevent radioiodine-associated GO progression. PMID:22632372

  5. Thromboresistant and endothelialization effects of dopamine-mediated heparin coating on a stent material surface.

    PubMed

    Bae, In-Ho; Park, In-Kyu; Park, Dae Sung; Lee, Haeshin; Jeong, Myung Ho

    2012-05-01

    Heparinization of surfaces has proven a successful strategy to prevent thrombus formation. Inspired by the composition of adhesive proteins in mussels, the authors used dopamine to immobilize heparin on a stent surface. This study aimed to assess the thromboresistant and endothelialization effects of dopamine-mediated heparin (HPM) coating on a stent material surface. The HPM was synthesized by bonding dopamine and heparin chemically. Cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy disks were first placed in the HPM solution and applied to surface stability then underwent thromboresistant tests and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cytotoxicity assays. The results showed not only thromboresistant activity and a stable state of heparin on the surfaces after investigation with toluidine blue and thrombin activation assay but also proliferation of HUVEC in vitro. Studies on animals showed that the HPM-coated stent has no obvious inflammation response and increasing of restenosis rate compared to the bare metal stent (BMS) indicating good biocompatibility as well as safety in its in vivo application. Moreover, improving the endothelial cell (EC) proliferation resulted in a higher strut-covering rate (i.e., endothelialization) with shuttle-shaped EC in the HPM-coated stent group compared to that of the BMS group. These results suggest that this facile coating approach could significantly promote endothelialization and offer greater safety than the BMS for its much improved thromboresistant property. Moreover, it may offer a platform for conjugating secondary drugs such as anti-proliferative drugs. PMID:22389099

  6. Renal effect of YM435, a new dopamine D1 receptor agonist, in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Yatsu, T; Arai, Y; Takizawa, K; Kasai-Nakagawa, C; Takanashi, M; Uchida, W; Inagaki, O; Tanaka, A; Asano, M; Honda, K; Takenaka, T

    1997-03-12

    The renal effects of YM435 ((-)-(S)-4-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-7,8-dihydroxy -1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline hydrochloride hydrate), a dopamine D1 receptor agonist, were investigated in anesthetized dogs. Intravenous infusion of YM435 (0.1-3 micrograms/kg per min) increased renal blood flow and decreased mean blood pressure in a dose-dependent manner with little effect on heart rate. Glomerular filtration rate, urine flow and urinary sodium excretion were concomitantly increased. The renal effect of YM435 by intravenous infusion at 0.3 microgram/kg per min was completely blocked by treatment with the selective dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390 (7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-(1H)-3-benzazep ine hydrochloride). Furthermore, intravenous infusion of YM435 (0.3 microgram/kg per min) reversed the angiotensin II-induced decreases in renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, urine flow and urinary sodium excretion, and prevented the decrease in renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate and urine flow induced by renal nerve stimulation and platelet-activating factor (PAF). These results suggest that intravenous administration of YM435 produces renal vasodilating and diuretic/natriuretic effects by stimulation of dopamine D1 receptors, and demonstrate that YM435 can inhibit angiotensin II-, renal nerve stimulation- and PAF-induced renal dysfunction. PMID:9088869

  7. Responses of in vivo renal microvessels to dopamine.

    PubMed

    Steinhausen, M; Weis, S; Fleming, J; Dussel, R; Parekh, N

    1986-09-01

    The split hydronephrotic kidney preparation was used to directly observe the effects of locally applied dopamine on the in vivo diameters of renal vessels. Dopamine (1 X 10(-6) to 3 X 10(-5) M) produced a concentration-dependent dilation of the arcuate and interlobular arteries and afferent arterioles. Efferent arterioles near the glomeruli also dilated to dopamine but the dilation was less than that of the preglomerular vessels. Higher dopamine concentrations (3 X 10(-4) and 1 X 10(-3) M) produced more variable effects, with a tendency for the arcuate and interlobular arteries and the afferent and efferent arterioles away from the glomeruli to decrease in diameter. After pretreatment with haloperidol, dopamine (1 X 10(-6) to 1 X 10(-4) M) did not dilate any pre- or postglomerular vascular segment, but the tendency for pre- and postglomerular constrictions with higher dopamine concentrations were not abolished. Pretreatment with phentolamine and propranolol enhanced the dilator response of the pre- and postglomerular vessels (except the afferent arterioles near glomeruli and efferent arterioles near welling points) to dopamine (3 X 10(-5) and 1 X 10(-4) M), and abolished the reductions in diameter produced by the high dopamine levels. These data indicate that the dilator effect of dopamine is mediated by interactions with specific dopaminergic receptors, while alpha and beta adrenergic receptors appear to mediate a constrictor influence observed with high dopamine concentrations. The overall effect of dopamine on the renal vessel diameters thus appears to depend on the balance of dilator and constrictor stimuli mediated by multiple receptors. PMID:3023735

  8. Deficits of mesolimbic dopamine neurotransmission in rat dietary obesity.

    PubMed

    Geiger, B M; Haburcak, M; Avena, N M; Moyer, M C; Hoebel, B G; Pothos, E N

    2009-04-10

    Increased caloric intake in dietary obesity could be driven by central mechanisms that regulate reward-seeking behavior. The mesolimbic dopamine system, and the nucleus accumbens in particular, underlies both food and drug reward. We investigated whether rat dietary obesity is linked to changes in dopaminergic neurotransmission in that region. Sprague-Dawley rats were placed on a cafeteria-style diet to induce obesity or a laboratory chow diet to maintain normal weight gain. Extracellular dopamine levels were measured by in vivo microdialysis. Electrically evoked dopamine release was measured ex vivo in coronal slices of the nucleus accumbens and the dorsal striatum using real-time carbon fiber amperometry. Over 15 weeks, cafeteria-diet fed rats became obese (>20% increase in body weight) and exhibited lower extracellular accumbens dopamine levels than normal weight rats (0.007+/-0.001 vs. 0.023+/-0.002 pmol/sample; P<0.05). Dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens of obese rats was stimulated by a cafeteria-diet challenge, but it remained unresponsive to a laboratory chow meal. Administration of d-amphetamine (1.5 mg/kg i.p.) also revealed an attenuated dopamine response in obese rats. Experiments measuring electrically evoked dopamine signal ex vivo in nucleus accumbens slices showed a much weaker response in obese animals (12 vs. 25x10(6) dopamine molecules per stimulation, P<0.05). The results demonstrate that deficits in mesolimbic dopamine neurotransmission are linked to dietary obesity. Depressed dopamine release may lead obese animals to compensate by eating palatable "comfort" food, a stimulus that released dopamine when laboratory chow failed. PMID:19409204

  9. DEFICITS OF MESOLIMBIC DOPAMINE NEUROTRANSMISSION IN RAT DIETARY OBESITY

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, B. M.; Haburcak, M.; Avena, N. M.; Moyer, M. C.; Hoebel, B. G.; Pothos, E. N.

    2009-01-01

    Increased caloric intake in dietary obesity could be driven by central mechanisms that regulate reward-seeking behavior. The mesolimbic dopamine system, and the nucleus accumbens in particular, underlies both food and drug reward. We investigated whether rat dietary obesity is linked to changes in dopaminergic neurotransmission in that region. Sprague–Dawley rats were placed on a cafeteria-style diet to induce obesity or a laboratory chow diet to maintain normal weight gain. Extracellular dopamine levels were measured by in vivo microdialysis. Electrically evoked dopamine release was measured ex vivo in coronal slices of the nucleus accumbens and the dorsal striatum using real-time carbon fiber amperometry. Over 15 weeks, cafeteria-diet fed rats became obese (>20% increase in body weight) and exhibited lower extracellular accumbens dopamine levels than normal weight rats (0.007±0.001 vs. 0.023±0.002 pmol/sample; P<0.05). Dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens of obese rats was stimulated by a cafeteria-diet challenge, but it remained unresponsive to a laboratory chow meal. Administration of d-amphetamine (1.5 mg/kg i.p.) also revealed an attenuated dopamine response in obese rats. Experiments measuring electrically evoked dopamine signal ex vivo in nucleus accumbens slices showed a much weaker response in obese animals (12 vs. 25 × 106 dopamine molecules per stimulation, P<0.05). The results demonstrate that deficits in mesolimbic dopamine neurotransmission are linked to dietary obesity. Depressed dopamine release may lead obese animals to compensate by eating palatable “comfort” food, a stimulus that released dopamine when laboratory chow failed. PMID:19409204

  10. Central actions of a novel and selective dopamine antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    Receptors for the neurotransmitter dopamine traditionally have been divided into two subgroups: the D/sub 1/ class, which is linked to the stimulation of adenylate cyclase-activity, and the D/sub 2/ class which is not. There is much evidence suggesting that it is the D/sub 2/ class which is not. There is much evidence suggesting that it is the D/sub 2/ dopamine receptor that mediates the physiological and behavioral actions of dopamine in the intact animal. However, the benzazepine SCH23390 is a dopamine antagonist which has potent behavioral actions while displaying apparent neurochemical selectivity for the D/sub 1/ class of dopamine receptors. The purpose of this dissertation was to (1) confirm and characterize this selectivity, and (2) test certain hypothesis related to possible modes of action of SCH233390. The inhibition of adenylate cyclase by SCH23390 occurred via an action at the dopamine receptor only. A radiolabeled analog of SCH23390 displayed the receptor binding properties of a specific high-affinity ligand, and regional receptor densities were highly correlated with dopamine levels. The subcellular distribution of (/sup 3/H)-SCH23390 binding did not correspond completely with that of dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase. The neurochemical potency of SCH23390 as a D/sub 1/ receptor antagonist was preserved following parental administration. A variety of dopamine agonists and antagonists displayed a high correlation between their abilities to compete for (/sup 3/H)-SCH23390 binding in vitro and to act at an adenylate cyclase-linked receptor. Finally, the relative affinities of dopamine and SCH23390 for both D/sub 1/ receptors and (/sup 3/H)-SCH23390 binding sites were comparable. It is concluded that the behavioral effects of SCH23390 are mediated by actions at D/sub 1/ dopamine receptors only, and that the physiological importance of this class of receptors should be reevaluated.

  11. Dopamine-dependent reinforcement of motor skill learning: evidence from Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palminteri, Stefano; Lebreton, Maël; Worbe, Yulia; Hartmann, Andreas; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Vidailhet, Marie; Grabli, David; Pessiglione, Mathias

    2011-08-01

    Reinforcement learning theory has been extensively used to understand the neural underpinnings of instrumental behaviour. A central assumption surrounds dopamine signalling reward prediction errors, so as to update action values and ensure better choices in the future. However, educators may share the intuitive idea that reinforcements not only affect choices but also motor skills such as typing. Here, we employed a novel paradigm to demonstrate that monetary rewards can improve motor skill learning in humans. Indeed, healthy participants progressively got faster in executing sequences of key presses that were repeatedly rewarded with 10 euro compared with 1 cent. Control tests revealed that the effect of reinforcement on motor skill learning was independent of subjects being aware of sequence-reward associations. To account for this implicit effect, we developed an actor-critic model, in which reward prediction errors are used by the critic to update state values and by the actor to facilitate action execution. To assess the role of dopamine in such computations, we applied the same paradigm in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, who were either unmedicated or treated with neuroleptics. We also included patients with focal dystonia, as an example of hyperkinetic motor disorder unrelated to dopamine. Model fit showed the following dissociation: while motor skills were affected in all patient groups, reinforcement learning was selectively enhanced in unmedicated patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome and impaired by neuroleptics. These results support the hypothesis that overactive dopamine transmission leads to excessive reinforcement of motor sequences, which might explain the formation of tics in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. PMID:21727098

  12. Essential Oils from the Medicinal Herbs Upregulate Dopamine Transporter in Rat Pheochromocytoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min Sun; Choi, Bang-sub; Kim, Sang Heon; Pak, Sok Cheon; Jang, Chul Ho; Chin, Young-Won; Kim, Young-Mi; Kim, Dong-il; Jeon, Songhee; Koo, Byung-Soo

    2015-10-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) protein, a component of the dopamine system, undergoes adaptive neurobiological changes from drug abuse. Prevention of relapse and reduction of withdrawal symptoms are still the major limitations in the current pharmacological treatments of drug addiction. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of essential oils extracted from Elsholtzia ciliata, Shinchim, Angelicae gigantis Radix, and Eugenia caryophyllata, well-known traditional Korean medicines for addiction, on the modulation of dopamine system in amphetamine-treated cells and to explore the possible mechanism underlying its therapeutic effect. The potential cytotoxic effect of essential oils was evaluated in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells using cell viability assays. Quantification of DAT, p-CREB, p-MAPK, and p-Akt was done by immunoblotting. DAT was significantly reduced in cells treated with 50 μM of amphetamine in a time-dependent manner. No significant toxicity of essential oils from Elsholtzia ciliata and Shinchim was observed at doses of 10, 25, and 50 μg/mL. However, essential oils from A. gigantis Radix at a dose of 100 μg/mL and E. caryophyllata at doses of 50 and 100 μg/mL showed cytotoxicity. Treatment with GBR 12909, a highly selective DAT inhibitor, significantly increased DAT expression compared with that of amphetamine only by enhancing phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and Akt. In addition, essential oils effectively induced hyperphosphorylation of cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), MAPK, and Akt, which resulted in DAT upregulation. Our study implies that the essential oils may rehabilitate brain dopamine function through increased DAT availability in abstinent former drug users. PMID:26295793

  13. Drug-induced up-regulation of dopamine D2 receptors on cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Starr, S; Kozell, L B; Neve, K A

    1995-08-01

    Ligand-induced up-regulation of recombinant dopamine D2 receptors was assessed using C6 glioma cells stably expressing the short (415-amino-acid; D2s) and long (444-amino-acid; D2L) forms of the receptor. Overnight treatment of C6-D2L cells with N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) caused a time- and concentration-dependent increase in the density of receptors, as assessed by the binding of radioligand to membranes prepared from the cells, with no change in the affinity of the receptors for the radioligand. The effect of 10 microM NPA was maximal after 10 h, at which time the density of D2L receptors was more than doubled. The agonists dopamine and quinpirole also increased the density of D2L receptors. The receptor up-regulation was not specific for agonists, because the antagonists epidepride, sulpiride, and domperidone caused smaller (30-60%) increases in receptor density. Prolonged treatment with 10 microM NPA desensitized D2L receptors, as evidenced by a reduced ability of dopamine to inhibit adenylyl cyclase, whereas treatment with sulpiride was associated with an enhanced responsiveness to dopamine. The magnitude of NPA-induced receptor up-regulation in each of four clonal lines of C6-D2L cells (mean increase, 80%) was greater than in all four lines of C6-D2S cells (33%). Inactivation of pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins had no effect on the basal density of D2L receptors or on the NPA-induced receptor up-regulation. Treatment with 5 micrograms/ml of cycloheximide, on the other hand, decreased the basal density of receptors and attenuated, but did not prevent, the NPA-induced increase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7616211

  14. Functional Upregulation of Ca2+ -Activated K+ Channels in the Development of Substantia Nigra Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Latorre, José A.

    2012-01-01

    Many connections in the basal ganglia are made around birth when animals are exposed to a host of new affective, cognitive, and sensori-motor stimuli. It is thought that dopamine modulates cortico-striatal synapses that result in the strengthening of those connections that lead to desired outcomes. We propose that there must be a time before which stimuli cannot be processed into functional connections, otherwise it would imply an effective link between stimulus, response, and reward in uterus. Consistent with these ideas, we present evidence that early in development dopamine neurons are electrically immature and do not produce high-frequency firing in response to salient stimuli. We ask first, what makes dopamine neurons immature? and second, what are the implications of this immaturity for the basal ganglia? As an answer to the first question, we find that at birth the outward current is small (3nS-V), insensitive to , TEA, BK, and SK blockers. Rapidly after birth, the outward current increases to 15nS-V and becomes sensitive to , TEA, BK, and SK blockers. We make a detailed analysis of the kinetics of the components of the outward currents and produce a model for BK and SK channels that we use to reproduce the outward current, and to infer the geometrical arrangement of BK and channels in clusters. In the first cluster, T-type and BK channels are coupled within distances of 20 nm (200 Å). The second cluster consists of L-type and BK channels that are spread over distances of at least 60 nm. As for the second question, we propose that early in development, the mechanism of action selection is in a “locked-in” state that would prevent dopamine neurons from reinforcing cortico-striatal synapses that do not have a functional experiential-based value. PMID:23284723

  15. Serotonin-S2 and dopamine-D2 receptors are the same size in membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Brann, M.R.

    1985-12-31

    Target size analysis was used to compare the sizes of serotonin-S2 and dopamine-D2 receptors in rat brain membranes. The sizes of these receptors were standardized by comparison with the muscarinic receptor, a receptor of known size. The number of serotonin-S2 receptors labeled with (3H)ketanserin or (3H)spiperone in frontal cortex decreased as an exponential function of radiation dose, and receptor affinity was not affected. The number of dopamine-D2 receptors labeled with (3H)spiperone in striatum also decreased as an exponential function of radiation dose, and D2 and S2 receptors were equally sensitive to radiation. In both striatum and frontal cortex, the number of muscarinic receptors labeled with (3H)QNB decreased as an exponential function of radiation dose, and were much less sensitive to radiation than S2 and D2 receptors. These data indicate that in rat brain membranes, S2 and D2 receptors are of similar size, and both molecules are much larger than the muscarinic receptor.

  16. Interaction of structural analogs of dopamine, chlorpromazine and sulpiride with striatal dopamine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of these studies were to determine if the nitrogen atom of dopaminergic agonists and antagonists drugs is required for interaction with the D-1 and D-2 dopamine receptors and whether the positively charged or uncharged molecular species interacts with these receptors. To address these issues, permanently charged analogs of dopamine, chlorpromazine and sulpiride were synthesized in which a dimethylsulfonium, dimethylselenonium or quaternary ammonium group replaced the amine group. Permanently uncharged analogs which contained a methylsulfide, methylselenide and sulfoxide group instead of an amine group were also synthesized. The interactions of these compounds with striatal dopamine receptors were studied. We found that the permanently charged dopamine analogs bound to the D-2 receptor of striatal membranes like conventional dopaminergic agonists and displayed agonist activity at the D-2 receptor regulating potassium-evoked (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine release. In contrast, the permanently uncharged analogs bound only to the high affinity state of the D-2 receptor and had neither agonist or antagonist activity.

  17. Anxiolytic effects of dopamine receptor ligands: I. Involvement of dopamine autoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Bartoszyk, G D

    1998-01-01

    The anxiolytic-like properties of dopamine agonists and antagonists with different receptor profiles were investigated in the ultrasonic vocalization test in rats after subcutaneous administration. Only dopamine D2 receptor agonists inhibited ultrasonic vocalization with the following ED50 values: apomorphine (0.07 mg/kg), quinelorane (0.01 mg/kg), quinpirole (0.04 mg/kg), pramipexole (0.09 mg/kg), roxindole (0.04 mg/kg), talipexole (0.04 mg/kg), (+/-)-7-OH-DPAT (0.05 mg/kg), (+/-)-PPHT (0.03 mg/kg), (-)-TNPA (0.06 mg/kg), PD128907 (0.13 mg/kg). The D2 antagonists haloperidol, mazapertine, raclopride, remoxipride, L745870, U99194A, U101958 and S(-)-DS121, the partial agonists PD143188 and preclamol, the selective D1 agonist R(+)-SKF38393 and the D1 antagonist SCH23390, and the uptake inhibitors GBR12909, GBR12935 and indatraline lacked significant inhibitory effects on ultrasonic vocalization. Because at least some of the D2 receptor agonists investigated have selectivity for dopamine autoreceptors, it is speculated that the dopamine autoreceptor may be a target for the development of new antianxiety drugs. PMID:9472724

  18. Design and Multi-Country Validation of Text Messages for an mHealth Intervention for Primary Prevention of Progression to Hypertension in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Diez-Canseco, Francisco; Zavala-Loayza, J Alfredo; Beratarrechea, Andrea; Kanter, Rebecca; Ramirez-Zea, Manuel; Rubinstein, Adolfo; Martinez, Homero

    2015-01-01

    Background Mobile health (mHealth) has been posited to contribute to the reduction in health gaps and has shown fast and widespread growth in developing countries. This growth demands understanding of, and preparedness for, local cultural contexts. Objective To describe the design and validation of text messages (short message service, SMS) that will be used for an mHealth behavioral change intervention to prevent hypertension in three Latin American countries: Argentina, Guatemala, and Peru. Methods An initial set of 64 SMS text messages were designed to promote healthy lifestyles among individuals in different stages of behavior change, addressing four key domains: salt and sodium intake, fruit and vegetable intake, consumption of high fat and sugar foods, and physical activity. The 64 SMS text messages were organized into nine subsets for field validation. In each country 36 people were recruited, half of them being male. Of the participants, 4 per country evaluated each subset of SMS text messages, which contained between 6 and 8 SMS text messages regarding different key domains and stages of change. The understanding and appeal of each SMS text message was assessed using a 7-item questionnaire. The understanding and appeal ratings were used to reach a final set of 56 SMS text messages. Results Overall, each of the 64 SMS text messages received a total of 12 evaluations (4 per country). The majority of evaluations—742 out of a total of 767 (96.7%) valid responses—revealed an adequate understanding of the key idea contained in the SMS text message. On a scale from 1 to 10, the average appeal score was 8.7 points, with a range of 4 to 10 points. Based on their low scores, 8 SMS text messages per country were discarded. Once the final set of 56 SMS text messages was established, and based on feedback obtained in the field, wording and content of some SMS text messages were improved. Of the final set, 9, 8, and 16 of the SMS text messages were improved based on

  19. β-Glucan treatment prevents progressive burn ischaemia in the zone of stasis and improves burn healing: an experimental study in rats.

    PubMed

    Firat, Cemal; Samdanci, Emine; Erbatur, Serkan; Aytekin, Ahmet Hamdi; Ak, Muharrem; Turtay, Muhammed Gokhan; Coban, Yusuf Kenan

    2013-02-01

    Saving the zone of stasis is one of the major goals of burn specialists. Increasing the tissue tolerance to ischaemia and inhibiting inflammation have been proposed to enable salvage of this zone. After a burn, excessive inflammation, including increased vascular permeability, local tissue oedema and neutrophil activation, causes local tissue damage by triggering vascular thrombosis and blocking capillaries, resulting in tissue ischaemia and necrosis. Oxygen radicals also contribute to tissue damage after a burn. However, macrophages play a pivotal role in the response to burn. We studied β-glucan because of its many positive systemic effects that are beneficial to burn healing, including immunomodulatory effects, antioxidant effects (free-radical scavenging activity) and effects associated with the reduction of the inflammatory response. There were four test groups in this study with eight rats in each group. Group 1 was the control group, group 2 was administered a local pomade (bacitracin+neomycin sulphate), group 3 received β-glucan (50 mg kg(-1), orally) + the local pomade and group 4 received β-glucan. Burns were created using a brass comb model. Macroscopic, histopathological and statistical assessments were performed. Samples were harvested on the 3rd, 7th and 21 days for analysis. The neutrophilic infiltration into the zone of stasis was analysed on day 3. Macrophage infiltration, fibroblast proliferation, angiogenesis and re-epithelialisation ratios in the zone of stasis were analysed on days 7 and 21. The β-glucan groups (groups 3 and 4) exhibited lower neutrophil counts on the 3rd day, and macrophage infiltration, fibroblast proliferation, angiogenesis and re-epithelialisation were very high in these groups on the 7th day. In particular, re-epithelialisation on the 21st day was significantly better in the β-glucan groups. This study demonstrated that β-glucan may prevent neutrophil-dependent tissue damage and burn-induced oxidative injury through

  20. Quantum-dot/dopamine bioconjugates function as redox coupled assemblies for in vitro and intracellular pH sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medintz, Igor L.; Stewart, Michael H.; Trammell, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Delehanty, James B.; Mei, Bing C.; Melinger, Joseph S.; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B.; Dawson, Philip E.; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2010-08-01

    The use of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) for bioimaging and sensing has progressively matured over the past decade. QDs are highly sensitive to charge-transfer processes, which can alter their optical properties. Here, we demonstrate that QD-dopamine-peptide bioconjugates can function as charge-transfer coupled pH sensors. Dopamine is normally characterized by two intrinsic redox properties: a Nernstian dependence of formal potential on pH and oxidation of hydroquinone to quinone by O2 at basic pH. We show that the latter quinone can function as an electron acceptor quenching QD photoluminescence in a manner that depends directly on pH. We characterize the pH-dependent QD quenching using both electrochemistry and spectroscopy. QD-dopamine conjugates were also used as pH sensors that measured changes in cytoplasmic pH as cells underwent drug-induced alkalosis. A detailed mechanism describing the QD quenching processes that is consistent with dopamine's inherent redox chemistry is presented.

  1. Functional potencies of dopamine agonists and antagonists at human dopamine D₂ and D₃ receptors.

    PubMed

    Tadori, Yoshihiro; Forbes, Robert A; McQuade, Robert D; Kikuchi, Tetsuro

    2011-09-01

    We measured the functional agonist potencies of dopamine agonists including antiparkinson drugs, and functional antagonist potencies of antipsychotics at human dopamine D(2) and D(3) receptors. In vitro pharmacological assessment included inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation and the reversal of dopamine-induced inhibition in clonal Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing low and high densities of human dopamine D(2L) and D(2S) receptors (hD(2L)-Low, hD(2L)-High, hD(2S)-Low and hD(2S)-High, respectively) and human dopamine D(3) Ser-9 and D(3) Gly-9 receptors (hD(3)-Ser-9 and hD(3)-Gly-9, respectively). Cabergoline, bromocriptine, pergolide, (±)-7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propyl-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT), talipexole, pramipexole, R-(+)-trans-3,4,4a,10b-tetrahydro-4-propyl-2H,5H-[1]benzopyrano[4,3-b]-1,4-oxazin-9-olhydrochloride (PD128907) and ropinirole behaved as dopamine D(2) and D(3) receptor full agonists and showed higher potencies in hD(2L)-High and hD(2S)-High compared to hD(2L)-Low and hD(2S)-Low. In hD(3)-Ser-9 and hD(3)-Gly-9 compared to hD(2L)-Low and hD(2S)-Low, dopamine, ropinirole, PD128907, and pramipexole potencies were clearly higher; talipexole and 7-OH-DPAT showed slightly higher potencies; pergolide showed slightly lower potency; and, cabergoline and bromocriptine potencies were lower. Aripiprazole acted as an antagonist in hD(2L)-Low; a low intrinsic activity partial agonist in hD(2S)-Low; a moderate partial agonist in hD(3)-Ser-9 and hD(3)-Gly-9; a robust partial agonist in hD(2L)-High; and a full agonist in hD(2S)-High. Amisulpride, sulpiride and perphenazine behaved as preferential antagonists; and chlorpromazine and asenapine behaved as modest preferential antagonists; whereas fluphenazine, haloperidol, and blonanserin behaved as non-preferential antagonists in hD(2S)-Low and hD(2S)-High compared to hD(3)-Ser-9 and hD(3)-Gly-9. These findings may help to elucidate the basis of therapeutic benefit observed with these drugs, with

  2. Increased expression of the dopamine transporter leads to loss of dopamine neurons, oxidative stress and l-DOPA reversible motor deficits.

    PubMed

    Masoud, S T; Vecchio, L M; Bergeron, Y; Hossain, M M; Nguyen, L T; Bermejo, M K; Kile, B; Sotnikova, T D; Siesser, W B; Gainetdinov, R R; Wightman, R M; Caron, M G; Richardson, J R; Miller, G W; Ramsey, A J; Cyr, M; Salahpour, A

    2015-02-01

    The dopamine transporter is a key protein responsible for regulating dopamine homeostasis. Its function is to transport dopamine from the extracellular space into the presynaptic neuron. Studies have suggested that accumulation of dopamine in the cytosol can trigger oxidative stress and neurotoxicity. Previously, ectopic expression of the dopamine transporter was shown to cause damage in non-dopaminergic neurons due to their inability to handle cytosolic dopamine. However, it is unknown whether increasing dopamine transporter activity will be detrimental to dopamine neurons that are inherently capable of storing and degrading dopamine. To address this issue, we characterized transgenic mice that over-express the dopamine transporter selectively in dopamine neurons. We report that dopamine transporter over-expressing (DAT-tg) mice display spontaneous loss of midbrain dopamine neurons that is accompanied by increases in oxidative stress markers, 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine and 5-S-cysteinyl-DOPAC. In addition, metabolite-to-dopamine ratios are increased and VMAT2 protein expression is decreased in the striatum of these animals. Furthermore, DAT-tg mice also show fine motor deficits on challenging beam traversal that are reversed with l-DOPA treatment. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that even in neurons that routinely handle dopamine, increased uptake of this neurotransmitter through the dopamine transporter results in oxidative damage, neuronal loss and l-DOPA reversible motor deficits. In addition, DAT over-expressing animals are highly sensitive to MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. The effects of increased dopamine uptake in these transgenic mice could shed light on the unique vulnerability of dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease. PMID:25447236

  3. Imaging dopamine receptors in the human brain by position tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Burns, H.D.; Dannals, R.F.; Wong, D.F.; Langstrom, B.; Duelfer, T.; Frost, J.J.; Ravert, H.T.; Links, J.M.; Rosenbloom, S.B.

    1983-01-01

    Neurotransmitter receptors may be involved in a number of neuropsychiatric disease states. The ligand 3-N-(/sup 11/C)methylspiperone, which preferentially binds to dopamine receptors in vivo, was used to image the receptors by positron emission tomography scanning in baboons and in humans. This technique holds promise for noninvasive clinical studies of dopamine receptors in humans.

  4. Undiagnosed congenital hypothyroidism in a newborn treated with dopamine infusion.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xuanxing; Sun, Yueling; Qiang, Rong

    2015-06-01

    Medications administered during the neonatal period may mask the diagnosis of congenital hypothyroidism. Herein, we report a case of undiagnosed congenital hypothyroidism while the infant was on treatment with dopamine. Given the inhibitory effect of dopamine on thyroid-stimulating hormone, a high index of suspicion for potential congenital hypothyroidism is needed in such neonates. PMID:25724212

  5. Mesolimbic dopamine and its neuromodulators in obesity and binge eating.

    PubMed

    Naef, Lindsay; Pitman, Kimberley A; Borgland, Stephanie L

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic prevalence, and much research has focused on homeostatic and nonhomeostatic mechanisms underlying overconsumption of food. Mesocorticolimbic circuitry, including dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA), is a key substrate for nonhomeostatic feeding. The goal of the present review is to compare changes in mesolimbic dopamine function in human obesity with diet-induced obesity in rodents. Additionally, we will review the literature to determine if dopamine signaling is altered with binge eating disorder in humans or binge eating modeled in rodents. Finally, we assess modulation of dopamine neurons by neuropeptides and peripheral peptidergic signals that occur with obesity or binge eating. We find that while decreased dopamine concentration is observed with obesity, there is inconsistency outside the human literature on the relationship between striatal D2 receptor expression and obesity. Finally, few studies have explored how orexigenic or anorexigenic peptides modulate dopamine neuronal activity or striatal dopamine in obese models. However, ghrelin modulation of dopamine neurons may be an important factor for driving binge feeding in rodents. PMID:26514168

  6. Dopamine receptor genes: new tools for molecular psychiatry.

    PubMed Central

    Niznik, H B; Van Tol, H H

    1992-01-01

    For over a decade it has been generally assumed that all the pharmacological and biochemical actions of dopamine within the central nervous system and periphery were mediated by two distinct dopamine receptors. These receptors, termed D1 and D2, were defined as those coupled to the stimulation or inhibition of adenylate cyclase, respectively, and by their selectivity and avidity for various drugs and compounds. The concept that two dopamine receptors were sufficient to account for all the effects mediated by dopamine was an oversimplification. Recent molecular biological studies have identified five distinct genes which encode at least eight functional dopamine receptors. The members of the expanded dopamine receptor family, however, can still be codifed by way of the original D1 and D2 receptor dichotomy. These include two genes encoding dopamine D1-like receptors (D1 [D1A]/D5 [D1B]) and three genes encoding D2-like receptors (D2/D3/D4). We review here our recent work on the cloning and characterization of some of the members of the dopamine receptor gene family (D1, D2, D4, D5), their relationship to neuropsychiatric disorders and their potential role in antipsychotic drug action. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1450188

  7. PKCβ Inhibitors Attenuate Amphetamine-Stimulated Dopamine Efflux.

    PubMed

    Zestos, Alexander G; Mikelman, Sarah R; Kennedy, Robert T; Gnegy, Margaret E

    2016-06-15

    Amphetamine abuse afflicts over 13 million people, and there is currently no universally accepted treatment for amphetamine addiction. Amphetamine serves as a substrate for the dopamine transporter and reverses the transporter to cause an increase in extracellular dopamine. Activation of the beta subunit of protein kinase C (PKCβ) enhances extracellular dopamine in the presence of amphetamine by facilitating the reverse transport of dopamine and internalizing the D2 autoreceptor. We previously demonstrated that PKCβ inhibitors block amphetamine-stimulated dopamine efflux in synaptosomes from rat striatum in vitro. In this study, we utilized in vivo microdialysis in live, behaving rats to assess the effect of the PKCβ inhibitors, enzastaurin and ruboxistaurin, on amphetamine-stimulated locomotion and increases in monoamines and their metabolites. A 30 min perfusion of the nucleus accumbens core with 1 μM enzastaurin or 1 μM ruboxistaurin reduced efflux of dopamine and its metabolite 3-methoxytyramine induced by amphetamine by approximately 50%. The inhibitors also significantly reduced amphetamine-stimulated extracellular levels of norepinephrine. The stimulation of locomotor behavior by amphetamine, measured simultaneously with the analytes, was comparably reduced by the PKCβ inhibitors. Using a stable isotope label retrodialysis procedure, we determined that ruboxistaurin had no effect on basal levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, glutamate, or GABA. In addition, normal uptake function through the dopamine transporter was unaltered by the PKCβ inhibitors, as measured in rat synaptosomes. Our results support the utility of using PKCβ inhibitors to reduce the effects of amphetamine. PMID:26996926

  8. Catecholamines up Integrates Dopamine Synthesis and Synaptic Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Ferdousy, Faiza; Lawal, Hakeem; Huang, Zhinong; Daigle, J. Gavin; Izevbaye, Iyare; Doherty, Olugbenga; Thomas, Jerrad; Stathakis, Dean G; O’Donnell, Janis M.

    2011-01-01

    The highly reactive nature of dopamine renders dopaminergic neurons vulnerable to oxidative damage. We recently demonstrated that loss-of-function mutations in the Drosophila gene Catecholamines up (Catsup) elevate dopamine pools but, paradoxically, also confer resistance to paraquat, an herbicide that induces oxidative stress-mediated toxicity in dopaminergic neurons. We now report a novel association of the membrane protein, Catsup, with GTP cyclohydrolase rate-limiting enzyme for tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) biosynthesis and tyrosine hydroxylase, rate-limiting enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis, which requires BH4 as a cofactor. Loss-of-function Catsup mutations cause dominant hyperactivation of both enzymes. Elevated dopamine levels in Catsup mutants coincide with several distinct characteristics, including hypermobility, minimal basal levels of 3,4-Dihydroxy-Phenylacetic Acid, an oxidative metabolite of dopamine, and resistance to the Vesicular Monoamine Transporter inhibitor, reserpine, suggesting that excess dopamine is synaptically active and that Catsup functions in the regulation of synaptic vesicle loading and release of dopamine. We conclude that Catsup regulates and links the dopamine synthesis and transport networks. PMID:21985068

  9. Decreased brain dopamine cell numbers in human cocaine users.

    PubMed

    Little, Karley Y; Ramssen, Eric; Welchko, Ryan; Volberg, Vitaly; Roland, Courtney J; Cassin, Bader

    2009-08-15

    Cocaine use diminishes striatal and midbrain dopamine neuronal components in both post-mortem and in vivo human experiments. The diffuse nature of these declines suggests the possibility that cocaine use might cause a loss of dopamine neurons in humans. Previous rodent studies have not detected cocaine-induced dopamine cell damage. The present experiment involved counting midbrain dopamine neurons utilizing both melanin and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity. Well-preserved blocks ranging from +38 mm obex to +45 mm obex were examined in 10 cocaine users and 9 controls. Sections were also examined for signs of acute pathological injury by counting activated macrophages and microglia. Melanized cells at six midbrain levels were significantly reduced in cocaine users by both drug exposures. The estimated total number of melanized dopamine cells in the anterior midbrain was significantly reduced in cocaine users by 16%. Results with tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity were less conclusive because of variability in staining. Both activated macrophages and activated microglia were significantly increased among cocaine users. Cocaine exposure may have neurotoxic effects on dopamine neurons in humans. The infiltration of phagocytic cells suggests that the lower number of dopamine cells found in cocaine users was a relatively recent effect. The loss of dopamine cells could contribute to and intensify cocaine dependence, as well as anhedonic and depressive symptoms, in some cocaine users. Further efforts at clarifying the pathophysiological mechanisms involved may help explain treatment refractoriness, and identify targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:19233481

  10. N-acetyl-cysteine prevents age-related hearing loss and the progressive loss of inner hair cells in γ-glutamyl transferase 1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dalian; Jiang, Haiyan; Chen, Guang-Di; Longo-Guess, Chantal; Muthaiah, Vijaya Prakash Krishnan; Tian, Cong; Sheppard, Adam; Salvi, Richard; Johnson, Kenneth R

    2016-04-01

    Genetic factors combined with oxidative stress are major determinants of age-related hearing loss (ARHL), one of the most prevalent disorders of the elderly. Dwarf grey mice, Ggt1dwg/dwg, are homozygous for a loss of function mutation of the g-glutamyl transferase 1 gene, which encodes an important antioxidant enzyme critical for the resynthesis of glutathione (GSH). Since GSH reduces oxidative damage, we hypothesized that Ggt1dwg/dwg mice would be susceptible to ARHL. Surprisingly, otoacoustic emissions and cochlear microphonic potentials, which reflect cochlear outer hair cell (OHC) function, were largely unaffected in mutant mice, whereas auditory brainstem responses and the compound action potential were grossly abnormal. These functional deficits were associated with an unusual and selective loss of inner hair cells (IHC), but retention of OHC and auditory nerve fibers. Remarkably, hearing deficits and IHC loss were completely prevented by N-acetyl-L-cysteine, which induces de novo synthesis of GSH; however, hearing deficits and IHC loss reappeared when treatment was discontinued. Ggt1dwg/dwg mice represent an important new model for investigating ARHL, therapeutic interventions, and understanding the perceptual and electrophysiological consequences of sensory deprivation caused by the loss of sensory input exclusively from IHC. PMID:26977590

  11. MicroRNA-27a Induces Mesangial Cell Injury by Targeting of PPARγ, and its In Vivo Knockdown Prevents Progression of Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lina; Wang, Qingzhu; Guo, Feng; Ma, Xiaojun; Ji, Hongfei; Liu, Fei; Zhao, Yanyan; Qin, Guijun

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs play important roles in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). In this study, we found that high glucose upregulated miR-27a expression in cultured glomerular mesangial cells and in the kidney glomeruli of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. miR-27a knockdown prevented high glucose-induced mesangial cell proliferation and also blocked the upregulation of extracellular matrix (ECM)-associated profibrotic genes. Reduction of cell proliferation and profibrotic gene expression by a miR-27a inhibitor depended upon the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Further studies showed that miR-27a negatively regulated PPARγ expression by binding to the 3′-untranslated region of rat PPARγ. An antisense oligonucleotide specific to miR-27a (antagomir-27a) significantly reduced renal miR-27a expression in STZ-induced diabetic rats and significantly increased PPARγ levels. Antagomir-27a also reduced kidney ECM accumulation and proteinuria in STZ-induced diabetic rats. These findings suggest that specific reduction of renal miR-27a decreases renal fibrosis, which may be explained in part by its regulation of PPARγ, and that targeting miR-27a may represent a novel therapeutic approach for DN. PMID:27184517

  12. Translating Research into Practice in Low-Resource Countries: Progress in Prevention of Maternal to Child Transmission of HIV in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ogbolu, Y.; Iwu, E. N.; Zhu, S.; Johnson, J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Research related to prevention of maternal to child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV is dynamic and rapidly changing and has provided evidence-based interventions and policies for practitioners. However, it is uncertain that research and policy guidelines are adequately being disseminated and implemented in resource-constrained countries with the largest burden PMTCT. This study examined current PMTCT practices in 27 public health facilities in Nigeria. Methods. A cross-sectional survey of 231 practicing nurses was conducted. Current PMTCT care practices were evaluated and compared to WHO and national PMTCT policy guidelines. Linear mixed models evaluated the association between PMTCT care practices and training in PMTCT. Results. Most nurses (80%) applied practices involving newborn prophylaxis; yet significant gaps in maternal intrapartum treatment and infant feeding practices were identified. PMTCT training explained 25% of the variance in the application of PMTCT care practices. Conclusion. Key PMTCT practices are not being adequately translated from research into practice. Researchers, policymakers, and clinicians could apply the study findings to address significant knowledge translation gaps in PMTCT. Strategies derived from an implementation science perspective are suggested as a means to improve the translation of PMTCT research into practice in Sub-Saharan African medical facilities. PMID:23738064

  13. Drug Treatment as HIV Prevention Among Women and Girls Who Inject Drugs From a Global Perspective: Progress, Gaps, and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Springer, Sandra A; Larney, Sarah; Alam-Mehrjerdi, Zahra; Altice, Frederick L; Metzger, David; Shoptaw, Steven

    2015-06-01

    Although there have been significant reductions in the number of new HIV infections globally from 2009 to 2013, incidence remains unacceptably high for persons who use drugs. In many settings, women and girls who inject drugs (WWID) with HIV/AIDS experience poor treatment access, including evidence-based practices like antiretroviral therapy and drug treatment. Medication-assisted therapies (MAT) for substance use disorders are especially inaccessible, which in their absence, increases HIV transmission risk. Irrespective of setting or culture, drug treatment using MAT is not only effective but also cost-effective at reducing opioid use and linked injection and sexual risks. Data presented here for WWID address their access to MAT for opioid addiction and to treatments being developed that address the relationship, family, and vocational needs of this group. The most glaring finding is that globally, WWID frequently are excluded in surveys or studies with an impressive lack of disaggregated data by gender when surveying access to MAT—even in wealthy countries. Despite this, there have been some striking improvements in implementing drug treatment as prevention, notably in Iran and China. Still, real barriers remain for women and girls to accessing drug treatment, other harm reduction services, and antiretroviral therapy. Development and/or implementation of interventions that facilitate women and girls engaging in drug treatment that address their roles within society, work, and family/relationships, and outcome evaluation of these interventions are crucial. PMID:25978482

  14. Drug Treatment as HIV Prevention Among Women and Girls Who Inject Drugs From a Global Perspective: Progress, Gaps, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Sandra A.; Larney, Sarah; Alam-mehrjerdi, Zahra; Altice, Frederick L.; Metzger, David; Shoptaw, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Although there have been significant reductions in the number of new HIV infections globally from 2009 to 2013, incidence remains unacceptably high for persons who use drugs. In many settings, women and girls who inject drugs (WWID) with HIV/AIDS experience poor treatment access, including evidence-based practices like antiretroviral therapy and drug treatment. Medication-assisted therapies (MAT) for substance use disorders are especially inaccessible, which in their absence, increases HIV transmission risk. Irrespective of setting or culture, drug treatment using MAT is not only effective but also cost-effective at reducing opioid use and linked injection and sexual risks. Data presented here for WWID address their access to MAT for opioid addiction and to treatments being developed that address the relationship, family, and vocational needs of this group. The most glaring finding is that globally, WWID frequently are excluded in surveys or studies with an impressive lack of disaggregated data by gender when surveying access to MAT—even in wealthy countries. Despite this, there have been some striking improvements in implementing drug treatment as prevention, notably in Iran and China. Still, real barriers remain for women and girls to accessing drug treatment, other harm reduction services, and antiretroviral therapy. Development and/or implementation of interventions that facilitate women and girls engaging in drug treatment that address their roles within society, work, and family/relationships, and outcome evaluation of these interventions are crucial. PMID:25978482

  15. N-acetyl-cysteine prevents age-related hearing loss and the progressive loss of inner hair cells in γ-glutamyl transferase 1 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dalian; Jiang, Haiyan; Chen, Guang-Di; Longo-Guess, Chantal; Muthaiah, Vijaya Prakash Krishnan; Tian, Cong; Sheppard, Adam; Salvi, Richard; Johnson, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic factors combined with oxidative stress are major determinants of age-related hearing loss (ARHL), one of the most prevalent disorders of the elderly. Dwarf grey mice, Ggt1dwg/dwg, are homozygous for a loss of function mutation of the γ-glutamyl transferase 1 gene, which encodes an important antioxidant enzyme critical for the resynthesis of glutathione (GSH). Since GSH reduces oxidative damage, we hypothesized that Ggt1dwg/dwg mice would be susceptible to ARHL. Surprisingly, otoacoustic emissions and cochlear microphonic potentials, which reflect cochlear outer hair cell (OHC) function, were largely unaffected in mutant mice, whereas auditory brainstem responses and the compound action potential were grossly abnormal. These functional deficits were associated with an unusual and selective loss of inner hair cells (IHC), but retention of OHC and auditory nerve fibers. Remarkably, hearing deficits and IHC loss were completely prevented by N-acetyl-L-cysteine, which induces de novo synthesis of GSH; however, hearing deficits and IHC loss reappeared when treatment was discontinued. Ggt1dwg/dwgmice represent an important new model for investigating ARHL, therapeutic interventions, and understanding the perceptual and electrophysiological consequences of sensory deprivation caused by the loss of sensory input exclusively from IHC. PMID:26977590

  16. Evolving trade policy and the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement: does it threaten Vietnam's access to medicine and its progress towards scaling up HIV prevention, treatment and care?

    PubMed

    Linh, Nguyen Nhat; Huong, Nguyen Thanh; Thuy, Hua Thanh

    2015-01-01

    The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP) has undergone 18 rounds of secretive negotiation between the USA and 11 Asia-Pacific countries. Aiming at a free trade area, this multilateral trade proposal covers all aspects of commercial relations among the countries involved. Despite some anticipated positive impacts in trade, specific articles in this proposal's intellectual property and transparency chapters might negatively impact access to medicine, in general, and to antiretroviral (ARV) drugs, in particular, in Vietnam. Drawing on a desk review and qualitative in-depth interviews with 20 key informants from government, academia, hospitals and civil society, we analyse various provisions of the proposal being negotiated leaked after the 14th round of negotiations in September 2012. Findings suggest that the TPP could lead to increased monopoly protection and could limit technological advancements within the local pharmaceutical manufacturing industry, resulting in higher medicine prices in Vietnam. This outcome would have a significant impact on Vietnam's ability to achieve goals for HIV prevention, treatment and care, and create barriers to universal health-care coverage. This research provides unique evidence for Vietnam to advocate for more equitable pharmaceutical provisions in and to raise awareness of the implications of the TPP among the pharmaceutical stakeholder community in Vietnam. PMID:25469870

  17. MicroRNA-27a Induces Mesangial Cell Injury by Targeting of PPARγ, and its In Vivo Knockdown Prevents Progression of Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lina; Wang, Qingzhu; Guo, Feng; Ma, Xiaojun; Ji, Hongfei; Liu, Fei; Zhao, Yanyan; Qin, Guijun

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs play important roles in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). In this study, we found that high glucose upregulated miR-27a expression in cultured glomerular mesangial cells and in the kidney glomeruli of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. miR-27a knockdown prevented high glucose-induced mesangial cell proliferation and also blocked the upregulation of extracellular matrix (ECM)-associated profibrotic genes. Reduction of cell proliferation and profibrotic gene expression by a miR-27a inhibitor depended upon the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Further studies showed that miR-27a negatively regulated PPARγ expression by binding to the 3'-untranslated region of rat PPARγ. An antisense oligonucleotide specific to miR-27a (antagomir-27a) significantly reduced renal miR-27a expression in STZ-induced diabetic rats and significantly increased PPARγ levels. Antagomir-27a also reduced kidney ECM accumulation and proteinuria in STZ-induced diabetic rats. These findings suggest that specific reduction of renal miR-27a decreases renal fibrosis, which may be explained in part by its regulation of PPARγ, and that targeting miR-27a may represent a novel therapeutic approach for DN. PMID:27184517

  18. Dopamine modulates egalitarian behavior in humans.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Ignacio; Zhu, Lusha; Set, Eric; Kayser, Andrew; Hsu, Ming

    2015-03-30

    Egalitarian motives form a powerful force in promoting prosocial behavior and enabling large-scale cooperation in the human species [1]. At the neural level, there is substantial, albeit correlational, evidence suggesting a link between dopamine and such behavior [2, 3]. However, important questions remain about the specific role of dopamine in setting or modulating behavioral sensitivity to prosocial concerns. Here, using a combination of pharmacological tools and economic games, we provide critical evidence for a causal involvement of dopamine in human egalitarian tendencies. Specifically, using the brain penetrant catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) inhibitor tolcapone [4, 5], we investigated the causal relationship between dopaminergic mechanisms and two prosocial concerns at the core of a number of widely used economic games: (1) the extent to which individuals directly value the material payoffs of others, i.e., generosity, and (2) the extent to which they are averse to differences between their own payoffs and those of others, i.e., inequity. We found that dopaminergic augmentation via COMT inhibition increased egalitarian tendencies in participants who played an extended version of the dictator game [6]. Strikingly, computational modeling of choice behavior [7] revealed that tolcapone exerted selective effects on inequity aversion, and not on other computational components such as the extent to which individuals directly value the material payoffs of others. Together, these data shed light on the causal relationship between neurochemical systems and human prosocial behavior and have potential implications for our understanding of the complex array of social impairments accompanying neuropsychiatric disorders involving dopaminergic dysregulation. PMID:25802148

  19. Dopamine agonist: pathological gambling and hypersexuality.

    PubMed

    2008-10-01

    (1) Pathological gambling and increased sexual activity can occur in patients taking dopaminergic drugs. Detailed case reports and small case series mention serious familial and social consequences. The frequency is poorly documented; (2) Most affected patients are being treated for Parkinson's disease, but cases have been reported among patients prescribed a dopamine agonist for restless legs syndrome or pituitary adenoma; (3) Patients treated with this type of drug, and their relatives, should be informed of these risks so that they can watch for changes in behaviour. If such disorders occur, it may be necessary to reduce the dose or to withdraw the drug or replace it with another medication. PMID:19536937

  20. Ethics of Preclinical Dopamine Transporter Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Thomas I

    2016-08-01

    While dopamine transporter single-photon emission computed tomography (DAT-SPECT) imaging is sensitive and specific when performed in patients with signs or symptoms of parkinsonism, its predictive value is uncertain in healthy subjects, even with patients who have first-degree relatives affected by Parkinson disease. In deciding whether to honor a patient's request for a DAT-SPECT, neurologists must balance a patient's autonomy rights with beneficence and nonmaleficence and also consider the distributive justice implications of ordering the test. Generally speaking, the benefits of a DAT-SPECT will be too small to justify its use in an asymptomatic patient concerned about developing Parkinson disease. PMID:27495208

  1. Effect of cocaine, nomifensine, GBR 12909 and WIN 35428 on carbon fiber microelectrode sensitivity for voltammetric recording of dopamine.

    PubMed

    Davidson, C; Ellinwood, E H; Douglas, S B; Lee, T H

    2000-08-15

    Electrochemical measurements using voltammetry or amperometry at carbon-fiber microelectrodes have been used in vitro and in vivo to examine regulatory mechanisms for the central dopamine system. In many of these experiments, dopamine efflux concentrations under control conditions are determined followed by their alterations in response to a drug treatment. The present study demonstrates that some drugs can affect dopamine measurements, not only by their expected pharmacological action but also by directly altering the microelectrode responsivity. The commonly used reuptake inhibitors GBR 12909 (10 microM) and nomifensine (5 microM) drastically reduce electrode sensitivity and, in the case of nomifensine, increase the time to reach a plateau in response to dopamine boluses (i.e. reduced 'frequency response'). Cocaine (10 microM) and WIN 35428 (2 microM) have negligible effect on these indices. This decrease in sensitivity was found in both nafion and non-nafion coated electrodes. Further, the reduction in sensitivity seen in non-nafion coated electrodes was not prevented by increasing the reversal potential (from +1.0 to +1.3 V) and voltage scan rate (from 350 to 450 V/s). These data suggest that care must be taken when interpreting data from voltammetric or amporometric experiments using carbon electrodes where GBR 12909 or nomifensine are used, especially at high concentrations. Furthermore, wherever possible, direct effects of a drug on electrode sensitivity and frequency response should be determined. PMID:10967364

  2. A descending dopamine pathway conserved from basal vertebrates to mammals

    PubMed Central

    Ryczko, Dimitri; Cone, Jackson J.; Alpert, Michael H.; Goetz, Laurent; Auclair, François; Dubé, Catherine; Parent, Martin; Roitman, Mitchell F.; Alford, Simon; Dubuc, Réjean

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine neurons are classically known to modulate locomotion indirectly through ascending projections to the basal ganglia that project down to brainstem locomotor networks. Their loss in Parkinson’s disease is devastating. In lampreys, we recently showed that brainstem networks also receive direct descending dopaminergic inputs that potentiate locomotor output. Here, we provide evidence that this descending dopaminergic pathway is conserved to higher vertebrates, including mammals. In salamanders, dopamine neurons projecting to the striatum or brainstem locomotor networks were partly intermingled. Stimulation of the dopaminergic region evoked dopamine release in brainstem locomotor networks and concurrent reticulospinal activity. In rats, some dopamine neurons projecting to the striatum also innervated the pedunculopontine nucleus, a known locomotor center, and stimulation of the dopaminergic region evoked pedunculopontine dopamine release in vivo. Finally, we found dopaminergic fibers in the human pedunculopontine nucleus. The conservation of a descending dopaminergic pathway across vertebrates warrants re-evaluating dopamine’s role in locomotion. PMID:27071118

  3. BASAL GANGLIA PATHOLOGY IN SCHIZOPHRENIA: DOPAMINE CONNECTIONS and ANOMALIES

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Costas, Emma; Melendez-Ferro, Miguel; Roberts, Rosalinda C.

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental illness that affects 1% of the world population. The disease usually manifests itself in early adulthood with hallucinations, delusions, cognitive and emotional disturbances and disorganized thought and behavior. Dopamine was the first neurotransmitter to be implicated in the disease, and though no longer the only suspect in schizophrenia pathophysiology, it obviously plays an important role. The basal ganglia are the site of most of the dopamine neurons in the brain and the target of antipsychotic drugs. In this review we will start with an overview of basal ganglia anatomy emphasizing dopamine circuitry. Then, we will review the major deficits in dopamine function in schizophrenia, emphasizing the role of excessive dopamine in the basal ganglia and the link to psychosis. PMID:20089137

  4. Basal Ganglia Dopamine Loss Due to Defect in Purine Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Egami, Kiyoshi; Yitta, Silaja; Kasim, Suhail; Lewers, J. Chris; Roberts, Rosalinda C.; Lehar, Mohamed; Jinnah, H. A.

    2007-01-01

    Several rare inherited disorders have provided valuable experiments of nature highlighting specific biological processes of particular importance to the survival or function of midbrain dopamine neurons. In both humans and mice, deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) is associated with profound loss of striatal dopamine, with relative preservation of other neurotransmitters. In the current studies of knockout mice, no morphological signs of abnormal development or degeneration were found in an exhaustive battery that included stereological and morphometric measures of midbrain dopamine neurons, electron microscopic studies of striatal axons and terminals, and stains for degeneration or gliosis. A novel culture model involving HPRT-deficient dopaminergic neurons also exhibited significant loss of dopamine without a morphological correlate. These results suggest dopamine loss in HPRT deficiency has a biochemical rather than anatomical basis, and imply purine recycling to be a biochemical process of particular importance to the function of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:17374562

  5. Arithmetic and local circuitry underlying dopamine prediction errors

    PubMed Central

    Eshel, Neir; Bukwich, Michael; Rao, Vinod; Hemmelder, Vivian; Tian, Ju; Uchida, Naoshige

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine neurons are thought to facilitate learning by comparing actual and expected reward1,2. Despite two decades of investigation, little is known about how this comparison is made. To determine how dopamine neurons calculate prediction error, we combined optogenetic manipulations with extracellular recordings in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) while mice engaged in classical conditioning. By manipulating the temporal expectation of reward, we demonstrate that dopamine neurons perform subtraction, a computation that is ideal for reinforcement learning but rarely observed in the brain. Furthermore, selectively exciting and inhibiting neighbouring GABA neurons in the VTA reveals that these neurons are a source of subtraction: they inhibit dopamine neurons when reward is expected, causally contributing to prediction error calculations. Finally, bilaterally stimulating VTA GABA neurons dramatically reduces anticipatory licking to conditioned odours, consistent with an important role for these neurons in reinforcement learning. Together, our results uncover the arithmetic and local circuitry underlying dopamine prediction errors. PMID:26322583

  6. Augmentation of Left Ventricular Wall Thickness With Alginate Hydrogel Implants Improves Left Ventricular Function and Prevents Progressive Remodeling in Dogs With Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Sabbah, Hani N.; Wang, Mengjun; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Rastogi, Sharad; Ilsar, Itamar; Sabbah, Michael S.; Kohli, Smita; Helgerson, Sam; Lee, Randall J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The study tested the hypothesis that augmentation of the left ventricular (LV) wall thickness with direct intramyocardial injections of alginate hydrogel implants (AHI) reduces LV cavity size, restores LV shape, and improves LV function in dogs with heart failure (HF). Background Progressive LV dysfunction, enlargement, and chamber sphericity are features of HF associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Methods Studies were performed in 14 dogs with HF produced by intracoronary microembolizations (LV ejection fraction [EF] <30%). Dogs were randomized to AHI treatment (n = 8) or to sham-operated control (n = 6). During an open-chest procedure, dogs received either intramyocardial injections of 0.25 to 0.35 ml of alginate hydrogel (Algisyl-LVR, LoneStar Heart, Inc., Laguna Hills, California) or saline. Seven injections were made ∼1.0 to 1.5 cm apart (total volume 1.8 to 2.1 ml) along the circumference of the LV free wall halfway between the apex and base starting from the anteroseptal groove and ending at the posteroseptal groove. Hemodynamic and ventriculographic measurements were made before treatment (PRE) and repeated post-surgery for up to 17 weeks (POST). Results Compared to control, AHI significantly reduced LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes and improved LV sphericity. AHI treatment significantly increased EF (26 ± 0.4% at PRE to 31 ± 0.4% at POST; p < 0.05) compared to the decreased EF seen in control dogs (27 ± 0.3% at PRE to 24 ± 1.3% at POST; p < 0.05). AHI treatment was well tolerated and was not associated with increased LV diastolic stiffness. Conclusions In HF dogs, circumferential augmentation of LV wall thickness with AHI improves LV structure and function. The results support continued development of AHI for the treatment of patients with advanced HF. PMID:23998003

  7. Antidiabetic Drug Metformin Prevents Progression of Pancreatic Cancer by Targeting in Part Cancer Stem Cells and mTOR Signaling12

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Altaf; Janakiram, Naveena B; Brewer, Misty; Ritchie, Rebekah L; Marya, Anuj; Lightfoot, Stan; Steele, Vernon E; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown that diabetes mellitus is associated positively with increased risk of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), and recent meta-analysis studies showed that metformin, reduces the risk of pancreatic cancer (PC). We tested the effects of metformin on pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and their progression to PDAC in p48Cre/+.LSL-KrasG12D/+ transgenic mice. Mice fed control diet showed 80% and 62% incidence of PDAC in males and females, respectively. Male mice showed 20% and 26%, and female mice showed 7% and 0% PDAC incidence with 1000- and 2000-ppm metformin treatments, respectively. Both doses of metformin decreased pancreatic tumor weights by 34% to 49% (P < 0.03–0.001). The drug treatment caused suppression of PanIN 3 (carcinoma in situ) lesions by 28% to 39% (P < .002) and significant inhibition of carcinoma spread in the pancreas. The pancreatic tissue and/or serum of mice fed metformin showed a significant inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (pErk), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) with an increase in phosphorylated 5′ adenosine monophosphate kinase (pAMPK), tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (TSC1, TSC2), C-protein and an autophagy related protein 2 (ATG2). The cancer stem cell (CSC) markers were significantly decreased (P < 0.04–0.0002) in the pancreatic tissue. These results suggest that biologic effects of metformin are mediated through decreased CSC markers cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44 and CD133), aldehyde dehydrogenase isoform 1 (ALDH1), and epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EPCAM) and modulation of the mTOR signaling pathway. Our preclinical data indicate that metformin has significant potential for use in clinical trials for PC chemoprevention. PMID:24466367

  8. Apomorphine and the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia: a dilemma?

    PubMed Central

    Dépatie, L; Lal, S

    2001-01-01

    The dopamine (DA) hypothesis of schizophrenia implicates an enhancement of DA function in the pathophysiology of the disorder, at least in the genesis of positive symptoms. Accordingly, apomorphine, a directly acting DA receptor agonist, should display psychotomimetic properties. A review of the literature shows little or no evidence that apomorphine, in doses that stimulate postsynaptic DA receptors, induces psychosis in non-schizophrenic subjects or a relapse or exacerbation of psychotic symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. After a detailed review of the literature reporting psychotogenic effects of apomorphine in patients with Parkinson's disease, an interpretation of these data is difficult, in part because of several confounding factors, such as the concomitant use of drugs known to induce psychosis and the advanced state of the progressive neurological disorder. In the context of the DA hypothesis of schizophrenia, the limited ability of apomorphine to induce psychosis, in contrast to indirectly acting DA agonists that increase synaptic DA, may be explained by the relatively weak affinity of apomorphine for the D3 receptor compared with DA. Alternatively, enhancement of DA function, though necessary, may be insufficient by itself to induce psychosis. PMID:11394190

  9. 5MeCDDO Blocks Metabolic Activation but not Progression of Breast, Intestine, and Tongue Cancers. Is Antioxidant Response Element a Prevention Target?

    PubMed

    Lubet, Ronald A; Townsend, Reid; Clapper, Margie L; Juliana, M Margaret; Steele, Vernon E; McCormick, David L; Grubbs, Clinton J

    2016-07-01

    The preventive efficacy of the triterpenoid 5MeCDDO was tested in two models of mammary cancer, the Min model of intestinal cancer, and a chemically induced model of head and neck cancer. In one model of mammary cancer, female Sprague-Dawley rats were administered MNU at 50 days of age, and 5MeCDDO (27 ppm) was administered in the diet beginning 5 days later for the duration of the study; 5MeCDDO was ineffective. In contrast, in a model examining initiation of mammary cancers by the procarcinogen dimethyl-benzanthracene, 5, 6-benzoflavone (500 ppm, an Ah receptor agonist) or 5MeCDDO (27 or 2.7 ppm) decreased tumor multiplicity by 90%, 80%, and 50%, respectively. This anti-initiating effect which is presumably mediated by altered metabolic activation parallels our observation that 5MeCDDO induced proteins of various antioxidant response element (ARE)-related phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes [e.g., GST Pi, AKR 7A3 (aflatoxicol), epoxide hydrolase, and quinone reductase] in the liver. 5MeCDDO tested in the 4-nitroquinoline-l-oxide (4-NQO) head and neck cancer model failed to decrease tumor incidence or invasiveness. In the Min mouse model of intestinal cancer, a high dose of 5MeCDDO (80 ppm) was weakly effective in reducing adenoma multiplicity [∼30% (P < 0.05)]; however, a lower dose was totally ineffective. These findings question whether measuring increased levels of certain ARE-related genes (e.g., quinone reductase, GST Pi), indicating decreased carcinogen activation are sufficient to imply general chemopreventive efficacy of a given agent or mixture. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 616-23. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27150634

  10. Preferential enhancement of dopamine transmission within the nucleus accumbens shell by cocaine is attributable to a direct increase in phasic dopamine release events.

    PubMed

    Aragona, Brandon J; Cleaveland, Nathan A; Stuber, Garret D; Day, Jeremy J; Carelli, Regina M; Wightman, R Mark

    2008-08-27

    Preferential enhancement of dopamine transmission within the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell is a fundamental aspect of the neural regulation of cocaine reward. Despite its importance, the nature of this effect is poorly understood. Here, we used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to examine specific transmission processes underlying cocaine-evoked increases in dopamine transmission within the NAc core and shell. Initially, we examined altered terminal dopamine concentrations after global autoreceptor blockade. This was the first examination of autoreceptor regulation of naturally occurring phasic dopamine transmission and provided a novel characterization of specific components of dopamine neurotransmission. Comparison of increased dopamine signaling evoked by autoreceptor blockade and cocaine administration allowed robust resolution between increased frequency, concentration, and duration of phasic dopamine release events after cocaine delivery. Cocaine increased dopamine transmission by slowed uptake and increased concentration of dopamine released in the core and shell. However, an additional increase in the number phasic release events occurred only within the NAc shell, and this increase was eliminated by inactivation of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. This represents the first evidence that cocaine directly increases the frequency of dopamine release events and reveals that this is responsible for preferentially increased dopamine transmission within the NAc shell after cocaine administration. Additionally, cocaine administration resulted in a synergistic increase in dopamine concentration, and subregion differences were abolished when cocaine was administered in the absence of autoregulation. Together, these results demonstrate that cocaine administration results in a temporally and regionally specific increase in phasic dopamine release that is significantly regulated by dopamine autoreceptors. PMID:18753384

  11. Higher nigrostriatal dopamine neuron loss in early than late onset Parkinson's disease?--a [99mTc]-TRODAT-1 SPECT study.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ming Chi; Franco de Andrade, Luiz Augusto; Amaro, Edson; Felicio, Andre Carvalho; Ferraz, Henrique Ballalai; Wagner, Jairo; Hoexter, Marcelo Queiroz; Lin, Li Fu; Fu, Ying Kai; Mari, Jair Jesus; Tufik, Sergio; Bressan, Rodrigo Affonseca

    2007-04-30

    Early-onset Parkinson's disease (EOPD) is distinct from the classic late-onset PD (LOPD) because of its slower disease progression. The aim of this study was to compare dopamine neuronal loss in EOPD with that of LOPD with the same disease duration, through dopamine transporter (DAT) estimation. Fourteen patients, seven EOPD (<50 years) and seven LOPD, matched for disease duration were scanned with [(99m)Tc]-TRODAT-1-SPECT (INER-Taiwan), and were assessed with standard PD scales. EOPD patients had 34% lower striatal DAT binding potential (BP) compared with that of LOPD patients (BP = 0.29 +/- 0.12, BP = 0.44 +/- 0.12, P < 0.02) with similar PD severity. These results suggest that EOPD patients have greater dopamine density loss than LOPD patients without motor-symptom worsening. PMID:17290452

  12. [Scans without Evidence of Dopamine Deficit (SWEDDs)].

    PubMed

    Mukai, Yohei; Murata, Miho

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine transporter (DaT) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and [18F]fluoro-L-DOPA ([18F]DOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) facilitate the investigation of dopaminergic hypofunction in neurodegenerative diseases. DaT SPECT and [18F]DOPA PET have been adopted as survey tools in clinical trials. In a large study on Parkinson's disease, 4-15% of subjects clinically diagnosed with early-stage Parkinson's disease had normal dopaminergic functional imaging scans. These are called Scans without Evidence of Dopamine Deficit (SWEDDs), and are considered to represent a state different from Parkinson's disease. Neurological diseases that exhibit parkinsonism and have normal dopaminergic cells in the nigrostriatal system (e.g., essential tremor, psychogenic parkinsonism, DOPA-responsive dystonia, vascular parkinsonism, drug-induced parkinsonism, manganism, brain tumor, myoclonus-dystonia (DYT11), and fragile X syndrome) might be diagnosed with SWEDDs. True bradykinesia with fatigue or decrement may be useful for distinguishing between Parkinson's disease and SWEDDs. However, because SWEDDs encompass many diseases, their properties may not be uniform. In this review, we discuss DaT SPECT, the concept of SWEDDs, and differential diagnosis. PMID:26764301

  13. Carrier-dependent and Ca2+-dependent 5-HT and dopamine release induced by (+)-amphetamine, 3,4-methylendioxy-methamphetamine, p-chloroamphetamine and (+)-fenfluramine

    PubMed Central

    Crespi, Daniela; Mennini, Tiziana; Gobbi, Marco

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism underlying 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and/or dopamine release induced by (+)-amphetamine ((+)-Amph), 3,4-methylendioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), p-chloroamphetamine (pCA) and (+)-fenfluramine ((+)-Fen) was investigated in rat brain superfused synaptosomes preloaded with the 3H neurotransmitters. Their rank order of potency for [3H]-5-HT-releasing activity was the same as for inhibition of 5-HT uptake (pCA⩾MDMA⩾(+)-Fen>>(+)-Amph). Similarly, their rank order as [3H]-dopamine releasers and dopamine uptake inhibitors was the same ((+)-Amph>>pCA=MDMA>>(+)-Fen). We also confirmed that the release induced by these compounds was prevented by selective transporter inhibitors (indalpine or nomifensine). [3H]-5-HT and/or [3H]-dopamine release induced by all these compounds was partially (31–80%), but significantly Ca2+-dependent. Lack of extracellular Ca2+ did not alter uptake mechanisms nor did it modify the carrier-dependent dopamine-induced [3H]-dopamine release. (+)-Amph-induced [3H]-dopamine release and pCA- and MDMA-induced [3H]-5-HT release were significantly inhibited by ω-agatoxin-IVA, a specific blocker of P-type voltage-operated Ca2+-channels, similar to the previous results on (+)-Fen-induced [3H]-5-HT release. Methiothepin inhibited the Ca2+-dependent component of (+)-Amph-induced [3H]-dopamine release with high potency (70 nM), as previously found with (+)-Fen-induced [3H]-5-HT release. The inhibitory effect of methiothepin was not due to its effects as a transporter inhibitor or Ca2+-channel blocker and is unlikely to be due to its antagonist properties on 5-HT1/2, dopamine or any other extracellular receptor. These results indicate that the release induced by these compounds is both ‘carrier-mediated' and Ca2+-dependent (possibly exocytotic-like), with the specific carrier allowing the amphetamines to enter the synaptosome. The Ca2+-dependent release is mediated by Ca2+-influx (mainly through P-type Ca2+-channels), possibly triggered by

  14. Stimulus-Dependent Dopamine Release in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikstrom, Sverker; Soderlund, Goran

    2007-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is related to an attenuated and dysfunctional dopamine system. Normally, a high extracellular dopamine level yields a tonic dopaminergic input that down-regulates stimuli-evoked phasic dopamine responses through autoreceptors. Abnormally low tonic extracellular dopamine in ADHD up-regulates the…

  15. Dopamine and light: dissecting effects on mood and motivational states in women with subsyndromal seasonal affective disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cawley, Elizabeth I.; Park, Sarah; Rot, Marije aan het; Sancton, Kimberley; Benkelfat, Chawki; Young, Simon N.; Boivin, Diane B.; Leyton, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite evidence that bright light can improve mood, the neurobiology remains poorly understood. Some evidence implicates the catecholamines. In the present study, we measured the effects of transiently decreasing dopamine (DA) synthesis on mood and motivational states in healthy women with mild seasonal mood changes who were tested in either bright or dim light. Methods On 2 test days, participants slept overnight in a light-controlled room. On the morning of each session, half of the participants awoke to gradual increases of bright light, up to 3000 lux, and half to dim light (10 lux). For all participants, DA was reduced on 1 of the test days using the acute phenylalanine/tyrosine depletion (APTD) method; on the other day, they ingested a nutritionally balanced control mixture (BAL). Beginning 4 hours postingestion, participants completed subjective mood questionnaires, psychological tests and a progressive ratio breakpoint task during which they worked for successive units of $5. Results Thirty-two women participated in our study. The APTD lowered mood, agreeableness, energy and the willingness to work for monetary reward. The effects on energy and motivation were independent of light, while the effects on mood and agreeableness were seen in the dim condition only, being prevented by bright light. Limitations Acute phenylalanine/tyrosine depletion might affect systems other than DA. The sample size was small. Conclusion These results suggest that increased DA function may be responsible for some of the beneficial effects of light, while adding to the evidence that the neurobiology of mood and motivational states can be dissociated. PMID:23735584

  16. Deficits in striatal dopamine D(2) receptors and energy metabolism detected by in vivo microPET imaging in a rat model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Araujo, D M; Cherry, S R; Tatsukawa, K J; Toyokuni, T; Kornblum, H I

    2000-12-01

    Functional imaging by repeated noninvasive scans of specific (18)F tracer distribution using a high-resolution small-animal PET scanner, the microPET, assessed the time course of alterations in energy utilization and dopamine receptors in rats with unilateral striatal quinolinic acid lesions. Energy utilization ipsilateral to the lesion, determined using scans of 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-d-glucose uptake, was compromised severely 1 week after intrastriatal excitotoxin injections. When the same rats were imaged 5 and 7 weeks postlesion, decrements in energy metabolism were even more prominent. In contrast, lesion-induced effects on dopamine D(2) receptor binding were more progressive, with an initial upregulation of [3-(2'-(18)F]fluoroethyl)spiperone binding apparent 1 week postlesion followed by a decline 5 and 7 weeks thereafter. Additional experiments revealed that marked upregulation of dopamine D(2) receptors consequent to quinolinic acid injections could be detected as early as 3 days after the initial insult. Postmortem markers of striatal GABAergic neurons were assessed in the same rats 7 weeks after the lesion: expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase and dopamine D(1) receptor mRNA, as well as [(3)H]SCH-23,390 and [(3)H]spiperone binding to dopamine D(1) and D(2) receptors, respectively, detected prominent decrements consequent to the lesion. In contrast, by 7 weeks postlesion [(3)H]WIN-35,428 binding to dopamine transport sites within the striatum appeared to be enhanced proximal to the quinolinic acid injection sites. The results demonstrate that functional imaging using the microPET is a useful technique to explore not only the progressive neurodegeneration that occurs in response to excitotoxic insults, but also to examine more closely the intricacies of neurotransmitter activity in a small animal model of HD. PMID:11085894

  17. Rhes regulates dopamine D2 receptor transmission in striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Sciamanna, Giuseppe; Napolitano, Francesco; Pelosi, Barbara; Bonsi, Paola; Vitucci, Daniela; Nuzzo, Tommaso; Punzo, Daniela; Ghiglieri, Veronica; Ponterio, Giulia; Pasqualetti, Massimo; Pisani, Antonio; Usiello, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    Ras homolog enriched in striatum (Rhes) is highly expressed in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of rodents. In the present study, we characterized the expression of Rhes mRNA across species, as well as its functional role in other striatal neuron subtypes. Double in situ hybridization analysis showed that Rhes transcript is selectively localized in striatal cholinergic interneurons (ChIs), but not in GABAergic parvalbumin- or in neuropeptide Y-positive cell populations. Rhes is closely linked to dopamine-dependent signaling. Therefore, we recorded ChIs activity in basal condition and following dopamine receptor activation. Surprisingly, instead of an expected dopamine D2 receptor (D2R)-mediated inhibition, we observed an aberrant excitatory response in ChIs from Rhes knockout mice. Conversely, the effect of D1R agonist on ChIs was less robust in Rhes mutants than in controls. Although Rhes deletion in mutants occurs throughout the striatum, we demonstrate that the D2R response is altered specifically in ChIs, since it was recorded in pharmacological isolation, and prevented either by intrapipette BAPTA or by GDP-β-S. Moreover, we show that blockade of Cav2.2 calcium channels prevented the abnormal D2R response. Finally, we found that the abnormal D2R activation in ChIs was rescued by selective PI3K inhibition thus suggesting that Rhes functionally modulates PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in these neurons. Our findings reveal that, besides its expression in MSNs, Rhes is localized also in striatal ChIs and, most importantly, lack of this G-protein, significantly alters D2R modulation of striatal cholinergic excitability. PMID:25818655

  18. Dopamine uptake dynamics are preserved under isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Brodnik, Zachary D; España, Rodrigo A

    2015-10-01

    Fast scan cyclic voltammetry is commonly used for measuring the kinetics of dopamine release and uptake. For experiments using an anesthetized preparation, urethane is preferentially used because it does not alter dopamine uptake kinetics compared to freely moving animals. Unfortunately, urethane is highly toxic, can induce premature death during experiments, and cannot be used for recovery surgeries. Isoflurane is an alternative anesthetic that is less toxic than urethane, produces a stable level of anesthesia over extended periods, and is often used for recovery surgeries. Despite these benefits, the effects of isoflurane on dopamine release and uptake have not been directly characterized. In the present studies, we assessed the utility of isoflurane for voltammetry experiments by testing dopamine signaling parameters under baseline conditions, after treatment with the dopamine uptake inhibitor cocaine, and after exposure to increasing concentrations of isoflurane. Our results indicate that surgical levels of isoflurane do not significantly alter terminal mechanisms of dopamine release and uptake over prolonged periods of time. Consequently, we propose that isoflurane is an acceptable anesthetic for voltammetry experiments, which in turn permits the design of studies in which dopamine signaling is examined under anesthesia prior to recovery and subsequent experimentation in the same animals. PMID:26321152

  19. The Neurotropic Parasite Toxoplasma Gondii Increases Dopamine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Prandovszky, Emese; Gaskell, Elizabeth; Martin, Heather; Dubey, J. P.; Webster, Joanne P.; McConkey, Glenn A.

    2011-01-01

    The highly prevalent parasite Toxoplasma gondii manipulates its host's behavior. In infected rodents, the behavioral changes increase the likelihood that the parasite will be transmitted back to its definitive cat host, an essential step in completion of the parasite's life cycle. The mechanism(s) responsible for behavioral changes in the host is unknown but two lines of published evidence suggest that the parasite alters neurotransmitter signal transduction: the disruption of the parasite-induced behavioral changes with medications used to treat psychiatric disease (specifically dopamine antagonists) and identification of a tyrosine hydroxylase encoded in the parasite genome. In this study, infection of mammalian dopaminergic cells with T. gondii enhanced the levels of K+-induced release of dopamine several-fold, with a direct correlation between the number of infected cells and the quantity of dopamine released. Immunostaining brain sections of infected mice with dopamine antibody showed intense staining of encysted parasites. Based on these analyses, T. gondii orchestrates a significant increase in dopamine metabolism in neural cells. Tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme for dopamine synthesis, was also found in intracellular tissue cysts in brain tissue with antibodies specific for the parasite-encoded tyrosine hydroxylase. These observations provide a mechanism for parasite-induced behavioral changes. The observed effects on dopamine metabolism could also be relevant in interpreting reports of psychobehavioral changes in toxoplasmosis-infected humans. PMID:21957440

  20. Prefrontal cortical dopamine transmission is decreased in alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Narendran, Rajesh; Mason, Neale Scott; Paris, Jennifer; Himes, Michael L.; Douaihy, Antoine B.; Frankle, W. Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Objective Basic studies have demonstrated that optimal levels of prefrontal cortical dopamine are critical to various executive functions such working memory, attention, inhibitory control and risk/reward decisions--all of which are impaired in addictive disorders such as alcoholism. Based on this and imaging studies in alcoholics that have demonstrated less dopamine in the striatum, we hypothesized decreased dopamine transmission in the prefrontal cortex in alcoholism. To test this hypothesis, we used amphetamine and [11C]FLB 457 positron emission tomography (PET) to measure cortical dopamine transmission in a group of 21 recently abstinent alcoholics and matched healthy controls. Methods [11C]FLB 457 binding potential (BPND) was measured in subjects with kinetic analysis using the arterial input function both before and after 0.5 mg kg−1 of d-amphetamine. Results Amphetamine-induced displacement of [11C]FLB 457 binding potential (Δ BPND) was significantly smaller in the cortical regions in alcoholics compared to healthy controls. Cortical regions that demonstrated lower dopamine transmission in alcoholics included the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, orbital frontal cortex, temporal cortex and medial temporal lobe. Conclusions The results of this study for the first time unambiguously demonstrate decreased dopamine transmission in the cortex in alcoholism. Further research is necessary to understand the clinical relevance of decreased cortical dopamine as to whether it is related to impaired executive function, relapse, and outcome in alcoholism. PMID:24874293

  1. Ceramide-induced alterations in dopamine transporter function.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Evan L; Rau, Kristi S; Topham, Matthew K; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of ceramide on dopamine and serotonin (5-HT, 5-hydroxytryptamine) transporters. Exposure of rat striatal synaptosomes to C2-ceramide caused a reversible, concentration-dependent decrease in plasmalemmal dopamine uptake. In contrast, ceramide exposure increased striatal 5-HT synaptosomal uptake. This increase did not appear to be due to an increased uptake by the 5-HT transporter. Rather, the increase appeared to result from an increase in 5-HT transport through the dopamine transporter, an assertion evidenced by findings that this increase: (1) does not occur in hippocampal synaptosomes (i.e., a preparation largely devoid of dopamine transporters), (2) occurs in striatal synaptosomes prepared from para-chloroamphetamine-treated rats (i.e., a preparation lacking 5-HT transporters), (3) is attenuated by pretreatment with methylphenidate (i.e., a relatively selective dopamine reuptake inhibitor) and (4) is inhibited by exposure to exogenous dopamine (i.e., which presumably competes for uptake with 5-HT). Taken together, these results reveal that ceramide is a novel modulator of monoamine transporter function, and may alter the affinity of dopamine transporters for its primary substrate. PMID:12498904

  2. Dopamine Modulates Metabolic Rate and Temperature Sensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Taro; Tomita, Jun; Kume, Shoen; Kume, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Homeothermal animals, such as mammals, maintain their body temperature by heat generation and heat dissipation, while poikilothermal animals, such as insects, accomplish it by relocating to an environment of their favored temperature. Catecholamines are known to regulate thermogenesis and metabolic rate in mammals, but their roles in other animals are poorly understood. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been used as a model system for the genetic studies of temperature preference behavior. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity of some temperature sensitive behaviors are regulated by dopamine in Drosophila. Temperature-sensitive molecules like dTrpA1 and shits induce temperature-dependent behavioral changes, and the temperature at which the changes are induced were lowered in the dopamine transporter-defective mutant, fumin. The mutant also displays a preference for lower temperatures. This thermophobic phenotype was rescued by the genetic recovery of the dopamine transporter in dopamine neurons. Flies fed with a dopamine biosynthesis inhibitor (3-iodo-L-tyrosine), which diminishes dopamine signaling, exhibited preference for a higher temperature. Furthermore, we found that the metabolic rate is up-regulated in the fumin mutant. Taken together, dopamine has functions in the temperature sensitivity of behavioral changes and metabolic rate regulation in Drosophila, as well as its previously reported functions in arousal/sleep regulation. PMID:22347491

  3. Maternal Immune Activation Disrupts Dopamine System in the Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Luchicchi, Antonio; Lecca, Salvatore; Melis, Miriam; De Felice, Marta; Cadeddu, Francesca; Frau, Roberto; Muntoni, Anna Lisa; Fadda, Paola; Devoto, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Background: In utero exposure to maternal viral infections is associated with a higher incidence of psychiatric disorders with a supposed neurodevelopmental origin, including schizophrenia. Hence, immune response factors exert a negative impact on brain maturation that predisposes the offspring to the emergence of pathological phenotypes later in life. Although ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons and their target regions play essential roles in the pathophysiology of psychoses, it remains to be fully elucidated how dopamine activity and functionality are disrupted in maternal immune activation models of schizophrenia. Methods: Here, we used an immune-mediated neurodevelopmental disruption model based on prenatal administration of the polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid in rats, which mimics a viral infection and recapitulates behavioral abnormalities relevant to psychiatric disorders in the offspring. Extracellular dopamine levels were measured by brain microdialysis in both the nucleus accumbens shell and the medial prefrontal cortex, whereas dopamine neurons in ventral tegmental area were studied by in vivo electrophysiology. Results: Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid-treated animals, at adulthood, displayed deficits in sensorimotor gating, memory, and social interaction and increased baseline extracellular dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens, but not in the prefrontal cortex. In polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid rats, dopamine neurons showed reduced spontaneously firing rate and population activity. Conclusions: These results confirm that maternal immune activation severely impairs dopamine system and that the polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid model can be considered a proper animal model of a psychiatric condition that fulfills a multidimensional set of validity criteria predictive of a human pathology. PMID:26819283

  4. Dopamine D2-like receptor signaling suppresses human osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hanami, Kentaro; Nakano, Kazuhisa; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Okada, Yosuke; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Kubo, Satoshi; Kondo, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2013-09-01

    Dopamine, a major neurotransmitter, transmits signals via five different seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors termed D1 to D5. Although the relevance of neuroendocrine system to bone metabolism has been emerging, the precise effects of dopaminergic signaling upon osteoclastogenesis remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that human monocyte-derived osteoclast precursor cells express all dopamine-receptor subtypes. Dopamine and dopamine D2-like receptor agonists such as pramipexole and quinpirole reduced the formation of TRAP-positive multi-nucleated cells, cathepsin K mRNA expression, and pit formation area in vitro. These inhibitory effects were reversed by pre-treatment with a D2-like receptor antagonist haloperidol or a Gαi inhibitor pertussis toxin, but not with the D1-like receptor antagonist SCH-23390. Dopamine and dopamine D2-like receptor agonists, but not a D1-like receptor agonist, suppressed intracellular cAMP concentration as well as RANKL-meditated induction of c-Fos and NFATc1 mRNA expression in human osteoclast precursor cells. Finally, the dopamine D2-like receptor agonist suppressed LPS-induced osteoclast formation in murine bone marrow culture ex vivo. These findings indicate that dopaminergic signaling plays an important role in bone homeostasis via direct effects upon osteoclast differentiation and further suggest that the clinical use of neuroleptics is likely to affect bone mass. PMID:23631878

  5. Genetics Home Reference: progressive osseous heteroplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and muscle tissue. Bone that forms outside the skeleton is called heterotopic or ectopic bone. In progressive ... preventing bony tissue from being produced outside the skeleton. The GNAS gene mutations that cause progressive osseous ...

  6. Individual differences in nucleus accumbens dopamine receptors predict development of addiction-like behavior: a computational approach.

    PubMed

    Piray, Payam; Keramati, Mohammad Mahdi; Dezfouli, Amir; Lucas, Caro; Mokri, Azarakhsh

    2010-09-01

    Clinical and experimental observations show individual differences in the development of addiction. Increasing evidence supports the hypothesis that dopamine receptor availability in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) predisposes drug reinforcement. Here, modeling striatal-midbrain dopaminergic circuit, we propose a reinforcement learning model for addiction based on the actor-critic model of striatum. Modeling dopamine receptors in the NAc as modulators of learning rate for appetitive--but not aversive--stimuli in the critic--but not the actor--we define vulnerability to addiction as a relatively lower learning rate for the appetitive stimuli, compared to aversive stimuli, in the critic. We hypothesize that an imbalance in this learning parameter used by appetitive and aversive learning systems can result in addiction. We elucidate that the interaction between the degree of individual vulnerability and the duration of exposure to drug has two progressive consequences: deterioration of the imbalance and establishment of an abnormal habitual response in the actor. Using computational language, the proposed model describes how development of compulsive behavior can be a function of both degree of drug exposure and individual vulnerability. Moreover, the model describes how involvement of the dorsal striatum in addiction can be augmented progressively. The model also interprets other forms of addiction, such as obesity and pathological gambling, in a common mechanism with drug addiction. Finally, the model provides an answer for the question of why behavioral addictions are triggered in Parkinson's disease patients by D2 dopamine agonist treatments. PMID:20569176

  7. Dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome: implications for patient care.

    PubMed

    Nirenberg, Melissa J

    2013-08-01

    Dopamine agonists are effective treatments for a variety of indications, including Parkinson's disease and restless legs syndrome, but may have serious side effects, such as orthostatic hypotension, hallucinations, and impulse control disorders (including pathological gambling, compulsive eating, compulsive shopping/buying, and hypersexuality). The most effective way to alleviate these side effects is to taper or discontinue dopamine agonist therapy. A subset of patients who taper a dopamine agonist, however, develop dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome (DAWS), which has been defined as a severe, stereotyped cluster of physical and psychological symptoms that correlate with dopamine agonist withdrawal in a dose-dependent manner, cause clinically significant distress or social/occupational dysfunction, are refractory to levodopa and other dopaminergic medications, and cannot be accounted for by other clinical factors. The symptoms of DAWS include anxiety, panic attacks, dysphoria, depression, agitation, irritability, suicidal ideation, fatigue, orthostatic hypotension, nausea, vomiting, diaphoresis, generalized pain, and drug cravings. The severity and prognosis of DAWS is highly variable. While some patients have transient symptoms and make a full recovery, others have a protracted withdrawal syndrome lasting for months to years, and therefore may be unwilling or unable to discontinue DA therapy. Impulse control disorders appear to be a major risk factor for DAWS, and are present in virtually all affected patients. Thus, patients who are unable to discontinue dopamine agonist therapy may experience chronic impulse control disorders. At the current time, there are no known effective treatments for DAWS. For this reason, providers are urged to use dopamine agonists judiciously, warn patients about the risks of DAWS prior to the initiation of dopamine agonist therapy, and follow patients closely for withdrawal symptoms during dopamine agonist taper. PMID:23686524

  8. Deamination of newly-formed dopamine in rat renal tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, M. H.; Pestana, M.; Soares-da-Silva, P.

    1991-01-01

    1. The present study has examined the formation of dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) in slices of the rat renal cortex and the renal medulla loaded with exogenous L-beta-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA). The effects of pargyline and of two selective inhibitors of monoamine oxidase (MAO) types A and B, respectively Ro 41-1049 and Ro 19-6327, on the deamination of newly-synthesized dopamine in kidney slices incubated with exogenous L-DOPA were also tested. The assay of L-DOPA, dopamine, noradrenaline and DOPAC was performed by means of h.p.l.c. with electrochemical detection. 2. Incubation of renal slices with exogenous L-DOPA resulted in a concentration-dependent accumulation of dopamine and DOPAC; the tissue levels of newly-formed dopamine and DOPAC in slices of the renal medulla were 6-8% of those in cortical slices. 3. Pargyline (0.1 mM) produced a marked decrease (84% reduction) in the formation of DOPAC in kidney slices loaded with 1.0 mM L-DOPA; this effect was accompanied by a 17% increase in the accumulation of dopamine. Similar effects were obtained at higher concentrations of pargyline (0.5 and 1.0 mM). At 5.0 and 10.0 mM pargyline, a marked decrease (46 and 76% reduction) in the accumulation of newly-formed dopamine was observed. 4. The accumulation of dopamine and DOPAC was found to be time-dependent in experiments in which tissues were incubated with 5 and 10 microM L-DOPA for 5, 10, 20 and 30 min. Pargyline (0.1 mM) produced an increase in the accumulation of dopamine at all incubation periods and decreased the formation of DOPAC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1364853

  9. Regulation of bat echolocation pulse acoustics by striatal dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Tressler, Jedediah; Schwartz, Christine; Wellman, Paul; Hughes, Samuel; Smotherman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The ability to control the bandwidth, amplitude and duration of echolocation pulses is a crucial aspect of echolocation performance but few details are known about the neural mechanisms underlying the control of these voice parameters in any mammal. The basal ganglia (BG) are a suite of forebrain nuclei centrally involved in sensory-motor control and are characterized by their dependence on dopamine. We hypothesized that pharmacological manipulation of brain dopamine levels could reveal how BG circuits might influence the acoustic structure of bat echolocation pulses. A single intraperitoneal injection of a low dose (5 mg kg–1) of the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPTP), which selectively targets dopamine-producing cells of the substantia nigra, produced a rapid degradation in pulse acoustic structure and eliminated the bat's ability to make compensatory changes in pulse amplitude in response to background noise, i.e. the Lombard response. However, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurements of striatal dopamine concentrations revealed that the main effect of MPTP was a fourfold increase rather than the predicted decrease in striatal dopamine levels. After first using autoradiographic methods to confirm the presence and location of D1- and D2-type dopamine receptors in the bat striatum, systemic injections of receptor subtype-specific agonists showed that MPTP's effects on pulse acoustics were mimicked by a D2-type dopamine receptor agonist (Quinpirole) but not by a D1-type dopamine receptor agonist (SKF82958). The results suggest that BG circuits have the capacity to influence echolocation pulse acoustics, particularly via D2-type dopamine receptor-mediated pathways, and may therefore represent an important mechanism for vocal control in bats. PMID:21900471

  10. Striatal dopamine receptor plasticity in neurotensin deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Chastain, Lucy G.; Qu, Hongyan; Bourke, Chase H.; Iuvone, P. Michael; Dobner, Paul R.; Nemeroff, Charles B.; Kinkead, Becky

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is thought to be caused, at least in part, by dysfunction in striatal dopamine neurotransmission. Both clinical studies and animal research have implicated the dopamine neuromodulator neurotensin (NT) in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Utilizing male mice lacking the NT gene (NT−/−), these studies examined the consequences of NT deficiency on dopaminergic tone and function, investigating (1) dopamine concentrations and dopamine receptor and transporter expression and binding in dopaminergic terminal regions, and (2) the behavioral effects of selective dopamine receptor agonists on locomotion and sensorimotor gating in adult NT−/− mice compared to wildtype (NT+/+) mice. NT−/− mice did not differ from NT+/+ mice in concentrations of dopamine or its metabolite DOPAC in any brain region examined. However, NT−/− mice showed significantly increased D1 receptor, D2 receptor, and dopamine transporter (DAT) mRNA in the caudate putamen compared to NT+/+ controls. NT−/− mice also showed elevated D2 receptor binding densities in both the caudate putamen and nucleus accumbens shell compared to NT+/+ mice. In addition, some of the behavioral effects of the D1-type receptor agonist SKF-82958 and the D2-type receptor agonist quinpirole on locomotion, startle amplitude, and prepulse inhibition were dose-dependently altered in NT−/− mice, showing altered D1-type and D2-type receptor sensitivity to stimulation by agonists in the absence of NT. The results indicate that NT deficiency alters striatal dopamine receptor expression, binding, and function. This suggests a critical role for the NT system in the maintenance of striatal DA system homeostasis and implicates NT deficiency in the etiology of dopamine-associated disorders such as schizophrenia. PMID:25449842

  11. Cannabinoid Receptor Activation Shifts Temporally Engendered Patterns of Dopamine Release

    PubMed Central

    Oleson, Erik B; Cachope, Roger; Fitoussi, Aurelie; Tsutsui, Kimberly; Wu, Sharon; Gallegos, Jacqueline A; Cheer, Joseph F

    2014-01-01

    The ability to discern temporally pertinent environmental events is essential for the generation of adaptive behavior in conventional tasks, and our overall survival. Cannabinoids are thought to disrupt temporally controlled behaviors by interfering with dedicated brain timing networks. Cannabinoids also increase dopamine release within the mesolimbic system, a neural pathway generally implicated in timing behavior. Timing can be assessed using fixed-interval (FI) schedules, which reinforce behavior on the basis of time. To date, it remains unknown how cannabinoids modulate dopamine release when responding under FI conditions, and for that matter, how subsecond dopamine release is related to time in these tasks. In the present study, we hypothesized that cannabinoids would accelerate timing behavior in an FI task while concurrently augmenting a temporally relevant pattern of dopamine release. To assess this possibility, we measured subsecond dopamine concentrations in the nucleus accumbens while mice responded for food under the influence of the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55 212-2 in an FI task. Our data reveal that accumbal dopamine concentrations decrease proportionally to interval duration—suggesting that dopamine encodes time in FI tasks. We further demonstrate that WIN 55 212-2 dose-dependently increases dopamine release and accelerates a temporal behavioral response pattern in a CB1 receptor-dependent manner—suggesting that cannabinoid receptor activation modifies timing behavior, in part, by augmenting time-engendered patterns of dopamine release. Additional investigation uncovered a specific role for endogenous cannabinoid tone in timing behavior, as elevations in 2-arachidonoylglycerol, but not anandamide, significantly accelerated the temporal response pattern in a manner akin to WIN 55 212-2. PMID:24345819

  12. Regulation of a protein phosphatase cascade allows convergent dopamine and glutamate signals to activate ERK in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Valjent, Emmanuel; Pascoli, Vincent; Svenningsson, Per; Paul, Surojit; Enslen, Hervé; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Stipanovich, Alexandre; Caboche, Jocelyne; Lombroso, Paul J; Nairn, Angus C; Greengard, Paul; Hervé, Denis; Girault, Jean-Antoine

    2005-01-11

    Many drugs of abuse exert their addictive effects by increasing extracellular dopamine in the nucleus accumbens, where they likely alter the plasticity of corticostriatal glutamatergic transmission. This mechanism implies key molecular alterations in neurons in which both dopamine and glutamate inputs are activated. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), an enzyme important for long-term synaptic plasticity, is a good candidate for playing such a role. Here, we show in mouse that d-amphetamine activates ERK in a subset of medium-size spiny neurons of the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens, through the combined action of glutamate NMDA and D1-dopamine receptors. Activation of ERK by d-amphetamine or by widely abused drugs, including cocaine, nicotine, morphine, and Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol was absent in mice lacking dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of M(r) 32,000 (DARPP-32). The effects of d-amphetamine or cocaine on ERK activation in the striatum, but not in the prefrontal cortex, were prevented by point mutation of Thr-34, a DARPP-32 residue specifically involved in protein phosphatase-1 inhibition. Regulation by DARPP-32 occurred both upstream of ERK and at the level of striatal-enriched tyrosine phosphatase (STEP). Blockade of the ERK pathway or mutation of DARPP-32 altered locomotor sensitization induced by a single injection of psychostimulants, demonstrating the functional relevance of this regulation. Thus, activation of ERK, by a multilevel protein phosphatase-controlled mechanism, functions as a detector of coincidence of dopamine and glutamate signals converging on medium-size striatal neurons and is critical for long-lasting effects of drugs of abuse. PMID:15608059

  13. The neurosteroidogenic enzyme 5α-reductase modulates the role of D1 dopamine receptors in rat sensorimotor gating.

    PubMed

    Frau, Roberto; Mosher, Laura J; Bini, Valentina; Pillolla, Giuliano; Pes, Romina; Saba, Pierluigi; Fanni, Silvia; Devoto, Paola; Bortolato, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Neurosteroids exert diverse modulatory actions on dopamine neurotransmission and signaling. We previously documented that the enzyme 5α-reductase, which catalyzes the main rate-limiting step in neurosteroid synthesis, is required for the behavioral responses of Sprague-Dawley rats to non-selective dopaminergic agonists, such as the D1-D2 receptor agonist apomorphine. Specifically, systemic and intra-accumbal administrations of the 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride countered apomorphine-induced deficits of sensorimotor gating, as measured by the prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex; the classes of dopamine receptors involved in these effects, however, remain unknown. Prior rodent studies have revealed that the contributions of dopamine receptors to PPI regulation vary depending on the genetic background; thus, we analyzed the effect of finasteride on the PPI deficits induced by selective dopamine receptor agonists in Long-Evans (a strain exhibiting PPI deficits in response to both D1 and D2 receptor agonists) and Sprague-Dawley rats (which display PPI reductions following treatment with D2, and D3, but not D1 receptor agonists). In Long-Evans rats, finasteride opposed the PPI deficits induced by activation of D1, but not D2 receptors; conversely, in Sprague-Dawley rats, finasteride prevented the reductions in %PPI and accumbal dopamine extracellular levels caused by selective stimulation of D3, but not D2 receptors; however, the effects on %PPI were not confirmed by analyses on absolute PPI values. Our findings suggest that 5α-reductase modulates the effects of D1, but not D2 receptor agonists on sensorimotor gating. These data may help elucidate the role of neurosteroids in neuropsychiatric disorders featuring PPI deficits, including schizophrenia and Tourette syndrome. PMID:26415119

  14. Impact of Levodopa Priming on Dopamine Neuron Transplant Efficacy and Induction of Abnormal Involuntary Movements in Parkinsonian Rats

    PubMed Central

    Steece-Collier, Kathy; Soderstrom, Katherine; Collier, Timothy; Sortwell, Caryl E.; Lad, Eleonora Maries

    2010-01-01

    Clinical trials of neural grafting for Parkinson's disease (PD) have produced variable, but overall, disappointing results. One particular disappointment has been the development of aberrant motor complications following dopamine (DA) neuron grafting. Despite a lack of consistent benefit, the utility of dopamine neuron replacement remains supported by clinical and basic data. In a continued effort to elucidate factors that might improve this therapy, we used a parkinsonian rat model to examine whether pre-graft chronic levodopa impacted graft efficacy and/or graft-induced dyskinesia (GID) induction. Indeed, all grafted PD patients to date have had a pre-graft history of long-term levodopa. It is well established that long-term levodopa results in a plethora of long-lasting neurochemical alterations, and genomic changes indicative of altered structural and synaptic plasticity. Thus, therapeutic dopamine terminal replacement in a striatal environment complicated by such changes could be expected to lead to abnormal or inappropriate connections between graft and host brain, and contribute to suboptimal efficacy and/or post-graft GID behaviors. To investigate the impact of pre-graft levodopa, one group of parkinsonian rats received levodopa for 4 weeks prior to grafting. A second levodopa naïve group was grafted and grafts allowed to mature for nine weeks prior to introducing chronic levodopa. We report here that in parkinsonian rats, pre-exposure to chronic levodopa significantly reduces behavioral and neurochemical efficacy of embryonic dopamine grafts. Further, dopamine terminal replacement prior to introduction of chronic levodopa is highly effective at preventing development of levodopa-induced dyskinesias, and GID-like behaviors occur regardless of pre-graft levodopa status. PMID:19399877

  15. Characterization of ultrananocrystalline diamond microsensors for in vivo dopamine detection

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Prabhu U.; Zeng, Hongjun; Siddiqui, Shabnam; Covey, Dan P.; Carlisle, John A.; Garris, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    We show the technical feasibility of coating and micro patterning boron-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD®) on metal microwires and of applying them as microsensors for the detection of dopamine in vivo using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. UNCD electrode surface consistently generated electrochemical signals with high signal-to-noise ratio of >800 using potassium ferrocyanide-ferricyanide redox couple. Parylene patterned UNCD microelectrodes were effectively applied to detect dopamine reliably in vitro using flow injection analysis with a detection limit of 27 nM and in the striatum of the anesthetized rat during electrical stimulation of dopamine neurons. PMID:23918991

  16. Characterization of ultrananocrystalline diamond microsensors for in vivo dopamine detection.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Prabhu U; Zeng, Hongjun; Siddiqui, Shabnam; Covey, Dan P; Carlisle, John A; Garris, Paul A

    2013-06-24

    We show the technical feasibility of coating and micro patterning boron-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD(®)) on metal microwires and of applying them as microsensors for the detection of dopamine in vivo using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. UNCD electrode surface consistently generated electrochemical signals with high signal-to-noise ratio of >800 using potassium ferrocyanide-ferricyanide redox couple. Parylene patterned UNCD microelectrodes were effectively applied to detect dopamine reliably in vitro using flow injection analysis with a detection limit of 27 nM and in the striatum of the anesthetized rat during electrical stimulation of dopamine neurons. PMID:23918991

  17. Corticostriatal circuit dysfunction in Huntington’s disease: intersection of glutamate, dopamine and calcium

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Benjamin Ray; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2011-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a noncurable and progressive autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder that results from a polyglutamine expansion in the amino-terminal region of the huntingtin protein. The generation of rodent HD models has revealed that cellular dysfunction, rather than cell death alone, occurs early in the disease progression, appearing even before overt symptom onset. Much evidence has now established that dysfunction of the corticostriatal circuit is key to HD symptomology. In this article, we summarize the most current findings that implicate glutamate, dopamine and calcium signaling in this system and discuss how they work in concert to disrupt corticostriatal function. In addition, we highlight therapeutic strategies related to altered corticostriatal signaling in HD. PMID:21977007

  18. Dopamine D3 receptor-preferring agonists induce neurotrophic effects on mesencephalic dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Du, Fang; Li, Rui; Huang, Yuangui; Li, Xuping; Le, Weidong

    2005-11-01

    Anti-parkinsonian agents, pramipexole (PPX) and ropinirole (ROP), have been reported to possess neuroprotective properties, both in vitro and in vivo. The mechanisms underlying neuroprotection afforded by the D3-preferring receptor agonists remain poorly understood. The present study demonstrates that incubation of primary mesencephalic cultures with PPX and ROP or the conditioned medium from PPX- or ROP-treated primary cultures induced a marked increase in the number of dopamine (DA) neurons in the cultures. Similar effects can be observed after incubating with the conditioned medium derived from PPX- and ROP-treated substantia nigra astroglia. Meanwhile, PPX and ROP can protect the primary cells from insult of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), the active metabolite of the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Furthermore, the neurotrophic effects of PPX and ROP on mesencephalic dopamine neurons could be significantly blocked by D3 receptor antagonist, but not by D2 receptor antagonist. Moreover, we found that the levels of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the conditioned medium of mesencephalic cultures treated with PPX and ROP were significantly increased. Blocking GDNF and BDNF with the neutralizing antibodies, the neurotrophic effects of PPX and ROP were greatly diminished. These results suggest that D3 dopamine receptor-preferring agonists, PPX and ROP, exert neurotrophic effects on cultured DA neurons by modulating the production of endogenous GDNF and BDNF, which may participate in their neuroprotection. PMID:16307585

  19. Prefrontal dopamine regulates fear reinstatement through the downregulation of extinction circuits.

    PubMed

    Hitora-Imamura, Natsuko; Miura, Yuki; Teshirogi, Chie; Ikegaya, Yuji; Matsuki, Norio; Nomura, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of relapses is a major challenge in treating anxiety disorders. Fear reinstatement can cause relapse in spite of successful fear reduction through extinction-based exposure therapy. By utilising a contextual fear-conditioning task in mice, we found that reinstatement was accompanied by decreased c-Fos expression in the infralimbic cortex (IL) with reduction of synaptic input and enhanced c-Fos expression in the medial subdivision of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeM). Moreover, we found that IL dopamine plays a key role in reinstatement. A reinstatement-inducing reminder shock induced c-Fos expression in the IL-projecting dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area, and the blocking of IL D1 signalling prevented reduction of synaptic input, CeM c-Fos expression, and fear reinstatement. These findings demonstrate that a dopamine-dependent inactivation of extinction circuits underlies fear reinstatement and may explain the comorbidity of substance use disorders and anxiety disorders. PMID:26226637

  20. Prefrontal dopamine regulates fear reinstatement through the downregulation of extinction circuits

    PubMed Central

    Hitora-Imamura, Natsuko; Miura, Yuki; Teshirogi, Chie; Ikegaya, Yuji; Matsuki, Norio; Nomura, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of relapses is a major challenge in treating anxiety disorders. Fear reinstatement can cause relapse in spite of successful fear reduction through extinction-based exposure therapy. By utilising a contextual fear-conditioning task in mice, we found that reinstatement was accompanied by decreased c-Fos expression in the infralimbic cortex (IL) with reduction of synaptic input and enhanced c-Fos expression in the medial subdivision of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeM). Moreover, we found that IL dopamine plays a key role in reinstatement. A reinstatement-inducing reminder shock induced c-Fos expression in the IL-projecting dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area, and the blocking of IL D1 signalling prevented reduction of synaptic input, CeM c-Fos expression, and fear reinstatement. These findings demonstrate that a dopamine-dependent inactivation of extinction circuits underlies fear reinstatement and may explain the comorbidity of substance use disorders and anxiety disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08274.001 PMID:26226637

  1. Suppression of hepatic fat accumulation by highly purified eicosapentaenoic acid prevents the progression of d-galactosamine-induced hepatitis in mice fed with a high-fat/high-sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Kajikawa, Satoshi; Harada, Tsuyoshi; Kawashima, Akiko; Imada, Kazunori; Mizuguchi, Kiyoshi

    2009-04-01

    The pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remains largely unknown. Here, we assessed the importance of hepatic fat accumulation on the progression of hepatitis. BALB/cA mice were fed with a standard diet (STD) or a high-fat and high-sucrose diet (HFHSD) for 14 days followed by intraperitoneal injection of d-galactosamine (DGalN) or vehicle. After 20-21 h, plasma and liver tissue were collected and analyzed. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels in plasma were increased significantly in HFHSD-fed mice treated with DGalN compared to STD-fed mice treated with DGalN. This exacerbation by the HFHSD was also observed in the plasma soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor (sTNFR) levels, and hepatic levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the fibrogenic gene expression, such as tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and osteopontin (OPN) in HFHSD-fed mice treated with DGalN. The triglyceride contents of the liver were significantly increased by the HFHSD. When eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a suppressor of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1), was administered to HFHSD-fed mice, the sensitivity of DGalN, as a result of plasma ALT and AST levels, was suppressed accompanied by reduced plasma sTNFR2 level and hepatic levels of triglyceride, ROS, and fibrogenic parameters, and by increased plasma adiponectin levels. These data suggest that the progression of steatotic liver injury closely depends on the accumulation of fat in the liver and is prevented by EPA through the suppression of the fatty liver change. PMID:19416647

  2. Role of Histidine 547 of Human Dopamine Transporter in Molecular Interaction with HIV-1 Tat and Dopamine Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yaxia; Quizon, Pamela M.; Sun, Wei-Lun; Yao, Jianzhuang; Zhu, Jun; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat plays an important role in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) by disrupting neurotransmission including dopamine uptake by human dopamine transporter (hDAT). Previous studies have demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat directly binds to hDAT and some amino-acid mutations that attenuate the hDAT-Tat binding also significantly decreased dopamine uptake activity of hDAT. This combined computational-experimental study demonstrates that histidine-547 (H547) of hDAT plays a crucial role in the hDAT-Tat binding and dopamine uptake by hDAT, and that the H547A mutation can not only considerably attenuate Tat-induced inhibition of dopamine uptake, but also significantly increase the Vmax of hDAT for dopamine uptake. The finding of such an unusual hDAT mutant capable of both increasing the Vmax of hDAT for dopamine uptake and disrupting the hDAT-Tat binding may provide an exciting knowledge basis for development of novel concepts for therapeutic treatment of the HAND. PMID:27250920

  3. Role of Histidine 547 of Human Dopamine Transporter in Molecular Interaction with HIV-1 Tat and Dopamine Uptake.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yaxia; Quizon, Pamela M; Sun, Wei-Lun; Yao, Jianzhuang; Zhu, Jun; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat plays an important role in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) by disrupting neurotransmission including dopamine uptake by human dopamine transporter (hDAT). Previous studies have demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat directly binds to hDAT and some amino-acid mutations that attenuate the hDAT-Tat binding also significantly decreased dopamine uptake activity of hDAT. This combined computational-experimental study demonstrates that histidine-547 (H547) of hDAT plays a crucial role in the hDAT-Tat binding and dopamine uptake by hDAT, and that the H547A mutation can not only considerably attenuate Tat-induced inhibition of dopamine uptake, but also significantly increase the Vmax of hDAT for dopamine uptake. The finding of such an unusual hDAT mutant capable of both increasing the Vmax of hDAT for dopamine uptake and disrupting the hDAT-Tat binding may provide an exciting knowledge basis for development of novel concepts for therapeutic treatment of the HAND. PMID:27250920

  4. About Alzheimer's Disease: Risk Factors and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Risk Factors and Prevention We can’t control some risk factors for ... as well. NIA Information on Risk Factors and Prevention 2014-2015 Alzheimer's Disease Progress Report: Advancing Research ...

  5. Dopamine signaling in reward-related behaviors.

    PubMed

    Baik, Ja-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) regulates emotional and motivational behavior through the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway. Changes in DA mesolimbic neurotransmission have been found to modify behavioral responses to various environmental stimuli associated with reward behaviors. Psychostimulants, drugs of abuse, and natural reward such as food can cause substantial synaptic modifications to the mesolimbic DA system. Recent studies using optogenetics and DREADDs, together with neuron-specific or circuit-specific genetic manipulations have improved our understanding of DA signaling in the reward circuit, and provided a means to identify the neural substrates of complex behaviors such as drug addiction and eating disorders. This review focuses on the role of the DA system in drug addiction and food motivation, with an overview of the role of D1 and D2 receptors in the control of reward-associated behaviors. PMID:24130517

  6. Prefrontal cortical dopamine from an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-A; Goto, Yukiori

    2015-04-01

    In this article, we propose the hypothesis that the prefrontal cortex (PFC) acquired neotenic development as a consequence of mesocortical dopamine (DA) innervation, which in turn drove evolution of the PFC into becoming a complex functional system. Accordingly, from the evolutionary perspective, decreased DA signaling in the PFC associated with such adverse conditions as chronic stress may be considered as an environmental adaptation strategy. Psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder may also be understood as environmental adaptation or a by-product of such a process that has emerged through evolution in humans. To investigate the evolutionary perspective of DA signaling in the PFC, domestic animals such as dogs may be a useful model. PMID:25617024

  7. | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. Formation and occurrence of dopamine-derived betacyanins.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, N; Schmidt, J; Wray, V; Schliemann, W

    2001-03-01

    In light of the fact that the main betaxanthin (miraxanthin V) and the major betacyanin (2-descarboxy-betanidin) in hairy root cultures of yellow beet (Beta vulgaris L.) are both dopamine-derived, the occurrence of similar structures for the minor betacyanins was also suggested. By HPLC comparison with the betacyanins obtained by dopamine administration to beet seedlings, enzymatic hydrolysis, LCMS and 1H NMR analyses, the minor betacyanins from hairy roots were identified as 2-descarboxy-betanin and its 6'-O-malonyl derivative. A short-term dopamine administration experiment with fodder beet seedlings revealed that the condensation step between 2-descarboxy-cyclo-Dopa and betalamic acid is the decisive reaction, followed by glucosylation and acylation. From these data a pathway for the biosynthesis of dopamine-derived betalains is proposed. Furthermore, the occurrence of these compounds in various cell and hairy root cultures as well as beet plants (Fodder and Garden Beet Group) is shown. PMID:11261575

  10. Selective dopamine chemosensing using silver-enhanced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Mainak; Mondal, Chanchal; Jana, Jayasmita; Pal, Anjali; Pal, Tarasankar

    2014-04-15

    Condensation product of salicylaldehyde and 1,3 propylenediamine becomes a diiminic Schiff base, which is oxidized by AgNO3 in alkaline solution, and in turn, stable Ag(0) is produced at room temperature. Under this condition, the solution exhibits intense silver nanoparticle enhanced fluorescence (SEF) with the λ(em) at 412 nm. Dopamine is selectively detected down to the nanomolar level via exclusive fluorescence quenching of the SEF. Dopamine-infested solution regains the fluorescence [i.e., SEF in the presence of Hg(II) ions]. Thus dopamine and Hg(II) in succession demonstrate "turn off/on" fluorescence due to the change in the scattering cross section of Ag(0) and gives a quantitative measure of dopamine in real samples. The proposed method is free from interferences of common biocompetitors. PMID:24650302

  11. The Role of Dopamine in Reinforcement: Changes in Reinforcement Sensitivity Induced by D[subscript 1]-Type, D[subscript 2]-Type, and Nonselective Dopamine Receptor Agonists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratcher, Natalie A.; Farmer-Dougan, Valeri; Dougan, James D.; Heidenreich, Byron A.; Garris, Paul A.

    2005-01-01

    Dose-dependent changes in sensitivity to reinforcement were found when rats were treated with low, moderate, and high doses of the partial dopamine D[subscript 1]-type receptor agonist SKF38393 and with the nonselective dopamine agonist apomorphine, but did not change when rats were treated with similar doses of the selective dopamine D[subscript…

  12. Could dopamine agonists aid in drug development for anorexia nervosa?

    PubMed

    Frank, Guido K W

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder most commonly starting during the teenage-years and associated with food refusal and low body weight. Typically there is a loss of menses, intense fear of gaining weight, and an often delusional quality of altered body perception. Anorexia nervosa is also associated with a pattern of high cognitive rigidity, which may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The complex interplay of state and trait biological, psychological, and social factors has complicated identifying neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to the illness. The dopamine D1 and D2 neurotransmitter receptors are involved in motivational aspects of food approach, fear extinction, and cognitive flexibility. They could therefore be important targets to improve core and associated behaviors in anorexia nervosa. Treatment with dopamine antagonists has shown little benefit, and it is possible that antagonists over time increase an already hypersensitive dopamine pathway activity in anorexia nervosa. On the contrary, application of dopamine receptor agonists could reduce circuit responsiveness, facilitate fear extinction, and improve cognitive flexibility in anorexia nervosa, as they may be particularly effective during underweight and low gonadal hormone states. This article provides evidence that the dopamine receptor system could be a key factor in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa and dopamine agonists could be helpful in reducing core symptoms of the disorder. This review is a theoretical approach that primarily focuses on dopamine receptor function as this system has been mechanistically better described than other neurotransmitters that are altered in anorexia nervosa. However, those proposed dopamine mechanisms in anorexia nervosa also warrant further study with respect to their interaction with other neurotransmitter systems, such as serotonin pathways. PMID:25988121

  13. Could Dopamine Agonists Aid in Drug Development for Anorexia Nervosa?

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Guido K. W.

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder most commonly starting during the teenage-years and associated with food refusal and low body weight. Typically there is a loss of menses, intense fear of gaining weight, and an often delusional quality of altered body perception. Anorexia nervosa is also associated with a pattern of high cognitive rigidity, which may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The complex interplay of state and trait biological, psychological, and social factors has complicated identifying neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to the illness. The dopamine D1 and D2 neurotransmitter receptors are involved in motivational aspects of food approach, fear extinction, and cognitive flexibility. They could therefore be important targets to improve core and associated behaviors in anorexia nervosa. Treatment with dopamine antagonists has shown little benefit, and it is possible that antagonists over time increase an already hypersensitive dopamine pathway activity in anorexia nervosa. On the contrary, application of dopamine receptor agonists could reduce circuit responsiveness, facilitate fear extinction, and improve cognitive flexibility in anorexia nervosa, as they may be particularly effective during underweight and low gonadal hormone states. This article provides evidence that the dopamine receptor system could be a key factor in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa and dopamine agonists could be helpful in reducing core symptoms of the disorder. This review is a theoretical approach that primarily focuses on dopamine receptor function as this system has been mechanistically better described than other neurotransmitters that are altered in anorexia nervosa. However, those proposed dopamine mechanisms in anorexia nervosa also warrant further study with respect to their interaction with other neurotransmitter systems, such as serotonin pathways. PMID:25988121

  14. Oxygen radicals diminish dopamine transporter function in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Fleckenstein, A E; Metzger, R R; Beyeler, M L; Gibb, J W; Hanson, G R

    1997-09-01

    Incubation of striatal synaptosomes with the oxygen radical generating enzyme, xanthine oxidase, decreased [3H]dopamine uptake: an effect attributable to a decreased Vmax. Concurrent incubation with the superoxide radical scavenger, superoxide dismutase, abolished the xanthine oxidase-induced decrease. These results indicate that, like methamphetamine administration in vivo, reactive oxygen species diminish dopamine transporter function in vitro. The significance of these findings to mechanisms responsible for effects of methamphetamine is discussed. PMID:9346337

  15. The role of D2-autoreceptors in regulating dopamine neuron activity and transmission.

    PubMed

    Ford, C P

    2014-12-12

    Dopamine D2-autoreceptors play a key role in regulating the activity of dopamine neurons and control the synthesis, release and uptake of dopamine. These Gi/o-coupled inhibitory receptors play a major part in shaping dopamine transmission. Found at both somatodendritic and axonal sites, autoreceptors regulate the firing patterns of dopamine neurons and control the timing and amount of dopamine released from their terminals in target regions. Alterations in the expression and activity of autoreceptors are thought to contribute to Parkinson's disease as well as schizophrenia, drug addiction and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which emphasizes the importance of D2-autoreceptors in regulating the dopamine system. This review will summarize the cellular actions of dopamine autoreceptors and discuss recent advances that have furthered our understanding of the mechanisms by which D2-receptors control dopamine transmission. PMID:24463000

  16. Selective modulation of excitatory and inhibitory microcircuits by dopamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wen-Jun; Goldman-Rakic, Patricia S.

    2003-03-01

    Dopamine plays an important role in the working memory functions of the prefrontal cortex, functions that are impacted in age-related memory decline, drug abuse, and a wide variety of disorders, including schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. We have previously reported that dopamine depresses excitatory transmission between pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex. Here, using paired recordings, we have investigated dopaminergic modulation of excitatory transmission from pyramidal neurons to fast-spiking (FS) interneurons. In contrast to its effect on recurrent excitation, dopamine was without effect on excitatory transmission to FS interneurons. However, dopamine has directly enhanced the excitability of the FS interneurons to the extent that even a single excitatory postsynaptic potential could initiate spiking with great temporal precision in some of them. These results indicate that dopamine's effects on excitatory transmission are target-specific and that the axon terminals of pyramidal neurons can be selectively regulated at the level of individual synapses. Thus, dopamine's net inhibitory effect on cortical function is remarkably constrained by the nature of the microcircuit elements on which it acts.

  17. Classification of dopamine, serotonin, and dual antagonists by decision trees.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Jung; Choo, Hyunah; Cho, Yong Seo; Koh, Hun Yeong; No, Kyoung Tai; Pae, Ae Nim

    2006-04-15

    Dopamine antagonists (DA), serotonin antagonists (SA), and serotonin-dopamine dual antagonists (Dual) are being used as antipsychotics. A lot of dopamine and serotonin antagonists reveal non-selective binding affinity against these two receptors because the antagonists share structurally common features originated from conserved residues of binding site of the aminergic receptor family. Therefore, classification of dopamine and serotonin antagonists into their own receptors can be useful in the designing of selective antagonist for individual therapy of antipsychotic disorders. Data set containing 1135 dopamine antagonists (D2, D3, and D4), 1251 serotonin antagonists (5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT2C), and 386 serotonin-dopamine dual antagonists was collected from the MDDR database. Cerius2 descriptors were employed to develop a classification model for the 2772 compounds with antipsychotic activity. LDA (linear discriminant analysis), SIMCA (soft independent modeling of class analogy), RP (recursive partitioning), and ANN (artificial neural network) algorithms successfully classified the active class of each compound at the average 73.6% and predicted at the average 69.8%. The decision trees from RP, the best model, were generated to identify and interpret those descriptors that discriminate the active classes more easily. These classification models could be used as a virtual screening tool to predict the active class of new candidates. PMID:16387502

  18. Development of specific dopamine D-1 agonists and antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Sakolchai, S.

    1987-01-01

    To develop potentially selective dopamine D-1 agonists and to investigate on the structural requirement for D-1 activity, the derivatives of dibenzocycloheptadiene are synthesized and pharmacologically evaluated. The target compounds are 5-aminomethyl-10,11-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxy-5H-dibenzo(a,d)cycloheptene hydrobromide 10 and 9,10-dihydroxy-1,2,3,7,8,12b-hexahydrobenzo(1,2)cyclohepta(3,4,5d,e)isoquinoline hydrobromide 11. In a dopamine-sensitive rat retinal adenylate cyclase assay, a model for D-1 activity, compound 10 is essentially inert for both agonist and antagonist activity. In contrast, compound 11 is approximately equipotent to dopamine in activation of the D-1 receptor. Based on radioligand and binding data, IC{sub 50} of compound 11 for displacement of {sup 3}H-SCH 23390, a D-1 ligand, is about 7 fold less than that for displacement of {sup 3}H-spiperone, a D-2 ligand. These data indicate that compound 11 is a potent selective dopamine D-1 agonist. This study provides a new structural class of dopamine D-1 acting agent: dihydroxy-benzocycloheptadiene analog which can serve as a lead compound for further drug development and as a probe for investigation on the nature of dopamine D-1 receptor.

  19. Purity and Enrichment of Laser-Microdissected Midbrain Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Amanda L.; Day, Trevor A.; Dayas, Christopher V.; Smith, Doug W.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to microdissect individual cells from the nervous system has enormous potential, as it can allow for the study of gene expression in phenotypically identified cells. However, if the resultant gene expression profiles are to be accurately ascribed, it is necessary to determine the extent of contamination by nontarget cells in the microdissected sample. Here, we show that midbrain dopamine neurons can be laser-microdissected to a high degree of enrichment and purity. The average enrichment for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene expression in the microdissected sample relative to midbrain sections was approximately 200-fold. For the dopamine transporter (DAT) and the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (Vmat2), average enrichments were approximately 100- and 60-fold, respectively. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (Gad65) expression, a marker for GABAergic neurons, was several hundredfold lower than dopamine neuron-specific genes. Glial cell and glutamatergic neuron gene expression were not detected in microdissected samples. Additionally, SN and VTA dopamine neurons had significantly different expression levels of dopamine neuron-specific genes, which likely reflects functional differences between the two cell groups. This study demonstrates that it is possible to laser-microdissect dopamine neurons to a high degree of cell purity. Therefore gene expression profiles can be precisely attributed to the targeted microdissected cells. PMID:23984404

  20. Metaphit inhibits dopamine transport and binding of ( sup 3 H)methylphenidate, a proposed marker for the dopamine transport complex

    SciTech Connect

    Schweri, M.M. ); Jacobson, A.E.; Rice, K.C. ); Lessor, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Metaphit, an acylating derivative of phencyclidine, was shown to interact with components of the dopamine nerve terminal in rat striatal tissue. This compound, previously demonstrated to be an irreversible inhibitor at the phencyclidine receptor, was shown in these experiments to irreversibly inhibit synaptosomal ({sup 3}H)dopamine uptake. It also inhibited binding of ({sup 3}H)methylphenidate to its recognition site, which is thought to be a subunit of the dopamine transporter. Although the inhibition was due primarily to a reduction in the binding and transport capacity of the systems studied, increases in the apparent K{sub D} of ({sup 3}H)methylphenidate and the K{sub m} of ({sup 3}H)dopamine were also observed. Differences in the behavior of Metaphit and phencylidine in these dopaminergic systems compared to their effects on the NMDA receptor-linked phencyclidine receptor suggest that Metaphit may be interacting with two distinct molecular sites in the rat striatum.

  1. Dopamine cross-sensitization between psychostimulant drugs and stress in healthy male volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Booij, L; Welfeld, K; Leyton, M; Dagher, A; Boileau, I; Sibon, I; Baker, G B; Diksic, M; Soucy, J-P; Pruessner, J C; Cawley-Fiset, E; Casey, K F; Benkelfat, C

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of the stress response system is a potential etiological factor in the development of and relapse to multiple neuropsychiatric disorders. Previously we reported that repeated intermittent d-amphetamine administration can lead to progressively greater dopamine release, thereby providing evidence of drug-induced neurochemical sensitization. Here, we test the hypothesis that repeated exposure to d-amphetamine increases dopaminergic responses to stress; that is, produces cross-sensitization. Using positron emission tomography, we measured in 17 healthy male volunteers (mean±s.d.=22.1±3.4 years) [11C]raclopride binding responses to a validated psychosocial stress task before and 2 weeks after a regimen of repeated d-amphetamine (3 × 0.3 mg kg−1, by mouth; n=8) or placebo (3 × lactose, by mouth; n=9). Mood and physiological measurements were recorded throughout each session. Before the d-amphetamine regimen, exposure to the stress task increased behavioral and physiological indices of stress (anxiety, heart rate, cortisol, all P⩽0.05). Following the d-amphetamine regimen, the stress-induced cortisol responses were augmented (P<0.04), and voxel-based analyses showed larger stress-induced decreases in [11C]raclopride non-displaceable binding potential across the striatum. In the placebo group, re-exposure to stress led to smaller clusters of decreased [11C]raclopride binding, primarily in the sensorimotor striatum (P<0.05). Together, this study provides evidence for drug × stress cross-sensitization; moreover, random exposure to stimulants and/or stress cumulatively, while enhancing dopamine release in striatal areas, may contribute to a lowered set point for psychopathologies in which altered dopamine neurotransmission is invoked. PMID:26905412

  2. Dopamine cross-sensitization between psychostimulant drugs and stress in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Booij, L; Welfeld, K; Leyton, M; Dagher, A; Boileau, I; Sibon, I; Baker, G B; Diksic, M; Soucy, J-P; Pruessner, J C; Cawley-Fiset, E; Casey, K F; Benkelfat, C

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of the stress response system is a potential etiological factor in the development of and relapse to multiple neuropsychiatric disorders. Previously we reported that repeated intermittent d-amphetamine administration can lead to progressively greater dopamine release, thereby providing evidence of drug-induced neurochemical sensitization. Here, we test the hypothesis that repeated exposure to d-amphetamine increases dopaminergic responses to stress; that is, produces cross-sensitization. Using positron emission tomography, we measured in 17 healthy male volunteers (mean ± s.d. = 22.1 ± 3.4 years) [(11)C]raclopride binding responses to a validated psychosocial stress task before and 2 weeks after a regimen of repeated d-amphetamine (3 × 0.3 mg kg(-1), by mouth; n = 8) or placebo (3 × lactose, by mouth; n = 9). Mood and physiological measurements were recorded throughout each session. Before the d-amphetamine regimen, exposure to the stress task increased behavioral and physiological indices of stress (anxiety, heart rate, cortisol, all P ⩽ 0.05). Following the d-amphetamine regimen, the stress-induced cortisol responses were augmented (P < 0.04), and voxel-based analyses showed larger stress-induced decreases in [(11)C]raclopride non-displaceable binding potential across the striatum. In the placebo group, re-exposure to stress led to smaller clusters of decreased [(11)C]raclopride binding, primarily in the sensorimotor striatum (P < 0.05). Together, this study provides evidence for drug × stress cross-sensitization; moreover, random exposure to stimulants and/or stress cumulatively, while enhancing dopamine release in striatal areas, may contribute to a lowered set point for psychopathologies in which altered dopamine neurotransmission is invoked. PMID:26905412

  3. Multi-facetted impulsivity following nigral degeneration and dopamine replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Engeln, Michel